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Sample records for gaba-a receptor subunit

  1. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-02-01

    Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9' serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose-response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9'S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Early expression of GABA(A) receptor delta subunit in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Didelon, F; Mladinic', M; Cherubini, E; Bradbury, A

    2000-12-01

    The cDNA library screening strategy was used to identify the genes encoding for GABA(A) receptor subunits in the rat hippocampus during development. With this technique, genes encoding eleven GABA(A) receptor subunits were identified. The alpha5 subunit was by far the most highly expressed, followed by the gamma2, alpha2 and alpha4 subunits respectively. The expression of the beta2, alpha1, gamma1, beta1 and beta3 subunits was moderate, although that of the alpha3 and delta subunits was weak. In situ hybridization experiments, using digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes, confirmed that the delta subunit was expressed in the neonatal as well as in the adult hippocampus, and is likely to form functional receptors in association with other subunits of the GABA(A) receptor. When the more sensitive RT-PCR approach was used, the gamma3 subunit was also detected, suggesting that this subunit is present in the hippocampus during development but at low levels of expression. The insertion of the delta subunit into functional GABA(A) receptors may enhance the efficacy of GABA in the immediate postnatal period when this amino acid is still exerting a depolarizing and excitatory action.

  3. Altered GABA(A) receptor subunit expression and pharmacology in human Angelman syndrome cortex.

    PubMed

    Roden, William H; Peugh, Lindsey D; Jansen, Laura A

    2010-10-15

    The neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome is most frequently caused by deletion of the maternally derived chromosome 15q11-q13 region, which includes not only the causative UBE3A gene, but also the beta(3)-alpha(5)-gamma(3) GABA(A) receptor subunit gene cluster. GABAergic dysfunction has been hypothesized to contribute to the occurrence of epilepsy and cognitive and behavioral impairments in this condition. In the present study, analysis of GABA(A) receptor subunit expression and pharmacology was performed in cerebral cortex from four subjects with Angelman syndrome and compared to that from control tissue. The membrane fraction of frozen postmortem neocortical tissue was isolated and subjected to quantitative Western blot analysis. The ratios of beta(3)/beta(2) and alpha(5)/alpha(1) subunit protein expression in Angelman syndrome cortex were significantly decreased when compared with controls. An additional membrane fraction was injected into Xenopus oocytes, resulting in incorporation of the brain membrane vesicles with their associated receptors into the oocyte cellular membrane. Two-electrode voltage-clamp analysis of GABA(A) receptor currents was then performed. Studies of GABA(A) receptor pharmacology in Angelman syndrome cortex revealed increased current enhancement by the alpha(1)-selective benzodiazepine-site agonist zolpidem and by the barbiturate phenobarbital, while sensitivity to current inhibition by zinc was decreased. GABA(A) receptor affinity and modulation by neurosteroids were unchanged. This shift in GABA(A) receptor subunit expression and pharmacology in Angelman syndrome is consistent with impaired extrasynaptic but intact to augmented synaptic cortical GABAergic inhibition, which could contribute to the epileptic, behavioral, and cognitive phenotypes of the disorder.

  4. The gamma 2 subunit of GABA(A) receptors is required for maintenance of receptors at mature synapses.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Claude; Balsiger, Sylvia; Bluethmann, Horst; Mansuy, Isabelle M; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Mohler, Hanns; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2003-10-01

    The gamma2 subunit of GABA(A) receptor chloride channels is required for normal channel function and for postsynaptic clustering of these receptors during synaptogenesis. In addition, GABA(A) receptor function is thought to contribute to normal postnatal maturation of neurons. Loss of postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors in gamma2-deficient neurons might therefore reflect a deficit in maturation of neurons due to the reduced channel function. Here, we have used the Cre-loxP strategy to examine the clustering function of the gamma2 subunit at mature synapses. Deletion of the gamma2 subunit in the third postnatal week resulted in loss of benzodiazepine-binding sites and parallel loss of punctate immunoreactivity for postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors and gephyrin. Thus, the gamma2 subunit contributes to postsynaptic localization of GABA(A) receptors and gephyrin by a mechanism that is operant in mature neurons and not limited to immature neurons, most likely through interaction with proteins involved in trafficking of synaptic GABA(A) receptors.

  5. The diversity of GABA(A) receptor subunit distribution in the normal and Huntington's disease human brain.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel, H J; Faull, R L M

    2015-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors are assembled into pentameric receptor complexes from a total of 19 different subunits derived from a variety of different subunit classes (α1-6, β1-3, γ1-3, δ, ɛ, θ, and π) which surround a central chloride ion channel. GABA(A) receptor complexes are distributed heterogeneously throughout the brain and spinal cord and are activated by the extensive GABAergic inhibitory system. In this chapter, we describe the heterogeneous distribution of six of the most widely distributed subunits (α1, α2, α3, β2,3, and γ2) throughout the human basal ganglia. This review describes the studies we have carried out on the normal and Huntington's disease human basal ganglia using autoradiographic labeling and immunohistochemistry in the human basal ganglia. GABA(A) receptors are known to react to changing conditions in the brain in neurological disorders, especially in Huntington's disease and display a high degree of plasticity which is thought to compensate for loss of function caused by disease. In Huntington's disease, the variable loss of GABAergic medium spiny striatopallidal projection neurons is associated with a loss of GABA(A) receptor subunits in the striosome and/or the matrix compartments of the striatum. By contrast in the globus pallidus, a loss of the GABAergic striatal projection neurons results in a dramatic upregulation of subunits on the large postsynaptic pallidal neurons; this is thought to be a compensatory plastic mechanism resulting from the loss of striatal GABAergic input. Most interestingly, our studies have revealed that the subventricular zone overlying the caudate nucleus contains a variety of proliferating progenitor stem cells that possess a heterogeneity of GABA(A) receptor subunits which may play a role in human brain repair mechanisms.

  6. Effects of cocaine administration on receptor binding and subunits mRNA of GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Abe, S; Yamaguchi, M; Baba, A; Hori, T; Shiraishi, H; Ito, T

    2000-11-01

    The effects of intermittent intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of cocaine (20 mg/kg) on GABA(A)-benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors labeled by t-[(35)S]butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS), and on several types of mRNA subunits were investigated in rat brain by in vitro quantitative receptor autoradiography and in situ hybridization. Phosphor screen imaging with high sensitivity and a wide linear range of response was utilized for imaging analysis. There was a significant decrease in the level of alpha 1, alpha 6, beta 2, beta 3, and gamma 2 subunits mRNA, with no alteration of [(35)S]TBPS binding in any regions in the brain of rats at 1 h following a single injection of cocaine. In chronically treated animals, the mean scores of stereotyped behavior were increased with the number of injections. The level of beta 3 subunit mRNA was decreased in the cortices and caudate putamen, at 24 h after a final injection of chronic administrations for 14 days. In the withdrawal from cocaine, the frontal cortex and hippocampal complexes showed a significant increase in [(35)S]TBPS binding and alpha1 and beta 3 subunit mRNA in the rats 1 week after a cessation of chronic administration of cocaine. These findings suggest that the disruption of GABA(A)-BZD receptor formation is closely involved in the development of cocaine-related behavioral disturbances. Further studies on the physiological functions on GABA(A)-BZD receptor complex will be necessary for an explanation of the precise mechanisms underlying the acute effects, development of hypersensitization, and withdrawal state of cocaine. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of GABA(A) receptor alpha1, beta2 and gamma2 subunits following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure of cultured cortical neurons of mice.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, C R Marutha; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2006-09-01

    There is evidence that many of the GABA(A) receptor subunits contain consensus sequence for tyrosine kinase, and phosphorylation may play a key role in ethanol's regulation of GABA(A) receptors. Recently, we investigated the effect of chronic exposure of ethanol (CE) on tyrosine kinase phosphorylation and reported that there was an up-regulation in tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of the beta(2)- and gamma(2)- subunits and no effect on alpha(1)-subunit of the GABA(A) receptor in the cultured cortical neurons of mice. In the present study, we have further investigated the effect of chronic intermittent administration of ethanol (CIE) on tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of the GABA(A) receptor subunits (alpha(1), beta(2), and gamma(2)) in the mouse cultured cortical neurons by immunoprecipitation and Western blot techniques. We observed that there was an up-regulation in the tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of the GABA(A )receptor beta(2)- and gamma(2)-subunits following CIE exposure, and no effect on alpha(1)-subunit in the cultured cortical neurons of mice. These CIE changes, unlike CE, were not reverted back to the control level following ethanol withdrawal even after 7 days. Acute exposure of ethanol did not cause any change in the tyrosine kinase regulation of the GABA(A) receptor subunits. In conclusion, the CIE exposure, unlike chronic/acute ethanol exposure, regulates the tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of the selective population of GABA(A )receptors in a long lasting manner.

  8. Altered gamma oscillations during pregnancy through loss of δ subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors on parvalbumin interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ferando, Isabella; Mody, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Gamma (γ) oscillations (30-120 Hz), an emergent property of neuronal networks, correlate with memory, cognition and encoding. In the hippocampal CA3 region, locally generated γ oscillations emerge through feedback between inhibitory parvalbumin-positive basket cells (PV+BCs) and the principal (pyramidal) cells. PV+BCs express δ-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs (δ-GABA(A)Rs) and NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) that balance the frequency of γ oscillations. Neuroactive steroids (NS), such as the progesterone-derived (3α,5α)-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone; ALLO), modulate the expression of δ-GABA(A)Rs and the tonic conductance they mediate. Pregnancy produces large increases in ALLO and brain-region-specific homeostatic changes in δ-GABA(A)Rs expression. Here we show that in CA3, where most PV+ interneurons (INs) express δ-GABA(A)Rs, expression of δ-GABA(A)Rs on INs diminishes during pregnancy, but reverts to control levels within 48 h postpartum. These anatomical findings were corroborated by a pregnancy-related increase in the frequency of kainate-induced CA3 γ oscillations in vitro that could be countered by the NMDA-R antagonists D-AP5 and PPDA. Mimicking the typical hormonal conditions during pregnancy by supplementing 100 nM ALLO lowered the γ frequencies to levels found in virgin or postpartum mice. Our findings show that states of altered NS levels (e.g., pregnancy) may provoke perturbations in γ oscillatory activity through direct effects on the GABAergic system, and underscore the importance of δ-GABA(A)Rs homeostatic plasticity in maintaining constant network output despite large hormonal changes. Inaccurate coupling of NS levels to δ-GABA(A)R expression may facilitate abnormal neurological and psychiatric conditions such as epilepsy, post-partum depression, and post-partum psychosis, thus providing insights into potential new treatments.

  9. Regulation of benzodiazepine receptor binding and GABA(A) subunit mRNA expression by punishment and acute alprazolam administration.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Glowa, J R

    2000-12-22

    Quantitative autoradiography of benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors and competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to characterize changes in BZ binding and GABA(A) receptor subunit transcription levels associated with the anxiolytic effects of alprazolam. Effects were assessed on punished and non-suppressed water consumption using a lick suppression (Vogel) paradigm. Alprazolam had no effect on non-suppressed licking, [(3)H]Ro 15-1788 binding or receptor subunit transcript levels, compared to non-drug controls. When each fifth lick produced a shock (0-0.5 mA), responding was suppressed in an intensity-related manner. The highest intensity significantly decreased licking (85%), [(3)H]Ro 15-1788 binding (12%) and alpha1 transcript levels (63%) in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala, and [(3)H]Ro 15-1788 binding in the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus (15%), compared to non-punished controls. Punishment increased the ratio of gamma2L/S transcripts in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala. Alprazolam blocked or reversed each of these effects. These results show that punishment has similar effects on BZ binding and GABA(A) receptor subunit expression and that alprazolam can block or reverse those effects. Such changes may be related to the anxiolytic effects of alprazolam.

  10. The Optimization of TaqMan Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for Transcriptional Profiling of GABA-A Receptor Subunit Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gangisetty, Omkaram; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2009-01-01

    The GABA-A receptor plays a critical role in inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Quantitation of GABA-A receptor subunits in various brain regions is essential to understand their role in plasticity and brain disorders. However, conventional RNA assays are tedious and less sensitive for use in studies of subunit plasticity. Here we describe optimization of a sensitive assay of GABA-A receptor subunit gene expression by TaqMan real-time PCR. For each subunit gene, a set of primers and TaqMan fluorogenic probe were designed to specifically amplify the target template. The TaqMan methodology was optimized for quantification of mouse GABA-A receptor subunits (α1–6, β1–3, γ2, and δ) and GAPDH. The TaqMan reaction detected very low levels of gene expression (~100 template copies of cDNA). A standard curve for GAPDH and one of the target genes, constructed using the cDNA, revealed slopes around −3.4 (r2=0.990), reflecting similar optimum PCR efficiencies. The methodology was utilized for quantification of the GABA-A receptor α4 subunit, which is known to upregulate following withdrawal from chronic progesterone or neurosteroids. Our results show that the α4-subunit expression increased threefold in the hippocampus following neurosteroid withdrawal in mice. The TaqMan PCR assay allows sensitive, high-throughput transcriptional profiling of complete GABA-A receptor subunit family, and thus provides specific tool for studies of GABA-A receptor subunit plasticity in neurological and psychiatric animal models. PMID:19406150

  11. Intracellular trafficking of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Barnes, E M

    2000-02-11

    Some of the mechanisms that control the intracellular trafficking of GABA(A) receptors have recently been described. Following the synthesis of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits in the endoplasmic reticulum, ternary receptor complexes assemble slowly and are inefficiently inserted into surface membranes of heterologous cells. While beta3, beta4, and gamma2S subunits appear to contain polypeptide sequences that alone are sufficient for surface targeting, these sequences are neither conserved nor essential for surface expression of heteromeric GABA(A) receptors formed from alpha1beta or alpha1betagamma subunits. At the neuronal surface, native GABA(A) receptor clustering and synaptic targeting require a gamma2 subunit and the participation of gephyrin, a clustering protein for glycine receptors. A linker protein, such as the GABA(A) receptor associated protein (GABARAP), may be necessary for the formation of GABA(A) receptor aggregates containing gephyrin. A substantial fraction of surface receptors are sequestered by endocytosis, another process which apparently requires a GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit. In heterologous cells, constitutive endocytosis seems to predominate while, in cortical neurons, internalization is evoked when receptors are occupied by GABA(A) agonists. After constitutive endocytosis, receptors are relatively stable and can be rapidly recycled to the cell surface, a process that may be regulated by protein kinase C. On the other hand, a portion of the intracellular GABA(A) receptors derived from ligand-dependent endocytosis is apparently degraded. The clustering of GABA(A) receptors at synapses and at coated pits are two mechanisms that may compete for a pool of diffusable receptors, providing a model for plasticity at inhibitory synapses.

  12. Hypoplasia of spiral and Scarpa's ganglion cells in GABA(A) receptor beta(3) subunit knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ja-Won; Homanics, Gregg E; Balaban, Carey D

    2002-05-01

    This study documents morphologic alterations in the spiral ganglion and Scarpa's ganglion from gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptor beta(3) subunit null mutant mice. The ganglion cells of the mutant mice were hypoplastic in hematoylin&eosin-stained sections. Hypoplasia was observed at every location of the spiral ganglion and Scarpa's ganglion except the apical cochlear turn. Calretinin immunostaining demonstrated a selective hypoplasia of calretinin-negative cells at every location of spiral and Scarpa's ganglion cells, while the soma area of calretinin-positive cells was not affected by the gene deletion. Meanwhile, in the spiral ganglion of both wild type and knockout mice, there were apical to basal gradients in the soma size and the proportion of calretinin-positive cells. The absence of statistically significant hypoplasia in hematoylin&eosin sections through the apical turn of the cochlea can be explained by the relatively higher proportion of calretinin-positive ganglion cells, which were unaffected by the gene deletion. These findings suggest that GABA(A) receptor isoforms containing the beta(3) subunit may play an important role in the development and differentiation of non-calyceal terminals of Scarpa's ganglion cells and type II and smaller type I spiral ganglion cells.

  13. Up-regulation of GABA transporters and GABA(A) receptor α1 subunit in tremor rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoyuan; Guo, Feng; Yu, Junling; Min, Dongyu; Wang, Zhanyou; Xie, Ni; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Cai, Jiqun

    2010-12-17

    The loss of GABAergic neurotransmission has been closely linked with epileptogenesis. The modulation of the synaptic activity occurs both via the removal of GABA from the synaptic cleft and by GABA transporters (GATs) and by modulation of GABA receptors. The tremor rat (TRM; tm/tm) is the parent strain of the spontaneously epileptic rat (SER; zi/zi, tm/tm), which exhibits absence-like seizure after 8 weeks of age. However, there are no reports that can elucidate the effects of GATs and GABA(A) receptors (GABARs) on TRMs. The present study was conducted to detect GATs and GABAR α1 subunit in TRMs hippocampus at mRNA and protein levels. In this study, total synaptosomal GABA content was significantly decreased in TRMs hippocampus compared with control Wistar rats by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); mRNA and protein expressions of GAT-1, GAT-3 and GABAR α1 subunit were all significantly increased in TRMs hippocampus by real time PCR and Western blot, respectively; GAT-1 and GABAR α1 subunit proteins were localized widely in TRMs and control rats hippocampus including CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions whereas only a wide distribution of GAT-3 was observed in CA1 region by immunohistochemistry. These data demonstrate that excessive expressions of GAT-1 as well as GAT-3 and GABAR α1 subunit in TRMs hippocampus may provide the potential therapeutic targets for genetic epilepsy. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Localisation of GABA(A) receptor epsilon-subunit in cholinergic and aminergic neurones and evidence for co-distribution with the theta-subunit in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Moragues, N; Ciofi, P; Tramu, G; Garret, M

    2002-01-01

    In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical methodologies suggest the existence of a large diversity of GABA(A) receptor subtypes in the brain. These are hetero-oligomeric proteins modulated by a number of clinically important drugs, depending on their subunit composition. We recently cloned and localised the rat GABA(A) receptor epsilon-subunit by in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical procedures. Here, in a dual-labelling immunohistochemical study in the rat brain, we used our affinity-purified antiserum to epsilon with antisera to markers of cholinergic, catecholaminergic, and serotonergic neurones. As far as cholinergic systems were concerned, epsilon-immunoreactivity was expressed in all forebrain cell-groups, as well as in the caudal lateral pontine tegmentum and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve. As far as dopaminergic systems were concerned, epsilon-immunoreactivity was found to be expressed in a great number of hypothalamic cell-groups (A15, A14 and A12) and in the substantia nigra pars compacta. The noradrenergic, and to a lesser extent, adrenergic cell-groups were all epsilon-immunoreactive. Also, epsilon-immunoreactivity was detected in all serotonergic cell-groups. We also revealed by in situ hybridisation in a monkey brain that epsilon mRNA was expressed in the locus coeruleus, as previously observed in rats. Finally, by using in situ hybridisation in rat brains, we compared the distribution of the mRNA of epsilon with that of the recently cloned theta-subunit of the GABA(A) receptor. Both subunits showed strikingly overlapping expression patterns throughout the brain, especially in the septum, preoptic areas, various hypothalamic nuclei, amygdala, and thalamus, as well as the aforementioned monoaminergic cell-groups. No theta-mRNA signals were detected in cholinergic cell-groups. Taken together with previously published evidence of the presence of the alpha3-subunit in monoamine- or acetylcholine-containing systems, our data suggest

  15. NEUROSTEROID WITHDRAWAL REGULATES GABA-A RECEPTOR α4-SUBUNIT EXPRESSION AND SEIZURE SUSCEPTIBILITY BY ACTIVATION OF PR-INDEPENDENT EGR3 PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Gangisetty, Omkaram; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2010-01-01

    Neurosteroids regulate GABA-A receptor plasticity. Neurosteroid withdrawal occurs during menstruation and is associated with a marked increase in expression of GABA-A receptor α4-subunit, a key subunit linked to enhanced neuronal excitability, seizure susceptibility and benzodiazepine resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the upregulation of α4-subunit expression remain unclear. Here we utilized the progesterone receptor (PR) knockout mouse to investigate molecular pathways of PR and the transcription factor early growth response factor-3 (Egr3) in regulation of the GABA-A receptor α4-subunit expression in the hippocampus in a mouse neurosteroid withdrawal paradigm. Neurosteroid withdrawal induced a threefold increase in α4-subunit expression in wild-type mice, but this upregulation was unchanged in PR knockout mice. The expression of Egr3, which controls α4-subunit transcription, was increased significantly following neurosteroid withdrawal in wild-type and PR knockout mice. Neurosteroid withdrawal-induced α4-subunit upregulation was completely suppressed by antisense Egr3 inhibition. In the hippocampus kindling model of epilepsy, there was heightened seizure activity, significant reduction in the antiseizure sensitivity of diazepam (a benzodiazepine insensitive at α4βγ-receptors) and conferral of increased seizure protection of flumazenil (a low-affinity agonist at α4βγ-receptors) in neurosteroid-withdrawn wild-type and PR knockout mice. These observations are consistent with enhanced α4-containing receptor abundance in vivo. Neurosteroid withdrawal-induced seizure exacerbation, diazepam insensitivity, and flumazenil efficacy in the kindling model were reversed by inhibition of Egr3. These results indicate that neurosteroid withdrawal-induced upregulation of GABA-A receptor α4-subunit expression is mediated by the Egr3 via a PR-independent signaling pathway. These findings help advance our understanding of the molecular basis of

  16. Agonist-specific conformational changes in the α1-γ2 subunit interface of the GABA A receptor.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Lim, You Bin; Bracamontes, John; Steinbach, Joe Henry; Akk, Gustav

    2012-08-01

    The GABA(A) receptor undergoes conformational changes upon the binding of agonist that lead to the opening of the channel gate and a flow of small anions across the cell membrane. Besides the transmitter GABA, allosteric ligands such as the general anesthetics pentobarbital and etomidate can activate the receptor. Here, we have investigated the agonist specificity of structural changes in the extracellular domain of the receptor. We used the substituted cysteine accessibility method and focused on the γ2(S195C) site (loop F). We show that modification of the site with (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) results in an enhanced response to GABA, indicating accessibility of the resting receptor to the modifying agent. Coapplication of GABA or muscimol, but not of gabazine, with MTSES prevented the effect, suggesting that GABA and muscimol elicit a conformational change that reduces access to the γ2(S195C) site. Exposure of the receptors to MTSES in the presence of the allosteric activators pentobarbital and etomidate resulted in an enhanced current response indicating accessibility and labeling of the γ2(S195C) site. However, comparison of the rates of modification indicated that labeling in the presence of etomidate was significantly faster than that in the presence of pentobarbital or gabazine or in resting receptors. We infer from the data that the structure of the α1-γ2 subunit interface undergoes agonist-specific conformational changes.

  17. Effect of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway on GABA(A) receptor subunit gene expression in the rodent basal ganglia and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Chadha, A; Dawson, L G; Jenner, P G; Duty, S

    2000-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, changes in GABAergic activity occurring downstream of the striatal dopamine loss are accompanied by reciprocal changes in GABA(A) receptor binding, the underlying molecular mechanisms for which are unknown. This study examined whether changes in expression of the genes encoding known GABA(A) receptor subunits (alpha(1-4), beta(1-3), gamma(1-3) and delta) could account for this receptor plasticity using a rodent model of Parkinson's disease with a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostriatal lesion. Analysis of autoradiograms of the basal ganglia and thalamus revealed changes in expression of only four of the 11 subunits studied. Expression of alpha1 and beta2 subunit genes was altered in a parallel manner following a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion; messenger RNA levels for both were significantly increased in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (11 +/- 4% and 17 +/- 1%, respectively), and significantly reduced in the globus pallidus (18 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 3%, respectively) and parafascicular nucleus (19 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 5%, respectively). Smaller changes in the messenger RNA levels encoding the alpha1 subunit in the lateral amygdala (8 +/- 1% decrease) and the alpha4 and gamma2 subunits in the striatum (10 +/- 2% and 6 +/- 1% increase, respectively) were also observed. No changes in expression were noted for any other subunits in any region studied. Clearly, both region- and subunit-specific regulation of GABA(A) receptor subunit gene expression occurs following a nigrostriatal tract lesion. The changes in expression of the alpha1 and beta2 subunit genes probably contribute to the documented changes in GABA(A) receptor binding following striatal dopamine depletion. Moreover, they provide a molecular basis by which the pathological changes in GABAergic activity in Parkinson's disease may be partially compensated.

  18. GABA A receptor π subunit promotes apoptosis of HTR-8/SVneo trophoblastic cells: Implications in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junjie; Zhang, Qian; Tan, Dongmei; Luo, Wenping; Zhao, Hai; Ma, Jing; Liang, Hao; Tan, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) functions primarily as an inhibitory neurotransmitter through its receptors in the mature central nervous system. The GABA type A receptor π subunit (GABRP) has been identified in the tissues of the reproductive system, particularly in the uterus. In addition, we have previously detected GABRP expression in both human and mouse placentas. To examine the role of GABRP in trophoblastic cell invasion, we constructed a pIRES2-GABRP-EGFP plasmid which was used for the transfection of a human placental cell line derived from first trimester extravillous trophoblasts (HTR-8/SVneo). The number of invaded cells was decreased by GABRP overexpression. Notably, the decrease in the invasive cell number may be due to the increased apoptosis of the HTR-8/SVneo cells following GABRP transfection, which was further confirmed by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. Based on the increased apoptosis of trophoblastic cells in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (PE) and the fact that GABRP promotes the apoptosis of trophoblastic cells, we hypothesized that GABRP expression is increased in the placental tissues from patients with PE compared with that in the normal groups and this hypothesis was confirmed by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical analysis. Taken together, these findings imply that GABRP plays an important role in placentation and this pathway may be a promising molecular target for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for PE.

  19. Altered pharmacology and GABA-A receptor subunit expression in dorsal midline thalamic neurons in limbic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Karthik; Sun, Chengsan; Bertram, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    The mediodorsal (MD) and paraventricular (PV) thalamic nuclei play a significant role in limbic epilepsy, and previous reports have shown changes in GABA-A receptor (GABAAR) mediated synaptic function. In this study, we examined changes in the pharmacology of GABAergic drugs and the expression of the GABAAR subunits in the MD and PV neurons in epilepsy. We observed nucleus specific changes in the sensitivity of sIPSCs to zolpidem and phenobarbital in MD and PV neurons from epileptic animals. In contrast, the magnitude of change in electrically evoked response (eIPSC) to zolpidem and phenobarbital were uniformly diminished in both MD and PV neurons in epilepsy. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that in epilepsy, there was a reduction in GAD65 expression and NeuN positive neurons in the MD neurons. Also, there was a decrease in immunoreactivity of the α1 and β2/3 subunit of GABAARs, but not the γ2 of the GABAAR in both MD and PV in epilepsy. These findings demonstrate significant alterations in the pharmacology of GABA and GABAARs in a key region for seizure generation, which may have implications for the physiology and pharmacology of limbic epilepsy. PMID:18992345

  20. Steroid requirements for regulation of the alpha4 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangping; Smith, Sheryl S

    2007-01-03

    The alpha4 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor (GABAR) has relatively low expression in the CNS, but is increased in vivo following 48 h administration of the GABA-modulatory steroid 3alpha-OH-5alpha[beta]-pregnan-20-one (THP or [allo]pregnanolone) to female rats. The purpose of the following study was to determine the optimal conditions for steroid-induced upregulation of alpha4 expression in an in vitro model. To this end, we used the IMR-32 cell, a neuroblastoma cell line, which normally expresses alpha4 mRNA at low levels. In undifferentiated IMR-32 cells, 48 h administration of THP increased alpha4 expression when ambient THP levels were reduced by the 5alpha-reductase blocker 4MA, suggesting that the background steroid milieu affects steroid regulation of this subunit. Following neuronal differentiation in serum-free medium, 48 h THP treatment significantly increased alpha4 expression two-fold following application of nerve growth factor (NGF) suggesting that development of neuronal processes facilitates this effect of the steroid. In the absence of NGF treatment, combined administration of 17beta-estradiol (E2) plus THP also increased alpha4 expression to a similar extent as THP following NGF treatment. In addition, E2 alone effectively increased alpha4 expression to maximal levels following NGF treatment. In contrast, neuronal differentiation in the absence of serum deprivation did not increase alpha4 levels. These results suggest that both THP and E2 can increase expression of the GABAR alpha4 subunit, but that this effect is dependent upon the background steroid milieu as well as the degree of neuronal development. These findings demonstrate optimal conditions for steroid-induced upregulation of the alpha4 subunit in an in vitro system.

  1. GABA(A) receptor epsilon-subunit may confer benzodiazepine insensitivity to the caudal aspect of the nucleus tractus solitarii of the rat.

    PubMed

    Kasparov, S; Davies, K A; Patel, U A; Boscan, P; Garret, M; Paton, J F

    2001-11-01

    1. Benzodiazepines (BZ) and barbiturates both potentiate chloride currents through GABA(A) receptors to enhance inhibition. However, unlike barbiturates BZ do not impair autonomic control of heart rate. We hypothesised that BZ might not significantly potentiate GABAergic transmission in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (cNTS), which is critically important for mediating the baroreceptor reflex. 2. In rat brain slices the BZ agonists chlordiazepoxide and midazolam (2 and 50 microM) did not significantly enhance currents evoked by GABA in voltage-clamped cNTS neurones. Chlordiazepoxide (50 microM) reversibly increased electrically evoked IPSPs in 5/10 rostral NTS (rNTS) neurones but only in 2/10 cNTS neurones. Pentobarbitone (50-100 microM) was effective in enhancing GABA(A)-mediated responses in all NTS neurones. An inverse BZ agonist, methyl 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM; 1 or 10 microM), failed to depress GABA-induced currents in the cNTS. 3. Microinjections of midazolam (10 and 100 microM solutions) into the cNTS did not affect the baroreceptor reflex (P > 0.2) while pentobarbitone (100 microM) significantly and reversibly depressed it (gain decrease to 53 +/- 11 % of control, P < 0.01). 4. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction revealed the presence of alpha(1), alpha(2), beta(2), beta(3) and gamma(2) GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA in the cNTS. No alternatively spliced variants of the alpha(1)- and gamma(2)-subunits were revealed. Moreover, GABA(A) epsilon-unit mRNA was found in both the cNTS and rNTS as two alternatively spliced transcripts. 5. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed numerous GABA(A) epsilon-subunit-positive neurones within the cNTS with significantly fewer epsilon-subunit-positive cells in the rNTS. 6. As incorporation of the epsilon-subunit in recombinant GABA(A) receptors may confer BZ insensitivity we propose that the paucity of BZ actions in the cNTS is due to a high level of epsilon-subunit

  2. Mutations in the main cytoplasmic loop of the GABA(A) receptor α4 and δ subunits have opposite effects on surface expression.

    PubMed

    Bracamontes, John R; Li, Ping; Akk, Gustav; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2014-07-01

    We examined the role of putative trafficking sequences in two GABA(A) receptor subunits: α4 and δ. These subunits assemble with a β subunit to form a subtype of GABA(A) receptor involved in generating the "tonic" outward current. Both α4 and δ subunits contain dibasic retention motifs in homologous positions. When basic residues are mutated to alanine in the α4 subunit, surface expression of epitope-tagged δ subunits is increased. When basic residues in homologous regions of the δ subunit are mutated, however, surface expression is reduced. We focused on the mutants that had the maximal effects to increase (in α4) or reduce (in δ) surface expression. The total expression of δ subunits is significantly decreased by the δ mutation, suggesting an effect on subunit maturation. We also examined surface expression of the β2 subunit. Expression of the mutated α4 subunit resulted in increased surface expression of β2 compared with wild-type α4, indicating enhanced forward trafficking. In contrast, mutated δ resulted in decreased surface expression of β2 compared with wild-type δ and to α4 and β2 in the absence of any δ. This observation suggests that the mutated δ incorporates into multimeric receptors and reduces the overall forward trafficking of receptors. These observations indicate that the roles of trafficking motifs are complex, even when located in homologous positions in related subunits. The physiologic properties of receptors containing mutated subunits were not significantly affected, indicating that the mutations in the α4 subunit will be useful to enhance surface expression.

  3. GABA-A and NMDA receptor subunit mRNA expression is altered in the caudate but not the putamen of the postmortem brains of alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Bhandage, Amol K; Jin, Zhe; Bazov, Igor; Kononenko, Olga; Bakalkin, Georgy; Korpi, Esa R; Birnir, Bryndis

    2014-01-01

    Chronic consumption of alcohol by humans has been shown to lead to impairment of executive and cognitive functions. Here, we have studied the mRNA expression of ion channel receptors for glutamate and GABA in the dorsal striatum of post-mortem brains from alcoholics (n = 29) and normal controls (n = 29), with the focus on the caudate nucleus that is associated with the frontal cortex executive functions and automatic thinking and on the putamen area that is linked to motor cortices and automatic movements. The results obtained by qPCR assay revealed significant changes in the expression of specific excitatory ionotropic glutamate and inhibitory GABA-A receptor subunit genes in the caudate but not the putamen. Thus, in the caudate we found reduced levels of mRNAs encoding the GluN2A glutamate receptor and the δ, ε, and ρ2 GABA-A receptor subunits, and increased levels of the mRNAs encoding GluD1, GluD2, and GABA-A γ1 subunits in the alcoholics as compared to controls. Interestingly in the controls, 11 glutamate and 5 GABA-A receptor genes were more prominently expressed in the caudate than the putamen (fold-increase varied from 1.24 to 2.91). Differences in gene expression patterns between the striatal regions may underlie differences in associated behavioral outputs. Our results suggest an altered balance between caudate-mediated voluntarily controlled and automatic behaviors in alcoholics, including diminished executive control on goal-directed alcohol-seeking behavior.

  4. Drug interactions at GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Korpi, Esa R; Gründer, Gerhard; Lüddens, Hartmut

    2002-06-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor systems have been the focus of intensive pharmacological research for more than 20 years for basic and applied scientific reasons, but only recently has there been a better understanding of their key features. One of these systems includes the type A receptor for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which forms an integral anion channel from a pentameric subunit assembly and mediates most of the fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the adult vertebrate central nervous system. Up to now, depending on the definition, 16-19 mammalian subunits have been cloned and localized on different genes. Their assembly into proteins in a poorly defined stoichiometry forms the basis of functional and pharmacological GABA(A) receptor diversity, i.e. the receptor subtypes. The latter has been well documented in autoradiographic studies using ligands that label some of the receptors' various binding sites, corroborated by recombinant expression studies using the same tools. Significantly less heterogeneity has been found at the physiological level in native receptors, where the subunit combinations have been difficult to dissect. This review focuses on the characteristics, use and usefulness of various ligands and their binding sites to probe GABA(A) receptor properties and to gain insight into the biological function from fish to man and into evolutionary conserved GABA(A) receptor heterogeneity. We also summarize the properties of the novel mouse models created for the study of various brain functions and review the state-of-the-art imaging of brain GABA(A) receptors in various human neuropsychiatric conditions. The data indicate that the present ligands are only partly satisfactory tools and further ligands with subtype-selective properties are needed for imaging purposes and for confirming the behavioral and functional results of the studies presently carried out in gene-targeted mice with other species, including man.

  5. Early loss of interneurons and delayed subunit-specific changes in GABA(A)-receptor expression in a mouse model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bouilleret, V; Loup, F; Kiener, T; Marescaux, C; Fritschy, J M

    2000-01-01

    Unilateral injection of kainic acid (KA) into the dorsal hippocampus of adult mice induces spontaneous recurrent partial seizures and replicates histopathological changes observed in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) (Bouilleret V et al., Neuroscience 1999; 89:717-729). Alterations in pre- and postsynaptic components of GABAergic neurotransmission were investigated immunohistochemically at different time points (1-120 days) in this mouse model of MTLE. Markers of GABAergic interneurons (parvalbumin, calbindin-D28k, and calretinin), the type-1 GABA transporter (GAT1), and major GABA(A)-receptor subunits expressed in the hippocampal formation were analyzed. Acutely, KA injection produced a profound loss of hilar cells but only limited damage to CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells. In addition, parvalbumin and calbindin-D28k staining of interneurons disappeared irreversibly in CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG), whereas calretinin staining was spared. The prominent GABA(A)-receptor alpha1 subunit staining of interneurons also disappeared after KA treatment, suggesting acute degeneration of these cells. Likewise, GAT1 immunoreactivity revealed degenerating terminals at 24 h post-KA in CA1 and DC and subsided almost completely thereafter. Loss of CA1 and, to a lesser extent, CA3 neurons became evident at 7-15 days post-KA. It was more accentuated after 1 month, accompanied by a corresponding reduction of GABA(A)-receptor staining. In contrast, DC granule cells were markedly enlarged and dispersed in the molecular layer and exhibited a prominent increase in GABA(A)-receptor subunit staining. After 4 months, the dorsal CA1 area was lost almost entirely, CA3 was reduced, and the DG represented most of the remaining dorsal hippocampal formation. No significant morphological alterations were detected contralaterally. These results suggest that loss of hilar cells and GABAergic neurons contributes to epileptogenesis in this model of MTLE. In contrast, long-term degeneration of

  6. Diminished neurosteroid sensitivity of synaptic inhibition and altered location of the alpha4 subunit of GABA(A) receptors in an animal model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengsan; Mtchedlishvili, Zakaria; Erisir, Alev; Kapur, Jaideep

    2007-11-14

    In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), neurosteroid sensitivity of GABA(A) receptors on dentate granule cells (DGCs) is diminished; the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. The current study investigated a mechanism for loss of neurosteroid sensitivity of synaptic GABA(A) receptors in TLE. Synaptic currents recorded from DGCs of epileptic animals (epileptic DGCs) were less frequent, larger in amplitude, and less sensitive to allopregnanolone modulation than those recorded from DGCs of control animals (control DGCs). Synaptic currents recorded from epileptic DGCs were less sensitive to diazepam and had altered sensitivity to benzodiazepine inverse agonist RO 15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5alpha][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) and furosemide than those recorded from control DGCs. Properties of synaptic currents recorded from epileptic DGCs appeared similar to those of recombinant receptors containing the alpha4 subunit. Expression of the alpha4 subunit and its colocalization with the synaptic marker GAD65 was increased in epileptic DGCs. Location of the alpha4 subunit in relation to symmetric (inhibitory) synapses on soma and dendrites of control and epileptic DGCs was examined with postembedding immunogold electron microscopy. The alpha4 immunogold labeling was present more commonly within the synapse in epileptic DGCs compared with control DGCs, in which the subunit was extrasynaptic. These studies demonstrate that, in epileptic DGCs, the neurosteroid modulation of synaptic currents is diminished and alpha4 subunit-containing receptors are present at synapses and participate in synaptic transmission. These changes may facilitate seizures in epileptic animals.

  7. Functional reorganization of visual cortex maps after ischemic lesions is accompanied by changes in expression of cytoskeletal proteins and NMDA and GABA(A) receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Angelica; Sengpiel, Frank; Guagnelli, Miguel Angel; Vaca, Luis; Arias, Clorinda

    2004-02-25

    Reorganization of cortical representations after focal visual cortex lesions has been documented. It has been suggested that functional reorganization may rely on cellular mechanisms involving modifications in the excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission balance and on morphological changes of neurons peripheral to the lesion. We explored functional reorganization of cortical retinotopic maps after a focal ischemic lesion in primary visual cortex of kittens using optical imaging of intrinsic signals. After 1, 2, and 5 weeks postlesion (wPL), we addressed whether functional reorganization correlated in time with changes in the expression of MAP-2, GAP-43, GFAP, GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha1 (GABA(A)alpha1), subunit 1 of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR1), and in neurotransmitter levels at the border of the lesion. Our results show that: (1) retinotopic maps reorganize with time after an ischemic lesion; (2) MAP-2 levels increase gradually from 1wPL to 5wPL; (3) MAP-2 upregulation is associated with an increase in dendritic-like structures surrounding the lesion and a decrease in GFAP-positive cells; (4) GAP-43 levels reach the highest point at 2wPL; (5) NMDAR1 and glutamate contents increase in parallel from 1wPL to 5wPL; (6) GABA(A)alpha1 levels increase from 1wPL to 2wPL but do not change after this time point; and (7) GABA contents remain low from 1wPL to 5wPL. This is a comprehensive study showing for the first time that functional reorganization correlates in time with dendritic sprouting and with changes in the excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission systems previously proposed to participate in cortical remodeling and suggests mechanisms by which plasticity of cortical representations may occur.

  8. Localization of two major GABA(A) receptor subunits in the dentate gyrus of the rat and cell type-specific up-regulation following entorhinal cortex lesion.

    PubMed

    Simbürger, E; Plaschke, M; Fritschy, J M; Nitsch, R

    2001-01-01

    GABA(A) receptor subunits show a specific regional distribution in the CNS during development and in the adult animal. In the hippocampal formation, individual subsets of GABAergic interneurons are highly immunoreactive for the alpha1-subunit, whereas granule and pyramidal cells show a strong expression of the alpha2-subunit. Using confocal microscopy and digital image analysis, we demonstrate that in the dentate gyrus the alpha1-subunit immunolabeling appears in differently sized clusters. The large clusters, which are confined to dendrites of interneurons, show no alpha2 labeling, whereas the smaller ones coincide with alpha2-subunit-positive clusters. In the molecular layer, the clusters of both alpha-subunits co-localize with the anchoring protein gephyrin. In the granule cell layer and hilus, we found alpha1- and alpha2-subunit-positive clusters which were devoid of gephyrin labeling. Lesions of the medial entorhinal cortex led to the deafferentation of dendrites in the middle molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. This resulted in a significantly increased concentration of alpha2-subunit-positive clusters. We also observed an increase of alpha1-subunit immunolabeling in the deafferented area. We found no change in the co-localization between alpha1 and alpha2, and no significant change in the number of large alpha1-positive clusters along individual dendritic segments of interneurons. In a previous study, we demonstrated that calbindin-immunoreactive dendrites of granule cells revealed a significant increase in gephyrin immunoreactivity following lesion, whereas parvalbumin-positive dendrites showed no such alterations. The predominant localization of small gephyrin clusters in dendrites of granule cells, which was also described in this study, leads to the conclusion that the increase of the alpha2-subunit-positive clusters, demonstrated in the present study, indicates that, following entorhinal cortex lesion, new GABAergic synapses may be formed and that

  9. Identification of channel-lining residues in the M2 membrane-spanning segment of the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors are the major inhibitory, postsynaptic, neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system. The binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to the GABA(A) receptors induces the opening of an anion-selective channel that remains open for tens of milliseconds before it closes. To understand how the structure of the GABA(A) receptor determines the functional properties such as ion conduction, ion selectivity and gating we sought to identify the amino acid residues that line the ion conducting channel. To accomplish this we mutated 26 consecutive residues (250-275), one at a time, in and flanking the M2 membrane- spanning segment of the rat alpha1 subunit to cysteine. We expressed the mutant alpha1 subunit with wild-type beta1 and gamma2 subunits in Xenopus oocytes. We probed the accessibility of the engineered cysteine to covalent modification by charged, sulfhydryl-specific reagents added extracellularly. We assume that among residues in membrane-spanning segments, only those lining the channel would be susceptible to modification by polar reagents and that such modification would irreversibly alter conduction through the channel. We infer that nine of the residues, alpha1 Val257, alpha1 Thr26l, alpha1 Thr262, alpha1 Leu264, alpha1 Thr265, alpha1 Thr268, alpha1 Ile27l, alpha1 Ser272 and alpha1 Asn275 are exposed in the channel. On a helical wheel plot, the exposed residues, except alpha1 Thr262, lie on one side of the helix in an arc of 120 degrees. We infer that the M2 segment forms an alpha helix that is interrupted in the region of alpha1 Thr262. The modification of residues as cytoplasmic as alpha1 Val257 in the closed state of the channel suggests that the gate is at least as cytoplasmic as alpha1 Val257. The ability of the positively charged reagent methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium to reach the level of alpha1 Thr261 suggests that the charge-selectivity filter is at least as cytoplasmic as this

  10. Expression of GABA(A) receptor alpha3-, theta-, and epsilon-subunit mRNAs during rat CNS development and immunolocalization of the epsilon subunit in developing postnatal spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Pape, J-R; Bertrand, S S; Lafon, P; Odessa, M-F; Chaigniau, M; Stiles, J K; Garret, M

    2009-04-21

    Ionotropic GABA(A) receptors are heteromeric structures composed of a combination of five from at least 16 different subunits. Subunit genes are expressed in distinct cell types at specific times during development. The most abundant native GABA(A) receptors consist of alpha1-, beta2-, and gamma2-subunits that are co-expressed in numerous brain areas. alpha3-, theta-, And epsilon-subunits are clustered on the X chromosome and show striking overlapping expression patterns throughout the adult rat brain. To establish whether these subunits are temporally and spatially co-expressed, we used in situ hybridization to analyze their expression throughout rat development from embryonic stage E14 to postnatal stage P12. Each transcript exhibited a unique or a shared regional and temporal developmental expression profile. The thalamic expression pattern evolved from a restricted expression of epsilon and theta transcripts before birth, to a theta and alpha3 expression at birth, and finally to a grouped epsilon, theta and alpha3 expression postpartum. However, strong similarities occurred, such as a grouped expression of the three subunits within the hypothalamus, tegmentum and pontine nuclei throughout the developmental process. At early stages of development (E17), epsilon and theta appeared to have a greater spatial distribution before the dominance of the alpha3 subunit transcript around birth. We also revealed expression of alpha3, theta, and epsilon in the developing spinal cord and identified neurons that express epsilon in the postnatal dorsal horn, intermediolateral column and motoneurons. Our findings suggest that various combinations of alpha3-, theta- and epsilon-subunits may be assembled at a regional and developmental level in the brain.

  11. Effects of gut microbiota disturbance induced in early life on the expression of extrasynaptic GABA-A receptor α5 and δ subunits in the hippocampus of adult rat.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liang; Yuan, Jingping; Zhang, Shiying; Wu, Hao

    2017-09-27

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gut microbiota disturbance significantly increases the risk of emotional disorders via gut-brain axis, but the mechanism is unclear. Furthermore, Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) deficits were reported to be implicated in development of depression and amnesia, but the alterations of GABA-A receptor subunits in pathogenetic process have not been fully elucidated. This study used juvenile rats fed with amplin-Na in order to result in degree III of dysbiosis of intestinal flora and examined their emotional change using tail suspension test, forced swim test and Morris water maze. And our study investigated the expression of GABA-A receptor α5 and δ subunits in the hippocampus in the adulthood using q-pcr and immunohistochemistry. We aimed to observe the role of GABA-A receptor α5 and δ subunits changes induced by juvenile gut microbiota disturbance in the pathogenesis of emotional disorders in adulthood. In addition, we investigated the protective effects of probiotics and benzodiazepine (clonazepam). This finding showed that juvenile gut microbiota disturbance induced chronic depression and memory loss, and reduced expression of GABA-A receptor α5 and δ subunits in the hippocampus of adult rat. Furthermore, moderate probiotics administration led to significant improvement as compared to short-term BZ treatment. However, We are aware that these results have been established with single animal experiment and will require further confirmation with a larger group of individuals. Future direction for exploration of the effects of gut microbiota disturbance on GABA-A receptor α5 and δ subunits are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid PCR-mediated synthesis of competitor molecules for accurate quantification of beta(2) GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA.

    PubMed

    Vela, J; Vitorica, J; Ruano, D

    2001-12-01

    We describe a fast and easy method for the synthesis of competitor molecules based on non-specific conditions of PCR. RT-competitive PCR is a sensitive technique that allows quantification of very low quantities of mRNA molecules in small tissue samples. This technique is based on the competition established between the native and standard templates for nucleotides, primers or other factors during PCR. Thus, the most critical parameter is the use of good internal standards to generate a standard curve from which the amount of native sequences can be properly estimated. At the present time different types of internal standards and methods for their synthesis have been described. Normally, most of these methods are time-consuming and require the use of different sets of primers, different rounds of PCR or specific modifications, such as site-directed mutagenesis, that need subsequent analysis of the PCR products. Using our method, we obtained in a single round of PCR and with the same primer pair, competitor molecules that were successfully used in RT-competitive PCR experiments. The principal advantage of this method is high versatility and economy. Theoretically it is possible to synthesize a specific competitor molecule for each primer pair used. Finally, using this method we have been able to quantify the increase in the expression of the beta(2) GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA that occurs during rat hippocampus development.

  13. Expression of 10 GABA(A) receptor subunit messenger RNAs in the motor-related thalamic nuclei and basal ganglia of Macaca mulatta studied with in situ hybridization histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kultas-Ilinsky, K; Leontiev, V; Whiting, P J

    1998-07-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry technique with [35S]UTP-labelled riboprobes was used to study the expression pattern of 10 GABA(A) receptor subunit messenger RNAs in the basal ganglia and motor thalamic nuclei of rhesus monkey. Human transcripts were used for the synthesis of alpha2, alpha4, beta2, beta3, gamma1 and delta subunit messenger RNA probes. Rat complementary DNAs were used for generating alpha1, alpha3, beta1 and gamma2 subunit messenger RNA probes. Nigral, pallidal and cerebellar afferent territories in the ventral tier thalamic nuclei all expressed alpha1, alpha2, alpha3, alpha4, beta1, beta2, beta3, delta and gamma2 subunit messenger RNAs but at different levels. Each intralaminar nucleus displayed its own unique expression pattern. In the thalamus, gamma1 subunit messenger RNA was detected only in the parafascicular nucleus. Comparison of the expression patterns with the known organization of GABA(A) connections in thalamic nuclei suggests that (i) the composition of the receptor associated with reticulothalamic synapses, except for those in the intralaminar nuclei, may be alpha1alpha4beta2delta, (ii) receptors of various other subunit compositions may operate in the local GABAergic circuits, and (iii) the composition of receptors at nigro- and pallidothalamic synapses may differ, with those at nigrothalamic probably containing beta1 and gamma2 subunits. In the medial and lateral parts of the globus pallidus, the subthalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra pars reticularis, the alpha1, beta2 and gamma2 messenger RNAs were co-expressed at a high level suggesting that this subunit composition was associated with all GABAergic synapses in the direct and indirect striatal output pathways. Various other subunit messenger RNAs were also expressed but at a lower level. In the substantia nigra pars compacta the most highly expressed messenger RNAs were alpha3, alpha4 and beta3; all other subunit messenger RNAs studied, except for gamma1, alpha1 and

  14. The reciprocal regulation of stress hormones and GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Mody, Istvan; Maguire, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    Stress-derived steroid hormones regulate the expression and function of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs). Changes in GABA(A)R subunit expression have been demonstrated under conditions of altered steroid hormone levels, such as stress, as well as following exogenous steroid hormone administration. In addition to the effects of stress-derived steroid hormones on GABA(A)R subunit expression, stress hormones can also be metabolized to neuroactive derivatives which can alter the function of GABA(A)Rs. Neurosteroids allosterically modulate GABA(A)Rs at concentrations comparable to those during stress. In addition to the actions of stress-derived steroid hormones on GABA(A)Rs, GABA(A)Rs reciprocally regulate the production of stress hormones. The stress response is mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the activity of which is governed by corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) neurons. The activity of CRH neurons is largely controlled by robust GABAergic inhibition. Recently, it has been demonstrated that CRH neurons are regulated by neurosteroid-sensitive, GABA(A)R δ subunit-containing receptors representing a novel feedback mechanism onto the HPA axis. Further, it has been demonstrated that neurosteroidogenesis and neurosteroid actions on GABA(A)R δ subunit-containing receptors on CRH neurons are necessary to mount the physiological response to stress. Here we review the literature describing the effects of steroid hormones on GABA(A)Rs as well as the importance of GABA(A)Rs in regulating the production of steroid hormones. This review incorporates what we currently know about changes in GABA(A)Rs following stress and the role in HPA axis regulation.

  15. Benzodiazepine-dependent stabilization of GABA(A) receptors at synapses.

    PubMed

    Gouzer, Géraldine; Specht, Christian G; Allain, Laure; Shinoe, Toru; Triller, Antoine

    2014-11-01

    GABA(A) receptors constitutively enter and exit synapses by lateral diffusion in the plane of the neuronal membrane. They are trapped at synapses through their interactions with gephyrin, the main scaffolding protein at inhibitory post-synaptic densities. Previous work has shown that the synaptic accumulation and diffusion dynamics of GABA(A)Rs are controlled via excitatory synaptic activity. However, it remains unknown whether GABA(A)R activity can itself impact the surface trafficking of the receptors. Here we report the effects of GABA(A)R agonists, antagonists and allosteric modulators on the receptor's surface dynamics. Using immunocytochemistry and single particle tracking experiments on mouse hippocampal neurons, we show that the agonist muscimol decreases GABA(A)R and gephyrin levels at synapses and accelerates the receptor's lateral diffusion within 30–120 min of treatment. In contrast, the GABA(A)R antagonist gabazine increased GABA(A)R amounts and slowed down GABA(A)R diffusion at synapses. The response to GABA(A)R activation or inhibition appears to be an adaptative regulation of GABAergic synapses. Surprisingly, the positive allosteric modulator diazepam abolished the regulation induced by muscimol, and this effect was observed on α1, α2, α5 and γ2 GABA(A)R subunits. Altogether these results indicate that diazepam stabilizes synaptic GABA(A)Rs and thus prevents the agonist-induced regulation of GABA(A)R levels at synapses. This occurred independently of neuronal activity and intracellular calcium and involved GABA(A)R–gephyrin interactions, suggesting that the changes in GABA(A)R diffusion depend on conformational changes of the receptor. Our study provides a new molecular mechanism involved in the adaptative response to changes in GABA(A)R activity and benzodiazepine treatments.

  16. The role of GABA(A) receptors in the development of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Mary-Anne

    2008-07-01

    Alcoholism is a common, heritable, chronic relapsing disorder. GABA(A) receptors undergo allosteric modulation by ethanol, anesthetics, benzodiazepines and neurosteroids and have been implicated in the acute as well as the chronic effects of ethanol including tolerance, dependence and withdrawal. Medications targeting GABA(A) receptors ameliorate the symptoms of acute withdrawal. Ethanol induces plasticity in GABA(A) receptors: tolerance is associated with generally decreased GABA(A) receptor activation and differentially altered subunit expression. The dopamine (DA) mesolimbic reward pathway originating in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and interacting stress circuitry play an important role in the development of addiction. VTA GABAergic interneurons are the primary inhibitory regulators of DA neurons and a subset of VTA GABA(A) receptors may be implicated in the switch from heavy drinking to dependence. GABA(A) receptors modulate anxiety and response to stress; important elements of sustained drinking and relapse. The GABA(A) receptor subunit genes clustered on chromosome 4 are highly expressed in the reward pathway. Several recent studies have provided strong evidence that one of these genes, GABRA2, is implicated in alcoholism in humans. The influence of the interaction between ethanol and GABA(A) receptors in the reward pathway on the development of alcoholism together with genetic and epigenetic vulnerabilities will be explored in this review.

  17. Diversity of inhibitory neurotransmission through GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Mody, Istvan; Pearce, Robert A

    2004-09-01

    In the brain, highly connected and heterogeneous GABAergic cells are crucial in controling the activity of neuronal networks. They accomplish this task by communicating through remarkably diverse sets of inhibitory processes, the complexity of which is reflected by the variety of interneuron classification schemes proposed in recent years. It is now becoming clear that the subcellular localization and intrinsic properties of heteropentameric GABA(A) receptors themselves also constitute major sources of diversity in GABA-mediated signaling. This review summarizes some of the factors underlying this diversity, including GABA(A) receptor subunit composition, localization, activation, number and phosphorylation states, variance of GABA concentration in the synaptic cleft, and some of the presynaptic factors regulating GABA release.

  18. Testing the silence of mutations: Transcriptomic and behavioral studies of GABA(A) receptor α1 and α2 subunit knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, R A; Osterndorff-Kahanek, E; Ponomarev, I; Homanics, G E; Blednov, Y A

    2011-01-13

    Knock-in mice were constructed with mutations in the α1 (H(270), A(277)) and α2 (H(270), A(277)) subunits of the GABAA receptor, which resulted in receptors that lacked modulation by ethanol but retained normal responses to GABA in vitro. A key question is whether these mutant receptors also function normally in vivo. Perturbation of brain function was evaluated by gene expression profiling in the cerebral cortex and by behavioral pharmacology experiments with GABAergic drugs. Analysis of individual transcripts found only six transcripts that were changed in α1 knock-in mice and three in the α2 mutants (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Two transcripts that are sensitive to neuronal activity, Arc and Fos, increased about 250% in the α2 mutants, and about 50% in the α1 mutants. Behavioral effects (loss of righting reflex, rotarod) of flurazepam and pentobarbital were not different between α2 mutants and wild-type, but they were enhanced for α1 knock-in mice. These results indicate that introduction of these mutations in the α2 subunit of the GABAA receptor does not produce marked perturbation of brain function, as measured by gene expression and GABAergic behavioral responses, but the same mutations in the α1 subunit produce more pronounced changes, especially in GABAergic function.

  19. The effect of chronic administration of corticosterone on anxiety- and depression-like behavior and the expression of GABA-A receptor alpha-2 subunits in brain structures of low- and high-anxiety rats.

    PubMed

    Skórzewska, Anna; Lehner, Małgorzata; Wisłowska-Stanek, Aleksandra; Krząścik, Paweł; Ziemba, Andrzej; Płaźnik, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in rat emotional behavior and determine differences in the expression of GABA-A receptor alpha-2 subunits in brain structures of low- (LR) and high-anxiety (HR) rats after the repeated corticosterone administration. The animals were divided into LR and HR groups based on the duration of their conditioned freezing in a contextual fear test. Repeated daily administration of corticosterone (20 mg/kg) for 21 days decreased activity in a forced swim test, reduced body weight and decreased prefrontal cortex corticosterone concentration in both the LR and HR groups. These effects of corticosterone administration were stronger in the HR group in comparison with the appropriate control group, and compared to LR treated and LR control animals. Moreover, in the HR group, chronic corticosterone administration increased anxiety-like behavior in the open field and elevated plus maze tests. The behavioral effects in HR rats were accompanied by a decrease in alpha-2 subunit density in the medial prefrontal cortex (prelimbic cortex and frontal association cortex) and by an increase in the expression of alpha-2 subunits in the basolateral amygdala. These studies have shown that HR rats are more susceptible to anxiogenic and depressive effects of chronic corticosterone administration, which are associated with modification of GABA-A receptor function in the medial prefrontal cortex and basolateral amygdala. The current data may help to better understand the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for individual differences in changes in mood and emotions induced by repeated administration of high doses of glucocorticoids or by elevated levels of these hormones associated with chronic stress or affective pathology.

  20. Anaesthetic impairment of immune function is mediated via GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel W; Thompson, Andrew J; Corletto, Federico; Reckless, Jill; Loke, Justin C T; Lapaque, Nicolas; Grant, Andrew J; Mastroeni, Pietro; Grainger, David J; Padgett, Claire L; O'Brien, John A; Miller, Nigel G A; Trowsdale, John; Lummis, Sarah C R; Menon, David K; Beech, John S

    2011-02-24

    GABA(A) receptors are members of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter receptors, proteins which are responsible for fast synaptic transmission, and are the site of action of wide range of drugs. Recent work has shown that Cys-loop receptors are present on immune cells, but their physiological roles and the effects of drugs that modify their function in the innate immune system are currently unclear. We are interested in how and why anaesthetics increase infections in intensive care patients; a serious problem as more than 50% of patients with severe sepsis will die. As many anaesthetics act via GABA(A) receptors, the aim of this study was to determine if these receptors are present on immune cells, and could play a role in immunocompromising patients. We demonstrate, using RT-PCR, that monocytes express GABA(A) receptors constructed of α1, α4, β2, γ1 and/or δ subunits. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiological studies show that GABA can activate these receptors, resulting in the opening of a chloride-selective channel; activation is inhibited by the GABA(A) receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not enhanced by the positive modulator diazepam. The anaesthetic drugs propofol and thiopental, which can act via GABA(A) receptors, impaired monocyte function in classic immunological chemotaxis and phagocytosis assays, an effect reversed by bicuculline and picrotoxin. Our results show that functional GABA(A) receptors are present on monocytes with properties similar to CNS GABA(A) receptors. The functional data provide a possible explanation as to why chronic propofol and thiopental administration can increase the risk of infection in critically ill patients: their action on GABA(A) receptors inhibits normal monocyte behaviour. The data also suggest a potential solution: monocyte GABA(A) receptors are insensitive to diazepam, thus the use of benzodiazepines as an alternative anesthetising agent may be advantageous where infection is a life

  1. Aging of whiskey increases the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor response.

    PubMed

    Koda, Hirofumi; Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Aoshima, Hitoshi

    2003-08-27

    It is known that the target of most mood-defining compounds such as ethanol is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activities in the human brain. Because both extracts of whiskey by pentane and fragrant components in whiskey potentiate the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting cRNAs prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors in order to study the effects of whiskey itself on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. Whiskey itself also potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors generally more than ethanol at the same concentration as that of the whiskey. The potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response increased with the aging period of the whiskey. Inhalation of whiskey to mice increased the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital more than that of the same concentration of ethanol as the whiskey. These results suggest that not only ethanol but also minor components in whiskey play an important role in the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor-mediated response and possibly the sedative effect of whiskey. Although the minor components are present in extremely small quantities compared with ethanol in alcoholic beverages, they may modulate the mood or consciousness of humans through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic compounds are easily absorbed into the brain across the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response.

  2. PR-independent neurosteroid regulation of α2-GABA-A receptors in the hippocampus subfields.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba; Gangisetty, Omkaram; Wu, Xin

    2017-03-15

    Progesterone (P) binding to the intracellular progesterone receptors (PRs) plays a key role in epilepsy via modulation of GABA-A receptor plasticity in the brain. This is thought to occur via conversion of P to neurosteroids such as allopregnanolone, an allosteric modulator of GABA-A receptors. In the female brain, the composition of GABA-A receptors is not static and undergoes dynamic spatial changes in response to fluctuations in P and neurosteroid levels. Synaptic α2-containing GABA-A receptors contribute to phasic neuronal excitability and seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanisms underlying α2-subunit plasticity remain unclear. Here, we utilized the neurosteroid synthesis inhibitor finasteride and PR knockout mice to investigate the role of PRs in α2-subunit in the hippocampus. α2-Subunit expression was significantly upregulated during the high-P state of diestrous stage and with P treatment in wildtype and PR knockout mice. In contrast, there was no change in α2-subunit expression when metabolism of P into neurosteroids was blocked by finasteride in both genotypes. These findings suggest that ovarian cycle-related P and neurosteroids regulate α2-GABA-A receptor expression in the hippocampus via a non-PR pathway, which may be relevant to menstrual-cycle related brain conditions.

  3. Tolerance to allopregnanolone with focus on the GABA-A receptor

    PubMed Central

    Turkmen, Sahruh; Backstrom, Torbjorn; Wahlstrom, Goran; Andreen, Lotta; Johansson, Inga-Maj

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have suggested a relationship between stress, sex steroids, and negative mental and mood changes in humans. The progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone is a potent endogenous ligand of the γ-amino butyric acid –A (GABA-A) receptor, and the most discussed neuroactive steroid. Variations in the levels of neuroactive steroids that influence the activity of the GABA-A receptor cause a vulnerability to mental and emotional pathology. There are physiological conditions in which allopregnanolone production increases acutely (e.g. stress) or chronically (e.g. menstrual cycle, pregnancy), thus exposing the GABA-A receptor to high and continuous allopregnanolone concentrations. In such conditions, tolerance to allopregnanolone may develop. We have shown that both acute and chronic tolerances can develop to the effects of allopregnanolone. Following the development of acute allopregnanolone tolerance, there is a decrease in the abundance of the GABA-A receptor α4 subunit and the expression of the α4 subunit mRNA in the ventral-posteriomedial nucleus of the thalamus. Little is known about the mechanism behind allopregnanolone tolerance and its effects on assembly of the GABA-A receptor composition. The exact mechanism of the allopregnanolone tolerance phenomena remains unclear. The purpose of this review is to summarize certain aspects of current knowledge concerning allopregnanolone tolerance and changes in the GABA-A receptors. PMID:20883478

  4. Targeted deletion of the GABRA2 gene encoding alpha2-subunits of GABA(A) receptors facilitates performance of a conditioned emotional response, and abolishes anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepines and barbiturates.

    PubMed

    Dixon, C I; Rosahl, T W; Stephens, D N

    2008-07-01

    Mice with point-mutated alpha2 GABA(A) receptor subunits (rendering them diazepam insensitive) are resistant to the anxiolytic-like effects of benzodiazepines (BZs) in the conditioned emotional response (CER) test, but show normal anxiolytic effects of a barbiturate. We investigated the consequence of deleting the alpha2-subunit on acquisition of the CER with increasing intensity of footshock, and on the anxiolytic efficacy of a benzodiazepine, diazepam, and a barbiturate, pentobarbital. alpha2 knockout (KO) and wildtype (WT) mice were trained in a conditioned emotional response (CER) task, in which lever pressing for food on a variable interval (VI) schedule was suppressed during the presentation of a compound light/tone conditioned stimulus (CS+) that predicted footshock. The ability of diazepam and of pentobarbital to reduce suppression during the CS+ was interpreted as an anxiolytic response. There were no differences between the genotypes in shock sensitivity, as assessed by their flinch responses to increasing levels of shock. However, alpha2 KO mice showed a greater suppression of lever pressing than WT littermates in the presence of a compound cue signalling footshock. Diazepam (0, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) induced a dose-dependent anxiolytic-like effect in WT mice but no such effect was seen in KO mice. Similarly, although pentobarbital (20 mg/kg) reduced the ability of the CS+ to reduce lever pressing rates in WT mice, this effect was not seen in the KO. These findings suggest that alpha2-containing GABA(A) receptors mediate the anxiolytic effects of barbiturates, as well as benzodiazepines, and that they may be involved in neuronal circuits underlying conditioned anxiety.

  5. Neurosteroids and GABA-A Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingde

    2011-01-01

    Neurosteroids represent a class of endogenous steroids that are synthesized in the brain, the adrenals, and the gonads and have potent and selective effects on the GABAA-receptor. 3α-hydroxy A-ring reduced metabolites of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, and testosterone are positive modulators of GABAA-receptor in a non-genomic manner. Allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one), 5α-androstane-3α, 17α-diol (Adiol), and 3α5α-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (3α5α-THDOC) enhance the GABA-mediated Cl- currents acting on a site (or sites) distinct from the GABA, benzodiazepine, barbiturate, and picrotoxin binding sites. 3α5α-P and 3α5α-THDOC potentiate synaptic GABAA-receptor function and activate δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic receptors that mediate tonic currents. On the contrary, 3β-OH pregnane steroids and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are GABAA-receptor antagonists and induce activation-dependent inhibition of the receptor. The activities of neurosteroid are dependent on brain regions and types of neurons. In addition to the slow genomic action of the parent steroids, the non-genomic, and rapid actions of neurosteroids play a significant role in the GABAA-receptor function and shift in mood and memory function. This review describes molecular mechanisms underlying neurosteroid action on the GABAA-receptor, mood changes, and cognitive functions. PMID:22654809

  6. Expression of the GABA(A) receptor gamma 4-subunit gene: anatomical distribution of the corresponding mRNA in the domestic chick forebrain and the effect of imprinting training.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R J; McCabe, B J; Solomonia, R O; Horn, G; Darlison, M G

    1998-09-01

    The learning process of imprinting involves morphological, electrophysiological and biochemical changes in a region of the chick (Gallus gallus domesticus) forebrain known as the intermediate and medial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV). The alterations include increases in the mean length of postsynaptic density profiles of axospinous synapses and the number of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor binding sites, and changes in spontaneous and evoked electrical activity. Recent immunocytochemical and behavioural studies have suggested that inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission plays a role in learning. In this context, it has previously been reported that a novel avian gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A (GABA(A)) receptor gene, encoding the gamma4 subunit, is highly expressed in the hyperstriatum ventrale. In this study, we have used in situ hybridization to map, in detail, the expression of the gamma4-subunit gene in the chick brain, and to assess the effect of imprinting training on the level of the corresponding transcript. Our results reveal that the gamma4-subunit mRNA has a restricted distribution, and demonstrate a highly significant, time-dependent effect of training on its steady-state level. At 10 h but not at 5 h after training there is a decrease (25-32%) in the amount of this transcript in parts of the medial hyperstriatum ventrale, including the IMHV. A decrease (28-39%) is also seen in certain visual and auditory pathway areas but no effect was observed in other forebrain regions such as the hyperstriatum intercalatus superior (HIS). These results suggest that imprinting training leads to a time-dependent down-regulation of GABAergic transmission, and raise the possibility that this down-regulation plays a role in learning.

  7. Pentobarbital enhances GABAergic neurotransmission to cardiac parasympathetic neurons, which is prevented by expression of GABA(A) epsilon subunit.

    PubMed

    Irnaten, Mustapha; Walwyn, Wendy M; Wang, Jijiang; Venkatesan, Priya; Evans, Cory; Chang, Kyoung S K; Andresen, Michael C; Hales, Tim G; Mendelowitz, David

    2002-09-01

    Pentobarbital decreases the gain of the baroreceptor reflex on the order of 50%, and this blunting is caused nearly entirely by decreasing cardioinhibitory parasympathetic activity. The most likely site of action of pentobarbital is the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor. The authors tested whether pentobarbital augments the inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission to cardiac parasympathetic neurons, and whether expression of the GABA(A) epsilon subunit prevents this facilitation. The authors used a novel approach to study the effect of pentobarbital on identified cardiac parasympathetic preganglionic neurons in rat brainstem slices. The cardiac parasympathetic neurons in the nucleus ambiguus were retrogradely prelabeled with a fluorescent tracer and were visually identified for patch clamp recording. The effects of pentobarbital on spontaneous GABAergic synaptic events were tested. An adenovirus was used to express the epsilon subunit of the GABA(A) receptor in cardiac parasympathetic neurons to examine whether this transfection alters pentobarbital-mediated changes in GABAergic neurotransmission. Pentobarbital increased the duration but not the frequency or amplitude of spontaneous GABAergic currents in cardiac parasympathetic neurons. Transfection of cardiac parasympathetic neurons with the epsilon subunit of the GABA(A) receptor prevented the pentobarbital-evoked facilitation of GABAergic currents. Pentobarbital, at clinically relevant concentrations, prolongs the duration of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents that impinge on cardiac parasympathetic neurons. This action would augment the inhibition of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, reduce parasympathetic cardioinhibitory activity, and increase heart rate. Expression of the GABA(A) receptor epsilon subunit in cardiac parasympathetic neurons renders the GABA receptors insensitive to pentobarbital.

