Science.gov

Sample records for future neutrino experiments

  1. Current and future liquid argon neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S.

    2015-05-15

    The liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detector technology provides an opportunity for precision neutrino oscillation measurements, neutrino cross section measurements, and searches for rare processes, such as SuperNova neutrino detection. These proceedings review current and future LArTPC neutrino experiments. Particular focus is paid to the ICARUS, MicroBooNE, LAr1, 2-LArTPC at CERN-SPS, LBNE, and 100 kton at Okinoshima experiments.

  2. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  3. Neutrino mass spectrum and future beta decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzan, Y.; Peres, O. L. G.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2001-09-01

    We study the discovery potential of future beta decay experiments on searches for the neutrino mass in the sub-eV range, and, in particular, KATRIN experiment with sensitivity m>0.3 eV. Effects of neutrino mass and mixing on the beta decay spectrum in the neutrino schemes which explain the solar and atmospheric neutrino data are discussed. The schemes which lead to observable effects contain one or two sets of quasi-degenerate states. Future beta decay measurements will allow to check the three-neutrino scheme with mass degeneracy, moreover, the possibility appears to measure the CP-violating Majorana phase. Effects in the four-neutrino schemes which can also explain the LSND data are strongly restricted by the results of Bugey and CHOOZ oscillation experiments: apart from bending of the spectrum and the shift of the end point one expects appearance of small kink of (<2%) size or suppressed tail after bending of the spectrum with rate below 2% of the expected rate for zero neutrino mass. We consider possible implications of future beta decay experiments for the neutrino mass spectrum, the determination of the absolute scale of neutrino mass and for establishing the nature of neutrinos. We show that beta decay measurements in combination with data from the oscillation and double beta decay experiments will allow to establish the structure of the scheme (hierarchical or non-hierarchical), the type of the hierarchy or ordering of states (normal or inverted) and to measure the relative CP-violating phase in the solar pair of states.

  4. Neutrino Oscillation Parameter Sensitivity in Future Long-Baseline Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The study of neutrino interactions and propagation has produced evidence for physics beyond the standard model and promises to continue to shed light on rare phenomena. Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations in the late 1990s there have been rapid advances in establishing the three flavor paradigm of neutrino oscillations. The 2012 discovery of a large value for the last unmeasured missing angle has opened the way for future experiments to search for charge-parity symmetry violation in the lepton sector. This thesis presents an analysis of the future sensitivity to neutrino oscillations in the three flavor paradigm for the T2K, NO A, LBNE, and T2HK experiments. The theory of the three flavor paradigm is explained and the methods to use these theoretical predictions to design long baseline neutrino experiments are described. The sensitivity to the oscillation parameters for each experiment is presented with a particular focus on the search for CP violation and the measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy. The variations of these sensitivities with statistical considerations and experimental design optimizations taken into account are explored. The effects of systematic uncertainties in the neutrino flux, interaction, and detection predictions are also considered by incorporating more advanced simulations inputs from the LBNE experiment.

  5. Solar model uncertainties, MSW analysis, and future solar neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Naoya; Langacker, Paul

    1994-07-01

    Various theoretical uncertainties in the standard solar model and in the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) analysis are discussed. It is shown that two methods give consistent estimations of the solar neutrino flux uncertainties: (a) a simple parametrization of the uncertainties using the core temperature and the ncuelar production cross sections; (b) the Monte Carlo method of Bahcall and Ulrich. In the MSW analysis, we emphasize proper treatments of correlations of theoretical uncertainties between flux components and between different detectors, the Earth effect, and multiple solutions in a combined χ2 procedure. In particular the large-angle solution of the combined observation is allowed at 95% C.L. only when the theoretical uncertainties are included. If their correlations were ignored, the region would be overestimated. The MSW solutions for various standard and nonstandard solar models are also shown. The MSW predictions of the global solutions for the future solar neutrino experiments are given, emphasizing the measurement of the energy spectrum and the day-night effect in Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and Super-Kamiokande to distinguish the two solutions.

  6. The future of reactor neutrino experiments: A novel approach to measuring theta{sub 13}

    SciTech Connect

    Heeger, Karsten M.; Freedman, Stuart J.; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2003-08-24

    Results from non-accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments have provided evidence for the oscillation of massive neutrinos. The subdominant oscillation, the coupling of the electron neutrino flavor to the third mass eigenstate, has not been measured yet. The size of this coupling U{sub e3} and its corresponding mixing angle theta{sub 13} are critical for CP violation searches in the lepton sector and will define the future of accelerator neutrino physics. The current best limit on U{sub e3} comes from the CHOOZ reactor neutrino disappearance experiment. In this talk we review proposals for future measurements of theta-13 with reactor antineutrinos.

  7. Future experiments with neutrino superbeams, beta-beams, and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Deborah A Harris

    2003-10-27

    This report describes the goals of the next generations of accelerator-based neutrino experiments, and the various strategies that are being considered to achieve those goals. Because these next steps in the field are significantly different from the current or previous steps, novel techniques must be considered for both the detectors and the neutrino beams themselves. We consider not only conventional neutrino beams created by decays of pions, but also those which could be made by decays of beams of relativistic isotopes (so-called ''beta-beams'') and also by decays of beams of muons (neutrino factories).

  8. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-12-24

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (?Beta Beams?), one based on decays of stored muon beams (?Neutrino Factory?), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (?Superbeam?). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R&D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R&D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  9. Status and perspectives of neutrino physics at present and future experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio E-mail: carmine.pagliarone@lngs.infn.it

    2016-03-25

    Neutrino Physics and Dark Matter searches play a crucial role in nowadays Particle and Astroparticle Physics. The present review paper will describe general properties of neutrinos and neutrino mass phenomenology (Dirac and Majorana masses). Space will be dedicated to the experimental attempts to answer the question of the neutrino mass hierarchy. We will give, then, a short review of the results of part of the experiments that have been running so far. We will also shortly summarize future experiments that plan to explore this very wide scientific area.

  10. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Diwan, M. V.; Galymov, V.; Qian, X.; ...

    2016-10-19

    We review long-baseline neutrino experiments in which neutrinos are detected after traversing macroscopic distances. Over such distances neutrinos have been found to oscillate among flavor states. Experiments with solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrinos have resulted in a coherent picture of neutrino masses and mixing of the three known flavor states. We will summarize the current best knowledge of neutrino parameters and phenomenology with our focus on the evolution of the experimental technique. We will proceed from the rst evidence produced by astrophysical neutrino sources to the current open questions and the goals of future research

  11. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwan, M. V.; Galymov, V.; Qian, X.; Rubbia, A.

    2016-10-01

    We review long-baseline neutrino experiments in which neutrinos are detected after traversing macroscopic distances. Over such distances neutrinos have been found to oscillate among flavor states. Experiments with solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrinos have resulted in a coherent picture of neutrino masses and mixing of the three known flavor states. We summarize the current best knowledge of neutrino parameters and phenomenology, with a focus on the evolution of the experimental technique. We proceed from the first evidence produced by astrophysical neutrino sources to the current open questions and the goals of future research.

  12. Neutrino Experiments: Hierarchy, CP, CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manmohan; Randhawa, Monika; Singh, Mandip

    We present an overview of our recent investigations regarding the prospects of ongoing neutrino experiments as well as future experiments in determining few of the most important unknowns in the field of neutrino physics, specifically the neutrino mass ordering and leptonic CP-violation phase. The effect of matter oscillations on the neutrino oscillation probabilities has been exploited in resolving the degeneracy between the neutrino mass ordering and the CP violation phase in the leptonic sector. Further, we estimate the extent of extrinsic CP and CPT violation in the experiments with superbeams as well as neutrino factories.

  13. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  14. Neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2000-12-01

    The present status of neutrino oscillation experiments and prospects of forthcoming experiments are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the recent results from Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino and solar neutrino observations. .

  15. Neutrino cross-sections: Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez, F.

    2015-07-15

    Neutrino-nucleus cross-sections are as of today the main source of systematic errors for oscillation experiments together with neutrino flux uncertainties. Despite recent experimental and theoretical developments, future experiments require even higher precisions in their search of CP violation. We will review the experimental status and explore possible future developments required by next generation of experiments.

  16. Testing keV sterile neutrino dark matter in future direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Miguel D.; Rodejohann, Werner

    2016-11-01

    We determine constraints on sterile neutrino warm dark matter through direct detection experiments, taking XENON100, XENON1T, and DARWIN as examples. If keV-scale sterile neutrinos scatter inelastically with bound electrons of the target material, an electron recoil signal is generated. This can be used to set limits on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active sector. While not competitive with astrophysical constraints from x-ray data, the constraints are the first direct laboratory bounds on sterile neutrino warm dark matter and will be in some parts of parameter space the strongest limits on keV-scale neutrinos.

  17. Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations was recognized by the 2015 Nobel Prize. Tremendous progress has been made in the past two decades on understanding of neutrino mass and mixing properties, yet there are remaining unknowns. This talk presented an overview of neutrino oscillation experiments, with emphasis on recent results from beam and reactor experiments, as well as exciting prospects for the next decades.

  18. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzetto, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Following the discovery of neutrino oscillations by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration, recently awarded with the Nobel Prize, two generations of long baseline experiments had been setup to further study neutrino oscillations. The first generation experiments, K2K in Japan, Minos in the States and Opera in Europe, focused in confirming the Super-Kamiokande result, improving the precision with which oscillation parameters had been measured and demonstrating the ντ appearance process. Second generation experiments, T2K in Japan and very recently NOνA in the States, went further, being optimized to look for genuine three neutrino phenomena like non-zero values of θ13 and first glimpses to leptonic CP violation (LCPV) and neutrino mass ordering (NMO). The discovery of leptonic CP violation will require third generation setups, at the moment two strong proposals are ongoing, Dune in the States and Hyper-Kamiokande in Japan. This review will focus a little more in these future initiatives.

  19. DEEP UNDERGROUND NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2016-03-03

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) collaboration will perform an experiment centered on accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino studies along with nucleon decay and topics in neutrino astrophysics. It will consist of a modular 40-kt (fiducial) mass liquid argon TPC detector located deep underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota and a high-resolution near detector at Fermilab in Illinois. This conguration provides a 1300-km baseline in a megawatt-scale neutrino beam provided by the Fermilab- hosted international Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility.

  20. Prompt {nu}{sub {tau}} fluxes in present and future {tau} neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    We use a nonperturbative QCD approach, the quark-gluon string model, to compute the {tau}-neutrino fluxes produced by fixed target pA collisions (where A is a target material) for incident protons of energies ranging from 120 to 800 GeV. The purpose of this calculation is to estimate {ital in a consistent way} the prompt background for the {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}{sub e}){leftrightarrow}{nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation search in the on-going {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}{sub e}){leftrightarrow}{nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation search experiments CHORUS and NOMAD, as well as the expected prompt background in future experiments, such as COSMOS at Fermilab and a possible second-generation {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}{sub e}){leftrightarrow}{nu}{sub {tau}} search experiment at the CERN SPS. In addition, we compute the number of {nu}{sub {tau}} interactions expected by the experiment E872 at Fermilab. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Solar neutrino experiments and neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, B.T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Rowley, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    This report gives the results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment that is based upon the neutrino capture reaction, /sup 37/Cl(..nu..,e/sup -/)/sup 37/Ar. The experiment was built in 1967 to test the theory of solar energy production, and it is well known that the neutrino capture rate in the detector is lower than that expected from theoretical models of the sun. The results will be compared to the current solar model calculations. One possible explanation of the low solar neutrino capture rate is that the neutrinos oscillate between two or more neutrino states, a topic of particular interest to this conference. This question is discussed in relation to the /sup 37/Cl experiment, and to other solar neutrino detectors that are capable of observing the lower energy neutrinos from the sun. A radiochemical solar neutrino detector located deep underground has a very low background and is capable of detecting the monoenergetic neutrinos from megacurie sources of radioisotopes that decay by electron capture. Experiments of this nature are described that are capable of testing for neutrino oscillations with a omicronm/sup 2/ as low as 0.2 eV/sup 2/ if there is maximum mixing between two neutrino states.

  2. Solar neutrino experiments and neutrino oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Bruce T.; Davis, Raymond; Rowley, J. K.

    1981-05-01

    This report will give the results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment that is based upon the neutrino capture reaction, 37Cl (ν,e-)37Ar. The experiment was built in 1967 to test the theory of solar energy production, and it is well known that the neutrino capture rate in the detector is lower than that expected from theoretical models of the sun. The results will be compared to the current solar model calculations. One possible explanation of the low solar neutrino capture rate is that the neutrinos oscillate between two or more neutrino states, a topic of particular interest to this conference. We will discuss this question in relation to the 37Cl experiment, and to other solar neutrino detectors that are capable of observing the lower energy neutrinos from the sun. A radiochemical solar neutrino detector located deep underground has a very low background and is capable of detecting the monoenergetic neutrinos from megacurie sources of radioisotopes that decay by electron capture. Experiments of this nature will be described that are capable of testing for neutrino oscillations with a δm2 as low as 0.2 eV2 if there is maximum mixing between the neutrino states.

  3. Jinping Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Linyan; Jinping Neutrino Experiment Research Group

    2017-09-01

    Jinping Neutrino Experiment (Jinping) is a unique observatory for low-energy neutrino physics, astrophysics and geophysics. Jinping is located in China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL), identified by the thickest overburden, lowest reactor neutrino background, etc. For solar neutrinos, Jinping has the capacity to measure the oscillation transition phase from vacuum to matter, to discover the CNO cycle neutrino, and to address the solar metallicity problem. Jinping will be able to precisely measure geo-neutrinos with signal-to-background ratio of 8.2:1.0 in the energy range of 1.8 MeV to 3.3 MeV. The ratio of U/Th can be determined to 10%. We also expect a promising sensitivity for neutrinos from a Milky Way supernova, the diffuse supernova neutrino background, and dark matter annihilation. The first, small phase of the laboratory (CJPL I) is already in operation, hosting dark matter experiments. The second, large phase (CJPL II) is already under construction, with ≈ 100,000 m3 being excavated.

  4. Neutrino detectors for oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudenko, Y.

    2017-06-01

    A brief overview of the development of neutrino detectors for long-baseline oscillation experiments at accelerators and reactors is presented. Basic principles and main features of detectors of running accelerator experiments T2K and NOνA sensitive to a first level of CP violation and neutrino mass hierarchy, and reactor experiments Daya Bay, RENO and Double Chooz which measured the mixing angle θ13 are discussed. A variety of different experimental techniques is proposed and developed for the next generation oscillation experiments: a 20 kt scintillator detector for the reactor experiment JUNO, a 0.52 kt water-Cherenkov detector Hyper-Kamiokande, and a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber neutrino detector envisaged for the DUNE experiment. Present status of these detectors, recent progress in R&D and future prospects are summarized in this paper.

  5. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrin, V. N.; Cleveland, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p+p→d+e++νe, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE - the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6±3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3-3.5+3.9 SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux of ϕpp♁=(3.41-0.77+0.76)×1010/(cm-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of ϕpp♁=(3.30-0.14+0.13)×1010/(cm-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88±0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

  6. Solar neutrino experiments and neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, B. T.; Davis, R., Jr.; Rowley, J. K.

    A solar neutrino experiment was conducted that was based on the neutrino capture reaction, Cl-37(v,e(-))Ar-37. The experiment was built to test the theory of solar energy production. The results are compared to solar model calculations.

  7. Testing the wave packet approach to neutrino oscillations in future experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris; Kopp, Joachim; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    When neutrinos propagate over long distances, the mass eigenstate components of a flavor eigenstate will become spatially separated due to their different group velocities. This can happen over terrestrial distance scales if the neutrino energy is of order MeV and if the neutrino is localized (in a quantum mechanical sense) to subatomic scales. For example, if the Heisenberg uncertainty in the neutrino position is below 10{sup -2} {angstrom}, neutrino decoherence can be observed in reactor neutrinos using a large liquid scintillator detector.

  8. Comments on the determination of the neutrino mass ordering in reactor neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenky, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    We consider the problem of determination of the neutrino mass ordering via precise study of the vacuum neutrino oscillations in the JUNO and other future medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments. We are proposing to resolve neutrino mass ordering by determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters from analysis of the data of the reactor experiments and comparison them with the oscillation parameters obtained from analysis of the solar and KamLAND experiments.

  9. The sensitivity of past and near-future lunar radio experiments to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, J. D.

    2016-04-01

    Various experiments have been conducted to search for the radio emission from ultra-high-energy (UHE) particles interacting in the lunar regolith. Although they have not yielded any detections, they have been successful in establishing upper limits on the flux of these particles. I present a review of these experiments in which I re-evaluate their sensitivity to radio pulses, accounting for effects which were neglected in the original reports, and compare them with prospective near-future experiments. In several cases, I find that past experiments were substantially less sensitive than previously believed. I apply existing analytic models to determine the resulting limits on the fluxes of UHE neutrinos and cosmic rays (CRs). In the latter case, I amend the model to accurately reflect the fraction of the primary particle energy which manifests in the resulting particle cascade, resulting in a substantial improvement in the estimated sensitivity to CRs. Although these models are in need of further refinement, in particular to incorporate the effects of small-scale lunar surface roughness, their application here indicates that a proposed experiment with the LOFAR telescope would test predictions of the neutrino flux from exotic-physics models, and an experiment with a phased-array feed on a large single-dish telescope such as the Parkes radio telescope would allow the first detection of CRs with this technique, with an expected rate of one detection per 140 h.

  10. Neutrino physics today, important issues and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    The status and the most important issues in neutrino physics will be summarized as well as how the current, pressing questions will be addressed by future experiments. Since the discovery of neutrino flavor transitions by the SuperKamiokande experiment in 1998, which demonstrates that neutrinos change and hence their clocks tick, i.e. they are not traveling at the speed of light and hence are not massless, the field of neutrino physics has made remarkable progress in untangling the nature of the neutrino. However, there are still many important questions to answer.

  11. Updated results from the RICE experiment and future prospects for ultra-high energy neutrino detection at the south pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, I.; Hussain, S.; Seckel, D.; Besson, D.; Fensholt, E.; Ralston, J.; Taylor, J.; Ratzlaff, K.; Young, R.

    2012-03-01

    The RICE experiment seeks observation of ultra-high energy (UHE; Eν>1017eV) neutrinos interacting in Antarctic ice, by measurement of the radio frequency (RF) Cherenkov radiation resulting from the collision of a neutrino with an ice molecule. RICE was initiated in 1999 as a first-generation prototype for an eventual, large-scale in-ice UHE neutrino detector. Herein, we present updated limits on the diffuse UHE neutrino flux, based on 12 years of data taken between 1999 and 2010. We find no convincing neutrino candidates, resulting in 95% confidence-level model-dependent limits on the flux Eν2dϕ/dEν<0.5×10-6GeV/(cm2s-sr) in the energy range 1017neutrino flux. As detailed herein, RICE studies of Antarctic ice demonstrate that both birefringence and internal layer RF scattering result in no significant loss of ARA neutrino sensitivity, and, for the first time, verify in situ the decrease in attenuation length with depth into the Antarctic ice sheet.

  12. Probing nonstandard neutrino cosmology with terrestrial neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalsasi, Akshay; McKeen, David; Nelson, Ann E.

    2017-06-01

    Neutrino masses and the number of light neutrino species can be tested in a variety of laboratory experiments and also can be constrained by particle astrophysics and precision cosmology. A conflict between these various results could be an indication of new physics in the neutrino sector. In this paper, we explore the possibility for reconciliation of otherwise discrepant results in a simple model containing a light scalar field which produces mass-varying neutrinos. We extend previous work on mass-varying neutrinos to consider issues of neutrino clumping, the effects of additional contributions to neutrino mass, and reconciliation of eV mass sterile neutrinos with cosmology.

  13. Solar neutrino experiments: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    The situation in solar neutrino physics has changed drastically in the past few years, so that now there are four neutrino experiments in operation, using different methods to look at different regions of the solar neutrino energy spectrum. These experiments are the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl Homestake detector, the realtime Kamiokande detector, and the different forms of radiochemical {sup 71}Ga detectors used in the GALLEX and SAGE projects. It is noteworthy that all of these experiments report a deficit of observed neutrinos relative to the predictions of standard solar models (although in the case of the gallium detectors, the statistical errors are still relatively large). This paper reviews the basic principles of operation of these neutrino detectors, reports their latest results and discusses some theoretical interpretations. The progress of three realtime neutrino detectors that are currently under construction, SuperKamiok, SNO and Borexino, is also discussed.

  14. Proposed neutrino experiment bounces back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Physicists at Fermilab in the US have come up with a plan that they hope will keep dreams of a next-generation neutrino facility alive. They have released a new design for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE), which would involve creating a beam of neutrinos at Fermilab and detecting them 1300 km away in a new detector to be built deep underground in South Dakota's Homestake mine.

  15. Next-generation atmospheric neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchner, Antoine

    2014-09-01

    A short review on the next-generation experiments aiming to study the neutrinos produced in cosmic-ray induced atmospheric showers is presented. The projects currently proposed rely on different complementary detection techniques, from the successful water Cherenkov and magnetized tracko-calorimeter techniques to the more innovative Liquid Argon technology. As all of the proposed detectors must be deeply buried to mitigate the atmospheric muon background, many experiments are expected to be placed deep underground. Following the neutrino telescope approach, the largest ones will be located deep under the sea/ice. Several future projects are part of a wider physics program which includes a neutrino beam. For such cases, the focus is put on the expected performances with only using atmospheric neutrinos. The main physics thread of the review is the question of the determination of the ordering of the neutrino mass eigenstates, referred to as the neutrino mass hierarchy. This falls into the broader context of the precise measurement of the neutrino mixing parameters. The expected reach of the future planned detectors in this respect is also addressed.

  16. The KATRIN Neutrino Mass Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parno, Diana; Katrin Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    While neutrino oscillation experiments have demonstrated that the particles have non-zero mass, the absolute neutrino mass scale is still unknown. The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is designed to improve on previous laboratory limits by an order of magnitude, probing the effective neutrino mass with a sensitivity approaching 0.2 eV at 90% confidence via the kinematics of tritium beta decay. At the same time, KATRIN has the potential to scan for sterile neutrinos at eV and keV scales. After years of preparation, all major components are now on site and commissioning is underway. I will report on the current status of the experiment, including recent results and preparations for the introduction of tritium later this year. US participation in KATRIN is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  17. Intense and exciting: current and future accelerator-based measurements of neutrino oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Accelerator-based experiments have been crucial in our understanding of neutrino oscillations. In this talk, I will give an overview of current accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, which have observed electron neutrino appearance and made precision measurements of the parameters governing muon neutrino disappearance. I will discuss what the current set of experiments can contribute to the remaining questions in neutrino oscillation physics, including measuring the CP violating phase, determining the mass hierarchy, resolving the θ23 octant, and searching for sterile neutrinos. Finally, I will describe the plans and physics goals for future accelerator-based neutrino experiments.

  18. Physics prospects with an intense neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomey, Nickolas

    2000-12-01

    With new forthcoming intense neutrino beams, for the study of neutrino oscillations, it is possible to consider other physics experiments that can be done with these extreme neutrino fluxes available close to the source.

  19. Discovering New Light States at Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Harnik, Roni; Kaplan, Jared; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-11

    Experiments designed to measure neutrino oscillations also provide major opportunities for discovering very weakly coupled states. In order to produce neutrinos, experiments such as LSND collide thousands of Coulombs of protons into fixed targets, while MINOS and MiniBooNE also focus and then dump beams of muons. The neutrino detectors beyond these beam dumps are therefore an excellent arena in which to look for long-lived pseudoscalars or for vector bosons that kinetically mix with the photon. We show that these experiments have significant sensitivity beyond previous beam dumps, and are able to partially close the gap between laboratory experiments and supernovae constraints on pseudoscalars. Future upgrades to the NuMI beamline and Project X will lead to even greater opportunities for discovery. We also discuss thin target experiments with muon beams, such as those available in COMPASS, and show that they constitute a powerful probe for leptophilic PNGBs.

  20. Hadroproduction experiments to constrain accelerator-based neutrino fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambelli, Laura

    2017-09-01

    The precise knowledge of (anti-)neutrino fluxes is one of the largest limitation in accelerator-based neutrino experiments. The main limitations arise from the poorly known production properties of neutrino parents in hadron-nucleus interactions. Strategies used by neutrino experiment to constrain their fluxes using external hadroproduction data will be described and illustrated with an example of a tight collaboration between T2K and NA61/SHINE experiments. This enabled a reduction of the T2K neutrino flux uncertainty from ∼25% (without external constraints) down to ∼10%. On-going developments to further constrain the T2K (anti-)neutrino flux are discussed and recent results from NA61/SHINE are reviewed. As the next-generation long baseline experiments aim for a neutrino flux uncertainty at a level of a few percent, the future data-taking plans of NA61/SHINE are discussed.

  1. Precision neutrino experiments vs the Littlest Seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballett, Peter; King, Stephen F.; Pascoli, Silvia; Prouse, Nick W.; Wang, TseChun

    2017-03-01

    We study to what extent upcoming precision neutrino oscillation experiments will be able to exclude one of the most predictive models of neutrino mass and mixing: the Littlest Seesaw. We show that this model provides a good fit to current data, predicting eight observables from two input parameters, and provide new assessments of its predictions and their correlations. We then assess the ability to exclude this model using simulations of upcoming neutrino oscillation experiments including the medium-distance reactor experiments JUNO and RENO-50 and the long-baseline accelerator experiments DUNE and T2HK. We find that an accurate determination of the currently least well measured parameters, namely the atmospheric and solar angles and the CP phase δ, provide crucial independent tests of the model. For θ 13 and the two mass-squared differences, however, the model's exclusion requires a combination of measurements coming from a varied experimental programme. Our results show that the synergy and complementarity of future experiments will play a vital role in efficiently discriminating between predictive models of neutrino flavour, and hence, towards advancing our understanding of neutrino oscillations in the context of the flavour puzzle of the Standard Model.

  2. Future Experiments in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krizmanic, John F.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement methodologies of astrophysics experiments reflect the enormous variation of the astrophysical radiation itself. The diverse nature of the astrophysical radiation, e.g. cosmic rays, electromagnetic radiation, and neutrinos, is further complicated by the enormous span in energy, from the 1.95 Kappa relic neutrino background to cosmic rays with energy greater than 10(exp 20)eV. The measurement of gravity waves and search for dark matter constituents are also of astrophysical interest. Thus, the experimental techniques employed to determine the energy of the incident particles are strongly dependent upon the specific particles and energy range to be measured. This paper summarizes some of the calorimetric methodologies and measurements planned by future astrophysics experiments. A focus will be placed on the measurement of higher energy astrophysical radiation. Specifically, future cosmic ray, gamma ray, and neutrino experiments will be discussed.

  3. Status of neutrino mass experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fackler, O.

    1985-12-01

    In 1980 two experiments ignited a fertile field of research the determination of the neutrino masses. Subsequently, over 35 experiments using a variety of techniques have probed or are probing this question. Primarily I will discuss electron antineutrino (hereafter referred to as neutrino) mass experiments. However, let me begin in Section I to discuss astronomical and terrestrial observations which motivated these experiments. In Section II, I will quote limits from muon and tau mass determinations. These limits are more thoroughly discussed in other papers. I will continue by describing the four approaches used to measure the electron neutrino mass. In Section III, tritium beta decay mass determinations will be reviewed. This section includes a general summary of previous experimental results, and discussion of the major ongoing experiments. Section IV offers concluding remarks. 24 refs., 24 figs.

  4. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  5. Double Beta Decays and Neutrinos - Experiments and MOON -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2008-01-01

    This is a brief review of the present and future experiments of neutrino-less double beta decays (0νββ) and the MOON (Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos) project. High sensitivity 0νββ experiments are unique and realistic probes for studying the Majorana nature of neutrinos and the absolute mass scale as suggested by neutrino oscillation experiments. MOON aims at spectroscopic 0νββ studies with the ν-mass sensitivity of 100-30 meV by means of a super ensemble of multilayer modules of scintillator plates and tracking detector planes.

  6. Sterile neutrinos facing kaon physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abada, A.; Bečirević, D.; Sumensari, O.; Weiland, C.; Funchal, R. Zukanovich

    2017-04-01

    We discuss weak kaon decays in a scenario in which the Standard Model is extended by massive sterile fermions. After revisiting the analytical expressions for leptonic and semileptonic decays we derive the expressions for decay rates with two neutrinos in the final state. By using a simple effective model with only one sterile neutrino, compatible with all current experimental bounds and general theoretical constraints, we conduct a thorough numerical analysis which reveals that the impact of the presence of massive sterile neutrinos on kaon weak decays is very small, less than 1% on decay rates. The only exception is B (KL→ν ν ) , which can go up to O (10-10), thus possibly within the reach of the KOTO, NA62 and SHIP experiments. Plans have also been proposed to search for this decay at the NA64 experiment. In other words, if all the future measurements of weak kaon decays turn out to be compatible with the Standard Model predictions, this will not rule out the existence of massive light sterile neutrinos with non-negligible active-sterile mixing. Instead, for a sterile neutrino of mass below mK, one might obtain a huge enhancement of B (KL→ν ν ), otherwise negligibly small in the Standard Model.

  7. Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    ISS Accelerator Working Group; Zisman, Michael S; Berg, J. S.; Blondel, A.; Brooks, S.; Campagne, J.-E.; Caspar, D.; Cevata, C.; Chimenti, P.; Cobb, J.; Dracos, M.; Edgecock, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Fernow, R.; Filthaut, F.; Gallardo, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; Gerigk, F.; Hanson, G.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.; Kaplan, D.; Keil, E.; Kirk, H.; Klier, A.; Kurup, A.; Lettry, J.; Long, K.; Machida, S.; McDonald, K.; Meot, F.; Mori, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Poklonskiy, A.; Popovic, M.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, T.; Sandstrom, R.; Sevior, R.; Sievers, P.; Simos, N.; Torun, Y.; Vretenar, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Zisman, Michael S

    2008-02-03

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  8. Long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M. C.

    2009-03-01

    This contribution to the proceedings of the 2008 NOW Workshop summarizes current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments in the United States. Together with recent results from MINOS, a future program incorporating NOvA and a long-baseline beam from Fermilab to DUSEL represents one possible scenario for a future U.S. High Energy Physics program with a significant neutrino component. Other futures are also possible. Depending on the value of {theta}{sub 13}, we may find that the future involves serious consideration of intercontinental neutrino beams, with the concomitant additional challenges in planning within an international framework.

  9. MINER{nu}A, a Neutrino--Nucleus Interaction Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Solano Salinas, C. J.; Chamorro, A.; Romero, C.

    2007-10-26

    With the fantastic results of KamLAND and SNO for neutrino physics, a new generation of neutrino experiments are being designed and build, specially to study the neutrino oscillations to resolve most of the incognita still we have in the neutrino physics. At FERMILAB we have the experiments MINOS and, in a near future, NO{nu}A, to study this kind of oscillations. One big problem these experiments will have is the lack of a good knowledge of the Physics of neutrino interactions with matter, and this will generate big systematic errors. MINER{nu}A, also at FERMILAB, will cover this space studying with high statistics and great precision the neutrino--nucleus interactions.

  10. Prospects for cosmic neutrino detection in tritium experiments in the case of hierarchical neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the effects of neutrino mixing and the neutrino mass hierarchy when considering the capture of the cosmic neutrino background (CNB) on radioactive nuclei. The implications of mixing and hierarchy at future generations of tritium decay experiments are considered. We find that the CNB should be detectable at these experiments provided that the resolution for the kinetic energy of the outgoing electron can be pushed to a few 0.01 eV for the scenario with inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, about an order of magnitude better than that of the upcoming KATRIN experiment. Another order of magnitude improvement is needed in the case of normal neutrino mass hierarchy. We also note that mixing effects generally make the prospects for CNB detection worse due to an increased maximum energy of the normal beta decay background.

  11. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeño, David G.; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Bœhm, Céline

    2016-05-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle sin2 θ W to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos, and use these estimates to quantify errors on future measurements of the neutrino fluxes, weak mixing angle and solar observables, as well as to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector. Our analysis shows that the combined rates of solar neutrino events in second generation experiments (SuperCDMS and LZ) can yield a measurement of the pp flux to 2.5% accuracy via electron recoil, and slightly improve the 8B flux determination. Assuming a low-mass argon phase, projected tonne-scale experiments like DARWIN can reduce the uncertainty on both the pp and boron-8 neutrino fluxes to below 1%. Finally, we use current results from LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite to set bounds on new interactions between neutrinos and electrons or nuclei, and show that future direct detection experiments can be used to set complementary constraints on the parameter space associated with light mediators.

  12. Future short-baseline sterile neutrino searches with accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, J.

    2015-07-15

    A number of experimental anomalies in neutrino oscillation physics point to the existence of at least one light sterile neutrino. This hypothesis can be precisely tested using neutrinos from reactors, radioactive isotopes, and particle accelerators. The focus of these proceedings is on future dedicated short-baseline sterile neutrino searches using accelerators.

  13. Future reactor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Liangjian

    2015-07-15

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ{sub 13} has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper.

  14. Physics prospects of the Jinping neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beacom, John F.; Chen, Shaomin; Cheng, Jianping; Doustimotlagh, Sayed N.; Gao, Yuanning; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Guo, Lei; Han, Ran; He, Hong-Jian; Huang, Xingtao; Li, Jianmin; Li, Jin; Li, Mohan; Li, Xueqian; Liao, Wei; Lin, Guey-Lin; Liu, Zuowei; McDonough, William; Šrámek, Ondřej; Tang, Jian; Wan, Linyan; Wang, Yuanqing; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zongyi; Wei, Hanyu; Xi, Yufei; Xu, Ye; Xu, Xun-Jie; Yang, Zhenwei; Yao, Chunfa; Yeh, Minfang; Yue, Qian; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Zhihong; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhou, Xiang; Zhu, Xianglei; Zuber, Kai

    2017-02-01

    The China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL), which has the lowest cosmic-ray muon flux and the lowest reactor neutrino flux of any laboratory, is ideal to carry out low-energy neutrino experiments. With two detectors and a total fiducial mass of 2000 tons for solar neutrino physics (equivalently, 3000 tons for geo-neutrino and supernova neutrino physics), the Jinping neutrino experiment will have the potential to identify the neutrinos from the CNO fusion cycles of the Sun, to cover the transition phase for the solar neutrino oscillation from vacuum to matter mixing, and to measure the geo-neutrino flux, including the Th/U ratio. These goals can be fulfilled with mature existing techniques. Efforts on increasing the target mass with multi-modular neutrino detectors and on developing the slow liquid scintillator will increase the Jinping discovery potential in the study of solar neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, and dark matter. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11235006, 11475093, 11135009, 11375065, 11505301, and 11620101004), the Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program (20121088035, 20131089288, and 20151080432), the Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP), U.S. National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1404311 (Beacom), and U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 (Yeh).

  15. Review of direct neutrino mass experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dragoun, O.

    2015-10-28

    Advantages and drawbacks of the kinematic methods of the neutrino mass determination are discussed. The meaning of the effective neutrino mass, resulting from measurements of the endpoint region of β-spectra is clarified. Current experimental constraints on the mass of active as well as sterile neutrinos are presented. Several new experiments are briefly outlined.

  16. Cosmogenic Neutron Production at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, I.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutrons are an important background for underground experiments studying neutrino oscillations, neutrino-less double-beta decay, dark matter, and other rare-event signals. The poster will present the status of a study of neutron production by cosmogenic muons at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. The experiments configuration of multiple identical detectors at varying depths gives us the ability to measure neutron yield for different values of average muon energy within the same experiment. The current status of our study and future prospects will be discussed.

  17. Future atmospheric neutrino measurements with PINGU

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.

    2015-07-15

    Neutrino oscillations, first measured in 1998 via atmospheric neutrinos, have provided the only current direct evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model of Elementary Particles. The full neutrino mixing, described by six parameters, has been measured in the last decade with the exception of the charge-parity phase and the ordering of the mass eigenstates (the neutrino mass hierarchy – NMH). A relatively large mixing-angle between the first and third mass eigenstates has opened the possibility of measuring the mass hierarchy via atmospheric neutrinos using very large volume detectors. A leading proposal to perform this measurement is the future low-energy extension to the IceCube–DeepCore detector, called PINGU (the Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade). By increasing the photocathode density in the DeepCore region, it is possible to lower the energy threshold in the fiducial volume to the region that is affected by the MSW [1, 2], and thus permits extraction of the hierarchy. Here we discuss the design of the PINGU detector, its sensitivity to the mass hierarchy (approximately 3σ in 3.5 years) and measurements of ν{sub μ} disappearance and ν{sub τ} appearance.

  18. The chlorine solar neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, J. K.; Cleveland, B. T.; Davis, R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The present consideration of the fourteen years' (1970-1984) results from the Homestake Gold Mine chlorine solar neutrino experiment gives attention to background processes generating Ar-37, as well as the constancy of the Ar-37 production rate. The counter background rates derived from a maximum likelihood treatment are noted to have been variable. The results of the chlorine experiment are clearly different from those of Monte Carlo simulations, with a production rate 3-4 times higher. Solar cycle variations and solar flare effects are also discussed.

  19. Sterile Neutrino Experiments I: Accelerator-based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toups, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Model is the theory that describes the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. Despite its great success, there still exists evidence for a wide range of phenomena, which lie outside the framework of the Standard Model. Among these, neutrino flavor oscillations hold great promise to bring insight to the field towards a theory that transcends the Standard Model. The discovery of light, sterile neutrinos that mix with the three active neutrino flavors and modify the standard three-neutrino oscillation probabilities in vacuum and matter would be a major breakthrough for the field and contribute to our overall understanding of neutrino mass and mixing. Current indications for light sterile neutrinos come from a variety of experiments reporting anomalies. The accelerator-based LSND and MiniBooNE experiments, for example, reported an excess of electron-type neutrinos over short baselines, which if interpreted as due to νμ ->νe (or νμ ->νe) oscillations, would imply the existence of a fourth light neutrino mass state. On the other hand, null results from other accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments searching for sterile neutrinos have put constraints on the possible existence of these particles. This talk will review the accelerator-based searches for light, sterile neutrinos as well as the prospects for confirming or refuting their existence in the coming years.

  20. Acoustic Detection of Neutrinos: Review and Future Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The acoustic neutrino detection technique is a promising approach for future large-scale detectors with the aim of measuring the small expected flux of cosmogenic neutrinos at energies exceeding 100 PeV. The technique is based on the thermo-acoustic model, which implies that the energy deposition by a particle cascade-resulting from a neutrino interaction in a medium with suitable thermal and acoustic properties-leads to a local heating and a subsequent characteristic pressure pulse that propagates in the surrounding medium. The main advantage of using sound for the detection of neutrino interactions, as opposed to Cherenkov light, lies in the much longer attenuation length of the former type of radiation: several kilometres for sound compared to several ten metres for light in the respective frequency ranges of interest in sea water. As detection media for future detectors, water, ice, salt domes and permafrost have been discussed, but it is the first two which have been investigated most thoroughly by using existing arrays of acoustic receivers-mainly military arrays in various bodies of water-or by implementing dedicated acoustic arrays in Cherenkov neutrino telescopes. Such arrays have been installed in IceCube at the South Pole, in the Lake Baikal experiment in Siberia and in ANTARES and the former NEMO experiment in the Mediterranean Sea. The future KM3NeT neutrino telescope to be installed in the Mediterranean Sea will be equipped with acoustic sensors for position calibration that are suited to also serve acoustic detection purposes. Ongoing experiments in water and ice have established the feasibility of the acoustic neutrino detection technique and allowed for the investigation of prevailing background conditions. Methods to improve the signal detection efficiency and to reduce the rate of misidentified neutrinos have been devised and potential future large-scale detector designs are investigated using detailed simulations in combination with the wealth

  1. Nuclear effects in neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2011-10-06

    We have studied the nuclear medium effects in the neutrino(antineutrino) induced interactions in nuclei which are relevant for present neutrino oscillation experiments in the few GeV energy region. The study is specially focused on calculating the cross sections and the event rates for atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments. The nuclear effects are found to be important for the quasielastic lepton production and the charged current incoherent and coherent pion production processes.

  2. Recent results from the ARIANNA neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelles, Anna

    2017-03-01

    The ARIANNA experiment is currently taking data in its pilot-phase on the Ross ice-shelf. Fully autonomous stations measure radio signals in the frequency range from 100 MHz to 1 GHz. The seven station hexagonal radio-array (HRA) was completed in December 2014, and augmented by two special purpose stations with unique configurations. In its full extent ARIANNA is targeted at detecting interactions of cosmogenic neutrinos (> 1016eV) in the ice-shelf. Downward-pointing antennas installed at the surface will record the radio emission created by neutrino-induced showers in the ice and exploit the fact that the ice-water surface acts as a mirror for radio emission. ARIANNA stations are independent, low-powered, easy to install and equipped with real-time communication via satellite modems. We report on the current status of the HRA, as well as air shower detections that have been made over the past year. Furthermore, we will discuss the search for neutrino emission, future plans of the experiment.

  3. The KATRIN neutrino mass experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim; Katrin Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) aims to determine the electron neutrino mass from tritium decay in a model-independent way, by a kinematic measurement of the energy of β-electrons. The unprecedented sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2 will improve present limits by one order of magnitude. The decay electrons will originate from a 10 m long windowless gaseous tritium source. Super-conducting magnets will guide the electrons through a differential and cryogenic pumping section to the electro-static tandem spectrometer (MAG-E-filter), where the kinetic energy will be measured. The experiment is presently being built at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe by an international collaboration of more than 120 scientists. The largest component, the 1240 m3 main spectrometer, was delivered end of 2006 and first commissioning tests have been performed. This paper gives an overview of the goals and technological challenges of the experiment and reports on the progress in commissioning first major components. The start of first measurements is expected in 2012.

  4. Neutrino Physics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lederman, L. M.

    1963-01-09

    The prediction and verification of the neutrino are reviewed, together with the V A theory for its interactions (particularly the difficulties with the apparent existence of two neutrinos and the high energy cross section). The Brookhaven experiment confirming the existence of two neutrinos and the cross section increase with momentum is then described, and future neutrino experiments are considered. (D.C.W.)

  5. Chlorine and gallium solar neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Cleveland, B. T.; Davis, R., Jr.; Rowley, J. K.

    1985-05-01

    The authors reevaluate the expected capture rates and their uncertainties for the chlorine and gallium solar neutrino experiments using improved laboratory data and new theoretical calculations. They also derive a minimum value for the flux of solar neutrinos that is expected provided only (1) that the sun is currently producing energy by fusing light nuclei at the rate that it is emitting energy in the form of photons from its surface and (2) that nothing happens to solar neutrinos on their way to earth. These results are used - together with Monte Carlo simulations - to determine how much gallium is required for a solar neutrino experiment.

  6. Omnibus experiment: CPT and CP violation with sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, K. K.; Novikov, Yu N.; Smirnov, M. V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Wurm, M.

    2017-09-01

    The verification of the sterile neutrino hypothesis and, if confirmed, the determination of the relevant oscillation parameters is one of the goals of the neutrino physics in near future. We propose to search for the sterile neutrinos with a high statistics measurement utilizing the radioactive sources and oscillometric approach with large liquid scintillator detector like LENA, JUNO, or RENO-50. Our calculations indicate that such an experiment is realistic and could be performed in parallel to the main research plan for JUNO, LENA, or RENO-50. Assuming as the starting point the values of the oscillation parameters indicated by the current global fit (in 3 + 1 scenario) and requiring at least 5σ confidence level, we estimate that we would be able to detect differences in the mass squared differences Δ m41^2 of electron neutrinos and electron antineutrinos of the order of 1% or larger. That would allow to probe the CPT symmetry with neutrinos with an unprecedented accuracy.

  7. Status of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Daya Bay Collaboration; Lin, Cheng-Ju Stephen

    2010-12-15

    The last unknown neutrino mixing angle theta_13 is one of the fundamental parameters of nature; it is also a crucial parameter for determining the sensitivity of future long-baseline experiments aimed to study CP violation in the neutrino sector. Daya Bay is a reactor neutrino oscillation experiment designed to achieve a sensitivity on the value of sin^2(2*theta_13) to better than 0.01 at 90percent CL. The experiment consists of multiple identical detectors placed underground at different baselines to minimize systematic errors and suppress cosmogenic backgrounds. With the baseline design, the expected anti-neutrino signal at the far site is about 360 events per day and at each of the near sites is about 1500 events per day. An overview and current status of the experiment will be presented.

  8. Future short baseline neutrino searches with nuclear decays

    SciTech Connect

    Caccianiga, Barbara

    2015-07-15

    Several anomalies coming from neutrino experiments may be pointing towards new physics: these hints suggest the existence of one (or more) sterile neutrinos. We discuss some of the experiments proposed to verify (or disproof) this hypothesis by using an intense radioactive source in proximity of large neutrino detectors.

  9. Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, P. V. R.

    The astrophysics and high energy physics of neutrinos are discussed. The former includes the topics of solar neutrinos, gravitational stellar collapses, neutrinos at high and superhigh energies, and DUMAND and related topics. Experimental results from the Homestake mine chlorine-37 experiment on solar neutrinos are shown. The solar neutrino puzzle is assessed, the economic aspects of DUMAND are discussed, and expectations for related projects are examined. For high energy physics, the discussion includes DUMAND and related projects, neutrino oscillations, the resolution of the puzzles of the measurement of the stopping muon flux and of the cosmic ray event time intervals, and the proton decay experiments.

  10. Sterile neutrino searches at future e-e+, pp and e-p colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cazzato, Eros; Fischer, Oliver

    2017-05-01

    Sterile neutrinos are among the most attractive extensions of the SM to generate the light neutrino masses observed in neutrino oscillation experiments. When the sterile neutrinos are subject to a protective symmetry, they can have masses around the electroweak scale and potentially large neutrino Yukawa couplings, which makes them testable at planned future particle colliders. We systematically discuss the production and decay channels at electron-positron, proton-proton and electron-proton colliders and provide a complete list of the leading order signatures for sterile neutrino searches. Among other things, we discuss several novel search channels, and present a first look at the possible sensitivities for the active-sterile mixings and the heavy neutrino masses. We compare the performance of the different collider types and discuss their complementarity.

  11. Future long-baseline neutrino oscillations: View from Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Hayato, Yoshinari

    2015-07-15

    Accelerator based long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments have been playing important roles in revealing the nature of neutrinos. However, it turned out that the current experiments are not sufficient to study two major remaining problems, the CP violation in the lepton sector and the mass hierarchy of neutrinos. Therefore, several new experiments have been proposed. Among of them, two accelerator based long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, the J-PARC neutrino beam and Hyper-Kamiokande, and MOMENT, have been proposed in Asia. These two projects are reviewed in this article.

  12. Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, L.; Hulth, P. O.; Botner, O.; Carlson, P.; Ohlsson, T.

