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Sample records for gabab receptors play

  1. Clinical potential of GABAB receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jennifer; Kerr, David I B

    2005-01-01

    Metabotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) (GABAB) receptors for the major inhibitory transmitter GABA, together with metabotropic glutamate (mGLuRs) receptors, the extracellular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs), some V2R pheromone receptors and T1R taste receptors, belong to the family of 3 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GABAB receptors are known to control neuronal excitability and modulate synaptic neurotransmission, playing a very important role in many physiological activities. These receptors are widely expressed and distributed in the nervous system and have been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and pathophysiological disorders including epilepsy, spasticity, chronic pain, depression, schizophrenia and drug addiction. To form a functional receptor entity, GABAB receptors must exist as a heterodimer consisting of GABAB1 and GABAB2 receptor subtypes with two 7-transmembrane proteins, and these subunits arise from distinct genes. The GABAB1 subunit binds the endogenous ligand within its extracellular N-terminus, whilst the GABAB2 subunit is not only essential for the correct trafficking of the GABAB1 subunit to the cell surface, but is also responsible for the interaction of the receptor with its cognate G-protein. Allosteric modulation has recently been recognized as an alternative pharmacological approach to gain selectivity in drug action. It is now generally accepted that modulators acting at the allosteric sites provide a novel perspective for the development of subtype-selective agents acting at GPCRs. These agents interact with allosteric binding sites quite separate from the highly conserved agonist binding region. In this review, we present a new class of phenylalkylamines, based on the lead compound fendiline, that are potent positive potentiators of GABAB receptor-mediated function and discuss their putative clinical applications. It is proposed that these new modulators may have therapeutic value in GABAB receptor pharmacology and

  2. Chemistry and pharmacology of GABAB receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents new clinical applications of the prototypic GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen for the treatment of addiction by drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and heroin, a novel baclofen prodrug Arbaclofen placarbil, the GABA(B) receptor agonist AZD3355 (Lesogabaran) currently in Phase 2 clinical trials for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and four positive allosteric modulators of GABA(B) receptors (CGP7930, GS39783, NVP-BHF177, and BHFF), which have less propensity for the development of tolerance due to receptor desensitization than classical GABA(B) receptor agonists. All four compounds showed anxiolytic affects. In the presence of positive allosteric modulators the "classical" GABA(B) receptor antagonists CGP35348 and 2-hydroxy-saclofen showed properties of partial GABA(B) receptor agonists. Seven micromolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists, phaclofen; 2-hydroxy-saclofen; CGP's 35348, 36742, 46381, 51176; and SCH50911, are discussed. CGP36742 (SGS742) showed statistically significant improvements of working memory and attention in a Phase 2 clinical trial in mild, but not in moderate Alzheimer patients. Eight nanomolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists are presented (CGP's 52432, 54626, 55845, 56433, 56999, 61334, 62349, and 63360) that were used by pharmacologists for numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. CGP's 36742, 51176, 55845, and 56433 showed antidepressant effects. Several compounds are also available as radioligands, such as [(3)H]CGP27492, [(3)H]CGP54626, [(3)H]CGP5699, and [(3)H]CGP62349. Three novel fluorescent and three GABA(B) receptor antagonists with very high specific radioactivity (>2,000 Ci/mmol) are presented. [(125)I]CGP64213 and the photoaffinity ligand [(125)I]CGP71872 allowed the identification of GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) receptors in the expression cloning work.

  3. GABAB receptor modulation of synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Chalifoux, Jason R.; Carter, Adam G.

    2011-01-01

    Neuromodulators have complex effects on both the presynaptic release and postsynaptic detection of neurotransmitters. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of synaptic modulation by metabotropic GABAB receptors. By inhibiting multivesicular release from the presynaptic terminal, these receptors decrease the synaptic glutamate signal. GABAB receptors also inhibit the Ca2+ permeability of NMDA receptors to decrease Ca2+ signals in postsynaptic spines. These new findings highlight the importance of GABAB receptors in regulating many aspects of synaptic transmission. They also point to novel questions about the spatiotemporal dynamics and sources of synaptic modulation in the brain. PMID:21376567

  4. Emerging neurotrophic role of GABAB receptors in neuronal circuit development.

    PubMed

    Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Porcher, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The proper development of highly organized structures in the central nervous system is a complex process during which key events - neurogenesis, migration, growth, differentiation, and synaptogenesis - have to take place in an appropriate manner to create functional neuronal networks. It is now well established that GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian brain, plays more than a classical inhibitory role and can function as an important developmental signal early in life. GABA binds to chloride-permeable ionotropic GABAA receptors and to G-protein-coupled GABAB receptors (GABAB-Rs). Although most of the trophic actions of GABA have been attributed to the activation of GABAA receptors, recent advances show that GABAB-Rs also regulate fundamental steps of network development. This review summarizes some of the recent progress about the neurotrophic role of GABAB-Rs to neuronal development.

  5. Emerging neurotrophic role of GABAB receptors in neuronal circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Porcher, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The proper development of highly organized structures in the central nervous system is a complex process during which key events – neurogenesis, migration, growth, differentiation, and synaptogenesis – have to take place in an appropriate manner to create functional neuronal networks. It is now well established that GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian brain, plays more than a classical inhibitory role and can function as an important developmental signal early in life. GABA binds to chloride-permeable ionotropic GABAA receptors and to G-protein-coupled GABAB receptors (GABAB-Rs). Although most of the trophic actions of GABA have been attributed to the activation of GABAA receptors, recent advances show that GABAB-Rs also regulate fundamental steps of network development. This review summarizes some of the recent progress about the neurotrophic role of GABAB-Rs to neuronal development. PMID:24282395

  6. A Gut Feeling about GABA: Focus on GABAB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Niall P.; Cryan, John F.

    2010-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the body and hence GABA-mediated neurotransmission regulates many physiological functions, including those in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. GABA is located throughout the GI tract and is found in enteric nerves as well as in endocrine-like cells, implicating GABA as both a neurotransmitter and an endocrine mediator influencing GI function. GABA mediates its effects via GABA receptors which are either ionotropic GABAA or metabotropic GABAB. The latter which respond to the agonist baclofen have been least characterized, however accumulating data suggest that they play a key role in GI function in health and disease. Like GABA, GABAB receptors have been detected throughout the gut of several species in the enteric nervous system, muscle, epithelial layers as well as on endocrine-like cells. Such widespread distribution of this metabotropic GABA receptor is consistent with its significant modulatory role over intestinal motility, gastric emptying, gastric acid secretion, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and visceral sensation of painful colonic stimuli. More intriguing findings, the mechanisms underlying which have yet to be determined, suggest GABAB receptors inhibit GI carcinogenesis and tumor growth. Therefore, the diversity of GI functions regulated by GABAB receptors makes it a potentially useful target in the treatment of several GI disorders. In light of the development of novel compounds such as peripherally acting GABAB receptor agonists, positive allosteric modulators of the GABAB receptor and GABA producing enteric bacteria, we review and summarize current knowledge on the function of GABAB receptors within the GI tract. PMID:21833169

  7. Ligand-guided homology modelling of the GABAB2 subunit of the GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Freyd, Thibaud; Warszycki, Dawid; Mordalski, Stefan; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Gabrielsen, Mari

    2017-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and disturbances in the GABAergic system have been implicated in numerous neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimeric class C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) consisting of GABAB1a/b and GABAB2 subunits. Two GABAB receptor ligand binding sites have been described, namely the orthosteric GABA binding site located in the extracellular GABAB1 Venus fly trap domain and the allosteric binding site found in the GABAB2 transmembrane domain. To date, the only experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of the GABAB receptor are of the Venus fly trap domain. GABAB receptor allosteric modulators, however, show great therapeutic potential, and elucidating the structure of the GABAB2 transmembrane domain may lead to development of novel drugs and increased understanding of the allosteric mechanism of action. Despite the lack of x-ray crystal structures of the GABAB2 transmembrane domain, multiple crystal structures belonging to other classes of GPCRs than class A have been released within the last years. More closely related template structures are now available for homology modelling of the GABAB receptor. Here, multiple homology models of the GABAB2 subunit of the GABAB receptor have been constructed using templates from class A, B and C GPCRs, and docking of five clusters of positive allosteric modulators and decoys has been undertaken to select models that enrich the active compounds. Using this ligand-guided approach, eight GABAB2 homology models have been chosen as possible structural representatives of the transmembrane domain of the GABAB2 subunit. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to describe homology modelling of the transmembrane domain of the GABAB2 subunit and the docking of positive allosteric modulators in the receptor.

  8. Ligand-guided homology modelling of the GABAB2 subunit of the GABAB receptor

    PubMed Central

    Freyd, Thibaud; Warszycki, Dawid; Mordalski, Stefan; Bojarski, Andrzej J.; Gabrielsen, Mari

    2017-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and disturbances in the GABAergic system have been implicated in numerous neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimeric class C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) consisting of GABAB1a/b and GABAB2 subunits. Two GABAB receptor ligand binding sites have been described, namely the orthosteric GABA binding site located in the extracellular GABAB1 Venus fly trap domain and the allosteric binding site found in the GABAB2 transmembrane domain. To date, the only experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of the GABAB receptor are of the Venus fly trap domain. GABAB receptor allosteric modulators, however, show great therapeutic potential, and elucidating the structure of the GABAB2 transmembrane domain may lead to development of novel drugs and increased understanding of the allosteric mechanism of action. Despite the lack of x-ray crystal structures of the GABAB2 transmembrane domain, multiple crystal structures belonging to other classes of GPCRs than class A have been released within the last years. More closely related template structures are now available for homology modelling of the GABAB receptor. Here, multiple homology models of the GABAB2 subunit of the GABAB receptor have been constructed using templates from class A, B and C GPCRs, and docking of five clusters of positive allosteric modulators and decoys has been undertaken to select models that enrich the active compounds. Using this ligand-guided approach, eight GABAB2 homology models have been chosen as possible structural representatives of the transmembrane domain of the GABAB2 subunit. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to describe homology modelling of the transmembrane domain of the GABAB2 subunit and the docking of positive allosteric modulators in the receptor. PMID:28323850

  9. Regulating hippocampal hyperexcitability through GABAB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Min; Moradi‐Chameh, Homeira; Zahid, Tariq; Gane, Jonathan; Wu, Chiping; Valiante, Taufik; Zhang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Disturbances of GABAergic inhibition are a major cause of epileptic seizures. GABA exerts its actions via ionotropic GABAA receptors and metabotropic G protein‐coupled GABAB receptors. Malfunction of GABAA inhibition has long been recognized in seizure genesis but the role of GABAB receptors in controlling seizure activity is still not well understood. Here, we examined the anticonvulsive, or inhibitory effects, of GABAB receptors in a mouse model of hippocampal kindling as well as mouse hippocampal slices through the use of GS 39783, a positive allosteric GABAB receptor modulator, and CGP 55845, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. When administered via intraperitoneal injections in kindled mice, GS 39783 (5 mg/kg) did not attenuate hippocampal EEG discharges, but did reduce aberrant hippocampal spikes, whereas CGP 55845 (10 mg/kg) prolonged hippocampal discharges and increased spike incidences. When examined in hippocampal slices, neither GS 39783 at 5 μmol/L nor the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen at 0.1 μmol/L alone significantly altered repetitive excitatory field potentials, but GS 39783 and baclofen together reversibly abolished these field potentials. In contrast, CGP 55845 at 1 μmol/L facilitated induction and incidence of these field potentials. In addition, CGP 55845 attenuated the paired pulse depression of CA3 population spikes and increased the frequency of EPSCs in individual CA3 pyramidal neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that GABABB receptors regulate hippocampal hyperexcitability by inhibiting CA3 glutamatergic synapses. We postulate that positive allosteric modulation of GABAB receptors may be effective in reducing seizure‐related hyperexcitability. PMID:24771688

  10. Encephalitis and GABAB receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Höftberger, Romana; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Sabater, Lidia; Dome, Balazs; Rózsás, Anita; Hegedus, Balazs; Hoda, Mir Alireza; Laszlo, Viktoria; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan; Harms, Lutz; Boyero, Sabas; de Felipe, Alicia; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical features of 20 newly diagnosed patients with GABAB receptor (GABABR) antibodies and determine the frequency of associated tumors and concurrent neuronal autoantibodies. Methods: Clinical data were retrospectively obtained and evaluated. Serum and CSF samples were examined for additional antibodies using methods previously reported. Results: Seventeen patients presented with seizures, memory loss, and confusion, compatible with limbic encephalitis (LE), one patient presented with ataxia, one patient presented with status epilepticus, and one patient presented with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS). Nineteen (95%) patients eventually developed LE during the course of the disease. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) was identified in 10 (50%) patients, all with LE. Treatment and outcome was available from 19 patients: 15 showed complete (n = 7) or partial (n = 8) neurologic improvement after steroids, IV immunoglobulins, or plasma exchange and oncologic treatment when indicated; 1 patient died of tumor progression shortly after the first cycle of immunotherapy, and 3 were not treated. Five patients with SCLC had additional onconeuronal antibodies (Ri, amphiphysin, or SOX1), and 2 without tumor had GAD65 and NMDAR antibodies, respectively. GABABR antibodies were not detected in serum of 116 patients with SCLC without neurologic symptoms. Conclusion: Our study confirms GABABR as an autoantigen of paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic LE and expands the phenotype of GABABR antibodies to ataxia, OMS, and status epilepticus. The long-term prognosis is dictated by the presence of a tumor. Recognition of syndromes associated with GABABR antibodies is important because they usually respond to treatment. PMID:24068784

  11. Mechanism of GABAB receptor-induced BDNF secretion and promotion of GABAA receptor membrane expression.

    PubMed

    Kuczewski, Nicola; Fuchs, Celine; Ferrand, Nadine; Jovanovic, Jasmina N; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Porcher, Christophe

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that GABA(B) receptors play more than a classical inhibitory role and can function as an important synaptic maturation signal early in life. In a previous study, we reported that GABA(B) receptor activation triggers secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and promotes the functional maturation of GABAergic synapses in the developing rat hippocampus. To identify the signalling pathway linking GABA(B) receptor activation to BDNF secretion in these cells, we have now used the phosphorylated form of the cAMP response element-binding protein as a biological sensor for endogenous BDNF release. In the present study, we show that GABA(B) receptor-induced secretion of BDNF relies on the activation of phospholipase C, followed by the formation of diacylglycerol, activation of protein kinase C, and the opening of L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. We further show that once released by GABA(B) receptor activation, BDNF increases the membrane expression of β(2/3) -containing GABA(A) receptors in neuronal cultures. These results reveal a novel function of GABA(B) receptors in regulating the expression of GABA(A) receptor through BDNF-tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor dependent signalling pathway.

  12. Allosteric Modulators of GABAB Receptors: Mechanism of Action and Therapeutic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prézeau, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays important roles in the central nervous system, acting as a neurotransmitter on both ionotropic ligand-gated Cl--channels, and metabotropic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). These two types of receptors called GABAA (and C) and GABAB are the targets of major therapeutic drugs such as the anxiolytic benzodiazepines, and antispastic drug baclofen (lioresal®), respectively. Although the multiplicity of GABAA receptors offer a number of possibilities to discover new and more selective drugs, the molecular characterization of the GABAB receptor revealed a unique, though complex, heterodimeric GPCR. High throughput screening strategies carried out in pharmaceutical industries, helped identifying new compounds positively modulating the activity of the GABAB receptor. These molecules, almost devoid of apparent activity when applied alone, greatly enhance both the potency and efficacy of GABAB agonists. As such, in contrast to baclofen that constantly activates the receptor everywhere in the brain, these positive allosteric modulators induce a large increase in GABAB-mediated responses only WHERE and WHEN physiologically needed. Such compounds are then well adapted to help GABA to activate its GABAB receptors, like benzodiazepines favor GABAA receptor activation. In this review, the way of action of these molecules will be presented in light of our actual knowledge of the activation mechanism of the GABAB receptor. We will then show that, as expected, these molecules have more pronounced in vivo responses and less side effects than pure agonists, offering new potential therapeutic applications for this new class of GABAB ligands. PMID:19305802

  13. GABA(B2) is essential for g-protein coupling of the GABA(B) receptor heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Robbins, M J; Calver, A R; Filippov, A K; Hirst, W D; Russell, R B; Wood, M D; Nasir, S; Couve, A; Brown, D A; Moss, S J; Pangalos, M N

    2001-10-15

    GABA(B) receptors are unique among G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in their requirement for heterodimerization between two homologous subunits, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), for functional expression. Whereas GABA(B1) is capable of binding receptor agonists and antagonists, the role of each GABA(B) subunit in receptor signaling is unknown. Here we identified amino acid residues within the second intracellular domain of GABA(B2) that are critical for the coupling of GABA(B) receptor heterodimers to their downstream effector systems. Our results provide strong evidence for a functional role of the GABA(B2) subunit in G-protein coupling of the GABA(B) receptor heterodimer. In addition, they provide evidence for a novel "sequential" GPCR signaling mechanism in which ligand binding to one heterodimer subunit can induce signal transduction through the second partner of a heteromeric complex.

  14. GABAB receptors suppress burst-firing in reticular thalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Cain, Stuart M; Garcia, Esperanza; Waheed, Zeina; Jones, Karen L; Bushell, Trevor J; Snutch, Terrance P

    2017-07-25

    Burst-firing in thalamic neurons is known to play a key role in mediating thalamocortical (TC) oscillations that are associated with non-REM sleep and some types of epileptic seizure. Within the TC system the primary output of GABAergic neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) is thought to induce the de-inactivation of T-type calcium channels in thalamic relay (TR) neurons, promoting burst-firing drive to the cortex and the propagation of TC network activity. However, RTN neurons also project back onto other neurons within the RTN. The role of this putative negative feedback upon the RTN itself is less well understood, although is hypothesized to induce de-synchronization of RTN neuron firing leading to the suppression of TC oscillations. Here we tested two hypotheses concerning possible mechanisms underlying TC oscillation modulation. Firstly, we assessed the burst-firing behavior of RTN neurons in response to GABAB receptor activation using acute brain slices. The selective GABAB receptor agonist baclofen was found to induce suppression of burst-firing concurrent with effects on membrane input resistance. Secondly, RTN neurons express CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 T-type calcium channel isoforms known to contribute toward TC burst-firing and we examined the modulation of these channels by GABAB receptor activation. Utilizing exogenously expressed T-type channels we assessed whether GABAB receptor activation could directly alter T-type calcium channel properties. Overall, GABAB receptor activation had only modest effects on CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 isoforms. The only effect that could be predicted to suppress burst-firing was a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage-dependence of inactivation, potentially causing lower channel availability at membrane potentials critical for burst-firing. Conversely, other effects observed such as a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage-dependence of activation of both CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 as well as increased time constant of activation of the CaV3

  15. Evidence for pharmacologically distinct subsets of GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Scherer, R W; Ferkany, J W; Enna, S J

    1988-09-01

    Activation of GABAB receptors augments neurotransmitter-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation while inhibiting forskolin-mediated second messenger production. Previous studies have revealed that GABAB receptors are associated with a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein, such as Gi. While such a linkage is consistent with the finding that GABAB receptor activation inhibits forskolin-mediated second messenger accumulation, it fails to explain how GABAB agonists are capable of augmenting receptor-mediated cyclic AMP production. The present experiments were undertaken to explore the possible existence of pharmacologically distinct GABAB receptors in an attempt to explain this apparent discrepancy. For the study, a variety of agents were examined for their ability to inhibit GABAB binding to brain membranes and to modify isoproterenol- or forskolin-stimulated second messenger production in rat brain slices. Of the compounds studied, only 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid were found to inhibit GABAB binding. However, 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid failed to influence either isoproterenol- or forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. On the other hand, while 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid also failed to affect isoproterenol-stimulated second messenger accumulation, it inhibited the forskolin-mediated response. Given this finding, and the fact that some of the agents tested are known to influence GABAB receptor function in other systems, the results indicate a multiplicity of pharmacologically distinct GABAB receptor recognition sites. This discovery paves the way for the development of more selective GABAB receptor agonists and antagonists possessing different therapeutic potentials.

  16. GABAB receptor-positive modulators: enhancement of GABAB receptor agonist effects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C

    2010-10-01

    In vivo effects of GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators suggest that they have therapeutic potential for treating central nervous system disorders such as anxiety, depression, and drug abuse. Although these effects generally are thought to be mediated by positive modulation of GABA(B) receptors, such modulation has been examined primarily in vitro. The present study was aimed at further examining the in vivo positive modulatory properties of the GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl) phenol (CGP7930) and (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF). Both compounds enhanced loss of righting induced by baclofen in mice. However, CGP7930 was less effective and rac-BHFF was less potent for enhancing loss of righting induced by γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), which, like baclofen, has GABA(B) receptor agonist properties. In contrast with baclofen- and GHB-induced loss of righting, the hypothermic effects of baclofen and GHB were not enhanced by rac-BHFF but were enhanced by CGP7930 only at doses that produced hypothermia when given alone. CGP7930-induced hypothermia was not attenuated by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348), at doses that blocked baclofen-induced hypothermia, and was not increased by the nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, at doses that increased the hypothermic effects of baclofen and GHB. The results provide evidence that CGP7930 and rac-BHFF act in vivo as positive modulators at GABA(B) receptors mediating loss of righting, but not at GABA(B) receptors mediating hypothermia. Conceivably, CGP7930, but not rac-BHFF, acts as an allosteric agonist at these latter receptors. Taken together, the results provide further evidence of pharmacologically distinct GABA(B) receptor subtypes, possibly allowing for a more selective therapeutic interference with the GABA(B) system.

  17. Pharmacology of the GABAB receptor in amphibian retina.

    PubMed

    Tian, N; Slaughter, M M

    1994-10-17

    Amacrine and ganglion cells in the amphibian retina contain GABAB, as well as GABAA, receptors. Baclofen, a GABAB agonist, hyperpolarizes the dark membrane potential of these third order neurons and makes their light responses more transient. GABAB receptors in the retina have a similar agonist profile to GABAB receptors described at other sites in the brain. Namely, preferential activation by the R-enantiomer of baclofen, and agonist sensitivity in the order 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid > baclofen > 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid. The GABAB receptor was not activated by 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid. Several antagonists, such as phaclofen, saclofen, and 2-hydroxysaclofen, were ineffective in the amphibian retina. However, CGP35348 blocked the action of applied baclofen and produced effects on the light response that were opposite to those of baclofen. Applied agonists and antagonists support the hypothesis that GABAB receptors serve to regulate the balance of sustained and transient signals to the inner retina.

  18. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Olivia F.; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M.; Bravo, Javier A.; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)−/− mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:25288769

  19. Decreased GABAB Receptors in the Cingulate Cortex and Fusiform Gyrus in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Terrell T.; Blatt, Gene J.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disorder and among its symptoms are disturbances in face and emotional processing. Emerging evidence demonstrates abnormalities in the GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) system in autism, which likely contributes to these deficits. GABAB receptors play an important role in modulating synapses and maintaining the balance of excitation-inhibition in the brain. The density of GABAB receptors in subjects with autism and matched controls was quantified in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, important for socio-emotional and cognitive processing, and the fusiform gyrus, important for identification of faces and facial expressions. Significant reductions in GABAB receptor density were demonstrated in all three regions examined suggesting that alterations in this key inhibitory receptor subtype may contribute to the functional deficits in individuals with autism. Interestingly, the presence of seizure in a subset of autism cases did not have a significant effect on the density of GABAB receptors in any of the three regions. PMID:20557420

  20. Sushi domains confer distinct trafficking profiles on GABAB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Saad; Wilkins, Megan E.; Smart, Trevor G.

    2012-01-01

    GABAB receptors mediate slow inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain and feature during excitatory synaptic plasticity, as well as various neurological conditions. These receptors are obligate heterodimers composed of GABABR1 and R2 subunits. The two predominant R1 isoforms differ by the presence of two complement control protein modules or Sushi domains (SDs) in the N terminus of R1a. By using live imaging, with an α-bungarotoxin-binding site (BBS) and fluorophore-linked bungarotoxin, we studied how R2 stabilizes R1b subunits at the cell surface. Heterodimerization with R2 reduced the rate of internalization of R1b, compared with R1b homomers. However, R1aR2 heteromers exhibited increased cell surface stability compared with R1bR2 receptors in hippocampal neurons, suggesting that for receptors containing the R1a subunit, the SDs play an additional role in the surface stability of GABAB receptors. Both SDs were necessary to increase the stability of R1aR2 because single deletions caused the receptors to be internalized at the same rate and extent as R1bR2 receptors. Consistent with these findings, a chimera formed from the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)2 and the SDs from R1a increased the surface stability of mGluR2. These results suggest a role for SDs in stabilizing cell surface receptors that could impart different pre- and postsynaptic trafficking itineraries on GABAB receptors, thereby contributing to their physiological and pathological roles. PMID:22778417

  1. My close encounter with GABA(B) receptors.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Roger A

    2004-10-15

    In this review, I summarize the sequence of events involved in characterizing the functional role of GABA(B) receptors in the CNS and their involvement in synaptic transmission. The story was launched with the realization that baclofen was a selective agonist of GABA(B) receptors. This lead to the discovery in the CNS that GABA(B) receptor activation could result in a presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release as well as a postsynaptic increase in potassium conductance. Based on this information, it was found that GABA also activated a potassium conductance. A role for GABA(B) receptors in synaptic transmission was suggested by the fact that activation of GABAergic interneurons could generate a slow IPSP mediated by an increase in potassium conductance. To link this slow IPSP to GABA(B) receptors required a selective GABA(B) antagonist. Phaclofen was the first antagonist developed and was found to antagonize the action of baclofen and the GABA(A) independent action of GABA. Most importantly, it blocked the slow IPSP. The properties of GABA(A) and GABA(B) IPSPs are remarkably different. GABA(A) IPSPs powerfully inhibit neurons and rapidly curtail excitatory inputs. This greatly enhances the precision of excitatory synaptic transmission. GABA(B) IPSPs are recruited with repetitive and synchronous activity and are postulated to modulate the rhythmic network activity of cortical tissue.

  2. Contribution of metabotropic GABA(B) receptors to neuronal network construction.

    PubMed

    Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Kuczewski, Nicola; Porcher, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    In the 1980s, Bowery and colleagues discovered the presence of a novel, bicuculline-resistant and baclofen-sensitive type of GABA receptor on peripheral nerve terminals, the GABA(B) receptor. Since this pioneering work, GABA(B) receptors have been identified in the Central Nervous System (CNS), where they provide an important inhibitory control of postsynaptic excitability and presynaptic transmitter release. GABA(B) receptors have been implicated in a number of important processes in the adult brain such as the regulation of synaptic plasticity and modulation of rhythmic activity. As a result of these studies, several potential therapeutic applications of GABA(B) receptor ligands have been identified. Recent advances have further shown that GABA(B) receptors play more than a classical inhibitory role in adult neurotransmission, and can in fact function as an important developmental signal early in life. Here we summarize current knowledge on the contribution of GABA(B) receptors to the construction and function of developing neuronal networks.