  8. Modulation of GABA-A receptors of astrocytes and STC-1 cells by taurine structural analogs.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; Cabrera-Ruíz, Elizabeth; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2014-11-01

    Taurine activates and modulates GABA receptors in vivo as well as those expressed in heterologous systems. This study aimed to determine whether the structural analogs of taurine: homotaurine and hypotaurine, have the ability to activate GABA-A receptors that include GABAρ subunits. The expression of GABA-A receptors containing GABAρ has been reported in the STC-1 cells and astrocytes. In both cell types, taurine, homo-, and hypotaurine gated with low efficiency a picrotoxin-sensitive GABA-A receptor. The known bimodal modulatory effect of taurine on GABAρ receptors was not observed; however, differences between the activation and deactivation rates were detected when they were perfused together with GABA. In silico docking simulations suggested that taurine, hypo-, and homotaurine do not form a cation-π interaction such as that generated by GABA in the agonist-binding site of GABAρ. This observation complements the electrophysiological data suggesting that taurine and its analogs act as partial agonists of GABA-A receptors. All the observations above suggest that the structural analogs of taurine are partial agonists of GABA-A receptors that occupy the agonist-binding site, but their structures do not allow the proper interaction with the receptor to fully gate its Cl(-) channel.

  9. Activation of GABA(A) receptors in subthalamic neurons in vitro: properties of native receptors and inhibition mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baufreton, J; Garret, M; Dovero, S; Dufy, B; Bioulac, B; Taupignon, A

    2001-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) influences the output of the basal ganglia, thereby interfering with motor behavior. The main inputs to the STN are GABAergic. We characterized the GABA(A) receptors expressed in the STN and investigated the response of subthalamic neurons to the activation of GABA(A) receptors. Cell-attached and whole cell recordings were made from rat brain slices using the patch-clamp technique. The newly identified epsilon subunit confers atypical pharmacological properties on recombinant receptors, which are insensitive to barbiturates and benzodiazepines. We tested the hypothesis that native subthalamic GABA(A) receptors contain epsilon proteins. Applications of increasing concentrations of muscimol, a selective GABA(A) agonist, induced Cl(-) and HCO currents with an EC(50) of 5 microM. Currents induced by muscimol were fully blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonists, bicuculline and picrotoxin. They were strongly potentiated by the barbiturate, pentobarbital (+190%), and by the benzodiazepines, diazepam (+197%) and flunitrazepam (+199%). Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents were also significantly enhanced by flunitrazepam. Furthermore, immunohistological experiments with an epsilon subunit-specific antibody showed that the epsilon protein was not expressed within the STN. Native subthalamic GABA(A) receptors did not, therefore, display pharmacological or structural properties consistent with receptors comprising epsilon. Burst firing is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease. Half of the subthalamic neurons have the intrinsic capacity of switching from regular-firing to burst-firing mode when hyperpolarized by current injection. This raises the possibility that activation of GABA(A) receptors might trigger the switch. Statistical analysis of spiking activity established that 90% of intact neurons in vitro were in single-spike firing mode, whereas 10% were in burst-firing mode. Muscimol reversibly stopped recurrent electrical activity in

  10. A multilevel prediction of physiological response to challenge: Interactions among child maltreatment, neighborhood crime, endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (eNOS), and GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha-6 gene (GABRA6).

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael; Manly, Jody Todd; Cicchetti, Dante

    2015-11-01

    Physiological response to stress has been linked to a variety of healthy and pathological conditions. The current study conducted a multilevel examination of interactions among environmental toxins (i.e., neighborhood crime and child maltreatment) and specific genetic polymorphisms of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (eNOS) and GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha-6 gene (GABRA6). One hundred eighty-six children were recruited at age 4. The presence or absence of child maltreatment as well as the amount of crime that occurred in their neighborhood during the previous year were determined at that time. At age 9, the children were brought to the lab, where their physiological response to a cognitive challenge (i.e., change in the amplitude of the respiratory sinus arrhythmia) was assessed and DNA samples were collected for subsequent genotyping. The results confirmed that complex Gene × Gene, Environment × Environment, and Gene × Environment interactions were associated with different patterns of respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity. The implications for future research and evidence-based intervention are discussed.

  11. Adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia involves GABA A receptors in the pons.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dick, Thomas E; Siegel, Ruth E

    2008-02-01

    Survival in low-oxygen environments requires adaptation of sympathorespiratory control networks located in the brain stem. The molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation are unclear. In naïve animals, acute hypoxia evokes increases in phrenic (respiratory) and splanchnic (sympathetic) nerve activities that persist after repeated challenges (long-term facilitation, LTF). In contrast, our studies show that conditioning rats to chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH), an environment characteristic of living at high altitude, diminishes the response to hypoxia and attenuates LTF in a time-dependent manner. Phrenic LTF decreases following 7 days of CHH, and both sympathetic and phrenic LTF disappear following 14 days of CHH. Previous studies demonstrated that GABA is released in the brain stem during hypoxia and depresses respiratory activity. Furthermore, the sensitivity of brain stem neurons to GABA is increased following prolonged hypoxia. In this study, we demonstrate that GABA(A) receptor expression changes along with the CHH-induced physiological changes. Expression of the GABA(A) receptor alpha4 subunit mRNA increases two-fold in animals conditioned to CHH for 7 days. In addition, de novo expression of delta and alpha6, a subunit normally found exclusively in the cerebellum, is observed after 14 days. Consistent with these changes, diazepam-insensitive binding sites, characteristic of GABA(A) receptors containing alpha4 and alpha6 subunits, increase in the pons. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CHH-induced GABA(A) receptor subunit expression is localized in regions of sympathorespiratory control within the pons. Our findings suggest that a GABA(A) receptor mediated-mechanism participates in adaptation of the sympathorespiratory system to hypobaric hypoxia.

  12. Taurine is a potent activator of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors in the thalamus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fan; Yue, Minerva; Chandra, Dev; Keramidas, Angelo; Goldstein, Peter A; Homanics, Gregg E; Harrison, Neil L

    2008-01-02

    Taurine is one of the most abundant free amino acids in the brain. In a number of studies, taurine has been reported to activate glycine receptors (Gly-Rs) at moderate concentrations (> or = 100 microM), and to be a weak agonist at GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)-Rs), which are usually activated at high concentrations (> or = 1 mM). In this study, we show that taurine reduced the excitability of thalamocortical relay neurons and activated both extrasynaptic GABA(A)-Rs and Gly-Rs in neurons in the mouse ventrobasal (VB) thalamus. Low concentrations of taurine (10-100 microM) decreased neuronal input resistance and firing frequency, and elicited a steady outward current under voltage clamp, but had no effects on fast inhibitory synaptic currents. Currents elicited by 50 microM taurine were abolished by gabazine, insensitive to midazolam, and partially blocked by 20 microM Zn2+, consistent with the pharmacological properties of extrasynaptic GABA(A)-Rs (alpha4beta2delta subtype) involved in tonic inhibition in the thalamus. Tonic inhibition was enhanced by an inhibitor of taurine transport, suggesting that taurine can act as an endogenous activator of these receptors. Taurine-evoked currents were absent in relay neurons from GABA(A)-R alpha4 subunit knock-out mice. The amplitude of the taurine current was larger in neurons from adult mice than juvenile mice. Taurine was a more potent agonist at recombinant alpha4beta2delta GABA(A)-Rs than at alpha1beta2gamma2 GABA(A)-Rs. We conclude that physiological concentrations of taurine can inhibit VB neurons via activation of extrasynaptic GABA(A)-Rs and that taurine may function as an endogenous regulator of excitability and network activity in the thalamus.

  13. The TM2 6' position of GABA(A) receptors mediates alcohol inhibition.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W David; Howard, Rebecca J; Trudell, James R; Harris, R Adron

    2012-02-01

    Ionotropic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs), which mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system, are implicated in the behavioral effects of alcohol and alcoholism. Site-directed mutagenesis studies support the presence of discrete molecular sites involved in alcohol enhancement and, more recently, inhibition of GABA(A)Rs. We used Xenopus laevis oocytes to investigate the 6' position in the second transmembrane region of GABA(A)Rs as a site influencing alcohol inhibition. We asked whether modification of the 6' position by substitution with larger residues or methanethiol labeling [using methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS)] of a substituted cysteine, reduced GABA action and/or blocked further inhibition by alcohols. Labeling of the 6' position in either α2 or β2 subunits reduced responses to GABA. In addition, methanol and ethanol potentiation increased after MMTS labeling or substitution with tryptophan or methionine, consistent with elimination of an inhibitory site for these alcohols. Specific alcohols, but not the anesthetic etomidate, competed with MMTS labeling at the 6' position. We verified a role for the 6' position in previously tested α2β2 as well as more physiologically relevant α2β2γ2s GABA(A)Rs. Finally, we built a novel molecular model based on the invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride channel receptor, a GABA(A)R homolog, revealing that the 6' position residue faces the channel pore, and modification of this residue alters volume and polarity of the pore-facing cavity in this region. These results indicate that the 6' positions in both α2 and β2 GABA(A)R subunits mediate inhibition by short-chain alcohols, which is consistent with the presence of multiple counteracting sites of action for alcohols on ligand-gated ion channels.

  14. Local and global ligand-induced changes in the structure of the GABA(A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Yukiko; Czajkowski, Cynthia; Jackson, Meyer B

    2006-06-13

    Ligand-gated channels mediate synaptic transmission through conformational transitions triggered by the binding of neurotransmitters. These transitions are well-defined in terms of ion conductance, but their structural basis is poorly understood. To probe these changes in structure, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and labeled at selected sites with environment-sensitive fluorophores. With labels at two different residues in the alpha1 subunit in loop E of the GABA-binding pocket, GABA elicited fluorescence changes opposite in sign. This pattern of fluorescence changes is consistent with a closure of the GABA-binding cavity at the subunit interface. The competitive antagonist SR-95531 inverted this pattern of fluorescence change, but the noncompetitive antagonist picrotoxin failed to elicit optical signals. In response to GABA (but not SR-95531), labels at the homologous residues in the beta2 subunit showed the same pattern of fluorescence change as the alpha1-subunit labels, indicating a global transition with comparable movements in homologous regions of different subunits. Incorporation of the gamma2 subunit altered the fluorescence changes of alpha1-subunit labels and eliminated them in beta2-subunit labels. Thus, the ligand-induced structural changes in the GABA(A) receptor can extend over considerable distances or remain highly localized, depending upon subunit composition and ligand.

  15. [Autoimmune encephalitis induced by antibodies against GABA-A receptor].

    PubMed

    González R, Pablo; Hudson A, Lorena; Basáez M, Esteban; Miranda C, Marcelo

    2016-11-01

    Among autoimmune encephalitides, a prevalent group are those associated with antibodies against the N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor, which present with behavior abnormalities, psychosis, seizures and abnormal movements. A new variant, mediated by antibodies against the GABA-A receptor, was recen-tly described. We report a 66-years-old female with this form of encephalitis whose main manifestation was the presence of severe seizures leading to status epilepticus. The patient had a good response to immunomodulatory therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone, azathioprine and anticonvulsants. The laboratory tests initially detected anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies which lead to the misdiagnosis of Hashimoto Encephalitis, which was ruled out after the detection of antibodies against GABA-A receptor. No malignancy was detected.

  16. Low nanomolar GABA effects at extrasynaptic α4β1/β3δ GABA(A) receptor subtypes indicate a different binding mode for GABA at these receptors.

    PubMed

    Karim, Nasiara; Wellendorph, Petrine; Absalom, Nathan; Bang, Line Haunstrup; Jensen, Marianne Lerbech; Hansen, Maja Michelle; Lee, Ho Joon; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R; Chebib, Mary

    2012-08-15

    Ionotropic GABA(A) receptors are a highly heterogenous population of receptors assembled from a combination of multiple subunits. The aims of this study were to characterize the potency of GABA at human recombinant δ-containing extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique, and to investigate, using site-directed mutagenesis, the molecular determinants for GABA potency at α4β3δ GABA(A) receptors. α4/δ-Containing GABA(A) receptors displayed high sensitivity to GABA, with mid-nanomolar concentrations activating α4β1δ (EC₅₀=24 nM) and α4β3δ (EC₅₀=12 nM) receptors. In the majority of oocytes expressing α4β3δ subtypes, GABA produced a biphasic concentration-response curve, and activated the receptor with low and high concentrations (EC₅₀(1)=16 nM; EC₅₀(2)=1.2 μM). At α4β2δ, GABA had low micromolar activity (EC₅₀=1 μM). An analysis of 10 N-terminal singly mutated α4β3δ receptors shows that GABA interacts with amino acids different to those reported for α1β2γ2 GABA(A) receptors. Residues Y205 and R207 of the β3-subunit significantly affected GABA potency, while the residue F71 of the α4- and the residue Y97 of the β3-subunit did not significantly affect GABA potency. Mutating the residue R218 of the δ-subunit, equivalent to the GABA binding residue R207 of the β2-subunit, reduced the potency of GABA by 670-fold, suggesting a novel GABA binding site at the δ-subunit interface. Taken together, GABA may have different binding modes for extrasynaptic δ-containing GABA(A) receptors compared to their synaptic counterparts.

  17. Neurosteroids shift partial agonist activation of GABA(A) receptor channels from low- to high-efficacy gating patterns.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Matt T; Macdonald, Robert L

    2003-11-26

    Although GABA activates synaptic (alphabetagamma) GABA(A) receptors with high efficacy, partial agonist activation of alphabetagamma isoforms and GABA activation of the primary extrasynaptic (alphabetadelta) GABA(A) receptors are limited to low-efficacy activity, characterized by minimal desensitization and brief openings. The unusual sensitivity of alphabetadelta receptor channels to neurosteroid modulation prompted investigation of whether this high sensitivity was dependent on the delta subunit or the low-efficacy channel function that it confers. We show that the isoform specificity (alphabetadelta > alphabetagamma) of neurosteroid modulation could be reversed by conditions that reversed isoform-specific activity modes, including the use of beta-alanine to achieve increased efficacy with alphabetadelta receptors and taurine to render alphabetagamma receptors low efficacy. We suggest that neurosteroids preferentially enhance low-efficacy GABA(A) receptor activity independent of subunit composition. Allosteric conversion of partial to full agonism may be a general mechanism for reversibly scaling the efficacy of GABA(A) receptors to endogenous partial agonists.

  18. γ1-Containing GABA-A Receptors Cluster at Synapses Where they Mediate Slower Synaptic Currents than γ2-Containing GABA-A Receptors.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Christine L; Sah, Pankaj; Keramidas, Angelo; Lynch, Joseph W; Durisic, Nela

    2017-01-01

    GABA-A receptors (GABAARs) are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels that are assembled mainly from α (α1-6), β (β1-3) and γ (γ1-3) subunits. Although GABAARs containing γ2L subunits mediate most of the inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, significant expression of γ1 subunits is seen in the amygdala, pallidum and substantia nigra. However, the location and function of γ1-containing GABAARs in these regions remains unclear. In "artificial" synapses, where the subunit composition of postsynaptic receptors is specifically controlled, γ1 incorporation slows the synaptic current decay rate without affecting channel deactivation, suggesting that γ1-containing receptors are not clustered and therefore activated by diffuse neurotransmitter. However, we show that γ1-containing receptors are localized at neuronal synapses and form clusters in both synaptic and extrasynaptic regions. In addition, they exhibit rapid membrane diffusion and a higher frequency of exchange between synaptic and perisynaptic populations compared to γ2L-containing GABAARs. A point mutation in the large intracellular domain and a pharmacological analysis reveal that when a single non-conserved γ2L residue is mutated to its γ1 counterpart (T349L), the synaptic current decay is slowed from γ2L- to γ1-like without changing the clustering or diffusion properties of the receptors. In addition, previous fast perfusion and single channel kinetic experiments revealed no difference in the intrinsic closing rates of γ2L- and γ1-containing receptors when expressed in HEK293 cells. These observations together with Monte Carlo simulations of synaptic function confirm that decreased clustering does not control γ1-containing GABAAR kinetics. Rather, they suggest that γ1- and γ2L-containing receptors exhibit differential synaptic current decay rates due to differential gating dynamics when localized at the synapse.

  19. Thiocolchicoside inhibits the activity of various subtypes of recombinant GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Mascia, Maria Paola; Bachis, Elisabetta; Obili, Nicola; Maciocco, Elisabetta; Cocco, Giovanni Antonio; Sechi, Gian Pietro; Biggio, Giovanni

    2007-03-08

    Thiocolchicoside is a myorelaxant drug with anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties as well as pronounced convulsant activity. To characterize the mechanisms of action of this drug at the molecular level, we examined its effects on the function of various recombinant neurotransmitter receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Electrophysiological recordings from recombinant human gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors consisting of alpha1beta1gamma2L, alpha1beta2gamma2L, or alpha2beta2gamma2L subunit combinations revealed that thiocolchicoside inhibited GABA-evoked Cl(-) currents with similar potencies (median inhibitory concentrations of 0.13 to 0.2 microM) and in a competitive manner. Consistent with previous observations, thiocolchicoside also inhibited the binding of GABA to rat cerebral cortical membranes. Thiocolchicoside inhibited the function of recombinant human strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors composed of the alpha1 subunit with a potency (median inhibitory concentration of 47 microM) lower than that apparent with recombinant GABA(A) receptors. It also inhibited the function of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptors composed of the alpha4 and beta2 subunits, but this effect was only partial and apparent at high concentrations. In contrast, thiocolchicoside had no effect on the function of 5-HT(3A) serotonin receptors. Our results thus provide molecular evidence that the epileptogenic activity of thiocolchicoside might be due to inhibition of the function of inhibitory receptors in the central nervous system, especially that of GABA(A) receptors.

  20. An intracellular motif of P2X(3) receptors is required for functional cross-talk with GABA(A) receptors in nociceptive DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Toulmé, Estelle; Blais, Dominique; Léger, Claire; Landry, Marc; Garret, Maurice; Séguéla, Philippe; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2007-08-01

    Functional cross-talk between structurally unrelated P2X ATP receptors and members of the 'cys-loop' receptor-channel superfamily represents a recently-discovered mechanism for rapid modulation of information processing. The extent and the mechanism of the inhibitory cross-talks between these two classes of ionotropic receptors remain poorly understood, however. Both ionic and molecular coupling were proposed to explain cross-inhibition between P2X subtypes and GABA(A) receptors, suggesting a P2X subunit-dependent mechanism. We show here that cross-inhibition between neuronal P2X(3) or P2X(2+3) and GABA(A) receptors does not depend on chloride and calcium ions. We identified an intracellular QST(386-388) motif in P2X(3) subunits which is required for the functional coupling with GABA(A) receptors. Moreover the cross-inhibition between native P2X(3) and GABA receptors in cultured rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons is abolished by infusion of a peptide containing the QST motif as well as by viral expression of the main intracellular loop of GABA(A)beta3 subunits. We provide evidence that P2X(3) and GABA(A) receptors are colocalized in the soma and central processes of nociceptive DRG neurons, suggesting that specific intracellular P2X(3)-GABA(A) subunit interactions underlie a pre-synaptic cross-talk that might contribute to the regulation of sensory synaptic transmission in the spinal cord.

  1. GABA A/Bz receptor subtypes as targets for selective drugs.

    PubMed

    Da Settimo, F; Taliani, S; Trincavelli, M L; Montali, M; Martini, C

    2007-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors are the major inhibitory neuronal receptors in the mammalian brain. Their activation by GABA opens the intrinsic ion channel, enabling chloride flux into the cell with subsequent hyperpolarization. Several GABA(A) receptor subunit isoforms have been cloned, the major isoform containing alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, and a regional heterogeneity associated with distinct physiological effects has been suggested. As a variety of allosteric ligands can modulate GABA-gated conductance changes through binding to distinct sites, the development of subtype-selective ligands may lead to the selective treatment of GABA system-associated pathology. In particular, the best characterized binding site is the benzodiazepine site (BzR), localized at the alpha/gamma subunit interface, in which the alpha subunit is the main determinant of BzR ligand action selectivity. The alpha1-containing BzR have been proposed to be responsible for the sedative action; the alpha2 and/or the alpha3 subtypes have been suggested to mediate the anxiolytic activity and the myorelaxation effects, and the alpha5 subtype has been associated with cognition processes. The discovery of alpha-selective subtype ligands may help in the specific treatment of anxiety, sleep disorders, convulsions and memory deficits with fewer side effects. Selectivity may be achieved by two approaches: selective affinity or selective efficacy. Selective affinity needs a compound to bind with a higher affinity to one receptor subtype compared with another, whereas subtype-selective efficacy relies on a compound binding to all subtypes, but having different efficacies at various subtypes. The status of BzR ligands, subdivided on the basis of their main chemical structural features, is reviewed in relation to structure-activity relationships which determine their affinity or efficacy selectivity for a certain BzR subtype.

  2. GABA(A) receptor physiology and its relationship to the mechanism of action of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Raman

    2012-03-01

    Clobazam was initially developed in the early 1970s as a nonsedative anxiolytic agent, and is currently available as adjunctive therapy for epilepsy and anxiety disorders in more than 100 countries. In October 2011, clobazam (Onfi™; Lundbeck Inc., Deerfield, IL, USA) was approved by the US FDA for use as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients aged 2 years and older. It is a long-acting 1,5-benzodiazepine whose structure distinguishes it from the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines, such as diazepam, lorazepam and clonazepam. Clobazam is well absorbed, with peak concentrations occurring linearly 1-4 hours after administration. Both clobazam and its active metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam, are metabolized in the liver via the cytochrome P450 pathway. The mean half-life of N-desmethylclobazam (67.5 hours) is nearly double the mean half-life of clobazam (37.5 hours). Clobazam was synthesized with the anticipation that its distinct chemical structure would provide greater efficacy with fewer benzodiazepine-associated adverse effects. Frequently reported adverse effects of clobazam therapy include dizziness, sedation, drowsiness and ataxia. Evidence gathered from approximately 50 epilepsy clinical trials in adults and children indicated that the sedative effects observed with clobazam treatment were less severe than those reported with 1,4-benzodiazepines. In several studies of healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety, clobazam appeared to enhance participants' performance in cognitive tests, further distinguishing it from the 1,4-benzodiazepines. The anxiolytic and anticonvulsant effects of clobazam are associated with allosteric activation of the ligand-gated GABA(A) receptor. GABA(A) receptors are found extensively throughout the CNS, occurring synaptically and extrasynaptically. GABA(A) receptors are composed of five protein subunits, two copies of a single type of α subunit, two copies of one type of

  3. α4βδ GABA(A) receptors are high-affinity targets for γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB).

    PubMed

    Absalom, Nathan; Eghorn, Laura F; Villumsen, Inge S; Karim, Nasiara; Bay, Tina; Olsen, Jesper V; Knudsen, Gitte M; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P; Chebib, Mary; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2012-08-14

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) binding to brain-specific high-affinity sites is well-established and proposed to explain both physiological and pharmacological actions. However, the mechanistic links between these lines of data are unknown. To identify molecular targets for specific GHB high-affinity binding, we undertook photolinking studies combined with proteomic analyses and identified several GABA(A) receptor subunits as possible candidates. A subsequent functional screening of various recombinant GABA(A) receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique showed GHB to be a partial agonist at αβδ- but not αβγ-receptors, proving that the δ-subunit is essential for potency and efficacy. GHB showed preference for α4 over α(1,2,6)-subunits and preferably activated α4β1δ (EC(50) = 140 nM) over α4β(2/3)δ (EC(50) = 8.41/1.03 mM). Introduction of a mutation, α4F71L, in α4β1(δ)-receptors completely abolished GHB but not GABA function, indicating nonidentical binding sites. Radioligand binding studies using the specific GHB radioligand [(3)H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid showed a 39% reduction (P = 0.0056) in the number of binding sites in α4 KO brain tissue compared with WT controls, corroborating the direct involvement of the α4-subunit in high-affinity GHB binding. Our data link specific GHB forebrain binding sites with α4-containing GABA(A) receptors and postulate a role for extrasynaptic α4δ-containing GABA(A) receptors in GHB pharmacology and physiology. This finding will aid in elucidating the molecular mechanisms behind the proposed function of GHB as a neurotransmitter and its unique therapeutic effects in narcolepsy and alcoholism.

  4. Ionic Mechanisms of Neuronal Excitation by Inhibitory GABA_A Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Kevin J.; Soldo, Brandi L.; Proctor, William R.

    1995-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA_A) receptors are the principal mediators of synaptic inhibition, and yet when intensely activated, dendritic GABA_A receptors excite rather than inhibit neurons. The membrane depolarization mediated by GABA_A receptors is a result of the differential, activity-dependent collapse of the opposing concentration gradients of chloride and bicarbonate, the anions that permeate the GABA_A ionophore. Because this depolarization diminishes the voltage-dependent block of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by magnesium, the activity-dependent depolarization mediated by GABA is sufficient to account for frequency modulation of synaptic NMDA receptor activation. Anionic gradient shifts may represent a mechanism whereby the rate and coherence of synaptic activity determine whether dendritic GABA_A receptor activation is excitatory or inhibitory.

  5. The modulation of synaptic GABA(A) receptors in the thalamus by eszopiclone and zolpidem.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fan; Goldstein, Peter A; Harrison, Neil L

    2009-03-01

    Eszopiclone (Lunesta; Sepracor, Marlborough, MA) and zolpidem [N,N,6-trimethyl-2-(4-methylphenyl)-imidazo(1,2-a)pyridine-3-acetamide] are among the most commonly prescribed hypnotics in use in the United States. The thalamus plays a pivotal role in sleep regulation and rhythmicity. Two distinct subtypes of synaptic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)-Rs), alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2) and alpha(3)beta(3)gamma(2), are expressed in thalamocortical relay neurons and in interneurons of the RTN (reticular thalamic nucleus), respectively. Thalamocortical neurons also express extrasynaptic GABA(A)-Rs composed of alpha(4)beta(2)delta subunits. In this study, we compared the effects of eszopiclone and zolpidem on miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), spontaneous IPSCs, and tonic inhibition in the mouse thalamus. Eszopiclone (0.1-1 microM) slowed the decay phase of IPSCs recorded from RTN neurons, whereas zolpidem was less effective and increased the decay time constant only at > or = 0.3 microM. IPSCs of RTN neurons were more sensitive to eszopiclone than zolpidem at all concentrations tested. On the other hand, IPSCs of relay neurons in the ventrobasal nucleus (VB) were more sensitive to zolpidem than eszopiclone. Zolpidem (0.1-1 microM) prolonged the decay of IPSCs from VB neurons, whereas eszopiclone increased the decay time constant only at > or = 0.3 microM. Neither of these two hypnotics affected tonic inhibition in relay neurons. Our results demonstrate that eszopiclone has greater efficacy at synaptic GABA(A)-Rs of RTN neurons than in relay neurons, whereas zolpidem exerts bigger effects on relay neurons than RTN neurons. This distinct pattern of activity on thalamic neurons may contribute to some of the observed differences in the clinical effects of these two hypnotics.

  6. Regulation of cognition and symptoms of psychosis: focus on GABA(A) receptors and glycine transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Möhler, Hanns; Rudolph, Uwe; Boison, Detlev; Singer, Philipp; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2008-07-01

    Adaptive purposeful behaviour depends on appropriate modifications of synaptic connectivity that incorporate an organism's past experience. At least some forms of such synaptic plasticity are believed to be mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Complementary interaction with inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GABA(A) receptors, and upstream control of the excitability of NMDARs by glycine availability can greatly influence the efficacy of NMDAR mediated neuroplasticity, and thereby exert significant effects on cognition. Memory, selective attention or sensorimotor gating functions can be modified in mice with a reduction of alpha(5)GABA(A) receptors in the hippocampus or a selective deletion of glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) in the forebrain. Both genetic manipulations altered the formation or persistence of associative links leading to distinct phenotypes on trace conditioning, extinction learning, latent inhibition, working memory, and object recognition. Behavioural assays of latent inhibition, prepulse inhibition, working memory, and sensitivity to psychostimulants in particular suggest that alpha(3) and alpha(5) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors as well as GlyT1 are potential sites for ameliorating psychotic-like behaviour. Taken together, these results qualify distinct GABA-A receptor subtypes and GlyT1 as molecular targets for the development of a new pharmacology in the treatment of cognitive decline and psychotic symptoms.

  7. Glycine and GABA(A) ultra-sensitive ethanol receptors as novel tools for alcohol and brain research.

    PubMed

    Naito, Anna; Muchhala, Karan H; Asatryan, Liana; Trudell, James R; Homanics, Gregg E; Perkins, Daya I; Davies, Daryl L; Alkana, Ronald L

    2014-12-01

    A critical obstacle to developing effective medications to prevent and/or treat alcohol use disorders is the lack of specific knowledge regarding the plethora of molecular targets and mechanisms underlying alcohol (ethanol) action in the brain. To identify the role of individual receptor subunits in ethanol-induced behaviors, we developed a novel class of ultra-sensitive ethanol receptors (USERs) that allow activation of a single receptor subunit population sensitized to extremely low ethanol concentrations. USERs were created by mutating as few as four residues in the extracellular loop 2 region of glycine receptors (GlyRs) or γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs), which are implicated in causing many behavioral effects linked to ethanol abuse. USERs, expressed in Xenopus oocytes and tested using two-electrode voltage clamp, demonstrated an increase in ethanol sensitivity of 100-fold over wild-type receptors by significantly decreasing the threshold and increasing the magnitude of ethanol response, without altering general receptor properties including sensitivity to the neurosteroid, allopregnanolone. These profound changes in ethanol sensitivity were observed across multiple subunits of GlyRs and GABA(A)Rs. Collectively, our studies set the stage for using USER technology in genetically engineered animals as a unique tool to increase understanding of the neurobiological basis of the behavioral effects of ethanol.

  8. The supramammillary nucleus mediates primary reinforcement via GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2005-06-01

    The supramammillary nucleus (SUM), a dorsal layer of the mammillary body, has recently been implicated in positive reinforcement. The present study examined whether GABA(A) receptors in the SUM or adjacent regions are involved in primary reinforcement using intracranial self-administration procedures. Rats learned quickly to lever-press for infusions of the GABA(A) antagonist picrotoxin into the SUM. Although picrotoxin was also self-administered into the posterior hypothalamic nuclei and anterior ventral tegmental area, these regions were less responsive to lower doses of picrotoxin than the SUM. The finding that rats learned to respond selectively on the lever triggering drug infusions is consistent with picrotoxin's reinforcing effect. Coadministration of the GABA(A) agonist muscimol disrupted picrotoxin self-administration, and another GABA(A) antagonist, bicuculline, was also self-administered into the SUM; thus, the reinforcing effect of picrotoxin is mediated by GABA(A) receptors. Since rats did not self-administer the GABA(B) antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen into the SUM, the role of GABA(B) receptors may be distinct from that of GABA(A) receptors. Pretreatment with the dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) extinguished picrotoxin self-administration into the SUM, suggesting that the reinforcing effects of GABA(A) receptor blockade depend on normal dopamine transmission. In conclusion, the blockade of GABA(A) receptors in the SUM is reinforcing, and the brain 'reward' circuitry appears to be tonically inhibited via supramammillary GABA(A) receptors and more extensive than the meso-limbic dopamine system.

  9. Increased GABA-A receptor binding and reduced connectivity at the motor cortex in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a multimodal investigation using 18F-fluoroflumazenil PET, immunohistochemistry, and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Kim, Chul Hoon; Park, Eun Sook; Park, Bumhee; Oh, So Ra; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Park, Chang Il; Lee, Jong Doo

    2013-08-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A receptor-mediated neural transmission is important to promote practice-dependent plasticity after brain injury. This study investigated alterations in GABA-A receptor binding and functional and anatomic connectivity within the motor cortex in children with cerebral palsy (CP). We conducted (18)F-fluoroflumazenil PET on children with hemiplegic CP to investigate whether in vivo GABA-A receptor binding is altered in the ipsilateral or contralateral hemisphere of the lesion site. To evaluate changes in the GABA-A receptor subunit after prenatal brain injury, we performed GABA-A receptor immunohistochemistry using rat pups with a diffuse hypoxic ischemic insult. We also performed diffusion tensor MR imaging and resting-state functional MR imaging on the same children with hemiplegic CP to investigate alterations in anatomic and functional connectivity at the motor cortex with increased GABA-A receptor binding. In children with hemiplegic CP, the (18)F-fluoroflumazenil binding potential was increased within the ipsilateral motor cortex. GABA-A receptors with the α1 subunit were highly expressed exclusively within cortical layers III, IV, and VI of the motor cortex in rat pups. The motor cortex with increased GABA-A receptor binding in children with hemiplegic CP had reduced thalamocortical and corticocortical connectivity, which might be linked to increased GABA-A receptor distribution in cortical layers in rats. Increased expression of the GABA-A receptor α1 subunit within the ipsilateral motor cortex may be an important adaptive mechanism after prenatal brain injury in children with CP but may be associated with improper functional connectivity after birth and have adverse effects on the development of motor plasticity.

  10. Excitatory Synaptic Responses Mediated by GABA_A Receptors in the Hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Hillary B.; Wong, Robert K. S.

    1991-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cortex. Activation of postsynaptic GABA_A receptors hyperpolarizes cells and inhibits neuronal activity. Synaptic responses mediated by GABA_A receptors also strongly excited hippocampal neurons. This excitatory response was recorded in morphologically identified interneurons in the presence of 4-aminopyridine or after elevation of extracellular potassium concentrations. The synaptic excitation sustained by GABA_A receptors synchronized the activity of inhibitory interneurons. This synchronized discharge of interneurons in turn elicited large-amplitude inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in pyramidal and granule cells. Excitatory synaptic responses mediated by GABA_A receptors may thus provide a mechanism for the recruitment of GABAergic interneurons through their recurrent connections.

  11. GABA A receptor abnormalities in Prader-Willi syndrome assessed with positron emission tomography and [11C]flumazenil.

    PubMed

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Panzacchi, Andrea; Bosio, Laura; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Ravasi, Laura; Coppa, Isabella; Chiumello, Giuseppe; Frey, Kirk; Koeppe, Robert; Fazio, Ferruccio

    2004-05-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a multi-system disorder characterized clinically by abnormal mental and physical development. PWS patients have a deletion in an imprinted region on paternal chromosome 15 (15q11-13), maternal disomy for this segment, or rarely, a chromosomal imprinting center deletion that gives rise to suppression of the equivalent paternal genes. Within the affected segment of chromosome 15 are genes encoding the alpha(5), beta(3) and gamma(3) subunits of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A (GABA(A)) receptor. Therefore, altered neurobehavioral function could arise in PWS due directly to altered GABA(A) receptor composition and expression, or alternatively, from brain developmental and maturational effects of these or other genes in the imprinted region. The aim of the present study was to assess cerebral GABA(A) receptors in PWS with the use of positron emission tomography of the benzodiazepine binding site employing [11C]flumazenil ([11C]FMZ). A reduction in [11C]FMZ binding was found predominantly in the cingulate, frontal and temporal neocortices and insula in six adult PWS patients compared to nine normal subjects. A possible role for the deleted beta(3) subunit gene in PWS is supported in part by the wide cortical distribution of its mRNA expression and the effects of experimental knockouts on benzodiazepine binding described in prior studies. Altered GABA(A) receptor composition or number in these cortical regions may account for neurobehavioral abnormalities in PWS including mild mental retardation, poor impulse control, and impaired responses to somatic pain.

  12. Time-course of SKF-81297-induced increase in glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 mRNA levels in striatonigral neurons and decrease in GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit mRNA levels in the substantia nigra, pars reticulata, in adult rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Soghomonian, J-J

    2008-06-26

    Striatal projection neurons use GABA as their neurotransmitter and express the rate-limiting synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the vesicular GABA transporter vGAT. The chronic systemic administration of an agonist of dopamine D1/D5-preferring receptors is known to alter GAD mRNA levels in striatonigral neurons in intact and dopamine-depleted rats. In the present study, the effects of a single or subchronic systemic administration of the dopamine D1/D5-preferring receptor agonist SKF-81297 on GAD65, GAD67, PPD and vGAT mRNA levels in the striatum and GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit mRNA levels in the substantia nigra, pars reticulata, were measured in rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion. After a single injection of SKF-81297, striatal GAD65 mRNA levels were significantly increased at 3 but not 72 h. In contrast, striatal GAD67 mRNA levels were increased and nigral alpha1 mRNA levels were decreased at 72 but not 3 h. Single cell analysis on double-labeled sections indicated that increased GAD or vGAT mRNA levels after acute SKF-81297 occurred in striatonigral neurons identified by their lack of preproenkephalin expression. Subchronic SKF-81297 induced significant increases in striatal GAD67, GAD65, preprodynorphin and vGAT mRNA levels and decreases in nigral alpha1 mRNA levels. In the striatum contralateral to the 6-OHDA lesion, subchronic but not acute SKF-81297 induced a significant increase in GAD65 mRNA levels. The other mRNA levels were not significantly altered. Finally, striatal GAD67 mRNA levels were negatively correlated with nigral alpha1 mRNA levels in the dopamine-depleted but not dopamine-intact side. The results suggest that different signaling pathways are involved in the modulation by dopamine D1/D5 receptors of GAD65 and GAD67 mRNA levels in striatonigral neurons. They also suggest that the down-regulation of nigral GABA(A) receptors is linked to the increase in striatal GAD67 mRNA levels in the dopamine

  13. Enhancement of GABA release through endogenous activation of axonal GABA(A) receptors in juvenile cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Chat, Mireille; Marty, Alain

    2007-11-14

    Recent evidence indicates the presence of presynaptic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) in the axon domain of several classes of central neurons, including cerebellar basket and stellate cells. Here, we investigate the possibility that these receptors could be activated in the absence of electrical or chemical stimulation. We find that low concentrations of GABA increase the frequency of miniature GABAergic synaptic currents. Submaximal concentrations of a GABA(A)R blocker, gabazine, decrease both the miniature current frequency and the probability of evoked GABA release. Zolpidem, an agonist of the benzodiazepine binding site, and NO-711 (1-[2-[[(diphenylmethylene)imino]oxy]ethyl]-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride), a blocker of GABA uptake, both increase the frequency of miniature currents. These effects occur up to postnatal day 14, but not later. Immunohistochemistry indicates the presence of alpha1-containing GABA(A)Rs in interneuron presynaptic terminals with a similar age dependence. We conclude that, under resting conditions, axonal GABA(A)Rs are significantly activated, that this activation results in enhanced GABA release, and that it can be augmented by increasing the affinity of GABA(A)Rs or reducing GABA uptake. Our findings suggest the existence of a positive-feedback mechanism involving presynaptic GABA(A)Rs that maintains a high release rate and a high local GABA concentration in the immature cerebellar network.

  14. Stoichiometry of expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors depends on the ratio of subunit cDNA transfected.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Kelly R; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2010-05-07

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) is the target of many depressants, including benzodiazepines, anesthetics, and alcohol. Although the highly prevalent alphabetagamma GABA(A)R subtype mediates the majority of fast synaptic inhibition in the brain, receptors containing delta subunits also play a key role, mediating tonic inhibition and the actions of endogenous neurosteroids and alcohol. However, the fundamental properties of delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, such as subunit stoichiometry, are not well established. To determine subunit stoichiometry of expressed delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, we inserted the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site tag in the alpha(4), beta(2), and delta subunit N termini. An enhanced green fluorescent protein tag was also inserted into the beta(2) subunit to shift its molecular weight, allowing us to separate subunits using SDS-PAGE. Tagged alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs were expressed in HEK293T cells using various ratios of subunit cDNA, and receptor subunit stoichiometry was determined by quantitating fluorescent alpha-bungarotoxin bound to each subunit on Western blots of surface immunopurified tagged GABA(A)Rs. The results demonstrate that the subunit stoichiometry of alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs is regulated by the ratio of subunit cDNAs transfected. Increasing the ratio of delta subunit cDNA transfected increased delta subunit incorporation into surface receptors with a concomitant decrease in beta(2) subunit incorporation. Because receptor subunit stoichiometry can directly influence GABA(A)R pharmacological and functional properties, considering how the transfection protocols used affect subunit stoichiometry is essential when studying heterologously expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs. Successful bungarotoxin binding site tagging of GABA(A)R subunits is a novel tool with which to accurately quantitate subunit stoichiometry and will be useful for monitoring GABA(A)R trafficking in live cells.

  15. Identification of GABA A receptor modulators in Kadsura longipedunculata and assignment of absolute configurations by quantum-chemical ECD calculations

    PubMed Central

    Zaugg, Janine; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Smiesko, Martin; Baburin, Igor; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    A petroleum ether extract of Kadsura longipedunculata enhanced the GABA-induced chloride current (IGABA) by 122.5 ± 0.3% (n = 2) when tested at 100 μg/ml in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing GABA A receptors (α1β2γ2S subtype) in two-microelectrode voltage clamp measurements. Thirteen compounds were subsequently identified by HPLC-based activity profiling as responsible for GABA A receptor activity and purified in preparative scale. 6-Cinnamoyl-6,7-dihydro-7-myrceneol and 5,6-dihydrocuparenic acid were thereby isolated for the first time. The determination of the absolute stereochemistry of these compounds was achieved by comparison of experimental and calculated ECD spectra. All but one of the 13 isolated compounds from K. longipedunculata potentiated IGABA through GABA A receptors composed of α1β2γ2S subunits in a concentration-dependent manner. Potencies ranged from 12.8 ± 3.1 to 135.6 ± 85.7 μM, and efficiencies ranged from 129.7 ± 36.8% to 885.8 ± 291.2%. The phytochemical profiles of petroleum ether extracts of Kadsura japonica fruits (114.1 ± 2.6% potentiation of IGABA at 100 μg/ml, n = 2), and Schisandra chinensis fruits (inactive at 100 μg/ml) were compared by HPLC-PDA-ESIMS with that of K. longipedunculata. PMID:21889177

  16. Homocysteine alters cerebral microvascular integrity and causes remodeling by antagonizing GABA-A receptor.

    PubMed

    Lominadze, David; Tyagi, Neetu; Sen, Utpal; Ovechkin, Alexander; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2012-12-01

    High levels of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), are associated with cerebrovascular diseases, such as vascular dementia, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. The γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter and a ligand of GABA-A receptor. By inhibiting excitatory response, it may decrease complications associated with vascular dementia and stroke. Hcy specifically competes with the GABA-A receptors and acts as an excitotoxic neurotransmitter. Previously, we have shown that Hcy increases levels of NADPH oxidase and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and decreases levels of thioredoxin and peroxiredoxin by antagonizing the GABA-A receptor. Hcy treatment leads to activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in cerebral circulation by inducing redox stress and ROS. The hypothesis is that Hcy induces MMPs and suppresses tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMPs), in part, by inhibiting the GABA-A receptor. This leads to degradation of the matrix and disruption of the blood brain barrier. The brain cortex of transgenic mouse model of HHcy (cystathionine β-synthase, CBS-/+) and GABA-A receptor null mice treated with and without muscimol (GABA-A receptor agonist) was analysed. The mRNA levels were measured by Q-RT-PCR. Levels of MMP-2, -9, -13, and TIMP-1, -2, -3, and -4 were evaluated by in situ labeling and PCR-gene arrays. Pial venular permeability to fluorescence-labeled albumin was assessed with intravital fluorescence microscopy. We found that Hcy increases metalloproteinase activity and decreases TIMP-4 by antagonizing the GABA-A receptor. The results demonstrate a novel mechanism in which brain microvascular permeability changes during HHcy and vascular dementias, and have therapeutic ramifications for microvascular disease in Alzheimer's patients.

  17. Amiloride and GMQ Allosteric Modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 Receptor: Influences of the Intersubunit Site.

    PubMed

    Snell, Heather D; Gonzales, Eric B

    2015-06-01

    Amiloride, a diuretic used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure, and 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ) are guanidine compounds that modulate acid-sensing ion channels. Both compounds have demonstrated affinity for a variety of membrane proteins, including members of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels, such as the heteromeric GABA-A αβγ receptors. The actions of these guanidine compounds on the homomeric GABA-A ρ1 receptor remains unclear, especially in light of how many GABA-A αβγ receptor modulators have different effects in the GABA-A ρ1 receptors. We sought to characterize the influence of amiloride and GMQ on the human GABA-A ρ1 receptors using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. The diuretic amiloride potentiated the human GABA-A ρ1 GABA-mediated current, whereas GMQ antagonized the receptor. Furthermore, a GABA-A second transmembrane domain site, the intersubunit site, responsible for allosteric modulation in the heteromeric GABA-A receptors mediated amiloride's positive allosteric actions. In contrast, the mutation did not remove GMQ antagonism but only changed the guanidine compound's potency within the human GABA-A ρ1 receptor. Through modeling and introduction of point mutations, we propose that the GABA-A ρ1 intersubunit site plays a role in mediating the allosteric effects of amiloride and GMQ.

  18. Phasic, Nonsynaptic GABA-A Receptor-Mediated Inhibition Entrains Thalamocortical Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Rovó, Zita; Mátyás, Ferenc; Barthó, Péter; Slézia, Andrea; Lecci, Sandro; Pellegrini, Chiara; Astori, Simone; Dávid, Csaba; Hangya, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    GABA-A receptors (GABA-ARs) are typically expressed at synaptic or nonsynaptic sites mediating phasic and tonic inhibition, respectively. These two forms of inhibition conjointly control various network oscillations. To disentangle their roles in thalamocortical rhythms, we focally deleted synaptic, γ2 subunit-containing GABA-ARs in the thalamus using viral intervention in mice. After successful removal of γ2 subunit clusters, spontaneous and evoked GABAergic synaptic currents disappeared in thalamocortical cells when the presynaptic, reticular thalamic (nRT) neurons fired in tonic mode. However, when nRT cells fired in burst mode, slow phasic GABA-AR-mediated events persisted, indicating a dynamic, burst-specific recruitment of nonsynaptic GABA-ARs. In vivo, removal of synaptic GABA-ARs reduced the firing of individual thalamocortical cells but did not abolish slow oscillations or sleep spindles. We conclude that nonsynaptic GABA-ARs are recruited in a phasic manner specifically during burst firing of nRT cells and provide sufficient GABA-AR activation to control major thalamocortical oscillations. PMID:24849349

  19. HPLC-based activity profiling: discovery of piperine as a positive GABA(A) receptor modulator targeting a benzodiazepine-independent binding site.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Janine; Baburin, Igor; Strommer, Barbara; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2010-02-26

    A plant extract library was screened for GABA(A) receptor activity making use of a two-microelectrode voltage clamp assay on Xenopus laevis oocytes. An ethyl acetate extract of black pepper fruits [Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae) 100 microg/mL] potentiated GABA-induced chloride currents through GABA(A) receptors (composed of alpha(1), beta(2), and gamma(2S) subunits) by 169.1 +/- 2.4%. With the aid of an HPLC-based activity profiling approach, piperine (5) was identified as the main active compound, together with 12 structurally related less active or inactive piperamides (1-4, 6-13). Identification was achieved by on-line high-resolution mass spectrometry and off-line microprobe 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, using only milligram amounts of extract. Compound 5 induced a maximum potentiation of the chloride currents by 301.9 +/- 26.5% with an EC(50) of 52.4 +/- 9.4 microM. A comparison of the modulatory activity of 5 and other naturally occurring piperamides enabled insights into structural features critical for GABA(A) receptor modulation. The stimulation of chloride currents through GABA(A) receptors by compound 5 was not antagonized by flumazenil (10 microM). These data show that piperine (5) represents a new scaffold of positive allosteric GABA(A) receptor modulators targeting a benzodiazepine-independent binding site.

  20. Evidence for inhibition mediated by coassembly of GABAA and GABAC receptor subunits in native central neurons.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Carol J; Buckley, Noel J; Garret, Maurice; Deuchars, Jim; Deuchars, Susan A

    2004-08-18

    Fast inhibition in the nervous system is commonly mediated by GABA(A) receptors comprised of 2alpha/2beta/1gamma subunits. In contrast, GABA(C) receptors containing only rho subunits (rho1-rho3) have been predominantly detected in the retina. However, here using reverse transcription-PCR and in situ hybridization we show that mRNA encoding the rho1 subunit is highly expressed in brainstem neurons. Immunohistochemistry localized the rho1 subunit to neurons at light and electron microscopic levels, where it was detected at synaptic junctions. Application of the GABA(C) receptor agonist cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (100-800 microM) requires the rho1 subunit to elicit responses, which surprisingly are blocked independently by antagonists to GABA(A) (bicuculline, 10 microM) and GABA(C) [(1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA); 40-160 microM] receptors. Responses to GABA(C) agonists were also enhanced by the GABA(A) receptor modulator pentobarbitone (300 microM). Spontaneous and evoked IPSPs were reduced in amplitude but never abolished by TPMPA, but were completely blocked by bicuculline. We therefore tested the hypothesis that GABA(A) and GABA(C) subunits formed a heteromeric receptor. Immunohistochemistry indicated that rho1 and alpha1 subunits were colocalized at light and electron microscopic levels. Electrophysiology revealed that responses to GABA(C) receptor agonists were enhanced by the GABA(A) receptor modulator zolpidem (500 nm), which acts on the alpha1 subunit when the gamma2 subunit is also present. Finally, coimmunoprecipitation indicated that the rho1 subunit formed complexes that also containedalpha1 and gamma2 subunits. Taken together these separate lines of evidence suggest that the effects of GABA in central neurons can be mediated by heteromeric complexes of GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptor subunits.

  1. Semisynthetic preparation of amentoflavone: A negative modulator at GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Jane R; Chebib, Mary; Davucheron, Neil L M; Hall, Belinda J; Johnston, Graham A R

    2003-07-21

    Amentoflavone is found in a number of plants with medicinal properties, including Ginkgo biloba and Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort). We have developed a rapid and economic semi-synthetic preparation of amentoflavone from biflavones isolated from autumnal Ginkgo biloba leaves. Several studies have shown that amentoflavone binds to benzodiazepine receptors. Using two electrode voltage-clamp methodology, amentoflavone has been shown to be a negative modulator of GABA at GABA(A) alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes This action appears to be independent of the flumazenil-sensitive benzodiazepine modulatory sites on the GABA(A) receptor.

  2. GABA(A) receptor binding and localization in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Standifer, K M; Sherry, D M

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the retina and also appears to act as a trophic factor regulating photoreceptor development and regeneration. Although the tiger salamander is a major model system for the study of retinal circuitry and regeneration, our understanding of GABA receptors in this species is almost exclusively based on the results of physiological studies. Therefore, we have examined the pharmacological binding properties of GABA(A) receptors and their anatomical localization in the tiger salamander retina. Radioligand-binding studies showed that specific 3H-GABA binding to GABA(A) receptors was dominated by a single high-affinity binding site (Kd = 15.6+/-6.9 nM). Specific binding of 3H-GABA was almost completely eliminated by muscimol (Ki = 105+/-62 nM) and bicuculline (Ki = 14.3+/-2.2 microM); however, SR-95531 only displaced about 40% of specific 3H-GABA binding (Ki = 35.0+/-3.8 nM). These data indicate that there are at least two subtypes of GABA(A) receptors present in the salamander retina that can be distinguished by their antagonist binding properties: one sensitive to both bicuculline and SR-95531, and one sensitive to bicuculline but insensitive to SR-95531. Because localization of GABA receptors in the salamander retina by immunocytochemistry is problematic, GABA(A) receptors were localized by fluorescent ligand binding combined with immunocytochemical labeling for cell specific markers. Binding of fluorescently labeled muscimol to GABA(A) receptors was present in both plexiform layers and on photoreceptor cell bodies. GABA(A) receptors in the outer plexiform layer were localized to both photoreceptor terminals and horizontal cell processes.

  3. A Review of the Updated Pharmacophore for the Alpha 5 GABA(A) Benzodiazepine Receptor Model

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Terry; Poe, Michael M.; Rallapalli, Sundari; Biawat, Poonam; Savić, Miroslav M.; Rowlett, James K.; Gallos, George; Emala, Charles W.; Kaczorowski, Catherine C.; Stafford, Douglas C.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Cook, James M.

    2015-01-01

    An updated model of the GABA(A) benzodiazepine receptor pharmacophore of the α5-BzR/GABA(A) subtype has been constructed prompted by the synthesis of subtype selective ligands in light of the recent developments in both ligand synthesis, behavioral studies, and molecular modeling studies of the binding site itself. A number of BzR/GABA(A) α5 subtype selective compounds were synthesized, notably α5-subtype selective inverse agonist PWZ-029 (1) which is active in enhancing cognition in both rodents and primates. In addition, a chiral positive allosteric modulator (PAM), SH-053-2′F-R-CH3 (2), has been shown to reverse the deleterious effects in the MAM-model of schizophrenia as well as alleviate constriction in airway smooth muscle. Presented here is an updated model of the pharmacophore for α5β2γ2 Bz/GABA(A) receptors, including a rendering of PWZ-029 docked within the α5-binding pocket showing specific interactions of the molecule with the receptor. Differences in the included volume as compared to α1β2γ2, α2β2γ2, and α3β2γ2 will be illustrated for clarity. These new models enhance the ability to understand structural characteristics of ligands which act as agonists, antagonists, or inverse agonists at the Bz BS of GABA(A) receptors. PMID:26682068

  4. Spontaneous thermal motion of the GABA(A) receptor M2 channel-lining segments.

    PubMed

    Bera, Amal K; Akabas, Myles H

    2005-10-21

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor channel opening involves translational and rotational motions of the five channel-lining, M2 transmembrane segments. The M2 segment's extracellular half is loosely packed and undergoes significant thermal motion. To characterize the extent of the M2 segment's motion, we used disulfide trapping experiments between pairs of engineered cysteines. In alpha1beta1 gamma2S receptors the single gamma subunit is flanked by an alpha and beta subunit. The gamma2 M2-14' position is located in the alpha-gamma subunit interface. Gamma2 13' faces the channel lumen. We expressed either the gamma2 14' or the gamma2 13' cysteine substitution mutants with alpha1 cysteine substitution mutants between 12' and 16' and wild-type beta1. Disulfide bonds formed spontaneously between gamma2 14'C and both alpha1 15'C and alpha1 16'C and also between gamma2 13'C and alpha1 13'C. Oxidation by copper phenanthroline induced disulfide bond formation between gamma2 14'C and alpha1 13'C. Disulfide bond formation rates with gamma2 14'C were similar in the presence and absence of GABA, although the rate with alpha1 13'C was slower than with the other two positions. In a homology model based on the acetylcholine receptor structure, alphaM2 would need to rotate in opposite directions by approximately 80 degrees to bring alpha1 13' and alpha1 15' into close proximity with gamma2 14'. Alternatively, translational motion of alphaM2 would reduce the extent of rotational motion necessary to bring these two alpha subunit residues into close proximity with the gamma2 14' position. These experiments demonstrate that in the closed state the M2 segments undergo continuous spontaneous motion in the region near the extracellular end of the channel gate. Opening the gate may involve similar but concerted motions of the M2 segments.

  5. GABA(A) receptor subtype-selectivity of novel bicuculline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Foppa, Verena; Thiery, Hanna; Hermange, Philippe; Janody, Simon; Berger, Michael L; Dodd, Robert H; Sieghart, Werner

    2015-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system and are targets of clinically important drugs modulating GABA induced ion flux by interacting with distinct allosteric binding sites. ROD 185 is a previously investigated structural analogue of the GABA site antagonist bicuculline, and a positive allosteric modulator acting via the benzodiazepine binding site. Here, we investigated 13 newly synthesized structural analogues of ROD 185 for their interaction with rat GABA(A) receptors. Using [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding assays, we identified four compounds exhibiting a higher affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site than ROD 185. Two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology at recombinant GABA(A) receptors indicated that most of these compounds positively modulated GABA-induced currents at these receptors. Additionally, these experiments revealed that this compound class not only interacts with the benzodiazepine binding site at αβγ receptors but also with a novel, so far unidentified binding site present in αβ receptors. Compounds with a high affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site stimulated GABA-induced currents stronger at αβγ than at αβ receptors and preferred α3β3γ2 receptors. Compounds showing equal or smaller effects at αβγ compared to αβ receptors differentially interacted with various αβ or αβγ receptor subtypes. Surprisingly, five of these compounds interacting with αβ receptors showed a strong stimulation at α6β3γ2 receptors. The absence of any direct effects at GABA(A) receptors, as well as their potential selectivity for receptor subtypes not being addressed by benzodiazepines, make this compound class to a starting point for the development of drugs with a possible clinical importance.

  6. Restoring the spinal pain gate: GABA(A) receptors as targets for novel analgesics.

    PubMed

    Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Ralvenius, William T; Acuña, Mario A

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) and glycine receptors are key elements of the spinal control of nociception and pain. Compromised functioning of these two transmitter systems contributes to chronic pain states. Restoring their proper function through positive allosteric modulators should constitute a rational approach to the treatment of chronic pain syndromes involving diminished inhibitory spinal pain control. Although classical benzodiazepines (i.e., full agonists at the benzodiazepine binding site of GABA(A)Rs) potentiate synaptic inhibition in spinal pain controlling circuits, they lack clinically relevant analgesic activity in humans. Recent data obtained from experiments in GABA(A)R point-mutated mice suggests dose-limiting sedative effects of classical nonspecific benzodiazepines as the underlying cause. Experiments in genetically engineered mice resistant to the sedative effects of classical benzodiazepines and studies with novel less sedating benzodiazepines have indeed shown that profound antihyperalgesia can be obtained at least in preclinical pain models. Present evidence suggests that compounds with high intrinsic activity at α2-GABA(A)R and minimal agonistic activity at α1-GABA(A)R should possess relevant antihyperalgesic activity without causing unwanted sedation. On-going preclinical studies in genetically engineered mice and clinical trials with more selective benzodiazepine site agonists should soon provide additional insights into this emerging topic.

  7. Plasticity of GABA(A) receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens of alcohol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Lindemeyer, A Kerstin; Suryanarayanan, Asha; Meyer, Edward M; Marty, Vincent N; Ahmad, S Omar; Shao, Xuesi Max; Olsen, Richard W; Spigelman, Igor

    2014-07-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure-induced changes in reinforcement mechanisms and motivational state are thought to contribute to the development of cravings and relapse during protracted withdrawal. The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is a key structure of the mesolimbic dopaminergic reward system and plays an important role in mediating alcohol-seeking behaviors. Here we describe the long-lasting alterations of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs) of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the NAcc after chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment, a rat model of alcohol dependence. CIE treatment and withdrawal (>40 days) produced decreases in the ethanol and Ro15-4513 potentiation of extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs, which mediate the picrotoxin-sensitive tonic current (I(tonic)), while potentiation of synaptic receptors, which give rise to miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), was increased. Diazepam sensitivity of both I(tonic) and mIPSCs was decreased by CIE treatment. The average magnitude of I(tonic) was unchanged, but mIPSC amplitude and frequency decreased and mIPSC rise time increased after CIE treatment. Rise-time histograms revealed decreased frequency of fast-rising mIPSCs after CIE treatment, consistent with possible decreases in somatic GABAergic synapses in MSNs from CIE rats. However, unbiased stereological analysis of NeuN-stained NAcc neurons did not detect any decreases in NAcc volume, neuronal numbers, or neuronal cell body volume. Western blot analysis of surface subunit levels revealed selective decreases in α1 and δ and increases in α4, α5, and γ2 GABA(A)R subunits after CIE treatment and withdrawal. Similar, but reversible, alterations occurred after a single ethanol dose (5 g/kg). These data reveal CIE-induced long-lasting neuroadaptations in the NAcc GABAergic neurotransmission. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Coupling between agonist and chloride ionophore sites of the GABA(A) receptor: agonist/antagonist efficacy of 4-PIOL.

    PubMed

    Rabe, H; Picard, R; Uusi-Oukari, M; Hevers, W; Lüddens, H; Korpi, E R

    2000-12-15

    Eight gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mimetics were tested on their ability to differentiate native GABA(A) receptor subtypes present in various rat brain regions. In rat brain cryostat sections, little regional variations by the agonistic actions of muscimol, thiomuscimol, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol, piperidine-4-sulphonic acid, taurine and beta-alanine on [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]TBPS) binding to GABA(A) receptor channels were found. They were very similar to those found for GABA itself and indicated no direct correlation with single subunit distributions for any of these compounds. Only the low-efficacy GABA mimetic 5-(4-piperidyl)isoxazol-3-ol (4-PIOL) acted like a weak partial agonist or antagonist depending on the brain area. As the cerebellar granule cell layer was relatively insensitive to both modes of action, we tested 4-PIOL in recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 (widespread major subtype) and alpha6beta2gamma2 (cerebellar granule cell restricted) receptors where it had different effects on GABA-modulated [35S]TBPS binding and on electrophysiological responses. 4-PIOL may thus serve as a potential lead for receptor subtype selective compounds.

  9. Dual Modulators of GABA-A and Alpha7 Nicotinic Receptors for Treating Autism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    and Alpha7 Nicotinic Receptors for Treating Autism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kelvin W. Gee RECIPIENT: University of California Irvine...Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dual Modulators of GABA-A and Alpha7 Nicotinic Receptors for Treating Autism 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...receptor (GABAAR) mediated signaling. Therefore GABAARs may be a relevant therapeutic target for blocking or reversing the symptoms of ASD. Nicotinic

  10. Potentiating effect of eszopiclone on GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses in pedunculopontine neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, Meijun; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2009-07-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the cholinergic arm of the reticular activating system, which is mostly active during waking and REM sleep. GABAergic modulation of this area appears to regulate sleep-wake cycles. Eszopiclone (ESZ), a nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic agent, appears to modulate GABAergic receptors. However, the action site of ESZ in the brain is still unresolved. We tested the hypothesis that ESZ acts by potentiating GABA(A) receptors on PPN neurons. Wholecell voltage clamp recordings were performed on PPN neurons in 7-15 day rat brainstem slices, and the potentiating effects of ESZ on the responses to the GABA(A) receptor agonist isoguvacine (IGV), and on GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs), were determined. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, ESZ (1) increased the amplitude of the outward current induced by IGV, (2) increased its duration, and (3) enhanced the IGV-induced decrease in input resistance (Rin). The GABA(A) receptor antagonist gabazine (GBZ) blocked these effects. ESZ alone did not induce detectable currents or change Rin at a holding potential of -60 mV, but when held at 0 mV, ESZ induced an outward current in 13/21 PPN cells, an effect blocked by GBZ. ESZ also increased the amplitude (n = 18/21), duration (n = 17/21), and frequency (n = 13/15) of IPSCs. ESZ may potentiate GABA(A) inhibition in the PPN via pre- and post-synaptic modulation, which may underlie the hypnotic effects of ESZ. The differential effects of ESZ on both pre- and post-synaptic sites may partially explain why it has less significant side effects compared to other hypnotic agents.

  11. Using an α-bungarotoxin binding site tag to study GABA A receptor membrane localization and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Brady, Megan L; Moon, Charles E; Jacob, Tija C

    2014-03-28

    It is increasingly evident that neurotransmitter receptors, including ionotropic GABA A receptors (GABAAR), exhibit highly dynamic trafficking and cell surface mobility(1-7). To study receptor cell surface localization and endocytosis, the technique described here combines the use of fluorescent α-bungarotoxin with cells expressing constructs containing an α-bungarotoxin (Bgt) binding site (BBS). The BBS (WRYYESSLEPYPD) is based on the α subunit of the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, which binds Bgt with high affinity(8,9). Incorporation of the BBS site allows surface localization and measurements of receptor insertion or removal with application of exogenous fluorescent Bgt, as previously described in the tracking of GABAA and metabotropic GABAB receptors(2,10). In addition to the BBS site, we inserted a pH-sensitive GFP (pHGFP(11)) between amino acids 4 and 5 of the mature GABAAR subunit by standard molecular biology and PCR cloning strategies (see Figure 1)(12). The BBS is 3' of the pH-sensitive GFP reporter, separated by a 13-amino acid alanine/proline linker. For trafficking studies described in this publication that are based on fixed samples, the pHGFP serves as a reporter of total tagged GABAAR subunit protein levels, allowing normalization of the Bgt labeled receptor population to total receptor population. This minimizes cell to cell Bgt staining signal variability resulting from higher or lower baseline expression of the tagged GABAAR subunits. Furthermore the pHGFP tag enables easy identification of construct expressing cells for live or fixed imaging experiments.

  12. 5-(N, N-Hexamethylene) amiloride is a GABA-A ρ1 receptor positive allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Snell, Heather D; Gonzales, Eric B

    2016-11-01

    Guanidine compounds act as ion channel modulators. In the case of Cys-loop receptors, the guanidine compound amiloride antagonized the heteromeric GABA-A, glycine, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. However, amiloride exhibits characteristics consistent with a positive allosteric modulator for the human GABA-A (hGABA-A) ρ1 receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the positive allosteric modulation was influenced by the GABA-A ρ1 second transmembrane domain 15' position, a site implicated in ligand allosteric modulation of Cys-loop receptors. There are a variety of amiloride derivatives that provide opportunities to assess the significance of amiloride functional groups (e.g., the guanidine group, the pyrazine ring, etc.) in the modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 receptor activity. We utilized 3 amiloride derivatives (benzamil, phenamil, and 5-(N, N-Hexamethylene) amiloride) to assess the contribution of these groups toward the potentiation of the GABA-A ρ1 receptor. Benzamil and phenamil failed to potentiate on the wild type GABA-A ρ1 GABA-mediated current while HMA demonstrated efficacy only at the highest concentration studied. The hGABA-A ρ1 (I15'N) mutant receptor activity was potentiated by lower HMA concentrations compared to the wild type receptor. Our findings suggest that an exposed guanidine group on amiloride and amiloride derivatives is critical for modulating the GABA-A ρ1 receptor. The present study provides a conceptual framework for predicting which amiloride derivatives will demonstrate positive allosteric modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 receptor.

  13. Activation of GABA-A Receptor Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced MMP-9 Activation by ERK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    TYAGI, NEETU; GILLESPIE, WILLIAM; VACEK, JONATHAN C.; SEN, UTPAL; TYAGI, SURESH C.; LOMINADZE, DAVID

    2010-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is a risk factor for neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Homocysteine (Hcy) induces redox stress, in part, by activating matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the matrix and leads to blood–brain barrier dysfunction. Hcy competitively binds to γ-aminbutyric acid (GABA) receptors, which are excitatory neurotransmitter receptors. However, the role of GABA-A receptor in Hcy-induced cerebrovascular remodeling is not clear. We hypothesized that Hcy causes cerebrovascular remodeling by increasing redox stress and MMP-9 activity via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway and by inhibition of GABA-A receptors, thus behaving as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. Hcy-induced reactive oxygen species production was detected using the fluorescent probe, 2′–7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Hcy increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase-4 concomitantly suppressing thioredoxin. Hcy caused activation of MMP-9, measured by gelatin zymography. The GABA-A receptor agonist, muscimol ameliorated the Hcy-mediated MMP-9 activation. In parallel, Hcy caused phosphorylation of ERK and selectively decreased levels of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-4 (TIMP-4). Treatment of the endothelial cell with muscimol restored the levels of TIMP-4 to the levels in control group. Hcy induced expression of iNOS and decreased eNOS expression, which lead to a decreased NO bioavailability. Furthermore muscimol attenuated Hcy-induced MMP-9 via ERK signaling pathway. These results suggest that Hcy competes with GABA-A receptors, inducing the oxidative stress transduction pathway and leading to ERK activation. PMID:19308943

  14. Electrophysiological properties and subunit composition of GABAA receptors in patients with gelastic seizures and hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Chang, Yongchang; Li, Guohui; Xue, Fenqin; DeChon, Jamie; Ellsworth, Kevin; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Kechun; Bahadroani, Nasim; Zheng, Chao; Zhang, Jianliang; Rekate, Harold; Rho, Jong M; Kerrigan, John F

    2007-07-01

    Abnormalities in GABA(A) receptor structure and/or function have been associated with various forms of epilepsy in both humans and animals. Whether this is true for patients with gelastic seizures and hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) is unknown. In this study, we characterized the pharmacological properties and native subunit composition of GABA(A) receptors on acutely dissociated single neurons from surgically resected HH tissues using patch-clamp, immunocytochemical, and RT-PCR techniques. We found that 1) GABA induced an inward current (I(GABA)) at a holding potential of -60 mV; 2) I(GABA) was mimicked by the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol and blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline, suggesting that I(GABA) was mediated principally through the GABA(A) receptor; 3) the EC(50) and Hill coefficient derived from the I(GABA) concentration-response curve were 6.8 muM and 1.9, respectively; 4) the current-voltage curve was linear at a reversal potential close to zero; and 5) I(GABA) exhibited low sensitivity to zinc and diazepam but higher sensitivity to pentobarbital and pregnanolone. Additionally, using Xenopus oocytes microtransplanted with normal human hypothalamic tissue, we confirmed that the functional properties of GABA(A) receptors were similar to those seen in small isolated HH neurons. Finally, the expression profile of GABA(A) receptor subunits obtained from normal control human hypothalamic tissue was identical to that from surgically resected human HH tissue. Taken together, our data indicate that GABA(A) receptors on small HH neurons exhibit normal pharmacosensitivity and subunit composition. These findings bear relevance to a broader understanding of inhibitory neurotransmission in human HH tissue.

