Science.gov

Sample records for fxr accelerator optimization

  1. FLASH X-RAY (FXR) LINEAR INDUCTION ACCELERATOR (LIA) OPTIMIZATION Upgrade of the OTR Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T L; Wargo, P E

    2006-12-01

    Knowing the electron beam parameters at the exit of an accelerator is critical for several reasons. Foremost is to optimize the application of the beam, which is flash radiography in the case of the FXR accelerator. The beam parameters not only determine the theoretical dose, x-ray spectrum, and radiograph resolution (spot size), they are required to calculate the final transport magnetic fields that focus the beam on the bremsstrahlung converter to achieve the theoretical limits. Equally important is the comparison of beam parameters to the design specifications. This comparison indicates the ''health'' of the accelerator, warning the operator when systems are deteriorating or failing. For an accelerator of the size and complexity of FXR, a large suite of diagnostics is normally employed to measure and/or infer beam parameters. These diagnostics are distributed throughout the accelerator and can require a large number of ''shots'' (measurements) to calculate a specific beam parameter. The OTR Emittance Diagnostic, however, has the potential to measure all but one of the beam parameters simultaneous at a specific location. Using measurements from a scan of a few shots, this final parameter can also be determined. Since first deployment, the OTR Emittance Diagnostic has been limited to measuring only one of the seven desired parameters, the beam's divergence. This report describes recent upgrades to the diagnostic that permit full realization of its potential.

  2. Flash X-Ray (FXR) Accelerator Optimization Electronic Time-Resolved Measurement of X-Ray Source Size

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P

    2005-07-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating various approaches to minimize the x-ray source size on the Flash X-Ray (FXR) linear induction accelerator in order to improve x-ray flux and increase resolution for hydrodynamic radiography experiments. In order to effectively gauge improvements to final x-ray source size, a fast, robust, and accurate system for measuring the spot size is required. Timely feedback on x-ray source size allows new and improved accelerator tunes to be deployed and optimized within the limited run-time constraints of a production facility with a busy experimental schedule; in addition, time-resolved measurement capability allows the investigation of not only the time-averaged source size, but also the evolution of the source size, centroid position, and x-ray dose throughout the 70 ns beam pulse. Combined with time-resolved measurements of electron beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and current, key limiting factors can be identified, modeled, and optimized for the best possible spot size. Roll-bar techniques are a widely used method for x-ray source size measurement, and have been the method of choice at FXR for many years. A thick bar of tungsten or other dense metal with a sharp edge is inserted into the path of the x-ray beam so as to heavily attenuate the lower half of the beam, resulting in a half-light, half-dark image as seen downstream of the roll-bar; by measuring the width of the transition from light to dark across the edge of the roll-bar, the source size can be deduced. For many years, film has been the imaging medium of choice for roll-bar measurements thanks to its high resolution, linear response, and excellent contrast ratio. Film measurements, however, are fairly cumbersome and require considerable setup and analysis time; moreover, with the continuing trend towards all-electronic measurement systems, film is becoming increasingly difficult and expensive to procure. Here, we shall

  3. The LLNL Flash X-Ray Induction Linear Accelerator (FXR)

    SciTech Connect

    Multhauf, L G

    2002-09-19

    The FXR is an induction linear accelerator used for high-speed radiography at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Experimental Test Site. It was designed specifically for the radiography of very thick explosive objects. Since its completion in 1982, it has been very actively used for a large variety of explosives tests, and has been periodically upgraded to achieve higher performance. Upgrades have addressed machine reliability, radiographic sensitivity and resolution, two-frame imaging by double pulsing improvements that are described in detail in the paper. At the same time, the facility in which it was installed has also been extensively upgraded, first by adding space for optical and interferometric diagnostics, and more recently by adding a containment chamber to prevent the environmental dispersal of hazardous and radioactive materials. The containment addition also further expands space for new non-radiographic diagnostics. The new Contained Firing Facility is still in the process of activation. At the same time, FXR is continuing to undergo modifications aimed primarily at further increasing radiographic resolution and sensitivity, and at improving double-pulsed performance.

  4. Upgrades to the LLNL flash x-ray induction linear accelerator (FXR)

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpetti, R. D., LLNL

    1997-06-30

    The FXR is an induction linear accelerator used for flash radiography at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 Test Facility. The FXR was originally completed in 1982 and has been in continuous use as a radiographic tool. At that time the FXR produced a 17MeV, 2.2 kA burst of electrons for a duration of 65 ns. An upgrade of the FXR was recently completed. The purpose of this upgrade was to improve the performance of the FXR by increasing the energy of the electron injector from 1.2 MeV to 2.5 MeV and the beam current from 2.2 kA to 3 kA, improving the magnetic transport system by redesigning the solenoidal transport focus coils, reducing the rf coupling of the electron beam to the accelerator cells, and by adding additional beam diagnostics. We will describe the injector upgrades and performance as well as our efforts to tune the accelerator by minimizing beam corkscrew motion and the impact of Beam Breakup Instability on beam centroid motion throughout the beam line as the current is increased to 3 kA.

  5. Optimization of a novel class of benzimidazole-based farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists to improve physicochemical and ADME properties.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hans G F; Benson, G M; Bleicher, K H; Blum, D; Chaput, E; Clemann, N; Feng, S; Gardes, C; Grether, U; Hartman, P; Kuhn, B; Martin, R E; Plancher, J-M; Rudolph, M G; Schuler, F; Taylor, S

    2011-02-15

    Structure-guided lead optimization of recently described benzimidazolyl acetamides addressed the key liabilities of the previous lead compound 1. These efforts culminated in the discovery of 4-{(S)-2-[2-(4-chloro-phenyl)-5,6-difluoro-benzoimidazol-1-yl]-2-cyclohexyl-acetylamino}-3-fluoro-benzoic acid 7g, a highly potent and selective FXR agonist with excellent physicochemical and ADME properties and potent lipid lowering activity after oral administration to LDL receptor deficient mice.

  6. Structural Investigation for Optimization of Anthranilic Acid Derivatives as Partial FXR Agonists by in Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Yang, Xuemei; Lai, Xinmei; Kang, Jie; Gan, Huijuan; Gao, Yuxing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a three level in silico approach was applied to investigate some important structural and physicochemical aspects of a series of anthranilic acid derivatives (AAD) newly identified as potent partial farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists. Initially, both two and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (2D- and 3D-QSAR) studies were performed based on such AAD by a stepwise technology combined with multiple linear regression and comparative molecular field analysis. The obtained 2D-QSAR model gave a high predictive ability (R2train = 0.935, R2test = 0.902, Q2LOO = 0.899). It also uncovered that number of rotatable single bonds (b_rotN), relative negative partial charges (RPC−), oprea's lead-like (opr_leadlike), subdivided van der Waal’s surface area (SlogP_VSA2) and accessible surface area (ASA) were important features in defining activity. Additionally, the derived3D-QSAR model presented a higher predictive ability (R2train = 0.944, R2test = 0.892, Q2LOO = 0.802). Meanwhile, the derived contour maps from the 3D-QSAR model revealed the significant structural features (steric and electronic effects) required for improving FXR agonist activity. Finally, nine newly designed AAD with higher predicted EC50 values than the known template compound were docked into the FXR active site. The excellent molecular binding patterns of these molecules also suggested that they can be robust and potent partial FXR agonists in agreement with the QSAR results. Overall, these derived models may help to identify and design novel AAD with better FXR agonist activity. PMID:27070594

  7. Design of a High Field Stress, Velvet Cathode for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) Induction Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Brown, C; Fleming, D; Kreitzer, B; Lewis, K; Ong, M; Zentler, J

    2007-06-08

    A new cathode design has been proposed for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) induction linear accelerator with the goal of lowering the beam emittance. The original design uses a conventional Pierce geometry and applies a peak field of 134 kV/cm (no beam) to the velvet emission surface. Voltage/current measurements indicate that the velvet begins emitting near this peak field value and images of the cathode show a very non-uniform distribution of plasma light. The new design has a flat cathode/shroud profile that allows for a peak field stress of 230 kV/cm on the velvet. The emission area is reduced by about a factor of four to generate the same total current due to the greater field stress. The relatively fast acceleration of the beam, approximately 2.5 MeV in 10 cm, reduces space charge forces that tend to hollow the beam for a flat, non-Pierce geometry. The higher field stress achieved with the same rise time is expected to lead to an earlier and more uniform plasma formation over the velvet surface. Simulations and initial testing are presented.

  8. Accelerating optimization by tracing valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing-Xiao; He, Rong-Qiang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2016-06-01

    We propose an algorithm to accelerate optimization when an objective function locally resembles a long narrow valley. In such a case, a conventional optimization algorithm usually wanders with too many tiny steps in the valley. The new algorithm approximates the valley bottom locally by a parabola that is obtained by fitting a set of successive points generated recently by a conventional optimization method. Then large steps are taken along the parabola, accompanied by fine adjustment to trace the valley bottom. The effectiveness of the new algorithm has been demonstrated by accelerating the Newton trust-region minimization method and the Levenberg-Marquardt method on the nonlinear fitting problem in exact diagonalization dynamical mean-field theory and on the classic minimization problem of the Rosenbrock's function. Many times speedup has been achieved for both problems, showing the high efficiency of the new algorithm.

  9. Initial performance parameters on FXR

    SciTech Connect

    Kulke, B.; Innes, T.G.; Kihara, R.; Scarpetti, R.D.

    1982-06-11

    Construction of the new flash x-ray induction LINAC (FXR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been completed. Initial tuning of the machine has produced stable current pulses in excess of 2 kA at the design energy of 20 MeV, with an 80 ns FWHM pulse width, producing single-pulse radiation doses near 500 Roentgen at one meter from the target. The electronic spot size on the bremsstrahlung target is estimated at 3 to 5 mm. In this paper we will discuss the basic FXR design; running-in and tuning of the machine; emittance measurements; beam stability; switch gap synchronization; and measurements of the radiation dose and angular distribution.

  10. Pulsed Inductive Plasma Acceleration: Performance Optimization Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization criteria for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration are developed using an acceleration model consisting of a set of coupled circuit equations describing the time-varying current in the thruster and a one-dimensional momentum equation. The model is nondimensionalized, resulting in the identification of several scaling parameters that are varied to optimize the performance of the thruster. The analysis reveals the benefits of underdamped current waveforms and leads to a performance optimization criterion that requires the matching of the natural period of the discharge and the acceleration timescale imposed by the inertia of the working gas. In addition, the performance increases when a greater fraction of the propellant is initially located nearer to the inductive acceleration coil. While the dimensionless model uses a constant temperature formulation in calculating performance, the scaling parameters that yield the optimum performance are shown to be relatively invariant if a self-consistent description of energy in the plasma is instead used.

  11. Gradient Optimization for SC CW Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, William; Kneisel, Peter; Rode, Claus

    2003-05-01

    The proposed rare isotope accelerator (RIA) design consists of a normally conducting radio frequency quadruple (RFQ) section, a superconducting (SC) drift tube cavity section, a SC elliptical multi-cell cavity section and two charge strippers with associated charge state selection and beam matching optics. The SC elliptical section uses two or three multi-cell beta cavity types installed into cryomodules to span the energy region of about 84.5 MeV/nucleon up to 400 MeV/nucleon. This paper focuses on the gradient optimization of these SC elliptical cavities that provide a significant portion of the total acceleration to the beam. The choice of gradient coupled with the cavity quality factor has a strong affect on the overall cost of the accelerator. The paper describes the optimization of the capital and operating cost associated with the RIA elliptical cavity cryomodules.

  12. Evolutionary optimization methods for accelerator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poklonskiy, Alexey A.

    Many problems from the fields of accelerator physics and beam theory can be formulated as optimization problems and, as such, solved using optimization methods. Despite growing efficiency of the optimization methods, the adoption of modern optimization techniques in these fields is rather limited. Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs) form a relatively new and actively developed optimization methods family. They possess many attractive features such as: ease of the implementation, modest requirements on the objective function, a good tolerance to noise, robustness, and the ability to perform a global search efficiently. In this work we study the application of EAs to problems from accelerator physics and beam theory. We review the most commonly used methods of unconstrained optimization and describe the GATool, evolutionary algorithm and the software package, used in this work, in detail. Then we use a set of test problems to assess its performance in terms of computational resources, quality of the obtained result, and the tradeoff between them. We justify the choice of GATool as a heuristic method to generate cutoff values for the COSY-GO rigorous global optimization package for the COSY Infinity scientific computing package. We design the model of their mutual interaction and demonstrate that the quality of the result obtained by GATool increases as the information about the search domain is refined, which supports the usefulness of this model. We Giscuss GATool's performance on the problems suffering from static and dynamic noise and study useful strategies of GATool parameter tuning for these and other difficult problems. We review the challenges of constrained optimization with EAs and methods commonly used to overcome them. We describe REPA, a new constrained optimization method based on repairing, in exquisite detail, including the properties of its two repairing techniques: REFIND and REPROPT. We assess REPROPT's performance on the standard constrained

  13. Statins and transcriptional regulation: The FXR connection

    SciTech Connect

    Habeos, Ioannis; Ziros, Panos G.; Psyrogiannis, Agathoklis; Vagenakis, Apostolos G.; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G. . E-mail: papavas@med.upatras.gr

    2005-08-26

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor involved in lipoprotein as well as glucose metabolism. Statins are widely used hypolipidemic agents with many pleiotropic actions. It is known that statins affect other nuclear hormone receptors, but no reports are available on the effect of these drugs on FXR. Employing an animal model (Syrian hamsters), we hereby present evidence to demonstrate that Simvastatin, a broadly prescribed statin, decreases the expression of FXR at both the RNA and protein levels and down-regulates its DNA-binding activity. This novel property may have important implications on the mode statins influence on lipoprotein and carbohydrate homeostasis in the organism.

  14. SUMOylation of the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) Regulates the Expression of FXR Target Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Luo, Yuhuan; Sun, An-Qiang; Suchy, Frederick J.

    2013-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to a family of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate many aspects of metabolism including bile acid homeostasis. Here we show that FXR is covalently modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (Sumo1), an important regulator of cell signaling and transcription. Well conserved consensus sites at lysine 122 and 275 in the AF-1 and ligand binding domains, respectively, of FXR were subject to SUMOylation in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that Sumo1 was recruited to the bile salt export pump (BSEP), the small heterodimer partner (SHP), and the OSTα-OSTβ organic solute transporter loci in a ligand-dependent fashion. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-ReChIP) verified the concurrent binding of FXR and Sumo1 to the BSEP and SHP promoters. Overexpression of Sumo1 markedly decreased binding and/or recruitment of FXR to the BSEP and SHP promoters on ChIP-ReChIP. SUMOylation did not have an apparent effect on nuclear localization of FXR. Expression of Sumo1 markedly inhibited the ligand-dependent, transactivation of BSEP and SHP promoters by FXR/retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) in HepG2 cells. In contrast, mutations that abolished SUMOylation of FXR or siRNA knockdown of Sumo1 expression augmented the transactivation of BSEP and SHP promoters by FXR. Pathways for SUMOylation were significantly altered during obstructive cholestasis with differential Sumo1 recruitment to the promoters of FXR target genes. In conclusion, FXR is subject to SUMOylation that regulates its capacity to transactivate its target genes in normal liver and during obstructive cholestasis. PMID:23546875

  15. An algorithm for online optimization of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; Safranek, James; Wu, Juhao

    2013-10-01

    We developed a general algorithm for online optimization of accelerator performance, i.e., online tuning, using the performance measure as the objective function. This method, named robust conjugate direction search (RCDS), combines the conjugate direction set approach of Powell's method with a robust line optimizer which considers the random noise in bracketing the minimum and uses parabolic fit of data points that uniformly sample the bracketed zone. Moreover, it is much more robust against noise than traditional algorithms and is therefore suitable for online application. Simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to demonstrate the strength of the new algorithm.

  16. FXR signaling in the enterohepatic system

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Tsutomu; Li, Fei; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Enterohepatic circulation serves to capture bile acids and other steroid metabolites produced in the liver and secreted to the intestine, for reabsorption back into the circulation and reuptake to the liver. This process is under tight regulation by nuclear receptor signaling. Bile acids, produced from cholesterol, can alter gene expression in the liver and small intestine via activating the nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4), pregnane X receptor (PXR; NR1I2), vitamin D receptor (VDR; NR1I1), G protein coupled receptor TGR5, and other cell signaling pathways (JNK1/2, AKT and ERK1/2). Among these controls, FXR is known to be a major bile acid-responsive ligand-activated transcription factor and a crucial control element for maintaining bile acid homeostasis. FXR has a high affinity for several major endogenous bile acids, notably cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and lithocholic acid. By responding to excess bile acids, FXR is a bridge between the liver and small intestine to control bile acid levels and regulate bile acid synthesis and enterohepatic flow. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and gut, relative to other tissues, and contributes to the maintenance of cholesterol/bile acid homeostasis by regulating a variety of metabolic enzymes and transporters. FXR activation also affects lipid and glucose metabolism, and can influence drug metabolism. PMID:22609541

  17. Estimating The Reliability of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Flash X-ray (FXR) Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, M M; Kihara, R; Zentler, J M; Kreitzer, B R; DeHope, W J

    2007-06-27

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), our flash X-ray accelerator (FXR) is used on multi-million dollar hydrodynamic experiments. Because of the importance of the radiographs, FXR must be ultra-reliable. Flash linear accelerators that can generate a 3 kA beam at 18 MeV are very complex. They have thousands, if not millions, of critical components that could prevent the machine from performing correctly. For the last five years, we have quantified and are tracking component failures. From this data, we have determined that the reliability of the high-voltage gas-switches that initiate the pulses, which drive the accelerator cells, dominates the statistics. The failure mode is a single-switch pre-fire that reduces the energy of the beam and degrades the X-ray spot-size. The unfortunate result is a lower resolution radiograph. FXR is a production machine that allows only a modest number of pulses for testing. Therefore, reliability switch testing that requires thousands of shots is performed on our test stand. Study of representative switches has produced pre-fire statistical information and probability distribution curves. This information is applied to FXR to develop test procedures and determine individual switch reliability using a minimal number of accelerator pulses.

  18. "Real-Life" Pulse Flattening on the LLNL Flash X-ray (FXR) Machine

    SciTech Connect

    DeHope, W J; Jacob, J S; Kihara, R; Ong, M; Zentler, J M

    2007-06-25

    High-resolution radiography using high-current electron accelerators based on the linear induction accelerator principle requires the linac's final spot on the X-ray target to be millimeter-sized. The requisite final focusing solenoid is adjusted for a specific beam energy at its entrance, hence, temporal variation of entrance beam energy results in a less than optimal time-averaged spot size. The FXR (Flash X-Ray) induction linac facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will be briefly described with an emphasis on its pulsed power system. In principle, the pulsed Blumleins at the heart of the system output a square pulse when discharged at the peak of their charging waveform so that, with correct cell timing synchronization, the effective beam output into the final focusing solenoid should be optimally flat. We have found that real-life consideration of transmission line and pulse power details in both the injector and accelerator sections of the machine results in significant energy variations in the final beam. We have implemented methods of measurement and analysis that permits this situation to be quantified and improved upon. The improvement will be linked to final beam spot size and enhancement in expected radiographic resolution.

  19. FXR and its ligands inhibit the function of platelets

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Ali, Marfoua S.; Sasikumar, Parvathy; Sage, Tanya; Flora, Gagan D; Bye, Alex P; Kriek, Neline; Dorchies, Emilie; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Dombrowicz, David; Staels, Bart; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective While initially seemingly paradoxical due to the lack of nucleus, platelets possess a number of transcription factors that regulate their function through DNA-independent mechanisms. These include the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR), a member of the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that has been identified as a bile acid receptor. In this study, we show that FXR is present in human platelets and FXR ligands, GW4064 and 6-ECDCA, modulate platelet activation nongenomically. Approach and Results FXR ligands inhibited the activation of platelets in response to stimulation of collagen or thrombin receptors, resulting in diminished intracellular calcium mobilization and secretion, fibrinogen binding and aggregation. Exposure to FXR ligands also reduced integrin αIIbβ3 outside-in signaling and thereby reduced the ability of platelets to spread and to stimulate clot retraction. FXR function in platelets was found to be associated with the modulation of cGMP levels in platelets and associated downstream inhibitory signaling. Platelets from FXR-deficient mice were refractory to the actions of FXR agonists on platelet function and cyclic nucleotide signaling, firmly linking the non-genomic actions of these ligands to the FXR receptor. Conclusion This study provides support for the ability of FXR ligands to modulate platelet activation. The athero-protective effects of GW4064, with its novel antiplatelet effects, indicate FXR as a potential target for prevention of athero-thrombotic disease. PMID:27758768

  20. A variational perspective on accelerated methods in optimization.

    PubMed

    Wibisono, Andre; Wilson, Ashia C; Jordan, Michael I

    2016-11-22

    Accelerated gradient methods play a central role in optimization, achieving optimal rates in many settings. Although many generalizations and extensions of Nesterov's original acceleration method have been proposed, it is not yet clear what is the natural scope of the acceleration concept. In this paper, we study accelerated methods from a continuous-time perspective. We show that there is a Lagrangian functional that we call the Bregman Lagrangian, which generates a large class of accelerated methods in continuous time, including (but not limited to) accelerated gradient descent, its non-Euclidean extension, and accelerated higher-order gradient methods. We show that the continuous-time limit of all of these methods corresponds to traveling the same curve in spacetime at different speeds. From this perspective, Nesterov's technique and many of its generalizations can be viewed as a systematic way to go from the continuous-time curves generated by the Bregman Lagrangian to a family of discrete-time accelerated algorithms.

  1. Direct methylation of FXR by Set7/9, a lysine methyltransferase, regulates the expression of FXR target genes

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Ananthanarayanan, Meena

    2012-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a ligand (bile acid)-dependent nuclear receptor that regulates target genes involved in every aspect of bile acid homeostasis. Upon binding of ligand, FXR recruits an array of coactivators and associated proteins, some of which have intrinsic enzymatic activity that modify histones or even components of the transcriptional complex. In this study, we show chromatin occupancy by the Set7/9 methyltransferase at the FXR response element (FXRE) and direct methylation of FXR in vivo and in vitro at lysine 206. siRNA depletion of Set7/9 in the Huh-7 liver cell line decreased endogenous mRNAs of the FXR target genes, the short heterodimer partner (SHP) and bile salt export pump (BSEP). Mutation of the methylation site at K206 of FXR to an arginine prevented methylation by Set7/9. A pan-methyllysine antibody recognized the wild-type FXR but not the K206R mutant form. An electromobility shift assay showed that methylation by Set7/9 enhanced binding of FXR/retinoic X receptor-α to the FXRE. Interaction between hinge domain of FXR (containing K206) and Set7/9 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation, GST pull down, and mammalian two-hybrid experiments. Set7/9 overexpression in Huh-7 cells significantly enhanced transactivation of the SHP and BSEP promoters in a ligand-dependent fashion by wild-type FXR but not the K206R mutant FXR. A Set7/9 mutant deficient in methyltransferase activity was also not effective in increasing transactivation of the BSEP promoter. These studies demonstrate that posttranslational methylation of FXR by Set7/9 contributes to the transcriptional activation of FXR-target genes. PMID:22345554

  2. Torque-based optimal acceleration control for electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dongbin; Ouyang, Minggao

    2014-03-01

    The existing research of the acceleration control mainly focuses on an optimization of the velocity trajectory with respect to a criterion formulation that weights acceleration time and fuel consumption. The minimum-fuel acceleration problem in conventional vehicle has been solved by Pontryagin's maximum principle and dynamic programming algorithm, respectively. The acceleration control with minimum energy consumption for battery electric vehicle(EV) has not been reported. In this paper, the permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM) is controlled by the field oriented control(FOC) method and the electric drive system for the EV(including the PMSM, the inverter and the battery) is modeled to favor over a detailed consumption map. The analytical algorithm is proposed to analyze the optimal acceleration control and the optimal torque versus speed curve in the acceleration process is obtained. Considering the acceleration time, a penalty function is introduced to realize a fast vehicle speed tracking. The optimal acceleration control is also addressed with dynamic programming(DP). This method can solve the optimal acceleration problem with precise time constraint, but it consumes a large amount of computation time. The EV used in simulation and experiment is a four-wheel hub motor drive electric vehicle. The simulation and experimental results show that the required battery energy has little difference between the acceleration control solved by analytical algorithm and that solved by DP, and is greatly reduced comparing with the constant pedal opening acceleration. The proposed analytical and DP algorithms can minimize the energy consumption in EV's acceleration process and the analytical algorithm is easy to be implemented in real-time control.

  3. Computational studies and optimization of wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tsung, Frank S.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Esarey, Eric H.; Mori, Warren B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Martins, Samuel F.; Katsouleas, Tom; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Fawley, William M.; Huang, Chengkun; Wang, Xiadong; Cowan, Ben; Decyk, Victor K.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nakamura, Kei; Paul, Kevin; Plateau, Guillaume R.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Silva, Luis O.; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, C.G.R.; Tzoufras, Michael; Antonsen, Tom; Vieira, Jorge; Leemans, Wim P.

    2008-06-16

    Laser- and particle beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators produce accelerating fields thousands of times higher than radio-frequency accelerators, offering compactness and ultrafast bunches to extend the frontiers of high energy physics and to enable laboratory-scale radiation sources. Large-scale kinetic simulations provide essential understanding of accelerator physics to advance beam performance and stability and show and predict the physics behind recent demonstration of narrow energy spread bunches. Benchmarking between codes is establishing validity of the models used and, by testing new reduced models, is extending the reach of simulations to cover upcoming meter-scale multi-GeV experiments. This includes new models that exploit Lorentz boosted simulation frames to speed calculations. Simulations of experiments showed that recently demonstrated plasma gradient injection of electrons can be used as an injector to increase beam quality by orders of magnitude. Simulations are now also modeling accelerator stages of tens of GeV, staging of modules, and new positron sources to design next-generation experiments and to use in applications in high energy physics and light sources.

  4. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, André; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs including the pancreas, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB activation and is implicated in maintaining intestinal barrier integrity and preventing bacterial overgrowth and translocation. Here we explore, with the aid of complementary animal and human experiments, the potential role of FXR in acute pancreatitis. Methods Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced using the CCK-analogue cerulein in wild-type and Fxr-/- mice. Severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed using histology and a semi-quantitative scoring system. Ileal permeability was analyzed in vitro by Ussing chambers and an in vivo permeability assay. Gene expression of Fxr and Fxr target genes was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Serum FGF19 levels were determined by ELISA in acute pancreatitis patients and healthy volunteers. A genetic association study in 387 acute pancreatitis patients and 853 controls was performed using 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the complete FXR gene and two additional functional SNPs. Results In wild-type mice with acute pancreatitis, ileal transepithelial resistance was reduced and ileal mRNA expression of Fxr target genes Fgf15, SHP, and IBABP was decreased. Nevertheless, Fxr-/- mice did not exhibit a more severe acute pancreatitis than wild-type mice. In patients with acute pancreatitis, FGF19 levels were lower than in controls. However, there were no associations of FXR SNPs or haplotypes with susceptibility to acute pancreatitis, or its course, outcome or etiology. Conclusion We found no evidence for a major role of FXR in acute human or murine pancreatitis. The observed altered Fxr activity during the course of disease may be a

  5. The bile acid sensor FXR regulates insulin transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Vavassori, Piero; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, cholesterol homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we investigated whether FXR is expressed by pancreatic beta-cells and regulates insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cell line and human islets. We found that FXR activation induces positive regulatory effects on glucose-induced insulin transcription and secretion by genomic and non-genomic activities. Genomic effects of FXR activation relay on the induction of the glucose regulated transcription factor KLF11. Indeed, results from silencing experiments of KLF11 demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for FXR activity on glucose-induced insulin gene transcription. In addition FXR regulates insulin secretion by non-genomic effects. Thus, activation of FXR in betaTC6 cells increases Akt phosphorylation and translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT2 at plasma membrane, increasing the glucose uptake by these cells. In vivo experiments on Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mice demonstrated that FXR activation delays development of signs of diabetes, hyperglycemia and glycosuria, by enhancing insulin secretion and by stimulating glucose uptake by the liver. These data established that an FXR-KLF11 regulated pathway has an essential role in the regulation of insulin transcription and secretion induced by glucose.

  6. Using Approximations to Accelerate Engineering Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torczon, Virginia; Trosset, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Optimization problems that arise in engineering design are often characterized by several features that hinder the use of standard nonlinear optimization techniques. Foremost among these features is that the functions used to define the engineering optimization problem often are computationally intensive. Within a standard nonlinear optimization algorithm, the computational expense of evaluating the functions that define the problem would necessarily be incurred for each iteration of the optimization algorithm. Faced with such prohibitive computational costs, an attractive alternative is to make use of surrogates within an optimization context since surrogates can be chosen or constructed so that they are typically much less expensive to compute. For the purposes of this paper, we will focus on the use of algebraic approximations as surrogates for the objective. In this paper we introduce the use of so-called merit functions that explicitly recognize the desirability of improving the current approximation to the objective during the course of the optimization. We define and experiment with the use of merit functions chosen to simultaneously improve both the solution to the optimization problem (the objective) and the quality of the approximation. Our goal is to further improve the effectiveness of our general approach without sacrificing any of its rigor.

  7. Optimization of the factors that accelerate leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1989-03-01

    The prediction of long-term leachability of low-level radioactive waste forms is an essential element of disposal-site performance assessment. This report describes experiments and modeling techniques used to develop an accelerated leach test that meets this need. The acceleration in leaching rates caused by the combinations of two or more factors were experimentally determined. These factors were identified earlier as being able to individually accelerate leaching. They are: elevated temperature, the size of the waste form, the ratio of the volume of leachant to the surface area of the waste form, and the frequency of replacement of the leachant. The solidification agents employed were ones that are currently used to treat low-level radioactive wastes, namely portland type I cement, bitumen, and vinyl ester-styrene. The simulated wastes, sodium sulfate, sodium tetraborate, and incinerator ash, are simplified representatives of typical low-level waste streams. Experiments determined the leaching behavior of the radionuclides of cesium (Cs-137), strontium (Sr-85), and cobalt (Co-60 or Co-57) from several different formulations of solidification agents and waste types. Leaching results were based upon radiochemical and elemental analyses of aliquots of the leachate, and on its total alkalinity and pH at various times during the experiment (up to 120 days). Solid phase analyses were carried out by Scanning/Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on the waste forms before and after some leaching experiments. 43 refs., 96 figs., 16 tabs.

  8. A variational perspective on accelerated methods in optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wibisono, Andre; Wilson, Ashia C.; Jordan, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated gradient methods play a central role in optimization, achieving optimal rates in many settings. Although many generalizations and extensions of Nesterov’s original acceleration method have been proposed, it is not yet clear what is the natural scope of the acceleration concept. In this paper, we study accelerated methods from a continuous-time perspective. We show that there is a Lagrangian functional that we call the Bregman Lagrangian, which generates a large class of accelerated methods in continuous time, including (but not limited to) accelerated gradient descent, its non-Euclidean extension, and accelerated higher-order gradient methods. We show that the continuous-time limit of all of these methods corresponds to traveling the same curve in spacetime at different speeds. From this perspective, Nesterov’s technique and many of its generalizations can be viewed as a systematic way to go from the continuous-time curves generated by the Bregman Lagrangian to a family of discrete-time accelerated algorithms. PMID:27834219

  9. Transcriptional regulation of autophagy by an FXR/CREB axis

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Sunmi; Fu, Ting; Choi, Sung-E; Li, Yang; Zhu, Rong; Kumar, Subodh; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Yoon, Gyesoon; Kang, Yup; Zhong, Wenxuan; Ma, Jian; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components by autophagy is essential for cellular survival and homeostasis under nutrient-deprived conditions1–4. Acute regulation of autophagy by nutrient-sensing kinases is well defined3, 5–7, but longer-term transcriptional regulation is relatively unknown. Here we show that the fed-state sensing nuclear receptor FXR8, 9 and the fasting transcriptional activator CREB10, 11 coordinately regulate the hepatic autophagy gene network. Pharmacological activation of FXR repressed many autophagy genes and inhibited autophagy even in fasted mice and feeding-mediated inhibition of macroautophagy was attenuated in FXR-knockout mice. From mouse liver ChIP-seq data12–15, FXR and CREB binding peaks were detected at 178 and 112, respectively, of 230 autophagy-related genes, and 78 genes showed shared binding, mostly in their promoter regions. CREB promoted lipophagy, autophagic degradation of lipids16, under nutrient-deprived conditions, and FXR inhibited this response. Mechanistically, CREB upregulated autophagy genes, including Atg7, Ulk1, and Tfeb, by recruiting the coactivator CRTC2. After feeding or pharmacological activation, FXR trans-repressed these genes by disrupting the functional CREB/CRTC2 complex. This study identifies the novel FXR/CREB axis as a key physiological switch regulating autophagy, resulting in sustained nutrient regulation of autophagy during feeding/fasting cycles. PMID:25383523

  10. Optimization of accelerated charged particle beam for ADS energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Paraipan, M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2017-01-01

    A comparative analysis and optimization of energy efficiency for proton and ion beams in ADS systems is performed via simulation using a GEANT4 code with account for energy consumption for different accelerator types. It is demonstrated that for light nuclei, beginning from 7Li, with energies above 1 GeV/nucleon, ion beams are considerably (several times) more efficient than the 1-3 GeV proton beam. The possibility of achieving energy deposition equivalent to 1 GeV protons in a quasi-infinite uranium target with higher efficiency (and twice as small accelerator size) in the case of acceleration of light ions is substantiated.

  11. Optimization of a Small Scale Linear Reluctance Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, Thor; Beard, Robby

    2011-11-01

    Reluctance accelerators are extremely promising future methods of transportation. Several problems still plague these devices, most prominently low efficiency. Variables to overcoming efficiency problems are many and difficult to correlate how they affect our accelerator. The study examined several differing variables that present potential challenges in optimizing the efficiency of reluctance accelerators. These include coil and projectile design, power supplies, switching, and the elusive gradient inductance problem. Extensive research in these areas has been performed from computational and theoretical to experimental. Findings show that these parameters share significant similarity to transformer design elements, thus general findings show current optimized parameters the research suggests as a baseline for further research and design. Demonstration of these current findings will be offered at the time of presentation.

  12. Control and optimization of a staged laser-wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Yan, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, B.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-09-01

    We report results of an experimental study of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons, using a staged device based on a double-jet gas target that enables independent injection and acceleration stages. This novel scheme is shown to produce stable, quasi-monoenergetic, and tunable electron beams. We show that optimal accelerator performance is achieved by systematic variation of five critical parameters. For the injection stage, we show that the amount of trapped charge is controlled by the gas density, composition, and laser power. For the acceleration stage, the gas density and the length of the jet are found to determine the final electron energy. This independent control over both the injection and acceleration processes enabled independent control over the charge and energy of the accelerated electron beam while preserving the quasi-monoenergetic character of the beam. We show that the charge and energy can be varied in the ranges of 2-45 pC, and 50-450 MeV, respectively. This robust and versatile electron accelerator will find application in the generation of high-brightness and controllable x-rays, and as the injector stage for more conventional devices.

  13. Structural Studies of the Tandem Tudor Domains of Fragile X Mental Retardation Related Proteins FXR1 and FXR2

    SciTech Connect

    Adams-Cioaba, Melanie A.; Guo, Yahong; Bian, ChuanBing; Amaya, Maria F.; Lam, Robert; Wasney, Gregory A.; Vedadi, Masoud; Xu, Chao; Min, Jinrong

    2011-11-23

    Expansion of the CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1, fragile X mental retardation 1, gene results in suppression of protein expression for this gene and is the underlying cause of Fragile X syndrome. In unaffected individuals, the FMRP protein, together with two additional paralogues (Fragile X Mental Retardation Syndrome-related Protein 1 and 2), associates with mRNA to form a ribonucleoprotein complex in the nucleus that is transported to dendrites and spines of neuronal cells. It is thought that the fragile X family of proteins contributes to the regulation of protein synthesis at sites where mRNAs are locally translated in response to stimuli. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of the non-canonical nuclear localization signals of the FXR1 and FXR2 autosomal paralogues of FMRP, which were determined at 2.50 and 1.92 {angstrom}, respectively. The nuclear localization signals of the FXR1 and FXR2 comprise tandem Tudor domain architectures, closely resembling that of UHRF1, which is proposed to bind methylated histone H3K9. The FMRP, FXR1 and FXR2 proteins comprise a small family of highly conserved proteins that appear to be important in translational regulation, particularly in neuronal cells. The crystal structures of the N-terminal tandem Tudor domains of FXR1 and FXR2 revealed a conserved architecture with that of FMRP. Biochemical analysis of the tandem Tudor doamins reveals their ability to preferentially recognize trimethylated peptides in a sequence-specific manner.

  14. Acceleration of quantum optimal control theory algorithms with mixing strategies.

    PubMed

    Castro, Alberto; Gross, E K U

    2009-05-01

    We propose the use of mixing strategies to accelerate the convergence of the common iterative algorithms utilized in quantum optimal control theory (QOCT). We show how the nonlinear equations of QOCT can be viewed as a "fixed-point" nonlinear problem. The iterative algorithms for this class of problems may benefit from mixing strategies, as it happens, e.g., in the quest for the ground-state density in Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. We demonstrate, with some numerical examples, how the same mixing schemes utilized in this latter nonlinear problem may significantly accelerate the QOCT iterative procedures.

  15. Metformin interferes with bile acid homeostasis through AMPK-FXR crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Fleur; Berthier, Alexandre; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Gheeraert, Céline; Alexandre, Jeremy; Porez, Geoffrey; Prawitt, Janne; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Colin, Sophie; Lucas, Anthony; Patrice, Alexandre; Pattou, François; Diemer, Hélène; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rachez, Christophe; Kamilic, Jelena; Groen, Albert K.; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an important transcriptional regulator of bile acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and intestine and controls the synthesis and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. However, little is known about FXR-associated proteins that contribute to metabolic regulation. Here, we performed a mass spectrometry–based search for FXR-interacting proteins in human hepatoma cells and identified AMPK as a coregulator of FXR. FXR interacted with the nutrient-sensitive kinase AMPK in the cytoplasm of target cells and was phosphorylated in its hinge domain. In cultured human and murine hepatocytes and enterocytes, pharmacological activation of AMPK inhibited FXR transcriptional activity and prevented FXR coactivator recruitment to promoters of FXR-regulated genes. Furthermore, treatment with AMPK activators, including the antidiabetic biguanide metformin, inhibited FXR agonist induction of FXR target genes in mouse liver and intestine. In a mouse model of intrahepatic cholestasis, metformin treatment induced FXR phosphorylation, perturbed bile acid homeostasis, and worsened liver injury. Together, our data indicate that AMPK directly phosphorylates and regulates FXR transcriptional activity to precipitate liver injury under conditions favoring cholestasis. PMID:24531544

  16. Global search acceleration in the nested optimization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishagin, Vladimir A.; Israfilov, Ruslan A.

    2016-06-01

    Multidimensional unconstrained global optimization problem with objective function under Lipschitz condition is considered. For solving this problem the dimensionality reduction approach on the base of the nested optimization scheme is used. This scheme reduces initial multidimensional problem to a family of one-dimensional subproblems being Lipschitzian as well and thus allows applying univariate methods for the execution of multidimensional optimization. For two well-known one-dimensional methods of Lipschitz optimization the modifications providing the acceleration of the search process in the situation when the objective function is continuously differentiable in a vicinity of the global minimum are considered and compared. Results of computational experiments on conventional test class of multiextremal functions confirm efficiency of the modified methods.

  17. DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivity as a novel co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Ruya; Xiong, Xuelian; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xianfeng; Ning, Guang; Li, Xiaoying

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} DAX1 is co-localized with FXR and interacts with FXR. {yields} DAX1 acts as a negative regulator of FXR. {yields} Three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required. {yields} DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation by competing with co-activators. -- Abstract: Bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) is a key regulator of hepatic bile acid, glucose and lipid homeostasis through regulation of numerous genes involved in the process of bile acid, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. DAX1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family due to lack of classical DNA-binding domains and acts primarily as a co-repressor of many nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrated that DAX1 is co-localized with FXR in the nucleus and acted as a negative regulator of FXR through a physical interaction with FXR. Our study showed that over-expression of DAX1 down-regulated the expression of FXR target genes, whereas knockdown of DAX1 led to their up-regulation. Furthermore, three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required for the full repression of FXR transactivation. In addition, our study characterized that DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation via competing with co-activators such as SRC-1 and PGC-1{alpha}. In conclusion, DAX1 acts as a co-repressor to negatively modulate FXR transactivity.

  18. FXR acetylation is normally dynamically regulated by p300 and SIRT1 but constitutively elevated in metabolic disease states.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Jongsook Kim; Xiao, Zhen; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Miao, Ji; Fang, Sungsoon; Kanamaluru, Deepthi; Tsang, Stephanie; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Veenstra, Timothy D

    2009-11-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor FXR is critical for regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Here, we report that FXR is a target of SIRT1, a deacetylase that mediates nutritional and hormonal modulation of hepatic metabolism. Lysine 217 of FXR is the major acetylation site targeted by p300 and SIRT1. Acetylation of FXR increases its stability but inhibits heterodimerization with RXRalpha, DNA binding, and transactivation activity. Downregulation of hepatic SIRT1 increased FXR acetylation with deleterious metabolic outcomes. Surprisingly, in mouse models of metabolic disease, FXR interaction with SIRT1 and p300 was dramatically altered, FXR acetylation levels were elevated, and overexpression of SIRT1 or resveratrol treatment reduced acetylated FXR levels. Our data demonstrate that FXR acetylation is normally dynamically regulated by p300 and SIRT1 but is constitutively elevated in metabolic disease states. Small molecules that inhibit FXR acetylation by targeting SIRT1 or p300 may be promising therapeutic agents for metabolic disorders.