  3. Discovery of a Negative Allosteric Modulator of GABAB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Initialized from the scaffold of CGP7930, an allosteric agonist of GABAB receptors, a series of noncompetitive antagonists were discovered. Among these compounds, compounds 3, 6, and 14 decreased agonist GABA-induced maximal effect of IP3 production in HEK293 cells overexpressing GABAB receptors and Gqi9 proteins without changing the EC50. Compounds 3, 6, and 14 not only inhibited agonist baclofen-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation but also blocked CGP7930-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in HEK293 cells overexpressing GABAB receptors. The results suggested that compounds 3, 6, and 14 are negative allosteric modulators of GABAB receptors. The representative compound 14 decreased GABA-induced IP3 production with IC50 of 37.9 μM and had no effect on other GPCR Class C members such as mGluR1, mGluR2, and mGluR5. Finally, we showed that compound 14 did not bind to the orthosteric binding sites of GABAB receptors, demonstrating that compound 14 negatively modulated GABAB receptors activity as a negative allosteric modulator. PMID:25050158

  4. The oligomeric state sets GABAB receptor signalling efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Comps-Agrar, Laëtitia; Kniazeff, Julie; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Maurel, Damien; Gassmann, Martin; Gregor, Nathalie; Prézeau, Laurent; Bettler, Bernhard; Durroux, Thierry; Trinquet, Eric; Pin, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have key roles in cell–cell communication. Recent data suggest that these receptors can form large complexes, a possibility expected to expand the complexity of this regulatory system. Among the brain GPCRs, the heterodimeric GABAB receptor is one of the most abundant, being distributed in most brain regions, on either pre- or post-synaptic elements. Here, using specific antibodies labelled with time-resolved FRET compatible fluorophores, we provide evidence that the heterodimeric GABAB receptor can form higher-ordered oligomers in the brain, as suggested by the close proximity of the GABAB1 subunits. Destabilizing the oligomers using a competitor or a GABAB1 mutant revealed different G protein coupling efficiencies depending on the oligomeric state of the receptor. By examining, in heterologous system, the G protein coupling properties of such GABAB receptor oligomers composed of a wild-type and a non-functional mutant heterodimer, we provide evidence for a negative functional cooperativity between the GABAB heterodimers. PMID:21552208

  5. The expression of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) receptor subunits in the cNS differs from that in peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Calver, A R; Medhurst, A D; Robbins, M J; Charles, K J; Evans, M L; Harrison, D C; Stammers, M; Hughes, S A; Hervieu, G; Couve, A; Moss, S J; Middlemiss, D N; Pangalos, M N

    2000-01-01

    GABA(B) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the slow and prolonged synaptic actions of GABA in the CNS via the modulation of ion channels. Unusually, GABA(B) receptors form functional heterodimers composed of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits. The GABA(B1) subunit is essential for ligand binding, whereas the GABA(B2) subunit is essential for functional expression of the receptor dimer at the cell surface. We have used real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to analyse expression levels of these subunits, and their associated splice variants, in the CNS and peripheral tissues of human and rat. GABA(B1) subunit splice variants were expressed throughout the CNS and peripheral tissues, whereas surprisingly GABA(B2) subunit splice variants were neural specific. Using novel antisera specific to individual GABA(B) receptor subunits, we have confirmed these findings at the protein level. Analysis by immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of the GABA(B1) subunit, but not the GABA(B2) subunit, in uterus and spleen. Furthermore, we have shown the first immunocytochemical analysis of the GABA(B2) subunit in the brain and spinal cord using a GABA(B2)-specific antibody. We have, therefore, identified areas of non-overlap between GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunit expression in tissues known to contain functional GABA(B) receptors. Such areas are of interest as they may well contain novel GABA(B) receptor subunit isoforms, expression of which would enable the GABA(B1) subunit to reach the cell surface and form functional GABA(B) receptors.

  6. Discriminative Stimulus Effects of the GABAB Receptor-Positive Modulator rac-BHFF: Comparison with GABAB Receptor Agonists and Drugs of Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.

    2013-01-01

    GABAB receptor-positive modulators are thought to have advantages as potential medications for anxiety, depression, and drug addiction. They may have fewer side effects than GABAB receptor agonists, because selective enhancement of activated receptors could have effects different from nonselective activation of all receptors. To examine this, pigeons were trained to discriminate the GABAB receptor-positive modulator (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF) from its vehicle. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not mimicked by the GABAB receptor agonists baclofen and γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), not by diazepam, and not by alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine, whose self-administration has been reported to be attenuated by GABAB receptor-positive modulators. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not antagonized by the GABAB receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl (diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348) but were attenuated by the less efficacious GABAB receptor-positive modulator 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl)phenol (CGP7930), suggesting the possibility that rac-BHFF produces its discriminative stimulus effects by directly activating GABAB2 subunits of GABAB receptors. At a dose 10-fold lower than the training dose, rac-BHFF enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. This study provides evidence that the effects of GABAB receptor-positive modulators are not identical to those of GABAB receptor agonists. In addition, the results suggest that positive modulation of GABAB receptors does not produce discriminative stimulus effects similar to those of benzodiazepines, alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine. Finally, the finding that rac-BHFF enhanced effects of baclofen but not of GHB is consistent with converging evidence that the populations of GABAB receptors mediating the effects of baclofen and GHB are not identical. PMID:23275067

  7. CGP7930: a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Adams, C L; Lawrence, A J

    2007-01-01

    CGP7930 (3-(3',5'-Di-tert-butyl-4'-hydroxy)phenyl-2,2-dimethylpropanol) is a positive allosteric modulator of the metabotropic GABAB receptor. CGP7930 has been found to modulate the GABAB receptor in the open, or high affinity, state increasing agonist affinity for the receptor and signal transduction efficacy following agonist stimulation. The GABAB heteromeric subunit B2, involved in signal transduction but not ligand binding, seems to be the site of action of CGP7930 and similar allosteric modulators. When administered alone in naïve animals, CGP7930 acts as an anxiolytic in rodents without other overt behavioral effects and has also been demonstrated to reduce self-administration of nicotine, cocaine, or alcohol in rodents, suggesting that "fine tuning" of the GABAB receptor by positive allosteric modulators may be able to regulate abuse of these drugs. Baclofen, the GABAB agonist, is currently finding use in treating addiction and various other disorders, but this can result in off-target effects and tolerance. CGP7930 when co-administered with baclofen enhances its potency, which could in theory minimize deleterious effects. Further study of CGP7930 is required, but this compound, and others like it, holds potential in a clinical setting.

  8. GABAB receptor activation attenuates the stimulant but not mesolimbic dopamine response to ethanol in FAST mice

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Sarah E.; Li, Na; Eshleman, Amy J.; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2012-01-01

    Neural processes influenced by γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) receptors appear to contribute to acute ethanol sensitivity, including the difference between lines of mice bred for extreme sensitivity (FAST) or insensitivity (SLOW) to the locomotor stimulant effect of ethanol. One goal of the current study was to determine whether selection of the FAST and SLOW lines resulted in changes in GABAB receptor function, since the lines differ in sensitivity to the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen and baclofen attenuates the stimulant response to ethanol in FAST mice. A second goal was to determine whether the baclofen-induced reduction in ethanol stimulation in FAST mice is associated with an attenuation of the mesolimbic dopamine response to ethanol. In Experiment 1, the FAST and SLOW lines were found to not differ in GABAB receptor function (measured by baclofen-stimulated [35S]GTP!S binding) in whole brain or in several regional preparations, except in the striatum in one of the two replicate sets of selected lines. In Experiment 2, baclofen-induced attenuation of the locomotor stimulant response to ethanol in FAST mice was not accompanied by a reduction in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens, as measured by microdialysis. These data suggest that, overall, GABAB receptor function does not play an integral role in the genetic difference in ethanol sensitivity between the FAST and SLOW lines. Further, although GABAB receptors do modulate the locomotor stimulant response to ethanol in FAST mice, this effect does not appear to be due to a reduction in tonic dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:22982185

  9. GABAB receptors role in cell migration and positioning within the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    McClellan, K M; Calver, A R; Tobet, S A

    2008-02-19

    The ventromedial (VMN) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei of the hypothalamus are bilateral nuclear groups at the base of the hypothalamus that are organized through the aggregation of neurons born along the third ventricle that migrate laterally. During development, GABAergic neurons and fibers surround the forming (or primordial) VMN while neurons containing GABA receptors are found within the boundaries of the emerging nucleus. To investigate the role that GABAB receptors play in establishing the VMN, Thy-1 yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) mice were utilized for live video microscopy studies. The Thy-1 promoter drives YFP expression in regions of the hypothalamus during development. Administration of the GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen and the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline selectively increased the rate of VMN cell movement in slices placed in vitro at embryonic day 14, when cells that form both the ARC and VMN are migrating away from the proliferative zone surrounding the third ventricle. To further test the role of GABAB receptors in VMN development, GABAB receptor knockout mice were used to examine changes in the positions of phenotypically identified cells within the VMN. Cells containing immunoreactive estrogen receptors (ER) alpha were located in the ventrolateral quadrant of the wild type VMN. In GABABR1 knockout mice, these ERalpha positive neurons were located in more dorsal positions at postnatal day (P) 0 and P4. We conclude that GABA alters cell migration and its effect on final cell positioning may lead to changes in the circuitry and connections within specific nuclei of the developing hypothalamus.

  10. GABAB Receptors Role in Cell Migration and Positioning within the Ventromedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Kristy M.; Calver, Andrew R.; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2008-01-01

    The ventromedial (VMN) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei of the hypothalamus are bilateral nuclear groups at the base of the hypothalamus that are organized through the aggregation of neurons born along the third ventricle that migrate laterally. During development, GABAergic neurons and fibers surround the forming (or primordial) VMN while neurons containing GABA receptors are found within the boundaries of the emerging nucleus. To investigate the role that GABAB receptors play in establishing the VMN, Thy-1 YFP mice were utilized for live video microscopy studies. The Thy-1 promoter drives YFP expression in regions of the hypothalamus during development. Administration of the GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen and the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline selectively increased the rate of VMN cell movement in slices placed in vitro at embryonic day 14, when cells that form both the ARC and VMN are migrating away from the proliferative zone surrounding the third ventricle. To further test the role of GABAB receptors in VMN development, GABAB receptor knockout mice were used to examine changes in the positions of phenotypically identified cells within the VMN. Cells containing immunoreactive estrogen receptors (ER)α were located in the ventrolateral quadrant of the wild type VMN. In GABABR1 knockout mice, these ERα positive neurons were located in more dorsal positions at postnatal day (P)0 and P4. We conclude that GABA alters cell migration and its effect on final cell positioning may lead to changes in the circuitry and connections within specific nuclei of the developing hypothalamus. PMID:18248902

  11. Heterodimeric coiled-coil interactions of human GABAB receptor

    PubMed Central

    Burmakina, Svetlana; Geng, Yong; Chen, Yan; Fan, Qing R.

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic GABAB receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that mediates inhibitory neurotransmission in the CNS. It functions as an obligatory heterodimer of GABAB receptor 1 (GBR1) and GABAB receptor 2 (GBR2) subunits. The association between GBR1 and GBR2 masks an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal in the cytoplasmic region of GBR1 and facilitates cell surface expression of both subunits. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structure of an intracellular coiled-coil heterodimer of human GABAB receptor. We found that polar interactions buried within the hydrophobic core determine the specificity of heterodimer pairing. Disruption of the hydrophobic coiled-coil interface with single mutations in either subunit impairs surface expression of GBR1, confirming that the coiled-coil interaction is required to inactivate the adjacent ER retention signal of GBR1. The coiled-coil assembly buries an internalization motif of GBR1 at the heterodimer interface. The ER retention signal of GBR1 is not part of the core coiled-coil structure, suggesting that it is sterically shielded by GBR2 upon heterodimer formation. PMID:24778228

  12. Increased GABAB receptor signaling in a rat model for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Selten, Martijn M; Meyer, Francisca; Ba, Wei; Vallès, Astrid; Maas, Dorien A; Negwer, Moritz; Eijsink, Vivian D; van Vugt, Ruben W M; van Hulten, Josephus A; van Bakel, Nick H M; Roosen, Joey; van der Linden, Robert J; Schubert, Dirk; Verheij, Michel M M; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Martens, Gerard J M

    2016-09-30

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder that affects cognitive function and has been linked, both in patients and animal models, to dysfunction of the GABAergic system. However, the pathophysiological consequences of this dysfunction are not well understood. Here, we examined the GABAergic system in an animal model displaying schizophrenia-relevant features, the apomorphine-susceptible (APO-SUS) rat and its phenotypic counterpart, the apomorphine-unsusceptible (APO-UNSUS) rat at postnatal day 20-22. We found changes in the expression of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 specifically in the prelimbic- but not the infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), indicative of reduced inhibitory function in this region in APO-SUS rats. While we did not observe changes in basal synaptic transmission onto LII/III pyramidal cells in the mPFC of APO-SUS compared to APO-UNSUS rats, we report reduced paired-pulse ratios at longer inter-stimulus intervals. The GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845 abolished this reduction, indicating that the decreased paired-pulse ratio was caused by increased GABAB signaling. Consistently, we find an increased expression of the GABAB1 receptor subunit in APO-SUS rats. Our data provide physiological evidence for increased presynaptic GABAB signaling in the mPFC of APO-SUS rats, further supporting an important role for the GABAergic system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  13. Increased GABAB receptor signaling in a rat model for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Selten, Martijn M.; Meyer, Francisca; Ba, Wei; Vallès, Astrid; Maas, Dorien A.; Negwer, Moritz; Eijsink, Vivian D.; van Vugt, Ruben W. M.; van Hulten, Josephus A.; van Bakel, Nick H. M.; Roosen, Joey; van der Linden, Robert J.; Schubert, Dirk; Verheij, Michel M. M.; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Martens, Gerard J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder that affects cognitive function and has been linked, both in patients and animal models, to dysfunction of the GABAergic system. However, the pathophysiological consequences of this dysfunction are not well understood. Here, we examined the GABAergic system in an animal model displaying schizophrenia-relevant features, the apomorphine-susceptible (APO-SUS) rat and its phenotypic counterpart, the apomorphine-unsusceptible (APO-UNSUS) rat at postnatal day 20–22. We found changes in the expression of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 specifically in the prelimbic- but not the infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), indicative of reduced inhibitory function in this region in APO-SUS rats. While we did not observe changes in basal synaptic transmission onto LII/III pyramidal cells in the mPFC of APO-SUS compared to APO-UNSUS rats, we report reduced paired-pulse ratios at longer inter-stimulus intervals. The GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845 abolished this reduction, indicating that the decreased paired-pulse ratio was caused by increased GABAB signaling. Consistently, we find an increased expression of the GABAB1 receptor subunit in APO-SUS rats. Our data provide physiological evidence for increased presynaptic GABAB signaling in the mPFC of APO-SUS rats, further supporting an important role for the GABAergic system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:27687783

  14. Dissociation and trafficking of rat GABAB receptor heterodimer upon chronic capsaicin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Laffray, Sophie; Tan, Kelly; Dulluc, Josette; Bouali-Benazzouz, Rabia; Calver, Andrew R; Nagy, Frédéric; Landry, Marc

    2007-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABAB) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate GABAergic inhibition in the brain. Their functional expression is dependent upon the formation of heterodimers between GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits, a process that occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the mechanisms that regulate GABAB receptor oligomerization at the plasma membrane remain largely unknown. We first characterized the functional cytoarchitecture of an organotypic co-culture model of rat dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord. Subsequently, we studied the interactions between GABAB subunits after chronic stimulation of sensory fibres with capsaicin. Surface labelling of recombinant proteins showed a decrease in subunit co-localization and GABAB2 labelling, after capsaicin treatment. In these conditions, fluorescence lifetime imaging measurements further demonstrated a loss of interactions between green fluorescent protein-GABAB1b and t-dimer discosoma sp red fluorescent protein-GABAB2 subunits. Finally, we established that the GABAB receptor undergoes clathrin-dependent internalization and rapid recycling to the plasma membrane following activation with baclofen, a GABAB agonist. However, in cultures chronically stimulated with capsaicin, the agonist-induced endocytosis was decreased, reflecting changes in the dimeric state of the receptor. Taken together, our results indicate that the chronic stimulation of sensory fibres can dissociate the GABAB heterodimer and alters its responsiveness to the endogenous ligand. Chronic stimulation thus modulates receptor oligomerization, providing additional levels of control of signalling.

  15. Activation but not blockade of GABAB receptors during early-life alters anxiety in adulthood in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Fabian F; O'Leary, Olivia F; Cryan, John F

    2014-06-01

    Although the underlying pathophysiology of anxiety disorders is unknown it is clear that a combination of genetic and environmental factors in early life predispose to disease risk. Preclinical research increasingly suggests an important role for the GABAB receptor in modulating anxiety behaviour, with GABAB receptor deficient mice having increased anxiety behaviour. Previous studies have highlighted critical windows during development where adult anxiety behaviour is primed. However, little is known regarding the role played by the GABAB receptors in the developmental processes that underlie adult anxiety behaviour. To this end, we treated male BALB/c mouse pups with the either the selective GABAB receptor agonist, R-baclofen (2 mg/kg, s.c), the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432 (10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg) or vehicle from postnatal days (P) 14-28. The anxiety behaviour of these mice was then assessed in adulthood (P62 onwards) in a battery of behavioural tests comprising; the stress induced hyperthermia (SIH) test, defensive marble burying (DMB), elevated-plus maze (EPM) and the forced swim test (FST). Postnatal R-baclofen treatment resulted in increased anxiety-like behaviour in the EPM as shown by approach-avoidance and ethological measures. Other behavioural measures were not significantly altered. Interestingly, blockade of GABAB receptors with CGP52432 in early life caused no alterations in emotional behaviour. These data suggest that during early life GABAB receptor signalling can play a functional role in programing anxiety behaviour in adulthood. The underlying neurodevelopmental processes underlying these effects remain to be discovered.

  16. The role of GABAB receptors in human reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Ort, Andres; Kometer, Michael; Rohde, Judith; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-10-01

    Behavioral evidence from human studies suggests that the γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABAB receptor) agonist baclofen modulates reinforcement learning and reduces craving in patients with addiction spectrum disorders. However, in contrast to the well established role of dopamine in reinforcement learning, the mechanisms by which the GABAB receptor influences reinforcement learning in humans remain completely unknown. To further elucidate this issue, a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed in healthy human subjects (N=15) to test the effects of baclofen (20 and 50mg p.o.) on probabilistic reinforcement learning. Outcomes were the feedback-induced P2 component of the event-related potential, the feedback-related negativity, and the P300 component of the event-related potential. Baclofen produced a reduction of P2 amplitude over the course of the experiment, but did not modulate the feedback-related negativity. Furthermore, there was a trend towards increased learning after baclofen administration relative to placebo over the course of the experiment. The present results extend previous theories of reinforcement learning, which focus on the importance of mesolimbic dopamine signaling, and indicate that stimulation of cortical GABAB receptors in a fronto-parietal network leads to better attentional allocation in reinforcement learning. This observation is a first step in our understanding of how baclofen may improve reinforcement learning in healthy subjects. Further studies with bigger sample sizes are needed to corroborate this conclusion and furthermore, test this effect in patients with addiction spectrum disorder.

  17. GABA(B) receptors, schizophrenia and sleep dysfunction: a review of the relationship and its potential clinical and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Kantrowitz, Joshua; Citrome, Leslie; Javitt, Daniel

    2009-08-01

    Evidence for an intrinsic relationship between sleep, cognition and the symptomatic manifestations of schizophrenia is accumulating. This review presents evidence for the possible utility of GABA(B) receptor agonists for the treatment of subjective and objective sleep abnormalities related to schizophrenia. At the phenotypic level, sleep disturbance occurs in 16-30% of patients with schizophrenia and is related to reduced quality of life and poor coping skills. On the neurophysiological level, studies suggest that sleep deficits reflect a core component of schizophrenia. Specifically, slow-wave sleep deficits, which are inversely correlated with cognition scores, are seen. Moreover, sleep plays an increasingly well documented role in memory consolidation in schizophrenia. Correlations of slow-wave sleep deficits with impaired reaction time and declarative memory have also been reported. Thus, both behavioural insomnia and sleep architecture are critical therapeutic targets in patients with schizophrenia. However, long-term treatment with antipsychotics often results in residual sleep dysfunction and does not improve slow-wave sleep, and adjunctive GABA(A) receptor modulators, such as benzodiazepines and zolpidem, can impair sleep architecture and cognition in schizophrenia. GABA(B) receptor agonists have therapeutic potential in schizophrenia. These agents have minimal effect on rapid eye movement sleep while increasing slow-wave sleep. Preclinical associations with increased expression of genes related to slow-wave sleep production and circadian rhythm function have also been reported. GABA(B) receptor deficits result in a sustained hyperdopaminergic state and can be reversed by a GABA(B) receptor agonist. Genetic, postmortem and electrophysiological studies also associate GABA(B) receptors with schizophrenia. While studies thus far have not shown significant effects, prior focus on the use of GABA(B) receptor agonists has been on the positive symptoms of

  18. Discriminative stimulus effects of the GABAB receptor-positive modulator rac-BHFF: comparison with GABAB receptor agonists and drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Koek, Wouter; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C

    2013-03-01

    GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators are thought to have advantages as potential medications for anxiety, depression, and drug addiction. They may have fewer side effects than GABA(B) receptor agonists, because selective enhancement of activated receptors could have effects different from nonselective activation of all receptors. To examine this, pigeons were trained to discriminate the GABA(B) receptor-positive modulator (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF) from its vehicle. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not mimicked by the GABA(B) receptor agonists baclofen and γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), not by diazepam, and not by alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine, whose self-administration has been reported to be attenuated by GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not antagonized by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl (diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348) but were attenuated by the less efficacious GABA(B) receptor-positive modulator 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl)phenol (CGP7930), suggesting the possibility that rac-BHFF produces its discriminative stimulus effects by directly activating GABA(B2) subunits of GABA(B) receptors. At a dose 10-fold lower than the training dose, rac-BHFF enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. This study provides evidence that the effects of GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators are not identical to those of GABA(B) receptor agonists. In addition, the results suggest that positive modulation of GABA(B) receptors does not produce discriminative stimulus effects similar to those of benzodiazepines, alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine. Finally, the finding that rac-BHFF enhanced effects of baclofen but not of GHB is consistent with converging evidence that the populations of GABA(B) receptors mediating the effects of baclofen and GHB are not identical.

  19. GABAB1 and GABAB2 receptor subunits co-expressed in cultured human RPE cells regulate intracellular Ca2+ via Gi/o-protein and phospholipase C pathways.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z-Y; Wang, X-P; Schmid, K L; Han, X-G

    2014-11-07

    GABAB receptors associate with Gi/o-proteins that regulate voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and thus the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), there is also reported cross-regulation of phospholipase C. These associations have been studied extensively in the brain and also shown to occur in non-neural cells (e.g. human airway smooth muscle). More recently GABAB receptors have been observed in chick retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The aims were to investigate whether the GABAB receptor subunits, GABAB1 and GABAB2, are co-expressed in cultured human RPE cells, and then determine if the GABAB receptor similarly regulates the [Ca(2+)]i of RPE cells and if phospholipase C is involved. Human RPE cells were cultured from five donor eye cups. Evidence for GABAB1 and GABAB2 mRNAs and proteins in the RPE cell cultures was investigated using real time polymerase chain reaction, western blots and immunofluorescence. The effects of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen, antagonist CGP46381, a Gi/o-protein inhibitor pertussis toxin, and the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 on [Ca(2+)]i in cultured human RPE were demonstrated using Fluo-3. Both GABAB1 and GABAB2 mRNA and protein were identified in cell cultures of human RPE; antibody staining was co-localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm. One-hundred micromolars of baclofen caused a transient increase in the [Ca(2+)]i of RPE cells regardless of whether Ca(2+) was added to the buffer. Baclofen-induced increases in the [Ca(2+)]i were attenuated by pre-treatment with CGP46381, pertussis toxin, and U73122. GABAB1 and GABAB2 are co-expressed in cell cultures of human RPE. GABAB receptors in RPE regulate the [Ca(2+)]i via a Gi/o-protein and phospholipase C pathway. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ethanol potentiation of GABAergic synaptic transmission may be self-limiting: role of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors.

    PubMed

    Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Weiner, Jeffrey L

    2004-11-24

    Ethanol enhances GABAergic synaptic inhibition, and this interaction contributes to many of the behavioral and cognitive effects of this drug. Most studies suggest that ethanol enhances GABAergic neurotransmission via an allosteric potentiation of the postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors that mediate fast synaptic inhibition in the mammalian CNS. Despite widespread acceptance of this hypothesis, direct support for such a mechanism has been difficult to obtain. Ethanol does not enhance GABA(A) receptor function in all brain regions or under all experimental conditions, and factors responsible for this variability remain mostly unknown. Notably, blockade of GABA(B) receptors dramatically enhances ethanol potentiation of hippocampal GABA(A) IPSPs and IPSCs, suggesting that some unknown GABA(B) receptor mechanism limits the overall potentiating effect of ethanol on GABAergic synapses. In this study, we demonstrate that, at perisomatic synapses in the rat hippocampus, ethanol enhances presynaptic GABA(B) autoreceptor function and that this interaction reduces the overall potentiating effect of ethanol at these synapses. We further show that ethanol significantly elevates basal presynaptic GABA(B) receptor tone, possibly via an increase in spontaneous GABA release, and that pretreatment with a subthreshold concentration of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen blocks ethanol but not flunitrazepam or pentobarbital potentiation of GABA(A) IPSCs. These data suggest that an interaction between ethanol and presynaptic GABA(B) autoreceptor activity regulates the ethanol sensitivity of GABAergic synapses. Given that the in vitro ethanol sensitivity of these synapses correlates with in vivo ethanol responsiveness in a number of rodent lines, our data further suggest that presynaptic GABA(B) receptor activity may play a role in regulating behavioral sensitivity to ethanol.

  1. Ischaemia differentially regulates GABAB receptor subunits in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cimarosti, Helena; Kantamneni, Sriharsha; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    Reduced synaptic inhibition due to dysfunction of ionotropic GABAA receptors has been proposed as one factor in cerebral ischaemia-induced excitotoxic cell death. However, the participation of the inhibitory metabotropic GABAB receptors in these pathological processes has not been extensively investigated. We used oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) and NMDA-induced excitotoxicity as models to investigate whether ischaemia-like challenges alter the protein levels of GABAB1 and GABAB2 receptor subunits in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Twenty-four hours after the insult both OGD and NMDA produced a marked decrease in the total levels of GABAB2 (~75%), while there was no significant change in the levels of GABAB1 after OGD, but an increase after NMDA treatment (~100%). The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (100 μM) was neuroprotective following OGD or NMDA treatment if added before or during the insult. GABAB receptors comprise heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits and our results suggest that the separate subunits are independently regulated in response to extreme neuronal stress. However, because GABAB2 is required for functional surface expression, down-regulation of this subunit removes an important inhibitory feedback mechanism under pathological conditions. PMID:19328818

  2. Phosphorylation and chronic agonist treatment atypically modulate GABAB receptor cell surface stability.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Pitcher, Julie A; Scott, Mark G H; Calver, Andrew R; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J; Couve, Andrés

    2004-03-26

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. The dynamic control of the cell surface stability of GABA(B) receptors is likely to be of fundamental importance in the modulation of receptor signaling. Presently, however, this process is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that GABA(B) receptors are remarkably stable at the plasma membrane showing little basal endocytosis in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. In addition, we show that exposure to baclofen, a well characterized GABA(B) receptor agonist, fails to enhance GABA(B) receptor endocytosis. Lack of receptor internalization in neurons correlates with an absence of agonist-induced phosphorylation and lack of arrestin recruitment in heterologous systems. We also demonstrate that chronic exposure to baclofen selectively promotes endocytosis-independent GABA(B) receptor degradation. The effect of baclofen can be attenuated by activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase or co-stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. Furthermore, we show that increased degradation rates are correlated with reduced receptor phosphorylation at serine 892 in GABA(B)R2. Our results support a model in which GABA(B)R2 phosphorylation specifically stabilizes surface GABA(B) receptors in neurons. We propose that signaling pathways that regulate cAMP levels in neurons may have profound effects on the tonic synaptic inhibition by modulating the availability of GABA(B) receptors.