  15. Expression of functional receptors by the human gamma-aminobutyric acid A gamma 2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2004-03-02

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors are heteromeric membrane proteins formed mainly by various combinations of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits; and it is commonly thought that the gamma 2 subunit alone does not form functional receptors. In contrast, we found that cDNA encoding the gamma 2L subunit of the human GABA(A) receptor, injected alone into Xenopus oocytes, expressed functional GABA receptors whose properties were investigated by using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. GABA elicited desensitizing membrane currents that recovered after a few minutes' wash. Repetitive applications of GABA induced a "run-up" of GABA currents that nearly doubled the amplitude of the first response. The GABA currents inverted direction at about -30 mV, indicating that they are carried mainly by Cl(-) ions. The homomeric gamma 2L receptors were also activated by beta-alanine > taurine > glycine, and, like some types of heteromeric GABA(A) receptors, the gamma 2L receptors were blocked by bicuculline and were potentiated by pentobarbital and flunitrazepam. These results indicate that the human gamma 2L subunit is capable of forming fully functional GABA receptors by itself in Xenopus oocytes and suggest that the roles proposed for the various subunits that make up the heteromeric GABA(A) receptors in situ require further clarification.

  16. Histone H2AX-dependent GABA(A) receptor regulation of stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Andäng, Michael; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Moliner, Annalena; Lundgren, T Kalle; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Nanou, Evanthia; Pozas, Ester; Bryja, Vitezslav; Halliez, Sophie; Nishimaru, Hiroshi; Wilbertz, Johannes; Arenas, Ernest; Koltzenburg, Martin; Charnay, Patrick; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Ibañez, Carlos F; Ernfors, Patrik

    2008-01-24

    Stem cell self-renewal implies proliferation under continued maintenance of multipotency. Small changes in numbers of stem cells may lead to large differences in differentiated cell numbers, resulting in significant physiological consequences. Proliferation is typically regulated in the G1 phase, which is associated with differentiation and cell cycle arrest. However, embryonic stem (ES) cells may lack a G1 checkpoint. Regulation of proliferation in the 'DNA damage' S/G2 cell cycle checkpoint pathway is known for its role in the maintenance of chromatin structural integrity. Here we show that autocrine/paracrine gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signalling by means of GABA(A) receptors negatively controls ES cell and peripheral neural crest stem (NCS) cell proliferation, preimplantation embryonic growth and proliferation in the boundary-cap stem cell niche, resulting in an attenuation of neuronal progenies from this stem cell niche. Activation of GABA(A) receptors leads to hyperpolarization, increased cell volume and accumulation of stem cells in S phase, thereby causing a rapid decrease in cell proliferation. GABA(A) receptors signal through S-phase checkpoint kinases of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase-related kinase family and the histone variant H2AX. This signalling pathway critically regulates proliferation independently of differentiation, apoptosis and overt damage to DNA. These results indicate the presence of a fundamentally different mechanism of proliferation control in these stem cells, in comparison with most somatic cells, involving proteins in the DNA damage checkpoint pathway.

  17. Diminished GABA(A) receptor-binding capacity and a DNA base substitution in a patient with treatment-resistant depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kosel, Markus; Rudolph, Uwe; Wielepp, Peter; Luginbühl, Martin; Schmitt, Wolfgang; Fisch, Hans U; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2004-02-01

    In this report, we describe the case of a caucasian male patient, aged 42 years, suffering from severe treatment-resistant generalized anxiety disorder with panic attacks and from severe major depression, for which he was treated with a course of electroconvulsive therapy. During electroconvulsive treatment, anesthesia was difficult to induce with etomidate and, once, propofol. Bispectral indices recordings (assessing the depth of anesthesia) revealed a much shorter duration of loss of responsiveness compared to a control patient receiving also a course of electroconvulsive therapy. Since GABA receptor-mediated regulation of cortical excitability is important with respect to general anesthesia, we investigated the density of GABA(A) receptors with (123)I-iomazenil SPECT and found a clearly diminished binding of the radiotracer in the right frontal and orbitotemporal regions compared to the recordings in a 38-year-old healthy male control. Genetic analysis of the exons 7 and 8 of the GABRB1-3 genes coding for the beta1-3 subunits of the GABA(A) receptors revealed a silent G to A substitution in the third position of amino acid 257 of the beta1-subunit. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a link between insensitivity to anesthetic agents and altered GABA(A) receptor function in a clinical case. Whereas reduced GABA(A) receptor-binding capacity has been investigated in anxiety disorders, this has not been the case in depressive disorders. This case illustrates how clinical observations in psychiatry can prompt investigation by modern techniques and potentially link clinics and basic sciences. No conclusion can, however, be made about casual links in this single case [corrected].

  18. Lateral mobility and anchoring of recombinant GABAA receptors depend on subunit composition.

    PubMed

    Peran, M; Hicks, B W; Peterson, N L; Hooper, H; Salas, R

    2001-10-01

    The clustering of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(A)R) at discrete and functionally significant domains on the nerve cell surface is an important determinant in the integration of synaptic inputs. To discern the role that the subunits of the GABA(A)R play in determining the receptor's cell surface topography and mobility, the alpha1, beta1, beta3, and gamma2s subunits were transfected into COS7, HEK293, and PC12 cells and the distribution and cell surface mobility of these recombinant receptors were examined. Our results show that alpha1 subunits are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum while beta1 and beta3 subunits are sorted to the plasma membrane where they form clusters. Co-expression and co-assembly of alpha1 and beta3 subunits result in the rescue of intracellular alpha1 subunits, which are transported as alphabeta subunit complexes to the cell surface where they formed clusters. Fluorescence photobleach recovery and single particle tracking of recombinant receptors show that, despite clustering, beta3 subunit homooligomers are mobile within a cell surface domain. Inclusion of alpha1 in beta3 or beta3gamma2s complexes, however, dramatically reduces the receptor's lateral mobility in COS 7 and PC12 cells and anchors GABA(A)Rs on the cell surface, suggesting the formation of a direct link to a component of the cytoskeleton. The mobility of recombinant receptors that include the alpha1 subunit mirrors the mobility of GABA(A)Rs on cell bodies and dendrites of cortical and spinal cord neurons. The results suggest that incorporation of alpha1 subunits give rise to a population of GABA(A)Rs that are immobilized on the cell surface.

  19. Allopregnanolone prevents dieldrin-induced NMDA receptor internalization and neurotoxicity by preserving GABA(A) receptor function.

    PubMed

    Briz, Víctor; Parkash, Jyoti; Sánchez-Redondo, Sara; Prevot, Vincent; Suñol, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    Dieldrin is an endocrine disruptor that accumulates in mammalian adipose tissue and brain. It induces convulsions due to its antagonism of the γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A)R). We have previously reported that long-term exposure to dieldrin causes the internalization of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) as a result of persistent GABA(A)R inhibition. Because the neurosteroids 17β-estradiol (E2) and allopregnanolone are known to modulate the function and trafficking of GABA(A)R and NMDAR, we examined the effects of E2 and allopregnanolone on dieldrin-induced GABA(A)R inhibition, NMDAR internalization, and neuronal death in cortical neurons. We found that 1 nM E2 increased the membrane expression of NR1/NR2B receptors and postsynaptic density 95 but did not induce their physical association. In contrast, 10 nM E2 had no effect on these proteins but reduced NR2A membrane expression. We also found that exposure to 60 nM dieldrin for 6 d in vitro caused the internalization of NR1 and NR2B but not NR2A. Treatment with either 1 nM E2 or 10 μM allopregnanolone prevented the dieldrin-induced reduction in membrane levels of the NR1/NR2B receptors. Furthermore, prolonged exposure to 200 nM dieldrin down-regulated the expression of NR2A; this was inhibited only by allopregnanolone. Although both hormones restored NMDAR function, as measured by the NMDA-induced rise in intracellular calcium, allopregnanolone (but not E2) reversed the inhibition of GABA(A)R and neuronal death caused by prolonged exposure to dieldrin. Our results indicate that allopregnanolone protects cortical neurons against the neurotoxicity caused by long-term exposure to dieldrin by maintaining GABA(A)R and NMDAR functionality.

  20. GABA(A) receptor activation is involved in noncontingent shock inhibition of instrumental conditioning in spinal rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Adam R; Washburn, Stephanie N; Crown, Eric D; Grau, James W

    2003-08-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that the spinal cord, isolated from higher neural structures, can support a simple form of instrumental learning. Furthermore, preexposure to uncontrollable (noncontingent) shock to the leg or tail inhibits this form of learning. The present study explores the role of GABA(A) receptor modulation on this inhibitory effect in spinal cord-transected rats. Intrathecal administration of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline blocked induction and expression of the inhibition. The GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol inhibited learning in a dose-dependent manner. However, this effect was transient and showed no additivity with shock. The findings suggest that GABA(A) receptor activation may work like a pharmacological switch that is activated by noncontingent shock to inhibit instrumental conditioning within the spinal cord.

  1. GABA-A receptors regulate neocortical neuronal migration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heck, Nicolas; Kilb, Werner; Reiprich, Petra; Kubota, Hisahiko; Furukawa, Tomonori; Fukuda, Atsuo; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2007-01-01

    The cortical migration process depends on a number of trophic factors and on the activation of different voltage- and ligand-gated channels. We investigated the role of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors in the neuronal migration process of the newborn rat parietal cortex in vivo and in vitro. Local in vivo application of the GABA-A antagonist bicuculline methiodide (BMI) or the agonist muscimol via cortical surface Elvax implants induced prominent alterations in the cortical architecture when compared with untreated or sham-operated controls. BMI- and muscimol-treated animals revealed heterotopic cell clusters in the upper layers and a complete loss of the cortical lamination in the region underlying the Elvax implant. Immunocytochemical staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and GABA demonstrated that heterotopia was not provoked by glial proliferation and confirmed the presence of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. In organotypic neocortical slices from embryonic day 18-19 embryos, application of BMI and to a lesser extent also muscimol induced an increase in the migration speed and an accumulation of neurons in the upper cortical layers. Spontaneous intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) oscillations in neocortical slices from newborn rats were abolished by BMI (5 and 20 microM) and muscimol (1 and 10 microM), indicating that both compounds interfere with [Ca2+]i signaling required for normal neuronal migration. Electrophysiological recordings from migrating neurons in newborn rat neocortical slices indicate that long-term application of muscimol causes a pronounced reduction (1 microM muscimol) or blockade (10 microM) in the responsiveness of postsynaptic GABA-A receptors due to a pronounced receptor desensitization. Our results indicate that modulation of GABA-A receptors by compounds acting as agonists or antagonists may profoundly influence the neuronal migration process in the developing cerebral cortex.

  2. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists rimonabant (SR141716) and AM251 directly potentiate GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Baur, R; Gertsch, J; Sigel, E

    2012-04-01

    Rimonabant (SR141716) and the structurally related AM251 are widely used in pharmacological experiments as selective cannabinoid receptor CB(1) antagonists / inverse agonists. Concentrations of 0.5-10 µM are usually applied in in vitro experiments. We intended to show that these drugs did not act at GABA(A) receptors but found a significant positive allosteric modulation instead. Recombinant GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Receptors were exposed to AM251 or rimonabant in the absence and presence of GABA. Standard electrophysiological techniques were used to monitor the elicited ionic currents. AM251 dose-dependently potentiated responses to 0.5 µM GABA at the recombinant α(1) β(2) γ(2) GABA(A) receptor with an EC(50) below 1 µM and a maximal potentiation of about eightfold. The Hill coefficient indicated that more than one binding site for AM251 was located in this receptor. Rimonabant had a lower affinity, but a fourfold higher efficacy. AM251 potentiated also currents mediated by α(1) β(2) , α(x) β(2) γ(2) (x = 2,3,5,6), α(1) β(3) γ(2) and α(4) β(2) δ GABA(A) receptors, but not those mediated by α(1) β(1) γ(2) . Interestingly, the CB(1) receptor antagonists LY320135 and O-2050 did not significantly affect α(1) β(2) γ(2) GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents at concentrations of 1 µM. This study identified rimonabant and AM251 as positive allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors. Thus, potential GABAergic effects of commonly used concentrations of these compounds should be considered in in vitro experiments, especially at extrasynaptic sites where GABA concentrations are low. This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology

  3. Effects of Antecedent GABA A Receptor Activation on Counterregulatory Responses to Exercise in Healthy Man.

    PubMed

    Hedrington, Maka S; Tate, Donna B; Younk, Lisa M; Davis, Stephen N

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether antecedent stimulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptors with the benzodiazepine alprazolam can blunt physiologic responses during next-day moderate (90 min) exercise in healthy man. Thirty-one healthy individuals (16 male/15 female aged 28 ± 1 year, BMI 23 ± 3 kg/m(2)) were studied during separate, 2-day protocols. Day 1 consisted of morning and afternoon 2-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic or hypoglycemic clamps with or without 1 mg alprazolam given 30 min before a clamp. Day 2 consisted of 90-min euglycemic cycling exercise at 50% VO2max. Despite similar euglycemia (5.3 ± 0.1 mmol/L) and insulinemia (46 ± 6 pmol/L) during day 2 exercise studies, GABA A activation with alprazolam during day 1 euglycemia resulted in significant blunting of plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, glucagon, cortisol, and growth hormone responses. Lipolysis (glycerol, nonesterified fatty acids) and endogenous glucose production during exercise were also reduced, and glucose infusion rates were increased following prior euglycemia with alprazolam. Prior hypoglycemia with alprazolam resulted in further reduction of glucagon and cortisol responses during exercise. We conclude that prior activation of GABA A pathways can play a significant role in blunting key autonomous nervous system, neuroendocrine, and metabolic physiologic responses during next-day exercise in healthy man.

  4. GABA(A) receptor mediated inhibition contributes to corticostriatal frequency filtering.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Devin A; Partridge, L Donald

    2012-11-21

    The striatum plays an important role in the initiation and learning of skilled motor behavior [6] and receives topographic input from most areas of the cortex. Cortical afferents make divergent contact with many striatal medium spiny neurons while individual medium spiny neurons receive tens of thousands of these glutamatergic synapses [13]. Temporal filtering of frequency information within synaptic fields plays an important role in the processing of neuronal signals. We have previously shown differential filtering characteristics within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus [26] and have now extended these studies to the cortical input to the dorsal striatum in order to address the network filtering characteristics in this important synaptic field. We measured field potentials of striatal medium spiny neurons in response to layer V cortical input over a range of stimulus frequencies from 2Hz to 100Hz. The average population spike amplitude in response to these stimulus trains exhibited a non-linear relationship to frequency, with characteristics of a low pass filter. In order to assess potential modulation of these filter properties, we examined the frequency response in the presence of antagonists to CB1, D2, nACh, and GABA(A) receptors, which are all known to be expressed at these synapses [13]. Of these, only GABA(A) receptor antagonists significantly modulated the frequency filtering characteristics over the examined frequency range. High frequency stimulation induces long term plasticity at corticostriatal synapses [4] and this process is strengthened when GABA(A) receptors are blocked [7,20,29]. Our results suggest a model whereby a temporary decrease in GABA level would modulate the filtering parameters of the corticostriatal circuit, allowing a more robust induction of high frequency-dependent plasticity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A New Susceptibility Locus for Migraine with Aura in the 15q11-q13 Genomic Region Containing Three GABA-A Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Luisa; Mariotti, Paolo; Sangiorgi, Eugenio; Giordano, Tiziana; Ricci, Iolanda; Lupi, Francesca; Chiera, Rossella; Guzzetta, Francesco; Neri, Giovanni; Gurrieri, Fiorella

    2005-01-01

    Migraine is the most common type of chronic episodic headache. Several population-based family studies have suggested a strong genetic predisposition to migraine, especially migraine with aura (MA). Although several susceptibility loci have been identified, none of the numerous studies performed to date have led to the identification of a gene responsible for the more common forms of migraine. GABA-A receptors and their modulator sites seem to be involved in the pathophysiological events that underlie migraine. We report on clinical and molecular data from a total of 10 families with MA, in which MA segregates as an autosomal dominant trait and presents with homogeneous clinical features. After excluding linkage with the known candidate loci, we used a functional candidate approach and genotyped these families with markers from the 15q11-q13 genomic region, which contains the genes encoding GABA-A receptor subunits. Evidence of linkage was obtained with a parametric two-point linkage analysis (maximum LOD score of 5.56 at a recombination fraction of 0.001 for marker GABRB3) and was supported by multipoint analysis (maximum LOD score of 6.54 between markers D15S113 and D15S1019). The critical region spanned 3.6 Mb. These results provide the basis for further investigation of the hypothesized relationship between a GABA-A receptor dysfunction and migraine. PMID:15586324

  6. Catamenial-like seizure exacerbation in mice with targeted ablation of extrasynaptic δGABA-a receptors in the brain.

    PubMed

    Clossen, Bryan L; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2017-10-01

    Neurosteroids play a key role in catamenial epilepsy, a menstrual cycle-related seizure clustering in women with epilepsy. While neurosteroids act on all GABA-A receptor isoforms, they cause greater effects on extrasynaptic δGABA-A receptors that mediate tonic inhibition in the brain. Previously, we identified a potential GABA-A receptor mechanism for catamenial epilepsy. However, the precise functional role of extrasynaptic δGABA-A receptors in the pathophysiology of catamenial epilepsy remains unclear. In this study, we utilized mice lacking extrasynaptic δGABA-A receptors (δKO) to investigate whether reduction of tonic inhibition affects catamenial seizure susceptibility or intensity. Intact female wildtype (WT) and δKO mice were subjected to hippocampus kindling until they exhibited stage 5 seizures. Elevated gonadal hormone-based neurosteroid levels were induced by standard gonadotropin regimen and neurosteroid withdrawal (NSW) was triggered by finasteride. NSW increased susceptibility to, as well the intensity of evoked catamenial-like seizures in WT and δKO mice. However, fully kindled δKO mice exhibited an accelerated and augmented response to NSW, with a more rapid increase in seizure susceptibility and intensity than WT mice undergoing the NSW paradigm. Moreover, δKO mice in NSW showed reduced benzodiazepine sensitivity, but in stark contrast to the increased neurosteroid sensitivity observed in WT animals, δKO mice displayed no change in neurosteroid sensitivity in response to NSW. The increased catamenial seizure exacerbation and alterations in antiseizure drug responses are consistent with NSW-induced changes in the abundance of δGABA-A receptors. Collectively, these findings provide evidence of a potential protective role for extrasynaptic δGABA-A receptors in catamenial-like seizures. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Mercury interaction with the GABA(A) receptor modulates the benzodiazepine binding site in primary cultures of mouse cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Fonfría, E; Rodríguez-Farré, E; Suñol, C

    2001-12-01

    Mercury compounds are neurotoxic compounds with a great specificity for cerebellar granule cells. The interaction of mercury compounds with proteins in the central nervous system may underlie some of their effects on neurotransmission. In this work we study the interaction of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and methylmercury (MeHg) with the GABA(A) receptor in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells. Both compounds increased, dose dependently, the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam to the benzodiazepine recognition site. EC50 values for this effect were 3.56 and 15.24 microM for HgCl2 and MeHg, respectively, after 30 min exposure of intact cultured cerebellar granule cells. The increase of [3H]flunitrazepam binding by mercury compounds was completely inhibited by the GABA(A) receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxinin, and by the organochlorine pesticide alpha-endosulfan. It was also partially inhibited by the anion transporter blocker DIDS, however this effect could be due to a possible chelation of mercury by DIDS. Intracellular events, like intracellular calcium, kinase activation/inactivation or antioxidant conditions did not affect [3H]flunitrazepam binding or its increase induced by mercury compounds. The sulfhydryl alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide mimicked the effect of mercury compounds on [3H]flunitrazepam binding suggesting a common mechanism. We conclude that mercury compounds interact with the GABA(A) receptor by the way of alkylation of SH groups of cysteinyl residues found in GABA(A) receptor subunit sequences.

  8. Inhibitory transmission in locus coeruleus neurons expressing GABAA receptor epsilon subunit has a number of unique properties.

    PubMed

    Belujon, P; Baufreton, J; Grandoso, L; Boué-Grabot, E; Batten, T F C; Ugedo, L; Garret, M; Taupignon, A I

    2009-10-01

    Fast inhibitory synaptic transmission in the brain relies on ionotropic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R). Eighteen genes code for GABA(A)R subunits, but little is known about the epsilon subunit. Our aim was to identify the synaptic transmission properties displayed by native receptors incorporating epsilon. Immunogold localization detected epsilon at synaptic sites on locus coeruleus (LC) neurons. In situ hybridization revealed prominent signals from epsilon, and mRNAs, some low beta1 and beta3 signals, and no gamma signal. Using in vivo extracellular and in vitro patch-clamp recordings in LC, we established that neuron firing rates, GABA-activated currents, and mIPSC charge were insensitive to the benzodiazepine flunitrazepam (FLU), in agreement with the characteristics of recombinant receptors including an epsilon subunit. Surprisingly, LC provided binding sites for benzodiazepines, and GABA-induced currents were potentiated by diazepam (DZP) in the micromolar range. A number of GABA(A)R ligands significantly potentiated GABA-induced currents, and zinc ions were only active at concentrations above 1 muM, further indicating that receptors were not composed of only alpha and beta subunits, but included an epsilon subunit. In contrast to recombinant receptors including an epsilon subunit, GABA(A)R in LC showed no agonist-independent opening. Finally, we determined that mIPSCs, as well as ensemble currents induced by ultra-fast GABA application, exhibited surprisingly slow rise times. Our work thus defines the signature of native GABA(A)R with a subunit composition including epsilon: differential sensitivity to FLU and DZP and slow rise time of currents. We further propose that alpha(3,) beta(1/3,) and epsilon subunits compose GABA(A)R in LC.

  9. Effects of central histamine receptors blockade on GABA(A) agonist-induced food intake in broiler cockerels.

    PubMed

    Morteza, Zendehdel; Vahhab, Babapour; Hossein, Jonaidi

    2008-02-01

    In this study, the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) injection of H1, H2 and H3 antagonists on feed intake induced by GABA(A) agonist was evaluated. In Experiment 1, the animals received chloropheniramine, a H1 antagonist and then muscimol, a GABA(A) agonist. In Experiment 2, chickens received famotidine, a H2 receptor antagonist, prior to injection of muscimol. Finally in Experiment 3, the birds were injected with thioperamide, a H3 receptor antagonist and muscimol. Cumulative food intake was measured 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after injections. The results of this study indicated that effects of muscimol on food intake inhibited by pretreatment with chloropheneramine maleate (p < or = 0.05), significantly, while the famotidine and thioperamide were ineffective. These results suggest the existence of H1-receptor mediated histamine-GABA(A) receptor interaction on food intake in broiler cockerels.

  10. Substance P selectively modulates GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Govindaiah, G; Wang, Yanyan; Cox, Charles L

    2010-02-01

    Substance P (SP) is co-localized and co-released with gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) from approximately 50% of GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum. MSNs innervate several cellular targets including neighboring MSNs and cholinergic interneurons via collaterals. However, the functional role of SP release onto striatal interneurons is unknown. Here we examined SP-mediated actions on inhibitory synaptic transmission in cholinergic interneurons using whole-cell recordings in mouse corticostriatal slices. We found that SP selectively suppressed GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs), but not excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) in cholinergic interneurons. In contrast, SP did not alter IPSCs in fast-spiking interneurons and MSNs. SP suppressed IPSC amplitude in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner, and the NK1 receptor antagonist RP67580 attenuated the SP-mediated suppression. In addition, RP67580 alone enhanced the evoked IPSC amplitude in cholinergic interneurons, suggesting an endogenous action of SP on regulation of inhibitory synaptic transmission. SP did not alter the paired-pulse ratio, but reduced the amplitudes of GABA(A) agonist muscimol-induced outward currents and miniature IPSCs in cholinergic interneurons, suggesting SP exerts its effects primarily at the post-synaptic site. Our results indicate that the physiological effects of SP are to enhance the activity of striatal cholinergic interneurons and provide a rationale for designing potential new antiparkinsonian agents.

  11. Attenuating GABA(A) receptor signaling in dopamine neurons selectively enhances reward learning and alters risk preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jones G; Wanat, Matthew J; Soden, Marta E; Ahmad, Kinza; Zweifel, Larry S; Bamford, Nigel S; Palmiter, Richard D

    2011-11-23

    Phasic dopamine (DA) transmission encodes the value of reward-predictive stimuli and influences both learning and decision-making. Altered DA signaling is associated with psychiatric conditions characterized by risky choices such as pathological gambling. These observations highlight the importance of understanding how DA neuron activity is modulated. While excitatory drive onto DA neurons is critical for generating phasic DA responses, emerging evidence suggests that inhibitory signaling also modulates these responses. To address the functional importance of inhibitory signaling in DA neurons, we generated mice lacking the β3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor specifically in DA neurons (β3-KO mice) and examined their behavior in tasks that assessed appetitive learning, aversive learning, and risk preference. DA neurons in midbrain slices from β3-KO mice exhibited attenuated GABA-evoked IPSCs. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of excitatory afferents to DA neurons elicited more DA release in the nucleus accumbens of β3-KO mice as measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. β3-KO mice were more active than controls when given morphine, which correlated with potential compensatory upregulation of GABAergic tone onto DA neurons. β3-KO mice learned faster in two food-reinforced learning paradigms, but extinguished their learned behavior normally. Enhanced learning was specific for appetitive tasks, as aversive learning was unaffected in β3-KO mice. Finally, we found that β3-KO mice had enhanced risk preference in a probabilistic selection task that required mice to choose between a small certain reward and a larger uncertain reward. Collectively, these findings identify a selective role for GABA(A) signaling in DA neurons in appetitive learning and decision-making.

  12. Stereoselective interaction of thiopentone enantiomers with the GABA(A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Cordato, D J; Chebib, M; Mather, L E; Herkes, G K; Johnston, G A

    1999-09-01

    1. As pharmacokinetic differences between the thiopentone enantiomers seem insufficient to explain the approximately 2 fold greater potency for CNS effects of (-)-S- over (+)-R-thiopentone, this study was performed to determine any enantioselectivity of thiopentone at the GABA(A) receptor, the primary receptor for barbiturate hypnotic effects. 2. Two electrode voltage clamp recording was performed on Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing human GABA(A) receptor subtype alpha1beta2gamma2 to determine relative differences in potentiation of the GABA response by rac-, (+)-R- and (-)-S-thiopentone, and rac-pentobarbitone. Changes in the cellular environment pH and in GABA concentrations were also evaluated. 3. With 3 microM GABA, the EC50 values were (-)-S-thiopentone (mean 26.0+/-s.e.mean 3.2 microM, n=9 cells) >rac-thiopentone (35.9+/-4.2 microM, n=6, P=0.1) >(+)-R-thiopentone (52.5+/-5.0 microM, n=8, P<0.02) >rac-pentobarbitone (97.0+/-11.2 microM, n=11, P<0.01). Adjustment of environment pH to 7.0 or 8.0 did not alter the EC50 values for (+)-R- or (-)-S-thiopentone. 4 Uninjected oocytes responded to >100 microM (-)-S- and R-thiopentone. This direct response was abolished by intracellular oocyte injection of 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N, N,N1,N1-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), a Ca2+ chelating agent. With BAPTA, the EC50 values were (-)-S-thiopentone (20.6+/-3.2 microM, n=8) <(+)-R-thiopentone (36.2+/-3.2 microM, n=9, P<0.005). 5 (-)-S-thiopentone was found to be approximately 2 fold more potent than (+)-R-thiopentone in the potentiation of GABA at GABA(A) receptors expressed on Xenopus oocytes. This is consistent with the differences in potency for CNS depressant effects found in vivo.

  13. Taurine activates GABA(A) but not GABA(B) receptors in rat hippocampal CA1 area.

    PubMed

    del Olmo, N; Bustamante, J; del Río, R M; Solís, J M

    2000-05-12

    We investigated if taurine, an endogenous GABA analog, could mimic both hyperpolarizing and depolarizing GABA(A)-mediated responses as well as pre- and postsynaptic GABA(B)-mediated actions in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. Taurine (10 mM) perfusion induced changes in membrane potential and input resistance that are compatible with GABA(A) receptor activation. Local pressure application of taurine and GABA from a double barrel pipette positioned along the dendritic shaft of pyramidal cells revealed that taurine evoked a very small change of membrane potential and resistance compared with the large changes induced by GABA in these parameters. Moreover, in the presence of GABA(A) antagonists, local application of GABA on the dendrites evoked a GABA(B)-mediated hyperpolarization while taurine did not induce any change. Taurine neither mimicked baclofen inhibitory actions on presynaptic release of glutamate and GABA as judging by the lack of taurine effect on paired-pulse facilitation ratio and slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials, respectively. These results show that taurine mainly activates GABA(A) receptors located on the cell body, indicating therefore that if taurine has any action on the dendrites it will not be mediated by either GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptors activation.

  14. Effects of halothane on GABA(A) receptor kinetics: evidence for slowed agonist unbinding.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Pearce, R A

    2000-02-01

    Many anesthetics, including the volatile agent halothane, prolong the decay of GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs at central synapses. This effect is thought to be a major factor in the production of anesthesia. A variety of different kinetic mechanisms have been proposed for several intravenous agents, but for volatile agents the kinetic mechanisms underlying this change remain unknown. To address this question, we used rapid solution exchange techniques to apply GABA to recombinant GABA(A) receptors (alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2s)) expressed in HEK 293 cells, in the absence and presence of halothane. To differentiate between different microscopic kinetic steps that may be altered by the anesthetic, we studied a variety of measures, including peak concentration-response characteristics, macroscopic desensitization, recovery from desensitization, maximal current activation rates, and responses to the low-affinity agonist taurine. Experimentally observed alterations were compared with predictions based on a kinetic scheme that incorporated two agonist binding steps, and open and desensitized states. We found that, in addition to slowing deactivation after a brief pulse of GABA, halothane increased agonist sensitivity and slowed recovery from desensitization but did not alter macroscopic desensitization or maximal activation rate and only slightly slowed rapid deactivation after taurine application. This pattern of responses was found to be consistent with a reduction in the microscopic agonist unbinding rate (k(off)) but not with changes in channel gating steps, such as the channel opening rate (beta), closing rate (alpha), or microscopic desensitization. We conclude that halothane slows IPSC decay by slowing dissociation of agonist from the receptor.

  15. Synthesis and GABA(A) receptor activity of 2,19-sulfamoyl analogues of allopregnanolone.

    PubMed

    Durán, Fernando J; Edelsztein, Valeria C; Ghini, Alberto A; Rey, Mariana; Coirini, Héctor; Dauban, Philippe; Dodd, Robert H; Burton, Gerardo

    2009-09-15

    The synthesis of new analogues of allopregnanolone with a bridged sulfamidate ring over the beta-face of ring A has been achieved from easily available precursors, using an intramolecular aziridination strategy. The methodology also allows the synthesis of 3alpha-substituted analogues such as the 3alpha-fluoro derivative. GABA(A) receptor activity of the synthetic analogues was evaluated by assaying their effect on the binding of [(3)H]flunitrazepam and [(3)H]muscimol. The 3alpha-hydroxy-2,19-sulfamoyl analogue and its N-benzyl derivative were more active than allopregnanolone for stimulating binding of [(3)H]flunitrazepam. For the binding of [(3)H]muscimol, both synthetic analogues and allopregnanolone stimulated binding to a similar extent, with the N-benzyl derivative exhibiting a higher EC(50). The 3alpha-fluoro derivative was inactive in both assays.

  16. Withdrawal properties of a neuroactive steroid: implications for GABA(A) receptor gene regulation in the brain and anxiety behavior.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sheryl S

    2002-05-01

    Early work in the field established that the 5 alpha-reduced metabolite of progesterone 3 alpha-OH-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone or 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP) is a potent positive modulator of the GABA(A) receptor (GABAR), the receptor mediating the effects of the primary inhibitory transmitter in the brain. This steroid acts in a manner similar to sedative drugs, such as the barbiturates, both in terms of potentiating GABA-induced inhibition in vitro and in behavioral assays, by reducing anxiety and seizure susceptibility. Because sedative compounds exhibit withdrawal properties that result in behavioral hyperexcitability, our laboratory has more recently investigated the effect of prolonged application and rapid removal (i.e. 'withdrawal') of this steroid, administered in vivo to female rats. Withdrawal from 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP produces a state of increased anxiety and lowered seizure threshold, similar to withdrawal from other GABA-modulatory drugs such as the benzodiazepines and alcohol. Hormone withdrawal also produced increases in the alpha 4-containing GABAR, an effect correlated with insensitivity of the GABAR to modulation by the benzodiazepine class of tranquilizers, as would normally occur under control conditions. In addition, changes in intrinsic channel properties, including a marked acceleration in the decay rate was also observed as a result of declining levels of 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP. Such a change would result in less inhibitory total current, and the resulting increase in neuronal excitability could then underlie the observed behavioral excitability following hormone withdrawal. These results suggest that actions of this steroid on a traditional transmitter receptor in the brain lead to alterations in GABAR subunit composition that result in changes in the intrinsic channel properties of the receptor and behavioral excitability. These results may have implications for endogenous fluctuations in this hormone which may accompany premenstrual

  17. GABA(A) receptors in visual and auditory cortex and neural activity changes during basic visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Pengmin; Duncan, Niall W; Wiebking, Christine; Gravel, Paul; Lyttelton, Oliver; Hayes, Dave J; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Kostikov, Alexey; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Reader, Andrew J; Northoff, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have demonstrated that levels of resting γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the visual cortex predict the degree of stimulus-induced activity in the same region. These studies have used the presentation of discrete visual stimulus; the change from closed eyes to open also represents a simple visual stimulus, however, and has been shown to induce changes in local brain activity and in functional connectivity between regions. We thus aimed to investigate the role of the GABA system, specifically GABA(A) receptors, in the changes in brain activity between the eyes closed (EC) and eyes open (EO) state in order to provide detail at the receptor level to complement previous studies of GABA concentrations. We conducted an fMRI study involving two different modes of the change from EC to EO: an EO and EC block design, allowing the modeling of the haemodynamic response, followed by longer periods of EC and EO to allow the measuring of functional connectivity. The same subjects also underwent [(18)F]Flumazenil PET to measure GABA(A) receptor binding potentials. It was demonstrated that the local-to-global ratio of GABA(A) receptor binding potential in the visual cortex predicted the degree of changes in neural activity from EC to EO. This same relationship was also shown in the auditory cortex. Furthermore, the local-to-global ratio of GABA(A) receptor binding potential in the visual cortex also predicted the change in functional connectivity between the visual and auditory cortex from EC to EO. These findings contribute to our understanding of the role of GABA(A) receptors in stimulus-induced neural activity in local regions and in inter-regional functional connectivity.

  18. Pharmacology of the beta-carboline FG-7,142, a partial inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine allosteric site of the GABA A receptor: neurochemical, neurophysiological, and behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew K; Lowry, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Given the well-established role of benzodiazepines in treating anxiety disorders, beta-carbolines, spanning a spectrum from full agonists to full inverse agonists at the benzodiazepine allosteric site for the GABA(A) receptor, can provide valuable insight into the neural mechanisms underlying anxiety-related physiology and behavior. FG-7,142 is a partial inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine allosteric site with its highest affinity for the alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A) receptor, although it is not selective. FG-7,142 also has its highest efficacy for modulation of GABA-induced chloride flux mediated at the alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A) receptor. FG-7,142 activates a recognized anxiety-related neural network and interacts with serotonergic, dopaminergic, cholinergic, and noradrenergic modulatory systems within that network. FG-7,142 has been shown to induce anxiety-related behavioral and physiological responses in a variety of experimental paradigms across numerous mammalian and non-mammalian species, including humans. FG-7,142 has proconflict actions across anxiety-related behavioral paradigms, modulates attentional processes, and increases cardioacceleratory sympathetic reactivity and neuroendocrine reactivity. Both acute and chronic FG-7,142 treatment are proconvulsive, upregulate cortical adrenoreceptors, decrease subsequent actions of GABA and beta-carboline agonists, and increase the effectiveness of subsequent GABA(A) receptor antagonists and beta-carboline inverse agonists. FG-7,142, as a partial inverse agonist, can help to elucidate individual components of full agonism of benzodiazepine binding sites and may serve to identify the specific GABA(A) receptor subtypes involved in specific behavioral and physiological responses.

  19. GABA-A and GABA-B receptors in the cuneate nucleus of the rat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Orviz, P; Cecchini, B G; Andrés-Trelles, F

    1986-09-01

    Electric stimulation of the rat forepaw evokes a negative potential (N-wave) at the ipsilateral cuneate nucleus. The responses of the N-wave to microiontophoretically applied GABA agonists and antagonists have been studied. Applications of GABA-A agonists (3-amino-propanesulfonic acid and muscimol) reduce the amplitude of the N-wave. This effect decreases during prolonged application, suggesting a desensitization of GABA-A receptors. In addition the effect of muscimol is reduced by (-)-bicuculline methiodide. Baclofen (a GABA-B agonist) also depresses the N-wave but its action lasts longer, is less reversible, shows no desensitization and is not blocked by (-)-bicuculline methiodide. The different responses of the N-wave to GABA-A and GABA-B agonists are compatible with the existence of different types of functional receptors for them in the cuneate nucleus of the rat. The receptors activated by muscimol (GABA-A) are clearly not the same as the ones activated by baclofen (conceivably GABA-B).

  20. Ethanol, not metabolized in brain, significantly reduces brain metabolism, probably via specific GABA(A) receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Caroline D.; Davidson, Joanne E.; Maher, Anthony D.; Rowlands, Benjamin D.; Kashem, Mohammed A.; Nasrallah, Fatima A.; Rallapalli, Sundari K.; Cook, James M; Balcar, Vladimir J.

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol is a known neuromodulatory agent with reported actions at a range of neurotransmitter receptors. Here, we used an indirect approach, measuring the effect of alcohol on metabolism of [3-13C]pyruvate in the adult Guinea pig brain cortical tissue slice and comparing the outcomes to those from a library of ligands active in the GABAergic system as well as studying the metabolic fate of [1,2-13C]ethanol. Ethanol (10, 30 and 60 mM) significantly reduced metabolic flux into all measured isotopomers and reduced all metabolic pool sizes. The metabolic profiles of these three concentrations of ethanol were similar and clustered with that of the α4β3δ positive allosteric modulator DS2 (4-Chloro-N-[2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[1,2a]-pyridin-3-yl]benzamide). Ethanol at a very low concentration (0.1 mM) produced a metabolic profile which clustered with those from inhibitors of GABA uptake, and ligands showing affinity for α5, and to a lesser extent, α1-containing GABA(A)R. There was no measureable metabolism of [1,2-13C]ethanol with no significant incorporation of 13C from [1,2-13C]ethanol into any measured metabolite above natural abundance, although there were measurable effects on total metabolite sizes similar to those seen with unlabeled ethanol. The reduction in metabolism seen in the presence of ethanol is therefore likely to be due to its actions at neurotransmitter receptors, particularly α4β3δ receptors, and not because ethanol is substituting as a substrate or because of the effects of ethanol catabolites acetaldehyde or acetate. We suggest that the stimulatory effects of very low concentrations of ethanol are due to release of GABA via GAT1 and the subsequent interaction of this GABA with local α5-containing, and to a lesser extent, α1-containing GABA(A)R. PMID:24313287

  1. The effects of agonists of ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors on learning.

    PubMed

    Zyablitseva, Evgeniya A; Kositsyn, Nikolay S; Shul'gina, Galina I

    2009-05-01

    The research described here investigates the role played by inhibitory processes in the discriminations made by the nervous system of humans and animals between familiar and unfamiliar and significant and nonsignificant events. This research compared the effects of two inhibitory mediators of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA): 1) phenibut, a nonselective agonist of ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors and 2) gaboxadol a selective agonist of ionotropic GABA(A) receptors on the process of developing active defensive and inhibitory conditioned reflexes in alert non-immobilized rabbits. It was found that phenibut, but not gaboxadol, accelerates the development of defensive reflexes at an early stage of conditioning. Both phenibut and gaboxadol facilitate the development of conditioned inhibition, but the effect of gaboxadol occurs at later stages of conditioning and is less stable than that of phenibut. The earlier and more stable effects of phenibut, as compared to gaboxadol, on storage in memory of the inhibitory significance of a stimulus may occur because GABA(B) receptors play the dominant role in the development of internal inhibition during an early stage of conditioning. On the other hand this may occur because the participation of both GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors are essential to the process. We discuss the polyfunctionality of GABA receptors as a function of their structure and the positions of the relevant neurons in the brain as this factor can affect regulation of various types of psychological processes.

  2. The GABA(A) receptor RDL acts in peptidergic PDF neurons to promote sleep in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chung, Brian Y; Kilman, Valerie L; Keath, J Russel; Pitman, Jena L; Allada, Ravi

    2009-03-10

    Sleep is regulated by a circadian clock that times sleep and wake to specific times of day and a homeostat that drives sleep as a function of prior wakefulness. To analyze the role of the circadian clock, we have used the fruit fly Drosophila. Flies display the core behavioral features of sleep, including relative immobility, elevated arousal thresholds, and homeostatic regulation. We assessed sleep-wake modulation by a core set of circadian pacemaker neurons that express the neuropeptide PDF. We find that disruption of PDF function increases sleep during the late night in light:dark and the first subjective day of constant darkness. Flies deploy genetic and neurotransmitter pathways to regulate sleep that are similar to those of their mammalian counterparts, including GABA. We find that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the GABA(A) receptor gene, Resistant to dieldrin (Rdl), in PDF neurons reduces sleep, consistent with a role for GABA in inhibiting PDF neuron function. Patch-clamp electrophysiology reveals GABA-activated picrotoxin-sensitive chloride currents on PDF+ neurons. In addition, RDL is detectable most strongly on the large subset of PDF+ pacemaker neurons. These results suggest that GABAergic inhibition of arousal-promoting PDF neurons is an important mode of sleep-wake regulation in vivo.

  3. Loss of functional GABA(A) receptors in the Alzheimer diseased brain.

    PubMed

    Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2012-06-19

    The cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission systems are known to be severely disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD). GABAergic neurotransmission, in contrast, is generally thought to be well preserved. Evidence from animal models and human postmortem tissue suggest GABAergic remodeling in the AD brain. Nevertheless, there is no information on changes, if any, in the electrophysiological properties of human native GABA receptors as a consequence of AD. To gain such information, we have microtransplanted cell membranes, isolated from temporal cortices of control and AD brains, into Xenopus oocytes, and recorded the electrophysiological activity of the transplanted GABA receptors. We found an age-dependent reduction of GABA currents in the AD brain. This reduction was larger when the AD membranes were obtained from younger subjects. We also found that GABA currents from AD brains have a faster rate of desensitization than those from non-AD brains. Furthermore, GABA receptors from AD brains were slightly, but significantly, less sensitive to GABA than receptors from non-AD brains. The reduction of GABA currents in AD was associated with reductions of mRNA and protein of the principal GABA receptor subunits normally present in the temporal cortex. Pairwise analysis of the transcripts within control and AD groups and analyses of the proportion of GABA receptor subunits revealed down-regulation of α1 and γ2 subunits in AD. In contrast, the proportions of α2, β1, and γ1 transcripts were up-regulated in the AD brains. Our data support a functional remodeling of GABAergic neurotransmission in the human AD brain.

  4. Low concentrations of ethanol do not affect radioligand binding to the delta-subunit-containing GABAA receptors in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ashok K; Marutha Ravindran, C R; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2007-08-24

    In the present study, we investigated the co-localization pattern of the delta subunit with other subunits of GABA(A) receptors in the rat brain using immunoprecipitation and Western blotting techniques. Furthermore, we investigated whether low concentrations of ethanol affect the delta-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptor assemblies in the rat brain using radioligand binding to the rat brain membrane homogenates as well as to the immunoprecipitated receptor assemblies. Our results revealed that delta subunit is not co-localized with gamma(2) subunit but it is associated with the alpha(1), alpha(4) or alpha(6), beta(2) and/or beta(3) subunit(s) of GABA(A) receptors in the rat brain. Ethanol (1-50 mM) neither affected [(3)H]muscimol (3 nM) binding nor diazepam-insensitive [(3)H]Ro 15-4513 (2 nM) binding in the rat cerebellum and cerebral cortex membranes. However, a higher concentration of ethanol (500 mM) inhibited the binding of these radioligands to the GABA(A) receptors partially in the rat cerebellum and cerebral cortex. Similarly, ethanol (up to 50 mM) did not affect [(3)H]muscimol (15 nM) binding to the immunoprecipitated delta-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptor assemblies in the rat cerebellum and hippocampus but it inhibited the binding partially at a higher concentration (500 mM). These results suggest that the native delta-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors do not play a major role in the pharmacology of clinically relevant low concentrations of ethanol.

  5. Depolarising and hyperpolarising actions of GABA(A) receptor activation on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones: towards an emerging consensus.

    PubMed

    Herbison, A E; Moenter, S M

    2011-07-01

    The gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones represent the final output neurones of a complex neuronal network that controls fertility. It is now appreciated that GABAergic neurones within this network provide an important regulatory influence on GnRH neurones. However, the consequences of direct GABA(A) receptor activation on adult GnRH neurones have been controversial for nearly a decade now, with both hyperpolarising and depolarising effects being reported. This review provides: (i) an overview of GABA(A) receptor function and its investigation using electrophysiological approaches and (ii) re-examines the past and present results relating to GABAergic regulation of the GnRH neurone, with a focus on mouse brain slice data. Although it remains difficult to reconcile the results of the early studies, there is a growing consensus that GABA can act through the GABA(A) receptor to exert both depolarising and hyperpolarising effects on GnRH neurones. The most recent studies examining the effects of endogenous GABA release on GnRH neurones indicate that the predominant action is that of excitation. However, we are still far from a complete understanding of the effects of GABA(A) receptor activation upon GnRH neurones. We argue that this will require not only a better understanding of chloride ion homeostasis in individual GnRH neurones, and within subcellular compartments of the GnRH neurone, but also a more integrative view of how multiple neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and intrinsic conductances act together to regulate the activity of these important cells. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. GABA-A Receptor Modulation and Anticonvulsant, Anxiolytic, and Antidepressant Activities of Constituents from Artemisia indica Linn

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imran; Karim, Nasiara; Ahmad, Waqar; Abdelhalim, Abeer; Chebib, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Artemisia indica, also known as “Mugwort,” has been widely used in traditional medicines. However, few studies have investigated the effects of nonvolatile components of Artemisia indica on central nervous system's function. Fractionation of Artemisia indica led to the isolation of carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid which were evaluated for their effects on GABA-A receptors in electrophysiological studies in Xenopus oocytes and were subsequently investigated in mouse models of acute toxicity, convulsions (pentylenetetrazole induced seizures), depression (tail suspension and forced swim tests), and anxiety (elevated plus maze and light/dark box paradigms). Carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid were found to be positive modulators of α1β2γ2L GABA-A receptors and the modulation was antagonized by flumazenil. Carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid were found to be devoid of any signs of acute toxicity (50–200 mg/kg) but elicited anticonvulsant, antidepressant, and anxiolytic activities. Thus carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid demonstrated CNS activity in mouse models of anticonvulsant, antidepressant, and anxiolysis. The anxiolytic activity of all three compounds was ameliorated by flumazenil suggesting a mode of action via the benzodiazepine binding site of GABA-A receptors. PMID:27143980

  7. Antiplasmodial and GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding activities of five plants used in traditional medicine in Mali, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Bah, Sekou; Jäger, Anna K; Adsersen, Anne; Diallo, Drissa; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2007-04-04

    Extracts of five medicinal plants: Boscia angustifolia, Cissus quadrangularis, Securidaca longipedunculata, Stylosanthes erecta and Trichilia emetica, used traditionally in Malian traditional medicine were screened for in vitro antiplasmodial activity and GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding activity. Four extracts showed significant antiplasmodial activities, with the dichloromethane extract of leaf of Securidaca longipedunculata being the most active (IC(50) of 7 microg/ml [95% CI: 5-9]). The dichloromethane extract of leaf of Trichilia emetica, in addition to its antiplasmodial activity (IC(50): 12 microg/ml [95% CI: 12-14]), exhibited a good binding activity to the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor, while water and methanol extracts of the same plant did not show any activity. A strong GABA(A)-receptor complex binding activity was observed in the methanol extract of aerial part of Stylosanthes erecta. The results in this study justify some of the traditional indications of the plants investigated and may thus be candidates for Improved Traditional Medicines in Mali.

  8. Sex-specific differences in GABA(A) -benzodiazepine receptor availability: relationship with sensitivity to pain and tobacco smoking craving.

    PubMed

    Esterlis, Irina; McKee, Sherry A; Kirk, Kathryne; Lee, Dianne; Bois, Frederic; Stiklus, Stephanie M; Seibyl, John P; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Staley, Julie K; Cosgrove, Kelly P

    2013-03-01

    Sex differences exist in tobacco smoking behaviors. Nicotine, the primary addictive ingredient in tobacco smoke, indirectly affects γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) function. Previous studies reported sex-by-smoking interactions in brain GABA levels. The goal of the present study was to evaluate if there is a sex-by-smoking interaction at the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptors (GABA(A)-BZRs), as well as relationships between GABA(A)-BZR availability and behavioral variables before and after 1 week of smoking cessation. Twenty-six women (8 non-smokers, age 36.0 ± 13.4 years; 19 smokers, age 34.6 ± 8.9 years) and 25 men (8 non-smokers, age 37.9 ± 13.8 years; 17 smokers, 34.1 ± 12.4 years) were imaged using [123I]iomazenil and single-photon emission computed tomography. Smokers were imaged at baseline 7 hours after the last cigarette. A significantly great number of men were able to abstain from smoking for 1 week (P = 0.003). There were no significant differences in nicotine dependence and cigarette craving, mood or pain sensitivity between male and female smokers. There was a significant effect of gender across all brain regions (frontal, parietal, anterior cingulate, temporal and occipital cortices, and cerebellum; P < 0.05), with all women (smokers and non-smokers combined) having a higher GABA(A)-BZR availability than all men. There was a negative correlation between GABA(A)-BZR availability and craving (P ≤ 0.02) and pain sensitivity (P = 0.04) in female smokers but not male smokers. This study provides further evidence of a sex-specific regulation of GABA(A)-BZR availability in humans and demonstrates the potential for GABA(A)-BZRs to mediate tobacco smoking craving and pain symptoms differentially in female and male smokers. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. GABA(A) receptors implicated in REM sleep control express a benzodiazepine binding site.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tin Quang; Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2013-08-21

    It has been reported that non-subtype-selective GABAA receptor antagonists injected into the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of rats induced long-lasting increases in REM sleep. Characteristics of these REM sleep increases were identical to those resulting from injection of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. Both actions were blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, atropine. Microdialysis of GABAA receptor antagonists into the PnO resulted in increased acetylcholine levels. These findings were consistent with GABAA receptor antagonists disinhibiting acetylcholine release in the PnO to result in an acetylcholine-mediated REM sleep induction. Direct evidence has been lacking for localization in the PnO of the specific GABAA receptor-subtypes mediating the REM sleep effects. Here, we demonstrated a dose-related, long-lasting increase in REM sleep following injection (60 nl) in the PnO of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline (DMCM, 10(-2)M). REM sleep increases were greater and more consistently produced than with the non-selective antagonist gabazine, and both were blocked by atropine. Fluorescence immunohistochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy, colocalized in PnO vesicular acetylcholine transporter, a presynaptic marker of cholinergic boutons, with the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor. These data provide support for the direct action of GABA on mechanisms of acetylcholine release in the PnO. The presence of the γ2 subunit at this locus and the REM sleep induction by DMCM are consistent with binding of benzodiazepines by a GABAA receptor-subtype in control of REM sleep.

  10. Striatal Serotonin 2C receptors decrease nigrostriatal dopamine release by increasing GABA-A receptor tone in the substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    Burke, M.V.; Nocjar, C.; Sonneborn, A.J.; McCreary, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Drugs acting at the serotonin-2C (5-HT2C) receptor subtype have shown promise as therapeutics in multiple syndromes including obesity, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. While it is established that 5-HT2C receptor stimulation inhibits DA release, the neural circuits and the localization of the relevant 5-HT2C receptors remain unknown. The present study used dual-probe in vivo microdialysis to investigate the relative contributions of 5-HT2C receptors localized in the rat substantia nigra (SN) and caudate-putamen (CP) in the control of nigrostriatal DA release. Systemic administration (3.0 mg/kg) of the 5-HT2C receptor selective agonist Ro 60-0175 [(α S )-6-Chloro-5-fluoro-α-methyl-1 H-indole-1-ethanamine fumarate] decreased, whereas intrastriatal infusions of the selective 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242084 [6-Chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1 H-indole-1-carboxyamide; 1.0 µM] increased, basal DA in the CP. Depending on the site within the SN pars reticulata (SNpr), infusions of SB 242084 had more modest but significant effects. Moreover, infusions of the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol (10 µM) into the SNpr completely reversed the increases in striatal DA release produced by intrastriatal infusions of SB 242084. These findings suggest a role for 5-HT2C receptors regulating striatal DA release that is highly localized. 5-HT2C receptors localized in the striatum may represent a primary site of action that is mediated by actions on GABAergic activity in the SN. PMID:25073477

  11. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Experimental Approach Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9′ serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Key Results Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose–response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9′S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Conclusions and Implications Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. PMID:24206220

  12. Early continuous white noise exposure alters l-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor subunit glutamate receptor 2 and gamma-aminobutyric acid type a receptor subunit beta3 protein expression in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinghong; Yu, Liping; Zhang, Jiping; Cai, Rui; Sun, Xinde

    2010-02-15

    Auditory experience during the postnatal critical period is essential for the normal maturation of auditory function. Previous studies have shown that rearing infant rat pups under conditions of continuous moderate-level noise delayed the emergence of adult-like topographic representational order and the refinement of response selectivity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) beyond normal developmental benchmarks and indefinitely blocked the closure of a brief, critical-period window. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of these physiological changes after noise rearing, we studied expression of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 and GABA(A) receptor subunit beta3 in the auditory cortex after noise rearing. Our results show that continuous moderate-level noise rearing during the early stages of development decreases the expression levels of GluR2 and GABA(A)beta3. Furthermore, noise rearing also induced a significant decrease in the level of GABA(A) receptors relative to AMPA receptors. However, in adult rats, noise rearing did not have significant effects on GluR2 and GABA(A)beta3 expression or the ratio between the two units. These changes could have a role in the cellular mechanisms involved in the delayed maturation of auditory receptive field structure and topographic organization of A1 after noise rearing.

  13. Chronic anabolic-androgenic steroid treatment affects brain GABA(A) receptor-gated chloride ion transport.

    PubMed

    Bitran, D; Hilvers, R J; Frye, C A; Erskine, M S

    1996-01-01

    Previous research in this laboratory has shown that chronic treatment of adult male rats with an anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) produced anxiolytic behavior and increased the functional response of cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptors. The experiments reported here were aimed at further characterizing the effect of chronic AAS exposure on cerebral cortical GABA(A) receptors. Adult male rats were injected with dianabol (1,4-androstadien-17alpha-methyl-17beta-ol-3-one; 10 mg/kg/day, SC) for 4 weeks. A significant decrease in ventral prostate gland weight was found after 2 weeks of dianabol, and returned to control levels 3 and 10 days after steroid discontinuation. Testicular weights decreased throughout the treatment period but reached statistical significance only during the withdrawal period. Serum 3alpha-androstanediol level was marginally increased afer 2 weeks of dianabol injection, and was significantly decreased at 3 and 10 days after withdrawal. GABA-stimulated 36chloride (Cl-) influx in cortical synaptoneurosomes was increased in animals treated with dianabol for 2 and 4 weeks, and remained elevated 3 days after dianabol withdrawal, returning to control levels at withdrawal day 10. The increase in receptor efficacy was associated with a transient increase in receptor sensitivity (inverse of EC50), apparent after 2 weeks of AAS treatment and at withdrawal day 3. In a follow-up experiment, metabolites of dianabol were tested for the in vitro efficacy in potentiating GABA-stimulated Cl- transport. Only 3alpha-androstanedial and androsterone were found to have potent stimulatory effects. The 3beta-reduced metabolites were inactive, as were metabolites that contained a methyl group at the 17alpha position. These results point to significant facilitative effects of dianabol treatment on brain GABA(A) receptors via the metabolic formation of neuroactive steroids.

  14. RDX binds to the GABA(A) receptor-convulsant site and blocks GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents in the amygdala: a mechanism for RDX-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Williams, Larry R; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Qashu, Felicia; Finne, Huckelberry; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr; Bannon, Desmond I; Braga, Maria F M

    2011-03-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a high-energy, trinitrated cyclic compound that has been used worldwide since World War II as an explosive in both military and civilian applications. RDX can be released in the environment by way of waste streams generated during the manufacture, use, and disposal of RDX-containing munitions and can leach into groundwater from unexploded munitions found on training ranges. For > 60 years, it has been known that exposure to high doses of RDX causes generalized seizures, but the mechanism has remained unknown. We investigated the mechanism by which RDX induces seizures. By screening the affinity of RDX for a number of neurotransmitter receptors, we found that RDX binds exclusively to the picrotoxin convulsant site of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) ionophore. Whole-cell in vitro recordings in the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) showed that RDX reduces the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents and the amplitude of GABA-evoked postsynaptic currents. In extracellular field recordings from the BLA, RDX induced prolonged, seizure-like neuronal discharges. These results suggest that binding to the GABA(A) receptor convulsant site is the primary mechanism of seizure induction by RDX and that reduction of GABAergic inhibitory transmission in the amygdala is involved in the generation of RDX-induced seizures. Knowledge of the molecular site and the mechanism of RDX action with respect to seizure induction can guide therapeutic strategies, allow more accurate development of safe thresholds for exposures, and help prevent the development of new explosives or other munitions that could pose similar health risks.

  15. Role of the amygdala GABA-A receptors in ACPA-induced deficits during conditioned fear learning.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Roghani, Farnaz; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-04-04

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is a key structure for the emotional processing and storage of memories associated with emotional events, especially fear. On the other hand, endocannabinoids and CB1 receptors play a key role in learning and memory partly through long-term synaptic depression of GABAergic synapses in the BLA. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of GABA-A receptor agonist and antagonist in the fear-related memory acquisition deficits induced by ACPA (a selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist). This study used context and tone fear conditioning paradigms to assess fear-related memory in male NMRI mice. Our results showed that the pre-training intraperitoneal administration of ACPA (0.5mg/kg) or (0.1 and 0.5mg/kg) decreased the percentage of freezing time in the contextual and tone fear conditioning, respectively. This indicated an impaired context- or tone-dependent fear memory acquisition. Moreover, the pre-training intra-BLA microinjection of GABA-A receptor agonist, muscimol, at 0.05 and 0.5μg/mouse impaired context-dependent fear memory, while the same doses of GABA-A antagonist, bicuculline, impaired tone-dependent fear memory. However, a subthreshold dose of muscimol or bicuculline increased the effect of ACPA at 0.1 and 0.5 or 0.05mg/kg on context- or tone-dependent fear memory, respectively. In addition, bicuculline at the lower dose increased the ACPA response on locomotor activity compared to its respective group. Such findings highlighted an interaction between BLA GABAergic and cannabinoidergic systems during the acquisition phase of conditioned fear memories.

  16. A novel GABA(A) alpha 5 receptor inhibitor with therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Ling, István; Mihalik, Balázs; Etherington, Lori-An; Kapus, Gábor; Pálvölgyi, Adrienn; Gigler, Gábor; Kertész, Szabolcs; Gaál, Attila; Pallagi, Katalin; Kiricsi, Péter; Szabó, Éva; Szénási, Gábor; Papp, Lilla; Hársing, László G; Lévay, György; Spedding, Michael; Lambert, Jeremy J; Belelli, Delia; Barkóczy, József; Volk, Balázs; Simig, Gyula; Gacsályi, István; Antoni, Ferenc A

    2015-10-05

    Novel 2,3-benzodiazepine and related isoquinoline derivatives, substituted at position 1 with a 2-benzothiophenyl moiety, were synthesized to produce compounds that potently inhibited the action of GABA on heterologously expressed GABAA receptors containing the alpha 5 subunit (GABAA α5), with no apparent affinity for the benzodiazepine site. Substitutions of the benzothiophene moiety at position 4 led to compounds with drug-like properties that were putative inhibitors of extra-synaptic GABAA α5 receptors and had substantial blood-brain barrier permeability. Initial characterization in vivo showed that 8-methyl-5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-1-benzothiophen-2-yl]-1,9-dihydro-2H-[1,3]oxazolo[4,5-h][2,3]benzodiazepin-2-one was devoid of sedative, pro-convulsive or motor side-effects, and enhanced the performance of rats in the object recognition test. In summary, we have discovered a first-in-class GABA-site inhibitor of extra-synaptic GABAA α5 receptors that has promising drug-like properties and warrants further development.

  17. Interaction between taurine and GABA(A)/glycine receptors in neurons of the rat anteroventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Song, Ning-Ying; Shi, Hai-Bo; Li, Chun-Yan; Yin, Shan-Kai

    2012-09-07

    Taurine, one of the most abundant endogenous amino acids in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), is involved in neural development and many physiological functions. In this study, the interaction between taurine and GABA(A)/glycine receptors was investigated in young rat (P13-P15) anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) neurons using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. We found that taurine at low (0.1mM) and high (1mM) concentrations activated both GABA(A) and glycine receptors, but not AMPA and NMDA receptors. The reversal potentials of taurine-, GABA- or glycine-evoked currents were close to the expected chloride equilibrium potential, indicating that receptors activated by these agonists were mediating chloride conductance. Moreover, our results showed that the currents activated by co-application of GABA and glycine were cross-inhibitive. Sequential application of GABA and glycine or vice versa also reduced the glycine or GABA evoked currents. There was no cross-inhibition when taurine and GABA or taurine and glycine were applied simultaneously, but the response was larger than that evoked by GABA or glycine alone. These results suggest that taurine can serve as a neuromodulator to strengthen GABAergic and glycinergic neurotransmission in the rat AVCN.

  18. Snake neurotoxin α-bungarotoxin is an antagonist at native GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Saad; Mortensen, Martin; Smart, Trevor G

    2015-06-01

    The snake neurotoxin α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgtx) is a competitive antagonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and is widely used to study their function and cell-surface expression. Increasingly, α-Bgtx is also used as an imaging tool for fluorophore-labelling studies, and given the structural conservation within the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel family, we assessed whether α-Bgtx could bind to recombinant and native γ-aminobutyric type-A receptors (GABAARs). Applying fluorophore-linked α-Bgtx to recombinant αxβ1/2γ2 GABAARs expressed in HEK-293 cells enabled clear cell-surface labelling of α2β1/2γ2 contrasting with the weaker staining of α1/4β1/2γ2, and no labelling for α3/5/6β1/2γ2. The labelling of α2β2γ2 was abolished by bicuculline, a competitive antagonist at GABAARs, and by d-tubocurarine (d-Tc), which acts in a similar manner at nAChRs and GABAARs. Labelling by α-Bgtx was also reduced by GABA, suggesting that the GABA binding site at the receptor β-α subunit interface forms part of the α-Bgtx binding site. Using whole-cell recording, high concentrations of α-Bgtx (20 μM) inhibited GABA-activated currents at all αxβ2γ2 receptors examined, but at lower concentrations (5 μM), α-Bgtx was selective for α2β2γ2. Using α-Bgtx, at low concentrations, permitted the selective inhibition of α2 subunit-containing GABAARs in hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells, reducing synaptic current amplitudes without affecting the GABA-mediated tonic current. In conclusion, α-Bgtx can act as an inhibitor at recombinant and native GABAARs and may be used as a selective tool to inhibit phasic but not tonic currents in the hippocampus.

  19. Recruitment of GABA(A) receptors and fearfulness in chicks: modulation by systemic insulin and/or epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Cid, Mariana Paula; Toledo, Carolina Maribel; Salvatierra, Nancy Alicia

    2013-02-01

    One-day-old chicks were individually assessed on their latency to peck pebbles, and categorized as low latency (LL) or high latency (HL) according to fear. Interactions between acute stress and systemic insulin and epinephrine on GABA(A) receptor density in the forebrain were studied. At 10 days of life, LL and HL chicks were intraperitoneally injected with insulin, epinephrine or saline, and immediately after stressed by partial water immersion for 15 min and killed by decapitation. Forebrains were dissected and the GABA(A) receptor density was measured ex vivo by the (3)[H]-flunitrazepam binding assay in synaptosomes. In non-stressed chicks, insulin (non-hypoglycemic dose) at 2.50 IU/kg of body weight incremented the Bmax by 40.53% in the HL chicks compared to saline group whereas no significant differences were observed between individuals in the LL subpopulation. Additionally, insulin increased the Bmax (23.48%) in the HL group with respect to the LL ones, indicating that the insulin responses were different according to the anxiety of each category. Epinephrine administration (0.25 and 0.50mg/kg) incremented the Bmax in non-stressed chicks, in the LL group by about 37% and 33%, respectively, compared to ones injected with saline. In the stressed chicks, 0.25mg/kg bw epinephrine increased the Bmax significantly in the HL group by about 24% compared to saline, suggesting that the effect of epinephrine was only observed in the HL group under acute stress conditions. Similarly, the same epinephrine doses co-administered with insulin increased the receptor density in both subpopulations and also showed that the highest dose of epinephrine did not further increase the maximum density of GABA(A)R in HL chicks. These results suggest that systemic epinephrine, perhaps by evoking central norepinephrine release, modulated the increase in the forebrain GABA(A) receptor recruitment induced by both insulin and stress in different ways depending on the subpopulation

  20. Pharmacological properties of GABAA receptors in rat hypothalamic neurons expressing the epsilon-subunit.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Olga A; Andreeva, Nadja; Garret, Maurice; Scherer, Annette; Haas, Helmut L

    2005-01-05

    The pharmacological properties and functional role of native GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) were investigated in rat hypothalamic neurons expressing the epsilon-subunit with the help of whole-cell patch-clamp recording and single-cell reverse transcription-PCR. Two cell groups were identified: histaminergic tuberomamillary and orexinergic/hypocretinergic neurons. Approximately 25% of histaminergic and 70% of orexinergic neurons contained mRNA encoding for the epsilon-subunit. Double-immunofluorescence staining revealed a somatic localization of this protein in these two neuronal groups. Constitutive activity, diazepam modulation, fast desensitization of maximal currents, and activation by propofol (6-98 microm) of GABA(A)Rs did not correlate with epsilon-subunit expression. Propofol at 3-12 microm potentiated GABA-mediated currents similarly in all neurons. However, noise variance analysis of GABA-mediated currents enhanced by propofol revealed a significant difference between epsilon-positive and epsilon-negative neurons. The former displayed no difference between control and potentiated responses, and, in the latter, noise was decreased in the presence of propofol. Spontaneous IPSCs recorded in cultured hypothalamic neurons were prolonged in the presence of propofol in all epsilon-negative neurons, whereas propofol-resistant IPSCs were recorded in epsilon-positive cells. The infrequent expression of the epsilon-subunit may be a key factor in the recently discovered central role of the tuberomamillary nucleus in anesthesia.

  1. cDNA cloning and expression of a gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor epsilon-subunit in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Moragues, N; Ciofi, P; Lafon, P; Odessa, M F; Tramu, G; Garret, M

    2000-12-01

    A cDNA encoding a GABA(A) receptor subunit was isolated from rat brain. The predicted protein is 70% identical to the human epsilon-subunit. It was recently reported [Sinkkonen et al. (2000), J. Neurosci., 20, 3588-3595] that the rodent epsilon-subunit mRNA encoded an additional sequence ( approximately 400 residues). We provide evidence that human and rat epsilon-subunit are similar in size. The distribution of cells expressing the GABA(A) epsilon-subunit was examined in the rat brain. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that epsilon-subunit mRNA is expressed by neurons located in septal and preoptic areas, as well as in various hypothalamic nuclei, including paraventricular, arcuate, dorsomedial and medial tuberal nuclei. The mRNA was also detected in major neuronal groups with broad-range influence, such as the cholinergic (basal nucleus), dopaminergic (substantia nigra compacta), serotonergic (raphe nuclei), and noradrenergic (locus coeruleus) systems. Immunohistochemistry using an affinity-purified antiserum directed towards the N-terminal sequence unique to the rat epsilon-subunit revealed the presence of epsilon-subunit immunoreactivity over the somatodendritic domain of neurons with a distribution closely matching that of mRNA-expressing cells. Moreover, using in situ hybridization, alpha3, theta and epsilon GABA(A) subunit mRNAs were all detected with an overlapping distribution in neurons of the dorsal raphe and the locus coeruleus. Our results suggest that novel GABA(A) receptors may regulate, neuroendocrine and modulatory systems in the brain.

  2. GABAA receptor epsilon subunit expression in identified peptidergic neurons of the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Moragues, Nathalie; Ciofi, Philippe; Lafon, Pierrette; Tramu, Gérard; Garret, Maurice

    2003-03-28

    Dual-labeling immunohistochemical or in situ hybridization studies for the recently cloned epsilon-subunit and several neuropeptides were performed in the rat hypothalamus. We revealed an extensive co-expression (>90%) with hypocretin (Hcrt), oxytocin (OT), the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) peptides, whereas occasional co-expression (<10%) with cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) was found. Our results suggest that novel GABA(A) receptor subtypes comprising epsilon-subunit are important for metabolic and neuroendocrine functions.