  19. Activation of the nuclear receptor FXR improves hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in diabetic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanqiao; Lee, Florence Ying; Barrera, Gabriel; Lee, Hans; Vales, Charisse; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Willson, Timothy M.; Edwards, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays an important role in maintaining bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. Here we demonstrate that FXR also regulates glucose metabolism. Activation of FXR by the synthetic agonist GW4064 or hepatic overexpression of constitutively active FXR by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer significantly lowered blood glucose levels in both diabetic db/db and wild-type mice. Consistent with these data, FXR null mice exhibited glucose intolerance and insulin insensitivity. We further demonstrate that activation of FXR in db/db mice repressed hepatic gluconeogenic genes and increased hepatic glycogen synthesis and glycogen content by a mechanism that involves enhanced insulin sensitivity. In view of its central roles in coordinating regulation of both glucose and lipid metabolism, we propose that FXR agonists are promising therapeutic agents for treatment of diabetes mellitus. glucose | GW4064 | farnesoid X receptor-VP16 | triglyceride | cholesterol

  20. Elliptical Cavity Shape Optimization for Acceleration and HOM Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang; Robert Rimmer; Genfa Wu

    2005-05-01

    We report a survey of center cell shapes developed for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) multi-cell cavities for different projects. Using a set of normalized parameters, we compare the designs for different frequencies and particle velocities for the fundamental mode. Using dispersion curves of High Order Modes (HOM) (frequency verse phase advance) calculated by MAFIA for a single cell, we further optimize the cavity shape to avoid a light cone line crossing at the dangerous resonance frequencies determined by the beam bunch structure and eliminate the trapped (or high R/Q) modes with a low group velocity. We developed this formulation to optimize a 5-cell, 750MHz cavity shape, with good real-estate accelerating gradient and a strong HOM damping waveguide structure for the JLab 1MW ERL-FEL project.

  1. Optimization of positrons generation based on laser wakefield electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuchi; Han, Dan; Zhang, Tiankui; Dong, Kegong; Zhu, Bin; Yan, Yonghong; Gu, Yuqiu

    2016-08-01

    Laser based positron represents a new particle source with short pulse duration and high charge density. Positron production based on laser wakefield electron acceleration (LWFA) has been investigated theoretically in this paper. Analytical expressions for positron spectra and yield have been obtained through a combination of LWFA and cascade shower theories. The maximum positron yield and corresponding converter thickness have been optimized as a function of driven laser power. Under the optimal condition, high energy (>100 MeV ) positron yield up to 5 ×1011 can be produced by high power femtosecond lasers at ELI-NP. The percentage of positrons shows that a quasineutral electron-positron jet can be generated by setting the converter thickness greater than 5 radiation lengths.

  2. Upregulation of decorin by FXR in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    He Fengtian; Zhang Qiuhong; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Gao Xiang; Li Jiang; Li Yong; Gong Wei; Jiang, Yu; Xie Wen; Li Song

    2008-08-08

    Decorin is a member of the family of small leucine-rich proteoglycans that are present in blood vessels and synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Decorin plays complex roles in both normal vascular physiology and the pathogenesis of various types of vascular disorders. However, the mechanisms of regulation of decorin expression in vasculature are not clearly understood. Particularly little information is available about a role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of decorin expression. In the present study, we report that activation of vascular FXR by a specific ligand resulted in upregulation of decorin at the levels of both mRNA and protein. FXR appears to induce decorin expression at a transcriptional level because (1) upregulation of decorin mRNA expression was abolished by the treatment of a transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D; and (2) decorin promoter activity was significantly increased by activation of FXR. Functional analysis of human decorin promoter identified an imperfect inverted repeat DNA motif, IR8 (-2313TGGTCAtagtgtcaTGACCT-2294), as a likely FXR-responsive element that is involved in decorin regulation.

  3. Regulation of FXR transcriptional activity in health and disease: Emerging roles of FXR cofactors and post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2011-08-01

    Abnormally elevated lipid and glucose levels due to the disruption of metabolic homeostasis play causative roles in the development of metabolic diseases. A cluster of metabolic conditions, including dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, and insulin resistance, is referred to as metabolic syndrome, which has been increasing globally at an alarming rate. The primary nuclear bile acid receptor, Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR, NR1H4), plays important roles in controlling lipid and glucose levels by regulating expression of target genes in response to bile acid signaling in enterohepatic tissues. In this review, I discuss how signal-dependent FXR transcriptional activity is dynamically regulated under normal physiological conditions and how it is dysregulated in metabolic disease states. I focus on the emerging roles of post-translational modifications (PTMs) and transcriptional cofactors in modulating FXR transcriptional activity and pathways. Dysregulation of nuclear receptor transcriptional signaling due to aberrant PTMs and cofactor interactions are key determinants in the development of metabolic diseases. Therefore, targeting such abnormal PTMs and transcriptional cofactors of FXR in disease states may provide a new molecular strategy for development of pharmacological agents to treat metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translating nuclear receptors from health to disease.

  4. Activation of FXR protects against renal fibrosis via suppressing Smad3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; He, Jialin; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Zhizhen; Xiong, Haojun; Gong, Rujun; Li, Song; Chen, Shan; He, Fengtian

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is the common pathway of most chronic kidney disease progression to end-stage renal failure. The nuclear receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor), a multiple functional transcription factor, plays an important role in protecting against fibrosis. The TGFβ-Smad signaling has a central role in kidney fibrosis. However, it remains unclear whether FXR plays direct anti-fibrotic effect in renal fibrosis via regulating TGFβ-Smad pathway. In this study, we found that the level of FXR was negatively correlated with that of Smad3 and fibronectin (a marker of fibrosis) in human fibrotic kidneys. Activation of FXR suppressed kidney fibrosis and downregulated Smad3 expression, which was markedly attenuated by FXR antagonist. Moreover, the FXR-mediated repression of fibrosis was significantly alleviated by ectopic expression of Smad3. Luciferase reporter assay revealed that FXR activation inhibited the transcriptional activity of Smad3 gene promoter. The in vivo experiments showed that FXR agonist protected against renal fibrosis and downregulated Smad3 expression in UUO mice. These results suggested that FXR may serve as an important negative regulator for manipulating Smad3 expression, and the FXR/Smad3 pathway may be a novel target for the treatment of renal fibrosis. PMID:27853248

  5. Bioenergetic cues shift FXR splicing towards FXRα2 to modulate hepatic lipolysis and fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Jorge C.; Massart, Julie; de Boer, Jan Freark; Porsmyr-Palmertz, Margareta; Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Agudelo, Leandro Z.; Sinha, Indranil; Meierhofer, David; Ribeiro, Vera; Björnholm, Marie; Sauer, Sascha; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zierath, Juleen R.; Groen, Albert K.; Ruas, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a prominent role in hepatic lipid metabolism. The FXR gene encodes four proteins with structural differences suggestive of discrete biological functions about which little is known. Methods We expressed each FXR variant in primary hepatocytes and evaluated global gene expression, lipid profile, and metabolic fluxes. Gene delivery of FXR variants to Fxr−/− mouse liver was performed to evaluate their role in vivo. The effects of fasting and physical exercise on hepatic Fxr splicing were determined. Results We show that FXR splice isoforms regulate largely different gene sets and have specific effects on hepatic metabolism. FXRα2 (but not α1) activates a broad transcriptional program in hepatocytes conducive to lipolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis. Consequently, FXRα2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation and improves cellular insulin signaling to AKT. FXRα2 expression in Fxr−/− mouse liver activates a similar gene program and robustly decreases hepatic triglyceride levels. On the other hand, FXRα1 reduces hepatic triglyceride content to a lesser extent and does so through regulation of lipogenic gene expression. Bioenergetic cues, such as fasting and exercise, dynamically regulate Fxr splicing in mouse liver to increase Fxrα2 expression. Conclusions Our results show that the main FXR variants in human liver (α1 and α2) reduce hepatic lipid accumulation through distinct mechanisms and to different degrees. Taking this novel mechanism into account could greatly improve the pharmacological targeting and therapeutic efficacy of FXR agonists. PMID:26909306

  6. Accelerated monotonic convergence of optimal control over quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-08-01

    The control of quantum dynamics is often concerned with finding time-dependent optimal control fields that can take a system from an initial state to a final state to attain the desired value of an observable. This paper presents a general method for formulating monotonically convergent algorithms to iteratively improve control fields. The formulation is based on a two-point boundary-value quantum control paradigm (TBQCP) expressed as a nonlinear integral equation of the first kind arising from dynamical invariant tracking control. TBQCP is shown to be related to various existing techniques, including local control theory, the Krotov method, and optimal control theory. Several accelerated monotonic convergence schemes for iteratively computing control fields are derived based on TBQCP. Numerical simulations are compared with the Krotov method showing that the new TBQCP schemes are efficient and remain monotonically convergent over a wide range of the iteration step parameters and the control pulse lengths, which is attributable to the trap-free character of the transition probability quantum dynamics control landscape.

  7. FXR silencing in human colon cancer by DNA methylation and KRAS signaling.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ann M; Zhan, Le; Maru, Dipen; Shureiqi, Imad; Pickering, Curtis R; Kiriakova, Galina; Izzo, Julie; He, Nan; Wei, Caimiao; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Liang, Han; Kopetz, Scott; Powis, Garth; Guo, Grace L

    2014-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid nuclear receptor described through mouse knockout studies as a tumor suppressor for the development of colon adenocarcinomas. This study investigates the regulation of FXR in the development of human colon cancer. We used immunohistochemistry of FXR in normal tissue (n = 238), polyps (n = 32), and adenocarcinomas, staged I-IV (n = 43, 39, 68, and 9), of the colon; RT-quantitative PCR, reverse-phase protein array, and Western blot analysis in 15 colon cancer cell lines; NR1H4 promoter methylation and mRNA expression in colon cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas; DNA methyltransferase inhibition; methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP); bisulfite sequencing; and V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) knockdown assessment to investigate FXR regulation in colon cancer development. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that expression and function of FXR was reduced in precancerous lesions and silenced in a majority of stage I-IV tumors. FXR expression negatively correlated with phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate 3 kinase signaling and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The NR1H4 promoter is methylated in ~12% colon cancer The Cancer Genome Atlas samples, and methylation patterns segregate with tumor subtypes. Inhibition of DNA methylation and KRAS silencing both increased FXR expression. FXR expression is decreased early in human colon cancer progression, and both DNA methylation and KRAS signaling may be contributing factors to FXR silencing. FXR potentially suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and other oncogenic signaling cascades, and restoration of FXR activity, by blocking silencing mechanisms or increasing residual FXR activity, represents promising therapeutic options for the treatment of colon cancer.

  8. Deletion of mouse FXR gene disturbs multiple neurotransmitter systems and alters neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Wang, Tingting; Lan, Yunyi; Yang, Li; Pan, Weihong; Zhu, Yonghui; Lv, Boyang; Wei, Yuting; Shi, Hailian; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jie; Duan, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhibi; Wu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in bile acid synthesis and homeostasis. Dysfunction of FXR is involved in cholestasis and atherosclerosis. FXR is prevalent in liver, gallbladder, and intestine, but it is not yet clear whether it modulates neurobehavior. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that mouse FXR deficiency affects a specific subset of neurotransmitters and results in an unique behavioral phenotype. The FXR knockout mice showed less depressive-like and anxiety-related behavior, but increased motor activity. They had impaired memory and reduced motor coordination. There were changes of glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, and norepinephrinergic neurotransmission in either hippocampus or cerebellum. FXR deletion decreased the amount of the GABA synthesis enzyme GAD65 in hippocampus but increased GABA transporter GAT1 in cerebral cortex. FXR deletion increased serum concentrations of many bile acids, including taurodehydrocholic acid, taurocholic acid, deoxycholic acid (DCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), tauro-α-muricholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, and hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA). There were also changes in brain concentrations of taurocholic acid, taurodehydrocholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, tauro-β-muricholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and lithocholic acid (LCA). Taken together, the results from studies with FXR knockout mice suggest that FXR contributes to the homeostasis of multiple neurotransmitter systems in different brain regions and modulates neurobehavior. The effect appears to be at least partially mediated by bile acids that are known to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) inducing potential neurotoxicity. PMID:25870546

  9. A dysregulated acetyl/SUMO switch of FXR promotes hepatic inflammation in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Xiao, Zhen; Kwon, Sanghoon; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ryerson, Daniel; Tkac, David; Ma, Ping; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Zhou, Edward; Xu, H Eric; Palvimo, Jorma J; Chen, Lin-Feng; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation of transcriptional regulators is normally dynamically regulated by nutrient status but is often persistently elevated in nutrient-excessive obesity conditions. We investigated the functional consequences of such aberrantly elevated acetylation of the nuclear receptor FXR as a model. Proteomic studies identified K217 as the FXR acetylation site in diet-induced obese mice. In vivo studies utilizing acetylation-mimic and acetylation-defective K217 mutants and gene expression profiling revealed that FXR acetylation increased proinflammatory gene expression, macrophage infiltration, and liver cytokine and triglyceride levels, impaired insulin signaling, and increased glucose intolerance. Mechanistically, acetylation of FXR blocked its interaction with the SUMO ligase PIASy and inhibited SUMO2 modification at K277, resulting in activation of inflammatory genes. SUMOylation of agonist-activated FXR increased its interaction with NF-κB but blocked that with RXRα, so that SUMO2-modified FXR was selectively recruited to and trans-repressed inflammatory genes without affecting FXR/RXRα target genes. A dysregulated acetyl/SUMO switch of FXR in obesity may serve as a general mechanism for diminished anti-inflammatory response of other transcriptional regulators and provide potential therapeutic and diagnostic targets for obesity-related metabolic disorders. PMID:25425577

  10. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    PubMed Central

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  11. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets.

    PubMed

    Stockem Novo, A; Kaluza, M C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2016-07-20

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  12. Development of Time Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-based Assay for FXR Antagonist Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Donna D.; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng; Forman, Barry M.

    2013-01-01

    FXR (farnesoid X receptor, NRIH4), a nuclear receptor, plays a major role in the control of cholesterol metabolism. FXR ligands have been investigated in preclinical studies for targeted therapy against metabolic diseases, but have shown limitations. Therefore, there is a need for new agonist or antagonist ligands of FXR, both for potential clinical applications, as well as to further elucidate its biological functions. Here we describe the use of the X-ray crystal structure of FXR complexed with the potent small molecule agonist GW4064 to design and synthesize a novel fluorescent, high-affinity probe (DY246) for time resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. We then used the TR-FRET assay for high throughput screening of a library of over 5,000 bioactive compounds. From this library, we identified 13 compounds that act as putative FXR transcriptional antagonists. PMID:23688559

  13. Development of time resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for FXR antagonist discovery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Donna D; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng; Forman, Barry M

    2013-07-15

    FXR (farnesoid X receptor, NRIH4), a nuclear receptor, plays a major role in the control of cholesterol metabolism. FXR ligands have been investigated in preclinical studies for targeted therapy against metabolic diseases, but have shown limitations. Therefore, there is a need for new agonist or antagonist ligands of FXR, both for potential clinical applications, as well as to further elucidate its biological functions. Here we describe the use of the X-ray crystal structure of FXR complexed with the potent small molecule agonist GW4064 to design and synthesize a novel fluorescent, high-affinity probe (DY246) for time resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. We then used the TR-FRET assay for high throughput screening of a library of over 5000 bioactive compounds. From this library, we identified 13 compounds that act as putative FXR transcriptional antagonists.

  14. FXR Primes the Liver for Intestinal FGF15 Signaling by Transient Induction of β-Klotho

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ting; Kim, Young-Chae; Byun, Sangwon; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Seok, Sunmi; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric; Kemper, Byron

    2016-01-01

    The bile acid (BA)-sensing nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), regulates postprandial metabolic responses, including inhibition of BA synthesis, by inducing the intestinal hormone, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)15 (FGF19 in human). In this study, we tested a novel hypothesis that FXR not only induces intestinal FGF15 but also primes the liver for effectively responding to the signal by transcriptional induction of the obligate coreceptor for FGF15, β-Klotho (βKL). Activation of FXR by a synthetic agonist, GW4064, in mice increased occupancy of FXR and its DNA-binding partner, retinoid X receptor-α, at FGF15-signaling component genes, particularly βKL, and induced expression of these genes. Interestingly, mRNA levels of Fgfr4, the FGF15 receptor, were not increased by GW4064, but protein levels increased as a result of βKL-dependent increased protein stability. Both FGF receptor 4 and βKL protein levels were substantially decreased in FXR-knockout (KO) mice, and FGF19 signaling, monitored by phosphorylated ERK, was blunted in FXR-KO mice, FXR-KO mouse hepatocytes, and FXR-down-regulated human hepatocytes. Overexpression of βKL in FXR-lacking hepatocytes partially restored FGF19 signaling and inhibition by FGF19 of Cyp7a1, which encodes the rate-limiting BA biosynthetic enzyme. In mice, transient inductions of intestinal Fgf15 and hepatic βKL were temporally correlated after GW4064 treatment, and pretreatment of hepatocytes with GW4064 before FGF19 treatment enhanced FGF19 signaling, which was abolished by transcriptional inhibition or βKL down-regulation. This study identifies FXR as a gut-liver metabolic coordinator for FGF15/19 action that orchestrates transient induction of hepatic βKL and intestinal Fgf15/19 in a temporally correlated manner. PMID:26505219

  15. FXR Primes the Liver for Intestinal FGF15 Signaling by Transient Induction of β-Klotho.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ting; Kim, Young-Chae; Byun, Sangwon; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Seok, Sunmi; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H Eric; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    The bile acid (BA)-sensing nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), regulates postprandial metabolic responses, including inhibition of BA synthesis, by inducing the intestinal hormone, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)15 (FGF19 in human). In this study, we tested a novel hypothesis that FXR not only induces intestinal FGF15 but also primes the liver for effectively responding to the signal by transcriptional induction of the obligate coreceptor for FGF15, β-Klotho (βKL). Activation of FXR by a synthetic agonist, GW4064, in mice increased occupancy of FXR and its DNA-binding partner, retinoid X receptor-α, at FGF15-signaling component genes, particularly βKL, and induced expression of these genes. Interestingly, mRNA levels of Fgfr4, the FGF15 receptor, were not increased by GW4064, but protein levels increased as a result of βKL-dependent increased protein stability. Both FGF receptor 4 and βKL protein levels were substantially decreased in FXR-knockout (KO) mice, and FGF19 signaling, monitored by phosphorylated ERK, was blunted in FXR-KO mice, FXR-KO mouse hepatocytes, and FXR-down-regulated human hepatocytes. Overexpression of βKL in FXR-lacking hepatocytes partially restored FGF19 signaling and inhibition by FGF19 of Cyp7a1, which encodes the rate-limiting BA biosynthetic enzyme. In mice, transient inductions of intestinal Fgf15 and hepatic βKL were temporally correlated after GW4064 treatment, and pretreatment of hepatocytes with GW4064 before FGF19 treatment enhanced FGF19 signaling, which was abolished by transcriptional inhibition or βKL down-regulation. This study identifies FXR as a gut-liver metabolic coordinator for FGF15/19 action that orchestrates transient induction of hepatic βKL and intestinal Fgf15/19 in a temporally correlated manner.

  16. Optimization of vehicle accelerator-brake pedal foot travel time.

    PubMed

    Glass, S W; Suggs, C W

    1977-12-01

    This study was directed towards reducing the lag time between stimulus and incidence of braking. The effect of the relative vertical heights of the brake and accelerator pedals on foot travel time was the subject of the first part of the investigation. In the second part, two new pedal designs in which the accelerator was mounted directly on the brake pedal were evaluated. A significant reduction in foot travel time of approximately 12.5% was realised by locating the accelerator pedal 25-50 mm (1-2 in) higher than the brake pedal. Mounting of the accelerator pedal adjacent to or directly on the brake pedal allowed reductions in braking lag time of 46% to 74%.

  17. Optimization of THz Radiation Generation from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Tilborg, J. van; Albert, O.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Ultrashort terahertz pulses with energies in the {mu}J range can be generated with laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA), which are novel, compact accelerators that produce ultrashort electron bunches with energies up to 1 GeV and energy spreads of a few-percent. Laser pulses interacting with a plasma create accelerated electrons which upon exiting the plasma emit terahertz pulses via transition radiation. Because these electron bunches are ultrashort (<50 fs), they can radiate coherently (coherent transition radiation--CTR) in a wide bandwidth ({approx}1-10 THz) yielding high intensity terahertz pulses. In addition to providing a non-invasive bunch-length diagnostic and thus feedback for the LWFA, these high peak power THz pulses are suitable for high field (MV/cm) pump-probe experiments. Here we present energy-based measurements using a Golay cell and an electro-optic technique which were used to characterize these THz pulses.

  18. Urinary metabolomics in Fxr-null mice reveals activated adaptive metabolic pathways upon bile acid challenge.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joo-Youn; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Kang, Dong Wook; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Luecke, Hans; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2010-05-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates genes involved in synthesis, metabolism, and transport of bile acids and thus plays a major role in maintaining bile acid homeostasis. In this study, metabolomic responses were investigated in urine of wild-type and Fxr-null mice fed cholic acid, an FXR ligand, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Multivariate data analysis between wild-type and Fxr-null mice on a cholic acid diet revealed that the most increased ions were metabolites of p-cresol (4-methylphenol), corticosterone, and cholic acid in Fxr-null mice. The structural identities of the above metabolites were confirmed by chemical synthesis and by comparing retention time (RT) and/or tandem mass fragmentation patterns of the urinary metabolites with the authentic standards. Tauro-3alpha,6,7alpha,12alpha-tetrol (3alpha,6,7alpha,12alpha-tetrahydroxy-5beta-cholestan-26-oyltaurine), one of the most increased metabolites in Fxr-null mice on a CA diet, is a marker for efficient hydroxylation of toxic bile acids possibly through induction of Cyp3a11. A cholestatic model induced by lithocholic acid revealed that enhanced expression of Cyp3a11 is the major defense mechanism to detoxify cholestatic bile acids in Fxr-null mice. These results will be useful for identification of biomarkers for cholestasis and for determination of adaptive molecular mechanisms in cholestasis.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluations of chalcones, flavones and chromenes as farnesoid x receptor (FXR) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoning; Liu, Shuainan; Tan, Wenjuan; Verma, Ruchi; Chen, Yuan; Sun, Deyang; Huan, Yi; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Xing; Wang, Na; Xu, Yang; Wong, Chiwai; Shen, Zhufang; Deng, Ruitang; Liu, Jinsong; Zhang, Yanqiao; Fang, Weishuo

    2017-03-31

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor mainly distributed in liver and intestine, has been regarded as a potential target for the treatment of various metabolic diseases, cancer and infectious diseases related to liver. Starting from two previously identified chalcone-based FXR antagonists, we tried to increase the activity through the design and synthesis of a library containing chalcones, flavones and chromenes, based on substitution manipulation and conformation (ring closure) restriction strategy. Many chalcones and four chromenes were identified as microM potent FXR antagonists, among which chromene 11c significantly decreased the plasma and hepatic triglyceride level in KKay mice.

  20. Origami Optimization: Role of Symmetry in Accelerating Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskohl, Philip; Fuchi, Kazuko; Bazzan, Giorgio; Durstock, Michael; Reich, Gregory; Joo, James; Vaia, Richard

    Origami structures morph between 2D and 3D conformations along predetermined fold lines that efficiently program the form, function and mobility of the structure. Design optimization tools have recently been developed to predict optimal fold patterns with mechanics-based metrics, such as the maximal energy storage, auxetic response and actuation. Origami actuator design problems possess inherent symmetries associated with the grid, mechanical boundary conditions and the objective function, which are often exploited to reduce the design space and computational cost of optimization. However, enforcing symmetry eliminates the prediction of potentially better performing asymmetric designs, which are more likely to exist given the discrete nature of fold line optimization. To better understand this effect, actuator design problems with different combinations of rotation and reflection symmetries were optimized while varying the number of folds allowed in the final design. In each case, the optimal origami patterns transitioned between symmetric and asymmetric solutions depended on the number of folds available for the design, with fewer symmetries present with more fold lines allowed. This study investigates the interplay of symmetry and discrete vs continuous optimization in origami actuators and provides insight into how the symmetries of the reference grid regulate the performance landscape. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  1. Acceleration techniques in the univariate Lipschitz global optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, Yaroslav D.; Kvasov, Dmitri E.; Mukhametzhanov, Marat S.; De Franco, Angela

    2016-10-01

    Univariate box-constrained Lipschitz global optimization problems are considered in this contribution. Geometric and information statistical approaches are presented. The novel powerful local tuning and local improvement techniques are described in the contribution as well as the traditional ways to estimate the Lipschitz constant. The advantages of the presented local tuning and local improvement techniques are demonstrated using the operational characteristics approach for comparing deterministic global optimization algorithms on the class of 100 widely used test functions.

  2. A note on the adaptive optimal control of ion accelerator facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The application of optimal control theory to the computer control system of an ion accelerator facility is presented. The process is shown to consist of mathematical modeling of the underlying process, parameter identification, as well as some design methods of the optimal computer control and the techniques of realizing adaptive control.

  3. FERMI&Elettra Accelerator Technical Optimization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; Wang, D.; Warnock, R.; /SLAC

    2007-04-30

    This chapter describes the accelerator physics aspects, the engineering considerations and the choice of parameters that led to the accelerator design of the FERMI Free-Electron-Laser. The accelerator (also called the ''electron beam delivery system'') covers the region from the exit of the injector to the entrance of the first FEL undulator. The considerations that led to the proposed configuration were made on the basis of a study that explored various options and performance limits. This work follows previous studies of x-ray FEL facilities (SLAC LCLS [1], DESY XFEL [2], PAL XFEL [3], MIT [4], BESSY FEL [5], LBNL LUX [6], Daresbury 4GLS [7]) and integrates many of the ideas that were developed there. Several issues specific to harmonic cascade FELs, and that had not yet been comprehensively studied, were also encountered and tackled. A particularly difficult issue was the need to meet the requirement for high peak current and small slice energy spread, as the specification for the ratio of these two parameters (that defines the peak brightness of the electron beam) is almost a factor of two higher than that of the LCLS's SASE FEL. Another challenging aspect was the demand to produce an electron beam with as uniform as possible peak current and energy distributions along the bunch, a condition that was met by introducing novel beam dynamics techniques. Part of the challenge was due to the fact that there were no readily available computational tools to carry out reliable calculations, and these had to be developed. Most of the information reported in this study is available in the form of scientific publications, and is partly reproduced here for the convenience of the reader.

  4. Optimization of accelerator system performance at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky, S.

    1994-10-01

    There is an active program of accelerator development at the NSLS aimed at improving reliability, stability and brightness. Work is primarily focused on providing improved performance for the NSLS user community, however, important elements of our work have a generic character and should be of value to other synchrotron radiation facilities. In particular, we have successfully operated a small gap undulator with a full vertical beam aperture of only 3.8 mm, with no degradation of beam lifetime. This provides strong support for the belief that small gap, short period devices will play an important role in the future.

  5. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Olivier F.; Still, Christopher D.; Argyropoulos, George; Edwards, Michael; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs) as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27006824

  6. Optimizing a mobile robot control system using GPU acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuck, Nat; McGuinness, Michael; Martin, Fred

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes our attempt to optimize a robot control program for the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) by running computationally intensive portions of the system on a commodity graphics processing unit (GPU). The IGVC Autonomous Challenge requires a control program that performs a number of different computationally intensive tasks ranging from computer vision to path planning. For the 2011 competition our Robot Operating System (ROS) based control system would not run comfortably on the multicore CPU on our custom robot platform. The process of profiling the ROS control program and selecting appropriate modules for porting to run on a GPU is described. A GPU-targeting compiler, Bacon, is used to speed up development and help optimize the ported modules. The impact of the ported modules on overall performance is discussed. We conclude that GPU optimization can free a significant amount of CPU resources with minimal effort for expensive user-written code, but that replacing heavily-optimized library functions is more difficult, and a much less efficient use of time.

  7. FXR1P is a GSK3β substrate regulating mood and emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    Del’Guidice, Thomas; Latapy, Camille; Rampino, Antonio; Khlghatyan, Jivan; Lemasson, Morgane; Gelao, Barbara; Quarto, Tiziana; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Barbeau, Annie; Lamarre, Claude; Bertolino, Alessandro; Blasi, Giuseppe; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a shared action believed to be involved in the regulation of behavior by psychoactive drugs such as antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. However, little is known about the identity of the substrates through which GSK3β affects behavior. We identified fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1P), a RNA binding protein associated to genetic risk for schizophrenia, as a substrate for GSK3β. Phosphorylation of FXR1P by GSK3β is facilitated by prior phosphorylation by ERK2 and leads to its down-regulation. In contrast, behaviorally effective chronic mood stabilizer treatments in mice inhibit GSK3β and increase FXR1P levels. In line with this, overexpression of FXR1P in the mouse prefrontal cortex also leads to comparable mood-related responses. Furthermore, functional genetic polymorphisms affecting either FXR1P or GSK3β gene expression interact to regulate emotional brain responsiveness and stability in humans. These observations uncovered a GSK3β/FXR1P signaling pathway that contributes to regulating mood and emotion processing. Regulation of FXR1P by GSK3β also provides a mechanistic framework that may explain how inhibition of GSK3β can contribute to the regulation of mood by psychoactive drugs in mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder. Moreover, this pathway could potentially be implicated in other biological functions, such as inflammation and cell proliferation, in which FXR1P and GSK3 are known to play a role. PMID:26240334

  8. FERMI&Elettra Accelerator Technical Optimization FinalReport

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; Wang, D.; Warnock, R.

    2006-07-01

    This report describes the accelerator physics aspects, theengineering considerations and the choice of parameters that led to theaccelerator design of the FERMI Free-Electron-Laser. The accelerator(also called the "electron beam delivery system") covers the region fromthe exit of the injector to the entrance of the first FEL undulator. Theconsiderations that led to the proposed configuration were made on thebasis of a study that explored various options and performance limits.This work follows previous studies of x-ray FEL facilities (SLAC LCLS[1], DESY XFEL [2], PAL XFEL [3], MIT [4], BESSY FEL[5], LBNL LUX [6],Daresbury 4GLS [7]) and integrates many of the ideas that were developedthere. Several issues specific to harmonic cascade FELs, and that had notyet been comprehensively studied, were also encountered and tackled. Aparticularly difficult issue was the need to meet the requirement forhigh peak current and small slice energy spread, as the specification forthe ratio of these two parameters (that defines the peak brightness ofthe electron beam) is almost a factor of two higher than that of theLCLS's SASE FEL. Another challenging aspect was the demand to produce anelectron beam with as uniform as possible peak current and energydistributions along the bunch, a condition that was met by introducingnovel beam dynamics techniques. Part of the challenge was due to the factthat there were no readily available computational tools to carry outreliable calculations, and these had to be developed. Most of theinformation reported in this study is available in the form of scientificpublications, and is partly reproduced here for the convenience of thereader.

  9. Nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors PPARα and FXR control liver energy balance.

    PubMed

    Preidis, Geoffrey A; Kim, Kang Ho; Moore, David D

    2017-04-03

    The nuclear receptors PPARα (encoded by NR1C1) and farnesoid X receptor (FXR, encoded by NR1H4) are activated in the liver in the fasted and fed state, respectively. PPARα activation induces fatty acid oxidation, while FXR controls bile acid homeostasis, but both nuclear receptors also regulate numerous other metabolic pathways relevant to liver energy balance. Here we review evidence that they function coordinately to control key nutrient pathways, including fatty acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis in the fasted state and lipogenesis and glycolysis in the fed state. We have also recently reported that these receptors have mutually antagonistic impacts on autophagy, which is induced by PPARα but suppressed by FXR. Secretion of multiple blood proteins is a major drain on liver energy and nutrient resources, and we present preliminary evidence that the liver secretome may be directly suppressed by PPARα, but induced by FXR. Finally, previous studies demonstrated a striking deficiency in bile acid levels in malnourished mice that is consistent with results in malnourished children. We present evidence that hepatic targets of PPARα and FXR are dysregulated in chronic undernutrition. We conclude that PPARα and FXR function coordinately to integrate liver energy balance.

  10. Optimizing chirped laser pulse parameters for electron acceleration in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Akhyani, Mina; Jahangiri, Fazel; Niknam, Ali Reza; Massudi, Reza

    2015-11-14

    Electron dynamics in the field of a chirped linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated. Variations of electron energy gain versus chirp parameter, time duration, and initial phase of laser pulse are studied. Based on maximizing laser pulse asymmetry, a numerical optimization procedure is presented, which leads to the elimination of rapid fluctuations of gain versus the chirp parameter. Instead, a smooth variation is observed that considerably reduces the accuracy required for experimentally adjusting the chirp parameter.

  11. A Parallel Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm Accelerated by Asynchronous Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    2005-01-01

    A parallel Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented. Particle swarm optimization is a fairly recent addition to the family of non-gradient based, probabilistic search algorithms that is based on a simplified social model and is closely tied to swarming theory. Although PSO algorithms present several attractive properties to the designer, they are plagued by high computational cost as measured by elapsed time. One approach to reduce the elapsed time is to make use of coarse-grained parallelization to evaluate the design points. Previous parallel PSO algorithms were mostly implemented in a synchronous manner, where all design points within a design iteration are evaluated before the next iteration is started. This approach leads to poor parallel speedup in cases where a heterogeneous parallel environment is used and/or where the analysis time depends on the design point being analyzed. This paper introduces an asynchronous parallel PSO algorithm that greatly improves the parallel e ciency. The asynchronous algorithm is benchmarked on a cluster assembled of Apple Macintosh G5 desktop computers, using the multi-disciplinary optimization of a typical transport aircraft wing as an example.

  12. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W-M; Trivikram, T Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J; Ayyub, P; Sheng, Z M; Krishnamurthy, M

    2015-07-08

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈ 0.25 μm) layer of 25-30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2 × 10(18)  W/cm(2). However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration.

  13. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W.-M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J.; Ayyub, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈0.25 μm) layer of 25–30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2×1018  W/cm2. However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration. PMID:26153048

  14. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W.-M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J.; Ayyub, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈0.25 μm) layer of 25-30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2×1018  W/cm2. However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration.

  15. Optimization of Drive-Bunch Current Profile for Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Beam-Driven Acceleration Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C.R.; Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2012-07-08

    In recent years, wakefield acceleration has gained attention due to its high acceleration gradients and cost effectiveness. In beam-driven wakefield acceleration, a critical parameter to optimize is the transformer ratio. It has been shown that current shaping of electron beams allows for enhanced (> 2) transformer ratios. In this paper we present the optimization of the pulse shape of the drive bunch for dielectric-wakefield acceleration.

  16. Hardware acceleration vs. algorithmic acceleration: can GPU-based processing beat complexity optimization for CT?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neophytou, Neophytos; Xu, Fang; Mueller, Klaus

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) is a compute-intensive process, due to the large amounts of source and destination data, and this limits the speed at which a reconstruction can be obtained. There are two main approaches to cope with this problem: (i) lowering the overall computational complexity via algorithmic means, and/or (ii) running CT on specialized high-performance hardware. Since the latter requires considerable capital investment into rather inflexible hardware, the former option is all one has typically available in a traditional CPU-based computing environment. However, the emergence of programmable commodity graphics hardware (GPUs) has changed this situation in a decisive way. In this paper, we show that GPUs represent a commodity high-performance parallel architecture that resonates very well with the computational structure and operations inherent to CT. Using formal arguments as well as experiments we demonstrate that GPU-based 'brute-force' CT (i.e., CT at regular complexity) can be significantly faster than CPU-based as well as GPU-based CT with optimal complexity, at least for practical data sizes. Therefore, the answer to the title question: "Can GPU-based processing beat complexity optimization for CT?" is "Absolutely!"

  17. Involvement of multiple elements in FXR-mediated transcriptional activation of FGF19.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hata, Tatsuya; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Kagawa, Tatehiro; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2012-10-01

    The intestinal endocrine hormone human fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is involved in the regulation of not only hepatic bile acid metabolism but also carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In the present study, bile acid/farnesoid X receptor (FXR) responsiveness in the FGF19 promoter region was investigated by a reporter assay using the human colon carcinoma cell line LS174T. The assay revealed the presence of bile acid/FXR-responsive elements in the 5'-flanking region up to 8.8 kb of FGF19. Deletion analysis indicated that regions from -1866 to -1833, from -1427 to -1353, and from -75 to +262 were involved in FXR responsiveness. Four, four, and two consecutive half-sites of nuclear receptors were observed in the three regions, respectively. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed FXR/retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer binding in these three regions. EMSA and reporter assays using mutated constructs indicated that the nuclear receptor IR1, ER2, and DR8 motifs in the 5'-flanking region were involved in FXR responsiveness of FGF19. Lithocholic acid (LCA) (10 μM), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) (10 μM), or GW4064 (0.1 μM) treatment increased reporter activity in a construct including the three motifs under FXR-expressing conditions whereas LCA and not CDCA or GW4064 treatment increased the reporter activity under pregnane X receptor (PXR)-expressing conditions. These results suggest that FGF19 is transcriptionally activated through multiple FXR-responsive elements in the promoter region.

  18. SIRT1 controls liver regeneration by regulating BA metabolism through FXR and mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodríguez, Juan L.; Barbier-Torres, Lucía; Fernández-Álvarez, Sara; Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez-de; Monte, María J.; Halilbasic, Emina; Herranz, Daniel; Álvarez, Luis; Aspichueta, Patricia; Marín, Jose J. G.; Trauner, Michael; Mato, Jose M.; Serrano, Manuel; Beraza, Naiara; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) regulates central metabolic functions such as lipogenesis, protein synthesis, gluconeogenesis and bile acid (BA) homeostasis through deacetylation. Here, we describe that SIRT1 tightly controls the regenerative response of the liver. We performed partial hepatectomy (PH) to transgenic mice that overexpress SIRT1 (SIRT). SIRT mice showed increased mortality, impaired hepatocyte proliferation, BA accumulation and profuse liver injury after surgery. The damaging phenotype in SIRT mice correlated with impaired FXR activity due to persistent deacetylation and lower protein expression that led to decreased FXR-target gene expression; SHP, BSEP and increased Cyp7A1. Next, we convincingly show that 24-norUrsodeoxycholic acid (NorUDCA) attenuates SIRT protein expression, increases the acetylation of FXR and neighboring histones, restores trimethylation of H3K4 and H3K9 and increases miR34a expression, thus re-establishing BA homeostasis. Consequently, NorUDCA restored liver regeneration in SIRT mice, which showed increased survival and hepatocyte proliferation. Furthermore, a Leucine-enriched diet restored mTOR activation, acetylation of FXR and histones, leading to an overall lower BA production through SHP-inhibition of Cyp7A1 and higher transport (BSEP) and detoxification (Sult2a1) leading to an improved liver regeneration. Finally, we found that human HCC samples have increased presence of SIRT1, which correlated with absence of FXR suggesting its oncogenic potential. Conclusions Overall, we define SIRT1 as a key regulator of the regenerative response in the liver through post-transcriptional modifications that regulate the activity of FXR, histones and mTOR. Moreover, our data suggest that SIRT1 contributes to liver tumorigenesis through dysregulation of BA homeostasis by persistent FXR deacetylation. PMID:24338587

  19. Microbunching Instability Effect Studies and Laser Heater Optimization for the SPARX FEL Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarezza, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Giannessi, L.; Quattromini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Venturini, C.; Migliorati, M.; Dattoli, G.

    2010-05-23

    The effects of microbunching instability for the SPARX accelerator have been analyzed by means of numerical simulations. The laser heater counteracting action has been addressed in order to optimize the parameters of the compression system, either hybrid RF plus magnetic chicane or only magnetic, and possibly enhance the FEL performance.

  20. Mechanisms of STAT3 activation in the liver of FXR knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guodong; Zhu, Yan; Tawfik, Ossama; Kong, Bo; Williams, Jessica A.; Zhan, Le; Kassel, Karen M.; Luyendyk, James P.; Wang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, Nr1h4) is a ligand-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is essential in maintaining bile acid (BA) homeostasis, and FXR−/− mice develop cholestasis, inflammation, and spontaneous liver tumors. The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is well known to regulate liver growth, and STAT3 is feedback inhibited by its target gene, the suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3). Strong activation of STAT3 was detected in FXR−/− mouse livers. However, the mechanism of STAT3 activation with FXR deficiency remains elusive. Wild-type (WT) and FXR−/− mice were used to detect STAT3 pathway activation in the liver. In vivo BA feeding or deprivation was used to determine the role of BAs in STAT3 activation, and in vitro molecular approaches were used to determine the direct transcriptional regulation of SOCS3 by FXR. STAT3 was activated in FXR−/− but not WT mice. BA feeding increased, but deprivation by cholestyramine reduced, serum inflammatory markers and STAT3 activation. Furthermore, the Socs3 gene was determined as a direct FXR target gene. The elevated BAs and inflammation, along with reduced SOCS3, collectively contribute to the activation of the STAT3 signaling pathway in the liver of FXR−/− mice. This study suggests that the constitutive activation of STAT3 may be a mechanism of liver carcinogenesis in FXR−/− mice. PMID:24091600

  1. Optimization of the combined proton acceleration regime with a target composition scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W. P.; Li, B. W.; Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Yan, X. Q.; Qiao, B.

    2016-01-15

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. Protons get pre-accelerated in the first stage when an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target. The wakefield is driven by the laser pulse after penetrating through the overdense CH target and propagating in the underdense tritium plasma gas. With the pre-accelerate stage, protons can now get trapped in the wakefield and accelerated to much higher energy by LWFA. Finally, protons with higher energies (from about 20 GeV up to about 30 GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about 18% down to about 5% in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hydrogen density ratio, the energy spread is lower and the maximum proton energy is higher. It also shows that for the same laser intensity around 10{sup 22} W cm{sup −2}, using the CH target will lead to a higher proton energy, as compared to the use of a pure H target. Additionally, proton energy can be further increased by employing a longitudinally negative gradient of a background plasma density.