    2006-03-01

    J. N. Bahcall (1934-2005) -- Preface -- List of participants -- Committees -- Nobel symposium on neutrino physics - program -- The history of neutrino oscillations / S. M. Bilenky -- Super-Kamiokande results on neutrino oscillations / Y. Suzuki -- Sudbury neutrino observatory results / A. B. McDonald -- Results from KamLAND reactor neutrino detection / A. Suzuki -- New opportunities for surprise / J. Conrad -- Solar models and solar neutrinos / J. N. Bahcall -- Atmospheric neutrino fluxes / T. K. Gaisser -- The MSW effect and matter effects in neutrino oscillations / A. Yu. Smirnov -- Three-flavour effects and CP- and T-violation in neutrino oscillations / E. Kh. Akhmedov -- Global analysis of neutrino data / M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia -- Future precision neutrino oscillation experiments and theoretical implications / M. Lindner -- Experimental prospects of neutrinoless double beta decay / E. Fiorini -- Theoretical prospects of neutrinoless double beta decay / S. T. Petcov -- Supernova neutrino oscillations / G. G. Raffelt -- High-energy neutrino astronomy / F. Halzen -- Neutrino astrophysics in the cold: Amanda, Baikal and IceCube / C. Spiering -- Status of radio and acoustic detection of ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos and a proposal on reporting results / D. Saltzberg -- Detection of neutrino-induced air showers / A. A. Watson -- Prospect for relic neutrino searches / G. B. Gelmini -- Leptogenesis in the early universe / T. Yanagida -- Neutrinos and big bang nucleosynthesis / G. Steigman -- Extra galactic sources of high energy neutrinos / E. Waxman -- Cosmological neutrino bounds for non-cosmologists / M. Tegmark -- Neutrino intrinsic properties: the neutrino-antineutrino relation / B. Kayser -- NuTeV and neutrino properties / M. H. Shaevitz -- Absolute masses of neutrinos - experimental results and future possibilities / C. Weinheimer -- Flavor theories and neutrino masses / P. Ramond -- Neutrino mass models and leptogenesis / S. F. King -- Neutrino mass and

  13. Towards a unified model of neutrino-nucleus reactions for neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, S. X.; Kamano, H.; Hayato, Y.; Hirai, M.; Horiuchi, W.; Kumano, S.; Murata, T.; Saito, K.; Sakuda, M.; Sato, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    2017-05-01

    A precise description of neutrino-nucleus reactions will play a key role in addressing fundamental questions such as the leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy through analyzing data from next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments. The neutrino energy relevant to the neutrino-nucleus reactions spans a broad range and, accordingly, the dominant reaction mechanism varies across the energy region from quasi-elastic scattering through nucleon resonance excitations to deep inelastic scattering. This corresponds to transitions of the effective degree of freedom for theoretical description from nucleons through meson-baryon to quarks. The main purpose of this review is to report our recent efforts towards a unified description of the neutrino-nucleus reactions over the wide energy range; recent overall progress in the field is also sketched. Starting with an overview of the current status of neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments, we formulate the cross section to be commonly used for the reactions over all the energy regions. A description of the neutrino-nucleon reactions follows and, in particular, a dynamical coupled-channels model for meson productions in and beyond the Δ (1232) region is discussed in detail. We then discuss the neutrino-nucleus reactions, putting emphasis on our theoretical approaches. We start the discussion with electroweak processes in few-nucleon systems studied with the correlated Gaussian method. Then we describe quasi-elastic scattering with nuclear spectral functions, and meson productions with a Δ -hole model. Nuclear modifications of the parton distribution functions determined through a global analysis are also discussed. Finally, we discuss issues to be addressed for future developments.

  14. Towards a unified model of neutrino-nucleus reactions for neutrino oscillation experiments.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S X; Kamano, H; Hayato, Y; Hirai, M; Horiuchi, W; Kumano, S; Murata, T; Saito, K; Sakuda, M; Sato, T; Suzuki, Y

    2017-05-01

    A precise description of neutrino-nucleus reactions will play a key role in addressing fundamental questions such as the leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy through analyzing data from next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments. The neutrino energy relevant to the neutrino-nucleus reactions spans a broad range and, accordingly, the dominant reaction mechanism varies across the energy region from quasi-elastic scattering through nucleon resonance excitations to deep inelastic scattering. This corresponds to transitions of the effective degree of freedom for theoretical description from nucleons through meson-baryon to quarks. The main purpose of this review is to report our recent efforts towards a unified description of the neutrino-nucleus reactions over the wide energy range; recent overall progress in the field is also sketched. Starting with an overview of the current status of neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments, we formulate the cross section to be commonly used for the reactions over all the energy regions. A description of the neutrino-nucleon reactions follows and, in particular, a dynamical coupled-channels model for meson productions in and beyond the [Formula: see text](1232) region is discussed in detail. We then discuss the neutrino-nucleus reactions, putting emphasis on our theoretical approaches. We start the discussion with electroweak processes in few-nucleon systems studied with the correlated Gaussian method. Then we describe quasi-elastic scattering with nuclear spectral functions, and meson productions with a [Formula: see text]-hole model. Nuclear modifications of the parton distribution functions determined through a global analysis are also discussed. Finally, we discuss issues to be addressed for future developments.

  15. Chlorine and bromine solar neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. Jr.; Cleveland, B.T.; Rowley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The solar neutrino experiment based upon the neutrino capture reaction /sup 37/Cl (..nu.., e/sup -/) /sup 37/Ar has been in operation in the Homestake Gold Mine at Lead, South Dakota since 1967. The results of this experiment are well known, and have been reported most recently to the solar neutrino conference at Lead in 1984. We report here the latest results from this experiment. A radiochemical neutrino detector based upon the neutrino capture reaction /sup 81/Br (..nu.., e/sup -/) /sup 81/Kr* ..-->.. /sup 81/Kr has recently been shown to be feasible. Our plans for performing a full scale test of the method using the Homestake chlorine detector are discussed briefly. 8 refs.

  16. NEUTRINO FACTORY AND BETA BEAM EXPERIMENTS AND DEVELOPMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALBRIGHT, C.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.; GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; KIRK, H.; ET AL.

    2004-09-21

    The long-term prospects for fully exploring three-flavor mixing in the neutrino sector depend upon an ongoing and increased investment in the appropriate accelerator R&D. Two new concepts have been proposed that would revolutionize neutrino experiments, namely the Neutrino Factory and the Beta Beam facility. These new facilities would dramatically improve our ability to test the three-flavor mixing framework, measure CP violation in the lepton sector, and perhaps determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, and, if necessary, probe extremely small values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The stunning sensitivity that could be achieved with a Neutrino Factory is described, together with our present understanding of the corresponding sensitivity that might be achieved with a Beta Beam facility. In the Beta Beam case, additional study is required to better understand the optimum Beta Beam energy, and the achievable sensitivity. Neither a Neutrino Factory nor a Beta Beam facility could be built without significant R&D. An impressive Neutrino Factory R&D effort has been ongoing in the U.S. and elsewhere over the last few years and significant progress has been made towards optimizing the design, developing and testing the required accelerator components, and significantly reducing the cost. The recent progress is described here. There has been no corresponding activity in the U.S. on Beta Beam facility design and, given the very limited resources, there is little prospect of starting a significant U.S. Beta Beam R&D effort in the near future. However, the Beta Beam concept is interesting, and progress on its development in Europe should be followed. The Neutrino Factory R&D program has reached a critical stage in which support is required for two crucial international experiments and a third-generation international design study. If this support is forthcoming, a Neutrino Factory could be added to the Neutrino Community's road map in about a decade.

  17. Future experimental programme for neutrino cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, Sara

    2017-09-01

    The neutrino-nucleus interaction modelling is crucial for a precise measurement of neutrino oscillations. The advantages and the drawbacks of the planned strategies to measure the neutrino-nucleus cross section with different detector technologies will be discussed. The present document summarizes a talk given on these topics at Neutrino 2016 conference.

  18. Direct determination of neutrino mass parameters at future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kadastik, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.

    2008-06-01

    If the observed light neutrino masses are induced by their Yukawa couplings to singlet right-handed neutrinos, the natural smallness of those makes direct collider tests of the electroweak scale neutrino mass mechanisms difficult in the simplest models. In the triplet Higgs seesaw scenario the smallness of light neutrino masses may come from the smallness of B-L breaking parameters, allowing sizable Yukawa couplings even for a TeV scale triplet. We show that, in this scenario, measuring the branching fractions of doubly charged Higgs to different same-charged lepton flavors at CERN LHC and/or ILC experiments will allow one to measure the neutrino mass parameters that neutrino oscillation experiments are insensitive to, including the neutrino mass hierarchy, lightest neutrino mass, and Majorana phases.

  19. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  20. New reactor neutrino experiments besides double-CHOOZ.

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M. C.; High Energy Physics

    2005-01-01

    Several new reactor neutrino experiments are being considered to measure the parameter {theta}{sub 13}. The current plans for Angra, Braidwood, Daya Bay, KASKA and KR2DET are reviewed. A case is made that, together with Double-CHOOZ, a future world program should include at least three such experiments.

  1. Future long-baseline neutrino oscillations: View from Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Patzak, T.

    2015-07-15

    Since about a decade the european physics community interested in neutrino and neutrino-astrophysics develops a plan to conceive the next generation large underground neutrino observatory. Recently, the LAGUNA-LBNO collaboration made the outcome of the FP7 design study public which shows a clear path for the realization of such experiment. In this paper the LAGUNA and LAGUNA-LBNO Design studies, resulting in a proposal for the LBNO experiment, will be discussed. The author will focus on the long baseline neutrino oscillation search, especially on the potential to discover the neutrino mass ordering and the search for CP violation in the lepton sector.

  2. Long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, D.; Goodman, M.

    1994-12-31

    There is no unambiguous definition for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The term is generally used for accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments which are sensitive to {Delta}m{sup 2} < 1.0 eV{sup 2}, and for which the detector is not on the accelerator site. The Snowmass N2L working group met to discuss the issues facing such experiments. The Fermilab Program Advisory Committee adopted several recommendations concerning the Fermilab neutrino program at their Aspen meeting immediately prior to the Snowmass Workshop. This heightened the attention for the proposals to use Fermilab for a long-baseline neutrino experiment at the workshop. The plan for a neutrino oscillation program at Brookhaven was also thoroughly discussed. Opportunities at CERN were considered, particularly the use of detectors at the Gran Sasso laboratory. The idea to build a neutrino beam from KEK towards Superkamiokande was not discussed at the Snowmass meeting, but there has been considerable development of this idea since then. Brookhaven and KEK would use low energy neutrino beams, while FNAL and CERN would plan have medium energy beams. This report will summarize a few topics common to LBL proposals and attempt to give a snapshot of where things stand in this fast developing field.

  3. Measurement of neutrino oscillations in MACRO experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musser, J.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of investigating neutrino oscillations in the proposed MACRO experiment are considered. Its sensitivity taking into account the theoretical uncertainties coming from flux calculations, geomagnetic effects and propagation through matter, and the experimental limitations.

  4. Silicon photomultiplier low temperature characterization for future neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yujing; Choi, Koun; Maricic, Jelena; Dela Cruz, Marielle; Nelson, Christina; Rosen, Marc; Milincic, Radovan

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are compact solid state photodetectors having single photoelectron (PE) level sensitivity. Due to their attributes, they are being considered for the photo detection systems of future neutrino detectors. Consequently, comprehensive studies of SiPMs at cryogenic temperatures are required since the data provided by the manufactures do not cover this temperature regime. In this work, SiPMs are tested for proper operation in a cryostat for the expected lifetime of the future experiments. The characterization of SenSL C-series SiPMs and their long-term mechanical durability are discussed. Performance of SiPMs from other vendors are also discussed.

  5. Report on solar neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. Jr.; Cleveland, B.T.; Rowley, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    A summary is given of the status of solar neutrino research that includes results of the Brookhaven chlorine detector, a discussion of the development of the gallium, bromine, and lithium radiochemical detectors, and some proposals for direct counting detectors. The gallium and bromine radiochemical detectors are developed and are capable of giving critical information of interest about neutrino physics and the fusion reactions in the interior of the sun. A plan for building these detectors is outlined and a rough cost estimate is given. A review is given of the plans in the Soviet Union in solar neutrino research.

  6. Report on solar neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R.; Cleveland, B. T.; Rowley, J. K.

    1984-11-01

    A summary is given of the status of solar neutrino research that includes results of the Brookhaven chlorine detector, a discussion of the development of the gallium, bromine, and lithium radiochemical detectors. The gallium and bromine radiochemical detectors are developed and are capable of giving critical information of interest about neutrino physics and the fusion reactions in the interior of the sun. A plan for building these detectors is outlined and a rough cost estimate is given. A review is given of the plans in the Soviet Union in solar neutrino research.

  7. Report on solar neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R., Jr.; Cleveland, B. T.; Rowley, J. K.

    The status of solar neutrino research that includes results of the Brookhaven chlorine detector, a discussion of the development of the gallium, bromine, and lithium radiochemical detectors, and some proposals for direct counting detectors is given. The gallium and bromine radiochemical detectors were developed and are capable of giving critical information of interest about neutrino physics and the fusion reactions in the interior of the Sun. A plan for building these detectors is outlined and a rough cost estimate is given. The plans in the Soviet Union for solar neutrino research are reviewed.

  8. Muon Acceleration Concepts for Future Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Slawomir Alex

    2016-05-01

    Here, we summarize current state of concept for muon acceleration aimed at future Neutrino Factory. The main thrust of these studies was to reduce the overall cost while maintaining performance through exploring interplay between complexity of the cooling systems and the acceptance of the accelerator complex. To ensure adequate survival of the short-lived muons, acceleration must occur at high average gradient. The need for large transverse and longitudinal acceptances drives the design of the acceleration system to initially low RF frequency, e.g. 325 MHz, and then increased to 650 MHz, as the transverse size shrinks with increasing energy. High-gradient normal conducting RF cavities at these frequencies require extremely high peak-power RF sources. Hence superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are chosen. Here, we considered two cost effective schemes for accelerating muon beams for a stagable Neutrino Factory: Exploration of the so-called 'dual-use' linac concept, where the same linac structure is used for acceleration of both H- and muons and alternatively, the SRF efficient design based on multi-pass (4.5) 'dogbone' RLA, extendable to multi-pass FFAG-like arcs.

  9. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energymore » regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.« less

  10. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energy regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.

  11. The CAPTAIN Liquid Argon Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuguang

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors - a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5-5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energy regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.

  12. Neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The field of neutrino physics has expanded greatly in recent years with the discovery that neutrinos change flavor and therefore have mass. Although there are many neutrino physics results since the last DIS workshop, these proceedings concentrate on recent neutrino physics results that either add to or depend on the understanding of Deep Inelastic Scattering. They also describe the short and longer term future of neutrino DIS experiments.

  13. Report on the chlorine solar neutrino experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R., Jr.; Lande, K.; Cleveland, B. T.; Ullman, J.; Rowley, J. K.

    New results from the chlorine solar neutrino experiment are presented. Observations of the solar neutrino flux over the period 1970 to 1988 show an average 37Ar production rate of 2.33±0.25 SNU. The 37Ar production rate exhibits an apparent anti-correlation with the solar activity cycle. The current measurements (1986 - 1988) made during minimum solar activity give an 37Ar production rate of 4.2±0.8 SNU.

  14. 3-flavor oscillations with current and future atmospheric experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Ed

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are comprised of both electron and muon neutrinos with a wide range of energies and baselines. In addition, those that pass through the earth are subject to substantial matter effects. Therefore, atmospheric neutrinos are a natural laboratory for exploring 3-flavor neutrino oscillation with sensitivity to the unknown mass ordering and CP violating phase. I will review the results from current experiments and the prospects for future experiments.

  15. Neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Peccei, R. D.

    1999-10-25

    These lectures describe some aspects of the physics of massive neutrinos. After a brief introduction of neutrinos in the Standard Model, I discuss possible patterns for their masses. In particular, I show how the presence of a large Majorana mass term for the right-handed neutrinos can engender tiny neutrino masses for the observed neutrinos. If neutrinos have mass, different flavors of neutrinos can oscillate into one another. To analyze this phenomena, I develop the relevant formalism for neutrino oscillations, both in vacuum and in matter. After reviewing the existing (negative) evidence for neutrino masses coming from direct searches, I discuss evidence for, and hints of, neutrino oscillations in the atmosphere, the sun, and at accelerators. Some of the theoretical implications of these results are emphasized. I close these lectures by briefly outlining future experiments which will shed further light on atmospheric, accelerator and solar neutrino oscillations. A pedagogical discussion of Dirac and Majorana masses is contained in an appendix.

  16. Future long-baseline neutrino oscillations: View from North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2015-07-01

    In late 2012 the US Department of Energy gave approval for the first phase of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) that will conduct a broad scientific program including neutrino oscillations, neutrino scattering physics, search for baryon violation, supernova burst neutrinos and other related astrophysical phenomena. The project is now being reformulated as an international facility hosted by the United States. The facility will consist of an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a highly capable set of neutrino detectors on the Fermilab campus, and a large underground liquid argon time projection chamber at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota 1300 km from Fermilab. With an intense beam and massive far detector, the experimental program at the facility will make detailed studies of neutrino oscillations, including measurements of the neutrino mass hierarchy and Charge-Parity symmetry violation, by measuring neutrino and anti-neutrino mixing separately. At the near site, the high-statistics neutrino scattering data will allow for many cross section measurements and precision tests of the Standard Model. This presentation will describe the configuration developed by the LBNE collaboration, the broad physics program, and the status of the formation of the international facility.

  17. Future Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillations: View from North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    In late 2012 the US Department of Energy gave approval for the first phase of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE), that will conduct a broad scientific program including neutrino oscillations, neutrino scattering physics, search for baryon violation, supernova burst neutrinos and other related astrophysical phenomena. The project is now being reformulated as an international facility hosted by the United States. The facility will consist of an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a highly capable set of neutrino detectors on the Fermilab campus, and a large underground liquid argon time projection chamber at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota 1300 km from Fermilab. With an intense beam and massive far detector, the experimental program at the facility will make detailed studies of neutrino oscillations, including measurements of the neutrino mass hierarchy and Charge-Parity symmetry violation, by measuring neutrino and anti-neutrino mixing separately. At the near site, the high-statistics neutrino scattering data will allow for many cross section measurements and precision tests of the Standard Model. This presentation will describe the configuration developed by the LBNE collaboration, the broad physics program, and the status of the formation of the international facility.

  18. Future long-baseline neutrino oscillations: View from North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2015-07-15

    In late 2012 the US Department of Energy gave approval for the first phase of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) that will conduct a broad scientific program including neutrino oscillations, neutrino scattering physics, search for baryon violation, supernova burst neutrinos and other related astrophysical phenomena. The project is now being reformulated as an international facility hosted by the United States. The facility will consist of an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a highly capable set of neutrino detectors on the Fermilab campus, and a large underground liquid argon time projection chamber at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota 1300 km from Fermilab. With an intense beam and massive far detector, the experimental program at the facility will make detailed studies of neutrino oscillations, including measurements of the neutrino mass hierarchy and Charge-Parity symmetry violation, by measuring neutrino and anti-neutrino mixing separately. At the near site, the high-statistics neutrino scattering data will allow for many cross section measurements and precision tests of the Standard Model. This presentation will describe the configuration developed by the LBNE collaboration, the broad physics program, and the status of the formation of the international facility.

  19. The MINERvA Neutrino Scattering Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung

    2010-11-01

    MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment at the NuMI beamline of FNAL which began data taking in fall 2009. MINERvA is a high resolution, fully active detector designed to study the interaction of neutrinos with nuclei. The active volume of the detector consists of 3 tons of plastic scintillator. In addition, targets of 4He, C, H2O, Fe, and Pb will allow detailed studies of the A dependence of neutrino cross sections. Some of the objectives of MINERvA are to measure the axial form factor of the neutron with unprecedented precision, measure nuclear shadowing of F2 and compare with muon scattering, study quark-hadron duality with neutrino scattering in comparison with electron scattering, and measure coherent pion production. We present an overview of the physics objectives, estimated uncertainties of the measurements, along with a description of the detector and a sample of the first measurements.

  20. Results from the Palo Verde neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, J.; Palo Verde Collaboration

    2000-12-01

    I report on the initial results from a measurement of the anti-neutrino flux and spectrum from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium-loaded scintillation detector at a distance of about 800 m. We find that the anti-neutrino flux agrees with that predicted in the absence of oscillations, excluding at 90% CL ν¯e-ix oscillations with Δm2>1.12×10-3eV2 for maximal mixing and sin2 2θ>0.21 for large Δm2. Our results support the conclusion that the atmospheric neutrino oscillations observed by Super-Kamiokande do not involve νe. I will also give a short overview of the present status of the next generation long baseline reactor neutrino experiment, KamLAND.

  1. Status of the Borexino solar neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneira, J. C.

    2000-12-01

    Borexino is a new real-time detector for low energy solar neutrinos presently in construction at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy. The low energy threshold and the low radioactive background rate required for the detection of neutrinos below 1 MeV determines the choice of using liquid scintillator as the detection medium. Several tests on scintillator radiopurity and on various techniques to be used in Borexino were performed in CTF, a prototype detector installed in Gran Sasso. By performing the first real-time measurement of low energy solar neutrinos, Borexino will supply new information contributing to the solution of the Solar Neutrino Problem. In this paper, the goals, techniques and status of the Borexino experiment are presented, as well as the program for calibrations and monitoring of the detector.

  2. Neutrino oscillation experiments at nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Marco

    2000-08-01

    The current status of the search for neutrino oscillations at reactors is reviewed, with a particular emphasis given to the final results recently published by the CHOOZ experiment. The results of the Bugey experiments and the status of the Palo Verde experiment are also discussed.

  3. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  4. Radiochemical Solar Neutrino Experiments - Successful and Otherwise.

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,R.L.

    2008-05-25

    Over the years, several different radiochemical systems have been proposed as solar neutrino detectors. Of these, two achieved operating status and obtained important results that helped to define the current field of neutrino physics: the first solar-neutrino experiment, the Chlorine Detector ({sup 37}Cl) that was developed by chemist Raymond Davis and colleagues at the Homestake Mine, and the subsequent Gallium ({sup 71}Ga) Detectors that were operated by (a) the SAGE collaboration at the Baksan Laboratory and (b) the GALLEX/GNO collaborations at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. These experiments have been extensively discussed in the literature and in many previous International Neutrino Conferences. In this paper, I present important updates to the results from SAGE and GALLEX/GNO. I also review the principles of the radiochemical detectors and briefly describe several different detectors that have been proposed. In light of the well-known successes that have been subsequently obtained by real-time neutrino detectors such as Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND, I do not anticipate that any new radiochemical neutrino detectors will be built. At present, only SAGE is still operating; the Chlorine and GNO radiochemical detectors have been decommissioned and dismantled.

  5. Report on solar-neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This report on solar neutrino experiments will include a summary of the results of the chlorine detector, and an account of our plans to build a gallium solar neutrino experiment. In addition to discussing the experimental side of the solar neutrino problem I would like to relate our experiences during the last 15 years in working in the Homestake Gold Mine. In the course of our work at Homestake a number of independent groups have asked to use our facilities and, because of the cooperative and helpful attitude of the Mine management, these experimentalists could be easily accommodated. A brief account of these experiences may be useful for the main business of this workshop, building large particle detectors for observing nucleon decay, and the related question of the need for a national underground physics facility.

  6. Sensitivity of low energy neutrino experiments to physics beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Miranda, O. G.; Rashba, T. I.

    2007-10-01

    We study the sensitivity of future low energy neutrino experiments to extra neutral gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and R-parity breaking interactions. We focus on future proposals to measure coherent neutrino-nuclei scattering and neutrino-electron elastic scattering. We introduce a new comparative analysis between these experiments and show that in different types of new physics it is possible to obtain competitive bounds to those of present and future collider experiments. For the cases of leptoquarks and R-parity breaking interactions we found that the expected sensitivity for most of the future low energy experimental setups is better than the current constraints.

  7. NEUTRINOS OSCILLATIONS WITH LONG-BASE-LINE BEAMS:. Past, Present and very near Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanco, L.

    2011-03-01

    We overview the status of the studies on neutrino oscillations with accelerators at the present running experiments. Past and present results enlighten the path towards the observation of massive neutrinos and the settling of their oscillations. The very near future may still have addiction from the outcome of the on-going experiments. OPERA is chosen as a relevant example justified by the very recent results released.

  8. Search for muon neutrino disappearance due to sterile neutrino oscillations with the MINOS/MINOS+ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, J.; Chen, R.; Huang, J.; ">MINOS, neutrino oscillations have successfully explained a wide range of neutrino oscillation data. However, anomalous results, such as the electron antineutrino appearance excesses seen by LSND and MiniBooNE, can be explained by the addition of a sterile neutrino at a larger mass scale than the existing three neutrino mass states. MINOS is a two-detector, long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment optimized to measure muon neutrino disappearance in the NuMI neutrino beam. MINOS+ is the continuation of the MINOS experiment with the NuMI beam in a medium energy configuration. In the model with one sterile neutrino flavor added to the three active neutrino flavors, a sterile neutrino causing electron antineutrino appearance at LSND and MiniBooNE would also cause muon neutrino disappearance at MINOS. The sterile neutrino signature would be seen as modulations at high energy in the charged-current muon neutrino spectrum and a depletion of events in the neutral current spectrum. These proceedings show new results from fitting neutral-current and charged-current energy spectra from MINOS and MINOS+ data to a neutrino oscillation model assuming one sterile neutrino.

  9. Prospects for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.

    1991-12-31

    Several recent development have motivated consideration of neutrino experiments located hundreds or thousand of kilometers from an accelerator. The motivations and experimental challenges for such experiments are examined. Three proposals for using the Fermilab Main Injector are compared. The requirements on mass, distance and resolution for an ``ideal`` detector for such an experimental are considered.

  10. Prospects for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.

    1991-01-01

    Several recent development have motivated consideration of neutrino experiments located hundreds or thousand of kilometers from an accelerator. The motivations and experimental challenges for such experiments are examined. Three proposals for using the Fermilab Main Injector are compared. The requirements on mass, distance and resolution for an ideal'' detector for such an experimental are considered.

  11. The GALLEX solar neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The recently published GALLEX result, 83 [plus minus] 19 (stat.) [plus minus]8 (syst.) SNU (10[sigma]), was obtained from data accumulated from 14 solar runs (with counting done to May, 1992). This value, while 2 standard deviations below the predictions of solar models, provided the first direct evidence for solar pp neutrinos. The signature for neutrino capture in the aqueous gallium-chloride detector was the observation of the characteristic energy spectrum (K and L X rays/Auger electrons), decaying with the half-life of the chemically isolated radioactive product, [sup 71]Ge. By adding to the data set 1 more solar run plus 4 additional months of counting (to September, 1992), an updated value of the GALLEX production rate was obtained, which, interestingly, does not differ perceptibly from our published value.

  12. Future Outlook: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoichiro

    2008-11-01

    The personal view for the next to the next neutrino detector, the ultimate experiment, is discussed. Considering the size, cost and head winds against the basic science, the ultimate experiment will be the only experiment in the world. Here two such experiments one for the neutrino oscillation and the other for the double beta decay were discussed. The ultimate experiment needs to include a bread and butter science and to have a discovery potential for an unexpected phenomenon. There are many technical challenges and international co-operations are absolutely necessary.

  13. Solar models, neutrino experiments, and helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    1988-01-01

    The event rates and their recognized uncertainties are calculated for 11 solar neutrino experiments using accurate solar models. These models are also used to evaluate the frequency spectrum of the p and g oscillations modes of the sun. It is shown that the discrepancy between the predicted and observed event rates in the Cl-37 and Kamiokande II experiments cannot be explained by a 'likely' fluctuation in input parameters with the best estimates and uncertainties given in the present study. It is suggested that, whatever the correct solution to the solar neutrino problem, it is unlikely to be a 'trival' error.

  14. Higgs production from sterile neutrinos at future lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cazzato, Eros; Fischer, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    In scenarios with sterile (right-handed) neutrinos that are subject to an approximate "lepton-number-like" symmetry, the heavy neutrinos (i.e. the mass eigenstates) can have masses around the electroweak scale and couple to the Higgs boson with, in principle, unsuppressed Yukawa couplings while accounting for the smallness of the light neutrinos' masses. In these scenarios, the on-shell production of heavy neutrinos and their subsequent decays into a light neutrino and a Higgs boson constitutes a hitherto unstudied resonant contribution to the Higgs production mechanism. We investigate the relevance of this resonant mono-Higgs production mechanism in leptonic collisions, including thepresent experimental constraints on the neutrino Yukawa couplings, and we determine the sensitivity of future lepton colliders to the heavy neutrinos. With Monte Carlo event sampling and a simulation of the detector response we find that, at future lepton colliders, neutrino Yukawa couplings below the percent level can lead to observable deviations from the SM and, furthermore, the sensitivity improves with higher center-of-mass energies (for identical integrated luminosities).

  15. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrick, Anne; LBNE Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will address the neutrino mass hierarchy, leptonic CP violation, and the value of the mixing angle Theta13 with unprecedented sensitivity. Protons from the Fermilab Main Injector will impinge on a target to create intense fluxes of charged pions and other mesons. The mesons will be guided down a 250 m length of pipe where they will decay creating a muon neutrino beam. The beam will pass through a near detector and travel on to massive detectors located in the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Lab (DUSEL) in Western South Dakota. The near detector at Fermilab will measure the absolute flux of neutrinos before oscillation, and measure signal and background processes in the poorly understood GeV neutrino energy range. To quantify the potential sensitivity of this experiment and the specific needs of the near detector, simulation work has been undertaken. In particular, results of studies using a more sophisticated understanding of various background processes will be presented. Additionally, hardware work for a possible near detector design will be presented.

  16. The Jiangmen underground neutrino observatory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugière, Timothée

    2017-02-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is a multipurpose neutrino-oscillation experiment designed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal, by detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance. The detector is placed at 1800-m.w.e. deep underground and consists of a 20 kiloton liquid scintillator contained in a 34.5 m-diameter acrylic ball, instrumented by more than 17,000 20-in. PMTs ensuring a 77% photocatode coverage. To reach an unprecedented 3% energy resolution (at 1 MeV), the PMTs need a quantum efficiency of more than 30% and the attenuation length of the liquid has to be better than 20 m (at 430 nm). This precision on the energy is a key point to determine at the 3-4 σ significance level the neutrinos mass hierarchy with six years of running. The measurement of the antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1%. The experiment will also be able to observe neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources. The international collaboration of JUNO was established in 2014, the civil construction started in 2015 and the R&D of the detectors is ongoing. JUNO is planning to start data taking in 2020.

  17. Generalized mass ordering degeneracy in neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma, Pilar; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-09-07

    Here, we consider the impact of neutral-current (NC) nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI) on the determination of the neutrino mass ordering. We show that in the presence of NSI there is an exact degeneracy which makes it impossible to determine the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of the solar mixing angle θ12 at oscillation experiments. The degeneracy holds at the probability level and for arbitrary matter density profiles, and hence solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino experiments are affected simultaneously. The degeneracy requires order-1 corrections from NSI to the NC electron neutrino-quark interaction and can be tested in electron neutrino NC scattering experiments.

  18. Generalized mass ordering degeneracy in neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma, Pilar; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-09-07

    Here, we consider the impact of neutral-current (NC) nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI) on the determination of the neutrino mass ordering. We show that in the presence of NSI there is an exact degeneracy which makes it impossible to determine the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of the solar mixing angle θ12 at oscillation experiments. The degeneracy holds at the probability level and for arbitrary matter density profiles, and hence solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino experiments are affected simultaneously. The degeneracy requires order-1 corrections from NSI to the NC electron neutrino-quark interaction and can be tested in electron neutrino NC scattering experiments.

  19. Generalized mass ordering degeneracy in neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Pilar; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We consider the impact of neutral-current (NC) nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI) on the determination of the neutrino mass ordering. We show that in the presence of NSI there is an exact degeneracy which makes it impossible to determine the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of the solar mixing angle θ12 at oscillation experiments. The degeneracy holds at the probability level and for arbitrary matter density profiles, and hence solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino experiments are affected simultaneously. The degeneracy requires order-1 corrections from NSI to the NC electron neutrino-quark interaction and can be tested in electron neutrino NC scattering experiments.

  20. Development of Muon Accelerators for Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, D.

    2017-09-01

    High-brilliance muon beams offer a unique potential for precision neutrino studies by providing intense neutrino beams with well-defined flavor content and energy spectrum. They also offer a path to improved precision searches for charged lepton flavor violation, and provide a basis for a next generation lepton-antilepton collider. The R&D for these muon facilities involves several technologies of which cooling the muon beam is a critical component. This talk will review progress on the development of the key technologies and their demonstration experiments.

  1. Low Energy Solar Neutrino Spectroscopy:. Results from the Borexino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, D.

    2011-03-01

    neutrino oscillations. A further confirmations of the LMA scenario is provided by the absence of a day-night asymmetry in the 7Be signal. These experimental results allow to improve the knowledge of the pp neutrino flux, to place an upper limit on the CNO flux and also to explore non standard neutrino properties, improving the upper limit on the neutrino effective magnetic moment. Calibration campaigns aiming to reduce the systematical errors on fiducial volume definition and detector energy response have been performed and data analysis is presently in progress. Borexino has also recently observed antineutrinos from the Earth, for the first time at more the 3σ C.L. and has measured a rate of 3.9{ - 1.3}{ + 1.6} <=ft( {{ - 3.2}{ + 5.8} } ; ) events/(100ton-yr) at 68.3%(99.73%) C.L. Borexino is also a powerful supernova neutrino detector. Future prospects of the experiment include reducing the systematic error on the 7Be flux to below 5% and direct measurement of additional solar neutrino emissions such as pep, CNO and possibly pp.

  2. A select overview of neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanski, Raymond J.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between the lepton sector and the quark sector is an interesting source of discourse in the current theoretical climate. Models that might someday supersede the Standard Model typically require quark structure, with implications for the lepton sector. This talk will explore some of the consequences of newer models, in the context of certain neutrino experiments.

  3. The OPERA long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilquet, G.

    2008-05-01

    OPERA is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment designed to observe the appearance of vτ in a pure vμ beam in the parameter space indicated by the atmospheric neutrinos oscillation signal. The detector is situated in the underground LNGS laboratory under 3 800 water meter equivalent at a distance of 730 km from CERN where the CNGS neutrino beam to which it is exposed originates. It consists of two identical 0.68 kilotons lead/nuclear emulsion targets, each instrumented with a tracking device and complemented by a muon spectrometer. The concept and the status of the detector are described and the first results obtained with cosmic rays and during two weeks of beam commissioning in 2006 are reported.

  4. Probing light sterile neutrino signatures at reactor and Spallation Neutron Source neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Papoulias, D. K.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the impact of a fourth sterile neutrino at reactor and Spallation Neutron Source neutrino detectors. Specifically, we explore the discovery potential of the TEXONO and COHERENT experiments to subleading sterile neutrino effects through the measurement of the coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering event rate. Our dedicated χ2-sensitivity analysis employs realistic nuclear structure calculations adequate for high purity sub-keV threshold Germanium detectors.

  5. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory: Latest results and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolich, N.; SNO Collaboration

    2011-08-01

    This article summarizes measurements of the 8B decay rate in the sun and neutrino oscillation parameters made with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), and discusses prospects for future improvements to the analysis. These improvements include a particle identification analysis for the proportional counter data obtained from the final phase of data taking, which should significantly improve the signal to noise ratio for that phase. Other analyses discussed include searches for high frequency temporal fluctuations in the solar neutrino signal, and supernovae with no optical signal, both of which resulted in a null result.

  6. Neutrinos: Theory and Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen

    2013-10-22

    The theory and phenomenology of neutrinos will be addressed, especially that relating to the observation of neutrino flavor transformations. The current status and implications for future experiments will be discussed with special emphasis on the experiments that will determine the neutrino mass ordering, the dominant flavor content of the neutrino mass eigenstate with the smallest electron neutrino content and the size of CP violation in the neutrino sector. Beyond the neutrino Standard Model, the evidence for and a possible definitive experiment to confirm or refute the existence of light sterile neutrinos will be briefly discussed.

  7. The Project 8 Radiofrequency Tritium Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal, Benjamin

    The Project 8 experiment aims to determine the electron neutrino mass by measuring the spectrum of tritium beta decay electrons near the 18.6 keV endpoint. Unlike past tritium experiments, which used electrostatic and magnetostatic spectrometers, Project 8 will detect decay electrons nondestructively via their cyclotron radiation emission in a magnetic field. An individual electron is expected to emit a detectable pulse of microwaves at a frequency which depends on the electron energy. Precise measurement of these pulse frequencies is a novel spectroscopy technique particularly well-suited for the high rate, high precision, low background needs of a tritium experiment. The collaboration is currently operating a prototype designed to detect single 83mKr conversion electron decays in an 0.9T magnetic field. We report on recent activities on the prototype, and on progress towards the design of a large tritium experiment with new neutrino-mass sensitivity.

  8. Report on the Brookhaven Solar Neutrino Experiment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Evans, J. C. Jr.

    1976-09-22

    This report is intended as a brief statement of the recent developments and results of the Brookhaven Solar Neutrino Experiment communicated through Professor G. Kocharov to the Leningrad conference on active processes on the sun and the solar neutrino problem. The report summarizes the results of experiments performed over a period of 6 years, from April 1970 to January 1976. Neutrino detection depends upon the neutrino capture reaction /sup 37/Cl(..nu..,e/sup -/)/sup 37/Ar producing the isotope /sup 37/Ar (half life of 35 days). The detector contains 3.8 x 10/sup 5/ liters of C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/ (2.2 x 10/sup 30/ atoms of /sup 37/Cl) and is located at a depth of 4400 meters of water equivalent (m.w.e.) in the Homestake Gold Mine at Lead, South Dakota, U.S.A. The procedures for extracting /sup 37/Ar and the counting techniques used were described in previous reports. The entire recovered argon sample was counted in a small gas proportional counter. Argon-37 decay events were characterized by the energy of the Auger electrons emitted following the electron capture decay and by the rise-time of the pulse. Counting measurements were continued for a period sufficiently long to observe the decay of /sup 37/Ar.

  9. A letter of intent for a neutrino scattering experiment on the booster neutrino meanline: FINeSSE

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, B.T.; Tayloe, R.; /Indiana U. /Yale U.

    2005-03-01

    identified as a priority of the neutrino community, as determined through the APS Multidisciplinary Study on the Future of Neutrino Physics. From the APS report, the Neutrino Matrix makes its recommendations in context of several assumptions regarding the neutrino program, including: ''Determination of the neutrino reaction and production cross sections required for a precise understanding of neutrino oscillation physics and the neutrino astronomy of astrophysical and cosmological sources. Our broad and exacting program of neutrino physics is built upon precise knowledge of how neutrinos interact with matter''. The experiment described here will provide unique information on cross sections of {approx}1 GeV neutrinos, in precisely the range explored by present and future long baseline oscillation programs. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is the natural place to perform this experiment. The physics goals proposed here grow the existing program and are necessary ingredients for the next generation oscillation physics measurements in this same energy range. This is a small, cost-effective, and timely experiment which fits well with the growing neutrino program at Fermilab.

  10. Impact of neutrino properties on the estimation of inflationary parameters from current and future observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbino, Martina; Freese, Katherine; Vagnozzi, Sunny; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Mena, Olga; Giusarma, Elena; Ho, Shirley

    2017-02-01

    We study the impact of assumptions about neutrino properties on the estimation of inflationary parameters from cosmological data, with a specific focus on the allowed contours in the ns/r plane, where ns is the scalar spectral index and r is the tensor-to-scalar ratio. We study the following neutrino properties: (i) the total neutrino mass Mν=∑i mi (where the index i =1 , 2, 3 runs over the three neutrino mass eigenstates); (ii) the number of relativistic degrees of freedom Neff at the time of recombination; and (iii) the neutrino hierarchy. Whereas previous literature assumed three degenerate neutrino masses or two massless neutrino species (approximations that clearly do not match neutrino oscillation data), we study the cases of normal and inverted hierarchy. Our basic result is that these three neutrino properties induce <1 σ shift of the probability contours in the ns/r plane with both current or upcoming data. We find that the choice of neutrino hierarchy (normal, inverted, or degenerate) has a negligible impact. However, the minimal cutoff on the total neutrino mass Mν ,min=0 that accompanies previous works using the degenerate hierarchy does introduce biases in the ns/r plane and should be replaced by Mν ,min=0.059 eV as required by oscillation data. Using current cosmic microwave background (CMB) data from Planck and Bicep/Keck, marginalizing over the total neutrino mass Mν and over r can lead to a shift in the mean value of ns of ˜0.3 σ toward lower values. However, once baryon acoustic oscillation measurements are included, the standard contours in the ns/r plane are basically reproduced. Larger shifts of the contours in the ns/r plane (up to 0.8 σ ) arise for nonstandard values of Neff. We also provide forecasts for the future CMB experiments Cosmic Origins Explorer (COrE, satellite) and Stage-IV (ground-based) and show that the incomplete knowledge of neutrino properties, taken into account by a marginalization over Mν, could induce a shift

  11. Investigation of neutrino oscillations in the T2k long-baseline accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Izmaylov, A. O. Yershov, N. V.; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Matveev, V. A.; Mineev, O. V.; Musienko, Yu. V.; Khabibulliun, M. M.; Khotjantsev, A. N.; Shaykhiev, A. T.

    2012-02-15

    High-sensitivity searches for transitions of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos are the main task of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) second-generation long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The present article is devoted to describing basic principles of T2K, surveying experimental apparatuses that it includes, and considering in detail the muon-range detector (SMRD) designed and manufactured by a group of physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The results of the first measurements with a neutrino beam are presented, and plans for the near future are discussed.

  12. Global analyses of neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Maltoni, Michele; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We summarize the determination of some neutrino properties from the global analysis of solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino data in the framework of three-neutrino mixing as well as in some extended scenarios such as the mixing with eV-scale sterile neutrinos invoked for the interpretation of the short baseline anomalies, and the presence of non-standard neutrino interactions.

  13. Computational Analysis of the Bugey Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Mason

    2012-03-01

    The Bugey 3-Detector neutrino experiment attempted to place a limit on δm^21,2 and 2̂(2θ1,2) by calculating neutrino fluxes from a nuclear reactor. This experiment was unusual because it utilized data taken from three different distances from the neutrino source. The experiment concluded that neutrinos did not oscillate between flavors. However, this conclusion was later contradicted and overruled by data from more accurate neutrino oscillation experiments, and recent discoveries suggest that a fourth neutrino may exist. To help determine the plausibility of a four neutrino model we are reexamining data from the Bugey experiment. Although our attempts to recreate the original experimenter's results have yielded some success, we have not yet been able to fully recreate the original experimenters' results.

  14. The MINERvA Neutrino Scattering Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransome, Ronald

    2012-10-01

    MINERvA part 1. MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. MINERvA began taking data in November, 2009. The detector is fully active and includes targets of helium, carbon, iron, and water upstream of the active region. We will describe the detector and its capabilities, including tracking resolution, energy resolution, and particle identification, and brief overview of physics objectives.

  15. The search for Majorana neutrinos with neutrinoless double beta decays: From CUORICINO to LUCIFER experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, F.

    2012-11-01

    The study of neutrino properties is one of the fundamental challenges in particle physics nowadays. Fifty years of investigations established that neutrinos are massive but the absolute mass scale has not yet been measured. Moreover its true nature is still unknown. Is the neutrino its own antiparticle (thus violating the lepton number) as proposed by Majorana in 1937? The only way to probe the neutrino nature is through the observation of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0νββ), a very rare spontaneous nuclear transition which emits two electrons and no neutrinos. In this paper, after a brief introduction to the theoretical framework of Majorana's neutrino, a presentation of experimental challenges posed by 0νββ search will be given as well as an overview of present status and future perpectives of experiments.

  16. SAGE: Solar Neutrino Data from SAGE, the Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment

    DOE Data Explorer

    SAGE Collaboration

    SAGE is a solar neutrino experiment based on the reaction 71Ga + n goes to 71Ge + e-. The 71Ge atoms are chemically extracted from a 50-metric ton target of Ga metal and concentrated in a sample of germane gas mixed with xenon. The atoms are then individually counted by observing their decay back to 71Ga in a small proportional counter. The distinguishing feature of the experiment is its ability to detect the low-energy neutrinos from proton-proton fusion. These neutrinos, which are made in the primary reaction that provides the Sun's energy, are the major component of the solar neutrino flux and have not been observed in any other way. To shield the experiment from cosmic rays, it is located deep underground in a specially built facility at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory in the northern Caucasus mountains of Russia. Nearly 100 measurements of the solar neutrino flux have been made during 1990-2000, and their combined result is a neutrino capture rate that is well below the prediction of the Standard Solar Model. The significant suppression of the solar neutrino flux that SAGE and other solar neutrino experiments have observed gives a strong indication for the existence of neutrino oscillations. [copied from the SAGE homepage at http://ewi.npl.washington.edu/SAGE/SAGE.html

  17. Status and commissioning of the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino experiment KATRIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuemmler, Thomas; Katrin Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Neutrino properties, and especially the determination of the neutrino rest mass, play an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. At present there are two complementary approaches to address this topic in laboratory experiments. The search for neutrinoless double β decay probes whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determines an effective neutrino mass value. Experiments based on single β decay investigate electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino mass by a modelindependent method. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. Applying an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source and an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type, it allows β spectroscopy close to the tritium endpoint with unprecedented precision and will reach a sensitivity of 200 meV/c2 (90% C.L.) on the neutrino mass.

  18. Status of the neutrino mass experiment KATRIN

    SciTech Connect

    Bornschein, L.; Bornschein, B.; Sturm, M.; Roellig, M.; Priester, F.

    2015-03-15

    The most sensitive way to determine the neutrino mass scale without further assumptions is to measure the shape of a tritium beta spectrum near its kinematic end-point. Tritium is the nucleus of choice because of its low endpoint energy, superallowed decay and simple atomic structure. Within an international collaboration the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently being built up at KIT. KATRIN will allow a model-independent measurement of the neutrino mass scale with an expected sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c{sup 2} (90% CL). KATRIN will use a source of ultrapure molecular tritium. This contribution presents the status of the KATRIN experiment, thereby focusing on its Calibration and Monitoring System (CMS), which is the last component being subject to research/development. After a brief overview of the KATRIN experiment in Section II the CMS is introduced in Section III. In Section IV the Beta Induced X-Ray Spectroscopy (BIXS) as method of choice to monitor the tritium activity of the KATRIN source is described and first results are presented.

  19. Results from the Palo Verde Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piepke, Andreas

    1999-10-01

    The Palo Verde experiment, taking data since July 1998, is a disappearance search for anti-neutrino oscillations at baselines of 750 and 890 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The finely segmented detector consists of 11.3 tons of 0.1% Gd loaded liquid scintillator surrounded by a passive water shield and hermetic cosmic muon veto. It is located in an underground laboratory with an overburden of 32 mw.e.. Analysis of data taken in 1998, covering 38 days at full power and 33 days with one reactor at 890 m distance down for refueling, was consistent with the absence of neutrino oscillations. Results of the analysis of data taken in 1999 will be presented. In addition to more than 100 days of reactor ``on'' data we have collected 24 days of data with the closest reactor down. An analysis of the Δm^2-sin^22θ sensitivity of our experiment and its implications for the interpretation of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly will be presented.

  20. Sterile Neutrino Search with the PROSPECT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surukuchi Venkata, Pranava Teja

    2017-01-01

    PROSPECT is a multi-phased short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiment with primary goals of performing a search for sterile neutrinos and making a precise measurement of 235U reactor antineutrino spectrum from the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. PROSPECT will provide a model independent oscillation measurement of electron antineutrinos by performing relative spectral comparison between a wide range of baselines. By covering the baselines of 7-12 m with Phase-I and extending the coverage to 19m with Phase-II, the PROSPECT experiment will be able to address the current eV-scale sterile neutrino oscillation best-fit region within a single year of data-taking and covers a major portion of suggested parameter space within 3 years of Phase-II data-taking. Additionally, with a Phase-II detector PROSPECT will be able to distinguish between 3+1 mixing, 3+N mixing and other non-standard oscillations. In this talk, we describe the PROSPECT oscillation fitting framework and expected detector sensitivity to the oscillations arising from eV-scale sterile neutrinos. DOE

  1. Status of the KATRIN neutrino mass experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Eric; Katrin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment aims to explore neutrino mass down to 0.2 eV/c2 (90% CL) by measuring the shape of the tritium beta decay spectrum. Using magnetic adiabatic collimation with an electrostatic filter (MAC-E filter) KATRIN will measure the electron kinetic energy spectrum with a resolution better than one part in 104. All major components are on site and commissioning is underway, with first tritium data currently scheduled for 2017. The measurement technique will be explained along with an update on commissioning progress. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  2. Solar neutrino experiments and a test for neutrino oscillations with radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, B.T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Rowley, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment are given and compared to the most recent standard solar model calculations. The observations are about a factor of 4 below theoretical expectations. In view of the uncertainties involved in the theoretical models of the sun, the discrepancy is not considered to be evidence for neutrino oscillations. The status of the development of a gallium solar neutrino detector is described. Radiochemical neutrino detectors can be used to search for ..nu../sub e/ oscillations by using megacurie sources of monoenergetic neutrinos like /sup 65/Zn. A quantitative evaluation of possible experiments using the Brookhaven chlorine solar neutrino detector and a gallium detector is given. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Sterile Neutrino Search with the Double Chooz Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig, D.; Matsubara, T.; Double Chooz Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Double Chooz is a reactor antineutrino disappearance experiment located in Chooz, France. A far detector at a distance of about 1 km from reactor cores is operating since 2011; a near detector of identical design at a distance of about 400 m is operating since begin 2015. Beyond the precise measurement of θ 13, Double Chooz has a strong sensitivity to so called light sterile neutrinos. Sterile neutrinos are neutrino mass states not taking part in weak interactions, but may mix with known neutrino states. In this paper, we present an analysis method to search for sterile neutrinos and the expected sensitivity with the baselines of our detectors.