  3. Positive feedback regulation between gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor signaling and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release in developing neurons.

    PubMed

    Porcher, Christophe; Hatchett, Caroline; Longbottom, Rebecca E; McAinch, Kristina; Sihra, Talvinder S; Moss, Stephen J; Thomson, Alex M; Jovanovic, Jasmina N

    2011-06-17

    During the early development of the nervous system, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated signaling parallels the neurotrophin/tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk)-dependent signaling in controlling a number of processes from cell proliferation and migration, via dendritic and axonal outgrowth, to synapse formation and plasticity. Here we present the first evidence that these two signaling systems regulate each other through a complex positive feedback mechanism. We first demonstrate that GABA(A)R activation leads to an increase in the cell surface expression of these receptors in cultured embryonic cerebrocortical neurons, specifically at the stage when this activity causes depolarization of the plasma membrane and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. We further demonstrate that GABA(A)R activity triggers release of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which, in turn by activating TrkB receptors, mediates the observed increase in cell surface expression of GABA(A)Rs. This BDNF/TrkB-dependent increase in surface levels of GABA(A)Rs requires the activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) and does not involve the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activity. The increase in GABA(A)R surface levels occurs due to an inhibition of the receptor endocytosis by BDNF, whereas the receptor reinsertion into the plasma membrane remains unaltered. Thus, GABA(A)R activity is a potent regulator of the BDNF release during neuronal development, and at the same time, it is strongly enhanced by the activity of the BDNF/TrkB/PI3K/PKC signaling pathway.

  4. Specific targeting of the GABA-A receptor α5 subtype by a selective inverse agonist restores cognitive deficits in Down syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Braudeau, J; Delatour, B; Duchon, A; Pereira, P Lopes; Dauphinot, L; de Chaumont, F; Olivo-Marin, J-C; Dodd, RH; Hérault, Y; Potier, M-C

    2011-01-01

    An imbalance between inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission has been proposed to contribute to altered brain function in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and accordingly treatment with GABA-A antagonists can efficiently restore cognitive functions of Ts65Dn mice, a genetic model for DS. However, GABA-A antagonists are also convulsant which preclude their use for therapeutic intervention in DS individuals. Here, we have evaluated safer strategies to release GABAergic inhibition using a GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist selective for the α5-subtype (α5IA). We demonstrate that α5IA restores learning and memory functions of Ts65Dn mice in the novel-object recognition and in the Morris water maze tasks. Furthermore, we show that following behavioural stimulation, α5IA enhances learning-evoked immediate early gene products in specific brain regions involved in cognition. Importantly, acute and chronic treatments with α5IA do not induce any convulsant or anxiogenic effects that are associated with GABA-A antagonists or non-selective inverse agonists of the GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptors. Finally, chronic treatment with α5IA did not induce histological alterations in the brain, liver and kidney of mice. Our results suggest that non-convulsant α5-selective GABA-A inverse agonists could improve learning and memory deficits in DS individuals. PMID:21693554

  5. Proteomic and systems biology analysis of monocytes exposed to securinine, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist and immune adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Matt; Lubick, Kirk; Fouchard, David; Guram, Rajani; Grieco, Paul; Jutila, Mark; Dratz, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Securinine, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, has been reported to enhance monocyte cell killing of Coxiella burnetii without obvious adverse effects in vivo. We employed multiplex 2D gel electrophoresis using Zdyes, a new generation of covalently linked fluorescent differential protein detection dyes to analyze changes in the monocyte proteome in response to Securinine. Securinine antagonism of GABA(A) receptors triggers the activation of p38. We used the differential protein expression results to guide a search of the literature and network analysis software to construct a systems biology model of the effect of Securinine on monocytes. The model suggests that various metabolic modulators (fatty acid binding protein 5, inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase, and thioredoxin) are at least partially reshaping the metabolic landscape within the monocytes. The actin bundling protein L-plastin, and the Ca(2+) binding protein S100A4 also appear to have important roles in the immune response stimulated by Securinine. Fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5) may be involved in effecting lipid raft composition, inflammation, and hormonal regulation of monocytes, and the model suggests that FABP5 may be a central regulator of metabolism in activated monocytes. The model also suggests that the heat shock proteins have a significant impact on the monocyte immune response. The model provides a framework to guide future investigations into the mechanisms of Securinine action and with elaboration may help guide development of new types of immune adjuvants.

  6. Differential localization of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A and glycine receptor subunits and gephyrin in the human pons, medulla oblongata and uppermost cervical segment of the spinal cord: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel, H J; Baer, K; Eady, E; Allen, K L; Gilbert, R T; Mohler, H; Rees, M I; Nicholson, L F B; Faull, R L M

    2010-02-01

    Gephyrin is a multifunctional protein responsible for the clustering of glycine receptors (GlyR) and gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)R). GlyR and GABA(A)R are heteropentameric chloride ion channels that facilitate fast-response, inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian brain and spinal cord. We investigated the immunohistochemical distribution of gephyrin and the major GABA(A)R and GlyR subunits in the human light microscopically in the rostral and caudal one-thirds of the pons, in the middle and caudal one-thirds of the medulla oblongata, and in the first cervical segment of the spinal cord. The results demonstrate a widespread pattern of immunoreactivity for GlyR and GABA(A)R subunits throughout these regions, including the spinal trigeminal nucleus, abducens nucleus, facial nucleus, pontine reticular formation, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, hypoglossal nucleus, lateral cuneate nucleus, and nucleus of the solitary tract. The GABA(A)R alpha(1) and GlyR alpha(1) and beta subunits show high levels of immunoreactivity in these nuclei. The GABA(A)R subunits alpha(2), alpha(3), beta(2,3), and gamma(2) present weaker levels of immunoreactivity. Exceptions are intense levels of GABA(A)R alpha(2) subunit immunoreactivity in the inferior olivary complex and high levels of GABA(A)R alpha(3) subunit immunoreactivity in the locus coeruleus and raphe nuclei. Gephyrin immunoreactivity is highest in the first segment of the cervical spinal cord and hypoglossal nucleus. Our results suggest that a variety of different inhibitory receptor subtypes is responsible for inhibitory functions in the human brainstem and cervical spinal cord and that gephyrin functions as a clustering molecule for major subtypes of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors.

  7. Altered expression of GABAA receptors (α4, γ2 subunit), potassium chloride cotransporter 2 and astrogliosis in tremor rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoyuan; Ma, Ping; Cao, Danfeng; Sun, Chunyan; Ji, Zhong; Min, Dongyu; Sun, Hongli; Xie, Ni; Cai, Jiqun; Cao, Yonggang

    2011-11-25

    Impaired GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R), potassium chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2) and astrocytes are of particular importance to GABAergic transmission and thus involved in the development of increased seizure susceptibility. The tremor rat (TRM: tm/tm), a genetic mutant discovered in a Kyoto-Wistar colony, can manifest both absence-like seizures and tonic convulsions without any external stimuli. So far, there are no reports that can elucidate the effects of GABA(A)R (α4, γ2 subunit), KCC2 and astrocytes on TRMs. The present study was undertaken to detect the expressions of GABA(A)R α4, GABA(A)R γ2 and KCC2 in TRMs hippocampus at mRNA and protein levels. In this work, mRNA and protein expressions of GABA(A)R α4 were significantly elevated while GABA(A)R γ2 and KCC2 were both evidently decreased in TRMs hippocampus by real-time RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Furthermore, a dramatic elevation of KCC2 protein level was found after cerebroventricular injection with K252a to TRMs than that in the DMSO-treated TRMs. Besides, our present study also demonstrated that GFAP (a major component of astrocyte) immunoreactivity was much more intense in TRMs hippocampal CA1, CA3 and DG regions than that in control group with immnohistochemistry and confocal microscopic analyses. The protein expression of GFAP was also markedly elevated in TRMs hippocampus, suggesting that astrogliosis appeared in the TRM model. These data demonstrate that altered expressions of GABA(A)R (α4, γ2) and KCC2 and astrogliosis observed in TRMs hippocampus may provide us good therapeutic targets for the treatment of genetic epilepsy.

  8. Exploring QSARs of the interaction of flavonoids with GABA (A) receptor using MLR, ANN and SVM techniques.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Omar; Shaik, Basheerulla; Agrawal, Vijay K

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models for binding affinity constants (log Ki) of 78 flavonoid ligands towards the benzodiazepine site of GABA (A) receptor complex were calculated using the machine learning methods: artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM) techniques. The models obtained were compared with those obtained using multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis. The descriptor selection and model building were performed with 10-fold cross-validation using the training data set. The SVM and MLR coefficient of determination values are 0.944 and 0.879, respectively, for the training set and are higher than those of ANN models. Though the SVM model shows improvement of training set fitting, the ANN model was superior to SVM and MLR in predicting the test set. Randomization test is employed to check the suitability of the models.

  9. Effects of GF-015535-00, a novel α1 GABA A receptor ligand, on the sleep-wake cycle in mice, with reference to zolpidem.

    PubMed

    Anaclet, Christelle; Zhang, Mei; Zhao, Chunmei; Buda, Colette; Seugnet, Laurent; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Novel, safe, and efficient hypnotic compounds capable of enhancing physiological sleep are still in great demand in the therapy of insomnia. This study compares the sleep-wake effects of a new α1 GABA(A) receptor subunit ligand, GF-015535-00, with those of zolpidem, the widely utilized hypnotic compound. Nine C57Bl6/J male mice were chronically implanted with electrodes for EEG and sleep-wake monitoring. Each mouse received 3 doses of GF-015535-00 and zolpidem. Time spent in sleep-wake states and cortical EEG power spectra were analyzed. Both zolpidem and GF-015535-00 prominently enhanced slow wave sleep and paradoxical sleep in the mouse. However, as compared with zolpidem, GF-015535-00 showed several important differences: (1) a comparable sleep-enhancing effect was obtained with a 10 fold smaller dose; (2) the induced sleep was less fragmented; (3) the risk of subsequent wake rebound was less prominent; and (4) the cortical EEG power ratio between slow wave sleep and wake was similar to that of natural sleep and thus compatible with physiological sleep. The characteristics of the sleep-wake effects of GF-015535-00 in mice could be potentially beneficial for its use as a therapeutic compound in the treatment of insomnia. Further investigations are required to assess whether the same characteristics are conserved in other animal models and humans.

  10. Heterogeneous susceptibility of GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs to depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Martin, L A; Wei, D S; Alger, B E

    2001-05-01

    Depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) in central neurons is mediated by a transient reduction of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from interneurons. DSI is induced by a retrograde signal emitted from principal cells. We used electrophysiological recordings from CA1 neurons of the rat hippocampal slice to test the hypothesis that only certain classes of interneurons are susceptible to DSI. DSI of action potential-dependent, spontaneous, inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in hippocampus is facilitated by carbachol (3 microM), which increases the occurrence of large sIPSCs. Besides carbachol, noradrenaline (norepinephrine; 10 microM), or elevated extracellular potassium (8 mM), could abruptly increase the occurrence of large sIPSCs and DSI in many cases. DSI appeared and disappeared concomitantly with the onset and offset of these large sIPSCs. In contrast, application of AP-5 and CNQX often markedly increased baseline sIPSC activity without enhancing DSI. A brief train of extracellular electrical stimulation could trigger the onset of prolonged, repetitive IPSC activity that was susceptible to DSI. The magnitude of DSI of single evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) in a given pyramidal cell could be altered by changes in stimulus strength, but there was no simple relationship between stimulus strength and DSI. Baclofen (0.5-5 microM) eliminated the increase in sIPSC activity and DSI induced by carbachol. A GABA(B)receptor antagonist, CGP 35348, reversed the effects of baclofen. Carbachol-induced sIPSCs had relatively rapid rise and decay phases. There was no marked distinction between DSI-susceptible and non-susceptible sIPSCs. Nevertheless, two kinetically distinct components of the eIPSC could be distinguished by their decay times. DSI reduced GABA(A),(fast) without affecting GABA(A),(slow). Furosemide (frusemide), which blocks only GABA(A),(fast), reduced the eIPSC and occluded DSI. The data suggest that, with respect to DSI, there are at least

  11. Laser photolysis of DPNI-GABA, a tool for investigating the properties and distribution of GABA receptors and for silencing neurons in situ.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Papageorgiou, George; Corrie, John E T; Ogden, David

    2009-07-30

    Laser photolysis to release GABA at precisely defined times and locations permits investigation of the distribution of functional GABA(A) receptors in neuronal compartments, the activation kinetics and pharmacology of GABA(A) receptors in situ, and the role of individual neurons in neural circuits by selective silencing with low GABA concentrations. We describe the experimental evaluation and applications of a new nitroindoline-caged GABA, DPNI-GABA, modified to minimize the pharmacological interference commonly found with caged GABA reagents, but retaining the advantages of nitroindoline cages. Unlike the 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-7-nitroindolinyl-GABA tested previously, DPNI-GABA inhibited GABA(A) receptors with much lower affinity, reducing peak GABA-evoked responses with an IC(50) of approximately 0.5 mM. Most importantly, the kinetics of receptor activation, determined as 10-90% rise-times, were comparable to synaptic events and were little affected by DPNI-GABA present at 1mM concentration, permitting photolysis of DPNI-GABA to mimic synaptic activation of GABA(A) receptors. With a laser spot of 1 microm applied to cerebellar molecular layer interneurons, the spatial resolution of uncaging DPNI-GABA in dendrites was estimated as 2 microm laterally and 7.5 microm focally. Finally, at low DPNI-GABA concentration, photorelease restricted to the area of the soma suppressed spiking in single Purkinje neurons or molecular layer interneurons for periods controlled by the flash intensity and duration. DPNI-GABA has properties better adapted for fast kinetic studies with laser photolysis at GABA(A) receptors than previously reported caged GABA reagents, and can be used in experiments where spatial resolution is determined by the dimensions of the laser light spot.

  12. Analysis of GABA(A)- and GABA(B)-receptor mediated effects on intracellular Ca(2+) in DRG hybrid neurones.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, T; Kim, S U; Krieger, C; Puil, E

    2001-09-01

    1. Using pharmacological analysis and fura-2 spectrofluorimetry, we examined the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and related substances on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of hybrid neurones, called MD3 cells. The cell line was produced by fusion between a mouse neuroblastoma cell and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurone. 2. MD3 cells exhibited DRG neurone-like properties, such as immunoreactivity to microtubule-associated protein-2 and neurofilament proteins. Bath applications of capsaicin and alpha, beta-methylene adenosine triphosphate reversibly increased [Ca(2+)]i. However, repeated applications of capsaicin were much less effective. 3. Pressure applications of GABA (100 microM), (Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl) thio] prop-2-enoic acid sulphate (ZAPA; 100 microM), an agonist at low affinity GABA(A)-receptors, or KCl (25 mM), transiently increased [Ca(2+)]i. 4. Bath application of bicuculline (100 nM - 100 microM), but not picrotoxinin (10 - 25 microM), antagonized GABA-induced increases in [Ca(2+)]i in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50)=9.3 microM). 5. Ca(2+)-free perfusion reversibly abolished GABA-evoked increases in [Ca(2+)]i. Nifedipine and nimodipine eliminated GABA-evoked increases in [Ca(2+)]i. These results imply GABA response dependence on extracellular Ca(2+). 6. Baclofen (500 nM - 100 microM) activation of GABA(B)-receptors reversibly attenuated KCl-induced increases in [Ca(2+)]i in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50)=1.8 microM). 2-hydroxy-saclofen (1 - 20 microM) antagonized the baclofen-depression of the KCl-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i. 7. In conclusion, GABA(A)-receptor activation had effects similar to depolarization by high external K(+), initiating Ca(2+) influx through high voltage-activated channels, thereby transiently elevating [Ca(2+)]i. GABA(B)-receptor activation reduced Ca(2+) influx evoked by depolarization, possibly at Ca(2+)-channel sites in MD3 cells.

  13. GABA(A) receptors in the pontine reticular formation of C57BL/6J mouse modulate neurochemical, electrographic, and behavioral phenotypes of wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Flint, RaShonda R; Chang, Theresa; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2010-09-15

    Drugs that potentiate transmission at GABA(A) receptors are widely used to enhance sleep and to cause general anesthesia. The mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptors in the pontine reticular nucleus, oral part (PnO) of mouse modulate five phenotypes of arousal: sleep and wakefulness, cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) activity, acetylcholine (ACh) release in the PnO, breathing, and recovery time from general anesthesia. Microinjections into the PnO of saline (vehicle control), the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol, muscimol with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline, and bicuculline alone were performed in male C57BL/6J mice (n = 33) implanted with EEG recording electrodes. Muscimol caused a significant increase in wakefulness and decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. These effects were reversed by coadministration of bicuculline. Bicuculline administered alone caused a significant decrease in wakefulness and increase in NREM sleep and REM sleep. Muscimol significantly increased EEG power in the delta range (0.5-4 Hz) during wakefulness and in the theta range (4-9 Hz) during REM sleep. Dialysis delivery of bicuculline to the PnO of male mice (n = 18) anesthetized with isoflurane significantly increased ACh release in the PnO, decreased breathing rate, and increased anesthesia recovery time. All drug effects were concentration dependent. The effects on phenotypes of arousal support the conclusion that GABA(A) receptors in the PnO promote wakefulness and suggest that increasing GABAergic transmission in the PnO may be one mechanism underlying the phenomenon of paradoxical behavioral activation by some benzodiazepines.

  14. Recovery from ketamine-induced amnesia by blockade of GABA-A receptor in the medial prefrontal cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Akbarabadi, Ardeshir; Bakhtazad, Atefeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-03-06

    Ketamine and other noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists are known to induce deficits in learning and cognitive performance sensitive to prefrontal cortex (PFC) functions. The interaction of a glutamatergic and GABAergic systems is essential for many cognitive behaviors. In order to understand the effect of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/glutamate interactions on learning and memory, we investigated the effects of intra medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) injections of GABAergic agents on ketamine-induced amnesia using a one-trial passive avoidance task in mice. Pre-training systemic administration of ketamine (5, 10 and 15mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently decreased the memory acquisition of a one-trial passive avoidance task. Pre-training intra-mPFC injection of muscimol, GABAA receptor agonist (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2μg/mouse) and baclofen GABAB receptor agonist (0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1μg/mouse), impaired memory acquisition. However, co-pretreatment of different doses of muscimol and baclofen with a lower dose of ketamine (5mg/kg), which did not induce amnesia by itself, caused inhibition of memory formation. Our data showed that sole pre-training administration of bicuculline, GABA-A receptor antagonist and phaclofen GABA-B receptor antagonist into the mPFC, did not affect memory acquisition. In addition, the amnesia induced by pre-training ketamine (15mg/kg) was significantly decreased by the pretreatment of bicuculline (0.005, 0.1 and 0.5μg/mouse). It can be concluded that GABAergic system of the mPFC is involved in the ketamine-induced impairment of memory acquisition.

  15. Neuroprotection by steroids after neurotrauma in organotypic spinal cord cultures: a key role for progesterone receptors and steroidal modulators of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Labombarda, Florencia; Ghoumari, Abdel Moumen; Liere, Philippe; De Nicola, Alejandro F; Schumacher, Michael; Guennoun, Rachida

    2013-08-01

    Progesterone is neuroprotective after spinal cord injury, however its mechanism of action remains unexplored. Here we used organotypic spinal cord slice cultures from 3 weeks-old mice to evaluate the mechanisms of neuroprotection by progesterone and its 5α-reduced metabolites. In vitro spinal cord injury, using a weight drop model, induced a decrease in the number of motoneurons. This was correlated with an increase in the number of dying cells (PI⁺ cells) and in LDH release. Addition of 10 μM of progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5α-DHP) or allopregnanolone (3α, 5α-tetrahydroprogesterone) to the medium at the time of injury rescued the spinal cord slices from the effects of damage. Progesterone prevented membrane cell damage, motoneuron loss and cell death. These effects were not due to its bioconversion to 5α-DHP nor to allopregnanolone, as supported by the finasteride, an inhibitor of 5α-reductase enzymes, and by the absence of 5α-reduced progesterone metabolites in the slices analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The neuroprotective effects of progesterone required PR as they could not be observed in slices from homozygous knockout PR(-/-) mice. Allopregnanolone treatment was also neuroprotective. Its effects were not due to its bioconversion back to 5α-DHP, which can activate gene transcription via PR, because they were still observed in slices from knockout PR(-/-) mice. Allopregnanolone effects involved GABA(A) receptors, as they were inhibited by the selective GABA(A) receptor antagonist Gabazine, in both PR(+/+) and PR(-/-) mice. Altogether, these findings identify both PR and GABA(A) receptors as important targets for neuroprotection by progestagens after spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Imprinting in the schizophrenia candidate gene GABRB2 encoding GABA(A) receptor β(2) subunit.

    PubMed

    Pun, F W; Zhao, C; Lo, W-S; Ng, S-K; Tsang, S-Y; Nimgaonkar, V; Chung, W S; Ungvari, G S; Xue, H

    2011-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex genetic disorder, the inheritance pattern of which is likely complicated by epigenetic factors yet to be elucidated. In this study, transmission disequilibrium tests with family trios yielded significant differences between paternal and maternal transmissions of the disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6556547 and its haplotypes. The minor allele (T) of rs6556547 was paternally undertransmitted to male schizophrenic offsprings, and this parent-of-origin effect strongly suggested that GABRB2 is imprinted. 'Flipping' of allelic expression in heterozygotes of SNP rs2229944 (C/T) in GABRB2 or rs2290732 (G/A) in the neighboring GABRA1 was compatible with imprinting effects on gene expression. Clustering analysis of GABRB2 mRNA expressions suggested that imprinting brought about the observed two-tiered distribution of expression levels in controls with heterozygous genotype at the disease-associated SNP rs1816071 (A/G). The deficit of upper-tiered expressions accounted for the lowered expression levels in the schizophrenic heterozygotes. The occurrence of a two-tiered distribution furnished support for imprinting, and also pointed to the necessity of differentiating between two kinds of heterozygotes of different parental origins in disease association studies on GABRB2. Bisulfite sequencing revealed hypermethylation in the neighborhood of SNP rs1816071, and methylation differences between controls and schizophrenia patients. Notably, the two schizophrenia-associated SNPs rs6556547 and rs1816071 overlapped with a CpG dinucleotide, thereby opening the possibility that CpG methylation status of these sites could have an impact on the risk of schizophrenia. Thus multiple lines of evidence pointed to the occurrence of imprinting in the GABRB2 gene and its possible role in the development of schizophrenia.

  17. Dual Modulators of GABA-A and Alpha 7 Nicotinic Receptors for Treating Autism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Achievements 18 11. References 18 12. Appendices 19 5 1. INTRODUCTION: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a disease of development characterized...spectrum disorder, brain, childhood disorders, comorbidity, epilepsy, excitatory, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), GABA type A receptor (GABAAR), inhibitory...Department of Behavioral Neuroscience & Drug Development , Institute of Pharmacology, Pol ish Academy of Sciences/Agnieszka Niki foruk 4. Dept. of

  18. Diversity of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew K; Sattelle, David B

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast synaptic transmission in the insect nervous system and are targets of a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. They consist of five subunits arranged around a central ion channeL Since the subunit composition determines the functional and pharmacological properties of the receptor the presence of nAChR families comprising several subunit-encodinggenes provides a molecular basis for broad functional diversity. Analyses of genome sequences have shown that nAChR gene families remain compact in diverse insect species, when compared to their nematode andvertebrate counterparts. Thus, the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), malaria mosquito (Anopheles gambiae), honey bee (Apis mellifera), silk worm (Bombyx mon) and the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) possess 10-12 nAChR genes while human and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have 16 and 29 respectively. Although insect nAChRgene families are amongst the smallest known, receptor diversity can be considerably increased by the posttranscriptional processes alternative splicing and mRNA A-to-I editingwhich can potentially generate protein products which far outnumber the nAChR genes. These two processes can also generate species-specific subunit isoforms. In addition, each insect possesses at least one highly divergent nAChR subunit which may perform species-specific functions. Species-specific subunit diversification may offer promising targets for future rational design of insecticides that target specific pest insects while sparing beneficial species.

  19. α2-containing GABA(A) receptors: a requirement for midazolam-escalated aggression and social approach in mice.

    PubMed

    Newman, Emily L; Smith, Kiersten S; Takahashi, Aki; Chu, Adam; Hwa, Lara S; Chen, Yang; DeBold, Joseph F; Rudolph, Uwe; Miczek, Klaus A

    2015-12-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are prescribed to reduce anxiety, agitation, and muscle spasms and for their sedative-hypnotic and anticonvulsant effects. Under specific conditions, BZDs escalate aggression in some individuals. Specific effects of BZDs have been linked to the α-subunit subtype composition of GABAA receptors. Point-mutated mice rendered selectively insensitive to BZDs at α1-, α2-, or α3-containing GABAA receptors were used to determine which α-subunit subtypes are necessary for BZDs to escalate aggression and social approach and to reduce fear-motivated behavior. During resident-intruder confrontations, male wild-type (WT) and point-mutated α1(H101R), α2(H101R), and α3(H126R) mice were treated with midazolam (0-1.7 mg/kg, i.p.) and evaluated for aggression in an unfamiliar environment. Separate midazolam-treated WT and point-mutated mice were assessed for social approach toward a female or investigated in a 6-day fear-potentiated startle procedure. Moderate doses of midazolam (0.3-0.56 mg/kg, i.p.) escalated aggression in WT and α3(H126R) mutants and increased social approach in WT and α1(H101R) mice. The highest dose of midazolam (1.0 mg/kg) reduced fear-potentiated startle responding. All mice were sensitive to the sedative effect of midazolam (1.7 mg/kg) except α1(H101R) mutants. Midazolam requires BZD-sensitive α1- and α2-containing GABAA receptors in order to escalate aggression and α2- and α3-containing receptors to reduce social anxiety-like behavior. GABAA receptors containing the α1-subunit are crucial for BZD-induced sedation, while α2-containing GABAA receptors may be a shared site of action for the pro-aggressive and anxiolytic effects of BZDs.

  20. α2-containing GABA(A) receptors: A requirement for midazolam-escalated aggression and social approach in mice

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Emily L.; Smith, Kiersten S.; Takahashi, Aki; Chu, Adam; Hwa, Lara S.; Chen, Yang; DeBold, Joseph F.; Rudolph, Uwe; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are prescribed to reduce anxiety, agitation, and muscle spasms, and for their sedative-hypnotic and anticonvulsant effects. Under specific conditions, BZDs escalate aggression in some individuals. Specific effects of BZDs have been linked to the α-subunit subtype composition of GABAA receptors. Objectives Point-mutated mice rendered selectively insensitive to BZDs at α1-, α2-, or α3-containing GABAA receptors were used to determine which α-subunit subtypes are necessary for BZDs to escalate aggression and social approach and to reduce fear-motivated behavior. Methods During resident-intruder confrontations, male wild-type (WT) and point-mutated α1(H101R), α2(H101R), and α3(H126R) mice were treated with midazolam (0-1.7 mg/kg, i.p.) and evaluated for aggression in an unfamiliar environment. Separate midazolam-treated WT and point-mutated mice were assessed for social approach toward a female or investigated in a six-day fear-potentiated startle procedure. Results Moderate doses of midazolam (0.3-0.56 mg/kg, i.p.) escalated aggression in WT and α3(H126R) mutants and increased social approach in WT and α1(H101R) mice. The highest dose of midazolam (1.0 mg/kg) reduced fear-potentiated startle responding. All mice were sensitive to the sedative effect of midazolam (1.7 mg/kg) except α1(H101R) mutants. Conclusions Midazolam requires BZD-sensitive α1- and α2-containing GABAA receptors in order to escalate aggression and α2- and α3-containing receptors to reduce social anxiety-like behavior. GABAA receptors containing the α1-subunit are crucial for BZD-induced sedation while α2-containing GABAA receptors may be a shared site of action for the pro-aggressive and anxiolytic effects of BZDs. PMID:26381154

  1. Alcohol use disorders and current pharmacological therapies: the role of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Olsen, Richard W

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are defined as alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence, which create large problems both for society and for the drinkers themselves. To date, no therapeutic can effectively solve these problems. Understanding the underlying mechanisms leading to AUD is critically important for developing effective and safe pharmacological therapies. Benzodiazepines (BZs) are used to reduce the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome. However, frequent use of BZs causes cross-tolerance, dependence, and cross-addiction to alcohol. The FDA-approved naltrexone and acamprosate have shown mixed results in clinical trials. Naltrexone is effective to treat alcohol dependence (decreased length and frequency of drinking bouts), but its severe side effects, including withdrawal symptoms, are difficult to overcome. Acamprosate showed efficacy for treating alcohol dependence in European trials, but two large US trials have failed to confirm the efficacy. Another FDA-approved medication, disulfiram, does not diminish craving, and it causes a peripheral neuropathy. Kudzu is the only natural medication mentioned by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, but its mechanisms of action are not yet established. It has been recently shown that dihydromyricetin, a flavonoid purified from Hovenia, has unique effects on GABAA receptors and blocks ethanol intoxication and withdrawal in alcoholic animal models. In this article, we review the role of GABAA receptors in the treatment of AUD and currently available and potentially novel pharmacological agents.

  2. Prodynorphin gene deletion increased anxiety-like behaviours, impaired the anxiolytic effect of bromazepam and altered GABAA receptor subunits gene expression in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Femenía, Teresa; Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Urigüen, Leyre; Manzanares, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of prodynorphin gene in the regulation of anxiety and associated molecular mechanisms. Emotional responses were assessed using the light-dark test, elevated plus maze and social interaction tests in prodynorphin knockout and wild-type mice. Corticotrophin releasing factor and proopiomelanocortin gene expressions in the hypothalamus were evaluated after restraint stress using in situ hybridization. The anxiolytic efficacy of bromazepam and GABA(A) receptor subunits gene expression in the amygdala were also assessed in both genotypes. The deletion of prodynorphin increased anxiety-like behaviours and proopiomelanocortin gene expression in the arcuate nucleus (two-fold). Moreover, the anxiolytic action of bromazepam was significantly attenuated in the mutant mice. Decreased GABA(A)γ(2) and increased GABA(A)β(2) gene expression receptor subunits were found in the amygdala of prodynorphin knockout mice. These results indicate that deletion of prodynorphin gene is associated with increased anxiety-like behaviours, enhanced sensibility response to stress stimuli, reduced anxiolytic efficacy of bromazepam and altered expression of the GABA(A) receptor subunits.

  3. GABA(A)- and AMPA-like receptors modulate the activity of an identified neuron within the central pattern generator of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Francesco; Di Cristo, Carlo; Winlow, William; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2009-03-01

    To examine the neurochemistry underlying the firing of the RPeD1 neuron in the respiratory central pattern generator of the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, we examined electrophysiologically and pharmacologically either "active" or "silent" preparations by intracellular recording and pharmacology. GABA inhibited electrical firing by hyperpolarizing RPeD1, while picrotoxin, an antagonist of GABA(A) receptors, excited silent cells and reversed GABA-induced inhibition. Action potential activity was terminated by 1 mM glutamate (Glu) while silent cells were depolarized by the GluR agonists, AMPA, and NMDA. Kainate exerted a complex triphasic effect on membrane potential. However, only bath application of AMPA desensitized the firing. These data indicate that GABA inhibits RPeD1 via activation of GABA(A) receptors, while Glu stimulates the neuron by activating AMPA-sensitive GluRs.

  4. GABA-A and 5-HT1A receptor agonists block expression of fear-potentiated startle in mice.

    PubMed

    Risbrough, Victoria B; Brodkin, Jesse D; Geyer, Mark A

    2003-04-01

    The present experiments characterized the acquisition of fear-potentiated startle (FPS) and determined the sensitivity of FPS to anxiolytic compounds in DBA/1J mice. A light (30 s) conditioned stimulus (CS) and mild footshock (0.14 mA, 0.5 s) unconditioned stimulus (US) were used. First, acquisition of FPS was examined by presenting the acoustic startle probe during and after each CS-US pairing trial, allowing for a trial-by-trial measurement of experience-dependent startle plasticity. In this novel protocol, mice showed robust acquisition (larger acoustic startle reflex in the presence of the CS) of FPS after as few as eight CS-US pairings. FPS was significantly greater when the CS and US were paired explicitly (light-paired) as compared to when both the US and CS were presented randomly (unpaired), or when the CS was presented alone (no shock), indicating pairing-dependent learning of the CS. Second, the present study assessed the sensitivity of FPS in mice to anxiolytic drugs. The GABA-A receptor agonists diazepam (3 and 6 mg/kg) and chlordiazepoxide (10 mg/kg) significantly reduced the expression of FPS post-training, as did the serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist buspirone (5 and 10 mg/kg). Furthermore, all three anxiolytic drugs reduced startle responding in a cue-specific manner and without significant changes in baseline responding. These data demonstrate a novel method of studying acquisition of FPS, and support the predictive validity of the FPS model of anxiolytic drug action in mice.

  5. Maternal separation increases GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation of norepinephrine release in the hippocampus of a rat model of ADHD, the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Sterley, Toni-Lee; Howells, Fleur M; Russell, Vivienne A

    2013-02-25

    Experiencing early life stress increases the risk of developing a psychiatric disorder later in life, possibly by altering neural networks, such as the locus-coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE) system. Whether early life stress affects the LC-NE system directly, or whether the effects are via changes in glutamate and GABA modulation of the LC-NE system, is unclear. Early life stress has been shown to alter glutamate and GABA transmission, and in particular, to alter GABA(A) receptor expression. The LC-NE system has been implicated in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), amongst other disorders, and is over-responsive to glutamate stimulation in a validated rat model of ADHD, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). It is plausible that the LC-NE system, or glutamate and GABA modulation thereof, in an individual already genetically predisposed to develop ADHD, or in SHR, may respond in a unique way to early life stress. To investigate this we applied a mild developmental stressor, maternal separation, onto SHR, and onto their control strain, Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), from post-natal day (P)2-14. On P50-52, in early adulthood, we assayed glutamate and potassium stimulated release of radio-actively labelled NE ((3)[H]NE) from hippocampal slices using an in vitro superfusion technique, in the presence or absence of a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Our results show that maternal separation altered GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation of NE release in the hippocampus of the two strains in opposite directions, increasing it in SHR and decreasing it in WKY. Our findings indicate that effects of early life stress are highly dependent on genetic predisposition, since opposite changes in GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation of NE release were observed in the rat model of ADHD, SHR, and their control strain, WKY.

  6. Hypnotic effects and binding studies for GABA(A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors of traditional medicinal plants used in Asia for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sueng-Mock; Shimizu, Makoto; Lee, C Justin; Han, Dae-Seok; Jung, Cheol-Kyun; Jo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Young-Myoung

    2010-10-28

    Many medicinal plants have been used for treatment of insomnia in Asia. However, scientific evidence and precise mechanism for their sedative-hypnotic activity have not been fully investigated. Thus, we investigated the binding activity of the oriental plant extracts (mainly from Korea and Japan) to the well-known molecular targets for sleep regulation, GABA(A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors. Following the binding assay, sedative-hypnotic effects of the extracts with high affinity were examined in an animal model of sleep. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of 15 medicinal plants were tested for binding at the benzodiazepine site of GABA(A) receptor and 5-HT site of 5-HT(2C) receptor. The sedative-hypnotic effects of selected extracts were evaluated by measuring the sleep latency and sleep duration during pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice after oral administration of extracts. In the GABA(A) assay, the ethanol extracts of licorice and danshen displayed concentration-dependent, high affinity binding, whereas in the 5-HT(2C) assay, the ethanol extracts of ginseng and silk tree showed high affinity. Among these extracts we tested previously uncharacterized licorice and silk tree for hypnotic effects. We found the ethanol extracts of licorice and silk tree significantly decreased sleep latency and increased sleep duration in pentobarbital-induced sleep. We demonstrate for the first time that licorice and silk tree have the sedative-hypnotic activity possibly by modulating GABA(A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors. We propose that licorice and silk tree might be effective candidates for treatment of insomnia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Activation of GABA(A) receptors by taurine and muscimol blocks the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Paula-Lima, Andréa C; De Felice, Fernanda G; Brito-Moreira, Jordano; Ferreira, Sérgio T

    2005-12-01

    The beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) is centrally related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is potently neurotoxic to central nervous system neurons. The neurotoxicity of Abeta has been partially related to the over activation of glutamatergic transmission and excitotoxicity. Taurine is a naturally occurring beta-amino acid present in the mammalian brain. Due to its safety and tolerability, taurine has been clinically used in humans in the treatment of a number of non-neurological disorders. Here, we show that micromolar doses of taurine block the neurotoxicity of Abeta to rat hippocampal and cortical neurons in culture. Moreover, taurine also rescues central neurons from the excitotoxicity induced by high concentrations of extracellular glutamate. Neuroprotection by taurine is abrogated by picrotoxin, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. GABA and muscimol, an agonist of the GABA(A) receptor, also block neuronal death induced by Abeta in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons. These results suggest that activation of GABA(A) receptors protects neurons against Abeta toxicity in AD-affected regions of the mammalian brain and that taurine should be investigated as a novel therapeutic tool in the treatment of AD and of other neurological disorders in which excitotoxicity plays a relevant role.

  8. Activation of glycine and extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors by taurine on the substantia gelatinosa neurons of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hoang; Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Park, Soo Joung; Han, Seong Kyu

    2013-01-01

    The substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) has been known for the processing and transmission of orofacial nociceptive information. Taurine, one of the most plentiful free amino-acids in humans, has proved to be involved in pain modulation. In this study, using whole-cell patch clamp technique, we investigated the direct membrane effects of taurine and the action mechanism behind taurine-mediated responses on the SG neurons of the Vc. Taurine showed non-desensitizing and repeatable membrane depolarizations and inward currents which remained in the presence of amino-acid receptors blocking cocktail (AARBC) with tetrodotoxin, indicating that taurine acts directly on the postsynaptic SG neurons. Further, application of taurine at different doses (10  μM to 3 mM) showed a concentration dependent depolarizations and inward currents with the EC50 of 84.3  μM and 723  μM, respectively. Taurine-mediated responses were partially blocked by picrotoxin (50  μM) and almost completely blocked by strychnine (2  μM), suggesting that taurine-mediated responses are via glycine receptor (GlyR) activation. In addition, taurine (1 mM) activated extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated currents. Taken together, our results indicate that taurine can be a target molecule for orofacial pain modulation through the activation of GlyRs and/or extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs on the SG neurons.

  9. Receptor subtype-dependent positive and negative modulation of GABA(A) receptor function by niflumic acid, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Sinkkonen, Saku T; Mansikkamäki, Salla; Möykkynen, Tommi; Lüddens, Hartmut; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Korpi, Esa R

    2003-09-01

    In addition to blocking cyclooxygenases, members of the fenamate group of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been proposed to affect brain GABAA receptors. Using quantitative autoradiography with GABAA receptor-associated ionophore ligand [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) on rat brain sections, one of the fenamates, niflumate, at micromolar concentration was found to potentiate GABA actions in most brain areas, whereas being in the cerebellar granule cell layer an efficient antagonist similar to furosemide. With recombinant GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we found that niflumate potentiated 3 microM GABA responses up to 160% and shifted the GABA concentration-response curve to the left in alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, the predominant GABAA receptor subtype in the brain. This effect needed the gamma2 subunit, because on alpha1beta2 receptors, niflumate exhibited solely an antagonistic effect at high concentrations. The potentiation was not abolished by the specific benzodiazepine site antagonist flumazenil. Niflumate acted as a potent antagonist of alpha6beta2 receptors (with or without gamma2 subunit) and of alphaXbeta2gamma2 receptors containing a chimeric alpha1 to alpha6 subunit, which suggests that niflumate antagonism is dependent on the same transmembrane domain 1- and 2-including fragment of the alpha6 subunit as furosemide antagonism. This antagonism was noncompetitive because the maximal GABA response, but not the potency, was reduced by niflumate. These data show receptor subtype-dependent positive and negative modulatory actions of niflumate on GABAA receptors at clinically relevant concentrations, and they suggest the existence of a novel positive modulatory site on alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors that is dependent on the gamma2 subunit but not associated with the benzodiazepine binding site.

  10. Decreased density of GABA-A receptors in the left sensorimotor cortex in akinetic catatonia: investigation of in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Northoff, G.; Steinke, R.; Czcervenka, C.; Krause, R.; Ulrich, S.; Danos, P.; Kropf, D.; Otto, H.; Bogerts, B.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome with concomittant akinesia and anxiety which both respond almost immediately to benzodiazepines such as lorazepam. The benzodiazepine receptor distribution was therefore investigated in akinetic catatonia with single photon emission tomography (SPECT) using iodine-123-iomazenil (123 I Iomazenil).
METHODS—Ten akinetic catatonic patients, 10 psychiatric controls (similar age, sex, medication, and underlying psychiatric diagnosis but without catatonic syndrome), and 20 healthy controls were investigated with SPECT 2 hours after injection of 123 I Iomazenil. To exclude potential effects of cerebral perfusion (r-CBF) r-CBF was additionally investigated with Tc-99mECD SPECT.
RESULTS—Catatonic patients showed significantly lower iomazenil binding and altered right-left relations in the left sensorimotor cortex compared with psychiatric (p<0.001) and healthy (p<0.001) controls. In addition, there was significantly lower r-CBF in the right lower prefrontal and parietal cortex in catatonia whereas in the left sensorimotor cortex no differences in r-CBF between groups were found. Catatonic motor and affective symptoms showed significant correlations (p<0.05) with benzodiazepine binding in the left sensorimotor cortex as well as with right parietal r-CBF.
CONCLUSIONS—Reduced iomazenil binding suggests decreased density of GABA-A receptors in the left sensorimotor cortex in akinetic catatonia. In addition to reduced GABA-A receptor density in the left sensorimotor cortex the parietal cortex seems to be involved in pathophysiology of catatonic symptoms. It is concluded that, considering results from correlation analyses, both emotional and motor symptoms in catatonia seem to be closely related to left sensorimotor and right parietal alterations.

 PMID:10486389

  11. Neuroprotection by estradiol: a role of aromatase against spine synapse loss after blockade of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lepu; Lehan, Nadine; Wehrenberg, Uwe; Disteldorf, Erik; von Lossow, Richard; Mares, Ute; Jarry, Hubertus; Rune, Gabriele M

    2007-01-01

    Estrogen has been suggested to be pro-epileptic by reducing GABA synthesis, resulting in increased spine density and a decreased threshold for seizures in the hippocampus, which, once they occur, are characterized by a dramatic spine loss in the affected brain areas. As considerable amounts of estradiol are synthesized in the hippocampus, in this study we focused on aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme in estrogen synthesis in order to examine the role of locally synthesized estrogens in epilepsy. To this end, we first examined the effects of letrozole, a potent aromatase inhibitor, on GABA metabolism in single interneurons of hippocampal dispersion cultures. Letrozole downregulated estradiol release into the medium, as well as glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) expression and GABA synthesis, and decreased the number of GAD positive cells in the cultures. Next, we counted spine synapses and measured estradiol release of hippocampal slice cultures, in which GABA(A) receptors had been blocked by bicuculline, in order to mimic epileptic activity. Treatment of slice cultures with bicuculline resulted in a dramatic decrease in the number of spine synapses and in a significant suppression of estrogen synthesis. The decrease in synapse number in response to bicuculline was restored by combined application of estradiol and bicuculline. Surprisingly, estradiol alone had no effect on either spine synapse number or on GAD expression and GABA synthesis. "Rescue" of synapse number in "epileptic slices" by estradiol and maintenance of GABA metabolism by hippocampus-derived estradiol points to a neuroprotective role of aromatase in epilepsy. Re-filling of estradiol stores after their depletion due to overexcitation may therefore add to therapeutical strategies in epilepsy.

  12. Inhibition of GABA A receptor improved special memory impairment in the local model of demyelination in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mousavi Majd, Alireza; Ebrahim Tabar, Forough; Afghani, Arghavan; Ashrafpour, Sahand; Dehghan, Samaneh; Gol, Mohammad; Ashrafpour, Manouchehr; Pourabdolhossein, Fereshteh

    2018-01-15

    Cognitive impairment and memory deficit are common features in multiple Sclerosis patients. The mechanism of memory impairment in MS is unknown, but neuroimaging studies suggest that hippocampal demyelination is involved. Here, we investigate the role of GABA A receptor on spatial memory in the local model of hippocampal demyelination. Demyelination was induced in male Wistar rats by bilaterally injection of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) 1% into the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The treatment groups were received daily intraventricular injection of bicuculline (0.025, 0.05μg/2μl/animal) or muscimol (0.1, 0.2μg/2μl/animal) 5days after LPC injection. Morris Water Maze was used to evaluate learning and memory in rats. We used Luxol fast blue staining and qPCR to assess demyelination extention and MBP expression level respectively. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD45 and H&E staining were performed to assess inflammatory cells infiltration. Behavioral study revealed that LPC injection in the hippocampus impaired learning and memory function. Animals treated with both doses of bicuculline improved spatial learning and memory function; however, muscimol treatment had no effect. Histological and MBP expression studies confirmed that demylination in LPC group was maximal. Bicuculline treatment significantly reduced demyelination extension and increased the level of MBP expression. H&E and IHC results showed that bicuculline reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in the lesion site. Bicuculline improved learning and memory and decreased demyelination extention in the LPC-induced hippocampal demyelination model. We conclude that disruption of GABAergic homeostasis in hippocampal demyelination context may be involved in memory impairment with the implications for both pathophysiology and therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Simultaneous optical recording in multiple cells by digital holographic microscopy of chloride current associated to activation of the ligand-gated chloride channel GABA(A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Pascal; Boss, Daniel; Rappaz, Benjamin; Moratal, Corinne; Hernandez, Maria-Clemencia; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre Julius; Marquet, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a group of targets for major clinical indications. However, molecular screening for chloride channel modulators has proven to be difficult and time-consuming as approaches essentially rely on the use of fluorescent dyes or invasive patch-clamp techniques which do not lend themselves to the screening of large sets of compounds. To address this problem, we have developed a non-invasive optical method, based on digital holographic microcopy (DHM), allowing monitoring of ion channel activity without using any electrode or fluorescent dye. To illustrate this approach, GABA(A) mediated chloride currents have been monitored with DHM. Practically, we show that DHM can non-invasively provide the quantitative determination of transmembrane chloride fluxes mediated by the activation of chloride channels associated with GABA(A) receptors. Indeed through an original algorithm, chloride currents elicited by application of appropriate agonists of the GABA(A) receptor can be derived from the quantitative phase signal recorded with DHM. Finally, chloride currents can be determined and pharmacologically characterized non-invasively simultaneously on a large cellular sampling by DHM.

  14. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Harriet; Ebert, Bjarke; Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    The 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients 2 years of age or older in the United States, and for treatment of anxiety and various forms of epilepsy elsewhere. Clobazam has been reported to exhibit different in vivo adverse effects and addiction liability profile than the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines. In this study, it was investigated whether the in vitro pharmacological properties of clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam could explain some of these clinical differences. The functional properties of the two 1,5-benzodiazepines were characterized at the human γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) subtypes α1β2γ(2S), α2β2γ(2S), α3β2γ(2S), α5β2γ(2S) and α6β2δ expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology and compared to those exhibited by the 1,4-benzodiazepine clonazepam. All three compounds potentiated GABA EC20-evoked responses through the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) GABA(A)Rs in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with each displaying similar EC50 values at the four subtypes. Furthermore, the degrees of potentiation of the GABA EC20 currents through the four receptors mediated by saturating modulator concentrations did not differ substantially for any of the three benzodiazepines. The three compounds were substantially less potent (200-3900 fold) as positive allosteric modulators at the α6β2δ GABA(A)R than at the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) receptors. Interestingly, however, clobazam and especially N-desmethylclobazam were highly efficacious potentiators of α6β2δ receptor signaling. Although this activity component is unlikely to contribute to the in vivo effects of clobazam/N-desmethylclobazam, the 1,5-benzodiazepine could constitute an interesting lead for novel modulators targeting this low-affinity binding site in GABAARs. In conclusion, the non-selective modulation

  15. Molecular and Functional Diversity of GABA-A Receptors in the Enteric Nervous System of the Mouse Colon

    PubMed Central

    Seifi, Mohsen; Brown, James F.; Mills, Jeremy; Bhandari, Pradeep; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Rudolph, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) provides the intrinsic neural control of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and regulates virtually all GI functions. Altered neuronal activity within the ENS underlies various GI disorders with stress being a key contributing factor. Thus, elucidating the expression and function of the neurotransmitter systems, which determine neuronal excitability within the ENS, such as the GABA-GABAA receptor (GABAAR) system, could reveal novel therapeutic targets for such GI disorders. Molecular and functionally diverse GABAARs modulate rapid GABAergic-mediated regulation of neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. However, the cellular and subcellular GABAAR subunit expression patterns within neurochemically defined cellular circuits of the mouse ENS, together with the functional contribution of GABAAR subtypes to GI contractility remains to be determined. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that immunoreactivity for the GABAAR gamma (γ) 2 and alphas (α) 1, 2, 3 subunits was located on somatodendritic surfaces of neurochemically distinct myenteric plexus neurons, while being on axonal compartments of submucosal plexus neurons. In contrast, immunoreactivity for the α4–5 subunits was only detected in myenteric plexus neurons. Furthermore, α-γ2 subunit immunoreactivity was located on non-neuronal interstitial cells of Cajal. In organ bath studies, GABAAR subtype-specific ligands had contrasting effects on the force and frequency of spontaneous colonic longitudinal smooth muscle contractions. Finally, enhancement of γ2-GABAAR function with alprazolam reversed the stress-induced increase in the force of spontaneous colonic contractions. The study demonstrates the molecular and functional diversity of the GABAAR system within the mouse colon providing a framework for developing GABAAR-based therapeutics in GI disorders. PMID:25080596

  16. GABA-A receptors and the response to CO(2) inhalation - a translational trans-species model of anxiety?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jayne E; Nutt, David J

    2008-07-01

    The mechanisms by which the inhalation of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) produces anxiety and panic are not fully understood, although more recently there is evidence to suggest the involvement of a neural 'fear circuit'. We have suggested that this neural fear circuit is partly mediated by the brain noradrenaline network [Bailey, J.E., Argyropoulos, S.V., Lightman, S.L. and Nutt, D.J., (2003) Does the brain noradrenaline network mediate the effects of the CO(2) challenge? J Psychopharmacol 17(3): 252-259.]. However, we now review evidence that GABA-A may also play an important role in the modulation of CO(2)-induced anxiety. The review of this evidence starts with a key publication showing that 1 min of 35% CO(2)/65% air produced anxiogenic effects in a rat model of anxiety, to a similar extent to the anxiogenic betacarboline derivative FG7142, a benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist. The effects of both anxiogenic stimuli were abolished with pre-treatment with alprazolam (0.5 mg/kg), but only those of FG7142, not CO(2), was blocked by a benzodiazepine antagonist [Cuccheddu, T., Floris, S., Serra, M., Porceddu, L., Sanna, E., Biggio, G., (1995) Proconflict effect of carbon dioxide inhalation in rats. Life Sci 56: PL 321-324.]. Although the evidence from this study did not conclusively prove that CO(2) had an action to reduce GABA function, it was an experiment designed to be translational to compare what was known about CO(2)-induced anxiety in patients, and to also to explore if GABA mechanisms are involved. Additional evidence from the literature is found in the association between GABA and chemoreceptors, both in laboratory and human studies and GABA and anxiety disorders. Evidence of this association is found across species from stress-induced change in GABA levels in plants and insects to humans, where there is now much evidence of abnormalities in GABA/benzodiazepine receptors in anxiety and other psychiatric disorders. This paper reviews some of the evidence and

  17. A gamma 2(R43Q) mutation, linked to epilepsy in humans, alters GABAA receptor assembly and modifies subunit composition on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Frugier, Guillaume; Coussen, Françoise; Giraud, Marie-France; Odessa, Marie-Françoise; Emerit, Michel B; Boué-Grabot, Eric; Garret, Maurice

    2007-02-09

    Genetic defects leading to epilepsy have been identified in gamma2 GABA(A) receptor subunit. A gamma2(R43Q) substitution is linked to childhood absence epilepsy and febrile seizure, and a gamma2(K289M) mutation is associated with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus. To understand the effect of these mutations, surface targeting of GABA(A) receptors was analyzed by subunit-specific immunofluorescent labeling of living cells. We first transfected hippocampal neurons in culture with recombinant gamma2 constructs and showed that the gamma 2(R43Q) mutation prevented surface expression of the subunit, unlike gamma2(K289M) substitution. Several gamma2-subunit constructs, bearing point mutations within the Arg-43 domain, were expressed in COS-7 cells with alpha3- and beta3-subunits. R43Q and R43A substitutions dramatically reduced surface expression of the gamma2-subunit, whereas R43K, P44A, and D39A substitutions had a lesser, but still significant, impact and K289M substitution had no effect. Whereas the mutant gamma2(R43Q) was retained within intracellular compartments, alphabeta complexes were still targeted at the cell membrane. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that gamma2(R43Q) was able to associate with alpha3- or beta3-subunits, although the stoichiometry of the complex with alpha3 was altered. Our data show that gamma2(R43Q) is not a dominant negative and that the mutation leads to a modification of GABA(A) receptor subunit composition on the cell surface that impairs the synaptic targeting in neurons. This study reveals an involvement of the gamma2-Arg-43 domain in the control of receptor assembly that may be relevant to the effect of the heterozygous gamma2(R43Q) mutation leading to childhood absence epilepsy and febrile seizure.

  18. GABA(A) receptor M2-M3 loop secondary structure and changes in accessibility during channel gating.

    PubMed

    Bera, Amal K; Chatav, Maya; Akabas, Myles H

    2002-11-08

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor M2-M3 loop structure and its role in gating were investigated using the substituted cysteine accessibility method. Residues from alpha(1)Arg-273 to alpha(1)Ile-289 were mutated to cysteine, one at a time. MTSET(+) or MTSES(-) reacted with all mutants from alpha(1)R273C to alpha(1)Y281C, except alpha(1)P277C, in the absence and presence of GABA. The MTSET(+) closed-state reaction rate was >1000 liters/mol-s at alpha(1)N274C, alpha(1)S275C, alpha(1)K278C, and alpha(1)Y281C and was <300 liters/mol-s at alpha(1)R273C, alpha(1)L276C, alpha(1)V279C, alpha(1)A280C, and alpha(1)A284C. These two groups of residues lie on opposite sides of an alpha-helix. The fast reacting group lies on a continuation of the M2 segment channel-lining helix face. This suggests that the M2 segment alpha-helix extends about two helical turns beyond alpha(1)N274 (20'), aligned with the extracellular ring of charge. At alpha(1)S275C, alpha(1)V279C, alpha(1)A280C, and alpha(1)A284C the reaction rate was faster in the presence of GABA. The reagents had no functional effect on the mutants from alpha(1)A282C to alpha(1)I289C, except alpha(1)A284C. Access may be sterically hindered possibly by close interaction with the extracellular domain. We suggest that the M2 segment alpha-helix extends beyond the predicted extracellular end of the M2 segment and that gating induces a conformational change in and/or around the N-terminal half of the M2-M3 loop. Implications for coupling ligand-evoked conformational changes in the extracellular domain to channel gating in the membrane-spanning domain are discussed.

  19. Embryonic exposure to ethanol disturbs regulation of mitotic spindle orientation via GABA(A) receptors in neural progenitors in ventricular zone of developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tochitani, Shiro; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2010-03-19

    Neural progenitors in the ventricular zone of the developing neocortex divide oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the ventricular surface based on their mitotic spindle orientation. It has been shown that the cleavage plane orientation is developmentally regulated and plays a crucial role in cell fate determination of neural progenitors or the maintenance of the proliferative ventricular zone during neocortical development. We tested if fetal exposure to ethanol, the most widely used psychoactive agent and a potent teratogen that may cause malformation in the central nervous system, alters mitotic cleavage orientation of the neural progenitors at the apical surface of the ventricular zone in the developing neocortex. Fetal exposure to ethanol on E10.5 and 11.5 increased the occurrence frequency of a horizontal cleavage plane that is parallel to the ventricular surface on E 12.5. Administration of picrotoxin, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, prior to ethanol administration canceled the effect of ethanol with the frequency of horizontal division similar to the control level, although picrotoxin itself did not show any effect on cleavage plane orientation. Phenobarbital, a GABA(A) receptor agonist, induced horizontal cleavage to an extent similar to that induced by ethanol administration. (+)MK801, an antagonist of NMDA receptor that is another major target of ethanol in neural cells, did not affect the cleavage plane of dividing progenitors. These results suggest that fetal ethanol exposure induced alterations in the cleavage plane orientation of neural progenitors in the ventricular zone of the neocortex via the enhancement of the function of GABA(A) receptors.

  20. [GABA: a functional duality? Transition during neurodevelopment].

    PubMed

    Cortes-Romero, C; Galindo, F; Galicia-Isasmendi, S; Flores, A

    2011-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the most important inhibitory-type neurotransmitter and its actions are mediated by ionotropic (GABA(A)) and metabotropic (GABA(B)) type receptors, which are widely distributed throughout the tissue of the central nervous system. To review the structure of GABA receptors and their involvement in physiological processes in the central nervous system. The study addresses the structure and diversity of the GABA receptors, especially during neurodevelopment, and reference is made to the excitatory and inhibitory nature of GABAergic transmission, where the participation of the cotransporters NKCC1 and KCC2 plays a key role in this functional duality in the transition from an embryonic to a post-natal state. Likewise, the interest in GABA receptors as a pharmacological target for clinical use is also discussed. This is manifested by the presence of under-explored allosteric modulation sites in the aforementioned complex-receptor. The physiological and pharmacological knowledge of the great diversity of subunits that make up a particular subtype of GABA receptor, as well as the correct expression in time and space in order to ensure the viability of the organism, promise to be the answer to long-time severe disorders like epilepsy or drug addiction, and such complex ones as neurodevelopment.

  1. Functional characterization of ivermectin binding sites in α1β2γ2L GABA(A) receptors

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mondragon, Argel; Lynch, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are therapeutic targets for many indications including sedation, anesthesia and anxiolysis. There is, however, considerable scope for the development of new therapeutics with improved beneficial effects and reduced side-effect profiles. The anthelminthic drug, ivermectin, activates the GABAAR although its binding site is not known. The molecular site of action of ivermectin has, however, been defined by crystallography in the homologous glutamate-gated chloride channel. Resolving the molecular mechanisms of ivermectin binding to α1β2γ2L GABAARs may provide insights into the design of improved therapeutics. Given that ivermectin binds to subunit interfaces, we sought to define (1) which subunit interface sites it binds to, (2) whether these sites are equivalent in terms of ivermectin sensitivity or efficacy, and (3) how many must be occupied for maximal efficacy. Our approach involved precluding ivermectin from binding to particular interfaces by introducing bulky M3 domain 36′F sidechains to the “+” side of those interfaces. We thereby demonstrated that ivermectin produces irreversible channel activation only when it binds to the single γ2L-β2 interface site. When it binds to α1-β2 sites it elicits potentiation of GABA-gated currents but has no irreversible activating effect. Ivermectin cannot bind to the β2-α1 interface site due to its endogenous bulky 36′ methionine. Replacing this with an alanine creates a functional site at this interface, but surprisingly it is inhibitory. Molecular docking simulations reveal that the γ2L-β2 interface forms more contacts with ivermectin than the other interfaces, possibly explaining why ivermectin appears to bind irreversibly at this interface. This study demonstrates unexpectedly stark pharmacological differences among GABAAR ivermectin binding sites. PMID:26441518

  2. GABA(A) receptor blockade in dorsomedial and ventromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus evokes panic-like elaborated defensive behaviour followed by innate fear-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Uribe-Mariño, Andrés; Castiblanco-Urbina, Maria Angélica; Elias-Filho, Daoud Hibraim; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2009-12-11

    Dysfunction in the hypothalamic GABAergic system has been implicated in panic syndrome in humans. Furthermore, several studies have implicated the hypothalamus in the elaboration of pain modulation. Panic-prone states are able to be experimentally induced in laboratory animals to study this phenomenon. The aim of the present work was to investigate the involvement of medial hypothalamic nuclei in the organization of panic-like behaviour and the innate fear-induced oscillations of nociceptive thresholds. The blockade of GABA(A) receptors in the neuronal substrates of the ventromedial or dorsomedial hypothalamus was followed by elaborated defensive panic-like reactions. Moreover, innate fear-induced antinociception was consistently elicited after the escape behaviour. The escape responses organized by the dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei were characteristically more elaborated, and a remarkable exploratory behaviour was recorded during GABA(A) receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus. The motor characteristic of the elaborated defensive escape behaviour and the patterns of defensive alertness and defensive immobility induced by microinjection of the bicuculline either into the dorsomedial or into the ventromedial hypothalamus were very similar. This was followed by the same pattern of innate fear-induced antinociceptive response that lasted approximately 40 min after the elaborated defensive escape reaction in both cases. These findings suggest that dysfunction of the GABA-mediated neuronal system in the medial hypothalamus causes panic-like responses in laboratory animals, and that the elaborated escape behaviour organized in both dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei are followed by significant innate-fear-induced antinociception. Our findings indicate that the GABA(A) receptor of dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei are critically involved in the modulation of panic-like behaviour.

  3. Effect of GABA agonists and GABA-A receptor modulators on cocaine- and food-maintained responding and cocaine discrimination in rats.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Andrew C; Negus, S Stevens; Mello, Nancy K; Caine, S Barak

    2005-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that GABAergic ligands modulate abuse-related effects of cocaine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of a mechanistically diverse group of GABAergic ligands on the discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects of cocaine in rats. One group of rats was trained to discriminate 5.6 mg/kg cocaine from saline in a two-lever, food-reinforced, drug discrimination procedure. In two other groups, responding was maintained by cocaine (0-3.2 mg/kg/injection) or liquid food (0-100%) under a fixed ratio 5 schedule. Six GABA agonists were tested: the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol, the GABA-B receptor agonist baclofen, the GABA transaminase inhibitor gamma-vinyl-GABA (GVG), and three GABA-A receptor modulators (the barbiturate pentobarbital, the high-efficacy benzodiazepine midazolam, and the low-efficacy benzodiazepine enazenil). When tested alone, none of the compounds substituted fully for the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. As acute pretreatments, select doses of midazolam and pentobarbital produced 2.2- to 3.6-fold rightward shifts in the cocaine dose-effect function. In contrast, muscimol, baclofen, GVG, and enazenil failed to alter the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. In assays of cocaine- and food-maintained responding, midazolam and pentobarbital decreased cocaine self-administration at doses 9.6- and 3.3-fold lower, respectively, than those that decreased food-maintained responding. In contrast, muscimol, baclofen, and GVG decreased cocaine self-administration at doses that also decreased food-maintained responding. Enazenil failed to alter cocaine self-administration. Together with previous studies, these data suggest that among mechanistically diverse GABA agonists, high-efficacy GABA-A modulators may be the most effective for modifying the abuse-related effects of cocaine.

  4. Genetic analysis of neuronal ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Granger, Adam J; Gray, John A; Lu, Wei; Nicoll, Roger A

    2011-09-01

    In the brain, fast, excitatory synaptic transmission occurs primarily through AMPA- and NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors are composed of subunit proteins that determine their biophysical properties and trafficking behaviour. Therefore, determining the function of these subunits and receptor subunit composition is essential for understanding the physiological properties of synaptic transmission. Here, we discuss and evaluate various genetic approaches that have been used to study AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits. These approaches have demonstrated that the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit is required for activity-dependent trafficking and contributes to basal synaptic transmission, while the GluA2 subunit regulates Ca(2+) permeability, homeostasis and trafficking to the synapse under basal conditions. In contrast, the GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits regulate synaptic AMPA receptor content, both during synaptic development and plasticity. Ongoing research in this field is focusing on the molecular interactions and mechanisms that control these functions. To accomplish this, molecular replacement techniques are being used, where native subunits are replaced with receptors containing targeted mutations. In this review, we discuss a single-cell molecular replacement approach which should arguably advance our physiological understanding of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, but is generally applicable to study of any neuronal protein.

  5. Successful combination immunotherapy of anti-gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antibody-positive encephalitis with extensive multifocal brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Yuki; Okada, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Mari; Yamaguchi, Keiji

    2017-08-31

    A 78-year old woman who presented with akinetic mutism was admitted to our hospital. Brain MRI showed multifocal increased T2/FLAIR signal with extensive cortical-subcortical involvement. We suspected autoimmune encephalitis and the patient received methylprednisolone pulse. Her conscious level gradually recovered, but later relapsed again and presented with refractory status epilepticus. We treated her with intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and pulsed cyclophosphamide, with satisfactory response. A brain biopsy showed perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates and reactive gliosis. Anti-gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antibodies test came back to be positive after her recovery, and the diagnosis of anti-GABAA receptor antibody-positive encephalitis was made. This is a very rare case where brain biopsies were performed in a patient with anti-GABAA receptor antibody-positive encephalitis.

  6. Synthesis, Modelling, and Anticonvulsant Studies of New Quinazolines Showing Three Highly Active Compounds with Low Toxicity and High Affinity to the GABA-A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Mohamed F; Ihmaid, Saleh K; Ahmed, Hany E A; El-Adl, Khaled; Asiri, Ahmed M; Omar, Abdelsattar M

    2017-01-24

    Some novel fluorinated quinazolines (5a-j) were designed and synthesized to be evaluated for their anticonvulsant activity and their neurotoxicity. Structures of all newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by their infrared (IR), mass spectrometry (MS) spectra, ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), (13)C-NMR, and elemental analysis (CHN). The anticonvulsant activity was evaluated by a subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) test and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure test, while neurotoxicity was evaluated by a rotorod test. The molecular docking was performed for all newly-synthesized compounds to assess their binding affinities to the GABA-A receptor in order to rationalize their anticonvulsant activities in a qualitative way. The data obtained from the molecular modeling was correlated with that obtained from the biological screening. These data showed considerable anticonvulsant activity for all newly-synthesized compounds. Compounds 5b, 5c, and 5d showed the highest binding affinities toward the GABA-A receptor, along with the highest anticonvulsant activities in experimental mice. These compounds also showed low neurotoxicity and low toxicity in the median lethal dose test compared to the reference drugs. A GABA enzymatic assay was performed for these highly active compounds to confirm the obtained results and explain the possible mechanism for anticonvulsant action. The most active compounds might be used as leads for future modification and optimization.

  7. Ethanol attenuates sensory stimulus-evoked responses in cerebellar granule cells via activation of GABA(A) receptors in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guang; Liu, Heng; Jin, Juan; Hong, Lan; Lan, Yan; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2014-02-21

    Acute alcohol intoxication affects cerebellar motor regulation possibly by altering the transfer and integration of external information in cerebellar cortical neurons, resulting in a dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation or a cerebellar atexia. However, the synaptic mechanisms of ethanol induced impairments of sensory information processing in cerebellar cortical neurons are not fully understand. In the present study, we used electrophysiological and pharmacological methods to study the effects of ethanol on the sensory stimulation-evoked responses in cerebellar granule cells (GCs) in vivo in urethane anesthetized mice. Air-puff stimulation of the ipsilateral whisker-pad evoked stimulus-on (P1) and stimulus-off responses (P2) in GCs of cerebellar Crus II. Cerebellar surface perfusion of ethanol did not alter the onset latency of the sensory stimulation-evoked responses, but reversible reduced the amplitude of P1 and P2. The ethanol-induced reduction of the GCs sensory responses was concentration-dependent. In the presence of ethanol, the mean half-width, area under curve, rise Tau and decay Tau of P1 were significantly decreased. Blockade of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors activity induced an increase in amplitude of P1, and abolished the ethanol induced inhibition of the GCs sensory responses. These results indicate that ethanol inhibits the tactile evoked responses in cerebellar GCs through enhancement of GABA(A) receptors activity.

  8. Roles of hippocampal GABA(A) and muscarinic receptors in consolidation of context memory and context-shock association in contextual fear conditioning: a double dissociation study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Dar; Liang, K C

    2012-07-01

    Contextual fear conditioning involves forming a context representation and associating it to a shock, both of which involved the dorsal hippocampus (DH) according to our recent findings. This study tested further whether the two processes may rely on different neurotransmitter systems in the DH. Male Wistar rats with cannula implanted into the DH were subjected to a two-phase training paradigm of contextual fear conditioning to separate context learning from context-shock association in two consecutive days. Immediately after each training phase, different groups of rats received bilateral intra-DH infusion of the GABA(A) agonist muscimol, 5HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT, NMDA antagonist APV or muscarinic antagonist scopolamine at various doses. On the third day, freezing behavior was tested in the conditioning context. Results showed that intra-DH infusion of muscimol impaired conditioned freezing only if it was given after context learning. In contrast, scopolamine impaired conditioned freezing only if it was given after context-shock training. Posttraining infusion of 8-OH-DPAT or APV had no effect on conditioned freezing when the drug was given at either phase. These results showed double dissociation for the hippocampal GABAergic and cholinergic systems in memory consolidation of contextual fear conditioning: forming context memory required deactivation of the GABA(A) receptors, while forming context-shock memory involved activation of the muscarinic receptors.