  3. The C-terminal domains of the GABA(b) receptor subunits mediate intracellular trafficking but are not required for receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Calver, A R; Robbins, M J; Cosio, C; Rice, S Q; Babbs, A J; Hirst, W D; Boyfield, I; Wood, M D; Russell, R B; Price, G W; Couve, A; Moss, S J; Pangalos, M N

    2001-02-15

    GABA(B) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain and spinal cord. These receptors are heterodimers assembled from GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits, neither of which is capable of producing functional GABA(B) receptors on homomeric expression. GABA(B1,) although able to bind GABA, is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) when expressed alone. In contrast, GABA(B2) is able to access the cell surface when expressed alone but does not couple efficiently to the appropriate effector systems or produce any detectable GABA-binding sites. In the present study, we have constructed chimeric and truncated GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits to explore further GABA(B) receptor signaling and assembly. Removal of the entire C-terminal intracellular domain of GABA(B1) results in plasma membrane expression without the production of a functional GABA(B) receptor. However, coexpression of this truncated GABA(B1) subunit with either GABA(B2) or a truncated GABA(B2) subunit in which the C terminal has also been removed is capable of functional signaling via G-proteins. In contrast, transferring the entire C-terminal tail of GABA(B1) to GABA(B2) leads to the ER retention of the GABA(B2) subunit when expressed alone. These results indicate that the C terminal of GABA(B1) mediates the ER retention of this protein and that neither of the C-terminal tails of GABA(B1) or GABA(B2) is an absolute requirement for functional coupling of heteromeric receptors. Furthermore although GABA(B1) is capable of producing GABA-binding sites, GABA(B2) is of central importance in the functional coupling of heteromeric GABA(B) receptors to G-proteins and the subsequent activation of effector systems.

  4. [Calcium current and GABA(B) receptors in dorsal sensory cells of the lamprey spinal cord].

    PubMed

    Batueva, I V; Buchanan, J T; Tsvetkov, E A; Sagatelian, A K; Veselkin, N P

    1997-01-01

    GABA and GABAB receptor agonists were shown to reduce the peak calcium current amplitude with its subsequent recovery, whereas glycine and taurine, the GABAA receptor agonists, did not modify the current. The findings suggest that the GABAB receptors mediate a presynaptic inhibition by suppression of the Calcium currents in the cyclostome spinal cord.

  5. GABA acting on GABAB receptors located in a medullary pain facilitatory area enhances nociceptive behaviors evoked by intraplantar formalin injection.

    PubMed

    Martins, Isabel; Carvalho, Paulina; de Vries, Martin G; Teixeira-Pinto, Armando; Wilson, Steven P; Westerink, Ben H C; Tavares, Isaura

    2015-08-01

    The dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt) plays a key role in facilitation of nociceptive transmission at the spinal cord. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms involved in GABA-mediated control of the DRt focusing on the role of local GABAB receptors. First, we used in vivo microdialysis to study the release of GABA in the DRt during the course of the formalin test. An increase of GABA levels in comparison with baseline values was detected in the second phase of the test. Because we previously showed that GABAB receptors are expressed by opioidergic DRt neurons, which respond to nociceptive stimuli and inhibit spinally projecting DRt neurons involved in descending pronociception, we then interfered with local GABAB receptors using gene transfer and pharmacological approaches. Lentiviral-mediated knockdown of GABAB1a expression decreased nociceptive responses during the second phase of the test. Local administration of the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 also decreased nociceptive responses in the second phase of the test, whereas the opposite was detected after injection of the GABAB agonist baclofen. Finally, we determined the GABAergic afferents of the DRt, namely those arising from its main brain afferents, which are located at the telencephalon and diencephalon. For that purpose, we combined retrograde tract-tracing from the DRt with immunodetection of glutamate decarboxylase, the GABA-synthesizing enzyme. The higher numbers of retrogradely labelled glutamate decarboxylase-immunoreactive neurons were located at insular, somatosensory, and motor cortices. Collectively, the results suggest that GABA acting on GABAB receptors may enhance pain facilitation from the DRt during inflammatory pain.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a novel GABAB-related G-protein coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Calver, A R; Michalovich, D; Testa, T T; Robbins, M J; Jaillard, C; Hill, J; Szekeres, P G; Charles, K J; Jourdain, S; Holbrook, J D; Boyfield, I; Patel, N; Medhurst, A D; Pangalos, M N

    2003-02-20

    Using a homology-based bioinformatics approach we have analysed human genomic sequence and identified the human and rodent orthologues of a novel putative seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptor, termed GABA(BL). The amino acid sequence homology of these cDNAs compared to GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) led us to postulate that GABA(BL) was a putative novel GABA(B) receptor subunit. The C-terminal sequence of GABA(BL) contained a putative coiled-coil domain, di-leucine and several RXR(R) ER retention motifs, all of which have been shown to be critical in GABA(B) receptor subunit function. In addition, the distribution of GABA(BL) in the central nervous system was reminiscent of that of the other known GABA(B) subunits. However, we were unable to detect receptor function in response to any GABA(B) ligands when GABA(BL) was expressed in isolation or in the presence of either GABA(B1) or GABA(B2). Therefore, if GABA(BL) is indeed a GABA(B) receptor subunit, its partner is a potentially novel receptor subunit or chaperone protein which has yet to be identified.

  7. Identifying the role of pre-and postsynaptic GABAB receptors in behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, Chelsea R.; Boehm, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Although many reviews exist characterizing the molecular differences of GABAB receptor isoforms, there is no current review of the in vivo effects of these isoforms. The current review focuses on whether the GABAB1a and GABAB1b isoforms contribute differentially to behaviors in isoform knockout mice. The roles of these receptors have primarily been characterized in cognitive, anxiety, and depressive phenotypes. Currently, the field supports a role of GABAB1a in memory maintenance and protection against an anhedonic phenotype, whereas GABAB1b appears to be involved in memory formation and a susceptibility to developing an anhedonic phenotype. Although GABAB receptors have been strongly implicated in drug abuse phenotypes, no isoform-specific work has been done in this field. Future directions include developing site-specific isoform knockdown to identify the role of different brain regions in behavior, as well as identifying how these isoforms are involved in development of behavioral phenotypes. PMID:26283074

  8. The effects of intraperitoneal and intracerebroventricular administration of the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 on food intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunit M; Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2004-10-25

    In order to test the hypothesis that endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), acting at central GABAB receptors, plays a physiological role in the control of feeding behaviour, it was reasoned that blocking these receptors with a centrally active GABAB receptor antagonist should reduce food intake in hungry rats. In the present study, experiments were carried out to test this possibility using the GABAB receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl-diethoxy-methyl-phosphinic acid (CGP 35348), which is water-soluble and can penetrate the blood-brain barrier from the systemic circulation. CGP 35348 (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) had no effect on food intake in 22-h fasted rats, but a higher dose (i.e. 500 mg/kg., i.p.) significantly reduced cumulative food consumption. These findings are consistent with previous observations that high systemic doses of CGP 35348 are needed to block central GABAB receptors. However, to eliminate the possibility that the 500 mg/kg dose of CGP 35348 decreased food intake by a peripheral, rather than a central mode of action, further experiments were undertaken where the drug was given directly into the brain by the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) route. I.c.v. administration of CGP 35348 (5 and 10 microg) significantly decreased cumulative food intake food intake in rats that had been fasted for 22 h. By contrast, i.c.v. administration of CGP 35348 (10 microg) had no effect on water intake in 16-h water-deprived rats. The results indicate that CGP 35348 reduces food consumption in hungry rats by blocking central GABAB receptors in a behaviourally specific manner. These findings suggest that endogenous GABA acting at central GABAB receptors plays a physiological role in the regulation of feeding behaviour.

  9. Transient Activation of GABAB Receptors Suppresses SK Channel Currents in Substantia Nigra Pars Compacta Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Estep, Chad M.; Galtieri, Daniel J.; Zampese, Enrico; Goldberg, Joshua A.; Brichta, Lars; Greengard, Paul; Surmeier, D. James

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) are richly innervated by GABAergic neurons. The postsynaptic effects of GABA on SNc DA neurons are mediated by a mixture of GABAA and GABAB receptors. Although activation of GABAA receptors inhibits spike generation, the consequences of GABAB receptor activation are less well characterized. To help fill this gap, perforated patch recordings were made from young adult mouse SNc DA neurons. Sustained stimulation of GABAB receptors hyperpolarized SNc DA neurons, as previously described. However, transient stimulation of GABAB receptors by optical uncaging of GABA did not; rather, it reduced the opening of small-conductance, calcium-activated K+ (SK) channels and increased the irregularity of spiking. This modulation was attributable to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A. Thus, because suppression of SK channel activity increases the probability of burst spiking, transient co-activation of GABAA and GABAB receptors could promote a pause-burst pattern of spiking. PMID:28036359

  10. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Regulate Hippocampal Synapses during Associative Learning in Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-Parras, M. Teresa; Delgado-García, José M.; Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    GABAB receptors are the G-protein-coupled receptors for GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Pharmacological activation of GABAB receptors regulates neurotransmission and neuronal excitability at pre- and postsynaptic sites. Electrophysiological activation of GABAB receptors in brain slices generally requires strong stimulus intensities. This raises the question as to whether behavioral stimuli are strong enough to activate GABAB receptors. Here we show that GABAB1a-/- mice, which constitutively lack presynaptic GABAB receptors at glutamatergic synapses, are impaired in their ability to acquire an operant learning task. In vivo recordings during the operant conditioning reveal a deficit in learning-dependent increases in synaptic strength at CA3-CA1 synapses. Moreover, GABAB1a-/- mice fail to synchronize neuronal activity in the CA1 area during the acquisition process. Our results support that activation of presynaptic hippocampal GABAB receptors is important for acquisition of a learning task and for learning-associated synaptic changes and network dynamics. PMID:26848590

  11. Repeated administration of desipramine and a GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP 36742, discretely up-regulates GABAB receptor binding sites in rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, G. D.; Bowery, N. G.

    1993-01-01

    1. GABAB receptor binding site densities within laminar regions of the rat frontal cortex were examined autoradiographically following repeated administration (21 days) of the antidepressants desipramine, paroxetine and amitriptyline in addition to the GABAB receptor antagonists, CGP 35348 and CGP 36742. beta 1-Adrenoceptor autoradiography was studied in parallel with that for GABAB receptor sites. 2. The effects of these compounds were examined concomitantly on the GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin- and enhancement of noradrenaline-stimulated cyclic AMP production. 3. GABAB receptor binding was increased by both desipramine (20 mg kg-1, p.o. and 10 mg kg-1, i.p.) and CGP 36742 (100 mg kg-1, i.p.) in the outer laminar region of the frontal cortex by around 50% above control levels. Conversely, no significant changes were mediated by paroxetine, amitriptyline, CGP 35348 or the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen. 4. With the exception of paroxetine, all compounds down-regulated the total beta-adrenoceptor population throughout frontal cortical laminae which was attributable to the beta 1-adrenoceptor subtype. In contrast, the reduction in beta-adrenoceptors mediated by CGP 35348 and CGP 36742 did not occur as a consequence of reduced beta 1-adrenoceptor numbers. 5. Protracted treatment with CGP 35348, failed to influence forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production; however, a significant increase in the accumulation of cyclic AMP produced in response to forskolin was seen after treatment with CGP 36742. 6. Such discretely localized changes in GABAB receptor densities induced by desipramine and CGP 36742 may provide an explanation for the discrepancies reported in membrane binding studies and possibly implicate a role for GABAB receptor antagonists in antidepressant therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8242244

  12. Cockroach GABAB receptor subtypes: molecular characterization, pharmacological properties and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Blankenburg, S; Balfanz, S; Hayashi, Y; Shigenobu, S; Miura, T; Baumann, O; Baumann, A; Blenau, W

    2015-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the predominant inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Its effects are mediated by either ionotropic GABAA receptors or metabotropic GABAB receptors. GABAB receptors regulate, via Gi/o G-proteins, ion channels, and adenylyl cyclases. In humans, GABAB receptor subtypes are involved in the etiology of neurologic and psychiatric disorders. In arthropods, however, these members of the G-protein-coupled receptor family are only inadequately characterized. Interestingly, physiological data have revealed important functions of GABAB receptors in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. We have cloned cDNAs coding for putative GABAB receptor subtypes 1 and 2 of P. americana (PeaGB1 and PeaGB2). When both receptor proteins are co-expressed in mammalian cells, activation of the receptor heteromer with GABA leads to a dose-dependent decrease in cAMP production. The pharmacological profile differs from that of mammalian and Drosophila GABAB receptors. Western blot analyses with polyclonal antibodies have revealed the expression of PeaGB1 and PeaGB2 in the CNS of the American cockroach. In addition to the widespread distribution in the brain, PeaGB1 is expressed in salivary glands and male accessory glands. Notably, PeaGB1-like immunoreactivity has been detected in the GABAergic salivary neuron 2, suggesting that GABAB receptors act as autoreceptors in this neuron.

  13. GABAB receptors as drug targets to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Anders

    2009-06-01

    For many years, acid-suppressive therapy has been at the forefront of treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), yet despite the advent of the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) some patients continue to experience persistent GERD symptoms. Therapeutic (non-surgical) options for such patients are currently limited. To tackle this clinical issue, research efforts have begun to focus on 'reflux inhibition' as a potential therapeutic target - i.e. inhibition of transient lower esophageal relaxations (TLESRs), the predominant mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux. Preclinical research has identified a number of drug targets through which TLESRs can be modulated, and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type B (GABA(B)) receptor has emerged as one of the most promising. Studies with baclofen, a well-known agonist of this receptor, have demonstrated that reflux inhibition is a valid concept in the clinical setting in that reducing the incidence of TLESRs improves GERD symptoms. But baclofen is associated with significant central nervous system (CNS) side effects, rendering it undesirable for use as a treatment for GERD. Further development work has yielded a number of novel GABA(B) receptor agonists with reduced CNS side effect profiles, and clinical trials are currently being performed with several agents. Compounds that target TLESRs may therefore present a new add-on treatment for patients with persistent GERD symptoms despite PPI therapy.

  14. The Role of GABAB Receptors in Morphine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ramshini, Effat; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Reisi, Parham; Alaei, Samaneh; Shahidani, Somaye

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is only little information about the effects of GABA receptors agonist and antagonist on morphine self-administration. Present study was designed to assess role of GABAB receptors in the regulation of morphine-reinforced self-administration. Methods: This study was performed in four groups of rats: (1) Saline group, which received saline in the self-administration session. (2) Morphine group, which received morphine in saline solution in the self-administration session. (3) Baclofen + Morphine group, which received both baclofen 20 min before self- administration test and morphine in the self-administration session. (4) Phaclofen + Morphine group, which received both phaclofen 20 min before self- administration test and morphine in the self-administration session. The number of lever pressing and self-infusion were recorded. Results: Morphine significantly increased the number of active lever pressing dose dependently in self-administration session in comparative with saline group. Administration of baclofen, 20 min before morphine self-administration produced significant decrease in the initiation of morphine self-administration during all session. Conversely, pre-treatment of phaclofen increased the number of active lever pressing and self-infusion in this test. Conclusion: Our results indicated a short-term treatment by baclofen, reduced morphine-maintenance response in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that GABAB receptor agonists could be useful for reversing the neuroadaptations related to opiates. PMID:23542877

  15. GABA-B receptor activation and conflict behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelaars, C.E.J.; Bollen, E.L.; Rigter, H.; Bruinvels, J.

    1988-01-01

    Baclofen and oxazepam enhance extinction of conflict behavior in the Geller-Seifter test while baclofen and diazepam release punished behavior in Vogel's conflict test. In order to investigate the possibility that the effect of the selective GABA-B receptor agonist baclofen is mediated indirectly via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex, the effect of pretreatment of rats with baclofen on (/sup 3/H)-diazepam binding to washed and unwashed cortical and cerebellar membranes of rats has been studied. Baclofen pretreatment increase Bmax in washed cerebellar membranes when bicuculline was present in the incubation mixture. No effect was seen in cortical membranes. The present results render it unlikely that the effect of baclofen on extinction of conflict behavior and punished drinking is mediated via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex. 50 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  16. GABAB receptor upregulates fragile X mental retardation protein expression in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhua; Xu, Chanjuan; Tu, Haijun; Wang, Yunyun; Sun, Qian; Hu, Ping; Hu, Yongjian; Rondard, Philippe; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein important for the control of translation and synaptic function. The mutation or silencing of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), which leads to intellectual disability and social impairment. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the mammalian central nervous system, and its metabotropic GABAB receptor has been implicated in various mental disorders. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen has been shown to improve FXS symptoms in a mouse model and in human patients, but the signaling events linking the GABAB receptor and FMRP are unknown. In this study, we found that GABAB receptor activation upregulated cAMP response element binding protein-dependent Fmrp expression in cultured mouse cerebellar granule neurons via two distinct mechanisms: the transactivation of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and activation of protein kinase C. In addition, a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, CGP7930, stimulated Fmrp expression in neurons. These results suggest a role for GABAB receptor in Fmrp regulation and a potential interest of GABAB receptor signaling in FXS improvement. PMID:26020477

  17. GABAB receptor upregulates fragile X mental retardation protein expression in neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhua; Xu, Chanjuan; Tu, Haijun; Wang, Yunyun; Sun, Qian; Hu, Ping; Hu, Yongjian; Rondard, Philippe; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-05-28

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein important for the control of translation and synaptic function. The mutation or silencing of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), which leads to intellectual disability and social impairment. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the mammalian central nervous system, and its metabotropic GABAB receptor has been implicated in various mental disorders. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen has been shown to improve FXS symptoms in a mouse model and in human patients, but the signaling events linking the GABAB receptor and FMRP are unknown. In this study, we found that GABAB receptor activation upregulated cAMP response element binding protein-dependent Fmrp expression in cultured mouse cerebellar granule neurons via two distinct mechanisms: the transactivation of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and activation of protein kinase C. In addition, a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, CGP7930, stimulated Fmrp expression in neurons. These results suggest a role for GABAB receptor in Fmrp regulation and a potential interest of GABAB receptor signaling in FXS improvement.

  18. GABAB receptor agonist baclofen improves methamphetamine-induced cognitive deficit in mice.

    PubMed

    Arai, Sawako; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Ibi, Daisuke; Nagai, Taku; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2009-01-05

    In this study, we investigated the effects of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor agonists on the methamphetamine-induced impairment of recognition memory in mice. Repeated treatment with methamphetamine at a dose of 1 mg/kg for 7 days induced an impairment of recognition memory. Baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist, ameliorated the repeated methamphetamine-induced cognitive impairment, although gaboxadol, a GABA(A) receptor agonist, had no significant effect. GABA(B) receptors may constitute a putative new target in treating cognitive deficits in patients suffering from schizophrenia, as well as methamphetamine psychosis.

  19. Expression of a GABAB - Receptor in Olfactory Sensory Neurons of Sensilla trichodea on the Male Antenna of the Moth Heliothis virescens

    PubMed Central

    Pregitzer, Pablo; Schultze, Anna; Raming, Klaus; Breer, Heinz; Krieger, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    In the olfactory pathway of Drosophila, a GABAB receptor mediated presynaptic gain control mechanism at the first synapse between olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and projection neurons has been suggested to play a critical role in setting the sensitivity and detection range of the sensory system. To approach the question if such a mechanism may be realized in the pheromone recognition system of male moths in this study attempts were made to explore if moth's pheromone-responsive cells express a GABAB- receptor. Employing a combination of genome analysis, RT-PCR experiments and screening of an antennal cDNA library we have identified a cDNA which encodes the GABAB-R1 receptor of Heliothis virescens. Moreover, based on the HvirGABAB-R1 sequence we could predict a GABAB-R1 protein from genome sequences of the silkmoth Bombyx mori. To assess whether HvirGABAB-R1 is expressed in OSNs of male antenna we performed whole-mount in situ hybridization (WM-ISH) experiments. Several HvirGABAB-R1 positive cells were visualized under long sensilla trichodea, known to contain pheromone-responsive OSNs. In parallel it was shown that cells under long trichoid hairs were labelled with pheromone receptor specific probes. In addition, the HvirGABAB-R1 specific probe also labelled several cells under shorter olfactory sensilla, but never stained cells under mechanosensory/gustatory sensilla chaetica. Together, the results indicate that a GABAB receptor is expressed in pheromone-responsive OSNs of H. virescens and suggest a presynaptic gain control mechanism in the axon terminals of these cells. PMID:23904795

  20. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABAB receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Warren, Noel; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen; Cooper, Edward; Smart, Trevor G.; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Moss., Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly-rectifying K+ channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca2+ channels. We demonstrate here that GABAB receptors are intimately associated with 5’AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5’AMP concentration caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia or ischemia. AMPK binds the R1 subunit and directly phosphorylates S783 in the R2 subunit to enhance GABAB receptor activation of GIRKs. Phosphorylation of S783 is evident in many brain regions, and is increased dramatically after ischemic injury. Finally we also reveal that S783 plays a critical role in enhancing neuronal survival after ischemia. Together our results provide evidence of a novel neuroprotective mechanism, which under conditions of metabolic stress or after ischemia increases GABAB receptor function to reduce excitotoxicity and thereby promoting neuronal survival. PMID:17224405

  1. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABA(B) receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Warren, Noel; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen; Cooper, Edward; Smart, Trevor G; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2007-01-18

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca(2+) channels. We demonstrate here that GABA(B) receptors are intimately associated with 5'AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5'AMP concentration that are caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia, or ischemia. AMPK binds the R1 subunit and directly phosphorylates S783 in the R2 subunit to enhance GABA(B) receptor activation of GIRKs. Phosphorylation of S783 is evident in many brain regions, and is increased dramatically after ischemic injury. Finally, we also reveal that S783 plays a critical role in enhancing neuronal survival after ischemia. Together our results provide evidence of a neuroprotective mechanism, which, under conditions of metabolic stress or after ischemia, increases GABA(B) receptor function to reduce excitotoxicity and thereby promotes neuronal survival.

  2. Role of GABAB receptors in autonomic control of systemic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Pei; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2010-01-01

    GABA(B) receptors belong to family III G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and are widely distributed in the peripheral and central nervous systems. The GABA(B) receptor is one of the most important therapeutic targets in the treatment for spasticity. GABA(B) agonists, such as baclofen, are used as muscle relaxants clinically and are effective for the treatment of anxiety, depression, epilepsy, and cognitive disorders (Caddick & Hosford, 1996; Dichter, 1997; Enna & Bowery, 1997). In addition, GABA(B) receptors regulate neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability in the brain regions involved in the autonomic nervous system. Recent studies have led to a better understanding of the role of GABA(B) in the regulation of the autonomic nervous system, especially in disease conditions such as hypertension. Here, we provide an overview of the recent progress, a discussion of disparate and contradictory findings, and a description of theories used to explain various cardiovascular effects of GABA(B) receptor drugs. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of GABA(B) receptors in the neural plasticity of brain regions related to the control of sympathetic outflow in cardiovascular disorders. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. GABA-B receptor activation inhibits the in vitro migration of malignant hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lodewyks, Carly; Rodriguez, Jose; Yan, Jing; Lerner, Betty; Lipschitz, Jeremy; Nfon, Charles; Rempel, Julia Darlene; Uhanova, Julia; Minuk, Gerald Yosel

    2011-06-01

    There are conflicting data regarding whether activation of γ-aminobutyric acid-B (GABA-B) receptors results in inhibition of tumor growth and invasion. The objectives of this study were to document the effects of the GABA-B receptor agonist baclofen on malignant hepatocyte proliferation and migration. We also sought to determine whether any effects on cell migration were mediated by changes in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling or matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Finally, GABA-B(1) and -B(2) receptor expression was documented in 2 malignant hepatocyte cell lines (PLC/PRF/5 and Huh-7) and 12 sets of human hepatocellular carcinoma and adjacent nontumor tissues. Cell proliferative activity was documented by WST-1 absorbance, migration by wound healing assays, cAMP levels by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), MMP by immunohistochemistry and ELISA, and GABA-B receptor expression by flow cytometry and reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction. Although baclofen had no effect on cell proliferation, wound healing was delayed, an effect that was reversed by the GABA-B receptor antagonist CGP. cAMP levels were decreased in Huh-7 but not PLC cells exposed to baclofen. MMP expression remained unaltered in both cell lines. Finally, GABA-B(1) receptor expression was present and consistently expressed, but GABA-B(2) expression was limited and varied with the number of cell passages and (or) duration of culture. In conclusion, activation of GABA-B receptors has no effect on malignant hepatocyte proliferation but does decrease cell migration. This inhibitory effect may involve cAMP signaling but not MMP expression. GABA-B(2) receptor expression is limited and variable, which may help to explain discrepancies with previously published results.

  4. Impairment of GABAB receptor dimer by endogenous 14-3-3ζ in chronic pain conditions

    PubMed Central

    Laffray, Sophie; Bouali-Benazzouz, Rabia; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Favereaux, Alexandre; Jiang, Yang; Holm, Tina; Spriet, Corentin; Desbarats, Pascal; Fossat, Pascal; Le Feuvre, Yves; Decossas, Marion; Héliot, Laurent; Langel, Ulo; Nagy, Frédéric; Landry, Marc

    2012-01-01

    In the central nervous system, the inhibitory GABAB receptor is the archetype of heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, the regulation of GABAB dimerization, and more generally of GPCR oligomerization, remains largely unknown. We propose a novel mechanism for inhibition of GPCR activity through de-dimerization in pathological conditions. We show here that 14-3-3ζ, a GABAB1-binding protein, dissociates the GABAB heterodimer, resulting in the impairment of GABAB signalling in spinal neurons. In the dorsal spinal cord of neuropathic rats, 14-3-3ζ is overexpressed and weakens GABAB inhibition. Using anti-14-3-3ζ siRNA or competing peptides disrupts 14-3-3ζ/GABAB1 interaction and restores functional GABAB heterodimers in the dorsal horn. Importantly, both strategies greatly enhance the anti-nociceptive effect of intrathecal Baclofen in neuropathic rats. Taken together, our data provide the first example of endogenous regulation of a GPCR oligomeric state and demonstrate its functional impact on the pathophysiological process of neuropathic pain sensitization. PMID:22692127

  5. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Decrease Neurotransmitter Release in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons During Vestibular Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Mei; Reddaway, Rebecca; Hirsch, June C.; Peusner, Kenna D.

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral damage to the peripheral vestibular receptors precipitates a debilitating syndrome of oculomotor and balance deficits at rest, which extensively normalize during the first week after the lesion due to vestibular compensation. In vivo studies suggest that GABAB receptor activation facilitates recovery. However, the presynaptic or postsynaptic sites of action of GABAB receptors in vestibular nuclei neurons after lesions have not been determined. Accordingly, here presynaptic and postsynaptic GABAB receptor activity in principal cells of the tangential nucleus, a major avian vestibular nucleus, was investigated using patch-clamp recordings correlated with immunolabeling and confocal imaging of the GABAB receptor subunit-2 (GABABR2) in controls and operated chickens shortly after unilateral vestibular ganglionectomy (UVG). Baclofen, a GABAB agonist, generated no postsynaptic currents in principal cells in controls, which correlated with weak GABABR2 immunolabeling on principal cell surfaces. However, baclofen decreased miniature excitatory (mEPSC) and GABAergic inhibitory (mIPSC) events in principal cells in controls, compensating and uncompensated chickens three days after UVG, indicating the presence of functional GABAB receptors on presynaptic terminals. Baclofen decreased GABAergic mIPSC frequency to the greatest extent in principal cells on the intact side of compensating chickens, with concurrent increases in GABABR2 pixel brightness and percentage overlap in synaptotagmin2 (Syt2)-labeled terminals. In uncompensated chickens, baclofen decreased mEPSC frequency to the greatest extent in principal cells on the intact side, with concurrent increases in GABABR2 pixel brightness and percentage overlap in Syt1-labeled terminals. Altogether, these results revealed changes in presynaptic GABAB receptor function and expression which differed in compensating and uncompensated chickens shortly after UVG. This work supports an important role for GABAB autoreceptor

  6. Decreased GABAB receptor function in the cerebellum and brain stem of hypoxic neonatal rats: role of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anju, Thoppil R; Jayanarayanan, Sadanandan; Paulose, Cheramadatikudiyil S

    2011-05-12

    Hypoxia during the first week of life can induce neuronal death in vulnerable brain regions usually associated with an impairment of cognitive function that can be detected later in life. The neurobiological changes mediated through neurotransmitters and other signaling molecules associated with neonatal hypoxia are an important aspect in establishing a proper neonatal care. The present study evaluated total GABA, GABAB receptor alterations, gene expression changes in GABAB receptor and glutamate decarboxylase in the cerebellum and brain stem of hypoxic neonatal rats and the resuscitation groups with glucose, oxygen and epinephrine. Radiolabelled GABA and baclofen were used for receptor studies of GABA and GABAB receptors respectively and Real Time PCR analysis using specific probes for GABAB receptor and GAD mRNA was done for gene expression studies. The adaptive response of the body to hypoxic stress resulted in a reduction in total GABA and GABAB receptors along with decreased GABAB receptor and GAD gene expression in the cerebellum and brain stem. Hypoxic rats supplemented with glucose alone and with oxygen showed a reversal of the receptor alterations and changes in GAD. Resuscitation with oxygen alone and epinephrine was less effective in reversing the receptor alterations. Being a source of immediate energy, glucose can reduce the ATP-depletion-induced changes in GABA and oxygenation, which helps in encountering hypoxia. The present study suggests that reduction in the GABAB receptors functional regulation during hypoxia plays an important role in central nervous system damage. Resuscitation with glucose alone and glucose and oxygen to hypoxic neonatal rats helps in protecting the brain from severe hypoxic damage.