  4. Solar neutrino detectors as sterile neutrino hunters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, Marco; Borexino-SOX Collaboration; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Atroshchenko, V.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; Cloué, O.; Cribier, M.; D’Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Durero, M.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Gschwender, M.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, Th.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jany, A.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Jeschke, D.; Jonquères, N.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kornoukhov, V.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Ortica, F.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Reinert, Y.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Semenov, D.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Veyssière, C.; Vishneva, A.; Vivier, M.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    The large size and the very low radioactive background of solar neutrino detectors such as Borexino at the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy offer a unique opportunity to probe the existence of neutrino oscillations into new sterile components by means of carefully designed and well calibrated anti-neutrino and neutrino artificial sources. In this paper we briefly summarise the key elements of the SOX experiment, a program for the search of sterile neutrinos (and other short distance effects) by means of a 144Ce-144Pr anti-neutrino source and, possibly in the medium term future, with a 51Cr neutrino source.

  5. The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.R.; Abdurashitov, J.N.; Bowles, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) is described. The solar neutrino flux measured by 31 extractions through October, 1993 is presented. The result of 69 {+-} 10{sub {minus}7}{sup +5} SNU is to be compared with a standard solar model prediction of 132 SNU. The status of a {sup 51}Cr neutrino source irradiation to test the overall operation of the experiment is also presented.

  6. The Russian-American gallium solar neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.R.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Abdurashitov, J.N.

    1995-08-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) is described. The solar neutrino flux measured by 31 extractions through October, 1993 is presented. The result of 69 {+-} 10{sub {minus}7}{sup +5} SNU is to be compared with a standard solar model prediction of 132 SNU. The status of a {sup 51}Cr neutrino source irradiation to test the overall operation of the experiment is also presented.

  7. The MINERvA Neutrino Scattering Experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, David W.

    2011-11-01

    The MINERνA experiment at Fermilab is aimed at precision measurements of neutrino interactions in nuclei for energies up to a few GeV. MINERνA makes use of a fine-grained, fully active detector design and a range of nuclear target materials. The experiment began taking data in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab in late 2009 and will collect data in both the neutrino and antineutrino configurations of the beamline.

  8. Search for sterile neutrinos in the neutrino-4 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoilov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Polyushkin, A. O.; Zinov'ev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Chernyi, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Martem'yanov, V. P.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I.; Petelin, A. L.; Izhutov, A. L.; Tuzov, A. A.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K.; Gromov, M. O.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Zaitsev, M. E.; Chaikovskii, M. E.

    2017-03-01

    An experimental search for sterile neutrinos has been carried out at a neutrino facility based on the SM-3 nuclear reactor in Dimitrovgrad, Russia. The movable detector with passive shielding against the external radiation may be positioned at a distance varying between 6 and 12 m from the center of the reactor. The antineutrino flux has for the first time been measured using a movable detector placed close to the antineutrino source. The accuracy of the measurements is largely restricted by the cosmic background. The results of the measurements performed at small and large distances are analyzed in terms of the sterile-neutrino model parameters Δ m 14 2 and sin22θ14.

  9. Mass hierarchy determination via future atmospheric neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Raj; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Mehta, Poonam; Uma Sankar, S.; Shalgar, Shashank

    2007-10-01

    We study the problem of determination of the sign of Δm312, or the neutrino mass hierarchy, through observations of atmospheric neutrinos in future detectors. We consider two proposed detector types: (a) Megaton sized water C̆erenkov detectors, which can measure the event rates of νμ+ν¯μ and νe+ν¯e and (b) 100 kton sized magnetized iron detectors, which can measure the event rates of νμ and ν¯μ. For energies and path lengths relevant to atmospheric neutrinos, these rates obtain significant matter contributions from Pμe, Pμμ and Pee, leading to an appreciable sensitivity to the hierarchy. We do a binned χ2 analysis of simulated data in these two types of detectors which includes the effect of smearing in neutrino energy and direction and incorporates detector efficiencies and relevant statistical, theoretical and systematic errors. We also marginalize the χ2 over the allowed ranges of neutrino parameters in order to accurately account for their uncertainties. Finally, we compare the performance of both types of detectors vis a vis the hierarchy determination.

  10. MOON for a next-generation neutrino-less double-beta decay experiment: Present status and perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, T.; Doe, P.J.; Ejiri, H.; Elliot, S.R.; Engel, J.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fushimi, K.; Gehman, V.M.; Greenfield, M.B.; Hazama, R.; /Hiroshima U. /NIRS, Chiba

    2008-01-01

    The performance of the MOON detector for a next-generation neutrino-less double-beta decay experiment was evaluated by means of the Monte Carlo method. The MOON detector was found to be a feasible solution for the future experiment to search for the Majorana neutrino mass in the range of 100-30 meV.

  11. MOON for a next-generation neutrino-less double-beta decay experiment; present status and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, T.; Doe, P. J.; Ejiri, H.; Elliot, S. R.; Engel, J.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fushimi, K.; Gehman, V. M.; Greenfield, M. B.; Hazama, R.; Imaseki, H.; Kavitov, P.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Kitamura, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Nakamura, H.; Nomachi, M.; Para, A.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Slunecka, M.; Shirkov, G. D.; Sissakian, A. N.; Titov, A. I.; Uchihori, Y.; Umehara, S.; Vaturin, V.; Voronov, V. V.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Will, D. I.; Yasuda, K.; Yoshida, S.

    2008-07-01

    The performance of the MOON detector for a next-generation neutrino-less double-beta decay experiment was evaluated by means of the Monte Carlo method. The MOON detector was found to be a feasible solution for the future experiment to search for the Majorana neutrino mass in the range of 100-30 meV.

  12. Impact on Astrophysics and Elementary Particle Physics of recent and future Solar Neutrino data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, V.; Miramonti, L.

    2014-06-01

    The study of neutrinos is fundamental to connect astrophysics and elementary particle physics. In this last decade solar neutrino experiments and Kam-LAND confirmed the LMA solution and further clarified the oscillation pattern. Borexino attacked also the study of the low energy neutrino spectrum. However, important points still need clarification, like the apparent anomaly in the vacuum to matter transition region. Besides, a more detailed study of the low energy components of the pp cycle, combined with a measurement of CNO fluxes, is compulsory, also to discriminate between the low and the high Z versions of the Solar Standard Models and solve the metallicity problem. We discuss the main recent advancements and the possibilities of studying these open problems with Borexino, SNO+ and the future experiments, like the next generation of scintillators.

  13. SIMULATION OF A WIDE-BAND LOW-ENERGY NEUTRINO BEAM FOR VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    BISHAI, M.; HEIM, J.; LEWIS, C.; MARINO, A.D.; VIREN, B.; YUMICEVA, F.

    2006-08-01

    We present simulations of a wide-band low-energy neutrino beam for a future very long baseline neutrino oscillation (VLBNO) program using the proton beam from the Main Injector (MI) proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The target and horn designs previously developed for Brookhaven Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) VLBNO program are used without modifications. The neutrino flux distributions for various MI proton beam energies and new high-intensity neutrino beam-line designs possible at Fermilab are presented. The beam-line siting and design parameters are chosen to match the requirements of an on-axis beam from Fermilab to one of the two possible sites for the future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). A preliminary estimate of the observable event rates and spectra at a detector located in DUSEL for different beam configurations has been performed. Our preliminary conclusions are that a 40-60 GeV 0.5 to 1 MW beam from the Fermilab Main Injector to a DUSEL site has the potential to reach the desired intensity for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. Recent studies indicate that the Fermilab MI can reach a beam power of 0.5 MW at 60 GeV with incremental upgrades to the existing accelerator complex.

  14. A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Stephen James

    2011-05-01

    Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting Δm232 = (2.32-0.08+0.12) x 10-3 eV2/c4 and the mixing angle sin2(2θ32) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2σ and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0σ.

  15. A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Stephen James

    2011-12-01

    Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MI-NOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting Dm223=(2.32+0.12 -0.08) x 10-3 eV²/c4 and the mixing angle sin²(2theta32) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2sigma and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0sigma.

  16. Displaced vertex searches for sterile neutrinos at future lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cazzato, Eros; Fischer, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of future lepton colliders to displaced vertices from the decays of long-lived heavy (almost sterile) neutrinos with electroweak scale masses and detectable time of flight. As future lepton colliders we consider the FCC-ee, the CEPC, and the ILC, searching at the Z-pole and at the center-of-mass energies of 240, 350 and 500 GeV. For a realistic discussion of the detector response to the displaced vertex signal and the Standard Model background we consider the ILC's Silicon Detector (SiD) as benchmark for the future lepton collider detectors. We find that displaced vertices constitute a powerful search channel for sterile neutrinos, sensitive to squared active-sterile mixing angles as small as 10-11.

  17. Scientific Opportunities with the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C.; et al.,

    2013-07-28

    In this document, we describe the wealth of science opportunities and capabilities of LBNE, the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment. LBNE has been developed to provide a unique and compelling program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of particle physics. Chief among the discovery opportunities are observation of CP symmetry violation in neutrino mixing, resolution of the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination of maximal or near-maximal mixing in neutrinos, searches for nucleon decay signatures, and detailed studies of neutrino bursts from galactic supernovae. To fulfill these and other goals as a world-class facility, LBNE is conceived around four central components: (1) a new, intense wide-band neutrino source at Fermilab, (2) a fine-grained `near' neutrino detector just downstream of the source, (3) the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota at an optimal distance (~1300 km) from the neutrino source, and (4) a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) deployed there as a 'far' detector. The facilities envisioned are expected to enable many other science opportunities due to the high event rates and excellent detector resolution from beam neutrinos in the near detector and atmospheric neutrinos in the far detector. This is a mature, well developed, world class experiment whose relevance, importance, and probability of unearthing critical and exciting physics has increased with time.

  18. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  19. Measurement of low energy neutrino cross sections with the PEANUT experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.

    2011-11-23

    The PEANUT experiment was designed to study neutrino interactions in the few GeV range using the NuMi beam at Fermilab. The detector uses a hybrid technique, being made of nuclear emulsions and scintillator trackers. Emulsion films act as a tracking device and they are interleaved with lead plates used as neutrino target. The detector is designed to reconstruct the topology of neutrino interactions at the single particle level. We present here the full reconstruction and analysis of a sample of 147 neutrino interactions occurred in the PEANUT detector and the measurement of the quasi-elastic, resonance and deep-inelastic contributions to the total charged current cross-section. This technique could be applied for the beam monitoring for future neutrino facilities.

  20. Measurement of low-energy neutrino cross-sections with the PEANUT experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Arrabito, L.; Autiero, D.; Besnier, M.; Bozza, C.; Buontempo, S.; Carrara, E.; Consiglio, L.; Cozzi, M.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Déclais, Y.; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Duchesneau, D.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L. S.; Fukuda, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Grella, G.; Hamada, K.; Ieva, M.; Juget, F.; Kitagawa, N.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Laktineh, I.; Longhin, A.; Lundberg, B.; Lutter, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Marotta, A.; Meisel, F.; Migliozzi, P.; Morishima, K.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Niwa, K.; Nonoyama, Y.; Paolone, V.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pistillo, C.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Rameika, R.; Rescigno, R.; Rosa, G.; Russo, A.; Sato, O.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Strolin, P.; Tenti, M.; Tioukov, V.; Yoshida, J.; Yoshioka, T.

    2010-11-01

    The PEANUT experiment was designed to study the NuMi neutrino beam at Fermilab. The detector uses a hybrid technique, being made of nuclear emulsions and scintillator trackers. Emulsion films act as a micrometric tracking device and are interleaved with lead plates used as passive material. The detector is designed to precisely reconstruct the topology of neutrino interactions and hence to measure the different contributions to the cross section. We present here the full reconstruction and analysis of 147 neutrino interactions and the measurement of the quasi-elastic, resonance and deep-inelastic contributions to the total charged current cross section at the energies of the NuMi neutrino beam. This technique could be applied for beam monitoring in future neutrino facilities, and this paper shows its proof-of-principle.

  1. Measurement of low energy neutrino cross sections with the PEANUT experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, A.

    2011-11-01

    The PEANUT experiment was designed to study neutrino interactions in the few GeV range using the NuMi beam at Fermilab. The detector uses a hybrid technique, being made of nuclear emulsions and scintillator trackers. Emulsion films act as a tracking device and they are interleaved with lead plates used as neutrino target. The detector is designed to reconstruct the topology of neutrino interactions at the single particle level. We present here the full reconstruction and analysis of a sample of 147 neutrino interactions occurred in the PEANUT detector and the measurement of the quasi-elastic, resonance and deep-inelastic contributions to the total charged current cross-section. This technique could be applied for the beam monitoring for future neutrino facilities.

  2. Detector Development for the MARE Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Galeazzi, M.; Bogorin, D.; Molina, R.; Saab, T.; Ribeiro Gomes, M.

    2009-12-16

    The MARE experiment is designed to measure the mass of the neutrino with sub-eV sensitivity by measuring the beta decay of {sup 187}Re with cryogenic microcalorimeters. A preliminary analysis shows that, to achieve the necessary statistics, between 10,000 and 50,000 detectors are likely necessary. We have fabricated and characterized Iridium transition edge sensors with high reproducibility and uniformity for such a large scale experiment. We have also started a full scale simulation of the experimental setup for MARE, including thermalization in the absorber, detector response, and optimum filter analysis, to understand the issues related to reaching a sub-eV sensitivity and to optimize the design of the MARE experiment. We present our characterization of the Ir devices, including reproducibility, uniformity, and sensitivity, and we discuss the implementation and capabilities of our full scale simulation.

  3. Testing SO(10)-inspired leptogenesis with low energy neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, Pasquale Di; Riotto, Antonio E-mail: Antonio.Riotto@cern.ch

    2011-04-01

    We extend the results of a previous analysis of ours showing that, when both heavy and light flavour effects are taken into account, successful minimal (type I + thermal) leptogenesis with SO(10)-inspired relations is possible. Barring fine tuned choices of the parameters, these relations enforce a hierarchical RH neutrino mass spectrum that results into a final asymmetry dominantly produced by the next-to-lightest RH neutrino decays (N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis). We present the constraints on the whole set of low energy neutrino parameters. Allowing a small misalignment between the Dirac basis and the charged lepton basis as in the quark sector, the allowed regions enlarge and the lower bound on the reheating temperature gets relaxed to values as low as ∼ 10{sup 10} GeV. It is confirmed that for normal ordering (NO) there are two allowed ranges of values for the lightest neutrino mass: m{sub 1} ≅ (1−5) × 10{sup −3} eV and m{sub 1} ≅ (0.03−0.1) eV. For m{sub 1}∼<0.01 eV the allowed region in the plane θ{sub 13}-θ{sub 23} is approximately given by θ{sub 23}∼<49°+0.65 (θ{sub 13}−5°), while the neutrinoless double beta decay effective neutrino mass falls in the range m{sub ee} = (1−3) × 10{sup −3} eV for θ{sub 13} = (6°−11.5°). For m{sub 1}∼>0.01 eV, one has quite sharply m{sub ee} ≅ m{sub 1} and an upper bound θ{sub 23}∼<46°. These constraints will be tested by low energy neutrino experiments during next years. We also find that inverted ordering (IO), though quite strongly constrained, is not completely ruled out. In particular, we find approximately θ{sub 23} ≅ 43°+12° log (0.2 eV/m{sub 1}), that will be fully tested by future experiments.

  4. Sterile Neutrino Search at the NEOS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Y. J.; Kim, B. R.; Kim, J. Y.; Han, B. Y.; Jang, C. H.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, K. K.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, Jaison; Lee, J. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Oh, Y. M.; Park, H. K.; Park, H. S.; Park, K. S.; Seo, K. M.; Siyeon, Kim; Sun, G. M.; NEOS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    An experiment to search for light sterile neutrinos is conducted at a reactor with a thermal power of 2.8 GW located at the Hanbit nuclear power complex. The search is done with a detector consisting of a ton of Gd-loaded liquid scintillator in a tendon gallery approximately 24 m from the reactor core. The measured antineutrino event rate is 1976 per day with a signal to background ratio of about 22. The shape of the antineutrino energy spectrum obtained from the eight-month data-taking period is compared with a hypothesis of oscillations due to active-sterile antineutrino mixing. No strong evidence of 3 +1 neutrino oscillation is found. An excess around the 5 MeV prompt energy range is observed as seen in existing longer-baseline experiments. The mixing parameter sin22 θ14 is limited up to less than 0.1 for Δ m412 ranging from 0.2 to 2.3 eV2 with a 90% confidence level.

  5. Future sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to dark matter annihilations from the cosmic diffuse neutrino signal

    SciTech Connect

    Moliné, Ángeles; Ibarra, Alejandro; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio E-mail: ibarra@tum.de

    2015-06-01

    Cosmological observations and cold dark matter N-body simulations indicate that our Universe is populated by numerous halos, where dark matter particles annihilate, potentially producing Standard Model particles. In this paper we calculate the contribution to the diffuse neutrino background from dark matter annihilations in halos at all redshifts and we estimate the future sensitivity to the annihilation cross section of neutrino telescopes such as IceCube or ANTARES. We consider various parametrizations to describe the internal halo properties and for the halo mass function in order to bracket the theoretical uncertainty in the limits from the modeling of the cosmological annihilation flux. We find that observations of the cosmic diffuse neutrino flux at large angular distances from the galactic center lead to constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section which are complementary to (and for some extrapolations of the astrophysical parameters, better than) those stemming from observations of the Milky Way halo, especially for neutrino telescopes not pointing directly to the Milky Way center, as is the case of IceCube.

  6. Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, K.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Neutrinos are electrically neutral ELEMENTARY PARTICLES which experience only the weak nuclear force and gravity. Their existence was introduced as a hypothesis by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 to explain the apparent violation of energy conservation in radioactive beta decay. Chadwick had discovered in 1914 that the energy spectrum of electrons emitted in beta decay was not monoenergetic but continuous...

  7. Status of Experiment NEUTRINO-4 Search for Sterile Neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A.; Ivochkin, V.; Samoilov, R.; Fomin, A.; Polyushkin, A.; Zinoviev, V.; Neustroev, P.; Golovtsov, V.; Chernyj, A.; Zherebtsov, O.; Martemyanov, V.; Tarasenkov, V.; Aleshin, V.; Petelin, A.; Izhutov, A.; Tuzov, A.; Sazontov, S.; Ryazanov, D.; Gromov, M.; Afanasiev, V.; Zaytsev, M.; Chaikovskii, M.

    2017-01-01

    In order to carry out research in the field of possible existence of a sterile neutrino the laboratory based on SM-3 reactor (Dimitrovgrad, Russia) was created to search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino. The prototype of a multi-section neutrino detector with liquid scintillator volume of 350 l was installed in the middle of 2015. It is a moveable inside the passive shielding detector, which can be set at distance range from 6 to 11 meters from the reactor core. Measurements of antineutrino flux at such short distances from the reactor core are carried out with moveable detector for the first time. The measurements with full-scale detector with liquid scintillator volume of 3m3 (5x10 sections) was started only in June, 2016. The today available data is presented in the article.

  8. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Orchanian, Mhair-armen Hagop

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes a search for ve appearance in the two-detector long-baseline MINOS neutrino experiment at Fermilab, based on a data set representing an exposure of 8.2×1020 protons on the NuMI target. The analysis detailed herein represents an increase in sensitivity to the θ13 mixing angle of approximately 25% over previous analyses, due to improvements in the event discriminant and fitting technique. Based on our observation, we constrain the value of θ13 further, finding 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13< 0.12(0.20) at the 90% confidence level for δCP = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. The best-fit value is 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13 = 0.041+0.047 -0.031(0.079+0.071 -0.053) under the same assumptions. We exclude the θ 13 = 0 hypothesis at the 89% confidence level.

  9. Search for sterile neutrinos with the SOX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminata, A.; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; Cribier, M.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Durero, M.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, Th.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jonquères, N.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kornoukhov, V.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Veyssière, C.; Vivier, M.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-01-01

    In the recent years, the Borexino detector has proven its outstanding performances in detecting neutrinos and antineutrinos in the low energy regime. Consequently, it is an ideal tool to investigate the existence of sterile neutrinos, whose presence has been suggested by several anomalies over the past two decades. The SOX ( Short distance neutrino Oscillations with boreXino) project will investigate the presence of sterile neutrinos placing a neutrino and an antineutrino sources in a location under the detector foreseen for this purpose since the construction of Borexino. Interacting in the detector active volume, each beam would create a well detectable spatial wave pattern in case of oscillation of neutrino or antineutrino in a sterile state. Otherwise, the experiment will set a very stringent limit on the existence of a sterile state.

  10. An alternative method of determining the neutrino mass ordering in reactor neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenky, S. M.; Capozzi, F.; Petcov, S. T.

    2017-09-01

    We discuss a novel alternative method of determining the neutrino mass ordering in medium baseline experiments with reactor antineutrinos. Results on the potential sensitivity of the new method are also presented.

  11. Generalized mass ordering degeneracy in neutrino oscillation experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Coloma, Pilar; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-09-07

    Here, we consider the impact of neutral-current (NC) nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI) on the determination of the neutrino mass ordering. We show that in the presence of NSI there is an exact degeneracy which makes it impossible to determine the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of the solar mixing angle θ12 at oscillation experiments. The degeneracy holds at the probability level and for arbitrary matter density profiles, and hence solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino experiments are affected simultaneously. The degeneracy requires order-1 corrections from NSI to the NC electron neutrino-quark interaction and can be tested in electron neutrinomore » NC scattering experiments.« less

  12. Sterile Neutrino Searches in MINOS and MINOS+ Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Junting

    2015-05-01

    This dissertation presents the searches on sterile neutrinos using the data collected in MINOS+ Experiment from September 2013 to September 2014, and the full data set of MINOS Experiment collected from 2005 to 2012. Anomalies in short baseline experiments, such as LSND and MiniBooNE, showed hints of sterile neutrinos, a type of neutrino that does not interact with the Standard Model particles. In this work, two models are considered: 3+1 and large extra dimension (LED). In the 3+1 model, one sterile neutrino state is added into the standard oscillation scheme consisting of three known active neutrino states ve, vμ and vτ. In the LED model, sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein (KK) states due to assumed large extra dimensions. Mixing between sterile and active neutrino states may modify the oscillation patterns observed in the MINOS detectors. Both searches yield null results. For 3+1, a combined fit of MINOS and MINOS+ data gives a stronger limit on θ24 in the range of 10-2 eV2 < Δm412 < 1 eV2 than previous experiments. For LED, with the complete MINOS data set, the size of extra dimensions is constrained to be smaller than ~ 0.35 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest neutrino mass.

  13. Nuclear effects in atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2010-11-24

    We have studied the nuclear medium effects in the neutrino (antineutrino) induced interactions in nuclei at intermediate energy region. We have applied this study to calculate the event rates for atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments. The study of the nuclear effects has been done for the quasielastic lepton production and the charged current incoherent and coherent pion production processes.

  14. NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment

    ScienceCinema

    Perko, John; Williams, Ron; Miller, Bill

    2016-07-12

    The NOvA neutrino experiment is searching for the answers to some of the most fundamental questions of the universe. This video documents how collaboration between government research institutions like Fermilab, academia and industry can create one of the largest neutrino detectors in the world.

  15. NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Perko, John; Williams, Ron; Miller, Bill

    2013-12-05

    The NOvA neutrino experiment is searching for the answers to some of the most fundamental questions of the universe. This video documents how collaboration between government research institutions like Fermilab, academia and industry can create one of the largest neutrino detectors in the world.

  16. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Holin, Anna Maria

    2010-02-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment which sends a high intensity muon neutrino beam through two functionally identical detectors, a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, 1km from the beam source, and a Far detector, 734km away, in the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. MINOS may be able to measure the neutrino mixing angle parameter sin213 for the rst time. Detector granularity, however, makes it very hard to distinguish any e appearance signal events characteristic of a non-zero value of θ 13 from background neutral current (NC) and short-track vμ charged current (CC) events. Also, uncertainties in the hadronic shower modeling in the kinematic region characteristic of this analysis are relatively large. A new data-driven background decomposition method designed to address those issues is developed and its results presented. By removing the long muon tracks from vμ-CC events, the Muon Removed Charge Current (MRCC) method creates independent pseudo-NC samples that can be used to correct the MINOS Monte Carlo to agree with the high-statistics Near detector data and to decompose the latter into components so as to predict the expected Far detector background. The MRCC method also provides an important cross-check in the Far detector to test the background in the signal selected region. MINOS finds a 1.0-1.5 σ ve-CC excess above background in the Far detector data, depending on method used, for a total exposure of 3.14 x 1020 protons-on-target. Interpreting this excess as signal, MINOS can set limits on sin213. Using the MRCC method, MINOS sets a limit of sin2 2 θ 13 < 0.265 at the 90% confidence limit for a CP-violating phase δ = 0.

  17. Observing Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the NOνA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations offers an insight on new physics beyond the Standard Model. The three mixing angles (θ12, θ13 and θ23) and the two mass splittings (Δm2 and Αm2 ) have been measured by different neutrino oscillation experiments. Some other parameters including the mass ordering of different neutrino mass eigenstates and the CP violation phase are still unknown. NOνA is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment, using neutrinos from the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The experiment is equipped with two functionally identical detectors about 810 kilometers apart and 14 mrad off the beam axis. In this configuration, the muon neutrinos from the NuMI beam reach the disappearance maximum in the far detector and a small fraction of that oscillates into electron neutrinos. The sensitivity to the mass ordering and CP viola- tion phase determination is greately enhanced. This thesis presents the νeappearance analysis using the neutrino data collected with the NOνA experiment between February 2014 and May 2015, which corresponds to 3.45 ×1020 protons-on-target (POT). The νe appearance analysis is performed by comparing the observed νe CC-like events to the estimated background at the far detector. The total background is predicted to be 0.95 events with 0.89 originated from beam events and 0.06 from cosmic ray events. The beam background is obtained by extrapolating near detector data through different oscillation channels, while the cosmic ray background is calculated based on out-of-time NuMI trigger data. A total of 6 electron neutrino candidates are observed in the end at the far detector which represents 3.3 σ excess over the predicted background. The NOνA result disfavors inverted mass hierarchy for δcp ϵ [0, 0.6π] at 90% C.L.

  18. Detecting Dark Photons with Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H. K.

    2017-08-01

    We propose to search for light U (1 ) dark photons, A', produced via kinetically mixing with ordinary photons via the Compton-like process, γ e-→A'e-, in a nuclear reactor and detected by their interactions with the material in the active volumes of reactor neutrino experiments. We derive 95% confidence-level upper limits on ɛ , the A'-γ mixing parameter, ɛ , for dark-photon masses below 1 MeV of ɛ <1.3 ×10-5 and ɛ <2.1 ×10-5, from NEOS and TEXONO experimental data, respectively. This study demonstrates the applicability of nuclear reactors as potential sources of intense fluxes of low-mass dark photons.

  19. Fourth standard model family neutrino at future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Sultansoy, S.

    2005-09-01

    It is known that flavor democracy favors the existence of the fourth standard model (SM) family. In order to give nonzero masses for the first three-family fermions flavor democracy has to be slightly broken. A parametrization for democracy breaking, which gives the correct values for fundamental fermion masses and, at the same time, predicts quark and lepton Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrices in a good agreement with the experimental data, is proposed. The pair productions of the fourth SM family Dirac ({nu}{sub 4}) and Majorana (N{sub 1}) neutrinos at future linear colliders with {radical}(s)=500 GeV, 1 TeV, and 3 TeV are considered. The cross section for the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{nu}{sub 4}{nu}{sub 4}(N{sub 1}N{sub 1}) and the branching ratios for possible decay modes of the both neutrinos are determined. The decays of the fourth family neutrinos into muon channels ({nu}{sub 4}(N{sub 1}){yields}{mu}{sup {+-}}W{sup {+-}}) provide cleanest signature at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. Meanwhile, in our parametrization this channel is dominant. W bosons produced in decays of the fourth family neutrinos will be seen in detector as either di-jets or isolated leptons. As an example, we consider the production of 200 GeV mass fourth family neutrinos at {radical}(s)=500 GeV linear colliders by taking into account di-muon plus four jet events as signatures.

  20. New bounds on neutrino electric millicharge from GEMMA experiment on neutrino magnetic moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudanin, Victor B.; Medvedev, Dmitry V.; Starostin, Alexander S.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-04-01

    Using the new limit on the neutrino anomalous magnetic moment recently obtained by GEMMA experiment we get an order-of-magnitude estimation for possible new direct upper bound on the neutrino electric millicharge |qν | ˜ 1.5 ×10-12e0 (e0 is the absolute value of the electron charge) by comparing the neutrino magnetic moment and millicharge contributions to the total cross section at the electron recoil energy threshold of the experiment. This estimation is confirmed by the performed analysis of the GEMMA data using established statistical procedures and a new direct bound on the neutrino millicharge absolute value |qν | < 2.7 ×10-12e0 (90%CL) is derived. This limit is more stringent than the previous one obtained from the TEXONO reactor experiment data that is included to the Review of Particle Properties 2012.

  1. Physical effects involved in the measurements of neutrino masses with future cosmological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archidiacono, Maria; Brinckmann, Thejs; Lesgourgues, Julien; Poulin, Vivian

    2017-02-01

    Future Cosmic Microwave Background experiments together with upcoming galaxy and 21-cm surveys will provide extremely accurate measurements of different cosmological observables located at different epochs of the cosmic history. The new data will be able to constrain the neutrino mass sum with the best precision ever. In order to exploit the complementarity of the different redshift probes, a deep understanding of the physical effects driving the impact of massive neutrinos on CMB and large scale structures is required. The goal of this work is to describe these effects, assuming a summed neutrino mass close to its minimum allowed value. We find that parameter degeneracies can be removed by appropriate combinations, leading to robust and model independent constraints. A joint forecast of the sensitivity of Euclid and DESI surveys together with a CORE-like CMB experiment leads to a 1σ uncertainty of 14 meV on the summed neutrino mass. Finally the degeneracy between Mν and the optical depth at reionization τreio, originating in the combination of CMB and low redshift galaxy probes, might be broken by future 21-cm surveys, thus further decreasing the uncertainty on Mν. For instance, an independent determination of the optical depth with an accuracy of σ(τreio)=0.001 (which might be achievable, although this is subject to astrophysical uncertainties) would decrease the uncertainty down to σ(Mν)=12 meV.

  2. Large extra dimensions at the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, Jeffrey M.; de Gouvêa, André; Kelly, Kevin J.; Peres, O. L. G.; Tabrizi, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the potential of the long-baseline Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) to study large-extra-dimension (LED) models originally proposed to explain the smallness of neutrino masses by postulating that right-handed neutrinos, unlike all standard model fermion fields, can propagate in the bulk. The massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the right-handed neutrino fields modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities and can hence affect their propagation. We show that, as far as DUNE is concerned, the LED model is indistinguishable from a (3 +3 N )-neutrino framework for modest values of N ; N =1 is usually a very good approximation. Nonetheless, there are no new sources of C P -invariance violation other than one C P -odd phase that can be easily mapped onto the C P -odd phase in the standard three-neutrino paradigm. We analyze the sensitivity of DUNE to the LED framework and explore the capability of DUNE to differentiate the LED model from the three-neutrino scenario and from a generic (3 +1 )-neutrino model.

  3. The possibility to observe the non-standard interaction by the Hyperkamiokande atmospheric neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukasawa, Shinya; Yasuda, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    It was suggested that a tension between the mass-squared differences obtained from the solar neutrino and KamLAND experiments can be solved by introducing the non-standard flavor-dependent interaction in neutrino propagation. In this paper we discuss the possibility to test such a hypothesis by atmospheric neutrino observations at the future Hyper-Kamiokande experiment. Assuming that the mass hierarchy is known, we find that the best-fit value from the solar neutrino and KamLAND data can be tested at more than 8σ, while the one from the global analysis can be examined at 5.0σ (1.4σ) for the normal (inverted) mass hierarchy.

  4. Subpanel on accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Neutrinos are among nature`s fundamental constituents, and they are also the ones about which we know least. Their role in the universe is widespread, ranging from the radioactive decay of a single atom to the explosions of supernovae and the formation of ordinary matter. Neutrinos might exhibit a striking property that has not yet been observed. Like the back-and-forth swing of a pendulum, neutrinos can oscillate to-and-from among their three types (or flavors) if nature provides certain conditions. These conditions include neutrinos having mass and a property called {open_quotes}mixing.{close_quotes} The phenomenon is referred to as neutrino oscillations. The questions of the origin of neutrino mass and mixing among the neutrino flavors are unsolved problems for which the Standard Model of particle physics holds few clues. It is likely that the next critical step in answering these questions will result from the experimental observation of neutrino oscillations. The High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on Accelerator-Based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments was charged to review the status and discovery potential of ongoing and proposed accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations, to evaluate the opportunities for the U.S. in this area of physics, and to recommend a cost-effective plan for pursuing this physics, as appropriate. The complete charge is provided in Appendix A. The Subpanel studied these issues over several months and reviewed all the relevant and available information on the subject. In particular, the Subpanel reviewed the two proposed neutrino oscillation programs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The conclusions of this review are enumerated in detail in Chapter 7 of this report. The recommendations given in Chapter 7 are also reproduced in this summary.

  5. Neutrino Oscillations with the MINOS, MINOS+, T2K, and NOvA Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Nakaya, Tsuyoshi; Plunkett, Robert K.

    2016-01-18

    Our paper discusses results and near-term prospects of the long-baseline neutrino experiments MINOS, MONOS+, T2K and NOvA. The non-zero value of the third neutrino mixing angle θ13 allows experimental analysis in a manner which explicitly exhibits appearance and disappearance dependencies on additional parameters associated with mass-hierarchy, CP violation, and any non-maximal θ23. Our current and near-future experiments begin the era of precision accelerator long-baseline measurements and lay the framework within which future experimental results will be interpreted.

  6. Results of the Bugey neutrino decay experiment: Limits on neutrino mixing and decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagner, C.; Altmann, M.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Mössbauer, R. L.; Oberauer, L.; Declais, Y.

    1994-05-01

    We searched for the νj → νi + e+ + e- decay mode of heavy neutrinos in an experiment performed nearby a nuclear power reactor in Bugey (France) using a detector consisting of multiwire proportional chambers. New limits on the neutrino mixing parameter ∥ Ue3 ∥ 2 in the mass range 1 MeV < mνh < 8 MeV are presented.

  7. Proposal to perform a high - statisics neutrino scattering experiment using a fine - grained detector in the NuMI Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, J.G.; McFarland, K.; /Rochester U.

    2003-12-01

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab will provide an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the MINOS neutrino-oscillation experiment. The spacious and fully-outfitted MINOS near detector hall will be the ideal venue for a high-statistics, high-resolution {nu} and {bar {nu}}-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiment. The experiment described here will measure neutrino cross-sections and probe nuclear effects essential to present and future neutrino-oscillation experiments. Moreover, with the high NuMI beam intensity, the experiment will either initially address or significantly improve our knowledge of a wide variety of neutrino physics topics of interest and importance to the elementary-particle and nuclear-physics communities.

  8. Solar Neutrinos

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Harmer, D. S.

    1964-12-01

    The prospect of studying the solar energy generation process directly by observing the solar neutrino radiation has been discussed for many years. The main difficulty with this approach is that the sun emits predominantly low energy neutrinos, and detectors for observing low fluxes of low energy neutrinos have not been developed. However, experimental techniques have been developed for observing neutrinos, and one can foresee that in the near future these techniques will be improved sufficiently in sensitivity to observe solar neutrinos. At the present several experiments are being designed and hopefully will be operating in the next year or so. We will discuss an experiment based upon a neutrino capture reaction that is the inverse of the electron-capture radioactive decay of argon-37. The method depends upon exposing a large volume of a chlorine compound, removing the radioactive argon-37 and observing the characteristic decay in a small low-level counter.

  9. Discovering the Majorana neutrino: The next generation of experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Winslow, L. A.

    2015-07-15

    The discovery of a Majorana neutrino would be revolutionary with far-reaching consequences in both particle physics and cosmology. The only feasible experiments to determine the Majorana nature of the neutrino are searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay. The next generation of double-beta decay experiments are being prepared. The general goal is to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay throughout the parameter space corresponding to the inverted hierarchy for neutrino mass. There are a several strong proposals for how to achieve this goal. The status of these efforts is reviewed.

  10. Is CP violation observable in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments?

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied CP violation originating from the phase of the neutrino-mixing matrix in the long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The direct measurement of CP violation is the difference of the transition probabilities between CP-conjugate channels. In those experiments, the CP-violating effect is not suppressed if the highest neutrino mass scale is taken to be 1{endash}5 eV, which is appropriate for the cosmological hot dark matter. Assuming the hierarchy for the neutrino masses, the upper bounds of CP violation have been calculated for three cases, in which mixings are constrained by the recent short baseline ones. The calculated upper bounds are larger than 10{sup {minus}2}, which will be observable in the long baseline accelerator experiments. The matter effect, which is not CP invariant, has been also estimated in those experiments. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Light dark matter detection prospects at neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Jason; Learned, John G.; Smith, Stefanie

    2009-12-01

    We consider the prospects for the detection of relatively light dark matter through direct annihilation to neutrinos. We specifically focus on the detection possibilities of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator neutrino detection devices. We find, in particular, that liquid scintillator detectors may potentially provide excellent detection prospects for dark matter in the 4-10 GeV mass range. These experiments can provide excellent corroborative checks of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal, but may yield results for low mass dark matter in any case. We identify important tests of the ratio of electron to muon neutrino events (and neutrino versus antineutrino events), which discriminate against background atmospheric neutrinos. In addition, the fraction of events which arise from muon neutrinos or antineutrinos (R{sub {mu}} and R{sub {mu}}) can potentially yield information about the branching fractions of hypothetical dark matter annihilations into different neutrino flavors. These results apply to neutrinos from secondary and tertiary decays as well, but will suffer from decreased detectability.

  12. Chlorine and bromine solar neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, B. T.; Davis, R., Jr.; Rowley, J. K.

    The Sun is generally believed to be generating energy by a set of hydrogen fusion reactions that are occurring in its deep interior. These exothermic reactions serve to convert hydrogen into helium emitting energy in the form of positrons, neutrinos, gamma radiation, and kinetic energy. These processes can be investigated directly by studying the spectrum of neutrinos. The neutrino has the unique property of penetrating the Sun without loss of energy and therefore can be used to observe the energy generation process in the interior of the Sun. The results of these studies are important in understanding the structure and evolution of the Sun and stars in general.

  13. Coherent Elastic Neutrino Nucleus Scattering (CENNS) Experiment at the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayloe, Rex; Cenns Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS) process is important to understand supernovae, nuclear form factors, and low-energy behavior of the Standard Model. It will also become more important as a background in direct-detection dark matter experiments. The process has yet to be observed because of the low-energy detection thresholds and neutron background reduction required. Recent advances in cryogenic detector technology now make it possible. The CENNS collaboration proposes to deploy a 1-ton-scale, single-phase, liquid argon scintillation detector near the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) for a first measurement. A detector near the neutrino production target at 90 degrees off-axis will observe a low-energy flux of 10-50 MeV stopped-pion neutrinos for CENNS. The details of this effort including prototype detectors and neutron background measurements will be presented.

  14. After SNO and before KamLAND: present and future of Solar and Reactor Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliani, P.; Antonelli, V.; Ferrari, R.; Picariello, M.; Torrente-Lujan, E.

    2003-02-01

    We present a short review of the existing evidence in favor of neutrino mass and neutrino oscillations which come from different kinds of experiments. We focus our attention in particular on solar neutrinos, presenting a review of some recent analysis of all available neutrino oscillation evidence in Solar experiments including the recent SNO CC and NC data. We present in detail the power of the reactor experiment KamLAND for discriminating existing solutions to the SNP and giving accurate information on neutrino masses and mixing angles.

  15. Neutrino experiments at LSD and ASD installations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Khalchukov, F. F.; Korchagin, V. B.; Korchagin, P. V.; Korolkova, E. V.; Malgin, A. S.; Mal'Gin, A. S.; Ryassny, V. G.; Ryasnyj, V. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Talochkin, V. P.; Yakushev, V. F.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Aglietta, M.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G. F.; Castagnoli, C.; Castellina, A.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Saavedra, O.; Trinchero, G. C.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.

    No candidate for an antineutrino burst from collapsing stars has been observed during more than 4 years of ASD (Artymovsk Scintillation Detector) and 250 days of LSD (Large Scintillation Detector, Mont Blanc) lifetime. The data collected by the LSD installation are used to obtain an upper limit on the flux of atmospheric neutrinos, and to examine the possibility of detecting solar neutrinos and the correlation between their flux and solar activity.

  16. A Sterile-Neutrino Search with the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the the NuMI beamline at Fermilab, USA. Using a near detector at 1 km distance from the neutrino production target, and a far detector at 735 km from the target, it is designed primarily to measure the disappearance of muon neutrinos. This thesis presents an analysis using MINOS data of the possibility of oscil- lation of the neutrinos in the NuMI beam to a hypothetical sterile flavour, which would have no Standard Model couplings. Such oscillations would result in a deficit in the neutral current interaction rate in the MINOS far detector relative to the expectation derived from the near detector data. The method used to identify neutral current and charged current events in the MINOS detectors is described and a new method of predicting and fitting the far detector spectrum presented, along with the effects of systematic uncertainties on the sterile neutrino oscillation analysis. Using this analysis, the fraction fs of the disappearing neutrinos that go to steriles is constrained to be below 0.15 at the 90% confidence level in the absence of electron neutrino appearance in the NuMI beam. With electron appearance at the CHOOZ limit, fs < 0.41 at 90% C.L.

  17. A study of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingjun

    2009-03-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations (neutrino changing from one flavor to another) has provided compelling evidence that the neutrinos have non-zero masses and that leptons mix, which is not part of the original Standard Model of particle physics. The theoretical framework that describes neutrino oscillation involves two mass scales (Δmatm2 and Δmsol2), three mixing angles (θ12, θ23, and θ13) and one CP violating phase (δCP). Both mass scales and two of the mixing angles (θ12 and θ23) have been measured by many neutrino experiments. The mixing angle θ13, which is believed to be very small, remains unknown. The current best limit on θ13 comes from the CHOOZ experiment: θ13 < 11° at 90% C.L. at the atmospheric mass scale. δCP is also unknown today. MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long baseline neutrino experiment based at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment uses a muon neutrino beam, which is measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near Detector at Fermilab and then 735 km later in the Far Detector at the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can obtain parameters in the atmospheric sector of neutrino oscillations. MINOS has published results on the precise measurement of Δmatm2 and θ23 through the disappearance of muon neutrinos in the Far Detector and on a search for sterile neutrinos by looking for a deficit in the number of neutral current interactions seen in the Far Detector. MINOS also has the potential to improve the limit on the neutrino mixing angle θ13 or make the first measurement of its value by searching for an electron neutrino appearance signal in the Far Detector. This is the focus of the study presented in this thesis. We developed a neural network based algorithm to

  18. Measuring leptonic CP violation by low energy neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.

    2000-12-01

    We uncover an interesting phenomenon that neutrino flavor transformation in slowly varying matter density imitates almost exactly that of vacuum neutrino oscillation under suitably chosen experimental parameters. It allows us to have relatively large CP violating measure ΔP≡P(νμ-->νe)- P(ν¯μ-->ν¯e) which is essentially free from matter effect contamination. We utilize this phenomenon to design a low-energy long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment to measure the leptonic CP violating phase.

  19. REPORT OF THE US LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    BARGER,V.; FINLEY, D.; LAUGHTON, C.; PORDES, S.; MARCHIONNI, A.; RAMEIKA, R.; SAOULIDOU, N.; ZWASKA, R.; BISHAI, M.; DIWAN, M.; DIERCKXSENS, M.; KIRK, H.; KAHN, S.; SIMOS, N.; MARCIANO, W.; PARSA, Z.; VIREN, B.; ET AL.

    2007-01-01

    This report provides the results of an extensive and important study of the potential for a U.S. scientific program that will extend our knowledge of neutrino oscillations well beyond what can be anticipated from ongoing and planned experiments worldwide. The program examined here has the potential to provide the U.S. particle physics community with world leading experimental capability in this intensely interesting and active field of fundamental research. Furthermore, this capability is not likely to be challenged anywhere else in the world for at least two decades into the future. The present study was initially commissioned in April 2006 by top research officers of Brookhaven National Laboratory and Fermilab and, as the study evolved, it also provides responses to questions formulated and addressed to the study group by the Neutrino Scientific Advisory Committee (NuSAG) of the U.S. DOE and NSF. The participants in the study, its Charge and history, plus the study results and conclusions are provided in this report and its appendices. A summary of the conclusions is provided in the Executive Summary.

  20. A search for neutrino oscillations using the CHOOZ 1 km baseline reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jean

    1999-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation searches are an active field of research due to the implications their discovery may have for the solar neutrino anomaly as well as for the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. Their discovery may also have broad ramifications for the Standard Model of Particle Physics as a whole. Results from an oscillation search using the CHOOZ long baseline reactor neutrino experiment are presented in this thesis. These results are based on the data taken from June 1997 through April 1998 when the two reactors ran at combined thermal power levels ranging from zero power to their full power level of 8.5 GW. Electron flavored antineutrinos emanating from the reactors were detected through the inverse beta decay channel using a liquid scintillating calorimeter located at a distance of approximately 1 km from the reactor sources. The underground experimental site (300 MWE) provided natural shielding from the background of cosmic ray muons-leading to a background rate more than an order of magnitude lower than the full power signal rate. From the agreement between the detected and expected neutrino event rates no evidence for neutrino oscillations was found (at the 90% C.L.) for the oscillation parameter space governed by Δm 2 > 0.8 × 10-3 eV2 for maximal mixing and by sin2 2Θ > 0.18 for large values of Δm2.

  1. The neutrino factory and beta beam experiments and development

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, C.; Barger, V.; Beacom, J.F.; Berg, J.S.; Black, E.; Blondel, A.; Bogacz, S.; Brice, S.; Caspi, S.; Chou, W.; Cummings, M.; Fernow, R.; Finley, D.; Gallardo, J.; Geer, S.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Goodman, M.; Harris, D.; Huber, Patrick; Jansson, A.; Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab /Wisconsin U., Madison /Brookhaven /IIT, Chicago /Geneva U. /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /Northern Illinois U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Argonne /Munich, Tech. U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Oak Ridge /Mississippi U. /Iowa State U.

    2004-11-01

    The long-term prospects for fully exploring three-flavor mixing in the neutrino sector depend upon an ongoing and increased investment in the appropriate accelerator R&D. Two new concepts have been proposed that would revolutionize neutrino experiments, namely the Neutrino Factory and the Beta Beam facility. These new facilities would dramatically improve our ability to test the three-flavor mixing framework, measure CP violation in the lepton sector, and perhaps determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, and, if necessary, probe extremely small values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The stunning sensitivity that could be achieved with a Neutrino Factory is described, together with our present understanding of the corresponding sensitivity that might be achieved with a Beta Beam facility. In the Beta Beam case, additional study is required to better understand the optimum Beta Beam energy, and the achievable sensitivity. Neither a Neutrino Factory nor a Beta Beam facility could be built without significant R&D. An impressive Neutrino Factory R&D effort has been ongoing in the U.S. and elsewhere over the last few years and significant progress has been made towards optimizing the design, developing and testing the required accelerator components, and significantly reducing the cost. The recent progress is described here.

  2. Confronting spin flavor solutions of the solar neutrino problem with current and future solar neutrino data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, J.; Miranda, O. G.; Rashba, T. I.; Semikoz, V. B.; Valle, J. W.