  9. Quantifying the cooperative subunit action in a multimeric membrane receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wongsamitkul, Nisa; Nache, Vasilica; Eick, Thomas; Hummert, Sabine; Schulz, Eckhard; Schmauder, Ralf; Schirmeyer, Jana; Zimmer, Thomas; Benndorf, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In multimeric membrane receptors the cooperative action of the subunits prevents exact knowledge about the operation and the interaction of the individual subunits. We propose a method that permits quantification of ligand binding to and activation effects of the individual binding sites in a multimeric membrane receptor. The power of this method is demonstrated by gaining detailed insight into the subunit action in olfactory cyclic nucleotide-gated CNGA2 ion channels. PMID:26858151

  10. Expression of GABA receptor rho subunits in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Boue-Grabot, E; Roudbaraki, M; Bascles, L; Tramu, G; Bloch, B; Garret, M

    1998-03-01

    The GABA receptor rho1, rho2, and rho3 subunits are expressed in the retina where they form bicuculline-insensitive GABA(C) receptors. We used northern blot, in situ hybridization, and RT-PCR analysis to study the expression of rho subunits in rat brains. In situ hybridization allowed us to detect rho-subunit expression in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the cerebellar Purkinje cells. RT-PCR experiments indicated that (a) in retina and in domains that may contain functional GABA(C) receptors, rho2 and rho1 subunits are expressed at similar levels; and (b) in domains and in tissues that are unlikely to contain GABA(C) receptors, rho2 mRNA is enriched relative to rho1 mRNA. These results suggest that both rho1 and rho2 subunits are necessary to form a functional GABA(C) receptor. The use of RT-PCR also showed that, except in the superior colliculus, rho3 is expressed along with rho1 and rho2 subunits. We also raised an antibody against a peptide sequence unique to the rho1 subunit. The use of this antibody on cerebellum revealed the rat rho1 subunit in the soma and dendrites of Purkinje neurons. The allocation of GABA(C) receptor subunits to identified neurons paves the way for future electrophysiological studies.

  11. Modulation of horizontal cell function by GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors in dark- and light-adapted tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Yang, X L; Gao, F; Wu, S M

    1999-01-01

    The physiological function of GABA transporters and GABA receptors in retinal horizontal cells (HCs) under dark-and light-adapted conditions were studied by whole-cell voltage clamp and intracellular recording techniques in retinal slices and whole-mounted isolated retinas of the larval tiger salamander. Puff application of GABA in picrotoxin elicited a NO-711 (a potent GABA transporter blocker)-sensitive inward current that did not exhibit a reversal potential in the physiological range, consistent with the idea that these HCs contain electrogenic GABA transporters. Application of GABA in NO-711 elicited a chloride current in HCs; about half of the current was suppressed by bicuculline or I4AA (a GABA(C) receptor antagonist), and the remaining half was suppressed by bicuculline + I4AA or picrotoxin. In whole-mount retinas, NO-711, bicuculline, I4AA, or picrotoxin hyperpolarized the HCs and enhanced the light responses under dark-adapted conditions, and blocked the time-dependent recovery of HC membrane potential and light responses during background illumination. Based on the parallel conductance model, GABA released in darkness mediates a chloride conductance about three times greater than the leak conductance or the glutamate-gated cation conductance. About half of this chloride conductance is mediated by GABA(A) receptors, and the other half is mediated by GABA(C) receptors. These results suggest that GABA released from HCs through the NO-711-sensitive GABA transporters activates GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors, resulting in chloride conductance increase which leads to a HC depolarization and reduction of the light response. Additionally, GABA transporters also mediate GABA release in background light that is responsible for the recovery of HC membrane potential and light responses.

  12. Protracted Developmental Trajectories of GABAA Receptor α1 and α2 Subunit Expression in Primate Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takanori; Nguyen, Quyen L.; Rotaru, Diana; Keenan, Tanya; Arion, Dominique; Beneyto, Monica; Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Background In schizophrenia, working memory dysfunction is associated with altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor α1 and α2 subunits in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In rodents, cortical α subunit expression shifts from low α1 and high α2 to high α1 and low α2 during early postnatal development. Because these two α subunits confer different functional properties to the GABAA receptors containing them, we determined whether this shift in α1 and α2 subunit expression continues through adolescence in the primate DLPFC, potentially contributing to the maturation of working memory during this developmental period. Methods Levels of GABAA receptor α1 and α2 subunit mRNAs were determined in the DLPFC of monkeys aged 1 week, 4 weeks, 3 months, 15–17 months (prepubertal), and 43–47 months (postpubertal) and in adult monkeys using in situ hybridization, followed by the quantification of α1 subunit protein by western blotting. We also performed whole-cell patch clamp recording of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (mIPSPs) in DLPFC slices prepared from pre- and postpubertal monkeys. Results The mRNA and protein levels of α1 and α2 subunits progressively increased and decreased, respectively, throughout postnatal development including adolescence. Furthermore, as predicted by the different functional properties of α1-containing versus α2-containing GABAA receptors, the mIPSP duration was significantly shorter in postpubertal than in prepubertal animals. Conclusions In contrast to rodents, the developmental shift in GABAA receptor α subunit expression continues through adolescence in primate DLPFC, inducing a marked change in the kinetics of GABA neurotransmission. Disturbances in this shift might underlie impaired working memory in schizophrenia. PMID:19249749

  13. Taurine-induced attenuation of MPP+ neurotoxicity in vitro: a possible role for the GABA(A) subclass of GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, M B; Tipton, K F

    2000-05-01

    Taurine is a sulphur-containing beta-amino acid found in high (millimolar) concentrations in excitable tissues such as brain and heart. Its suggested roles include osmoregulator, thermoregulator, neuromodulator, and potential neurotransmitter. This amino acid has also been shown to be released in large concentrations during ischaemia and excitotoxin-induced neuronal damage. Here we report a protective effect of taurine against MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity in coronal slices from rat brain. Significant protective effects were observed at taurine concentrations of 20 and 1 mM, suggesting a potential role for taurine in cases of neuronal insult. Studies with the synthetic taurine analogues taurine phosphonate, guanidinoethane sulphonate, and trimethyltaurine suggested the observed effect to be mediated via an extracellular mechanism. The use of GABA receptor ligands muscimol and bicuculline indicated the effect to be mediated through activation of GABA(A) receptors.

  14. Regional mRNA expression of GABAergic receptor subunits in brains of C57BL/6J and 129P3/J mice: Strain and heroin effects

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, A.J.; Zhang, Y.; Ho, A.; Kreek, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    C57BL/6J and 129 substrains of mice are known to differ in their basal levels of anxiety and behavioral response to drugs of abuse. We have previously shown strain differences in heroin-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) between C57BL/6J (C57) and 129P3/J (129) mice, and in the regional expression of several receptor and peptide mRNAs. In this study, we examined the contribution of the GABAergic system in the cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAc), caudate putamen (CPu) and the region containing the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA) to heroin reward by measuring mRNA levels of 7 of the most commonly expressed GABA-A receptor subunits, and both GABA-B receptor subunits, in these same mice following saline (control) or heroin administration in a CPP design. Using real-time PCR, we studied the effects of strain and heroin administration on GABA-A α1, α2, α3, β2, and γ2 subunits, which typically constitute synaptic GABA-A receptors, GABA-A α4 and δ subunits, which typically constitute extrasynaptic GABA-A receptors, and GABA-B R1 and R2 subunits. In saline-treated animals, we found an experiment-wise significant strain difference in GABA-Aα2 mRNA expression in the SN/VTA. Point-wise significant strain differences were also observed in GABA-Aα2, GABA-Aα3, and GABA-Aα4 mRNA expression in the NAc, as well as GABA-BR2 mRNA expression in the NAc and CPu, and GABA-BR1 mRNA expression in the cortex. For all differences, 129 mice had higher mRNA expression compared to C57 animals, with the exception of GABA-BR1 mRNA in the cortex where we observed lower levels in 129 mice. Therefore, it may be possible that known behavioral differences between these two strains are, in part, due to differences in their GABAergic systems. While we did not find heroin dose-related changes in mRNA expression levels in C57 mice, we did observe dose-related differences in 129 mice. These results may relate to our earlier behavioral finding that 129 mice are

  15. Subunit structure of the follitropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, J.

    1985-01-01

    Both of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of intact human follitropin (FSH) were radioiodinated with /sup 125/I-FSH-sodium iodide and chloramine-T, and could be resolved on polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE). The electrophoretic mobility of radioiodinated FSH ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits as well as the ..cap alpha beta.. dimer changed markedly depending on the concentration of reducing agents. /sup 125/I-FSH (Ka = 1.4 x 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/), complexes to the receptor on procine granulosa cells or in Triton X-100 extracts, was affinity-crosslinked with a cleavable (nondisulfide) homobifunctional reagent, bis(2-(succinimidooxycarbonyloxy)ethyl)sulfone, solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate with or without reducing agents, and electrophoresed. Crosslinked samples revealed three additional bands of slower electrophoretic mobility, corresponding to 65 (unreduced 62), 83 (unreduced 76) and 117 (unreduced 110)kDa, in addition to hormone bands. Formation of the three bands requires the /sup 125/I-FSH hormone to bind specifically to the receptor with subsequent cross-linking. The rate of formation and cleavage of the cross-linked complexes indicated a sequential and incremental addition of 22, 18, and 34 kDa components to the FSH ..cap alpha beta.. dimer. The results of reduction of cross-linked complexes demonstrated the existence of disulfide linkage between the three components. FSH was photoactively derivatized with N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 4-azidobenzolyl-glycine and radioiodinated for photoaffinity labeling. When derivatized /sup 125/I-FSH (Ka = 1.12 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/) bound to the cell was photolyzed for cross-linking and resolved on the SDS-PAGE, two new bands (106 and 61 kDa) under reducing condition appeared in addition to the hormone bands. Upon reduction with dithiotheitol and second-dimensional electrophoresis, the unreduced 104 kDa (reduced 106 kDa) band released two small components 31 and 14 kDa.

  16. Differentiated human midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells express excitatory strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors containing α2β subunits.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Florian; Kraft, Robert; Busse, Kathy; Härtig, Wolfgang; Ahrens, Jörg; Leffler, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Schwarz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Human fetal midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) may deliver a tissue source for drug screening and regenerative cell therapy to treat Parkinson's disease. While glutamate and GABA(A) receptors play an important role in neurogenesis, the involvement of glycine receptors during human neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation as well as their molecular and functional characteristics in NPCs are largely unknown. Here we investigated NPCs in respect to their glycine receptor function and subunit expression using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate the ability of NPCs to express functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors after differentiation for 3 weeks in vitro. Pharmacological and molecular analyses indicate a predominance of glycine receptor heteromers containing α2β subunits. Intracellular calcium measurements of differentiated NPCs suggest that glycine evokes depolarisations mediated by strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and not by D-serine-sensitive excitatory glycine receptors. Culturing NPCs with additional glycine, the glycine-receptor antagonist strychnine, or the Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1)-inhibitor bumetanide did not significantly influence cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro. These data indicate that NPCs derived from human fetal midbrain tissue acquire essential glycine receptor properties during neuronal maturation. However, glycine receptors seem to have a limited functional impact on neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation of NPCs in vitro.

  17. Specific Roles of NMDA Receptor Subunits in Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, H.; Hagino, Y.; Kasai, S.; Ikeda, K.

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays important roles in learning and memory. NMDA receptors are a tetramer that consists of two glycine-binding subunits GluN1, two glutamate-binding subunits (i.e., GluN2A, GluN2B, GluN2C, and GluN2D), a combination of a GluN2 subunit and glycine-binding GluN3 subunit (i.e., GluN3A or GluN3B), or two GluN3 subunits. Recent studies revealed that the specific expression and distribution of each subunit are deeply involved in neural excitability, plasticity, and synaptic deficits. The present article summarizes reports on the dysfunction of NMDA receptors and responsible subunits in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, autoimmune-induced glutamatergic receptor dysfunction, mood disorders, and autism. A key role for the GluN2D subunit in NMDA receptor antagonist-induced psychosis has been recently revealed. PMID:25817860

  18. Maternal caffeine ingestion during gestation and lactation influences respiratory adaptation to acute alveolar hypoxia in newborn rats and adenosine A2A and GABA A receptor mRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Picard, N; Guénin, S; Larnicol, N; Perrin, Y

    2008-10-15

    Caffeine is a widely used psychostimulant freely crossing the placental barrier. At the doses usually absorbed, it acts as an antagonist of both A1 and A2A adenosine receptors. Pregnant women are generally not advised to limit their caffeine consumption and thus expose their progeny to the drug during the whole of gestation and lactation. The possibility that such caffeine exposure may have long-term consequences on brain development has led to several behavioral investigations on animal models. Despite the crucial role played by adenosine receptor systems in neonatal breathing control, few studies in vitro have been concerned with the consequences of maternal caffeine absorption on breathing, and none in the unrestrained intact animal. The present investigation analyzed the influence of caffeine exposure via placental and milk transfer on resting ventilation and on the response to moderate alveolar hypoxia of 0 to 2-day-old newborn rat (P0-P2) together with the possible underlying mechanisms. Dams absorbed caffeine (46+/-3 mg/kg/day) via drinking fluid (0.2 g/L) throughout gestation, in conditions mimicking moderate human consumption. Caffeine exposure did not significantly affect basal respiratory parameters. In contrast, it attenuated both the early increase and the secondary decrease in ventilation triggered by moderate alveolar hypoxia (11% O2 inhaled). The abolition of Fos protein expression evoked by hypoxia suggested that caffeine exposure may decrease the activity of O2-sensing peripheral chemoreceptor pathway. From real-time PCR data, those functional alterations were associated to increases in A2A adenosine receptor and alpha2 GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNAs in the medulla. This indicates that, even at moderate doses, maternal caffeine consumption may induce a series of subtle developmental alterations that may affect modulation of breathing control in the neonate in pathological situations such hypoxia.

  19. Glycine receptor subunits expression in the developing rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel Ángel; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Salceda, Rocío

    2017-09-01

    Glycine receptor (GlyR) consists of two α (1-4) and three β subunits. Considerable evidence indicates that the adult retina expresses the four types of α subunits; however, the proportion of these subunits in adult and immature retina is almost unknown. In this report we have studied mRNA and the protein expression of GlyR subunits in the retina during postnatal rat development by Real-Time qRT-PCR and western blot. mRNA and protein expression indicated a gradual increase of the α1, α3, α4 and β GlyR subunits during postnatal ages tested. The mRNA β subunit showed higher expression levels (∼3 fold) than those observed for the α1 and α3 subunits. Very interestingly, the α2 GlyR subunit had the highest expression in the retina, even in the adult. These results revealed the expression of GlyR at early postnatal ages, supporting its role in retina development. In addition, our results indicated that the adult retina expressed a high proportion of the α2 subunit, suggesting the expression of monomeric and/or heteromeric receptors. A variety of studies are needed to further characterize the role of the specific subunits in both adult and immature retina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stereoselective modulatory actions of oleamide on GABA(A) receptors and voltage-gated Na(+) channels in vitro: a putative endogenous ligand for depressant drug sites in CNS.

    PubMed

    Verdon, B; Zheng, J; Nicholson, R A; Ganelli, C R; Lees, G

    2000-01-01

    1. cis-9,10-octadecenoamide ('oleamide') accumulates in CSF on sleep deprivation. It induces sleep in animals (the trans form is inactive) but its cellular actions are poorly characterized. We have used electrophysiology in cultures from embryonic rat cortex and biochemical studies in mouse nerve preparations to address these issues. 2. Twenty microM cis-oleamide (but not trans) reversibly enhanced GABA(A) currents and depressed the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity in cultured networks. 3. cis-oleamide stereoselectively blocked veratridine-induced (but not K(+)-induced) depolarisation of mouse synaptoneurosomes (IC(50), 13. 9 microM). 4. The cis isomer stereoselectively blocked veratridine-induced (but not K(+)-induced) [(3)H]-GABA release from mouse synaptosomes (IC(50), 4.6 microM). 5. At 20 microM cis-oleamide, but not trans, produced a marked inhibition of Na(+) channel-dependent rises in intrasynaptosomal Ca(2+). 6. The physiological significance of these observations was examined by isolating Na(+) spikes in cultured pyramidal neurones. Sixty-four microM cis-oleamide did not significantly alter the amplitude, rate of rise or duration of unitary action potentials (1 Hz). 7. cis-Oleamide stereoselectively suppressed sustained repetitive firing (SRF) in these cells with an EC(50) of 4.1 microM suggesting a frequency- or state-dependent block of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. 8. Oleamide is a stereoselective modulator of both postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors and presynaptic or somatic voltage-gated Na(+) channels which are crucial for synaptic inhibition and conduction. The modulatory actions are strikingly similar to those displayed by sedative or anticonvulsant barbiturates and a variety of general anaesthetics. 9. Oleamide may represent an endogenous modulator for drug receptors and an important regulator of arousal.

  1. A case of relapsing encephalitis positive for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antibody associated with Type B3 thymoma.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Takaya; Kinoshita, Makoto; Shimazu, Kohki; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Omori, Kenichi; Hazama, Takanori

    2016-11-29

    A 87-year-old female presented with subacute progression of cognitive decline. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of brain MRI showed multifocal high-intensity lesions. Thoracic CT image revealed the presence of thymoma, and serum autoantibody screening showed positivity for anti-gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antibody. Histopathological analysis confirmed type B3 thymoma after thymectomy. The patient received both plasmapheresis and intravenous methylprednisolone therapy, and showed remarkable amelioration of clinical symptoms and MRI abnormal high intensity. However, after 2 month from the clinical recovery, the patient showed recurrence of brain lesions and intravenous methylprednisolone monotherapy was performed. Continuation of oral steroid therapy was required to maintain the quienscent state of inflammation within the central nervous system. Anti-GABAA receptor antibody is a recently discovered novel autoantibody associated with autoimmue encephalitis. Due to the limited number of literature reported, clinical course and therapeutic response of GABAA receptor antibody encephalitis remains elusive. Here we reported a rare case of GABAA receptor antibody encephalitis with type B3 thymoma. Clinical, radiological and therapeutic courses described in our report highlight the importance of immunotherapy for treatment of the disease.

  2. Barbiturates require the N terminus and first transmembrane domain of the delta subunit for enhancement of alpha1beta3delta GABAA receptor currents.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hua-Jun; Macdonald, Robert L

    2010-07-30

    GABA(A) receptors are composed predominantly of alphabetagamma receptors, which mediate primarily synaptic inhibition, and alphabetadelta receptors, which mediate primarily extrasynaptic inhibition. At saturating GABA concentrations, the barbiturate pentobarbital substantially increased the amplitude and desensitization of the alpha1beta3delta receptor but not the alpha1beta3gamma2L receptor currents. To explore the structural domains of the delta subunit that are involved in pentobarbital potentiation and increased desensitization of alpha1beta3delta currents, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by progressive replacement of gamma2L subunit sequence with a delta subunit sequence or a delta subunit sequence with a gamma2L subunit sequence, and HEK293T cells were co-transfected with alpha1 and beta3 subunits or alpha1 and beta3 subunits and a gamma2L, delta, or chimeric subunit. Currents evoked by a saturating concentration of GABA or by co-application of GABA and pentobarbital were recorded using the patch clamp technique. By comparing the extent of enhancement and changes in kinetic properties produced by pentobarbital among chimeric and wild type receptors, we concluded that although potentiation of alpha1beta3delta currents by pentobarbital required the delta subunit sequence from the N terminus to proline 241 in the first transmembrane domain (M1), increasing desensitization of alpha1beta3delta currents required a delta subunit sequence from the N terminus to isoleucine 235 in M1. These findings suggest that the delta subunit N terminus and N-terminal portion of the M1 domain are, at least in part, involved in transduction of the allosteric effect of pentobarbital to enhance alpha1beta3delta currents and that this effect involves a distinct but overlapping structural domain from that involved in altering desensitization.

  3. Ethanol, not detectably metabolized in brain, significantly reduces brain metabolism, probably via action at specific GABA(A) receptors and has measureable metabolic effects at very low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Rae, Caroline D; Davidson, Joanne E; Maher, Anthony D; Rowlands, Benjamin D; Kashem, Mohammed A; Nasrallah, Fatima A; Rallapalli, Sundari K; Cook, James M; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2014-04-01

    Ethanol is a known neuromodulatory agent with reported actions at a range of neurotransmitter receptors. Here, we measured the effect of alcohol on metabolism of [3-¹³C]pyruvate in the adult Guinea pig brain cortical tissue slice and compared the outcomes to those from a library of ligands active in the GABAergic system as well as studying the metabolic fate of [1,2-¹³C]ethanol. Analyses of metabolic profile clusters suggest that the significant reductions in metabolism induced by ethanol (10, 30 and 60 mM) are via action at neurotransmitter receptors, particularly α4β3δ receptors, whereas very low concentrations of ethanol may produce metabolic responses owing to release of GABA via GABA transporter 1 (GAT1) and the subsequent interaction of this GABA with local α5- or α1-containing GABA(A)R. There was no measureable metabolism of [1,2-¹³C]ethanol with no significant incorporation of ¹³C from [1,2-¹³C]ethanol into any measured metabolite above natural abundance, although there were measurable effects on total metabolite sizes similar to those seen with unlabelled ethanol.

  4. Early continuous white noise exposure alters auditory spatial sensitivity and expression of GAD65 and GABAA receptor subunits in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinghong; Yu, Liping; Cai, Rui; Zhang, Jiping; Sun, Xinde

    2010-04-01

    Sensory experiences have important roles in the functional development of the mammalian auditory cortex. Here, we show how early continuous noise rearing influences spatial sensitivity in the rat primary auditory cortex (A1) and its underlying mechanisms. By rearing infant rat pups under conditions of continuous, moderate level white noise, we found that noise rearing markedly attenuated the spatial sensitivity of A1 neurons. Compared with rats reared under normal conditions, spike counts of A1 neurons were more poorly modulated by changes in stimulus location, and their preferred locations were distributed over a larger area. We further show that early continuous noise rearing induced significant decreases in glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor alpha1 subunit expression, and an increase in GABA(A) receptor alpha3 expression, which indicates a returned to the juvenile form of GABA(A) receptor, with no effect on the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. These observations indicate that noise rearing has powerful adverse effects on the maturation of cortical GABAergic inhibition, which might be responsible for the reduced spatial sensitivity.

  5. Mutational analysis of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The structural elements required for normal maturation and assembly of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were investigated by expression of mutated subunits in transfected fibroblasts. Normally, the wild-type alpha subunit acquires high affinity alpha bungarotoxin binding in a time-dependent manner; however, mutation of the 128 and/or 142 cysteines to either serine or alanine, as well as deletion of the entire 14 amino acids in this region abolished all detectable high affinity binding. Nonglycosylated subunits that had a serine to glycine mutation in the consensus sequence also did not efficiently attain high affinity binding to toxin. In contrast, mutation of the proline at position 136 to glycine or alanine, or a double mutation of the cysteines at position 192 and 193 to serines had no effect on the acquisition of high affinity toxin binding. These data suggest that a disulfide bridge between cysteines 128 and 142 and oligosaccharide addition at asparagine 141 are required for the normal maturation of alpha subunit as assayed by high affinity toxin binding. The unassembled wild-type alpha subunit expressed in fibroblasts is normally degraded with a t1/2 of 2 h; upon assembly with the delta subunit, the degradation rate slows significantly (t1/2 greater than 13 h). All mutated alpha subunits retained the capacity to assemble with a delta subunit coexpressed in fibroblasts; however, mutated alpha subunits that were not glycosylated or did not acquire high affinity toxin binding were rapidly degraded (t1/2 = 20 min to 2 h) regardless of whether or not they assembled with the delta subunit. Assembly and rapid degradation of nonglycosylated acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits and subunit complexes were also observed in tunicamycin- treated BC3H-1 cells, a mouse musclelike cell line that normally expresses functional AChR. Hence, rapid degradation may be one form of regulation assuring that only correctly processed and assembled subunits

  6. γ-aminobutyric acid type A α4, β2, and δ subunits assemble to produce more than one functionally distinct receptor type.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Bracamontes, John; Shu, Hong-Jin; Li, Ping; Mennerick, Steven; Steinbach, Joe Henry; Akk, Gustav

    2014-12-01

    Native γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors consisting of α4, β1-3, and δ subunits mediate responses to the low, tonic concentration of GABA present in the extracellular milieu. Previous studies on heterologously expressed α4βδ receptors have shown a large degree of variability in functional properties, including sensitivity to the transmitter. We studied properties of α4β2δ receptors employing free subunits and concatemeric constructs, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, HEK 293 cells, and cultured hippocampal neurons. The expression system had a strong effect on the properties of receptors containing free subunits. The midpoint of GABA activation curve was 10 nM for receptors in oocytes versus 2300 nM in HEK cells. Receptors activated by the steroid alfaxalone had an estimated maximal open probability of 0.6 in oocytes and 0.01 in HEK cells. Irrespective of the expression system, receptors resulting from combining the tandem construct β2-δ and a free α4 subunit exhibited large steroid responses. We propose that free α4, β2, and δ subunits assemble in different configurations with distinct properties in oocytes and HEK cells, and that subunit linkage can overcome the expression system-dependent preferential assembly of free subunits. Hippocampal neurons transfected with α4 and the picrotoxin-resistant δ(T269Y) subunit showed large responses to alfaxalone in the presence of picrotoxin, suggesting that α4βδ receptors may assemble in a similar configuration in neurons and oocytes.

  7. A reduction in hippocampal GABAA receptor alpha5 subunits disrupts the memory for location of objects in mice.

    PubMed

    Prut, L; Prenosil, G; Willadt, S; Vogt, K; Fritschy, J-M; Crestani, F

    2010-07-01

    The memory for location of objects, which binds information about objects to discrete positions or spatial contexts of occurrence, is a form of episodic memory particularly sensitive to hippocampal damage. Its early decline is symptomatic for elderly dementia. Substances that selectively reduce alpha5-GABA(A) receptor function are currently developed as potential cognition enhancers for Alzheimer's syndrome and other dementia, consistent with genetic studies implicating these receptors that are highly expressed in hippocampus in learning performance. Here we explored the consequences of reduced GABA(A)alpha5-subunit contents, as occurring in alpha5(H105R) knock-in mice, on the memory for location of objects. This required the behavioral characterization of alpha5(H105R) and wild-type animals in various tasks examining learning and memory retrieval strategies for objects, locations, contexts and their combinations. In mutants, decreased amounts of alpha5-subunits and retained long-term potentiation in hippocampus were confirmed. They exhibited hyperactivity with conserved circadian rhythm in familiar actimeters, and normal exploration and emotional reactivity in novel places, allocentric spatial guidance, and motor pattern learning acquisition, inhibition and flexibility in T- and eight-arm mazes. Processing of object, position and context memories and object-guided response learning were spared. Genotype difference in object-in-place memory retrieval and in encoding and response learning strategies for object-location combinations manifested as a bias favoring object-based recognition and guidance strategies over spatial processing of objects in the mutants. These findings identify in alpha5(H105R) mice a behavioral-cognitive phenotype affecting basal locomotion and the memory for location of objects indicative of hippocampal dysfunction resulting from moderately decreased alpha5-subunit contents.

  8. Expression of glutamate receptor subunits in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Stepulak, Andrzej; Luksch, Hella; Gebhardt, Christine; Uckermann, Ortrud; Marzahn, Jenny; Sifringer, Marco; Rzeski, Wojciech; Staufner, Christian; Brocke, Katja S; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2009-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role for glutamate and its receptors in the biology of cancer. This study was designed to systematically analyze the expression of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subunits in various human cancer cell lines, compare expression levels to those in human brain tissue and, using electrophysiological techniques, explore whether cancer cells respond to glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists. Expression analysis of glutamate receptor subunits NR1-NR3B, GluR1-GluR7, KA1, KA2 and mGluR1-mGluR8 was performed by means of RT-PCR in human rhabdomyosarcoma/medulloblastoma (TE671), neuroblastoma (SK-NA-S), thyroid carcinoma (FTC 238), lung carcinoma (SK-LU-1), astrocytoma (MOGGCCM), multiple myeloma (RPMI 8226), glioma (U87-MG and U343), lung carcinoma (A549), colon adenocarcinoma (HT 29), T cell leukemia cells (Jurkat E6.1), breast carcinoma (T47D) and colon adenocarcinoma (LS180). Analysis revealed that all glutamate receptor subunits were differentially expressed in the tumor cell lines. For the majority of tumors, expression levels of NR2B, GluR4, GluR6 and KA2 were lower compared to human brain tissue. Confocal imaging revealed that selected glutamate receptor subunit proteins were expressed in tumor cells. By means of patch-clamp analysis, it was shown that A549 and TE671 cells depolarized in response to application of glutamate agonists and that this effect was reversed by glutamate receptor antagonists. This study reveals that glutamate receptor subunits are differentially expressed in human tumor cell lines at the mRNA and the protein level, and that their expression is associated with the formation of functional channels. The potential role of glutamate receptor antagonists in cancer therapy is a feasible goal to be explored in clinical trials.

  9. The effect of BLA GABA(A) receptors in anxiolytic-like effect and aversive memory deficit induced by ACPA

    PubMed Central

    Kangarlu-Haghighi, Katayoon; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-01-01

    The roles of GABAergic receptors of the Basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist (arachydonilcyclopropylamide; ACPA)-induced anxiolytic-like effect and aversive memory deficit in adult male mice were examined in elevated plus-maze task. Results showed that pre-test intra-peritoneal injection of ACPA induced anxiolytic-like effect (at dose of 0.05 mg/kg) and aversive memory deficit (at doses of 0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg). The results revealed that Pre-test intra-BLA infusion of muscimol (GABAA receptor agonist; at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 µg/mouse) or bicuculline (GABAA receptor antagonist; at all doses) impaired and did not alter aversive memory, respectively. All previous GABA agents did not have any effects on anxiety-like behaviors. Interestingly, pretreatment with a sub-threshold dose of muscimol (0.025 µg/mouse) and bicuculline (0.025 µg/mouse) did not alter anxiolytic-like behaviors induced by ACPA, while both drugs restored ACPA-induced amnesia. Moreover, muscimol or bicuculline increased and decreased ACPA-induced locomotor activity, respectively. Finally the data may indicate that BLA GABAA receptors have critical and different roles in anxiolytic-like effect, aversive memory deficit and locomotor activity induced by ACPA. PMID:26648818

  10. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Olivia F.; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M.; Bravo, Javier A.; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)−/− mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:25288769

  11. GABA(A) receptor activation modulates corneal unit activity in rostral and caudal portions of trigeminal subnucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Bereiter, David A

    2003-11-01

    Corneal nociceptors terminate at the trigeminal subnucleus interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition and subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical spinal cord (Vc/C1) junction regions of the lower brain stem. The aims of this study were to determine if local GABAA receptor activation modifies corneal input to second-order neurons at these regions and if GABAA receptor activation in one region affects corneal input to the other region. In barbiturate-anesthetized male rats, corneal nociceptors were excited by pulses of CO2 gas, and GABAA receptors were activated by microinjections of the selective agonist muscimol. Local muscimol injection at the site of recording inhibited all Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 units tested and was reversed partially by bicuculline. To test for ascending intersubnuclear communication, muscimol injection into the caudal Vc/C1 junction, remote from the recording site at the Vi/Vc transition, inhibited the evoked response of most corneal units, although some neurons were enhanced. Injection of the nonselective synaptic blocking agent, CoCl2, remotely into the Vc/C1 region inhibited the evoked response of all Vi/Vc units tested. To test for descending intersubnuclear communication, muscimol was injected remotely into the rostral Vi/Vc transition and enhanced the evoked activity of all corneal units tested at the caudal Vc/C1 junction. These results suggest that GABAA receptor mechanisms play a significant role in corneal nociceptive processing by second-order trigeminal brain stem neurons. GABAA receptor mechanisms act locally at both the Vi/Vc transition and Vc/C1 junction regions to inhibit corneal input and act through polysynaptic pathways to modify corneal input at multiple levels of the trigeminal brain stem complex.

  12. [Effects of intra-amygdala injection of GABA(A)-receptor agonist and antagonist on respiratory and cardiac components of conditioned fear in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, I V; Rysakova, M P

    2013-01-01

    The role of GABAergic system of amygdala in vegetative and behavioral manifestations of conditioned fear was studied in groups of active and passive rabbits, selected upon testing in open field and light-dark chamber. During training, the light (4 s) was paired with electrodermal stimulation of hind limbs(1 s, 10 Hz). Conditioned fear was judged by heartbeats and respiratory rates before and in the process of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli presentation. Solutions of GABA(A)-receptor agonist (muscimol, 0.1 μg/μL) or antagonist (bicuculline methbromide, 0.5 μg/μL) were applied to the right or left basal nucleus of amygdala after conditioning. Muscimol injection evoked more powerful vegetative changes in passive rabbits than in the active ones; respiratory deceleration during freezing in response to conditioned stimuli was eliminated and the reaction to electrodermal stimulation was reduced or altered. Activation of the left amygdala by bicuculline resulted in the increased probability of active locomotor reactions in active rabbits, activation of the right amygdale, on the contrary, increased probability of freezing. The results evidence the non-equivalence of amygdalar GABAergic system in active and passive animals.

  13. p-Coumaric acid activates the GABA-A receptor in vitro and is orally anxiolytic in vivo.

    PubMed

    Scheepens, Arjan; Bisson, Jean-Francois; Skinner, Margot

    2014-02-01

    The increasing prevalence and social burden of subclinical anxiety in the western world represents a significant psychosocial and financial cost. Consumers are favouring a more natural and nonpharmacological approach for alleviating the effects of everyday stress and anxiety. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor is the primary mediator of central inhibitory neurotransmission, and GABA-receptor agonists are well known to convey anxiolytic effects. Using an in vitro screening approach to identify naturally occurring phytochemical GABA agonists, we discovered the plant secondary metabolite p-coumaric acid to have significant GABAergic activity, an effect that could be blocked by co-administration of the specific GABA-receptor antagonist, picrotoxin. Oral administration of p-coumaric acid to rodents induced a significant anxiolytic effect in vivo as measured using the elevated plus paradigm, in line with the effects of oral diazepam. Given that p-coumaric acid is reasonably well absorbed following oral consumption in man and is relatively nontoxic, it may be suitable for the formulation of a safe and effective anxiolytic functional food.

  14. Subunit structure of the acetylcholine receptor from Electrophorus electricus.

    PubMed

    Conti-Tronconi, B M; Hunkapiller, M W; Lindstrom, J M; Raftery, M A

    1982-11-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of the four major peptides (Mr 41,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 62,000) present in purified preparations of Electrophorus electricus nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) have been determined for 24 cycles by automated sequence analysis procedures yielding four unique polypeptide sequences. The sequences showed a high degree of similarity, having identical residues in a number of positions ranging between 37% and 50% for specific pairs of subunits. Comparison of the sequences obtained with those of the subunits of similar molecular weight from Torpedo californica AcChoR revealed an even higher degree of homology (from 46% to 71%) for these two highly diverged species. Simultaneous sequence analysis of the amino termini present in native, purified Electrophorus AcChoR showed that these four related sequences were the only ones present and that they occur in a ratio of 2:1:1:1, with the smallest subunit ("alpha 1") being present in two copies. Genealogical analysis suggests that the subunits of both Torpedo and Electrophorus AcChoRs derive from a common ancestral gene, the divergence having occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry and the very early divergence of the four subunits, as well as the highly conserved structure of the AcChoR complex along animal evolution, suggest that each of the subunits evolved to perform discrete crucial roles in the physiological function of the AcChoR.

  15. Binding interactions with the complementary subunit of nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Blum, Angela P; Van Arnam, Ethan B; German, Laurel A; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2013-03-08

    The agonist-binding site of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) spans an interface between two subunits of the pentameric receptor. The principal component of this binding site is contributed by an α subunit, and it binds the cationic moiety of the nicotinic pharmacophore. The other part of the pharmacophore, a hydrogen bond acceptor, has recently been shown to bind to the complementary non-α subunit via the backbone NH of a conserved Leu. This interaction was predicted by studies of ACh-binding proteins and confirmed by functional studies of the neuronal (CNS) nAChR, α4β2. The ACh-binding protein structures further suggested that the hydrogen bond to the backbone NH is mediated by a water molecule and that a second hydrogen bonding interaction occurs between the water molecule and the backbone CO of a conserved Asn, also on the non-α subunit. Here, we provide new insights into the nature of the interactions between the hydrogen bond acceptor of nicotinic agonists and the complementary subunit backbone. We studied both the nAChR of the neuromuscular junction (muscle-type) and a neuronal subtype, (α4)2(β4)3. In the muscle-type receptor, both ACh and nicotine showed a strong interaction with the Leu NH, but the potent nicotine analog epibatidine did not. This interaction was much attenuated in the α4β4 receptor. Surprisingly, we found no evidence for a functionally significant interaction with the backbone carbonyl of the relevant Asn in either receptor with an array of agonists.

  16. GABA-A receptor modulators alter emotionality and hippocampal theta rhythm in an animal model of long-lasting anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Alexandre Ademar; Duzzioni, Marcelo; Duarte, Filipe Silveira; Leme, Leandro Rinaldi; Costa, Ana Paula Ramos; Santos, Evelyn Cristina da Silva; de Pieri, Claudini Honório; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Naime, Aline Aita; Farina, Marcelo; de Lima, Thereza Christina Monteiro

    2013-09-26

    The cholinergic system is implicated in emotional regulation. The injection of non-convulsant doses of the muscarinic receptor agonist pilocarpine (PILO) induces long-lasting anxiogenic responses in rats evaluated at different time-points (24h to 3 months). To investigate the underlying mechanisms, rats treated with PILO (150mg/kg) were injected 24h or 1 month later with an anxiolytic (diazepam, 1mg/kg, DZP) or anxiogenic (pentylenetetrazole, 15mg/kg, PTZ) drug and evaluated in the elevated plus-maze (EPM). Prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampal (HIP) electroencephalographic recordings and acetylcolinesterase (AChE) activity were also analyzed after PILO treatment. Anxiogenic responses observed in the EPM 24h or 1 month after PILO treatment (e.g., decreased time spent and number of entries into the open arms of the maze) were blocked by DZP but not affected by PTZ. No epileptiform events were registered in the HIP or PFC at 24h or 1 month after PILO injection, but enhanced theta activity was observed in the HIP. DZP decreased hippocampal theta of PILO-treated rats in contrast with PTZ, which increased this parameter in saline- and PILO-treated rats. The HIP and PFC AChE activity did not change after PILO treatment. Our findings demonstrate that the long-term effects on the emotionality of rats induced by PILO are associated with electrophysiological changes in the HIP and sensitive to pharmacological manipulation of the GABAergic system. The present work may support this new research model of long-lasting anxiety, while also highlighting the muscarinic system as a potential target involved in anxiety disorders.

  17. Interactions between opioid-peptides-containing pathways and GABA(A)-receptors-mediated systems modulate panic-like-induced behaviors elicited by electric and chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Fabrício; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2006-08-09

    Aiming to clarify the effect of interactive interconnections between the endogenous opioid peptides-neural links and GABAergic pathways on panic-like responses, in the present work, the effect of the peripheral and central administration of morphine or the non-specific opioid receptors antagonist naloxone was evaluated on the fear-induced responses (defensive attention, defensive immobility and escape behavior) elicited by electric and chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus. Central microinjections of opioid drugs in the inferior colliculus were also performed followed by local administration of the GABA(A)-receptor antagonist bicuculline. The defensive behavior elicited by the blockade of GABAergic receptors in the inferior colliculus had been quantitatively analyzed, recording the number of crossing, jump, rotation and rearing, in each minute, during 30 min, in the open-field test. The opioid receptors stimulation with morphine decreased the defensive attention, the defensive immobility and escape behavior thresholds, and the non-specific opioid receptors blockade caused opposite effects, enhancing the defensive behavior thresholds. These effects were corroborated by either the stimulation or the inhibition of opioid receptors followed by the GABA(A) receptor blockade with bicuculline, microinjected into the inferior colliculus. There was a significant increase in the diverse fear-induced responses caused by bicuculline with the pretreatment of the inferior colliculus with morphine, and the opposite effect was recorded after the pretreatment of the inferior colliculus nuclei with naloxone followed by bicuculline local administration. These findings suggest an interaction between endogenous opioid-peptides-containing connections and GABA(A)-receptor-mediated system with direct influence on the organization of the panic-like or fear-induced responses elaborated in the inferior colliculus during critical emotional states.

  18. Serotonergic modulation of muscle acetylcholine receptors of different subunit composition.

    PubMed Central

    García-Colunga, J; Miledi, R

    1996-01-01

    Modulation of muscle acetylcholine (AcCho) receptors (AcChoRs) by serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)] and other serotonergic compounds was studied in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Various combinations of alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunit RNAs were injected into oocytes, and membrane currents elicited by AcCho were recorded under voltage clamp. Judging by the amplitudes of AcCho currents generated, the levels of functional receptor expression were: alpha beta gamma delta > alpha beta delta > alpha beta gamma > alpha gamma delta. The alpha beta gamma delta and alpha beta delta AcChoR Subtypes were strongly blocked by 5HT, whereas the alpha beta gamma receptor was blocked only slightly. The order of blocking potency of AcChoRs by 5HT was: alpha beta delta > alpha beta gamma delta > alpha beta gamma. 5HT receptor antagonists, such as methysergide and spiperone, were even more potent blockers of AcChoRs than 5HT but did not show much subunit selectivity. Blockage of alpha beta gamma delta and alpha beta delta receptors by 5HT was voltage-dependent, and the voltage dependence was abolished when the delta subunit was omitted. These findings may need to be taken into consideration when trying to elucidate the mode of action of many clinically important serotonergic compounds. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8633003

  19. Subunit-Specific Trafficking of GABAA Receptors during Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Goodkin, Howard P.; Joshi, Suchitra; Mtchedlishvili, Zakaria; Brar, Jasmit; Kapur, Jaideep

    2010-01-01

    It is proposed that a reduced surface expression of GABAA receptors (GABARs) contributes to the pathogenesis of status epilepticus (SE), a condition characterized by prolonged seizures. This hypothesis was based on the finding that prolonged epileptiform bursting (repetitive bursts of prolonged depolarizations with superimposed action potentials) in cultures of dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neurons (dissociated cultures) results in the increased intracellular accumulation of GABARs. However, it is not known whether this rapid modification in the surface-expressed GABAR pool results from selective, subunit-dependent or nonselective, subunit-independent internalization of GABARs. In hippocampal slices obtained from animals undergoing prolonged SE (SE-treated slices), we found that the surface expression of the GABARβ2/3 and γ2 subunits was reduced, whereas that of the δ subunit was not. Complementary electrophysiological recordings from dentate granule cells in SE-treated slices demonstrated a reduction in GABAR-mediated synaptic inhibition, but not tonic inhibition. A reduction in the surface expression of the γ2 subunit, but not the δ subunit was also observed in dissociated cultures and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures when incubated in an elevated KCl external medium or an elevated KCl external medium supplemented with NMDA, respectively. Additional studies demonstrated that the reduction in the surface expression of the γ2 subunit was independent of direct ligand binding of the GABAR. These findings demonstrate that the regulation of surface-expressed GABAR pool during SE is subunit-specific and occurs independent of ligand binding. The differential modulation of the surface expression of GABARs during SE has potential implications for the treatment of this neurological emergency. PMID:18322097

  20. Gene expression analysis of CL-20-induced reversible neurotoxicity reveals GABA(A) receptors as potential targets in the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Guan, Xin; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Liang, Chun; Perkins, Edward J

    2012-01-17

    The earthworm Eisenia fetida is one of the most used species in standardized soil ecotoxicity tests. End points such as survival, growth, and reproduction are eco-toxicologically relevant but provide little mechanistic insight into toxicity pathways, especially at the molecular level. Here we apply a toxicogenomic approach to investigate the mode of action underlying the reversible neurotoxicity of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20), a cyclic nitroamine explosives compound. We developed an E. fetida-specific shotgun microarray targeting 15119 unique E. fetida transcripts. Using this array we profiled gene expression in E. fetida in response to exposure to CL-20. Eighteen earthworms were exposed for 6 days to 0.2 μg/cm(2) of CL-20 on filter paper, half of which were allowed to recover in a clean environment for 7 days. Nine vehicle control earthworms were sacrificed at days 6 and 13, separately. Electrophysiological measurements indicated that the conduction velocity of earthworm medial giant nerve fiber decreased significantly after 6-day exposure to CL-20, but was restored after 7 days of recovery. Total RNA was isolated from the four treatment groups including 6-day control, 6-day exposed, 13-day control, and 13-day exposed (i.e., 6-day exposure followed by 7-day recovery), and was hybridized to the 15K shotgun oligo array. Statistical and bioinformatic analyses suggest that CL-20 initiated neurotoxicity by noncompetitively blocking the ligand-gated GABA(A) receptor ion channel, leading to altered expression of genes involved in GABAergic, cholinergic, and Agrin-MuSK pathways. In the recovery phase, expression of affected genes returned to normality, possibly as a result of autophagy and CL-20 dissociation/metabolism. This study provides significant insights into potential mechanisms of CL-20-induced neurotoxicity and the recovery of earthworms from transient neurotoxicity stress.

  1. Development and modulation of GABA(A) receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the CA1 region of prenatally protein malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    Mokler, D J; Galler, J R; Luebke, J I

    2001-01-01

    Prenatal protein malnutrition has been demonstrated to result in alterations in the serotonergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems in the rat hippocampus. In the present study, whole-cell patch clamp recordings of CA1 pyramidal cells were employed in an effort to gain insight into the specific cellular locus and functional consequences of the previously reported changes. Hippocampal slices were prepared from Sprague-Dawley rats whose dams were fed either a normal (25% casein) or low (6% casein) protein diet during pregnancy. The development of GABA(A) receptor-mediated miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) and their modulation by the benzodiazipine agonist zolpidem were compared in cells from the two nutritional groups at postnatal days 7, 14, 21 and >90. The modulation of mIPSCs by serotonin was also examined in cells from 21 day old rats. No significant differences were observed in the characteristics of mIPSCs in cells from control vs. prenatally protein malnourished rats at any of the ages studied, although there was a trend for a higher frequency of mIPSCs in adult (>p90) prenatally protein malnourished rats. At all ages, zolpidem produced a significant increase in the mean decay time of mIPSCs that was not significantly different in cells from the two nutritional groups. Serotonin application resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of mIPSCs in CA1 pyramidal cells but there was no significant difference between cells from the two nutritional groups in the characteristics of this effect. These data demonstrate that the previously observed alterations in the serotonergic and GABAergic systems that result from prenatal protein malnutrition do not have significant functional consequences at a single cell level in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus as measured in vitro.

  2. The Biochemistry, Ultrastructure, and Subunit Assembly Mechanism of AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) are tetrameric ligand-gated ion channels that play crucial roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Our knowledge about the ultrastructure and subunit assembly mechanisms of intact AMPA-Rs was very limited. However, the new studies using single particle EM and X-ray crystallography are revealing important insights. For example, the tetrameric crystal structure of the GluA2cryst construct provided the atomic view of the intact receptor. In addition, the single particle EM structures of the subunit assembly intermediates revealed the conformational requirement for the dimer-to-tetramer transition during the maturation of AMPA-Rs. These new data in the field provide new models and interpretations. In the brain, the native AMPA-R complexes contain auxiliary subunits that influence subunit assembly, gating, and trafficking of the AMPA-Rs. Understanding the mechanisms of the auxiliary subunits will become increasingly important to precisely describe the function of AMPA-Rs in the brain. The AMPA-R proteomics studies continuously reveal a previously unexpected degree of molecular heterogeneity of the complex. Because the AMPA-Rs are important drug targets for treating various neurological and psychiatric diseases, it is likely that these new native complexes will require detailed mechanistic analysis in the future. The current ultrastructural data on the receptors and the receptor-expressing stable cell lines that were developed during the course of these studies are useful resources for high throughput drug screening and further drug designing. Moreover, we are getting closer to understanding the precise mechanisms of AMPA-R-mediated synaptic plasticity. PMID:21080238

  3. Effects of GABA(A) receptor modulation on the expression of GnRH gene and GnRH receptor (GnRH-R) gene in the hypothalamus and GnRH-R gene in the anterior pituitary gland of follicular-phase ewes.

    PubMed

    Ciechanowska, Magdalena; Lapot, Magdalena; Malewski, Tadeusz; Mateusiak, Krystyna; Misztal, Tomasz; Przekop, Franciszek

    2009-04-01

    The effect of prolonged, intermittent infusion of GABA(A) receptor agonist (muscimol) or GABA(A) receptor antagonist (bicuculline) into the third cerebral ventricle on the expression of GnRH gene and GnRH-R gene in the hypothalamus and GnRH-R gene in the anterior pituitary gland was examined in follicular-phase ewes by real-time PCR. The activation or inhibition of GABA(A) receptors in the hypothalamus decreased or increased the expression of GnRH and GnRH-R genes and LH secretion, respectively. The present results indicate that the GABAergic system in the hypothalamus of follicular-phase ewes may suppress, via hypothalamic GABA(A) receptors, the expression of GnRH and GnRH-R genes in this structure. The decrease or increase of GnRH-R mRNA in the anterior pituitary gland and LH secretion in the muscimol- or bicuculline-treated ewes, respectively, is probably a consequence of parallel changes in the release of GnRH from the hypothalamus activating GnRH-R gene expression. It is suggested that GABA acting through the GABA(A) receptor mechanism on the expression of GnRH gene and GnRH-R gene in the hypothalamus may be involved in two processes: the biosynthesis of GnRH and the release of this neurohormone in the hypothalamus.

  4. Changes in ventral respiratory column GABAaR ε- and δ-subunits during hibernation mediate resistance to depression by EtOH and pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Hengen, K B; Gomez, T M; Stang, K M; Johnson, S M; Behan, M

    2011-02-01

    During hibernation in the 13-lined ground squirrel, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, the cerebral cortex is electrically silent, yet the brainstem continues to regulate cardiorespiratory function. Previous work showed that neurons in slices through the medullary ventral respiratory column (VRC) but not the cortex are insensitive to high doses of pentobarbital during hibernation, leading to the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R) in the VRC undergo a seasonal modification in subunit composition. To test whether alteration of GABA(A)R subunits are responsible for hibernation-associated pentobarbital insensitivity, we examined an array of subunits using RT-PCR and Western blots and identified changes in ε- and δ-subunits in the medulla but not the cortex. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that during hibernation, the expression of ε-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs nearly doubles in the VRC. We also identified a population of δ-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs adjacent to the VRC that were differentially expressed during hibernation. As δ-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs are particularly sensitive to ethanol (EtOH), multichannel electrodes were inserted in slices of medulla and cortex from hibernating squirrels and EtOH was applied. EtOH, which normally inhibits neuronal activity, excited VRC but not cortical neurons during hibernation. This excitation was prevented by bicuculline pretreatment, indicating the involvement of GABA(A)Rs. We propose that neuronal activity in the VRC during hibernation is unaffected by pentobarbital due to upregulation of ε-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs on VRC neurons. Synaptic input from adjacent inhibitory interneurons that express δ-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs is responsible for the excitatory effects of EtOH on VRC neurons during hibernation.

  5. Subunit structure of the acetylcholine receptor from Electrophorus electricus.

    PubMed Central

    Conti-Tronconi, B M; Hunkapiller, M W; Lindstrom, J M; Raftery, M A

    1982-01-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of the four major peptides (Mr 41,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 62,000) present in purified preparations of Electrophorus electricus nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) have been determined for 24 cycles by automated sequence analysis procedures yielding four unique polypeptide sequences. The sequences showed a high degree of similarity, having identical residues in a number of positions ranging between 37% and 50% for specific pairs of subunits. Comparison of the sequences obtained with those of the subunits of similar molecular weight from Torpedo californica AcChoR revealed an even higher degree of homology (from 46% to 71%) for these two highly diverged species. Simultaneous sequence analysis of the amino termini present in native, purified Electrophorus AcChoR showed that these four related sequences were the only ones present and that they occur in a ratio of 2:1:1:1, with the smallest subunit ("alpha 1") being present in two copies. Genealogical analysis suggests that the subunits of both Torpedo and Electrophorus AcChoRs derive from a common ancestral gene, the divergence having occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry and the very early divergence of the four subunits, as well as the highly conserved structure of the AcChoR complex along animal evolution, suggest that each of the subunits evolved to perform discrete crucial roles in the physiological function of the AcChoR. Images PMID:6959131

  6. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  7. Comparison of Steroid Modulation of Spontaneous Inhibitory Postsynaptic Currents in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons and Steady-State Single-Channel Currents from Heterologously Expressed α1β2γ2L GABA(A) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sampurna; Qian, Mingxing; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Covey, Douglas F; Mennerick, Steven; Akk, Gustav

    2016-04-01

    Neuroactive steroids are efficacious modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)) receptor function. The effects of steroids on the GABA(A) receptor are typically determined by comparing steady-state single-channel open probability or macroscopic peak responses elicited by GABA in the absence and presence of a steroid. Due to differences in activation conditions (exposure duration, concentration of agonist), it is not obvious whether modulation measured using typical experimental protocols can be used to accurately predict the effect of a modulator on native receptors under physiologic conditions. In the present study, we examined the effects of 14 neuroactive steroids and analogs on the properties of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The goal was to determine whether the magnitude of modulation of the decay time course of sIPSCs correlates with the extent of modulation and kinetic properties of potentiation as determined in previous single-channel studies. The steroids were selected to cover a wide range of efficacy on heterologously expressed rat α1β2γ2L GABA(A) receptors, ranging from essentially inert to highly efficacious (strong potentiators of single-channel and macroscopic peak responses). The data indicate a strong correlation between prolongation of the decay time course of sIPSCs and potentiation of single-channel open probability. Furthermore, changes in intracluster closed time distributions were the single best predictor of prolongation of sIPSCs. We infer that the information obtained in steady-state single-channel recordings can be used to forecast modulation of synaptic currents.

  8. Molecular Pathology of Genetic Epilepsies Associated with GABAA Receptor Subunit Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Robert L; Kang, Jing-Qiong

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in ligand-gated ion channel genes associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsies have been reported in excitatory acetylcholine receptor α4 and β2 subunit genes linked to autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy and in inhibitory GABAA receptor α1, β3, γ2, and δ subunit genes associated with childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, pure febrile seizures, generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, and generalized epilepsy with tonic–clonic seizures. Recent studies suggest that these mutations alter receptor function or biogenesis, including impaired receptor subunit messenger RNA stability, receptor subunit protein folding and stability, receptor assembly, and receptor trafficking. PMID:19396344

  9. Affinities and densities of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)muscimol (GABA-A) binding sites and of central benzodiazepine receptors are unchanged in autopsied brain tissue from cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, R.F.; Lavoie, J.; Giguere, J.F.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    1988-09-01

    The integrity of GABA-A receptors and of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated in membrane preparations from prefrontal cortex and caudate nuclei obtained at autopsy from nine cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and an equal number of age-matched control subjects. Histopathological studies revealed Alzheimer Type II astrocytosis in all cases in the cirrhotic group; controls were free from neurological, psychiatric or hepatic diseases. Binding to GABA-A receptors was studied using (/sup 3/H)muscimol as radioligand. The integrity of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated using (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam and (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788. Data from saturation binding assays was analyzed by Scatchard plot. No modifications of either affinities (Kd) or densities (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)muscimol of central benzodiazepine binding sites were observed. These findings do not support recent suggestions that alterations of either high-affinity GABA or benzodiazepine receptors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  10. The multifaceted subunit interfaces of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Green, Tim; Nayeem, Naushaba

    2015-01-01

    The past fifteen years has seen a revolution in our understanding of ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) structure, starting with the first view of the ligand binding domain (LBD) published in 1998, and in many ways culminating in the publication of the full-length structure of GluA2 in 2009. These reports have revealed not only the central role played by subunit interfaces in iGluR function, but also myriad binding sites within interfaces for endogenous and exogenous factors. Changes in the conformation of inter-subunit interfaces are central to transmission of ligand gating into pore opening (itself a rearrangement of interfaces), and subsequent closure through desensitization. With the exception of the agonist binding site, which is located entirely within individual subunits, almost all modulatory factors affecting iGluRs appear to bind to sites in subunit interfaces. This review seeks to summarize what we currently understand about the diverse roles interfaces play in iGluR function, and to highlight questions for future research.

  11. The multifaceted subunit interfaces of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Green, Tim; Nayeem, Naushaba

    2014-06-06

    The past fifteen years has seen a revolution in our understanding of ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) structure, starting with the first view of the ligand binding domain (LBD) published in 1998, and in many ways culminating in the publication of the full-length structure of GluA2 in 2009. These reports have revealed not only the central role played by subunit interfaces in iGluR function, but also myriad binding sites within interfaces for endogenous and exogenous factors. Changes in the conformation of inter-subunit interfaces are central to transmission of ligand gating into pore opening (itself a rearrangement of interfaces), and subsequent closure through desensitization. With the exception of the agonist binding site, which is located entirely within individual subunits, almost all modulatory factors affecting iGluRs appear to bind to sites in subunit interfaces. This review seeks to summarize what we currently understand about the diverse roles interfaces play in iGluR function, and to highlight questions for future research.

  12. Cornichon proteins determine the subunit composition of synaptic AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Herring, Bruce E; Shi, Yun; Suh, Young Ho; Zheng, Chan-Ying; Blankenship, Sabine M; Roche, Katherine W; Nicoll, Roger A

    2013-03-20

    Cornichon-2 and cornichon-3 (CNIH-2/-3) are AMPA receptor (AMPAR) binding proteins that promote receptor trafficking and markedly slow AMPAR deactivation in heterologous cells, but their role in neurons is unclear. Using CNIH-2 and CNIH-3 conditional knockout mice, we find a profound reduction of AMPAR synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. This deficit is due to the selective loss of surface GluA1-containing AMPARs (GluA1A2 heteromers), leaving a small residual pool of synaptic GluA2A3 heteromers. The kinetics of AMPARs in neurons lacking CNIH-2/-3 are faster than those in WT neurons due to the fast kinetics of GluA2A3 heteromers. The remarkably selective effect of CNIHs on the GluA1 subunit is probably mediated by TARP γ-8, which prevents a functional association of CNIHs with non-GluA1 subunits. These results point to a sophisticated interplay between CNIHs and γ-8 that dictates subunit-specific AMPAR trafficking and the strength and kinetics of synaptic AMPAR-mediated transmission.

  13. GABAA receptors are differentially sensitive to zinc: dependence on subunit composition.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, T. G.; Moss, S. J.; Xie, X.; Huganir, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    GABAA receptors with different subunit composition, were expressed in kidney cells and studied by whole cell recording. Expressed GABAA receptors were differentially sensitive to inhibition by zinc; receptors which lacked the gamma subunit were inhibited by zinc. Embryonic neurons also exhibited zinc-sensitive GABA responses, in contrast to adult neurones. This developmentally-sensitive aspect of GABAA receptor pharmacology may be partly dependent on expression of the gamma subunit. PMID:1655141

  14. Differential Contribution of Subunit Interfaces to α9α10 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function.

    PubMed

    Boffi, Juan Carlos; Marcovich, Irina; Gill-Thind, JasKiran K; Corradi, Jeremías; Collins, Toby; Lipovsek, María Marcela; Moglie, Marcelo; Plazas, Paola V; Craig, Patricio O; Millar, Neil S; Bouzat, Cecilia; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2017-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors can be assembled from either homomeric or heteromeric pentameric subunit combinations. At the interface of the extracellular domains of adjacent subunits lies the acetylcholine binding site, composed of a principal component provided by one subunit and a complementary component of the adjacent subunit. Compared with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine cholinergic receptors (nAChRs) assembled from α and β subunits, the α9α10 receptor is an atypical member of the family. It is a heteromeric receptor composed only of α subunits. Whereas mammalian α9 subunits can form functional homomeric α9 receptors, α10 subunits do not generate functional channels when expressed heterologously. Hence, it has been proposed that α10 might serve as a structural subunit, much like a β subunit of heteromeric nAChRs, providing only complementary components to the agonist binding site. Here, we have made use of site-directed mutagenesis to examine the contribution of subunit interface domains to α9α10 receptors by a combination of electrophysiological and radioligand binding studies. Characterization of receptors containing Y190T mutations revealed unexpectedly that both α9 and α10 subunits equally contribute to the principal components of the α9α10 nAChR. In addition, we have shown that the introduction of a W55T mutation impairs receptor binding and function in the rat α9 subunit but not in the α10 subunit, indicating that the contribution of α9 and α10 subunits to complementary components of the ligand-binding site is nonequivalent. We conclude that this asymmetry, which is supported by molecular docking studies, results from adaptive amino acid changes acquired only during the evolution of mammalian α10 subunits.

  15. Differential Contribution of Subunit Interfaces to α9α10 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Boffi, Juan Carlos; Marcovich, Irina; Gill-Thind, JasKiran K.; Corradi, Jeremías; Collins, Toby; Lipovsek, María Marcela; Moglie, Marcelo; Plazas, Paola V.; Craig, Patricio O.; Millar, Neil S.; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors can be assembled from either homomeric or heteromeric pentameric subunit combinations. At the interface of the extracellular domains of adjacent subunits lies the acetylcholine binding site, composed of a principal component provided by one subunit and a complementary component of the adjacent subunit. Compared with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine cholinergic receptors (nAChRs) assembled from α and β subunits, the α9α10 receptor is an atypical member of the family. It is a heteromeric receptor composed only of α subunits. Whereas mammalian α9 subunits can form functional homomeric α9 receptors, α10 subunits do not generate functional channels when expressed heterologously. Hence, it has been proposed that α10 might serve as a structural subunit, much like a β subunit of heteromeric nAChRs, providing only complementary components to the agonist binding site. Here, we have made use of site-directed mutagenesis to examine the contribution of subunit interface domains to α9α10 receptors by a combination of electrophysiological and radioligand binding studies. Characterization of receptors containing Y190T mutations revealed unexpectedly that both α9 and α10 subunits equally contribute to the principal components of the α9α10 nAChR. In addition, we have shown that the introduction of a W55T mutation impairs receptor binding and function in the rat α9 subunit but not in the α10 subunit, indicating that the contribution of α9 and α10 subunits to complementary components of the ligand-binding site is nonequivalent. We conclude that this asymmetry, which is supported by molecular docking studies, results from adaptive amino acid changes acquired only during the evolution of mammalian α10 subunits. PMID:28069778

  16. Respiratory and behavioral dysfunction following loss of the GABAA receptor α4 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Loria, C Jean; Stevens, Ashley M; Crummy, Ellen; Casadesus, Gemma; Jacono, Frank J; Dick, Thomas E; Siegel, Ruth E

    2013-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor plasticity participates in mediating adaptation to environmental change. Previous studies in rats demonstrated that extrasynaptic GABAA receptor subunits and receptors in the pons, a brainstem region involved in respiratory control, are upregulated by exposure to sustained hypobaric hypoxia. In these animals, expression of the mRNA encoding the extrasynaptic α4 subunit rose after 3 days in sustained hypoxia, while those encoding the α6 and δ subunits increased dramatically by 2 weeks. However, the participation of extrasynaptic subunits in maintaining respiration in normoxic conditions remains unknown. To examine the importance of α4 in a normal environment, respiratory function, motor and anxiety-like behaviors, and expression of other GABAA receptor subunit mRNAs were compared in wild-type (WT) and α4 subunit-deficient mice. Loss of the α4 subunit did not impact frequency, but did lead to reduced ventilatory pattern variability. In addition, mice lacking the subunit exhibited increased anxiety-like behavior. Finally, α4 subunit loss resulted in reduced expression of other extrasynaptic (α6 and δ) subunit mRNAs in the pons without altering those encoding the most prominent synaptic subunits. These findings on subunit-deficient mice maintained in normoxia, in conjunction with earlier findings on animals maintained in chronic hypoxia, suggest that the expression and regulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptor subunits in the pons is interdependent and that their levels influence respiratory control as well as adaptation to stress. PMID:23533098

  17. α2-containing GABAA receptors expressed in hippocampal region CA3 control fast network oscillations.

    PubMed

    Heistek, Tim S; Ruiperez-Alonso, Marta; Timmerman, A Jaap; Brussaard, Arjen B; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2013-02-15

    GABA(A) receptors are critically involved in hippocampal oscillations. GABA(A) receptor α1 and α2 subunits are differentially expressed throughout the hippocampal circuitry and thereby may have distinct contributions to oscillations. It is unknown which GABA(A) receptor α subunit controls hippocampal oscillations and where these receptors are expressed. To address these questions we used transgenic mice expressing GABA(A) receptor α1 and/or α2 subunits with point mutations (H101R) that render these receptors insensitive to allosteric modulation at the benzodiazepine binding site, and tested how increased or decreased function of α subunits affects hippocampal oscillations. Positive allosteric modulation by zolpidem prolonged decay kinetics of hippocampal GABAergic synaptic transmission and reduced the frequency of cholinergically induced oscillations. Allosteric modulation of GABAergic receptors in CA3 altered oscillation frequency in CA1, while modulation of GABA receptors in CA1 did not affect oscillations. In mice having a point mutation (H101R) at the GABA(A) receptor α2 subunit, zolpidem effects on cholinergically induced oscillations were strongly reduced compared to wild-type animals, while zolpidem modulation was still present in mice with the H101R mutation at the α1 subunit. Furthermore, genetic knockout of α2 subunits strongly reduced oscillations, whereas knockout of α1 subunits had no effect. Allosteric modulation of GABAergic receptors was strongly reduced in unitary connections between fast spiking interneurons and pyramidal neurons in CA3 of α2H101R mice, but not of α1H101R mice, suggesting that fast spiking interneuron to pyramidal neuron synapses in CA3 contain α2 subunits. These findings suggest that α2-containing GABA(A) receptors expressed in the CA3 region provide the inhibition that controls hippocampal rhythm during cholinergically induced oscillations.

  18. Screening for AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit specific modulators

    PubMed Central

    Azumaya, Caleigh M.; Days, Emily L.; Vinson, Paige N.; Stauffer, Shaun; Sulikowski, Gary; Weaver, C. David; Nakagawa, Terunaga

    2017-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPAR) are ligand gated ion channels critical for synaptic transmission and plasticity. Their dysfunction is implicated in a variety of psychiatric and neurological diseases ranging from major depressive disorder to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Attempting to potentiate or depress AMPAR activity is an inherently difficult balancing act between effective treatments and debilitating side effects. A newly explored strategy to target subsets of AMPARs in the central nervous system is to identify compounds that affect specific AMPAR-auxiliary subunit complexes. This exploits diverse spatio-temporal expression patterns of known AMPAR auxiliary subunits, providing means for designing brain region-selective compounds. Here we report a high-throughput screening-based pipeline that can identify compounds that are selective for GluA2-CNIH3 and GluA2-stargazin complexes. These compounds will help us build upon the growing library of AMPAR-auxiliary subunit specific inhibitors, which have thus far all been targeted to TARP γ-8. We used a cell-based assay combined with a voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) to identify changes in glutamate-gated cation flow across the membranes of HEK cells co-expressing GluA2 and an auxiliary subunit. We then used a calcium flux assay to further validate hits picked from the VSD assay. VU0612951 and VU0627849 are candidate compounds from the initial screen that were identified as negative and positive allosteric modulators (NAM and PAM), respectively. They both have lower IC50/EC50s on complexes containing stargazin and CNIH3 than GSG1L or the AMPAR alone. We have also identified a candidate compound, VU0539491, that has NAM activity in GluA2(R)-CNIH3 and GluA2(Q) complexes and PAM activity in GluA2(Q)-GSG1L complexes. PMID:28358902

  19. GABA-A RECEPTOR ACTIVITY IN THE NORADRENERGIC LOCUS COERULEUS DRIVES TRIGEMINAL NEUROPATHIC PAIN IN THE RAT; CONTRIBUTION OF NAα1 RECEPTORS IN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    KAUSHAL, R.; TAYLOR, B. K.; JAMAL, A. B.; ZHANG, L.; MA, F.; DONAHUE, R.; WESTLUND, K. N.

    2017-01-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain is described as constant excruciating facial pain. The study goal was to investigate the role of nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) in a model of chronic orofacial neuropathic pain (CCI-ION). The study examines LC’s relationship to both the medullary dorsal horn receiving trigeminal nerve sensory innervation and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). LC is a major source of CNS noradrenaline (NA) and a primary nucleus involved in pain modulation. Although descending inhibition of acute pain by LC is well established, contribution of the LC to facilitation of chronic neuropathic pain is also reported. In the present study, a rat orofacial pain model of trigeminal neuropathy was induced by chronic constrictive injury of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Orofacial neuropathic pain was indicated by development of whisker pad mechanical hypersensitivity. Hypersensitivity was alleviated by selective elimination of NA neurons, including LC (A6 cell group), with the neurotoxin anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase saporin (anti-DβH-saporin) microinjected either intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or into trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis (spVc). The GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, administered directly into LC (week 8) inhibited hypersensitivity. This indicates a valence shift in which increased GABAA signaling ongoing in LC after trigeminal nerve injury paradoxically produces excitatory facilitation of the chronic pain state. Microinjection of NAα1 receptor antagonist, benoxathian, into mPFC attenuated whisker pad hypersensitivity, while NAα2 receptor antagonist, idazoxan, was ineffective. Thus, GABAA-mediated activation of NA neurons during CCI-ION can facilitate hypersensitivity through NAα1 receptors in the mPFC. These data indicate LC is a chronic pain generator. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IBRO. PMID:27520081

  20. Identification of New Agonists and Antagonists of the Insect Odorant Receptor Co-Receptor Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sisi; Luetje, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Insects detect attractive and aversive chemicals using several families of chemosensory receptors, including the OR family of olfactory receptors, making these receptors appealing targets for the control of insects. Insect ORs are odorant-gated ion channels, comprised of at least one common subunit (the odorant receptor co-receptor subunit, Orco) and at least one variable odorant specificity subunit. Each of the many ORs of an insect species is activated or inhibited by an unique set of odorants that interact with the variable odorant specificity subunits, making the development of OR directed insect control agents complex and laborious. However, several N-,2-substituted triazolothioacetamide compounds (VUAA1, VU0450667 and VU0183254) were recently shown to act directly on the highly conserved Orco subunit, suggesting that broadly active compounds can be developed. We have explored the chemical space around the VUAA1 structure in order to identify new Orco ligands. Principal Findings We screened ORs from several insect species, using heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes and an electrophysiological assay, with a panel of 22 compounds structurally related to VUAA1. By varying the nitrogen position in the pyridine ring and altering the moieties decorating the phenyl ring, we identified two new agonists and a series of competitive antagonists. Screening smaller compounds, similar to portions of the VUAA1 structure, also yielded competitive antagonists. Importantly, we show that Orco antagonists inhibit odorant activation of ORs from several insect species. Detailed examination of one antagonist demonstrated inhibition to be through a non-competitive mechanism. Conclusions A similar pattern of agonist and antagonist sensitivity displayed by Orco subunits from different species suggests a highly conserved binding site structure. The susceptibility to inhibition of odorant activation by Orco antagonism is conserved across disparate insect species

  1. Cell-type specific deletion of GABA(A)α1 in corticotropin-releasing factor-containing neurons enhances anxiety and disrupts fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Gafford, Georgette M; Guo, Ji-Dong; Flandreau, Elizabeth I; Hazra, Rimi; Rainnie, Donald G; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-10-02

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is critical for the endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stressors, and it has been shown to modulate fear and anxiety. The CRF receptor is widely expressed across a variety of cell types, impeding progress toward understanding the contribution of specific CRF-containing neurons to fear dysregulation. We used a unique CRF-Cre driver transgenic mouse line to remove floxed GABA(A)α1 subunits specifically from CRF neurons [CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO]. This process resulted in mice with decreased GABA(A)α1 expression only in CRF neurons and increased CRF mRNA within the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These mice show normal locomotor and pain responses and no difference in depressive-like behavior or Pavlovian fear conditioning. However, CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO increased anxiety-like behavior and impaired extinction of conditioned fear, coincident with an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. These behavioral impairments were rescued with systemic or BNST infusion of the CRF antagonist R121919. Infusion of Zolpidem, a GABA(A)α1-preferring benzodiazepine-site agonist, into the BNST of the CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO was ineffective at decreasing anxiety. Electrophysiological findings suggest a disruption in inhibitory current may play a role in these changes. These data indicate that disturbance of CRF containing GABA(A)α1 neurons causes increased anxiety and impaired fear extinction, both of which are symptoms diagnostic for anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder.