  2. Design of Linear Accelerator (LINAC) tanks for proton therapy via Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, T.; De Palma, L.; Laneve, D.; Strippoli, V.; Cuccovilllo, A.; Prudenzano, F.; Dimiccoli, V.; Losito, O.; Prisco, R.

    2015-07-01

    A homemade computer code for designing a Side- Coupled Linear Accelerator (SCL) is written. It integrates a simplified model of SCL tanks with the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm. The computer code main aim is to obtain useful guidelines for the design of Linear Accelerator (LINAC) resonant cavities. The design procedure, assisted via the aforesaid approach seems very promising, allowing future improvements towards the optimization of actual accelerating geometries. (authors)

  3. Multilevel Optimization Framework for Hierarchical Stiffened Shells Accelerated by Adaptive Equivalent Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Tian, Kuo; Zhao, Haixin; Hao, Peng; Zhu, Tianyu; Zhang, Ke; Ma, Yunlong

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the post-buckling optimization efficiency of hierarchical stiffened shells, a multilevel optimization framework accelerated by adaptive equivalent strategy is presented in this paper. Firstly, the Numerical-based Smeared Stiffener Method (NSSM) for hierarchical stiffened shells is derived by means of the numerical implementation of asymptotic homogenization (NIAH) method. Based on the NSSM, a reasonable adaptive equivalent strategy for hierarchical stiffened shells is developed from the concept of hierarchy reduction. Its core idea is to self-adaptively decide which hierarchy of the structure should be equivalent according to the critical buckling mode rapidly predicted by NSSM. Compared with the detailed model, the high prediction accuracy and efficiency of the proposed model is highlighted. On the basis of this adaptive equivalent model, a multilevel optimization framework is then established by decomposing the complex entire optimization process into major-stiffener-level and minor-stiffener-level sub-optimizations, during which Fixed Point Iteration (FPI) is employed to accelerate convergence. Finally, the illustrative examples of the multilevel framework is carried out to demonstrate its efficiency and effectiveness to search for the global optimum result by contrast with the single-level optimization method. Remarkably, the high efficiency and flexibility of the adaptive equivalent strategy is indicated by compared with the single equivalent strategy.

  4. Synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 is a modulator of multiple G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Yadav, Manisha; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Kumar, Harish; Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Gurjar, Anagha; Manhas, Amit; Chandra, Sharat; Yadav, Prem Narayan; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Sanyal, Sabyasachi

    2014-05-01

    The synthetic nuclear bile acid receptor (farnesoid X receptor [FXR]) agonist GW4064 is extensively used as a specific pharmacological tool to illustrate FXR functions. We noticed that GW4064 activated empty luciferase reporters in FXR-deficient HEK-293T cells. We postulated that this activity of GW4064 might be routed through as yet unknown cellular targets and undertook an unbiased exploratory approach to identify these targets. Investigations revealed that GW4064 activated cAMP and nuclear factor for activated T-cell response elements (CRE and NFAT-RE, respectively) present on these empty reporters. Whereas GW4064-induced NFAT-RE activation involved rapid intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and NFAT nuclear translocation, CRE activation involved soluble adenylyl cyclase-dependent cAMP accumulation and Ca(2+)-calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of transducers of regulated CRE-binding protein 2. Use of dominant negative heterotrimeric G-protein minigenes revealed that GW4064 caused activation of Gαi/o and Gq/11 G proteins. Sequential pharmacological inhibitor-based screening and radioligand-binding studies revealed that GW4064 interacted with multiple G protein-coupled receptors. Functional studies demonstrated that GW4064 robustly activated H1 and H4 and inhibited H2 histamine receptor signaling events. We also found that MCF-7 breast cancer cells, reported to undergo GW4064-induced apoptosis in an FXR-dependent manner, did not express FXR, and the GW4064-mediated apoptosis, also apparent in HEK-293T cells, could be blocked by selective histamine receptor regulators. Taken together, our results demonstrate identification of histamine receptors as alternate targets for GW4064, which not only necessitates cautious interpretation of the biological functions attributed to FXR using GW4064 as a pharmacological tool but also provides a basis for the rational designing of new pharmacophores for histamine receptor modulation.

  5. Fragile X mental retardation protein has a unique, evolutionarily conserved neuronal function not shared with FXR1P or FXR2P.

    PubMed

    Coffee, R Lane; Tessier, Charles R; Woodruff, Elvin A; Broadie, Kendal

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), resulting solely from the loss of function of the human fragile X mental retardation 1 (hFMR1) gene, is the most common heritable cause of mental retardation and autism disorders, with syndromic defects also in non-neuronal tissues. In addition, the human genome encodes two closely related hFMR1 paralogs: hFXR1 and hFXR2. The Drosophila genome, by contrast, encodes a single dFMR1 gene with close sequence homology to all three human genes. Drosophila that lack the dFMR1 gene (dfmr1 null mutants) recapitulate FXS-associated molecular, cellular and behavioral phenotypes, suggesting that FMR1 function has been conserved, albeit with specific functions possibly sub-served by the expanded human gene family. To test evolutionary conservation, we used tissue-targeted transgenic expression of all three human genes in the Drosophila disease model to investigate function at (1) molecular, (2) neuronal and (3) non-neuronal levels. In neurons, dfmr1 null mutants exhibit elevated protein levels that alter the central brain and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synaptic architecture, including an increase in synapse area, branching and bouton numbers. Importantly, hFMR1 can, comparably to dFMR1, fully rescue both the molecular and cellular defects in neurons, whereas hFXR1 and hFXR2 provide absolutely no rescue. For non-neuronal requirements, we assayed male fecundity and testes function. dfmr1 null mutants are effectively sterile owing to disruption of the 9+2 microtubule organization in the sperm tail. Importantly, all three human genes fully and equally rescue mutant fecundity and spermatogenesis defects. These results indicate that FMR1 gene function is evolutionarily conserved in neural mechanisms and cannot be compensated by either FXR1 or FXR2, but that all three proteins can substitute for each other in non-neuronal requirements. We conclude that FMR1 has a neural-specific function that is distinct from its paralogs, and that the unique FMR1 function

  6. Automated ARGET ATRP Accelerates Catalyst Optimization for the Synthesis of Thiol-Functionalized Polymers.

    PubMed

    Siegwart, Daniel J; Leiendecker, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-02-14

    Conventional synthesis of polymers by ATRP is relatively low throughput, involving iterative optimization of conditions in an inert atmosphere. Automated, high-throughput controlled radical polymerization was developed to accelerate catalyst optimization and production of disulfide-functionalized polymers without the need of an inert gas. Using ARGET ATRP, polymerization conditions were rapidly identified for eight different monomers, including the first ARGET ATRP of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate. In addition, butyl acrylate, oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate 300 and 475, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate, styrene, and methyl methacrylate were polymerized using bis(2-hydroxyethyl) disulfide bis(2-bromo-2-methylpropionate) as the initiator, tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine as the ligand, and tin(II) 2-ethylhexanoate as the reducing agent. The catalyst and reducing agent concentration was optimized specifically for each monomer, and then a library of polymers was synthesized systematically using the optimized conditions. The disulfide-functionalized chains could be cleaved to two thiol-terminated chains upon exposure to dithiothreitol, which may have utility for the synthesis of polymer bioconjugates. Finally, we demonstrated that these new conditions translated perfectly to conventional batch polymerization. We believe the methods developed here may prove generally useful to accelerate the systematic optimization of a variety of chemical reactions and polymerizations.

  7. Active vibration control with optimized modified acceleration feedback equipped with adaptive line enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi, S. Nima; Craft, Michael J.; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2010-04-01

    Modified acceleration feedback (MAF) control, an active vibration control method that uses collocated piezoelectric actuator actuators and sensors is improved using an optimal controller. The controller consists of two main parts: 1) Frequency adaptation that uses Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE), and 2) an optimal controller. Frequency adaptation tracks the frequency of vibrations using ALE. The obtained frequency is then fed to MPPF compensators and the optimal controller. This provides a unique feature for MAF, by extending its domain of capabilities from controlling tonal vibrations to broad band disturbances. The optimal controller consists of a set of optimal gains for wide range of frequencies that is provided, related to the characteristics of the system. Based on the tracked frequency, the optimal control system decides to use which set of gains for the MAF controller. The gains are optimal for the frequencies close to the tracked frequency. The numerical results show that the frequency tracking method that is derived has worked quite well. In addition, the frequency tracking is fast enough to be used in real-time controller. The results also indicate that the MAF can provide significant vibration reduction using the optimal controller.

  8. Active vibration control using optimized modified acceleration feedback with Adaptive Line Enhancer for frequency tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nima Mahmoodi, S.; Craft, Michael J.; Southward, Steve C.; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2011-03-01

    Modified acceleration feedback (MAF) control, an active vibration control method that uses collocated piezoelectric actuators and accelerometer is developed and its gains optimized using an optimal controller. The control system consists of two main parts: (1) frequency adaptation that uses Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE) and (2) an optimized controller. Frequency adaptation method tracks the frequency of vibrations using ALE. The obtained frequency is then fed to MAF compensators. This provides a unique feature for MAF, by extending its domain of capabilities from controlling a certain mode of vibrations to any excited mode. The optimized MAF controller can provide optimal sets of gains for a wide range of frequencies, based on the characteristics of the system. The experimental results show that the frequency tracking method works quite well and fast enough to be used in a real-time controller. ALE parameters are numerically and experimentally investigated and tuned for optimized frequency tracking. The results also indicate that the MAF can provide significant vibration reduction using the optimized controller. The control power varies for vibration suppression at different resonance frequencies; however, it is always optimized.

  9. Evolution of the bile salt nuclear receptor FXR in vertebrates*s⃞

    PubMed Central

    Reschly, Erica J.; Ai, Ni; Ekins, Sean; Welsh, William J.; Hagey, Lee R.; Hofmann, Alan F.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    Bile salts, the major end metabolites of cholesterol, vary significantly in structure across vertebrate species, suggesting that nuclear receptors binding these molecules may show adaptive evolutionary changes. We compared across species the bile salt specificity of the major transcriptional regulator of bile salt synthesis, the farnesoid X receptor (FXR). We found that FXRs have changed specificity for primary bile salts across species by altering the shape and size of the ligand binding pocket. In particular, the ligand binding pockets of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) FXRs, as predicted by homology models, are flat and ideal for binding planar, evolutionarily early bile alcohols. In contrast, human FXR has a curved binding pocket best suited for the bent steroid ring configuration typical of evolutionarily more recent bile acids. We also found that the putative FXR from the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis, a chordate invertebrate, was completely insensitive to activation by bile salts but was activated by sulfated pregnane steroids, suggesting that the endogenous ligands of this receptor may be steroidal in nature. Our observations present an integrated picture of the coevolution of bile salt structure and of the binding pocket of their target nuclear receptor FXR. PMID:18362391

  10. Conformationally constrained farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists: Heteroaryl replacements of the naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Mills, Wendy Y.; Navas, III, Frank; Parks, Derek J.; Smalley, Jr., Terrence L.; Spearing, Paul K.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2014-08-13

    To improve on the drug properties of GSK8062 1b, a series of heteroaryl bicyclic naphthalene replacements were prepared. The quinoline 1c was an equipotent FXR agonist with improved drug developability parameters relative to 1b. In addition, analog 1c lowered body weight gain and serum glucose in a DIO mouse model of diabetes.

  11. Bile acids regulate intestinal cell proliferation by modulating EGFR and FXR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Avafia Y.; Escobar, Oswaldo; Golden, Jamie; Frey, Mark R.; Ford, Henri R.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are synthesized in the liver and secreted into the intestine. In the lumen, enteric bacteria metabolize BAs from conjugated, primary forms into more toxic unconjugated, secondary metabolites. Secondary BAs can be injurious to the intestine and may contribute to disease. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are known to interact with BAs. In this study we examined the effects of BAs on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and investigated the possible roles for EGFR and FXR in these effects. We report that taurine-conjugated cholic acid (TCA) induced proliferation, while its unconjugated secondary counterpart deoxycholic acid (DCA) inhibited proliferation. TCA stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, and ERK 1/2. Pharmacological blockade of any of these pathways or genetic ablation of EGFR abrogated TCA-stimulated proliferation. Interestingly, Src or EGFR inhibitors eliminated TCA-induced phosphorylation of both molecules, suggesting that their activation is interdependent. In contrast to TCA, DCA exposure diminished EGFR phosphorylation, and pharmacological or siRNA blockade of FXR abolished DCA-induced inhibition of proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that TCA induces intestinal cell proliferation via Src, EGFR, and ERK activation. In contrast, DCA inhibits proliferation via an FXR-dependent mechanism that may include downstream inactivation of the EGFR/Src/ERK pathway. Since elevated secondary BA levels are the result of specific bacterial modification, this may provide a mechanism through which an altered microbiota contributes to normal or abnormal intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26608185

  12. Design and Optimization of Large Accelerator Systems through High-Fidelity Electromagnetic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Cho; Akcelik, Volkan; Candel, Arno; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Kabel, Andreas; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Prudencio, Ernesto; Schussman, Greg; Uplenchwar1, Ravi; Xiao1, Liling; Ko1, Kwok; Austin, T.; Cary, J.R.; Ovtchinnikov, S.; Smith, D.N.; Werner, G.R.; Bellantoni, L.; /SLAC /TechX Corp. /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    SciDAC1, with its support for the 'Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology' (AST) project, witnessed dramatic advances in electromagnetic (EM) simulations for the design and optimization of important accelerators across the Office of Science. In SciDAC2, EM simulations continue to play an important role in the 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation' (ComPASS), through close collaborations with SciDAC CETs/Institutes in computational science. Existing codes will be improved and new multi-physics tools will be developed to model large accelerator systems with unprecedented realism and high accuracy using computing resources at petascale. These tools aim at targeting the most challenging problems facing the ComPASS project. Supported by advances in computational science research, they have been successfully applied to the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in High Energy Physics (HEP), the JLab 12-GeV Upgrade in Nuclear Physics (NP), as well as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in Basic Energy Sciences (BES).

  13. SREBP-2 negatively regulates FXR-dependent transcription of FGF19 in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hata, Tatsuya; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2014-01-10

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor that positively regulates transcription of target genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. In the present study, we have investigated a possible involvement of SREBP-2 in human intestinal expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)19, which is an endocrine hormone involved in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Overexpression of constitutively active SREBP-2 decreased FGF19 mRNA levels in human colon-derived LS174T cells. In reporter assays, active SREBP-2 overexpression suppressed GW4064/FXR-mediated increase in reporter activities in regions containing the IR-1 motif (+848 to +5200) in the FGF19 gene. The suppressive effect disappeared in reporter activities in the region containing the IR-1 motif when the mutation was introduced into the IR-1 motif. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, binding of the FXR/retinoid X receptor α heterodimer to the IR-1 motif was attenuated by adding active SREBP-2, but SREBP-2 binding to the IR-1 motif was not observed. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, specific binding of FXR to the IR-1-containing region of the FGF19 gene (+3214 to +3404) was increased in LS174T cells by treatment with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. Specific binding of SREBP-2 to FXR was observed in glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays. These results suggest that SREBP-2 negatively regulates the FXR-mediated transcriptional activation of the FGF19 gene in human intestinal cells.

  14. Optimal convolution SOR acceleration of waveform relaxation with application to semiconductor device simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichelt, Mark

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel generalized SOR (successive overrelaxation) algorithm for accelerating the convergence of the dynamic iteration method known as waveform relaxation. A new convolution SOR algorithm is presented, along with a theorem for determining the optimal convolution SOR parameter. Both analytic and experimental results are given to demonstrate that the convergence of the convolution SOR algorithm is substantially faster than that of the more obvious frequency-independent waveform SOR algorithm. Finally, to demonstrate the general applicability of this new method, it is used to solve the differential-algebraic system generated by spatial discretization of the time-dependent semiconductor device equations.

  15. Optimization and control of two-component radially self-accelerating beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander

    2015-11-23

    We report on the properties of radially self-accelerating intensity distributions consisting of two components in the angular frequency domain. We show how this subset of solutions, in literature also known as helicon beams, possesses peculiar characteristics that enable a better control over its properties. In this work, we present a step-by-step optimization procedure to achieve the best possible intensity contrast, a distinct rotation rate and long propagation lengths. All points are discussed on a theoretical basis and are experimentally verified.

  16. FXR mediates a chromatin looping in the GR promoter thus promoting the resolution of colitis in rodents.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; D'Amore, Claudio; Cipriani, Sabrina; Mencarelli, Andrea; Carino, Adriana; Sepe, Valentina; Zampella, Angela; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are important endocrine regulators of a wide range of physiological processes ranging from immune function to glucose and lipid metabolism. For decades, synthetic glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone have been the cornerstone for the clinical treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). A previous study has shown that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) enhances the transcription of NR3C1 gene, which encodes for human GR, by binding to a conserved FXR response element (FXRE) in the distal promoter of this gene. In the present study we demonstrate that FXR promotes the resolution of colitis in rodents by enhancing Gr gene transcription. We used the chromatin conformation capture (3C) assay to demonstrate that this FXRE is functional in mediating a head-to-tail chromatin looping, thus increasing Gr transcription efficiency. These findings underscore the importance of FXR/GR axis in the control of intestinal inflammation.

  17. Hierarchical incremental path planning and situation-dependent optimized dynamic motion planning considering accelerations.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xue-Cheng; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Al Mamun, Abdullah

    2007-12-01

    This paper studies a hierarchical approach for incrementally driving a nonholonomic mobile robot to its destination in unknown environments. The A* algorithm is modified to handle a map containing unknown information. Based on it, optimal (discrete) paths are incrementally generated with a periodically updated map. Next, accelerations in varying velocities are taken into account in predicting the robot pose and the robot trajectory resulting from a motion command. Obstacle constraints are transformed to suitable velocity limits so that the robot can move as fast as possible while avoiding collisions when needed. Then, to trace the discrete path, the system searches for a waypoint-directed optimized motion in a reduced 1-D translation or rotation velocity space. Various situations of navigation are dealt with by using different strategies rather than a single objective function. Extensive simulations and experiments verified the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  18. Label-Assisted Mass Spectrometry for the Acceleration of Reaction Discovery and Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Pardo, Jaime R.; Chai, David I.; Liu, Song; Mrksich, Milan; Kozmin, Sergey A.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new reactions expands our knowledge of chemical reactivity and enables new synthetic applications. Accelerating the pace of this discovery process remains challenging. We describe a highly effective and simple platform for screening a large number of potential chemical reactions in order to discover and optimize previously unknown catalytic transformations thereby revealing new chemical reactivity. Our strategy is based on labeling one of the reactants with a polyaromatic chemical tag, which selectively undergoes photoionization-desorption process upon laser irradiation without the assistance of an external matrix and enables rapid mass spectrometric detection of any products originating from such labeled reactants in complex reaction mixtures without any chromatographic separation. This method was successfully employed for high-throughput discovery and subsequent optimization of two previously unknown benzannulation reactions. PMID:23609094

  19. Orally Administered Berberine Modulates Hepatic Lipid Metabolism by Altering Microbial Bile Acid Metabolism and the Intestinal FXR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Runbin; Yang, Na; Kong, Bo; Cao, Bei; Feng, Dong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Ge, Chun; Huang, Jingqiu; Shen, Jianliang; Wang, Pei; Feng, Siqi; Fei, Fei; Guo, Jiahua; He, Jun; Aa, Nan; Chen, Qiang; Pan, Yang; Schumacher, Justin D; Yang, Chung S; Guo, Grace L; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies suggest that the lipid-lowering effect of berberine (BBR) involves actions on the low-density lipoprotein receptor and the AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. However, the implication of these mechanisms is unclear because of the low bioavailability of BBR. Because the main action site of BBR is the gut and intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of lipid metabolism, we hypothesized that the effects of BBR on intestinal FXR signaling pathway might account for its pharmacological effectiveness. Using wild type (WT) and intestine-specific FXR knockout (FXR(int-/-)) mice, we found that BBR prevented the development of high-fat-diet-induced obesity and ameliorated triglyceride accumulation in livers of WT, but not FXR(int-/-) mice. BBR increased conjugated bile acids in serum and their excretion in feces. Furthermore, BBR inhibited bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity in gut microbiota, and significantly increased the levels of tauro-conjugated bile acids, especially tauro-cholic acid(TCA), in the intestine. Both BBR and TCA treatment activated the intestinal FXR pathway and reduced the expression of fatty-acid translocase Cd36 in the liver. These results indicate that BBR may exert its lipid-lowering effect primarily in the gut by modulating the turnover of bile acids and subsequently the ileal FXR signaling pathway. In summary, we provide the first evidence to suggest a new mechanism of BBR action in the intestine that involves, sequentially, inhibiting BSH, elevating TCA, and activating FXR, which lead to the suppression of hepatic expression of Cd36 that results in reduced uptake of long-chain fatty acids in the liver.

  20. Tuberatolides, potent FXR antagonists from the Korean marine tunicate Botryllus tuberatus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyukjae; Hwang, Hoosang; Chin, Jungwook; Kim, Euno; Lee, Jaehwan; Nam, Sang-Jip; Lee, Byoung Chan; Rho, Boon Jo; Kang, Heonjoong

    2011-01-28

    One isoprenoid, tuberatolide A (1), meroterpenoids tuberatolide B (2) and 2'-epi-tuberatolide B (3), and the known meroterpenoids yezoquinolide (4), (R)-sargachromenol (5), and (S)-sargachromenol (6) were isolated from the Korean marine tunicate Botryllus tuberatus. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by NMR, MS, and CD spectroscopic analyses. These terpenoids antagonized the chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA)-activated human farnesoid X receptor (hFXR) in a cell-based co-transfection assay with IC(50) values as low as 1.5 μM without significant effect on steroid receptors. Furthermore, they released the co-activator peptide from the CDCA-bound hFXR ligand binding domain in cell-free surface plasmon resonance experiments.

  1. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  2. Detailed design optimization of the MITICA negative ion accelerator in view of the ITER NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostinetti, P.; Aprile, D.; Antoni, V.; Cavenago, M.; Chitarin, G.; de Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Gambetta, G.; Hemsworth, R. S.; Kashiwagi, M.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pilan, N.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Singh, M.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Toigo, V.; Veltri, P.; Zaccaria, P.

    2016-01-01

    The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (PRIMA) is presently under construction at Consorzio RFX (Padova, Italy). PRIMA includes two experimental devices: an ITER-size ion source with low voltage extraction, called SPIDER, and the full prototype of the whole ITER Heating Neutral Beams (HNBs), called MITICA. The purpose of MITICA is to demonstrate that all operational parameters of the ITER HNB accelerator can be experimentally achieved, thus establishing a large step forward in the performances of neutral beam injectors in comparison with the present experimental devices. The design of the MITICA extractor and accelerator grids, here described in detail, was developed using an integrated approach, taking into consideration at the same time all the relevant physics and engineering aspects. Particular care was taken also to support and validate the design on the basis of the expertise and experimental data made available by the collaborating neutral beam laboratories of CEA, IPP, CCFE, NIFS and JAEA. Considering the operational requirements and the other physics constraints of the ITER HNBs, the whole design has been thoroughly optimized and improved. Furthermore, specific innovative concepts have been introduced.

  3. Optimization of accelerator parameters using normal form methods on high-order transfer maps

    SciTech Connect

    Snopok, Pavel

    2007-05-01

    Methods of analysis of the dynamics of ensembles of charged particles in collider rings are developed. The following problems are posed and solved using normal form transformations and other methods of perturbative nonlinear dynamics: (1) Optimization of the Tevatron dynamics: (a) Skew quadrupole correction of the dynamics of particles in the Tevatron in the presence of the systematic skew quadrupole errors in dipoles; (b) Calculation of the nonlinear tune shift with amplitude based on the results of measurements and the linear lattice information; (2) Optimization of the Muon Collider storage ring: (a) Computation and optimization of the dynamic aperture of the Muon Collider 50 x 50 GeV storage ring using higher order correctors; (b) 750 x 750 GeV Muon Collider storage ring lattice design matching the Tevatron footprint. The normal form coordinates have a very important advantage over the particle optical coordinates: if the transformation can be carried out successfully (general restrictions for that are not much stronger than the typical restrictions imposed on the behavior of the particles in the accelerator) then the motion in the new coordinates has a very clean representation allowing to extract more information about the dynamics of particles, and they are very convenient for the purposes of visualization. All the problem formulations include the derivation of the objective functions, which are later used in the optimization process using various optimization algorithms. Algorithms used to solve the problems are specific to collider rings, and applicable to similar problems arising on other machines of the same type. The details of the long-term behavior of the systems are studied to ensure the their stability for the desired number of turns. The algorithm of the normal form transformation is of great value for such problems as it gives much extra information about the disturbing factors. In addition to the fact that the dynamics of particles is represented

  4. Accelerated Simplified Swarm Optimization with Exploitation Search Scheme for Data Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Wei-Chang; Lai, Chyh-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Data clustering is commonly employed in many disciplines. The aim of clustering is to partition a set of data into clusters, in which objects within the same cluster are similar and dissimilar to other objects that belong to different clusters. Over the past decade, the evolutionary algorithm has been commonly used to solve clustering problems. This study presents a novel algorithm based on simplified swarm optimization, an emerging population-based stochastic optimization approach with the advantages of simplicity, efficiency, and flexibility. This approach combines variable vibrating search (VVS) and rapid centralized strategy (RCS) in dealing with clustering problem. VVS is an exploitation search scheme that can refine the quality of solutions by searching the extreme points nearby the global best position. RCS is developed to accelerate the convergence rate of the algorithm by using the arithmetic average. To empirically evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, experiments are examined using 12 benchmark datasets, and corresponding results are compared with recent works. Results of statistical analysis indicate that the proposed algorithm is competitive in terms of the quality of solutions. PMID:26348483

  5. Optimization by response surface methodology of lutein recovery from paprika leaves using accelerated solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Suna; Moon, BoKyung

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we used response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the extraction conditions for recovering lutein from paprika leaves using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The lutein content was quantitatively analyzed using a UPLC equipped with a BEH C18 column. A central composite design (CCD) was employed for experimental design to obtain the optimized combination of extraction temperature (°C), static time (min), and solvent (EtOH, %). The experimental data obtained from a twenty sample set were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis. The adjusted coefficient of determination (R(2)) for the lutein extraction model was 0.9518, and the probability value (p=0.0000) demonstrated a high significance for the regression model. The optimum extraction conditions for lutein were temperature: 93.26°C, static time: 5 min, and solvent: 79.63% EtOH. Under these conditions, the predicted extraction yield of lutein was 232.60 μg/g.

  6. Dissociation of Intestinal and Hepatic Activities of FXR and LXRα Supports Metabolic Effects of Terminal Ileum Interposition in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Renga, Barbara; D’Amore, Claudio; Santorelli, Chiara; Graziosi, Luigina; Bruno, Angela; Monti, Maria Chiara; Distrutti, Eleonora; Cipriani, Sabrina; Donini, Annibale; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the liver x receptors (LXRs) are bile acid–activated receptors that are highly expressed in the enterohepatic tissues. The mechanisms that support the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery are only partially defined. We have investigated the effects of ileal interposition (IT), a surgical relocation of the distal ileum into the proximal jejunum, on FXR and LXRs in rats. Seven months after surgery, blood concentrations of total bile acids, taurocholic acid, an FXR ligand, and taurohyocholic acid, an LXRα ligand, were significantly increased by IT (P < 0.05). In contrast, liver and intestinal concentrations of conjugated and nonconjugated bile acids were decreased (P < 0.05). These changes were associated with a robust induction of FXR and FXR-regulated genes in the intestine, including Fgf15, a negative regulator of bile acid synthesis. IT repressed the liver expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck), two gluconeogenetic genes, along with the expression of LXRα and its target genes sterol regulatory element-binding protein (Srebp) 1c and fatty acid synthase (Fas) in the liver. Treating IT rats with chenodeoxycholic acid ameliorated insulin signaling in the liver. Whether confirmed in human settings, these results support the association of pharmacological therapies with bariatric surgeries to exploit the selective activation of intestinal nuclear receptors. PMID:23835330

  7. Pharmacophore-based discovery of FXR-agonists. Part II: identification of bioactive triterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Grienke, Ulrike; Mihály-Bison, Judit; Schuster, Daniela; Afonyushkin, Taras; Binder, Markus; Guan, Shu-hong; Cheng, Chun-ru; Wolber, Gerhard; Stuppner, Hermann; Guo, De-an; Bochkov, Valery N; Rollinger, Judith M

    2011-11-15

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belonging to the metabolic subfamily of nuclear receptors is a ligand-induced transcriptional activator. Its central function is the physiological maintenance of bile acid homeostasis including the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. Accessible structural information about its ligand-binding domain renders FXR an attractive target for in silico approaches. Integrated to natural product research these computational tools assist to find novel bioactive compounds showing beneficial effects in prevention and treatment of, for example, the metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and type 2 diabetes. Virtual screening experiments of our in-house Chinese Herbal Medicine database with structure-based pharmacophore models, previously generated and validated, revealed mainly lanostane-type triterpenes of the TCM fungus Ganoderma lucidum Karst. as putative FXR ligands. To verify the prediction of the in silico approach, two Ganoderma fruit body extracts and compounds isolated thereof were pharmacologically investigated. Pronounced FXR-inducing effects were observed for the extracts at a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Intriguingly, five lanostanes out of 25 secondary metabolites from G. lucidum, that is, ergosterol peroxide (2), lucidumol A (11), ganoderic acid TR (12), ganodermanontriol (13), and ganoderiol F (14), dose-dependently induced FXR in the low micromolar range in a reporter gene assay. To rationalize the binding interactions, additional pharmacophore profiling and molecular docking studies were performed, which allowed establishing a first structure-activity relationship of the investigated triterpenes.

  8. The region of CQQQKPQRRP of PGC-1{alpha} interacts with the DNA-binding complex of FXR/RXR{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaya, Eiko; Jingami, Hisato . E-mail: jingami@mfour.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-04-14

    PGC-1{alpha} co-activates transcription by several nuclear receptors. To study the interaction among PGC-1{alpha}, RXR{alpha}/FXR, and DNA, we performed electrophoresis mobility shift assays. The RXR{alpha}/FXR proteins specifically bound to DNA containing the IR-1 sequence in the absence of ligand. When the fusion protein of GST-PGC-1{alpha} was added to the mixture of RXR{alpha}/FXR/DNA, the ligand-influenced retardation of the mobility was observed. The ligand for RXR{alpha} (9-cis-retinoic acid) was necessary for this retardation, whereas, the ligand for FXR, chenodeoxycholic acid, barely had an effect. The results obtained using truncated PGC-1{alpha} proteins suggested that two regions are necessary for PGC-1{alpha} to interact with the DNA-binding complex of RXR{alpha}/FXR. One is the region of the second leucine-rich motif, and the other is that of the amino acid sequence CQQQKPQRRP, present between the second and third leucine-rich motifs. The results obtained with the SPQSS mutation for KPQRR suggested that the basic amino acids are important for the interaction.

  9. RNA-Binding Protein FXR1 Regulates p21 and TERC RNA to Bypass p53-Mediated Cellular Senescence in OSCC

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mrinmoyee; House, Reniqua; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Qie, Shuo; Day, Terrence A.; Neskey, David; Diehl, J. Alan

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBP) regulate numerous aspects of co- and post-transcriptional gene expression in cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that RBP, fragile X-related protein 1 (FXR1), plays an essential role in cellular senescence by utilizing mRNA turnover pathway. We report that overexpressed FXR1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma targets (G-quadruplex (G4) RNA structure within) both mRNA encoding p21 (Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A, Cip1) and the non-coding RNA Telomerase RNA Component (TERC), and regulates their turnover to avoid senescence. Silencing of FXR1 in cancer cells triggers the activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors, p53, increases DNA damage, and ultimately, cellular senescence. Overexpressed FXR1 binds and destabilizes p21 mRNA, subsequently reduces p21 protein expression in oral cancer cells. In addition, FXR1 also binds and stabilizes TERC RNA and suppresses the cellular senescence possibly through telomerase activity. Finally, we report that FXR1-regulated senescence is irreversible and FXR1-depleted cells fail to form colonies to re-enter cellular proliferation. Collectively, FXR1 displays a novel mechanism of controlling the expression of p21 through p53-dependent manner to bypass cellular senescence in oral cancer cells. PMID:27606879

  10. Accelerated testing of an optimized closing system for automotive fuel tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligor, A.; Ilie, S.; Nicolae, V.; Mitran, G.

    2015-11-01

    Taking into account the legal prescriptions which are in force and the new regulatory requirements that will be mandatory to implement in the near future regarding testing characteristics of automotive fuel tanks, resulted the necessity to develop a new testing methodology which allows to estimate the behaviour of the closing system of automotive fuel tank over a long period of time (10-15 years). Thus, were designed and conducted accelerated tests under extreme assembling and testing conditions (high values for initial tightening torques, extreme values of temperature and pressure). In this paper are presented two of durability tests which were performed on an optimized closing system of fuel tank: (i) the test of exposure to temperature with cyclical variation and (ii) the test of continuous exposure to elevated temperature. In these experimental tests have been used main components of the closing system manufactured of two materials variants, both based on the polyoxymethylene, material that provides higher mechanical stiffness and strength in a wide temperature range, as well as showing increased resistance to the action of chemical agents and fuels. The tested sample included a total of 16 optimized locking systems, 8 of each of 2 versions of material. Over deploying the experiments were determined various parameters such as: the initial tightening torque, the tightening torque at different time points during measurements, the residual tightening torque, defects occurred in the system components (fissures, cracks, ruptures), the sealing conditions of system at the beginning and at the end of test. Based on obtained data were plotted the time evolution diagrams of considered parameter (the residual tightening torque of the system consisting of locking nut and threaded ring), in different temperature conditions, becoming possible to make pertinent assessments on the choice between the two types of materials. By conducting these tests and interpreting the

  11. Advanced Simulation and Optimization Tools for Dynamic Aperture of Non-scaling FFAGs and Accelerators including Modern User Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.; Makino, Kyoko; Berz, Martin; Johnstone, C.

    2010-09-01

    With the U.S. experimental effort in HEP largely located at laboratories supporting the operations of large, highly specialized accelerators, colliding beam facilities, and detector facilities, the understanding and prediction of high energy particle accelerators becomes critical to the success, overall, of the DOE HEP program. One area in which small businesses can contribute to the ongoing success of the U.S. program in HEP is through innovations in computer techniques and sophistication in the modeling of high-energy accelerators. Accelerator modeling at these facilities is performed by experts with the product generally highly specific and representative only of in-house accelerators or special-interest accelerator problems. Development of new types of accelerators like FFAGs with their wide choices of parameter modifications, complicated fields, and the simultaneous need to efficiently handle very large emittance beams requires the availability of new simulation environments to assure predictability in operation. In this, ease of use and interfaces are critical to realizing a successful model, or optimization of a new design or working parameters of machines. In Phase I, various core modules for the design and analysis of FFAGs were developed and Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) have been investigated instead of the more general yet less easily manageable console-type output COSY provides.

  12. Accelerated parameter identification in a 3D marine biogeochemical model using surrogate-based optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieß, M.; Piwonski, J.; Koziel, S.; Oschlies, A.; Slawig, T.

    2013-08-01

    We present the application of the Surrogate-based Optimization (SBO) method on a parameter identification problem for a 3-D biogeochemical model. SBO is a method for acceleration of optimization processes when the underlying model itself is of very high computational complexity. In these cases, coupled simulation runs require large amounts of computer time, where optimization runs may become unfeasible even with high-performance hardware. As a consequence, the key idea of SBO is to replace the original and computationally expensive (high-fidelity) model by a so-called surrogate, which is created from a less accurate but computationally cheaper (low-fidelity) model and a suitable correction approach to increase its accuracy. To date, the SBO approach has been widely and successfully used in engineering applications and also for parameter identification in a 1-D marine ecosystem model of NPZD type. In this paper, we apply the approach onto a two-component biogeochemical model. The model is spun-up into a steady seasonal cycle via the Transport Matrix Approach. The low-fidelity model we use consists of a reduced number of spin-up iterations (several decades instead of millennia used for the original model). A multiplicative correction operator is further exploited to extrapolate the rather inaccurate low-fidelity model onto the original one. This corrected model builds our surrogate. We validate this SBO method by twin-experiments that use synthetic observations generated by the original model. We motivate our choice of the low-fidelity model and the multiplicative correction and discuss the computational advantage of SBO in comparison to an expensive parameter optimization in the context of the high-fidelity model. The proposed SBO technique is shown to yield a solution close to the target at a significant gain of computational efficiency. Without further regularization techniques, the method is able to identify most model parameters. The method is simple to

  13. Accelerated barrier optimization compressed sensing (ABOCS) for CT reconstruction with improved convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Tianye; Ye, Xiaojing; Fruhauf, Quentin; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-01

    Recently, we proposed a new algorithm of accelerated barrier optimization compressed sensing (ABOCS) for iterative CT reconstruction. The previous implementation of ABOCS uses gradient projection (GP) with a Barzilai-Borwein (BB) step-size selection scheme (GP-BB) to search for the optimal solution. The algorithm does not converge stably due to its non-monotonic behavior. In this paper, we further improve the convergence of ABOCS using the unknown-parameter Nesterov (UPN) method and investigate the ABOCS reconstruction performance on clinical patient data. Comparison studies are carried out on reconstructions of computer simulation, a physical phantom and a head-and-neck patient. In all of these studies, the ABOCS results using UPN show more stable and faster convergence than those of the GP-BB method and a state-of-the-art Bregman-type method. As shown in the simulation study of the Shepp-Logan phantom, UPN achieves the same image quality as those of GP-BB and the Bregman-type methods, but reduces the iteration numbers by up to 50% and 90%, respectively. In the Catphan©600 phantom study, a high-quality image with relative reconstruction error (RRE) less than 3% compared to the full-view result is obtained using UPN with 17% projections (60 views). In the conventional filtered-backprojection reconstruction, the corresponding RRE is more than 15% on the same projection data. The superior performance of ABOCS with the UPN implementation is further demonstrated on the head-and-neck patient. Using 25% projections (91 views), the proposed method reduces the RRE from 21% as in the filtered backprojection (FBP) results to 7.3%. In conclusion, we propose UPN for ABOCS implementation. As compared to GP-BB and the Bregman-type methods, the new method significantly improves the convergence with higher stability and fewer iterations.

  14. Accelerated barrier optimization compressed sensing (ABOCS) for CT reconstruction with improved convergence

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Tianye; Ye, Xiaojing; Fruhauf, Quentin; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we proposed a new algorithm of accelerated barrier optimization compressed sensing (ABOCS) for iterative CT reconstruction. The previous implementation of ABOCS uses gradient projection (GP) with a Barzilai-Borwein (BB) step-size selection scheme (GP-BB) to search for the optimal solution. The algorithm does not converge stably due to its non-monotonic behavior. In this paper, we further improve the convergence of ABOCS using the unknown-parameter Nesterov (UPN) method and investigate the ABOCS reconstruction performance on clinical patient data. Comparison studies are carried out on reconstructions of computer simulation, a physical phantom and a head-and-neck patient. In all of these studies, the ABOCS results using UPN show more stable and faster convergence than those of the GPBB method and a state-of-the-art Bregman-type method. As shown in the simulation study of the Shepp-Logan phantom, UPN achieves the same image quality as those of GPBB and the Bregman-type method, but reduces the iteration numbers by up to 50% and 90%, respectively. In the Catphan©600 phantom study, a high-quality image with relative reconstruction error (RRE) less than 3% compared to the full-view result is obtained using UPN with 17% projections (60 views). In the conventional filtered-backprojection (FBP) reconstruction, the corresponding RRE is more than 15% on the same projection data. The superior performance of ABOCS with the UPN implementation is further demonstrated on the head-and-neck patient. Using 25% projections (91 views), the proposed method reduces the RRE from 21% as in the FBP results to 7.3%. In conclusion, we propose UPN for ABOCS implementation. As compared to GPBB and the Bregman-type methods, the new method significantly improves the convergence with higher stability and less iterations. PMID:24625411

  15. Pulmonary acceleration time to optimize the timing of lung transplant in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Damy, Thibaud; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Boelle, Pierre-Yves; Cracowski, Claire; Murris-Espin, Marlène; Nove-Josserand, Raphaele; Stremler, Nathalie; Simon, Tabassome; Adnot, Serge; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may affect survival in cystic fibrosis (CF) and can be assessed on echocardiographic measurement of the pulmonary acceleration time (PAT). The study aimed at evaluating PAT as a tool to optimize timing of lung transplant in CF patients. Prospective multicenter longitudinal study of patients with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) ≤60% predicted. Echocardiography, spirometry and nocturnal oximetry were obtained as part of the routine evaluation. We included 67 patients (mean FEV1 42±12% predicted), among whom 8 underwent lung transplantation during the mean follow-up of 19±6 months. No patients died. PAT was determined in all patients and correlated negatively with systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP, r=-0.36, P=0.01). Patients in the lowest PAT tertile (<101 ms) had lower FEV1 and worse nocturnal oxygen saturation, and they were more often on the lung transplant waiting list compared to patients in the other tertiles. Kaplan-Meier curves showed a shorter time to lung transplantation in the lowest PAT tertile (P<0.001) but not in patients with sPAP>35 mmHg. By multivariate analysis, FEV(1)and nocturnal desaturation were the main determinants of reduced PAT. A PAT<101 ms reduction is a promising tool for timing of lung transplantation in CF.