    2002-11-01

    A global analysis of spin flavor precession (SFP) solutions to the solar neutrino problem is given, taking into account the impact of the full set of latest solar neutrino data, including the recent SNO data and the 1496-day Super-Kamiokande data. These are characterized by three effective parameters: Δm2SOL≡Δm2, the neutrino mixing angle θSOL≡θ, and the magnetic field parameter μB⊥. For the last we adopt a self-consistent magnetohydrodynamics field profile in the convective zone and identify an optimum B⊥~80 kG strength for μ=10-11μB. We find that no low mass (LOW) quasivacuum or vacuum solutions are present at 3σ. In addition to the standard large mixing angle (LMA) oscillation solution, there are two SFP solutions, in the resonant (RSFP) and nonresonant (NRSFP) regimes. These two SFP solutions have a goodness of fit of 84% (RSFP) and 83% (NRSFP), slightly better than the LMA oscillation solution (78%). We discuss the role of solar antineutrino searches in the fit and present a table of best-fit parameters and χ2min values. Should the KamLAND experiment confirm the LMA solution, the SFP solutions may at best be present at a subleading level, leading to a constraint on μB⊥. In the event the LMA is not the solution realized in nature, then experiments such as Borexino can help in distinguishing the LMA solution from the NRSFP solution and the simplest RSFP solution with no mixing.

  3. Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and new neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Rodejohann, Werner; Xu, Xun-Jie

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the potential to probe new neutrino physics with future experiments measuring coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. Experiments with high statistics should become feasible soon and allow to constrain parameters with unprecedented precision. Using a benchmark setup for a future experiment probing reactor neutrinos, we study the sensitivity on neutrino non-standard interactions and new exotic neutral currents (scalar, tensor, etc). Compared to Fermi interaction, percent and permille level strengths of the new interactions can be probed, superseding for some observables the limits from future neutrino oscillation experiments by up to two orders of magnitude.

  4. Experimental Evidence for Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations: MACRO, Soudan 2, and the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Hugh

    2005-06-01

    In this note I will summarize the most recent results from the MACRO and Soudan 2 experiments. Despite their limited statistics compared with SuperKamiokande these experiments provide strong confirmatory evidence, with completely different systematics, of atmospheric neutrino oscillations. I will briefly mention the additional information that the current generation of running experiments may provide and the important role atmospheric neutrinos can continue to play in the exploration of the neutrino sector.

  5. Atmospheric neutrino results from Super-Kamiokande experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, Yoshihisa; Super-KAMIOKANDE Collaboration

    2000-12-01

    Super-Kamiokande has been observing atmospheric neutrinos since April 1, 1996. The observation livetime is now 990 days, corresponding to an exposure of 61 kt-yr. Observed flavor, energy and direction distributions of are inconsistent with atmospheric neutrino flux assuming no neutrino oscillation; they are, however, consistent with νμ to ντ oscillation. The allowed νμ to ντ oscillation parameter space is 2×10-3<Δm2<5×10-3eV2 and sin2 2θ>0.88, at 90% confidence level. This result agrees well with other recent underground atmospheric neutrino experiments. The data have also been analyzed for νμ to νsterile oscillation and νe-νμ-ντ 3-flavor oscillation. Both analyses favor νμ to ντ oscillation.

  6. Lepton number violation interactions and their effects on neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Sven; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. V.; Päs, Heinrich

    2000-12-01

    Mixing between bosons that transform differently under the standard model gauge group, but identically under its unbroken subgroup, can induce interactions that violate the total lepton number. We discuss four-fermion operators that mediate lepton number violating neutrino interactions both in a model-independent framework and within supersymmetry (SUSY) without R parity. The effective couplings of such operators are constrained by (i) the upper bounds on the relevant elementary couplings between the bosons and the fermions, (ii) by the limit on universality violation in pion decays, (iii) by the data on neutrinoless double beta decay, and (iv) by loop-induced neutrino masses. We find that the present bounds imply that lepton number violating neutrino interactions are not relevant for the solar and atmospheric neutrino problems. Within SUSY without R parity also the LSND anomaly cannot be explained by such interactions, but one cannot rule out an effect model independently. Possible consequences for future terrestrial neutrino oscillation experiments and for neutrinos from a supernova are discussed.

  7. Cosmological Neutrino Mass Detection: The Best Probe of Neutrino Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2007-04-27

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence, on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi)massless particles as in Majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way out to explain a discrepancy < or approx. 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and lab data.

  8. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  9. The Daya Bay Reactor Electron Anti-neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianglai

    2007-10-01

    The phenomenon of neutrino flavor oscillations is now well-established. Mixing among the three flavors is characterized by three mixing angles, with θ13 being the only presently unknown angle. A precise measurement of θ13 using nuclear reactors as a source of electron anti-neutrinos requires high electron anti-neutrino flux, ˜2 km baselines, as well as good shielding to reduce cosmogenic backgrounds. The Daya Bay nuclear reactor complex located in south China is an ideal site to perform such a measurement. We have proposed an experiment at Daya Bay utilizing multiple baselines (between 0.3 and 2 km) and multiple liquid scintillator detector modules. Since the formal physics proposal in 2006, much progress has been made by the collaboration in the design of the experiment. The civil construction of the experiment will begin this year. In this talk, I will give an overview of the experiment, and report on the recent progress and the project status.

  10. Measuring $\\theta_{13}$ via Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Ruth B.

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary goals in neutrino physics at the present moment is to make a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$. This parameter, in addition to being unknown, could potentially allow for the introduction of CP violation into the lepton sector. The MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has the ability to make a measurement of this parameter, by looking for the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos between a Near and Far Detector over a distance of 735 km. This thesis discusses the development of an analysis framework to search for this oscillation mode. Two major improvements to pre-existing analysis techniques have been implemented by the author. First, a novel particle ID technique based on strip topology, known as the Library Event Matching (LEM) method, is optimized for use in MINOS. Second, a multiple bin likelihood method is developed to fit the data. These two improvements, when combined, increase MINOS' sensitivity to $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})$ by 27\\% over previous analyses. This thesis sees a small excess over background in the Far Detector. A Frequentist interpretation of the data rules out $\\theta_{13}=0$ at 91\\%. A Bayesian interpretation of the data is also presented, placing the most stringent upper boundary on the oscillation parameter to date, at $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})<0.09(0.015)$ for the Normal (Inverted) Hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=0$.

  11. Neutrino Physics in the NOvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Mayly

    2016-09-19

    The objective of the experimental neutrino physics program at ISU is to contribute to the NOvA experiment in order to enable the measurement of the unknown neutrino parameters: the CP violation phase and the mass hierarchy. In the Summer of 2015, the NOvA Collaboration released results from the first year of data collected by the experiment. The ISU group played an important role in various aspects of these results including authoring one of the two resulting publications. During this project period and with the support of this grant the PI and her group made leading contributions both in data analysis and operations to the NOvA experiment.

  12. Non-Standard Interactions in propagation at the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma, Pilar

    2016-03-03

    Here, we study the sensitivity of current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments to the effects of dimension six operators affecting neutrino propagation through Earth, commonly referred to as Non-Standard Interactions (NSI). All relevant parameters entering the oscillation probabilities (standard and non-standard) are considered at once, in order to take into account possible cancellations and degeneracies between them. We find that the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment will significantly improve over current constraints for most NSI parameters. Most notably, it will be able to rule out the so-called LMA-dark solution, still compatible with current oscillation data, and will be sensitive to off-diagonal NSI parameters at the level of ε ~ $ \\mathcal{O} $ (0.05 – 0.5). We also identify two degeneracies among standard and non-standard parameters, which could be partially resolved by combining T2HK and DUNE data.

  13. Non-Standard Interactions in propagation at the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Coloma, Pilar

    2016-03-03

    Here, we study the sensitivity of current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments to the effects of dimension six operators affecting neutrino propagation through Earth, commonly referred to as Non-Standard Interactions (NSI). All relevant parameters entering the oscillation probabilities (standard and non-standard) are considered at once, in order to take into account possible cancellations and degeneracies between them. We find that the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment will significantly improve over current constraints for most NSI parameters. Most notably, it will be able to rule out the so-called LMA-dark solution, still compatible with current oscillation data, and will be sensitive to off-diagonal NSI parameters at the level of ε ~more » $$ \\mathcal{O} $$ (0.05 – 0.5). We also identify two degeneracies among standard and non-standard parameters, which could be partially resolved by combining T2HK and DUNE data.« less

  14. Non-standard interactions in propagation at the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Pilar

    2016-03-01

    We study the sensitivity of current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments to the effects of dimension six operators affecting neutrino propagation through Earth, commonly referred to as Non-Standard Interactions (NSI). All relevant parameters entering the oscillation probabilities (standard and non-standard) are considered at once, in order to take into account possible cancellations and degeneracies between them. We find that the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment will significantly improve over current constraints for most NSI parameters. Most notably, it will be able to rule out the so-called LMA-dark solution, still compatible with current oscillation data, and will be sensitive to off-diagonal NSI parameters at the level of ɛ ˜ {O} (0.05 - 0.5). We also identify two degeneracies among standard and non-standard parameters, which could be partially resolved by combining T2HK and DUNE data.

  15. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-01

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  16. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-15

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  17. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern

    2009-05-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the vμ oscillate to vτ but a small fraction may oscillate instead to ve. This thesis presents a measurement of the ve appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6σ excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of ve appearance.

  18. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; ...

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for allmore » measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.« less

  19. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  20. Future Detection of Supernova Neutrino Burst and Explosion Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Totani, T.; Sato, K.; Dalhed, H.E.; Wilson, J.R.

    1998-03-01

    Future detection of a supernova neutrino burst by large underground detectors would give important information for the explosion mechanism of collapse-driven supernovae. We studied the statistical analysis for the future detection of a nearby supernova by using a numerical supernova model and realistic Monte Carlo simulations of detection by the Super-Kamiokande detector. We mainly discuss the detectability of the signatures of the delayed explosion mechanism in the time evolution of the {ovr {nu}}{sub e} luminosity and spectrum. For a supernova at 10 kpc away from the Earth, we find not only that the signature is clearly discernible but also that the deviation of the energy spectrum from the Fermi-Dirac (FD) distribution can be observed. The deviation from the FD distribution would, if observed, provide a test for the standard picture of neutrino emission from collapse-driven supernovae. For the {ital D}=50 kpc case, the signature of the delayed explosion is still observable, but statistical fluctuation is too large to detect the deviation from the FD distribution. We also propose a method for statistical reconstruction of the time evolution of {ovr {nu}}{sub e} luminosity and spectrum from data, by which we can get a smoother time evolution and smaller statistical errors than by a simple, time-binning analysis. This method is useful especially when the available number of events is relatively small, e.g., a supernova in the LMC or SMC. A neutronization burst of {nu}{sub {ital e}}`s produces about five scattering events when D=10 kpc, and this signal is difficult to distinguish from {ovr {nu}}{sub e}{ital p} events. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  1. Neutrinos

    PubMed Central

    Besson, Dave; Cowen, Doug; Selen, Mats; Wiebusch, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Neutrinos represent a new “window” to the Universe, spanning a large range of energy. We discuss the science of neutrino astrophysics and focus on two energy regimes. At “lower” energies (≈1 MeV), studies of neutrinos born inside the sun, or produced in interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere, have allowed the first incontrovertible evidence that neutrinos have mass. At energies typically one thousand to one million times higher, sources further than the sun (both within the Milky Way and beyond) are expected to produce a flux of particles that can be detected only through neutrinos. PMID:10588680

  2. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the NOnuA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji

    The NuMI Off-Axis nue Appearance (NOnuA) experiment is a long baseline, off-axis neutrino oscillation experiment. It is designed to search for oscillations of numu to nu e by comparing measurements of the NuMI beam composition in two detectors. These two detectors are functionally identical, nearly fully-active liquid-scintillator tracking calorimeters and located at two points along the beam line to observe the neutrinos. The Near Detector (ND), situated 1km away from the proton target at Fermilab, measures neutrinos prior to oscillation. Then the Far Detector (FD), located 810 km away at Ash River, Minnesota, measures the neutrinos after they have traveled and potentially oscillated. The neutrino beam is generated at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois by the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility. By observing the numu → nue oscillation, NOnuA is capable of measuring the neutrino mass hierarchy, CP violation and the octant of mixing angle theta23. This thesis presents the first measurement of nue appearance in the NOnuA detectors with 3:52 x 1020 protons-on-target (POT) data accumulated from February 2014 till May 2015. In this analysis the primary nu e CC particle selection LID observes 6 nue like events in the far detector with a background prediction of 0:99 +/- 0:11 (syst.), which corresponds to a 3:3sigma excess over the no-oscillation hypothesis. This results disfavors 0:1pi < deltacp < 0:5pi in the inverted mass hierarchy at 90% C.L with the reactor constrain on theta13.

  3. Recent results of Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, R.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has been designed to precisely measure the least known neutrino mixing angle θ13. In March 2012, Daya Bay collaboration announced [Daya Bay Collaboration (F. P. An et al.), Observation of electron-antineutrino disappearance at Daya Bay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 (2012) 171803] the observation of non-zero value of sin2 ⁡ 2θ13. Because of large statistics of detected antineutrinos and excellent performance of the experiment, Daya Bay continuously improves the precision of world best measurement of sin2 ⁡ 2θ13. In addition it provides results on neutrino mass splitting Δmee2 competitive with measurements of other experiments, results on precise measurement of reactor fluxes and on limits of the existence of hypothetical fourth neutrino. In this paper, we report the results available by the time of the 6th Capri workshop: the measurement of oscillation parameters sin2 ⁡ (2θ13) = 0.084 ± 0.005 and | Δ mee2 | = (2.42 ± 0.11) ×10-3eV2 [Daya Bay Collaboration (F. P. An et al.), New Measurement of Antineutrino Oscillation with the Full Detector Configuration at Daya Bay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 (2015) no. 11, 111802], searches for sterile neutrinos [Daya Bay Collaboration (F. P. An et al.) Search for a Light Sterile Neutrino at Daya Bay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (2014) 141802] and precise measurement of reactor neutrino flux [Daya Bay Collaboration (F. P. An et al.), Measurement of the Reactor Anti-neutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (2016) no. 6, 061801]. These are based on 621 days of measurement, most of the data has been taken in full detector configuration. More precise results [Daya Bay Collaboration (F. P. An et al.), Measurement of electron antineutrino oscillation based on 1230 days of operation of the Daya Bay experiment, arxiv:arXiv:1610.04802] with 1230 days of operation have been presented few weeks later at the Neutrino 2016 conference.

  4. MINERvA: A Dedicated neutrino scattering experiment at NuMI

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Kevin S.; /Rochester U.

    2006-05-01

    MINERvA is a dedicated neutrino cross-section experiment planned for the near detector hall of the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. I summarize the detector design and physics capabilities of the experiment.

  5. Searching for Physics beyond the Standard Model with Accelerator Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, William C

    2008-01-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab was designed to test the LSND evidence for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations . The first MiniBooNE oscillation result in neutrino mode shows no significant excess of events at higher energies (E{sub {nu}} > 475 MeV), although a sizeable excess is observed at lower energies (E{sub {nu}}< 475 MeV). The lack of a significant excess at higher energies allows MiniBooNE to rule out simple 2 - {nu} oscillations as an explanation of the LSND signal. However, the low-energy excess is presently unexplained. Additional antineutrino data and NuMI data may allow the collaboration to determine whether the excess is due, for example, to a neutrino neutral-current radiative interaction or to neutrino oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. If the excess is consistent with being due to sterile neutrinos, then future experiments at FNAL (BooNE) or ORNL (OscSNS) could prove their existence.

  6. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jiali; Tiedt, Douglas

    2013-05-23

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  7. Solar Neutrino Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feilitzsch, F. v.

    1999-01-01

    Since the pioneering experiment of R. Davis et al., which started neutrino astronomy by measuring the solar neutrinos via the inverse beta decay reaction on 37Cl, all solar neutrino experiments find a considerably lower flux than expected by standard solar models. This finding is generally called the solar neutrino problem. Many attempts have been made to explain this result by altering the solar models, or assuming different nuclear cross sections for fusion processes assumed to be the energy sources in the sun. There have been performed numerous experiments recently to investigate the different possibilities to explain the solar neutrino problem. These experiments covered solar physics with helioseismology, nuclear cross section measurements, and solar neutrino experiments. Up to now no convincing explanation based on "standard" physics was suggested. However, assuming nonstandard neutrino properties, i.e. neutrino masses and mixing as expected in most extensions of the standard theory of elementary particle physics, natural solutions for the solar neutrino problem can be found. It appears that with this newly invented neutrino astronomy fundamental information on astrophysics as well as elementary particle physics are tested uniquely. In this contribution an attempt is made to review the situation of the neutrino astronomy for solar neutrino spectroscopy and discuss the future prospects in this field.

  8. Low energy solar neutrino experiments: The Soviet American Gallium Experiment (SAGE). Final report, August 12, 1988--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Two {sup 71}Ga experiments are currently in operation. The first is the 60 ton Soviet American Gallium Experiment (SAGE) at Baksan, which has recently reported a signal level of 73+18/{minus}16(stat)+5/{minus}7(syst) SNU; the second is the 30 ton GALLEX experiment at Gran Sasso, which sees 87{+-}14{+-}7 SNU. Both results are consistent, and both suggest a neutrino flux level low compared to the total expected from standard solar model calculations. It is not possible, however, to make a case for flux levels lower than the p-p prediction. Assuming the experiments are correct (Neutrino source calibrations are planned for both SAGE and GALLEX in the near future.), it is not at all clear yet whether the answer lies with the neutrino physics, solar physics, or a combination of both. Nevertheless, though solar model effects cannot be ruled out, if the Homestake and Kamiokande results are taken at face value, then these two experiments alone imply that neutrino oscillations or some similar particle physics result must be present to some degree. This report reviews the SAGE experiment and recent results. Non-radiochemical experiments are also discussed, with an emphasis on the Kamiokande water Cerenkov results.

  9. Possible implications of the atmospheric, the Bugey, and the Los Alamos neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakata, Hisakazu

    1995-12-01

    A combined analysis of the terrestrial neutrino experiments and the Kamiokande observation of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly is performed under the assumption of the existence of dark-matter-mass neutrinos, as suggested by the recent Los Alamos experiment. In the three-flavor mixing scheme of neutrinos it is shown that the constraints from these experiments are so strong that the patterns of mass hierarchy and flavor mixing of neutrinos are determined almost uniquely depending upon the interpretation of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly.

  10. The Accelerator Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE) Front Anti-Coincidence Counter (FACC) Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingqian

    The searching for proton decay (PDK) is going on current Water Cherenkov (WCh) detectors such as Super-Kamiokande. However, PDK-like backgrounds produced by the neutrino interactions will limit the sensitivity of the detectors. The Accelerator Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE) is going to measure the neutron yield of neutrino interactions in gadolinium-loaded water by the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) with known characteristics. In this thesis, neutrino, neutrino oscillations, Dirac neutrino and Majorana neutrino and neutrino interactions are introduced. ANNIE experiment is also introduced. And two modes of proton decays are discussed. The ANNIE experiment requires detection of the neutrons produced by the BNB interactions with water. However, dirt muons produced by the interaction of the BNB with the rock and dirt upstream of the ANNIE hall will cause a correlated background. Therefore, the Front Anti-Coincidence Counter (FACC) was built to measure the rock muons. This thesis details the design, installation, and commissioning of the ANNIE FACC.

  11. Neutrino mass and mixing, and non-accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental knowledge about neutrinos derived from kinematic mass measurements, neutrino oscillation searches at reactors and accelerators, solar neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and single and double beta decay. The solar neutrino results yield fairly strong and consistent indication that neutrino oscillations are occurring. Other evidence for new physics is less consistent and convincing.

  12. Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Terranova, F.

    2005-10-12

    Long-baseline experiments will play a crucial role in the precision era of neutrino oscillation physics. In this paper we review the ongoing European programme, which is focused on CNGS, and we discuss the opportunities for new facilities based on the CERN acceleration complex.

  13. First Neutrino Oscillation Results from the NOvA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sachdev, Kanika

    2016-11-29

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment on the NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab. It consists of two functionally identical, nearly fully-active liquid-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The Near Detector (ND) at Fermilab is used to study the neutrino beam spectrum and composition before oscillations occur. The Far Detector in northern Minnesota, 810 km away, observes the oscillated beam and is used to extract the oscillation parameters. NOvA is designed to observe oscillations in two channels: disappearance channel ( ν μ → ν μ ) and ν e appearance channel ( ν μ → ν e ). This paper reports the measurements of both these channels based on the first NOvA data taken from February 16, 2014 till May 15, 2015

  14. Future flavour physics experiments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The current status of flavour physics and the prospects for present and future experiments will be reviewed. Measurements in B‐physics, in which sensitive probes of new physics are the CKM angle γ, the Bs mixing phase ϕs, and the branching ratios of the rare decays B(s)0→μ+μ− , will be highlighted. Topics in charm and kaon physics, in which the measurements of ACP and the branching ratios of the rare decays K→πνν¯ are key measurements, will be discussed. Finally the complementarity of the future heavy flavour experiments, the LHCb upgrade and Belle‐II, will be summarised. PMID:26877543

  15. Effective field theory treatment of the neutrino background in direct dark matter detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, James B.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Newstead, Jayden L.; Strigari, Louis E.

    2016-04-01

    Distinguishing a dark matter interaction from an astrophysical neutrino-induced interaction will be major challenge for future direct dark matter searches. In this paper, we consider this issue within nonrelativistic effective field theory (EFT), which provides a well-motivated theoretical framework for determining nuclear responses to dark matter scattering events. We analyze the nuclear energy recoil spectra from the different dark matter-nucleon EFT operators, and compare them to the nuclear recoil energy spectra that are predicted to be induced by astrophysical neutrino sources. We determine that for 11 of the 14 possible operators, the dark matter-induced recoil spectra can be cleanly distinguished from the corresponding neutrino-induced recoil spectra with moderate-size detector technologies that are now being pursued, e.g., these operators would require 0.5 tonne years to be distinguished from the neutrino background for low mass dark matter. Our results imply that in most models detectors with good energy resolution will be able to distinguish a dark matter signal from a neutrino signal, without the need for much larger detectors that must rely on additional information from timing or direction. In addition we calculate up-to-date exclusion limits in the EFT model space using data from the LUX experiment.

  16. PIP-III and future opportunities in the US Neutrino Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derwent, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The focus of Fermilab's long term research program is the physics of neutrino oscillations. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), located at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, will study neutrino oscillations with a baseline of 1300 km. The neutrinos will be produced in the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a proposed new beam line from Fermilab's Main Injector. The physics goals of DUNE require a proton beam with a power of roughly 2.5 MW at 120 GeV, which is about four times the current maximum power. In addition to the long baseline program, Fermilab is pursuing a comprehensive program to investigate short baseline neutrino physics. I will present a view on how the Fermilab accelerator complex will evolve to meet these goals.

  17. Search for direct and indirect unitarity violation in neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shu

    2014-08-01

    If three standard neutrinos mix with other degree of freedoms like sterile neutrinos, no matter how heavy the sterile neutrino masses are, it could result in the unitarity violation in the MNSP matrix. Nevertheless, the unitarity violation induced by the existence of light or heavy sterile neutrinos can have very different effects on neutrino oscillations, we call the former case direct unitarity violation and the later case the indirect unitarity violation. We will explain in this paper the difference of these two kinds of unitarity violations, then focus on the possibilities of searching the unitarity violation in neutrino oscillation experiments, of which the precision reactor experiments with multiple baselines are discussed in detail.

  18. Omnibus experiment: CPT and CP violation with sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, K. K.; Novikov, N. Yu; Smirnov, M. V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Wurm, M.

    2016-05-01

    We propose to probe both the CPT and CP violation together with the search for sterile neutrinos in one do-it-all experiment. This omnibus experiment would utilize neutrino oscillometry with large scintillator detectors like LENA, JUNO or RENO-50 and manmade radioactive sources similar to the ones used by the GALLEX experiment. Our calculations indicate that such an experiment is realistic and could be performed in parallel to the main research plan for JUNO, LENA, or RENO-50. Assuming as the starting point the values of the oscillation parameters indicated by the current global fit (in 3 active + 1 sterile scenario) and requiring at least 5 sigma confidence level, we estimate that with the proposed experiment we would be able to detect CPT mass anomalies of the order of 1% or larger.

  19. The not-so-sterile 4th neutrino: constraints on new gauge interactions from neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Joachim; Welter, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Sterile neutrino models with new gauge interactions in the sterile sector are phenomenologically interesting since they can lead to novel effects in neutrino oscillation experiments, in cosmology and in dark matter detectors, possibly even explaining some of the observed anomalies in these experiments. Here, we use data from neutrino oscillation experiments, in particular from MiniBooNE, MINOS and solar neutrino experiments, to constrain such models. We focus in particular on the case where the sterile sector gauge boson A ' couples also to Standard Model particles (for instance to the baryon number current) and thus induces a large Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein potential. For eV-scale sterile neutrinos, we obtain strong constraints especially from MINOS, which restricts the strength of the new interaction to be less than ˜ 10 times that of the Standard Model weak interaction unless active-sterile neutrino mixing is very small (sin2 θ 24 ≲ 10-3). This rules out gauge forces large enough to affect short-baseline experiments like MiniBooNE and it imposes nontrivial constraints on signals from sterile neutrino scattering in dark matter experiments.

  20. Search for Neutrino Radiation from Collapsing Stars and the Sensitivity of Experiments to the Different Types of Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.

    2013-11-01

    The experiments running to search for neutrino radiation from collapsing stars up to now traditionally take one's bearings for the detection of the ˜ ν e p -> e^ + n reaction and, accordingly, for the use of the hadrogenate targets. The observation of neutrino radiation from SN1987A showed that it is important to have in the composition of the targets beside the hadrogen also other nuclei suitable to neutrino radiation detection. In particular the presence of iron nuclei in the LSD provided for the sensational detection of νe flux at 2:52 UT on February 23 1987 when other more powerful detectors with their hadrogenate targets could not respond to this type of neutrino. The sensitivity of present searching experiments to different types of neutrino radiation from collapsing stars is discussed in the paper.

  1. International Scoping Study (ISS) for a future neutrino factory and Super-Beam facility. Detectors and flux instrumentation for future neutrino facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ISS Detector Working Group; Abe, T.; Aihara, H.; Andreop oulos, C.; Ankowski, A.; Badertscher, A.; Battistoni, G.; Blondel, A.; Bouchez, J.; Bross, A.; Bueno, A.; Camilleri, L.; Campagne, J. E.; Cazes, A.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; DeLellis, G.; Di Capua, F.; Ellis, M.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L. S.; Fukushima, C.; Gschwendtner, E.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Iwasaki, M.; Kaneyuki, K.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kashikhin, V.; Kawai, Y.; Komatsu, M.; Kozlovskaya, E.; Kudenko, Y.; Kusaka, A.; Kyushima, H.; Laing, A.; Long, K.; Longhin, A.; Marchionni, A.; Marotta, A.; McGrew, C.; Menary, S.; Meregaglia, A.; Mezzeto, M.; Migliozzi, P.; Mondal, N. K.; Montanari, C.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakumo, H.; Nakayama, H.; Nelson, J.; Nowak, J.; Ogawa, S.; Peltoniemi, J.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Ragazzi, S.; Rubbia, A.; Sanchez, F.; Sarkamo, J.; Sato, O.; Selvi, M.; Shibuya, H.; Shozawa, M.; Sobczyk, J.; Soler, F. J. P.; Strolin, P.; Suyama, M.; Tanaka, M.; Terranova, F.; Tsenov, R.; Uchida, Y.; Weber, A.; Zlobin, A.

    2009-05-01

    This report summarises the conclusions from the detector group of the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and Super-Beam neutrino facility. The baseline detector options for each possible neutrino beam are defined as follows: A very massive (Megaton) water Cherenkov detector is the baseline option for a sub-GeV Beta Beam and Super Beam facility. There are a number of possibilities for either a Beta Beam or Super Beam (SB) medium energy facility between 1-5 GeV. These include a totally active scintillating detector (TASD), a liquid argon TPC or a water Cherenkov detector. A 100 kton magnetized iron neutrino detector (MIND) is the baseline to detect the wrong sign muon final states (golden channel) at a high energy (20-50 GeV) neutrino factory from muon decay. A 10 kton hybrid neutrino magnetic emulsion cloud chamber detector for wrong sign tau detection (silver channel) is a possible complement to MIND, if one needs to resolve degeneracies that appear in the δ-θ13 parameter space.

  2. A framework for testing leptonic unitarity by neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Chee Sheng; Minakata, Hisakazu; Nunokawa, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    If leptonic unitarity is violated by new physics at an energy scale much lower than the electroweak scale, which we call low-scale unitarity violation, it has different characteristic features from those expected in unitarity violation at high-energy scales. They include maintaining flavor universality and absence of zero-distance flavor transition. We present a framework for testing such unitarity violation at low energies by neutrino oscillation experiments. Starting from the unitary 3 active plus N (arbitrary positive integer) sterile neutrino model we show that by restricting the active-sterile and sterile-sterile neutrino mass squared differences to ≳ 0.1 eV2 the oscillation probability in the (3 + N) model becomes insensitive to details of the sterile sector, providing a nearly model-independent framework for testing low-scale unitarity violation. Yet, the presence of the sterile sector leaves trace as a constant probability leaking term, which distinguishes low-scale unitarity violation from the high-scale one. The non-unitary mixing matrix in the active neutrino subspace is common for the both cases. We analyze how severely the unitarity violation can be constrained in ν e -row by taking a JUNO-like setting to simulate medium baseline reactor experiments. Possible modification of the features of the (3 + N) model due to matter effect is discussed to first order in the matter potential.

  3. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoa Ricoux, Juan Pedro

    2009-01-01

    We perform a search for vμ → ve oscillations, a process which would manifest a nonzero value of the θ13 mixing angle, in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The analysis consists of searching for an excess of ve charged-current candidate events over the predicted backgrounds, made mostly of neutral-current events with high electromagnetic content. A novel technique to select electron neutrino events is developed, which achieves an improved separation between the signal and the backgrounds, and which consequently yields a better reach in θ13. The backgrounds are predicted in the Far Detector from Near Detector measurements. An excess is observed in the Far Detector data over the predicted backgrounds, which is consistent with the background-only hypothesis at 1.2 standard deviations.

  4. Neutrino oscillation physics potential of the T2K experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T2K Collaboration; Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; de Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaker, F.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.

    2015-04-01

    The observation of the recent electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam and the high-precision measurement of the mixing angle θ _{13} have led to a re-evaluation of the physics potential of the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Sensitivities are explored for CP violation in neutrinos, non-maximal sin ^22θ _{23}, the octant of θ _{23}, and the mass hierarchy, in addition to the measurements of δ _{CP}, sin ^2θ _{23}, and Δ m^2_{32}, for various combinations of ν-mode and bar {ν }-mode data-taking. With an exposure of 7.8× 10^{21} protons-on-target, T2K can achieve 1σ resolution of 0.050 (0.054) on sin ^2θ _{23} and 0.040 (0.045)× 10^{-3} {eV}^2 on Δ m^2_{32} for 100% (50%) neutrino beam mode running assuming sin ^2θ _{23}=0.5 and Δ m^2_{32} = 2.4× 10^{-3} eV^2. T2K will have sensitivity to the CP-violating phase δ _{CP} at 90% C.L. or better over a significant range. For example, if sin ^22θ _{23} is maximal (i.e. θ _{23}=45°) the range is -115° < δ _{CP}< -60° for normal hierarchy and +50° < δ _{CP}< +130° for inverted hierarchy. When T2K data is combined with data from the NOνA experiment, the region of oscillation parameter space where there is sensitivity to observe a non-zero δ _{CP} is substantially increased compared to if each experiment is analyzed alone.

  5. Heavy Majorana neutrino production and decay in future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gluza, J.; Zralek, M.

    1997-06-01

    The production of heavy and light neutrinos in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} future colliders is considered. The cross section for the process e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{nu}N and then the heavy neutrino decay N{r_arrow}W{sup {plus_minus}}e{sup {minus_plus}} is determined for experimentally possible values of mixing matrix elements. The bound on the heavy neutrino-electron mixing is estimated in models without right-handed currents. The role of neutrino CP eigenvalues and the mass of the lightest Higgs particle are investigated. The angular distributions of charged leptons in the total c.m. frame resulting from the heavy neutrino decay and from the main W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} production background process are briefly compared. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Neutrino Detectors: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2011-10-06

    This paper covers possible detector options suitable at future neutrino facilities, such as Neutrino Factories, Super Beams and Beta Beams. The Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND), which is the baseline detector at a Neutrino Factory, will be described and a new analysis which improves the efficiency of this detector at low energies will be shown. Other detectors covered include the Totally Active Scintillating Detectors (TASD), particularly relevant for a low energy Neutrino Factory, emulsion detectors for tau detection, liquid argon detectors and megaton scale water Cherenkov detectors. Finally the requirements of near detectors for long-baseline neutrino experiments will be demonstrated.

  7. Background studies for the MINER Coherent Neutrino Scattering reactor experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnolet, G.; Baker, W.; Barker, D.; Beck, R.; Carroll, T. J.; Cesar, J.; Cushman, P.; Dent, J. B.; De Rijck, S.; Dutta, B.; Flanagan, W.; Fritts, M.; Gao, Y.; Harris, H. R.; Hays, C. C.; Iyer, V.; Jastram, A.; Kadribasic, F.; Kennedy, A.; Kubik, A.; Lang, K.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Marianno, C.; Martin, R. D.; Mast, N.; McDeavitt, S.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Nakajima, K.; Newhouse, J.; Newstead, J. L.; Ogawa, I.; Phan, D.; Proga, M.; Rajput, A.; Roberts, A.; Rogachev, G.; Salazar, R.; Sander, J.; Senapati, K.; Shimada, M.; Soubasis, B.; Strigari, L.; Tamagawa, Y.; Teizer, W.; Vermaak, J. I. C.; Villano, A. N.; Walker, J.; Webb, B.; Wetzel, Z.; Yadavalli, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    The proposed Mitchell Institute Neutrino Experiment at Reactor (MINER) experiment at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University will search for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering within close proximity (about 2 m) of a 1 MW TRIGA nuclear reactor core using low threshold, cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors. Given the Standard Model cross section of the scattering process and the proposed experimental proximity to the reactor, as many as 5-20 events/kg/day are expected. We discuss the status of preliminary measurements to characterize the main backgrounds for the proposed experiment. Both in situ measurements at the experimental site and simulations using the MCNP and GEANT4 codes are described. A strategy for monitoring backgrounds during data taking is briefly discussed.

  8. Reanalysis of the GALLEX solar neutrino flux and source experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaether, F.; Hampel, W.; Heusser, G.; Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.

    2010-02-01

    After the completion of the gallium solar neutrino experiments at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (GALLEX: 1991-1997; GNO: 1998-2003) we have retrospectively updated the GALLEX results with the help of new technical data that were impossible to acquire for principle reasons before the completion of the low rate measurement phase (that is, before the end of the GNO solar runs). Subsequent high rate experiments have allowed the calibration of absolute internal counter efficiencies and of an advanced pulse shape analysis for counter background discrimination. The updated overall result for GALLEX (only) is 73.4-7.3+7.1 SNU. This is 5.3% below the old value of 77.5-7.8+7.5 SNU (GALLEX Collaboration, W. Hampel et al., 1999 [1]), with a substantially reduced error. A similar reduction is obtained from the reanalysis of the 51Cr neutrino source experiments of 1994/1995.

  9. Neutrino-induced deuteron disintegration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, S.P.; Greenwood, Z.D.; Kropp, W.R.; Price, L.R.; Reines, F.; Sobel, H.W.; Declais, Y.; Etenko, A.; Skorokhvatov, M.

    1999-03-01

    Cross sections for the disintegration of the deuteron via neutral-current (NCD) and charged-current (CCD) interactions with reactor antineutrinos ({bar {nu}}{sub e}d{r_arrow}{bar {nu}}{sub e}pn and {bar {nu}}{sub e}d{r_arrow}e{sup +}nn) are measured to be 6.08{plus_minus}0.77{times}10{sup {minus}45} cm{sup 2} and 9.83{plus_minus}2.04{times}10{sup {minus}45} cm{sup 2} per neutrino, respectively, in excellent agreement with current calculations. Since the experimental NCD value depends upon the CCD value, if we use the theoretical value for the CCD reaction, we obtain the improved value of 5.98{plus_minus}0.54{times}10{sup {minus}45} for the NCD cross section. The neutral-current reaction allows a unique measurement of the isovector{endash}axial vector coupling constant in the hadronic weak interaction, {beta}. In the standard model, this constant is predicted to be exactly 1, independent of the Weinberg angle. We measure a value of {beta}{sup 2}=1.01{plus_minus}0.16. Using the above improved value for the NCD cross section, {beta}{sup 2} becomes 0.99{plus_minus}0.10. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; Reid, Beth A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže E-mail: PVMcDonald@lbl.gov E-mail: BAReid@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2014-05-01

    We present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant — DESI and other experiments can measure the sum of neutrino masses to ∼ 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is ∼ 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. We do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors — these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.

  11. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; Reid, Beth A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže

    2014-05-19

    Here we present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant $-$ DESI and other experiments can measure the sum of neutrino masses to ~ 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. Finally, we do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors $-$ these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.

  12. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; ...

    2014-05-19

    Here we present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant $-$ DESI and other experiments can measuremore » the sum of neutrino masses to ~ 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. Finally, we do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors $-$ these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.« less

  13. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precision measurements in electron and muon neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, S.J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-07-01

    Recently a new method for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the effective values of the atmospheric {Delta}m{sup 2} measured in the electron neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee), with the one measured in the muon neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}), was proposed. If {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) is larger (smaller) than {Delta}m{sup 2} ({mu}{mu}) the hierarchy is of the normal (inverted) type. We re-examine this proposition in the light of two very high precision measurements: {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) that may be accomplished by the phase II of the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment, for example, and {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) that can be envisaged using the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic uncertainties of both measurements, we estimate the parameter region of ({theta}{sub 13}, {delta}) in which the mass hierarchy can be determined. If {theta}{sub 13} is relatively large, sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} {approx}> 0.05, and both of {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) and {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) can be measured with the precision of {approx} 0.5 % it is possible to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at > 95% CL for 0.3{pi} {approx}< {delta} {approx}< 1.7 {pi} for the current best fit values of all the other oscillation parameters.

  14. Neutrino Oscillations with Reactor Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Anatael

    2007-06-01

    Prospect measurements of neutrino oscillations with reactor neutrinos are reviewed in this document. The following items are described: neutrinos oscillations status, reactor neutrino experimental strategy, impact of uncertainties on the neutrino oscillation sensitivity and, finally, the experiments in the field. This is the synthesis of the talk delivered during the NOW2006 conference at Otranto (Italy) during September 2006.

  15. A search for sterile neutrinos at the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pittam, Robert Neil

    2010-01-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, USA. The experiment was designed to study neutrino oscillation phenomena. The vμ beam produced by the NuMI beam facility at FNAL is used along with two functionally identical detectors. The Near Detector at FNAL and a Far Detector 735 km away in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. Comparison of the observed spectra of neutrinos at the two detectors provides the evidence for neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents work on the postulated phenomena of sterile neutrinos. Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos will lead to a deficit in the expected rate of measured Neutral Current interactions at the Far Detector. A technique for selecting Neutral Current events utilizing an Artificial Neural Network is presented with resulting overall efficiency of 91.1% and purity of 66.0%. A method of predicting the expected Charged and Neutral Current energy spectra at the Far Detector given the data recorded at the Near Detector is presented. A model to search for oscillations between sterile and active neutrinos is developed. Sources of systematic uncertainty that can effect the results of the analysis are discussed. The analysis developed is applied to a Standard Model 3 flavour oscillation model as a cross check under the scenarios with and without ve appearance. The oscillation parameters measured by this model are Δm322 = (2.39-0.15+0.23) x 10-3 eV2 and θ23 = 0.727-0.11+0.22 for the no ve appearance result. An analysis of the resulting prediction reveals no evidence for active neutrino disappearance. The analysis is then performed using the 4 flavour neutrino oscillation model developed. Again this is done under the 2 scenarios of ve appearance and no ve appearance

  16. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1: The LBNF and DUNE Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.

    2016-01-22

    This document presents the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) put forward by an international neutrino community to pursue the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF/DUNE), a groundbreaking science experiment for long-baseline neutrino oscillation studies and for neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay searches. The DUNE far detector will be a very large modular liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) located deep underground, coupled to the LBNF multi-megawatt wide-band neutrino beam. DUNE will also have a high-resolution and high-precision near detector.

  17. Contribution of gallium experiments to the understanding of solar physics and neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrin, V. N.

    2013-10-15

    The results of gallium measurements of solar neutrino and measurements with artificial sources of neutrinos are presented. Conclusions are drawn from these results, and the potential of the SAGE experiment for studying transitions of active neutrinos to sterile states for {Delta}m{sup 2} > 0.5 eV{sup 2} and a sensitivity of a few percent to the disappearance of electron neutrinos is examined.

  18. Limits on the neutrino magnetic moment from the MUNU experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munu Collaboration; Daraktchieva, Z.; Lamblin, J.; Link, O.; Amsler, C.; Avenier, M.; Broggini, C.; Busto, J.; Cerna, C.; Gervasio, G.; Jeanneret, P.; Jonkmans, G.; Koang, D. H.; Lebrun, D.; Ould-Saada, F.; Puglierin, G.; Stutz, A.; Tadsen, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.

    2003-07-01

    The MUNU experiment was carried out at the Bugey nuclear power reactor. The aim was the study of ν¯ee- elastic scattering at low energy. The recoil electrons were recorded in a gas time projection chamber, immersed in a tank filled with liquid scintillator serving as veto detector, suppressing in particular Compton electrons. The measured electron recoil spectrum is presented. Upper limits on the neutrino magnetic moment were derived and are discussed.

  19. Background study for the KamLAND reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, K.; Minekawa, Y.

    2008-07-01

    One of the goals of the KamLAND experiment is a search for anti-neutrino oscillation via inverse β decay with the characteristic delayed-coincidence method in the liquid scintillator. For a more precise measurement than previous KamLAND result [1], we have improved the background estimations of (α, n) and fast neutrons. We present the estimated number of backgrounds in our data set from Mar. 2002 to May 2007.

  20. Optimizing the θ 23 octant search in long baseline neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C. R.; Maalampi, J.; Pulido, J.; Vihonen, S.

    2017-09-01

    Determination of the θ 23 octant will be an important goal for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments, as it will show whether the true value of θ 23 lies in the high octant, θ 23 > 45°, or in the low octant, θ 23 < 45°. In this work we investigate the prospects of studying the θ 23 octant in future long baseline neutrino experiments. Using the GLoBES software, we study the sensitivity to θ 23 octant in terms of baseline length and beam sharing and use the LBNO setup as our benchmark. We also show the interference on the octant determination that arises from the unconstrained CP violation angle δ CP. In our results, we show the impact of matter effects on the octant determination potential and establish a connection between the beam sharing and mass hierarchy.

  1. Neutrinos in Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2008-01-24

    I give an overview of the effects of neutrinos on cosmology, focussing in particular on the role played by neutrinos in the evolution of cosmological perturbations. I discuss how recent observations of the cosmic microwave background and the large-scale structure of galaxies can probe neutrino masses with greater precision than current laboratory experiments. I describe several new techniques that will be used to probe cosmology in the future.

  2. Creation of neutrino laboratory for carrying out experiment on search for a sterile neutrino at the SM-3 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoilov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Zinov'ev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gruzinskii, N. V.; Solovei, V. A.; Chernyi, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Martem'yanov, V. P.; Tsinoev, V. G.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I.; Petelin, A. L.; Pavlov, S. V.; Izhutov, A. L.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K.; Gromov, M. O.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Matrosov, L. N.; Matrosova, M. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    To check the existence of a sterile neutrino, a neutrino laboratory aimed at searching reactor antineutrino oscillations is created at the SM-3 reactor. A prototype of a neutrino detector with a scintillator volume of 400 L is moved at distances 6-11 m from the core of the reactor. Background conditions are measured. It is shown that the cosmic rays background is the main problem in the experiment. The prospects of the search for reactor antineutrino oscillations at short distances are discussed.

  3. Status of the JUNO reactor anti-neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haoqi; JUNO Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is a reactor antineutrino experiment with the aim to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The detector will be filled with 20 kilotons of liquid scintillator and instrumented with 18000 20-inch PMTs to achieve an unprecedented energy resolution of 3%@1 MeV. A 35.4 m diameter acrylic sphere will be built as a liquid scintillator vessel.The detector will be constructed in a 700-m-deep-underground laboratory to reduce cosmogenic muon flux. An external veto cosisting of a water Cherenkov detector and a top tracker will be used for cosmogenic muon detection and background reduction. The mass hierarchy sensitivity is expected to reach 3-4σ after 6 years of data taking. Civil construction and detector R&D are underway. Data taking is expected to start in 2020.

  4. Measuring neutrino masses with a future galaxy survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk

    2012-11-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a EUCLID-like photometric galaxy and cosmic shear survey will be able to constrain the absolute neutrino mass scale. Adopting conservative assumptions about the survey specifications and assuming complete ignorance of the galaxy bias, we estimate that the minimum mass sum of Σm{sub ν} ≅ 0.06 eV in the normal hierarchy can be detected at 1.5σ to 2.5σ significance, depending on the model complexity, using a combination of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements in conjunction with CMB temperature and polarisation observations from PLANCK. With better knowledge of the galaxy bias, the significance of the detection could potentially reach 5.4σ. Interestingly, neither PLANCK+shear nor PLANCK+galaxy alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined effect of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements that breaks the persistent degeneracies between the neutrino mass, the physical matter density, and the Hubble parameter. Notwithstanding this remarkable sensitivity to Σm{sub ν}, EUCLID-like shear and galaxy data will not be sensitive to the exact mass spectrum of the neutrino sector; no significant bias ( < 1σ) in the parameter estimation is induced by fitting inaccurate models of the neutrino mass splittings to the mock data, nor does the goodness-of-fit of these models suffer any significant degradation relative to the true one (Δχ{sub eff}{sup 2} < 1)

  5. Constraints on dark photon from neutrino-electron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilmiş, S.; Turan, I.; Aliev, T. M.; Deniz, M.; Singh, L.; Wong, H. T.

    2015-08-01

    A possible manifestation of an additional light gauge boson A', named a dark photon, associated with a group U (1 )B -L , is studied in neutrino-electron scattering experiments. The exclusion plot on the coupling constant gB -L and the dark photon mass MA' is obtained. It is shown that the contributions of interference terms between the dark photon and the Standard Model are important. The interference effects are studied and compared with data sets from TEXONO, GEMMA, BOREXINO, and LSND, as well as CHARM II experiments. Our results provide more stringent bounds to some regions of parameter space.

  6. Late Time Neutrino Masses, the LSND Experiment and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Z.; Hall, Lawrence J.; Oliver, Steven J.; Perelstein, Maxim

    2004-05-07

    Models with low-scale breaking of global symmetries in the neutrino sector provide an alternative to the seesaw mechanism for understanding why neutrinos are light. Such models can easily incorporate light sterile neutrinos required by the LSND experiment. Furthermore, the constraints on the sterile neutrino properties from nucleosynthesis and large scale structure can be removed due to the non-conventional cosmological evolution of neutrino masses and densities. We present explicit, fully realistic supersymmetric models, and discuss the characteristic signatures predicted in the angular distributions of the cosmic microwave background.

  7. Final results on the neutrino magnetic moment from the MUNU experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraktchieva, Z.; Amsler, C.; Avenier, M.; Broggini, C.; Busto, J.; Cerna, C.; Juget, F.; Koang, D. H.; Lamblin, J.; Lebrun, D.; Link, O.; Puglierin, G.; Stutz, A.; Tadsen, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Zacek, V.; MUNU Collaboration

    2005-06-01

    The MUNU detector was designed to study νbaree- elastic scattering at low energy. The central component is a Time Projection Chamber filled with CF4 gas, surrounded by an anti-Compton detector. The experiment was carried out at the Bugey (France) nuclear reactor. In this Letter we present the final analysis of the data recorded at 3 bar and 1 bar pressure. Both the energy and the scattering angle of the recoil electron are measured. From the 3 bar data a new upper limit on the neutrino magnetic moment μeshort < 9 ×10-11μB at 90% CL was derived. At 1 bar electron tracks down to 150 keV were reconstructed, demonstrating the potentiality of the experimental technique for future applications in low energy neutrino physics.