  2. Mutation of glycine receptor subunit creates beta-alanine receptor responsive to GABA.

    PubMed

    Schmieden, V; Kuhse, J; Betz, H

    1993-10-08

    The amino acid at position 160 of the ligand-binding subunit, alpha 1, is an important determinant of agonist and antagonist binding to the glycine receptor. Exchange of the neighboring residues, phenylalanine at position 159 and tyrosine at position 161, increased the efficacy of amino acid agonists. Whereas wild-type alpha 1 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes required 0.7 millimolar beta-alanine for a half-maximal response, the doubly mutated (F159Y,Y161F) alpha 1 subunit had an affinity for beta-alanine (which was more potent than glycine) that was 110-fold that of the wild type. Also, gamma-aminobutyric acid and D-serine, amino acids that do not activate wild-type alpha 1 receptors, efficiently gated the mutant channel. Thus, aromatic hydroxyl groups are crucial for ligand discrimination at inhibitory amino acid receptors.

  3. Subunit-dependent effects of nickel on NMDA receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Carla; Gavazzo, Paola

    2003-10-07

    Nickel (Ni2+) is a transition metal that affects different neuronal ionic channels. We investigated its effects on glutamate channels of the NMDA-type in the presence of saturating concentration of glutamate or NMDA (50 microM), in 0 external Mg and in the continuous presence of saturating glycine (30 microM). In neonatal rat cerebellar granule cells, Ni2+ inhibited the current evoked by NMDA at -60 mV with an IC50 close to 40 microM. The inhibition was weakly voltage-dependent and the current at +40 mV was inhibited with IC50=86 microM. Wash out of the metal unmasked a stimulatory effect which persisted for a few seconds. In HEK293 cells transiently transfected with recombinant NR1a-NR2A receptors, Ni2+ inhibited the current elicited by glutamate with an IC50=52 microM at -60 mV and 90 microM at +40 mV. In HEK293 expressing NR1a-NR2B receptors, 0.1-100 microM Ni2+ caused a potentiation of the current, with EC50=4 microM, while with 300 microM, a voltage-dependent block became apparent (IC50=170 microM). As previously reported, the current through both classes of recombinant receptors was steeply dependent on external pH, and in both cases the protonic block had an IC50 close to pH 7.2. Application of Ni2+ showed that stimulation of NR1a-NR2B receptor channels was dependent on external pH, while voltage-independent inhibition of NR1a-NR2A was less sensitive to pH change. These results indicate that Ni2+ has multiple and complex effects on NMDA channels, which are largely dependent on the NR2 subunit.

  4. Antagonism of GABA-B but not GABA-A receptors in the VTA prevents stress- and intra-VTA CRF-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Blacktop, Jordan M.; Vranjkovic, Oliver; Mayer, Matthieu; Van Hoof, Matthew; Baker, David A.; Mantsch, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking requires corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) actions in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However the mechanisms through which CRF regulates VTA function to promote cocaine use are not fully understood. Here we examined the role of GABAergic neurotransmission in the VTA mediated by GABA-A or GABA-B receptors in the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking by a stressor, uncontrollable intermittent footshock, or bilateral intra-VTA administration of CRF. Rats underwent repeated daily cocaine self-administration (1.0 mg/kg/ing; 14 × 6 hrs/day) and extinction and were tested for reinstatement in response to footshock (0.5 mA, 0.5” duration, average every 40 sec; range 10–70 sec) or intra-VTA CRF delivery (500 ng/side) following intra-VTA pretreatment with the GABA-A antagonist, bicuculline, the GABA-B antagonist, 2-hydroxysaclofen or vehicle. Intra-VTA bicuculline (1, 10 or 20 ng/side) failed to block footshock- or CRF-induced cocaine seeking at either dose tested. By contrast, 2-hydroxysaclofen (0.2 or 2 µg/side) prevented reinstatement by both footshock and intra-VTA CRF at a concentration that failed to attenuate food-reinforced lever pressing (45 mg sucrose-sweetened pellets; FR4 schedule) in a separate group of rats. These data suggest that GABA-B receptor-dependent CRF actions in the VTA mediate stress-induced cocaine seeking and that GABA-B receptor antagonists may have utility for the management of stress-induced relapse in cocaine addicts. PMID:26596556

  5. Antagonism of GABA-B but not GABA-A receptors in the VTA prevents stress- and intra-VTA CRF-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Blacktop, Jordan M; Vranjkovic, Oliver; Mayer, Matthieu; Van Hoof, Matthew; Baker, David A; Mantsch, John R

    2016-03-01

    Stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking requires corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) actions in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However the mechanisms through which CRF regulates VTA function to promote cocaine use are not fully understood. Here we examined the role of GABAergic neurotransmission in the VTA mediated by GABA-A or GABA-B receptors in the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking by a stressor, uncontrollable intermittent footshock, or bilateral intra-VTA administration of CRF. Rats underwent repeated daily cocaine self-administration (1.0 mg/kg/ing; 14 × 6 h/day) and extinction and were tested for reinstatement in response to footshock (0.5 mA, 0.5" duration, average every 40 s; range 10-70 s) or intra-VTA CRF delivery (500 ng/side) following intra-VTA pretreatment with the GABA-A antagonist, bicuculline, the GABA-B antagonist, 2-hydroxysaclofen or vehicle. Intra-VTA bicuculline (1, 10 or 20 ng/side) failed to block footshock- or CRF-induced cocaine seeking at either dose tested. By contrast, 2-hydroxysaclofen (0.2 or 2 μg/side) prevented reinstatement by both footshock and intra-VTA CRF at a concentration that failed to attenuate food-reinforced lever pressing (45 mg sucrose-sweetened pellets; FR4 schedule) in a separate group of rats. These data suggest that GABA-B receptor-dependent CRF actions in the VTA mediate stress-induced cocaine seeking and that GABA-B receptor antagonists may have utility for the management of stress-induced relapse in cocaine addicts.

  6. Antibodies to the. cap alpha. -subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hens

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.; Yu, J.; Bai, D.H.; Hester, P.Y.; Kim, K.

    1985-11-01

    Simple methods for the generation, purification, and assay of antibodies to the ..cap alpha..-subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hen have been described. Chicken antibodies against the ..cap alpha..-subunit inhibit insulin binding to the receptor and stimulate glucose oxidation as well as autophosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit. Thus the properties of chicken antibodies are very similar to those of antibodies found in human autoimmune diseases and different from rabbit antibodies obtained against the same antigen.

  7. Use of an α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit concatamer to characterize ganglionic receptor subtypes with specific subunit composition reveals species-specific pharmacologic properties.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Clare; Papke, Roger L

    2012-09-01

    Drug development for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) is challenged by subtype diversity arising from variations in subunit composition. On-target activity for neuronal heteromeric receptors is typically associated with CNS receptors that contain α4 and other subunits, while off-target activity could be associated with ganglionic-type receptors containing α3β4 binding sites and other subunits, including β4, β2, α5, or α3 as a structural subunit in the pentamer. Additional interest in α3 β4 α5-containing receptors arises from genome-wide association studies linking these genes, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in α5 in particular, to lung cancer and heavy smoking. While α3 and β4 readily form receptors in expression system such as the Xenopus oocyte, since α5 is not required for function, simple co-expression approaches may under-represent α5-containing receptors. We used a concatamer of human α3 and β4 subunits to form ligand-binding domains, and show that we can force the insertions of alternative structural subunits into the functional pentamers. These α3β4 variants differ in sensitivity to ACh, nicotine, varenicline, and cytisine. Our data indicated lower efficacy for varenicline and cytisine than expected for β4-containing receptors, based on previous studies of rodent receptors. We confirm that these therapeutically important α4 receptor partial agonists may present different autonomic-based side-effect profiles in humans than will be seen in rodent models, with varenicline being more potent for human than rat receptors and cytisine less potent. Our initial characterizations failed to find functional effects of the α5 SNP. However, our data validate this approach for further investigations.

  8. Stoichiometry of the Human Glycine Receptor Revealed by Direct Subunit counting

    PubMed Central

    Durisic, Nela; Godin, Antoine G.; Wever, Claudia M.; Heyes, Colin D.; Lakadamyali, Melike; Dent, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The subunit stoichiometry of heteromeric glycine-gated channels (GlyRs) determines fundamental properties of these key inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors; however the ratio of α1 to β-subunits per receptor remains controversial. We used single molecule imaging and stepwise photobleaching in Xenopus oocytes to directly determine the subunit stoichiometry of a glycine receptor to be 3α1:2β. This approach allowed us to determine the receptor stoichiometry in mixed populations consisting of both heteromeric and homomeric channels, additionally revealing the quantitative proportions for the two populations. PMID:22973015

  9. Single Expressed Glycine Receptor Domains Reconstitute Functional Ion Channels without Subunit-specific Desensitization Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Meiselbach, Heike; Vogel, Nico; Langlhofer, Georg; Stangl, Sabine; Schleyer, Barbara; Bahnassawy, Lamia'a; Sticht, Heinrich; Breitinger, Hans-Georg; Becker, Cord-Michael; Villmann, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Cys loop receptors are pentameric arrangements of independent subunits that assemble into functional ion channels. Each subunit shows a domain architecture. Functional ion channels can be reconstituted even from independent, nonfunctional subunit domains, as shown previously for GlyRα1 receptors. Here, we demonstrate that this reconstitution is not restricted to α1 but can be transferred to other members of the Cys loop receptor family. A nonfunctional GlyR subunit, truncated at the intracellular TM3–4 loop by a premature stop codon, can be complemented by co-expression of the missing tail portion of the receptor. Compared with α1 subunits, rescue by domain complementation was less efficient when GlyRα3 or the GABAA/C subunit ρ1 was used. If truncation disrupted an alternative splicing cassette within the intracellular TM3–4 loop of α3 subunits, which also regulates receptor desensitization, functional rescue was not possible. When α3 receptors were restored by complementation using domains with and without the spliced insert, no difference in desensitization was found. In contrast, desensitization properties could even be transferred between α1/α3 receptor chimeras harboring or lacking the α3 splice cassette proving that functional rescue depends on the integrity of the alternative splicing cassette in α3. Thus, an intact α3 splicing cassette in the TM3–4 loop environment is indispensable for functional rescue, and the quality of receptor restoration can be assessed from desensitization properties. PMID:25143388

  10. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor. alpha. subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; Falls, D.L.; Dill-Devor, R.M.; Fischbach, G.D. )

    1988-03-01

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the {alpha} subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of {alpha} subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the {alpha}-subunit nuclear precursor.

  11. Coexpression of striatal dopamine receptor subtypes and excitatory amino acid subunits.

    PubMed

    Ariano, M A; Larson, E R; Noblett, K L; Sibley, D R; Levine, M S

    1997-08-01

    The striatal cellular coexpression patterns for the D(1A) and D2 dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and the ionotropic excitatory amino acid (EAA) subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-R1) and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) (GluR1 and GluR2/3) receptor subunits were examined morphologically. Their coincidence was assessed by visualization of mRNA transcripts, localization of encoded receptor proteins, and binding analysis using concurrently paired methods of fluorescence detection. The findings indicated that 1) mRNA transcripts for both receptor systems were detected in the medium-sized neuron population, and the distribution of receptor message closely reflected protein and binding patterns, with the exception of the GluR1 subunit; 2) both DA receptor mRNA transcripts were coexpressed with each ionotropic EAA receptor subunit examined and with each other, and NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits also showed coincident expression; 3) D(1A) DA receptor protein was detected in neurons which coexpressed EAA subunit proteins; and 4) GluR2/3 and NMDA-R1 subunit proteins were coexpressed in medium-sized neurons which also demonstrated D2 DA receptor binding sites. These findings suggest morphological receptor "promiscuity" since the coexpression patterns between DA and EAA receptors were found in all permutations. The results provide a spatial framework for physiological findings describing functional interactions between the two DA receptor types and between specific DA and EAA receptors in the striatum.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF SUBUNIT-DEPENDENT DIRECT GATING AND ALLOSTERIC MODULATORY EFFECTS OF CARISOPRODOL AT GABAA RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; González, Lorie A.; Dillon, Glenn H.

    2016-01-01

    Carisoprodol is a widely prescribed muscle relaxant, abuse of which has grown considerably in recent years. It directly activates and allosterically modulates α1β2γ2 GABAARs, although the site(s) of action are unknown. To gain insight into the actions of carisoprodol, subunit-dependent effects of this drug were assessed. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from HEK293 cells expressing α1β2, α1β3 or αxβzγ2 (where x = 1–6 and z = 1–3) GABAARs, and in receptors incorporating the δ subunit (modeling extrasynaptic receptors). The ability to directly gate and allosterically potentiate GABA-gated currents was observed for all configurations. Presence or absence of the γ2 subunit did not affect the ability of carisoprodol to directly gate or allosterically modulate the receptor. Presence of the β1 subunit conferred highest efficacy for direct activation relative to maximum GABA currents, while presence of the β2 subunit conferred highest efficacy for allosteric modulation of the GABA response. With regard to α subunits, carisoprodol was most efficacious at enhancing the actions of GABA in receptors incorporating the α1 subunit. The ability to directly gate the receptor was generally comparable regardless of the α subunit isoform, although receptors incorporating the α3 subunit showed significantly reduced direct gating efficacy and affinity. In extrasynaptic (α1β3δ and α4β3δ) receptors, carisoprodol had greater efficacy than GABA as a direct gating agonist. In addition, carisoprodol allosterically potentiated both EC20 and saturating GABA concentrations in these receptors. In assessing voltage-dependence, we found direct gating and inhibitory effects were insensitive to membrane voltage, whereas allosteric modulatory effects were affected by membrane voltage. Our findings demonstrate direct and allosteric effects of carisoprodol at synaptic and extrasynpatic GABAARs and that subunit isoform influences these effects. PMID:25896767

  13. Putative TRP channel antagonists, SKF 96365, flufenamic acid and 2-APB, are non-competitive antagonists at recombinant human α1β2γ2 GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Rae, M G; Hilton, J; Sharkey, J

    2012-05-01

    Although transient receptor potential (TRP) channel biology research has expanded rapidly in recent years, the field is hampered by the widely held, but relatively poorly investigated, belief that most of the pharmacological tools used to investigate TRP channel function may not be particularly selective for their intended targets. The objective of this study was therefore to determine if this was indeed the case by systematically evaluating the effects of three routinely used putative TRP channel antagonists, SKF 96365, flufenamic acid (FF) and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) against one of the most widely expressed CNS receptor subtypes CNS, the human α1β2γ2 GABA(A) receptor. Using whole cell patch-clamp recording to record responses to rapidly applied GABA in the absence and presence of the three putative antagonists in turn we found that SKF 96365 (1-100 μM) and FF (1-100 μM) significantly inhibited GABA responses of recombinant human α1β2γ2 GABA(A) receptor stably expressed in HEK293 cells with IC(50) values of 13.4 ± 5.1 and 1.9 ± 1.4 μM, respectively, suppressing the maximal response to GABA at all concentrations used in a manner consistent with a non-competitive mode of action. SKF 96365 and FF also both significantly reduced desensitisation and prolonged the deactivation kinetics of the receptors to GABA (1mM; P<0.05). 2-APB (10-1000 μM) also inhibited responses to GABA at all concentrations used with an IC(50) value of 16.7 ± 5.4 μM (n=3-5) but had no significant effect on the activation, desensitisation or deactivation kinetics of the GABA responses. Taken together this investigation revealed that these widely utilised TRP channel antagonists display significant 'off-target' effects at concentrations that are routinely used for the study of TRP channel function in numerous biological systems and as such, data which is obtained utilising these compounds should be interpreted with caution.

  14. Functional properties of a cloned 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptor subunit: comparison with native mouse receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hussy, N; Lukas, W; Jones, K A

    1994-01-01

    1. A comparative study of the whole-cell and single-channel properties of cloned and native mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptors (5-HT3) was undertaken using mammalian cell lines expressing the cloned 5-HT3 receptor subunit A (5-HT3R-A), superior cervical ganglia (SCG) neurones and N1E-115 cells. 2. No pharmacological difference was found in the sensitivity to the agonists 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT, or to the antagonists d-tubocurare and 3-tropanyl-3,5-dichlorobenzoate (MDL-72222). 3. Current-voltage (I-V) relationships of whole-cell currents showed inward rectification in the three preparations. Rectification was stronger both in cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit and in N1E-115 cells when compared with SCG neurones. 4. No clear openings could be resolved in 5-HT-activated currents in patches excised from cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit or N1E-115 cells. Current fluctuation analysis of whole-cell and excised-patch records revealed a slope conductance of 0.4-0.6 pS in both preparations. Current-voltage relationships of these channels showed strong rectification that fully accounted for the whole-cell voltage dependence. 5. In contrast, single channels of about 10 pS were activated by 5-HT in patches excised from SCG neurones. The weak voltage dependence of their conductance did not account completely for the rectification of whole-cell currents. A lower unitary conductance (3.4 pS) was inferred from whole-cell noise analysis. 6. We conclude that the receptor expressed from the cloned cDNA is indistinguishable from the 5-HT3 receptor of N1E-115 cells, suggesting an identical structure for these two receptors. The higher conductance and different voltage dependence of the 5-HT3 receptor in SCG neurones might indicate the participation of an additional subunit in the structure of native ganglionic 5-HT3 receptors. Homo-oligomeric 5-HT3R-A channels may also be present as suggested by the lower conductance estimated by whole-cell noise analysis. PMID

  15. Recombinant GABAA receptor desensitization: the role of the gamma 2 subunit and its physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Perrot, C; Feltz, P; Poulter, M O

    1996-11-15

    1. The purpose of these investigations was to examine the role that the gamma 2 subunit plays in human GABAA receptor desensitization. Two different recombinant GABAA receptors (alpha 1 beta 3 and alpha 1 beta 3 gamma 2) were compared by measuring the relaxation of whole-cell currents during the application of GABA, isoguvacine or taurine. 2. At concentrations which trigger a maximum response (100-500 microM GABA) the current relaxation usually fitted the sum of two exponentials. For alpha 1 beta 3 subunit receptors these values were tau 1 = 145 +/- 12 ms and tau 2 = 6.3 +/- 2.1 s (means +/- S.E.M.). Receptors consisting of alpha 1 beta 3 gamma 2 subunits desensitized faster: tau 1 = 41.6 +/- 8.3 ms and tau 2 = 2.4 +/- 0.6 s. 3. The Hill slope, determined for each receptor subunit combination, was the same and greater than 1.0, implying two binding steps in the activation of both receptor subunit combinations. 4. For alpha 1 beta 3 subunit receptors the fast desensitization rates were unaltered by reducing the GABA concentration from the EC100 (100 microM) to the approximate EC50 values (10-20 microM), whereas for alpha 1 beta 3 gamma 2 subunit receptors a significant slowing was observed. The fast desensitization disappeared at agonist concentrations below the EC50 for both subunit combinations. In contrast, the slow desensitization appeared at agonist concentrations near the EC20. This rate was dependent on agonist concentration reaching a maximum near the EC60 value of GABA. 5. The fast desensitization rates were unaltered by changing the holding potential of the cell during agonist application. However, for alpha 1 beta 3 gamma 2 subunit receptors the slow desensitization rate increased by approximately 15- to 20-fold over the range of voltages of -60 to +40 mV. This indicates that the gamma 2 subunit makes GABAA receptor desensitization voltage dependent. 6. Recovery from desensitization was also biphasic. The first recovery phase was faster for alpha 1 beta 3

  16. Determination of kainate receptor subunit ratios in mouse brain using novel chimeric protein standards.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Iida, Izumi; Konno, Kohtarou; Akashi, Kaori; Abe, Manabu; Natsume, Rie; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) are tetrameric channels assembled from GluK1-5. GluK1-3 are low-affinity subunits that form homomeric and heteromeric KARs, while GluK4 and GluK5 are high-affinity subunits that require co-assembly with GluK1-3 for functional expression. Although the subunit composition is thought to be highly heterogeneous in the brain, the distribution of KAR subunits at the protein level and their relative abundance in given regions of the brain remain largely unknown. In the present study, we titrated C-terminal antibodies to each KAR subunit using chimeric GluA2-GluK fusion proteins, and measured their relative abundance in the P2 and post-synaptic density (PSD) fractions of the adult mouse hippocampus and cerebellum. Analytical western blots showed that GluK2 and GluK3 were the major KAR subunits, with additional expression of GluK5 in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In both regions, GluK4 was very low and GluK1 was below the detection threshold. The relative amount of low-affinity subunits (GluK2 plus GluK3) was several times higher than that of high-affinity subunits (GluK4 plus GluK5) in both regions. Of note, the highest ratio of high-affinity subunits to low-affinity subunits was found in the hippocampal PSD fraction (0.32), suggesting that heteromeric receptors consisting of high- and low-affinity subunits highly accumulate at hippocampal synapses. In comparison, this ratio was decreased to 0.15 in the cerebellar PSD fraction, suggesting that KARs consisting of low-affinity subunits are more prevalent in the cerebellum. Therefore, low-affinity KAR subunits are predominant in the brain, with distinct subunit combinations between the hippocampus and cerebellum. Kainate receptors, an unconventional member of the iGluR receptor family, have a tetrameric structure assembled from low-affinity (GluK1-3) and high-affinity (GluK4 and GluK5) subunits. We used a simple but novel procedure to measure the relative abundance of both low- and

  17. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Szklarczyk, Arek; Ewaleifoh, Osefame; Beique, Jean-Claude; Wang, Yue; Knorr, David; Haughey, Norman; Malpica, Tanya; Mattson, Mark P.; Huganir, Richard; Conant, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent enzymes that play a role in the inflammatory response. These enzymes have been well studied in the context of cancer biology and inflammation. Recent studies, however, suggest that these enzymes also play roles in brain development and neurodegenerative disease. Select MMPs can target proteins critical to synaptic structure and neuronal survival, including integrins and cadherins. Here, we show that one member of the MMP family, MMP-7, which may be released from cells, including microglia, can target a protein critical to synaptic function. Through analysis of extracts from murine cortical slice preparations, we show that MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to generate an N-terminal fragment of ∼65 kDa. Moreover, studies with recombinant protein show that MMP-7-mediated cleavage of NR1 occurs at amino acid 517, which is extracellular and just distal to the first transmembrane domain. Data suggest that NR2A, which shares sequence homology with NR1, is also cleaved following treatment of slices with MMP-7, while select AMPA receptor subunits are not. Consistent with a potential effect of MMP-7 on ligand binding, additional experiments demonstrate that NMDA-mediated calcium flux is significantly diminished by MMP-7 pretreatment of cultures. In addition, the AMPA/NMDA ratio is increased by MMP-7 pretreatment. These data suggest that synaptic function may be altered in neurological conditions associated with increased levels of MMP-7.—Szklarczyk, A., Ewaleifoh, O., Beique, J.-C., Wang, Y., Knorr, D., Haughey, N., Malpica, T., Mattson, M. P., Huganir, R., Conant, K. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function. PMID:18644839

  18. Expression of functional receptors by the human γ-aminobutyric acid A γ2 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors are heteromeric membrane proteins formed mainly by various combinations of α, β, and γ subunits; and it is commonly thought that the γ2 subunit alone does not form functional receptors. In contrast, we found that cDNA encoding the γ2L subunit of the human GABAA receptor, injected alone into Xenopus oocytes, expressed functional GABA receptors whose properties were investigated by using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. GABA elicited desensitizing membrane currents that recovered after a few minutes' wash. Repetitive applications of GABA induced a “run-up” of GABA currents that nearly doubled the amplitude of the first response. The GABA currents inverted direction at about -30 mV, indicating that they are carried mainly by Cl- ions. The homomeric γ2L receptors were also activated by β-alanine > taurine > glycine, and, like some types of heteromeric GABAA receptors, the γ2L receptors were blocked by bicuculline and were potentiated by pentobarbital and flunitrazepam. These results indicate that the human γ2L subunit is capable of forming fully functional GABA receptors by itself in Xenopus oocytes and suggest that the roles proposed for the various subunits that make up the heteromeric GABAA receptors in situ require further clarification. PMID:14981251

  19. Expression and functional properties of α7 acetylcholine nicotinic receptors are modified in the presence of other receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Criado, Manuel; Valor, Luis M; Mulet, José; Gerber, Susana; Sala, Salvador; Sala, Francisco

    2012-11-01

    Although α7 nicotinic receptors are predominantly homopentamers, previous reports have indicated that α7 and β2 subunits are able to form heteromers. We have studied whether other nicotinic receptor subunits can also assemble with α7 subunits and the effect of this potential association. Coexpression of α7 with α2, α3, or β4 subunits reduced to about half, surface α-bungarotoxin binding sites and acetylcholine-gated currents. This is probably because of inhibition of membrane trafficking, as the total amount of α7 subunits was similar in all cases and a significant proportion of mature α7 receptors was present inside the cell. Only β4 subunits appeared to directly associate with α7 receptors at the membrane and these heteromeric receptors showed some kinetic and pharmacological differences when compared with homomeric α7 receptors. Finally, we emulated the situation of bovine chromaffin cells in Xenopus laevis oocytes by using the same proportion of α3, β4, α5, and α7 mRNAs, finding that α-bungarotoxin binding was similarly reduced in spite of increased currents, apparently mediated by α3β4(α5) receptors.

  20. Design, synthesis, and subtype selectivity of 3,6-disubstituted β-carbolines at Bz/GABA(A)ergic receptors. SAR and studies directed toward agents for treatment of alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenyuan; Majumder, Samarpan; Clayton, Terry; Petrou, Steven; VanLinn, Michael L; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Ma, Chunrong; Cromer, Brett A; Roth, Bryan L; Platt, Donna M; Cook, James M

    2010-11-01

    A series of 3,6-disubstituted β-carbolines was synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro affinities at α(x)β(3)γ(2) GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptor subtypes by radioligand binding assays in search of α(1) subtype selective ligands to treat alcohol abuse. Analogues of β-carboline-3-carboxylate-t-butyl ester (βCCt, 1) were synthesized via a CDI-mediated process and the related 6-substituted β-carboline-3-carboxylates 6 including WYS8 (7) were synthesized via a Sonogashira or Stille coupling processes from 6-iodo-βCCt (5). The bivalent ligands of βCCt (32 and 33) were also designed and prepared via a palladium-catalyzed homocoupling process to expand the structure-activity relationships (SAR) to larger ligands. Based on the pharmacophore/receptor model, a preliminary SAR study on 34 analogues illustrated that large substituents at position-6 of the β-carbolines were well tolerated. As expected, these groups are proposed to project into the extracellular domain (L(Di) region) of GABA(A)/Bz receptors (see 32 and 33). Moreover, substituents located at position-3 of the β-carboline nucleus exhibited a conserved stereo interaction in lipophilic pocket L(1), while N(2) presumably underwent a hydrogen bonding interaction with H(1). Three novel β-carboline ligands (βCCt, 3PBC and WYS8), which preferentially bound to α1 BzR subtypes permitted a comparison of the pharmacological efficacies with a range of classical BzR antagonists (flumazenil, ZK93426) from several different structural groups and indicated these β-carbolines were 'near GABA neutral antagonists'. Based on the SAR, the most potent (in vitro) α(1) selective ligand was the 6-substituted acetylenyl βCCt (WYS8, 7). Earlier both βCCt and 3PBC had been shown to reduce alcohol self-administration in alcohol preferring (P) and high alcohol drinking (HAD) rats but had little or no effect on sucrose self-administration.(1-3) Moreover, these two β-carbolines were orally active, and in addition, were

  1. Comparison of the subunit structure of acetylcholine receptors from muscle and electric organ of Electrophorus electricus.

    PubMed

    Gullick, W J; Lindstrom, J M

    1983-08-02

    The acetylcholine receptors of the electric organ and muscle tissues of Electrophorus electricus are composed of alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunits. Receptor subunits from the two tissues were compared by peptide mapping with monoclonal antibodies, an affinity-labeling reagent, and a lectin to characterize particular peptide fragments. These experiments indicate that the corresponding receptor subunits from the two tissues are extensively homologous or identical throughout their amino acid sequences. Small differences in the electrophoresis of peptide fragments of alpha subunits between the two tissues occurred on fragments which bound labeled lectin. These results suggest that the acetylcholine receptors in electric organ and muscle tissues of Electrophorus differ in structure only by minor posttranslational modifications perhaps involving carbohydrate.

  2. Influence of subunit composition on desensitization of neuronal acetylcholine receptors at low concentrations of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Fenster, C P; Rains, M F; Noerager, B; Quick, M W; Lester, R A

    1997-08-01

    The influence of alpha and beta subunits on the properties of nicotine-induced activation and desensitization of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes was examined. Receptors containing alpha4 subunits were more sensitive to activation by nicotine than alpha3-containing receptors. At low concentrations of nicotine, nAChRs containing beta2 subunits reached near-maximal desensitization more rapidly than beta4-containing receptors. The concentration of nicotine producing half-maximal desensitization was influenced by the particular alpha subunit expressed; similar to results for activation, alpha4-containing receptors were more sensitive to desensitizing levels of nicotine than alpha3-containing receptors. The alpha subunit also influenced the rate of recovery from desensitization; this rate was approximately inversely proportional to the apparent nicotine affinity for the desensitized state. The homomeric alpha7 receptor showed the lowest sensitivity to nicotine for both activation and desensitization; alpha7 nAChRs also demonstrated the fastest desensitization kinetics. These subunit-dependent properties remained in the presence of external calcium, although subtle, receptor subtype-specific effects on both the apparent affinities for activation and desensitization and the desensitization kinetics were noted. These data imply that the subunit composition of various nAChRs determines the degree to which receptors are desensitized and/or activated by tobacco-related levels of nicotine. The subtype-specific balance between receptor activation and desensitization should be considered important when the cellular and behavioral actions of nicotine are interpreted.

  3. The NMDA receptor NR2A subunit regulates proliferation of MKN45 human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Kanako; Kanno, Takeshi; Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto; Tashiro, Chikara; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2008-03-07

    The present study investigated proliferation of MKN28 and MKN45 human gastric cancer cells regulated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit. The NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) inhibited proliferation of MKN45 cells, but not MKN28 cells. Of the NMDA subunits such as NR1, NR2 (2A, 2B, 2C, and 2D), and NR3 (3A and 3B), all the NMDA subunit mRNAs except for the NR2B subunit mRNA were expressed in both MKN28 and MKN45 cells. MKN45 cells were characterized by higher expression of the NR2A subunit mRNA and lower expression of the NR1 subunit mRNA, but MKN28 otherwise by higher expression of the NR1 subunit mRNA and lower expression of the NR2A subunit mRNA. MKN45 cell proliferation was also inhibited by silencing the NR2A subunit-targeted gene. For MKN45 cells, AP5 or knocking-down the NR2A subunit increased the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of cell cycling and decreased the proportion in the S/G{sub 2} phase. The results of the present study, thus, suggest that blockage of NMDA receptors including the NR2A subunit suppresses MKN45 cell proliferation due to cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 1} phase; in other words, the NR2A subunit promotes MKN45 cell proliferation by accelerating cell cycling.

  4. Postsynaptic clustering of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors by the γ3 subunit in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Kristin; Essrich, Christian; Benson, Jack A.; Benke, Dietmar; Bluethmann, Horst; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Lüscher, Bernhard

    1999-01-01

    Synaptic localization of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors is a prerequisite for synaptic inhibitory function, but the mechanism by which different receptor subtypes are localized to postsynaptic sites is poorly understood. The γ2 subunit and the postsynaptic clustering protein gephyrin are required for synaptic localization and function of major GABAA receptor subtypes. We now show that transgenic overexpression of the γ3 subunit in γ2 subunit-deficient mice restores benzodiazepine binding sites, benzodiazepine-modulated whole cell currents, and postsynaptic miniature currents, suggesting the formation of functional, postsynaptic receptors. Moreover, the γ3 subunit can substitute for γ2 in the formation of GABAA receptors that are synaptically clustered and colocalized with gephyrin in vivo. These clusters were formed even in brain regions devoid of endogenous γ3 subunit, indicating that the factors present for clustering of γ2 subunit-containing receptors are sufficient to cluster γ3 subunit-containing receptors. The GABAA receptor and gephyrin-clustering properties of the ectopic γ3 subunit were also observed for the endogenous γ3 subunit, but only in the absence of the γ2 subunit, suggesting that the γ3 subunit is at a competitive disadvantage with the γ2 subunit for clustering of postsynaptic GABAA receptors in wild-type mice. PMID:10536013

  5. G protein βγ subunits: Central mediators of G protein-coupled receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Smrcka, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    G protein βγ subunits are central participants in G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways. They interact with receptors, G protein α subunits and downstream targets to coordinate multiple, different GPCR functions. Much is known about the biology of Gβγ subunits but mysteries remain. Here, we will review what is known about general aspects of structure and function of Gβγ as well as discuss emerging mechanisms for regulation of Gβγ signaling. Recent data suggest that Gβγ is a potential therapeutic drug target. Thus, a thorough understanding of the molecular and physiological functions of Gβγ has significant implications. PMID:18488142

  6. Kainate receptor subunit diversity underlying response diversity in retinal Off bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, Sarah H; Ryan, David G; Shi, Jun; DeVries, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    Postsynaptic kainate receptors mediate excitatory synaptic transmission over a broad range of temporal frequencies. In heterologous systems, the temporal responses of kainate receptors vary when different channel-forming and auxiliary subunits are co-expressed but how this variability relates to the temporal differences at central synapses is incompletely understood. The mammalian cone photoreceptor synapse provides advantages for comparing the different temporal signalling roles of kainate receptors, as cones release glutamate over a range of temporal frequencies, and three functionally distinct Off bipolar cell types receive cone signals at synapses that contain either AMPA or kainate receptors, all with different temporal properties. A disadvantage is that the different receptor subunits are not identified. We used in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and pharmacology to identify the kainate receptor and auxiliary subunits in ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecimlineatus) cb1a/b, cb2, and cb3a/b Off bipolar cell types. As expected, the types showed distinct subunit expression patterns. Kainate receptors mediated ∼80% of the synaptic response in cb3a/b cells and were heteromers of GluK1 and GluK5. Cb3a/b cells contained message for GluK1 and GluK5, and also GluK3 and the auxiliary subunit Neto1. The synaptic responses in cb1a/b cells were mediated by GluK1-containing kainate receptors that behaved differently from the receptors expressed by cb3a/b cells. AMPA receptors mediated the entire synaptic response in cb2 cells and the remaining synaptic response in cb3a/b cells. We conclude that GluK1 is the predominant kainate receptor subunit in cb1 and cb3 Off bipolar cells. Different temporal response properties may result from selective association with GluK3, GluK5, or Neto1. PMID:24396054

  7. A Transmembrane Accessory Subunit that Modulates Kainate-Type Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; St-Gelais, Fannie; Grabner, Chad P.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Sumioka, Akio; Morimoto-Tomita, Megumi; Kim, Kwang S.; Straub, Christoph; Burlingame, Alma L.; Howe, James R.; Tomita, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Glutamate receptors play major roles in excitatory transmission in the vertebrate brain. Among ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, kainate, NMDA), AMPA receptors mediate fast synaptic transmission and require TARP auxiliary subunits. NMDA receptors and kainate receptors play roles in synaptic transmission, but it remains uncertain whether these ionotropic glutamate receptors also have essential subunits. Using a proteomic screen, we have identified NETO2, a brain-specific protein of unknown function, as an interactor with kainate-type glutamate receptors. NETO2 modulates the channel properties of recombinant and native kainate receptors without affecting trafficking of the receptors and also modulates kainate-receptor-mediated mEPSCs. Furthermore, we found that kainate receptors regulate the surface expression of NETO2 and that NETO2 protein levels and surface expression are decreased in mice lacking the kainate receptor GluR6. The results show that NETO2 is a kainate receptor subunit with significant effects on glutamate signaling mechanisms in brain. PMID:19217376

  8. Dancing partners at the synapse: auxiliary subunits that shape kainate receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Copits, Bryan A.; Swanson, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    Kainate receptors are a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors whose physiological roles differ from those of other subtypes of glutamate receptors in that they predominantly serve as modulators, rather than mediators, of synaptic transmission. Neuronal kainate receptors exhibit unusually slow kinetic properties that have been difficult to reconcile with the behaviour of recombinant kainate receptors. Recently, however, the neuropilin and tolloid-like 1 (NETO1) and NETO2 proteins were identified as auxiliary kainate receptor subunits that shape both the biophysical properties and synaptic localization of these receptors. PMID:22948074

  9. GABAA receptor subunit composition and competition at synapses are tuned by GABAB receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Gerrow, K; Triller, A

    2014-05-01

    GABABRs have a well-established role in controlling neuronal excitability and presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We examined the role of GABABR activity in modulating the number and lateral diffusion of GABAARs at inhibitory synapses. Changes in diffusion of GABAARs at synapses were observed when subunit heterogeneity was taken into account. While α1-GABAARs were unaffected, α2- and α5-GABAARs showed inverse changes in enrichment and diffusion. The intracellular TM3-4 loop of α2 was sufficient to observe the changes in diffusion by GABABR activity, whereas the loop of α5 was not. The opposing effect on α2- and α5-GABAARs was caused by a competition between GABAARs for binding slots at synapses. Receptor immobilization by cross-linking revealed that α5-GABAAR trapping at synapses is regulated by modulation of α2-GABAAR mobility. Finally, PKC activity was determined to be part of the signaling pathway through which GABABR activity modulates α2-GABAAR diffusion at synapses. These results outline a novel mechanism for tuning inhibitory transmission in a subunit-specific manner, and for the first time describe competition between GABAARs with different subunit compositions for binding slots at synapses.

  10. Monoterpene α-thujone exerts a differential inhibitory action on GABA(A) receptors implicated in phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Czyzewska, Marta M; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2013-02-28

    A monoterpene ketone, α-thujone originally attracted attention as a major natural ingredient of absinthe and was suspected to cause adverse effects such as hallucinations and seizures in persons excessively consuming this beverage. Although subsequent studies ruled out any major role of α-thujone in the "absynthism", it was found that at high doses it may induce epileptic activity pointing to an interaction with GABAergic inhibition. Indeed, subsequent studies, including those from this laboratory, showed that α-thujone inhibits GABAergic currents. However, GABAA receptors are extremely heterogeneous and in the present study we have investigated the effect of α-thujone on different recombinant GABAA receptors (α1β2γ2L, α1β2, α1β2δ and α4β2δ) relevant to phasic or tonic forms of inhibition. We report that α-thujone inhibits all considered receptor types by a qualitatively similar mechanism but the strongest effect is observed for α1β2δ receptors, suggesting that tonic currents might be more sensitive to α-thujone than the phasic ones. Moreover, we demonstrate that tonic currents, mimicked by response to a submicromollar GABA concentration (0.3 μM) in cultured neurons, showed a substantially larger sensitivity to α-thujone than responses elicited by higher [GABA] (more similar to phasic currents) or Inhibitory Postsynaptic Currents in the same preparation. Importantly, the extent of tonic current inhibition by α-thujone was as strong as in the case of currents mediated by α1β2δ receptors. Altogether, these data provide evidence that different GABAA receptor subtypes show distinct sensitivities to α-thujone and suggest that this compound may differentially affect tonic and phasic components of GABAergic inhibition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MicroRNA-mediated GABA Aα-1 receptor subunit down-regulation in adult spinal cord following neonatal cystitis-induced chronic visceral pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Jyoti N; Pochiraju, Soumya; Pochiraju, Soumiya; Kannampalli, Pradeep; Bruckert, Mitchell; Addya, Sankar; Yadav, Priyanka; Miranda, Adrian; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani

    2013-01-01

    The nociceptive transmission under pathological chronic pain conditions involves transcriptional and/or translational alteration in spinal neurotransmitters, receptor expressions, and modification of neuronal functions. Studies indicate the involvement of microRNA (miRNA) - mediated transcriptional deregulation in the pathophysiology of acute and chronic pain. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that long-term cross-organ colonic hypersensitivity in neonatal zymosan-induced cystitis is due to miRNA-mediated posttranscriptional suppression of the developing spinal GABAergic system. Cystitis was produced by intravesicular injection of zymosan (1% in saline) into the bladder during postnatal (P) days P14 through P16 and spinal dorsal horns (L6-S1) were collected either on P60 (unchallenged groups) or on P30 after a zymosan re-challenge on P29 (re-challenged groups). miRNA arrays and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed significant, but differential, up-regulation of mature miR-181a in the L6-S1 spinal dorsal horns from zymosan-treated rats compared with saline-treated controls in both the unchallenged and re-challenged groups. The target gene analysis demonstrated multiple complementary binding sites in miR-181a for GABA(A) receptor subunit GABA(Aα-1) gene with a miRSVR score of -1.83. An increase in miR-181a concomitantly resulted in significant down-regulation of GABA(Aα-1) receptor subunit gene and protein expression in adult spinal cords from rats with neonatal cystitis. Intrathecal administration of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol failed to attenuate the viscero-motor response (VMR) to colon distension in rats with neonatal cystitis, whereas in adult zymosan-treated rats the drug produced significant decrease in VMR. These results support an integral role for miRNA-mediated transcriptional deregulation of the GABAergic system in neonatal cystitis-induced chronic pelvic pain. Copyright © 2012 International

  12. Primary structure and functional expression of the AMPA/kainate receptor subunit 2 from human brain.

    PubMed

    Sun, W; Ferrer-Montiel, A V; Montal, M

    1994-01-12

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)/kainate (KA) receptor subunit 2 (HBGR2) was isolated from a human brain cDNA library. The HBGR2 cDNA has an open reading frame of approximately 2.7 kb that codes for an 883-residue protein. At the amino acid level, HBGR2 is 98% identical to its rat counterpart GluR2, and 69% to the AMPA/KA receptor subunit 1 from human brain (HBGR1). Injection of cRNA transcripts from the HBGR2 into oocytes produces barely detectable kainate-activated ionic currents, indicating that the HBGR2 subunit alone weakly expresses homomeric receptor channels. Coexpression of HBGR2 and HBGR1 transcripts, however, evokes kainate-dependent currents which activate at higher agonist concentration than those required by homomeric HBGR1 receptor channels. Coexpressed receptors display a linear current-to-voltage relationship at variance with the inwardly rectifying profile exhibited by HBGR1 homomers. Hence, the HBGR2 subunit coassembles with the HBGR1 subunit to form heteromeric receptor channels akin to the glutamate receptors from rodent brain.

  13. [Effect of damage integrity rat brain synaptic membranes on the functional activity GABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-)-ionophore complex in the CNC].

    PubMed

    Rebrov, I G; Kalinina, M V

    2013-01-01

    Functional activity of the CGABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex was investigated the muscimol-stimulated entry of the radioactive isotope 36Cl(-) in synaptoneurosomes in changing the structure and permeability of neuronal membranes. Integrity of the membranes was damaged by removal of Ca(+2) and Mg(+2) from the incubation medium and by the method of freezing-thawing synaptoneurosomes. In both cases, an increase in basal 36Cl(-) entry into synaptoneurosomes, indicating increased nonspecific permeability of neuronal membranes, and decreased activity the CABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex. The conclusion about the relationship of processes damage neuronal membranes and reducing the inhibitory processes in the epileptic focus.

  14. Biosynthesis of the Torpedo californica Acetylcholine Receptor α Subunit in Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Norihisa; Nelson, Nathan; Fox, Thomas D.; Claudio, Toni; Lindstrom, Jon; Riezman, Howard; Hess, George P.

    1986-03-01

    Yeast cells were transformed with a plasmid containing complementary DNA encoding the α subunit of the Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor. These cells synthesized a protein that had the expected molecular weight, antigenic specificity, and ligand-binding properties of the α subunit. The subunit was inserted into the yeast plasma membrane, demonstrating that yeast has the apparatus to express a membrane-bound receptor protein and to insert such a foreign protein into its plasma membrane. The α subunit constituted approximately 1 percent of the total yeast membrane proteins, and its density was about the same in the plasma membrane of yeast and in the receptor-rich electric organ of Electrophorus electricus. In view of the available technology for obtaining large quantities of yeast proteins, it may now be possible to obtain amplified amounts of interesting membrane-bound proteins for physical and biochemical studies.

  15. Ethanol-induced GABAA receptor alpha4 subunit plasticity involves phosphorylation and neuroactive steroids.

    PubMed

    Werner, David F; Porcu, Patrizia; Boyd, Kevin N; O'Buckley, Todd K; Carter, Jenna M; Kumar, Sandeep; Morrow, A Leslie

    2016-04-01

    GABAA receptors containing α4 subunits are widely implicated in acute ethanol sensitivity, and their spatial and temporal regulation prominently contributes to ethanol-induced neuroplasticity in hippocampus and cortex. However, it is unknown if α4-containing GABAA receptors in the thalamus, an area of high α4 expression, display similar regulatory patterns following ethanol administration, and if so, by which molecular mechanisms. In the current study, thalamic GABAA receptor α4 subunit levels were increased following a 6-week-, but not a 2-week chronic ethanol diet. Following acute high-dose ethanol administration, thalamic GABAA receptor α4 subunit levels were regulated in a temporal fashion, as a decrease was observed at 2h followed by a delayed transient increase. PKCγ and PKCδ levels paralleled α4 temporal expression patterns following ethanol exposure. Initial decreases in α4 subunit expression were associated with reduced serine phosphorylation. Delayed increases in expression were not associated with a change in phosphorylation state, but were prevented by inhibiting neuroactive steroid production with the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride. Overall, these studies indicate that thalamic GABAA receptor α4 subunit expression following acute and chronic ethanol administration exhibits similar regulatory patterns as other regions and that transient expression patterns following acute exposure in vivo are likely dependent on both subunit phosphorylation state and neuroactive steroids.

  16. Roles of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β subunits in function of human α4-containing nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Qiang; Yu, Kewei; Hu, Jun; Kuo, Yen-Ping; Segerberg, Marsha; St John, Paul A; Lukas, Ronald J

    2006-01-01

    Naturally expressed nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) containing α4 subunits (α4*-nAChR) in combination with β2 subunits (α4β2-nAChR) are among the most abundant, high-affinity nicotine binding sites in the mammalian brain. β4 subunits are also richly expressed and colocalize with α4 subunits in several brain regions implicated in behavioural responses to nicotine and nicotine dependence. Thus, α4β4-nAChR also may exist and play important functional roles. In this study, properties were determined of human α4β2- and α4β4-nAChR heterologously expressed de novo in human SH-EP1 epithelial cells. Whole-cell currents mediated via human α4β4-nAChR have ∼4-fold higher amplitude than those mediated via human α4β2-nAChR and exhibit much slower acute desensitization and functional rundown. Nicotinic agonists induce peak whole-cell current responses typically with higher functional potency at α4β4-nAChR than at α4β2-nAChR. Cytisine and lobeline serve as full agonists at α4β4-nAChR but are only partial agonists at α4β2-nAChR. However, nicotinic antagonists, except hexamethonium, have comparable affinities for functional α4β2- and α4β4-nAChR. Whole-cell current responses show stronger inward rectification for α4β2-nAChR than for α4β4-nAChR at a positive holding potential. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that human nAChR β2 or β4 subunits can combine with α4 subunits to generate two forms of α4*-nAChR with distinctive physiological and pharmacological features. Diversity in α4*-nAChR is of potential relevance to nervous system function, disease, and nicotine dependence. PMID:16825297

  17. Rabies virus binding to an acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit peptide.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L

    1990-04-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled rabies virus to a synthetic peptide comprising residues 173-204 of the alpha 1-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was investigated. Binding of rabies virus to the receptor peptide was dependent on pH, could be competed with by unlabeled homologous virus particles, and was saturable. Synthetic peptides of snake venom, curaremimetic neurotoxins and of the structurally similar segment of the rabies virus glycoprotein, were effective in competing with labeled virus binding to the receptor peptide at micromolar concentrations. Similarly, synthetic peptides of the binding domain on the acetylcholine receptor competed for binding. These findings suggest that both rabies virus and neurotoxins bind to residues 173-204 of the alpha 1-subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. Competition studies with shorter alpha-subunit peptides within this region indicate that the highest affinity virus binding determinants are located within residues 179-192. A rat nerve alpha 3-subunit peptide, that does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin, inhibited binding of virus to the alpha 1 peptide, suggesting that rabies binds to neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These studies indicate that synthetic peptides of the glycoprotein binding domain and of the receptor binding domain may represent useful antiviral agents by targeting the recognition event between the viral attachment protein and the host cell receptor, and inhibiting attachment of virus to the receptor.

  18. Blocking GABA(A) inhibition reveals AMPA- and NMDA-receptor-mediated polysynaptic responses in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Crépel, V; Khazipov, R; Ben-Ari, Y

    1997-04-01

    We have investigated the conditions required to evoke polysynaptic responses in the isolated CA1 region of hippocampal slices from Wistar adult rats. Experiments were performed with extracellular and whole cell recording techniques. In the presence of bicuculline (10 microM), 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2-3-dione (10 microM), glycine (10 microM), and a low external concentration of Mg2+ (0.3 mM), electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals/commissural pathway evoked graded N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor-mediated late field potentials in the stratum radiatum of the CA1 region. These responses were generated via polysynaptic connections because their latency varied strongly and inversely with the stimulation intensity and they were abolished by a high concentration of divalent cations (7 mM Ca2+). These responses likely were driven by local collateral branches of CA1 pyramidal cell axons because focal application of tetrodotoxin (30 microM) in the stratum oriens strongly reduced the late synaptic component and antidromic stimulation of CA1 pyramidal cells could evoke the polysynaptic response. Current-source density analysis suggested that the polysynaptic response was generated along the proximal part of the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells (50-150 microm below the pyramidal cell layer in the stratum radiatum). In physiological concentration of Mg2+ (1.3 mM), the pharmacologically isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated polysynaptic response was abolished. In control artificial cerebrospinal fluid (with physiological concentration of Mg2+), bicuculline ( 10 microM) generated a graded polysynaptic response. Under these conditions, this response was mediated both by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/NMDA receptors. In the presence of D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (50 microM), the polysynaptic response could be mediated by AMPA receptors, although less efficiently. In conclusion, suppression of gamma-aminobutyric acid

  19. Gene expression changes in serotonin, GABA-A receptors, neuropeptides and ion channels in the dorsal raphe nucleus of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) rats following binge-like alcohol drinking.

    PubMed

    McClintick, Jeanette N; McBride, William J; Bell, Richard L; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard J

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol binge-drinking during adolescence is a serious public health concern with long-term consequences. We used RNA sequencing to assess the effects of excessive adolescent ethanol binge-drinking on gene expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of alcohol preferring (P) rats. Repeated binges across adolescence (three 1h sessions across the dark-cycle per day, 5 days per week for 3 weeks starting at 28 days of age; ethanol intakes of 2.5-3 g/kg/session) significantly altered the expression of approximately one-third of the detected genes. Multiple neurotransmitter systems were altered, with the largest changes in the serotonin system (21 of 23 serotonin-related genes showed decreased expression) and GABA-A receptors (8 decreased and 2 increased). Multiple neuropeptide systems were also altered, with changes in the neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems similar to those associated with increased drinking and decreased resistance to stress. There was increased expression of 21 of 32 genes for potassium channels. Expression of downstream targets of CREB signaling was increased. There were also changes in expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes, axonal guidance, growth factors, transcription factors, and several intracellular signaling pathways. These widespread changes indicate that excessive binge drinking during adolescence alters the functioning of the DRN and likely its modulation of many regions of the central nervous system, including the mesocorticolimbic system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cloning and characterization of the ionotropic GABA receptor subunit ρ1 from pig (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Miledi, Ricardo

    2014-01-13

    Since human and pig eyes have remarkably anatomical and physiological similitudes swine models have been broadly used for functional studies and therapeutic research. Recently, a GABAρ-mediated relaxation of retinal vascularity suggested that GABAρ signaling may be used to improve retinal blood flow in vascular-driven impaired vision, and a further molecular characterization of GABAρ receptors would be beneficial. However, none of the GABAρ type subunits from pigs has been yet cloned; Among the 19 subunits that compose the family of GABAA receptors, ρ1-3 subunits are capable of forming homomeric channels. These homomeric receptors are particularly interesting because their pharmacological and kinetic properties are notably different from receptors composed by other GABAA subunits. Here we report the cloning of the GABAρ1subunit from the pig and the functional expression of homomeric channels in Xenopus oocytes. The most notable difference found in the pig GABAρ1 receptor was the absence of a stretch of 17 amino acids near the amino terminus (R41-V58) conserved in the rat and the human. This sequence has a higher nucleotidic match with the transcript variant 2 of the human GABAρ1 subunit. Xenopus oocytes injected with cRNA from the receptor generated currents when exposed to GABA that shared all the characteristics of other GABAρ1 subunits in mammals, including its modulation by dopamine. This study will help to increase the knowledge of the genetics of the pig, further the understanding of this important neurotransmitter receptor family and will shed some light in the evolution of these genes among mammals.

  1. Regulation of AMPA receptor gating and pharmacology by TARP auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Aaron D; Nicoll, Roger A

    2008-07-01

    Presynaptic glutamate release elicits brief waves of membrane depolarization in neurons by activating AMPA receptors. Depending on its precise size and shape, current through AMPA receptors gates downstream processes like NMDA receptor activation and action potential generation. Over a decade of research on AMPA receptor structure and function has identified binding sites on AMPA receptors for agonists, antagonists and allosteric modulators as well as key residues underlying differences in the gating behavior of various AMPA receptor subtypes. However, the recent discovery that AMPA receptors are accompanied in the synaptic membrane by a family of auxiliary subunits known as transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) has revealed that the kinetics and pharmacology of neuronal AMPA receptors differ in many respects from those predicted by classical studies of AMPA receptors in heterologous systems. Here, we summarize recent work and discuss remaining questions concerning the structure and function of native TARP-AMPA receptor complexes.

  2. NMDA receptor surface mobility depends on NR2A-2B subunits

    PubMed Central

    Groc, Laurent; Heine, Martin; Cousins, Sarah L.; Stephenson, F. Anne; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The NR2 subunit composition of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) varies during development, and this change is important in NMDAR-dependent signaling. In particular, synaptic NMDAR switch from containing mostly NR2B subunit to a mixture of NR2B and NR2A subunits. The pathways by which neurons differentially traffic NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDARs are poorly understood. Using single-particle and -molecule approaches and specific antibodies directed against NR2A and NR2B extracellular epitopes, we investigated the surface mobility of native NR2A and NR2B subunits at the surface of cultured neurons. The surface mobility of NMDARs depends on the NR2 subunit subtype, with NR2A-containing NMDARs being more stable than NR2B-containing ones, and NR2A subunit overexpression stabilizes surface NR2B-containing NMDARs. The developmental change in the synaptic surface content of NR2A and NR2B subunits was correlated with a developmental change in the time spent by the subunits within synapses. This suggests that the switch in synaptic NMDAR subtypes depends on the regulation of the receptor surface trafficking. PMID:17124177

  3. GABAA receptors are located in cholinergic terminals in the nucleus pontis oralis of the rat: implications for REM sleep control.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2014-01-16

    The oral pontine reticular formation (PnO) of rat is one region identified in the brainstem as a rapid eye movement (REM) sleep induction zone. Microinjection of GABA(A) receptor antagonists into PnO induces a long lasting increase in REM sleep, which is similar to that produced by cholinergic agonists. We previously showed that this REM sleep-induction can be completely blocked by a muscarinic antagonist, indicating that the REM sleep-inducing effect of GABA(A) receptor antagonism is dependent upon the local cholinergic system. Consistent with these findings, it has been reported that GABA(A) receptor antagonists microdialyzed into PnO resulted in increased levels of acetylcholine. We hypothesize that GABA(A) receptors located on cholinergic boutons in the PnO are responsible for the REM sleep induction by GABA(A) receptor antagonists through blocking GABA inhibition of acetylcholine release. Cholinergic, varicose axon fibers were studied in the PnO by immunofluorescence and confocal, laser scanning microscopy. Immunoreactive cholinergic boutons were found to be colocalized with GABA(A) receptor subunit protein γ2. This finding implicates a specific subtype and location of GABA(A) receptors in PnO of rat in the control of REM sleep. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Expression Levels of GABA-A Receptor Subunit Alpha 3, Gabra3 and Lipoprotein Lipase, Lpl Are Associated with the Susceptibility to Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjeong; Yun, Jun-Won; Shin, Kyeho; Cho, Yejin; Yang, Mijeong; Nam, Ki Taek; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the serious and fatal drug-associated adverse effect, but its incidence is very low and individual variation in severity is substantial. Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury accounts for >50% of reported DILI cases but little is known for the cause of individual variations in the severity. Intrinsic genetic variation is considered a key element but the identity of the genes was not well-established. Here, pre-biopsy method and microarray technique was applied to uncover the key genes for APAP-induced liver injury in mice, and a cause and effect experiment employing quantitative real-time PCR was conducted to confirm the correlation between the uncovered genes and APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We identified the innately and differentially expressed genes of mice susceptible to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in the pre-biopsied liver tissue before APAP treatment through microarray analysis of the global gene expression profiles (Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST for 28,853 genes). Expression of 16 genes including Gdap10, Lpl, Gabra3 and Ccrn4l were significantly different (t-test: FDR <10%) more than 1.5 fold in the susceptible animals than resistant. To confirm the association with the susceptibility to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, another set of animals were measured for the expression level of selected 4 genes (higher two and lower two genes) in the liver pre-biopsy and their sensitivity to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was evaluated by post hoc. Notably, the expressions of Gabra3 and Lpl were significantly correlated with the severity of liver injury (p<0.05) demonstrating that these genes may be linked to the susceptibility to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27530116

  5. Trace amines inhibit insect odorant receptor function through antagonism of the co-receptor subunit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sisi; Luetje, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Many insect behaviors are driven by olfaction, making insect olfactory receptors (ORs) appealing targets for insect control.  Insect ORs are odorant-gated ion channels, with each receptor thought to be composed of a representative from a large, variable family of odorant binding subunits and a highly conserved co-receptor subunit (Orco), assembled in an unknown stoichiometry.  Synthetic Orco directed agonists and antagonists have recently been identified.  Several Orco antagonists have been shown to act via an allosteric mechanism to inhibit OR activation by odorants.  The high degree of conservation of Orco across insect species results in Orco antagonists having broad activity at ORs from a variety of insect species and suggests that the binding site for Orco ligands may serve as a modulatory site for compounds endogenous to insects or may be a target of exogenous compounds, such as those produced by plants.  To test this idea, we screened a series of biogenic and trace amines, identifying several as Orco antagonists.  Of particular interest were tryptamine, a plant-produced amine, and tyramine, an amine endogenous to the insect nervous system.  Tryptamine was found to be a potent antagonist of Orco, able to block Orco activation by an Orco agonist and to allosterically inhibit activation of ORs by odorants.  Tyramine had effects similar to those of tryptamine, but was less potent.  Importantly, both tryptamine and tyramine displayed broad activity, inhibiting odorant activation of ORs of species from three different insect orders (Diptera, Lepidoptera and Coleoptera), as well as odorant activation of six diverse ORs from a single species (the human malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae).  Our results suggest that endogenous and exogenous natural compounds serve as Orco ligands modulating insect olfaction and that Orco can be an important target for the development of novel insect repellants. PMID:25075297

  6. Effects of the α subunit on imidacloprid sensitivity of recombinant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, K; Buckingham, S D; Freeman, J C; Squire, M D; Baylis, H A; Sattelle, D B

    1998-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a new insecticide with selective toxicity for insects over vertebrates. Recombinant (α4β2) chicken neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and a hybrid nicotinic AChR formed by co-expression of a Drosophila melanogaster neuronal α subunit (SAD) with the chicken β2 subunit were heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes by nuclear injection of cDNAs. The agonist actions of imidacloprid and other nicotinic AChR ligands ((+)-epibatidine, (−)-nicotine and acetylcholine) were compared on both recombinant nicotinic AChRs by use of two-electrode, voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Imidacloprid alone of the 4 agonists behaved as a partial agonist on the α4β2 receptor; (+)-epibatidine, (−)-nicotine and acetylcholine were all full, or near full, agonists. Imidacloprid was also a partial agonist of the hybrid Drosophila SAD chicken β2 receptor, as was (−)-nicotine, whereas (+)-epibatidine and acetylcholine were full agonists. The EC50 of imidacloprid was decreased by replacing the chicken α4 subunit with the Drosophila SAD α subunit. This α subunit substitution also resulted in an increase in the EC50 for (+)-epibatidine, (−)-nicotine and acetylcholine. Thus, the Drosophila (SAD) α subunit contributes to the greater apparent affinity of imidacloprid for recombinant insect/vertebrate nicotinic AChRs. Imidacloprid acted as a weak antagonist of ACh-mediated responses mediated by SADβ2 hybrid receptors and as a weak potentiator of ACh responses mediated by α4β2 receptors. This suggests that imidacloprid has complex effects upon these recombinant receptors, determined at least in part by the α subunit. PMID:9504393

  7. Proteasome subunit Rpn13 is a novel ubiquitin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Husnjak, Koraljka; Elsasser, Suzanne; Zhang, Naixia; Chen, Xiang; Randles, Leah; Shi, Yuan; Hofmann, Kay; Walters, Kylie; Finley, Daniel; Dikic, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Proteasomal receptors that recognize ubiquitin chains attached to substrates are key mediators of selective protein degradation in eukaryotes. Here we report the identification of a new ubiquitin receptor, Rpn13/ARM1, a known component of the proteasome. Rpn13 binds ubiquitin via a conserved N-terminal region termed the Pru domain (Pleckstrin-like receptor for ubiquitin), which binds K48-linked diubiquitin with an affinity of ∼90 nM. Like proteasomal ubiquitin receptor Rpn10/S5a, Rpn13 also binds ubiquitin-like domains of the UBL/UBA family of ubiquitin receptors. A synthetic phenotype results in yeast when specific mutations of the ubiquitin binding sites of Rpn10 and Rpn13 are combined, indicating functional linkage between these ubiquitin receptors. Since Rpn13 is also the proteasomal receptor for Uch37, a deubiquitinating enzyme, our findings suggest a coupling of chain recognition and disassembly at the proteasome. PMID:18497817

  8. Ocular and generalized myasthenia gravis induced by human acetylcholine receptor γ subunit immunization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaorong; Tuzun, Erdem; Li, Jing; Xiao, Tianlin; Saini, Shamsher S; Qi, Huibin; Allman, Windy; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2012-02-01

    HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice develop ocular myasthenia gravis (oMG), which then progresses to generalized MG (gMG) when immunized with the human acetylcholine receptor (H-AChR) α subunit. Because the fetal AChR γ subunit is expressed in adult extraocular muscles, we anticipated that γ subunit immunization would generate an immune response to mouse AChR and induce MG in mice. H-AChR γ subunit immunization in HLA-DQ8 mice induced an autoimmune response to mouse AChR and led to the destruction of AChR in the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) by anti-AChR antibody and complement activation, and it triggered upregulation of AChR gene transcription. Our findings indicate that oMG may be induced by immunity to the AChR γ subunit. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Distribution of NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits at thalamo-amygdaloid dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Radley, Jason J; Farb, Claudia R; He, Yong; Janssen, William G M; Rodrigues, Sarina M; Johnson, Luke R; Hof, Patrick R; LeDoux, Joseph E; Morrison, John H

    2007-02-23

    Synapses onto dendritic spines in the lateral amygdala formed by afferents from the auditory thalamus represent a site of plasticity in Pavlovian fear conditioning. Previous work has demonstrated that thalamic afferents synapse onto LA spines expressing glutamate receptor (GluR) subunits, but the GluR subunit distribution at the synapse and within the cytoplasm has not been characterized. Therefore, we performed a quantitative analysis for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor subunits GluR2 and GluR3 and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B by combining anterograde labeling of thalamo-amygdaloid afferents with postembedding immunoelectron microscopy for the GluRs in adult rats. A high percentage of thalamo-amygdaloid spines was immunoreactive for GluR2 (80%), GluR3 (83%), and NR1 (83%), while a smaller proportion of spines expressed NR2B (59%). To compare across the various subunits, the cytoplasmic to synaptic ratios of GluRs were measured within thalamo-amygdaloid spines. Analyses revealed that the cytoplasmic pool of GluR2 receptors was twice as large compared to the GluR3, NR1, and NR2B subunits. Our data also show that in the adult brain, the NR2B subunit is expressed in the majority of in thalamo-amygdaloid spines and that within these spines, the various GluRs are differentially distributed between synaptic and non-synaptic sites. The prevalence of the NR2B subunit in thalamo-amygdaloid spines provides morphological evidence supporting its role in the fear conditioning circuit while the differential distribution of the GluR subtypes may reflect distinct roles for their involvement in this circuitry and synaptic plasticity.

  10. Enrichment of GABAA Receptor α-Subunits on the Axonal Initial Segment Shows Regional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yudong; Heldt, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is generally recognized that certain α-subunits of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) form enriched clusters on the axonal initial segment (AIS), the degree to which these clusters vary in different brain areas is not well known. In the current study, we quantified the density, size, and enrichment ratio of fluorescently labeled α1-, α2-, or α3-subunits aggregates co-localized with the AIS-marker ankyrin G and compared them to aggregates in non-AIS locations among different brain areas including hippocampal subfields, basal lateral amygdala (BLA), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and sensory cortex (CTX). We found regional differences in the enrichment of GABAAR α-subunits on the AIS. Significant enrichment was identified in the CA3 of hippocampus for α1-subunits, in the CA1, CA3, and BLA for α2-subunits, and in the BLA for α3-subunits. Using α-subunit knock-out (KO) mice, we found that BLA enrichment of α2- and α3-subunits were physiologically independent of each other, as the enrichment of one subunit was unaffected by the genomic deletion of the other. To further investigate the unique pattern of α-subunit enrichment in the BLA, we examined the association of α2- and α3-subunits with the presynaptic vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT) and the anchoring protein gephyrin (Geph). As expected, both α2- and α3-subunits on the AIS within the BLA received prominent GABAergic innervation from vGAT-positive terminals. Further, we found that the association of α2- and α3-subunits with Geph was weaker in AIS versus non-AIS locations, suggesting that Geph might be playing a lesser role in the enrichment of α2- and α3-subunits on the AIS. Overall, these observations suggest that GABAARs on the AIS differ in subunit composition across brain regions. As with somatodendritic GABAARs, the distinctive expression pattern of AIS-located GABAAR α-subunits in the BLA, and other brain areas, likely contribute to unique forms of GABAergic inhibitory

  11. Allosteric modulation of GABA(A) receptor subtypes:effects on visual recognition and visuospatial working memory in rhesus monkeys [corrected].

    PubMed

    Soto, Paul L; Ator, Nancy A; Rallapalli, Sundari K; Biawat, Poonam; Clayton, Terry; Cook, James M; Weed, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    Non-selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) are known to impair anterograde memory. The role of the various GABAAR subtypes in the memory-impairing effects of non-selective GABAAR PAMs has not been fully elucidated. The current study assessed, in rhesus monkeys, effects of modulation of α1, α2/3, and α5GABAARs on visual recognition and spatial working memory using delayed matching-to-sample (DMTS) and self-ordered spatial search (SOSS) procedures, respectively. The DMTS procedure (n=8) involved selecting a previously presented 'sample' image from a set of multiple images presented after a delay. The SOSS procedure (n=6) involved touching a number of boxes without repeats. The non-selective GABAAR PAM triazolam and the α1GABAA preferential PAMS zolpidem and zaleplon reduced accuracy in both procedures, whereas the α5GABAA preferential PAMs SH-053-2'F-R-CH3 and SH-053-2'F-S-CH3, and the α2/3GABAA preferential PAM TPA023B were without effects on accuracy or trial completion. The low-efficacy α5GABAAR negative allosteric modulator (NAM) PWZ-029 slightly increased only DMTS accuracy, whereas the high-efficacy α5GABAAR NAMs RY-23 and RY-24 did not affect accuracy under either procedure. Finally, the slopes of the accuracy dose-effect curves for triazolam, zolpidem, and zaleplon increased with box number in the SOSS procedure, but were equivalent across DMTS delays. The present results suggest that (1) α1GABAARs, compared with α2/3 and α5GABAARs, are primarily involved in the impairment, by non-selective GABAAR PAMs, of visual recognition and visuospatial working memory in nonhuman primates; and (2) relative cognitive impairment produced by positive modulation of GABAARs increases with number of locations to be remembered, but not with the delay for remembering.