  7. Decreased GABAB receptor function in the cerebellum and brain stem of hypoxic neonatal rats: Role of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background- Hypoxia during the first week of life can induce neuronal death in vulnerable brain regions usually associated with an impairment of cognitive function that can be detected later in life. The neurobiological changes mediated through neurotransmitters and other signaling molecules associated with neonatal hypoxia are an important aspect in establishing a proper neonatal care. Methods- The present study evaluated total GABA, GABAB receptor alterations, gene expression changes in GABAB receptor and glutamate decarboxylase in the cerebellum and brain stem of hypoxic neonatal rats and the resuscitation groups with glucose, oxygen and epinephrine. Radiolabelled GABA and baclofen were used for receptor studies of GABA and GABAB receptors respectively and Real Time PCR analysis using specific probes for GABAB receptor and GAD mRNA was done for gene expression studies. Results- The adaptive response of the body to hypoxic stress resulted in a reduction in total GABA and GABAB receptors along with decreased GABAB receptor and GAD gene expression in the cerebellum and brain stem. Hypoxic rats supplemented with glucose alone and with oxygen showed a reversal of the receptor alterations and changes in GAD. Resuscitation with oxygen alone and epinephrine was less effective in reversing the receptor alterations. Conclusions- Being a source of immediate energy, glucose can reduce the ATP-depletion-induced changes in GABA and oxygenation, which helps in encountering hypoxia. The present study suggests that reduction in the GABAB receptors functional regulation during hypoxia plays an important role in central nervous system damage. Resuscitation with glucose alone and glucose and oxygen to hypoxic neonatal rats helps in protecting the brain from severe hypoxic damage. PMID:21569387

  8. In vivo blockade of thalamic GABA(B) receptors increases excitatory amino-acid levels.

    PubMed

    Nyitrai, G; Emri, Z; Crunelli, V; Kékesi, K A; Dobolyi, A; Juhász, G

    1996-12-30

    The effect of intrathalamic application of GABA(B) receptor antagonists on the basal excitatory amino-acid levels was studied using microdialysis probes implanted in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus and in the ventrobasal complex. In both nuclei, continuous perfusion of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl-(diethoxymethyl)-phosphinic acid (CGP 35348) produced an increase in the extracellular concentration of aspartate and (to a lesser extent) glutamate, but no change was observed in the level of taurine, the main amino acid involved in the regulation of brain osmolarity processes. In contrast, 3-amino-2-hydroxy-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-propanesulphonic acid (2-hydroxy-saclofen), another GABA(B) receptor antagonist, failed to affect the extracellular concentration of aspartate, glutamate and taurine. Thus, the basal level of excitatory amino acids in the thalamus in vivo is under the control of CGP 35348-sensitive GABA(B) receptors.

  9. [An analysis and literature review of two cases of autoimmune encephalitis with GABAB receptor antibodies].

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Hao, H J; Liu, L P; Zhang, H H; Zhou, Y Y

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis with GABAB receptor antibodies has been rarely reported. Two cases of GABAB receptor antibodies encephalitis were presented here.Epilepsy was the onset symptom, followed by declined consciousness and frequent seizures. Fever was presented in the whole course of the disease. Myorhythmia of the two hands and pilomotor seizures were shown in the later course of the disease. No specificity was demonstrated in electroencephalograms and magnetic resonance imaging. Sensitive response was shown to the first-line immunotherapy.

  10. Role of GABA(B) receptors in learning and memory and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Chelcie F; Kinney, Jefferson W

    2016-04-01

    Although it is evident from the literature that altered GABAB receptor function does affect behavior, these results often do not correspond well. These differences could be due to the task protocol, animal strain, ligand concentration, or timing of administration utilized. Because several clinical populations exhibit learning and memory deficits in addition to altered markers of GABA and the GABAB receptor, it is important to determine whether altered GABAB receptor function is capable of contributing to the deficits. The aim of this review is to examine the effect of altered GABAB receptor function on synaptic plasticity as demonstrated by in vitro data, as well as the effects on performance in learning and memory tasks. Finally, data regarding altered GABA and GABAB receptor markers within clinical populations will be reviewed. Together, the data agree that proper functioning of GABAB receptors is crucial for numerous learning and memory tasks and that targeting this system via pharmaceuticals may benefit several clinical populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. GABAB receptors as a therapeutic strategy in substance use disorders: focus on positive allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Filip, Małgorzata; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Suder, Agata; Szumiec, Lukasz; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; Przegaliński, Edmund; Cryan, John F

    2015-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) receptors and their ligands are postulated as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of several brain disorders, including drug dependence. Over the past fifteen years positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have emerged that enhance the effects of GABA at GABAB receptors and which may have therapeutic effects similar to those of agonists but with superior side-effect profiles. This review summarizes current preclinical evidence supporting a role of GABAB receptor PAMs in drug addiction in several paradigms with relevance to reward processes and drug abuse liability. Extensive behavioral research in recent years has indicated that PAMs of GABAB receptors may have a therapeutic efficacy in cocaine, nicotine, amphetamine and alcohol dependence. The magnitude of the effects observed are similar to that of the clinically approved drug baclofen, an agonist at GABAB receptors. Moreover, given that anxiolytic effects are also reported with such ligands they may also benefit in mitigating the withdrawal from drugs of abuse. In summary, a wealth of data now supports the benefits of GABAB receptor PAMs and clinical validation is now warranted.

  12. Nicotine-induced molecular alterations are modulated by GABAB receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Varani, Andres P; Pedrón, Valeria T; Aon, Amira J; Höcht, Christian; Acosta, Gabriela B; Bettler, Bernhard; Balerio, Graciela N

    2017-04-17

    It has been demonstrated that GABAB receptors modulate nicotine (NIC) reward effect; nevertheless, the mechanism implicated is not well known. In this regard, we evaluated the involvement of GABAB receptors on the behavioral, neurochemical, biochemical and molecular alterations associated with the rewarding effects induced by NIC in mice, from a pharmacological and genetic approach. NIC-induced rewarding properties (0.5 mg/kg, subcutaneously, sc) were evaluated by conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. CPP has three phases: preconditioning, conditioning and postconditioning. GABAB receptor antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg; intraperitoneally, ip) or the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (3 mg/kg; ip) was injected before NIC during the conditioning phase. GABAB1 knockout (GABAB1 KO) mice received NIC during the conditioning phase. Vehicle and wild-type controls were employed. Neurochemical (dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites), biochemical (nicotinic receptor α4β2, α4β2nAChRs) and molecular (c-Fos) alterations induced by NIC were analyzed after the postconditioning phase by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), receptor-ligand binding assays and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in nucleus accumbens (Acb), prefrontal cortex (PFC) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). NIC induced rewarding effects in the CPP paradigm and increased dopamine levels in Acb and PFC, α4β2nAChRs density in VTA and c-Fos expression in Acb shell (AcbSh), VTA and PFC. We showed that behavioral, neurochemical, biochemical and molecular alterations induced by NIC were prevented by baclofen. However, in 2-hydroxysaclofen pretreated and GABAB1 KO mice, these alterations were potentiated, suggesting that GABAB receptor activity is necessary to control alterations induced by NIC-induced rewarding effects. Therefore, the present findings provided important contributions to the mechanisms implicated in NIC-induced rewarding effects. © 2017 Society for the

  13. GABAB Receptors Tune Cortical Feedback to the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Mazo, Camille; Lepousez, Gabriel; Nissant, Antoine; Valley, Matthew T; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2016-08-10

    Sensory perception emerges from the confluence of sensory inputs that encode the composition of external environment and top-down feedback that conveys information from higher brain centers. In olfaction, sensory input activity is initially processed in the olfactory bulb (OB), serving as the first central relay before being transferred to the olfactory cortex. In addition, the OB receives dense connectivity from feedback projections, so the OB has the capacity to implement a wide array of sensory neuronal computation. However, little is known about the impact and the regulation of this cortical feedback. Here, we describe a novel mechanism to gate glutamatergic feedback selectively from the anterior olfactory cortex (AOC) to the OB. Combining in vitro and in vivo electrophysiological recordings, optogenetics, and fiber-photometry-based calcium imaging applied to wild-type and conditional transgenic mice, we explore the functional consequences of circuit-specific GABA type-B receptor (GABABR) manipulation. We found that activation of presynaptic GABABRs specifically depresses synaptic transmission from the AOC to OB inhibitory interneurons, but spares direct excitation to principal neurons. As a consequence, feedforward inhibition of spontaneous and odor-evoked activity of principal neurons is diminished. We also show that tunable cortico-bulbar feedback is critical for generating beta, but not gamma, OB oscillations. Together, these results show that GABABRs on cortico-bulbar afferents gate excitatory transmission in a target-specific manner and thus shape how the OB integrates sensory inputs and top-down information. The olfactory bulb (OB) receives top-down inputs from the olfactory cortex that produce direct excitation and feedforward inhibition onto mitral and tufted cells, the principal neurons. The functional role of this feedback and the mechanisms regulating the balance of feedback excitation and inhibition remain unknown. We found that GABAB receptors are

  14. Tracking Cell Surface GABAB Receptors Using an α-Bungarotoxin Tag*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Megan E.; Li, Xinyan; Smart, Trevor G.

    2008-01-01

    GABAB receptors mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system and are important for synaptic plasticity as well as being implicated in disease. Located at pre- and postsynaptic sites, GABAB receptors will influence cell excitability, but their effectiveness in doing so will be dependent, in part, on their trafficking to, and stability on, the cell surface membrane. To examine the dynamic behavior of GABAB receptors in GIRK cells and neurons, we have devised a method that is based on tagging the receptor with the binding site components for the neurotoxin, α-bungarotoxin. By using the α-bungarotoxin binding site-tagged GABAB R1a subunit (R1aBBS), co-expressed with the R2 subunit, we can track receptor mobility using the small reporter, α-bungarotoxin-conjugated rhodamine. In this way, the rates of internalization and membrane insertion for these receptors could be measured with fixed and live cells. The results indicate that GABAB receptors rapidly turnover in the cell membrane, with the rate of internalization affected by the state of receptor activation. The bungarotoxin-based method of receptor-tagging seems ideally suited to follow the dynamic regulation of other G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:18812318

  15. The effects of agonists of ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors on learning.

    PubMed

    Zyablitseva, Evgeniya A; Kositsyn, Nikolay S; Shul'gina, Galina I

    2009-05-01

    The research described here investigates the role played by inhibitory processes in the discriminations made by the nervous system of humans and animals between familiar and unfamiliar and significant and nonsignificant events. This research compared the effects of two inhibitory mediators of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA): 1) phenibut, a nonselective agonist of ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors and 2) gaboxadol a selective agonist of ionotropic GABA(A) receptors on the process of developing active defensive and inhibitory conditioned reflexes in alert non-immobilized rabbits. It was found that phenibut, but not gaboxadol, accelerates the development of defensive reflexes at an early stage of conditioning. Both phenibut and gaboxadol facilitate the development of conditioned inhibition, but the effect of gaboxadol occurs at later stages of conditioning and is less stable than that of phenibut. The earlier and more stable effects of phenibut, as compared to gaboxadol, on storage in memory of the inhibitory significance of a stimulus may occur because GABA(B) receptors play the dominant role in the development of internal inhibition during an early stage of conditioning. On the other hand this may occur because the participation of both GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors are essential to the process. We discuss the polyfunctionality of GABA receptors as a function of their structure and the positions of the relevant neurons in the brain as this factor can affect regulation of various types of psychological processes.

  16. Presynaptic Excitation via GABAB Receptors in Habenula Cholinergic Neurons Regulates Fear Memory Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juen; Tan, Lubin; Ren, Yuqi; Liang, Jingwen; Lin, Rui; Feng, Qiru; Zhou, Jingfeng; Hu, Fei; Ren, Jing; Wei, Chao; Yu, Tao; Zhuang, Yinghua; Bettler, Bernhard; Wang, Fengchao; Luo, Minmin

    2016-07-28

    Fear behaviors are regulated by adaptive mechanisms that dampen their expression in the absence of danger. By studying circuits and the molecular mechanisms underlying this adaptive response, we show that cholinergic neurons of the medial habenula reduce fear memory expression through GABAB presynaptic excitation. Ablating these neurons or inactivating their GABAB receptors impairs fear extinction in mice, whereas activating the neurons or their axonal GABAB receptors reduces conditioned fear. Although considered exclusively inhibitory, here, GABAB mediates excitation by amplifying presynaptic Ca(2+) entry through Cav2.3 channels and potentiating co-release of glutamate, acetylcholine, and neurokinin B to excite interpeduncular neurons. Activating the receptors for these neurotransmitters or enhancing neurotransmission with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor reduces fear responses of both wild-type and GABAB mutant mice. We identify the role of an extra-amygdalar circuit and presynaptic GABAB receptors in fear control, suggesting that boosting neurotransmission in this pathway might ameliorate some fear disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Baclofen and other GABAB receptor agents are allosteric modulators of the CXCL12 chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Alice; Kussrow, Amanda; Olmsted, Ian Roys; Sandoz, Guillaume; Bornhop, Darryl J; Nahon, Jean-Louis

    2013-07-10

    CXCR4, a receptor for the chemokine CXCL12 (stromal-cell derived factor-1α), is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), expressed in the immune and CNS and integrally involved in various neurological disorders. The GABAB receptor is also a GPCR that mediates metabotropic action of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and is located on neurons and immune cells as well. Using diverse approaches, we report novel interaction between GABAB receptor agents and CXCR4 and demonstrate allosteric binding of these agents to CXCR4. First, both GABAB antagonists and agonists block CXCL12-elicited chemotaxis in human breast cancer cells. Second, a GABAB antagonist blocks the potentiation by CXCL12 of high-threshold Ca(2+) channels in rat neurons. Third, electrophysiology in Xenopus oocytes and human embryonic kidney cell line 293 cells in which we coexpressed rat CXCR4 and the G-protein inward rectifier K(+) (GIRK) channel showed that GABAB antagonist and agonist modified CXCL12-evoked activation of GIRK channels. To investigate whether GABAB ligands bind to CXCR4, we expressed this receptor in heterologous systems lacking GABAB receptors and performed competition binding experiments. Our fluorescent resonance energy transfer experiments suggest that GABAB ligands do not bind CXCR4 at the CXCL12 binding pocket suggesting allosteric modulation, in accordance with our electrophysiology experiments. Finally, using backscattering interferometry and lipoparticles containing only the CXCR4 receptor, we quantified the binding affinity for the GABAB ligands, confirming a direct interaction with the CXCR4 receptor. The effect of GABAergic agents on CXCR4 suggests new therapeutic potentials for neurological and immune diseases.

  18. Unravelling the unusual signalling properties of the GABA(B) receptor.

    PubMed

    Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew R; Fairfax, Benjamin; Moss, Stephen J; Pangalos, Menelas N

    2004-10-15

    GABA(B) receptors are the cornerstone receptors in the modulation of inhibitory signalling in the central nervous system and continue to be targets for the amelioration of a number of neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. Unravelling the molecular identity of this receptor has spurred much research over the past five or so years and generated a renewed interest and excitement in the field. Many questions are being answered and lessons learnt, not only about GABA(B) receptor function but also about general mechanisms of G-protein-coupled receptor signalling. However, as questions are being answered as many new questions are being raised and many GABA(B)-related conundrums continue to remain unanswered. In this report, we review some of the most recent work in the area of GABA(B) receptor research. In particular, we focus our attentions on the emerging mechanisms thought to be important in GABA(B) receptor signalling and the growing complex of associated proteins that we consider to be part of the GABA(B) receptor "signalosome."

  19. Modulation of synaptic input by GABAB receptors improves coincidence detection for computation of sound location

    PubMed Central

    Fischl, Matthew J; Combs, T Dalton; Klug, Achim; Grothe, Benedikt; Burger, R Michael

    2012-01-01

    Interaural time disparities (ITDs) are the primary cues for localisation of low-frequency sound stimuli. ITDs are computed by coincidence-detecting neurones in the medial superior olive (MSO) in mammals. Several previous studies suggest that control of synaptic gain is essential for maintaining ITD selectivity as stimulus intensity increases. Using acute brain slices from postnatal day 7 to 24 (P7–P24) Mongolian gerbils, we confirm that activation of GABAB receptors reduces the amplitude of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents to the MSO and, moreover, show that the decay kinetics of IPSCs are slowed in mature animals. During repetitive stimuli, activation of GABAB receptors reduced the amount of depression observed, while PSC suppression and the slowed kinetics were maintained. Additionally, we used physiological and modelling approaches to test the potential impact of GABAB activation on ITD encoding in MSO neurones. Current clamp recordings from MSO neurones were made while pharmacologically isolated excitatory inputs were bilaterally stimulated using pulse trains that simulate ITDs in vitro. MSO neurones showed strong selectivity for bilateral delays. Application of both GABAB agonists and antagonists demonstrate that GABAB modulation of synaptic input can sharpen ITD selectivity. We confirmed and extended these results in a computational model that allowed for independent manipulation of each GABAB-dependent effect. Modelling suggests that modulation of both amplitude and kinetics of synaptic inputs by GABAB receptors can improve precision of ITD computation. Our studies suggest that in vivo modulation of synaptic input by GABAB receptors may act to preserve ITD selectivity across various stimulus conditions. PMID:22473782

  20. Characterization of [3H]-CGP54626A binding to heterodimeric GABAB receptors stably expressed in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Green, Andrew; Walls, Steven; Wise, Alan; Green, Richard H; Martin, Amanda K; Marshall, Fiona H

    2000-01-01

    Functional human GABAB(1a,2) and GABAB(1b,2) receptors have been stably expressed in mammalian CHO K1 cells.Detailed characterization of GABAB ligand binding at each of the receptors has been compared using [3H]-CGP54626A. In cell membranes fractions, [3H]-CGP54626A bound to a single site with a KD of 1.51±1.12 nM, Bmax of 2.02±0.17 pmoles mg protein−1 and 0.86±0.20 nM, Bmax of 5.19±0.57 pmoles mg protein−1 for GABAB(1a,2) and GABAB(1b,2) respectively.In competition binding assays the rank order was identical for both GABAB receptors. For known GABAB agonists the rank order was CGP27492>SKF97541=CGP46381>GABA>Baclofen and for GABAB antagonists the rank order was CGP54262A>CGP55845>CGP52432>SCH 50911>CGP51176>CGP36742=CGP35348 ⩾2-OH Saclofen ⩾ABPA.The allosteric effect of calcium cations was also investigated. The effect of removal of CaCl2 from the binding assay conditions was ligand dependent to either cause a decrease in ligand affinity or to have no significant effect. However, these effects were similar for both GABAB receptors.A whole cell, scintillation proximity binding assay was used to determine agonist affinity at exclusively heterodimeric GABAB receptors. In competition assays, the rank order was the same for both GABAB(1a,2) and GABAB(1b,2) and consistent with that seen with cell membrane fractions.These data suggest that, in terms of ligand binding, the currently identified isoforms of the GABAB receptor are pharmacologically indistinguishable. PMID:11139457

  1. Metabotropic GABAB receptors mediate GABA inhibition of acetylcholine release in the rat neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Malomouzh, Artem I; Petrov, Konstantin A; Nurullin, Leniz F; Nikolsky, Evgeny E

    2015-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an amino acid which acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Here, we studied the effects of GABA on non-quantal, spontaneous, and evoked quantal acetylcholine (ACh) release from motor nerve endings. We found that while the application of 10 μM of GABA had no effect on spontaneous quantal ACh release, as detected by the frequency of miniature endplate potentials, GABA reduced the non-quantal ACh release by 57%, as determined by the H-effect value. Finally, the evoked quantal ACh release, estimated by calculating the quantal content of full-sized endplate potentials (EPPs), was reduced by 34%. GABA's inhibitory effect remained unchanged after pre-incubation with picrotoxin, an ionotropic GABAA receptor blocker, but was attenuated following application of the GABAB receptor blocker CGP 55845, which itself had no effect on ACh release. An inhibitor of phospholipase C, U73122, completely prevented the GABA-induced decrease in ACh release. Immunofluorescence demonstrated the presence of both subunits of the GABAB receptor (GABAB R1 and GABAB R2) in the neuromuscular junction. These findings suggest that metabotropic GABAB receptors are expressed in the mammalian neuromuscular synapse and their activation results in a phospholipase C-mediated reduction in the intensity of non-quantal and evoked quantal ACh release. We investigated the effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on neuromuscular transmission. GABA reduced the non-quantal and evoked quantal release of acetylcholine. These effects are mediated by GABAB receptors and are implemented via phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Our findings suggest that in the mammalian neuromuscular synapse, metabotropic GABAB receptors are expressed and their activation results in a reduction in the intensity of acetylcholine release. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. GABA(B) receptors: altered coupling to G-proteins in rats sensitized to amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Tarazi, F I; Campbell, A; Baldessarini, R J

    2000-01-01

    Modified dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission in discrete brain regions is implicated in stimulant-induced behavioral sensitization. Release of both neurotransmitters is influenced by GABA(B) metabotropic receptors for the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Accordingly, GABA(B) receptors were examined in rats sensitized to amphetamine by measuring receptor density and coupling to G-proteins indicated as [(3)H]baclofen binding and baclofen-mediated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. Repeated treatment with (+)-amphetamine (5mg/kg per day, i.p., for five days) sensitized the rats to amphetamine challenge (1mg/kg) at 14 days, but not one day, later. GABA(B) receptor density was not altered at either time. Baclofen-mediated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, however, was selectively augmented in the prefrontal cortex and attenuated in the nucleus accumbens at 14 days, but not one day, after amphetamine treatment. Changes in GABA(B) receptor coupling to G-proteins in rats sensitized to amphetamine, but not in similarly treated but unsensitized rats, lead us to suggest that altered GABA(B) receptor functioning may contribute to the expression of amphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization.

  3. GABAB receptors modulate catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells by a mechanism involving cyclic AMP formation.

    PubMed

    Oset-Gasque, M J; Parramón, M; González, M P

    1993-12-01

    1. The function of gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors in modulation of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells and the possible mechanism involved in this action have been examined. 2. The GABAB agonists (-)-baclofen and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APPA) were found to induce a dose-dependent increase of basal catecholamine secretion. The EC50s were 151 +/- 35 microM and 225 +/- 58 microM for baclofen and 3-APPA, respectively. This stimulatory effect was specific since it could be blocked by 0.5 mM of the specific GABAB antagonist CGP-35348. 3. In contrast, preincubation of chromaffin cells with the GABAB agonists was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the catecholamine secretion evoked by 10 microM nicotine and 200 microM muscimol. 4. The effects of GABAB agonists on both basal and evoked catecholamine secretion were found to be accompanied by parallel changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). GABAB agonists produced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i which was partially blocked by CGP 35348, but they produced a strong inhibition of the [Ca2+]i increase induced by nicotine and muscimol. 5. The GABAB agonists also produced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP levels, there being a direct correlation between both increase in catecholamine secretion and in intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The pretreatment of chromaffin cells with pertussis toxin doubled the catecholamine secretion and increased by four times the intracellular cyclic AMP levels evoked by GABAB agonists. 7. The possible involvement of adenylate cyclase in the mechanism of GABAA receptor modulation of catecholamine secretion is discussed.

  4. GABAB receptors modulate catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells by a mechanism involving cyclic AMP formation.

    PubMed Central

    Oset-Gasque, M. J.; Parramón, M.; González, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The function of gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors in modulation of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells and the possible mechanism involved in this action have been examined. 2. The GABAB agonists (-)-baclofen and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APPA) were found to induce a dose-dependent increase of basal catecholamine secretion. The EC50s were 151 +/- 35 microM and 225 +/- 58 microM for baclofen and 3-APPA, respectively. This stimulatory effect was specific since it could be blocked by 0.5 mM of the specific GABAB antagonist CGP-35348. 3. In contrast, preincubation of chromaffin cells with the GABAB agonists was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the catecholamine secretion evoked by 10 microM nicotine and 200 microM muscimol. 4. The effects of GABAB agonists on both basal and evoked catecholamine secretion were found to be accompanied by parallel changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). GABAB agonists produced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i which was partially blocked by CGP 35348, but they produced a strong inhibition of the [Ca2+]i increase induced by nicotine and muscimol. 5. The GABAB agonists also produced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP levels, there being a direct correlation between both increase in catecholamine secretion and in intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The pretreatment of chromaffin cells with pertussis toxin doubled the catecholamine secretion and increased by four times the intracellular cyclic AMP levels evoked by GABAB agonists. 7. The possible involvement of adenylate cyclase in the mechanism of GABAA receptor modulation of catecholamine secretion is discussed. PMID:8306105

  5. Differential Regulation of GABAB Receptor Trafficking by Different Modes of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Kantamneni, Sriharsha; Gonzàlez-Gonzàlez, Immaculada M.; Luo, Jia; Cimarosti, Helena; Jacobs, Susan C.; Jaafari, Nadia; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory GABAB receptors (GABABRs) can down-regulate most excitatory synapses in the CNS by reducing postsynaptic excitability. Functional GABABRs are heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits and here we show that the trafficking and surface expression of GABABRs is differentially regulated by synaptic or pathophysiological activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Activation of synaptic NMDARs using a chemLTP protocol increases GABABR recycling and surface expression. In contrast, excitotoxic global activation of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDARs by bath application of NMDA causes the loss of surface GABABRs. Intriguingly, exposing neurons to extreme metabolic stress using oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) increases GABAB1 but decreases GABAB2 surface expression. The increase in surface GABAB1 involves enhanced recycling and is blocked by the NMDAR antagonist AP5. The decrease in surface GABAB2 is also blocked by AP5 and by inhibiting degradation pathways. These results indicate that NMDAR activity is critical in GABABR trafficking and function and that the individual subunits can be separately controlled to regulate neuronal responsiveness and survival. PMID:24425870

  6. Neuroprotective effect of vitamin C against the ethanol and nicotine modulation of GABA(B) receptor and PKA-alpha expression in prenatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Naseer, M I; Lee, H Y; Kim, M O

    2010-06-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure has various deleterious effects on neuronal development and can induce various defects in developing brain, resulting in fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA(B)) receptor (R) is known to play an important role during the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Our study was designed to investigate the effect of ethanol (100 mM), nicotine (50 microM) (for 30 min and 1 h), vitamin C (vitC, 0.5 mM), ethanol plus vitC, and nicotine plus vitC on expression level of GABA(B1), GABA(B2)R, and protein kinase A-alpha (PKA) in prenatal rat cortical and hippocampal neurons at gestational days (GD) 17.5. The results showed that, upon ethanol and nicotine exposure, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2)R protein expression increased significantly in the cortex and hippocampus for a short (30 min) and long term (1 h), whereas only GABA(B2)R subunit was decreased upon nicotine exposure for a long term in the cortex. Furthermore, PKA expression in cortex and hippocampus increased with ethanol exposure during short term, whereas long-term exposure results increased in cortex and decreased in hippocampus. Moreover, the cotreatment of vitC with ethanol and nicotine showed significantly decreased expression of GABA(B1), GABA(B2)R, and PKA in cortex and hippocampus for a long-term exposure. Mitochondrial membrane potential, Fluoro-jade-B, and propidium iodide staining were used to elucidate possible neurodegeneration. Our results suggest the involvement of GABA(B)R and PKA in nicotine and ethanol-mediated neurodevelopmental defects and the potential use of vitC as a effective protective agent for FAS-related deficits.