  16. Dose optimization for the MRI-accelerator: IMRT in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Hårdemark, B.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Raaijmakers, C. P. J.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2007-12-01

    A combined system of a 6 MV linear accelerator and a 1.5 T MRI scanner is currently being developed. In this system, the patient will be irradiated in the presence of a 1.5 T magnetic field. This causes a strong dose increase at tissue-air interfaces. Around air cavities in the patient, these effects may become problematic. Homogeneous dose distributions can be obtained around regularly shaped symmetrical cavities using opposing beams. However, for more irregularly shaped cavities this approach may not be sufficient. This study will investigate whether IMRT can be used to cope with magnetic field dose effects, in particular for target volumes adjacent to irregularly shaped air cavities. Therefore, an inverse treatment planning approach has been designed based on pre-calculated beamlet dose distribution kernels. Using this approach, optimized dose distributions were calculated for B = 1.5 T and for B = 0 T. Investigated target sites include a prostate cancer, a laryngeal cancer and an oropharyngeal cancer. Differences in the dose distribution between B = 0 and 1.5 T were minimal; only the skin dose increased for B = 1.5 T. Homogeneous dose distributions were obtained for target structures adjacent to air cavities without the use of opposing beams. These results show that a 1.5 T magnetic field does not compromise the ability to achieve desired dose distributions with IMRT.

  17. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Burlon, A A; Kreiner, A J; Valda, A A; Minsky, D M

    2004-11-01

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon, and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases.

  18. Acceleration of the Geostatistical Software Library (GSLIB) by code optimization and hybrid parallel programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peredo, Oscar; Ortiz, Julián M.; Herrero, José R.

    2015-12-01

    The Geostatistical Software Library (GSLIB) has been used in the geostatistical community for more than thirty years. It was designed as a bundle of sequential Fortran codes, and today it is still in use by many practitioners and researchers. Despite its widespread use, few attempts have been reported in order to bring this package to the multi-core era. Using all CPU resources, GSLIB algorithms can handle large datasets and grids, where tasks are compute- and memory-intensive applications. In this work, a methodology is presented to accelerate GSLIB applications using code optimization and hybrid parallel processing, specifically for compute-intensive applications. Minimal code modifications are added decreasing as much as possible the elapsed time of execution of the studied routines. If multi-core processing is available, the user can activate OpenMP directives to speed up the execution using all resources of the CPU. If multi-node processing is available, the execution is enhanced using MPI messages between the compute nodes.Four case studies are presented: experimental variogram calculation, kriging estimation, sequential gaussian and indicator simulation. For each application, three scenarios (small, large and extra large) are tested using a desktop environment with 4 CPU-cores and a multi-node server with 128 CPU-nodes. Elapsed times, speedup and efficiency results are shown.

  19. Pulmonary acceleration time to optimize the timing of lung transplant in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Damy, Thibaud; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Boelle, Pierre-Yves; Cracowski, Claire; Murris-Espin, Marlène; Nove-Josserand, Raphaele; Stremler, Nathalie; Simon, Tabassome; Adnot, Serge; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may affect survival in cystic fibrosis (CF) and can be assessed on echocardiographic measurement of the pulmonary acceleration time (PAT). The study aimed at evaluating PAT as a tool to optimize timing of lung transplant in CF patients. Prospective multicenter longitudinal study of patients with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) ≤60% predicted. Echocardiography, spirometry and nocturnal oximetry were obtained as part of the routine evaluation. We included 67 patients (mean FEV1 42±12% predicted), among whom 8 underwent lung transplantation during the mean follow-up of 19±6 months. No patients died. PAT was determined in all patients and correlated negatively with systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP, r=–0.36, P=0.01). Patients in the lowest PAT tertile (<101 ms) had lower FEV1 and worse nocturnal oxygen saturation, and they were more often on the lung transplant waiting list compared to patients in the other tertiles. Kaplan–Meier curves showed a shorter time to lung transplantation in the lowest PAT tertile (P<0.001) but not in patients with sPAP>35 mmHg. By multivariate analysis, FEV1and nocturnal desaturation were the main determinants of reduced PAT. A PAT<101 ms reduction is a promising tool for timing of lung transplantation in CF. PMID:22558523

  20. Optimization of Beam Injection Into the First Accelerating Module at TTF With Cavity Dipole Mode Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, N.; Kreps, G.; Schlarb, H.; Wendt, M.; Frisch, J.; McCormick, D.; Ross, M.; Smith, T.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.G.; /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-04-10

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is a user facility for intense VUV-FEL light. The facility is densely equipped with diagnostics, essential in obtaining the necessary beam parameters, in particular the low emittance. However there is no dedicated component for alignment of the beam in the accelerating modules, each containing eight superconducting cavities. Large beam offsets can lead to an increase of the beam emittance. The centering of the beam in these modules is therefore important, mostly at the low energy end. A misalignment of the first TTF module with respect to the gun axis has already been observed using cavity dipole modes. This paper presents the experimental results of the optimization of the beam injection into the first module, based on the monitoring of dipole modes through the couplers installed for wakefield damping. For this we use a spectrum analyzer together with a multiplexer. By scanning the beam position and tilt with two pairs of steerers, we can find the trajectory which minimizes the dipole modes amplitude. The impact of the beam steering in the module on the beam is discussed. A time domain setup is also being presented.

  1. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  2. Chenodeoxycholic acid, an endogenous FXR ligand alters adipokines and reverses insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Shihabudeen, Mohamed Sham; Roy, Debasish; James, Joel; Thirumurugan, Kavitha

    2015-10-15

    Adipose tissue secretes adipokines that regulate insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and other peripheral tissues critical to glucose metabolism. Insulin resistance is associated with severe alterations in adipokines characterized by release of increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased anti-inflammatory cytokines from adipose tissue. The role of Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation on adipokines in relation to adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance is not completely explored. For the first time, we have evaluated the ability of Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), an endogenous FXR ligand, in restoring the disturbance in adipokine secretion and insulin resistance in palmitate treated 3T3-L1 cells and adipose tissues of High fat diet (HFD) rats. CDCA suppressed several of the tested pro-inflammatory adipokines (TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-6, Chemerin, PAI, RBP4, resistin, vaspin), and enhanced the major anti-inflammatory and insulin sensitizing adipokines (adiponectin, leptin). CDCA suppressed the activation of critical inflammatory regulators such as NF-κB and IKKβ which are activated by palmitate treatment in differentiated cells and HFD in rats. We show the altered adipokines in insulin resistance, its association with inflammatory regulators, and the role of CDCA in amelioration of insulin resistance by modulation of adipokines.

  3. FXR agonist obeticholic acid reduces hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a rat model of toxic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, Len; Mannaerts, Inge; Schierwagen, Robert; Govaere, Olivier; Klein, Sabine; Vander Elst, Ingrid; Windmolders, Petra; Farre, Ricard; Wenes, Mathias; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Nevens, Frederik; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Trebicka, Jonel; Laleman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic inflammation drives hepatic stellate cells (HSC), resulting in liver fibrosis. The Farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) antagonizes inflammation through NF-κB inhibition. We investigated preventive and therapeutic effects of FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) on hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in toxic cirrhotic rats. Cirrhosis was induced by thioacetamide (TAA) intoxication. OCA was given during or after intoxication with vehicle-treated rats as controls. At sacrifice, fibrosis, hemodynamic and biochemical parameters were assessed. HSC activation, cell turn-over, hepatic NF-κB activation, pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines were determined. The effect of OCA was further evaluated in isolated HSC, Kupffer cells, hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). OCA decreased hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis during TAA-administration and reversed fibrosis in established cirrhosis. Portal pressure decreased through reduced intrahepatic vascular resistance. This was paralleled by decreased expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines (transforming growth-factor β, connective tissue growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor) as well as markers of hepatic cell turn-over, by blunting effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). In vitro, OCA inhibited both LSEC and Kupffer cell activation; while HSC remained unaffected. This related to NF-κB inhibition via up-regulated IκBα. In conclusion, OCA inhibits hepatic inflammation in toxic cirrhotic rats resulting in decreased HSC activation and fibrosis. PMID:27634375

  4. Use of marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) for accelerated 2D MRI relaxometry and diffusometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamini, Dan; Basser, Peter J.

    2016-10-01

    Measuring multidimensional (e.g., 2D) relaxation spectra in NMR and MRI clinical applications is a holy grail of the porous media and biomedical MR communities. The main bottleneck is the inversion of Fredholm integrals of the first kind, an ill-conditioned problem requiring large amounts of data to stabilize a solution. We suggest a novel experimental design and processing framework to accelerate and improve the reconstruction of such 2D spectra that uses a priori information from the 1D projections of spectra, or marginal distributions. These 1D marginal distributions provide powerful constraints when 2D spectra are reconstructed, and their estimation requires an order of magnitude less data than a conventional 2D approach. This marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) methodology is demonstrated here with a polyvinylpyrrolidone-water phantom that has 3 distinct peaks in the 2D D-T1 space. The stability, sensitivity to experimental parameters, and accuracy of this new approach are compared with conventional methods by serially subsampling the full data set. While the conventional, unconstrained approach performed poorly, the new method had proven to be highly accurate and robust, only requiring a fraction of the data. Additionally, synthetic T1 -T2 data are presented to explore the effects of noise on the estimations, and the performance of the proposed method with a smooth and realistic 2D spectrum. The proposed framework is quite general and can also be used with a variety of 2D MRI experiments (D-T2,T1 -T2, D -D, etc.), making these potentially feasible for preclinical and even clinical applications for the first time.

  5. Optimization of magnetically accelerated, ultra-high velocity aluminum flyer plates for use in plate impact, shock wave experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Knudson, Marcus D.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Lemke, Raymond William; Davis, J. P.; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Giunta, Anthony Andrew; Bliss, David Emery

    2005-05-01

    The intense magnetic field produced by the 20 MA Z accelerator is used as an impulsive pressure source to accelerate metal flyer plates to high velocity for the purpose of performing plate impact, shock wave experiments. This capability has been significantly enhanced by the recently developed pulse shaping capability of Z, which enables tailoring the rise time to peak current for a specific material and drive pressure to avoid shock formation within the flyer plate during acceleration. Consequently, full advantage can be taken of the available current to achieve the maximum possible magnetic drive pressure. In this way, peak magnetic drive pressures up to 490 GPa have been produced, which shocklessly accelerated 850 {micro}m aluminum (6061-T6) flyer plates to peak velocities of 34 km/s. We discuss magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that are used to optimize the magnetic pressure for a given flyer load and to determine the shape of the current rise time that precludes shock formation within the flyer during acceleration to peak velocity. In addition, we present results pertaining to plate impact, shock wave experiments in which the aluminum flyer plates were magnetically accelerated across a vacuum gap and impacted z-cut, {alpha}-quartz targets. Accurate measurements of resulting quartz shock velocities are presented and analyzed through high-fidelity MHD simulations enhanced using optimization techniques. Results show that a fraction of the flyer remains at solid density at impact, that the fraction of material at solid density decreases with increasing magnetic pressure, and that the observed abrupt decrease in the quartz shock velocity is well correlated with the melt transition in the aluminum flyer.

  6. Numerically optimized structures for dielectric asymmetric dual-grating laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Aimidula, A.; Bake, M. A.; Wan, F.; Xie, B. S.; Welsch, C. P.; Xia, G.; Mete, O.; Uesaka, M.; Matsumura, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Koyama, K.

    2014-02-15

    Optical scale dielectric structures are promising candidates to realize future compact, low cost particle accelerators, since they can sustain high acceleration gradients in the range of GeV/m. Here, we present numerical simulation results for a dielectric asymmetric dual-grating accelerator. It was found that the asymmetric dual-grating structures can efficiently modify the laser field to synchronize it with relativistic electrons, therefore increasing the average acceleration gradient by ∼10% in comparison to symmetric structures. The optimum pillar height which was determined by simulation agrees well with that estimated analytically. The effect of the initial kinetic energy of injected electrons on the acceleration gradient is also discussed. Finally, the required laser parameters were calculated analytically and a suitable laser is proposed as energy source.

  7. Pharmacophore modeling, 3D-QSAR and molecular docking studies of benzimidazole derivatives as potential FXR agonists.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Thangaraj; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2014-08-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Atom-based three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models were developed for a series of 48 benzimidazole-based agonists of FXR. A total of five pharmacophore hypotheses were generated based on the survival score to build QSAR models. HHHRR was considered as a best model that consisted of three hydrophobic features (H) and two aromatic rings (R). The best hypothesis, HHHRR yielded a 3D-QSAR model with good statistical value (R(2)) of 0.8974 for a training set of 39 compounds and also showed good predictive power with correlation coefficient (Q(2)) of 0.7559 for a test set of nine compounds. Furthermore, molecular docking simulation was performed to understand the binding affinity of 48 benzimidazole-based compounds against the active site of human FXR protein. Docking results revealed that both the most active and least active compounds showed similar binding mode to the experimentally observed binding mode of co-crystallized ligand. The generated 3D contour maps revealed the structure activity relationship of the compounds. Substitution effects at different positions of benzimidazole derivatives would lead to the discovery of new agonists against human FXR protein.

  8. Plakophilins 1 and 3 Bind to FXR1 and Thereby Influence the mRNA Stability of Desmosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Kešo, Regina; Breuninger, Sonja; Hofmann, Sarah; Henn, Manuela; Röhrig, Theresa; Ströbel, Philipp; Stoecklin, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilins 1 and 3 (PKP1/3) are members of the arm repeat family of catenin proteins and serve as structural components of desmosomes, which are important for cell-cell-adhesion. In addition, PKP1/3 occur as soluble proteins outside desmosomes, yet their role in the cytoplasm is not known. We found that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 coprecipitated with the RNA-binding proteins FXR1, G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1, and these PKP1/3 complexes also comprised desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNAs. Moreover, we showed that the interaction of PKP1/3 with G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1 but not with FXR1 was RNase sensitive. To address the cytoplasmic function of PKP1/3, we performed gain-and-loss-of-function studies. Both PKP1 and PKP3 knockdown cell lines showed reduced protein and mRNA levels for desmoplakin and PKP2. Whereas global rates of translation were unaffected, desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNA were destabilized. Furthermore, binding of PKP1/3 to FXR1 was RNA independent, and both PKP3 and FXR1 stabilized PKP2 mRNA. Our results demonstrate that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 are components of mRNA ribonucleoprotein particles and act as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. PMID:25225333

  9. Activated FXR Inhibits Leptin Signaling and Counteracts Tumor-promoting Activities of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in Breast Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Cinzia; Barone, Ines; Vircillo, Valentina; Panza, Salvatore; Malivindi, Rocco; Gelsomino, Luca; Pellegrino, Michele; Rago, Vittoria; Mauro, Loredana; Lanzino, Marilena; Panno, Maria Luisa; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Catalano, Stefania; Andò, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the principal components of the tumor stroma, play a central role in cancer development and progression. As an important regulator of the crosstalk between breast cancer cells and CAFs, the cytokine leptin has been associated to breast carcinogenesis. The nuclear Farnesoid X Receptor-(FXR) seems to exert an oncosuppressive role in different tumors, including breast cancer. Herein, we demonstrated, for the first time, that the synthetic FXR agonist GW4064, inhibiting leptin signaling, affects the tumor-promoting activities of CAFs in breast malignancy. GW4064 inhibited growth, motility and invasiveness induced by leptin as well as by CAF-conditioned media in different breast cancer cell lines. These effects rely on the ability of activated FXR to increase the expression of the suppressor of the cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) leading to inhibition of leptin-activated signaling and downregulation of leptin-target genes. In vivo xenograft studies, using MCF-7 cells alone or co-injected with CAFs, showed that GW4064 administration markedly reduced tumor growth. Interestingly, GW4064-treated tumors exhibited decreased levels of leptin-regulated proteins along with a strong staining intensity for SOCS3. Thus, FXR ligands might represent an emerging potential anti-cancer therapy able to block the tumor supportive role of activated fibroblasts within the breast microenvironment. PMID:26899873

  10. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors.

  11. Waltonitone inhibits proliferation of hepatoma cells and tumorigenesis via FXR-miR-22-CCNA2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Gong, Junting; Wang, Guangyun; Chen, Peng; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2016-01-01

    Waltonitone (WA), an ursane-type pentacyclic triterpene extracted from Gentiana waltonii Burkill, was recently appeared to exert anti-tumor effect. However, the biological underpinnings underlying the role of WA in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells have not been completely elucidated. Our previous report indicated that the FXR-regulated miR-22-CCNA2 pathway contributed to the progression and development of HCC. Besides, a wide spectrum of microRNAs (miRNAs) could be up- or down-regulated upon WA treatment, including miR-22. Hence, we aimed to determine whether WA inhibited HCC cell proliferation via the FXR-miR-22-CCNA2 axis. In this study, we observed a significant downregulation of FXR and miR-22, along with upregulation of CCNA2 in 80 paired tumors relative to adjacent normal tissues of HCC subjects, which were obtained from the available GEO database in NCBI (GSE22058). Furthermore, we validated the expression patterns of these three targets in another set of HCC samples and found the highly correlation within each other. Additionally, our data demonstrated that WA induced miR-22 and repressed CCNA2 in HCC cells, which contributed to the cell proliferation arrest. In addition, evidence suggested that either miR-22 silencing or FXR knockdown reversed the diminished CCNA2 expression as well as cell proliferation inhibition caused by WA treatment and WA inhibited tumor masses in vivo in a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model of HCC. Overall, our data indicated that WA inhibited HCC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis through miR-22-regulated CCNA2 repression, which was at least partially through FXR modulation. PMID:27738335

  12. OPTIMIZATION AND SINGLE-SHOT CHARACTERIZATION OF ULTRASHORT THz PULSES FROM A LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-05-04

    We present spatiotemporal characterization of J-class ultrashort THz pulses generated from a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Accelerated electrons, resulting from the interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with a plasma, emit high-intensity THz pulses as coherent transition radiation. Such high peak-power THz pulses, suitable for high-field (MV/cm) pump-probe experiments, also provide a non-invasive bunch-length diagnostic and thus feedback for the accelerator. The characterization of the THz pulses includes energy measurement using a Golay cell, 2D sign-resolved electro-optic measurement and single-shot spatiotemporal electric-field distribution retrieval using a new technique, coined temporal electric-field cross-Correlation (TEX). All three techniques corroborate THz pulses of 5 muJ, with peak fields of 100's of kV/cm and ~;;0:4 ps rms duration.

  13. Optimization of Electron Beam Transport for a 3-MeV DC Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, S.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Tiwari, R.; Sahu, G. K.; Thakur, K. B.; Mittal, K. C.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2012-11-01

    Transport of a low-current-density electron beam is simulated for an electrostatic accelerator system. Representative charged particles are uniformly assigned for emission from a circular indirectly-heated cathode of an axial electron gun. The beam is accelerated stepwise up to energy of 1 MeV electrostatically in a length-span of ~3 m using multiple accelerating electrodes in a column of ten tubes. The simulation is done under relativistic condition and the effect of the magnetic field induced by the cathode-heating filament current is taken into account. The beam diameter is tracked at different axial locations for various settings of the electrode potentials. Attempts have been made to examine and explain data on beam transport efficiency obtained from experimental observations.

  14. FXR-mediated down-regulation of CYP7A1 dominates LXRalpha in long-term cholesterol-fed NZW rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guorong; Li, Hai; Pan, Lu-Xing; Shang, Quan; Honda, Akira; Ananthanarayanan, M; Erickson, Sandra K; Shneider, Benjamin L; Shefer, Sarah; Bollineni, Jaya; Forman, Barry M; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Suchy, Frederick J; Tint, G Stephen; Salen, Gerald

    2003-10-01

    We investigated how cholesterol feeding regulates cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) via the nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha) in New Zealand white rabbits. After 1 day of 2% cholesterol feeding, when the bile acid pool size had not expanded, mRNA levels of the FXR target genes short-heterodimer partner (SHP) and sterol 12alpha-hydroxylase (CYP8B) were unchanged, indicating that FXR activation remained constant. In contrast, the mRNA levels of the LXRalpha target genes ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) increased 5-fold and 2.3-fold, respectively, associated with significant increases in hepatic concentrations of oxysterols. Activity and mRNA levels of CYP7A1 increased 2.4 times and 2.2 times, respectively. After 10 days of cholesterol feeding, the bile acid pool size increased nearly 2-fold. SHP mRNA levels increased 4.1-fold while CYP8B declined 64%. ABCA1 mRNA rose 8-fold and CETP mRNA remained elevated. Activity and mRNA of CYP7A1 decreased 60% and 90%, respectively. Feeding cholesterol for 1 day did not enlarge the ligand pool size or change FXR activation, while LXRalpha was activated highly secondary to increased hepatic oxysterols. As a result, CYP7A1 was up-regulated. After 10 days of cholesterol feeding, the bile acid (FXR ligand) pool size increased, which activated FXR and inhibited CYP7A1 despite continued activation of LXRalpha. Thus, in rabbits, when FXR and LXRalpha are activated simultaneously, the inhibitory effect of FXR overrides the stimulatory effect of LXRalpha to suppress CYP7A1 mRNA expression.

  15. Optimization of the accelerated curing process of concrete using a fibre Bragg grating-based control system and microwave technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Matthias; Jia, Yaodong; Shi, Shi; McCague, Colum; Bai, Yun; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an investigation into the suitability of using fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) for monitoring the accelerated curing process of concrete in a microwave heating environment is presented. In this approach, the temperature data provided by the FBGs are used to regulate automatically the microwave power so that a pre-defined temperature profile is maintained to optimize the curing process, achieving early strength values comparable to those of conventional heat-curing techniques but with significantly reduced energy consumption. The immunity of the FBGs to interference from the microwave radiation used ensures stable readings in the targeted environment, unlike conventional electronic sensor probes.

  16. Target optimization for desired X-ray spectra produced by laser plasma accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobok, Maxim; Brantov, Andrey; Bychenkov, Valery

    2016-10-01

    Different regimes of electron acceleration from low-density targets are investigated using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Multiple spatial target density profiles were examined, including laser pre-pulse modified targets. The size of the plasma corona is shown to be one of the main parameters characterizing the temperature and number of hot electrons, which determine the yield of X-ray radiation and its hardness. The generation of X-ray radiation by laser accelerated electrons, which impact the converter target located behind the laser target, was studied. The X-ray spectra were computed using Monte-Carlo simulations. This work was partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research 16-02-00088-a.

  17. Optimization of radiation acceleration regime and the target structure in laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikova, Galina; Lui, Chuan; Papadopoulos, Dennis; Sagdeev, Roald; Zigler, Ari

    2009-11-01

    Recent work [1,2] indicates that under proper conditions the interaction of ultra-short, high power lasers with thin foils can generate ion beams in the 100-200 MeV energy range with relatively low velocity dispersion. This technology can have major implications to medical ion proton cancer therapy since it can provide a relatively inexpensive table-top alternative to the current used traditional cyclotrons. This paper presents a simulation trade-off study of laser driven generation of quasi-monochromatic ion beams in the thin-foil Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) regime. The radiation pressure accelerates the electron cloud, which in its turn transfers accelerates the ions due to the induced longitudinal charge separation fields. A series of two and three-dimensional PIC simulations are presented with emphasis on stabilizing the target plasma against Raleigh-Taylor and modulational instabilities. Such instabilities are known as the main obstacles in achieving monochromatic beams. [4pt] [1] B. Eliasson, C. Lui, et al. New Jour. Phys., 11, 2009.[0pt] [2] F. Pegoraro, S.V. Bulanov. Laser Phys., v19, N 2, 2009.

  18. Optimal design of a standing-wave accelerating tube with a high shunt impedance based on a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhenxing; Pei, Yuanji; Pang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present an optimal design based on a genetic algorithm for a compact standing-wave (SW) accelerating tube with an operating frequency of 2998 MHz for industrial and medical applications. It consists of bi-periodic structures with a nose cone whose inter-cavity coupling is achieved through electric coupling rather than magnetic coupling. A mathematical model is established to optimize the arc at the cavity wall to reduce the microwave power loss and to optimize the nose cone to increase the electric field along the axis to achieve a high shunt impedance. The simulation results indicate that with the proper nose cone and arc, the shunt impedance of the cavity can be as high as 114 MΩ / m. Afterward, we present the tuning of the tube using SUPERFISH and the calculation of the beam dynamics using ASTRA and Parmela. The total length of the optimal tube is only 30.175 cm. Finally, a coupler is designed with a small-aperture coupling using CST MICROWAVE STUDIO.

  19. Optimizing a microwave gas ion source for continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    von Reden, K F; Roberts, M L; Burton, J R; Beaupré, S R

    2012-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source coupled with a magnesium charge exchange canal (C × C) has been successfully adapted to a large acceptance radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry system at the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. CO(2) samples from various preparation sources are injected into the source through a glass capillary at 370 μl∕min. Routine system parameters are about 120-140 μA of negative (12)C current after the C × C, leading to about 400 (14)C counts per second for a modern sample and implying a system efficiency of 0.2%. While these parameters already allow us to perform high-quality AMS analyses on large samples, we are working on ways to improve the output of the ion source regarding emittance and efficiency. Modeling calculations suggest modifications in the extraction triode geometry, shape, and size of the plasma chamber could improve emittance and, hence, ion transport efficiency. Results of experimental tests of these modifications are presented.

  20. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jiasen Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. Methods: An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. Results: For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100 000 spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cm{sup 3} and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. Conclusions: A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45

  1. Optimizing scan parameters for antibody microarray experiments: accelerating robust systems diagnostics for life sciences.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qiang; Sivanandam, Thamil Mani

    2014-06-01

    Microarray experiments are a centerpiece of postgenomics life sciences and the current efforts to develop systems diagnostics for personalized medicine. The majority of antibody microarray experiments are fluorescence-based, which utilizes a scanner to convert target signals into image files for subsequent quantification. Certain scan parameters such as the laser power and photomultiplier tube gain (PMT) can influence the readout of fluorescent intensities and thus may affect data quantitation. To date, however, there is no consensus of how to determine the optimal settings of microarray scanners. Here we show that different settings of the laser power and PMT not only affect the signal intensities but also the accuracy of antibody microarray experiments. More importantly, we demonstrate an experimental approach using two fluorescent dyes to determine optimal settings of scan parameters for microarray experiments. These measures provide added quality control of microarray experiments, and thus help to improve the accuracy of quantitative outcome in microarray experiments in the above contexts.

  2. Beam tests on the 4-kA, 1. 5-MeV injector for FXR

    SciTech Connect

    Kulke, B.; Kihara, R.; Ravenscroft, D.; Scarpetti, R.; Vogtlin, G.

    1981-01-01

    The new flash x-ray machine (FXR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is scheduled for completion in late 1981. This is a 54 module, linear induction accelertor, designed to deliver 500 Roentgen at 1 m as bremsstrahlung from a 20 MeV, 4 kA, 60 ns pulsed electron beam. The 9 cm diameter, cold-cathode electron source generates a 15 kA emitted beam at 1.5 MeV, and collimation is being used to reduce the transmitted current to 3.5 kA, with an emittance of 70 mr-cm. The collimated beam diameter is 4 cm. Six ferrite-loaded cavities are used in tandem to energize the injector. The high voltage performance of the injector cavities and other pulsed-power conditioning elements was tested earlier in a series of 10/sup 5/ shots at 400 kV per cavity. An overview of the injector design and of the beam test results is given.

  3. New paradigms in the treatment of hepatic cholestasis: from UDCA to FXR, PXR and beyond.

    PubMed

    Beuers, Ulrich; Trauner, Michael; Jansen, Peter; Poupon, Raoul

    2015-04-01

    Cholestasis is an impairment of bile formation/flow at the level of the hepatocyte and/or cholangiocyte. The first, and for the moment, most established medical treatment is the natural bile acid (BA) ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). This secretagogue improves, e.g. in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy or early stage primary biliary cirrhosis, impaired hepatocellular and cholangiocellular bile formation mainly by complex post-transcriptional mechanisms. The limited efficacy of UDCA in various cholestatic conditions urges for development of novel therapeutic approaches. These include nuclear and membrane receptor agonists and BA derivatives. The nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR), retinoid X receptor (RXR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are transcriptional modifiers of bile formation and at present are under investigation as promising targets for therapeutic interventions in cholestatic disorders. The membrane receptors fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) and apical sodium BA transporter (ASBT) deserve attention as additional therapeutic targets, as does the potential therapeutic agent norUDCA, a 23-C homologue of UDCA. Here, we provide an overview on established and future promising therapeutic agents and their potential molecular mechanisms and sites of action in cholestatic diseases.

  4. Optimal extraction and fingerprinting of carotenoids by accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Supradip; Walia, Suresh; Kundu, Aditi; Sharma, Khushbu; Paul, Ranjit Kumar

    2015-06-15

    Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) is applied for the extraction of carotenoids from orange carrot and the extraction parameters were optimized. Two carotenoids, lutein and β-carotene, are selected as the validation process. Hildebrand solubility parameters and dielectric constant of solvents were taken into consideration in selecting solvent mixture. The effects of various experimental parameters, such as temperature, static time, drying agent etc., on the ASE extraction efficiency are investigated systematically. Interactions among the variables were also studied. Furthermore, two carotenoids were analyzed and characterized by LC-ESI MS. The study concluded that Hildebrand solubility parameter approach may be applicable for less polar bioactive molecules like carotenoids. The properties of solvent and extraction temperature are found to be the most important parameters affecting the ASE extraction efficiency of thermolabile natural compounds.

  5. Retinoic acid represses CYP7A1 expression in human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells by FXR/RXR-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shi-Ying; He, Hongwei; Nguyen, Trong; Mennone, Albert; Boyer, James L

    2010-08-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) plays a key role in maintaining lipid and bile salt homeostasis as it is the rate-limiting enzyme converting cholesterol to bile acids. Deficiency of CYP7A1 leads to hyperlipidemia in man and mouse. Hyperlipidemia is often seen in patients when treated with high-dose retinoic acid (RA), but the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Our present study revealed that CYP7A1 mRNA expression is greatly repressed by RA in both human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells where increased fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) and small heterodimer partner (SHP) expressions were also observed, suggesting farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) were activated. Promoter reporter assays demonstrate that all-trans RA (atRA) specifically activated FXR/RXR. However, detailed molecular analyses indicate that this activation is through RXR, whose ligand is 9-cis RA. Knocking down of FXR or RXRalpha by small interference RNA (siRNA) in human hepatocytes increased CYP7A1 basal expression, but the repressive effect of atRA persisted, suggesting there are also FXR/RXR-independent mechanisms mediating atRA repression of CYP7A1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay and cell transfection results indicate that PGC-1alpha plays a role in the FXR/RXR-independent mechanism. Our findings may provide a potential explanation for hyperlipidemic side effects observed in some patients treated with high-dose RA.

  6. A version of the Trasco Intense Proton Source optimized for accelerator driven system purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Presti, M.; Andò, L.; Passarello, S.; Zhang, XZh.; Consoli, F.; Chines, F.; Percolla, C.; Calzona, V.; Winkler, M.

    2004-05-01

    A full set of measurements of the magnetic field has been carried out to define a different design of the TRASCO Intense Proton Source (TRIPS) magnetic system, based on permanent magnets, in order to increase the reliability of the source. The two coils of the source generate a maximum field of 150 mT and the optimum field was determined around 95 mT. The OPERA-3D package was used to simulate the magnetic field and a new magnetic system was designed as a combination of three rings of NdFeB magnets and soft iron. The high voltage insulation has been completely modified, in order to avoid any electronics at 80 kV voltage. The description of the magnetic measurements and the comparison with the simulations are presented, along with the mechanical design of the new version permanent magnet TRIPS (PM-TRIPS) and the new design of the extraction system. Finally the modification of the low energy beam transfer line (LEBT), which now includes a 30° bending magnet, will be outlined, with special regard to the accelerator availability improvement which can be obtained with the installation of two PM-TRIPS sources or more on the LEBT.

  7. Design and optimization of Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Grudiev, Alexej

    2016-11-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) main linac uses waveguide damped structure as its baseline design. The current baseline structure design written in the CLIC Conceptual Design Report is named "CLIC-G." Recent activities on the CLIC-G design including high power tests on structure prototypes and the study of machining cost assessment had raised the need of reoptimizing the structure design to minimize the machining cost and the pulse surface temperature rise. This work presents optimization of the structure geometry, high-order-mode (HOM) damping loads and the design of a HOM-free power splitter for the input coupler. Compared to the current baseline design CLIC-G, the new structure design reduced the pulse surface temperature rise, input power and manufacturing cost and achieves better suppression to the long range transverse wakefield. Cell disks and damping loads for the new structure design are also more compact than those of the CLIC-G design.

  8. Optimization of in-cell accelerated solvent extraction technique for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in river sediments.

    PubMed

    Duodu, Godfred Odame; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2016-04-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants with adverse impacts on aquatic biota, wildlife and human health even at low concentrations. However, conventional methods for their determination in river sediments are resource intensive. This paper presents an approach that is rapid and also reliable for the detection of OCPs. Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) with in-cell silica gel clean-up followed by Triple Quadrupole Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometry (GCMS/MS) was used to recover OCPs from sediment samples. Variables such as temperature, solvent ratio, adsorbent mass and extraction cycle were evaluated and optimized for the extraction. With the exception of Aldrin, which was unaffected by any of the variables evaluated, the recovery of OCPs from sediment samples was largely influenced by solvent ratio and adsorbent mass and, to some extent, the number of cycles and temperature. The optimized conditions for OCPs extraction in sediment with good recoveries were determined to be 4 cycles, 4.5 g of silica gel, 105 °C, and 4:3 v/v DCM: hexane mixture. With the exception of two compounds (α-BHC and Aldrin) whose recoveries were low (59.73 and 47.66% respectively), the recovery of the other pesticides were in the range 85.35-117.97% with precision <10% RSD. The method developed significantly reduces sample preparation time, the amount of solvent used, matrix interference, and is highly sensitive and selective.

  9. Biological/biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry targets. 1. optimizing the CO2 reduction step using zinc dust.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kelly, Peter B; Clifford, Andrew J

    2008-10-15

    Biological and biomedical applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) use isotope ratio mass spectrometry to quantify minute amounts of long-lived radioisotopes such as (14)C. AMS target preparation involves first the oxidation of carbon (in sample of interest) to CO 2 and second the reduction of CO 2 to filamentous, fluffy, fuzzy, or firm graphite-like substances that coat a -400-mesh spherical iron powder (-400MSIP) catalyst. Until now, the quality of AMS targets has been variable; consequently, they often failed to produce robust ion currents that are required for reliable, accurate, precise, and high-throughput AMS for biological/biomedical applications. Therefore, we described our optimized method for reduction of CO 2 to high-quality uniform AMS targets whose morphology we visualized using scanning electron microscope pictures. Key features of our optimized method were to reduce CO 2 (from a sample of interest that provided 1 mg of C) using 100 +/- 1.3 mg of Zn dust, 5 +/- 0.4 mg of -400MSIP, and a reduction temperature of 500 degrees C for 3 h. The thermodynamics of our optimized method were more favorable for production of graphite-coated iron powders (GCIP) than those of previous methods. All AMS targets from our optimized method were of 100% GCIP, the graphitization yield exceeded 90%, and delta (13)C was -17.9 +/- 0.3 per thousand. The GCIP reliably produced strong (12)C (-) currents and accurate and precise F m values. The observed F m value for oxalic acid II NIST SRM deviated from its accepted F m value of 1.3407 by only 0.0003 +/- 0.0027 (mean +/- SE, n = 32), limit of detection of (14)C was 0.04 amol, and limit of quantification was 0.07 amol, and a skilled analyst can prepare as many as 270 AMS targets per day. More information on the physical (hardness/color), morphological (SEMs), and structural (FT-IR, Raman, XRD spectra) characteristics of our AMS targets that determine accurate, precise, and high-hroughput AMS measurement are in the

  10. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  11. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  12. Exosomes derived from human adipose mensenchymal stem cells accelerates cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Zehuan; Zhao, Jiajia; Yu, Ran; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Handong; Chen, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged healing and scar formation are two major challenges in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) play an important role in tissue regeneration, and recent studies have suggested that exosomes secreted by stem cells may contribute to paracrine signaling. In this study, we investigated the roles of ASCs-derived exosomes (ASCs-Exos) in cutaneous wound healing. We found that ASCs-Exos could be taken up and internalized by fibroblasts to stimulate cell migration, proliferation and collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with increased genes expression of N-cadherin, cyclin-1, PCNA and collagen I, III. In vivo tracing experiments demonstrated that ASCs-Exos can be recruited to soft tissue wound area in a mouse skin incision model and significantly accelerated cutaneous wound healing. Histological analysis showed increased collagen I and III production by systemic administration of exosomes in the early stage of wound healing, while in the late stage, exosomes might inhibit collagen expression to reduce scar formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that ASCs-Exos can facilitate cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts. Our results provide a new perspective and therapeutic strategy for the use of ASCs-Exos in soft tissue repair. PMID:27615560

  13. A Specialized Mechanism of Translation Mediated by FXR1a-Associated MicroRNP in Cellular Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed I A; Truesdell, Samuel S; Lee, Sooncheol; Kollu, Swapna; Classon, Anthony; Boukhali, Myriam; Jain, Esha; Mortensen, Richard D; Yanagiya, Akiko; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Haas, Wilhelm; Vasudevan, Shobha

    2016-03-03

    MicroRNAs predominantly decrease gene expression; however, specific mRNAs are translationally upregulated in quiescent (G0) mammalian cells and immature Xenopus laevis oocytes by an FXR1a-associated microRNA-protein complex (microRNP) that lacks the microRNP repressor, GW182. Their mechanism in these conditions of decreased mTOR signaling, and therefore reduced canonical (cap-and-poly(A)-tail-mediated) translation, remains undiscovered. Our data reveal that mTOR inhibition in human THP1 cells enables microRNA-mediated activation. Activation requires shortened/no poly(A)-tail targets; polyadenylated mRNAs are partially activated upon PAIP2 overexpression, which interferes with poly(A)-bound PABP, precluding PABP-enhanced microRNA-mediated inhibition and canonical translation. Consistently, inhibition of PARN deadenylase prevents activation. P97/DAP5, a homolog of canonical translation factor, eIF4G, which lacks PABP- and cap binding complex-interacting domains, is required for activation, and thereby for the oocyte immature state. P97 interacts with 3' UTR-binding FXR1a-associated microRNPs and with PARN, which binds mRNA 5' caps, forming a specialized complex to translate recruited mRNAs in these altered canonical translation conditions.

  14. Curcumin protects ANIT-induced cholestasis through signaling pathway of FXR-regulated bile acid and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Tang, Xiaowen; Ding, Lili; zhou, Yue; Yang, Qiaoling; Gong, Junting; Wang, Guangyun; Wang, Zhengtao; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis is a clinically significant symptom and widely associated with liver diseases, however, there are very few effective therapies for cholestasis. Danning tablet (DNT, a Chinese patent medicine preparation) has been clinically used to treat human liver and gallbladder diseases for more than 20 years in China. However, which ingredients of DNT contributed to this beneficial effect and their mechanistic underpinnings have been largely unknown. In the present study, we discovered that DNT not only demonstrated greater benefits for cholecystitis patients after cholecystectomy surgery in clinic but also showed protective effect against alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced cholestasis model in rodent. Curcumin, one major compound derived from DNT, exerted the protective effect against cholestasis through farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which has been focused as potential therapeutic targets for treating cholestasis. The underlying mechanism of curcumin against cholestasis was restoring bile acid homeostasis and antagonizing inflammatory responses in a FXR-dependent manner and in turn contributed to overall cholestasis attenuation. Collectively, curcumin can be served as a potential treatment option for liver injury with cholestasis. PMID:27624003

  15. FXR agonists enhance the sensitivity of biliary tract cancer cells to cisplatin via SHP dependent inhibition of Bcl-xL expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhan, Ming; Li, Qi; Chen, Wei; Chu, Huiling; Huang, Qihong; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Man, Mohan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Chemoresistance is common in patients with biliary tract cancer (BTC) including gallbladder cancer (GBC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Therefore, it is necessary to identify effective chemotherapeutic agents for BTC. In the present study, we for the first time tested the effect of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists GW4064 and CDCA (chenodeoxycholic acid) in combination with cisplatin (CDDP) on increasing the chemosensitivity in BTC. Our results show that co-treatment of CDDP with FXR agonists remarkably enhance chemosensitivity of BTC cells. Mechanistically, we found that activation of FXR induced expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), which in turn inhibited signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and resulted in down-regulation of Bcl-xL expression in BTC cells, leading to increased susceptibility to CDDP. Moreover, the experiments on tumor-bearing mice showed that GW4064/CDDP co-treatment inhibited the tumor growth in vivo by up-regulating SHP expression and down-regulating STAT3 phosphorylation. These results suggest CDDP in combination with FXR agonists could be a potential new therapeutic strategy for BTC. PMID:27127878

  16. Combined modulated electron and photon beams planned by a Monte-Carlo-based optimization procedure for accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    PubMed

    Palma, Bianey Atriana; Sánchez, Ana Ureba; Salguero, Francisco Javier; Arráns, Rafael; Sánchez, Carlos Míguez; Zurita, Amadeo Walls; Hermida, María Isabel Romero; Leal, Antonio

    2012-03-07

    The purpose of this study was to present a Monte-Carlo (MC)-based optimization procedure to improve conventional treatment plans for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using modulated electron beams alone or combined with modulated photon beams, to be delivered by a single collimation device, i.e. a photon multi-leaf collimator (xMLC) already installed in a standard hospital. Five left-sided breast cases were retrospectively planned using modulated photon and/or electron beams with an in-house treatment planning system (TPS), called CARMEN, and based on MC simulations. For comparison, the same cases were also planned by a PINNACLE TPS using conventional inverse intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Normal tissue complication probability for pericarditis, pneumonitis and breast fibrosis was calculated. CARMEN plans showed similar acceptable planning target volume (PTV) coverage as conventional IMRT plans with 90% of PTV volume covered by the prescribed dose (D(p)). Heart and ipsilateral lung receiving 5% D(p) and 15% D(p), respectively, was 3.2-3.6 times lower for CARMEN plans. Ipsilateral breast receiving 50% D(p) and 100% D(p) was an average of 1.4-1.7 times lower for CARMEN plans. Skin and whole body low-dose volume was also reduced. Modulated photon and/or electron beams planned by the CARMEN TPS improve APBI treatments by increasing normal tissue sparing maintaining the same PTV coverage achieved by other techniques. The use of the xMLC, already installed in the linac, to collimate photon and electron beams favors the clinical implementation of APBI with the highest efficiency.