  8. Final results on the neutrino magnetic moment from the MUNU experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munu Collaboration; Daraktchieva, Z.; Amsler, C.; Avenier, M.; Broggini, C.; Busto, J.; Cerna, C.; Juget, F.; Koang, D. H.; Lamblin, J.; Lebrun, D.; Link, O.; Puglierin, G.; Stutz, A.; Tadsen, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Zacek, V.

    2005-06-01

    The MUNU detector was designed to study νe elastic scattering at low energy. The central component is a Time Projection Chamber filled with CF4 gas, surrounded by an anti-Compton detector. The experiment was carried out at the Bugey (France) nuclear reactor. In this Letter we present the final analysis of the data recorded at 3 bar and 1 bar pressure. Both the energy and the scattering angle of the recoil electron are measured. From the 3 bar data a new upper limit on the neutrino magnetic moment μeshort<9×10μ at 90% CL was derived. At 1 bar electron tracks down to 150 keV were reconstructed, demonstrating the potentiality of the experimental technique for future applications in low energy neutrino physics.

  9. Discovery of τ Neutrino Appearance in the CNGS Neutrino Beam with the OPERA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, N.; Aleksandrov, A.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bender, D.; Bertolin, A.; Bodnarchuk, I.; Bozza, C.; Brugnera, R.; Buonaura, A.; Buontempo, S.; Büttner, B.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chukanov, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; de Lellis, G.; de Serio, M.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; di Crescenzo, A.; di Ferdinando, D.; di Marco, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Ereditato, A.; Fini, R. A.; Fornari, F.; Fukuda, T.; Galati, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Goldberg, J.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Guler, A. M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hara, T.; Hayakawa, H.; Hollnagel, A.; Hosseini, B.; Ishiguro, K.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Kamiscioglu, C.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Laudisio, F.; Lauria, A.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Loverre, P. F.; Malgin, A.; Malenica, M.; Mandrioli, G.; Matsuo, T.; Matsushita, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meregaglia, A.; Mikado, S.; Miyanishi, M.; Mizutani, F.; Monacelli, P.; Montesi, M. C.; Morishima, K.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Niwa, K.; Ogawa, S.; Olchevsky, A.; Omura, T.; Ozaki, K.; Paoloni, A.; Paparella, L.; Park, B. D.; Park, I. G.; Pasqualini, L.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pessard, H.; Pistillo, C.; Podgrudkov, D.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Roda, M.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Rosa, G.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Shakirianova, I.; Shchedrina, T.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shiraishi, T.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Sotnikov, A.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stellacci, S. M.; Stipcevic, M.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tioukov, V.; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladymyrov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J. L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Yoon, C. S.; Zemskova, S.; Opera Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The OPERA experiment was designed to search for νμ→ντ oscillations in appearance mode, i.e., by detecting the τ leptons produced in charged current ντ interactions. The experiment took data from 2008 to 2012 in the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso beam. The observation of the νμ→ντ appearance, achieved with four candidate events in a subsample of the data, was previously reported. In this Letter, a fifth ντ candidate event, found in an enlarged data sample, is described. Together with a further reduction of the expected background, the candidate events detected so far allow us to assess the discovery of νμ→ντ oscillations in appearance mode with a significance larger than 5 σ .

  10. Discovery of τ Neutrino Appearance in the CNGS Neutrino Beam with the OPERA Experiment.

    PubMed

    Agafonova, N; Aleksandrov, A; Anokhina, A; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Bender, D; Bertolin, A; Bodnarchuk, I; Bozza, C; Brugnera, R; Buonaura, A; Buontempo, S; Büttner, B; Chernyavsky, M; Chukanov, A; Consiglio, L; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; De Serio, M; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Di Crescenzo, A; Di Ferdinando, D; Di Marco, N; Dmitrievski, S; Dracos, M; Duchesneau, D; Dusini, S; Dzhatdoev, T; Ebert, J; Ereditato, A; Fini, R A; Fornari, F; Fukuda, T; Galati, G; Garfagnini, A; Goldberg, J; Gornushkin, Y; Grella, G; Guler, A M; Gustavino, C; Hagner, C; Hara, T; Hayakawa, H; Hollnagel, A; Hosseini, B; Ishiguro, K; Jakovcic, K; Jollet, C; Kamiscioglu, C; Kamiscioglu, M; Kim, J H; Kim, S H; Kitagawa, N; Klicek, B; Kodama, K; Komatsu, M; Kose, U; Kreslo, I; Laudisio, F; Lauria, A; Ljubicic, A; Longhin, A; Loverre, P F; Malgin, A; Malenica, M; Mandrioli, G; Matsuo, T; Matsushita, T; Matveev, V; Mauri, N; Medinaceli, E; Meregaglia, A; Mikado, S; Miyanishi, M; Mizutani, F; Monacelli, P; Montesi, M C; Morishima, K; Muciaccia, M T; Naganawa, N; Naka, T; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Nakatsuka, Y; Niwa, K; Ogawa, S; Olchevsky, A; Omura, T; Ozaki, K; Paoloni, A; Paparella, L; Park, B D; Park, I G; Pasqualini, L; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Pessard, H; Pistillo, C; Podgrudkov, D; Polukhina, N; Pozzato, M; Pupilli, F; Roda, M; Roganova, T; Rokujo, H; Rosa, G; Ryazhskaya, O; Sato, O; Schembri, A; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Shakirianova, I; Shchedrina, T; Sheshukov, A; Shibuya, H; Shiraishi, T; Shoziyoev, G; Simone, S; Sioli, M; Sirignano, C; Sirri, G; Sotnikov, A; Spinetti, M; Stanco, L; Starkov, N; Stellacci, S M; Stipcevic, M; Strolin, P; Takahashi, S; Tenti, M; Terranova, F; Tioukov, V; Tufanli, S; Vilain, P; Vladymyrov, M; Votano, L; Vuilleumier, J L; Wilquet, G; Wonsak, B; Yoon, C S; Zemskova, S

    2015-09-18

    The OPERA experiment was designed to search for ν_{μ}→ν_{τ} oscillations in appearance mode, i.e., by detecting the τ leptons produced in charged current ν_{τ} interactions. The experiment took data from 2008 to 2012 in the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso beam. The observation of the ν_{μ}→ν_{τ} appearance, achieved with four candidate events in a subsample of the data, was previously reported. In this Letter, a fifth ν_{τ} candidate event, found in an enlarged data sample, is described. Together with a further reduction of the expected background, the candidate events detected so far allow us to assess the discovery of ν_{μ}→ν_{τ} oscillations in appearance mode with a significance larger than 5σ.

  11. Implications of the Recent Results of Solar Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, M.; Petcov, S. T.

    2002-12-01

    Detailed predictions for the D-N asymmetry for the Super-Kamiokande and SNO experiments, as well as for the ratio of the CC and NC event rates measured by SNO, in the cases of the LMA MSW and of the LOW solutions of the solar neutrino problem, are presented. The possibilities to use the forthcoming SNO data on these two observables to discriminate between the LMA and LOW solutions and/or to further constrain the regions of the two solutions are also discussed.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of the Neutrino-4 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Serebrov, A. P. Fomin, A. K.; Onegin, M. S.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Matrosov, L. N.

    2015-12-15

    Monte Carlo simulation of the two-section reactor antineutrino detector of the Neutrino-4 experiment is carried out. The scintillation-type detector is based on the inverse beta-decay reaction. The antineutrino is recorded by two successive signals from the positron and the neutron. The simulation of the detector sections and the active shielding is performed. As a result of the simulation, the distributions of photomultiplier signals from the positron and the neutron are obtained. The efficiency of the detector depending on the signal recording thresholds is calculated.

  13. Electron neutrino appearance in the NOvA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catano-Mur, E.; NOvA Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    NOvA is an off-axis, two-detector experiment studying neutrino oscillations with the νµ beam from Fermilab. This paper describes the νe appearance analysis, including data-driven constraints from Near Detector measurements. The data set corresponds to an exposure equivalent to 6.05 × 1020 protons-on-target in the Far Detector. We observed 33 νe candidates with a predicted background of 8.2 ± 0.8 (syst.), for a significance of appearance higher than 8σ. Preliminary results for the allowed values of δCP and θ 23 in both hierarchies are presented.

  14. Ion source issues for the DAEδALUS neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Jose R. Barletta, William A.; Toups, Matthew H.; Conrad, Janet; Liu, Y.; Bannister, Mark E.; Havener, C. C.; Vane, Randy

    2014-02-15

    The DAEδALUS experiment calls for 10 mA of protons at 800 MeV on a neutrino-producing target. To achieve this record-setting current from a cyclotron system, H{sub 2}{sup +} ions will be accelerated. Loosely bound vibrationally excited H{sub 2}{sup +} ions inevitably produced in conventional ion sources will be Lorentz stripped at the highest energies. Presence of these states was confirmed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and strategies were investigated to quench them, leading to a proposed R and D effort towards a suitable ion source for these high-power cyclotrons.

  15. Ion source issues for the DAEδALUS neutrino experiment.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose R; Barletta, William A; Toups, Matthew H; Conrad, Janet; Liu, Y; Bannister, Mark E; Havener, C C; Vane, Randy

    2014-02-01

    The DAEδALUS experiment calls for 10 mA of protons at 800 MeV on a neutrino-producing target. To achieve this record-setting current from a cyclotron system, H2 (+) ions will be accelerated. Loosely bound vibrationally excited H2 (+) ions inevitably produced in conventional ion sources will be Lorentz stripped at the highest energies. Presence of these states was confirmed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and strategies were investigated to quench them, leading to a proposed R&D effort towards a suitable ion source for these high-power cyclotrons.

  16. Final scientific and technical report: New experiments to measure the neutrino mass scale

    SciTech Connect

    Monreal, Benjamin

    2016-11-19

    In this work, we made material progress towards future measurements of the mass of the neutrino. The neutrino is a fundamental particle, first observed in the 1950s and subjected to particularly intense study over the past 20 years. It is now known to have some, non-zero mass, but we are in an unusual situation of knowing the mass exists but not knowing what value it takes. The mass may be determined by precise measurements of certain radioactive decay distributions, particularly the beta decay of tritium. The KATRIN experiment is an international project which is nearing the beginning of a tritium measurement campaign using a large electrostatic spectrumeter. This research included participation in KATRIN, including construction and delivery of a key calibration subsystem, the ``Rear Section''. To obtain sensitivity beyond KATRIN's, new techniques are required; this work included R\\&D on a new technique we call CRES (Cyclotron Resonance Electron Spectroscopy) which has promise to enable even-more-sensitive tritium decay measurements. We successfully carried out CRES spectroscopy in a model system in 2014, making an important step towards the design of a next-generation tritium experiment with new neutrino mass measurement abilities.

  17. Charmonium production at neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, A.A.; Torma, T.

    1999-11-01

    At existing and planned neutrino factories (high energy and high intensity neutrino beam facilities) precision studies of QCD in neutrino-nucleon interactions are a realistic opportunity. We investigate charmonium production in fixed target neutrino experiments. We find that J/{psi} production in neutrino-nucleon collisions is dominated by the color octet {sup 3}S{sub 1} nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) matrix element in a neutral current process, which is not accessible in photoproduction or leptoproduction. Neutrino experiments at a future Muon Collider will acquire a sufficient event rate to accurately measure color octet matrix element contributions. The currently running high energy neutrino experiments NOMAD and NuTeV could also observe several such events. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Unparticle physics and neutrino phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Bolanos, A.; Miranda, O. G.; Moura, C. A.; Rashba, T. I.

    2009-04-01

    We have constrained unparticle interactions with neutrinos and electrons using available data on neutrino-electron elastic scattering and the four CERN LEP experiments data on mono photon production. We have found that, for neutrino-electron elastic scattering, the MUNU experiment gives better constraints than previous reported limits in the region d>1.5. The results are compared with the current astrophysical limits, pointing out the cases where these limits may or may not apply. We also discuss the sensitivity of future experiments to unparticle physics. In particular, we show that the measurement of coherent reactor neutrino scattering off nuclei could provide a good sensitivity to the couplings of unparticle interaction with neutrinos and quarks. We also discuss the case of future neutrino-electron experiments as well as the International Linear Collider.

  19. Identifying ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray accelerators with future ultrahigh-energy neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Miller, M. Coleman; Murase, Kohta; Oikonomou, Foteini

    2016-12-01

    The detection of ultrahigh-energy (UHE) neutrino sources would contribute significantly to solving the decades-old mystery of the origin of the highest-energy cosmic rays. We investigate the ability of a future UHE neutrino detector to identify the brightest neutrino point sources, by exploring the parameter space of the total number of observed events and the angular resolution of the detector. The favored parameter region can be translated to requirements for the effective area, sky coverage and angular resolution of future detectors, for a given source number density and evolution history. Moreover, by studying the typical distance to sources that are expected to emit more than one event for a given diffuse neutrino flux, we find that a significant fraction of the identifiable UHE neutrino sources may be located in the nearby Universe if the source number density is above ~10-6 Mpc-3. If sources are powerful and rare enough, as predicted in blazar scenarios, they can first be detected at distant locations. Our result also suggests that if UHE cosmic-ray accelerators are neither beamed nor transients, it will be possible to associate the detected UHE neutrino sources with nearby UHE cosmic-ray and gamma-ray sources, and that they may also be observed using other messengers, including ones with limited horizons such as TeV gamma rays, UHE gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for a gtrsim5σ detection of UHE neutrino sources with a uniform density, ns~10-7-10-5 Mpc-3, at least ~100-1000 events and sub-degree angular resolution are needed, and the results depend on the source evolution model.

  20. Neutrino astrophysics experiments beneath the sea and ice.

    PubMed

    Halzen, Francis

    2007-01-05

    Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s. A neutrino detector at the bottom of Lake Baikal, the deployment of detectors in the Mediterranean Sea, and the construction of a kilometer-scale neutrino telescope at the South Pole exemplify current efforts to realize this dream.

  1. Observing a light dark matter beam with neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniverville, Patrick; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam

    2011-10-01

    We consider the sensitivity of fixed-target neutrino experiments at the luminosity frontier to light stable states, such as those present in models of MeV-scale dark matter. To ensure the correct thermal relic abundance, such states must annihilate via light mediators, which in turn provide an access portal for direct production in colliders or fixed targets. Indeed, this framework endows the neutrino beams produced at fixed-target facilities with a companion “dark matter beam,” which may be detected via an excess of elastic scattering events off electrons or nuclei in the (near-)detector. We study the high-luminosity proton fixed-target experiments at LSND and MiniBooNE, and determine that the ensuing sensitivity to light dark matter generally surpasses that of other direct probes. For scenarios with a kinetically-mixed U(1)' vector mediator of mass mV, we find that a large volume of parameter space is excluded for mDM˜1-5MeV, covering vector masses 2mDM≲mV≲mη and a range of kinetic mixing parameters reaching as low as κ˜10-5. The corresponding MeV-scale dark matter scenarios motivated by an explanation of the galactic 511 keV line are thus strongly constrained.

  2. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precise measurements of two delta m**2 in electron-neutrino and muon-neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, Stephen J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-09-01

    In this talk, the authors discuss the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the two effective atmospheric neutrino mass squared differences measured, respectively, in electron, and in muon neutrino disappearance oscillation experiments. if the former, is larger (smaller) than the latter, the mass hierarchy is of normal (inverted) type. They consider two very high precision (a few per mil) measurements of such mass squared differences by the phase II of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) experiment and by the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic errors of both measurements, they determine the region of sensitivities where the mass hierarchy can be distinguished. Due to the tight space limitation, they present only the general idea and show a few most important plots.

  3. Neutrinos from colliding wind binaries: future prospects for PINGU and ORCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker Tjus, J.

    2014-05-01

    Massive stars play an important role in explaining the cosmic ray spectrum below the knee, possibly even up to the ankle, i.e. up to energies of 1015 or 1018.5 eV, respectively. In particular, Supernova Remnants are discussed as one of the main candidates to explain the cosmic ray spectrum. Even before their violent deaths, during the stars' regular life times, cosmic rays can be accelerated in wind environments. High-energy gamma-ray measurements indicate hadronic acceleration binary systems, leading to both periodic gamma-ray emission from binaries like LSI + 60 303 and continuous emission from colliding wind environments like η-Carinae. The detection of neutrinos and photons from hadronic interactions are one of the most promising methods to identify particle acceleration sites. In this paper, future prospects to detect neutrinos from colliding wind environments in massive stars are investigated. In particular, the seven most promising candidates for emission from colliding wind binaries are investigated to provide an estimate of the signal strength. The expected signal of a single source is about a factor of 5-10 below the current IceCube sensitivity and it is therefore not accessible at the moment. What is discussed in addition is future the possibility to measure low-energy neutrino sources with detectors like PINGU and ORCA: the minimum of the atmospheric neutrino flux at around 25 GeV from neutrino oscillations provides an opportunity to reduce the background and increase the significance to searches for GeV-TeV neutrino sources. This paper presents the first idea, detailed studies including the detector's effective areas will be necessary in the future to test the feasibility of such an approach.

  4. Neutrino-4 experiment on the search for a sterile neutrino at the SM-3 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Serebrov, A. P. Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoylov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gruzinsky, N. V.; Solovey, V. A.; Chernyi, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Martemyanov, V. P.; Tsinoev, V. G.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I.; Petelin, A. L.; Pavlov, S. V.; Izhutov, A. L.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K.; and others

    2015-10-15

    In view of the possibility of the existence of a sterile neutrino, test measurements of the dependence of the reactor antineutrino flux on the distance from the reactor core has been performed on SM-2 reactor with the Neutrino-2 detector model in the range of 6–11 m. Prospects of the search for reactor antineutrinos at short distances have been discussed.

  5. Precise predictions for Dirac neutrino mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Gauhar; Abyaneh, Mehran Zahiri; Srivastava, Rahul

    2017-04-01

    The neutrino mixing parameters are thoroughly studied using renormalization-group evolution of Dirac neutrinos with recently proposed parametrization of the neutrino mixing angles referred to as "high-scale mixing relations." The correlations among all neutrino mixing and C P violating observables are investigated. The predictions for the neutrino mixing angle θ23 are precise, and could be easily tested by ongoing and future experiments. We observe that the high-scale mixing unification hypothesis is incompatible with Dirac neutrinos due to updated experimental data.

  6. First results from the 51Cr neutrino source experiment with the GALLEX detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmann, P.; Fockenbrock, R.; Hampel, W.; Heusser, G.; Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Pernicka, E.; Pezzoni, S.; Rönn, U.; Sann, M.; Spielker, F.; Wink, R.; Wójcik, M.; Ammon, R. V.; Ebert, K. H.; Fritsch, T.; Heidt, D.; Henrich, E.; Schlosser, C.; Stieglitz, L.; Weirich, F.; Balata, M.; Lalla, H.; Bellotti, E.; Cattadori, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Ferrari, N.; Fiorini, E.; Zanotti, L.; Altmann, M.; Feilitzsch, F. V.; Mößbauer, R.; Schanda, U.; Berthomieu, G.; Schatzman, E.; Carmi, I.; Dostrovsky, I.; Bacci, C.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; D'Angelo, S.; Paoluzi, L.; Bevilacqua, A.; Charbit, S.; Cribier, M.; Dupont, G.; Gosset, L.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Tao, C.; Vignaud, D.; Boger, J.; Hahn, R. L.; Hartmann, F. X.; Rowley, J. K.; Stoenner, R. W.; Weneser, J.; GALLEX Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    The radiochemical GALLEX experiment, which has been measuring the solar neutrino flux since May 1991, has performed an investigation with an intense man-made 51Cr neutrino source (61.9 ± 1.2 PBq). The source, produced via neutron irradiation of ≈ 36 kg of chromium enriched in 50Cr, primarily emits 746 keV neutrinos. It was placed for a period of 3.5 months in the reentrant tube in the GALLEX tank, to expose the gallium chloride target to a known neutrino flux. This experiment provides the ratio, R, of the production rate of Cr-produced 71Ge measured in these source exposures to the rate expected from the known source activity: R = 1.04 ± 0.12. This result not only constitutes the first observation of low-energy neutrinos from a terrestrial source, but also (a) provides an overall check of GALLEX, indicating that there are no significant experimental artifacts or unknown errors at the 10% level that are comparable to the 40% deficit in observed solar neutrino signal, and (b) directly demonstrates for the first time, using a man-made neutrino source, the validity of the basic principles of radiochemical methods used to detect rare events (at the level of 10 atoms or less). Because of the close similarity in neutrino energy spectra from 51Cr and from the solar 7Be branch, this source experiment also shows that the gallium detector is sensitive to 7Be neutrinos with full efficiency.

  7. Photon Detection System Designs for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, Denver

    2015-11-19

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the DUNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. To maximize the active area while maintaining a small photocathode coverage, the experiment will utilize a design based on plastic light guides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, along with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. This report presents recent preliminary performance measurements of this baseline design and several alternative designs which promise significant improvements in sensitivity to low-energy interactions.

  8. Photon detection system designs for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the DUNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. To maximize the active area while maintaining a small photocathode coverage, the experiment will utilize a design based on plastic light guides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, along with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. This report presents recent preliminary performance measurements of this baseline design and several alternative designs which promise significant improvements in sensitivity to low-energy interactions.

  9. Results from the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, K. V.; An, F. P.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Beriguete, W.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Brown, R. L.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Carr, R.; Chan, W. T.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, Y.; Chasman, C.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, X. C.; Chen, X. H.; Chen, X. S.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. X.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Draeger, E.; Du, X. F.; Dwyer, D.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Fang, S. D.; Fu, J. Y.; Fu, Z. W.; Ge, L. Q.; Gill, R. L.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Gornushkin, Y. A.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hahn, R. L.; Hans, S.; Hao, H. F.; He, M.; He, Q.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Hinrichs, P.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Issakov, V.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. L.; Ji, X. P.; Jiang, H. J.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lai, C. Y.; Lai, W. C.; Lai, W. H.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Leung, K. Y.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. B.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y. C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, Y. B.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Luk, A.; Luk, K. B.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. Q.; McDonald, K. T.; McFarlane, M. C.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mohapatra, D.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Nemchenok, I.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngai, W. K.; Nie, Y. B.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevski, A.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Shao, B. B.; Shih, K.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tagg, N.; Tam, Y. H.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tang, X.; Themann, H.; Torun, Y.; Trentalange, S.; Tsai, O.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Y.; Wang, L. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webber, D. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wei, Y. D.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Williamson, Y.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Worcester, E. T.; Wu, F. F.; Wu, Q.; Xi, J. B.; Xia, D. M.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J.; Xu, J.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, L.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y. S.; Young, B. L.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment was designed to achieve a sensitivity on the value of sin2 2θ13 to better than 0.01 at 90% CL. The experiment consists of eight antineutrino detectors installed underground at different baselines from six nuclear reactors. With data collected with six antineutrino detectors for 55 days, Daya Bay announced the discovery of a non-zero value for sin2 2θ13 with a significance of 5.2 standard deviations in March 2012. The most recent analysis with 139 days of data acquired in a six-detector configuration yields sin2 2θ13 = 0.089 ± 0.010 (stat.) ± 0.005 (syst.), which is the most precise measurement of sin2 2θ13 to date.

  10. Results from the Palo Verde neutrino oscillation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, F.; Busenitz, J.; Cook, B.; Gratta, G.; Henrikson, H.; Kornis, J.; Lawrence, D.; Lee, K. B.; McKinny, K.; Miller, L.

    2000-10-01

    The {nu}(bar sign){sub e} flux and spectrum have been measured at a distance of about 800 m from the reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented Gd-loaded liquid scintillator detector. Correlated positron-neutron events from the reaction {nu}(bar sign){sub e}p{yields}e{sup +}n were recorded for a period of 200 d including 55 d with one of the three reactors off for refueling. Backgrounds were accounted for by making use of the reactor-on and reactor-off cycles, and also with a novel technique based on the difference between signal and background under reversal of the e{sup +} and n portions of the events. A detailed description of the detector calibration, background subtraction, and data analysis is presented here. Results from the experiment show no evidence for neutrino oscillations. {nu}(bar sign){sub e}{yields}{nu}(bar sign){sub x} oscillations were excluded at 90% C.L. for {delta}m{sup 2}>1.12x10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} for full mixing and sin{sup 2}2{theta}>0.21 for large {delta}m{sup 2}. These results support the conclusion that the observed atmospheric neutrino oscillations do not involve {nu}{sub e}. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Recent Results from the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, En-Chuan

    2016-11-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment is designed to precisely measure the mixing parameter sin2 2θ13 via relative measurements with eight functionally identical antineutrino detectors (ADs). In 2012, Daya Bay has first measured a non-zero sin2 2θ13 value with a significance larger than 5σ with the first six ADs. With the installation of two new ADs to complete the full configuration, Daya Bay has continued to increase statistics and lower systematic uncertainties for better precision of sin2 2θ13 and for the exploration of other physics topics. In this proceeding, the latest analysis results of sin2 2θ13 and |Δm 2 ee|, including a measurement made with neutron capture on Gadolinium and an independent measurement made with neutron capture on hydrogen are presented. The latest results of the search for sterile neutrino in the mass splitting range of 10-3 eV2 < |Δm 2 41| < 0.3 eV2 and the absolute measurement of the rate and energy spectrum of reactor antineutrinos will also be presented.

  12. Neutrino '88. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneps, J.; Kafka, T.; Mann, W. A.; Nath, P.

    Contents: 1. Neutrino mass. 2. Neutrino oscillations. 3. Double beta decay. 4. Solar neutrinos. 5. Neutrinos from supernovae. 6. Neutrino interactions at accelerators. 7. New detectors for neutrino processes. 8. Neutrino interactions at accelerators II. 9. W, Z, and the standard model. 10. "Fred Reines at 70" Fest. 11. Nucleon decay, the standard model, and beyond. 12. Neutrinos: Earth, atmosphere, Sun, and galaxies. 13. Dark matter and cosmology. 14. Theoretical topics. 15. Future prospects.

  13. The status of the solar neutrino problem and the Russian-American gallium experiment (SAGE)

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.

    1994-04-01

    Perhaps the most outstanding discrepancy between prediction and measurements in current particle physics comes from the solar neutrino problem, in which a large deficit of high-energy solar neutrinos is observed. Many Nonstandard Solar Models have been invoked to try to reduce the predicted flux, but all have run into problems in trying to reproduce other measured parameters (e.g., the luminosity) of the Sun. Other explanations involving new physics such as neutrino decay and neutrino oscillations, etc. have also been proffered. Again, most of these explanations have been ruled out by either laboratory or astrophysical measurements. It appears that perhaps the most likely particle physics solution is that of matter enhanced neutrino oscillation, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) oscillations. Two new radiochemical gallium experiments, which have a low enough threshold to be sensitive to the dominant flux of low-energy p-p neutrinos, now also report a deficit and also favor a particle physics solution.

  14. Preliminary results from the Russian-American gallium experiment Cr-neutrino source measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.R.; Abdurashitov, J.N.; Bowles, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Russian-American Gallium Experiment has been collecting solar neutrino data since early 1990. The flux measurement of solar neutrinos is well below that expected from solar models. We discuss the initial results of a measurement of experimental efficiencies by exposing the gallium target to neutrinos from an artificial source. The capture rate of neutrinos from this source is very close to that which is expected. The result can be expressed as a ratio of the measured capture rate to the anticipated rate from the source activity. This ratio is 0.93 + 0.15, {minus}0.17 where the systematic and statistical errors have been combined. To first order the experimental efficiencies are in agreement with those determined during solar neutrino measurements and in previous auxiliary measurements. One must conclude that the discrepancy between the measured solar neutrino flux and that predicted by the solar models can not arise from an experimental artifact. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-15

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (∼ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  16. Neutrino physics, superbeams and the neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Boris Kayser

    2003-10-14

    We summarize what has been learned about the neutrino mass spectrum and neutrino mixing, identify interesting open questions that can be answered by accelerator neutrino facilities of the future, and discuss the importance and physics of answering them.

  17. Solar neutrinos.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonesi, O.

    1993-12-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to review the progress made in the field of solar-neutrino physics with the results of the last-generation experiments together with the new perspectives suggested by the future projects. An elementary introduction to energy production mechanisms and stellar models is given. Neutrino properties and oscillations are discussed with particular interest in matter effects. Present experiments and future projects are reviewed. Particular attention is devoted to the compelling background and low-statistics problems. Finally, presently available results from running experiments are discussed, in the framework of the SNP. Some conclusions on the possibilities of the new proposed projects to actually slove the problem are also given.

  18. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations. PMID:20431258

  19. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations.

  20. A new-concept calorimeter for future neutrino beams based on Kaon tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Terranova, F.

    2016-07-01

    Neutrino cross-section measurements are an essential requirement for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments and they are presently limited by uncertainties on neutrino fluxes. In [1] we propose to instrument a neutrino decay tunnel to detect large angle positrons and tag the three-body semileptonic K+ →e+π0νe decays. In such a facility the absolute electron neutrino flux could be determined with unprecedented precision (O(1%)). An e+/π+ separation capability of about 2% as well as a high e+ efficiency is required for a diffuse particle source over a length of several tens of meters. Additional constraints, due to the harsh beam environment, involve radiation hardness and fast response. For this purpose we propose a specialized shashlik calorimeter (copper-scintillator) with a compact readout based on small-area Silicon PhotoMultipliers coupled to WLS fibers. The setup would allow an effective longitudinal segmentation for electron/hadron separation, reducing the dead zones introduced by fiber bundling. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations are in progress. The construction of a small prototype and exposures to pion and electron beams are foreseen.

  1. Energy reconstruction in the long-baseline neutrino experiment.

    PubMed

    Mosel, U; Lalakulich, O; Gallmeister, K

    2014-04-18

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment aims at measuring fundamental physical parameters to high precision and exploring physics beyond the standard model. Nuclear targets introduce complications towards that aim. We investigate the uncertainties in the energy reconstruction, based on quasielastic scattering relations, due to nuclear effects. The reconstructed event distributions as a function of energy tend to be smeared out and shifted by several 100 MeV in their oscillatory structure if standard event selection is used. We show that a more restrictive experimental event selection offers the possibility to reach the accuracy needed for a determination of the mass ordering and the CP-violating phase. Quasielastic-based energy reconstruction could thus be a viable alternative to the calorimetric reconstruction also at higher energies.

  2. Advancements in Solar Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miramonti, Lino; Antonelli, Vito

    2013-03-01

    We review the results of solar neutrino physics, with particular attention to the data obtained and the analyses performed in the last decades, which were determinant to solve the solar neutrino problem (SNP), proving that neutrinos are massive and oscillating particles and contributing to refine the solar models. We also discuss the perspectives of the presently running experiments in this sector and of the ones planned for the near future and the impact they can have on elementary particle physics and astrophysics.

  3. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  4. CP violation and matter effect in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arafune, J.; Koike, M.; Sato, J.

    1997-09-01

    We show simple methods of how to separate pure CP-violating effects from matter effects in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with three generations of neutrinos. We give compact formulas for neutrino oscillation probabilities assuming one of the three neutrino masses (presumably {nu}{sub {tau}} mass) to be much larger than the other masses and the effective mass due to the matter effect. Two methods are shown. One is to observe envelopes of the curves of oscillation probabilities as functions of neutrino energy; a merit of this method is that only a single detector is enough to determine the presence of CP violation. The other is to compare experiments with at least two different baseline lengths; this has the merit that it needs only a narrow energy range of oscillation data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Design and analysis of a 1-ton prototype of the Jinping Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zongyi; Wang, Yuanqing; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin; Du, Xinxi; Zhang, Tianxiong; Guo, Ziyi; Yuan, Huanxin

    2017-05-01

    The Jinping Neutrino Experiment will perform an in-depth research on solar neutrinos and geo-neutrinos. Two structural options (i.e., cylindrical and spherical schemes) are proposed for the Jinping detector based on other successful underground neutrino detectors. Several key factors in the design are also discussed in detail. A 1-ton prototype of the Jinping experiment is proposed based on physics requirements. Subsequently, the structural design, installation procedure, and mechanical analysis of the neutrino detector prototype are discussed. The results show that the maximum Mises stresses on the acrylic vessel, stainless steel truss, and the tank are all lower than the design values of the strengths. The stability requirement of the stainless steel truss in the detector prototype is satisfied. Consequently, the structural scheme for the 1-ton prototype is safe and reliable.

  6. Neutrino-oscillation experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.; Aronson, S.A.; Connolly, P.L.; Gibbard, B.G.; Maeda, Y.; Murtagh, M.J.; Murtagh, S.J.; Terada, S.; Callas, J.; Cutts, D.

    1983-01-01

    Two groups have submitted major proposals for neutrino oscillation searches at BNL. Both are two detector experiments with a close detector at approx. = 100m and a far detector at approx. = 900m. While the details of the experiments are quite different, both groups expect to obtain nu/sub ..mu../ disappearance limits of delta m/sup 2/sin2 theta approx. = 0.1 - 0.2 for small mass difference and sin/sup 2/2 theta at the few percent level for the most sensitive delta m/sup 2/(approx. = 25eV/sup 2/). Since both detectors are designed to identify electrons as well as muons they expect to obtain significant limits on nu/sub e/ appearance (nu/sub ..mu../ ..-->.. nu/sub e/). Each has received approval for a single detector (Phase I) experiment with the two detector phase (Phase II) still pending. The present status of the single detector experiments is detailed. (WHK)

  7. Probing BSM neutrino physics with flavor and spectral distortions: Prospects for future high-energy neutrino telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Ian M.; Murase, Kohta

    2016-04-01

    The flavor of cosmic neutrinos may help unveil their sources and could reveal the presence of new physics in the neutrino sector. We consider impacts of next-generation neutrino detectors, including the planned upgrade to neutrino detector, IceCube-Gen2, which is well positioned to make dramatic improvements in both flavor and spectral measurements. We show that various models in neutrino physics beyond the Standard Model, such as neutrino decay, pseudo-Dirac states, and neutrino self-scattering, may be found or strongly constrained at IceCube-Gen2 and Cubic Kilometre Neutrino Telescope. We find that the additional flavor discriminants given by Glashow resonance events and so-called "double-bang" topologies improve the ability to access the flavor of the cosmic high-energy neutrinos and probe the beyond the Standard Model physics. In addition, although details depend on source properties, Glashow resonance events have the additional feature of being able to inform us of the relative strengths of neutrino and antineutrino emission, which may help us discriminate astrophysical scenarios.

  8. Neutrino Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Rey, Juan Jose

    2006-11-28

    We review the present status of high energy neutrino astronomy. The advantages of neutrinos as extra-terrestrial messengers are recalled and their possible extra-terrestrial sources examined. We review as well the status of present and future neutrino telescopes and summarize the results obtained so far in this field.

  9. Supernova neutrinos in SK-Gd and other experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    Now many detectors are waiting for core-collapse supernovae in or near our galaxy. If they occur in our galaxy we will be able to reveal the mechanism of supernova explosions and also be able to access the properties of neutrinos, such as mass hierarchy. Even dark mater detectors can reach them via coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering; however no supernova neutrinos have been observed since February 1987. Supernova explosions in our galaxy may be fairly rare, but supernovae themselves are not. On average, there is one supernova somewhere in the universe each second. The neutrinos emitted from all of these supernovae since the onset of stellar formation have suffused the universe. We refer to this unobserved flux as the “relic” supernova neutrinos. Theoretical models vary, but several supernova relic neutrinos (SRNs) per year above 10 MeV are expected to interact in Super-Kamiokande. However, in order to separate these signals from the much more common solar and atmospheric neutrinos and other backgrounds, we need a new detection method. On June 27 2015, the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration approved the SK-Gd project. It is the upgrade of the SK detector via the addition of gadolinium sulfate. This modification will enable it to efficiently identify low energy anti-neutrinos for the world’s first observation of the SRNs via inverse beta decay.

  10. The status of the study of solar CNO neutrinos in the Borexino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanchenko, G. A.; Collaboration: Borexino Collaboration

    2015-12-15

    Although less than 1% of solar energy is generated in the CNO cycle, it plays a critical role in astrophysics, since this cycle is the primary source of energy in certain more massive stars and at later stages of evolution of solar-type stars. Electron neutrinos are produced in the CNO cycle reactions. These neutrinos may be detected by terrestrial neutrino detectors. Various solar models with different abundances of elements heavier than helium predict different CNO neutrino fluxes. A direct measurement of the CNO neutrino flux could help distinguish between these models and solve several other astrophysical problems. No CNO neutrinos have been detected directly thus far, and the best upper limit on their flux was set in the Borexino experiment. The work on reducing the background in the region of energies of CNO neutrinos (up to 1.74 MeV) and developing novel data analysis methods is presently under way. These efforts may help detect the CNO neutrino flux in the Borexino experiment at the level predicted by solar models.

  11. Capabilities of long-baseline experiments in the presence of a sterile neutrino

    DOE PAGES

    Dutta, Debajyoti; Gandhi, Raj; Kayser, Boris; ...

    2016-11-21

    Assuming that there is a sterile neutrino, we ask what then is the ability of long-baseline experiments to i) establish that neutrino oscillation violates CP, ii) determine the three-neutrino mass ordering, and iii) determine which CP-violating phase or phases are the cause of any CP violation that may be observed. We find that the ability to establish CP violation and to determine the mass ordering could be very substantial. However, the effects of the sterile neutrino could be quite large, and it might prove very difficult to determine which phase is responsible for an observed CP violation. We explain whymore » a sterile neutrino changes the long-baseline sensitivities to CP violation and to the mass ordering in the ways that it does. We note that long-baseline experiments can probe the presence of sterile neutrinos in a way that is different from, and complementary to, the probes of short-baseline experiments. As a result, we explore the question of how large sterile-active mixing angles need to be before long-baseline experiments can detect their effects, or how small they need to be before the interpretation of these experiments can safely disregard the possible existence of sterile neutrinos.« less

  12. Capabilities of long-baseline experiments in the presence of a sterile neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Debajyoti; Gandhi, Raj; Kayser, Boris; Masud, Mehedi; Prakash, Suprabh

    2016-11-21

    Assuming that there is a sterile neutrino, we ask what then is the ability of long-baseline experiments to i) establish that neutrino oscillation violates CP, ii) determine the three-neutrino mass ordering, and iii) determine which CP-violating phase or phases are the cause of any CP violation that may be observed. We find that the ability to establish CP violation and to determine the mass ordering could be very substantial. However, the effects of the sterile neutrino could be quite large, and it might prove very difficult to determine which phase is responsible for an observed CP violation. We explain why a sterile neutrino changes the long-baseline sensitivities to CP violation and to the mass ordering in the ways that it does. We note that long-baseline experiments can probe the presence of sterile neutrinos in a way that is different from, and complementary to, the probes of short-baseline experiments. As a result, we explore the question of how large sterile-active mixing angles need to be before long-baseline experiments can detect their effects, or how small they need to be before the interpretation of these experiments can safely disregard the possible existence of sterile neutrinos.

  13. Observation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos from lunar orbit: LORD space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, Vladimir; Chechin, Valery; Gusev, German

    The problem of detecting highest-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos in the Universe is reviewed. Nowadays, there becomes clear that observation of these particles requires approaches based on novel principles. Projects based on orbital radio detectors for particles of energies above the CZK cut-off are discussed. We imply the registration of coherent Cherenkov radio emission produced by cascades of most energetic particles in radio-transparent lunar regolith. The Luna-Glob space mission proposed for launching in the near future involves the Lunar Orbital Radio Detector (LORD). The feasibility of LORD space instrument to detect radio signals from cascades initiated by ultrahigh-energy particles interacting with lunar regolith is examined. The comprehensive Monte Carlo calculations were carried out within the energy range of 10 (20) -10 (25) eV with the account for physical properties of the Moon such as its density, the lunar-regolith radiation length, the radio-wave absorption length, the refraction index, and the orbital altitude of a lunar satellite. We may expect that the LORD space experiment will surpass in its apertures and capabilities the majority of well-known current and proposed experiments dealing with the detection of both ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. The design of the LORD space instrument and its scientific potentialities in registration of low-intense cosmic-ray particle fluxes above the GZK cut-off up to 10 (25) eV is discussed as well. The designed LORD module (including an antenna system, amplifiers, and a data acquisition system) now is under construction. The LORD space experiment will make it possible to obtain important information on the highest-energy particles in the Universe, to verify modern models for the origin and the propagation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Successful completion of the LORD experiment will permit to consider the next step of the program, namely, a multi-satellite lunar systems to

  14. Limits on Active to Sterile Neutrino Oscillations from Disappearance Searches in the MINOS, Daya Bay, and Bugey-3 Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; An, F. P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Blyth, S.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, R.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. X.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, J.-H.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cheng, Z. K.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Childress, S.; Chu, M. C.; Chukanov, A.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; De Rijck, S.; Deng, Z. Y.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolgareva, M.; Dove, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gill, R.; Gomes, R. A.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grassi, M.; Grzelak, K.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Guo, Z.; Habig, A.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Holin, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, J.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Huo, W.; Hussain, G.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; James, C.; Jen, K. L.; Jensen, D.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. L.; Ji, X. P.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; de Jong, J. K.; Joshi, J.; Kafka, T.; Kang, L.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kramer, M.; Kreymer, A.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lang, K.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H. C.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Litchfield, P. J.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, J. L.; Loh, C. W.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Lucas, P.; Luk, K. B.; Lv, Z.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malyshkin, Y.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Mayer, N.; McDonald, K. T.; McGivern, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Mitchell, I.; Mooney, M.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Naples, D.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Ngai, H. Y.; Nichol, R. J.; Ning, Z.; Nowak, J. A.; O'Connor, J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Pan, H.-R.; Park, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Patton, S.; Pawloski, G.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Pinsky, L.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Raper, N.; Rebel, B.; Ren, J.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Moed Sher, S.; Sousa, A.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Treskov, K.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webb, R. C.; Weber, A.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wise, T.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, C.-H.; Wu, Q.; Wu, W. J.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Searches for a light sterile neutrino have been performed independently by the MINOS and the Daya Bay experiments using the muon (anti)neutrino and electron antineutrino disappearance channels, respectively. In this Letter, results from both experiments are combined with those from the Bugey-3 reactor neutrino experiment to constrain oscillations into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to probe regions allowed by the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) and MiniBooNE experiments in a minimally extended four-neutrino flavor framework. Stringent limits on sin22 θμ e are set over 6 orders of magnitude in the sterile mass-squared splitting Δ m412. The sterile-neutrino mixing phase space allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments is excluded for Δ m412<0.8 eV2 at 95 % CLs .

  15. Accurate GPS orientation of a long baseline for Neutrino Oscillation Experiments at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Tomás; Foote, Richard H.; Hoyle, Dixon; Bocean, Virgil

    2000-12-01

    Recent research in elementary particle physics is concentrating a great amount of effort on neutrino oscillation experiments. These studies require the accurate pointing of neutrino beams between two distant points. The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) intends to build a new particle beamline to direct a beam of muon neutrinos from its Main Injector toward a far-off (735 km away) underground detector capable of searching for non-zero neutrino mass by looking for neutrino oscillations. This paper describes the GPS work carried out to accurately position the reference ground marks at the two sites from which the spatial orientation of the baseline can be accurately determined. The effect of plate rotations on the absolute orientation of the baseline was also investigated.

  16. Testing sterile neutrinos with new fixed target experiment at CERN SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, D. S.

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the recently proposed new fixed target experiment at CERN with SPS beam of 400 GeV protons aimed at searches for sterile neutrinos produced in charmed hadron decays. The three sterile neutrino introduced to the Standard Model can explain the active neutrino masses and mixings by means of seesaw type I mechanism, baryon asymmetry of the Universe by making use of leptogenesis via sterile-active neutrino oscillations in the primordial plasma, and dark matter phenomenon due to a relic component of the lightest sterile neutrino. The new beam-dump with detector placed as close to the target as possible will allow to test many other extensions of the Standard Model with new unstable yet long-lived particles at GeV mass scale.

  17. The neutrino-oscillation experiment at the CHOOZ nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolò, D.

    The CHOOZ experiment is measuring the neutrino flux from two nuclear reactors at a distance of 1 km. The aim is to search for possible overlineνe → overlineνx oscillations in a region of parameters ( Δm2 ≥ 10 -3eV 2 at full mixing) where hints at neutrino oscillations come from the measurement of the atmosferic neutrino flux. A short description of the status of the experiment (data taking and physics analysis) is given.

  18. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; ...

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energymore » regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.« less

  19. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energy regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.

  20. Results and Status of the T2K and NOvA long-baseline neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muether, Mathew

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations and the resulting implication that neutrinos have mass, recently awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, has bolstered a world-wide effort to exploit this effect as a handle on the properties of neutrinos. In the decades since the initial discovery of neutrino oscillations, great strides have been made in understanding the nature of these elusive particles, yet important and fundamental questions remain open, such as: How are the neutrino masses ordered? And Do neutrinos and antineutrinos oscillate differently? The current generation of accelerator based long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K in Japan and NOvA in the United States, are actively pursuing the answers to these questions. In this talk, I will review the recent results and current status of the T2K and NOvA long-baseline neutrino experiments.

  1. Thermal properties of holmium-implanted gold films for a neutrino mass experiment with cryogenic microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Prasai, K.; Yanardag, S. Basak; Galeazzi, M.; Uprety, Y.; Alves, E.; Rocha, J.; Bagliani, D.; Biasotti, M.; Gatti, F.; Gomes, M. Ribeiro

    2013-08-15

    In a microcalorimetric neutrino mass experiment using the radioactive decay of {sup 163}Ho, the radioactive material must be fully embedded in the microcalorimeter absorber. One option that is being investigated is to implant the radioactive isotope into a gold absorber, as gold is successfully used in other applications. However, knowing the thermal properties at the working temperature of microcalorimeters is critical for choosing the absorber material and for optimizing the detector performance. In particular, it is paramount to understand if implanting the radioactive material in gold changes its heat capacity. We used a bolometric technique to measure the heat capacity of gold films, implanted with various concentrations of holmium and erbium (a byproduct of the {sup 163}Ho fabrication), in the temperature range 70 mK–300 mK. Our results show that the specific heat capacity of the gold films is not affected by the implant, making this a viable option for a future microcalorimeter holmium experiment.

  2. Neutrino Oscillations at the Intensity Frontier: The NOvA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzikoutelis, Athanasios

    2013-02-01

    The "NuMI Off-Axis electron-neutrino Appearance" (NOvA) is a second generation, long- baseline, neutrino oscillation, experiment. It is made of two detectors, a large Far detector (14 ktons) and a similar Near detector (222 tons), both made of mostly active scintillator and separated by 810 km. Along with the 700 kW NuMI-beam upgrade (a prelude to the Intensity Frontier), it will be the leading neutrino experiment at Fermilab. In the wake of the recent measurement of the θ13 mixing angle, NOvA is positioned to see evidence of the neutrino mass hierarchy, possibly to resolve the θ23 octant ambiguity, and begin the study of the CP violation at the lepton sector. The experiment is under construction. The design and potential of this experiment is presented here along with the current status.

  3. Positronium signature in organic liquid scintillators for neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, D.; Consolati, G.; Trezzi, D.

    2011-01-15

    Electron antineutrinos are commonly detected in liquid scintillator experiments via inverse {beta} decay by looking at the coincidence between the reaction products: neutrons and positrons. Prior to positron annihilation, an electron-positron pair may form an orthopositronium (o-Ps) state, with a mean lifetime of a few nanoseconds. Even if the o-Ps decay is speeded up by spin-flip or pick-off effects, it may introduce distortions in the photon emission time distribution, crucial for position reconstruction and pulse shape discrimination algorithms in antineutrino experiments. Reversing the problem, the o-Ps-induced time distortion represents a new signature for tagging antineutrinos in liquid scintillator. In this article, we report the results of measurements of the o-Ps formation probability and lifetime for the most used solvents for organic liquid scintillators in neutrino physics (pseudocumene, linear alkyl benzene, phenylxylylethane, and dodecane). We characterize also a mixture of pseudocumene +1.5 g/l of 2,5-diphenyloxazole, a fluor acting as wavelength shifter. In the second part of the article, we demonstrate that the o-Ps-induced distortion of the scintillation photon emission time distributions represent an optimal signature for tagging positrons on an event by event basis, potentially enhancing the antineutrino detection.