  7. Spinal GABA-B receptor modulates neutrophil recruitment to the knee joint in zymosan-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Gabriel S; do C Malvar, David; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Kanashiro, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the central nervous system controls inflammatory responses by activating complex efferent neuroimmune pathways. The present study was designed to evaluate the role that central gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA-B) receptor plays in neutrophil migration in a murine model of zymosan-induced arthritis by using different pharmacological tools. We observed that intrathecal administration of baclofen, a selective GABA-B agonist, exacerbated the inflammatory response in the knee after zymosan administration characterized by an increase in the neutrophil recruitment and knee joint edema, whereas saclofen, a GABA-B antagonist, exerted the opposite effect. Intrathecal pretreatment of the animals with SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) blocked the pro-inflammatory effect of baclofen. On the other hand, systemic administration of guanethidine, a sympatholytic drug that inhibits catecholamine release, and nadolol, a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, reversed the effect of saclofen. Moreover, saclofen suppressed the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines into the knee joint (ELISA) and pain-related behaviors (open field test). Since the anti-inflammatory effect of saclofen depends on the sympathetic nervous system integrity, we observed that isoproterenol, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, mimics the central GABA-B blockade decreasing knee joint neutrophil recruitment. Together, these results demonstrate that the pharmacological manipulation of spinal GABAergic transmission aids control of neutrophil migration to the inflamed joint by modulating the activation of the knee joint-innervating sympathetic terminal fibers through a mechanism dependent on peripheral beta-adrenergic receptors and central components, such as p38 MAPK.

  8. Influence of leptin and GABAB-receptor agonist and antagonist on neurons of the hypothalamic infundibular nucleus in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Bogatyrev, S; Yakimova, K S; Tzschentke, B

    2017-04-01

    In birds and mammals, the neuroendocrine regulation of energy balance is conserved in many aspects. Despite significant similarities between the two groups, differences in the regulatory mechanisms were detected. The present study was performed to carry out investigations of the influence of human leptin and GABAB-receptor agonist and antagonist on the firing rate of neurons of the Nucleus infundibuli hypothalami in brain slices from juvenile chickens. For the first time, we demonstrated a clear, dose-related change in the firing rate of hypothalamic neurons in juvenile chickens after the acute application of recombinant human leptin (1, 10, and 100 nM). All investigated neurons increased their subsequent firing rate. Application of GABAB-receptor agonist baclofen (1 µM) blocked, while antagonist CGP 35348 (10 µM) increased the spontaneous neuronal activity. Simultaneous application of baclofen and leptin reduced the effect observed from single leptin application. This was not found after simultaneously application of leptin and CGP. Altogether, our results indicate that in bird brain slices, and exemplarily in those of the chicken, hypothalamic neurons show mammalian-like responsiveness after acute leptin and GABA application. GABAB-mechanisms involved in GABA release play a likely important role in the leptin-mediated effects on NI neurons via functional leptin receptors.

  9. Ionotropic AMPA-type glutamate and metabotropic GABAB receptors: determining cellular physiology by proteomes.

    PubMed

    Bettler, Bernhard; Fakler, Bernd

    2017-03-07

    Ionotropic AMPA-type glutamate receptors and G-protein-coupled metabotropic GABAB receptors are key elements of neurotransmission whose cellular functions are determined by their protein constituents. Over the past couple of years unbiased proteomic approaches identified comprehensive sets of protein building blocks of these two types of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain (termed receptor proteomes). This provided the opportunity to match receptor proteomes with receptor physiology and to study the structural organization, regulation and function of native receptor complexes in an unprecedented manner. In this review we discuss the principles of receptor architecture and regulation emerging from the functional characterization of the proteomes of AMPA and GABAB receptors. We also highlight progress in unraveling the role of unexpected protein components for receptor physiology.

  10. Hippocampal partial kindling decreased hippocampal GABAB receptor efficacy and wet dog shakes in rats.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Shen, Bixia

    2006-10-16

    To test the hypothesis that GABA(B) receptor efficacy in the behaving rat decreases after partial hippocampal kindling, we measured GABA(B) receptor efficacy by the number of wet dog shakes (WDSs) induced by baclofen (5mM in 0.2muL of saline) infusion into the dorsal hippocampus; these WDSs were blocked by prior infusion of GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP55845A. Rats were given 15 afterdischarges (ADs) evoked in CA1 over 3 days or control stimulations. The partially kindled rats (after 15 ADs) showed a significant decrease in baclofen-induced WDSs as compared to control rats, on days 1, 4 and 21 after kindling. In contrast, kindled and control rats did not show a significant difference in WDSs induced by hippocampal infusion of GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. Also, the number of WDSs induced after subcutaneous injection of serotonin-2A/2C agonist+/-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane was not different between kindled and control rats on 4 and 21 days after kindling. We further tested the hypothesis that the decrease in hippocampal AD-induced WDSs during kindling is caused by a decrease in GABA(B) receptor efficacy. However, we found no convincing evidence to support the latter hypothesis since the AD-induced WDSs were not suppressed by hippocampal infusion of CGP55845A, with the exception that CGP55845A infusion into ventral hippocampus suppressed both hippocampal ADs and WDSs. Together with results derived from previous electrophysiological studies in vitro, it is suggested that a decrease of GABA(B) receptor, possibly GABA(B) autoreceptor, efficacy may explain the decrease of baclofen-induced WDSs after hippocampal kindling.

  11. The GABAB receptor agonists baclofen and CGP44532 decreased nicotine self-administration in the rat.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Neil E; Froestl, Wolfgang; Markou, Athina

    2004-03-01

    Previous work has indicated a potential role for gamma-aminobutyric acid-B (GABA(B)) receptor agonists in treating drug addiction in humans. Specifically, GABA(B) receptor agonists decreased cocaine, heroin and nicotine self-administration in rats. The purpose of the present studies was to extend previous findings by assessing the effects of additional GABA(B) receptor agonists on nicotine self-administration and food-maintained responding, under both fixed and progressive ratio schedules in rats. Male Wistar rats were exposed to a progressive ratio schedule where various nicotine doses were made available according to a within-subjects Latin Square design. Additional groups of rats were used to test the effects of the GABA(B) receptor agonists baclofen and CGP44532 on nicotine self-administration (0.01 and 0.03 mg/kg per infusion) and food-reinforced responding on fixed and progressive ratio (CGP44532 only) schedules. Nicotine maintained stable self-administration under a progressive ratio schedule with a linear dose-response function ( r=0.61). Both CGP44532 and (-)baclofen dose-dependently reduced nicotine self-administration on the fixed ratio schedule, and also decreased food-maintained responding at higher doses. Further, CGP44532 decreased breakpoints for nicotine and food at identical doses under the progressive ratio schedule. The present data demonstrate that administration of GABA(B) receptor agonists decreased intravenous nicotine self-administration under both fixed and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement, possibly reflecting reduced rewarding effects of nicotine. Both baclofen and CGP44532 exhibited specificity for nicotine- versus food-maintained responding on the fixed ratio schedules but not on the progressive ratio schedule (CGP44532 tested only), indicating the potential usefulness of GABA(B) receptor agonists as therapeutics for smoking cessation.

  12. [GABAB receptor as therapeutic target for drug addiction: from baclofen to positive allosteric modulators].

    PubMed

    Agabio, Roberta; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The present paper summarizes experimental and clinical data indicating the therapeutic potential of the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, in the treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD) and substance use disorder (SUD). Multiple preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of baclofen to suppress alcohol drinking (including binge- and relapse-like drinking), oral alcohol self-administration, and intravenous self-administration of cocaine, nicotine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, morphine, and heroin in rodents. Some randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) and case reports support the efficacy of baclofen in suppressing alcohol consumption, craving for alcohol, and alcohol withdrawal symptomatology in alcohol-dependent patients. Data from RCTs and open studies investigating baclofen efficacy on SUD are currently less conclusive. Interest in testing high doses of baclofen in AUD and SUD treatment has recently emerged. Preclinical research has extended the anti-addictive properties of baclofen to positive allosteric modulators of the GABAB receptor (GABAB PAMs). In light of their more favourable side effect profile (compared to baclofen), GABAB PAMs may represent a major step forward in a GABAB receptor-based pharmacotherapy of AUD and SUD.

  13. Activation of the GABA(B) Receptor Prevents Nicotine-Induced Locomotor Stimulation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lobina, Carla; Carai, Mauro A M; Froestl, Wolfgang; Mugnaini, Claudia; Pasquini, Serena; Corelli, Federico; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that activation of the GABA(B) receptor, either by means of orthosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators (PAMs), inhibited different nicotine-related behaviors, including intravenous self-administration and conditioned place preference, in rodents. The present study investigated whether the anti-nicotine effects of the GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen, and GABA(B) PAMs, CGP7930, and GS39783, extend to nicotine stimulant effects. To this end, CD1 mice were initially treated with baclofen (0, 1.25, and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), CGP7930 (0, 25, and 50 mg/kg, i.g.), or GS39783 (0, 25, and 50 mg/kg, i.g.), then treated with nicotine (0 and 0.05 mg/kg, s.c.), and finally exposed to an automated apparatus for recording of locomotor activity. Pretreatment with doses of baclofen, CGP7930, or GS39783 that did not alter locomotor activity when given with nicotine vehicle fully prevented hyperlocomotion induced by 0.05 mg/kg nicotine. These data extend to nicotine stimulant effects the capacity of baclofen and GABA(B) PAMs to block the reinforcing, motivational, and rewarding properties of nicotine. These data strengthen the hypothesis that activation of the GABA(B) receptor may represent a potentially useful, anti-smoking therapeutic strategy.

  14. FRET-Based Sensors Unravel Activation and Allosteric Modulation of the GABAB Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lecat-Guillet, Nathalie; Monnier, Carine; Rovira, Xavier; Kniazeff, Julie; Lamarque, Laurent; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Trinquet, Eric; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Rondard, Philippe

    2017-03-06

    The main inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), modulates many synapses by activating the G protein-coupled receptor GABAB, which is a target for various therapeutic applications. It is an obligatory heterodimer made of GB1 and GB2 that can be regulated by positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). The molecular mechanism of activation of the GABAB receptor remains poorly understood. Here, we have developed FRET-based conformational GABAB sensors compatible with high-throughput screening. We identified conformational changes occurring within the extracellular and transmembrane domains upon receptor activation, which are smaller than those observed in the related metabotropic glutamate receptors. These sensors also allow discrimination between agonists of different efficacies and between PAMs that have different modes of action, which has not always been possible using conventional functional assays. Our study brings important new information on the activation mechanism of the GABAB receptor and should facilitate the screening and identification of new chemicals targeting this receptor.

  15. Noradrenergic and GABAB Receptor Activation Differentially Modulate Inputs to the Premotor Nucleus RA in Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Sizemore, Max; Perkel, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Neuromodulators can rapidly modify neural circuits, altering behavior. Songbirds provide an excellent system for studying the role of neuromodulation in modifying circuits that underlie behavior because song learning and production are mediated by a discrete set of interconnected nuclei. We examined the neuromodulatory effects of noradrenergic and GABAB receptor activation on synaptic inputs to the premotor robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) in zebra finches using whole cell voltage-clamp recording in vitro. In adults, norepinephrine strongly reduced input from the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN) but only slightly reduced the input from nucleus HVC (proper name), the excitatory input from axon collaterals of other RA neurons, and input from GABAergic interneurons. The effect of norepinephrine was mimicked by the α2 adrenoceptor agonist UK14,304 and blocked by the α2 antagonist yohimbine. Conversely, the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen strongly decreased HVC, collateral, and GABAergic inputs to RA neurons while causing little reduction in the LMAN input. In juveniles undergoing song learning, norepinephrine reduced the LMAN input, caused only a small reduction in the HVC input, and greatly reduced the collateral and GABAergic inputs. Baclofen caused similar results in juvenile and adult birds, reducing HVC, collateral, and GABAergic inputs significantly more than the LMAN input. Significant increases in paired-pulse ratio accompanied all reductions in synaptic transmission, suggesting a presynaptic locus. The reduction in the LMAN input by norepinephrine may be important for mediating changes in song elicited by different social contexts and is well-placed to play a role in song learning. PMID:18463188

  16. Gua Lou Gui Zhi decoction attenuates post‑stroke spasticity via the modulation of GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Hu, Haixia; Li, Zuanfang; Lin, Ruhui; Mao, Jingjie; Chen, Lidian

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective and antispastic effects of Gua Lou Gui Zhi decoction (GLGZD) in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The MCAO rats were treated with GLGZD (14.3 g/kg body weight) once a day for a period of seven days. Neurological deficit scores and screen tests were analyzed every other day. Following treatment with GLGZD for 7 days, the ischemic infarct volume of the rat brains was measured using 2,3,5‑triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to determine the mRNA expression levels of γ‑amino butyric acid B (γ‑GABAB) receptor (R) in the cortical infarct region. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of GABAB R were detected in the cortical infarct region by western blot analysis. Following 7 days, treatment with GLGZD significantly ameliorated the neurological defects and cerebral infarction in the MCAO rats. In addition, treatment with GLGZD ameliorated motor performance in the MCAO rats, as determined by screen tests. Furthermore, GLGZD was able to upregulate the mRNA and protein expression levels of GABAB1 R and GABAB2 R in the ischemic cerebral cortex. The results of the present study suggested that GLGZD may exert neuroprotective and antispastic effects in a cerebral ischemia model, through upregulating the expression of GABAB R.

  17. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and limbic encephalitis associated with GABAB receptor antibodies in CSF.

    PubMed

    DeFelipe-Mimbrera, Alicia; Masjuan, Jaime; Corral, Íñigo; Villar, Luisa Maria; Graus, Francesc; García-Barragán, Nuria

    2014-07-15

    We report a case of a woman who had two consecutive autoimmune neurological disorders, including an opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) and limbic encephalitis (LE), with positive titers of GABAB receptor antibodies. The patient never developed seizures or had an underlying tumor after 4 years of follow-up.

  18. Evaluation of difluoromethyl ketones as agonists of the γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptor.

    PubMed

    Han, Changho; Salyer, Amy E; Kim, Eun Hoo; Jiang, Xinyi; Jarrard, Rachel E; Powers, Matthew S; Kirchhoff, Aaron M; Salvador, Tolani K; Chester, Julia A; Hockerman, Gregory H; Colby, David A

    2013-03-28

    The design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and in vivo studies of difluoromethyl ketones as GABAB agonists that are not structurally analogous to known GABAB agonists, such as baclofen or 3-aminopropyl phosphinic acid, are presented. The difluoromethyl ketones were assembled in three synthetic steps using a trifluoroacetate-release aldol reaction. Following evaluation at clinically relevant GABA receptors, we have identified a difluoromethyl ketone that is a potent GABAB agonist, obtained its X-ray structure, and presented preliminary in vivo data in alcohol-preferring mice. The behavioral studies in mice demonstrated that this compound tended to reduce the acoustic startle response, which is consistent with an anxiolytic profile. Structure-activity investigations determined that replacing the fluorines of the difluoromethyl ketone with hydrogens resulted in an inactive analogue. Resolution of the individual enantiomers of the difluoromethyl ketone provided a compound with full biological activity at concentrations less than an order of magnitude greater than the pharmaceutical, baclofen.

  19. Calcium currents and GABAB receptors in the dorsal sensory cells of the lamprey spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Batueva, I V; Buchanan, J T; Tsvetkov, E A; Sagatelyan, A K; Veselkin, N P

    1999-01-01

    Patch-clamp studies were performed on the isolated dorsal sensory cells of the spinal cords of three species of lamprey, Ichthyomyzon unicuspis, Petromyzon marinus, and Lampetra fluviatilis, to measure changes in the amplitudes of calcium current induced by GABA and its specific antagonists and agonists. The experiments showed that GABA (4 mM) reduced the peak amplitude of the calcium current by 28.5 +/- 4.9%, with subsequent recovery to 96.2 +/- 9.2% of control (n = 45). The GABAB agonist baclofen had similar effects. The GABAA agonists glycine and taurine had no effect on the Ca2+ current. The inhibitory effect of GABA was blocked by 2-hydroxysaclofen (a GABAB antagonist), but persisted in the presence of bicuculline (a GABAA antagonist). These results are evidence that the membranes of dorsal sensory cells contain GABAB receptors, which significantly increases our understanding of the mechanisms of presynaptic inhibition in the spinal cords of the cyclostomata.

  20. The GABAB receptor positive modulator BHF177 attenuated anxiety, but not conditioned fear, in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Kaczanowska, Katarzyna; Finn, M. G.; Markou, Athina; Risbrough, Victoria B.

    2015-01-01

    GABAB (γ-aminobutyric acid B) receptors may be a therapeutic target for anxiety disorders. Here we characterized the effects of the GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) BHF177 on conditioned and unconditioned physiological responses to threat in the light-enhanced startle (LES), stress-induced hyperthermia, and fear-potentiated startle (FPS) procedures in rats. The effects of BHF177 on LES were compared with those of the GABAB receptor agonists baclofen and CGP44532, and the positive control buspirone, a 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist with anxiolytic activity in humans. Baclofen (0.4, 0.9 and 1.25 mg/kg) and CGP44532 (0.065, 0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) administration had significant sedative, but not anxiolytic, activity reflected in overall decrease in the startle response in the LES tests. BHF177 (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) had no effect on LES, nor did it produce an overall sedative effect. Interesting, however, when rats were grouped by high and low LES responses, BHF177 had anxiolytic-like effects only on LES in high, but not low, LES responding rats. BHF177 also blocked stress-induced hyperthermia, but had no effect on conditioned fear responses in the FPS test. Buspirone (1 and 3 mg/kg) had an anxiolytic-like profile in both LES and FPS tests. These results indicate that BHF177 may specifically attenuate unconditioned anxiety in individuals that exhibit a high anxiety state, and has fewer sedative effects than direct agonists. Thus, BHF177 or other GABAB receptor PAMs may be promising compounds for alleviating increased anxiety seen in various psychiatric disorders with a superior side-effect profile compared to GABAB receptor agonists. PMID:26002628

  1. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation facilitates GABA(B) receptor-effector coupling.

    PubMed

    Couve, A; Thomas, P; Calver, A R; Hirst, W D; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Smart, T G; Moss, S J

    2002-05-01

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Here we show that the functional coupling of GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptors to inwardly rectifying K(+) channels rapidly desensitizes. This effect is alleviated after direct phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser892) in the cytoplasmic tail of GABA(B)R2 by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Basal phosphorylation of this residue is evident in rat brain membranes and in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of Ser892 is modulated positively by pathways that elevate cAMP concentration, such as those involving forskolin and beta-adrenergic receptors. GABA(B) receptor agonists reduce receptor phosphorylation, which is consistent with PKA functioning in the control of GABA(B)-activated currents. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of Ser892 specifically enhances the membrane stability of GABA(B) receptors. We conclude that signaling pathways that activate PKA may have profound effects on GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. These results also challenge the accepted view that phosphorylation is a universal negative modulator of G protein-coupled receptors.

  2. GABAB Receptor Positive Modulation Decreases Selective Molecular and Behavioral Effects of Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Lhuillier, Loic; Mombereau, Cedric; Cryan, John F.; Kaupmann, Klemens

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to cocaine induces selective behavioral and molecular adaptations. In rodents, acute cocaine induces increased locomotor activity whereas prolonged drug exposure results in behavioral locomotor sensitization, which is thought to be a consequence of drug–induced neuroadaptive changes. Recent attention has been given to compounds activating GABAB receptors as potential anti-addictive therapies. In particular the principle of allosteric positive GABAB receptor modulators is very promising in this respect, as positive modulators lack the sedative and muscle relaxant properties of full GABAB receptor agonists such as baclofen. Here we investigated the effects of systemic application of the GABAB receptor positive modulator GS39783 in animals treated with acute and chronic cocaine administration. Both GS39783 and baclofen dose-dependently attenuated acute cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. Furthermore, both compounds also efficiently blocked cocaine-induced Fos induction in the striatal complex. In chronic studies GS39783 induced a modest attenuation of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Chronic cocaine induces the accumulation of the transcription factor ΔFosB and up regulates cAMP-response-element-binding-protein (CREB) and dopamine-and-cAMP-regulated-phosphoprotein of 32 kd (DARPP-32). GS39783 blocked the induction/activation of DARPP-32 and CREB in the nucleus accumbens and dorsal striatum and partially inhibited ΔFosB accumulation in the dorsal striatum. In summary our data provide evidence that GS39783 attenuates the acute behavioral effects of cocaine exposure in rodents and in addition prevents the induction of selective long-term adaptive changes in dopaminergic signaling pathways. Further investigation of GABAB receptor positive modulation as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cocaine dependence and possibly other drugs of abuse is therefore warranted. PMID:16710312

  3. Distribution of a GABAB-like receptor protein in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Charles, K J; Calver, A R; Jourdain, S; Pangalos, M N

    2003-11-07

    Using a homology-based bioinformatics approach we have identified the human and rodent orthologues of a novel putative seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptor, termed GABA(BL). The amino acid sequence homology of these cDNAs compared to GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) led us to postulate that GABA(BL) may be a putative novel GABA(B) receptor subunit. We have developed a rabbit polyclonal antisera specific to the GABA(BL) protein and assessed the distribution of GABA(BL) in the rat CNS by immunohistochemistry. Protein expression was particularly dense in regions previously shown to contain known GABA(B) receptor subunits. Dense immunoreactivity was observed in the cortex, major subfields of the hippocampus and the dentate gyrus. GABA(BL) labelling was very conspicuous in the cerebellum, both in the granule cell layer and in Purkinje cells, and was also observed in the substantia gelatinosa and ventral horn motor neurons of the spinal cord. GABA(BL) immunoreactivity was also noted in a subset of parvalbumin positive hippocampal interneurons. Our data suggest a widespread distribution of GABA(BL) throughout the rat CNS.

  4. Structural determinants of activity at the GABAB receptor. A comparison of phosphoethanolamine and related GABA analogs.

    PubMed

    Klunk, W E; McClure, R J; Xu, C J; Pettegrew, J W

    1995-09-01

    Phosphoethanolamine is a phosphomonoester that is reduced in Alzheimer disease brain. Despite its close structural similarity to GABA and the GABAB partial agonist 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid, phosphoethanolamine binds very poorly to GABAB receptors (IC50 = 7.5 +/- 0.8 mM). In this study, we examined whether the marked decrease in binding affinity associated with the presence of an ester oxygen in place of the alpha-CH2 group of GABAergic compounds also occurred in sulfonates and used high resolution solution NMR and molecular mechanics calculations to determine the structural basis of this decrease in activity. The sulfonate analog of GABA, 3-amino-propylsulfonic acid, became > 2500-fold less potent when the alpha-CH2 was replaced by an ester oxygen. Structural studies showed that the active alpha-CH2 compounds (GABA, 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid, and 3-aminopropylsulfonic acid) prefer a fully extended conformation. The inactive compounds, phosphoethanolamine and ethanolamine-O-sulfate, exist in a gauche conformation around the C beta-C gamma bond. This study, which suggests conformational differences, may explain how PE can be so efficiently excluded from GABAB receptors, despite being present in millimolar concentrations in brain. Exclusion of phosphoethanolamine from GABAB receptors may be an important physiologic control mechanism in the regulation of inhibitory neurotransmission.

  5. GABA(B) receptors and opioid mechanisms involved in homotaurine-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Serrano, M I; Serrano, J S; Fernández, A; Asadi, I; Serrano-Martino, M C

    1998-03-01

    1. The involvement of GABA(B) receptors and opioid mechanisms in homotaurine-induced analgesia has been investigated in current models of nociception by using a GABA(B) receptor antagonist, morphine, and naloxone. CGP 35348 (50-200 mg/kg IP), a highly selective GABA(B) antagonist, was administered prior to carrying out a dose-response curve of homotaurine (22.6-445 mg/kg IP) antinociceptive effect in the abdominal constriction (mice) and tail flick (rats) tests. 2. The tail flick test was performed in animals pretreated with morphine (0.5 mg/kg SC) and naloxone (1 mg/kg), 15 min before amino acid. Animals treated with saline 10 ml/kg (mice) or 1.25 ml/kg (rats) were included as control for the vehicle used. 3. CGP 35348 antagonized the antinociceptive effect of homotaurine in both tests. The range of doses affected by the interaction depended on the test assayed, but it was coincident for the main part of the dose-response curve. 4. A subanalgesic dose of morphine potentiated the antinociceptive effect of lower doses of homotaurine in the tail flick test. Naloxone pretreatment inhibited the antinociceptive effect of homotaurine. 5. These data imply that GABA(B) receptor subpopulations and opiate mechanisms are involved in the antinociceptive effect of homotaurine. Because functional relationships have been found between GABAergic and opiate systems in analgesic effects, an interaction of the two mechanisms may be operating in the effects described for homotaurine.

  6. KCTD Hetero-oligomers Confer Unique Kinetic Properties on Hippocampal GABAB Receptor-Induced K+ Currents.

    PubMed

    Fritzius, Thorsten; Turecek, Rostislav; Seddik, Riad; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Tiao, Jim; Rem, Pascal D; Metz, Michaela; Kralikova, Michaela; Bouvier, Michel; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    GABAB receptors are the G-protein coupled receptors for the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, GABA. GABAB receptors were shown to associate with homo-oligomers of auxiliary KCTD8, KCTD12, KCTD12b, and KCTD16 subunits (named after their T1 K(+)-channel tetramerization domain) that regulate G-protein signaling of the receptor. Here we provide evidence that GABAB receptors also associate with hetero-oligomers of KCTD subunits. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicate that two-thirds of the KCTD16 proteins in the hippocampus of adult mice associate with KCTD12. We show that the KCTD proteins hetero-oligomerize through self-interacting T1 and H1 homology domains. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer measurements in live cells reveal that KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers associate with both the receptor and the G-protein. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrate that KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers impart unique kinetic properties on G-protein-activated Kir3 currents. During prolonged receptor activation (one min) KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers produce moderately desensitizing fast deactivating K(+) currents, whereas KCTD12 and KCTD16 homo-oligomers produce strongly desensitizing fast deactivating currents and nondesensitizing slowly deactivating currents, respectively. During short activation (2 s) KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers produce nondesensitizing slowly deactivating currents. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal neurons of KCTD knock-out mice are consistent with these findings and indicate that KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers increase the duration of slow IPSCs. In summary, our data demonstrate that simultaneous assembly of distinct KCTDs at the receptor increases the molecular and functional repertoire of native GABAB receptors and modulates physiologically induced K(+) current responses in the hippocampus.

  7. Comparison of the effects of the GABAB receptor positive modulator BHF177 and the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on anxiety-like behavior, learning, and memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Risbrough, Victoria B; Cates-Gatto, Chelsea; Kaczanowska, Katarzyna; Finn, M G; Roberts, Amanda J; Markou, Athina

    2013-07-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) receptor activation is a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of drug addiction, pain, anxiety, and depression. However, full agonists of this receptor induce side-effects, such as sedation, muscle relaxation, tolerance, and cognitive disruption. Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the GABAB receptor may have similar therapeutic effects as agonists with superior side-effect profiles. The present study behaviorally characterized N-([1R,2R,4S]-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl)-2-methyl-5-(4-[trifluoromethyl]phenyl)-4-pyrimidinamine (BHF177), a GABAB receptor PAM, in mouse models of anxiety-like behavior, learning and memory. In addition, the effects of BHF177 were compared with the agonist baclofen. Unlike the anxiolytic chlordiazepoxide, baclofen (0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and BHF177 (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg, orally) had no effect on anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze, light/dark box, or Vogel conflict test. Baclofen increased punished drinking in the Vogel conflict test, but this effect may be attributable to the analgesic actions of baclofen. At the highest dose tested (2.5 mg/kg), baclofen-treated mice exhibited sedation-like effects (i.e., reduced locomotor activity) across many of the tests, whereas BHF177-treated mice exhibited no sedation-like effects. BHF177 exhibited pro-convulsion properties only in mice, but not in rats, indicating that this effect may be species-specific. At doses that were not sedative or pro-convulsant, baclofen and BHF177 had no selective effects on fear memory retrieval in contextual and cued fear conditioning or spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. These data suggest that BHF177 has little sedative activity, no anxiolytic-like profile, and minimal impairment of learning and memory in mice.