  17. Self-Organizing Hierarchical Particle Swarm Optimization with Time-Varying Acceleration Coefficients for Economic Dispatch with Valve Point Effects and Multifuel Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polprasert, Jirawadee; Ongsakul, Weerakorn; Dieu, Vo Ngoc

    2011-06-01

    This paper proposes a self-organizing hierarchical particle swarm optimization (SPSO) with time-varying acceleration coefficients (TVAC) for solving economic dispatch (ED) problem with non-smooth functions including multiple fuel options (MFO) and valve-point loading effects (VPLE). The proposed SPSO with TVAC is the new approach optimizer and good performance for solving ED problems. It can handle the premature convergence of the problem by re-initialization of velocity whenever particles are stagnated in the search space. To properly control both local and global explorations of the swarm during the optimization process, the performance of TVAC is included. The proposed method is tested in different ED problems with non-smooth cost functions and the obtained results are compared to those from many other methods in the literature. The results have revealed that the proposed SPSO with TVAC is effective in finding higher quality solutions for non-smooth ED problems than many other methods.

  18. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  19. Processing of radioactive waste by the use of low energy ({le} 100 MeV) charged particle accelerators. Optimization problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mushnikov, V.N.; Ozhigov, L.S.; Khizhnyak, N.A.

    1993-12-31

    The radiation processing of long-lived radiotoxic elements is based on transmutation reactions under the action of various particles and energies. Among the different particle sources the most promising is the proton accelerator. The present work studied the process of radiation deactivation in the stationary proton flux as functions of their flux density and energy. The Bateman-Robinson differential equations were solved.

  20. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-li; Wang, Chang-yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-jun; Sun, Peng-yuan; Huo, Xiao-kui; Liu, Zhi-hao; Yao, Ji-hong; Liu, Ke-xin

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. - Highlights: • AB23A has at least three roles in protection against ANIT-induced liver injury. • AB23A decreases Ntcp, and increases Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2 expression. • AB23A represses Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 through inducing Shp and Fgf15 expression. • AB23A increases bile acid metabolism through inducing Sult2a1 expression. • FXR activation is involved

  1. Optimal Model-Based Fault Estimation and Correction for Particle Accelerators and Industrial Plants Using Combined Support Vector Machines and First Principles Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, Bijan; Schweiger, Carl; /SLAC /Pavilion Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX

    2010-08-25

    parameters of the beam lifetime model) are physically meaningful. (3) Numerical Efficiency of the Training - We investigated the numerical efficiency of the SVM training. More specifically, for the primal formulation of the training, we have developed a problem formulation that avoids the linear increase in the number of the constraints as a function of the number of data points. (4) Flexibility of Software Architecture - The software framework for the training of the support vector machines was designed to enable experimentation with different solvers. We experimented with two commonly used nonlinear solvers for our simulations. The primary application of interest for this project has been the sustained optimal operation of particle accelerators at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Particle storage rings are used for a variety of applications ranging from 'colliding beam' systems for high-energy physics research to highly collimated x-ray generators for synchrotron radiation science. Linear accelerators are also used for collider research such as International Linear Collider (ILC), as well as for free electron lasers, such as the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. One common theme in the operation of storage rings and linear accelerators is the need to precisely control the particle beams over long periods of time with minimum beam loss and stable, yet challenging, beam parameters. We strongly believe that beyond applications in particle accelerators, the high fidelity and cost benefits of a combined model-based fault estimation/correction system will attract customers from a wide variety of commercial and scientific industries. Even though the acquisition of Pavilion Technologies, Inc. by Rockwell Automation Inc. in 2007 has altered the small business status of the Pavilion and it no longer qualifies for a Phase II funding, our findings in the course of the Phase I research have convinced us that further research will render a workable model

  2. Accelerating ordered subsets image reconstruction for X-ray CT using spatially non-uniform optimization transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghwan; Pal, Debashish; Thibault, Jean-Baptiste; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Statistical image reconstruction algorithms in X-ray CT provide improved image quality for reduced dose levels but require substantial computation time. Iterative algorithms that converge in few iterations and that are amenable to massive parallelization are favorable in multiprocessor implementations. The separable quadratic surrogate (SQS) algorithm is desirable as it is simple and updates all voxels simultaneously. However, the standard SQS algorithm requires many iterations to converge. This paper proposes an extension of the SQS algorithm that leads to spatially non-uniform updates. The non-uniform (NU) SQS encourages larger step sizes for the voxels that are expected to change more between the current and the final image, accelerating convergence, while the derivation of NU-SQS guarantees monotonic descent. Ordered subsets (OS) algorithms can also accelerate SQS, provided suitable “subset balance” conditions hold. These conditions can fail in 3D helical cone-beam CT due to incomplete sampling outside the axial region-of-interest (ROI). This paper proposes a modified OS algorithm that is more stable outside the ROI in helical CT. We use CT scans to demonstrate that the proposed NU-OS-SQS algorithm handles the helical geometry better than the conventional OS methods and “converges” in less than half the time of ordinary OS-SQS. PMID:23751959

  3. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  4. Optimization-driven identification of genetic perturbations accelerates the convergence of model parameters in ensemble modeling of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Zomorrodi, Ali R; Lafontaine Rivera, Jimmy G; Liao, James C; Maranas, Costas D

    2013-09-01

    The ensemble modeling (EM) approach has shown promise in capturing kinetic and regulatory effects in the modeling of metabolic networks. Efficacy of the EM procedure relies on the identification of model parameterizations that adequately describe all observed metabolic phenotypes upon perturbation. In this study, we propose an optimization-based algorithm for the systematic identification of genetic/enzyme perturbations to maximally reduce the number of models retained in the ensemble after each round of model screening. The key premise here is to design perturbations that will maximally scatter the predicted steady-state fluxes over the ensemble parameterizations. We demonstrate the applicability of this procedure for an Escherichia coli metabolic model of central metabolism by successively identifying single, double, and triple enzyme perturbations that cause the maximum degree of flux separation between models in the ensemble. Results revealed that optimal perturbations are not always located close to reaction(s) whose fluxes are measured, especially when multiple perturbations are considered. In addition, there appears to be a maximum number of simultaneous perturbations beyond which no appreciable increase in the divergence of flux predictions is achieved. Overall, this study provides a systematic way of optimally designing genetic perturbations for populating the ensemble of models with relevant model parameterizations.

  5. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  6. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  7. Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from. PMID:20170998

  8. Factors Associated With Optimal Long-Term Cosmetic Results in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Balloon-Based Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A.; Keisch, Martin; Shah, Chirag; Goyal, Sharad; Khan, Atif J.; Beitsch, Peter D.; Lyden, Maureen; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with optimal cosmetic results at 72 months for early-stage breast cancer patients treated with Mammosite balloon-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 1,440 patients (1,449 cases) with early-stage breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving therapy were treated with balloon-based brachytherapy to deliver APBI (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions). Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good (E/G) or fair/poor (F/P). Follow-up was evaluated at 36 and 72 months to establish long-term cosmesis, stability of cosmesis, and factors associated with optimal results. Results: The percentage of evaluable patients with excellent/good (E/G) cosmetic results at 36 months and more than 72 months were 93.3% (n = 708/759) and 90.4% (n = 235/260). Factors associated with optimal cosmetic results at 72 months included: larger skin spacing (p = 0.04) and T1 tumors (p = 0.02). Using multiple regression analysis, the only factors predictive of worse cosmetic outcome at 72 months were smaller skin spacing (odds ratio [OR], 0.89; confidence interval [CI], 0.80-0.99) and tumors greater than 2 cm (OR, 4.96, CI, 1.53-16.07). In all, 227 patients had both a 36-month and a 72-month cosmetic evaluation. The number of patients with E/G cosmetic results decreased only slightly from 93.4% at 3 years to 90.8% (p = 0.13) at 6 years, respectively. Conclusions: APBI delivered with balloon-based brachytherapy produced E/G cosmetic results in 90.4% of cases at 6 years. Larger tumors (T2) and smaller skin spacing were found to be the two most important independent predictors of cosmesis.

  9. An overlapping binding site in the CYP7A1 promoter allows activation of FXR to override the stimulation by LXRalpha.

    PubMed

    Shang, Quan; Pan, Luxing; Saumoy, Monica; Chiang, John Y L; Tint, G Stephen; Salen, Gerald; Xu, Guorong

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore why in rabbits activation of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is dominant over activated liver X receptor-alpha (LXRalpha) in the regulation of CYP7A1. We cloned the rabbit CYP7A1 promoter and found a fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF) binding element embedded within the LXRalpha binding site (LXRE). Gel shift assays demonstrated that FTF competes with LXRalpha for binding to LXRE. Short heterodimer partner (SHP) enhances the competitive ability of FTF. Studies in HepG2 cells showed that SHP combined with FTF had more powerful effect to offset the stimulation of CYP7A1 by LXRalpha. Gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that SHP with FTF diminished LXRalpha binding to the CYP7A1 promoter. In vivo studies in rabbits fed cholesterol for 10 days showed that hepatic expression of SHP but not FTF rose and LXRalpha-bound LXRE decreased. We propose that the SHP/FTF heterodimer occupies LXRE via the embedded FTF binding element and blocks LXRalpha from recruiting to LXRE. Therefore, activation of FXR, which upregulates SHP expression, will eliminate the stimulatory effect of LXRalpha on the CYP7A1 promoter because increased levels of SHP combined with FTF diminish the recruitment of LXRalpha to CYP7A1 promoter.

  10. BAR502, a dual FXR and GPBAR1 agonist, promotes browning of white adipose tissue and reverses liver steatosis and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Carino, Adriana; Cipriani, Sabrina; Marchianò, Silvia; Biagioli, Michele; Santorelli, Chiara; Donini, Annibale; Zampella, Angela; Monti, Maria Chiara; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a highly prevalent chronic liver disease. Here, we have investigated whether BAR502, a non-bile acid, steroidal dual ligand for FXR and GPBAR1, reverses steato-hepatitis in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) and fructose. After 9 week, mice on HFD gained ≈30% of b.w (P < 0.01 versus naïve) and were insulin resistant. These overweighting and insulin resistant mice were randomized to receive HFD or HFD in combination with BAR502. After 18 weeks, HFD mice developed NASH like features with severe steato-hepatitis and fibrosis, increased hepatic content of triacylglycerol and cholesterol and expression of SREPB1c, FAS, ApoC2, PPARα and γ, α-SMA, α1 collagen and MCP1 mRNAs. Treatment with BAR502 caused a ≈10% reduction of b.w., increased insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of HDL, while reduced steatosis, inflammatory and fibrosis scores and liver expression of SREPB1c, FAS, PPARγ, CD36 and CYP7A1 mRNA. BAR502 increased the expression of SHP and ABCG5 in the liver and SHP, FGF15 and GLP1 in intestine. BAR502 promoted the browning of epWAT and reduced liver fibrosis induced by CCl4. In summary, BAR502, a dual FXR and GPBAR1 agonist, protects against liver damage caused by HFD by promoting the browning of adipose tissue. PMID:28202906

  11. Optimization and validation of an accelerated laboratory extraction method to estimate nitrogen release patterns of slow- and controlled-release fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Medina, L Carolina; Sartain, Jerry B; Obreza, Thomas A; Hall, William L; Thiex, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    Several technologies have been proposed to characterize the nutrient release and availability patterns of enhanced-efficiency fertilizers (EEFs), especially slow-release fertilizers (SRFs) and controlled-release fertilizers (CRFs) during the last few decades. These technologies have been developed mainly by manufacturers and are product-specific based on the regulation and analysis of each EEF product. Despite previous efforts to characterize EEF materials, no validated method exists to assess their nutrient release patterns. However, the increased use of EEFs in specialty and nonspecialty markets requires an appropriate method to verify nutrient claims and material performance. A series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of temperature, fertilizer test portion size, and extraction time on the performance of a 74 h accelerated laboratory extraction method to measure SRF and CRF nutrient release profiles. Temperature was the only factor that influenced nutrient release rate, with a highly marked effect for phosphorus and to a lesser extent for nitrogen (N) and potassium. Based on the results, the optimal extraction temperature set was: Extraction No. 1-2:00 h at 25 degrees C; Extraction No. 2-2:00 h at 50 degrees C; Extraction No. 3-20:00 h at 55 degrees C; and Extraction No. 4-50:00 h at 60 degrees C. Ruggedness of the method was tested by evaluating the effect of small changes in seven selected factors on method behavior using a fractional multifactorial design. Overall, the method showed ruggedness for measuring N release rates of coated CRFs.

  12. CEBAF Accelerator Achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Drury, M.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G. A.; Poelker, M.; Reece, C.; Tiefenback, M.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  13. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  14. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  15. New World and Old World Alphaviruses Have Evolved to Exploit Different Components of Stress Granules, FXR and G3BP Proteins, for Assembly of Viral Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dal Young; Reynaud, Josephine M.; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; Akhrymuk, Ivan; Mobley, James A.; Frolov, Ilya; Frolova, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    The positive-strand RNA viruses initiate their amplification in the cell from a single genome delivered by virion. This single RNA molecule needs to become involved in replication process before it is recognized and degraded by cellular machinery. In this study, we show that distantly related New World and Old World alphaviruses have independently evolved to utilize different cellular stress granule-related proteins for assembly of complexes, which recruit viral genomic RNA and facilitate formation of viral replication complexes (vRCs). Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) utilizes all members of the Fragile X syndrome (FXR) family, while chikungunya and Sindbis viruses exploit both members of the G3BP family. Despite being in different families, these proteins share common characteristics, which determine their role in alphavirus replication, namely, the abilities for RNA-binding and for self-assembly into large structures. Both FXR and G3BP proteins interact with virus-specific, repeating amino acid sequences located in the C-termini of hypervariable, intrinsically disordered domains (HVDs) of viral nonstructural protein nsP3. We demonstrate that these host factors orchestrate assembly of vRCs and play key roles in RNA and virus replication. Only knockout of all of the homologs results in either pronounced or complete inhibition of replication of different alphaviruses. The use of multiple homologous proteins with redundant functions mediates highly efficient recruitment of viral RNA into the replication process. This independently evolved acquisition of different families of cellular proteins by the disordered protein fragment to support alphavirus replication suggests that other RNA viruses may utilize a similar mechanism of host factor recruitment for vRC assembly. The use of different host factors by alphavirus species may be one of the important determinants of their pathogenesis. PMID:27509095

  16. Atorvastatin induces bile acid-synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1 by suppressing FXR signaling in both liver and intestine in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-12-01

    Statins are effective cholesterol-lowering drugs to treat CVDs. Bile acids (BAs), the end products of cholesterol metabolism in the liver, are important nutrient and energy regulators. The present study aims to investigate how statins affect BA homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with atorvastatin (100 mg/kg/day po) for 1 week, followed by BA profiling by ultra-performance LC-MS/MS. Atorvastatin decreased BA pool size, mainly due to less BA in the intestine. Surprisingly, atorvastatin did not alter total BAs in the serum or liver. Atorvastatin increased the ratio of 12α-OH/non12α-OH BAs. Atorvastatin increased the mRNAs of the BA-synthetic enzymes cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) (over 10-fold) and cytochrome P450 27a1, the BA uptake transporters Na⁺/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1b2, and the efflux transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in the liver. Noticeably, atorvastatin suppressed the expression of BA nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) target genes, namely small heterodimer partner (liver) and fibroblast growth factor 15 (ileum). Furthermore, atorvastatin increased the mRNAs of the organic cation uptake transporter 1 and cholesterol efflux transporters Abcg5 and Abcg8 in the liver. The increased expression of BA-synthetic enzymes and BA transporters appear to be a compensatory response to maintain BA homeostasis after atorvastatin treatment. The Cyp7a1 induction by atorvastatin appears to be due to suppressed FXR signaling in both the liver and intestine.

  17. Atorvastatin induces bile acid-synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1 by suppressing FXR signaling in both liver and intestine in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Statins are effective cholesterol-lowering drugs to treat CVDs. Bile acids (BAs), the end products of cholesterol metabolism in the liver, are important nutrient and energy regulators. The present study aims to investigate how statins affect BA homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with atorvastatin (100 mg/kg/day po) for 1 week, followed by BA profiling by ultra-performance LC-MS/MS. Atorvastatin decreased BA pool size, mainly due to less BA in the intestine. Surprisingly, atorvastatin did not alter total BAs in the serum or liver. Atorvastatin increased the ratio of 12α-OH/non12α-OH BAs. Atorvastatin increased the mRNAs of the BA-synthetic enzymes cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) (over 10-fold) and cytochrome P450 27a1, the BA uptake transporters Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1b2, and the efflux transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in the liver. Noticeably, atorvastatin suppressed the expression of BA nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) target genes, namely small heterodimer partner (liver) and fibroblast growth factor 15 (ileum). Furthermore, atorvastatin increased the mRNAs of the organic cation uptake transporter 1 and cholesterol efflux transporters Abcg5 and Abcg8 in the liver. The increased expression of BA-synthetic enzymes and BA transporters appear to be a compensatory response to maintain BA homeostasis after atorvastatin treatment. The Cyp7a1 induction by atorvastatin appears to be due to suppressed FXR signaling in both the liver and intestine. PMID:25278499

  18. Advanced Accelerators for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Koyama, Kazuyoshi

    We review advanced accelerators for medical applications with respect to the following key technologies: (i) higher RF electron linear accelerator (hereafter “linac”); (ii) optimization of alignment for the proton linac, cyclotron and synchrotron; (iii) superconducting magnet; (iv) laser technology. Advanced accelerators for medical applications are categorized into two groups. The first group consists of compact medical linacs with high RF, cyclotrons and synchrotrons downsized by optimization of alignment and superconducting magnets. The second group comprises laser-based acceleration systems aimed of medical applications in the future. Laser plasma electron/ion accelerating systems for cancer therapy and laser dielectric accelerating systems for radiation biology are mentioned. Since the second group has important potential for a compact system, the current status of the established energy and intensity and of the required stability are given.

  19. SU-F-BRA-14: Optimization of Dosimetric Guidelines for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) Using the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI)

    SciTech Connect

    Mooney, K; Altman, M; Garcia-Ramirez, J; Thomas, M; Zoberi, I; Mullen, D; DeWees, T; Esthappan, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning guidelines for accelerated partial breast irradiation (ABPI) using the strut-adjusted volume implant (SAVI) are inconsistent between the manufacturer and NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol. Furthermore neither set of guidelines accounts for different applicator sizes. The purpose of this work is to establish guidelines specific to the SAVI that are based on clinically achievable dose distributions. Methods: Sixty-two consecutive patients were implanted with a SAVI and prescribed to receive 34 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily using high dose-rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy. The target (PTV-EVAL) was defined per NSABP. The treatments were planned and evaluated using a combination of dosimetric planning goals provided by the NSABP, the manufacturer, and our prior clinical experience. Parameters evaluated included maximum doses to skin and ribs, and volumes of PTV-EVAL receiving 90%, 95%, 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescription (V90, etc). All target parameters were evaluated for correlation with device size using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Revised dosimetric guidelines for target coverage and heterogeneity were determined from this population. Results: Revised guidelines for minimum target coverage (ideal in parentheses): V90≥95%(97%), V95≥90%(95%), V100≥88%(91%). The only dosimetric parameters that were significantly correlated (p<0.05) with device size were V150 and V200. Heterogeneity criteria were revised for the 6–1 Mini/6-1 applicators to V150≤30cc and V200≤15cc, and unchanged for the other sizes. Re-evaluation of patient plans showed 90% (56/62) met the revised minimum guidelines and 76% (47/62) met the ideal guidelines. All and 56/62 patients met our institutional guidelines for maximum skin and rib dose, respectively. Conclusions: We have optimized dosimetric guidelines for the SAVI applicators, and found that implementation of these revised guidelines for SAVI treatment planning yielded target coverage exceeding

  20. 'Light Sail' Acceleration Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2009-08-21

    The dynamics of the acceleration of ultrathin foil targets by the radiation pressure of superintense, circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. By addressing self-induced transparency and charge separation effects, it is shown that for 'optimal' values of the foil thickness only a thin layer at the rear side is accelerated by radiation pressure. The simple 'light sail' model gives a good estimate of the energy per nucleon, but overestimates the conversion efficiency of laser energy into monoenergetic ions.

  1. "Light sail" acceleration reexamined.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2009-08-21

    The dynamics of the acceleration of ultrathin foil targets by the radiation pressure of superintense, circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. By addressing self-induced transparency and charge separation effects, it is shown that for "optimal" values of the foil thickness only a thin layer at the rear side is accelerated by radiation pressure. The simple "light sail" model gives a good estimate of the energy per nucleon, but overestimates the conversion efficiency of laser energy into monoenergetic ions.

  2. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  3. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  4. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  5. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  6. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  7. Optimization of an accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the separation and determination of essential oil from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Sun, Qiushi; Hu, Zhiyan; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Tingting; Fan, Guorong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, an accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was established and employed for the extraction, concentration and analysis of essential oil constituents from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. Response surface methodology was performed to optimize the key parameters in accelerated solvent extraction on the extraction efficiency, and key parameters in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction were discussed as well. Two representative constituents in Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort, (Z)-ligustilide and n-butylphthalide, were quantitatively analyzed. It was shown that the qualitative result of the accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction approach was in good agreement with that of hydro-distillation, whereas the proposed approach took far less extraction time (30 min), consumed less plant material (usually <1 g, 0.01 g for this study) and solvent (<20 mL) than the conventional system. To sum up, the proposed method could be recommended as a new approach in the extraction and analysis of essential oil.

  8. Advanced accelerator theory development

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Houck, T.L.; Poole, B.; Tishchenko, N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wang, I.

    1998-02-09

    A new accelerator technology, the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA), is potentially an ultra compact accelerator/pulsed power driver. This new accelerator relies on three new components: the ultra-high gradient insulator, the asymmetric Blumlein and low jitter switches. In this report, we focused our attention on the first two components of the DWA system the insulators and the asymmetric Blumlein. First, we sought to develop the necessary design tools to model and scale the behavior of the high gradient insulator. To perform this task we concentrated on modeling the discharge processes (i.e., initiation and creation of the surface discharge). In addition, because these high gradient structures exhibit favorable microwave properties in certain accelerator configurations, we performed experiments and calculations to determine the relevant electromagnetic properties. Second, we performed circuit modeling to understand energy coupling to dynamic loads by the asymmetric Blumlein. Further, we have experimentally observed a non-linear coupling effect in certain asymmetric Blumlein configurations. That is, as these structures are stacked into a complete module, the output voltage does not sum linearly and a lower than expected output voltage results. Although we solved this effect experimentally, we performed calculations to understand this effect more fully to allow better optimization of this DWA pulse-forming line system.

  9. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  10. Suppressing Thermal Energy Drift In The LLNL Flash X-Ray Accelerator Using Linear Disk Resistor Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitzer, B R; Houck, T L; Luchterhand, O C

    2011-07-19

    This paper addresses thermal drift in sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors and their replacement with linear disk resistors from HVR Advanced Power Components. Sodium thiosulfate resistors in the FXR induction linear accelerator application have a temperature coefficient of {approx}1.8%/C. The FXR Marx banks send an 8kJ pulse through eight 524 cm{sup 3} liquid resistors at a repetition rate of up to 1 every 45 seconds. Every pulse increases the temperature of the solution by {approx}0.4 C which produces a 0.7% change in resistance. The typical cooling rate is {approx}0.4 C per minute which results in {approx}0.1% energy drop per pulse during continuous pulsed operations. A radiographic accelerator is extraordinarily sensitive to energy variations. Changes in beam energy produce movement in beam transport, changes in spot size, and large dose variations. If self-heating were the only problem, we could predict the increase in input voltage required to compensate for the energy loss. However, there are other variables that influence the temperature of the resistors such as focus magnet heating, changes in room temperature, changes in cooling water, where the cell is located, etc. Additionally not all of the resistors have equivalent cooling rates and as many as 32 resistors are driven from a single power source. The FXR accelerator group elected to replace the sodium thiosulfate resistors with HVR Linear Disk Resistors in a stack type configuration. With data limited for these resistors when used in oil and at low resistance values, a full characterization needed to be performed. High currents (up to 15kA), high voltages (up to 400kV), and Fast Rise times (<10ns) made a resistor choice difficult. Other solid resistors have been tried and had problems at the connection points and with the fact that the resistivity changed as they absorbed oil. The selected HVR resistors have the advantage of being manufactured with the oil impregnated in to them so this characteristic

  11. Genetic algorithms and their applications in accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, Alicia S.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-objective optimization techniques are widely used in an extremely broad range of fields. Genetic optimization for multi-objective optimization was introduced in the accelerator community in relatively recent times and quickly spread becoming a fundamental tool in multi-dimensional optimization problems. This discussion introduces the basics of the technique and reviews applications in accelerator problems.

  12. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  13. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  14. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  15. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  16. Intestine-specific Deletion of Sirt1 in Mice Impairs DCoH2–HNF1α–FXR Signaling and Alters Systemic Bile Acid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kazgan, Nevzat; Metukuri, Mallikarjuna R.; Purushotham, Aparna; Lu, Jing; Rao, Anuradha; Lee, Sangkyu; Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Lickteig, Andrew; Csanaky, Ivan; Zhao, Yingming; Dawson, Paul A.; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the most conserved mammalian NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase, is an important metabolic sensor in many tissues. However, little is known about its role in the small intestine, which absorbs and senses nutrients. We investigated the functions of intestinal Sirt1 in systemic bile acid and cholesterol metabolism in mice. Methods Sirt1 was specifically deleted from intestines of mice using the Flox-villin-Cre system (Sirt1 iKO mice). Intestinal and heptic tissues were collected, and bile acid absorption was analyzed using the everted gut sac experiment. Systemic bile acid metabolism was studied in Sirt1 iKO and Flox control mice placed on standard diets, diets containing 0.5% cholic acid or 1.25% cholesterol, or lithogenic diets. Results Sirt1 iKO mice had reduced intestinal Fxr signaling via Hnf1a compared with controls, which reduced expression of the bile acid transporter genes Asbt and Mcf2l (encodes Ost) and absorption of ileal bile acids. Sirt1 regulated Hnf1α–Fxr signaling partially through Dcoh2, which increases dimerization of Hnf1α. Sirt1 was found to deacetylate DCoH2, promoting its interaction with Hnf1α and inducing DNA binding by Hnf1α. Intestine-specific deletion of Sirt1 increased hepatic bile acid biosynthesis, reduced hepatic accumulation of bile acids, and protected animals from liver damage from high-bile acid diets. Conclusions Intestinal Sirt1, a key nutrient sensor, is required for ileal bile acid absorption and systemic bile acid homeostasis in mice. We delineated the mechanism of metabolic regulation of Hnf1α–Fxr signaling. Reagents designed to inhibit intestinal SIRT1 might be developed to treat bile acid-related diseases such as cholestasis. PMID:24389307

  17. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  18. Accelerated Profile HMM Searches.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Sean R

    2011-10-01

    Profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs) and probabilistic inference methods have made important contributions to the theory of sequence database homology search. However, practical use of profile HMM methods has been hindered by the computational expense of existing software implementations. Here I describe an acceleration heuristic for profile HMMs, the "multiple segment Viterbi" (MSV) algorithm. The MSV algorithm computes an optimal sum of multiple ungapped local alignment segments using a striped vector-parallel approach previously described for fast Smith/Waterman alignment. MSV scores follow the same statistical distribution as gapped optimal local alignment scores, allowing rapid evaluation of significance of an MSV score and thus facilitating its use as a heuristic filter. I also describe a 20-fold acceleration of the standard profile HMM Forward/Backward algorithms using a method I call "sparse rescaling". These methods are assembled in a pipeline in which high-scoring MSV hits are passed on for reanalysis with the full HMM Forward/Backward algorithm. This accelerated pipeline is implemented in the freely available HMMER3 software package. Performance benchmarks show that the use of the heuristic MSV filter sacrifices negligible sensitivity compared to unaccelerated profile HMM searches. HMMER3 is substantially more sensitive and 100- to 1000-fold faster than HMMER2. HMMER3 is now about as fast as BLAST for protein searches.

  19. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  20. Laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  1. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  2. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  3. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  4. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; Cary, J.; McInnes, L.C.; Mori, W.; Ng, C.; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization

  5. Impact accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Brinkley, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The degree to which impact acceleration is an important factor in space flight environments depends primarily upon the technology of capsule landing deceleration and the weight permissible for the associated hardware: parachutes or deceleration rockets, inflatable air bags, or other impact attenuation systems. The problem most specific to space medicine is the potential change of impact tolerance due to reduced bone mass and muscle strength caused by prolonged weightlessness and physical inactivity. Impact hazards, tolerance limits, and human impact tolerance related to space missions are described.

  6. Laser produced streams of Ge ions accelerated and optimized in the electric fields for implantation into SiO{sub 2} substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Rosinski, M.; Parys, P.; Gasior, P.; Wolowski, J.; Giuffrida, L.; Torrisi, L.; Fazio, E.; Mezzasalma, A. M.; Ando, L.

    2012-02-15

    Ge crystals were prepared by means of laser-induced ion implantation technique. A Nd:YAG pulsed laser (repetition rate: 10 Hz; pulse duration: 3.5 ns; pulse energy: {approx}0.5 J) was used both as an ion source and to carry out the ablation processes. The optimization of the laser-generated ion beam parameters in a broad energy and current density range has been obtained controlling the electrostatic field parameters. Numerical simulations of the focusing system, performed adopting an OPERA 3D code, and an investigation of the ion characteristics, using the ion time-of-flight method, have allowed to optimize the preparation parameters. The structural properties of the samples were investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron, micro-Raman spectroscopies, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Experimental results show that, by appropriately varying the ion implantation parameters and by a post-preparation annealing treatment, it is possible to achieve the development of a micrometer-sized crystalline Ge phase and/or an amorphous one.

  7. Laser produced streams of Ge ions accelerated and optimized in the electric fields for implantation into SiO2 substrates.

    PubMed

    Rosinski, M; Giuffrida, L; Parys, P; Gasior, P; Fazio, E; Mezzasalma, A M; Torrisi, L; Ando, L; Wolowski, J

    2012-02-01

    Ge crystals were prepared by means of laser-induced ion implantation technique. A Nd:YAG pulsed laser (repetition rate: 10 Hz; pulse duration: 3.5 ns; pulse energy: ∼0.5 J) was used both as an ion source and to carry out the ablation processes. The optimization of the laser-generated ion beam parameters in a broad energy and current density range has been obtained controlling the electrostatic field parameters. Numerical simulations of the focusing system, performed adopting an OPERA 3D code, and an investigation of the ion characteristics, using the ion time-of-flight method, have allowed to optimize the preparation parameters. The structural properties of the samples were investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron, micro-Raman spectroscopies, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Experimental results show that, by appropriately varying the ion implantation parameters and by a post-preparation annealing treatment, it is possible to achieve the development of a micrometer-sized crystalline Ge phase and∕or an amorphous one.

  8. Accelerating Commercial Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Through the Visiting Investigator Program (VIP) at Stennis Space Center, Community Coffee was able to use satellites to forecast coffee crops in Guatemala. Using satellite imagery, the company can produce detailed maps that separate coffee cropland from wild vegetation and show information on the health of specific crops. The data can control coffee prices and eventually may be used to optimize application of fertilizers, pesticides and irrigation. This would result in maximal crop yields, minimal pollution and lower production costs. VIP is a mechanism involving NASA funding designed to accelerate the growth of commercial remote sensing by promoting general awareness and basic training in the technology.

  9. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  10. Measurements of electron-induced neutrons as a tool for determination of electron temperature of fast electrons in the task of optimization laser-produced plasma ions acceleration.

    PubMed

    Sakaki, H; Nishiuchi, M; Maeda, S; Sagisaka, A; Pirozhkov, A S; Pikuz, T; Faenov, A; Ogura, K; Fukami, T; Matsukawa, K; Kanasaki, M; Fukuda, Y; Yogo, A; Esirkepov, T; Kiriyama, H; Shimomura, T; Nakai, Y; Tanoue, M; Torimoto, K; Okamoto, M; Sato, T; Niita, K; Tamura, J; Nishio, K; Sako, H; Yamauchi, T; Watanabe, Y; Bulanov, S; Kondo, K

    2014-02-01

    High intensity laser-plasma interaction has attracted considerable interest for a number of years. The laser-plasma interaction is accompanied by generation of various charged particle beams, such as high-energy proton and ions with high charge to mass ratio (Q/M; same as multi-charged ions). Results of simultaneous novel measurements of electron-induced photonuclear neutrons (photoneutron), which are a diagnostic of the laser-plasma interaction, are proposed to use for optimization of the laser-plasma ion generation. The proposed method is demonstrated by the laser irradiation with the intensity of 1 × 10(21) W/cm(2) on the metal foil target. The photoneutrons are measured by using NE213 liquid scintillation detectors. Heavy-ion signal is registered with the CR-39 track detector simultaneously. The measured signals of the electron-induced photoneutrons are well reproduced by using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System. The results obtained provide useful approach for analyzing the various laser based ion beams.

  11. Modeling lateral acceleration effects on pilot performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korn, J.; Kleinan, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Attendant to the direct side force maneuver of a Vectored Force Fighter is the transverse acceleration imposed on the pilot. This lateral acceleration (Gy), when combind with a positive Gz stress, is a potential source of pilot tracking performance impairment. A research effort to investigate these performance decrements includes experimental as well as anaytical pilot performance modeling using the Optimal Control Model.

  12. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

    2007-06-25

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

  13. Preliminary tests of the electrostatic plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.; Acker, T.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the results of a program to verify an electrostatic plasma acceleration concept and to identify those parameters most important in optimizing an Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) thruster based upon this thrust mechanism. Preliminary performance measurements of thrust, specific impulse and efficiency were obtained using a unique plasma exhaust momentum probe. Reliable EPA thruster operation was achieved using one power supply.

  14. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Omelyan, Igor E-mail: omelyan@icmp.lviv.ua; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-12-28

    We develop efficient handling of solvation forces in the multiscale method of multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of a biomolecule steered by the solvation free energy (effective solvation forces) obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model complemented with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation). To reduce the computational expenses, we calculate the effective solvation forces acting on the biomolecule by using advanced solvation force extrapolation (ASFE) at inner time steps while converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations only at large outer time steps. The idea of ASFE consists in developing a discrete non-Eckart rotational transformation of atomic coordinates that minimizes the distances between the atomic positions of the biomolecule at different time moments. The effective solvation forces for the biomolecule in a current conformation at an inner time step are then extrapolated in the transformed subspace of those at outer time steps by using a modified least square fit approach applied to a relatively small number of the best force-coordinate pairs. The latter are selected from an extended set collecting the effective solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps over a broad time interval. The MTS-MD integration with effective solvation forces obtained by converging 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps and applying ASFE at inner time steps is stabilized by employing the optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) ensemble. Compared to the previous extrapolation schemes used in combination with the Langevin thermostat, the ASFE approach substantially improves the accuracy of evaluation of effective solvation forces and in combination with the OIN thermostat enables a dramatic increase of outer time steps. We demonstrate on a fully flexible model of alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution that the MTS-MD/OIN/ASFE/3D-RISM-KH multiscale method of molecular dynamics

  15. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelyan, Igor; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-12-01

    We develop efficient handling of solvation forces in the multiscale method of multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of a biomolecule steered by the solvation free energy (effective solvation forces) obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model complemented with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation). To reduce the computational expenses, we calculate the effective solvation forces acting on the biomolecule by using advanced solvation force extrapolation (ASFE) at inner time steps while converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations only at large outer time steps. The idea of ASFE consists in developing a discrete non-Eckart rotational transformation of atomic coordinates that minimizes the distances between the atomic positions of the biomolecule at different time moments. The effective solvation forces for the biomolecule in a current conformation at an inner time step are then extrapolated in the transformed subspace of those at outer time steps by using a modified least square fit approach applied to a relatively small number of the best force-coordinate pairs. The latter are selected from an extended set collecting the effective solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps over a broad time interval. The MTS-MD integration with effective solvation forces obtained by converging 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps and applying ASFE at inner time steps is stabilized by employing the optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) ensemble. Compared to the previous extrapolation schemes used in combination with the Langevin thermostat, the ASFE approach substantially improves the accuracy of evaluation of effective solvation forces and in combination with the OIN thermostat enables a dramatic increase of outer time steps. We demonstrate on a fully flexible model of alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution that the MTS-MD/OIN/ASFE/3D-RISM-KH multiscale method of molecular dynamics

  16. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  17. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  18. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  19. Radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Liseykina, Tatyana V.; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2010-04-01

    The acceleration of sub-wavelength, solid-density plasma foils by the ultraintense radiation pressure of circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated analytically and with simulations. An improved 'Light Sail' or accelerating mirror model, accounting for nonlinear self-induced transparency effects, is used for estimating the optimal thickness for acceleration. The model predictions are in good agreement with one-dimensional simulations. These latter are analyzed in detail to unfold the dynamics and self-organization of electrons and ions during the acceleration. Two-dimensional simulations are also performed to address the effects of target bending and of laser intensity inhomogeneity.

  20. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; Mori, Warren; Ng, Cho; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-01

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  1. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; Mori, Warren; Ng, Cho; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-10-21

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  2. Parametric approach to linear induction accelerator design

    SciTech Connect

    Bresie, D.A.; Andrews, J.A.; Ingram, S.W. . Center for Electromechanics)

    1991-01-01

    Past work on the design of linear induction accelerators has centered on the development of computer codes to analyze accelerator designs, using the current filament method. While these filament models are a very valuable tool for evaluating the performance of an induction launcher design, they provide little insight into the selection of dimensions, materials, and operation points for accelerators with interesting performance. Described in this paper is a parametric approach to defining effective accelerator designs. This method uses a computer optimization routine to iteratively seek out effective designs. The optimization routine is forced to search within a parameter space restricted to interesting and realistic parameters such as size, weight, voltage, and temperature rises. A filament model is used as the filter for the optimizer. Several linear induction accelerators have been designed using this method. The accelerators designed all used a switched capacitor power supply. While the run time of this code on The University of Texas' CRAY XMP-24 computer is moderately long, the resulting designs have good predicted performance. With realistic power supplies and materials, accelerator efficiencies in the 20 to 40% range were easily obtained. This paper describes the effect of armature diameter, length-to-diameter ratio, and weight, as well as other parameters, on the optimum accelerator design.

  3. Muon Acceleration-RLA and FFAG

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, S. Alex

    2011-10-06

    Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittace dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

  4. Design of a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trbojevic, D.; Courant, E. D.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    2005-05-01

    We present a design of nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerators (FFAG) minimizing the dispersion action function H. The design is considered both analytically and via computer modeling. We present the basic principles of a nonscaling FFAG lattice and discuss optimization strategies so that one can accelerate over a broad range of momentum with reasonable apertures. Acceleration schemes for muons are discussed.

  5. Pulsed Plasma Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Kazeminezhad, F.; Owens, T.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the main results of the modeling task of the PPA project. The objective of this task is to make major progress towards developing a new computational tool with new capabilities for simulating cylindrically symmetric 2.5 dimensional (2.5 D) PPA's. This tool may be used for designing, optimizing, and understanding the operation of PPA s and other pulsed power devices. The foundation for this task is the 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PCAPPS (Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation). PCAPPS was originally developed by Sankaran (2001, 2005) to model Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LLFA's), which are electrode based devices, and are typically operated in continuous magnetic field to the model, and implementing a first principles, self-consistent algorithm to couple the plasma and power circuit that drives the plasma dynamics.

  6. Linac-accelerator-radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sturm, V; Schlegel, W; Pastyr, O; Treuer, H; Voges, J; Müller, R P; Lorenz, W J

    1993-01-01

    A survey is given of the actual possibilities and limitations of the use of linear accelerators (Linac radiosurgery systems) for intra = cranial radiosurgery. Depending on the collimator size, spherical fields from 5-54 mm in diameter can be irradiated with dose gradients from 10% (large fields) to 20% (small fields) per millimeter distance between surface and treatment volume. This is comparable to the possibilities of Gamma-Knife and Proton-irradiation. Optimal mechanical adjustment of gantry and linac table are necessary for the required stability of the isocenter. Mechanical inaccuracy should be smaller than 0.8 mm. Advanced computerized 3D-treatment planning systems are indispensable prerequisites for accurate treatment and use of the flexibility of the linac system. Future developments are outlined.