  4. TRIMS: Validating T2 Molecular Effects for Neutrino Mass Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Ting; Bodine, Laura; Enomoto, Sanshiro; Kallander, Matthew; Machado, Eric; Parno, Diana; Robertson, Hamish; Trims Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upcoming KATRIN and Project 8 experiments will measure the model-independent effective neutrino mass through the kinematics near the endpoint of tritium beta-decay. A critical systematic, however, is the understanding of the molecular final-state distribution populated by tritium decay. In fact, the current theory incorporated in the KATRIN analysis framework predicts an observable that disagrees with an experimental result from the 1950s. The Tritium Recoil-Ion Mass Spectrometer (TRIMS) experiment will reexamine branching ratio of the molecular tritium (T2) beta decay to the bound state (3HeT+). TRIMS consists of a magnet-guided time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a detector located on each end. By measuring the kinetic energy and time-of-flight difference of the ions and beta particles reaching the detectors, we will be able to distinguish molecular ions from atomic ones and hence derive the ratio in question.We will give an update on simulation software, analysis tools, and the apparatus, including early commissioning results. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  5. Neutrino mass and mixing: from theory to experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.; Merle, Alexander; Morisi, Stefano; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    2014-04-01

    The origin of fermion mass hierarchies and mixings is one of the unresolved and most difficult problems in high-energy physics. One possibility to address the flavour problems is by extending the standard model to include a family symmetry. In the recent years it has become very popular to use non-Abelian discrete flavour symmetries because of their power in the prediction of the large leptonic mixing angles relevant for neutrino oscillation experiments. Here we give an introduction to the flavour problem and to discrete groups that have been used to attempt a solution for it. We review the current status of models in light of the recent measurement of the reactor angle, and we consider different model-building directions taken. The use of the flavons or multi-Higgs scalars in model building is discussed as well as the direct versus indirect approaches. We also focus on the possibility of experimentally distinguishing flavour symmetry models by means of mixing sum rules and mass sum rules. In fact, we illustrate in this review the complete path from mathematics, via model building, to experiments, so that any reader interested in starting work in the field could use this text as a starting point in order to obtain a broad overview of the different subject areas.

  6. The detector system of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Bai, J. Z.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Beavis, D.; Beriguete, W.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Brown, R. L.; Butorov, I.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Carr, R.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, W. T.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chasman, C.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M. J.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, X. C.; Chen, X. H.; Chen, X. S.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chidzik, S.; Chow, K.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dong, L.; Dove, J.; Draeger, E.; Du, X. F.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Fang, S. D.; Fu, J. Y.; Fu, Z. W.; Ge, L. Q.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gill, R.; Goett, J.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Gornushkin, Y. A.; Grassi, M.; Greenler, L. S.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hahn, R. L.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; He, Q.; He, W. S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hinrichs, P.; Ho, T. H.; Hoff, M.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, P. W.; Huang, X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, H. J.; Jiang, W. Q.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Joseph, J.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lai, C. Y.; Lai, W. C.; Lai, W. H.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, M. K. P.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, B.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, J.; Li, N. Y.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. F.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. B.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, J.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. X.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y. C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, S.; Liu, S. S.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, A.; Luk, K. B.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, L. H.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Mayes, B.; McDonald, K. T.; McFarlane, M. C.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Mohapatra, D.; Monari Kebwaro, J.; Morgan, J. E.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Newsom, C.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngai, W. K.; Nie, Y. B.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pagac, A.; Pan, H.-R.; Patton, S.; Pearson, C.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Sands, W. R.; Seilhan, B.; Shao, B. B.; Shih, K.; Song, W. Y.; Steiner, H.; Stoler, P.; Stuart, M.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tagg, N.; Tam, Y. H.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tang, W.; Tang, X.; Taychenachev, D.; Themann, H.; Torun, Y.; Trentalange, S.; Tsai, O.; Tsang, K. V.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Virostek, S.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Y.; Wang, L. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X. T.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webber, D. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wei, Y. D.; Wen, L. J.; Wenman, D. L.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Whitten, C. A.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. C.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, J.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, F. F.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xiang, S. T.; Xiao, Q.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, G.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y. S.; Yip, K.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, Q. X.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. F.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zimmerman, S.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    The Daya Bay experiment was the first to report simultaneous measurements of reactor antineutrinos at multiple baselines leading to the discovery of νbare oscillations over km-baselines. Subsequent data has provided the world's most precise measurement of sin2 2θ13 and the effective mass splitting Δ mee2. The experiment is located in Daya Bay, China where the cluster of six nuclear reactors is among the world's most prolific sources of electron antineutrinos. Multiple antineutrino detectors are deployed in three underground water pools at different distances from the reactor cores to search for deviations in the antineutrino rate and energy spectrum due to neutrino mixing. Instrumented with photomultiplier tubes, the water pools serve as shielding against natural radioactivity from the surrounding rock and provide efficient muon tagging. Arrays of resistive plate chambers over the top of each pool provide additional muon detection. The antineutrino detectors were specifically designed for measurements of the antineutrino flux with minimal systematic uncertainty. Relative detector efficiencies between the near and far detectors are known to better than 0.2%. With the unblinding of the final two detectors' baselines and target masses, a complete description and comparison of the eight antineutrino detectors can now be presented. This paper describes the Daya Bay detector systems, consisting of eight antineutrino detectors in three instrumented water pools in three underground halls, and their operation through the first year of eight detector data-taking.

  7. The detector system of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    An, F. P.

    2015-12-15

    The Daya Bay experiment was the first to report simultaneous measurements of reactor antineutrinos at multiple baselines leading to the discovery of ν¯e oscillations over km-baselines. Subsequent data has provided the world's most precise measurement of sin 213 and the effective mass splitting Δm2ee. The experiment is located in Daya Bay, China where the cluster of six nuclear reactors is among the world's most prolific sources of electron antineutrinos. Multiple antineutrino detectors are deployed in three underground water pools at different distances from the reactor cores to search for deviations in the antineutrino rate and energy spectrum due to neutrino mixing. Instrumented with photomultiplier tubes, the water pools serve as shielding against natural radioactivity from the surrounding rock and provide efficient muon tagging. Arrays of resistive plate chambers over the top of each pool provide additional muon detection. The antineutrino detectors were specifically designed for measurements of the antineutrino flux with minimal systematic uncertainty. Relative detector efficiencies between the near and far detectors are known to better than 0.2%. With the unblinding of the final two detectors’ baselines and target masses, a complete description and comparison of the eight antineutrino detectors can now be presented. This study describes the Daya Bay detector systems, consisting of eight antineutrino detectors in three instrumented water pools in three underground halls, and their operation through the first year of eight detector data-taking.

  8. The Science and Strategy for Phasing of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Diwan, Milind V.

    2012-05-22

    This note is about the principles behind a phased plan for realizing a Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment(LBNE) in the U.S.. The most important issue that must be resolved is the direction of the first phase of the experiment. Based on both scientific and programmatic considerations, the U.S. should pursue the best option for accelerator neutrino physics, which is the longer baseline towards Homestake with an optimizedbroadband intense beam.

  9. Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Several anomalies recorded in short-baseline neutrino experiments suggest the possibility that the standard 3-flavor framework may be incomplete and point towards a manifestation of new physics. Light sterile neutrinos provide a credible solution to these puzzling results. Here, we present a concise review of the status of the neutrino oscillations within the 3+1 scheme, the minimal extension of the standard 3-flavor framework endowed with one sterile neutrino species. We emphasize the potential role of LBL experiments in the searches of CP violation related to sterile neutrinos and their complementarity with the SBL experiments.

  10. Study of muon neutrino and muon antineutrino disappearance with the NOvA neutrino oscillation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pawloski, Gregory

    2014-06-30

    The primary goal of this working group is to study the disappearance rate of νμ charged current events in order to measure the mixing angle θ23 and the magnitude of the neutrino mass square splitting Δm 232.

  11. TRITIUM-β-DECAY Experiments - the Direct way to the Absolute Neutrino Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornschein, Lutz

    2013-11-01

    Tritium-β-decay experiments provide the most sensitive approach to measure the absolute neutrino mass in a model independent way. The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment KATRIN will measure the neutrino mass scale with an expected sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2 (90% C.L.) and so will help to clarify the roles of neutrinos in the early universe. KATRIN investigates spectroscopically the electron spectrum from tritium β-decay 3 H -> 3 {He} + {e}^ - + bar ν e close to the kinematic endpoint of 18.6 keV. It will use a windowless gaseous tritium source in combination with an electrostatic filter for energy analysis. KATRIN is currently under construction at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) Campus North. This proceeding will give an overview of the status of the main components of the KATRIN experiment.

  12. Neutrino phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma, Pilar

    2016-11-21

    Neutrino oscillations have demonstrated that neutrinos have mass and, by now, oscillation experiments have been able to determine most of the parameters in the leptonic mixing matrix with a very good accuracy. Nevertheless, there are still many open questions in the neutrino sector. As a result, I will briefly discuss some of these questions, pointing out possible experimental avenues to address them.

  13. Neutrino phenomenology

    DOE PAGES

    Coloma, Pilar

    2016-11-21

    Neutrino oscillations have demonstrated that neutrinos have mass and, by now, oscillation experiments have been able to determine most of the parameters in the leptonic mixing matrix with a very good accuracy. Nevertheless, there are still many open questions in the neutrino sector. As a result, I will briefly discuss some of these questions, pointing out possible experimental avenues to address them.

  14. Experimental Measurement of Low Energy Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, Kate

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino interactions in the few to few tens of MeV range are of importance for several physics topics, including solar, supernova and reactor neutrinos, as well as future proposed oscillation and Standard Model test experiments. Although interaction cross-sections for some simple targets are well understood, very little experimental data exist for interactions with nuclei. This talk will discuss the motivation for measuring low energy neutrino interactions, the state of knowledge, and possible future strategies.

  15. Recent Charm Production and Neutrino Oscillation Results From the CHORUS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kayis-Topaksu, A.

    2006-07-11

    CHORUS Experiment was taking data during the years of 1994-1997. In total about 100 000 charged-current(CC) neutrino interactions were located in the nuclear emulsion target and fully reconstructed. In addition to the oscillation search, measurements of charm production have been also performed. From the sample of 100 000 events based on the data acquired by new automatic scanning system, 2013 charm-decay events were selected by a pattern recognition program. A comprehensive study of charm production by neutrinos being made. We report here some of the recent results on charm production and neutrino oscillation results.

  16. High Energy Neutrinos from the Cold: Status and Prospects of the IceCube Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Portello-Roucelle, Cecile; Collaboration, IceCube

    2008-02-29

    The primary motivation for building neutrino telescopes is to open the road for neutrino astronomy, and to offer another observational window for the study of cosmic ray origins. Other physics topics, such as the search for WIMPs, can also be developed with neutrino telescope. As of March 2008, the IceCube detector, with half of its strings deployed, is the world largest neutrino telescope taking data to date and it will reach its completion in 2011. Data taken with the growing detector are being analyzed. The results of some of these works are summarized here. AMANDA has been successfully integrated into IceCube data acquisition system and continues to accumulate data. Results obtained using only AMANDA data taken between the years 2000 and 2006 are also presented. The future of IceCube and the extensions in both low and high energy regions will finally be discussed in the last section.

  17. Nuclear responses for double-beta decays by hadron, photon, and neutrino probes and MOON experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2006-05-01

    Neutrino-less double-beta decays (0νββ) with the mass sensitivities of the solar and atmospheric ν masses are of great interest for studying the Majorana nature of neutrinos and the absolute mass spectrum as suggested by recent ν oscillation experiments. Here nuclear responses (nuclear matrix elements) for 0νββ are crucial. They are well studied experimentally by using charge-exchange, photo-nuclear and neutrino reactions. MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos) is a high sensitivity 0νβ β experiment with the mass sensitivity of an order of 30 meV. Experimental studies of the nuclear responses and the present status of MOON are briefly discussed.

  18. Data Driven Study of Neutron Response Using Quasielastic Neutrino Scattering in the Minerva Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Evan; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how particles behave in detectors is a critical part of analyzing data from neutrino experiments, but neutral particles are difficult to characterize. The purpose of this project was to calibrate the neutron response in Quasielastic antineutrino scattering (QE) events in the Minerva detector. We applied quasi-elastic assumptions to estimate the outgoing neutron kinematics in QE scattering, and then added modifications to improve the model's predictions for neutron response in data. We compared these kinematic predictions of neutron energy and angle to Monte Carlo simulations of QE scattering and to the behavior of reconstructed energy ``blobs'' that characterize neutral particle behavior in simulated and real Minerva data. Filtering events for neutron energy, angle, and distance from the interaction vertex, we derive calibration functions for both the simulation and real data. Future work will include potential changes to the blobbing algorithms and refinement of the calibration technique using rigorous statistical methods.

  19. Neutrino-4 experiment on search for sterile neutrino with multi-section model of detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A.; Ivochkin, V.; Samoilov, R.; Fomin, A.; Polyushkin, A.; Zinoviev, V.; Neustroev, P.; Golovtsov, V.; Chernyj, A.; Zherebtsov, O.; Martemyanov, V.; Tarasenkov, V.; Aleshin, V.; Petelin, A.; Izhutov, A.; Tuzov, A.; Sazontov, S.; Ryazanov, D.; Gromov, M.; Afanasiev, V.; Zaytsev, M.; Chaikovskii, M.

    2017-09-01

    In order to carry out research in the field of possible existence of a sterile neutrino the laboratory based on SM-3 reactor (Dimitrovgrad, Russia) was created to search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino. The prototype of a multi-section neutrino detector with liquid scintillator volume of 350 l was installed in the middle of 2015. It is a moveable inside the passive shielding detector, which can be set at distance range from 6 to 11 meters from the reactor core. Measurements of antineutrino flux at such small distances from the reactor core are carried out with moveable detector for the first time. The measurements carried out with detector prototype demonstrated a possibility of measuring a reactor antineutrino flux in difficult conditions of cosmic background at Earth surface.

  20. ICFA neutrino panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2015-07-15

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: <<neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments. >>>In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel’s findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel’s initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  1. ICFA neutrino panel report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K.

    2015-07-01

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: "To promote international cooperation in the development of the accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments." In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel's findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel's initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  2. Measurement of theta{sub 13} with reactor neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Heeger, Karsten M.; Freedman, Stuart J.; Kadel, Richard W.; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2004-07-13

    Recent experimental results have provided unambiguous evidence that neutrinos have a small but finite mass and mix from one type into another. The phenomenon of neutrino mixing is characterized by the coupling between the neutrino flavor (nu{sub e,mu,tau}) and mass eigenstates (nu{sub 1,2,3}) and the associated mixing angles. Previous neutrino oscillation experiments have determined two of the three mixing angles in the neutrino mixing matrix, U{sub MNSP}. Using multiple neutrino detectors placed at different distances from a nuclear power plant, a future reactor neutrino experiment has the potential to discover and measure the coupling of the electron neutrino flavor to the third mass eigenstate, U{sub e3}, the last undetermined element of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  3. MINERνA neutrino detector calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2015-05-15

    MINERνA is a neutrino scattering experiment that uses Fermilab’s NuMI beamline. Its goal is to measure cross-sections for neutrino scattering from different nuclei. Precise knowledge of these cross-sections is vital for current and future neutrino oscillation experiments. In order to measure these values to a high degree of accuracy, it is essential that the detector be carefully calibrated. Here, we describe in-situ calibration and cross-checks.

  4. Limits on the Diffuse Flux of Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos from the RICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J.; Allen, Chris; Bean, A.; Besson, David Z.; Box, D. J.; Buniy, R.; Drees, J.; Frichter, George M., IV; Kravchenko, Igor; McKay, D.; Meyers, J.; Miller, T.; Perry, L.; Piccirillo, L.; Ralston, John P.; Razzaque, S.; Schmitz, D. W.; Seckel, David; Seunarine, S.; Spiczak, G. M.

    2003-02-01

    Upper limits are presented on the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos, based on analysis of data taken by the RICE experiment during August, 2000. The RICE receiver array at South Pole monitors cold ice for radio-wavelength Cherenkov radiation resulting from neutrino-induced in-ice showers. For energies above 1 EeV, RICE monitors over 25 km3 sr. We discuss limits based on both hadronic and electromagnetic showers.

  5. Probing Neutrino Properties with Long-Baseline Neutrino Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, Alysia

    2015-06-29

    This final report on an Early Career Award grant began in April 15, 2010 and concluded on April 14, 2015. Alysia Marino's research is focussed on making precise measurements of neutrino properties using intense accelerator-generated neutrino beams. As a part of this grant, she is collaborating on the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino experiment, currently taking data in Japan, and on the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) design effort for a future Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) in the US. She is also a member of the NA61/SHINE particle production experiment at CERN, but as that effort is supported by other funds, it will not be discussed further here. T2K was designed to search for the disappearance of muon neutrinosμ) and the appearance of electron neutrinose), using a beam of muon neutrino beam that travels 295 km across Japan towards the Super-Kamiokande detector. In 2011 T2K first reported indications of νe appearance, a previously unobserved mode of neutrino oscillations. In the past year, T2K has published a combined analysis of νμ disappearance and νe appearance, and began collecting taking data with a beam of anti-neutrinos, instead of neutrinos, to search for hints of violation of the CP symmetry of the universe. The proposed DUNE experiment has similar physics goals to T2K, but will be much more sensitive due to its more massive detectors and new higher-intensity neutrino beam. This effort will be very high-priority particle physics project in the US over the next decade.

  6. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter for electron neutrino appearance oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically begin with the muon neutrino cross section and apply theoretical corrections to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section. However, at present no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments exists. We present the cross sections for a CCQE-like process determined using the MINERvA detector, which are the first measurements of any exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, Q2. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in Q2 from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between these measurements and the predictions of the GENIE generator. We furthermore report on a photon-like background unpredicted by the generator which we interpret as neutral-coherent diffractive scattering from hydrogen.

  7. Search for Sterile Neutrinos with the MINOS Long-Baseline Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Timmons, Ashley Michael

    2016-01-01

    This thesis will present a search for sterile neutrinos using data taken with the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. MINOS is a two-detector on-axis experiment based at Fermilab. The NuMI neutrino beam encounters the MINOS Near Detector 1km downstream of the neutrino-production target before traveling a further 734km through the Earth's crust, to reach the Far Detector located at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Northern Minnesota. By searching for oscillations driven by a large mass splitting, MINOS is sensitive to the existence of sterile neutrinos through looking for any energy-dependent perturbations using a charged-current sample, as well as looking at any relative deficit in neutral current events between the Far and Near Detectors. This thesis will discuss the novel analysis that enabled a search for sterile neutrinos covering five orders of magnitude in the mass splitting and setting a limit in previously unexplored regions of the parameter space $\\left\\{\\Delta m^{2}_{41},\\sin^2\\theta_{24}\\right\\}$, where a 3+1-flavour phenomenological model was used to extract parameter limits. The results presented in this thesis are sensitive to the sterile neutrino parameter space suggested by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments.

  8. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, J.

    2015-12-31

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter for electron neutrino appearance oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically begin with the muon neutrino cross section and apply theoretical corrections to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section. However, at present no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments exists. We present the cross sections for a CCQE-like process determined using the MINERvA detector, which are the first measurements of any exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^{2}$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^{2}$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between these measurements and the predictions of the GENIE generator. We furthermore report on a photon-like background unpredicted by the generator which we interpret as neutral-coherent diffractive scattering from hydrogen.

  9. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2015-10-28

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter to appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically work from the muon neutrino cross section and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section, but to date there has been no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments. We present the first measurement of an exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions, namely, the cross section for a CCQE-like process, made using the MINERvA detector. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^2$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^2$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between this measurement and the predictions of the GENIE generator.

  10. The LEM Experiment:. Measurement of Low Energy Spectrum at J-PARC On-Axis Neutrino Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, H.

    2013-03-01

    The LEM experiment measures the flux of J-PARC neutrino beam. We newly constructed the neutrino monitor, LEM, and installed at the J-PARC ND280 hall. We measure neutrino flux in the low energy part of on-axis direction. This part of the neutrino beam cannot be measured by any of T2K detectors. Therefore we can help further understandings of the J-PARC neutrino flux. The detailed design of detector is shown. In addition, the status of construction and installation at the ND280 hall is reported.

  11. Experiment for search for sterile neutrino at SM-3 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoylov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gruzinsky, N. V.; Solovey, V. A.; Cherniy, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Martemyanov, V. P.; Zinoev, V. G.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I.; Petelin, A. L.; Pavlov, S. V.; Izhutov, A. L.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K.; Gromov, M. O.; Afanasiev, V. V.; Matrosov, L. N.; Matrosova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    In connection with the question of possible existence of sterile neutrino the laboratory on the basis of SM-3 reactor was created to search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino. A prototype of a neutrino detector with scintillator volume of 400 l can be moved at the distance of 6-11 m from the reactor core. The measurements of background conditions have been made. It is shown that the main experimental problem is associated with cosmic radiation background. Test measurements of dependence of a reactor antineutrino flux on the distance from a reactor core have been made. The prospects of search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino at short distances are discussed.

  12. Neutrino Scattering Uncertainties and their Role in Long Baseline Oscillation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Harris; G. Blazey; Arie Bodek; D. Boehnlein; S. Boyd; William Brooks; Antje Bruell; Howard S. Budd; R. Burnstein; D. Casper; A. Chakravorty; Michael Christy; Jesse Chvojka; M.A.C. Cummings; P. deBarbaro; D. Drakoulakos; J. Dunmore; Rolf Ent; Hugh Gallagher; David Gaskell; Ronald Gilman; Charles Glashausser; Wendy Hinton; Xiaodong Jiang; T. Kafka; O. Kamaev; Cynthia Keppel; M. Kostin; Sergey Kulagin; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Steven Manly; W.A. Mann; Kevin Mcfarland-porter; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Jorge Morfin; D. Naples; John Nelson; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-ioana Niculescu; W. Oliver; Michael Paolone; Emmanuel Paschos; A. Pla-Dalmau; Ronald Ransome; C. Regis; P. Rubinov; V. Rykalin; Willis Sakumoto; P. Shanahan; N. Solomey; P. Spentzouris; P. Stamoulis; G. Tzanakos; Stephen Wood; F.X. Yumiceva; B. Ziemer; M. Zois

    2004-10-01

    The field of oscillation physics is about to make an enormous leap forward in statistical precision: first through the MINOS experiment in the coming year, and later through the NOvA and T2K experiments. Because of the relatively poor understanding of neutrino interactions in the energy ranges of these experiments, there are systematics that can arise in interpreting far detector data that can be as large as or even larger than the expected statistical uncertainties. We describe how these systematic errors arise, and how specific measurements in a dedicated neutrino scattering experiment like MINERvA can reduce the cross section systematic errors to well below the statistical errors.

  13. A combined view of sterile-neutrino constraints from CMB and neutrino oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridle, Sarah; Elvin-Poole, Jack; Evans, Justin; Fernandez, Susana; Guzowski, Pawel; Söldner-Rembold, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We perform a comparative analysis of constraints on sterile neutrinos from the Planck experiment and from current and future neutrino oscillation experiments (MINOS, IceCube, SBN). For the first time, we express joint constraints on Neff and meffsterile from the CMB in the Δm2, sin2 ⁡ 2 θ parameter space used by oscillation experiments. We also show constraints from oscillation experiments in the Neff, meffsterile cosmology parameter space. In a model with a single sterile neutrino species and using standard assumptions, we find that the Planck 2015 data and the oscillation experiments measuring muon-neutrino (νμ) disappearance have similar sensitivity.

  14. Results from SAGE (The Russian-American gallium solar neutrino experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurashitov, J. N.; Faizov, E. L.; Gavrin, V. N.; Gusev, A. O.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Knodel, T. V.; Knyshenko, I. I.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Mirmov, I. N.; Pshukov, A. M.; Shalagin, A. M.; Shikhin, A. A.; Timofeyev, P. V.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Vermul, V. M.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Bowles, T. J.; Nico, J. S.; Teasdale, W. A.; Wark, D. L.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Cleveland, B. T.; Daily, T.; Davis, R.; Lande, K.; Lee, C. K.; Wildenhain, P. W.; Elliott, S. R.; Cherry, M. L.; Kouzes, R. T.

    1994-05-01

    Fifteen measurements of the solar neutrino flux have been made in a radiochemical 71Ga-71Ge experiment employing initially 30 t and later 57 t of liquid metallic gallium at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory between January 1990 and May 1992. This provides an integral measurement of the flux of solar neutrinos and in particular is sensitive to the dominant, low-energy p-p solar neutrinos. SAGE observed the capture rate to be 73-16+18 (stat.)-7+5 (syst.) SNU. This represents only 56%-60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. Present address: Batelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352, USA.

  15. Neutrino Interactions with Nucleons and Nuclei: Importance for Long-Baseline Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    This article reviews our present knowledge of neutrino interactions with nucleons and discusses the interactions with nuclei, the target material of all presently running and planned long-baseline experiments. I emphasize descriptions of semi-inclusive reactions and full descriptions of the final state; the latter are needed to reconstruct the incoming neutrino energy from final-state observations. I then discuss Monte Carlo generator and more advanced transport-theoretical approaches in connection with experimental results on various reaction mechanisms. Finally, I describe the effects of uncertainties in the reconstruction of the incoming neutrino energy on oscillation parameters. The review argues that the precision era of neutrino physics also needs precision-era generators.

  16. Neutrinos from failed supernovae at future water and liquid argon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keehn, James G.; Lunardini, Cecilia

    2012-02-01

    We discuss the diffuse flux of electron neutrinos and antineutrinos from cosmological failed supernovae, stars that collapse directly into a black hole with no explosion. This flux has a hotter energy spectrum compared to the flux from regular, neutron star-forming collapses and therefore it dominates the total diffuse flux from core collapses above 20-45 MeV of neutrino energy. Reflecting the features of the originally emitted neutrinos, the flux of νe and ν¯e at Earth is larger when the survival probability of these species is larger, and also when the equations of state of nuclear matter are stiffer. In the 19-29 MeV energy window, the flux from failed supernovae is substantial, ranging from ˜7% to a dominant fraction of the total flux from all core collapses. It can be as large as ϕe¯BH=0.38s-1cm-2 for ν¯e and as large as ϕeBH=0.28s-1cm-2 for νe, normalized to a local rate of core collapses of Rcc(0)=10-4yr-1Mpc-3. In 5 years, a 0.45 Mt water Cherenkov detector should see ˜5-65 events from failed supernovae, while up to ˜160 events are expected for the same mass with Gadolinium added. A 0.1 Mt liquid argon experiment should record ˜1-11 events. Signatures of neutrinos from failed supernovae are the enhancement of the total rates of events from core collapses (up to a factor of ˜2) and the appearance of high energy tails in the event spectra.

  17. Neutrinos from failed supernovae at future water and liquid argon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Keehn, James G.; Lunardini, Cecilia

    2012-02-01

    We discuss the diffuse flux of electron neutrinos and antineutrinos from cosmological failed supernovae, stars that collapse directly into a black hole with no explosion. This flux has a hotter energy spectrum compared to the flux from regular, neutron star-forming collapses and therefore it dominates the total diffuse flux from core collapses above 20–45 MeV of neutrino energy. Reflecting the features of the originally emitted neutrinos, the flux of νe and $\\bar{v}$e at Earth is larger when the survival probability of these species is larger, and also when the equations of state of nuclear matter are stiffer. In the 19–29 MeV energy window, the flux from failed supernovae is substantial, ranging from ~7% to a dominant fraction of the total flux from all core collapses. It can be as large as Φ$\\bar{e}$BH=0.38 s-1 cm-2 for $\\bar{v}$e and as large as Φ$\\bar{e}$BH=0.28 s-1 cm-2 for νe, normalized to a local rate of core collapses of Rcc(0)=10-4 yr-1 Mpc-3. In 5 years, a 0.45 Mt water Cherenkov detector should see ~5–65 events from failed supernovae, while up to ~160 events are expected for the same mass with Gadolinium added. A 0.1 Mt liquid argon experiment should record ~1–11 events. Signatures of neutrinos from failed supernovae are the enhancement of the total rates of events from core collapses (up to a factor of ~2) and the appearance of high energy tails in the event spectra.

  18. Probing atmospheric mixing and leptonic CP violation in current and future long baseline oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sabya Sachi; Pasquini, Pedro; Valle, J. W. F.

    2017-08-01

    We perform realistic simulations of the current and future long baseline experiments such as T2K, NOνA, DUNE and T2HK in order to determine their ultimate potential in probing neutrino oscillation parameters. We quantify the potential of these experiments to underpin the octant of the atmospheric angle θ23 as well as the value and sign of the CP phase δCP. We do this both in general, as well as within the predictive framework of a previously proposed [1] benchmark theory of neutrino oscillations which tightly correlates θ23 and δCP.

  19. SNO Data: Results from Experiments at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was built 6800 feet under ground, in INCO's Creighton mine near Sudbury, Ontario. SNO is a heavy-water Cherenkov detector that is designed to detect neutrinos produced by fusion reactions in the sun. It uses 1000 tonnes of heavy water, on loan from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), contained in a 12 meter diameter acrylic vessel. Neutrinos react with the heavy water (D2O) to produce flashes of light called Cherenkov radiation. This light is then detected by an array of 9600 photomultiplier tubes mounted on a geodesic support structure surrounding the heavy water vessel. The detector is immersed in light (normal) water within a 30 meter barrel-shaped cavity (the size of a 10 story building!) excavated from Norite rock. Located in the deepest part of the mine, the overburden of rock shields the detector from cosmic rays. The detector laboratory is extremely clean to reduce background signals from radioactive elements present in the mine dust which would otherwise hide the very weak signal from neutrinos. (From http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/]

    The SNO website provides access to various datasets. See also the SNO Image Catalog at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/images/ and computer-generated images of SNO events at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/events/ and the list of published papers.

  20. Everything under the Sun: A review of solar neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Gabriel D. Orebi

    2015-07-15

    Solar neutrinos offer a unique opportunity to study the interaction of neutrinos with matter, a sensitive search for potential new physics effects, and a probe of solar structure and solar system formation. This paper describes the broad physics program addressed by solar neutrino studies, presents the current suite of experiments programs, and describes several potential future detectors that could address the open questions in this field. This paper is a summary of a talk presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference in Boston.

  1. Everything under the sun: A review of solar neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Gabriel D. Orebi

    2015-07-15

    Solar neutrinos offer a unique opportunity to study the interaction of neutrinos with matter, a sensitive search for potential new physics effects, and a probe of solar structure and solar system formation. This paper describes the broad physics program addressed by solar neutrino studies, presents the current suite of experiments programs, and describes several potential future detectors that could address the open questions in this field. This paper is a summary of a talk presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference in Boston.

  2. Everything under the sun: A review of solar neutrinos

    DOE PAGES

    Gann, Gabriel D. Orebi

    2015-07-15

    Solar neutrinos offer a unique opportunity to study the interaction of neutrinos with matter, a sensitive search for potential new physics effects, and a probe of solar structure and solar system formation. This paper describes the broad physics program addressed by solar neutrino studies, presents the current suite of experiments programs, and describes several potential future detectors that could address the open questions in this field. This paper is a summary of a talk presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference in Boston.

  3. Everything under the Sun: A review of solar neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gann, Gabriel D. Orebi

    2015-07-01

    Solar neutrinos offer a unique opportunity to study the interaction of neutrinos with matter, a sensitive search for potential new physics effects, and a probe of solar structure and solar system formation. This paper describes the broad physics program addressed by solar neutrino studies, presents the current suite of experiments programs, and describes several potential future detectors that could address the open questions in this field. This paper is a summary of a talk presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference in Boston.

  4. Observation of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the NuMI Beam with the NOvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Niner, Evan David

    2015-01-01

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment that uses two functionally identical detectors separated by 810 kilometers at locations 14 milliradians off-axis from the NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab. At these locations the beam energy peaks at 2 GeV. This baseline is the longest in the world for an accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment, which enhances the sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering. The experiment studies oscillations of the muon neutrino and anti-neutrino beam that is produced. Both detectors completed commissioning in the summer of 2014 and continue to collect data. One of the primary physics goals of the experiment is the measurement of electron neutrino appearance in the muon neutrino beam which yields measurements of the oscillation parameters sin213, δ , and the neutrino mass ordering within the standard model of neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents the analysis of data collected between February 2014 and May 2015, corresponding to 3.52 X 1020 protons-on-target. In this first analysis NOvA recorded 6 electron neutrino candidates, which is a 3.3σ observation of electron neutrino appearance. The T2K experiment performs the same measurement on a baseline of 295 kilometers and has a 1 σ preference for the normal mass ordering over the inverted ordering over the phase space of the CP violating parameter δ, which is also weakly seen in the NOvA result. By the summer of 2016 NOvA will triple its statistics due to increased beam power and a completed detector. If electron neutrinos continue to be observed at the current rate NOvA will be able to establish a mass ordering preference at a similar confidence level to T2K.

  5. Measurement of gamma-ray production from thermal neutron capture on gadolinium for neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Takatomi

    2017-02-01

    Recently, several scientific applications of gadolinium are found in neutrino physics experiments. Gadolinium-157 is the nucleus, which has the largest thermal neutron capture cross-section among all stable nuclei. Gadolinium-155 also has the large cross-section. These neutron capture reactions provide the gamma-ray cascade with the total energy of about 8 MeV. This reaction is applied for several neutrino experiments, e.g. reactor neutrino experiments and Gd doped large water Cherenkov detector experiments, to recognize inverse-beta-decay reaction. A good Gd(n,γ) simulation model is needed to evaluate the detection efficiency of the neutron capture reaction, i.e. the efficiency of IBD detection. In this presentation, we will report the development and study status of a Gd(n,γ) calculation model and comparison with our experimental data taken at ANNRI/MLF beam line, J-PARC.

  6. Neutrino mixing, CP and T violation, and textures in four-neutrino models

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, V.; Dai, Y.; Whisnant, K.; Young, B.

    1999-06-01

    We examine the prospects for determining the neutrino mixing matrix and for observing CP and T violation in neutrino oscillations in four-neutrino models. We focus on a general class of four-neutrino models with two pairs of nearly degenerate mass eigenstates separated by approximately 1 eV, which can describe the solar, atmospheric and LSND neutrino data. We present a general parametrization of these models and discuss in detail the determination of the mixing parameters and the mass matrix texture from current and future neutrino data in the case where {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} each mix primarily with one other neutrino. We find that measurable CP or T violation in long-baseline experiments, with amplitude at the level of the LSND signal, is possible given current experimental constraints. Also, additional oscillation effects in short- and long-baseline experiments may be measurable in many cases. We point out that, given separate scales for the mass-squared differences of the solar and atmospheric oscillations, observable CP or T violation effects in neutrino oscillations signal the existence of a sterile neutrino. We examine several textures of the neutrino mass matrix and determine which textures can have measurable CP or T violation in neutrino oscillations in long-baseline experiments. We also briefly discuss some possible origins of the neutrino mass terms in straightforward extensions of the standard model. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Solar neutrinos and neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltoni, Michele; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Solar neutrino studies triggered and largely motivated the major developments in neutrino physics in the last 50 years. The theory of neutrino propagation in different media with matter and fields has been elaborated. It includes oscillations in vacuum and matter, resonance flavor conversion and resonance oscillations, spin and spin-flavor precession, etc. LMA MSW has been established as the true solution of the solar neutrino problem. Parameters θ_{12} and Δ m 2 21 have been measured; θ_{13} extracted from the solar data is in agreement with results from reactor experiments. Solar neutrino studies provide a sensitive way to test theory of neutrino oscillations and conversion. Characterized by long baseline, huge fluxes and low energies they are a powerful set-up to search for new physics beyond the standard 3 ν paradigm: new neutrino states, sterile neutrinos, non-standard neutrino interactions, effects of violation of fundamental symmetries, new dynamics of neutrino propagation, probes of space and time. These searches allow us to get stringent, and in some cases unique bounds on new physics. We summarize the results on physics of propagation, neutrino properties and physics beyond the standard model obtained from studies of solar neutrinos.

  8. Status of the KATRIN experiment and prospects to search for keV-mass sterile neutrinos in tritium β-decay

    DOE PAGES

    Mertens, Susanne

    2015-03-24

    In this contribution the current status and future perspectives of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment are presented. The prime goal of this single β-decay experiment is to probe the absolute neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 meV (90% CL). We discuss first results of the recent main spectrometer commissioning measurements, successfully verifying the spectrometer’s basic vacuum, transmission and background properties. We also discuss the prospects of making use of the KATRIN tritium source, to search for sterile neutrinos in the multi-keV mass range constituting a classical candidate for Warm Dark Matter. Due to the very high sourcemore » luminosity, a statistical sensitivity down to active-sterile mixing angles of sin² θ < 1 · 10⁻⁷ (90% CL) could be reached.« less

  9. Status of the KATRIN experiment and prospects to search for keV-mass sterile neutrinos in tritium β-decay

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, Susanne

    2015-03-24

    In this contribution the current status and future perspectives of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment are presented. The prime goal of this single β-decay experiment is to probe the absolute neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 meV (90% CL). We discuss first results of the recent main spectrometer commissioning measurements, successfully verifying the spectrometer’s basic vacuum, transmission and background properties. We also discuss the prospects of making use of the KATRIN tritium source, to search for sterile neutrinos in the multi-keV mass range constituting a classical candidate for Warm Dark Matter. Due to the very high source luminosity, a statistical sensitivity down to active-sterile mixing angles of sin² θ < 1 · 10⁻⁷ (90% CL) could be reached.

  10. Long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the AGS. Physics design report

    SciTech Connect

    Beavis, D.; Carroll, A.; Chiang, I.; E889 Collaboration

    1995-04-01

    The authors present a design for a multi-detector long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the BNL AGS. It has been approved by the BNL-HENP-PAC as AGS Experiment 889. The experiment will search for oscillations in the {nu}{sub {mu}}, disappearance channel and the {nu}{sub {mu}} {leftrightarrow} {nu}{sub e} appearance channel by means of four identical neutrino detectors located 1, 3, 24, and 68km from the AGS neutrino source. Observed depletion of the {nu}{sub {mu}} flux (via quasi-elastic muon neutrino events, {nu}{sub {mu}}n {yields} {mu}{sup {minus}}p) in the far detectors not attended by an observed proportional increase of the {nu}{sub e} flux (via quasi-elastic electron neutrino events, {nu}{sub e}n {yields} e{sup {minus}}p) in those detectors will be prima facie evidence for the oscillation channel {nu}{sub {mu}} {leftrightarrow} {nu}{sub {tau}}. The experiment is directed toward exploration of the region of the neutrino oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}2{theta}, suggested by the Kamiokande and IMB deep underground detectors but it will also explore a region more than two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous accelerator experiments. The experiment will run in a mode new to BNL. It will receive the fast extracted proton beam on the neutrino target approximately 20 hours per day when the AGS is not filling RHIC. A key aspect of the experimental design involves placing the detectors 1.5 degrees off the center line of the neutrino beam, which has the important advantage that the central value of the neutrino energy ({approx} 1 GeV) and the beam spectral shape are, to a good approximation, the same in all four detectors. The proposed detectors are massive, imaging, water Cherenkov detectors similar in large part to the Kamiokande and IMB detectors. The design has profited from their decade-long experience, and from the detector designs of the forthcoming SNO and SuperKamiokande detectors.

  11. Measuring the mass of a sterile neutrino with a very short baseline reactor experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, D. C.; Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.

    2007-04-01

    An analysis of the world's neutrino oscillation data, including sterile neutrinos, [M. Sorel, C. M. Conrad, and M. H. Shaevitz, Phys. Rev. D 70, 073004 (2004)] found a peak in the allowed region at a mass-squared difference Δm2≅0.9eV2. We trace its origin to harmonic oscillations in the electron survival probability Pee as a function of L/E, the ratio of baseline to neutrino energy, as measured in the near detector of the Bugey experiment. We find a second occurrence for Δm2≅1.9eV2. We point out that the phenomenon of harmonic oscillations of Pee as a function of L/E, as seen in the Bugey experiment, can be used to measure the mass-squared difference associated with a sterile neutrino in the range from a fraction of an eV2 to several eV2 (compatible with that indicated by the LSND experiment), as well as measure the amount of electron-sterile neutrino mixing. We observe that the experiment is independent, to lowest order, of the size of the reactor and suggest the possibility of a small reactor with a detector sitting at a very short baseline.

  12. Measuring the mass of a sterile neutrino with a very short baseline reactor experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Latimer, D. C.; Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.

    2007-04-15

    An analysis of the world's neutrino oscillation data, including sterile neutrinos, [M. Sorel, C. M. Conrad, and M. H. Shaevitz, Phys. Rev. D 70, 073004 (2004)] found a peak in the allowed region at a mass-squared difference {delta}m{sup 2} congruent with 0.9 eV{sup 2}. We trace its origin to harmonic oscillations in the electron survival probability P{sub ee} as a function of L/E, the ratio of baseline to neutrino energy, as measured in the near detector of the Bugey experiment. We find a second occurrence for {delta}m{sup 2} congruent with 1.9 eV{sup 2}. We point out that the phenomenon of harmonic oscillations of P{sub ee} as a function of L/E, as seen in the Bugey experiment, can be used to measure the mass-squared difference associated with a sterile neutrino in the range from a fraction of an eV{sup 2} to several eV{sup 2} (compatible with that indicated by the LSND experiment), as well as measure the amount of electron-sterile neutrino mixing. We observe that the experiment is independent, to lowest order, of the size of the reactor and suggest the possibility of a small reactor with a detector sitting at a very short baseline.

  13. Scintillating bolometric technique for the neutrino-less double beta decay search: The LUCIFER/CUPID-0 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casali, N.; Artusa, D. R.; Bellini, F.; Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Camacho, A.; Capelli, S.; Cardani, L.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Clemenza, M.; Cremonesi, O.; Cruciani, A.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dafinei, I.; Domizio, S. Di; Vacri, M. L. di; Ferroni, F.; Gironi, L.; Gotti, C.; Keppel, G.; Maino, M.; Martinez, M.; Morganti, S.; Nagorny, S.; Orlandi, D.; Pagnanini, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pettinacci, V.; Pozzi, S.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Puiu, A.; Rusconi, C.; Schäffner, K.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2017-02-01

    CUPID is a proposed future tonne-scale bolometric neutrino-less double beta decay (0 νββ) experiment to probe the Majorana nature of neutrinos and discover lepton number violation in the so-called inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass. In order to improve the sensitivity with respect to the current bolometric experiments, the source mass must be increased and the backgrounds in the region of interest must be dramatically reduced. The background suppression can be achieved discriminating β / γ against α events by means of the different light yield produced in the interactions within a scintillating bolometer. The increase in the number of 0 νββ emitters demands for crystals grown with enriched material. LUCIFER/CUPID-0, the first demonstrator of CUPID, aims at running the first array of enriched scintillating Zn82Se bolometers (total mass of about 7 kg of 82Se) with a background level as low as 10-3 counts/(keV kg y) in the energy region of interest. We present the results of the first measurement performed on three Zn82Se enriched scintillating bolometers operated deep underground in the Hall C of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso.

  14. A measurement of coherent neutral pion production in neutrino neutral current interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullenberg, C. T.; Mishra, S. R.; Seaton, M. B.; Kim, J. J.; Tian, X. C.; Scott, A. M.; Kirsanov, M.; Petti, R.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; De Santo, A.; Del Prete, T.; Di Lella, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kulagin, S.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Ling, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Samoylov, O.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Wu, Q.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2009-11-01

    We present a study of exclusive neutral pion production in neutrino-nucleus Neutral Current interactions using data from the NOMAD experiment at the CERN SPS. The data correspond to 1.44 ×106 muon-neutrino Charged Current interactions in the energy range 2.5 ⩽Eν ⩽ 300 GeV. Neutrino events with only one visible π0 in the final state are expected to result from two Neutral Current processes: coherent π0 production, ν + A → ν + A +π0 and single π0 production in neutrino-nucleon scattering. The signature of coherent π0 production is an emergent π0 almost collinear with the incident neutrino while π0's produced in neutrino-nucleon deep inelastic scattering have larger transverse momenta. In this analysis all relevant backgrounds to the coherent π0 production signal are measured using data themselves. Having determined the backgrounds, and using the Rein-Sehgal model for the coherent π0 production to compute the detection efficiency, we obtain 4630 ± 522 (stat) ± 426 (syst) corrected coherent-π0 events with Eπ0 ⩾ 0.5 GeV. We measure σ (νA → νAπ0) = [ 72.6 ± 8.1 (stat) ± 6.9 (syst) ] ×10-40 cm2 /nucleus. This is the most precise measurement of the coherent π0 production to date.

  15. Performance and Status of the ARIANNA Experiment for Detection of GZK Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, Joulien

    2013-04-01

    Dedicated high-energy neutrino telescopes based on optical Cherenkov techniques have been scanning the cosmos for about a decade. Consequently, neutrino flux limits have improved by several orders of magnitude in the TeV-PeV energy interval. At higher energies, detectors using radio Cherenkov techniques have produced aggressive limits on the neutrino flux. An experiment called ARIANNA is a novel concept for the next generation of astrophysical neutrino detection, which takes advantage of unique geophysical features of the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica will be described. Utilizing the radio Cherenkov technique, ARIANNA is designed to improve sensitivity to neutrinos with energies in excess of 100 TeV by at least a factor of 10 relative to current limits. It consists of a scalable array of autonomous stations with an inner-station spacing of 1 kilometer. The physics motivation for ARIANNA, which includes a measurement of the GZK neutrino flux, whose existence is relatively secure but frustratingly small, and the search for nonstandard particle physics will be presented. The progress toward completion of the hexagonal radio array, initial analysis results and performance of three new stations deployed in December of 2012 will be reported.

  16. Investigation of alternative mechanisms to neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment; Investigacao de Mecanismos Alternativos a Oscilacao de Neutrinos no Experimentos MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    de Abreu Barbosa Coelho, Joao

    2012-01-01

    The neutrino oscillation model is very successful in explaining a large variety of experiments. The model is based on the premise that the neutrinos that interact through the weak force via charged current are not mass eigenstates, but a superposition of them. In general, a quantum superposition is subject to loss of coherence, so that pure states tend toward mixed states. This type of evolution is not possible within the context of isolated quantum systems because the evolution is unitary and, therefore, is invariant under time reversal. By breaking unitarity, an arrow of time is introduced and the characteristic effect for neutrinos is a damping of oscillations. In this thesis, some phenomenological decoherence and decay models are investigated, which could be observed by MINOS, a neutrino oscillation experiment that consists of measuring the neutrino flux produced in a particle accelerator 735 km away. We analyse the disappearance of muon neutrinos in MINOS. Information from other experiments is used to constrain the number of parameters, leaving only one extra parameter in each model. We assume a power law energy dependence of the decoherence parameter. The official MINOS software and simulation are used to obtain the experiment's sensitivities to the effects of unitarity breaking considered.

  17. Combined analysis of short-baseline neutrino experiments in the (3+1) and (3+2) sterile neutrino oscillation hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Sorel, M.; Conrad, J.M.; Shaevitz, M.H.

    2004-10-01

    We investigate adding two sterile neutrinos to resolve the apparent tension existing between short-baseline neutrino oscillation results and CPT-conserving, four-neutrino oscillation models. For both (3+1) and (3+2) models, the level of statistical compatibility between the combined dataset from the null short-baseline experiments Bugey, CHOOZ, CCFR84, CDHS, KARMEN, and NOMAD, on the one hand; and the LSND dataset, on the other, is computed. A combined analysis of all seven short-baseline experiments, including LSND, is also performed, to obtain the favored regions in neutrino mass and mixing parameter space for both models. Finally, four statistical tests to compare the (3+1) and the (3+2) hypotheses are discussed. All tests show that (3+2) models fit the existing short-baseline data significantly better than (3+1) models.

  18. Short-baseline electron neutrino oscillation length after the Troitsk experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.; Li, Y. F.; Long, H. W.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the implications for short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance in the 3+1 mixing scheme of the recent Troitsk bounds on the mixing of a neutrino with mass between 2 and 100 eV. Considering the Troitsk data in combination with the results of short-baseline νe and ν¯e disappearance experiments, which include the reactor and Gallium anomalies, we derive a 2σ allowed range for the effective neutrino squared-mass difference between 0.85 and 43eV2. The upper bound implies that it is likely that oscillations in distance and/or energy can be observed in radioactive source experiments. It is also favorable for the ICARUS@CERN experiment, in which it is likely that oscillations are not washed out in the near detector. We discuss also the implications for neutrinoless double-β decay.