  12. Similar GABAA receptor subunit composition in somatic and axon initial segment synapses of hippocampal pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kerti-Szigeti, Katalin; Nusser, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells (PCs) express many GABAAR subunit types and receive GABAergic inputs from distinct interneurons. Previous experiments revealed input-specific differences in α1 and α2 subunit densities in perisomatic synapses, suggesting distinct IPSC decay kinetics. However, IPSC decays evoked by axo-axonic, parvalbumin- or cholecystokinin-expressing basket cells were found to be similar. Using replica immunogold labeling, here we show that all CA1 PC somatic and AIS synapses contain the α1, α2, β1, β2, β3 and γ2 subunits. In CA3 PCs, 90% of the perisomatic synapses are immunopositive for the α1 subunit and all synapses are positive for the remaining five subunits. Somatic synapses form unimodal distributions based on their immunoreactivity for these subunits. The α2 subunit densities in somatic synapses facing Cav2.1 (i.e. parvalbumin) or Cav2.2 (cholecystokinin) positive presynaptic active zones are comparable. We conclude that perisomatic synapses made by three distinct interneuron types have similar GABAA receptor subunit content. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18426.001 PMID:27537197

  13. Α2 GABAA receptor sub-units in the ventral hippocampus and α5 GABAA receptor sub-units in the dorsal hippocampus mediate anxiety and fear memory.

    PubMed

    McEown, K; Treit, D

    2013-11-12

    Temporary neuronal inactivation of the ventral hippocampus with the GABAA agonist muscimol suppresses unconditioned fear behavior (anxiety) but inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus does not. On the other hand, inactivating the dorsal hippocampus disrupts fear memory, while inactivating the ventral hippocampus does not. Here we investigate the roles of hippocampal GABAA receptor sub-units in mediating these anxiolytic and amnesic effects of GABAA receptor agonists. We microinfused TPA023 (α2 agonist) or TB-21007 (inverse α5 agonist) into the dorsal or ventral hippocampus prior to testing rats in two animal models of anxiety: the elevated plus-maze and shock-probe burying test. Twenty-four hours later rats were re-tested in the shock-probe chamber with a non-electrified probe to assess their memory of the initial shock-probe experience (i.e., fear memory). We found that TPA023 was anxiolytic in the plus-maze and shock-probe burying tests when microinfused into the ventral hippocampus. However, TPA023 did not affect anxiety-related behavior when infused into the dorsal hippocampus. Conversely, we found that the α5 sub-unit inverse agonist TB-21007 impaired rats' memory of the initial shock-probe experience when infused into the dorsal hippocampus, but not when infused into the ventral hippocampus. This double dissociation suggests that α2 GABAA receptor sub-units in the ventral hippocampus mediate unconditioned fear or anxiety, while α5 GABAA receptor sub-units in the dorsal hippocampus mediate conditioned fear memory. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. GABAA receptor subunit gene expression in human prefrontal cortex: comparison of schizophrenics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akbarian, S.; Huntsman, M. M.; Kim, J. J.; Tafazzoli, A.; Potkin, S. G.; Bunney, W. E. Jr; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics is hypoactive and displays changes related to inhibitory, GABAergic neurons, and GABAergic synapses. These changes include decreased levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme for GABA synthesis, upregulation of muscimol binding, and downregulation of benzodiazepine binding to GABAA receptors. Studies in the visual cortex of nonhuman primates have demonstrated that gene expression for GAD and for several GABAA receptor subunit polypeptides is under control of neuronal activity, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics may explain the abnormalities in GAD and in GABAA receptor regulation. In the present study, which is the first of its type on human cerebral cortex, levels of mRNAs for six GABAA receptor subunits (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 2) and their laminar expression patterns were analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics and matched controls, using in situ hybridization histochemistry and densitometry. Three types of laminar expression pattern were observed: mRNAs for the alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 subunits, which are the predominant receptor subunits expressed in the mature cortex, were expressed at comparatively high levels by cells of all six cortical layers, but most intensely by cells in lower layer III and layer IV. mRNAs for the alpha 2, alpha 5, and beta 1 subunits were expressed at lower levels; alpha 2 and beta 1 were expressed predominantly by cells in layers II, III, and IV; alpha 5 was expressed predominantly in layers IV, V, and VI. There were no significant changes in overall mRNA levels for any of the receptor subunits in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics, and the laminar expression pattern of all six receptor subunit mRNAs did not differ between schizophrenics and controls. Because gene expression for GABAA receptor subunits is not consistently altered in the prefrontal cortex of

  15. GABAA receptor subunit gene expression in human prefrontal cortex: comparison of schizophrenics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akbarian, S.; Huntsman, M. M.; Kim, J. J.; Tafazzoli, A.; Potkin, S. G.; Bunney, W. E. Jr; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics is hypoactive and displays changes related to inhibitory, GABAergic neurons, and GABAergic synapses. These changes include decreased levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme for GABA synthesis, upregulation of muscimol binding, and downregulation of benzodiazepine binding to GABAA receptors. Studies in the visual cortex of nonhuman primates have demonstrated that gene expression for GAD and for several GABAA receptor subunit polypeptides is under control of neuronal activity, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics may explain the abnormalities in GAD and in GABAA receptor regulation. In the present study, which is the first of its type on human cerebral cortex, levels of mRNAs for six GABAA receptor subunits (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 2) and their laminar expression patterns were analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics and matched controls, using in situ hybridization histochemistry and densitometry. Three types of laminar expression pattern were observed: mRNAs for the alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 subunits, which are the predominant receptor subunits expressed in the mature cortex, were expressed at comparatively high levels by cells of all six cortical layers, but most intensely by cells in lower layer III and layer IV. mRNAs for the alpha 2, alpha 5, and beta 1 subunits were expressed at lower levels; alpha 2 and beta 1 were expressed predominantly by cells in layers II, III, and IV; alpha 5 was expressed predominantly in layers IV, V, and VI. There were no significant changes in overall mRNA levels for any of the receptor subunits in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics, and the laminar expression pattern of all six receptor subunit mRNAs did not differ between schizophrenics and controls. Because gene expression for GABAA receptor subunits is not consistently altered in the prefrontal cortex of

  16. Flexible subunit stoichiometry of functional human P2X2/3 heteromeric receptors.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Maria; Hausmann, Ralf; Schmid, Julia; Dopychai, Anke; Stephan, Gabriele; Tang, Yong; Schmalzing, Günther; Illes, Peter; Rubini, Patrizia

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to clarify whether heterotrimeric P2X2/3 receptors have a fixed subunit stoichiometry consisting of one P2X2 and two P2X3 subunits as previously suggested, or a flexible stoichiometry containing also the inverse subunit composition. For this purpose we transfected HEK293 cells with P2X2 and P2X3 encoding cDNA at the ratios of 1:2 and 4:1, and analysed the biophysical and pharmacological properties of the generated receptors by means of the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The concentration-response curves for the selective agonist α,β-meATP did not differ from each other under the two transfection ratios. However, co-expression of an inactive P2X2 mutant and the wild type P2X3 subunit and vice versa resulted in characteristic distortions of the α,β-meATP concentration-response relationships, depending on which subunit was expressed in excess, suggesting that HEK293 cells express mixtures of (P2X2)1/(P2X3)2 and (P2X2)2/(P2X3)1 receptors. Whereas the allosteric modulators H+ and Zn2+ failed to discriminate between the two possible heterotrimeric receptor variants, the α,β-meATP-induced responses were blocked more potently by the competitive antagonist A317491, when the P2X2 subunit was expressed in deficit of the P2X3 subunit. Furthermore, blue-native PAGE analysis of P2X2 and P2X3 subunits co-expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK293 cells revealed that plasma membrane-bound P2X2/3 receptors appeared in two clearly distinct heterotrimeric complexes: a (P2X2-GFP)2/(P2X3)1 complex and a (P2X2-GFP)1/(P2X3)2 complex. These data strongly indicate that the stoichiometry of the heteromeric P2X2/3 receptor is not fixed, but determined in a permutational manner by the relative availability of P2X2 and P2X3 subunits.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF NICOTINE ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR SUBUNITS IN THE COCKROACH Periplaneta americana MUSHROOM BODIES REVEALS A STRONG EXPRESSION OF β1 SUBUNIT: INVOLVEMENT IN NICOTINE-INDUCED CURRENTS.

    PubMed

    Taillebois, Emiliane; Thany, Steeve H

    2016-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ligand-gated ion channels expressed in many insect structures, such as mushroom bodies, in which they play a central role. We have recently demonstrated using electrophysiological recordings that different native nicotinic receptors are expressed in cockroach mushroom bodies Kenyon cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that eight genes coding for cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits are expressed in the mushroom bodies. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments demonstrated that β1 subunit was the most expressed in the mushroom bodies. Moreover, antisense oligonucleotides performed against β1 subunit revealed that inhibition of β1 expression strongly decreases nicotine-induced currents amplitudes. Moreover, co-application with 0.5 μM α-bungarotoxin completely inhibited nicotine currents whereas 10 μM d-tubocurarine had a partial effect demonstrating that β1-containing neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes could be sensitive to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist α-bungarotoxin.

  18. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type B (GABAB) Receptor Internalization Is Regulated by the R2 Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Saad; Wilkins, Megan E.; Dehghani-Tafti, Ebrahim; Thomas, Philip; Baddeley, Stuart M.; Smart, Trevor G.

    2011-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptors are important for slow synaptic inhibition in the CNS. The efficacy of inhibition is directly related to the stability of cell surface receptors. For GABAB receptors, heterodimerization between R1 and R2 subunits is critical for cell surface expression and signaling, but how this determines the rate and extent of receptor internalization is unknown. Here, we insert a high affinity α-bungarotoxin binding site into the N terminus of the R2 subunit and reveal its dominant role in regulating the internalization of GABAB receptors in live cells. To simultaneously study R1a and R2 trafficking, a new α-bungarotoxin binding site-labeling technique was used, allowing α-bungarotoxin conjugated to different fluorophores to selectively label R1a and R2 subunits. This approach demonstrated that R1a and R2 are internalized as dimers. In heterologous expression systems and neurons, the rates and extents of internalization for R1aR2 heteromers and R2 homomers are similar, suggesting a regulatory role for R2 in determining cell surface receptor stability. The fast internalization rate of R1a, which has been engineered to exit the endoplasmic reticulum, was slowed to that of R2 by truncating the R1a C-terminal tail or by removing a dileucine motif in its coiled-coil domain. Slowing the rate of internalization by co-assembly with R2 represents a novel role for GPCR heterodimerization whereby R2 subunits, via their C terminus coiled-coil domain, mask a dileucine motif on R1a subunits to determine the surface stability of the GABAB receptor. PMID:21724853

  19. Immunochemical Localization of GABAA Receptor Subunits in the Freshwater Polyp Hydra vulgaris (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa).

    PubMed

    Concas, A; Imperatore, R; Santoru, F; Locci, A; Porcu, P; Cristino, L; Pierobon, P

    2016-11-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, responding to GABA positive allosteric modulators, are present in the freshwater polyp Hydra vulgaris (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa), one of the most primitive metazoans to develop a nervous system. We examined the occurrence and distribution of GABAA receptor subunits in Hydra tissues by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Antibodies against different GABAA receptor subunits were used in Hydra membrane preparations. Unique protein bands, inhibited by the specific peptide, appeared at 35, 60, ∼50 and ∼52 kDa in membranes incubated with α3, β1, γ3 or δ antibodies, respectively. Immunohistochemical screening of whole mount Hydra preparations revealed diffuse immunoreactivity to α3, β1 or γ3 antibodies in tentacles, hypostome, and upper part of the gastric region; immunoreactive fibers were also present in the lower peduncle. By contrast, δ antibodies revealed a strong labeling in the lower gastric region and peduncle, as well as in tentacles. Double labeling showed colocalization of α3/β1, α3/γ3 and α3/δ immunoreactivity in granules or cells in tentacles and gastric region. In the peduncle, colocalization of both α3/β1 and α3/γ3 immunoreactivity was found in fibers running horizontally above the foot. These data indicate that specific GABAA receptor subunits are present and differentially distributed in Hydra body regions. Subunit colocalization suggests that Hydra GABA receptors are heterologous multimers, possibly sub-serving different physiological activities.

  20. Ischaemia differentially regulates GABAB receptor subunits in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cimarosti, Helena; Kantamneni, Sriharsha; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    Reduced synaptic inhibition due to dysfunction of ionotropic GABAA receptors has been proposed as one factor in cerebral ischaemia-induced excitotoxic cell death. However, the participation of the inhibitory metabotropic GABAB receptors in these pathological processes has not been extensively investigated. We used oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) and NMDA-induced excitotoxicity as models to investigate whether ischaemia-like challenges alter the protein levels of GABAB1 and GABAB2 receptor subunits in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Twenty-four hours after the insult both OGD and NMDA produced a marked decrease in the total levels of GABAB2 (~75%), while there was no significant change in the levels of GABAB1 after OGD, but an increase after NMDA treatment (~100%). The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (100 μM) was neuroprotective following OGD or NMDA treatment if added before or during the insult. GABAB receptors comprise heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits and our results suggest that the separate subunits are independently regulated in response to extreme neuronal stress. However, because GABAB2 is required for functional surface expression, down-regulation of this subunit removes an important inhibitory feedback mechanism under pathological conditions. PMID:19328818

  1. NKCC1 knockdown decreases neuron production through GABA(A)-regulated neural progenitor proliferation and delays dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Young, Stephanie Z; Taylor, M Morgan; Wu, Sharon; Ikeda-Matsuo, Yuri; Kubera, Cathryn; Bordey, Angélique

    2012-09-26

    Signaling through GABA(A) receptors controls neural progenitor cell (NPC) development in vitro and is altered in schizophrenic and autistic individuals. However, the in vivo function of GABA(A) signaling on neural stem cell proliferation, and ultimately neurogenesis, remains unknown. To examine GABA(A) function in vivo, we electroporated plasmids encoding short-hairpin (sh) RNA against the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC1 (shNKCC1) in NPCs of the neonatal subventricular zone in mice to reduce GABA(A)-induced depolarization. Reduced GABA(A) depolarization identified by a loss of GABA(A)-induced calcium responses in most electroporated NPCs led to a 70% decrease in the number of proliferative Ki67(+) NPCs and a 60% reduction in newborn neuron density. Premature loss of GABA(A) depolarization in newborn neurons resulted in truncated dendritic arborization at the time of synaptic integration. However, by 6 weeks the dendritic tree had partially recovered and displayed a small, albeit significant, decrease in dendritic complexity but not total dendritic length. To further examine GABA(A) function on NPCs, we treated animals with a GABA(A) allosteric agonist, pentobarbital. Enhancement of GABA(A) activity in NPCs increased the number of proliferative NPCs by 60%. Combining shNKCC1 and pentobarbital prevented the shNKCC1 and the pentobarbital effects on NPC proliferation, suggesting that these manipulations affected NPCs through GABA(A) receptors. Thus, dysregulation in GABA(A) depolarizing activity delayed dendritic development and reduced NPC proliferation resulting in decreased neuronal density.

  2. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of GABAA Receptor γ2-Subunit Regulates Tonic and Phasic Inhibition in the Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Nani, Francesca; Bright, Damian P.; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Tretter, Verena; Moss, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    GABA-mediated tonic and phasic inhibition of thalamic relay neurons of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) was studied after ablating tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation of receptor γ2-subunits. As phosphorylation of γ2 Y365 and Y367 reduces receptor internalization, to understand their importance for inhibition we created a knock-in mouse in which these residues are replaced by phenylalanines. On comparing wild-type (WT) and γ2Y365/367F+/− (HT) animals (homozygotes are not viable in utero), the expression levels of GABAA receptor α4-subunits were increased in the thalamus of female, but not male mice. Raised δ-subunit expression levels were also observed in female γ2Y365/367F +/− thalamus. Electrophysiological analyses revealed no difference in the level of inhibition in male WT and HT dLGN, while both the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic activity and the tonic current were significantly augmented in female HT relay cells. The sensitivity of tonic currents to the δ-subunit superagonist THIP, and the blocker Zn2+, were higher in female HT relay cells. This is consistent with upregulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors containing α4- and δ-subunits to enhance tonic inhibition. In contrast, the sensitivity of GABAA receptors mediating inhibition in the female γ2Y356/367F +/− to neurosteroids was markedly reduced compared with WT. We conclude that disrupting tyrosine phosphorylation of the γ2-subunit activates a sex-specific increase in tonic inhibition, and this most likely reflects a genomic-based compensation mechanism for the reduced neurosteroid sensitivity of inhibition measured in female HT relay neurons. PMID:23904608

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation of GABAA receptor γ2-subunit regulates tonic and phasic inhibition in the thalamus.

    PubMed

    Nani, Francesca; Bright, Damian P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Tretter, Verena; Moss, Stephen J; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-07-31

    GABA-mediated tonic and phasic inhibition of thalamic relay neurons of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) was studied after ablating tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation of receptor γ2-subunits. As phosphorylation of γ2 Y365 and Y367 reduces receptor internalization, to understand their importance for inhibition we created a knock-in mouse in which these residues are replaced by phenylalanines. On comparing wild-type (WT) and γ2(Y365/367F)+/- (HT) animals (homozygotes are not viable in utero), the expression levels of GABAA receptor α4-subunits were increased in the thalamus of female, but not male mice. Raised δ-subunit expression levels were also observed in female γ2(Y365/367F) +/- thalamus. Electrophysiological analyses revealed no difference in the level of inhibition in male WT and HT dLGN, while both the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic activity and the tonic current were significantly augmented in female HT relay cells. The sensitivity of tonic currents to the δ-subunit superagonist THIP, and the blocker Zn(2+), were higher in female HT relay cells. This is consistent with upregulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors containing α4- and δ-subunits to enhance tonic inhibition. In contrast, the sensitivity of GABAA receptors mediating inhibition in the female γ2(Y356/367F) +/- to neurosteroids was markedly reduced compared with WT. We conclude that disrupting tyrosine phosphorylation of the γ2-subunit activates a sex-specific increase in tonic inhibition, and this most likely reflects a genomic-based compensation mechanism for the reduced neurosteroid sensitivity of inhibition measured in female HT relay neurons.

  4. Molecular cloning and expression of a GABA receptor subunit from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Vázquez, Eric N; Díaz-Velásquez, Clara E; Uribe, R M; Arias, Juan M; García, Ubaldo

    2016-02-01

    Molecular cloning has introduced an unexpected, large diversity of neurotransmitter hetero- oligomeric receptors. Extensive research on the molecular structure of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR) has been of great significance for understanding how the nervous system works in both vertebrates and invertebrates. However, only two examples of functional homo-oligomeric GABA-activated Cl(-) channels have been reported. In the vertebrate retina, the GABAρ1 subunit of various species forms homo-oligomeric receptors; in invertebrates, a cDNA encoding a functional GABA-activated Cl(-) channel has been isolated from a Drosophila melanogaster head cDNA library. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, these subunits function efficiently as a homo-oligomeric complex. To investigate the structure-function of GABA channels from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, we cloned a subunit and expressed it in human embryonic kidney cells. Electrophysiological recordings show that this subunit forms a homo-oligomeric ionotropic GABAR that gates a bicuculline-insensitive Cl(-) current. The order of potency of the agonists was GABA > trans-4-amino-crotonic acid = cis-4-aminocrotonic acid > muscimol. These data support the notion that X-organ sinus gland neurons express at least two GABA subunits responsible for the formation of hetero-oligomeric and homo-oligomeric receptors. In addition, by in situ hybridization studies we demonstrate that most X-organ neurons from crayfish eyestalk express the isolated pcGABAA β subunit. This study increases the knowledge of the genetics of the crayfish, furthers the understanding of this important neurotransmitter receptor family, and provides insight into the evolution of these genes among vertebrates and invertebrates.

  5. Salicylate, an aspirin metabolite, specifically inhibits the current mediated by glycine receptors containing α1-subunits

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y-G; Tang, Z-Q; Ye, Z-Y; Wang, H-T; Huang, Y-N; Zhou, K-Q; Zhang, M; Xu, T-L; Chen, L

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Aspirin or its metabolite sodium salicylate is widely prescribed and has many side effects. Previous studies suggest that targeting neuronal receptors/ion channels is one of the pathways by which salicylate causes side effects in the nervous system. The present study aimed to investigate the functional action of salicylate on glycine receptors at a molecular level. Experimental approach: Whole-cell patch-clamp and site-directed mutagenesis were deployed to examine the effects of salicylate on the currents mediated by native glycine receptors in cultured neurones of rat inferior colliculus and by glycine receptors expressed in HEK293T cells. Key results: Salicylate effectively inhibited the maximal current mediated by native glycine receptors without altering the EC50 and the Hill coefficient, demonstrating a non-competitive action of salicylate. Only when applied simultaneously with glycine and extracellularly, could salicylate produce this antagonism. In HEK293T cells transfected with either α1-, α2-, α3-, α1β-, α2β- or α3β-glycine receptors, salicylate only inhibited the current mediated by those receptors that contained the α1-subunit. A single site mutation of I240V in the α1-subunit abolished inhibition by salicylate. Conclusions and implications: Salicylate is a non-competitive antagonist specifically on glycine receptors containing α1-subunits. This action critically involves the isoleucine-240 in the first transmembrane segment of the α1-subunit. Our findings may increase our understanding of the receptors involved in the side effects of salicylate on the central nervous system, such as seizures and tinnitus. PMID:19594751

  6. A Negative Allosteric Modulator for α5 Subunit-Containing GABA Receptors Exerts a Rapid and Persistent Antidepressant-Like Action without the Side Effects of the NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mackenzie E.; Krimmel, Samuel R.; Georgiou, Polymnia; Gould, Todd D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract New antidepressant pharmacotherapies that provide rapid relief of depressive symptoms are needed. The NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine exerts rapid antidepressant actions in depressed patients but also side effects that complicate its clinical utility. Ketamine promotes excitatory synaptic strength, likely by producing high-frequency correlated activity in mood-relevant regions of the forebrain. Negative allosteric modulators of GABA-A receptors containing α5 subunits (α5 GABA-NAMs) should also promote high-frequency correlated electroencephalogram (EEG) activity and should therefore exert rapid antidepressant responses. Because α5 subunits display a restricted expression in the forebrain, we predicted that α5 GABA-NAMs would produce activation of principle neurons but exert fewer side effects than ketamine. We tested this hypothesis in male mice and observed that the α5 GABA-NAM MRK-016 exerted an antidepressant-like response in the forced swim test at 1 and 24 h after administration and an anti-anhedonic response after chronic stress in the female urine sniffing test (FUST). Like ketamine, MRK-016 produced a transient increase in EEG γ power, and both the increase in γ power and its antidepressant effects in the forced swim test were blocked by prior administration of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor antagonist 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX). Unlike ketamine, however, MRK-016 produced no impairment of rota-rod performance, no reduction of prepulse inhibition (PPI), no conditioned-place preference (CPP), and no change in locomotion. α5 GABA-NAMs, thus reproduce the rapid antidepressant-like actions of ketamine, perhaps via an AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-dependent increase in coherent neuronal activity, but display fewer potential negative side effects. These compounds thus demonstrate promise as clinically useful fast-acting antidepressants. PMID:28275719

  7. JAK/STAT pathway regulation of GABAA receptor expression after differing severities of experimental TBI.

    PubMed

    Raible, Daniel J; Frey, Lauren C; Del Angel, Yasmin Cruz; Carlsen, Jessica; Hund, Dana; Russek, Shelley J; Smith, Bret; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R

    2015-09-01

    Synaptic inhibition in the adult brain is primarily mediated by the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor (GABA(A)R). The distribution, properties, and dynamics of these receptors are largely determined by their subunit composition. Alteration of subunit composition after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result in abnormal increased synaptic firing and possibly contribute to injury-related pathology. Several studies have shown that the Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway can alter GABA(A)R subunit expression. The present study investigated changes in JAK/STAT pathway activation after two different severities of experimental TBI in the mouse using the controlled cortical impact (CCI) model. It also investigated whether modulating the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway after severe controlled cortical impact (CCI-S) with a JAK/STAT inhibitor (WP1066) alters post-traumatic epilepsy development and/or neurological recovery after injury. Our results demonstrated differential changes in both the activation of STAT3 and the expression of the GABA(A)R α1 and γ2 subunit levels that were dependent on the severity of the injury. The change in the GABA(A)R α1 subunit levels appeared to be at least partly transcriptionally mediated. We were able to selectively reverse the decrease in GABA(A)R α1 protein levels with WP1066 treatment after CCI injury. WP1066 treatment also improved the degree of recovery of vestibular motor function after injury. These findings suggest that the magnitude of JAK/STAT pathway activation and GABA(A)R α1 subunit level decrease is dependent on injury severity in this mouse model of TBI. In addition, reducing JAK/STAT pathway activation after severe experimental TBI reverses the decrease in the GABA(A)R α1 protein levels and improves vestibular motor recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Deletion of α5 nicotine receptor subunits abolishes nicotinic aversive motivational effects in a manner that phenocopies dopamine receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Grieder, Taryn E; George, Olivier; Yee, Mandy; Bergamini, Michael A; Chwalek, Michal; Maal-Bared, Geith; Vargas-Perez, Hector; van der Kooy, Derek

    2017-07-01

    Nicotine addiction is a worldwide epidemic that claims millions of lives each year. Genetic deletion of α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits has been associated with increased nicotine intake, however, it remains unclear whether acute nicotine is less aversive or more rewarding, and whether mice lacking the α5 nAChR subunit can experience withdrawal from chronic nicotine. We used place conditioning and conditioned taste avoidance paradigms to examine the effect of α5 subunit-containing nAChR deletion (α5 -/-) on conditioned approach and avoidance behaviour in nondependent and nicotine-dependent and -withdrawn mice, and compared these motivational effects with those elicited after dopamine receptor antagonism. We show that nondependent α5 -/- mice find low, non-motivational doses of nicotine rewarding, and do not show an aversive conditioned response or taste avoidance to higher aversive doses of nicotine. Furthermore, nicotine-dependent α5 -/- mice do not show a conditioned aversive motivational response to withdrawal from chronic nicotine, although they continue to exhibit a somatic withdrawal syndrome. These effects phenocopy those observed after dopamine receptor antagonism, but are not additive, suggesting that α5 nAChR subunits act in the same pathway as dopamine and are critical for the experience of nicotine's aversive, but not rewarding motivational effects in both a nondependent and nicotine-dependent and -withdrawn motivational state. Genetic deletion of α5 nAChR subunits leads to a behavioural phenotype that exactly matches that observed after antagonizing dopamine receptors, thus we suggest that modulation of nicotinic receptors containing α5 subunits may modify dopaminergic signalling, suggesting novel therapeutic treatments for smoking cessation. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Selective Pyramidal Cell Reduction of GABAA Receptor α1 Subunit Messenger RNA Expression in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Glausier, Jill R; Lewis, David A

    2011-01-01

    Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) for the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor, which is present in 60% of cortical GABAA receptors, have been reported to be lower in layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in subjects with schizophrenia. This subunit is expressed in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, and thus lower α1 subunit levels in each cell population would have opposite effects on net cortical excitation. We used dual-label in situ hybridization to quantify GABAA α1 subunit mRNA expression in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II α (CaMKIIα)-containing pyramidal cells and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa (GAD65)-containing interneurons in layer 3 of the PFC from matched schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. In subjects with schizophrenia, mean GABAA α1 subunit mRNA expression was significantly 40% lower in pyramidal cells, but was not altered in interneurons. Lower α1 subunit mRNA expression in pyramidal cells was not attributable to potential confounding factors, and thus appeared to reflect the disease process of schizophrenia. These results suggest that pyramidal cell inhibition is reduced in schizophrenia, whereas inhibition of GABA neurons is maintained. The cell type specificity of these findings may reflect a compensatory response to enhance layer 3 pyramidal cell activity in the face of the diminished excitatory drive associated with the lower dendritic spine density on these neurons. PMID:21677653

  10. Energetic Contributions to Channel Gating of Residues in the Muscle Nicotinic Receptor β1 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Gustav; Eaton, Megan; Li, Ping; Zheng, Steven; Lo, Joshua; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2013-01-01

    In the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel family, transmitter binds in the extracellular domain and conformational changes result in channel opening in the transmembrane domain. In the muscle nicotinic receptor and other heteromeric members of the family one subunit does not contribute to the canonical agonist binding site for transmitter. A fundamental question is whether conformational changes occur in this subunit. We used records of single channel activity and rate-equilibrium free energy relationships to examine the β1 (non-ACh-binding) subunit of the muscle nicotinic receptor. Mutations to residues in the extracellular domain have minimal effects on the gating equilibrium constant. Positions in the channel lining (M2 transmembrane) domain contribute strongly and relatively late during gating. Positions thought to be important in other subunits in coupling the transmitter-binding to the channel domains have minimal effects on gating. We conclude that the conformational changes involved in channel gating propagate from the binding-site to the channel in the ACh-binding subunits and subsequently spread to the non-binding subunit. PMID:24194945

  11. Genetically encoding a light switch in an ionotropic glutamate receptor reveals subunit-specific interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shujia; Riou, Morgane; Yao, C. Andrea; Carvalho, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Pamela C.; Bensaude, Olivier; Paoletti, Pierre; Ye, Shixin

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming receptors to artificially respond to light has strong potential for molecular studies and interrogation of biological functions. Here, we design a light-controlled ionotropic glutamate receptor by genetically encoding a photoreactive unnatural amino acid (UAA). The photo–cross-linker p-azido-l-phenylalanine (AzF) was encoded in NMDA receptors (NMDARs), a class of glutamate-gated ion channels that play key roles in neuronal development and plasticity. AzF incorporation in the obligatory GluN1 subunit at the GluN1/GluN2B N-terminal domain (NTD) upper lobe dimer interface leads to an irreversible allosteric inhibition of channel activity upon UV illumination. In contrast, when pairing the UAA-containing GluN1 subunit with the GluN2A subunit, light-dependent inactivation is completely absent. By combining electrophysiological and biochemical analyses, we identify subunit-specific structural determinants at the GluN1/GluN2 NTD dimer interfaces that critically dictate UV-controlled inactivation. Our work reveals that the two major NMDAR subtypes differ in their ectodomain-subunit interactions, in particular their electrostatic contacts, resulting in GluN1 NTD coupling more tightly to the GluN2B NTD than to the GluN2A NTD. It also paves the way for engineering light-sensitive ligand-gated ion channels with subtype specificity through the genetic code expansion. PMID:24715733

  12. GABAρ subunits confer a bicuculline-insensitive component to GFAP+ cells of cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Pétriz, Adriana; Reyes-Haro, Daniel; González-González, María Alejandra; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2014-01-01

    GABA-A receptors mediating synaptic or extrasynaptic transmission are molecularly and functionally distinct, and glial cells are known to express a plethora of GABA-A subunits. Here we demonstrate that GFAP+ cells of the granular layer of cerebellum express GABAρ subunits during early postnatal development, thereby conferring peculiar pharmacologic characteristics to GABA responses. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of GABAρ in the plasma membrane of GFAP+ cells. In contrast, expression in the adult was restricted to Purkinje neurons and a subset of ependymal cells. Electrophysiological studies in vitro revealed that astrocytes express functional receptors with an EC50 of 52.2 ± 11.8 μM for GABA. The evoked currents were inhibited by bicuculline (100 μM) and TPMPA (IC50, 5.9 ± 0.6 μM), indicating the presence of a GABAρ component. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated protein–protein interactions between GABAρ1 and GABAα1, and double immunofluorescence showed that these subunits colocalize in the plasma membrane. Three populations of GABA-A receptors in astrocytes were identified: classic GABA-A, bicuculline-insensitive GABAρ, and GABA-A–GABAρ hybrids. Clusters of GABA-A receptors were distributed in the perinuclear space and along the processes of GFAP+ cells. Time-lapse microscopy showed GABAρ2-GFP accumulation in clusters located in the soma and along the processes. The clusters were relatively immobile, with mean displacement of 9.4 ± 0.9 μm and a net distance traveled of 1–2 μm, owing mainly to directional movement or simple diffusion. Modulation of GABAρ dynamics may be a novel mechanism of extrasynaptic transmission regulating GABAergic control of GFAP+ cells during early postnatal development. PMID:25422464

  13. Mutation causing congenital myasthenia reveals acetylcholine receptor β/δ subunit interaction essential for assembly

    PubMed Central

    Quiram, Polly A.; Ohno, Kinji; Milone, Margherita; Patterson, Marc C.; Pruitt, Ned J.; Brengman, Joan M.; Sine, Steven M.; Engel, Andrew G.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a severe postsynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome with marked endplate acetylcholine receptor (AChR) deficiency caused by 2 heteroallelic mutations in the β subunit gene. One mutation causes skipping of exon 8, truncating the β subunit before its M1 transmembrane domain, and abolishing surface expression of pentameric AChR. The other mutation, a 3-codon deletion (β426delEQE) in the long cytoplasmic loop between the M3 and M4 domains, curtails but does not abolish expression. By coexpressing β426delEQE with combinations of wild-type subunits in 293 HEK cells, we demonstrate that β426delEQE impairs AChR assembly by disrupting a specific interaction between β and δ subunits. Studies with related deletion and missense mutants indicate that secondary structure in this region of the β subunit is crucial for interaction with the δ subunit. The findings imply that the mutated residues are positioned at the interface between β and δ subunits and demonstrate contribution of this local region of the long cytoplasmic loop to AChR assembly. J. Clin. Invest. 104:1403–1410 (1999). PMID:10562302

  14. Lungfish aestivating activities are locked in distinct encephalic γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor α subunits.

    PubMed

    Giusi, Giuseppina; Crudo, Michele; Di Vito, Anna; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Garofalo, Filippo; Chew, Shit Fun; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Canonaco, Marcello

    2011-03-01

    Ammonia in dipnoans plays a crucial role on neuronal homeostasis, especially for those brain areas that maintain torpor and awakening states in equilibrium. In the present study, specific α subunits of the major neuroreceptor inhibitory complex (GABA(A) R), which predominated during some phases of aestivation of the lungfish Protopterus annectens, turned out to be key adaptive factors of this species. From the isolation, for the first time, of the encoding sequence for GABA(A) R α₁, α₄ , and α₅ subunits in Protopterus annectens, qPCR and in situ hybridization levels of α₄ transcript in thalamic (P < 0.001) and mesencephalic (P < 0.01) areas proved to be significantly higher during long aestivating maintenance states. Very evident α₅ mRNA levels were detected in diencephalon during short inductive aestivating states, whereas an α₄ /α₁ turnover characterized the arousal state. Contextually, the recovery of physiological activities appeared to be tightly related to an evident up-regulation of α₁ transcripts in telencephalic and cerebellar sites. Surprisingly, TUNEL and amino cupric silver methods corroborated apoptotic and neurodegenerative cellular events, respectively, above all in telencephalon and cerebellum of lungfish exposed to long maintenance aestivating conditions. Overall, these results tend to underlie a novel GABAergic-related ON/OFF molecular switch operating during aestivation of the lungfish, which might have a bearing on sleeping disorders. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Glycine Receptors Containing α2 or α3 Subunits Regulate Specific Ethanol-Mediated Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Blednov, Yuri A.; Benavidez, Jillian M.; Black, Mendy; Leiter, Courtney R.; Osterndorff-Kahanek, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are broadly expressed in the central nervous system. Ethanol enhances the function of brain GlyRs, and the GlyRα1 subunit is associated with some of the behavioral actions of ethanol, such as loss of righting reflex. The in vivo role of GlyRα2 and α3 subunits in alcohol responses has not been characterized despite high expression levels in the nucleus accumbens and amygdala, areas that are important for the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse. We used an extensive panel of behavioral tests to examine ethanol actions in mice lacking Glra2 (the gene encoding the glycine receptor alpha 2 subunit) or Glra3 (the gene encoding the glycine receptor alpha 3 subunit). Deletion of Glra2 or Glra3 alters specific ethanol-induced behaviors. Glra2 knockout mice demonstrate reduced ethanol intake and preference in the 24-hour two-bottle choice test and increased initial aversive responses to ethanol and lithium chloride. In contrast, Glra3 knockout mice show increased ethanol intake and preference in the 24-hour intermittent access test and increased development of conditioned taste aversion to ethanol. Mutants and wild-type mice consumed similar amounts of ethanol in the limited access drinking in the dark test. Other ethanol effects, such as anxiolysis, motor incoordination, loss of righting reflex, and acoustic startle response, were not altered in the mutants. The behavioral changes in mice lacking GlyRα2 or α3 subunits were distinct from effects previously observed in mice with knock-in mutations in the α1 subunit. We provide evidence that GlyRα2 and α3 subunits may regulate ethanol consumption and the aversive response to ethanol. PMID:25678534

  16. Early life stress is a risk factor for excessive alcohol drinking and impulsivity in adults and is mediated via a CRF/GABA(A) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Warnock, Kaitlin T; Wang, Hong; June, Harry L; Bell, Kimberly A; Rabe, Holger; Tiruveedhula, Veera Venkata Naga Phani Babu; Cook, James; Lüddens, Hartmut; Aurelian, Laure; June, Harry L

    2016-01-01

    Childhood stress and trauma are associated with substance use disorders in adulthood, but the neurological changes that confer increased vulnerability are largely unknown. In this study, maternal separation (MS) stress, restricted to the pre-weaning period, was used as a model to study mechanisms of protracted effects of childhood stress/traumatic experiences on binge drinking and impulsivity. Using an operant self-administration model of binge drinking and a delay discounting assay to measure impulsive-like behavior, we report that early life stress due to MS facilitated acquisition of binge drinking and impulsivity during adulthood in rats. Previous studies have shown heightened levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) after MS, and here, we add that MS increased expression levels of GABA(A) α2 subunit in central stress circuits. To investigate the precise role of these circuits in regulating impulsivity and binge drinking, the CRF1 receptor antagonist antalarmin and the novel GABA(A) α2 subunit ligand 3-PBC were infused into the central amygdala (CeA) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Antalarmin and 3-PBC at each site markedly reduced impulsivity and produced profound reductions on binge-motivated alcohol drinking, without altering responding for sucrose. Furthermore, whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed that low concentrations of 3-PBC directly reversed the effect of relatively high concentrations of ethanol on α2β3γ2 GABA(A) receptors, by a benzodiazepine site-independent mechanism. Together, our data provide strong evidence that maternal separation, i.e. early life stress, is a risk factor for binge drinking, and is linked to impulsivity, another key risk factor for excessive alcohol drinking. We further show that pharmacological manipulation of CRF and GABA receptor signaling is effective to reverse binge drinking and impulsive-like behavior in MS rats. These results provide novel insights into the role of the brain stress systems in the

  17. Hydrophobic interactions mediate binding of the glycine receptor beta-subunit to gephyrin.

    PubMed

    Kneussel, M; Hermann, A; Kirsch, J; Betz, H

    1999-03-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are ligand-gated chloride channel proteins composed of alpha- and beta-subunits. GlyRs are located to and anchored at postsynaptic sites by the receptor-associated protein gephyrin. Previous work from our laboratory has identified a core motif for gephyrin binding in the cytoplasmic loop of the GlyR beta-subunit. Here, we localized amino acid residues implicated in gephyrin binding by site-directed mutagenesis. In a novel transfection assay, a green fluorescent protein-gephyrin binding motif fusion protein was used to monitor the consequences of amino acid substitutions for beta-subunit interaction with gephyrin. Only multiple, but not single, replacements of hydrophobic side chains abolished the interaction between the two proteins. Our data are consistent with gephyrin binding being mediated by the hydrophobic side of an imperfect amphipathic helix.

  18. EM colocalization of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits at synapses in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Kharazia, V N; Phend, K D; Rustioni, A; Weinberg, R J

    1996-05-24

    Electrophysiology and light microscopy suggest that a single excitatory synapse may use both amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we here provide direct evidence for colocalization at individual synapses in sensorimotor cortex of adult rats. Colocalization was most commonly observed on dendritic spines; subunits of the two classes of receptors seemed to be independently distributed within the synaptic active zone.

  19. Ligand-guided homology modelling of the GABAB2 subunit of the GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Freyd, Thibaud; Warszycki, Dawid; Mordalski, Stefan; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Gabrielsen, Mari

    2017-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and disturbances in the GABAergic system have been implicated in numerous neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimeric class C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) consisting of GABAB1a/b and GABAB2 subunits. Two GABAB receptor ligand binding sites have been described, namely the orthosteric GABA binding site located in the extracellular GABAB1 Venus fly trap domain and the allosteric binding site found in the GABAB2 transmembrane domain. To date, the only experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of the GABAB receptor are of the Venus fly trap domain. GABAB receptor allosteric modulators, however, show great therapeutic potential, and elucidating the structure of the GABAB2 transmembrane domain may lead to development of novel drugs and increased understanding of the allosteric mechanism of action. Despite the lack of x-ray crystal structures of the GABAB2 transmembrane domain, multiple crystal structures belonging to other classes of GPCRs than class A have been released within the last years. More closely related template structures are now available for homology modelling of the GABAB receptor. Here, multiple homology models of the GABAB2 subunit of the GABAB receptor have been constructed using templates from class A, B and C GPCRs, and docking of five clusters of positive allosteric modulators and decoys has been undertaken to select models that enrich the active compounds. Using this ligand-guided approach, eight GABAB2 homology models have been chosen as possible structural representatives of the transmembrane domain of the GABAB2 subunit. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to describe homology modelling of the transmembrane domain of the GABAB2 subunit and the docking of positive allosteric modulators in the receptor.

  20. Ligand-guided homology modelling of the GABAB2 subunit of the GABAB receptor

    PubMed Central

    Freyd, Thibaud; Warszycki, Dawid; Mordalski, Stefan; Bojarski, Andrzej J.; Gabrielsen, Mari

    2017-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and disturbances in the GABAergic system have been implicated in numerous neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimeric class C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) consisting of GABAB1a/b and GABAB2 subunits. Two GABAB receptor ligand binding sites have been described, namely the orthosteric GABA binding site located in the extracellular GABAB1 Venus fly trap domain and the allosteric binding site found in the GABAB2 transmembrane domain. To date, the only experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of the GABAB receptor are of the Venus fly trap domain. GABAB receptor allosteric modulators, however, show great therapeutic potential, and elucidating the structure of the GABAB2 transmembrane domain may lead to development of novel drugs and increased understanding of the allosteric mechanism of action. Despite the lack of x-ray crystal structures of the GABAB2 transmembrane domain, multiple crystal structures belonging to other classes of GPCRs than class A have been released within the last years. More closely related template structures are now available for homology modelling of the GABAB receptor. Here, multiple homology models of the GABAB2 subunit of the GABAB receptor have been constructed using templates from class A, B and C GPCRs, and docking of five clusters of positive allosteric modulators and decoys has been undertaken to select models that enrich the active compounds. Using this ligand-guided approach, eight GABAB2 homology models have been chosen as possible structural representatives of the transmembrane domain of the GABAB2 subunit. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to describe homology modelling of the transmembrane domain of the GABAB2 subunit and the docking of positive allosteric modulators in the receptor. PMID:28323850

  1. Basal Levels of AMPA Receptor GluA1 Subunit Phosphorylation at Threonine 840 and Serine 845 in Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babiec, Walter E.; Guglietta, Ryan; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluA1 subunits at two sites, serine 845 (S845) and threonine 840 (T840), is thought to be involved in NMDA receptor-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Importantly, the notion that dephosphorylation of these sites contributes to LTD assumes that a significant fraction of GluA1 subunits are…

  2. Basal Levels of AMPA Receptor GluA1 Subunit Phosphorylation at Threonine 840 and Serine 845 in Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babiec, Walter E.; Guglietta, Ryan; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluA1 subunits at two sites, serine 845 (S845) and threonine 840 (T840), is thought to be involved in NMDA receptor-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Importantly, the notion that dephosphorylation of these sites contributes to LTD assumes that a significant fraction of GluA1 subunits are…

  3. Impaired Discrimination Learning in Mice Lacking the NMDA Receptor NR2A Subunit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, Jonathan L.; Feyder, Michael; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Mishina, Masayoshi; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate certain forms of synaptic plasticity and learning. We used a touchscreen system to assess NR2A subunit knockout mice (KO) for (1) pairwise visual discrimination and reversal learning and (2) acquisition and extinction of an instrumental response requiring no pairwise discrimination. NR2A KO mice…

  4. Impaired Discrimination Learning in Mice Lacking the NMDA Receptor NR2A Subunit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, Jonathan L.; Feyder, Michael; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Mishina, Masayoshi; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate certain forms of synaptic plasticity and learning. We used a touchscreen system to assess NR2A subunit knockout mice (KO) for (1) pairwise visual discrimination and reversal learning and (2) acquisition and extinction of an instrumental response requiring no pairwise discrimination. NR2A KO mice…

  5. d Subunit-Containing GABA[subscript A] Receptor Prevents Overgeneralization of Fear in Adult Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Han-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Yang; Liu, Wei-Zhu; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Yin, Xiao-Ping; Pan, Bing-Xing

    2017-01-01

    The role of d subunit-containing GABA[subscript A] receptor (GABA[subscript A](d)R) in fear generalization is uncertain. Here, by using mice with or without genetic deletion of GABA[subscript A](d)R and using protocols in which the conditioned tone stimuli were cross presented with different nonconditioned stimuli, we observed that when the two…

  6. Response kinetics and pharmacological properties of heteromeric receptors formed by coassembly of GABA rho- and gamma 2-subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, H; Ripps, H

    1999-01-01

    Two of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, GABAA and GABAC, are ligand-gated chloride channels expressed by neurons in the retina and throughout the central nervous system. The different subunit composition of these two classes of GABA receptor result in very different physiological and pharmacological properties. Although little is known at the molecular level as to the subunit composition of any native GABA receptor, it is thought that GABAC receptors are homomeric assemblies of rho-subunits. However, we found that the kinetic and pharmacological properties of homomeric receptors formed by each of the rho-subunits cloned from perch retina did not resemble those of the GABAC receptors on perch bipolar cells. Because both GABAA and GABAC receptors are present on retinal bipolar cells, we attempted to determine whether subunits of these two receptor classes are capable of interacting with each other. We report here that, when coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes, heteromeric (rho 1B gamma 2) receptors formed by coassembly of the rho 1B-subunit with the gamma 2-subunit of the GABAA receptor displayed response properties very similar to those obtained with current recordings from bipolar cells. In addition to being unresponsive to bicuculline and diazepam, the time-constant of deactivation, and the sensitivities to GABA, picrotoxin and zinc closely approximated the values obtained from the native GABAC receptors on bipolar cells. These results provide the first direct evidence of interaction between GABA rho and GABAA receptor subunits. It seems highly likely that coassembly of GABAA and rho-subunits contributes to the molecular organization of GABAC receptors in the retina and perhaps throughout the nervous system. PMID:10643085

  7. The α6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit influences ethanol-induced sedation.

    PubMed

    Kamens, Helen M; Hoft, Nicole R; Cox, Ryan J; Miyamoto, Jill H; Ehringer, Marissa A

    2012-08-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are often co-used and data from human and animals studies have demonstrated that common genes underlie responses to these two drugs. Recently, the genes that code for the subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been implicated as a common genetic mediator for alcohol and nicotine responses. The mammalian genes that code for the α6 and β3 subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (Chrna6 and Chrnb3, respectively) are located adjacent to each other on human and mouse chromosome 8. These subunits have gained attention as potential regulators of drug behaviors because of their expression in the striatum where they have been shown to modulate dopamine release. Human genetic studies have shown that variation in these genes is associated with alcohol phenotypes. In the current experiments, mice lacking the Chrna6 or Chrnb3 gene were tested for three ethanol behaviors: choice ethanol consumption, ataxia, and sedation. Wildtype (WT), heterozygous (HET), and knockout (KO) mice of each strain went through a standard 2-bottle choice drinking paradigm, the balance beam, and the Loss of Righting Reflex (LORR) paradigm. No genotypic effects on any of the 3 behavioral tasks were observed in Chrnb3 animals. While the Chrna6 gene did not significantly influence ethanol consumption (g/kg) or ataxia, mice lacking the α6 subunit took significantly longer to recover their righting reflex than WT animals. These data provide evidence that receptors containing this subunit modulate the sedative effects of ethanol. Further work examining other models of ethanol consumption and behavioral responses to ethanol is needed to fully characterize the role of these receptor subunits in modulating ethanol responses.

  8. Molecular determinants of glycine receptor αβ subunit sensitivities to Zn2+-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul S; Beato, Marco; Harvey, Robert J; Smart, Trevor G

    2005-01-01

    Glycine receptors exhibit a biphasic sensitivity profile in response to Zn2+-mediated modulation, with low Zn2+ concentrations potentiating (< 10 μm), and higher Zn2+ concentrations inhibiting submaximal responses to glycine. Here, a substantial 30-fold increase in sensitivity to Zn2+-mediated inhibition was apparent for the homomeric glycine receptor (GlyR) α1 subunit compared to either GlyR α2 or α3 subtypes. Swapping the divergent histidine (H107) residue in GlyR α1, which together with the conserved H109 forms part of an intersubunit Zn2+-binding site, for the equivalent asparagine residue present in GlyR α2 and α3, reversed this phenotype. Co-expression of heteromeric GlyR α1 or α2 with the ancillary β subunit yielded receptors that maintained their distinctive sensitivities to Zn2+ inhibition. However, GlyR α2β heteromers were consistently 2-fold more sensitive to inhibition compared to the GlyR α2 homomer. Comparative studies to elucidate the specific residue in the β subunit responsible for this differential sensitivity revealed instead threonine 133 in the α1 subunit as a new vital component for Zn2+-mediated inhibition. Further studies on heteromeric receptors demonstrated that a mutated β subunit could indeed affect Zn2+-mediated inhibition but only from one side of the intersubunit Zn2+-binding site, equivalent to the GlyR α1 H107 face. This strongly suggests that the α subunit is responsible for Zn2+-mediated inhibition and that this is effectively transduced, asymmetrically, from the side of the Zn2+-binding site where H109 and T133 are located. PMID:15905212

  9. LTP requires a reserve pool of glutamate receptors independent of subunit type.

    PubMed

    Granger, Adam J; Shi, Yun; Lu, Wei; Cerpas, Manuel; Nicoll, Roger A

    2013-01-24

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission is thought to be an important cellular mechanism underlying memory formation. A widely accepted model posits that LTP requires the cytoplasmic carboxyl tail (C-tail) of the AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) receptor subunit GluA1. To find the minimum necessary requirement of the GluA1 C-tail for LTP in mouse CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, we used a single-cell molecular replacement strategy to replace all endogenous AMPA receptors with transfected subunits. In contrast to the prevailing model, we found no requirement of the GluA1 C-tail for LTP. In fact, replacement with the GluA2 subunit showed normal LTP, as did an artificially expressed kainate receptor not normally found at these synapses. The only conditions under which LTP was impaired were those with markedly decreased AMPA receptor surface expression, indicating a requirement for a reserve pool of receptors. These results demonstrate the synapse's remarkable flexibility to potentiate with a variety of glutamate receptor subtypes, requiring a fundamental change in our thinking with regard to the core molecular events underlying synaptic plasticity.

  10. Evidence that the subunit structure of gonadotropin receptor is preserved during regression of rat corpus luteum

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.; Menon, K.N.J.

    1986-05-29

    The level of hCG/LH receptor has been shown to undergo marked changes during the life span of rat corpus luteum. To evaluate whether these fluctuations are due to changes in the receptor subunit structure or receptor protein content, the /sup 125/I-hCG binding activity and the receptor subunit structure were determined during different time periods of pseudopregnancy. The maximum /sup 125/I-hCG binding activity was observed on day 7, after which it decreased by 20 and 45% on day 11 and day 14, respectively. The Scatchard analysis of /sup 125/I-hCG binding data showed that the decrease in binding activity was caused by a change in the number of binding sites rather than a change in the binding affinity. The LH/hCG receptor in ovarian membranes obtained on days 7, 11 and 14 were characterized by the method of affinity cross-linking. All four subunits of the LH/hCG receptor were detected in the ovarian membranes at all stages while the intensity decreased parallel to a decrease in hCG binding from day 7 to day 14.

  11. Rat gustatory neurons in the geniculate ganglion express glutamate receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, Alejandro; Zucchi, Benedetta; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2004-07-01

    Taste receptor cells are innervated by primary gustatory neurons that relay sensory information to the central nervous system. The transmitter(s) at synapses between taste receptor cells and primary afferent fibers is (are) not yet known. By analogy with other sensory organs, glutamate might a transmitter in taste buds. We examined the presence of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits in rat gustatory primary neurons in the ganglion that innervates the anterior tongue (geniculate ganglion). AMPA and NMDA type subunits were immunohistochemically detected with antibodies against GluR1, GluR2, GluR2/3, GluR4 and NR1 subunits. Gustatory neurons were specifically identified by retrograde tracing with fluorogold from injections made into the anterior portion of the tongue. Most gustatory neurons in the geniculate ganglion were strongly immunoreactive for GluR2/3 (68%), GluR4 (78%) or NR1 (71%). GluR1 was seen in few cells (16%). We further examined if glutamate receptors were present in the peripheral terminals of primary gustatory neurons in taste buds. Many axonal varicosities in fungiform and vallate taste buds were immunoreactive for GluR2/3 but not for NR1. We conclude that gustatory neurons express glutamate receptors and that glutamate receptors of the AMPA type are likely targeted to synapses within taste buds.

  12. Potentiation of the ionotropic GABA receptor response by whiskey fragrance.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2002-11-06

    It is well-known that the target of most mood-defining compounds is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activity in the human brain. To study the effects of whiskey fragrance on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting rat whole brain mRNA or cRNA prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors. Most whiskey components such as phenol, ethoxy, and lactone derivatives potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors, especially ethyl phenylpropanoate (EPP), which strongly potentiated the response. When this compound was applied to mice through respiration, the convulsions induced by pentetrazole were delayed, suggesting that EPP was absorbed by the brain, where it could potentiate the GABA(A) receptor responses. The extract of other alcoholic drinks such as wine, sake, brandy, and shochu also potentiated the responses to varying degrees. Although these fragrant components are present in alcoholic drinks at low concentrations (extremely small quantities compared with ethanol), they may also modulate the mood or consciousness of the human through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic fragrant compounds are easily absorbed into the brain through the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response.

  13. Rescue of gamma2 subunit-deficient mice by transgenic overexpression of the GABAA receptor gamma2S or gamma2L subunit isoforms.

    PubMed

    Baer, K; Essrich, C; Balsiger, S; Wick, M J; Harris, R A; Fritschy, J M; Lüscher, B

    2000-07-01

    The gamma2 subunit is an important functional determinant of GABAA receptors and is essential for formation of high-affinity benzodiazepine binding sites and for synaptic clustering of major GABAA receptor subtypes along with gephyrin. There are two splice variants of the gamma2 subunit, gamma2 short (gamma2S) and gamma2 long (gamma2L), the latter carrying in the cytoplasmic domain an additional eight amino acids with a putative phosphorylation site. Here, we show that transgenic mice expressing either the gamma2S or gamma2L subunit on a gamma2 subunit-deficient background are phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type. They express nearly normal levels of gamma2 subunit protein and [3H]flumazenil binding sites. Likewise, the distribution, number and size of GABAA receptor clusters colocalized with gephyrin are similar to wild-type in both juvenile and adult mice. Our results indicate that the two gamma2 subunit splice variants can substitute for each other and fulfil the basic functions of GABAA receptors, allowing in vivo studies that address isoform-specific roles in phosphorylation-dependent regulatory mechanisms.

  14. Genetic disruption of the autism spectrum disorder risk gene PLAUR induces GABAA receptor subunit changes

    PubMed Central

    Eagleson, Kathie L.; Gravielle, Maria C.; SchlueterMcFadyen-Ketchum, Lisa J.; Russek, Shelley J.; Farb, David H.; Levitt, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Disruption of the GABAergic system has been implicated in multiple developmental disorders, including epilepsy, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The human gene encoding uPAR (PLAUR) has been shown recently to be associated with the risk of autism. The uPAR-/- mouse exhibits a regionally selective reduction in GABAergic interneurons in frontal and parietal regions of the cerebral cortex as well as in the CA1 and dentate gyrus subfields of the hippocampus. Behaviorally, these mice exhibit increased sensitivity to pharmacologically-induced seizures, heightened anxiety, and atypical social behavior. Here, we explore potential alterations in GABAergic circuitry that may occur in the context of altered interneuron development. Analysis of gene expression for 13 GABAA receptor subunits using quantitative real-time PCR indicates seven subunit mRNAs (α1, α2, α3, β2, β3, γ2S and γ2L) of interest. Semi-quantitative in situ hybridization analysis focusing on these subunit mRNAs reveals a complex pattern of potential gene regulatory adaptations. The levels of α2 subunit mRNAs increase in frontal cortex, CA1 and CA3, while those of α3 decrease in frontal cortex and CA1. In contrast, α1 subunit mRNAs are unaltered in any region examined. β2 subunit mRNAs are increased in frontal cortex whereas β3 subunit mRNAs are decreased in parietal cortex. Finally, γ2S subunit mRNAs are increased in parietal cortex while γ2L subunit mRNAs are increased in the dentate gyrus, potentially altering the γ2S:γ2L ratio in these two regions. For all subunits, no changes were observed in forebrain regions where GABAergic interneuron numbers are normal. We propose that disrupted differentiation of GABAergic neurons specifically in frontal and parietal cortices leads to regionally-selective alterations in local circuitry and subsequent adaptive changes in receptor subunit composition. Future electrophysiological studies will be useful in determining how alterations in network

  15. Expression variations of chromogranin A and α1,2,4 GABA(A)Rs in discrete limbic and brainstem areas rescue cardiovascular alterations.

    PubMed

    Avolio, Ennio; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Mele, Maria; Carelli, Antonio; Canonaco, Alessia; Mosciaro, Lucia; Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico; Mahata, Sushil K; Canonaco, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Recent interferences of hemodynamic functions via modified brain neuronal mechanisms have proven to be major causes of dementia and sleeping disorders. In this work, cerebral expression differences of the neuroactive vesicular chromogranin A (CgA) and distinct α GABA(A)R subunits were detected in the facultative hibernating hamster. In particular, damaged neuronal fields of hypotensive torpor (TORP) state were correlated to elevated CgA and GABA(A)R α1, α4 mRNA levels in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), central amygdalar nucleus (CeA) plus solitary tractus nucleus (NTS). Conversely, few neurodegeneration signals of hypertensive arousal (AROU) state, accounted for mostly lower CgA levels in the same areas. This state also provided increased α2-containing sites in amygdala, hippocampal and NTS neurons together with elevated α4-containing receptors in the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus (Pe). Interestingly in our hibernating model, CgA appeared to preferentially feature inhibitory neurosignals as indicated by preliminary perfusion of amygdalar sites with its highly specific antihypertensive derived peptide (catestatin) promoting GABA-dependent sIPSCs. Overall, evident neuronal damages plus altered expression capacities of CgA and α1-, α2-, α4-GABA(A)Rs in CeA, Pe, PVN as well as NTS during both hibernating states corroborate for the first time key molecular switching events guaranteeing useful cardiovascular rescuing abilities of neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Altered GABAA Receptor Subunit Expression and Pharmacology in Human Angelman Syndrome Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roden, William H.; Peugh, Lindsey D.; Jansen, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    The neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome is most frequently caused by deletion of the maternally-derived chromosome 15q11-q13 region, which includes not only the causative UBE3A gene, but also the β3-α5-γ3 GABAA receptor subunit gene cluster. GABAergic dysfunction has been hypothesized to contribute to the occurrence of epilepsy and cognitive and behavioral impairments in this condition. In the present study, analysis of GABAA receptor subunit expression and pharmacology was performed in cerebral cortex from four subjects with Angelman syndrome and compared to that from control tissue. The membrane fraction of frozen postmortem neocortical tissue was isolated and subjected to quantitative Western blot analysis. The ratios of β3/β2 and α5/α1 subunit protein expression in Angelman syndrome cortex were significantly decreased when compared with controls. An additional membrane fraction was injected into Xenopus oocytes, resulting in incorporation of the brain membrane vesicles with their associated receptors into the oocyte cellular membrane. Two-electrode voltage clamp analysis of GABAA receptor currents was then performed. Studies of GABAA receptor pharmacology in Angelman syndrome cortex revealed increased current enhancement by the α1-selective benzodiazepine site agonist zolpidem and by the barbiturate phenobarbital, while sensitivity to current inhibition by zinc was decreased. GABAA receptor affinity and modulation by neurosteroids were unchanged. This shift in GABAA receptor subunit expression and pharmacology in Angelman syndrome is consistent with impaired extrasynaptic but intact to augmented synaptic cortical GABAergic inhibition, which could contribute to the epileptic, behavioral, and cognitive phenotypes of the disorder. PMID:20692323

  17. Subunit Interfaces Contribute Differently to Activation and Allosteric Modulation of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Short, Caitlin A.; Cao, Angela T.; Wingfield, Molly A.; Doers, Matthew E.; Jobe, Emily M.; Wang, Nan; Levandoski, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely distributed in the nervous system and are implicated in many normal and pathological processes. The structural determinants of allostery in nAChRs are not well understood. One class of nAChR allosteric modulators, including the small molecule morantel (Mor), acts from a site that is structurally homologous to the canonical agonist site but exists in the β(+)/α(–) subunit interface. We hypothesized that all nAChR subunits move with respect to each other during channel activation and allosteric modulation. We therefore studied five pairs of residues predicted to span the interfaces of α3β2 receptors, one at the agonist interface and four at the modulator interface. Substituting cysteines in these positions, we used disulfide trapping to perturb receptor function. The pair α3Y168-β2D190, involving the C loop region of the β2 subunit, mediates modulation and agonist activation, because evoked currents were reduced up to 50% following oxidation (H2O2) treatment. The pair α3S125-β2Q39, below the canonical site, is also involved in channel activation, in accord with previous studies of the muscle-type receptor; however, the pair is differentially sensitive to ACh activation and Mor modulation (currents decreased 60% and 80%, respectively). The pairs α3Q37-β2A127 and α3E173-β2R46, both in the non-canonical interface, showed increased currents following oxidation, suggesting that subunit movements are not symmetrical. Together, our results from disulfide trapping and further mutation analysis indicate that subunit interface movement is important for allosteric modulation of nAChRs, but that the two types of interfaces contribute unequally to receptor activation. PMID:25486620

  18. Extrasynaptic αβ subunit GABAA receptors on rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Martin; Smart, Trevor G

    2006-01-01

    Extrasynaptic GABAA receptors that are tonically activated by ambient GABA are important for controlling neuronal excitability. In hippocampal pyramidal neurons, the subunit composition of these extrasynaptic receptors may include α5βγ and/or α4βδ subunits. Our present studies reveal that a component of the tonic current in the hippocampus is highly sensitive to inhibition by Zn2+. This component is probably not mediated by either α5βγ or α4βδ receptors, but might be explained by the presence of αβ isoforms. Using patch-clamp recording from pyramidal neurons, a small tonic current measured in the absence of exogenous GABA exhibited both high and low sensitivity to Zn2+ inhibition (IC50 values, 1.89 and 223 μm, respectively). Using low nanomolar and micromolar GABA concentrations to replicate tonic currents, we identified two components that are mediated by benzodiazepine-sensitive and -insensitive receptors. The latter indicated that extrasynaptic GABAA receptors exist that are devoid of γ2 subunits. To distinguish whether the benzodiazepine-insensitive receptors were αβ or αβδ isoforms, we used single-channel recording. Expressing recombinant α1β3γ2, α5β3γ2, α4β3δ and α1β3 receptors in human embryonic kidney (HEK) or mouse fibroblast (Ltk) cells, revealed similar openings with high main conductances (∼25–28 pS) for γ2 or δ subunit-containing receptors whereas αβ receptors were characterized by a lower main conductance state (∼11 pS). Recording from pyramidal cell somata revealed a similar range of channel conductances, indicative of a mixture of GABAA receptors in the extrasynaptic membrane. The lowest conductance state (∼11 pS) was the most sensitive to Zn2+ inhibition in accord with the presence of αβ receptors. This receptor type is estimated to account for up to 10% of all extrasynaptic GABAA receptors on hippocampal pyramidal neurons. PMID:17023503

  19. Developmental Expression Patterns of GABAA Receptor Subunits in Layer 3 and 5 Pyramidal Cells of Monkey Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dibyadeep; Arion, Dominique; Lewis, David A

    2015-08-01

    Cortical pyramidal neuron activity is regulated in part through inhibitory inputs mediated by GABAA receptors. The subunit composition of these receptors confers distinct functional properties. Thus, developmental shifts in subunit expression will likely influence the characteristics of pyramidal cell firing and the functional maturation of processes that depend on these neurons. We used laser microdissection and PCR to quantify postnatal developmental changes in the expression of GABAA receptor subunits (α1, α2, α5, β2, γ2, and δ) in layer 3 pyramidal cells of monkey prefrontal cortex, which are critical for working memory. To determine the specificity of these changes, we examined glutamate receptor subunits (AMPA Glur1 and NMDA Grin1) and conducted the same analyses in layer 5 pyramidal cells. Expression of GABAA receptor subunit mRNAs changed substantially, whereas glutamate receptor subunit changes were modest over postnatal development. Some transcripts (e.g., GABAA α1) progressively increased from birth until adulthood, whereas others (e.g., GABAA α2) declined with age. Changes in some transcripts were present in only one layer (e.g., GABAA δ). The development of GABAA receptor subunit expression in primate prefrontal pyramidal neurons is protracted and subunit- and layer-specific. These trajectories might contribute to the molecular basis for the maturation of working memory.

  20. Study of the nematode putative GABA type-A receptor subunits: evidence for modulation by ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Peng; Hayashi, Jon; Beech, Robin N; Prichard, Roger K

    2002-11-01

    Two alleles of the HG1 gene, which encodes a putative GABA receptor alpha/gamma subunit, were isolated from Haemonchus contortus. These two alleles were shown previously to be associated with ivermectin susceptibility (HG1A) and resistance (HG1E), respectively. Sequence analysis indicates that they differ in four amino acids. To explore the functional properties of the two alleles, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta subunit, a key functional component of the GABA receptor, was isolated from Caenorhabditis elegans (gab-1, corresponding to the GenBank locus ZC482.1) and coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes with the HG1 alleles. When gab-1 was coexpressed with either the HG1A allele or the HG1E allele in Xenopus oocytes, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-responsive channels with different sensitivity to the agonist were formed. The effects of ivermectin on the hetero-oligomeric receptors were determined. Application of ivermectin alone had no effect on the receptors. However, when coapplied with 10 micro m GABA, ivermectin potentiated the GABA-evoked current of the GAB-1/HG1A receptor, but attenuated the GABA response of the GAB-1/HG1E receptor. We demonstrated that the coexpressed HG1 and GAB-1 receptors are GABA-responsive, and provide evidence for the possible involvement of GABA receptors in the mechanism of ivermectin resistance.

  1. Lifelong ethanol consumption and brain regional GABAA receptor subunit mRNA expression in alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Sarviharju, Maija; Hyytiä, Petri; Hervonen, Antti; Jaatinen, Pia; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Korpi, Esa R

    2006-11-01

    Brain regional gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subunit mRNA expression was studied in ethanol-preferring AA (Alko, Alcohol) rats after moderate ethanol drinking for up to 2 years of age. In situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes specific for 13 different subunits was used with coronal cryostat sections of the brains. Selective alterations were observed by ethanol exposure and/or aging in signals for several subunits. Most interestingly, the putative highly ethanol-sensitive alpha4 and beta3 subunit mRNAs were significantly decreased in several brain regions. The age-related alterations in alpha4 subunit expression were parallel to those caused by lifelong ethanol drinking, whereas aging had no significant effect on beta3 subunit expression. The results suggest that prolonged ethanol consumption leading to blood concentrations of about 10 mM may downregulate the mRNA expression of selected GABAA receptor subunits and that aging might have partly similar effects.