  8. Effects of stress and tranylcypromine on amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and GABA(B) receptor function in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sands, S A; Reisman, S A; Enna, S J

    2003-01-17

    Modification in gamma-aminobutyric acid-B (GABA(B)) receptors may contribute to the symptoms of some neurological and psychiatric disorders and to the clinical response to psychotherapeutics. The present study was undertaken to determine whether chronic administration of tranylcypromine (TCP), an antidepressant, and chronic stress influence GABA(B) receptor function in rat brain. The results indicate that TCP treatment, but not stress, increases GABA(B) receptor activity in the cerebral cortex, as measured by baclofen-stimulated GTPgammaS binding. In addition, chronic administration of TCP enhances significantly the locomotor response to a single dose of amphetamine, an effect that is abolished by restraint stress. These results indicate that although TCP administration modifies brain GABA(B) receptor activity, which may contribute to the antidepressant response to this agent, this effect is unrelated to the interaction of stress and TCP treatment on the locomotor response to amphetamine.

  9. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type B (GABAB) Receptor Internalization Is Regulated by the R2 Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Saad; Wilkins, Megan E.; Dehghani-Tafti, Ebrahim; Thomas, Philip; Baddeley, Stuart M.; Smart, Trevor G.

    2011-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptors are important for slow synaptic inhibition in the CNS. The efficacy of inhibition is directly related to the stability of cell surface receptors. For GABAB receptors, heterodimerization between R1 and R2 subunits is critical for cell surface expression and signaling, but how this determines the rate and extent of receptor internalization is unknown. Here, we insert a high affinity α-bungarotoxin binding site into the N terminus of the R2 subunit and reveal its dominant role in regulating the internalization of GABAB receptors in live cells. To simultaneously study R1a and R2 trafficking, a new α-bungarotoxin binding site-labeling technique was used, allowing α-bungarotoxin conjugated to different fluorophores to selectively label R1a and R2 subunits. This approach demonstrated that R1a and R2 are internalized as dimers. In heterologous expression systems and neurons, the rates and extents of internalization for R1aR2 heteromers and R2 homomers are similar, suggesting a regulatory role for R2 in determining cell surface receptor stability. The fast internalization rate of R1a, which has been engineered to exit the endoplasmic reticulum, was slowed to that of R2 by truncating the R1a C-terminal tail or by removing a dileucine motif in its coiled-coil domain. Slowing the rate of internalization by co-assembly with R2 represents a novel role for GPCR heterodimerization whereby R2 subunits, via their C terminus coiled-coil domain, mask a dileucine motif on R1a subunits to determine the surface stability of the GABAB receptor. PMID:21724853

  10. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) induces cognitive deficits and affects GABAB receptors and IGF-1 receptors in male rats.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jenny; Grönbladh, Alfhild; Hallberg, Mathias

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the abuse of the club drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has become increasingly popular among adolescents. The drug induces euphoria but can also result in sedation, anaesthesia as well as short-term amnesia. In addition, the abuse of GHB causes cognitive impairments and the mechanism by which GHB induces these impairments is not clarified. The present study investigates the impact of GHB treatment on spatial learning and memory using a water maze (WM) test in rats. Furthermore, the behavioural data is combined with an autoradiographic analysis of the GABAB and the IGF-1 receptor systems. The results demonstrate that the animals administered with GHB display an impaired performance in the WM test as compared to controls. In addition, significant alterations in GABAB and IGF-1 receptor density as well as GABAB receptor functionality, were observed in several brain regions associated with cognitive functions e.g. hippocampus. To conclude, our findings suggest that GHB treatment can affect spatial learning and memory, and that this outcome at least to some extent is likely to involve both GABAB and IGF-1 receptors.

  11. Clinical, imaging, and follow-up observations of patients with anti-GABAB receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Song; Zhang, Yin-Xi; Zhang, Bi-Jun; Lu, Ru-Yi; Lai, Qi-Lun; Chen, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jiong

    2017-05-01

    Anti-gamma-aminobutyric acid B (anti-GABAB) receptor encephalitis is a newly described type of autoimmune encephalitis. We report a case series of patients diagnosed with anti-GABAB receptor encephalitis in China, focusing on their presentations, laboratory and imaging results, and outcomes, as well as the treatment strategies which were employed. Data from patients diagnosed with anti-GABAB receptor encephalitis in the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, from January 2014 to June 2015 were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on specific diagnostic criteria, seven cases were included. Six of the seven patients were males, and a median age at presentation of 56 years (range: 4-71 years). Seizures were the most common initial symptom, and all patients developed symptoms of typical limbic encephalitis during their disease course. Additional types of autoantibodies were identified in four patients. After presentation, three patients were found to have small cell lung cancer and one patient was eventually diagnosed with thymoma. All patients accepted first-line immune therapy, but only one chose tumor treatment. The three tumor-free patients had a good outcome, whereas those with tumors had a poor one. Finally, there were no relapses during follow-up. Anti-GABAB receptor encephalitis is a rare, unique autoimmune disease, and is often associated with tumors. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis for middle and senior-aged patients who present with predominantly limbic encephalitis symptoms. Importantly, earlier recognition of this potentially treatable condition could improve its overall prognosis.

  12. Effects of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on primary drinking in rats.

    PubMed

    Houston, Abigail J; Wong, John C L; Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2012-01-15

    The effects of subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen were investigated on primary drinking in rats. Baclofen (1-4 mg/kg) produced a dose-related reduction in cumulative water intake in 16 h water-deprived rats during the 120 min measurement period (Experiment 1). The suppressant effect of baclofen (2mg/kg) on water intake 16 h water-deprived rats was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP 35348 (3-aminopropyl (diethoxymethyl)-phosphinic acid; 50mg/kg; s.c., Experiment 2.), indicating that the hypodipsic effects of the drug in thirsty rats are mediated by an action at GABA(B) receptors. Experiment 3 was undertaken to investigate the effects of baclofen on volemic drinking induced in rats pretreated with propylene glycol. S.C. administration of polyethylene glycol induces volemic drinking in rats by reducing extracellular fluid. Baclofen (2mg/kg, s.c.) significantly reduced the volemic drinking in rats pretreated with polyethylene glycol (30% w/v solution). Experiment 4 was conducted to investigate the effects of baclofen on osmotic drinking in non-deprived rats pretreated with hypertonic sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. Hypertonic NaCl will draw out intracellular fluid to stimulate osmotic drinking. Baclofen (2mg/kg; s.c.) significantly reduced osmotic drinking in rats pretreated with 1 ml hypertonic NaCl (16% w/v). The results of this study indicate that (i) the hypodipsic effect of baclofen in water-deprived rats is mediated by an action at GABA(B) receptors and (ii) baclofen suppresses both volemic and osmotic drinking.

  13. GABAB receptor ligands for the treatment of alcohol use disorder: preclinical and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Agabio, Roberta; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies conducted to define the “anti-alcohol” pharmacological profile of the prototypic GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, and its therapeutic potential for treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Numerous studies have reported baclofen-induced suppression of alcohol drinking (including relapse- and binge-like drinking) and alcohol reinforcing, motivational, stimulating, and rewarding properties in rodents and monkeys. The majority of clinical surveys conducted to date—including case reports, retrospective chart reviews, and randomized placebo-controlled studies—suggest the ability of baclofen to suppress alcohol consumption, craving for alcohol, and alcohol withdrawal symptomatology in alcohol-dependent patients. The recent identification of a positive allosteric modulatory binding site, together with the synthesis of in vivo effective ligands, represents a novel, and likely more favorable, option for pharmacological manipulations of the GABAB receptor. Accordingly, data collected to date suggest that positive allosteric modulators of the GABAB receptor reproduce several “anti-alcohol” effects of baclofen and display a higher therapeutic index (with larger separation—in terms of doses—between “anti-alcohol” effects and sedation). PMID:24936171

  14. GABAB receptor cell surface export is controlled by an endoplasmic reticulum gatekeeper

    PubMed Central

    Doly, Stéphane; Shirvani, Hamasseh; Gäta, Gabriel; Meye, Frank; Emerit, Michel-Boris; Enslen, Hervé; Achour, Lamia; Pardo-Lopez, Liliana; Kwon, Yang Seung; Armand, Vincent; Gardette, Robert; Giros, Bruno; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Mameli, Manuel; Darmon, Michèle; Marullo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Summary Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) release and cell surface export of many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), are tightly regulated. For GABAB receptors of GABA, the major mammalian inhibitory neurotransmitter, the ligand-binding GB1 subunit is maintained in the ER by unknown mechanisms in the absence of hetero-dimerization with the GB2 subunit. We report that GB1 retention is regulated by a specific gatekeeper, PRAF2. This ER resident transmembrane protein binds to GB1, preventing its progression in the biosynthetic pathway. GB1 release occurs upon competitive displacement from PRAF2 by GB2. PRAF2 concentration, relative to that of GB1 and GB2, tightly controls cell surface receptor density and controls GABAB function in neurons. Experimental perturbation of PRAF2 levels in vivo caused marked hyperactivity disorders in mice. These data reveal an unanticipated major impact of specific ER gate-keepers on GPCR function and identify PRAF2 as a new molecular target with therapeutic potential for psychiatric and neurological diseases involving GABAB function. PMID:26033241

  15. GABA(B) receptor agonists for the treatment of drug addiction: a review of recent findings.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Michael S; Roberts, David C S; de Wit, Harriet

    2002-02-01

    A growing preclinical and clinical literature suggests that GABA(B) receptor agonists promote abstinence and reduce the use of cocaine, heroin, alcohol and nicotine. The purpose of this paper is to critically review these data. GABA(B) receptor agonists, such as baclofen, appear to reduce the reinforcing effects of abused drugs in animal models under multiple experimental procedures. This occurs at doses that have little effect on responding for other positive reinforcers such as food or water. We review evidence that these potential therapeutic effects may be mediated by modulation of mesolimbic dopamine neurons. This review also examines the preliminary clinical data from studies of the efficacy of baclofen for treatment of cocaine, alcohol, and nicotine dependence. We suggest that these preliminary data provide a rationale for conducting more systematic studies of the effects of GABA(B) receptor agonists as treatment for drug abuse. This line of research may also improve our understanding of the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the drug dependence process.

  16. Deficits in cognition and synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of Down syndrome ameliorated by GABAB receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kleschevnikov, Alexander M; Belichenko, Pavel V; Faizi, Mehrdad; Jacobs, Lucia F; Htun, Khin; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Mobley, William C

    2012-07-04

    Cognitive impairment in Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by deficient learning and memory. Mouse genetic models of DS exhibit impaired cognition in hippocampally mediated behavioral tasks and reduced synaptic plasticity of hippocampal pathways. Enhanced efficiency of GABAergic neurotransmission was implicated in those changes. We have recently shown that signaling through postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors is significantly increased in the dentate gyrus of Ts65Dn mice, a genetic model of DS. Here we examined a role for GABA(B) receptors in cognitive deficits in DS by defining the effect of selective GABA(B) receptor antagonists on behavior and synaptic plasticity of adult Ts65Dn mice. Treatment with the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP55845 restored memory of Ts65Dn mice in the novel place recognition, novel object recognition, and contextual fear conditioning tasks, but did not affect locomotion and performance in T-maze. The treatment increased hippocampal levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, equally in 2N and Ts65Dn mice. In hippocampal slices, treatment with the GABA(B) receptor antagonists CGP55845 or CGP52432 enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the Ts65Dn DG. The enhancement of LTP was accompanied by an increase in the NMDA receptor-mediated component of the tetanus-evoked responses. These findings are evidence for a contribution of GABA(B) receptors to changes in hippocampal-based cognition in the Ts65Dn mouse. The ability to rescue cognitive performance through treatment with selective GABA(B) receptor antagonists motivates studies to further explore the therapeutic potential of these compounds in people with DS.

  17. Deficits in cognition and synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of Down syndrome ameliorated by GABAB receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Kleschevnikov, A.M.; Belichenko, P.V.; Faizi, M.; Jacobs, L.F.; Htun, K.; Shamloo, M.; Mobley, W.C.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by deficient learning and memory. Mouse genetic models of DS exhibit impaired cognition in hippocampally mediated behavioral tasks and reduced synaptic plasticity of hippocampal pathways. Enhanced efficiency of GABAergic neurotransmission was implicated in those changes. We have recently shown that signaling through postsynaptic GABAB receptors is significantly increased in the dentate gyrus (DG) of Ts65Dn mice, a genetic model of DS. Here we examined a role for GABAB receptors in cognitive deficits in DS by defining the effect of selective GABAB receptor antagonists on behavior and synaptic plasticity of adult Ts65Dn mice. Treatment with the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP55845 restored memory of Ts65Dn mice in the novel place recognition, novel object recognition and contextual fear conditioning tasks, but did not affect locomotion and performance in T-maze. The treatment increased hippocampal levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), equally in 2N and Ts65Dn mice. In hippocampal slices, treatment with the GABAB receptor antagonists CGP55845 or CGP52432 enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the Ts65Dn DG. The enhancement of LTP was accompanied by an increase in the NMDA receptor-mediated component of the tetanus-evoked responses. These findings are evidence for a contribution of GABAB receptors to changes in hippocampal-based cognition in the Ts65Dn mouse. The ability to rescue cognitive performance through treatment with selective GABAB receptor antagonists motivates studies to further explore the therapeutic potential of these compounds in people with DS. PMID:22764230

  18. GABA(B) receptor agonist only reduces ethanol drinking in light-drinking mice.

    PubMed

    Villas Boas, Gustavo Roberto; Zamboni, Camila Gadens; Peretti, Murilo Calvo; Correia, Diego; Rueda, André Veloso Lima; Camarini, Rosana; Brunialti-Godard, Ana Lucia; Boerngen-Lacerda, Roseli

    2012-08-01

    Baclofen, a GABA(B) agonist, reduces ethanol intake in animals and humans, but the contrary or no effect was also reported. Our previous study demonstrated that mice characterized as "loss of control over ethanol intake" had different Gabbr1 and Gabbr2 transcription levels, which express, respectively, the GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits in brain areas related to addictive behavior. In the present study, we tested baclofen on ethanol intake in mice exposed to the free-choice paradigm. Adult male Swiss mice, individually housed, had free access to three bottles: ethanol (5% and 10%) and water. The protocol had four phases: acquisition (AC, 10 weeks), withdrawal (W, 4 cycles during 2 weeks of 2 day-free-choice and 2 day-only-water), reexposure (RE, 2 weeks), and adulteration of ethanol solutions with quinine (AD, 2 weeks). Mice characterized as "loss of control" (A, n=11, preference for ethanol in AC and maintenance of ethanol intake levels in AD), heavy (H, n=11, preference for ethanol in AC and reduction of ethanol intake levels in AD), and light (L, n=16, preference for water in all phases) drinkers were randomly distributed into two subgroups receiving either intraperitoneal injections of all doses of baclofen (1.25, 2.5, and 5.0mg/kg, given each dose twice in consecutive days) or saline, being exposed to free-choice. Fluid consumption was measured 24h later. Baclofen reduced ethanol intake in group L. In group H a reduction compared to AC was observed. Group A maintained their high ethanol intake even after baclofen treatment. Activation of the GABA(B) receptor depends on the precise balance between the GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits, so the disproportionate transcription levels, we reported in group A, could explain this lack of response to baclofen. These data highlight the importance to test baclofen in individuals with different ethanol drinking profiles, including humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct Interaction of GABAB Receptors with M2 Muscarinic Receptors Enhances Muscarinic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Stephanie B.; Clancy, Sinead M.; Terunuma, Miho; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Thomas, Steven M.; Moss, Stephen J.; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Down-regulation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) provides an important mechanism for reducing neurotransmitter signaling during sustained stimulation. Chronic stimulation of M2 muscarinic receptors (M2R) causes internalization of M2R and G protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels in neuronal PC12 cells, resulting in loss of function. Here, we show that co-expression of GABAB R2 receptors (GBR2) rescues both surface expression and function of M2R, including M2R-induced activation of GIRKs and inhibition of cAMP production. GBR2 showed significant association with M2R at the plasma membrane but not other GPCRs (M1R, μOR), as detected by FRET measured with TIRF microscopy. Unique regions of the proximal C-terminal domains of GBR2 and M2R mediate specific binding between M2R and GBR2. In the brain, GBR2, but not GBR1, biochemically coprecipitates with M2R and overlaps with M2R expression in cortical neurons. This novel heteromeric association between M2R and GBR2 provides a possible mechanism for altering muscarinic signaling in the brain and represents a previously unrecognized role for GBR2. PMID:20016095

  20. Methamphetamine-evoked depression of GABA(B) receptor signaling in GABA neurons of the VTA.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Claire L; Lalive, Arnaud L; Tan, Kelly R; Terunuma, Miho; Munoz, Michaelanne B; Pangalos, Menelas N; Martínez-Hernández, José; Watanabe, Masahiko; Moss, Stephen J; Luján, Rafael; Lüscher, Christian; Slesinger, Paul A

    2012-03-08

    Psychostimulants induce neuroadaptations in excitatory and fast inhibitory transmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Mechanisms underlying drug-evoked synaptic plasticity of slow inhibitory transmission mediated by GABA(B) receptors and G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK/Kir(3)) channels, however, are poorly understood. Here, we show that 1 day after methamphetamine (METH) or cocaine exposure both synaptically evoked and baclofen-activated GABA(B)R-GIRK currents were significantly depressed in VTA GABA neurons and remained depressed for 7 days. Presynaptic inhibition mediated by GABA(B)Rs on GABA terminals was also weakened. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy revealed internalization of GABA(B1) and GIRK2, which occurred coincident with dephosphorylation of serine 783 (S783) in GABA(B2), a site implicated in regulating GABA(B)R surface expression. Inhibition of protein phosphatases recovered GABA(B)R-GIRK currents in VTA GABA neurons of METH-injected mice. This psychostimulant-evoked impairment in GABA(B)R signaling removes an intrinsic brake on GABA neuron spiking, which may augment GABA transmission in the mesocorticolimbic system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Antidepressant-like effects of ascorbic acid and ketamine involve modulation of GABAA and GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Priscila B; Neis, Vivian B; Ribeiro, Camille M; Moretti, Morgana; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2016-10-01

    It has been suggested that dysregulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated neurotransmission is involved in the etiology of major depressive disorder and in the action of the fast-acting antidepressant ketamine. Considering that recent evidence has suggested that ascorbic acid may exert an antidepressant-like effect through mechanisms similar to ketamine, this study evaluated the involvement of GABAA and GABAB receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of ascorbic acid, comparing the results with those obtained with ketamine. To investigate the involvement of GABAA in the antidepressant-like effect of ascorbic acid and ketamine in the tail suspension test (TST), mice were treated with a sub-effective dose of ascorbic acid (0.1mg/kg, po), ketamine (0.1mg/kg, ip) or vehicle and 30minutes later, a sub-effective dose of muscimol (0.1mg/kg, ip, GABAA receptor agonist) or vehicle was administered. In another set of experiments, mice were treated with ascorbic acid (1mg/kg, po, active dose in the TST) or vehicle and 30minutes later, baclofen (1mg/kg, ip, GABAB receptor agonist) was administered. A similar experimental protocol was performed with ketamine (1mg/kg, ip). The administration of muscimol combined with ascorbic acid or ketamine produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the TST. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of ascorbic acid and ketamine were abolished by baclofen. There was no alteration in spontaneous locomotion in any experimental group. Results indicate that the anti-immobility effect of ascorbic acid and ketamine in TST may involve an activation of GABAA receptors and a possible inhibition of GABAB receptors. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. GABA(B) receptors involvement in the effects induced by nicotine on anxiety-related behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Varani, Andrés P; Balerio, Graciela N

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible involvement of GABA(B) receptors in the anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like responses induced by nicotine in mice. Animals were exposed to nicotine only once. The acute administration of low (0.05mg/kg, sc) or high (0.8mg/kg, sc) doses of nicotine produced opposite effects in the elevated plus maze test; respectively, anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like responses. The effect of pretreatment with either the GABA(B) receptor antagonist 2-OH-saclofen (0.25, 0.5 and 1mg/kg; ip) or the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen (0.5, 1 and 2mg/kg; ip), was evaluated on the anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like responses induced by nicotine. 2-OH-saclofen completely abolished both nicotine-induced effects (p<0.001) at the highest dose tested, suggesting an involvement of GABA(B) receptors in these behavioural responses. On the other hand, baclofen failed to modify the anxiety-related effects of nicotine. These results suggest that the GABA(B) receptors are involved in the regulation of nicotine-induced anxiety-related behavioural responses in mice, and provide new findings to support a potential pharmaco therapeutic use of GABAergic drugs in the treatment of tobacco addiction.

  3. Ethanol inhibits excitatory neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens of adolescent mice through GABAA and GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Devesh; Chergui, Karima

    2013-07-01

    Age-related differences in various acute physiological and behavioral effects of alcohol have been demonstrated in humans and in other species. Adolescents are more sensitive to positive reinforcing properties of alcohol than adults, but the cellular mechanisms that underlie such a difference are not clearly established. We, therefore, assessed age differences in the ability of ethanol to modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the mouse nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region importantly involved in reward mechanisms. We measured field excitatory postsynaptic potentials/population spikes (fEPSP/PS) in NAc slices from adolescent (22-30 days old) and adult (5-8 months old) male mice. We found that 50mM ethanol applied in the perfusion solution inhibits glutamatergic neurotransmission in the NAc of adolescent, but not adult, mice. This effect is blocked by the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antagonist bicuculline and by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845. Furthermore, bicuculline applied alone produces a stronger increase in the fEPSP/PS amplitude in adult mice than in adolescent mice. Activation of GABAA receptors with muscimol produces a stronger and longer lasting depression of neurotransmission in adolescent mice as compared with adult mice. Activation of GABAB receptors with SKF 97541 also depresses neurotransmission more strongly in adolescent than in adult mice. These results demonstrate that an increased GABA receptor function associated with a reduced inhibitory tone underlies the depressant action of ethanol on glutamatergic neurotransmission in the NAc of adolescent mice.

  4. Evaluation of peripheral versus central effects of GABAB receptor activation using a novel, positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor ADX71943, a pharmacological tool compound with a fully peripheral activity profile

    PubMed Central

    Kalinichev, M; Donovan-Rodriguez, T; Girard, F; Riguet, E; Rouillier, M; Bournique, B; Haddouk, H; Mutel, V; Poli, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, has shown promising effects in patients suffering from pain, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcoholism, overactive bladder and gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, baclofen's short duration of action and side effects limit its wider use. Here we characterized a novel, GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) ADX71943. Experimental Approach In vitro, ADX71943 was assessed for pharmacological activity and selectivity using recombinant and native GABAB receptors. In vivo ADX71943 was assessed in the acetic acid-induced writhing (AAW) test in mice and formalin tests (FTs) in mice and rats. Marble burying (MB) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests, rotarod, spontaneous locomotor activity (sLMA) and body temperature (BT) tests in mice and rats were used to investigate centrally-mediated effects. Key Results In vitro, in the presence of GABA, ADX71943 increased the potency and efficacy of agonists and showed selectivity at the GABAB receptor. ADX71943 reduced pain-associated behaviours in AAW; an effect blocked by GABAB receptor antagonist CGP63360. ADX71943 reduced pain in the FT in mice and rats, but was inactive in the MB and EPM despite reaching high concentrations in plasma. ADX71943 had no effect on BT, rotarod and sLMA. Conclusions and Implications ADX71943 showed consistent and target-related efficacy in tests of disorders that have a significant peripheral component (acute and chronic pain), while having no effect in those associated with centrally-mediated anxiety-like reactivity and side effects. Thus, ADX71943 is a useful pharmacological tool for delineation of peripherally- versus centrally-mediated effects of GABAB receptor activation. PMID:24923436

  5. Involvement of GABA(B) receptors of the dorsal hippocampus on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Massoudi, Roohollah; Sepehri, Houri; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2006-01-30

    In the present study, effects of intra-hippocampal CA1 (intra-CA1) injections of GABA(B) receptor agonist and antagonist on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced place preference in male Wistar rats have been investigated. Subcutaneous administration of different doses of morphine sulphate (0.5-6 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent conditioned place preference (CPP). Using a 3-day schedule of conditioning, it was found that the GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen (0.5-2 microg/rat; intra-CA1), or the GABA(B) receptor antagonist, phaclofen (1-3 microg/rat; intra-CA1), did not produce a significant place preference or place aversion. Intra-CA1 administration of baclofen (1 and 2 microg/rat; intra-CA1) decreased the acquisition of CPP induced by morphine (3 mg/kg; s.c.). On the other hand, intra-CA1 injection of phaclofen (1 and 2 microg/rat; intra-CA1) in combination with a lower dose of morphine (1 mg/kg) elicited a significant CPP. The response of baclofen (2 microg/rat; intra-CA1) was reversed by phaclofen (4 and 6 microg/rat; intra-CA1). Furthermore, intra-CA1 administration of baclofen but not phaclofen before testing significantly decreased the expression of morphine (3 mg/kg; s.c.)-induced place preference. Baclofen or phaclofen injections had no effects on locomotor activity on the testing sessions. It is concluded that the GABA(B) receptors in dorsal hippocampus may play an active role in morphine reward.