  19. Status report on the Livermore-Rockefeller-Fermilab neutrino mass experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fackler, O.; Mugge, M.; Sticker, H.; White, R.M.; Woerner, R.

    1986-03-01

    An experiment is being performed to determine the electron neutrino mass with the precision of a few eV by measuring the tritium beta decay energy distribution near the endpoint. Key features of the experiment are a 2 eV resolution electrostatic spectrometer and a high-activity frozen tritium source.

  20. Experiment neutrino-4 on searching for a sterile neutrino with multisection detector model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoilov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Zinov'ev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Chernyi, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Polyushkin, A. O.; Martem'yanov, V. P.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I.; Petelin, A. L.; Izhutov, A. L.; Tuzov, A. A.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K.; Gromov, M. O.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Zaitsev, M. E.; Chaikovskii, M. E.

    2017-02-01

    A laboratory for searching for oscillations of reactor antineutrinos has been created based on the SM-3 reactor in order to approach the problem of the possible existence of a sterile neutrino. The multisection detector prototype with a liquid scintillator volume of 350 L was installed in mid-2015. This detector can move inside the passive shield in a range of 6-11 m from the active core of the reactor. The antineutrino flux was measured for the first time at these short distances from the active core of the reactor by the movable detector. The measurements with the multisection detector prototype demonstrated that it is possible to measure the antineutrino flux from the reactor in the complicated conditions of cosmic background on the Earth's surface.

  1. Recent results from the Bugey neutrino oscillation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaignac, J. F.; Hoummada, A.; Koang, D. H.; Vignon, B.; Declais, Y.; de Kerret, H.; Pessard, H.; Thenard, J. M.

    1984-11-01

    The energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos has been measured at two distances, 13.6 and 18.3 meters, from the core of a PWR power reactor at Bugey (FRANCE). About 63000 antineutrinos events have been recorded using the inverse β-decay reaction νe¯+p→n+e+. A significant difference in the counting rate between the two positions has been observed. The compatibility of the results with solutions in a two-neutrino oscillation analysis is discussed.

  2. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  3. A model for pseudo-Dirac neutrinos: leptogenesis and ultra-high energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y. H.; Kang, Sin Kyu; Kim, C. S.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a model where sterile neutrinos are introduced to make light neutrinos to be pseudo-Dirac particles. It is shown how tiny mass splitting necessary for realizing pseudo-Dirac neutrinos can be achieved. Within the model, we show how leptogenesis can be successfully generated. Motivated by the recent observation of very high energy neutrino events at IceCube, we study a possibility to observe the effects of the pseudo-Dirac property of neutrinos by performing astronomical-scale baseline experiments to uncover the oscillation effects of very tiny mass splitting. We also discuss future prospect to observe the effects of the pseudo-Dirac property of neutrinos at high energy neutrino experiments.

  4. FOCUSING HORN SYSTEM FOR THE BNL VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    KAHN,S.A.CARROLL,A.DIWAN,M.V.GALLARDO,J.C.KIRK,H.SCARLETT,C.SIMOS,N.VIREN,B.ZHANG,W.

    2003-05-12

    This paper describes the focusing horn system for the proposed very long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment using a neutrino beam from BNL to an underground facility such as the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The proposed experiment uses a 1 MW upgraded AGS. In order to achieve this performance the AGS will operate with a cycle time of 2.5 Hz and 8.9 x 10{sup 13} protons on target at 28 GeV. This paper discusses the design criteria of a horn system necessary to handle this intense beam and the optical geometry to achieve the desired flux distribution at the detector.

  5. The first results of K2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Taku; K2K Collaboration

    2000-12-01

    The first results of the K2K (KEK to Kamioka) long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment are presented in this talk. In 1999 7.2×1018 protons on target were delivered to the experiment. During this period of running there were 3 events fully contained in the Super-Kamiokande inner detector fiducial area which occurred during the beam spill timing window. In the case of no oscillations the expected number of events during this period was 12.3-1.9+1.7. The near detectors located at KEK also have begun detailed measurements of neutrino interactions in water at around 1 GeV.

  6. Comprehensive analysis of neutrino events in the Super-Kamiokande type detector from the view point of the Computer Numerical Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshi, E.; Takahashi, N.; Galkin, V. I.; Misaki, A.

    2008-07-01

    Comparisons are made on the direction of the incident neutrino, zenith angle distribution of neutrino events produced both inside and outside the detector between the Super-Kamiokande Experiment and our Computer Numerical Experiment.

  7. Nonstandard neutrino interactions in supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleford, Charles J.; Väänänen, Daavid J.; Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.; Shapiro, Brandon T.

    2016-11-01

    Nonstandard interactions (NSI) of neutrinos with matter can significantly alter neutrino flavor evolution in supernovae with the potential to impact explosion dynamics, nucleosynthesis, and the neutrinos signal. In this paper, we explore, both numerically and analytically, the landscape of neutrino flavor transformation effects in supernovae due to NSI and find a new, heretofore unseen transformation processes can occur. These new transformations can take place with NSI strengths well below current experimental limits. Within a broad swath of NSI parameter space, we observe symmetric and standard matter-neutrino resonances for supernovae neutrinos, a transformation effect previously only seen in compact object merger scenarios; in another region of the parameter space we find the NSI can induce neutrino collective effects in scenarios where none would appear with only the standard case of neutrino oscillation physics; and in a third region the NSI can lead to the disappearance of the high density Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonance. Using a variety of analytical tools, we are able to describe quantitatively the numerical results allowing us to partition the NSI parameter according to the transformation processes observed. Our results indicate nonstandard interactions of supernova neutrinos provide a sensitive probe of beyond the Standard Model physics complementary to present and future terrestrial experiments.

  8. Potential measurements of neutrino-deuterium interactions with the T2K near detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahn, Kendall; T2K Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Uncertainties on neutrino interactions with matter are important for current and future generation neutrino long baseline experiments, which infer neutrino mixing parameters. Measurements of neutrinos on deuterium constrain neutrino-nucleon interaction models, such as axial form factors, and are relatively free of complicating nuclear effects. Existing measurements of neutrino interaction using deuterium bubble chambers suffer from low statistics and significant systematic uncertainty on neutrino flux production. This talk describes the possibility of modern neutrino-deuterium cross section measurements using modifications to the existing T2K experiment near detector complex. A comparison of data taken with deuterated water and normal water would provide a measurement of neutrino-deuteron interactions with high-intensity neutrino beam. T2K is supported by the Department of Energy.

  9. Measuring the low energy solar neutrino spectrum with the LENS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayloe, Rex

    2008-10-01

    The Low-Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (LENS) experiment is designed for a precision measurement in real time of the fluxes of low energy solar neutrinos (pp, ^7Be, pep, and CNO, comprising > 99 % of the solar neutrino energy) via charged-current capture on Indium-115 (with threshold of 114 keV). LENS will allow a comparison of the neutrino and photon luminosities of the sun that will test the basic assumptions of solar astrophysics and the overall validity of the MSW-LMA neutrino model. The individual flux results will improve limits on θ12 and the pp spectrum can directly probe the temperature profile of fusion energy production. A detector technology, utilizing a novel optical segmentation method with indium-loaded liquid scintillator has been developed. A modest 1 m^3 prototype (miniLENS), in development for installation in the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), will demonstrate experimental feasibility and will allow for optimization for a 200 ton, full-scale LENS experiment.

  10. Prospects for future experiments to search for nucleon decay

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, D.S.; Heller, K.; LoSecco, J.; Mann, A.K.; Marciano, W.; Shrock, R.E.; Thornton, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    We review the status of theoretical expectations and experimental searches for nucleon decay, and predict the sensitivities which could be reached by future experiments. For the immediate future, we concur with the conclusions of the 1982 Summer Workshop on Proton Decay Experiments: all detectors now in operation or construction will be relatively insensitive to some potentially important decay modes. Next-generation experiments must therefore be designed to search for these modes, and should be undertaken whether or not present experiments detect nucleon decay in other modes. These future experiments should be designed to push the lifetime limits on all decay modes to the levels at which irreducible cosmic-ray neutrino-induced backgrounds become important. Since the technology for these next-generation experiments is available now, the timetable for starting work on them will be determined by funding constraints and not by the need for extensive development of detectors. Efforts to develop advanced detector techniques should also be pursued, in order to mount more sensitive searches than can be envisioned using current technology, or to provide the most precise measurements possible of the properties of the nucleon decay interaction if it should occur at a detectable rate.

  11. Resource Letter ANP-1: Advances in Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Maury C.

    2016-12-01

    Three of the twelve fundamental fermions in particle physics are neutrinos. It was long thought that neutrinos might be massless, but we now know through the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations that neutrinos have mass. This resource letter will cover the history of the growth in our knowledge about neutrinos since they were first proposed in the 1930s, and also covers some up the upcoming experiments which will further our understanding of neutrino properties. Results from experiments are described that use various sources of neutrinos including nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, accelerators, and supernovae. In this resource letter, the resources that can be used to trace the past, present, and anticipated future advances in neutrino physics are reviewed.

  12. Low-energy neutral-current neutrino scattering on nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.; Wambach, J.

    2011-12-16

    Inelastic cross-sections of neutral current neutrino scattering on the {sup 40}Ar isotope, detector-medium of the ongoing ICARUS experiment, are computed in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation by utilizing realistic two-nucleon forces. ICARUS is a multipurpose neutrino physics experiment that includes in its objectives low-energy neutrino detection. The incoming neutrino energy range adopted in our calculations ({epsilon}{sub {nu}}{<=}100 MeV), covers the laboratory low-energy beta-beam-neutrinos and pion-muon stopped neutrino-beams operating or planned to be conducted at future neutron spallation sources. One of the main goals of these neutrino beams is to measure neutrino-nucleus cross sections at low-energies.

  13. Statistical issues in long baseline neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonazzo, Alessandra; LBNO Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    An animated debate has been ongoing in the neutrino community on how to estimate and quote the expected sensitivity of future long-baseline neutrino experiments to key parameters such as Mass Hierarchy or CP violation. We will present an overview of some items covered by recent papers and will detail the approach chosen by the LBNO Collaboration to present its results.

  14. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ˜10 % due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We have isolated a sample of 135 ±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  15. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman,; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.

    2016-06-10

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently, a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  16. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman,; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.

    2016-06-10

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently, a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  17. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; ...

    2016-06-10

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently, a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9%more » to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.« less

  18. Working Group Report: Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P.

    2013-10-16

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  19. A very intense neutrino super beam experiment for leptonic CP violation discovery based on the European spallation source linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baussan, E.; Blennow, M.; Bogomilov, M.; Bouquerel, E.; Caretta, O.; Cederkäll, J.; Christiansen, P.; Coloma, P.; Cupial, P.; Danared, H.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Dracos, M.; Ekelöf, T.; Eshraqi, M.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gaudiot, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Lindroos, M.; Loveridge, P.; Matev, R.; McGinnis, D.; Mezzetto, M.; Miyamoto, R.; Mosca, L.; Ohlsson, T.; Öhman, H.; Osswald, F.; Peggs, S.; Poussot, P.; Ruber, R.; Tang, J. Y.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Wurtz, J.

    2014-08-01

    Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few μs with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground Water Cherenkov detector located in existing mines 300-600 km from Lund will make it possible to discover leptonic CP violation at 5 σ significance level in up to 50% of the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase range. This experiment could also determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a significance level of more than 3 σ if this issue will not already have been settled by other experiments by then. The mass hierarchy performance could be increased by combining the neutrino beam results with those obtained from atmospheric neutrinos detected by the same large volume detector. This detector will also be used to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova explosions. Results on the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy are presented.

  20. Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    There is compelling evidence for neutrino flavor change as neutrinos propagate. The evidence for this phenomenon has been provided by several experiments observing neutrinos that traverse distances of several hundred kilometers between production and detection. This review outlines the evidence for neutrino flavor change from such experiments and describes recent results in the field.

  1. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  2. Recent results from the Bugey neutrino oscillation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaignac, J.F.; Hoummada, A.; Koang, D.H.; Vignon, B.; Declais, Y.; de Kerret, H.; Pessard, H.; Thenard, J.M.

    1984-11-15

    The energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos has been measured at two distances, 13.6 and 18.3 meters, from the core of a PWR power reactor at Bugey (FRANCE). About 63000 antineutrinos events have been recorded using the inverse ..beta..-decay reaction ..nu../sub e//sub $-bar//sub +p//sub ..-->..//sub n+e<+/. A significant difference in the counting rate between the two positions has been observed. The compatibility of the results with solutions in a two-neutrino oscillation analysis is discussed.

  3. Limits on neutrino oscillations from the CHOOZ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, M.; Baldini, A.

    1999-11-01

    We present new results based on the entire CHOOZ data sample. We find (at 90% confidence level) no evidence for neutrino oscillations in the anti_nue disappearance mode, for the parameter region given by approximately Delta m**2 > 7 x 10**-4 eV^2 for maximum mixing, and sin**2(2 theta) = 0.10 for large Delta m**2. Lower sensitivity results, based only on the comparison of the positron spectra from the two different-distance nuclear reactors, are also presented; these are independent of the absolute normalization of the anti_nue flux, the cross section, the number of target protons and the detector efficiencies.

  4. Neutrino masses, neutrino oscillations, and cosmological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical concepts and motivations for considering neutrinos having finite masses are discussed and the experimental situation on searches for neutrino masses and oscillations is summarized. The solar neutrino problem, reactor, deep mine and accelerator data, tri decay experiments and double beta-decay data are considered and cosmological implications and astrophysical data relating to neutrino masses are reviewed. The neutrino oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem, the missing mass problem in galaxy halos and galaxy cluster galaxy formation and clustering, and radiative neutrino decay and the cosmic ultraviolet background radiation are examined.

  5. Measurements of muon neutrino charged-current interactions by the MicroBooNE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, D.; Lister, A.; MicroBooNE collaboration

    2017-09-01

    MicroBooNE is a 170 ton Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiment located at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. It has been operating in the Booster neutrino beam since October 2015 and is already demonstrating the superb imaging capabilities of LArTPC detectors. MicroBooNE is the first large LArTPC detector to be exposed to a high-intensity neutrino beam. Among its primary physics goals are precise measurements of muon neutrino charged-current (CC) interactions on argon. In order to analyse its high-statistics data, a suite of fully automated techniques have been developed that reconstruct the LArTPC images and separate muon neutrino CC interactions from their cosmic-ray and neutral current backgrounds. These proceedings will describe the reconstruction and selection of muon neutrino CC event candidates, and present measured distributions of the observed events based on 5e19 protons on target from the first MicroBooNE data-taking period.

  6. Baby MIND: a magnetized segmented neutrino detector for the WAGASCI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Bayes, R.; Benoit, P.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Bross, A.; Cadoux, F.; Cervera, A.; Chikuma, N.; Dudarev, A.; Ekelöf, T.; Favre, Y.; Fedotov, S.; Hallsjö, S.-P.; Izmaylov, A.; Karadzhov, Y.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotyantsev, A.; Kleymenova, A.; Koga, T.; Kostin, A.; Kudenko, Y.; Likhacheva, V.; Martinez, B.; Matev, R.; Medvedeva, M.; Mefodiev, A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Nessi, M.; Nicola, L.; Noah, E.; Ovsiannikova, T.; Pais Da Silva, H.; Parsa, S.; Rayner, M.; Rolando, G.; Shaykhiev, A.; Simion, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Suvorov, S.; Tsenov, R.; Ten Kate, H.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Yershov, N.

    2017-07-01

    T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) is a long-baseline neutrino experiment in Japan designed to study various parameters of neutrino oscillations. A near detector complex (ND280) is located 280 m downstream of the production target and measures neutrino beam parameters before any oscillations occur. ND280's measurements are used to predict the number and spectra of neutrinos in the Super-Kamiokande detector at the distance of 295 km. The difference in the target material between the far (water) and near (scintillator, hydrocarbon) detectors leads to the main non-cancelling systematic uncertainty for the oscillation analysis. In order to reduce this uncertainty a new WAter-Grid-And-SCintillator detector (WAGASCI) has been developed. A magnetized iron neutrino detector (Baby MIND) will be used to measure momentum and charge identification of the outgoing muons from charged current interactions. The Baby MIND modules are composed of magnetized iron plates and long plastic scintillator bars read out at the both ends with wavelength shifting fibers and silicon photomultipliers. The front-end electronics board has been developed to perform the readout and digitization of the signals from the scintillator bars. Detector elements were tested with cosmic rays and in the PS beam at CERN. The obtained results are presented in this paper.

  7. Charged-current quasielastic scattering of muon antineutrino and neutrino in the MINERvA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankowski, Artur M.

    2015-07-01

    One of the largest sources of systematic uncertainties in ongoing neutrino-oscillation measurements is the description of nuclear effects. Its considerable reduction is expected thanks to the dedicated studies of (anti)neutrino-nucleus interactions in the MINERvA experiment. In this article, the calculations within the spectral function approach are compared to the charged-current quasielastic cross sections reported from MINERvA. The obtained results show that the effect of final-state interactions on the (anti)muon kinematics plays a pivotal role in reproducing the experimental data.

  8. A large liquid scintillator detector for a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Border, P.; Cushman, P.; Heller, K.; Maxam, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Ruddick, K.; Rusack, R.; Schwienhorst, R.; Berg, T.; Chase, T.; Hansen, M.; Bower, C.; Hatcher, R.; Heinz, R.; Miller, L.; Mufson, S.

    2001-05-01

    We present the concept and design of a liquid scintillator detector for a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Neutrinos interact in 2.5 cm thick steel plates alternating with 2.0 cm thick planes of liquid scintillator. The scintillator is contained in multicell PVC extrusions containing individual 2 cm×3 cm cells up to 8 m long. Readout of the scintillation light is via wavelength-shifting fibers which transport light to pixellated photodetectors at one end of the cells.

  9. Theta13 Neutrino Experiment at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, LBNL Engineering Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Oshatz, Daryl

    2004-03-12

    This summary document describes the results of conceptual design and cost estimates performed by LBNL Engineering staff between October 10, 2003 and March 12, 2004 for the proposed {theta}{sub 13} neutrino experiment at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP). This document focuses on the detector room design concept and mechanical engineering issues associated with the neutrino detector structures. Every effort has been made not to duplicate information contained in the last LBNL Engineering Summary Report dated October 10, 2003. Only new or updated information is included in this document.

  10. Mass Hierarchy Resolution in Reactor Anti-neutrino Experiments: Parameter Degeneracies and Detector Energy Response

    SciTech Connect

    X. Qian, D. A. Dwyer, R. D. McKeown, P. Vogel, W. Wang, C. Zhang`

    2013-02-01

    Determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy using a reactor neutrino experiment at ∼60  km is analyzed. Such a measurement is challenging due to the finite detector resolution, the absolute energy scale calibration, and the degeneracies caused by current experimental uncertainty of |Δm{sub 32}{sup 2}|. The standard {chi}{sup 2} method is compared with a proposed Fourier transformation method. In addition, we show that for such a measurement to succeed, one must understand the nonlinearity of the detector energy scale at the level of a few tenths of percent.

  11. Neutrino detection systematics in the two detector phase of the Double Chooz experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almazan, H.; Navas-Nicolás, D.

    2017-09-01

    Being an intense and pure source of low energy electron antineutrinos, nuclear reactors are one of the most powerful tools to investigate neutrino oscillations. The Double Chooz experiment aims for a precise determination of the neutrino mixing angle θ 13 using a two detector configuration with a liquid scintillator target volume read by photomultipliers. The antineutrino detection efficiency systematic uncertainty is the dominant component in the normalization uncertainty affecting the final precision on the θ 13 measurement.The collected data from the near detector since January 2015 will profit from improved detection systematic uncertainties thanks to the cancellation of correlated contributions between both detectors.

  12. Neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R.J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A.C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  13. Neutrino factory

    DOE PAGES

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; ...

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable ofmore » making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.« less

  14. Prospects for reconstruction of leptonic unitarity quadrangle and neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surender; Bhardwaj, Shankita

    2016-06-01

    After the observation of non-zero θ13 the goal has shifted to observe CP violation in the leptonic sector. Neutrino oscillation experiments can, directly, probe the Dirac CP phases. Alternatively, one can measure CP violation in the leptonic sector using Leptonic Unitarity Quadrangle (LUQ). The existence of Standard Model (SM) gauge singlets - sterile neutrinos - will provide additional sources of CP violation. We investigate the connection between neutrino survival probability and rephasing invariants of the 4 × 4 neutrino mixing matrix. In general, LUQ contain eight geometrical parameters out of which five are independent. We obtain CP asymmetry (Pνf→νf‧ -Pνbarf→νbarf‧) in terms of these independent parameters of the LUQ and search for the possibilities of extracting information on these independent geometrical parameters in short baseline (SBL) and long baseline (LBL) experiments, thus, looking for constructing LUQ and possible measurement of CP violation. We find that it is not possible to construct LUQ using data from LBL experiments because CP asymmetry is sensitive to only three of the five independent parameters of LUQ. However, for SBL experiments, CP asymmetry is found to be sensitive to all five independent parameters making it possible to construct LUQ and measure CP violation.

  15. Early steps towards quarks and their interactions using neutrino beams in CERN bubble chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Don H.

    2016-06-01

    Results from neutrino experiments at CERN in the1970's, using bubble chamber detectors filled with heavy liquids, gave early evidence for the existence of quarks and gluons as real dynamical objects. In detail, the measured moments of the non-singlet structure functions provided crucial support for the validity of the present theory of the strong inter-quark interactions, quantum chromodynamics.

  16. Improved Search for a Light Sterile Neutrino with the Full Configuration of the Daya Bay Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.-H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cheng, Z. K.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Chukanov, A.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolgareva, M.; Dove, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Grassi, M.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Guo, Z.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Huo, W.; Hussain, G.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Joshi, J.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H. C.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Loh, C. W.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, K. B.; Lv, Z.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malyshkin, Y.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McDonald, K. T.; McKeown, R. D.; Mitchell, I.; Mooney, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pan, H.-R.; Park, J.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Treskov, K.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, C.-H.; Wu, Q.; Wu, W. J.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    This Letter reports an improved search for light sterile neutrino mixing in the electron antineutrino disappearance channel with the full configuration of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. With an additional 404 days of data collected in eight antineutrino detectors, this search benefits from 3.6 times the statistics available to the previous publication, as well as from improvements in energy calibration and background reduction. A relative comparison of the rate and energy spectrum of reactor antineutrinos in the three experimental halls yields no evidence of sterile neutrino mixing in the 2 ×10-4≲|Δ m412|≲0.3 eV2 mass range. The resulting limits on sin22 θ14 are improved by approx imately a factor of 2 over previous results and constitute the most stringent constraints to date in the |Δ m412|≲0.2 eV2 region.

  17. Muon and neutrino results from KGF experiment at a depth of 7000 hg/square cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Menon, M. G. K.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Streekantan, B. V.; Hayashi, Y.; Ito, N.; Kawakami, S.; Miyake, S.

    1985-01-01

    The KGF nucleon decay experiment at a depth of 7000 hg/sq cm has provided valuable data on muons and neutrinos. The detector comprised of 34 crossed layers of proportional counters (cross section 10 x 10 sq cm; lengths 4m and 6m) sandwiched between 1.2 cm thick iron plates can record tracks of charged particles to an accuracy of 1 deg from tracks that traverse the whole of the detector. A special two-fold coincidence system enables the detector to record charged particles that enter at very large zenith angles. In a live time of 3.6 years about 2600 events have been recorded. These events include atmospheric muons, neutrino induced muons from rock, stopping muons, showers and events which have their production vertex inside the detectors. The results on atmospheric muons and neutrino events are presented.

  18. Solar neutrino measurement from the second phase of the Super-Kamiokande experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, John Parker

    The second phase of the Super-Kamiokande experiment aimed at the continuation of the solar neutrino measurement after the 1496-day first phase. However, the second phase operated with a photocathode coverage 47% of the first phase's. This reduction in sensitivity prompted the development of new analysis tools and created larger estimations of systematic errors. Despite these changes, the second phase solar neutrino data showed consistency with the first phase and no indication of systematic tendencies between the two phases was present. An oscillation analysis of the second phase resulted in reduced exclusion power of the neutrino mixing angle and mass difference parameter set. However, a rate constrained combined oscillation analysis of both phases continues to favor the Large Mixing Angle solution at 95% confidence level.

  19. NEUTRINO FACTORIES - PHYSICS POTENTIALS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-02-16

    The recent results from Super-Kamiokande atmospheric and solar neutrino observations opens a new era in neutrino physics and has sparked a considerable interest in the physics possibilities with a Neutrino Factory based on the muon storage ring. We present physics opportunities at a Neutrino Factory, and prospects of Neutrino oscillation experiments. Using the precisely known flavor composition of the beam, one could envision an extensive program to measure the neutrino oscillation mixing matrix, including possible CP violating effects. These and Neutrino Interaction Rates for examples of a Neutrino Factory at BNL (and FNAL) with detectors at Gran Sasso, SLAC and Sudan are also presented.

  20. Neutrino mass hierarchy and stepwise spectral swapping of supernova neutrino flavors.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huaiyu; Fuller, George M; Carlson, J; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2007-12-14

    We examine a phenomenon recently predicted by numerical simulations of supernova neutrino flavor evolution: the swapping of supernova nu(e) and nu(mu,tau) energy spectra below (above) energy E(C) for the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. We present the results of large-scale numerical calculations which show that in the normal neutrino mass hierarchy case, E(C) decreases as the assumed effective 2x2 vacuum nu(e)<==>nu(mu,tau) mixing angle (approximately theta13) is decreased. In contrast, these calculations indicate that E(C) is essentially independent of the vacuum mixing angle in the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy case. With a good neutrino signal from a future galactic supernova, the above results could be used to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy even if theta13 is too small to be measured by terrestrial neutrino oscillation experiments.

  1. The Antares Undersea Neutrino Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghinolfi, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Neutrino astronomy is a very promising field of investigation representing a complementary source of information with respect to photon-astronomy. ANTARES, operating off the French Mediterranean coast, is the worlds largest operational underwater neutrino telescope. In these proceedings, in addition to a short detector description, the results of recent analysis will be discussed. The ANTARES project is an important physics experiment but also represents a bench mark for a future large detector of the km3 scale.

  2. Astrophysical probes of electromagnetic neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, Carlo; Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Li, Yu-Feng; Lokhov, Alexey V.; Studenikin, Alexander I.; Zhou, Shun

    2017-09-01

    Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos and current best astrophysical bounds on neutrino magnetic moment and millicharge are outlined. Future probes of electromagnetic neutrinos from a core-collapse supernova with JUNO are discussed.

  3. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Disappearance with Non-Fiducial Interactions in the NOnuA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Nicholas Jacob

    The NuMI1 Off-Axis nue Appearance (NOnuA) experiment is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The experiment measures the oscillations of a primarily muon neutrino beam using two functionally identical liquid scintillator tracking calorimeters detectors placed 810 km apart and 14 milliradians off-axis to the NuMI beam. The oscillation parameters sin2theta23 and |Deltam 322| are measured from the disappearance of muon neutrinos as they propagate between the two detectors using the first data collected in 2014 and 2015. The primary NOnuA analysis uses charged current events only in the fiducial volume of the far detector. This analysis also includes a non-fiducial sample of interactions that originate in the fiducial volume of the far detector but escape the detector. This analysis measures the oscillation parameters as sin2theta23 = 0.3--0.71 and |Deltam32 2| = 2.15--2.91x10-3 eV2 at 90% confidence limits. 1 Neutrinos at the Main Injector.

  4. Neutrino Oscillations and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, David

    2001-04-01

    When the existence of the neutrino was almost apologetically first proposed by Wolfgang Pauli it was intended to explain the mysterious apparent absence of energy and momentum in beta decay. 70 years later the neutrino has indeed solved that mystery, but it has generated still more of its own. Are neutrinos massive? Is it possible to create a neutrino with its spin in the same direction as its momentum? What fraction of the mass of the Universe is made up of neutrinos? Are the flavour labels which we put on neutrinos, like electron and muon, really fixed or can they change? Why does no experiment see the predicted flux of neutrinos from the Sun? Why do there appear to be roughly equal numbers of muon and electron neutrinos created in our atmosphere, rather than the 2:1 ratio we would expect? Many of these questions were coupled when Bruno Pontecorvo first suggested that the shortfall in solar neutrino measurements were caused by neutrino oscillations - neutrinos spontaneously changing flavour as they travel from the Sun. 30 years later we still await definitive proof of that conjecture, and providing that proof is the reason for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The talk will discuss the current state of neutrino oscillations studies, and show how the unique capabilities of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory can provide definitive proof of whether neutrino oscillations are the long-sought answer to the solar neutrino problem.

  5. Relic right-handed Dirac neutrinos and implications for detection of cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jue; Zhou, Shun

    2016-02-01

    It remains to be determined experimentally if massive neutrinos are Majorana or Dirac particles. In this connection, it has been recently suggested that the detection of cosmic neutrino background of left-handed neutrinos νL and right-handed antineutrinos ν‾R in future experiments of neutrino capture on beta-decaying nuclei (e.g., νe +3H →3He +e- for the PTOLEMY experiment) is likely to distinguish between Majorana and Dirac neutrinos, since the capture rate is twice larger in the former case. In this paper, we investigate the possible impact of right-handed neutrinos on the capture rate, assuming that massive neutrinos are Dirac particles and both right-handed neutrinos νR and left-handed antineutrinos ν‾L can be efficiently produced in the early Universe. It turns out that the capture rate can be enhanced at most by 28% due to the presence of relic νR and ν‾L with a total number density of 95 cm-3, which should be compared to the number density 336 cm-3 of cosmic neutrino background. The enhancement has actually been limited by the latest cosmological and astrophysical bounds on the effective number of neutrino generations Neff =3.14-0.43+0.44 at the 95% confidence level. For illustration, two possible scenarios have been proposed for thermal production of right-handed neutrinos in the early Universe.

  6. CPT-Odd Resonances in Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, V.; Pakvasa, S.; Weiler, T. J.; Whisnant, K.

    2000-12-01

    We consider the consequences for future neutrino factory experiments of small CPT-odd interactions in neutrino oscillations. The νμ-->νμ and ν¯μ-->ν¯μ survival probabilities at a baseline L = 732 km can test for CPT-odd contributions at orders of magnitude better sensitivity than present neutrino sector limits. Interference between the CPT-violating interaction and CPT-even mass terms in the Lagrangian can lead to a resonant enhancement of the oscillation amplitude. For oscillations in matter, a simultaneous enhancement of both neutrino and antineutrino oscillation amplitudes is possible.

  7. Gemma experiment: The results of neutrino magnetic moment search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beda, A. G.; Brudanin, V. B.; Egorov, V. G.; Medvedev, D. V.; Pogosov, V. S.; Shevchik, E. A.; Shirchenko, M. V.; Starostin, A. S.; Zhitnikov, I. V.

    2013-03-01

    The result of the neutrino magnetic moment (NMM) measurement at the Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) with GEMMA spectrometer is presented. The antineutrino-electron scattering is investigated. A high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a mass of 1.5 kg placed at a distance of 13.9 m from the 3 GWth reactor core is exposed to the antineutrino flux of 2.7 × 1013 cm-2s-1. The recoil electron spectra taken in 18134 and 4487 h for the reactor ON and OFF periods are compared. The upper limit for the NMM μν < 2.9 × 10-11 μB at 90% C.L. is derived from the data processing.

  8. Progress and Challenges of Neutrino-Nuclear Cross Sections in the GeV Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahn, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos with nuclear material are an essential ingredient in measurements of neutrino oscillation. As future experiments aim at unprecedented precision of the parameters which govern neutrino mixing, neutrino-nuclear interactions have come under intense scrutiny and interest. This talk will describe the needs of future experiments, the unique challenges of neutrino interaction physics and summarize recent results from a suite of experiments worldwide. The speaker would like to acknowledge support by Department of Energy and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  9. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  10. Limits on Active to Sterile Neutrino Oscillations from Disappearance Searches in the MINOS, Daya Bay, and Bugey-3 Experiments.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; An, F P; Anghel, I; Aurisano, A; Balantekin, A B; Band, H R; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Blyth, S; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Cao, S V; Carroll, T J; Castromonte, C M; Cen, W R; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, R; Chen, S M; Chen, Y; Chen, Y X; Cheng, J; Cheng, J-H; Cheng, Y P; Cheng, Z K; Cherwinka, J J; Childress, S; Chu, M C; Chukanov, A; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; De Rijck, S; Deng, Z Y; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dolgareva, M; Dove, J; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Flanagan, W; Frohne, M V; Gabrielyan, M; Gallagher, H R; Germani, S; Gill, R; Gomes, R A; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grassi, M; Grzelak, K; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, L; Guo, R P; Guo, X H; Guo, Z; Habig, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hahn, S R; Han, R; Hans, S; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Holin, A; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, J; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Huo, W; Hussain, G; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; James, C; Jen, K L; Jensen, D; Jetter, S; Ji, X L; Ji, X P; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; de Jong, J K; Joshi, J; Kafka, T; Kang, L; Kasahara, S M S; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kramer, M; Kreymer, A; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lang, K; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lee, J H C; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, J K C; Li, C; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, S; Lin, S K; Lin, Y-C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Litchfield, P J; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, J C; Liu, J L; Loh, C W; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Lucas, P; Luk, K B; Lv, Z; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y Q; Malyshkin, Y; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Martinez Caicedo, D A; Mayer, N; McDonald, K T; McGivern, C; McKeown, R D; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, I; Mooney, M; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Nakajima, Y; Naples, D; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Ngai, H Y; Nichol, R J; Ning, Z; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevskiy, A; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Pan, H-R; Park, J; Patterson, R B; Patton, S; Pawloski, G; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Perch, A; Pfützner, M M; Phan, D D; Phan-Budd, S; Pinsky, L; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Raper, N; Rebel, B; Ren, J; Rosenfeld, C; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Rubin, H A; Sail, P; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Moed Sher, S; Sousa, A; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Todd, J; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Treskov, K; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Webb, R C; Weber, A; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wise, T; Wojcicki, S G; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, C-H; Wu, Q; Wu, W J; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J L; Xu, J Y; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yang, C G; Yang, H; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Ye, Z; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, Z Y; Zeng, S; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, X T; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y B; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2016-10-07

    Searches for a light sterile neutrino have been performed independently by the MINOS and the Daya Bay experiments using the muon (anti)neutrino and electron antineutrino disappearance channels, respectively. In this Letter, results from both experiments are combined with those from the Bugey-3 reactor neutrino experiment to constrain oscillations into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to probe regions allowed by the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) and MiniBooNE experiments in a minimally extended four-neutrino flavor framework. Stringent limits on sin^{2}2θ_{μe} are set over 6 orders of magnitude in the sterile mass-squared splitting Δm_{41}^{2}. The sterile-neutrino mixing phase space allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments is excluded for Δm_{41}^{2}<0.8  eV^{2} at 95%  CL_{s}.

  11. Limits on active to sterile neutrino oscillations from disappearance searches in the MINOS, Daya Bay, and Bugey-3 experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; An, F. P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Blyth, S.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, R.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. X.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, J. -H.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cheng, Z. K.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Childress, S.; Chu, M. C.; Chukanov, A.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; De Rijck, S.; Deng, Z. Y.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolgareva, M.; Dove, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gill, R.; Gomes, R. A.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grassi, M.; Grzelak, K.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Guo, Z.; Habig, A.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Holin, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, J.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Huo, W.; Hussain, G.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; James, C.; Jen, K. L.; Jensen, D.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. L.; Ji, X. P.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; de Jong, J. K.; Joshi, J.; Kafka, T.; Kang, L.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kramer, M.; Kreymer, A.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lang, K.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H. C.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y. -C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Litchfield, P. J.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, J. L.; Loh, C. W.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Lucas, P.; Luk, K. B.; Lv, Z.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malyshkin, Y.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Mayer, N.; McDonald, K. T.; McGivern, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Mitchell, I.; Mooney, M.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Naples, D.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Ngai, H. Y.; Nichol, R. J.; Ning, Z.; Nowak, J. A.; O’Connor, J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Pan, H. -R.; Park, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Patton, S.; Pawloski, G.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Pinsky, L.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Raper, N.; Rebel, B.; Ren, J.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Moed Sher, S.; Sousa, A.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Treskov, K.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webb, R. C.; Weber, A.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wise, T.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, C. -H.; Wu, Q.; Wu, W. J.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-10-07

    Searches for a light sterile neutrino have been performed independently by the MINOS and the Daya Bay experiments using the muon (anti)neutrino and electron antineutrino disappearance channels, respectively. In this Letter, results from both experiments are combined with those from the Bugey-3 reactor neutrino experiment to constrain oscillations into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to probe regions allowed by the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) and MiniBooNE experiments in a minimally extended four-neutrino flavor framework. Here, stringent limits on sin2μe are set over 6 orders of magnitude in the sterile mass-squared splitting Δm241. The sterile-neutrino mixing phase space allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments is excluded for Δm241 < 0.8 eV2 at 95% CLs.

  12. Limits on active to sterile neutrino oscillations from disappearance searches in the MINOS, Daya Bay, and Bugey-3 experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.; An, F. P.; Anghel, I.; ...

    2016-10-07

    Searches for a light sterile neutrino have been performed independently by the MINOS and the Daya Bay experiments using the muon (anti)neutrino and electron antineutrino disappearance channels, respectively. In this Letter, results from both experiments are combined with those from the Bugey-3 reactor neutrino experiment to constrain oscillations into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to probe regions allowed by the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) and MiniBooNE experiments in a minimally extended four-neutrino flavor framework. Here, stringent limits on sin22θμe are set over 6 orders of magnitudemore » in the sterile mass-squared splitting Δm241. The sterile-neutrino mixing phase space allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments is excluded for Δm241 < 0.8 eV2 at 95% CLs.« less

  13. Limits on active to sterile neutrino oscillations from disappearance searches in the MINOS, Daya Bay, and Bugey-3 experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; An, F. P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Blyth, S.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, R.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. X.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, J. -H.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cheng, Z. K.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Childress, S.; Chu, M. C.; Chukanov, A.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; De Rijck, S.; Deng, Z. Y.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolgareva, M.; Dove, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gill, R.; Gomes, R. A.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grassi, M.; Grzelak, K.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Guo, Z.; Habig, A.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Holin, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, J.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Huo, W.; Hussain, G.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; James, C.; Jen, K. L.; Jensen, D.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. L.; Ji, X. P.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; de Jong, J. K.; Joshi, J.; Kafka, T.; Kang, L.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kramer, M.; Kreymer, A.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lang, K.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H. C.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y. -C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Litchfield, P. J.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, J. L.; Loh, C. W.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Lucas, P.; Luk, K. B.; Lv, Z.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malyshkin, Y.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Mayer, N.; McDonald, K. T.; McGivern, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Mitchell, I.; Mooney, M.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Naples, D.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Ngai, H. Y.; Nichol, R. J.; Ning, Z.; Nowak, J. A.; O’Connor, J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Pan, H. -R.; Park, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Patton, S.; Pawloski, G.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Pinsky, L.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Raper, N.; Rebel, B.; Ren, J.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Moed Sher, S.; Sousa, A.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Treskov, K.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webb, R. C.; Weber, A.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wise, T.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, C. -H.; Wu, Q.; Wu, W. J.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-10-07

    Searches for a light sterile neutrino have been performed independently by the MINOS and the Daya Bay experiments using the muon (anti)neutrino and electron antineutrino disappearance channels, respectively. In this Letter, results from both experiments are combined with those from the Bugey-3 reactor neutrino experiment to constrain oscillations into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to probe regions allowed by the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) and MiniBooNE experiments in a minimally extended four-neutrino flavor framework. Here, stringent limits on sin2μe are set over 6 orders of magnitude in the sterile mass-squared splitting Δm241. The sterile-neutrino mixing phase space allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments is excluded for Δm241 < 0.8 eV2 at 95% CLs.

  14. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21 cm line and precise CMB polarization observations

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Yoshihiko; Kohri, Kazunori; Hazumi, Masashi E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp

    2016-02-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Besides, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this paper, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the neutrino mass hierarchy. We show that by combining a precise CMB polarization observation such as Simons Array with a 21 cm line observation such as Square kilometer Array (SKA) phase 1 and a baryon acoustic oscillation observation (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument:DESI) we can measure effects of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation if the total neutrino mass is larger than 0.1 eV. Additionally, the combinations can strongly improve errors of the bounds on the effective number of neutrino species σ (N{sub ν}) ∼ 0.06−0.09 at 95 % C.L.. Finally, by using SKA phase 2, we can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at 95 % C.L. if the total neutrino mass is similar to or smaller than 0.1 eV.

  15. Final results of the 51Cr neutrino source experiments in GALLEX.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, W.; Heusser, G.; Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Pernicka, E.; Rau, W.; Roenn, U.; Schlosser, C.; Wojcik, M.; von Ammon, R.; Ebert, K. H.; Fritsch, T.; Heidt, D.; Henrich, E.; Stieglitz, L.; Weirich, F.; Balata, M.; Hartmann, F. X.; Sann, M.; Bellotti, E.; Cattadori, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Ferrari, N.; Fiorini, E.; Zanotti, L.; Altmann, M.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Moessbauer, R.; Berthomieu, G.; Schatzman, E.; Carmi, I.; Dostrovsky, I.; Bacci, C.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; D'Angelo, S.; Paoluzi, L.; Bevilacqua, A.; Cribier, M.; Gosset, L.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Tao, C.; Vignaud, D.; Boger, J.; Hahn, R. L.; Rowley, J. K.; Stoenner, R. W.; Weneser, J.

    1998-02-01

    The radiochemical GALLEX experiment, which has been measuring the solar neutrino flux since May 1991, has performed an investigation with two intense 51Cr neutrino sources that were produced in the Siloé nuclear reactor and used at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, one between June and October 1994, and the second between October 95 and February 96. The ratio, R, of the the neutrino source strength derived from the measured rate of 71Ge production, divided by the directly determined source strength is R = 1.01 (-0.11, +0.12) for the first source and R = 0.84 (-0.11, +0.12) for the second one. The combined value of R for the two source experiments is R = 0.93±0.08. It shows that the >40% deficit of solar neutrino flux observed by GALLEX cannot be attributed to experimental artifacts and demonstrates the absence of any significant unexpected systematic errors at the 10% level.

  16. Final results of the 51Cr neutrino source experiments in GALLEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GALLEX Collaboration; Hampel, W.; Heusser, G.; Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Pernicka, E.; Rau, W.; Rönn, U.; Schlosser, C.; Wójcik, M.; Ammon, R. V.; Ebert, K. H.; Fritsch, T.; Heidt, D.; Henrich, E.; Stieglitz, L.; Weirich, F.; Balata, M.; Hartmann, F. X.; Sann, M.; Bellotti, E.; Cattadori, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Ferrari, N.; Fiorini, E.; Zanotti, L.; Altmann, M.; Feilitzsch, F. V.; Mößbauer, R.; Berthomieu, G.; Schatzman, E.; Carmi, I.; Dostrovsky, I.; Bacci, C.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; D'Angelo, S.; Paoluzi, L.; Bevilacqua, A.; Cribier, M.; Gosset, L.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Tao, C.; Vignaud, D.; Boger, J.; Hahn, R. L.; Rowley, J. K.; Stoenner, R. W.; Weneser, J.

    1998-02-01

    The radiochemical GALLEX experiment, which has been measuring the solar neutrino flux since May 1991, has performed an investigation with two intense 51Cr neutrino sources (>60 PBq) that were produced in the Siloé nuclear reactor and used at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, one between June and October 1994, and the second between October 95 and February 96. The ratio, R, of the the neutrino source strength derived from the measured rate of 71Ge production, divided by the directly determined source strength is R=1.01 +0.12-0.11 for the first source and R=0.84 +0.12-0.11 for the second one. The combined value of R for the two source experiments is R=0.93 +/- 0.08. It shows that the > 40 % deficit of solar neutrino flux observed by GALLEX cannot be attributed to experimental artifacts and demonstrates the absence of any significant unexpected systematic errors at the 10 % level.

  17. Low-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludhova, Livia

    2016-05-01

    There exist several kinds of sources emitting neutrinos in the MeV energy range. These low-energy neutrinos from different sources can be often detected by the same multipurpose detectors. The status-of-art of the field of solar neutrinos, geoneutrinos, and the search for sterile neutrino with artificial neutrino sources is provided here; other neutrino sources, as for example reactor or high-energy neutrinos, are described elsewhere. For each of these three fields, the present-day motivation and open questions, as well as the latest experimental results and future perspectives are discussed.

  18. Physics potential of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment using a J-PARC neutrino beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Aihara, H.; Andreopoulos, C.; Anghel, I.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Askins, M.; Back, J. J.; Ballett, P.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bay, F.; Beltrame, P.; Berardi, V.; Bergevin, M.; Berkman, S.; Berry, T.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Cafagna, F. S.; Carminati, G.; Cartwright, S. L.; Catanesi, M. G.; Choi, K.; Choi, J. H.; Collazuol, G.; Cowan, G.; Cremonesi, L.; Davies, G.; De Rosa, G.; Densham, C.; Detwiler, J.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Fernández, P.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A.; Fitton, M.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Galymov, V.; Ganezer, K.; Gonin, M.; Gumplinger, P.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haga, Y.; Hartfiel, B.; Hartz, M.; Hayato, Y.; Hierholzer, M.; Hill, J.; Himmel, A.; Hirota, S.; Horiuchi, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Inoue, K.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Irvine, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishino, H.; Ishitsuka, M.; Itow, Y.; Izmaylov, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jang, H. I.; Jiang, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jung, C. K.; Kaboth, A.; Kajita, T.; Kameda, J.; Karadhzov, Y.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Koga, M.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W. R.; Kudenko, Y.; Kutter, T.; Kuze, M.; Labarga, L.; Lagoda, J.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Learned, J. G.; Lim, I. T.; Lindner, T.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Ma, W.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Mariani, C.; Marti, L.; Martin, J. F.; Martin, C.; Martins, P. P. J.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Minakata, H.; Minamino, A.; Mine, S.; Mineev, O.; Miura, M.; Monroe, J.; Mori, T.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, T.; Muheim, F.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayama, S.; Needham, M.; Nicholls, T.; Nirkko, M.; Nishimura, Y.; Noah, E.; Nowak, J.; Nunokawa, H.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Okajima, Y.; Okumura, K.; Oser, S. M.; O'Sullivan, E.; Ovsiannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Pérez, J.; Pac, M. Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Pistillo, C.; Playfer, S.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Quilain, B.; Quinto, M.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A.; Redij, A.; Retiere, F.; Riccio, C.; Richard, E.; Rondio, E.; Rose, H. J.; Ross-Lonergan, M.; Rott, C.; Rountree, S. D.; Rubbia, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakuda, M.; Sanchez, M. C.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shimizu, I.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Sinnis, G.; Smy, M. B.; Sobczyk, J.; Sobel, H. W.; Stewart, T.; Stone, J. L.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, A. T.; Svoboda, R.; Tacik, R.; Takeda, A.; Taketa, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Tanaka, H.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorpe, M.; Tobayama, S.; Tolich, N.; Tomura, T.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vagins, M. R.; Vasseur, G.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Xin, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Zito, M.

    2015-05-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next-generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of CP asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long-baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW × 10^7s integrated proton beam power (corresponding to 1.56 × 10^{22} protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a 2.5^circ off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic CP phase δ _{CP} can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of δ _{CP}, and CP violation can be established with a statistical significance of more than 3 σ (5 σ) for 76{%} (58{%}) of the {δ _{CP}} parameter space. Using both ν _e appearance and ν _μ disappearance data, the expected 1σ uncertainty of sin ^2θ _{23} is 0.015(0.006) for sin ^2θ _{23}=0.5(0.45).