  2. Sequence and functional expression of a single alpha subunit of an insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, J; Buckingham, S D; Shingai, R; Lunt, G G; Goosey, M W; Darlison, M G; Sattelle, D B; Barnard, E A

    1990-01-01

    We report the isolation and sequence of a cDNA clone that encodes a locust (Schistocerca gregaria) nervous system nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunit (alpha L1). The calculated molecular weight of the unglycosylated polypeptide, which contains in the proposed extracellular domain two adjacent cysteine residues which are characteristic of alpha (ligand binding) subunits, is 60,641 daltons. Injection into Xenopus oocytes, of RNA synthesized from this clone in vitro, results in expression of functional nicotinic receptors in the oocyte membrane. In these, nicotine opens a cation channel; the receptors are blocked by both alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Bgt) and kappa-bungarotoxin (kappa-Bgt). Reversible block of the expressed insect AChR by mecamylamine, d-tubocurarine, tetraethylammonium, bicuculline and strychnine has also been observed. These data are entirely consistent with previously reported electrophysiological studies on in vivo insect nicotinic receptors and also with biochemical studies on an alpha-Bgt affinity purified locust AChR. Thus, a functional receptor exhibiting the characteristic pharmacology of an in vivo insect nicotinic AChR can be expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injection with a single subunit RNA. PMID:1702381

  3. Myasthenia gravis. CD4+ T epitopes on the embryonic gamma subunit of human muscle acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Protti, M P; Manfredi, A A; Wu, X D; Moiola, L; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1992-01-01

    In myasthenia gravis (MG) an autoimmune response against muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) occurs. Embryonic muscle AChR contains a gamma subunit, substituted in adult muscle by a homologous epsilon subunit. Antibodies and CD4+ cells specific for embryonic AChR have been demonstrated in MG patients. We identified sequence segments of the human gamma subunit forming epitopes recognized by four embryonic AChR-specific CD4+ T cell lines, propagated from MG patients' blood by stimulation with synthetic peptides corresponding to the human gamma subunit sequence. Each line had an individual epitope repertoire, but two 20-residue sequence regions were recognized by three lines of different HLA haplotype. Most T epitope sequences were highly diverged between the gamma and the other AChR subunits, confirming the specificity of the T cells for embryonic AChR. These T cells may have been sensitized against AChR expressed by a tissue other than innervated skeletal muscle, possibly the thymus, which expresses an embryonic muscle AChR-like protein, containing a gamma subunit. Several sequence segments forming T epitopes are similar to regions of microbial and/or mammalian proteins unrelated to the AChR. These findings are consistent with the possibility that T cell cross-reactivity between unrelated proteins ("molecular mimicry"), proposed as a cause of autoimmune responses, is not a rare event. PMID:1383275

  4. The expression of kainate receptor subunits in hippocampal astrocytes after experimentally induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Jay R; Takahashi, D Koji; Thomson, Kyle E; Wilcox, Karen S

    2013-10-01

    Astrocytes have emerged as active participants of synaptic transmission and are increasingly implicated in neurologic disorders including epilepsy. Adult glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive hippocampal astrocytes are not known for ionotropic glutamate receptor expression under basal conditions. Using a chemoconvulsive status epilepticus (SE) model of temporal lobe epilepsy, we show by immunohistochemistry and colocalization analysis that reactive hippocampal astrocytes express kainate receptor (KAR) subunits after SE. In the CA1 region, GluK1, GluK2/3, GluK4, and GluK5 subunit expression was observed in GFAP-positive astrocytes during the seizure-free or "latent" period 1 week after SE. At 8 weeks after SE, a time after SE when spontaneous behavioral seizures occur, the GluK1 and GluK5 subunits remained expressed at significant levels. Kainate receptor subunit expression was found in astrocytes in the hippocampus and surrounding cortex but not in GFAP-positive astrocytes of striatum, olfactory bulb, or brainstem. To examine hippocampal KAR expression more broadly, astroglial-enriched tissue fractions were prepared from dissected hippocampi and were found to have greater GluK4 expression after SE than controls. These results demonstrate that astrocytes begin to express KARs after seizure activity and suggest that their expression may contribute to the pathophysiology of epilepsy.

  5. AMPA and GABAA/B Receptor Subunit Expression in the Cortex of Adult Squirrel Monkeys during Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mowery, Todd M.; Walls, Sarah M.; Garraghty, Preston E.

    2014-01-01

    The primate somatosensory neuroaxis provides a highly translational model system with which to investigate adult neural plasticity. Here, we report immunohistochemical staining data for AMPA and GABAA/B receptor subunits in the area 3b cortex of adult squirrel monkeys one and five months after median nerve compression. This method of nerve injury was selected because it allows unique insight into how receptor expression changes during the regeneration of the peripheral nerve. One month after nerve compression, the pattern of subunit staining provides evidence that the cortex enters a state of reorganization. GABA 1 receptor subunits are significantly down-regulated in layer IV, V, and VI. Glur2/3 AMPA receptor subunits and postsynaptic GABABR1b receptor subunits are up and down regulated respectively across all layers of cortex. After five months of recovery from nerve compression, the pattern of AMPA and GABAA/B receptor subunits remain significantly altered in a layer specific manner. In layer II/III, GluR1, GluR2/3, and GABA 1 subunit expression is significantly up-regulated while post synaptic GABABR1b receptor subunits are significantly down regulated. In layer VI, V, and VI the GluR2/3 and presynaptic GABABR1a receptor subunits are significantly up-regulated, while the postsynaptic GABABR1b receptor subunits remain significantly down-regulated. Taken together, these results suggest that following nerve injury the cortex enters a state of reorganization that has persistent effects on cortical plasticity even after partial or total reinnervation of the peripheral nerve. PMID:23643858

  6. Slow-dissociation effect of common signaling subunit beta c on IL5 and GM-CSF receptor assembly.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Tetsuya; Harrington, Adrian E; Zaks-Zilberman, Meirav; Scibek, Jeffery J; Chaiken, Irwin

    2008-05-01

    Receptor activation by IL5 and GM-CSF is a sequential process that depends on their interaction with a cytokine-specific subunit alpha and recruitment of a common signaling subunit beta (betac). In order to elucidate the assembly dynamics of these receptor subunits, we performed kinetic interaction analysis of the cytokine-receptor complex formation by a surface plasmon resonance biosensor. Using the extracellular domains of receptor fused with C-terminal V5-tag, we developed an assay method to co-anchor alpha and betac subunits on the biosensor surface. We demonstrated that dissociation of the cytokine-receptor complexes was slower when both subunits were co-anchored on the biosensor surface than when alpha subunit alone was anchored. The slow-dissociation effect of betac had a similar impact on GM-CSF receptor stabilization to that of IL5. The effects were abolished by alanine replacement of either Tyr18 or Tyr344 residue in betac, which together constitute key parts of a cytokine binding epitope. The data argue that betac plays an important role in preventing the ligand-receptor complexes from rapidly dissociating. This slow-dissociation effect of betac explains how, when multiple betac cytokine receptor alpha subunits are present on the same cell surface, selective betac usage can be controlled by sequestration in stabilized cytokine-alpha-betac complexes.

  7. Nicotine enhances the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of alpha4 subunits of neuronal nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y N; Edwards, S C; Wecker, L

    1997-12-01

    Studies determined whether alpha4beta2 or alpha3beta2 neuronal nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes are substrates for cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and whether nicotine affects receptor phosphorylation. The cRNAs for the subunits were coinjected into oocytes, and cells were incubated for 24 h in the absence or presence of nicotine (50 nM for alpha4beta2 and 500 nM for alpha3beta2 receptors). Nicotine did not interfere with the isolation of the receptors. When receptors isolated from oocytes expressing alpha4beta2 receptors were incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP and the catalytic subunit of PKA, separated by electrophoresis, and visualized by autoradiography, a labeled phosphoprotein with the predicted molecular size of the alpha4 subunit was present. Phosphorylation of alpha4 subunits of alpha4beta2 receptors increased within the first 5 min of incubation with nicotine and persisted for 24 h. In contrast, receptors isolated from oocytes expressing alpha3beta2 receptors did not exhibit a labeled phosphoprotein corresponding to the size of the alpha3 subunit. Results suggest that the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of alpha4 and not alpha3 subunits may explain the differential inactivation by nicotine of these receptor subtypes expressed in oocytes.

  8. Different functional roles of T1R subunits in the heteromeric taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Staszewski, Lena; Tang, Huixian; Adler, Elliot; Zoller, Mark; Li, Xiaodong

    2004-09-28

    The T1R receptors, a family of taste-specific class C G protein-coupled receptors, mediate mammalian sweet and umami tastes. The structure-function relationships of T1R receptors remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R extracellular and transmembrane domains in ligand recognition and G protein coupling. Similar to other family C G protein-coupled receptors, the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain of T1R2 is required for recognizing sweeteners, such as aspartame and neotame. The G protein coupling requires the transmembrane domain of T1R2. Surprisingly, the C-terminal transmembrane domain of T1R3 is required for recognizing sweetener cyclamate and sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. Because T1R3 is the common subunit in the sweet taste receptor and the umami taste receptor, we tested the interaction of lactisole and cyclamate with the umami taste receptor. Lactisole inhibits the activity of the human T1R1/T1R3 receptor, and, as predicted, blocked the umami taste of l-glutamate in human taste tests. Cyclamate does not activate the T1R1/T1R3 receptor by itself, but potentiates the receptor's response to l-glutamate. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R3 and T1R2 and the presence of multiple ligand binding sites on the sweet taste receptor.

  9. Different functional roles of T1R subunits in the heteromeric taste receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Staszewski, Lena; Tang, Huixian; Adler, Elliot; Zoller, Mark; Li, Xiaodong

    2004-01-01

    The T1R receptors, a family of taste-specific class C G proteincoupled receptors, mediate mammalian sweet and umami tastes. The structure–function relationships of T1R receptors remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R extracellular and transmembrane domains in ligand recognition and G protein coupling. Similar to other family C G protein-coupled receptors, the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain of T1R2 is required for recognizing sweeteners, such as aspartame and neotame. The G protein coupling requires the transmembrane domain of T1R2. Surprisingly, the C-terminal transmembrane domain of T1R3 is required for recognizing sweetener cyclamate and sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. Because T1R3 is the common subunit in the sweet taste receptor and the umami taste receptor, we tested the interaction of lactisole and cyclamate with the umami taste receptor. Lactisole inhibits the activity of the human T1R1/T1R3 receptor, and, as predicted, blocked the umami taste of l-glutamate in human taste tests. Cyclamate does not activate the T1R1/T1R3 receptor by itself, but potentiates the receptor's response to l-glutamate. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R3 and T1R2 and the presence of multiple ligand binding sites on the sweet taste receptor. PMID:15353592

  10. Candidate gene study of eight GABAA receptor subunits in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Crowe, R R; Wang, Z; Noyes, R; Albrecht, B E; Darlison, M G; Bailey, M E; Johnson, K J; Zoëga, T

    1997-08-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subunit genes are candidate genes for panic disorder. Benzodiazepine agonists acting at this receptor can suppress panic attacks, and both inverse agonists and antagonists can precipitate them. The human GABAA receptor subtypes are composed of various combinations of 13 subunits, each encoded by a unique gene. The authors tested eight of these subunits in a candidate gene linkage study of panic disorder. In 21 U.S. and five Icelandic multiplex pedigrees of panic disorder, 104 individuals had DSM-III-R panic disorder (the narrowly defined affected phenotype) and 134 had either this diagnosis or subsyndromal panic disorder characterized by panic attacks that failed to meet either the criterion of attack frequency or the number of criterion symptoms necessary for a definite diagnosis (the broadly defined affected phenotype). The authors conducted lod score linkage analyses with both phenotypes using both a dominant and a recessive model of inheritance for the following loci: GABRA1-GABRA5 (alpha 1-alpha 5), GABRB1 (beta 1), GABRB3 (beta 3), and GABRG2 (gamma 2). The results failed to support the hypothesis that any of these genes cause panic disorder in a majority of the pedigrees. Within the limitations of the candidate gene linkage method, panic disorder does not appear to be caused by mutation in any of the eight GABAA receptor genes tested.

  11. Receptor-binding domain-based subunit vaccines against MERS-CoV.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Naru; Tang, Jian; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying

    2015-04-16

    Development of effective vaccines, in particular, subunit-based vaccines, against emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) caused by the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) will provide the safest means of preventing the continuous spread of MERS in humans and camels. This review briefly describes the structure of the MERS-CoV spike (S) protein and its receptor-binding domain (RBD), discusses the current status of MERS vaccine development and illustrates the strategies used to develop RBD-based subunit vaccines against MERS. It also summarizes currently available animal models for MERS-CoV and proposes a future direction for MERS vaccines. Taken together, this review will assist researchers working to develop effective and safe subunit vaccines against MERS-CoV and any other emerging coronaviruses that might cause future pandemics.

  12. Voluntary wheel running modulates glutamate receptor subunit gene expression and stress hormone release in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Makatsori, A; Duncko, R; Schwendt, M; Moncek, F; Johansson, B B; Jezova, D

    2003-07-01

    Lewis rats that are known to be addiction-prone, develop compulsive running if they have access to running wheels. The present experiments were aimed 1) to evaluate the activation of stress systems following chronic and acute voluntary wheel running in Lewis rats by measurement of hormone release and gene expression of neuropeptides related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and 2) to test the hypothesis that wheel running as a combined model of addictive behavior and stress exposure is associated with modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in the ventral tegmental area. Voluntary running for three weeks but not for one night resulted in a rise in plasma corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels (p<0.05) compared to those in control rats. Principal component analysis revealed the relation between POMC gene expression in the intermediate pituitary and running rate. Acute exposure of animals to voluntary wheel running induced a significant decrease in alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA levels (p<0.01), while repeated voluntary physical activity increased levels of GluR1 mRNA in the ventral tegmentum (p<0.05). Neither acute nor chronic wheel running influenced N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR1 mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area. Thus, the present study revealed changes in AMPA receptor subunit gene expression in a reward-related brain structure as well as an activation of HPA axis in response to compulsive wheel running in Lewis rats. It may be suggested that hormones of HPA axis and glutamate receptors belong to the factors that substantiate higher vulnerability to addictive behavior.

  13. Differences of AMPA and kainate receptor interactomes identify a novel AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit, GSG1L

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Natalie F.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Maruo, Tomohiko; Cais, Ondrej; Hirao, Atsushi; Oe, Souichi; Ghosh, Anirvan; Noda, Yasuko; Greger, Ingo H.; Yates, John R.; Nakagawa, Terunaga

    2012-01-01

    AMPA receptor (AMPA-R) complexes consist of channel forming subunits, GluA1–4 and auxiliary proteins including TARPs, CNIHs, synDIG1, and CKAMP44, which can modulate AMPA-R function in specific ways. Combinatorial effects of four GluA subunits binding to various auxiliary subunits amplify the functional diversity of AMPA-Rs. The significance and magnitude of molecular diversity, however, remain elusive. To gain insight into the molecular complexity of AMPA and kainate receptors (KA-Rs), we compared the proteins that co-purify with each receptor type in rat brain. This interactome study identified the majority of known interacting proteins and more importantly, provides novel candidates for further studies. We validate the claudin homologue GSG1L as a novel binding protein and unique modulator of AMPA-R gating, as determined by detailed molecular, cellular, electrophysiological, and biochemical experiments. GSG1L extends the functional variety of AMPA-R complexes and further investigation of other candidates may reveal additional complexity of ionotropic glutamate receptor function. PMID:22813734

  14. Subunit structure of the follitropin (FSH) receptor. Photoaffinity labeling of the membrane-bound receptor follitropin complex in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.; Branca, A.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1985-11-15

    Human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH) was acylated with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB) and radioiodinated (55 microCi/micrograms) for use as a photoaffinity probe to investigate the subunit structure of the FSH receptor in calf testis. After incubation with the photoaffinity probe and photolysis with UV light, the cross-linked hormone-receptor complex was solubilized from the membrane and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Autoradiography of the polyacrylamide gels revealed two major bands, 64 kDa and 84 kDa. These were equivalent in molecular mass to those observed in a previous study in which performed hormone-receptor complexes were solubilized with detergent prior to formation of covalent cross-linkages through the use of homobifunctional cross-linking reagents. Reduction with dithiothreitol resulted in the loss of radioactivity from the 84-kDa band with a concomitant increase in the intensity of the 64-kDa band. Since dithiothreitol increases the dissociation of intact radioiodinated azidobenzoyl-FSH into subunits, it is suggested that the conversion of the 84-kDa band to the 64-kDa band by dithiothreitol is due to the loss of non-cross-linked hFSH subunit from the 84-kDa band and that the two bands observed after photoaffinity labeling arise from covalent bond formation between hFSH and a receptor subunit having a relative molecular weight (Mr) of 48,000. In addition to the predominant photolabeling of the receptor to yield the 64-kDa and 84-kDa bands, several other, less intense bands (54 kDa, 76 kDa, 97 kDa, and 116 kDa) were also consistently observed on autoradiographs.

  15. AMPA receptor/TARP stoichiometry visualized by single-molecule subunit counting.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Peter; Ulbrich, Maximilian H; Wang, Hui-Li; Arant, Ryan J; Lau, Anthony G; Zhang, Zhenjie; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Chen, Lu

    2013-03-26

    Members of the transmembrane AMPA receptor-regulatory protein (TARP) family modulate AMPA receptor (AMPA-R) trafficking and function. AMPA-Rs consist of four pore-forming subunits. Previous studies show that TARPs are an integral part of the AMPA-R complex, acting as accessory subunits for mature receptors in vivo. The TARP/AMPA-R stoichiometry was previously measured indirectly and found to be variable and dependent on TARP expression level, with at most four TARPs associated with each AMPA-R complex. Here, we use a single-molecule technique in live cells that selectively images proteins located in the plasma membrane to directly count the number of TARPs associated with each AMPA-R complex. Although individual GFP-tagged TARP subunits are observed as freely diffusing fluorescent spots on the surface of Xenopus laevis oocytes when expressed alone, coexpression with AMPA-R-mCherry immobilizes the stargazin-GFP spots at sites of AMPA-R-mCherry, consistent with complex formation. We determined the number of TARP molecules associated with each AMPA-R by counting bleaching steps for three different TARP family members: γ-2, γ-3, and γ-4. We confirm that the TARP/AMPA-R stoichiometry depends on TARP expression level and discover that the maximum number of TARPs per AMPA-R complex falls into two categories: up to four γ-2 or γ-3 subunits, but rarely above two for γ-4 subunit. This unexpected AMPA-R/TARP stoichiometry difference has important implications for the assembly and function of TARP/AMPA-R complexes.

  16. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  17. Effects of aging and caloric restriction on dentate gyrus synapses and glutamate receptor subunits

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Isabel G.; Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Linville, M. Constance; Pang, Hui; Tucker, Elizabeth M.; Riddle, David R.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2009-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) attenuates aging-related degenerative processes throughout the body. It is less clear, however, whether CR has a similar effect in the brain, particularly in the hippocampus, an area important for learning and memory processes that often are compromised in aging. In order to evaluate the effect of CR on synapses across lifespan, we quantified synapses stereologically in the middle molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) of young, middle aged, and old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats fed ad libitum (AL) or a CR diet from 4 months of age. The results indicate that synapses are maintained across lifespan in both AL and CR rats. In light of this stability, we addressed whether aging and CR influence neurotransmitter receptor levels by measuring subunits of NMDA (NR1, NR2A, and NR2B) and AMPA (GluR1, GluR2) receptors in the DG of a second cohort of AL and CR rats across lifespan. The results reveal that the NR1 and GluR1 subunits decline with age in AL, but not CR rats. The absence of an aging-related decline in these subunits in CR rats, however, does not arise from increased levels in old CR rats. Instead, it is due to subunit decreases in young CR rats to levels that are sustained in CR rats throughout lifespan, but that are reached in AL rats only in old age. PMID:17433502

  18. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Claudio, T; Ballivet, M; Patrick, J; Heinemann, S

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence has been determined of a cDNA clone that codes for the 60,000-dalton gamma subunit of Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor. The length of the cDNA clone is 2,010 base pairs. The 5' and 3' untranslated regions have respective lengths of 31 and 461 base pairs. Data suggest that the putative polyadenylylation consensus sequence A-A-T-A-A-A may not be required for polyadenylylation of the mRNA corresponding to the cDNA clone described in this study. From the DNA sequence data, the amino acid sequence of the gamma subunit was deduced. The subunit is composed of 489 amino acids giving a molecular mass of 56,600 daltons. The deduced amino acid sequence data also indicate the presence of a 17-amino acid extension or signal peptide on this subunit. From these data, structural predictions for the gamma subunit are made such as potential membrane-spanning regions, possible asparagine-linked glycosylation sites, and the assignment of regions of the protein to the extracellular, internal, and cytoplasmic domains of the lipid bilayer. Images PMID:6573658

  19. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, G. Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R.P.; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C.; Bowie, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  20. Molecular characterisation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits from the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae).

    PubMed

    Bass, Chris; Lansdell, Stuart J; Millar, Neil S; Schroeder, Iris; Turberg, Andreas; Field, Linda M; Williamson, Martin S

    2006-01-01

    As part of a program to monitor the susceptibility of cat flea populations to the insecticide imidacloprid we have examined the cat flea nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, the target site protein of the neonicotinoid group of insecticides. Seven nAChR subunits (six alpha-type and one beta-type) were identified in cat flea using a degenerate PCR-based strategy. Five of these were expressed in vitro by creating chimeras containing the N-terminal ligand-binding domain of the cat flea subunits and the C-terminal region of the Drosophila Dalpha2 (SAD) subunit. Two of the five chimeric subunits, Cfalpha1/Dalpha2 and Cfalpha3/Dalpha2, when co-expressed with rat beta2 in Drosophila S2 cells, showed high-affinity binding of both epibatidine (Kd=1.6+/-0.6 and 0.13+/-0.06nM, respectively), and imidacloprid (Ki=142+/-34 and 28.7+/-2.4nM, respectively). It is likely therefore that Cfalpha1 and Cfalpha3 contribute to nAChR populations in vivo that are sensitive to imidacloprid. The identification of cat flea nAChR subunits that have a high affinity for imidacloprid presents candidate genes in which to look for resistance-associated mutations if target-site resistance to imidacloprid arises in domestic pet flea populations.

  1. Early immune response and regulation of IL-2 receptor subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Sugano, Eiko; Schopper, Thomas; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, J. B.; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays were used to monitor expression of 8796 genes and probe sets in activated T-cells; analysis revealed that 217 genes were significantly upregulated within 4 h. Induced genes included transcription factors, cytokines and their receptor genes. Analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the significant induction of IL-2, IL-2R(gamma) and IL-2R(alpha). Forty-eight of the 217 induced genes are known to or predicted to be regulated by a CRE promoter/enhancer. We found that T-cell activation caused a significant increase in CREB phosphorylation furthermore, inhibition of the PKC pathway by GF109203 reduced CREB activation by 50% and inhibition of the PKA pathway caused a total block of CREB phosphorylation and significantly reduced IFN(gamma), IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha) gene expression by approximately 40% (p<0.001). PKC(theta) plays a major role in T-cell activation: inhibition of PKC significantly reduced the expression of IFN(gamma), IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha). Since PKC blocked activation of CREB, we studied potential cross-talk between the PKC and the PKA/MAPK pathways, PMA-stimulated Jurkat cells were studied with specific signal pathway inhibitors. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK2) pathway was found to be significantly activated greater than seven-fold within 30 min; however, there was little activation of ERK-1 and no activation of JNK or p38 MAPK. Inhibition of the PKA pathway, but not the PKC pathway, resulted in inhibition of ERK1/2 activation at all time points, inhibition of MEK1 and 2 significantly blocked expression of IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha). Gene expression of IL-2R(alpha) and IFN(gamma) was dependent on PKA in S49 wt cells but not in kin- mutants. Using gel shift analysis, we found that forskolin activation of T-cells resulted in activation of AP1 sites; this increase in nuclear extract AP1 was significantly blocked by MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Taken together, these results suggest that the PKA in addition to PKC and

  2. Early immune response and regulation of IL-2 receptor subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Sugano, Eiko; Schopper, Thomas; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, J. B.; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays were used to monitor expression of 8796 genes and probe sets in activated T-cells; analysis revealed that 217 genes were significantly upregulated within 4 h. Induced genes included transcription factors, cytokines and their receptor genes. Analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the significant induction of IL-2, IL-2R(gamma) and IL-2R(alpha). Forty-eight of the 217 induced genes are known to or predicted to be regulated by a CRE promoter/enhancer. We found that T-cell activation caused a significant increase in CREB phosphorylation furthermore, inhibition of the PKC pathway by GF109203 reduced CREB activation by 50% and inhibition of the PKA pathway caused a total block of CREB phosphorylation and significantly reduced IFN(gamma), IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha) gene expression by approximately 40% (p<0.001). PKC(theta) plays a major role in T-cell activation: inhibition of PKC significantly reduced the expression of IFN(gamma), IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha). Since PKC blocked activation of CREB, we studied potential cross-talk between the PKC and the PKA/MAPK pathways, PMA-stimulated Jurkat cells were studied with specific signal pathway inhibitors. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK2) pathway was found to be significantly activated greater than seven-fold within 30 min; however, there was little activation of ERK-1 and no activation of JNK or p38 MAPK. Inhibition of the PKA pathway, but not the PKC pathway, resulted in inhibition of ERK1/2 activation at all time points, inhibition of MEK1 and 2 significantly blocked expression of IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha). Gene expression of IL-2R(alpha) and IFN(gamma) was dependent on PKA in S49 wt cells but not in kin- mutants. Using gel shift analysis, we found that forskolin activation of T-cells resulted in activation of AP1 sites; this increase in nuclear extract AP1 was significantly blocked by MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Taken together, these results suggest that the PKA in addition to PKC and

  3. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  4. Heterogeneity of Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: SAD, a novel developmentally regulated alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Sawruk, E; Schloss, P; Betz, H; Schmitt, B

    1990-01-01

    Two genes, ard and als, are known to encode subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in Drosophila. Here we describe the isolation of cDNA clones encoding a novel member (SAD, or alpha 2) of this receptor protein family. The deduced amino acid sequence displays high homology to the ALS protein and shares structural features with ligand binding nAChR alpha-subunits. Sad transcripts accumulate during major periods of neuronal differentiation and, in embryos, are localized in the central nervous system. Expression of SAD cRNA in Xenopus oocytes generates cation channels that are gated by nicotine. These data indicate heterogeneity of nAChRs in Drosophila. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1697262

  5. Identification of a novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor structural subunit expressed in goldfish retina

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A new non-alpha (n alpha) member of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) gene family designated GFn alpha-2 has been identified in goldfish retina by cDNA cloning. This cDNA clone encodes a protein with structural features common to all nAChR subunits sequenced to date; however, unlike all known alpha-subunits of the receptor, it lacks the cysteine residues believed to be involved in acetylcholine binding. Northern blot analysis shows multiple transcripts hybridizing to the GFn alpha-2 cDNA in goldfish retina but undetectable levels of hybridizable RNA in brain, muscle, or liver. S1 nuclease protection experiments indicate that multiple mRNAs are expressed in retina with regions identical or very similar to the GFn alpha-2 sequence. In situ hybridization shows that the gene encoding GFn alpha-2 is expressed predominantly in the ganglion cell layer of the retina. PMID:2465296

  6. Attenuated sensitivity to neuroactive steroids in γ-aminobutyrate type A receptor delta subunit knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Mihalek, Robert M.; Banerjee, Pradeep K.; Korpi, Esa R.; Quinlan, Joseph J.; Firestone, Leonard L.; Mi, Zhi-Ping; Lagenaur, Carl; Tretter, Verena; Sieghart, Werner; Anagnostaras, Stephan G.; Sage, Jennifer R.; Fanselow, Michael S.; Guidotti, Alessandro; Spigelman, Igor; Li, Zhiwei; DeLorey, Timothy M.; Olsen, Richard W.; Homanics, Gregg E.

    1999-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors mediate fast inhibitory synaptic transmission and have been implicated in responses to sedative/hypnotic agents (including neuroactive steroids), anxiety, and learning and memory. Using gene targeting technology, we generated a strain of mice deficient in the δ subunit of the GABA type A receptors. In vivo testing of various behavioral responses revealed a strikingly selective attenuation of responses to neuroactive steroids, but not to other modulatory drugs. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices revealed a significantly faster miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current decay time in null mice, with no change in miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current amplitude or frequency. Learning and memory assessed with fear conditioning were normal. These results begin to illuminate the novel contributions of the δ subunit to GABA pharmacology and sedative/hypnotic responses and behavior and provide insights into the physiology of neurosteroids. PMID:10536021

  7. Pathological reorganization of NMDA receptors subunits and postsynaptic protein PSD-95 distribution in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Leuba, Genevieve; Vernay, Andre; Kraftsik, Rudolf; Tardif, Eric; Riederer, Beat Michel; Savioz, Armand

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), synaptic alterations play a major role and are often correlated with cognitive changes. In order to better understand synaptic modifications, we compared alterations in NMDA receptors and postsynaptic protein PSD-95 expression in the entorhinal cortex (EC) and frontal cortex (FC; area 9) of AD and control brains. We combined immunohistochemical and image analysis methods to quantify on consecutive sections the distribution of PSD-95 and NMDA receptors GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B in EC and FC from 25 AD and control cases. The density of stained receptors was analyzed using multivariate statistical methods to assess the effect of neurodegeneration. In both regions, the number of neuronal profiles immunostained for GluN1 receptors subunit and PSD-95 protein was significantly increased in AD compared to controls (3-6 fold), while the number of neuronal profiles stained for GluN2A and GluN2B receptors subunits was on the contrary decreased (3-4 fold). The increase in marked neuronal profiles was more prominent in a cortical band corresponding to layers 3 to 5 with large pyramidal cells. Neurons positive for GluN1 or PSD-95 staining were often found in the same localization on consecutive sections and they were also reactive for the anti-tau antibody AD2, indicating a neurodegenerative process. Differences in the density of immunoreactive puncta representing neuropile were not statistically significant. Altogether these data indicate that GluN1 and PSD-95 accumulate in the neuronal perikarya, but this is not the case for GluN2A and GluN2B, while the neuropile compartment is less subject to modifications. Thus, important variations in the pattern of distribution of the NMDA receptors subunits and PSD-95 represent a marker in AD and by impairing the neuronal network, contribute to functional deterioration.

  8. Alterations in Purkinje cell GABAA receptor pharmacology following oxygen and glucose deprivation and cerebral ischemia reveal novel contribution of β1-subunit-containing receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Melissa H.; Ortiz, Justin; Shimizu, Kaori; Grewal, Himmat; Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) are particularly sensitive to cerebral ischemia, and decreased GABAA receptor function following injury is thought to contribute to PC sensitivity to ischemia-induced excitotoxicity. Here we examined the functional properties of the GABAA receptors that are spared following ischemia in cultured Purkinje cells from rat and in vivo ischemia in mouse. Using subunit-specific positive modulators of GABAA receptors, we observed that oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and cardiac arrest-induced cerebral ischemia cause a decrease in sensitivity to the β2/3-subunit-preferring compound, etomidate. However, sensitivity to propofol, a β-subunit-acting compound that modulates β1–3-subunits, was not affected by OGD. The α/γ-subunit-act-ing compounds, diazepam and zolpidem, were also unaffected by OGD. We performed single-cell reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction on isolated PCs from acutely dissociated cerebellar tissue and observed that PCs expressed the β1-subunit, contrary to previous reports examining GABAA receptor subunit expression in PCs. GABAA receptor β1-subunit protein was also detected in cultured PCs by western blot and by immunohistochemistry in the adult mouse cerebellum and levels remained unaffected by ischemia. High concentrations of loreclezole (30 µm) inhibited PC GABA-mediated currents, as previously demonstrated with β1-subunit-containing GABAA receptors expressed in heterologous systems. From our data we conclude that PCs express the β1-subunit and that there is a greater contribution of β1-subunit-containing GABAA receptors following OGD. PMID:23176253

  9. Increased GABA(A) inhibition of the RVLM after hindlimb unloading in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, Julia A.; Heesch, Cheryl M.; Hasser, Eileen M.

    2002-01-01

    Attenuated baroreflex-mediated increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats apparently are due to changes within the central nervous system. We hypothesized that GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is increased after hindlimb unloading. Responses to bilateral microinjection of the GABA(A) antagonist (-)-bicuculline methiodide (BIC) into the RVLM were examined before and during caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) inhibition in Inactin-anesthetized control and HU rats. Increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and RSNA in response to BIC in the RVLM were significantly enhanced in HU rats. Responses to bilateral CVLM blockade were not different. When remaining GABA(A) inhibition in the RVLM was blocked by BIC during CVLM inhibition, the additional increases in MAP and RSNA were significantly greater in HU rats. These data indicate that GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of RVLM neurons is augmented after hindlimb unloading. Effects of input from the CVLM were unaltered. Thus, after cardiovascular deconditioning in rodents, the attenuated increase in sympathetic nerve activity in response to hypotension is associated with greater GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of RVLM neurons originating at least in part from sources other than the CVLM.

  10. Extrasynaptic α6 Subunit-Containing GABAA Receptors Modulate Excitability in Turtle Spinal Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Carmen; Aguilar, Justo; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Elias-Viñas, David; Felix, Ricardo; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Motoneurons are furnished with a vast repertoire of ionotropic and metabotropic receptors as well as ion channels responsible for maintaining the resting membrane potential and involved in the regulation of the mechanisms underlying its membrane excitability and firing properties. Among them, the GABAA receptors, which respond to GABA binding by allowing the flow of Cl− ions across the membrane, mediate two distinct forms of inhibition in the mature nervous system, phasic and tonic, upon activation of synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors, respectively. In a previous work we showed that furosemide facilitates the monosynaptic reflex without affecting the dorsal root potential. Our data also revealed a tonic inhibition mediated by GABAA receptors activated in motoneurons by ambient GABA. These data suggested that the high affinity GABAA extrasynaptic receptors may have an important role in motor control, though the molecular nature of these receptors was not determined. By combining electrophysiological, immunofluorescence and molecular biology techniques with pharmacological tools here we show that GABAA receptors containing the α6 subunit are expressed in adult turtle spinal motoneurons and can function as extrasynaptic receptors responsible for tonic inhibition. These results expand our understanding of the role of GABAA receptors in motoneuron tonic inhibition. PMID:25531288

  11. Alternative splicing in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits from Locusta migratoria and its influence on acetylcholine potencies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Yang; Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Liu, Zewen

    2017-01-18

    Due to the great abundance within insect central nervous system (CNS), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play key roles in insect CNS, which makes it to be the targets of several classes of insecticides, such as neonicotinoids. Insect nAChRs are pentameric complexes consisting of five subunits, and a dozen subunits in one insect species can theoretically comprise diverse nAChRs. The alternative splicing in insect nAChR subunits may increase the diversity of insect nAChRs. In the oriental migratory locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis Meyen), a model insect species with agricultural importance, the alternative splicing was found in six α subunits among nine α and two β subunits, such as missing conserved residues in Loop D from Locα1, Locα6 and Locα9, a 34-residue insertion in Locα8 cytoplasmic loop, and truncated transcripts for Locα4, Locα7 and Locα9. Hybrid nAChRs were successfully constructed in Xenopus oocytes through co-expression with rat β2 and one α subunit from L. migratoria, which included Locα1, Locα2, Locα3, Locα4, Locα5, Locα8 and Locα9. Influences of alternative splicing in Locα1, Locα8 and Locα9 on acetylcholine potency were tested on hybrid nAChRs. The alternative splicing in Locα1 and Locα9 could increase acetylcholine sensitivities on recombinant receptors, while the splicing in Locα8 showed significant influences on the current amplitudes of oocytes. The results revealed that the alternative splicing at or close to the ligand-binding sites, as well as at cytoplasmic regions away from the ligand-binding sites, in insect nAChR subunits would change the agonist potencies on the receptors, which consequently increased nAChR diversity in functional and pharmacological properties.

  12. Removal of GABAA Receptor γ2 Subunits from Parvalbumin Neurons Causes Wide-Ranging Behavioral Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Leppä, Elli; Linden, Anni-Maija; Vekovischeva, Olga Y.; Swinny, Jerome D.; Rantanen, Ville; Toppila, Esko; Höger, Harald; Sieghart, Werner; Wulff, Peer; Wisden, William; Korpi, Esa R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the behavioral significance of fast synaptic inhibition by αβγ2-type GABAA receptors on parvalbumin (Pv) cells. The GABAA receptor γ2 subunit gene was selectively inactivated in Pv-positive neurons by Cre/loxP recombination. The resulting Pv-Δγ2 mice were relatively healthy in the first postnatal weeks; but then as Cre started to be expressed, the mice progressively developed wide-ranging phenotypic alterations including low body weight, motor deficits and tremor, decreased anxiety levels, decreased pain sensitivity and deficient prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex and impaired spatial learning. Nevertheless, the deletion was not lethal, and mice did not show increased mortality even after one year. Autoradiography with t-butylbicyclophosphoro[35S]thionate suggested an increased amount of GABAA receptors with only α and β subunits in central nervous system regions that contained high levels of parvalbumin neurons. Using BAC-transgenesis, we reduced some of the Pv-Δγ2 phenotype by selectively re-expressing the wild-type γ2 subunit back into some Pv cells (reticular thalamic neurons and cerebellar Pv-positive neurons). This produced less severe impairments of motor skills and spatial learning compared with Pv-Δγ2 mice, but all other deficits remained. Our results reveal the widespread significance of fast GABAergic inhibition onto Pv-positive neurons for diverse behavioral modalities, such as motor coordination, sensorimotor integration, emotional behavior and nociception. PMID:21912668

  13. The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α5 Subunit Plays a Key Role in Attention Circuitry and Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Craig D. C.; De Biasi, Mariella; Fletcher, Paul J.; Lambe, Evelyn K.

    2010-01-01

    Stimulation of the prefrontal cortex by acetylcholine is critical for attention; however, the cellular mechanisms underlying its influence on attention pathways within the brain are not well understood. Pyramidal neurons in layer VI of the prefrontal cortex are believed to play an important role in this process because they are excited by acetylcholine and provide a major source of feedback projections to the thalamus. Here, we show using whole-cell electrophysiology that the relatively rare α5 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor powerfully enhances nicotinic currents in layer VI pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical brain slices from adult mice. In addition, behavioral experiments using the five-choice serial reaction time test show that the presence of the nicotinic receptor α5 subunit also increases the accuracy of adult mice on this visual attention task under highly demanding conditions. Together, these findings demonstrate a novel and important role for the nicotinic receptor α5 subunit in adult brain circuitry required for attentional performance. PMID:20610759

  14. An ER-resident membrane protein complex regulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit composition at the synapse

    PubMed Central

    Almedom, Ruta B; Liewald, Jana F; Hernando, Guillermina; Schultheis, Christian; Rayes, Diego; Pan, Jie; Schedletzky, Thorsten; Hutter, Harald; Bouzat, Cecilia; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are homo- or heteropentameric ligand-gated ion channels mediating excitatory neurotransmission and muscle activation. Regulation of nAChR subunit assembly and transfer of correctly assembled pentamers to the cell surface is only partially understood. Here, we characterize an ER transmembrane (TM) protein complex that influences nAChR cell-surface expression and functional properties in Caenorhabditis elegans muscle. Loss of either type I TM protein, NRA-2 or NRA-4 (nicotinic receptor associated), affects two different types of muscle nAChRs and causes in vivo resistance to cholinergic agonists. Sensitivity to subtype-specific agonists of these nAChRs is altered differently, as demonstrated by whole-cell voltage-clamp of dissected adult muscle, when applying exogenous agonists or after photo-evoked, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) mediated acetylcholine (ACh) release, as well as in single-channel recordings in cultured embryonic muscle. These data suggest that nAChRs desensitize faster in nra-2 mutants. Cell-surface expression of different subunits of the ‘levamisole-sensitive' nAChR (L-AChR) is differentially affected in the absence of NRA-2 or NRA-4, suggesting that they control nAChR subunit composition or allow only certain receptor assemblies to leave the ER. PMID:19609303

  15. Snake acetylcholine receptor: cloning of the domain containing the four extracellular cysteines of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Horowitz, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1989-01-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) at the neuromuscular junction of elapid snakes binds cholinergic ligands but unlike other muscle AcChoRs does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. Numerous studies indicate that the ligand-binding site of the AcChoR includes cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunit. We have previously shown that a synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo AcChoR alpha subunit contains the essential elements of the ligand-binding site. In an attempt to elucidate the structural basis for the precise binding properties of snake AcChoR, we sequenced a portion of the snake AcChoR alpha subunit. First, a mouse AcChoR alpha-subunit cDNA probe was used to screen a size-selected snake (Natrix tessellata) genomic library. A genomic clone was isolated and was found to contain sequences homologous to the exon including the first two cysteines (Cys-128 and -142) of AcChoR alpha subunit. The domain of the alpha subunit from Natrix and cobra AcChoR (amino acid residues 119-222), which contains the four extracellular cysteines (128, 142, 192, and 193), was amplified by reverse transcription of mRNA and the polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the snake alpha subunit contains the two tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193, resembling all other AcChoR alpha subunits. Sequence comparison revealed that the cloned region of the snake alpha subunit is highly homologous (75-80%) to other muscle AcChoRs and not to neuronal AcChoR, which also does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. In the presumed ligand-binding site, in the vicinity of Cys-192 and Cys-193, four major substitutions occur in the snake sequence--at positions 184 (Trp----Phe), 185 (Lys----Trp), 187 (Trp----Ser), and 194 (Pro----Leu). In addition, Asn-189 is a putative N-glycosylation site, present only in the snake. These changes, or part of them, may explain the lack of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding to snake Ac

  16. Snake acetylcholine receptor: cloning of the domain containing the four extracellular cysteines of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Horowitz, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1989-09-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) at the neuromuscular junction of elapid snakes binds cholinergic ligands but unlike other muscle AcChoRs does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. Numerous studies indicate that the ligand-binding site of the AcChoR includes cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunit. We have previously shown that a synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo AcChoR alpha subunit contains the essential elements of the ligand-binding site. In an attempt to elucidate the structural basis for the precise binding properties of snake AcChoR, we sequenced a portion of the snake AcChoR alpha subunit. First, a mouse AcChoR alpha-subunit cDNA probe was used to screen a size-selected snake (Natrix tessellata) genomic library. A genomic clone was isolated and was found to contain sequences homologous to the exon including the first two cysteines (Cys-128 and -142) of AcChoR alpha subunit. The domain of the alpha subunit from Natrix and cobra AcChoR (amino acid residues 119-222), which contains the four extracellular cysteines (128, 142, 192, and 193), was amplified by reverse transcription of mRNA and the polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the snake alpha subunit contains the two tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193, resembling all other AcChoR alpha subunits. Sequence comparison revealed that the cloned region of the snake alpha subunit is highly homologous (75-80%) to other muscle AcChoRs and not to neuronal AcChoR, which also does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. In the presumed ligand-binding site, in the vicinity of Cys-192 and Cys-193, four major substitutions occur in the snake sequence--at positions 184 (Trp----Phe), 185 (Lys----Trp), 187 (Trp----Ser), and 194 (Pro----Leu). In addition, Asn-189 is a putative N-glycosylation site, present only in the snake. These changes, or part of them, may explain the lack of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding to snake AcChoR.

  17. Identification of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit by photoaffinity crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Barrington, W.W.; Jacobson, K.A.; Hutchison, A.J.; Williams, M.; Stiles, G.L. )

    1989-09-01

    A high-affinity iodinated agonist radioligand for the A2 adenosine receptor has been synthesized to facilitate studies of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit. The radioligand 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC (125I-labeled 2-(4-(2-(2-((4- aminophenyl)methylcarbonylamino)ethylaminocarbonyl)- ethyl)phenyl)ethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) was synthesized and found to bind to the A2 adenosine receptor in bovine striatal membranes with high affinity (Kd = 1.5 nM) and A2 receptor selectivity. Competitive binding studies reveal the appropriate A2 receptor pharmacologic potency order with 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) greater than (-)-N6-((R)-1-methyl- 2-phenylethyl)adenosine (R-PIA) greater than (+)-N6-((S)-1-methyl-2- phenylethyl)adenosine (S-PIA). Adenylate cyclase assays, in human platelet membranes, demonstrate a dose-dependent stimulation of cAMP production. PAPA-APEC (1 microM) produces a 43% increase in cAMP production, which is essentially the same degree of increase produced by 5'-N- ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (the prototypic A2 receptor agonist). These findings combined with the observed guanine nucleotide-mediated decrease in binding suggest that PAPA-APEC is a full A2 agonist. The A2 receptor binding subunit was identified by photoaffinity-crosslinking studies using 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC and the heterobifunctional crosslinking agent N-succinimidyl 6-(4'-azido-2'-nitrophenylamino)hexanoate (SANPAH). After covalent incorporation, a single specifically radiolabeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa was observed on NaDodSO4/PAGE/autoradiography. Incorporation of 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC into this polypeptide is blocked by agonists and antagonists with the expected potency for A2 receptors and is decreased in the presence of 10(-4) M guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate.

  18. GABAA Receptor α1 Subunit Mutation A322D Associated with Autosomal Dominant Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy Reduces the Expression and Alters the Composition of Wild Type GABAA Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Li; Feng, Hua-Jun; Macdonald, Robert L.; Botzolakis, Emanuel J.; Hu, Ningning; Gallagher, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    A GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1 subunit mutation, A322D (AD), causes an autosomal dominant form of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (ADJME). Previous studies demonstrated that the mutation caused α1(AD) subunit misfolding and rapid degradation, reducing its total and surface expression substantially. Here, we determined the effects of the residual α1(AD) subunit expression on wild type GABAAR expression to determine whether the AD mutation conferred a dominant negative effect. We found that although the α1(AD) subunit did not substitute for wild type α1 subunits on the cell surface, it reduced the surface expression of α1β2γ2 and α3β2γ2 receptors by associating with the wild type subunits within the endoplasmic reticulum and preventing them from trafficking to the cell surface. The α1(AD) subunit reduced surface expression of α3β2γ2 receptors by a greater amount than α1β2γ2 receptors, thus altering cell surface GABAAR composition. When transfected into cultured cortical neurons, the α1(AD) subunit altered the time course of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current kinetics and reduced miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current amplitudes. These findings demonstrated that, in addition to causing a heterozygous loss of function of α1(AD) subunits, this epilepsy mutation also elicited a modest dominant negative effect that likely shapes the epilepsy phenotype. PMID:20551311

  19. Waking action of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) involves histamine and GABAA receptor block.

    PubMed

    Yanovsky, Yevgenij; Schubring, Stephan R; Yao, Quiaoling; Zhao, Yan; Li, Sha; May, Andrea; Haas, Helmut L; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Sergeeva, Olga A

    2012-01-01

    Since ancient times ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a constituent of bile, is used against gallstone formation and cholestasis. A neuroprotective action of UDCA was demonstrated recently in models of Alzheimer's disease and retinal degeneration. The mechanisms of UDCA action in the nervous system are poorly understood. We show now that UDCA promotes wakefulness during the active period of the day, lacking this activity in histamine-deficient mice. In cultured hypothalamic neurons UDCA did not affect firing rate but synchronized the firing, an effect abolished by the GABA(A)R antagonist gabazine. In histaminergic neurons recorded in slices UDCA reduced amplitude and duration of spontaneous and evoked IPSCs. In acutely isolated histaminergic neurons UDCA inhibited GABA-evoked currents and sIPSCs starting at 10 µM (IC(50) = 70 µM) and did not affect NMDA- and AMPA-receptor mediated currents at 100 µM. Recombinant GABA(A) receptors composed of α1, β1-3 and γ2L subunits expressed in HEK293 cells displayed a sensitivity to UDCA similar to that of native GABA(A) receptors. The mutation α1V256S, known to reduce the inhibitory action of pregnenolone sulphate, reduced the potency of UDCA. The mutation α1Q241L, which abolishes GABA(A)R potentiation by several neurosteroids, had no effect on GABA(A)R inhibition by UDCA. In conclusion, UDCA enhances alertness through disinhibition, at least partially of the histaminergic system via GABA(A) receptors.

  20. AMPA receptor subunits expression and phosphorylation in cingulate cortex in rats following esophageal acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    BANERJEE, B.; MEDDA, B. K.; POCHIRAJU, S.; KANNAMPALLI, P.; LANG, I. M.; SENGUPTA, J. N.; SHAKER, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently reported an increase in N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit expression and CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of NR2B in the rostral cingulate cortical (rCC) neurons following esophageal acid exposure in rats. As α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors mediate the fast excitatory transmission and play a critical role in synaptic plasticity, in this study, we investigated the effect of esophageal acid exposure in rats on the expression of AMPA receptor subunits and the involvement of these molecular alterations in acid-induced sensitization of neurons in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and midcingulate (MCC) cortices. Methods In molecular study, we examined GluA1 and GluA2 expression and phosphorylation in membrane preparations and in the isolated postsynaptic densities (PSDs) from rats receiving acute esophageal exposure of either saline (control group) or 0.1 NHCl (experimental group). In electrophysiological study, the effect of selective AMPA receptor (Ca2+ permeable) antagonist IEM-1460 and CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 was tested on responses of cortical neurons during acid infusion to address the underlying molecular mechanism of acid-induced sensitization. Key Results The acid exposure significantly increased expression of GluA1, pGluA1Ser831, and phosphorylated CaMKIIThr286, in the cortical membrane preparations. In isolated PSDs, a significant increase in pGluA1Ser831 was observed in acid-treated rats compared with controls. Microinjection of IEM-1460 or KN-93 near the recording site significantly attenuated acid-induced sensitization of cortical neurons. Conclusions & Inferences The underlying mechanism of acid-induced cortical sensitization involves upregulation and CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of GluA1. These molecular changes of AMPA receptors subunit GluA1 in the cortical neurons might play an important role in acid-induced esophageal hypersensitivity. PMID:24118589

  1. Expression Profile of the Integrin Receptor Subunits in the Guinea Pig Sclera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kevin K; Metlapally, Ravikanth; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2017-06-01

    The ocular dimensional changes in myopia reflect increased scleral remodeling, and in high myopia, loss of scleral integrity leads to biomechanical weakening and continued scleral creep. As integrins, a type of cell surface receptors, have been linked to scleral remodeling, they represent potential targets for myopia therapies. As a first step, this study aimed to characterize the integrin subunits at the messenger RNA level in the sclera of the guinea pig, a more recently added but increasingly used animal model for myopia research. Primers for α and β integrin subunits were designed using NCBI/UCSC Genome Browser and Primer3 software tools. Total RNA was extracted from normal scleral tissue and isolated cultured scleral fibroblasts, as well as liver and lung, as reference tissues, all from guinea pig. cDNA was produced by reverse transcription, PCR was used to amplify products of predetermined sizes, and products were sequenced using standard methods. Guinea pig scleral tissue expressed all known integrin alpha subunits except αD and αE. The latter integrin subunits were also not expressed by cultured guinea pig scleral fibroblasts; however, their expression was confirmed in guinea pig liver. In addition, isolated cultured fibroblasts did not express integrin subunits αL, αM, and αX. This difference between results for cultured cells and intact sclera presumably reflects the presence in the latter of additional cell types. Both guinea pig scleral tissue and isolated scleral fibroblasts expressed all known integrin beta subunits. All results were verified through sequencing. The possible contributions of integrins to scleral remodeling make them plausible targets for myopia prevention. Data from this study will help guide future ex vivo and in vitro studies directed at understanding the relationship between scleral integrins and ocular growth regulation in the guinea pig model for myopia.

  2. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. Results CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Conclusion Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore

  3. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-09-22

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore, these data suggest that CANs

  4. Gene Expression Changes in Glutamate and GABA-A Receptors, Neuropeptides, Ion Channels, and Cholesterol Synthesis in the Periaqueductal Gray Following Binge-Like Alcohol Drinking by Adolescent Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats.

    PubMed

    McClintick, Jeanette N; McBride, William J; Bell, Richard L; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard J

    2016-05-01

    Binge drinking of alcohol during adolescence is a serious public health concern with long-term consequences, including increased pain, fear, and anxiety. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is involved in processing pain, fear, and anxiety. The effects of adolescent binge drinking on gene expression in this region have yet to be studied. Male adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) rats were exposed to repeated binge drinking (three 1-hour sessions/d during the dark/cycle, 5 days/wk for 3 weeks starting at 28 days of age; ethanol intakes of 2.5 to 3 g/kg/session). We used RNA sequencing to assess the effects of ethanol intake on gene expression. Ethanol significantly altered the expression of 1,670 of the 12,123 detected genes: 877 (53%) decreased. In the glutamate system, 23 genes were found to be altered, including reduction in 7 of 10 genes for metabotropic and NMDA receptors. Subunit changes in the NMDA receptor may make it less sensitive to ethanol. Changes in GABAA genes would most likely increase the ability of the PAG to produce tonic inhibition. Five serotonin receptor genes, 6 acetylcholine receptor genes, and 4 glycine receptor genes showed decreased expression in the alcohol-drinking rats. Opioid genes (e.g., Oprk1, Oprm1) and genes for neuropeptides linked to anxiety and panic behaviors (e.g., Npy1r) had mostly decreased expression. Genes for 27 potassium, 10 sodium, and 5 calcium ion channels were found to be differentially expressed. Nine genes in the cholesterol synthesis pathway had decreased expression, including Hmgcr, encoding the rate-limiting enzyme. Genes involved in the production of myelin also had decreased expression. The results demonstrate that binge alcohol drinking during adolescence produces developmental changes in the expression of key genes within the PAG; many of these changes point to increased susceptibility to pain, fear, and anxiety, which could contribute to excessive drinking to relieve these negative effects. Copyright © 2016 by

  5. A single mutation in the acetylcholine receptor δ-subunit causes distinct effects in two types of neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee-Young; Mott, Meghan; Williams, Tory; Ikeda, Hiromi; Wen, Hua; Linhoff, Michael; Ono, Fumihito

    2014-07-30

    Mutations in AChR subunits, expressed as pentamers in neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), cause various types of congenital myasthenic syndromes. In AChR pentamers, the adult ε subunit gradually replaces the embryonic γ subunit as the animal develops. Because of this switch in subunit composition, mutations in specific subunits result in synaptic phenotypes that change with developmental age. However, a mutation in any AChR subunit is considered to affect the NMJs of all muscle fibers equally. Here, we report a zebrafish mutant of the AChR δ subunit that exhibits two distinct NMJ phenotypes specific to two muscle fiber types: slow or fast. Homozygous fish harboring a point mutation in the δ subunit form functional AChRs in slow muscles, whereas receptors in fast muscles are nonfunctional. To test the hypothesis that different subunit compositions in slow and fast muscles underlie distinct phenotypes, we examined the presence of ε/γ subunits in NMJs using specific antibodies. Both wild-type and mutant larvae lacked ε/γ subunits in slow muscle synapses. These findings in zebrafish suggest that some mutations in human congenital myasthenic syndromes may affect slow and fast muscle fibers differently. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410211-08$15.00/0.

  6. The DREAM protein negatively regulates the NMDA receptor through interaction with the NR1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Su, Ping; Liang, Ping; Liu, Tao; Liu, Xu; Liu, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Bo; Han, Tao; Zhu, Yan-Bing; Yin, Dong-Min; Li, Junfa; Zhou, Zhuan; Wang, Ke-Wei; Wang, Yun

    2010-06-02

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity has been implicated in the etiology of stroke, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases. NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a pivotal role in excitotoxic injury; however, clinical trials testing NMDAR antagonists as neuroprotectants have been discouraging. The development of novel neuroprotectant molecules is being vigorously pursued. Here, we report that downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) significantly inhibits surface expression of NMDARs and NMDAR-mediated current. Overexpression of DREAM showed neuroprotection against excitotoxic neuronal injury, whereas knockdown of DREAM enhanced NMDA-induced toxicity. DREAM could directly bind to the C0 domain of the NR1 subunit. Although DREAM contains multiple binding sites for the NR1 subunit, residues 21-40 of the N terminus are the main binding site for the NR1 subunit. Thus, 21-40 residues might relieve the autoinhibition conferred by residues 1-50 and derepress the DREAM core domain by a competitive mechanism. Intriguingly, the cell-permeable TAT-21-40 peptide, constructed according to the critical binding site of DREAM to the NR1 subunit, inhibits NMDAR-mediated currents in primary cultured hippocampal neurons and has a neuroprotective effect on in vitro neuronal excitotoxic injury and in vivo ischemic brain damage. Moreover, both pretreatment and posttreatment of TAT-21-40 is effective against excitotoxicity. In summary, this work reveals a novel, negative regulator of NMDARs and provides an attractive candidate for the treatment of excitotoxicity-related disease.

  7. The AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 regulates dendritic architecture of motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inglis, Fiona M.; Crockett, Richard; Korada, Sailaja; Abraham, Wickliffe C.; Hollmann, Michael; Kalb, Robert G.

    2002-01-01

    The morphology of the mature motor neuron dendritic arbor is determined by activity-dependent processes occurring during a critical period in early postnatal life. The abundance of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 in motor neurons is very high during this period and subsequently falls to a negligible level. To test the role of GluR1 in dendrite morphogenesis, we reintroduced GluR1 into rat motor neurons at the end of the critical period and quantitatively studied the effects on dendrite architecture. Two versions of GluR1 were studied that differed by the amino acid in the "Q/R" editing site. The amino acid occupying this site determines single-channel conductance, ionic permeability, and other essential electrophysiologic properties of the resulting receptor channels. We found large-scale remodeling of dendritic architectures in a manner depending on the amino acid occupying the Q/R editing site. Alterations in the distribution of dendritic arbor were not prevented by blocking NMDA receptors. These observations suggest that the expression of GluR1 in motor neurons modulates a component of the molecular substrate of activity-dependent dendrite morphogenesis. The control of these events relies on subunit-specific properties of AMPA receptors.

  8. The AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 regulates dendritic architecture of motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inglis, Fiona M.; Crockett, Richard; Korada, Sailaja; Abraham, Wickliffe C.; Hollmann, Michael; Kalb, Robert G.

    2002-01-01

    The morphology of the mature motor neuron dendritic arbor is determined by activity-dependent processes occurring during a critical period in early postnatal life. The abundance of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 in motor neurons is very high during this period and subsequently falls to a negligible level. To test the role of GluR1 in dendrite morphogenesis, we reintroduced GluR1 into rat motor neurons at the end of the critical period and quantitatively studied the effects on dendrite architecture. Two versions of GluR1 were studied that differed by the amino acid in the "Q/R" editing site. The amino acid occupying this site determines single-channel conductance, ionic permeability, and other essential electrophysiologic properties of the resulting receptor channels. We found large-scale remodeling of dendritic architectures in a manner depending on the amino acid occupying the Q/R editing site. Alterations in the distribution of dendritic arbor were not prevented by blocking NMDA receptors. These observations suggest that the expression of GluR1 in motor neurons modulates a component of the molecular substrate of activity-dependent dendrite morphogenesis. The control of these events relies on subunit-specific properties of AMPA receptors.

  9. Auxiliary Subunit GSG1L Acts to Suppress Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Thomas P.; Bats, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors are ligand-gated cation channels responsible for a majority of the fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. Their behavior and calcium permeability depends critically on their subunit composition and the identity of associated auxiliary proteins. Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) contribute to various forms of synaptic plasticity, and their dysfunction underlies a number of serious neurological conditions. For CP-AMPARs, the prototypical transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein stargazin, which acts as an auxiliary subunit, enhances receptor function by increasing single-channel conductance, slowing channel gating, increasing calcium permeability, and relieving the voltage-dependent block by endogenous intracellular polyamines. We find that, in contrast, GSG1L, a transmembrane auxiliary protein identified recently as being part of the AMPAR proteome, acts to reduce the weighted mean single-channel conductance and calcium permeability of recombinant CP-AMPARs, while increasing polyamine-dependent rectification. To examine the effects of GSG1L on native AMPARs, we manipulated its expression in cerebellar and hippocampal neurons. Transfection of GSG1L into mouse cultured cerebellar stellate cells that lack this protein increased the inward rectification of mEPSCs. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous GSG1L in rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurons led to an increase in mEPSC amplitude and in the underlying weighted mean single-channel conductance, revealing that GSG1L acts to suppress current flow through native CP-AMPARs. Thus, our data suggest that GSG1L extends the functional repertoire of AMPAR auxiliary subunits, which can act not only to enhance but also diminish current flow through their associated AMPARs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) are an important group of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. These receptors contribute to various forms of

  10. Expression of five acetylcholine receptor subunit genes in Brugia malayi adult worms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ben-Wen; Rush, Amy C.; Weil, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are required for body movement in parasitic nematodes and are targets of “classical” anthelmintic drugs such as levamisole and pyrantel and of newer drugs such as tribendimidine and derquantel. While neurotransmission explains the effects of these drugs on nematode movement, their effects on parasite reproduction are unexplained. The levamisole AChR type (L-AChRs) in Caenorhabditis elegans is comprised of five subunits: Cel-UNC-29, Cel-UNC-38, Cel-UNC-63, Cel-LEV-1 and Cel-LEV-8. The genome of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi contains nine AChRs subunits including orthologues of Cel-unc-29, Cel-unc-38, and Cel-unc-63. We performed in situ hybridization with RNA probes to localize the expression of five AChR genes (Bm1_35890-Bma-unc-29, Bm1_20330-Bma-unc-38, Bm1_38195-Bma-unc-63, Bm1_48815-Bma-acr-26 and Bm1_40515-Bma-acr-12) in B. malayi adult worms. Four of these genes had similar expression patterns with signals in body muscle, developing embryos, spermatogonia, uterine wall adjacent to stretched microfilariae, wall of Vas deferens, and lateral cord. Three L-AChR subunit genes (Bma-unc-29, Bma-unc-38 and Bma-unc-63) were expressed in body muscle, which is a known target of levamisole. Bma-acr-12 was co-expressed with these levamisole subunit genes in muscle, and this suggests that its protein product may form receptors with other alpha subunits. Bma-acr-26 was expressed in male muscle but not in female muscle. Strong expression signals of these genes in early embryos and gametes in uterus and testis suggest that AChRs may have a role in nervous system development of embryogenesis and spermatogenesis. This would be consistent with embryotoxic effects of drugs that target these receptors in filarial worms. Our data show that the expression of these receptor genes is tightly regulated with regard to localization in adult worms and developmental stage in embryos and gametes. These results may help to explain the broad effects

  11. Molecular forms and subunit structure of the acetylcholine receptor in the central nervous system of insects.

    PubMed

    Breer, H; Kleene, R; Hinz, G

    1985-12-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor as probed by alpha-bungarotoxin binding has been isolated from detergent-solubilized ganglionic membrane preparations from the insect, Locusta migratoria. The isolation and characterization of the receptor protein was achieved by preparation of membrane fragments, extraction by sodium deoxycholate, centrifugation on sucrose density gradient, affinity chromatography, gel electrophoresis, and immunoblotting. The purified receptor protein migrated as a single band on polyacrylamide when native (Mr = 250,000 to 300,000) but also under denaturing conditions (Mr = 65,000) and cross-reacted with some monoclonal antibodies against the Torpedo receptor. In immunohistochemical approaches using polyclonal antibodies the acetylcholine receptor antigenic sites could topochemically be identified at very distinct zones in the neuropil of locust ganglia. The results suggest that the acetylcholine receptor in the central nervous system of insects represents an oligomeric complex composed of four identical or very similar subunits and thus may represent a prototype of the recently proposed homo-oligomeric ancestral acetylcholine receptor.

  12. Subunit-specific mechanisms and proton sensitivity of NMDA receptor channel block.

    PubMed

    Dravid, Shashank M; Erreger, Kevin; Yuan, Hongjie; Nicholson, Katherine; Le, Phuong; Lyuboslavsky, Polina; Almonte, Antoine; Murray, Ernest; Mosely, Cara; Barber, Jeremy; French, Adam; Balster, Robert; Murray, Thomas F; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2007-05-15

    We have compared the potencies of structurally distinct channel blockers at recombinant NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B, NR1/NR2C and NR1/NR2D receptors. The IC50 values varied with stereochemistry and subunit composition, suggesting that it may be possible to design subunit-selective channel blockers. For dizocilpine (MK-801), the differential potency of MK-801 stereoisomers determined at recombinant NMDA receptors was confirmed at native receptors in vitro and in vivo. Since the proton sensor is tightly linked both structurally and functionally to channel gating, we examined whether blocking molecules that interact in the channel pore with the gating machinery can differentially sense protonation of the receptor. Blockers capable of remaining trapped in the pore during agonist unbinding showed the strongest dependence on extracellular pH, appearing more potent at acidic pH values that promote channel closure. Determination of pK(a) values for channel blockers suggests that the ionization of ketamine but not of other blockers can influence its pH-dependent potency. Kinetic modelling and single channel studies suggest that the pH-dependent block of NR1/NR2A by (-)MK-801 but not (+)MK-801 reflects an increase in the MK-801 association rate even though protons reduce channel open probability and thus MK-801 access to its binding site. Allosteric modulators that alter pH sensitivity alter the potency of MK-801, supporting the interpretation that the pH sensitivity of MK-801 binding reflects the changes at the proton sensor rather than a secondary effect of pH. These data suggest a tight coupling between the proton sensor and the ion channel gate as well as unique subunit-specific mechanisms of channel block.

  13. Subunit-specific mechanisms and proton sensitivity of NMDA receptor channel block

    PubMed Central

    Dravid, Shashank M; Erreger, Kevin; Yuan, Hongjie; Nicholson, Katherine; Le, Phuong; Lyuboslavsky, Polina; Almonte, Antoine; Murray, Ernest; Mosely, Cara; Barber, Jeremy; French, Adam; Balster, Robert; Murray, Thomas F; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2007-01-01

    We have compared the potencies of structurally distinct channel blockers at recombinant NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B, NR1/NR2C and NR1/NR2D receptors. The IC50 values varied with stereochemistry and subunit composition, suggesting that it may be possible to design subunit-selective channel blockers. For dizocilpine (MK-801), the differential potency of MK-801 stereoisomers determined at recombinant NMDA receptors was confirmed at native receptors in vitro and in vivo. Since the proton sensor is tightly linked both structurally and functionally to channel gating, we examined whether blocking molecules that interact in the channel pore with the gating machinery can differentially sense protonation of the receptor. Blockers capable of remaining trapped in the pore during agonist unbinding showed the strongest dependence on extracellular pH, appearing more potent at acidic pH values that promote channel closure. Determination of pKa values for channel blockers suggests that the ionization of ketamine but not of other blockers can influence its pH-dependent potency. Kinetic modelling and single channel studies suggest that the pH-dependent block of NR1/NR2A by (−)MK-801 but not (+)MK-801 reflects an increase in the MK-801 association rate even though protons reduce channel open probability and thus MK-801 access to its binding site. Allosteric modulators that alter pH sensitivity alter the potency of MK-801, supporting the interpretation that the pH sensitivity of MK-801 binding reflects the changes at the proton sensor rather than a secondary effect of pH. These data suggest a tight coupling between the proton sensor and the ion channel gate as well as unique subunit-specific mechanisms of channel block. PMID:17303642

  14. α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SUBUNIT STOICHIOMETRY AND FUNCTION AT THE SINGLE CHANNEL LEVEL.

    PubMed

    Mazzaferro, Simone; Bermudez, Isabel; Sine, Steven M

    2017-02-17

    Acetylcholine receptors comprising α4 and β2 subunits are the most abundant class of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the brain. They contribute to cognition, reward, mood, and nociception and are implicated in a range of neurological disorders. Previous measurements of whole-cell macroscopic currents showed that α4 and β2 subunits assemble in two predominant pentameric stoichiometries, which differ in their sensitivity to agonists, antagonists, and allosteric modulators. Here we compare agonist-elicited single channel currents from receptors assembled with an excess of either the α4 or β2 subunit, forming receptor populations biased toward one or the other stoichiometry, with currents from receptors composed of five concatemeric subunits in which the subunit stoichiometry is predetermined. Our results associate each subunit stoichiometry with a unique single channel conductance, mean open channel lifetime, and sensitivity to the allosteric potentiator 3-[3-(3-pyridinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS-9283). Receptors with the composition (α4β2)2α4 exhibit high single channel conductance, brief mean open lifetime, and strong potentiation by NS-9283, whereas receptors with the composition (α4β2)2β2 exhibit low single channel conductance and long mean open lifetime and are not potentiated by NS-9283. Thus single channel current measurements reveal bases for the distinct functional and pharmacological properties endowed by different stoichiometries of α4 and β2 subunits and establish pentameric concatemers as a means to delineate interactions between subunits that confer these properties.

  15. Novel TPR-containing subunit of TOM complex functions as cytosolic receptor for Entamoeba mitosomal transport.

    PubMed

    Makiuchi, Takashi; Mi-ichi, Fumika; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Under anaerobic environments, the mitochondria have undergone remarkable reduction and transformation into highly reduced structures, referred as mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs), which include mitosomes and hydrogenosomes. In agreement with the concept of reductive evolution, mitosomes of Entamoeba histolytica lack most of the components of the TOM (translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane) complex, which is required for the targeting and membrane translocation of preproteins into the canonical aerobic mitochondria. Here we showed, in E. histolytica mitosomes, the presence of a 600-kDa TOM complex composed of Tom40, a conserved pore-forming subunit, and Tom60, a novel lineage-specific receptor protein. Tom60, containing multiple tetratricopeptide repeats, is localized to the mitosomal outer membrane and the cytosol, and serves as a receptor of both mitosomal matrix and membrane preproteins. Our data indicate that Entamoeba has invented a novel lineage-specific shuttle receptor of the TOM complex as a consequence of adaptation to an anaerobic environment.

  16. GABAA Receptors Containing ρ1 Subunits Contribute to In Vivo Effects of Ethanol in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blednov, Yuri A.; Benavidez, Jillian M.; Black, Mendy; Leiter, Courtney R.; Osterndorff-Kahanek, Elizabeth; Johnson, David; Borghese, Cecilia M.; Hanrahan, Jane R.; Johnston, Graham A. R.; Chebib, Mary; Harris, R. Adron

    2014-01-01

    GABAA receptors consisting of ρ1, ρ2, or ρ3 subunits in homo- or hetero-pentamers have been studied mainly in retina but are detected in many brain regions. Receptors formed from ρ1 are inhibited by low ethanol concentrations, and family-based association analyses have linked ρ subunit genes with alcohol dependence. We determined if genetic deletion of ρ1 in mice altered in vivo ethanol effects. Null mutant male mice showed reduced ethanol consumption and preference in a two-bottle choice test with no differences in preference for saccharin or quinine. Null mutant mice of both sexes demonstrated longer duration of ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR), and males were more sensitive to ethanol-induced motor sedation. In contrast, ρ1 null mice showed faster rec