  7. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    by Chen et al where the driver, instead of being a laser, is a whistler wave known as the magnetowave plasma accelerator. The application to electron--positron plasmas that are found around pulsars is studied in the paper by Shukla, and to muon acceleration by Peano et al. Electron wakefield experiments are now concentrating on control and optimisation of high-quality beams that can be used as drivers for novel radiation sources. Studies by Thomas et al show that filamentation has a deleterious effect on the production of high quality mono-energetic electron beams and is caused by non-optimal choice of focusing geometry and/or electron density. It is crucial to match the focusing with the right plasma parameters and new types of plasma channels are being developed, such as the magnetically controlled plasma waveguide reported by Froula et al. The magnetic field provides a pressure profile shaping the channel to match the guiding conditions of the incident laser, resulting in predicted electron energies of 3GeV. In the forced laser-wakefield experiment Fang et al show that pump depletion reduces or inhibits the acceleration of electrons. One of the earlier laser acceleration concepts known as the beat wave may be revived due to the work by Kalmykov et al who report on all-optical control of nonlinear focusing of laser beams, allowing for stable propagation over several Rayleigh lengths with pre-injected electrons accelerated beyond 100 MeV. With the increasing number of petawatt lasers, attention is being focused on different acceleration regimes such as stochastic acceleration by counterpropagating laser pulses, the relativistic mirror, or the snow-plough effect leading to single-step acceleration reported by Mendonca. During wakefield acceleration the leading edge of the pulse undergoes frequency downshifting and head erosion as the laser energy is transferred to the wake while the trailing edge of the laser pulse undergoes frequency up-shift. This is commonly known

  8. Pros and Cons of the Acceleration Scheme (NF-IDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Alex; Bogacz, Slawomir

    2008-07-01

    The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and beam shaping can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a nonâ scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. Pros and cons of various stages are discussed here in detail. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. Close proximity of strong solenoids and superc

  9. Computational Tools for Accelerating Carbon Capture Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David; Sahinidis, N V; Cozad, A; Lee, A; Kim, H; Morinelly, J; Eslick, J; Yuan, Z

    2013-06-04

    This presentation reports development of advanced computational tools to accelerate next generation technology development. These tools are to develop an optimized process using rigorous models. They include: Process Models; Simulation-Based Optimization; Optimized Process; Uncertainty Quantification; Algebraic Surrogate Models; and Superstructure Optimization (Determine Configuration).

  10. Future accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1986-05-01

    A general discussion is presented of the acceleration of particles. Upon this foundation is built a categorization scheme into which all accelerators can be placed. Special attention is devoted to accelerators which employ a wake-field mechanism and a restricting theorem is examined. It is shown how the theorem may be circumvented. Comments are made on various acceleration schemes.

  11. ACCELERATION AND THE GIFTED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GIBSON, ARTHUR R.; STEPHANS, THOMAS M.

    ACCELERATION OF PUPILS AND SUBJECTS IS CONSIDERED A MEANS OF EDUCATING THE ACADEMICALLY GIFTED STUDENT. FIVE INTRODUCTORY ARTICLES PROVIDE A FRAMEWORK FOR THINKING ABOUT ACCELERATION. FIVE PROJECT REPORTS OF ACCELERATED PROGRAMS IN OHIO ARE INCLUDED. ACCELERATION IS NOW BEING REGARDED MORE FAVORABLY THAN FORMERLY, BECAUSE METHODS HAVE BEEN…

  12. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  13. Peak acceleration limiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.

    1972-01-01

    Device is described that limits accelerations by shutting off shaker table power very rapidly in acceleration tests. Absolute value of accelerometer signal is used to trigger electronic switch which terminates test and sounds alarm.

  14. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the ... Therapy (SBRT) . top of page How does the equipment work? The linear accelerator uses microwave technology (similar ...

  15. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  16. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  17. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  18. Accelerators, Colliders, and Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, Ernest D.

    2003-12-01

    The author traces his involvement in the evolution of particle accelerators over the past 50 years. He participated in building the first billion-volt accelerator, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, which led to the introduction of the "strong-focusing" method that has in turn led to the very large accelerators and colliders of the present day. The problems of acceleration of spin-polarized protons are also addressed, with discussions of depolarizing resonances and "Siberian snakes" as a technique for mitigating these resonances.

  19. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  20. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  1. Accelerated test design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    The design of an accelerated life test program for electric batteries is discussed. A number of observations and suggestions on the procedures and objectives for conducting an accelerated life test program are presented. Equations based on nonlinear regression analysis for predicting the accelerated life test parameters are discussed.

  2. Elementary principles of linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.; Talman, R.

    1983-09-01

    These lectures come in five sections. The first is this introduction. The second is a short chronology of what are viewed as important milestones in the field. The third covers proton linacs. It introduces elementary concepts such as transit time, shunt impedance, and Q. Critical issues such as phase stability and transverse forces are discussed. The fourth section contains an elementary discussion of waveguide accelerating structures. It can be regarded as an introduction to some of the more advanced treatments of the subject. The final section is devoted to electron accelerators. Taking SLAC as an example, various topics are discussed such as structure design, choice of parameters, frequency optimization, beam current, emittance, bunch length and beam loading. Recent developments and future challenges are mentioned briefly. 41 figures, 4 tables.

  3. Convex Accelerated Maximum Entropy Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Maximum entropy (MaxEnt) spectral reconstruction methods provide a powerful framework for spectral estimation of nonuniformly sampled datasets. Many methods exist within this framework, usually defined based on the magnitude of a Lagrange multiplier in the MaxEnt objective function. An algorithm is presented here that utilizes accelerated first-order convex optimization techniques to rapidly and reliably reconstruct nonuniformly sampled NMR datasets using the principle of maximum entropy. This algorithm – called CAMERA for Convex Accelerated Maximum Entropy Reconstruction Algorithm – is a new approach to spectral reconstruction that exhibits fast, tunable convergence in both constant-aim and constant-lambda modes. A high-performance, open source NMR data processing tool is described that implements CAMERA, and brief comparisons to existing reconstruction methods are made on several example spectra. PMID:26894476

  4. Summary report: working group 2 on 'Plasma Based AccelerationConcepts'

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Leemans, Wim

    1998-09-01

    A summary of the talks, papers and discussion sessions presented in the Working Group on Plasma Based Acceleration Concepts is given within the context of the progress towards a 1 GeV laser driven accelerator module. The topics covered within the Working Group were self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration, standard laser wakefield acceleration, plasma beatwave acceleration, laser guiding and wake excitation in plasma channels, plasma wakefield acceleration, plasma lenses and optical injection techniques for laser wakefield accelerators. An overview will be given of the present status of experimental and theoretical progress as well as an outlook towards the future physics and technological challenges for the development of an optimized accelerator module.

  5. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  6. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  7. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  8. Optimized planning of in-service inspections of local flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based units at the Novovoronezh NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Budanov, V. A.; Golubeva, T. N.

    2015-03-01

    Matters concerned with making efficient use of the information-analytical system on the flow-accelerated corrosion problem in setting up in-service examination of the metal of pipeline elements operating in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered. The principles used to select samples of pipeline elements in planning ultrasonic thickness measurements for timely revealing metal thinning due to flow-accelerated corrosion along with reducing the total amount of measurements in the condensate-feedwater path are discussed.

  9. An introduction to acceleration mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper discusses the acceleration of charged particles by electromagnetic fields, i.e., by fields that are produced by the motion of other charged particles driven by some power source. The mechanisms that are discussed include: Ponderamotive Forces, Acceleration, Plasma Beat Wave Acceleration, Inverse Free Electron Laser Acceleration, Inverse Cerenkov Acceleration, Gravity Acceleration, 2D Linac Acceleration and Conventional Iris Loaded Linac Structure Acceleration. (LSP)

  10. Schooling in Times of Acceleration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddeberg, Magdalena; Hornberg, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Modern societies are characterised by forms of acceleration, which influence social processes. Sociologist Hartmut Rosa has systematised temporal structures by focusing on three categories of social acceleration: technical acceleration, acceleration of social change, and acceleration of the pace of life. All three processes of acceleration are…

  11. Uniformly accelerated black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letelier, Patricio S.; Oliveira, Samuel R.

    2001-09-01

    The static and stationary C metric are examined in a generic framework and their interpretations studied in some detail, especially those with two event horizons, one for the black hole and another for the acceleration. We find that (i) the spacetime of an accelerated static black hole is plagued by either conical singularities or a lack of smoothness and compactness of the black hole horizon, (ii) by using standard black hole thermodynamics we show that accelerated black holes have a higher Hawking temperature than Unruh temperature of the accelerated frame, and (iii) the usual upper bound on the product of the mass and acceleration parameters (<1/27) is just a coordinate artifact. The main results are extended to accelerated rotating black holes with no significant changes.

  12. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  13. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  14. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  15. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  16. The foxhole accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.; Claus, J.

    1992-07-17

    This report examines some properties of a new type of open accelerating structure. It consists of a series of rectangular cavities, which we call foxholes, joined by a beam channel. The power for accelerating the particles comes from an external radiation source and enters the cavities through their open upper surfaces. Analytic and computer calculations are presented showing that the foxhole is a suitable structure for accelerating relativistic electrons.

  17. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  18. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  19. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  20. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  1. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  2. FFAGS for rapid acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Carol J. Johnstone and Shane Koscielniak

    2002-09-30

    When large transverse and longitudinal emittances are to be transported through a circular machine, extremely rapid acceleration holds the advantage that the beam becomes immune to nonlinear resonances because there is insufficient time for amplitudes to build up. Uncooled muon beams exhibit large emittances and require fast acceleration to avoid decay losses and would benefit from this style of acceleration. The approach here employs a fixed-field alternating gradient or FFAG magnet structure and a fixed frequency acceleration system. Acceptance is enhanced by the use only of linear lattice elements, and fixed-frequency rf enables the use of cavities with large shunt resistance and quality factor.

  3. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  4. Acceleration-augmented LQG control of an active magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  5. Acceleration-Augmented LQG Control of an Active Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  6. Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

    2005-06-06

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) at LBNL have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  7. Scaling FFAG accelerator for muon acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, JB.; Planche, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-10-06

    Recent developments in scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators have opened new ways for lattice design, with straight sections, and insertions like dispersion suppressors. Such principles and matching issues are detailed in this paper. An application of these new concepts is presented to overcome problems in the PRISM project.

  8. Scaling FFAG accelerator for muon acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagrange, JB.; Planche, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Recent developments in scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators have opened new ways for lattice design, with straight sections, and insertions like dispersion suppressors. Such principles and matching issues are detailed in this paper. An application of these new concepts is presented to overcome problems in the PRISM project.

  9. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  10. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Pavel Evtushenko

    2007-07-03

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs at Cornell University [1] and Jefferson Lab [2]. We propose to apply GA techniques to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize a system that has been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  11. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  12. Accelerator Science: Why RF?

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-12-21

    Particle accelerators can fire beams of subatomic particles at near the speed of light. The accelerating force is generated using radio frequency technology and a whole lot of interesting features. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it all works.

  13. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  14. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  15. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  16. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  17. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  18. Measuring Model Rocket Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Randy A.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an experiment that measures the acceleration and velocity of a model rocket. Lift-off information is transmitted to a computer that creates a graph of the velocity. Discusses the analysis of the computer-generated data and differences between calculated and experimental velocity and acceleration of several rocket types. (MDH)

  19. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  20. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  1. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-29

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?.

  2. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  3. Electron acceleration by a propagating laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fengchao; Shen Baifei; Zhang Xiaomei; Li Xuemei; Jin Zhangying

    2007-08-15

    Electrons accelerated by a propagating laser pulse of linear or circular polarization in vacuum have been investigated by one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and analytical modeling. A stopping target is used to stop the laser pulse and extract the energetic electrons from the laser field. The effect of the reflected light is taken into account. The maximum electron energy depends on the laser intensity and initial electron energy. There is an optimal acceleration length for electrons to gain maximum energy where electrons meet the peak of the laser pulse. The optimal acceleration length depends strongly on the laser pulse duration and amplitude.

  4. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  5. Progress Toward NLC/GLC Prototype Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J

    2004-09-13

    The accelerator structure groups for NLC (Next Linear Collider) and GLC (Global Linear Colliders) have successfully collaborated on the research and development of a major series of advanced accelerator structures based on room-temperature technology at X-band frequency. The progress in design, simulation, microwave measurement and high gradient tests are summarized in this paper. The recent effort in design and fabrication of the accelerator structure prototype for the main linac is presented in detail including HOM (High Order Mode) suppression and design of HOM couplers and fundamental mode couplers, optimized accelerator cavities as well as plans for future structures.

  6. Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. I.; Hafizi, B.; Ting, A.; Burris, H. R.; Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Ganguly, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-11-01

    The Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator (VBWA) is a particle acceleration scheme which uses the non-linear ponderomotive beating of two different frequency laser beams to accelerate electrons. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate the VBWA is underway at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). This experiment will use the beating of a 1054 nm and 527 nm laser pulse from the NRL T-cubed laser to generate the beat wave and a 4.5 MeV RF electron gun as the electron source. Simulation results and the experimental design will be presented. The suitability of using axicon or higher order Gaussian laser beams will also be discussed.

  7. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  8. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  9. Laser acceleration of ions: recent results and prospects for applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Yu; Brantov, A. V.; Govras, E. A.; Kovalev, V. F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a brief review of recent theoretical and numerical simulation results on the acceleration of ions from various targets irradiated by high-power femtosecond laser pulses. The results include: the optimization of the laser-plasma acceleration of ions over the thickness of a solid target; a new dependence of the energy of accelerated protons from a semi-transparent foil on the incident pulse energy; a theoretical model of plasma layer expansion in the vacuum for a fixed temperature of heated electrons, describing arbitrary regimes of particle acceleration, from the quasineutral flow of a plasma to Coulomb explosion; analytic theories of the relativistic Coulomb explosion of a spherical microtarget and the radial ponderomotive acceleration of ions from a laser channel in a transparent plasma; and calculations optimizing the production of isotopes for medicine using next-generation lasers.

  10. A beam-matching concept for medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, David; Bjelkengren, Ulf; Ottosson, Wiviann; Behrens, Claus F

    2009-01-01

    The flexibility in radiotherapy can be improved if a patient can be moved between any one of the department's medical linear accelerators without the need to change anything in the patient's treatment plan. For this to be possible, the dosimetric characteristics of the various accelerators must be the same, or nearly the same i.e. the accelerators must be beam-matched. During a period of nine months, eight Varian iX accelerators with 6 and 15 MV photon beams and 6-18 MeV electron beams (only four of the eight) were installed at our clinic. All accelerators fulfilled the vendor-defined "fine beam-match" criteria, and a more extensive set of measurements was carried out during commissioning. The measured absorbed dose data for each accelerator were compared with the first accelerator, chosen as reference, and the TPS calculations. Two of the eight accelerators showed a larger discrepancy for the 15 MV beam not revealed by the vendor-defined acceptance criteria, whereas the other six accelerators were satisfactorily matched. The beam-matching acceptance criteria defined by the vendor are not strict enough to guarantee optimal beam-match. Deviations related to dose calculations and to beam-matched accelerators may add up. The safest and most practical way to ensure that all accelerators are within clinical acceptable accuracy is to include TPS calculations in the evaluation. Further, comparisons between measurements and calculations should be done in absolute dose terms.

  11. Accelerating Scientific Computations using FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pell, O.; Atasu, K.; Mencer, O.

    Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are semiconductor devices that contain a grid of programmable cells, which the user configures to implement any digital circuit of up to a few million gates. Modern FPGAs allow the user to reconfigure these circuits many times each second, making FPGAs fully programmable and general purpose. Recent FPGA technology provides sufficient resources to tackle scientific applications on large-scale parallel systems. As a case study, we implement the Fast Fourier Transform [1] in a flexible floating point implementation. We utilize A Stream Compiler [2] (ASC) which combines C++ syntax with flexible floating point support by providing a 'HWfloat' data-type. The resulting FFT can be targeted to a variety of FPGA platforms in FFTW-style, though not yet completely automatically. The resulting FFT circuit can be adapted to the particular resources available on the system. The optimal implementation of an FFT accelerator depends on the length and dimensionality of the FFT, the available FPGA area, the available hard DSP blocks, the FPGA board architecture, and the precision and range of the application [3]. Software-style object-orientated abstractions allow us to pursue an accelerated pace of development by maximizing re-use of design patterns. ASC allows a few core hardware descriptions to generate hundreds of different circuit variants to meet particular speed, area and precision goals. The key to achieving maximum acceleration of FFT computation is to match memory and compute bandwidths so that maximum use is made of computational resources. Modern FPGAs contain up to hundreds of independent SRAM banks to store intermediate results, providing ample scope for optimizing memory parallelism. At 175Mhz, one of Maxeler's Radix-4 FFT cores computes 4x as many 1024pt FFTs per second as a dual Pentium-IV Xeon machine running FFTW. Eight such parallel cores fit onto the largest FPGA in the Xilinx Virtex-4 family, providing a 32x speed-up over

  12. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  13. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  14. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  15. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  17. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  18. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  19. Principles of Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs*, Richard J.

    The basic concepts involved in induction accelerators are introduced in this chapter. The objective is to provide a foundation for the more detailed coverage of key technology elements and specific applications in the following chapters. A wide variety of induction accelerators are discussed in the following chapters, from the high current linear electron accelerator configurations that have been the main focus of the original developments, to circular configurations like the ion synchrotrons that are the subject of more recent research. The main focus in the present chapter is on the induction module containing the magnetic core that plays the role of a transformer in coupling the pulsed power from the modulator to the charged particle beam. This is the essential common element in all these induction accelerators, and an understanding of the basic processes involved in its operation is the main objective of this chapter. (See [1] for a useful and complementary presentation of the basic principles in induction linacs.)

  20. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  1. DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-10-18

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact pulsed power device where the pulse forming lines, switching, and vacuum wall are integrated into a single compact geometry. For this effort, we initiated a extensive compact pulsed power development program and have pursued the study of switching (gas, oil, laser induced surface flashover and photoconductive), dielectrics (ceramics and nanoparticle composites), pulse forming line topologies (asymmetric and symmetric Blumleins and zero integral pulse forming lines), and multilayered vacuum insulator (HGI) technology. Finally, we fabricated an accelerator cell for test on ETAII (a 5.5 MeV, 2 kA, 70 ns pulsewidth electron beam accelerator). We review our past results and report on the progress of accelerator cell testing.

  2. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  3. ELECTROMAGNETIC SIMULATIONS OF DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR STRUCTURES FOR ELECTRON BEAM ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S D; Poole, B R

    2005-05-05

    Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA) technology incorporates the energy storage mechanism, the switching mechanism, and the acceleration mechanism for electron beams. Electromagnetic simulations of DWA structures includes these effects and also details of the switch configuration and how that switch time affects the electric field pulse which accelerates the particle beam. DWA structures include both bi-linear and bi-spiral configurations with field gradients on the order of 20MV/m and the simulations include the effects of the beampipe, the beampipe walls, the DWA High Gradient Insulator (HGI) insulating stack, wakefield impedance calculations, and test particle trajectories with low emittance gain. Design trade-offs include the transmission line impedance (typically a few ohms), equilibration ring optimization, driving switch inductances, and layer-to-layer coupling effects and the associated affect on the acceleration pulse's peak value.

  4. Designing reliability into accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, A.

    1992-07-01

    Future accelerators will have to provide a high degree of reliability. Quality must be designed in right from the beginning and must remain a central theme throughout the project. The problem is similar to the problems facing US industry today, and examples of the successful application of quality engineering will be given. Different aspects of an accelerator project will be addressed: Concept, Design, Motivation, Management Techniques, and Fault Diagnosis. The importance of creating and maintaining a coherent team will be stressed.

  5. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  6. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Briner, Clifton F.; Martin, Samuel B.

    1993-01-01

    A rolamite acceleration sensor which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently.

  7. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P.; Briner, C.F.; Martin, S.B.

    1993-12-21

    A rolamite acceleration sensor is described which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently. 6 figures.

  8. Collective field accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Luce, John S.

    1978-01-01

    A collective field accelerator which operates with a vacuum diode and utilizes a grooved cathode and a dielectric anode that operates with a relativistic electron beam with a .nu./.gamma. of .about. 1, and a plurality of dielectric lenses having an axial magnetic field thereabout to focus the collectively accelerated electrons and ions which are ejected from the anode. The anode and lenses operate as unoptimized r-f cavities which modulate and focus the beam.

  9. Accelerators for America's Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Particle accelerator, a powerful tool to energize beams of charged particles to a desired speed and energy, has been the working horse for investigating the fundamental structure of matter and fundermental laws of nature. Most known examples are the 2-mile long Stanford Linear Accelerator at SLAC, the high energy proton and anti-proton collider Tevatron at FermiLab, and Large Hadron Collider that is currently under operation at CERN. During the less than a century development of accelerator science and technology that led to a dazzling list of discoveries, particle accelerators have also found various applications beyond particle and nuclear physics research, and become an indispensible part of the economy. Today, one can find a particle accelerator at almost every corner of our lives, ranging from the x-ray machine at the airport security to radiation diagnostic and therapy in hospitals. This presentation will give a brief introduction of the applications of this powerful tool in fundermental research as well as in industry. Challenges in accelerator science and technology will also be briefly presented

  10. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  11. Precession dynamics of the relativistic electron spin in laser-plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pugacheva, D V; Andreev, N E

    2016-01-31

    A model is developed to study the precession dynamics of the relativistic electron spin in a laser-plasma accelerator versus the initial energy of the electron and its injection phase. Optimal parameters providing minimum depolarisation of the electron in the acceleration process are determined. (laser -plasma acceleration of electrons)

  12. Multileaf collimator for Coline medical accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Plebański, Grzegorz; Sajna, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) allows advanced field shaping for radiation therapy delivered with medical accelerators. In this paper theoretical considerations and scientific studies of a new MLC design are described. Considered multileaf collimator model comprises of a multiplicity of tungsten leaves of 1 cm width projected at isocenter plane. To ensure compatibility of a new MLC solution with different accelerator types as well as to assure high reliability in irradiated environment and presence of strong magnetic field, a complex and independent control system had to be developed. It comprises of two modules - one placed in the accelerator treatment head and the other one placed in the control room. Both of them ensure high reliability and treatment quality while working in harsh conditions. Mechanical design and leaf shape optimization algorithm based on a ray tracing method are also described in details. Adapted solutions allowed providing minimized and uniform radiation penumbrae in the full range of leaves positions which is crucial for modern advanced radiotherapy.

  13. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  14. Gait analysis using gravitational acceleration measured by wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ryo; Tadano, Shigeru; Todoh, Masahiro; Morikawa, Manabu; Nakayasu, Minoru; Yoshinari, Satoshi

    2009-02-09

    A novel method for measuring human gait posture using wearable sensor units is proposed. The sensor units consist of a tri-axial acceleration sensor and three gyro sensors aligned on three axes. The acceleration and angular velocity during walking were measured with seven sensor units worn on the abdomen and the lower limb segments (both thighs, shanks and feet). The three-dimensional positions of each joint are calculated from each segment length and joint angle. Joint angle can be estimated mechanically from the gravitational acceleration along the anterior axis of the segment. However, the acceleration data during walking includes three major components; translational acceleration, gravitational acceleration and external noise. Therefore, an optimization analysis was represented to separate only the gravitational acceleration from the acceleration data. Because the cyclic patterns of acceleration data can be found during constant walking, a FFT analysis was applied to obtain some characteristic frequencies in it. A pattern of gravitational acceleration was assumed using some parts of these characteristic frequencies. Every joint position was calculated from the pattern under the condition of physiological motion range of each joint. An optimized pattern of the gravitational acceleration was selected as a solution of an inverse problem. Gaits of three healthy volunteers were measured by walking for 20s on a flat floor. As a result, the acceleration data of every segment was measured simultaneously. The characteristic three-dimensional walking could be shown by the expression using a stick figure model. In addition, the trajectories of the knee joint in the horizontal plane could be checked by visual imaging on a PC. Therefore, this method provides important quantitive information for gait diagnosis.

  15. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yong; Hirshfield, Jay Leonard

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  16. New Advanced Dielectric Materials for Accelerator Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.

    2010-11-04

    We present our recent results on the development and experimental testing of advanced dielectric materials that are capable of supporting the high RF electric fields generated by electron beams or pulsed high power microwaves. These materials have been optimized or specially designed for accelerator applications. The materials discussed here include low loss microwave ceramics, quartz, Chemical Vapor Deposition diamonds and nonlinear Barium Strontium Titanate based ferroelectrics.

  17. Laser Ion Acceleration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Shigeo; Nagashima, T.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2013-10-01

    An intense femtosecond pulsed laser is employed to accelerate ions. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching, the ion particle energy control, etc. In the study particle computer simulations were performed to solve the issues, and each component was designed to control the ion beam quality. When an intense laser illuminates a target, electrons in the target are accelerated and leave from the target; temporarily a strong electric field is formed between the high-energy electrons and the target ions, and the target ions are accelerated. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions was improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or by a near critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation was realized by holes behind the solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching were successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. The present study proposed a novel concept for a future compact laser ion accelerator, based on each component study required to control the ion beam quality and parameters. Partly supported by JSPS, MEXT, CORE, Japan/US Cooperation program, ASHULA and ILE/Osaka University.

  18. Dielectric laser accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, R. Joel; Noble, Robert J.; Bane, Karl; Dowell, David H.; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Spencer, James E.; Tantawi, Sami; Wu, Ziran; Byer, Robert L.; Peralta, Edgar; Soong, Ken; Chang, Chia-Ming; Montazeri, Behnam; Wolf, Stephen J.; Cowan, Benjamin; Dawson, Jay; Gai, Wei; Hommelhoff, Peter; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Jing, Chunguang; McGuinness, Christopher; Palmer, Robert B.; Naranjo, Brian; Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Mizrahi, Amit; Schachter, Levi; Sears, Christopher; Werner, Gregory R.; Yoder, Rodney B.

    2014-10-01

    The use of infrared lasers to power optical-scale lithographically fabricated particle accelerators is a developing area of research that has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The physics and technology of this approach is reviewed, which is referred to as dielectric laser acceleration (DLA). In the DLA scheme operating at typical laser pulse lengths of 0.1 to 1 ps, the laser damage fluences for robust dielectric materials correspond to peak surface electric fields in the GV /m regime. The corresponding accelerating field enhancement represents a potential reduction in active length of the accelerator between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. Power sources for DLA-based accelerators (lasers) are less costly than microwave sources (klystrons) for equivalent average power levels due to wider availability and private sector investment. Because of the high laser-to-particle coupling efficiency, required pulse energies are consistent with tabletop microJoule class lasers. Combined with the very high (MHz) repetition rates these lasers can provide, the DLA approach appears promising for a variety of applications, including future high-energy physics colliders, compact light sources, and portable medical scanners and radiative therapy machines.

  19. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  20. Backward Raman Amplifier for Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Joshua; Masson-Laborde, Paul-Edouard; Huller, Stefan; Rozmus, Wojciech; Wilks, Scott C.

    2016-10-01

    Particle in cell simulations via SCPIC and theoretical work on Raman amplification and laser wake field acceleration will be presented. Laser energy depletion has been shown to be a limiting factor during wake field acceleration. This work focuses on optimizing parameters for Raman amplification to work in conjunction with wake field acceleration in order in order to sustain an accelerating laser pulse as it generates plasma waves. It has been shown that laser pulses undergo red shifting during wake generation. Our work demonstrates that this red shifting results in a detuning between pump and seed in the backward Raman Amplifier. This detuning limits the amount of energy that can be transferred from the pump to the seed, and places new limits on backward Raman amplification. To overcome this limiting factor, this study makes use of a chirped pump allowing for extended coupling to the accelerating pulse. Three wave coupling model of Raman amplifier with a frequency shift term due to wake field will also be discussed and compared with PIC simulations.

  1. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  2. Surfzone alongshore advective accelerations: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The sources, magnitudes, and impacts of non-linear advective accelerations on alongshore surfzone currents are investigated with observations and a numerical model. Previous numerical modeling results have indicated that advective accelerations are an important contribution to the alongshore force balance, and are required to understand spatial variations in alongshore currents (which may result in spatially variable morphological change). However, most prior observational studies have neglected advective accelerations in the alongshore force balance. Using a numerical model (Delft3D) to predict optimal sensor locations, a dense array of 26 colocated current meters and pressure sensors was deployed between the shoreline and 3-m water depth over a 200 by 115 m region near Duck, NC in fall 2013. The array included 7 cross- and 3 alongshore transects. Here, observational and numerical estimates of the dominant forcing terms in the alongshore balance (pressure and radiation-stress gradients) and the advective acceleration terms will be compared with each other. In addition, the numerical model will be used to examine the force balance, including sources of velocity gradients, at a higher spatial resolution than possible with the instrument array. Preliminary numerical results indicate that at O(10-100 m) alongshore scales, bathymetric variations and the ensuing alongshore variations in the wave field and subsequent forcing are the dominant sources of the modeled velocity gradients and advective accelerations. Additional simulations and analysis of the observations will be presented. Funded by NSF and ASDR&E.

  3. Optimally Stopped Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinci, Walter; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-11-01

    We combine the fields of heuristic optimization and optimal stopping. We propose a strategy for benchmarking randomized optimization algorithms that minimizes the expected total cost for obtaining a good solution with an optimal number of calls to the solver. To do so, rather than letting the objective function alone define a cost to be minimized, we introduce a further cost-per-call of the algorithm. We show that this problem can be formulated using optimal stopping theory. The expected cost is a flexible figure of merit for benchmarking probabilistic solvers that can be computed when the optimal solution is not known and that avoids the biases and arbitrariness that affect other measures. The optimal stopping formulation of benchmarking directly leads to a real-time optimal-utilization strategy for probabilistic optimizers with practical impact. We apply our formulation to benchmark simulated annealing on a class of maximum-2-satisfiability (MAX2SAT) problems. We also compare the performance of a D-Wave 2X quantum annealer to the Hamze-Freitas-Selby (HFS) solver, a specialized classical heuristic algorithm designed for low-tree-width graphs. On a set of frustrated-loop instances with planted solutions defined on up to N =1098 variables, the D-Wave device is 2 orders of magnitude faster than the HFS solver, and, modulo known caveats related to suboptimal annealing times, exhibits identical scaling with problem size.

  4. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  5. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried; Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S. E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ΛCDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  6. Uniform acceleration in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Yaakov; Scarr, Tzvi

    2015-10-01

    We extend de la Fuente and Romero's (Gen Relativ Gravit 47:33, 2015) defining equation for uniform acceleration in a general curved spacetime from linear acceleration to the full Lorentz covariant uniform acceleration. In a flat spacetime background, we have explicit solutions. We use generalized Fermi-Walker transport to parallel transport the Frenet basis along the trajectory. In flat spacetime, we obtain velocity and acceleration transformations from a uniformly accelerated system to an inertial system. We obtain the time dilation between accelerated clocks. We apply our acceleration transformations to the motion of a charged particle in a constant electromagnetic field and recover the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation.

  7. Microelectromechanical acceleration-sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Robb M.; Shul, Randy J.; Polosky, Marc A.; Hoke, Darren A.; Vernon, George E.

    2006-12-12

    An acceleration-sensing apparatus is disclosed which includes a moveable shuttle (i.e. a suspended mass) and a latch for capturing and holding the shuttle when an acceleration event is sensed above a predetermined threshold level. The acceleration-sensing apparatus provides a switch closure upon sensing the acceleration event and remains latched in place thereafter. Examples of the acceleration-sensing apparatus are provided which are responsive to an acceleration component in a single direction (i.e. a single-sided device) or to two oppositely-directed acceleration components (i.e. a dual-sided device). A two-stage acceleration-sensing apparatus is also disclosed which can sense two acceleration events separated in time. The acceleration-sensing apparatus of the present invention has applications, for example, in an automotive airbag deployment system.

  8. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  9. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  10. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  11. Radioisotope Dating with Accelerators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Richard A.

    1979-01-01

    Explains a new method of detecting radioactive isotopes by counting their accelerated ions rather than the atoms that decay during the counting period. This method increases the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, and allows one to find the ages of much older and smaller samples. (GA)

  12. Accelerated Management Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Kenn

    1974-01-01

    Western Electric's accelerated management development program for hand picked college graduate students consists of a high risk training project in which the management candidate accomplishes his task or is terminated. The success of such projects puts candidates in third level management in seven years or half the normal time. (DS)

  13. FPGA Verification Accelerator (FVAX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Jane; Burke, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Is Verification Acceleration Possible? - Increasing the visibility of the internal nodes of the FPGA results in much faster debug time - Forcing internal signals directly allows a problem condition to be setup very quickly center dot Is this all? - No, this is part of a comprehensive effort to improve the JPL FPGA design and V&V process.

  14. Combined generating-accelerating buncher for compact linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, E. A.; Matsievskiy, S. V.; Sobenin, N. P.; Sokolov, I. D.; Zavadtsev, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Described in the previous article [1] method of the power extraction from the modulated electron beam has been applied to the compact standing wave electron linear accelerator feeding system, which doesnt require any connection waveguides between the power source and the accelerator itself [2]. Generating and accelerating bunches meet in the hybrid accelerating cell operating at TM020 mode, thus the accelerating module is placed on the axis of the generating module, which consists from the pulsed high voltage electron sources and electrons dumps. This combination makes the accelerator very compact in size which is very valuable for the modern applications such as portable inspection sources. Simulations and geometry cold tests are presented.

  15. Neurodegeneration in accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Moren

    2016-11-01

    The growing proportion of elderly people represents an increasing economic burden, not least because of age-associated diseases that pose a significant cost to the health service. Finding possible interventions to age-associated disorders therefore have wide ranging implications. A number of genetically defined accelerated aging diseases have been characterized that can aid in our understanding of aging. Interestingly, all these diseases are associated with defects in the maintenance of our genome. A subset of these disorders, Cockayne syndrome, Xeroderma pigmentosum group A and ataxia-telangiectasia, show neurological involvement reminiscent of what is seen in primary human mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cells converting energy stored in oxygen, sugar, fat, and protein into ATP, the energetic currency of our body. Emerging evidence has linked this organelle to aging and finding mitochondrial dysfunction in accelerated aging disorders thereby strengthens the mitochondrial theory of aging. This theory states that an accumulation of damage to the mitochondria may underlie the process of aging. Indeed, it appears that some accelerated aging disorders that show neurodegeneration also have mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial alterations may be secondary to defects in nuclear DNA repair. Indeed, nuclear DNA damage may lead to increased energy consumption, alterations in mitochondrial ATP production and defects in mitochondrial recycling, a term called mitophagy. These changes may be caused by activation of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase 1 (PARP1), an enzyme that responds to DNA damage. Upon activation PARP1 utilizes key metabolites that attenuate pathways that are normally protective for the cell. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 or reconstitution of the metabolites rescues the changes caused by PARP1 hyperactivation and in many cases reverse the phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. This implies that modulation

  16. Menopause accelerates biological aging

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Morgan E.; Lu, Ake T.; Chen, Brian H.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E.; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D. J.; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R.; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Horvath, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the “epigenetic clock”), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  17. Staging and laser acceleration of ions in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Antonio; Hafizi, Bahman; Helle, Michael; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Gordon, Daniel; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Markus; Miao, Chenlong; Dover, Nicholas; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Ettlinger, Oliver

    2017-03-01

    Accelerating ions from rest in a plasma requires extra considerations because of their heavy mass. Low phase velocity fields or quasi-electrostatic fields are often necessary, either by operating above or near the critical density or by applying other slow wave generating mechanisms. Solid targets have been a favorite and have generated many good results. High density gas targets have also been reported to produce energetic ions. It is interesting to consider acceleration of ions in laser-driven plasma configurations that will potentially allow continuous acceleration in multiple consecutive stages. The plasma will be derived from gaseous targets, producing plasma densities slightly below the critical plasma density (underdense) for the driving laser. Such a plasma is experimentally robust, being repeatable and relatively transparent to externally injected ions from a previous stage. When optimized, multiple stages of this underdense laser plasma acceleration mechanism can progressively accelerate the ions to a high final energy. For a light mass ion such as the proton, relativistic velocities could be reached, making it suitable for further acceleration by high phase velocity plasma accelerators to energies appropriate for High Energy Physics applications. Negatively charged ions such as antiprotons could be similarly accelerated in this multi-staged ion acceleration scheme.

  18. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  19. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    PubMed

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  20. Efficient Optical Energy Harvesting in Self-Accelerating Beams

    PubMed Central

    Bongiovanni, Domenico; Hu, Yi; Wetzel, Benjamin; Robles, Raul A.; Mendoza González, Gregorio; Marti-Panameño, Erwin A.; Chen, Zhigang; Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of energetically confined self-accelerating optical beams propagating along various convex trajectories. We show that, under an appropriate transverse compression of their spatial spectra, these self-accelerating beams can exhibit a dramatic enhancement of their peak intensity and a significant decrease of their transverse expansion, yet retaining both the expected acceleration profile and the intrinsic self-healing properties. We found our experimental results to be in excellent agreement with the numerical simulations. We expect further applications in such contexts where power budget and optimal spatial confinement can be important limiting factors. PMID:26299360

  1. A New Cavity Design For Medium Beta Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    He, Feisi; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert A.

    2014-02-01

    Heavy duty or cw, superconducting proton and heavy ion accelerators are being proposed and constructed worldwide. The total length of the machine is one of the main drivers in terms of cost. Thus hwr and spoke cavities at medium beta are usually optimized to achieve low surface field and high gradient. A novel accelerating structure at beta=0.5 evolved from spoke cavity is proposed, with lower surface fields but slightly higher heat load. It would be an interesting option for pulsed and cw accelerators with beam energy of more than 200mev/u.

  2. Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-05-17

    Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

  3. Terascale Optimal PDE Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    David Keyes

    2009-07-28

    The Terascale Optimal PDE Solvers (TOPS) Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (ISIC) was created to develop and implement algorithms and support scientific investigations performed by DOE-sponsored researchers. These simulations often involve the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on terascale computers. The TOPS Center researched, developed and deployed an integrated toolkit of open-source, optimal complexity solvers for the nonlinear partial differential equations that arise in many DOE application areas, including fusion, accelerator design, global climate change and reactive chemistry. The algorithms created as part of this project were also designed to reduce current computational bottlenecks by orders of magnitude on terascale computers, enabling scientific simulation on a scale heretofore impossible.

  4. Review of ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1990-06-01

    The field of ion acceleration to higher energies has grown rapidly in the last years. Many new facilities as well as substantial upgrades of existing facilities have extended the mass and energy range of available beams. Perhaps more significant for the long-term development of the field has been the expansion in the applications of these beams, and the building of facilities dedicated to areas outside of nuclear physics. This review will cover many of these new developments. Emphasis will be placed on accelerators with final energies above 50 MeV/amu. Facilities such as superconducting cyclotrons and storage rings are adequately covered in other review papers, and so will not be covered here.

  5. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  6. Commissioning the GTA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Bowling, S.; Brown, S.; Cole, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Garnett, R.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Johnson, K.F.; Kerstiens, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P. Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Yuan, V.; Connolly, R.; Weiss, R.; Saadatmand, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is supported by the Strategic Defense command as part of their Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program. Neutral particles have the advantage that in space they are unaffected by the earth`s magnetic field and travel in straight lines unless they enter the earth`s atmosphere and become charged by stripping. Heavy particles are difficult to stop and can probe the interior of space vehicles; hence, NPB can function as a discriminator between warheads and decoys. We are using GTA to resolve the physics and engineering issues related to accelerating, focusing, and steering a high-brightness, high-current H{sup -} beam and then neutralizing it. Our immediate goal is to produce a 24-MeV, 50mA device with a 2% duty factor.

  7. Commissioning the GTA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Bowling, S.; Brown, S.; Cole, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Garnett, R.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Johnson, K.F.; Kerstiens, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P. Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Yuan, V. ); Connolly, R.; Weiss, R. (Gr

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is supported by the Strategic Defense command as part of their Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program. Neutral particles have the advantage that in space they are unaffected by the earth's magnetic field and travel in straight lines unless they enter the earth's atmosphere and become charged by stripping. Heavy particles are difficult to stop and can probe the interior of space vehicles; hence, NPB can function as a discriminator between warheads and decoys. We are using GTA to resolve the physics and engineering issues related to accelerating, focusing, and steering a high-brightness, high-current H{sup -} beam and then neutralizing it. Our immediate goal is to produce a 24-MeV, 50mA device with a 2% duty factor.

  8. Auroral ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalimov, S. L.

    From the altitude of 500 km to 15 R sub E everywhere conic like distributions of H+, O+, He+ ions are moving upwards from the ionosphere along the geomagnetic field lines in the auroral zone. The distributed ions suggest the existence of ion transverse acceleration mechanisms (ITAM) acting below the observation point. The more plausible mechanisms are connected with the resonance of the type wave particle between ions and the observed EIC and LH waves and are also due to the existence of the local transverse electric fields in the ionoshere and the magnetosphere. The known ion transverse acceleration mechanisms were complemented by new results. The conical distributions of ionospheric ions at different altitudes in the auroral zone are pointed out.

  9. Review of accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrin, J.L.

    1980-05-01

    Some of the problems associated with the monitoring of accelerator beams, particularly storage rings' beams, are reviewed along with their most common solutions. The various electrode structures used for the measurement of beam current, beam position, and the detection of the bunches' transverse oscillations, yield pulses with sub-nanosecond widths. The electronics for the processing of these short pulses involves wide band techniques and circuits usually not readily available from industry or the integrated circuit market: passive or active, successive integrations, linear gating, sample-and-hold circuits with nanosecond acquisition time, etc. This report also presents the work performed recently for monitoring the ultrashort beams of colliding linear accelerators or single-pass colliders. To minimize the beam emittance, the beam position must be measured with a high resolution, and digitized on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Experimental results obtained with the Stanford two-mile Linac single bunches are included.

  10. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-04-12

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists.

  11. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, Lawrie E.; Jachim, Stephen P.; Natter, Eckard F.

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  12. Pulsed electromagnetic gas acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental data were combined with one-dimensional conservation relations to yield information on the energy deposition ratio in a parallel-plate accelerator, where the downstream flow was confined to a constant area channel. Approximately 70% of the total input power was detected in the exhaust flow, of which only about 20% appeared as directed kinetic energy, thus implying that a downstream expansion to convert chamber enthalpy into kinetic energy must be an important aspect of conventional high power MPD arcs. Spectroscopic experiments on a quasi-steady MPD argon accelerator verified the presence of A(III) and the absence of A(I), and indicated an azimuthal structure in the jet related to the mass injection locations. Measurements of pressure in the arc chamber and impact pressure in the exhaust jet using a piezocrystal backed by a Plexiglas rod were in good agreement with the electromagnetic thrust model.