  19. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Bob

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  20. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics was held at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden during August 19 24, 2004. Invited to the symposium were around 40 globally leading researchers in the field of neutrino physics, both experimental and theoretical. In addition to these participants, some 30 local researchers and graduate students participated in the symposium. The dominant theme of the lectures was neutrino oscillations, which after several years were recently verified by results from the Super-Kamiokande detector in Kamioka, Japan and the SNO detector in Sudbury, Canada. Discussion focused especially on effects of neutrino oscillations derived from the presence of matter and the fact that three different neutrinos exist. Since neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have mass, this is the first experimental observation that fundamentally deviates from the standard model of particle physics. This is a challenge to both theoretical and experimental physics. The various oscillation parameters will be determined with increased precision in new, specially designed experiments. Theoretical physics is working intensively to insert the knowledge that neutrinos have mass into the theoretical models that describe particle physics. It will probably turn out that the discovery of neutrino oscillations signifies a breakthrough in the description of the very smallest constituents of matter. The lectures provided a very good description of the intensive situation in the field right now. The topics discussed also included mass models for neutrinos, neutrinos in extra dimensions as well as the `seesaw mechanism', which provides a good description of why neutrino masses are so small. Also discussed, besides neutrino oscillations, was the new field of neutrino astronomy. Among the questions that neutrino astronomy hopes to answer are what the dark matter in the Universe consists of and where cosmic radiation at extremely high energies comes from. For this purpose, large neutrino

  1. Exclusive muon neutrino charged current pion-less topologies. ArgoNeuT results and future prospects in LAr TPC detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Palamara, Ornella

    2016-12-29

    Results from the analysis of charged current pion-less (CC 0-pion) muon neutrino events in argon collected by the ArgoNeuT experiment on the NuMI beam at Fermilab are presented and compared with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations. A novel analysis method, based on the reconstruction of exclusive topologies, fully exploiting the Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) technique capabilities, is used to analyze the events, characterized by the presence at the vertex of a leading muon track eventually accompanied by one or more highly ionizing tracks, and study nuclear effects in neutrino interactions on argon nuclei. Multiple protons accompanying the leading muon are visible in the ArgoNeuT events, and measured with a proton reconstruction threshold of 21 MeV kinetic energy. As a result, measurements of (anti-)neutrino CC 0-pion inclusive and exclusive cross sections on argon nuclei are reported. Prospects for future, larger mass LAr TPC detectors are discussed.

  2. Exclusive muon neutrino charged current pion-less topologies. ArgoNeuT results and future prospects in LAr TPC detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Palamara, Ornella

    2016-12-29

    Results from the analysis of charged current pion-less (CC 0-pion) muon neutrino events in argon collected by the ArgoNeuT experiment on the NuMI beam at Fermilab are presented and compared with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations. A novel analysis method, based on the reconstruction of exclusive topologies, fully exploiting the Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) technique capabilities, is used to analyze the events, characterized by the presence at the vertex of a leading muon track eventually accompanied by one or more highly ionizing tracks, and study nuclear effects in neutrino interactions on argon nuclei. Multiple protons accompanying themore » leading muon are visible in the ArgoNeuT events, and measured with a proton reconstruction threshold of 21 MeV kinetic energy. As a result, measurements of (anti-)neutrino CC 0-pion inclusive and exclusive cross sections on argon nuclei are reported. Prospects for future, larger mass LAr TPC detectors are discussed.« less

  3. Future CMB tests of dark matter: Ultralight axions and massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hložek, Renée; Marsh, David J. E.; Grin, Daniel; Allison, Rupert; Dunkley, Jo; Calabrese, Erminia

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies provide strong evidence for the existence of dark matter and dark energy. They can also test its composition, probing the energy density and particle mass of different dark-matter and dark-energy components. CMB data have already shown that ultralight axions (ULAs) with mass in the range 10-32 eV →10-26 eV compose a fraction ≲0.01 of the cosmological critical density. The next Stage-IV CMB experiment (CMB-S4) (assuming a 1 arcmin beam and ˜1 μ K -arcmin noise levels over a sky fraction of 0.4) to the density of ULAs and other dark-sector components is assessed. CMB-S4 data should be ˜10 times more sensitive to the ULA energy density than Planck data alone, across a wide range of ULA masses 10-32≲ma≲10-23 eV , and will probe axion decay constants of fa≈1 016 GeV , at the grand unified scale. CMB-S4 could improve the CMB lower bound on the ULA mass from ˜10-25 eV to 10-23 eV , nearing the mass range probed by dwarf galaxy abundances and dark-matter halo density profiles. These improvements will allow for a multi-σ detection of percent-level departures from CDM over a wide range of masses. Much of this improvement is driven by the effects of weak gravitational lensing on the CMB, which breaks degeneracies between ULAs and neutrinos. We also find that the addition of ULA parameters does not significantly degrade the sensitivity of the CMB to neutrino masses. These results were obtained using the axionCAMB code (a modification to the CAMB Boltzmann code), presented here for public use.

  4. Neutrino properties from SN 1987A and from future observations of GSC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, A.

    The early neutrino signal reported by the Mont Blanc group on Feb 23, 1987 was not produced by a neutrino burst from SN 1987A. The second neutrino burst that was reported by the KAMIOKANDE II, the IMB and the Baksan groups is consistent with the general theoretical picture of supernovae explosions, but it also has unexpected features. Analysis of the neutrino burst yields new limits on the lifetime, mass, mixing, and electric charge of the νe, and new limits on the magnetic moment and the radiative lifetime of light neutrinos. These limits imply that neither decay, nor mixing, nor electric charge, nor magnetic moment of the νe are responsible for the solar neutrino problem. Similar limits on the properties of the νμ and the ντ require the observation of a gravitational stellar collapse in the Galaxy with more advanced neutrino telescopes which are under construction. Such limits, when obtained, will resolve the question whether relic neutrinos from the big bang can close the universe.

  5. Initial results from the CHOOZ long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, M.; Baldini, A.; Bemporad, C.; Caffau, E.; Cei, F.; Déclais, Y.; de Kerret, H.; Dieterle, B.; Etenko, A.; George, J.; Giannini, G.; Grassi, M.; Kozlov, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kryn, D.; Laiman, M.; Lane, C. E.; Lefièvre, B.; Machulin, I.; Martemyanov, A.; Martemyanov, V.; Mikaelyan, L.; Nicolò, D.; Obolensky, M.; Pazzi, R.; Pieri, G.; Price, L.; Riley, S.; Reeder, R.; Sabelnikov, A.; Santin, G.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Sobel, H.; Steele, J.; Steinberg, R.; Sukhotin, S.; Tomshaw, S.; Veron, D.; Vyrodov, V.

    1998-02-01

    Initial results are presented from CHOOZ, a long-baseline reactor-neutrino vacuum-oscillation experiment. The data reported here were taken during the period March to October 1997, when the two reactors ran at combined power levels varying from zero to values approaching their full rated power of 8.5 (thermal). Electron antineutrinos from the reactors were detected by a liquid scintillation calorimeter located at a distance of about 1. The detector was constructed in a tunnel protected from cosmic rays by a 300 rock overburden. This massive shielding strongly reduced potentially troublesome backgrounds due to cosmic-ray muons, leading to a background rate of about one event per day, more than an order of magnitude smaller than the observed neutrino signal. From the statistical agreement between detected and expected neutrino event rates, we find (at 90% confidence level) no evidence for neutrino oscillations in the disappearance mode for the parameter region given approximately by for maximum mixing and for large .

  6. Neutrino physics with dark matter experiments and the signature of new baryonic neutral currents

    SciTech Connect

    Pospelov, Maxim

    2011-10-15

    New neutrino states {nu}{sub b}, sterile under the standard model interactions, can be coupled to baryons via the isoscalar vector currents that are much stronger than the standard model weak interactions. If some fraction of solar neutrinos oscillate into {nu}{sub b} on their way to Earth, the coherently enhanced elastic {nu}{sub b}-nucleus scattering can generate a strong signal in the dark matter detectors. For the interaction strength a few hundred times stronger than the weak force, the elastic {nu}{sub b}-nucleus scattering via new baryonic currents may account for the existing anomalies in the direct detection dark matter experiments at low recoil. We point out that for solar-neutrino energies, the baryon-current-induced inelastic scattering is suppressed, so that the possible enhancement of a new force is not in conflict with signals at dedicated neutrino detectors. We check this explicitly by calculating the {nu}{sub b}-induced deuteron breakup, and the excitation of a 4.4 MeV {gamma} line in {sup 12}C. A stronger-than-weak force coupled to the baryonic current implies the existence of a new Abelian gauge group U(1){sub B} with a relatively light gauge boson.

  7. Accelerator, reactor, solar, and atmospheric neutrino oscillations: Beyond three generations

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, S.

    1997-03-01

    We perform a phenomenological analysis of neutrino oscillations introducing an additional sterile neutrino. In such a scenario, more than one spectrum is possible that can accommodate three hierarchically different mass-squared differences as required by the present experiments. We considered two different spectra. Choosing the {Delta}m{sup 2}s in the ranges suitable for the LSND, atmospheric, and solar neutrino oscillations, limits on the mixing angles are derived, consistent with the most restrictive accelerator and reactor data as well as the atmospheric and solar neutrino results. We show that the present data disfavor one of these mass spectra leaving us with a very stringent choice of mass and mixing angle. The potential of the future heavy water solar neutrino experiment SNO to distinguish between the four-neutrino mixing and two-neutrino mixing cases is explored. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Supernova neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, K.

    2015-07-15

    In this presentation I summarize the main detection channels for neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae, and describe current status of and future prospects for supernova-neutrino-sensitive detectors worldwide.

  9. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  10. The NOvA Timing System: A system for synchronizing a long baseline neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, A.; Kwarciany, R.; Deuerling, G.; Wilcer, N.

    2012-12-01

    The NOvA experiment is designed to measure key parameters in neutrino physics related to the neutrino mass hierarchy and the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. To make these measurements the NOvA experiment must correlate the extraction of beam to the NuMI target with individual hits in both a near detector and a far detector located 810 km from Fermilab. Precisely correlating hits across these detectors and reconstructing particle trajectories require that all of the readout electronics be precisely synchronized to an absolute wall time with a channel to channel variation less than 15.6 ns. The NOvA Timing Distribution System accomplishes this through an integration of commercial GPS receiver technology and custom electronics. This paper describes the timing system, its component hardware and the synchronization method that is employed by it.

  11. Birth of Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-07

    Based mainly on the results of two experiments, KamiokaNDE and Super-KamiokaNDE, the birth of neutrino astrophysics will be described. At the end, the result of the third generation Kamioka experiment, KamLAND, will be discussed together with the future possibilities.Organiser(s): Daniel Treille / EP DivisionNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs. Please note unusual day.

  12. Birth of Neutrino Astrophysics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Based mainly on the results of two experiments, KamiokaNDE and Super-KamiokaNDE, the birth of neutrino astrophysics will be described. At the end, the result of the third generation Kamioka experiment, KamLAND, will be discussed together with the future possibilities.Organiser(s): Daniel Treille / EP DivisionNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs. Please note unusual day.

  13. The neutrino burst from SN 1987A detected in the Mont Blanc LSD experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietta, M.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Castellina, A.; Dadykin, V. L.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Kalchukov, F. F.; Khalchukov, F. F.; Kortchaguin, V. B.; Korchagin, V. B.; Kortchaguin, P. V.; Korchagin, P. V.; Malguin, A. S.; Mal'Gin, A. S.; Ryassny, V. G.; Ryasnyj, V. G.; Ryazhkaya, O. G.; Saavedra, O.; Talochkin, V. P.; Trinchero, G.; Vernetto, S.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Yakushev, V. F.

    The authors discuss the event, (5 interactions recorded during 7 seconds) detected in the Mont Blanc Underground Neutrino Observatory on February 23, 1987, during the occurrence of supernova SN 1987A. The pulse amplitudes, the background imitation probability, and the energetics connected with the event are reported. It is also shown that some interactions recorded at the same time in other underground experiments, with a lower detection efficiency, are consistent with the Mont Blanc event.

  14. The Sensitivity of the nEXO Experiment to Majorana Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, Caio; nEXO Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The nEXO Collaboration is performing R&D towards a detector with ∼ 5 t of enriched liquid 136Xe to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. The experiment is based on the success of the EXO-200 detector, an ultra-low background time projection chamber with collection of both scintillation light and ionization charge from xenon. The projected sensitivity of the nEXO detector will probe the inverted hierarchy of neutrino masses.

  15. Charm dimuon production in neutrino-nucleon interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petti, Roberto; Samoylov, Oleg

    2012-09-01

    We present our new measurement of charm dimuon production in neutrino-iron interactions based upon the full statistics collected by the NOMAD experiment. After background subtraction we observe 15,340 charm dimuon events, providing the largest sample currently available. The analysis exploits the large inclusive charged current sample (about 9 million events after all analysis cuts) to constrain the total systematic uncertainty to about 2%. The extraction of strange sea and charm production parameters is also discussed.

  16. Charm dimuon production in neutrino-nucleon interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petti, R.; Samoylov, O. B.

    2011-12-01

    We present our new measurement of charm dimuon production in neutrino-iron interactions based upon the full statistics collected by the NOMAD experiment. After background subtraction we observe 15,340 charm dimuon events, providing the largest sample currently available. The analysis exploits the large inclusive charged current sample (about 9 million events after all analysis cuts) to constrain the total systematic uncertainty to ˜2%. The extraction of strange sea and charm production parameters is also discussed.

  17. Locating the neutrino interaction vertex with the help of electronic detectors in the OPERA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornushkin, Yu. A.; Dmitrievsky, S. G.; Chukanov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The OPERA experiment is designed for the direct observation of the appearance of ντ from νμ → ντ oscillation in a νμ beam. A description of the procedure of neutrino interaction vertex localization (Brick Finding) by electronic detectors of a hybrid OPERA setup is presented. The procedure includes muon track and hadronic shower axis reconstruction and a determination of the target bricks with the highest probability to contain the vertex.

  18. Neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2015-07-15

    The Neutrino Factory is a facility that produces neutrino beams with a well-defined flavour content and energy spectrum from the decay of intense, high-energy, stored muon beams to establish CP violation in the neutrino sector. The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) is providing a Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility. The present design is optimised for the recent measurements of θ{sub 13}. The accelerator facility will deliver 10{sup 21} muon decays per year from 10 GeV stored muon beams. The straight sections of the storage ring point to a 100 kton Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) at a distance of 2000-2500 km from the source. The accuracy in the value of δ{sub CP} that a Neutrino Factory can achieve and the δ{sub CP} coverage is unrivalled by other future facilities. Staging scenarios for the Neutrino Factory deliver facilities that can carry out physics at each stage. In the context of Fermilab, such a scenario would imply in the first stage the construction of a small storage ring, nuSTORM, to carry out neutrino cross-section and sterile neutrino measurements and to perform a programme of 6D muon cooling R&D. The second stage is the construction of a 5 GeV Neutrino Factory (nuMAX) pointing to the Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake and the final stage would use many of the components of this facility to construct a Muon Collider, initially as a 126 GeV CM Higgs Factory, which may be upgraded to a multi-TeV Muon Collider if required.

  19. Neutrino factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2015-07-01

    The Neutrino Factory is a facility that produces neutrino beams with a well-defined flavour content and energy spectrum from the decay of intense, high-energy, stored muon beams to establish CP violation in the neutrino sector. The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) is providing a Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility. The present design is optimised for the recent measurements of θ13. The accelerator facility will deliver 1021 muon decays per year from 10 GeV stored muon beams. The straight sections of the storage ring point to a 100 kton Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) at a distance of 2000-2500 km from the source. The accuracy in the value of δCP that a Neutrino Factory can achieve and the δCP coverage is unrivalled by other future facilities. Staging scenarios for the Neutrino Factory deliver facilities that can carry out physics at each stage. In the context of Fermilab, such a scenario would imply in the first stage the construction of a small storage ring, nuSTORM, to carry out neutrino cross-section and sterile neutrino measurements and to perform a programme of 6D muon cooling R&D. The second stage is the construction of a 5 GeV Neutrino Factory (nuMAX) pointing to the Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake and the final stage would use many of the components of this facility to construct a Muon Collider, initially as a 126 GeV CM Higgs Factory, which may be upgraded to a multi-TeV Muon Collider if required.

  20. A Search for Lorentz and CPT Violation in the Neutrino Sector of the Standard Model Extension Using the Near Detectors of the Tokai to Kamioka Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Gary Alexander

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) neutrino experiment is designed to search for electron neutrino appearance oscillations and muon neutrino disappearance oscillations. While the main physics goals of T2K fall into conventional physics, T2K may be used to search for more exotic physics. One exotic physics analysis that can be performed is a search for Lorentz and CPT symmetry violation (LV and CPTV) through short baseline neutrino oscillations. The theoretical framework which describes these phenomena is the Standard Model Extension (SME). Due to its off-axis nature, T2K has two near detectors. A search for LV and CPTV is performed in each detector. The search utilizes charged-current inclusive (CC inclusive) neutrino events to search for sidereal variations in the neutrino event rate at each detector. Two methods are developed; the first being a Fast Fourier Transform method to perform a hypothesis test of the data with a set of 10,000 toy Monte-Carlo simulations that do not have any LV signal in them. The second is a binned likelihood fit. Using three data sets, both analysis methods are consistent with no sidereal variations. One set of data is used to calculate upper limits on combinations of the SME coefficients while the other two are used to constrain the SME coefficients directly. Despite not seeing any indication of LV in the T2K near detectors, the upper limits provided are useful for the theoretical field to continue improving theories which include LV and CPTV.

  1. Probing CP violation with non-unitary mixing in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments: DUNE as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escrihuela, F. J.; Forero, D. V.; Miranda, O. G.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2017-09-01

    When neutrino masses arise from the exchange of neutral heavy leptons, as in most seesaw schemes, the effective lepton mixing matrix N describing neutrino propagation is non-unitary, hence neutrinos are not exactly orthonormal. New CP violation phases appear in N that could be confused with the standard phase {δ }{CP} characterizing the three neutrino paradigm. We study the potential of the long-baseline neutrino experiment DUNE in probing CP violation induced by the standard CP phase in the presence of non-unitarity. In order to accomplish this we develop our previous formalism, so as to take into account the neutrino interactions with the medium, important in long baseline experiments such as DUNE. We find that the expected CP sensitivity of DUNE is somewhat degraded with respect to that characterizing the standard unitary case. However the effect is weaker than might have been expected thanks mainly to the wide neutrino beam. We also investigate the sensitivity of DUNE to the parameters characterizing non-unitarity. In this case we find that there is no improvement expected with respect to the current situation, unless the near detector setup is revamped.

  2. 3-flavor oscillations with current and future reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear reactors have been a crucial tool for our understanding of neutrinos. The disappearance of electron antineutrinos emitted by nuclear reactors has firmly established that neutrino flavor oscillates, and that neutrinos consequently have mass. The current generation of precision measurements rely on some of the world's most intense reactor facilities to demonstrate that the electron antineutrino mixes with the third antineutrino mass eigenstate (v3-). Accurate measurements of antineutrino energies robustly determine the tiny difference between the masses-squared of the v3- state and the two more closely-spaced v1- and v2- states. These results have given us a much clearer picture of neutrino mass and mixing, yet at the same time open major questions about how to account for these small but non-zero masses in or beyond the Standard Model. These observations have also opened the door for a new generation of experiments which aim to measure the ordering of neutrino masses and search for potential violation of CP symmetry by neutrinos. I will provide a brief overview of this exciting field. Work supported under DOE OHEP DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  3. Octant of θ23 at long baseline neutrino experiments in the light of nonunitary leptonic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Debajyoti; Ghoshal, Pomita; Sehrawat, Sandeep K.

    2017-05-01

    The octant of the atmospheric mixing angle θ23 is still undetermined by neutrino oscillation experiments. Long-baseline experiments like NO ν A , T2K, and DUNE offer good prospects for determining the octant of θ23. However, their capability to do so may be compromised by the possible presence of nonunitarity in the leptonic mixing matrix. In this paper, we study in detail the octant degeneracy with and without nonunitarity at the level of oscillation probabilities and events for these experiments. We also analyze their octant sensitivity and discovery reach and show that they are hampered in the presence of nonunitarity.

  4. An early neutrino experiment: how we missed quark substructure in 1963

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, D. H.

    2013-12-01

    Some 50 years after the event seems to be an appropriate time at which to take a long look back at one of the early neutrino experiments at CERN. This report is principally about a failure in a 1963 bubble chamber experiment to detect substructure in the nucleon, a year before the quark concept was invented by Gell-Mann and Zweig, and some five years before the existence of quarks as real dynamical objects was definitely established in deep inelastic electron scattering experiments at Stanford.

  5. A light sterile neutrino from Friedberg-Lee symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Liao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Light sterile neutrinos of mass about an eV with mixing U of a few percent to active neutrinos may solve some anomalies shown in experimental data related to neutrino oscillation. How to have light sterile neutrinos is one of the theoretical problems which have attracted a lot of attentions. In this article we show that such an eV scale light sterile neutrino candidate can be obtained in a seesaw model in which the right-handed neutrinos satisfy a softly-broken Friedberg-Lee (FL) symmetry. In this model a right-handed neutrino is guaranteed by the FL symmetry to be light comparing with other two heavy right-handed neutrinos. It can be of eV scale when the FL symmetry is softly broken and can play the role of eV scale sterile neutrino needed for explaining the anomalies of experimental data. This model predicts that one of the active neutrino is massless. We find that this model prefers inverted hierarchy mass pattern of active neutrinos than normal hierarchy. An interesting consequence of this model is that realizing relatively large |U| and relatively small |U| in this model naturally leads to a relatively small |U|. This interesting prediction can be tested in future atmospheric or solar neutrino experiments.

  6. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-08-01

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation--or neutrino oscillation--by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5% respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical

  7. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-06-11

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation or neutrino oscillation by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5 percent respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock

  8. Search for neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment by using quasi-elastic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Piteira, Rodolphe

    2005-09-29

    The enthusiasm of the scientific community for studying oscillations of neutrinos is equaled only by the mass of their detectors. The MINOS experiment determines and compares the near spectrum of muonic neutrinos from the NUMI beam to the far one, in order to measure two oscillation parameters: Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and sin2 (2θ23). The spectra are obtained by analyzing the charged current interactions which difficulty lies in identifying the interactions products (e.g. muons). An alternative method identifying the traces of muons, bent by the magnetic field of the detectors, and determining their energies is presented in this manuscript. The sensitivity of the detectors is optimal for the quasi-elastic interactions, for which a selection method is proposed, to study their oscillation. Even though it reduces the statistics, such a study introduces fewer systematic errors, constituting the ideal method on the long range.

  9. Calculation of molecular final states and their effect on a precision neutrino mass experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fackler, O.; Mugge, M.; Sticker, H.; Winter, N.; Woerner, R.

    1984-02-01

    An experiment to determine the electron neutrino mass is being performed with the precision of a few electron volts by measuring the tritium beta decay energy distribution near the endpoint. At the few electron volt level, a major consideration in the choice of a tritium source is the effect of excited final atomic or molecular states on the beta decay distribution. It is important to choose a source for which the initial and final states can be accurately calculated. Frozen tritium was chosen as the source since the states of molecular tritium and those of the HeT/sup +/ daughter ion have electronic wavefunctions that can be calculated with high accuracy. The effects of final excited states on the neutrino mass determination and the results of these calculations are described.

  10. Constraints on Neutrino Mass from Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, A. J.; Niro, V.; Verde, L.

    2017-03-01

    Modern large-scale galaxy surveys, combined with measurements of the cosmic microwave background, have managed to constrain the sum of neutrino masses to an order of magnitude below the limit placed by laboratory experiments. We discuss the signature of massive neutrinos in the distribution of galaxies and the current state of the art of neutrino mass constraints, focusing on parameter degeneracies that reveal how we can improve current constraints with next-generation galaxy surveys. We also comment on how the near future cosmology experiments are an opportunity for the first measurement of the value of the sum of neutrino masses, or alternatively, to find profound implications for neutrino physics extensions beyond the Standard Model.

  11. Neutrino physics with accelerators and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiser, Achim

    2000-11-01

    Neutrino physics, and in particular the question of neutrino mass and oscillations, is currently one of the primary fields of interest in particle physics. This review mainly focuses on how experiments using neutrino beams from accelerators have contributed to the current knowledge over the last few years, and how they will contribute in the future. It also sets these results in the context of results obtained from non-accelerator neutrino sources. Classical measurements within the Standard Model framework are summarized, and potential extensions of the Standard Model are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the question of neutrino oscillations, its current status, and how new experiments can yield decisive insights into the many open questions in this field.

  12. A study of quasi-elastic muon neutrino and antineutrino scattering in the NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubushkin, V.; Popov, B.; Kim, J. J.; Camilleri, L.; Levy, J.-M.; Mezzetto, M.; Naumov, D.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; de Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; di Lella, L.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kulagin, S.; Kustov, D.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Ling, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mishra, S. R.; Moorhead, G. F.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Samoylov, O.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Seaton, M.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Wu, Q.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2009-10-01

    We have studied the muon neutrino and antineutrino quasi-elastic (QEL) scattering reactions ( ν μ n→ μ - p and bar{ν }_{μ}ptoμ+n ) using a set of experimental data collected by the NOMAD Collaboration. We have performed measurements of the cross-section of these processes on a nuclear target (mainly carbon) normalizing it to the total ν μ ( bar{ν}_{μ} ) charged-current cross section. The results for the flux-averaged QEL cross sections in the (anti)neutrino energy interval 3-100 GeV are < σ_{qel}rangle_{ν_{μ}}=(0.92±0.02(stat)±0.06(syst))×10^{-38} cm2 and <σ_{qel}rangle_{bar{ν}_{μ}}=(0.81±0.05(stat)±0.09(syst))×10^{-38} cm2 for neutrino and antineutrino, respectively. The axial mass parameter M A was extracted from the measured quasi-elastic neutrino cross section. The corresponding result is M A =1.05±0.02(stat)±0.06(syst) GeV. It is consistent with the axial mass values recalculated from the antineutrino cross section and extracted from the pure Q 2 shape analysis of the high purity sample of ν μ quasi-elastic 2-track events, but has smaller systematic error and should be quoted as the main result of this work. Our measured M A is found to be in good agreement with the world average value obtained in previous deuterium filled bubble chamber experiments. The NOMAD measurement of M A is lower than those recently published by K2K and MiniBooNE Collaborations. However, within the large errors quoted by these experiments on M A , these results are compatible with the more precise NOMAD value.

  13. A study of quasi-elastic muon (anti)neutrino scattering in he NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubushkin, Vladimir

    2009-11-01

    We have studied the muon neutrino and antineutrino quasi-elastic (QEL) scattering reactions (vμn→μ-p and v¯μp→μ+n using a set of experimental data collected by the NOMAD collaboration. We have performed measurements of the cross-section of these processes on a nuclear target (mainly Carbon) normalizing it to the total vμ (v¯μ) charged current cross-section. The results for the flux averaged QEL cross-sections in the (anti)neutrino energy interval 3-100 GeV are <σqel>vμ = (0.92±0.02(stat)±0.06(syst))×10-38 cm2 and <σqel>v¯μ = (0.81±0.05(stat)±0.09(syst))×10-38 cm2 for neutrino and antineutrino, respectively. The axial mass parameter MA was extracted from the measured quasi-elastic neutrino cross-section. The corresponding result is MA = 1.05±0.02(stat)±0.06(syst) GeV. It is consistent with the axial mass values recalculated from the antineutrino cross-section and extracted from the pure Q2 shape analysis of the high purity sample of vμ quasi-elastic 2-track events, but has smaller systematic error and should be quoted as the main result of this work. Our measured MA is found to be in good agreement with the world average value obtained in previous deuterium filled bubble chamber experiments. The NOMAD measurement of MA is lower than those recently published by K2K and MiniBooNE collaborations. However, within the large errors quoted by these experiments on MA, these results are compatible with the more precise NOMAD value.

  14. Sterile neutrinos and indirect dark matter searches in IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    Argüelles, Carlos A.; Kopp, Joachim E-mail: jkopp@fnal.gov

    2012-07-01

    If light sterile neutrinos exist and mix with the active neutrino flavors, this mixing will affect the propagation of high-energy neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun. In particular, new Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonances can occur, leading to almost complete conversion of some active neutrino flavors into sterile states. We demonstrate how this can weaken IceCube limits on neutrino capture and annihilation in the Sun and how potential future conflicts between IceCube constraints and direct detection or collider data might be resolved by invoking sterile neutrinos. We also point out that, if the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross section and the allowed annihilation channels are precisely measured in direct detection and collider experiments in the future, IceCube can be used to constrain sterile neutrino models using neutrinos from the dark matter annihilation.

  15. Multimessenger Astronomy with Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franckowiak, Anna

    2017-09-01

    The recent discovery of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos has opened a new window to the Universe. However, the sources of those neutrinos are still unknown. Among the plausible candidates are gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei and supernovae. Combining neutrino data with electromagnetic measurements in a multimessenger approach will increase our ability to identify the neutrino sources and help to solve long-standing problems in astrophysics such as the origin of cosmic rays. Neutrino observations may also contribute to future detections of gravitational wave signals, and enable the study of their source progenitors. I will review the recent progress in multimessenger astronomy using neutrino data.

  16. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos. PMID:25913819

  17. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Wen, L J; Zhang, C

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  18. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  19. Measuring Neutrino Oscillations with Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2007-10-26

    Since the first direct observations of antineutrino events by Reines and Cowan in the 1950's, nuclear reactors have been an important tool in the study of neutrino properties. More recently, the study of neutrino oscillations has been a very active area of research. The pioneering observation of oscillations by the KamLAND experiment has provided crucial information on the neutrino mixing matrix. New experiments to study the remaining unknown mixing angle are currently under development. These recent studies and potential future developments will be discussed.

  20. Experimental limits on the proton life-time from the neutrino experiments with heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyak, V. I.; Zdesenko, Y. G.

    2001-04-01

    Experimental data on the number of neutrons born in the heavy water targets of the large neutrino detectors are used to set the limit on the proton life-time independently on decay mode through the reaction d-->n+?. The best up-to-date limit τp>4×1023 yr with 95% C.L. is derived from the measurements with D2O target (mass 267 kg) installed near the Bugey reactor. This value can be improved by six orders of magnitude with future data accumulated with the SNO detector containing 1000 t of D2O.

  1. Very low-energy neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2015-05-15

    Neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are now evaluated rather accurately by shell-model (SM) or SM+RPA calculations based on recent advances in nuclear structure studies. Due to these achievements, reliable constraints on super-nova neutrino temperatures as well as neutrino oscillation parameters become possible. Supernova neutrino tempeatures are constrained from abundances of elements obtained by using new ν-nucleus reaction cross sections. A possibility of constructing supernova neutrino spectrum from beta-beam measurements is pointed out. Neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle θ{sub 13} can be determined from abundance ratio of {sup 7}Li/{sup 11}B, which is sensitive to the MSW matter oscillation effects in supernova explosions. Inverted mass hierarchy is shown to be statistically more favored based on a recent analysis of presolar grains. Effects of neutrino-neutrino interactions are also shown to play important roles in r-process nucleosynthesis. Importance and possibilities of direct measurements of ν-induced cross sections on {sup 40}Ar and {sup 208}Pb are discussed for future supernova neutrino detections. Recent calculations of the cross sections for ν-{sup 40}Ar are presented. The need for new theoretical evaluations of the cross sections for ν-{sup 208}Pb is pointed out. Challenges to experiments on coherent elastic scattering are presented.

  2. Waterproofed photomultiplier tube assemblies for the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Ken; Cummings, John; Edwards, Emily; Edwards, William; Ely, Ry; Hoff, Matthew; Lebanowski, Logan; Li, Bo; Li, Piyi; Lin, Shih-Kai; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Jinchang; Luk, Kam-Biu; Miao, Jiayuan; Napolitano, Jim; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Qi, Ming; Steiner, Herbert; Stoler, Paul; Stuart, Mary; Wang, Lingyu; Yang, Changgen; Zhong, Weili

    2015-09-01

    In the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment 960 20-cm-diameter waterproof photomultiplier tubes are used to instrument three water pools as Cherenkov detectors for detecting cosmic-ray muons. Of these 960 photomultiplier tubes, 341 are recycled from the MACRO experiment. A systematic program was undertaken to refurbish them as waterproof assemblies. In the context of passing the water leakage check, a success rate better than 97% was achieved. Details of the design, fabrication, testing, operation, and performance of these waterproofed photomultiplier-tube assemblies are presented.

  3. Nucleon decay and atmospheric neutrinos in the Mont Blanc experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, E.; Bologne, G.; Campana, P.; Castagnoli, C.; Chiarella, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cundy, D. C.; Dettorepiazzoli, B.; Fiorini, E.

    1985-01-01

    In the NUSEX experiment, during 2.8 years of operation, 31 fully contained events have been collected; 3 among them are nucleon decay candidates, while the others have been attributed to upsilon interactions. Limits on nucleon lifetime and determinations of upsilon interaction rates are presented.

  4. Nucleon decay and atmospheric neutrinos in the Mont Blanc experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, E.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Castagnoli, C.; Chiarella, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cundy, D. C.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Fiorini, E.

    1985-08-01

    In the NUSEX experiment, during 2.8 years of operation, 31 fully contained events have been collected; 3 among them are nucleon decay candidates, while the others have been attributed to upsilon interactions. Limits on nucleon lifetime and determinations of upsilon interaction rates are presented.

  5. Hunting for cosmic neutrinos under the deep sea: the ANTARES experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaminio, Vincenzo

    2013-06-01

    Attempts to detect high energy neutrinos originating in violent Galactic or Extragalactic processes have been carried out for many years, both using the polar-cap ice and the sea as a target/detection medium. The first large detector built and operated for several years has been the AMANDA Ĉerenkov array, installed under about two km of ice at the South Pole. More recently a much larger detector, ICECUBE has been successfully installed and operated at the same location. Attempts by several groups to install similar arrays under large sea depths have been carried out following the original pioneering attempts by the DUMAND collaboration, initiated in 1990 and terminated only six years later. ANTARES has been so far the only detector deployed at large sea depths and successfully operated for several years. It has been installed in the Mediterranean by a large international collaboration and is in operation since 2007. I describe in the following the experimental technique, the sensitivity of the experiment, the detector performance and the first results that have been obtained in the search for neutrinos from cosmic point sources and on the oscillations of atmospheric neutrinos.

  6. Improved Search for a Light Sterile Neutrino with the Full Configuration of the Daya Bay Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J. -H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cheng, Z. K.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Chukanov, A.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolgareva, M.; Dove, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Grassi, M.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Guo, Z.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Huo, W.; Hussain, G.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Joshi, J.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H. C.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y. -C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Loh, C. W.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, K. B.; Lv, Z.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malyshkin, Y.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McDonald, K. T.; McKeown, R. D.; Mitchell, I.; Mooney, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pan, H. -R.; Park, J.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Treskov, K.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, C. -H.; Wu, Q.; Wu, W. J.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-10-07

    Here this Letter reports an improved search for light sterile neutrino mixing in the electron antineutrino disappearance channel with the full configuration of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. With an additional 404 days of data collected in eight antineutrino detectors, this search benefits from 3.6 times the statistics available to the previous publication, as well as from improvements in energy calibration and background reduction. A relative comparison of the rate and energy spectrum of reactor antineutrinos in the three experimental halls yields no evidence of sterile neutrino mixing in the 2 x 10-4 $\\lesssim$| Δ$2\\atop{41}$| $\\lesssim$ 0.3 eV2 . The resulting limits on sin2 $2\\theta$14 are improved by approximately a factor of two over previous results and constitute the most stringent constraints to date in the |Δm$2\\atop{41}$| $\\lesssim$ 0.2 eV2 region.

  7. Improved Search for a Light Sterile Neutrino with the Full Configuration of the Daya Bay Experiment.

    PubMed

    An, F P; Balantekin, A B; Band, H R; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Cen, W R; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, J-H; Cheng, J; Cheng, Y P; Cheng, Z K; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Chukanov, A; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dolgareva, M; Dove, J; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Grassi, M; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, L; Guo, R P; Guo, X H; Guo, Z; Hackenburg, R W; Han, R; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Huo, W; Hussain, G; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lee, J H C; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, J K C; Li, C; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, S; Lin, S K; Lin, Y-C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Loh, C W; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Luk, K B; Lv, Z; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; Malyshkin, Y; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McDonald, K T; McKeown, R D; Mitchell, I; Mooney, M; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Ngai, H Y; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevskiy, A; Pan, H-R; Park, J; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Treskov, K; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, C-H; Wu, Q; Wu, W J; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yang, C G; Yang, H; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Ye, Z; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, Z Y; Zeng, S; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, X T; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y B; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2016-10-07

    This Letter reports an improved search for light sterile neutrino mixing in the electron antineutrino disappearance channel with the full configuration of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. With an additional 404 days of data collected in eight antineutrino detectors, this search benefits from 3.6 times the statistics available to the previous publication, as well as from improvements in energy calibration and background reduction. A relative comparison of the rate and energy spectrum of reactor antineutrinos in the three experimental halls yields no evidence of sterile neutrino mixing in the 2×10^{-4}≲|Δm_{41}^{2}|≲0.3  eV^{2} mass range. The resulting limits on sin^{2}2θ_{14} are improved by approx imately a factor of 2 over previous results and constitute the most stringent constraints to date in the |Δm_{41}^{2}|≲0.2  eV^{2} region.

  8. Study of neutrino interactions with the electronic detectors of the OPERA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, N.; Aleksandrov, A.; Altinok, O.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Bagulya, A.; Bendhahbi, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bozza, C.; Brugière, T.; Brugnera, R.; Brunet, F.; Brunetti, G.; Buontempo, S.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Chernyavskiy, M.; Chiarella, V.; Chukanov, A.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Dal Corso, F.; De Lellis, G.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Déclais, Y.; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Egorov, O.; Enikeev, R.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L. S.; Favier, J.; Ferber, T.; Fini, R. A.; Frekers, D.; Fukuda, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Göllnitz, C.; Goldberg, J.; Golubkov, D.; Goncharova, L.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Grianti, F.; Guler, A. M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hamada, K.; Hara, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Hollnagel, A.; Hoshino, K.; Ieva, M.; Ishida, H.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Juget, F.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kazuyama, K.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, M.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Kubota, H.; Lazzaro, C.; Lenkeit, J.; Lippi, I.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Loverre, P.; Lutter, G.; Malgin, A.; Mandrioli, G.; Mannai, K.; Marteau, J.; Matsuo, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meisel, F.; Meregaglia, A.; Migliozzi, P.; Mikado, S.; Miyamoto, S.; Monacelli, P.; Morishima, K.; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nikitina, V.; Niwa, K.; Nonoyama, Y.; Ogawa, S.; Okateva, N.; Olchevskiy, A.; Paniccia, M.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B. D.; Park, I. G.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Pretzl, K.; Pilipenko, V.; Pistillo, C.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Romano, G.; Rosa, G.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rubbia, A.; Russo, A.; Ryasny, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Sato, Y.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schroeder, H.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shoziyeov, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Song, J. S.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stipcevic, M.; Strauss, T.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tezuka, I.; Tioukov, V.; Tolun, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tran, T.; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladimirov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J. L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Yakushev, V.; Yoon, C. S.; Yoshioka, T.; Yoshida, J.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zemskova, S.; Zghiche, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2011-05-01

    The OPERA experiment is based on a hybrid technology combining electronic detectors (EDs) and nuclear emulsions. OPERA collected muon-neutrino interactions during the 2008 and 2009 physics runs of the CNGS neutrino beam, produced at CERN with an energy range of about 5-35 GeV. A total of 5.3×1019 protons on target equivalent luminosity have been analysed with the OPERA EDs: scintillator strips target trackers and magnetic muon spectrometers equipped with resistive plate gas chambers and drift tubes, allowing a detailed reconstruction of muon-neutrino interactions. Charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) interactions are identified, using the measurements in the EDs, and the NC/CC ratio is computed. The momentum distribution and the charge of the muon tracks produced in CC interactions are analysed. Calorimetric measurements of the visible energy are performed for both the CC and NC samples. For CC events, the Bjorken-y distribution and the hadronic shower profile are computed. The results are compared with a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the response of EDs.

  9. Improved Search for a Light Sterile Neutrino with the Full Configuration of the Daya Bay Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; ...

    2016-10-07

    Here this Letter reports an improved search for light sterile neutrino mixing in the electron antineutrino disappearance channel with the full configuration of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. With an additional 404 days of data collected in eight antineutrino detectors, this search benefits from 3.6 times the statistics available to the previous publication, as well as from improvements in energy calibration and background reduction. A relative comparison of the rate and energy spectrum of reactor antineutrinos in the three experimental halls yields no evidence of sterile neutrino mixing in the 2 x 10-4more » $$\\lesssim$$| Δ$$2\\atop{41}$$| $$\\lesssim$$ 0.3 eV2 . The resulting limits on sin2 $$2\\theta$$14 are improved by approximately a factor of two over previous results and constitute the most stringent constraints to date in the |Δm$$2\\atop{41}$$| $$\\lesssim$$ 0.2 eV2 region.« less

  10. Solar Neutrino Problem

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Evans, J. C.; Cleveland, B. T.

    1978-04-28

    A summary of the results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment is given and discussed in relation to solar model calculations. A review is given of the merits of various new solar neutrino detectors that were proposed.

  11. Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.

    2005-04-01

    The latest results from the Soudan 2, MACRO and SuperKamiokande experiments on atmospheric neutrino oscillations are summarised and discussed. In particular a discussion is made on the Monte Carlo simulations used for the atmospheric neutrino flux.

  12. Constraints on the neutrino flux in NOvA using the near detector data

    SciTech Connect

    Maan, Kuldeep K.

    2016-12-19

    NOvA, a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab, is designed to measure electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance in the NuMI beam. NOvA comprises of two finely segmented liquid scintillator detectors at 14 mrad off-axis in the NuMI beam. An accurate prediction of the neutrino flux is needed for precision oscillation and cross-section measurements. Data from the hadron-production experiments and, importantly, from the NOvA Near Detector provide powerful constraints on the muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino fluxes. In particular, the measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering provides an in situ constraint on the absolute flux. Lastly, this poster presents the data-driven predictions of the NOvA muonneutrino and electron-neutrino flux, and outlines future improvements in the flux determination.

  13. Constraints on the neutrino flux in NOvA using the near detector data

    DOE PAGES

    Maan, Kuldeep K.

    2016-12-19

    NOvA, a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab, is designed to measure electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance in the NuMI beam. NOvA comprises of two finely segmented liquid scintillator detectors at 14 mrad off-axis in the NuMI beam. An accurate prediction of the neutrino flux is needed for precision oscillation and cross-section measurements. Data from the hadron-production experiments and, importantly, from the NOvA Near Detector provide powerful constraints on the muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino fluxes. In particular, the measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering provides an in situ constraint on the absolute flux. Lastly, this poster presents the data-driven predictions ofmore » the NOvA muonneutrino and electron-neutrino flux, and outlines future improvements in the flux determination.« less

  14. Sterile neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, J.; Machado, P. A. N.

    2016-06-21

    We characterize statistically the indications of a presence of one or more light sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE and LSND data, together with the reactor and gallium anomalies, in the global context. The compatibility of the aforementioned signals with null results from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator experiments is evaluated. We conclude that a severe tension is present in the global fit, and therefore the addition of eV-scale sterile neutrinos does not satisfactorily explain the anomalies.

  15. Sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, J.; Machado, P. A. N.; Maltoni, M.; Schwetz, T.

    2016-06-01

    We characterize statistically the indications of a presence of one or more light sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE and LSND data, together with the reactor and gallium anomalies, in the global context. The compatibility of the aforementioned signals with null results from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator experiments is evaluated. We conclude that a severe tension is present in the global fit, and therefore the addition of eV-scale sterile neutrinos does not satisfactorily explain the anomalies.

  16. A Guide to Designing Future Ground-based CMB Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W. L.K.; Errard, J.; Dvorkin, C.; Kuo, C. L.; Lee, A. T.; McDonald, P.; Slosar, A.; Zahn, O.

    2014-02-18

    In this follow-up work to the High Energy Physics Community Summer Study 2013 (HEP CSS 2013, a.k.a. Snowmass), we explore the scientific capabilities of a future Stage-IV Cosmic Microwave Background polarization experiment (CMB-S4) under various assumptions on detector count, resolution, and sky coverage. We use the Fisher matrix technique to calculate the expected uncertainties in cosmological parameters in vΛCDM that are especially relevant to the physics of fundamental interactions, including neutrino masses, effective number of relativistic species, dark-energy equation of state, dark-matter annihilation, and inflationary parameters. To further chart the landscape of future cosmology probes, we include forecasted results from the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal as measured by DESI to constrain parameters that would benefit from low redshift information. We find the following best 1-σ constraints: σ(Mv ) = 15 meV, σ(Neff ) = 0.0156, Dark energy Figure of Merit = 303, σ(pann) = 0.00588 x 3 x 10-26 cm3/s/GeV, σ( ΩK) = 0.00074, σ(ns) = 0.00110, σ( αs) = 0.00145, and σ(r) = 0.00009. We also detail the dependences of the parameter constraints on detector count, resolution, and sky coverage.

  17. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 3: Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, James; McCluskey, Elaine; Lundin, Tracy; Willhite, Joshua; Hamernik, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Marchionni, Alberto; Kim, Min Jeong; Nessi, Marzio; Montanari, David; Heavey, Anne

    2016-01-21

    This volume of the LBNF/DUNE Conceptual Design Report covers the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE and describes the LBNF Project, which includes design and construction of the beamline at Fermilab, the conventional facilities at both Fermilab and SURF, and the cryostat and cryogenics infrastructure required for the DUNE far detector.

  18. The detector system of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    DOE PAGES

    An, F. P.

    2015-12-15

    The Daya Bay experiment was the first to report simultaneous measurements of reactor antineutrinos at multiple baselines leading to the discovery of ν¯e oscillations over km-baselines. Subsequent data has provided the world's most precise measurement of sin 22θ13 and the effective mass splitting Δm2ee. The experiment is located in Daya Bay, China where the cluster of six nuclear reactors is among the world's most prolific sources of electron antineutrinos. Multiple antineutrino detectors are deployed in three underground water pools at different distances from the reactor cores to search for deviations in the antineutrino rate and energy spectrum due to neutrinomore » mixing. Instrumented with photomultiplier tubes, the water pools serve as shielding against natural radioactivity from the surrounding rock and provide efficient muon tagging. Arrays of resistive plate chambers over the top of each pool provide additional muon detection. The antineutrino detectors were specifically designed for measurements of the antineutrino flux with minimal systematic uncertainty. Relative detector efficiencies between the near and far detectors are known to better than 0.2%. With the unblinding of the final two detectors’ baselines and target masses, a complete description and comparison of the eight antineutrino detectors can now be presented. This study describes the Daya Bay detector systems, consisting of eight antineutrino detectors in three instrumented water pools in three underground halls, and their operation through the first year of eight detector data-taking.« less

  19. Analysis Techniques to Measure Charged Current Inclusive Water Cross Section and to Constrain Neutrino Oscillation Parameters using the Near Detector (ND280) of the T2K Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rajarshi

    2014-03-01

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) Experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment located in Japan with the primary goal to precisely measure multiple neutrino flavor oscillation parameters. An off-axis muon neutrino beam with an energy that peaks at 600 MeV is generated at the JPARC facility and directed towards the kiloton Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector located 295 km away. The rates of electron neutrino and muon neutrino interactions are measured at SK and compared with expected model values. This yields a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters sinq and sinq. Measurements from a Near Detector that is 280 m downstream of the neutrino beam target are used to constrain uncertainties in the beam flux prediction and neutrino interaction rates. We present a measurement of inclusive charged current neutrino interactions on water. We used several sub-detectors in the ND280 complex, including a Pi-Zero detector (P0D) that has alternating planes of plastic scintillator and water bag layers, a time projection chamber (TPC) and fine-grained detector (FGD) to detect and reconstruct muons from neutrino charged current events. Finally, we describe a ``forward-fitting'' technique that is used to constrain the beam flux and cross section as an input for the neutrino oscillation analysis and also to extract a flux-averaged inclusive charged current cross section on water.

  20. Acquiring information about neutrino parameters by detecting supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2010-08-01

    We consider the supernova shock effects, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the collective effects, and the Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos on the Earth. It is found that the event number of supernova neutrinos depends on the neutrino mass hierarchy, the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, and neutrino masses. Therefore, we propose possible methods to identify the mass hierarchy and acquire information about {theta}{sub 13} and neutrino masses by detecting supernova neutrinos. We apply these methods to some current neutrino experiments.