  6. Neuroprotective role of GABAB receptor modulation against streptozotocin-induced behavioral and biochemical abnormalities in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kushal; Kaur, Harmanpreet; Deshmukh, Rahul

    2017-08-15

    Stimulation as well as inhibition of GABAB (Gamma amino butyric acid) receptors has been reported to show beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental evidences suggest that the use of GABAergic agents could influence learning and memory. The present study was designed to investigate the possible role of GABAB receptors in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced behavioral and biochemical abnormalities in rats. Herein STZ was infused (3mg/kg) bilaterally on alternate days (day 1 and day 3) to produce experimental dementia in rats. STZ-infused rats were then treated with baclofen (GABABR agonist) 5 and 10mg/kg i.p. and CGP35348 (GABABR antagonist) 25 and 50mg/kg i.p. one week following STZ infusion for 15days. Cognitive functions were assessed by using Morris water maze (MWM) and object recognition task (ORT). Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA.), reduced glutathione (GSH), andacetylcholinesterase (AChE) were determined to evaluate oxidative stress and cholinergic function. STZ-infused rats showed decreased memory retention, elevated levels of MDA, increased AChE activity, reduced GSH levels. The combination of STZ with increasing doses of Baclofen further induced a higher decrease in memory retention and increase in oxidative stress. CGP35348 restored cognitive functions and AChE activity in STZ-infused rats. The cognitive enhancement following CGP35348 may be due to its ability to restore cholinergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic function, and its antioxidant activity. Therefore, it would be safe to conclude that the pharmacological blockade of GABAB receptors would be therapeutic in the management of cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cloning of the GABAB Receptor Subunits B1 and B2 and their Expression in the Central Nervous System of the Adult Sea Lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Romaus-Sanjurjo, Daniel; Fernández-López, Blanca; Sobrido-Cameán, Daniel; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory transmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) acting through ionotropic (GABAA) and metabotropic (GABAB) receptors. The GABAB receptor produces a slow inhibition since it activates second messenger systems through the binding and activation of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins [G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)]. Lampreys are a key reference to understand molecular evolution in vertebrates. The importance of the GABAB receptor for the modulation of the circuits controlling locomotion and other behaviors has been shown in pharmacological/physiological studies in lampreys. However, there is no data about the sequence of the GABAB subunits or their expression in the CNS of lampreys. Our aim was to identify the sea lamprey GABAB1 and GABAB2 transcripts and study their expression in the CNS of adults. We cloned two partial sequences corresponding to the GABAB1 and GABAB2 cDNAs of the sea lamprey as confirmed by sequence analysis and comparison with known GABAB sequences of other vertebrates. In phylogenetic analyses, the sea lamprey GABAB sequences clustered together with GABABs sequences of vertebrates and emerged as an outgroup to all gnathostome sequences. We observed a broad and overlapping expression of both transcripts in the entire CNS. Expression was mainly observed in neuronal somas of the periventricular regions including the identified reticulospinal cells. No expression was observed in identifiable fibers. Comparison of our results with those reported in other vertebrates indicates that a broad and overlapping expression of the GABAB subunits in the CNS is a conserved character shared by agnathans and gnathostomes. PMID:28008311

  8. Age-related relationship between mRNA expression of GABA(B) receptors and calcium channel beta4 subunits in cacnb4lh mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, F; Wang, Y; Hosford, D A

    1999-07-23

    In previous studies we found increased GABA(B) receptor number in 8-week-old homozygous Cacnb4lh mice compared to nonepileptic (+/+) littermates. In this study, we examined the relationship between Cacnb4 and GABA(B) receptor mRNA expression in brains from Cacnb4lh homozygotes and (+/+) controls. We found a significant correlation between the magnitude of increased GABA(B) receptor and decreased Cacnb4 mRNA expression in 8-week-old mice. In contract, in 6-month-old mice, there was no change in GABA(B) receptor or Cacnb4 mRNA expression. These findings suggest that the factor(s) responsible for decreased Cacnb4 and increased GABA(B) receptor mRNA expression abate in older mice. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. Antibodies to the GABAB receptor in limbic encephalitis with seizures: case series and characterisation of the antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Eric; Lai, Meizan; Peng, Xiaoyu; Hughes, Ethan; Constantinescu, Radu; Raizer, Jeffrey; Friedman, Daniel; Skeen, Mark B; Grisold, Wolfgang; Kimura, Akio; Ohta, Kouichi; Iizuka, Takahiro; Guzman, Miguel; Graus, Francesc; Moss, Stephen J; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Dalmau, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Some encephalitides or seizure disorders once thought idiopathic now seem to be immune mediated. We aimed to describe the clinical features of one such disorder and to identify the autoantigen involved. Methods 15 patients who were suspected to have paraneoplastic or immune-mediated limbic encephalitis were clinically assessed. Confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, and mass spectrometry were used to characterise the autoantigen. An assay of HEK293 cells transfected with rodent GABAB1 or GABAB2 receptor subunits was used as a serological test. 91 patients with encephalitis suspected to be paraneoplastic or immune mediated and 13 individuals with syndromes associated with antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 were used as controls. Findings All patients presented with early or prominent seizures; other symptoms, MRI, and electroencephalography findings were consistent with predominant limbic dysfunction. All patients had antibodies (mainly IgG1) against a neuronal cell-surface antigen; in three patients antibodies were detected only in CSF. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry showed that the antibodies recognise the B1 subunit of the GABAB receptor, an inhibitory receptor that has been associated with seizures and memory dysfunction when disrupted. Confocal microscopy showed colocalisation of the antibody with GABAB receptors. Seven of 15 patients had tumours, five of which were small-cell lung cancer, and seven patients had non-neuronal autoantibodies. Although nine of ten patients who received immunotherapy and cancer treatment (when a tumour was found) showed neurological improvement, none of the four patients who were not similarly treated improved (p=0.005). Low levels of GABAB1 receptor antibodies were identified in two of 104 controls (p<0.0001). Interpretation GABAB receptor autoimmune encephalitis is a potentially treatable disorder characterised by seizures and, in some patients, associated with small-cell lung cancer and

  10. Epileptiform activity triggers long-term plasticity of GABAB receptor signalling in the developing rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Tosetti, P; Ferrand, N; Brun, I Colin-Le; Gaïarsa, JL

    2005-01-01

    GABAB receptor (GABABR)-mediated presynaptic inhibition regulates neurotransmitter release from synaptic terminals. In the neonatal hippocampus, GABABR activation reduces GABA release and terminates spontaneous network discharges called giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). Blocking GABABRs transforms GDPs into longer epileptiform discharges. Thus, GABABR-mediated presynaptic inhibition of GABA release (GABA auto-inhibition) controls both spontaneous network activity and excitability in the developing hippocampus. Here we show that extensive release of endogenous GABA during epileptiform activity impairs GABA auto-inhibition, but not GABABR-mediated inhibition of glutamate release, leading to hyperexcitability of the neonatal hippocampal network. Paired-pulse depression of GABA release (PPD) and heterosynaptic depression of glutamate release were used to monitor the efficacy of presynaptic GABABR-mediated inhibition in slices. PPD, but not heterosynaptic depression, was dramatically reduced after potassium (K+)-induced ictal-like discharges (ILDs), suggesting a selective impairment of GABABR-dependent presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic terminals. Impairing GABA auto-inhibition induced a 44% increase in GDP width and the appearance of pathological network discharges. Preventing GABA-induced activation of GABABRs during ILDs avoided PPD loss and most modifications of the network activity. In contrast, a partial block of GABABRs induced network discharges strikingly similar to those observed after K+-driven ILDs. Finally, neither loss of GABA auto-inhibition nor network hyperexcitability could be observed following synchronous release of endogenous GABA in physiological conditions (during GDPs at 1 Hz). Thus, epileptiform activity was instrumental to impair GABABR-dependent presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic terminals. In conclusion, our results indicate that endogenous GABA released during epileptiform activity can reduce GABA auto-inhibition and trigger

  11. Evidence for involvement of nitric oxide and GABAB receptors in MK-801- stimulated release of glutamate in rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roenker, Nicole L.; Gudelsky, Gary A.; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Horn, Paul S.; Richtand, Neil M.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic administration of NMDA receptor antagonists elevates extracellular glutamate within prefrontal cortex. The cognitive and behavioral effects of NMDA receptor blockade have direct relevance to symptoms of schizophrenia, and recent studies demonstrate an important role for nitric oxide and GABAB receptors in mediating the effects of NMDA receptor blockade on these behaviors. We sought to extend those observations by directly measuring the effects of nitric oxide and GABAB receptor mechanisms on MK-801-induced glutamate release in the prefrontal cortex. Systemic MK-801 injection (0.3 mg/kg) to male Sprague-Dawley rats significantly increased extracellular glutamate levels in prefrontal cortex, as determined by microdialysis. This effect was blocked by pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (60 mg/kg). Reverse dialysis of the nitric oxide donor SNAP (0.5 – 5 mM) directly into prefrontal cortex mimicked the effect of systemic MK-801, dose-dependently elevating cortical extracellular glutamate. The effect of MK-801 was also blocked by systemic treatment with the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (5 mg/kg). In combination, these data suggest increased nitric oxide formation is necessary for NMDA antagonist-induced elevations of extracellular glutamate in the prefrontal cortex. Additionally, the data suggest GABAB receptor activation can modulate the NMDA antagonist-induced increase in cortical glutamate release. PMID:22579658

  12. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    PubMed

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils.

  13. GABAB receptor stimulation by baclofen and taurine enhances excitatory amino acid induced phosphatidylinositol turnover in neonatal rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Smith, S S; Li, J

    1991-10-28

    Excitatory amino acid stimulation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis has been associated with development of the CNS. Normally minimally ineffective in stimulating PI hydrolysis in the neonatal rat cerebellum, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) increased levels of PI hydrolysis 82.3 +/- 5.5% above basal values in the presence of 1 microM baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptor agonist. This effect was observed at day 7 but not in adult cerebellum. The effect of baclofen could be mimicked by low dose GABA and taurine, actions which were blocked by prior application of a specific GABAB antagonist. Therefore, the ability of NMDA to stimulate PI hydrolysis in neonatal cerebellar tissue may be regulated by the degree of GABAB receptor stimulation.

  14. GABAB receptor deficiency causes failure of neuronal homeostasis in hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Vertkin, Irena; Styr, Boaz; Slomowitz, Edden; Ofir, Nir; Shapira, Ilana; Berner, David; Fedorova, Tatiana; Laviv, Tal; Barak-Broner, Noa; Greitzer-Antes, Dafna; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Lotan, Ilana; Slutsky, Inna

    2015-06-23

    Stabilization of neuronal activity by homeostatic control systems is fundamental for proper functioning of neural circuits. Failure in neuronal homeostasis has been hypothesized to underlie common pathophysiological mechanisms in a variety of brain disorders. However, the key molecules regulating homeostasis in central mammalian neural circuits remain obscure. Here, we show that selective inactivation of GABAB, but not GABA(A), receptors impairs firing rate homeostasis by disrupting synaptic homeostatic plasticity in hippocampal networks. Pharmacological GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) blockade or genetic deletion of the GB(1a) receptor subunit disrupts homeostatic regulation of synaptic vesicle release. GABA(B)Rs mediate adaptive presynaptic enhancement to neuronal inactivity by two principle mechanisms: First, neuronal silencing promotes syntaxin-1 switch from a closed to an open conformation to accelerate soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex assembly, and second, it boosts spike-evoked presynaptic calcium flux. In both cases, neuronal inactivity removes tonic block imposed by the presynaptic, GB(1a)-containing receptors on syntaxin-1 opening and calcium entry to enhance probability of vesicle fusion. We identified the GB(1a) intracellular domain essential for the presynaptic homeostatic response by tuning intermolecular interactions among the receptor, syntaxin-1, and the Ca(V)2.2 channel. The presynaptic adaptations were accompanied by scaling of excitatory quantal amplitude via the postsynaptic, GB(1b)-containing receptors. Thus, GABA(B)Rs sense chronic perturbations in GABA levels and transduce it to homeostatic changes in synaptic strength. Our results reveal a novel role for GABA(B)R as a key regulator of population firing stability and propose that disruption of homeostatic synaptic plasticity may underlie seizure's persistence in the absence of functional GABA(B)Rs.

  15. Hippocampal CA1 lacunosum-moleculare interneurons: modulation of monosynaptic GABAergic IPSCs by presynaptic GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Khazipov, R; Congar, P; Ben-Ari, Y

    1995-11-01

    1. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were employed to characterize monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in morphologically and electrophysiologically identified interneurons located in the stratum lacunosum moleculare, or near the border of the stratum radiatum (LM interneurons), in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices taken from 3- to 4-wk-old rats. Monosynaptic IPSCs, evoked in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX; 20 microM) and D-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoate (APV; 50 microM) were biphasic. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptor antagonist, bicuculline (20 microM), blocked the fast IPSC, and the slow IPSC was blocked by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP35348 (500 microM). 2. Monosynaptic IPSCs were evoked by electrical stimulation in several distant regions including the stratum radiatum, the stratum oriens, the stratum lacunosum-moleculare, and the molecular layer of dentate gyrus, suggesting an extensive network of inhibitory interneurons in the hippocampus. In paired recordings of CA1 interneurons and pyramidal cells, IPSCs were evoked by electrical stimulation of most of these distal regions with the exception of the molecular layer of dentate gyrus, which evoked an IPSC only in LM interneurons. 3. Frequent (> 0.1 Hz) stimulation depressed the evoked IPSCs. With a paired-pulse protocol, the second IPSC was depressed and the maximal depression (40-50%) was observed with an interstimulus interval of 100-200 ms. 4. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (1 microM) reduced the amplitude of evoked IPSCs and the paired-pulse depression of the second IPSC. The GABAB receptor antagonist CGP35348 (0.5-1 mM) had no significant effect on the amplitude of isolated IPSCs. However, CGP35348 reduced but did not fully block paired-pulse depression, suggesting that this depression is partly due to the activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors. 5. The paired-pulse depression depended on the level of

  16. The role of GABAB receptors in the vestibular oculomotor system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Naoki; Wood, Scott; Kushiro, Keisuke; Perachio, Adrian; Makishima, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Systemic administration of a gamma-amino butyric acid type B (GABAB) receptor agonist, baclofen, affects various physiological and psychological processes. To date, the effects on oculomotor system have been well characterized in primates, however those in mice have not been explored. In this study, we investigated the effects of baclofen focusing on vestibular-related eye movements. Two rotational paradigms, i.e. sinusoidal rotation and counter rotation were employed to stimulate semicircular canals and otolith organs in the inner ear. Experimental conditions (dosage, routes and onset of recording) were determined based on the prior studies exploring the behavioral effects of baclofen in mice. With an increase in dosage, both canal and otolith induced ocular responses were gradually affected. There was a clear distinction in the drug sensitivity showing that eye movements derived from direct vestibulo-ocular reflex pathways were relatively unaltered, while the responses through higher-order neural networks in the vestibular system were substantially decreased. These findings were consistent with those observed in primates suggesting a well-conserved role of GABAB receptors in the oculomotor system across frontal-eyed and lateral-eyed animals. We showed here a previously unrecognized effect of baclofen on the vestibular oculomotor function in mice. When interpreting general animal performance under the drug, the potential contribution of altered balance system should be taken into consideration. PMID:26778789

  17. GABAB receptor stimulation decreases amphetamine-induced behavior and neuropeptide gene expression in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenxia; Mailloux, Adam W; Jung, Bruce J; Edmunds, Hayward S; McGinty, Jacqueline F

    2004-04-09

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether GABA(B) receptor activation blocks acute amphetamine-induced behavioral activity, dopamine release, and neuropeptide mRNA expression in the striatum. Systemic administration of R-(+)-baclofen (1.25 mg/kg, i.p.) did not alter total distance traveled or vertical rearing induced by amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). At 2.5 mg/kg, baclofen did not alter spontaneous motor activity or total distance traveled, but completely blocked vertical rearing induced by amphetamine. At 5.0 mg/kg, baclofen completely blocked both total distance traveled and vertical rearing induced by amphetamine. Quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that baclofen (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the ability of amphetamine to increase preprodynorphin (PPD), preprotachykinin (PPT), preproenkephalin (PPE), and secretogranin II (SGII) mRNA levels in the striatum without altering the basal levels of these signals. Baclofen also blocked the amphetamine-induced rise in SGII mRNA in the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens and cingulate cortex. In a separate experiment, systemic baclofen (2.5 mg/kg) decreased the amphetamine-induced increase in dialysate dopamine levels in the striatum. These results suggest that reduced striatal dopamine release contributes to the ability of GABA(B) receptor activation to decrease acute amphetamine-induced behavioral activity and striatal neuropeptide gene expression.

  18. The GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen attenuates cocaine- and heroin-seeking behavior by rats.

    PubMed

    Di Ciano, Patricia; Everitt, Barry J

    2003-03-01

    Conditioned stimuli paired with drugs of abuse can acquire motivational properties, and are capable of inducing drug-seeking behavior and relapse to cocaine use. Converging evidence implicates the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system, through interactions with limbic afferents to the nucleus accumbens, in behavior controlled by conditioned stimuli. The GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen has been shown to decrease break points in rats responding for cocaine under progressive ratio schedules and also to attenuate activation of limbic cortical areas in human cocaine addicts. The purpose of the present study was therefore to investigate the effects of baclofen on drug-associated cue-controlled cocaine- or heroin-seeking behavior by rats. Under the second-order schedule of reinforcement used in the present study, cocaine or heroin were available after a fixed time interval, while high rates of responding during the interdrug intervals were maintained by the response-contingent presentations of drug-associated conditioned reinforcers. Baclofen decreased stimulus-maintained responding for either heroin or cocaine, but decreased only cocaine intake under an FR1 schedule. These results therefore support preliminary clinical findings and suggest that drugs with GABA(B) receptor agonist properties may aid abstinence in human drug addicts by decreasing the propensity to cue-induced drug-seeking and relapse.

  19. Conjoint occurrence of GABAB receptor antibodies in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome with antibodies to the voltage gated calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Dogan Onugoren, Müjgan; Rauschka, Helmut; Bien, Christian G

    2014-08-15

    Antibodies (abs) to the GABAB receptor have been recently found to be responsible for immune-mediated encephalitis with dominant seizures. They are in approximately 50% of cases associated with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). GABAB receptors are mainly located in the hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum in the presynaptic and postsynaptic regions of synapses. The main function of these receptors is to reduce activity states of neurons. In some instances, GABAB receptor abs in these patients were accompanied by other antibodies, among them VGCC abs (Lancaster et al., 2010, Boronat et al., 2011). VGCC abs cause paraneoplastic Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) by reduction of presynaptic VGCCs (Titulaer et al., 2011). In the domain of CNS disease, VGCC abs have been found in association with paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia (Mason et al., 1997) and rarely and at low titres also in other paraneoplastic encephalopathies together with Hu abs (Lennon et al., 1995). It has been a long-standing debate if abs in paraneoplastic conditions associate rather with the neurological syndrome or the tumour. Here, we describe the conjoint occurrence of abs to the GABAB receptor and to the VGCC in a patient with SCLC presenting only symptoms of the peripheral nervous system giving another example of the latter hypothesis.

  20. Diminished presynaptic GABA(B) receptor function in the neocortex of a genetic model of absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yugi; D'Antuono, Margherita; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Biagini, Giuseppe; Avoli, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Changes in GABA(B) receptor subunit expression have been recently reported in the neocortex of epileptic WAG/Rij rats that are genetically prone to experience absence seizures. These alterations may lead to hyperexcitability by downregulating the function of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in neocortical networks as suggested by a reduction in paired-pulse depression. Here, we tested further this hypothesis by analyzing the effects induced by the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen (0.1-10 microM) on the inhibitory events recorded in vitro from neocortical slices obtained from epileptic (>180 day-old) WAG/Rij and age-matched, non-epileptic control (NEC) rats. We found that higher doses of baclofen were required to depress pharmacologically isolated, stimulus-induced IPSPs generated by WAG/Rij neurons as compared to NEC. We also obtained similar evidence by comparing the effects of baclofen on the rate of occurrence of synchronous GABAergic events recorded by WAG/Rij and NEC neocortical slices treated with 4-aminopyridine + glutamatergic receptor antagonists. In conclusion, these data highlight a decreased function of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in the WAG/Rij rat neocortex. We propose that this alteration may contribute to neocortical hyperexcitability and thus to absence seizures.

  1. gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) induces GABA(B) receptor independent intracellular Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, but has no effect on GHB or GABA(B) receptors of medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Molnár, T; Antal, K; Nyitrai, G; Emri, Z

    2009-08-18

    We report on cellular actions of the illicit recreational drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in the brain reward area nucleus accumbens. First, we compared the effects of GHB and the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen. Neither of them affected the membrane currents of medium spiny neurons in rat nucleus accumbens slices. GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic potentials of medium spiny neurons, however, were reduced by baclofen but not GHB. These results indicate the lack of GHB as well as postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors, and the presence of GHB insensitive presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in medium spiny neurons. In astrocytes GHB induced intracellular Ca(2+) transients, preserved in slices from GABA(B) receptor type 1 subunit knockout mice. The effects of tetrodotoxin, zero added Ca(2+) with/without intracellular Ca(2+) store depletor cyclopiazonic acid or vacuolar H-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 indicate that GHB-evoked Ca(2+) transients depend on external Ca(2+) and intracellular Ca(2+) stores, but not on vesicular transmitter release. GHB-induced astrocytic Ca(2+) transients were not affected by the GHB receptor-specific antagonist NCS-382, suggesting the presence of a novel NCS-382-insensitive target for GHB in astrocytes. The activation of astrocytes by GHB implies their involvement in physiological actions of GHB. Our findings disclose a novel profile of GHB action in the nucleus accumbens. Here, unlike in other brain areas, GHB does not act on GABA(B) receptors, but activates an NCS-382 insensitive GHB-specific target in a subpopulation of astrocytes. The lack of either post- or presynaptic effects on medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens distinguishes GHB from many drugs and natural rewards with addictive properties and might explain why GHB has only a weak reinforcing capacity.

  2. RGS2 modulates coupling between GABAB receptors and GIRK channels in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Lomazzi, Marta; Cruz, Hans G; Creton, Cyril; Luján, Rafael; Li, Meng; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko; Wickman, Kevin; Boyer, Stephanie B; Slesinger, Paul A; Lüscher, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Agonists of GABA(B) receptors exert a bi-directional effect on the activity of dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area, which can be explained by the fact that coupling between GABA(B) receptors and G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels is significantly weaker in DA neurons than in GABA neurons. Thus, low concentrations of agonists preferentially inhibit GABA neurons and thereby disinhibit DA neurons. This disinhibition might confer reinforcing properties on addictive GABA(B) receptor agonists such as gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and its derivatives. Here we show that, in DA neurons of mice, the low coupling efficiency reflects the selective expression of heteromeric GIRK2/3 channels and is dynamically modulated by a member of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) protein family. Moreover, repetitive exposure to GHB increases the GABA(B) receptor-GIRK channel coupling efficiency through downregulation of RGS2. Finally, oral self-administration of GHB at a concentration that is normally rewarding becomes aversive after chronic exposure. On the basis of these results, we propose a mechanism that might underlie tolerance to GHB.

  3. The Regulatory Effects of Lateral Hypothalamus Area GABAB Receptor on Gastric Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lin; Zhao, Huiru; Zhu, Tao; Liu, Yeliu; Hu, Li; Liu, Zhenguo; Huang, Hai; Chen, Fuxue; Deng, Zhenxu; Chu, Dechang; Du, Dongshu

    2017-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS The aim of the research was to determine the functional effects and molecular mechanisms of GABAB receptor on ischemia reperfusion-induced gastric injury in rats.The lateral hypothalamus area GABAB receptor attenuated the ischemia reperfusion-induced gastric injury by up-regulating the production of GABA, GABABR, and down-regulating P-GABABR in the brain.This work would provide a new therapeutic strategy for acute gastric injury. Gastric ischemia-reperfusion (GI-R) injury progression is largely associated with excessive activation of the greater splanchnic nerve (GSN). This study aims to investigate the protective effects of GABAB receptor (GABABR) in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) on GI-R injury. A model of GI-R injury was established by clamping the celiac artery for 30 min and then reperfusion for 1 h. The coordinate of FN and LHA was identified in Stereotaxic Coordinates and then the L-Glu was microinjected into FN, GABAB receptor agonist baclofen, or GABAB receptor antagonist CGP35348 was microinjected into the LHA, finally the GI-R model was prepared. The expression of GABABR, P-GABABR, NOX2, NOX4, and SOD in the LHA was detected by western blot, PCR, and RT-PCR. The expression of IL-1β, NOX2, and NXO4 in gastric mucosa was detected by western blot. We found that microinjection of L-Glu into the FN or GABAB receptor agonist (baclofen) into the LHA attenuated GI-R injury. Pretreatment with GABAB receptor antagonist CGP35348 reversed the protective effects of FN stimulation or baclofen into the LHA. Microinjection of baclofen into the LHA obviously reduced the expression of inflammatory factor IL-1β, NOX2, and NOX4 in the gastric mucosa. Conclusion: The protective effects of microinjection of GABABR agonist into LHA on GI-R injury in rats could be mediated by up-regulating the production of GABA, GABABR, and down-regulating P-GABABR in the LHA. PMID:28983255

  4. GABAB receptors increase intracellular calcium concentrations in chromaffin cells through two different pathways: their role in catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed

    Parramón, M; González, M P; Herrero, M T; Oset-Gasque, M J

    1995-05-01

    The activation of GABAB receptors of adrenal chomaffin cells produces an increase of [Ca2+]i measured by fura-2 AM techniques. GABAB agonists 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid or (-)baclofen, at concentrations of 0.5 mM, increased basal Ca2+ values 332 +/- 60.9 and 306 +/- 40.5 nM, respectively, in cells suspended in a 2.5 mM Ca2+ buffer. The GABAB-induced increase of [Ca2+]i seemed to have two different components. The first was due to an entry from the extracellular medium mainly through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels as the dihydropiridine nifedipine 50 microM was able to decrease it more than 60%, while omega-conotoxin, which blocks N-type channels, did not produce any change in the GABAB-evoked Ca2+ increment. The second component was due to a release of Ca2+ from intracellular pools and was about one-third of the total GABAB-induced increase of [Ca2+]i. GABAB receptors stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive and not the caffeine-sensitive Ca2+ store. In a low-Ca2+ buffer after treatment with 2 microM angiotensin II, neither 0.5 mM 3-APPA nor baclofen were able to produce an additional increase of [Ca2+]i, whereas 4 mM caffeine had no effect on GABAB response. This intracellular Ca2+ mobilization could be due to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation produced by the activation of GABAB receptors. In fact, the specific agonists after 10 minutes incubation produced a dose-dependent increase of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. The maximal effect was obtained at 100 microM baclofen and 3-APPA, and it was 3.63 +/- 0.75 and 3.2 +/- 1.5 times the basal levels (7.3 +/- 0.3 pmol/10(6) cells), respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Modulation by different GABAB receptor types of voltage-activated calcium currents in rat thalamocortical neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Guyon, A; Leresche, N

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents were studied in rat thalamocortical neurones with the use of whole cell voltage-clamp recordings in brain slices. 2. The contribution of N-, L- and P-types of Ca2+ channels to the total high voltage-activated Ca2+ (HVA Ca2+) current was assessed by the use of omega-conotoxin, nifedipine and omega-agatoxin IVA, respectively. No P-type current could be detected. Thus, the HVA Ca2+ current contained an N- and an L-type current (23 and 15% of the total current, respectively) and a residual current, which will be referred to as the 'R' component. 3. Baclofen (1-50 microM) had no effect on the low voltage-activated (LVA) Ca2+ current (IT). 4. At low concentrations (0.5-10 microM), baclofen decreased the HVA Ca2+ currents by about 10-20% without a marked modification on the kinetics, whereas 50 microM baclofen decreased the HVA Ca2+ currents by about 40% with a pronounced slowing down of the kinetics. 5. The 10-20% decrease of the total HVA Ca2+ currents produced by the low concentrations of baclofen occurred as the result of a 30% block of the 'R' component. The additional decrease observed with the dose of 50 microM was due to a full block of the N-type current. The L-type was unaffected by baclofen. 6. The effect of baclofen on the total HVA Ca2+ current was partially blocked by GABAB receptor antagonists indicating that it occurred through stimulation of GABAB receptors. 7. The effect of baclofen on the N-type current was abolished by CGP 35348 (100 microM) and CGP 55845A (100 nM). The effect on the 'R' component was also antagonized by CGP 55845A (100 nM) although with a lower potency, but was not blocked by CGP 35348 (100 microM). 8. We conclude that the effects of baclofen on the various components of the HVA Ca2+ currents occur through different types of GABAB receptors. One receptor has a high affinity for baclofen (i.e. saturated by concentrations as low as 0.5 micro

  6. Presynaptic GABAB and adenosine A1 receptors regulate synaptic transmission to rat substantia nigra reticulata neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, K Z; Johnson, S W

    1997-01-01

    1. Patch pipettes were used to record whole-cell currents under voltage clamp in substantia nigra zona reticulata (SNR) neurones in the rat midbrain slice. Bipolar electrodes evoked synaptic currents mediated by glutamate (EPSCs) and GABAA receptors (IPSCs). 2. Baclofen reduced the amplitude of IPSCs by 48% at its IC50 value of 0.60 microM. The GABAB antagonist CGP 35348 blocked this effect with a Kd value estimated by Schild analysis of 5 microM. 3. Adenosine reduced IPSCs by 48% at its IC50 value of 56 microM. Adenosine agonists reduced IPSCs with the following rank order of potency: CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine) > R-PIA (R(-)N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine) > CHA (N6-cyclohexyladenosine) = NECA (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) > 2-CADO (2-chloroadenosine) > adenosine. Schild analysis yielded a Kd value of 0.4 nM for antagonism of CPA by the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine). 4. Both baclofen and adenosine reduced the magnitude of paired-pulse depression of IPSCs, and neither blocked currents evoked by GABA, which was pressure-ejected from micropipettes. 5. Glutamate EPSCs were reduced by baclofen (IC50 = 0.78 microM) and adenosine (IC50 = 57 microM). Schild analysis yielded a Kd value of 11 microM for antagonism of baclofen-induced inhibition of EPSCs by CGP 35348. DPCPX (1 microM) completely blocked the inhibitory effects of adenosine (100 microM) and CPA (100 nM) on EPSCs. Neither adenosine nor baclofen reduced inward currents evoked by glutamate which was pressure-ejected from micropipettes. 6. These results show that presynaptic GABAB and A1 receptors reduce glutamate and GABA release from nerve terminals in the SNR. PMID:9409479

  7. GABAB receptor antibodies in limbic encephalitis and anti-GAD–associated neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Boronat, A.; Sabater, L.; Saiz, A.; Dalmau, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: γ-Aminobutyric acid-B receptor antibodies (GABABR-ab) were recently described in 15 patients with limbic encephalitis (LE), associated with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) or with concurrent glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies. We analyzed the frequency of GABABR-ab in 147 patients with LE or neurologic syndromes associated with GAD-ab. Methods: We examined the presence of GABABR-ab in 70 patients with LE (33 paraneoplastic with onconeural antibodies, 18 paraneoplastic without onconeural antibodies [5 with Gad-ab], and 19 idiopathic with either GAD-ab [5 patients] or seronegative) and 77 patients with GAD-ab-associated neurologic syndromes other than LE (29 stiff-person syndrome, 28 cerebellar ataxia, 14 epilepsy, and 6 with diverse paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes). GABABR-ab were analyzed in serum or CSF by indirect immunofluorescence on HEK293 cells transfected with GABAB1 and GABAB2 receptor subunits. Results: GABABR-ab were detected in 10 of the 70 patients with LE (14%). Eight had SCLC and 2 were idiopathic. One of the 8 patients with LE with SCLC had an additional onconeural antibody (Hu) and 2 GAD-ab. GABABR-ab were identified in 7 (70%) of the 10 patients with LE and SCLC without onconeural antibodies. GABABR-ab antibodies were not found in patients with GAD-ab and stiff-person syndrome, idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, or epilepsy. However, one patient with GAD-ab, paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, and anaplastic carcinoid of the thymus also presented GABABR-ab. Conclusions: GABABR-ab are the most common antibodies found in LE associated with SCLC previously considered “seronegative.” In patients with GAD-ab, the frequency of GABABR-ab is low and only observed in the context of cancer. PMID:21357831

  8. Differential GABAB-receptor-mediated effects in perisomatic- and dendrite-targeting parvalbumin interneurons.

    PubMed

    Booker, Sam A; Gross, Anna; Althof, Daniel; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Bettler, Bernhard; Frotscher, Michael; Hearing, Matthew; Wickman, Kevin; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kulik, Ákos; Vida, Imre

    2013-05-01

    Inhibitory parvalbumin-containing interneurons (PVIs) control neuronal discharge and support the generation of theta- and gamma-frequency oscillations in cortical networks. Fast GABAergic input onto PVIs is crucial for their synchronization and oscillatory entrainment, but the role of metabotropic GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs) in mediating slow presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition remains unknown. In this study, we have combined high-resolution immunoelectron microscopy, whole-cell patch-clamp recording, and computational modeling to investigate the subcellular distribution and effects of GABA(B)Rs and their postsynaptic effector Kir3 channels in rat hippocampal PVIs. Pre-embedding immunogold labeling revealed that the receptors and channels localize at high levels to the extrasynaptic membrane of parvalbumin-immunoreactive dendrites. Immunoreactivity for GABA(B)Rs was also present at lower levels on PVI axon terminals. Whole-cell recordings further showed that synaptically released GABA in response to extracellular stimulation evokes large GABA(B)R-mediated slow IPSCs in perisomatic-targeting (PT) PVIs, but only small or no currents in dendrite-targeting (DT) PVIs. In contrast, paired recordings demonstrated that GABA(B)R activation results in presynaptic inhibition at the output synapses of both PT and DT PVIs, but more strongly in the latter. Finally, computational analysis indicated that GABA(B) IPSCs can phasically modulate the discharge of PT interneurons at theta frequencies. In summary, our results show that GABA(B)Rs differentially mediate slow presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition in PVIs and can contribute to the dynamic modulation of their activity during oscillations. Furthermore, these data provide evidence for a compartment-specific molecular divergence of hippocampal PVI subtypes, suggesting that activation of GABA(B)Rs may shift the balance between perisomatic and dendritic inhibition.