  13. Pulsed Drift Tube Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.

    2004-10-25

    The pulsed drift-tube accelerator (DTA) concept was revived by Joe Kwan and John Staples and is being considered for the HEDP/WDM application. It could be used to reach the full energy or as an intermediate accelerator between the diode and a high gradient accelerator such as multi-beam r.f. In the earliest LBNL HIF proposals and conceptual drivers it was used as an extended injector to reach energies where an induction linac with magnetic quadrupoles is the best choice. For HEDP, because of the very short pulse duration, the DTA could provide an acceleration rate of about 1MV/m. This note is divided into two parts: the first, a design based on existing experience; the second, an optimistic extrapolation. The first accelerates 16 parallel K{sup +} beams at a constant line charge density of 0.25{micro} C/m per beam to 10 MeV; the second uses a stripper and charge selector at around 4MeV followed by further acceleration to reach 40 MeV. Both benefit from more compact sources than the present 2MV injector source, although that beam is the basis of the first design and is a viable option. A pulsed drift-tube accelerator was the first major HIF experiment at LBNL. It was designed to produce a 2{micro}s rectangular 1 Ampere C{sub s}{sup +} beam at 2MeV. It ran comfortably at 1.6MeV for several years, then at lower voltages and currents for other experiments, and remnants of that experiment are in use in present experiments, still running 25 years later. The 1A current, completely equivalent to 1.8A K{sup +}, was chosen to be intermediate between the beamlets appropriate for a multi-beam accelerator, and a single beam of, say, 10A, at injection energies. The original driver scenarios using one large beam on each side of the reactor rapidly fell out of favor because of the very high transverse and longitudinal fields from the beam space charge, circa 1MV/cm and 250 kV/cm respectively, near the chamber and because of aberrations in focusing a large diameter beam down to a 1

  14. SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2012-05-10

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration is extended to the case of superdiffusive transport, i.e., when the mean square deviation grows proportionally to t{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} > 1. Superdiffusion can be described by a statistical process called Levy random walk, in which the propagator is not a Gaussian but it exhibits power-law tails. By using the propagator appropriate for Levy random walk, it is found that the indices of energy spectra of particles are harder than those obtained where a normal diffusion is envisaged, with the spectral index decreasing with the increase of {alpha}. A new scaling for the acceleration time is also found, allowing substantially shorter times than in the case of normal diffusion. Within this framework we can explain a number of observations of flat spectra in various astrophysical and heliospheric contexts, for instance, for the Crab Nebula and the termination shock of the solar wind.

  15. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  16. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence.

  17. Linear induction accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  18. Compact pulsed accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, M.J.; Schneider, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of fast pulses from a current charged transmission line and opening switch is described. By employing a plasma focus as an opening switch and diode in the prototype device, a proton beam of peak energy 250 keV is produced. The time integrated energy spectrum of the beam is constructed from a Thomson spectrograph. Applications of this device as an inexpensive and portable charged particle accelerator are discussed. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. ION ACCELERATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.; Martin, J.A.

    1960-02-23

    Well focused, intense ion beams are obtained by providing a multi- apertured source grid in front of an ion source chamber and an accelerating multi- apertured grid closely spaced from and in alignment with the source grid. The longest dimensions of the elongated apertures in the grids are normal to the direction of the magnetic field used with the device. Large ion currents may be withdrawn from the source, since they do not pass through any small focal region between the grids.

  20. Frontiers of accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.

    1992-08-01

    New technology has permitted significant performance improvements of established instrumentation techniques including beam position and profile monitoring. Fundamentally new profile monitor strategies are required for the next generation of accelerators, especially linear colliders (LC). Beams in these machines may be three orders of magnitude smaller than typical beams in present colliders. In this paper we review both the present performance levels achieved by conventional systems and present some new ideas for future colliders.

  1. Accelerator simulation using computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Zambre, Y.; Corbett, W.

    1992-01-01

    Every accelerator or storage ring system consists of a charged particle beam propagating through a beam line. Although a number of computer programs exits that simulate the propagation of a beam in a given beam line, only a few provide the capabilities for designing, commissioning and operating the beam line. This paper shows how a multi-track'' simulation and analysis code can be used for these applications.

  2. Accelerator simulation using computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Zambre, Y.; Corbett, W.

    1992-01-01

    Every accelerator or storage ring system consists of a charged particle beam propagating through a beam line. Although a number of computer programs exits that simulate the propagation of a beam in a given beam line, only a few provide the capabilities for designing, commissioning and operating the beam line. This paper shows how a ``multi-track`` simulation and analysis code can be used for these applications.

  3. Acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2015-07-16

    The presentation begins with colorful depictions of solar x-ray flares and references to pulsar phenomena. Plasma reconnection is complex, could be x-point dominated or turbulent, field lines could break due to either resistivity or non-ideal effects, such as electron pressure anisotropy. Electron acceleration is sometimes observed, and sometimes not. One way to study this complex problem is to have many examples of the process (reconnection) and compare them; the other way is to simplify and come to something robust. Ideal MHD (E=0) turbulence driven by magnetic energy is assumed, and the first-order acceleration is sought. It is found that dissipation in big (length >100 ion skin depths) current sheets is universal and independent on microscopic resistivity and the mean imposed field; particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. One example of such flow is spontaneous reconnection. This explains hot electrons with a power-law tail in solar flares, as well as ultrashort time variability in some astrophysical sources.

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples.

  5. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    The application of electric propulsion to communications satellites, however, has been limited to the use of hydrazine thrusters with electric heaters for thrust and specific impulse augmentation. These electrothermal thrusters operate at specific impulse levels of approximately 300 s with heater powers of about 500 W. Low power arcjets (1-3 kW) are currently being investigated as a way to increase specific impulse levels to approximately 500 s. Ion propulsion systems can easily produce specific impulses of 3000 s or greater, but have yet to be applied to communications satellites. The reasons most often given for not using ion propulsion systems are their high level of overall complexity, low thrust with long burn times, and the difficulty of integrating the propulsion system into existing commercial spacecraft busses. The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass.

  6. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  7. ACCELERATION INTEGRATING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Wilkes, D.F.

    1961-08-29

    An acceleration responsive device is described. A housing has at one end normally open electrical contacts and contains a piston system with a first part of non-magnetic material having metering orifices in the side walls for forming an air bearing between it and the walls of the housing; this first piston part is normally held against the other end of the housing from the noted contacts by a second piston or reset part. The reset part is of partly magnetic material, is separable from the flrst piston part, and is positioned within the housing intermediate the contacts and the first piston part. A magnet carried by the housing imposes a retaining force upon the reset part, along with a helical compression spring that is between the reset part and the end with the contacts. When a predetermined acceleration level is attained, the reset part overcomes the bias or retaining force provided by the magnet and the spring'' snaps'' into a depression in the housing adjacent the contacts. The first piston part is then free to move toward the contacts with its movement responsive tc acceleration forces and the metering orifices. (AEC)

  8. French nuclear physics accelerator opens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2016-12-01

    A new €140m particle accelerator for nuclear physics located at the French Large Heavy Ion National Accelerator (GANIL) in Caen was inaugurated last month in a ceremony attended by French president François Hollande.

  9. GAMER: GPU-accelerated Adaptive MEsh Refinement code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2016-12-01

    GAMER (GPU-accelerated Adaptive MEsh Refinement) serves as a general-purpose adaptive mesh refinement + GPU framework and solves hydrodynamics with self-gravity. The code supports adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), hydrodynamics with self-gravity, and a variety of GPU-accelerated hydrodynamic and Poisson solvers. It also supports hybrid OpenMP/MPI/GPU parallelization, concurrent CPU/GPU execution for performance optimization, and Hilbert space-filling curve for load balance. Although the code is designed for simulating galaxy formation, it can be easily modified to solve a variety of applications with different governing equations. All optimization strategies implemented in the code can be inherited straightforwardly.

  10. Plasma accelerator experiments in Yugoslavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purić, J.; Astashynski, V. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Dojčinovié, I. P.

    2002-12-01

    An overview is given of the results obtained in the Plasma Accelerator Experiments in Belgrade, using quasi-stationary high current plasma accelerators constructed within the framework of the Yugoslavia-Belarus Joint Project. So far, the following plasma accelerators have been realized: Magnetoplasma Compressor type (MPC); MPC Yu type; one stage Erosive Plasma Dynamic System (EPDS) and, in final stage of construction two stage Quasi-Stationary High Current Plasma Accelerator (QHPA).

  11. Science and Technology of Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerio Lizarraga, Cristhian; Castilla Loaeza, Alejandro; Guillermo Cantón, Gerardo; Duarte, Carlos; Chavez Valenzuela, Daniel; Hernández Chahín, Karim; Cuna, Humberto Maury; Medina Medrano, Luis; Reyes Herrera, Juan; Sosa Güitrón, Salvador; Valdivia García, Alan; Rendón, Bruce Yee

    2016-10-01

    The Mexican Particle Accelerator Community (CMAP) was created in 2015 and currently its members participate in different experiments around the world. Using their expertise, they are working in the development of the particle accelerators area in Mexico. This paper provides a summary of the research done by its members and presents the preliminary design of an electron linear particle accelerator (eLINAC). This proposal will be the first accelerator designed and created in Mexico.

  12. Accelerator Science: Proton vs. Electron

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-10-19

    Particle accelerators are one of the most powerful ways to study the fundamental laws that govern the universe. However, there are many design considerations that go into selecting and building a particular accelerator. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of building an accelerator that collides pairs of protons to one that collides electrons.

  13. Accelerator Science: Circular vs. Linear

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-12-14

    Particle accelerator are scientific instruments that allow scientists to collide particles together at incredible energies to study the secrets of the universe. However, there are many manners in which particle accelerators can be constructed. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of circular and linear accelerators.

  14. Accelerator Science: Circular vs. Linear

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-11-10

    Particle accelerator are scientific instruments that allow scientists to collide particles together at incredible energies to study the secrets of the universe. However, there are many manners in which particle accelerators can be constructed. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of circular and linear accelerators.

  15. Accelerator Science: Proton vs. Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-10-11

    Particle accelerators are one of the most powerful ways to study the fundamental laws that govern the universe. However, there are many design considerations that go into selecting and building a particular accelerator. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of building an accelerator that collides pairs of protons to one that collides electrons.

  16. High-field dipoles for future accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wipf, S.L.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents the concept for building superconducting accelerator dipoles with record high fields. Economic considerations favor the highest possible current density in the windings. Further discussion indicates that there is an optimal range of pinning strength for a superconducting material and that it is not likely for multifilamentary conductors to ever equal the potential performance of tape conductors. A dipole design with a tape-wound, inner high-field winding is suggested. Methods are detailed to avoid degradation caused by flux jumps and to overcome problems with the dipole ends. Concerns for force support structure and field precision are also addressed. An R and D program leading to a prototype 11-T dipole is outlined. Past and future importance of superconductivity to high-energy physics is evident from a short historical survey. Successful dipoles in the 10- to 20-T range will allow interesting options for upgrading present largest accelerators.

  17. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same.

  18. APT accelerator. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.; Rusthoi, D.

    1995-03-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation`s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century.

  19. VLHC accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Blaskiewicz et al.

    2001-11-01

    A six-month design study for a future high energy hadron collider was initiated by the Fermilab director in October 2000. The request was to study a staged approach where a large circumference tunnel is built that initially would house a low field ({approx}2 T) collider with center-of-mass energy greater than 30 TeV and a peak (initial) luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The tunnel was to be scoped, however, to support a future upgrade to a center-of-mass energy greater than 150 TeV with a peak luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} using high field ({approx} 10 T) superconducting magnet technology. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a report of the Design Study was produced by Fermilab in June 2001. 1 The Design Study focused on a Stage 1, 20 x 20 TeV collider using a 2-in-1 transmission line magnet and leads to a Stage 2, 87.5 x 87.5 TeV collider using 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet technology. The article that follows is a compilation of accelerator physics designs and computational results which contributed to the Design Study. Many of the parameters found in this report evolved during the study, and thus slight differences between this text and the Design Study report can be found. The present text, however, presents the major accelerator physics issues of the Very Large Hadron Collider as examined by the Design Study collaboration and provides a basis for discussion and further studies of VLHC accelerator parameters and design philosophies.

  20. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2007-03-19

    The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.

  1. Accelerating Gallstone Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Tao, J. C.; Cussler, E. L.; Evans, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    The dissolution rates of cholesterol in model bile salt solutions are controlled by diffusion in slowly flowing bile and by interfacial kinetics in rapidly flowing bile. At low flow, dissolution varies with the square root of bile flow and can be predicted, a priori, from existing correlations of mass transfer. At high bile flow, dissolution is independent of bile flow and is probably dominated by the rate of micelle adsorption. These results show that cholesterol gallstone dissolution, a potential nonsurgical therapy for cholelithiasis, can be accelerated little in slow bile, but more significantly in rapidly flowing bile. PMID:4530271

  2. Accelerated Innovation Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities: I. Engage NASA team (examples) a) Research and technology calls . provide suggestions to AES, HRP, OCT. b) Use NASA@Work to solicit other ideas; (possibly before R+D calls). II. Stimulate collaboration (examples) a) NHHPC. b) Wharton Mack Center for Technological Innovation (Feb 2013). c) International ] DLR ] :envihab (July 2013). d) Accelerated research models . NSF, Myelin Repair Foundation. III. Engage public Prizes (open platform: InnoCentive, yet2.com, NTL; Rice Business Plan, etc.) IV. Use same methods to engage STEM.

  3. The Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Brian P.

    2012-05-01

    In 1998 two teams traced back the expansion of the universe over billions of years and discovered that it was accelerating, a startling discovery that suggests that more than 70% of the cosmos is contained in a previously unknown form of matter, called Dark Energy. The 2011 Nobel Laureate for Physics, Brian Schmidt, leader of the High-Redshift Supernova Search Team, will describe this discovery and explain how astronomers have used observations to trace our universe's history back more than 13 billion years, leading them to ponder the ultimate fate of the cosmos.

  4. Flattening Earth acceleration in atomic fountains

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoldi, Andrea

    2010-07-15

    A method to compensate for Earth's gravity tide over an extended axial region is reported. Flattening acceleration is important in experiments where the coupling of the dynamics of free-falling probes to the gravity gradient generates stochastic noise on the measurement. Optimized cylindrically symmetric mass distributions lower Earth's tidal effect over 10 cm by a factor 10{sup 3}. A multimass compensation system with comparable performance is devised for tall atom interferometers. Reducing the gravity gradient is essential in terrestrial experiments based on atom fountain configurations being developed to precisely test general relativity or the neutrality of matter.

  5. Acceleration in Linear and Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellington, S. H.; Docherty, W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a simple accelerometer and explains its use in demonstrating acceleration, deceleration, constant speed, measurement of acceleration, acceleration and the inclined plane and angular and radial acceleration. (GS)

  6. Numerical Investigation and Experimental Reproduction of Fermi Acceleration in Laboratory Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Zhai, C.

    2015-12-01

    Fermi acceleration is widely accepted as the mechanism to explain power law of cosmic ray spectrum. Now this mechanism has been developed to first order Fermi acceleration and second order Fermi acceleration. In first order Fermi acceleration, also known as diffusive shock acceleration, particles are confined around the shock through scattering and accelerated by repeatedly crossing shock front. In second order Fermi acceleration, particles gain energy through statistical collisions with interstellar clouds. In this proposed work, we plan to carefully study these two kinds of acceleration numerically and experimentally. We first consider a single relativistic particle and investigate how it gains energy in Fermi-Ulam model and shock wave acceleration model respectively. We investigate collective behavior of particles with different kinds of wall-oscillation functions and try to find an optimal one in terms of efficiency of acceleration. Then, we plan to go further and consider a group of particles statistically, during which we borrow the correct generalization of Maxwell's velocity distribution in special relativity and compare the results with those in cases where we simply use Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. To this end, we try to provide a scheme to build an accelerator applying both laser technology and mirror effect in Laboratory to reproduce Fermi acceleration, which might be a promising source to obtain high energy particles and further study the mechanism of cosmic rays acceleration.

  7. The Student Course Experience among Online, Accelerated, and Traditional Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielitz, Colleen L.

    2016-01-01

    The demand by the public for a wider variety of course formats has led to complexity in determining a course's optimal delivery format as many faculty members still believe that online and accelerated courses do not offer students an equivalent experience to traditional face to face instruction. The purpose of this quantitative, comparative study…

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of autonomous vehicles with limits on acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. C.

    2014-07-01

    The stability of autonomous vehicle platoons with limits on acceleration and deceleration is determined. If the leading-vehicle acceleration remains within the limits, all vehicles in the platoon remain within the limits when the relative-velocity feedback coefficient is equal to the headway time constant [k=1/h]. Furthermore, if the sensitivity α>1/h, no collisions occur. String stability for small perturbations is assumed and the initial condition is taken as the equilibrium state. Other values of k and α that give stability with no collisions are found from simulations. For vehicles with non-negligible mechanical response, simulations indicate that the acceleration-feedback-control gain might have to be dynamically adjusted to obtain optimal performance as the response time changes with engine speed. Stability is demonstrated for some perturbations that cause initial acceleration or deceleration greater than the limits, yet do not cause collisions.

  9. Ion Accelerator With Negatively Biased Decelerator Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1994-01-01

    Three-grid ion accelerator in which accelerator grid is biased at negative potential and decelerator grid downstream of accelerator grid biased at smaller negative potential. This grid and bias arrangement reduces frequency of impacts, upon accelerator grid, of charge-exchange ions produced downstream in collisions between accelerated ions and atoms and molecules of background gas. Sputter erosion of accelerator grid reduced.

  10. Accelerator simulation of astrophysical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Phenomena that involve accelerated ions in stellar processes that can be simulated with laboratory accelerators are described. Stellar evolutionary phases, such as the CNO cycle, have been partially explored with accelerators, up to the consumption of He by alpha particle radiative capture reactions. Further experimentation is indicated on reactions featuring N-13(p,gamma)O-14, O-15(alpha, gamma)Ne-19, and O-14(alpha,p)F-17. Accelerated beams interacting with thin foils produce reaction products that permit a determination of possible elemental abundances in stellar objects. Additionally, isotopic ratios observed in chondrites can be duplicated with accelerator beam interactions and thus constraints can be set on the conditions producing the meteorites. Data from isotopic fractionation from sputtering, i.e., blasting surface atoms from a material using a low energy ion beam, leads to possible models for processes occurring in supernova explosions. Finally, molecules can be synthesized with accelerators and compared with spectroscopic observations of stellar winds.

  11. Laser acceleration and its future

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2010-01-01

    Laser acceleration is based on the concept to marshal collective fields that may be induced by laser. In order to exceed the material breakdown field by a large factor, we employ the broken-down matter of plasma. While the generated wakefields resemble with the fields in conventional accelerators in their structure (at least qualitatively), it is their extreme accelerating fields that distinguish the laser wakefield from others, amounting to tiny emittance and compact accelerator. The current research largely falls on how to master the control of acceleration process in spatial and temporal scales several orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional method. The efforts over the last several years have come to a fruition of generating good beam properties with GeV energies on a table top, leading to many applications, such as ultrafast radiolysis, intraoperative radiation therapy, injection to X-ray free electron laser, and a candidate for future high energy accelerators. PMID:20228616

  12. Accelerating Spectrum Sharing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Lynda L. Brighton; Rangam Subramanian; Hussein Moradi; Jose Loera

    2013-09-01

    Spectrum sharing potentially holds the promise of solving the emerging spectrum crisis. However, technology innovators face the conundrum of developing spectrum sharing technologies without the ability to experiment and test with real incumbent systems. Interference with operational incumbents can prevent critical services, and the cost of deploying and operating an incumbent system can be prohibitive. Thus, the lack of incumbent systems and frequency authorization for technology incubation and demonstration has stymied spectrum sharing research. To this end, industry, academia, and regulators all require a test facility for validating hypotheses and demonstrating functionality without affecting operational incumbent systems. This article proposes a four-phase program supported by our spectrum accountability architecture. We propose that our comprehensive experimentation and testing approach for technology incubation and demonstration will accelerate the development of spectrum sharing technologies.

  13. Accelerated Decay of Radioisotopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    00-01 -2013 Technical June20 l l-June 2012 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER DTRA MIPR 11-2362M Accelerated Decay of Radioisotopes Sb...268 x E +2 4.788 026 x E -2 6.894 757 4.535 924 x E -1 4.214 011 x E -2 1.601 846 x E +1 1.000 000 x E -2 2.579 760 x E - 4 1.000 000 x E -8...c a y o f R a d i o i s o t o p e s " P r o p o s a l # B R C A L L 0 7 - N - 2 - 0 0 4 7 I l l u s t r a t i o n o f \\ P F R P a s p o

  14. Understanding projectile acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hecht, H; Bertamini, M

    2000-04-01

    Throwing and catching balls or other objects is a generally highly practiced skill; however, conceptual as well as perceptual understanding of the mechanics that underlie this skill is surprisingly poor. In 5 experiments, we investigated conceptual and perceptual understanding of simple ballistic motion. Paper-and-pencil tests revealed that up to half of all participants mistakenly believed that a ball would continue to accelerate after it left the thrower's hand. Observers also showed a remarkable tolerance for anomalous trajectory shapes. Perceptual judgments based on graphics animations replicated these erroneous beliefs for shallow release angles. Observers' tolerance for anomalies tended to decrease with their distance from the actor. The findings are at odds with claims of the naive physics literature that liken intuitive understanding to Aristotelian or medieval physics theories. Instead, observers seem to project their intentions to the ball itself (externalization) or even feel that they have power over the ball when it is still close.

  15. Pulsed electromagnetic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    Direct measurements of the power deposited in the anode of a multimegawatt MPD accelerator using thermocouples attached to a thin shell anode reveal a dramatic decrease in the fractional anode power from 50% at 200 KW input power to less than 10% at 20 MW power. The corresponding local power flux peak at a value of 10,000 W/sq cm at the lip of the anode exhaust orifice, a distribution traced to a corresponding peak in the local current density at the anode. A comparison of voltage-current characteristics and spectral photographs of the MPD discharge using quartz, boron nitride and plexiglas insulators with various mass injection configurations led to the identification of different voltage modes and regions of ablation free operation. The technique of piezoelectric impact pressure measurement in the MPD exhaust flow was refined to account for the effects due to probe yaw angle.

  16. Network acceleration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Patricia (Inventor); Awrach, James Michael (Inventor); Maccabe, Arthur Barney (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Splintered offloading techniques with receive batch processing are described for network acceleration. Such techniques offload specific functionality to a NIC while maintaining the bulk of the protocol processing in the host operating system ("OS"). The resulting protocol implementation allows the application to bypass the protocol processing of the received data. Such can be accomplished this by moving data from the NIC directly to the application through direct memory access ("DMA") and batch processing the receive headers in the host OS when the host OS is interrupted to perform other work. Batch processing receive headers allows the data path to be separated from the control path. Unlike operating system bypass, however, the operating system still fully manages the network resource and has relevant feedback about traffic and flows. Embodiments of the present disclosure can therefore address the challenges of networks with extreme bandwidth delay products (BWDP).

  17. Paraelectric gas flow accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Daniel M. (Inventor); Wilkinson, Stephen P. (Inventor); Roth, J. Reece (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A substrate is configured with first and second sets of electrodes, where the second set of electrodes is positioned asymmetrically between the first set of electrodes. When a RF voltage is applied to the electrodes sufficient to generate a discharge plasma (e.g., a one-atmosphere uniform glow discharge plasma) in the gas adjacent to the substrate, the asymmetry in the electrode configuration results in force being applied to the active species in the plasma and in turn to the neutral background gas. Depending on the relative orientation of the electrodes to the gas, the present invention can be used to accelerate or decelerate the gas. The present invention has many potential applications, including increasing or decreasing aerodynamic drag or turbulence, and controlling the flow of active and/or neutral species for such uses as flow separation, altering heat flow, plasma cleaning, sterilization, deposition, etching, or alteration in wettability, printability, and/or adhesion.

  18. Lectures in accelerator theory

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M

    1980-01-01

    Lecture I deals with the behavior of particles in the nonlinear field arising from the electromagnetic interaction of colliding beams. The case treated, that of counter-rotating proton beams crossing each other at a non-zero angle, has the simple feature that the force between the beam is one dimensional. In lecture II, an analysis of the development of traveling waves on particle beams is presented. The situation studied is that of a uniform beam current in a circular accelerator and the excitation for the coherent motion is induced by the resistivity of the vacuum chamber wall. Finally, in lecture III, a description of the current accumulation process used at the proton storage rings at CERN (The ISR) is given. Particle pulses of rather low average current are injected and stored along the length and width of the vacuum chamber. The efficiency is very high and large currents (over 40 amperes) have been achieved.

  19. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  20. High-performance computing in accelerating structure design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zenghai; Folwell, Nathan; Ge, Lixin; Guetz, Adam; Ivanov, Valentin; Kowalski, Marc; Lee, Lie-Quan; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Schussman, Greg; Stingelin, Lukas; Uplenchwar, Ravindra; Wolf, Michael; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok

    2006-03-01

    Future high-energy accelerators such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC) will accelerate multi-bunch beams of high current and low emittance to obtain high luminosity, which put stringent requirements on the accelerating structures for efficiency and beam stability. While numerical modeling has been quite standard in accelerator R&D, designing the NLC accelerating structure required a new simulation capability because of the geometric complexity and level of accuracy involved. Under the US DOE Advanced Computing initiatives (first the Grand Challenge and now SciDAC), SLAC has developed a suite of electromagnetic codes based on unstructured grids and utilizing high-performance computing to provide an advanced tool for modeling structures at accuracies and scales previously not possible. This paper will discuss the code development and computational science research (e.g. domain decomposition, scalable eigensolvers, adaptive mesh refinement) that have enabled the large-scale simulations needed for meeting the computational challenges posed by the NLC as well as projects such as the PEP-II and RIA. Numerical results will be presented to show how high-performance computing has made a qualitative improvement in accelerator structure modeling for these accelerators, either at the component level (single cell optimization), or on the scale of an entire structure (beam heating and long-range wakefields).

  1. High-Performance Computing in Accelerating Structure Design And Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.H.; Folwell, N.; Ge, Li-Xin; Guetz, A.; Ivanov, V.; Kowalski, M.; Lee, L.Q.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.; Stingelin, L.; Uplenchwar, R.; Wolf, M.; Xiao, L.L.; Ko, K.; /SLAC /PSI, Villigen /Illinois U., Urbana

    2006-06-27

    Future high-energy accelerators such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC) will accelerate multi-bunch beams of high current and low emittance to obtain high luminosity, which put stringent requirements on the accelerating structures for efficiency and beam stability. While numerical modeling has been quite standard in accelerator R&D, designing the NLC accelerating structure required a new simulation capability because of the geometric complexity and level of accuracy involved. Under the US DOE Advanced Computing initiatives (first the Grand Challenge and now SciDAC), SLAC has developed a suite of electromagnetic codes based on unstructured grids and utilizing high performance computing to provide an advanced tool for modeling structures at accuracies and scales previously not possible. This paper will discuss the code development and computational science research (e.g. domain decomposition, scalable eigensolvers, adaptive mesh refinement) that have enabled the large-scale simulations needed for meeting the computational challenges posed by the NLC as well as projects such as the PEP-II and RIA. Numerical results will be presented to show how high performance computing has made a qualitative improvement in accelerator structure modeling for these accelerators, either at the component level (single cell optimization), or on the scale of an entire structure (beam heating and long range wakefields).

  2. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  3. NIIEFA accelerators for applied purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorogushin, M. F.; Strokach, A. P.; Filatov, O. G.

    2016-12-01

    Since the foundation of the institute, we have designed and delivered more than three hundred different accelerators to Russia and abroad: cyclotrons, linear accelerators, and neutron generators. The technical characteristics of our equipment makes it competitive on the international market. Here we present the application, main parameters, and status of accelerators manufactured by NIIEFA, as well as prospects for the development of electrophysical systems for applied purposes.

  4. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-05-13

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch.

  5. Basic concepts in plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Robert

    2006-03-15

    In this article, we present the underlying physics and the present status of high gradient and high-energy plasma accelerators. With the development of compact short pulse high-brightness lasers and electron and positron beams, new areas of studies for laser/particle beam-matter interactions is opening up. A number of methods are being pursued vigorously to achieve ultra-high-acceleration gradients. These include the plasma beat wave accelerator (PBWA) mechanism which uses conventional long pulse ( approximately 100 ps) modest intensity lasers (I approximately 10(14)-10(16) W cm(-2)), the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) which uses the new breed of compact high-brightness lasers (<1 ps) and intensities >10(18) W cm(-2), self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SMLWFA) concept which combines elements of stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS) and electron acceleration by nonlinear plasma waves excited by relativistic electron and positron bunches the plasma wakefield accelerator. In the ultra-high intensity regime, laser/particle beam-plasma interactions are highly nonlinear and relativistic, leading to new phenomenon such as the plasma wakefield excitation for particle acceleration, relativistic self-focusing and guiding of laser beams, high-harmonic generation, acceleration of electrons, positrons, protons and photons. Fields greater than 1 GV cm(-1) have been generated with monoenergetic particle beams accelerated to about 100 MeV in millimetre distances recorded. Plasma wakefields driven by both electron and positron beams at the Stanford linear accelerator centre (SLAC) facility have accelerated the tail of the beams.

  6. Accelerator Structure Development for NLC/GLC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J

    2004-03-05

    The NLC (Next Linear Collider) and GLC (Global Linear Collider) [1,2] are e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider proposals based on room-temperature accelerator technology--so called ''warm machines'' in comparison with the TESLA ''cold machine'' that is based on superconducting accelerator technology. There have been two major challenges in developing X-band (11.4 GHz) accelerator structures for the GLC/NLC. The first is to demonstrate stable, long-term operation at the high gradient (65 MV/m) that is required to optimize the machine cost. The second is to strongly suppress the beam induced long-range wakefields, which is required to achieve high luminosity. The development of high gradient structures has been a high priority in recent years. Nearly thirty X-band structures with various rf parameters, cavity shapes and coupler types have been fabricated and tested since 2000. This program has been a successful collaborative effort among groups at SLAC, KEK, FNAL and other labs. A summary of the main achievements and experiences are presented in this paper as well as a status report on the structure design, high power performance, manufacturing techniques, and other structure related issues.

  7. Simulations for Plasma and Laser Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Lehe, Rémi

    Computer simulations have had a profound impact on the design and understanding of past and present plasma acceleration experiments, and will be a key component for turning plasma accelerators from a promising technology into a mainstream scientific tool. In this article, we present an overview of the numerical techniques used with the most popular approaches to model plasma-based accelerators: electromagnetic particle-in-cell, quasistatic and ponderomotive guiding center. The material that is presented is intended to serve as an introduction to the basics of those approaches, and to advances (some of them very recent) that have pushed the state of the art, such as the optimal Lorentz-boosted frame, advanced laser envelope solvers and the elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability. The particle-in-cell method, which has broader interest and is more standardized, is presented in more depth. Additional topics that are cross-cutting, such as azimuthal Fourier decomposition or filtering, are also discussed, as well as potential challenges and remedies in the initialization of simulations and output of data. Examples of simulations using the techniques that are presented have been left out of this article for conciseness, and because simulation results are best understood when presented together, and contrasted with theoretical and/or experimental results, as in other articles of this volume.

  8. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  9. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We review the current status of the development of accelerator sources of epithermal neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a promising method of malignant tumor treatment. Particular attention is given to the source of epithermal neutrons on the basis of a new type of charged particle accelerator: tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and lithium neutron-producing target. It is also shown that the accelerator with specialized targets makes it possible to generate fast and monoenergetic neutrons, resonance and monoenergetic gamma-rays, alpha-particles, and positrons.

  10. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  11. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  12. Accelerators for research and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The newest particle accelerators are almost always built for extending the frontiers of research, at the cutting edge of science and technology. Once these machines are operating and these technologies mature, new applications are always found, many of which touch our lives in profound ways. The evolution of accelerator technologies will be discussed, with descriptions of accelerator types and characteristics. The wide range of applications of accelerators will be discussed, in fields such as nuclear science, medicine, astrophysics and space-sciences, power generation, airport security, materials processing and microcircuit fabrication. 13 figs.

  13. ADS Based on Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weimin; Dai, Jianping

    An accelerator-driven system (ADS), which combines a particle accelerator with a subcritical core, is commonly regarded as a promising device for the transmutation of nuclear waste, as well as a potential scheme for thorium-based energy production. So far the predominant choice of the accelerator for ADS is a superconducting linear accelerator (linac). This article gives a brief overview of ADS based on linacs, including the motivation, principle, challenges and research activities around the world. The status and future plan of the Chinease ADS (C-ADS) project will be highlighted and discussed in depth as an example.

  14. SHORT ACCELERATION TIMES FROM SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2015-12-10

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks allows particle transport properties to be inferred. The frequently observed power-law decay upstream, indeed, implies a superdiffusive particle transport when the level of magnetic field variance does not change as the time interval from the shock front increases. In this context, a superdiffusive shock acceleration (SSA) theory has been developed, allowing us to make predictions of the acceleration times. In this work we estimate for a number of interplanetary shocks, including the solar wind termination shock, the acceleration times for energetic protons in the framework of SSA and we compare the results with the acceleration times predicted by standard diffusive shock acceleration. The acceleration times due to SSA are found to be much shorter than in the classical model, and also shorter than the interplanetary shock lifetimes. This decrease of the acceleration times is due to the scale-free nature of the particle displacements in the framework of superdiffusion. Indeed, very long displacements are possible, increasing the probability for particles far from the front of the shock to return, and short displacements have a high probability of occurrence, increasing the chances for particles close to the front to cross the shock many times.

  15. Accelerating molecular modeling applications with graphics processors.

    PubMed

    Stone, John E; Phillips, James C; Freddolino, Peter L; Hardy, David J; Trabuco, Leonardo G; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-12-01

    Molecular mechanics simulations offer a computational approach to study the behavior of biomolecules at atomic detail, but such simulations are limited in size and timescale by the available computing resources. State-of-the-art graphics processing units (GPUs) can perform over 500 billion arithmetic operations per second, a tremendous computational resource that can now be utilized for general purpose computing as a result of recent advances in GPU hardware and software architecture. In this article, an overview of recent advances in programmable GPUs is presented, with an emphasis on their application to molecular mechanics simulations and the programming techniques required to obtain optimal performance in these cases. We demonstrate the use of GPUs for the calculation of long-range electrostatics and nonbonded forces for molecular dynamics simulations, where GPU-based calculations are typically 10-100 times faster than heavily optimized CPU-based implementations. The application of GPU acceleration to biomolecular simulation is also demonstrated through the use of GPU-accelerated Coulomb-based ion placement and calculation of time-averaged potentials from molecular dynamics trajectories. A novel approximation to Coulomb potential calculation, the multilevel summation method, is introduced and compared with direct Coulomb summation. In light of the performance obtained for this set of calculations, future applications of graphics processors to molecular dynamics simulations are discussed.

  16. Accelerating Science Driven System Design With RAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzynek, John

    2015-05-01

    Researchers from UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, are engaged in developing an Infrastructure for Synthesis with Integrated Simulation (ISIS). The ISIS Project was a cooperative effort for “application-driven hardware design” that engages application scientists in the early parts of the hardware design process for future generation supercomputing systems. This project served to foster development of computing systems that are better tuned to the application requirements of demanding scientific applications and result in more cost-effective and efficient HPC system designs. In order to overcome long conventional design-cycle times, we leveraged reconfigurable devices to aid in the design of high-efficiency systems, including conventional multi- and many-core systems. The resulting system emulation/prototyping environment, in conjunction with the appropriate intermediate abstractions, provided both a convenient user programming experience and retained flexibility, and thus efficiency, of a reconfigurable platform. We initially targeted the Berkeley RAMP system (Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors) as that hardware emulation environment to facilitate and ultimately accelerate the iterative process of science-driven system design. Our goal was to develop and demonstrate a design methodology for domain-optimized computer system architectures. The tangible outcome is a methodology and tools for rapid prototyping and design-space exploration, leading to highly optimized and efficient HPC systems.

  17. Beam quality study for a grating-based dielectric laser-driven accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Jamison, S.; Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Li, Y.; Smith, J. D. A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric laser-driven accelerators (DLAs) based on grating structures are considered to be one of the most promising technologies to reduce the size and cost of future particle accelerators. They offer high accelerating gradients of up to several GV/m in combination with mature lithographic techniques for structure fabrication. This paper numerically investigates the beam quality for acceleration of electrons in a realistic dual-grating DLA. In our simulations, we use beam parameters of the future Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications facility to load an electron bunch into an optimized 100-period dual-grating structure where it interacts with a realistic laser pulse. The emittance, energy spread, and loaded accelerating gradient for modulated electrons are then analyzed in detail. Results from simulations show that an accelerating gradient of up to 1.13 ± 0.15 GV/m with an extremely small emittance growth, 3.6%, can be expected.

  18. Numerical Study of a Multi-stage Dielectric Laser-driven Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yelong; Xia, Guoxing; Smith, Jonathan. D. A.; Hanahoe, Kieran; Mete, Oznur; Jamison, Steve P.; Welsch, Carsten P.

    In order to overcome the limits of commonly used radiofrequency accelerators, it is highly desirable to reduce the unit cost and increase the maximum achievable accelerating gradient. Dielectric laser-driven accelerators (DLAs) based on grating structures have received considerable attention due to maximum acceleration gradients of several GV/m and mature lithographic techniques for structure fabrication. This paper explores different spatial harmonics excited by an incident laser pulse and their interaction with the electron beam from the non-relativistic (25 keV) to the highly relativistic regime in double-grating silica structures. The achievable acceleration gradient for different spatial harmonics and the optimal compromise between maximum acceleration gradient and simplicity of structure fabrication are discussed. Finally, the suitability of a multi-stage DLA which would enable the acceleration of electrons from 25 keV to relativistic energies is discussed.

  19. Clinical Requirements and Accelerator Concepts for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.

    1997-05-01

    Accelerator-driven epithermal neutron sources are an attractive alternative to nuclear reactors for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In BNCT the goal of delivering a sufficient dose to the tumor without exceeding the dose limits of the surrounding normal tissues is achieved by administering a ^10B-containing compound which is selectively taken up in the tumor cells. Subsequent irradiation with epithermal neutrons leads to the release of short ranged (< 10 μm) ionizing particles via the ^10B(n,α)^7Li neutron-capture reaction. By carefully shaping the neutron spectrum the background dose, partially due to recoil protons and external gamma radiation, can be minimized and the depth dose distribution optimized. Excellent epithermal neutron beams for BNCT can be produced by bombarding a Li-target with a high current proton beam at energies ranging from the (p,n) reaction threshold to 2.5 MeV and subsequent moderation and filtering of the primary neutrons. In comparison the use of Be-targets and higher proton or deuteron energies, up to 20 MeV, leads to higher neutron yields but also to higher primary neutron energies requiring more moderation and resulting in less desirable neutron spectra. Accelerator options for possible neutron sources include dc-accelerators, RFQs, LINACs and cyclotrons. An electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator has been chosen to provide a 2.5 MeV proton beam for the BNCT facility currently being designed at LBNL. An ESQ-accelerator is ideally suited to provide the high beam currents which are desired for producing high quality neutron beams for BNCT treatments. A novel power supply based on the air-coupled transformer concept is under development. It will enable the accelerator to deliver proton beam currents up to about 50 mA. A Li-target has been designed which can handle beam power in excess of 50 kW establishing the practicability of this approach. Monte Carlo simulation studies have shown that at a proton beam current of 20 mA high

  20. Design of High Gradient Accelerating Structure for CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.

    2006-01-01

    A new CLIC main-linac accelerating-structure design, HDS (Hybrid Damped Structure), with improved high-gradient performance, efficiency and simplicity of fabrication is presented. The gains are achieved in part through a new cell design which includes fully-profiled rf surfaces optimized to minimize surface fields, and hybrid damping using both iris slots and radial waveguides. The slotted irises allow a simple structure fabrication in quadrants with no rf currents across joints, a reduced number of pieces per structure (only 4) and a reduced surface requiring precise machining. Further gains are achieved through a new structure optimization procedure, which simultaneously balances surface fields, power flow, short and long-range transverse wakefields and rf-to-beam efficiency. The optimization of a 30 GHz structure with a loaded accelerating gradient of 150 MV/m results in a bunch spacing of eight rf cycles and 31 % rf-to-beam efficiency.

  1. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  2. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  3. Optimal coupler and power setting for superconductive linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Branlard, J.; Chase, B,; Nagaitsev, S.; Nezhevenko, O.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The modeling analysis presented in this paper addresses the question of how to achieve the highest vector sum gradient for all beam currents when individual cavities operate at different gradients due to their inherent quenching limitations. The analytical method explained here constitutes a step forward toward the operability of the International Linear Collider (ILC), Project X [8], or XFEL [7]. Unlike previously proposed methods [1, 2], this approach prevents cavities from quenching should the beam current be lower than its maximum value.

  4. Measuring and optimizing the momentum aperture in a particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Steier, C; Robin, D; Nadolski, L; Decking, W; Wu, Y; Laskar, J

    2002-05-01

    Particle motion in storage rings is confined by various aperture limits, the size of which restricts the performance of the ring in terms of injection efficiency, lifetime, etc. Intrabeam scattering makes particles sweep a large portion of the phase space, where their motion may eventually be resonantly or chaotically excited to large amplitudes leading to collision with the vacuum chamber. We report here the studies performed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) on the on- and off-momentum particle motion that provides a good understanding of these limitations. Using off-momentum simulations and experiments together with frequency map analysis, we could precisely correlate beam loss areas with resonance locations. The very good agreement between simulations and experiments allowed us to provide guidance for avoiding these dangerous areas. This analysis results in predictive improvements of the momentum aperture, which actually led to a lifetime increase of 25% at the ALS for very high bunch charge.

  5. Thomas Edison Accelerated Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.; Chasin, Gene

    This paper describes early outcomes of a Sacramento, California, elementary school that participated in the Accelerated Schools Project. The school, which serves many minority and poor students, began training for the project in 1992. Accelerated Schools were designed to advance the learning rate of students through a gifted and talented approach,…

  6. Natural Acceleration: Supporting Creative Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, LeoNora M.

    2011-01-01

    "Natural acceleration" happens through an internal fire that burns to learn and may transcend school boundaries. Based on their passionate interests and connections with a domain, children who hunger for domain understandings outside school curricula require different types of acceleration, motivated by these interests. The lifeworks,…

  7. COMPASS Accelerator Design Technical Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Nanni, Emilio; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Neilson, Jeff

    2016-03-14

    This report is a survey of technical options for generating a MeV-class accelerator for space based science applications. The survey was performed focusing on the primary technical requirements of the accelerator in the context of a satellite environment with its unique challenges of limited electrical power (PE), thermal isolation, dimensions, payload requirement and electrical isolation.

  8. Switching mechanism senses angular acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Switching mechanism actuates an electrical circuit when a predetermined angular acceleration and displacement are reached. A rotor in the mechanism overcomes the restraint of a magnetic detent when the case in which the detent is mounted reaches the predetermined angular acceleration.

  9. General purpose programmable accelerator board

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Perry J.; Witzke, Edward L.

    2001-01-01

    A general purpose accelerator board and acceleration method comprising use of: one or more programmable logic devices; a plurality of memory blocks; bus interface for communicating data between the memory blocks and devices external to the board; and dynamic programming capabilities for providing logic to the programmable logic device to be executed on data in the memory blocks.

  10. EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER, P.

    2005-09-18

    Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

  11. Energy Innovation Acceleration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, Johanna

    2015-06-15

    The Energy Innovation Acceleration Program (IAP) – also called U-Launch – has had a significant impact on early stage clean energy companies in the Northeast and on the clean energy economy in the Northeast, not only during program execution (2010-2014), but continuing into the future. Key results include: Leverage ratio of 105:1; $105M in follow-on funding (upon $1M investment by EERE); At least 19 commercial products launched; At least 17 new industry partnerships formed; At least $6.5M in revenue generated; >140 jobs created; 60% of assisted companies received follow-on funding within 1 year of program completion; In addition to the direct measurable program results summarized above, two primary lessons emerged from our work executing Energy IAP:; Validation and demonstration awards have an outsized, ‘tipping-point’ effect for startups looking to secure investments and strategic partnerships. An ecosystem approach is valuable, but an approach that evaluates the needs of individual companies and then draws from diverse ecosystem resources to fill them, is most valuable of all.

  12. Pulsars and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for the studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. But even forty years after their discovery, we still do not understand their pulsed emission at any wavelength. I will review both the basic physics of pulsars as well as the latest developments in understanding their high-energy emission. Special and general relativistic effects play important roles in pulsar emission, from inertial frame-dragging near the stellar surface to aberration, time-of-flight and retardation of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Understanding how these effects determine what we observe at different wavelengths is critical to unraveling the emission physics. Fortunately the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), with launch in May 2008 will detect many new gamma-ray pulsars and test the predictions of these models with unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 300 GeV.

  13. RFQ accelerator tuning system

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1990-01-01

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control signal to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in response to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. In an RFQ environment the stable temperature control enables the resonant frequency of the device to be maintained at substantially a predetermined value during transient operations.

  14. RFQ accelerator tuning system

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    1990-07-03

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control signal to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in response to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. In an RFQ environment the stable temperature control enables the resonant frequency of the device to be maintained at substantially a predetermined value during transient operations. 3 figs.

  15. Is Global Warming Accelerating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, J.; Delsole, T. M.; Tippett, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    A global pattern that fluctuates naturally on decadal time scales is identified in climate simulations and observations. This newly discovered component, called the Global Multidecadal Oscillation (GMO), is related to the Atlantic Meridional Oscillation and shown to account for a substantial fraction of decadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature. IPCC-class climate models generally underestimate the variance of the GMO, and hence underestimate the decadal fluctuations due to this component of natural variability. Decomposing observed sea surface temperature into a component due to anthropogenic and natural radiative forcing plus the GMO, reveals that most multidecadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature can be accounted for by these two components alone. The fact that the GMO varies naturally on multidecadal time scales implies that it can be predicted with some skill on decadal time scales, which provides a scientific rationale for decadal predictions. Furthermore, the GMO is shown to account for about half of the warming in the last 25 years and hence a substantial fraction of the recent acceleration in the rate of increase in global average sea surface temperature. Nevertheless, in terms of the global average “well-observed” sea surface temperature, the GMO can account for only about 0.1° C in transient, decadal-scale fluctuations, not the century-long 1° C warming that has been observed during the twentieth century.

  16. Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conformational changes that occur upon ligand binding may be too slow to observe on the time scales routinely accessible using molecular dynamics simulations. The adaptive integration method (AIM) leverages the notion that when a ligand is either fully coupled or decoupled, according to λ, barrier heights may change, making some conformational transitions more accessible at certain λ values. AIM adaptively changes the value of λ in a single simulation so that conformations sampled at one value of λ seed the conformational space sampled at another λ value. Adapting the value of λ throughout a simulation, however, does not resolve issues in sampling when barriers remain high regardless of the λ value. In this work, we introduce a new method, called Accelerated AIM (AcclAIM), in which the potential energy function is flattened at intermediate values of λ, promoting the exploration of conformational space as the ligand is decoupled from its receptor. We show, with both a simple model system (Bromocyclohexane) and the more complex biomolecule Thrombin, that AcclAIM is a promising approach to overcome high barriers in the calculation of free energies, without the need for any statistical reweighting or additional processors. PMID:24780083

  17. Accelerated shallow water modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandham, Rajesh; Medina, David; Warburton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    ln this talk we will describe our ongoing developments in accelerated numerical methods for modeling tsunamis, and oceanic fluid flows using two dimensional shallow water model and/or three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes model discretized with high order discontinuous Galerkin methods. High order discontinuous Galerkin methods can be computationally demanding, requiring extensive computational time to simulate real time events on traditional CPU architectures. However, recent advances in computing architectures and hardware aware algorithms make it possible to reduce simulation time and provide accurate predictions in a timely manner. Hence we tailor these algorithms to take advantage of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) architecture that is seen in modern many core compute devices such as GPUs. We will discuss our unified and extensive many-core programming library OCCA that alleviates the need to completely re-design the solvers to keep up with constantly evolving parallel programming models and hardware architectures. We will present performance results for the flow simulations demonstrating performance leveraging multiple different multi-threading APIs on GPU and CPU targets.

  18. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  19. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  20. Touch Accelerates Visual Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Lo Verde, Luca; Alais, David

    2017-01-01

    To efficiently interact with the external environment, our nervous system combines information arising from different sensory modalities. Recent evidence suggests that cross-modal interactions can be automatic and even unconscious, reflecting the ecological relevance of cross-modal processing. Here, we use continuous flash suppression (CFS) to directly investigate whether haptic signals can interact with visual signals outside of visual awareness. We measured suppression durations of visual gratings rendered invisible by CFS either during visual stimulation alone or during visuo-haptic stimulation. We found that active exploration of a haptic grating congruent in orientation with the suppressed visual grating reduced suppression durations both compared with visual-only stimulation and to incongruent visuo-haptic stimulation. We also found that the facilitatory effect of touch on visual suppression disappeared when the visual and haptic gratings were mismatched in either spatial frequency or orientation. Together, these results demonstrate that congruent touch can accelerate the rise to consciousness of a suppressed visual stimulus and that this unconscious cross-modal interaction depends on visuo-haptic congruency. Furthermore, since CFS suppression is thought to occur early in visual cortical processing, our data reinforce the evidence suggesting that visuo-haptic interactions can occur at the earliest stages of cortical processing. PMID:28210486

  1. Optimized design for PIGMI

    SciTech Connect

    Hansborough, L.; Hamm, R.; Stovall, J.; Swenson, D.

    1980-01-01

    PIGMI (Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations) is a compact linear proton accelerator design, optimized for pion production and cancer treatment use in a hospital environment. Technology developed during a four-year PIGMI Prototype experimental program allows the design of smaller, less expensive, and more reliable proton linacs. A new type of low-energy accelerating structure, the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) has been tested; it produces an exceptionally good-quality beam and allows the use of a simple 30-kV injector. Average axial electric-field gradients of over 9 MV/m have been demonstrated in a drift-tube linac (DTL) structure. Experimental work is underway to test the disk-and-washer (DAW) structure, another new type of accelerating structure for use in the high-energy coupled-cavity linac (CCL). Sufficient experimental and developmental progress has been made to closely define an actual PIGMI. It will consist of a 30-kV injector, and RFQ linac to a proton energy of 2.5 MeV, a DTL linac to 125 MeV, and a CCL linac to the final energy of 650 MeV. The total length of the accelerator is 133 meters. The RFQ and DTL will be driven by a single 440-MHz klystron; the CCL will be driven by six 1320-MHz klystrons. The peak beam current is 28 mA. The beam pulse length is 60 ..mu..s at a 60-Hz repetition rate, resulting in a 100-..mu..A average beam current. The total cost of the accelerator is estimated to be approx. $10 million.

  2. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  3. Shear Acceleration in Expanding Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, F. M.; Duffy, P.

    2016-12-01

    Shear flows are naturally expected to occur in astrophysical environments and potential sites of continuous non-thermal Fermi-type particle acceleration. Here we investigate the efficiency of expanding relativistic outflows to facilitate the acceleration of energetic charged particles to higher energies. To this end, the gradual shear acceleration coefficient is derived based on an analytical treatment. The results are applied to the context of the relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei. The inferred acceleration timescale is investigated for a variety of conical flow profiles (i.e., power law, Gaussian, Fermi-Dirac) and compared to the relevant radiative and non-radiative loss timescales. The results exemplify that relativistic shear flows are capable of boosting cosmic-rays to extreme energies. Efficient electron acceleration, on the other hand, requires weak magnetic fields and may thus be accompanied by a delayed onset of particle energization and affect the overall jet appearance (e.g., core, ridge line, and limb-brightening).

  4. The ISAC post-accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Marchetto, M.

    2014-01-01

    The acceleration chain of the ISAC facility boosts the energy of both radioactive and stable light and heavy ions for beam delivery to both a medium energy area in ISAC-I and a high energy area in ISAC-II. The post-accelerator comprises a 35.4 MHz RFQ to accelerate beams of A/q ≤ 30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u and a post stripper, 106.1 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of A/q ≤ 6 to a final energy between 0.15 MeV/u to 1.5 MeV/u. A 40 MV superconducting linac further accelerates beam from 1.5 MeV/u to energies above the Coulomb barrier. All linacs operate cw to preserve beam intensity.

  5. Critical Issues in Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Hosokai, T.

    2004-10-01

    Updated achievements and critical issues in plasma accelerators are summarized. As to laser plasma accelerators, we cover the results of plasma cathodes by U.Michigan, LBNL, LOA and U.Tokyo. Although many new results of accelerated electrons have been reported, the electrons do not yet form a bunch with narrow energy spread. Several injection schemes and measurements to verify ultrashort bunch (tens fs) with narrow energy spread, low emittance and many charges are planned. E-162 experiments by UCLA / USC / SLAC and a newly proposed experiment on density transition trapping are introduced for electron beam driven plasma accelerators. Their main purpose is realization of GeV plasma accelerator, but application to pump-and-probe analysis for investigation of ultrafast quantum phenomena is also promising.

  6. Accelerating molecular docking calculations using graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Korb, Oliver; Stützle, Thomas; Exner, Thomas E

    2011-04-25

    The generation of molecular conformations and the evaluation of interaction potentials are common tasks in molecular modeling applications, particularly in protein-ligand or protein-protein docking programs. In this work, we present a GPU-accelerated approach capable of speeding up these tasks considerably. For the evaluation of interaction potentials in the context of rigid protein-protein docking, the GPU-accelerated approach reached speedup factors of up to over 50 compared to an optimized CPU-based implementation. Treating the ligand and donor groups in the protein binding site as flexible, speedup factors of up to 16 can be observed in the evaluation of protein-ligand interaction potentials. Additionally, we introduce a parallel version of our protein-ligand docking algorithm PLANTS that can take advantage of this GPU-accelerated scoring function evaluation. We compared the GPU-accelerated parallel version to the same algorithm running on the CPU and also to the highly optimized sequential CPU-based version. In terms of dependence of the ligand size and the number of rotatable bonds, speedup factors of up to 10 and 7, respectively, can be observed. Finally, a fitness landscape analysis in the context of rigid protein-protein docking was performed. Using a systematic grid-based search methodology, the GPU-accelerated version outperformed the CPU-based version with speedup factors of up to 60.

  7. Accelerating incoherent dedispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsdell, B. R.; Bailes, M.; Barnes, D. G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2012-05-01

    Incoherent dedispersion is a computationally intensive problem that appears frequently in pulsar and transient astronomy. For current and future transient pipelines, dedispersion can dominate the total execution time, meaning its computational speed acts as a constraint on the quality and quantity of science results. It is thus critical that the algorithm be able to take advantage of trends in commodity computing hardware. With this goal in mind, we present an analysis of the 'direct', 'tree' and 'sub-band' dedispersion algorithms with respect to their potential for efficient execution on modern graphics processing units (GPUs). We find all three to be excellent candidates, and proceed to describe implementations in C for CUDA using insight gained from the analysis. Using recent CPU and GPU hardware, the transition to the GPU provides a speed-up of nine times for the direct algorithm when compared to an optimized quad-core CPU code. For realistic recent survey parameters, these speeds are high enough that further optimization is unnecessary to achieve real-time processing. Where further speed-ups are desirable, we find that the tree and sub-band algorithms are able to provide three to seven times better performance at the cost of certain smearing, memory consumption and development time trade-offs. We finish with a discussion of the implications of these results for future transient surveys. Our GPU dedispersion code is publicly available as a C library at .

  8. Accelerating defocus blur magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriener, Florian; Binder, Thomas; Wille, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    A shallow depth-of-field is often used as a creative element in photographs. This, however, comes at the cost of expensive and heavy camera equipment, such as large sensor DSLR bodies and fast lenses. In contrast, cheap small-sensor cameras with fixed lenses usually exhibit a larger depth-of-field than desirable. In this case a computational solution is suggesting, since a shallow depth-of-field cannot be achieved by optical means. One possibility is to algorithmically increase the defocus blur already present in the image. Yet, existing algorithmic solutions tackling this problem suffer from poor performance due to the ill-posedness of the problem: The amount of defocus blur can be estimated at edges only; homogeneous areas do not contain such information. However, to magnify the defocus blur we need to know the amount of blur at every pixel position. Estimating it requires solving an optimization problem with many unknowns. We propose a faster way to propagate the amount of blur from the edges to the entire image by solving the optimization problem on a small scale, followed by edge-aware upsampling using the original image as guide. The resulting approximate defocus map can be used to synthesize images with shallow depth-of-field with quality comparable to the original approach. This is demonstrated by experimental results.

  9. Innovative applications of genetic algorithms to problems in accelerator physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofler, Alicia; Terzić, Balša; Kramer, Matthew; Zvezdin, Anton; Morozov, Vasiliy; Roblin, Yves; Lin, Fanglei; Jarvis, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a powerful technique that implements the principles nature uses in biological evolution to optimize a multidimensional nonlinear problem. The GA works especially well for problems with a large number of local extrema, where traditional methods (such as conjugate gradient, steepest descent, and others) fail or, at best, underperform. The field of accelerator physics, among others, abounds with problems which lend themselves to optimization via GAs. In this paper, we report on the successful application of GAs in several problems related to the existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility nuclear physics machine, the proposed Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab, and a radio frequency gun-based injector. These encouraging results are a step forward in optimizing accelerator design and provide an impetus for application of GAs to other problems in the field. To that end, we discuss the details of the GAs used, include a newly devised enhancement which leads to improved convergence to the optimum, and make recommendations for future GA developments and accelerator applications.

  10. A magnetorheological haptic cue accelerator for manual transmission vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Min; Noh, Kyung-Wook; Lee, Yang-Sub; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes a new haptic cue function for manual transmission vehicles to achieve optimal gear shifting. This function is implemented on the accelerator pedal by utilizing a magnetorheological (MR) brake mechanism. By combining the haptic cue function with the accelerator pedal, the proposed haptic cue device can transmit the optimal moment of gear shifting for manual transmission to a driver without requiring the driver's visual attention. As a first step to achieve this goal, a MR fluid-based haptic device is devised to enable rotary motion of the accelerator pedal. Taking into account spatial limitations, the design parameters are optimally determined using finite element analysis to maximize the relative control torque. The proposed haptic cue device is then manufactured and its field-dependent torque and time response are experimentally evaluated. Then the manufactured MR haptic cue device is integrated with the accelerator pedal. A simple virtual vehicle emulating the operation of the engine of a passenger vehicle is constructed and put into communication with the haptic cue device. A feed-forward torque control algorithm for the haptic cue is formulated and control performances are experimentally evaluated and presented in the time domain.

  11. Feedback in Flow for Accelerated Reaction Development.

    PubMed

    Reizman, Brandon J; Jensen, Klavs F

    2016-09-20

    The pharmaceutical industry is investing in continuous flow and high-throughput experimentation as tools for rapid process development accelerated scale-up. Coupled with automation, these technologies offer the potential for comprehensive reaction characterization and optimization, but with the cost of conducting exhaustive multifactor screens. Automated feedback in flow offers researchers an alternative strategy for efficient characterization of reactions based on the use of continuous technology to control chemical reaction conditions and optimize in lieu of screening. Optimization with feedback allows experiments to be conducted where the most information can be gained from the chemistry, enabling product yields to be maximized and kinetic models to be generated while the total number of experiments is minimized. This Account opens by reviewing select examples of feedback optimization in flow and applications to chemical research. Systems in the literature are classified into (i) deterministic "black box" optimization systems that do not model the reaction system and are therefore limited in the utility of results for scale-up, (ii) deterministic model-based optimization systems from which reaction kinetics and/or mechanisms can be automatically evaluated, and (iii) stochastic systems. Though diverse in application, flow feedback systems have predominantly focused upon the optimization of continuous variables, i.e., variables such as time, temperature, and concentration that can be ramped from one experiment to the next. Unfortunately, this implies that the screening of discrete variables such as catalyst, ligand, or solvent generally does not factor into automated flow optimization, resulting in incomplete process knowledge. Herein, we present a system and strategy developed for optimizing discrete and continuous variables of a chemical reaction simultaneously. The approach couples automated feedback with high-throughput reaction screening in droplet flow

  12. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  13. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  14. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  15. FINAL REPORT DE-FG02-04ER41317 Advanced Computation and Chaotic Dynamics for Beams and Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R

    2014-09-08

    During the year ending in August 2013, we continued to investigate the potential of photonic crystal (PhC) materials for acceleration purposes. We worked to characterize acceleration ability of simple PhC accelerator structures, as well as to characterize PhC materials to determine whether current fabrication techniques can meet the needs of future accelerating structures. We have also continued to design and optimize PhC accelerator structures, with the ultimate goal of finding a new kind of accelerator structure that could offer significant advantages over current RF acceleration technology. This design and optimization of these requires high performance computation, and we continue to work on methods to make such computation faster and more efficient.

  16. Accelerated cleanup risk reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.B.; Aines, R.M.; Blake, R.G.; Copeland, A.B.; Newmark, R.L.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1998-02-01

    There is no proven technology for remediating contaminant plume source regions in a heterogeneous subsurface. This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop the requisite new technologies so that will be rapidly accepted by the remediation community. Our technology focus is hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO) which is a novel in situ thermal technique. We have expanded this core technology to leverage the action of steam injection and place an in situ microbial filter downstream to intercept and destroy the accelerated movement of contaminated groundwater. Most contaminant plume source regions, including the chlorinated solvent plume at LLNL, are in subsurface media characterized by a wide range in hydraulic conductivity. At LLNL, the main conduits for contaminant transport are buried stream channels composed of gravels and sands; these have a hydraulic conductivity in the range of 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -2} cm/s. Clay and silt units with a hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -6} cm/s bound these buried channels; these are barriers to groundwater movement and contain the highest contaminant concentrations in the source region. New remediation technologies are required because the current ones preferentially access the high conductivity units. HPO is an innovative process for the in situ destruction of contaminants in the entire subsurface. It operates by the injection of steam. We have demonstrated in laboratory experiments that many contaminants rapidly oxidize to harmless compounds at temperatures easily achieved by injecting steam, provided sufficient dissolved oxygen is present. One important challenge in a heterogeneous source region is getting heat, contaminants, and an oxidizing agent in the same place at the same time. We have used the NUFT computer program to simulate the cyclic injection of steam into a contaminated aquifer for design of a field demonstration. We used an 8 hour, steam/oxygen injection cycle followed by a 56 hour relaxation

  17. Operation of the accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Batzka, B.; Billquist, P.J.

    1995-08-01

    Fiscal Year 1994 was the first year of seven-day operation since ATLAS became a national user facility in 1985. ATLAS made the most of the opportunity this year by providing 5200 hours of beam on-target to the research program. A record number of 60 experiments were completed and the {open_quotes}facility reliability{close_quotes} remained near the 90% level. Seven-day operation was made possible with the addition to the staff of two operator positions providing single-operator coverage during the weekend period. The normally scheduled coverage was augmented by an on-call list of system experts who respond to emergencies with phone-in advice and return to the Laboratory when necessary. This staffing approach continues but we rearranged our staffing patterns so that we now have one cryogenics engineer working a shift pattern which includes 8-hour daily coverage during the weekend. ATLAS provided a beam mix to users consisting of 26 different isotopic species, 23% of which were for A>100 in FY 1994. Approximately 60% of the beam time was provided by the Positive Ion Injector, slightly less than the usage rate of FY 1993. Experiments using uranium or lead beams accounted for 16.4% of the total beam time. The ECR ion source and high-voltage platform functioned well throughout the year. A new technique for solid material production in the source was developed which uses a sputtering process wherein the sample of material placed near the plasma chamber wall is biased negatively. Plasma ions are accelerated into the sample and material is sputtered from the surface into the plasma. This technique is now used routinely for many elements. Runs of calcium, germanium, nickel, lead, tellurium, and uranium were carried out with this technique.

  18. Acceleration units for the Induction Linac Systems Experiment (ILSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Brady, V.; Brodzik, D.; Hansen, L.; Laslett, L.J.; Mukherjee, S.; Bubp, D.; Ravenscroft, D.; Reginato, L.

    1989-03-01

    The design of a high current heavy ion induction linac driver for inertial confinement fusion is optimized by adjusting the acceleration units along the length of the accelerator to match the beam current, energy, and pulse duration at any location. At the low energy end of the machine the optimum is a large number of electrostatically focused parallel beamlets, whereas at higher energies the optimum is a smaller number of magnetically focused beams. ILSE parallels this strategy by using 16 electrostatically focused beamlets at the low end followed by 4 magnetically focused beams after beam combining. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Helium refrigeration systems for super-conducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.

    2015-12-04

    Many of the present day accelerators are based on superconducting technology which requires 4.5-K or 2-K helium refrigeration systems. These systems utilize superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and/or superconducting magnets which are packaged into vacuum vessels known as cryo-modules (CM’s). Many of the present day accelerators are optimized to operate primarily at around 2-K, requiring specialized helium refrigeration systems which are cost intensive to produce and to operate. Some of the cryogenic refrigeration system design considerations for these challenging applications are discussed.

  20. Helium refrigeration systems for super-conducting accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganni, V.

    2015-12-01

    Many of the present day accelerators are based on superconducting technology which requires 4.5-K or 2-K helium refrigeration systems. These systems utilize superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and/or superconducting magnets which are packaged into vacuum vessels known as cryo-modules (CM's). Many of the present day accelerators are optimized to operate primarily at around 2-K, requiring specialized helium refrigeration systems which are cost intensive to produce and to operate. Some of the cryogenic refrigeration system design considerations for these challenging applications are discussed.

  1. Acceleration of low order finite element computation with GPUs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knepley, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Considerable effort has been focused on the acceleration using GPUs of high order spectral element methods and discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods. However, these methods are not universally applicable, and much of the existing FEM software base employs low order methods. In this talk, we present a formulation of FEM, using the PETSc framework from ANL, which is amenable to GPU acceleration even at very low order. In addition, using the FEniCS system for FEM, we show that the relevant kernels can be automatically generated and optimized using a symbolic manipulation system.

  2. A Fundamental Theorem on Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2003-05-01

    A fundamental theorem on particle acceleration is derived from the reciprocity principle of electromagnetism and a rigorous proof of the theorem is presented. The theorem establishes a relation between acceleration and radiation, which is particularly useful for insightful understanding of and practical calculation about the first order acceleration in which energy gain of the accelerated particle is linearly proportional to the accelerating field.

  3. Enhancement of chronic acceleration tolerance by selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    A review is presented of experiments concerning the physiological consequences of chronic acceleration and of studies of selection for acceleration tolerance over many generations. It is shown that acceleration selection is effective in improving chronic acceleration tolerance. However, it is determined that the variable selection procedure employed in developing this acceleration-tolerant line limits the confidence in the quantitative evaluation of the procedure.

  4. Proton Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  5. PROTON ACCELERATION AT OBLIQUE SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-20

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  6. Laser Acceleration of Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons via Radiation Pressure Driven Thin Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao Xi; Liu, T. C.; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Eliasson, Bengt

    2011-01-04

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons in a thin foil irradiated by high intensity laser light. The underlying physics of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is discussed, including the importance of optimal thickness and circularly polarized light for efficient acceleration of ions to quasi-monoenergetic beams. Preliminary two-dimensional simulation studies show that certain parameter regimes allow for stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and possibility of acceleration of monoenergetic ions to an excess of 200 MeV, making them suitable for important applications such as medical cancer therapy and fast ignition.

  7. Expansion tube experiments for the investigation of ram-accelerator-related combustion and gasdynamic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srulijes, J.; Smeets, G.; Seiler, F.

    1992-07-01

    By means of a specially devised expansion tube, it has proven possible to accelerate an explosive gas mixture to a superdetonative, ram-accelerator-type velocity without autoignition. By reducing the driver length, a gas flow of decreasing velocity was generated; this allowed detailed observations of the sub-, trans-, and superdetonative regimes to be conducted in a simple experiment. In addition to aiding ram accelerator-related research, this method will help optimize the operating parameters of 30 mm and 90 mm ram accelerator test facilities that are currently under construction.

  8. The computer monitor and control system for the munich MP tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörchen, H.; Off, J.; Rohrer, L.; Schnitter, H.

    1981-05-01

    Presently a computer monitor and control system for the Munich MP tandem accelerator is being developed. It is based on a PDP-11/34 with disc units, DEC-tapes, and an interactive graphic terminal. The accelerator is connected to the system via CAMAC hardware. A monitor program takes all data and stores the accelerator status in the memory and in a direct access file. A logbook file is created and the logbook is printed. During test-runs subsystems of the accelerator have been controlled. A beam transport program controlling a quadrupole doublet and optimizing the beam current measured at a Faraday cup was operated successfully.

  9. Two-color-laser-driven direct electron acceleration in infinite vacuum.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang Jie; Kärtner, Franz X

    2011-03-15

    We propose a direct electron acceleration scheme that uses a two-color pulsed radially polarized laser beam. The two-color scheme achieves electron acceleration exceeding 90% of the theoretical energy gain limit, over twice of what is possible with a one-color pulsed beam of equal total energy and pulse duration. The scheme succeeds by exploiting the Gouy phase shift to cause an acceleration-favoring interference of fields only as the electron enters its effectively final accelerating cycle. Optimization conditions and power scaling characteristics are discussed.

  10. Universe acceleration and nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    A new model of nonlinear electrodynamics with a dimensional parameter β coupled to gravity is considered. We show that an accelerated expansion of the universe takes place if the nonlinear electromagnetic field is the source of the gravitational field. A pure magnetic universe is investigated, and the magnetic field drives the universe to accelerate. In this model, after the big bang, the universe undergoes inflation and the accelerated expansion and then decelerates approaching Minkowski spacetime asymptotically. We demonstrate the causality of the model and a classical stability at the deceleration phase.

  11. Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    FEB 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve 5a. CONTRACT...December 2004 issue of TPT presented a problem concerning how a car should acceler-ate around an unbanked curve of constant radius r starting from rest...Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve Carl E. Mungan, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 100 THE PHYSICS TEACHER ◆ Vol. 44, February 2006 The shapes

  12. Imaging using accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1982-05-01

    Several methods for imaging using accelerated heavy ion beams are being investigated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Using the HILAC (Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator) as an injector, the Bevalac can accelerate fully stripped atomic nuclei from carbon (Z = 6) to krypton (Z = 34), and partly stripped ions up to uranium (Z = 92). Radiographic studies to date have been conducted with helium (from 184-inch cyclotron), carbon, oxygen, and neon beams. Useful ranges in tissue of 40 cm or more are available. To investigate the potential of heavy-ion projection radiography and computed tomography (CT), several methods and instrumentation have been studied.

  13. Optimizing Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Anette

    2006-11-01

    In this talk we will discuss two optimization topics related to low Reynolds number locomotion: optimal stroke patterns in linked swimmers and optimal fluid material properties in adhesive locomotion. In contrast to many optimization problems, we do not consider geometry, rather we optimize the swimming kinematics or fluid material properties for a given geometrical configuration. In the first case, we begin by optimizing stroke patterns for Purcell's 3-link swimmer. We model the swimmer as a jointed chain of three slender links moving in an inertialess flow. The swimmer is optimized for both efficiency and speed. In the second case, we analyze the adhesive locomotion used by common gastropods such as snails and slugs. Such organisms crawl on a solid substrate by propagating muscular waves of shear stress on a viscoelastic mucus. Using a simple mechanical model, we derive criteria for favorable fluid material properties to lower the energetic cost of locomotion.

  14. US Particle Accelerators at Age 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the development of accelerators over the past 50 years. Topics include: types of accelerators, including cyclotrons; sociology of accelerators (motivation, financing, construction, and use); impact of war; national laboratories; funding; applications; future projects; foreign projects; and international collaborations. (JN)

  15. SNEAP 80: symposium of Northeastern Accelerator personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Billen, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Reports of operations are presented for twenty-seven facilities, along with reports on accelerators in progress, ion sources, insulating gases, charging systems, stripping foils, accelerating tubes, and upgraded accelerator systems. (GHT)

  16. Exercise Training During +Gz Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Chou, J. L.; Simonson, S. R.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Barnes, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The overall purpose is to study the effect of passive (without exercise) and active (with exercise) +Gz (head-to-foot) acceleration training, using a short-arm (1.9m radius) centrifuge, on post- training maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max, work capacity) and 70 deg head-up tilt (orthostatic) tolerance in ambulatory subjects to test the hypothesis that (a) both passive and active acceleration training will improve post-training tilt-tolerance, and (b) there will be no difference in tilt-tolerance between passive and active exercise acceleration training because increased hydrostatic and blood pressures, rather than increased muscular metabolism, will provide the major adaptive stimulus. The purpose of the pilot study was to test the hypothesis that there would be no significant difference in the metabolic responses (oxygen uptake, heart rate, pulmonary ventilation, or respiratory exchange ratio) during supine exercise with moderate +Gz acceleration.

  17. The Uniformly Accelerated Reference Frame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, J. Dwayne

    1978-01-01

    The observations that would be made by a uniformly accelerated observer, including the observer's event horizon, the variation of clock rates with position, and the effects of following a freely falling object are considered in detail. (SL)

  18. Accelerating advanced-materials commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maine, Elicia; Seegopaul, Purnesh

    2016-05-01

    Long commercialization times, high capital costs and sustained uncertainty deter investment in innovation for advanced materials. With appropriate strategies, technology and market uncertainties can be reduced, and the commercialization of advanced materials accelerated.

  19. Accelerating to New Aviation Horizons

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA has a 10-year plan to accelerate aviation research that includes the design, build and flight of a series of piloted X-planes -- experimental aircraft -- which will test advanced technologies ...

  20. Accelerated testing of space batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J.; Thomas, R. E.; Waite, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated life test program for space batteries is presented that fully satisfies empirical, statistical, and physical criteria for validity. The program includes thermal and other nonmechanical stress analyses as well as mechanical stress, strain, and rate of strain measurements.

  1. Fate of an accelerating universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, J.-A.; Hwang, W-Y. P.

    2006-01-15

    The presently accelerating universe may keep accelerating forever, eventually run into the event horizon problem, and thus be in conflict with the superstring idea. On the other hand, the current accelerating phase as well as the fate of the universe may be swayed by a negative cosmological constant, which dictates a big crunch. Based on the current observational data, in this paper we investigate how large the magnitude of a negative cosmological constant is allowed to be. In addition, for distinguishing the sign of the cosmological constant via observations, we point out that a measure of the evolution of the dark energy equation-of-state may be a good discriminator. Hopefully future observations will provide much more detailed information about dark energy and thereby indicate the sign of the cosmological constant as well as the fate of the presently accelerating universe.

  2. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Update `92

    SciTech Connect

    Rosing, M.; Balka, L.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1992-09-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is an experiment designed to test various ideas related to wakefield technology. Construction is now underway for a 100 nC electron beam in December of 1992. This report updates this progress.

  3. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Update '92

    SciTech Connect

    Rosing, M.; Balka, L.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is an experiment designed to test various ideas related to wakefield technology. Construction is now underway for a 100 nC electron beam in December of 1992. This report updates this progress.

  4. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hendrix, M. K.; Fox, J. C.; Thomas, D. J.; Nicholson, J.

    1986-01-01

    The hardware and software of NASA's proposed Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) are described. The OARE is to provide aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's principal axis in the free-molecular flow-flight regime at orbital attitude and in the transition regime during reentry. Models considering the effects of electromagnetic effects, solar radiation pressure, orbiter mass attraction, gravity gradient, orbital centripetal acceleration, out-of-orbital-plane effects, orbiter angular velocity, structural noise, mass expulsion signal sources, crew motion, and bias on acceleration are examined. The experiment contains an electrostatically balanced cylindrical proofmass accelerometer sensor with three orthogonal sensing axis outputs. The components and functions of the experimental calibration system and signal processor and control subsystem are analyzed. The development of the OARE software is discussed. The experimental equipment will be enclosed in a cover assembly that will be mounted in the Orbiter close to the center of gravity.

  5. Computing tools for accelerator design

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1986-06-01

    An algorithm has been developed that calculates and obtains information about nonlinear contributions in accelerators. The comparison of the results obtained from this program ''NONLIN'' and HARMON is discussed and illustrated for the SSC-CDR clustered lattices.

  6. Particle Acceleration in Cosmic Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G.P.; Gaisser, T.K. )

    1992-01-01

    This proceedings includes papers presented at the Bartol ResearchInstitute, on topics concerning particle acceleration in stellar, space andgalactic environments. Two of the papers from this proceedings have beenabstracted for the database. (AIP)

  7. Accelerator structure work for NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D.; Hoag, H.A.; Holtkamp, N.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Nelson, E.M.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Gluckstern, R.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N. |

    1992-07-01

    The NLC design achieves high luminosity with multiple bunches in each RF pulse. Acceleration of a train of bunches without emittance growth requires control of long range dipole wakefields. SLAC is pursuing a structure design which suppresses the effect of wakefields by varying the physical dimensions of successive cells of the disk-loaded traveling wave structure in a manner which spreads the frequencies of the higher mode while retaining the synchronism between the electrons and the accelerating mode. The wakefields of structures incorporating higher mode detuning have been measured at the Accelerator Test Facility at Argonne. Mechanical design and brazing techniques which avoid getting brazing alloy into the interior of the accelerator are being studied. A test facility for high-power testing of these structures is complete and high power testing has begun.

  8. The KEK Digital Accelerator and Its Brothers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Ken

    Circular induction accelerators developed in the last 10 years are discussed. They are characterized by induction acceleration of a charged beam bunch trapped in the barrier bucket. This property enables acceleration of any ion species from an extremely low energy to relativistic energy in a single accelerator ring. In the future, a racetrack-shaped fixed field induction accelerator (induction microtron) could be realized as a unique accelerator for cluster ions such as C-60 and Si-100.

  9. Dynamics of Radiation Pressure Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, A.; Benedetti, C.; Pegoraro, F.; Veghini, S.

    2010-02-02

    We describe recent theoretical results on Radiation Pressure Acceleration of ions by ultraintense, circularly polarized laser pulses, giving an insight on the underlying dynamics and suggestions for the development of applications. In thick targets, we show how few-cycle pulses may generate single ion bunches in inhomogeneous density profiles. In thin targets, we present a refinement of the simple model of the accelerating mirror and a comparison of its predictions with simulation results, solving an apparent paradox.

  10. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  11. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  12. SPEAR3 Accelerator Physics Update

    SciTech Connect

    Safranek, James A.; Corbett, W.Jeff; Gierman, S.; Hettel, R.O.; Huang, X.; Nosochkov, Yuri; Sebek, Jim; Terebilo, Andrei; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The SPEAR3 storage ring at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory has been delivering photon beams for three years. We will give an overview of recent and ongoing accelerator physics activities, including 500 mA fills, work toward top-off injection, long-term orbit stability characterization and improvement, fast orbit feedback, new chicane optics, low alpha optics & short bunches, low emittance optics, and MATLAB software. The accelerator physics group has a strong program to characterize and improve SPEAR3 performance

  13. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  14. Acceleration using total internal reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1991-06-07

    This report considers the use of a dielectric slab undergoing total internal reflection as an accelerating structure for charged particle beams. We examine the functional dependence of the electromagnetic fields above the surface of the dielectric for polarized incident waves. We present an experimental arrangement for testing the performance of the method, using apparatus under construction for the Grating Acceleration experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Radiation from violently accelerated bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Ulrich H.

    2001-11-01

    A determination is made of the radiation emitted by a linearly uniformly accelerated uncharged dipole transmitter. It is found that, first of all, the radiation rate is given by the familiar Larmor formula, but it is augmented by an amount which becomes dominant for sufficiently high acceleration. For an accelerated dipole oscillator, the criterion is that the center of mass motion become relativistic within one oscillation period. The augmented formula and the measurements which it summarizes presuppose an expanding inertial observation frame. A static inertial reference frame will not do. Secondly, it is found that the radiation measured in the expanding inertial frame is received with 100% fidelity. There is no blueshift or redshift due to the accelerative motion of the transmitter. Finally, it is found that a pair of coherently radiating oscillators accelerating (into opposite directions) in their respective causally disjoint Rindler-coordinatized sectors produces an interference pattern in the expanding inertial frame. Like the pattern of a Young double slit interferometer, this Rindler interferometer pattern has a fringe spacing which is inversely proportional to the proper separation and the proper frequency of the accelerated sources. The interferometer, as well as the augmented Larmor formula, provide a unifying perspective. It joins adjacent Rindler-coordinatized neighborhoods into a single spacetime arena for scattering and radiation from accelerated bodies.

  16. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  17. Optically powered charged particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesner, Larry D.

    1991-09-01

    A charged particle control apparatus provides very high voltage particle beams. One or more photocell arrays provide bias voltages for beam accelerating stages. The arrays are made from a number of microfabricated photocells connected in series to produce a voltage output that is the sum of the voltages from the individual cells. Arrays of each stage are connected in series to produce a cumulative stage voltage that is applied to an accelerating electrode made part of the stage. Optical power illuminates the stages to generate desired voltage biases to the accelerating electrodes. A light source is used to excite the photocathode when this emission source is used. Electrons from the emission source are accelerated electrodes and are emitted from the chamber which is typically conjoined with other apparatus. By utilizing photocell arrays to generate beam current and accelerating biases, as well as a photocathode for providing a source of electrons, the apparatus of the invention is completely optically isolated thereby requiring no direct electrical connections to the apparatus even though multiple accelerating stages are used to facilitate the achievement of very high voltage particle beams.

  18. Scaled simulations of a 10 GeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, C.G.R; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Paul, K.; Cowan, B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-09-08

    Laser plasma accelerators are able to produce high quality electron beams from 1 MeV to 1 GeV. The next generation of plasma accelerator experiments will likely use a multi-stage approach where a high quality electron bunch is first produced and then injected into an accelerating structure. In this paper we present scaled particle-in-cell simulations of a 10 GeV stage in the quasi-linear regime. We show that physical parameters can be scaled to be able to perform these simulations at reasonable computational cost. Beam loading properties and electron bunch energy gain are calculated. A range of parameter regimes are studied to optimize the quality of the electron bunch at the output of the stage.

  19. Scaled simulations of a 10 GeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Paul, K.; Cowan, B.

    2009-01-22

    Laser plasma accelerators are able to produce high quality electron beams from 1 MeV to 1 GeV. The next generation of plasma accelerator experiments will likely use a multi-stage approach where a high quality electron bunch is first produced and then injected into an accelerating structure. In this paper we present scaled particle-in-cell simulations of a 10 GeV stage in the quasi-linear regime. We show that physical parameters can be scaled to be able to perform these simulations at reasonable computational cost. Beam loading properties and electron bunch energy gain are calculated. A range of parameter regimes are studied to optimize the quality of the electron bunch at the output of the stage.

  20. Linac-Based Photonuclear Applications at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, Mayir; Starovoitova, Valeriia N.; Harmon, Frank

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, current Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) activities based on the exploitation of high energy bremsstrahlung photons generated by linear electron accelerators will be reviewed. These beams are used to induce photonuclear interactions for a wide variety of applications in materials science, activation analysis, medical research, and nuclear technology. Most of the exploited phenomena are governed by the familiar giant dipole resonance cross section in nuclei. By proper target and converter design, optimization of photon and photoneutron production can be achieved, allowing radiation fields produced with both photons and neutrons to be used for medical isotope production and for fission product transmutation. The latter provides a specific application example that supports long-term fission product waste management. Using high-energy, highpower electron accelerators, we can demonstrate transmutation of radio-toxic, long-lived fission products (LLFP) such as 99Tc and 129I into short lived species. The latest experimental and simulation results will be presented.