  9. Differential GABAB-Receptor-Mediated Effects in Perisomatic- and Dendrite-Targeting Parvalbumin Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Sam A.; Gross, Anna; Althof, Daniel; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Bettler, Bernhard; Frotscher, Michael; Hearing, Matthew; Wickman, Kevin; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitory parvalbumin-containing interneurons (PVIs) control neuronal discharge and support the generation of theta- and gamma-frequency oscillations in cortical networks. Fast GABAergic input onto PVIs is crucial for their synchronization and oscillatory entrainment, but the role of metabotropic GABAB receptors (GABABRs) in mediating slow presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition remains unknown. In this study, we have combined high-resolution immunoelectron microscopy, whole-cell patch-clamp recording, and computational modeling to investigate the subcellular distribution and effects of GABABRs and their postsynaptic effector Kir3 channels in rat hippocampal PVIs. Pre-embedding immunogold labeling revealed that the receptors and channels localize at high levels to the extrasynaptic membrane of parvalbumin-immunoreactive dendrites. Immunoreactivity for GABABRs was also present at lower levels on PVI axon terminals. Whole-cell recordings further showed that synaptically released GABA in response to extracellular stimulation evokes large GABABR-mediated slow IPSCs in perisomatic-targeting (PT) PVIs, but only small or no currents in dendrite-targeting (DT) PVIs. In contrast, paired recordings demonstrated that GABABR activation results in presynaptic inhibition at the output synapses of both PT and DT PVIs, but more strongly in the latter. Finally, computational analysis indicated that GABAB IPSCs can phasically modulate the discharge of PT interneurons at theta frequencies. In summary, our results show that GABABRs differentially mediate slow presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition in PVIs and can contribute to the dynamic modulation of their activity during oscillations. Furthermore, these data provide evidence for a compartment-specific molecular divergence of hippocampal PVI subtypes, suggesting that activation of GABABRs may shift the balance between perisomatic and dendritic inhibition. PMID:23637187

  10. Ontogenesis of presynaptic GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition in the CA3 region of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caillard, O; McLean, H A; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaïarsa, J L

    1998-03-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid-B(GABAB) receptor-dependent and -independent components of paired-pulse depression (PPD) were investigated in the rat CA3 hippocampal region. Intracellular and whole cell recordings of CA3 pyramidal neurons were performed on hippocampal slices obtained from neonatal (5-7 day old) and adult (27-34 day old) rats. Electrical stimulation in the hilus evoked monosynaptic GABAA postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) isolated in the presence of the ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX, 10 microM) and D(-)2-amino-5-phosphovaleric acid (-AP5, 50 microM) with 2(triethylamino)-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl) acetamine (QX314) filled electrodes. In adult CA3 pyramidal neurons, when a pair of identical stimuli was applied at interstimulus intervals (ISIs) ranging from 50 to 1,500 ms the amplitude of the second eIPSC was depressed when compared with the first eIPSC. This paired-pulse depression (PPD) was partially blocked by P-3-aminoprophyl -P-diethoxymethylphosphoric acid (CGP35348, 0.5 mM), a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. In neonates, PPD was restricted to ISIs shorter than 200 ms and was not affected by CGP35348. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduced the amplitude of eIPSCs in a dose-dependent manner with the same efficiency in both adults and neonates. Increasing the probability of transmitter release with high Ca2+ (4 mM)/low Mg2+ (0.3 mM) external solution revealed PPD in neonatal CA3 pyramidal neurons that was 1) partially prevented by CGP35348, 2) independent of the membrane holding potential of the recorded cell, and 3) not resulting from a change in the reversal potential of GABAA eIPSCs. In adults the GABA uptake blocker tiagabine (20 microM) increased the duration of eIPSCs and the magnitude of GABAB receptor-dependent PPD. In neonates, tiagabine also increased duration of eIPSCs but to a lesser extent than in adult and did not reveal a GABAB receptor-dependent PPD. These results demonstrate that

  11. Reduced G-protein coupling to the GABAB receptor in the nucleus accumbens and the medial prefrontal cortex of the rat after chronic treatment with nicotine.

    PubMed

    Amantea, Diana; Tessari, Michela; Bowery, Norman G

    2004-01-30

    The effect of repeated administration of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, daily, s.c., for 14 days) on GABAB receptor density, affinity and G-protein coupling was investigated in the mesocorticolimbic system of the rat brain. Baclofen-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding autoradiography revealed that the level of G-protein coupling to GABAB receptors was significantly reduced in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens of nicotine-treated rats as compared to vehicle-injected controls. By contrast, GABAB receptor density and affinity, as revealed by [3H]GABA saturation binding autoradiography, were not altered by the nicotine exposure in any of the regions examined. Reduced G-protein coupling to the GABAB receptor may result in disinhibition of mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic neurones, which would contribute to the development of sensitised dopaminergic responses to repeated administration of nicotine.

  12. Embryonic GABA(B) receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Matthew S; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B) receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B) receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B) receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B) receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B) receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

  13. Embryonic GABAB Receptor Blockade Alters Cell Migration, Adult Hypothalamic Structure, and Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors Sex Specifically in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T.; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J.; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABAB receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABAB receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11–E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABAB receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABAB receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABAB receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABAB receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  14. Postsynaptic GABAB Receptor Activity Regulates Excitatory Neuronal Architecture and Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Quadros, Isabel M.; Deng, Qiudong; Deeb, Tarek Z.; Lumb, Michael; Sicinski, Piotr; Haydon, Philip G.; Pangalos, Menelas N.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common symptom in many neuropsychiatric disorders and directly correlates with poor patient outcomes. The majority of prolonged inhibitory signaling in the brain is mediated via GABAB receptors (GABABRs), but the molecular function of these receptors in cognition is ill defined. To explore the significance of GABABRs in neuronal activity and cognition, we created mice with enhanced postsynaptic GABABR signaling by mutating the serine 783 in receptor R2 subunit (S783A), which decreased GABABR degradation. Enhanced GABABR activity reduced the expression of immediate-early gene-encoded protein Arc/Arg3.1, effectors that are critical for long-lasting memory. Intriguingly, S783A mice exhibited increased numbers of excitatory synapses and surface AMPA receptors, effects that are consistent with decreased Arc/Arg3.1 expression. These deficits in Arc/Arg3.1 and neuronal morphology lead to a deficit in spatial memory consolidation. Collectively our results suggest a novel and unappreciated role for GABABR activity in determining excitatory neuronal architecture and spatial memory via their ability to regulate Arc/Arg3.1. PMID:24431439

  15. Postsynaptic GABAB receptor activity regulates excitatory neuronal architecture and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Terunuma, Miho; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Quadros, Isabel M; Deng, Qiudong; Deeb, Tarek Z; Lumb, Michael; Sicinski, Piotr; Haydon, Philip G; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2014-01-15

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common symptom in many neuropsychiatric disorders and directly correlates with poor patient outcomes. The majority of prolonged inhibitory signaling in the brain is mediated via GABAB receptors (GABABRs), but the molecular function of these receptors in cognition is ill defined. To explore the significance of GABABRs in neuronal activity and cognition, we created mice with enhanced postsynaptic GABABR signaling by mutating the serine 783 in receptor R2 subunit (S783A), which decreased GABABR degradation. Enhanced GABABR activity reduced the expression of immediate-early gene-encoded protein Arc/Arg3.1, effectors that are critical for long-lasting memory. Intriguingly, S783A mice exhibited increased numbers of excitatory synapses and surface AMPA receptors, effects that are consistent with decreased Arc/Arg3.1 expression. These deficits in Arc/Arg3.1 and neuronal morphology lead to a deficit in spatial memory consolidation. Collectively our results suggest a novel and unappreciated role for GABABR activity in determining excitatory neuronal architecture and spatial memory via their ability to regulate Arc/Arg3.1.

  16. GABAA and GABAB receptors are functionally active in the regulation of catecholamine secretion by bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Castro, E; Oset-Gasque, M J; González, M P

    1989-07-01

    GABA stimulates the basal catecholamine release from adrenal bovine chromaffin cells in a calcium-dependent manner. This release represents about 70% of that obtained by similar doses of nicotine under similar experimental conditions. This effect is mediated by GABAA receptor sites present in chromaffin cells, since it was mimicked by muscimol and reversed by bicuculline. In addition, GABA, through its GABAA receptors, increases the catecholamine release evoked by submaximal doses of nicotine, but it has no effect on nicotine-evoked secretion of catecholamines when nicotine was given at maximal doses. These results seem to indicate that both nicotine and GABA release catecholamines from the same intracellular pool. In contrast, baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, depressed both basal and nicotine-evoked catecholamine release; this result indicates that in addition to GABAA control of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells, there is a GABAB control of this function. These results support the existence of a dual regulation of catecholamine secretion by both the GABAA and GABAB receptors in a similar way as that proposed for muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

  17. Involvement of pallidotegmental neurons in methamphetamine- and MK-801-induced impairment of prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex in mice: reversal by GABAB receptor agonist baclofen.

    PubMed

    Arai, Sawako; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Ibi, Daisuke; Nagai, Taku; Takahashi, Kenji; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2008-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that pallidotegmental GABAergic neurons play a crucial role in prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex in mice through the activation of GABA(B) receptors in pedunculopontine tegmental neurons. In this study, we investigated whether PPI disruption induced by methamphetamine (METH) or MK-801 is associated with the dysfunction of pallidotegmental neurons. Furthermore, we examined the effects of baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist, on METH- and MK-801-induced PPI impairment. Acute treatment with METH (3 mg/kg, subcutaneouly (s.c.)) and MK-801 (>0.3 mg/kg, s.c.) significantly disrupted PPI, accompanied by the suppression of c-Fos expression in lateral globus pallidus induced by PPI. Furthermore, acute treatment with METH and MK-801 stimulated c-Fos expression in the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC) in mice subjected to the PPT test, although PPI alone had no effect on c-Fos expression. Repeated treatment with 1 mg/kg METH for 7 days, which did not affect PPI acutely, showed similar effects on PPI and c-Fos expression to acute treatment with METH (3 mg/kg). Baclofen dose-dependently ameliorated PPI impairment induced by acute treatment with METH (3 mg/kg) and MK-801 (1 mg/kg), and decreased METH- and MK-801-stimulated c-Fos expression in PnC to the basal level. These results suggest that dysfunction of pallidotegmental neurons is involved in PPI disruption caused by METH and MK-801 in mice. GABA(B) receptor may constitute a putative target in treating neuropsychiatric disorders with sensorimotor gating deficits, such as schizophrenia and METH psychosis.

  18. Subchronic administration and combination metabotropic glutamate and GABAB receptor drug therapy in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pacey, Laura K K; Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Hampson, David R

    2011-09-01

    The most common cause of inherited mental retardation, fragile X syndrome, results from a triplet repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene and loss of the mRNA binding protein, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). In the absence of FMRP, signaling through group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) is enhanced. We previously proposed a mechanism whereby the audiogenic seizures exhibited by FMR1 null mice result from an imbalance in excitatory mGluR and inhibitory GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) signaling (Mol Pharmacol 76:18-24, 2009). Here, we tested the mGluR5-positive allosteric modulator 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB), the mGluR5 inverse agonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP), and GABA(B) receptor agonists, alone and in combination on receptor protein expression and audiogenic seizures in FMR1 mice. Single doses of MPEP (30 mg/kg), the GABA(B)R orthosteric agonist R-baclofen (1 mg/kg), or the GABA(B)R-positive allosteric modulator N,N'-dicyclopentyl-2-(methylthio)-5-nitro-4,6-pyrimidine diamine (GS-39783) (30 mg/kg), reduced the incidence of seizures. However, when administered subchronically (daily injections for 6 days), MPEP retained its anticonvulsant activity, whereas R-baclofen and GS-39783 did not. When administered at lower doses that had no effect when given alone, a single injection of MPEP plus R-baclofen also reduced seizures, but the effect was lost after subchronic administration. We were surprised to find that subchronic treatment with R-baclofen also induced tolerance to a single high dose of MPEP. These data demonstrate that tolerance develops rapidly to the antiseizure properties of R-baclofen alone and R-baclofen coadministered with MPEP, but not with MPEP alone. Our findings suggest that cross-talk between the G-protein signaling pathways of these receptors affects drug efficacy after repeated treatment.

  19. The postganglionic excitatory innervation of the mouse urinary bladder and its modulation by prejunctional GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Santicioli, P; Maggi, C A; Meli, A

    1986-03-01

    Field stimulation produced reproducible contractions of the mouse isolated urinary bladder whose amplitude was frequency-related. These contractions were partially sensitive to atropine (3 microM), unaffected by hexamethonium (10 microM) and almost abolished by tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM). Atropine (3 microM) suppressed contractions produced by exogenous acetylcholine thereby indicating atropine-resistance of the nerve-mediated contractions. Nerve-mediated contractions of the mouse urinary bladder were enhanced by physostigmine (0.1-0.5 microM) and inhibited by hemicholinium-3 (0.5 mM) thus confirming the presence of a cholinergic component in the excitatory postganglionic innervation. Atropine (3 microM) inhibition of the nerve-mediated contractions increased with increasing duration and strength of the train of stimulation. The nerve-mediated contractions of the mouse bladder were unaffected by phentolamine (0.2 microM), propranolol (0.3 microM) or indomethacin (5 microM). ATP (1mM) the major candidate for the role of nonadrenergic-noncholinegic (NANC) excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian urinary bladder produced a contraction of the mouse isolated bladder. Exposure to the stable ATP analogue alpha, beta-methylene ATP (APCPP) or beta, gamma-methylene ATP (APPCP) produced a partial desensitization of the nerve-mediated response which, for APCPP, was greater in the presence than in the absence of atropine (3 microM). In the presence of atropine (3 microM) and after APCPP desensitization the amplitude of the response to field stimulation amounted to about 20% of the original response and was sensitive to tetrodotoxin, indicating that it is nerve-mediated. GABA (0.001-0.3 mM) inhibited the amplitude of field stimulation induced contractions of mouse urinary bladder. This effect was mimicked by the selective GABAB receptor agonist, (+/-)-baclofen, but not by the selective GABAA receptor agonist, homotaurine. GABA and (+/-)-baclofen exhibited cross

  20. Transport along the dendritic endoplasmic reticulum mediates the trafficking of GABAB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, José I.; Jaureguiberry-Bravo, Matías; Salas, Daniela A.; Ramírez, Omar A.; Cornejo, Víctor H.; Lu, Hsiangmin E.; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Couve, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In neurons, secretory organelles within the cell body are complemented by the dendritic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi outposts (GOPs), whose role in neurotransmitter receptor trafficking is poorly understood. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type B metabotropic receptors (GABABRs) regulate the efficacy of synaptic transmission throughout the brain. Their plasma membrane availability is controlled by mechanisms involving an ER retention motif and assembly-dependent ER export. Thus, they constitute an ideal molecular model to study ER trafficking, but the extent to which the dendritic ER participates in GABABR biosynthesis has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we show that GABAB1 localizes preferentially to the ER in dendrites and moves long distances within this compartment. Not only diffusion but also microtubule and dynein-dependent mechanisms control dendritic ER transport. GABABRs insert throughout the somatodendritic plasma membrane but dendritic post-ER carriers containing GABABRs do not fuse selectively with GOPs. This study furthers our understanding of the spatial selectivity of neurotransmitter receptors for dendritic organelles. PMID:24895402

  1. Effects of the GABAB receptor-positive modulators CGP7930 and rac-BHFF in baclofen- and γ-hydroxybutyrate-discriminating pigeons.

    PubMed

    Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C

    2012-05-01

    In vivo effects of GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators suggest them to have therapeutic potential to treat central nervous system disorders such as anxiety and drug abuse. Although these effects are thought to be mediated by positive modulation of GABA(B) receptors, such modulation has been examined primarily in vitro. This study further examined the in vivo properties of the GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl) phenol (CGP7930) and (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF). In pigeons discriminating baclofen from saline, γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) produced 100% baclofen-appropriate responding, and the GABA(B) antagonist 3-aminopropyl(dimethoxymethyl) phosphinic acid (CGP35348) blocked the effects of both drugs. CGP7930 and rac-BHFF produced at most 41 and 74% baclofen-appropriate responding, respectively, and enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. In pigeons discriminating GHB from saline, CGP7930 and rac-BHFF produced at most 1 and 49% GHB-appropriate responding, respectively, and enhanced the effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. Enhancement of the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen by rac-BHFF and CGP7930 is further evidence of their effectiveness as GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators in vivo. Furthermore, lack of complete substitution of the positive modulators rac-BHFF and CGP7930 for baclofen and GHB suggests that their discriminative stimulus effects differ from those of GABA(B) receptor agonists. Finally, together with converging evidence that the GABA(B) receptor populations mediating the effects of baclofen and GHB are not identical, the present findings suggest that these populations differ in their susceptibility to positive modulatory effects. Such differences could allow for more selective therapeutic targeting of the GABA(B) system.

  2. GABAB-receptor splice variants GB1a and GB1b in rat brain: developmental regulation, cellular distribution and extrasynaptic localization.

    PubMed

    Fritschy, J M; Meskenaite, V; Weinmann, O; Honer, M; Benke, D; Mohler, H

    1999-03-01

    GABAB (gamma-aminobutyric acid)-receptors have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS) functions, e.g. cognition and pain perception, and dysfunctions including spasticity and absence epilepsy. To permit an analysis of the two known GABAB-receptor splice variants GABAB-R1a (GB1a) and GABAB-R1b (GB1b), their distribution pattern has been differentiated in the rat brain, using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific antisera. During postnatal maturation, the expression of the two splice variants was differentially regulated with GB1a being preponderant at birth. In adult brain, GB1b-immunoreactivity (-IR) was predominant, and the two isoforms largely accounted for the pattern of GABAB-receptor binding sites in the brain. Receptor heterogeneity was pronounced in the hippocampus, where both isoforms occurred in CA1, but only GB1b in CA3. Similarly, in the cerebellum, GB1b was exclusively found in Purkinje cells in a zebrin-like pattern. The staining was most pronounced in Purkinje cell dendrites and spines. Using electron microscopy, over 80% of the spine profiles in which a synaptic contact with a parallel fibre was visible contained GB1b-IR at extrasynaptic sites. This subcellular localization is unrelated to GABAergic inputs, indicating that the role of GABAB-receptors in vivo extends beyond synaptic GABAergic neurotransmission and may, in the cerebellum, involve taurine as a ligand.

  3. Spontaneous release of GABA activates GABAB receptors and controls network activity in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    McLean, H A; Caillard, O; Khazipov, R; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaiarsa, J L

    1996-08-01

    1. We investigated the effects of the selective gamma-aminobutyric acid-B (GABAB) receptor antagonist, P-3 aminopropyl-P-diethoxymethyl phosphoric acid (CGP 35348), on spontaneous and evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) and currents (PSCs) in CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons of hippocampal slices obtained between postnatal day 3 and 7 with the use of intracellular and whole cell recording techniques. The intracellular pipette solution contained either 2 M CsCl or 50 mM 2(triethylamino)-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl) acetamine (QX314) dissolved in 2 M KMeSO4. Cesium and QX314 block postsynaptic responses mediated by GABAB receptors. 2. Under control conditions, bath application of CGP 35348 (0.5-1 mM) progressively increased the duration of spontaneous and evoked polysynaptic giant GABAergic PSPs leading to the appearance of ictal-like discharges. The effects of CGP 35348 were dose dependent and voltage independent. 3. In CA3 pyramidal neurons, CGP 35348 (0.5 mM) had no effect on monosynaptic GABAergic inhibitory PSPs (IPSPs) that were isolated in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX, 10 microM) and D(-)2-amino-5-phosphovaleric acid (D-APV, 50 microM). Similarly, CGP 35348 (0.5 mM) had no effect on monosynaptic glutamatergic excitatory PSPs (EPSPs) that were isolated in the presence of bicuculline (10 microM) and high divalent cation artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF; 6 mM Mg2+/4 mM Ca2+). 4. In CA3 pyramidal neurons exposed to CNQX (20 microM) and D-APV (50 microM), application of the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 50 microM) generated synchronous giant GABAergic PSPS that were blocked in the presence of high divalent cation ACSF (6 mM Mg2+/4 mM Ca2+) or bicuculline (10 microM). The duration of these synchronous GABAergic PSPs was prolonged in the presence of CGP 35348 (0.5 mM) but did not lead to the appearance of ictal-like discharges. 5. In the presence of bicuculline, interictal

  4. Modulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic neural bronchoconstriction in guinea-pig airways via GABAB-receptors.

    PubMed

    Belvisi, M G; Ichinose, M; Barnes, P J

    1989-08-01

    via an action at GABAB receptors and that GABA might play a role in the regulation of neurogenic responses in the airways.

  5. Analysis of G-protein-activated inward rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channel currents upon GABAB receptor activation in rat supraoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Harayama, Nobuya; Kayano, Tomohiko; Moriya, Taiki; Kitamura, Naoki; Shibuya, Izumi; Tanaka-Yamamoto, Keiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueta, Yoichi; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2014-12-03

    While magnocellular neurons in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) possess rich Gi/o-mediated mechanisms, molecular and cellular properties of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channels have been controversial. Here, properties of GIRK channels are examined by RT-PCR and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat SON neurons. Patch clamp experiments showed that the selective GABAB agonist, baclofen, enhanced currents in a high K(+) condition. The baclofen-enhanced currents exhibited evident inward rectification and were blocked by the selective GABAB antagonist, CGP55845A, the IRK channel blocker, Ba(2+), and the selective GIRK channel blocker, tertiapin, indicating that baclofen activates GIRK channels via GABAB receptors. The GIRK currents were abolished by N-ethylmaleimide pretreatment, and prolonged by GTPγS inclusion in the patch pipette, suggesting that Gi/o proteins are involved. RT-PCR analysis revealed mRNAs for all four GIRK 1-4 channels and for both GABABR1 and GABABR2 receptors in rat SON. However, the concentration-dependency of the baclofen-induced activation of GIRK currents had an EC50 of 110 µM, which is about 100 times higher than that of baclofen-induced inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, baclofen caused no significant changes in the membrane potential and the firing rate. These results suggest that although GIRK channels can be activated by GABAB receptors via the Gi/o pathway, this occurs at high agonist concentrations, and thus may not be a physiological mechanism regulating the function of SON neurons. This property that the membrane potential receives little influence from GIRK currents seems to be uncommon for CNS neurons possessing rich Gi/o-coupled receptors, and could be a special feature of rat SON neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. GABAB receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition in guinea-pig hippocampus is caused by reduction of presynaptic Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L G; Saggau, P

    1995-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that activation of GABAB receptors inhibits evoked synaptic transmission by reducing the presynaptic Ca2+ influx was tested using a recently developed technique for simultaneously recording the presynaptic Ca2+ transient ([Ca2+]t) and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) evoked by a single electrical stimulus at CA3 to CA1 synapses of guinea-pig hippocampus. 2. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reversibly blocked, in a dose-dependant manner, both the fEPSP and the presynaptic [Ca2+]t with similar time courses. During application of baclofen, the fEPSP was proportional to about the fourth power of the presynaptic [Ca2+]t, and the presynaptic fibre volley and the resting Ca2+ level did not change. These results are similar to those we previously observed following application of several voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that baclofen inhibits the fEPSP by blocking the presynaptic Ca2+ influx. 3. The inhibition by baclofen of both the fEPSP and the presynaptic [Ca2+]t was blocked by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348, consistent with the causal relationship between the GABAB receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition of the [Ca2+]t and the fEPSP. 4. The inhibition by baclofen of the [Ca2+]t was partially occluded by application of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blocker omega-conotoxin-GVIA (omega-CgTX-GVIA), but not omega-agatoxin-IVA (omega-AgaTX-IVA), suggesting that baclofen reduces the presynaptic [Ca2+]t by blocking Ca2+ channels including the omega-CgTX-GVIA-sensitive type. 5. We conclude that baclofen inhibits evoked transmitter release by reducing presynaptic Ca2+ influx.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7562607

  7. GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated effects in guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Giotti, A; Luzzi, S; Spagnesi, S; Zilletti, L

    1983-03-01

    -pig ileum: a bicuculline-sensitive GABA(A) receptor, which elicits contraction through an excitatory action on cholinergic post-ganglionic neurones; and a bicuculline-insensitive GABA(B) receptor which causes relaxation through an inhibitory presynaptic action on cholinergic post-ganglionic neurones. We confirm that GABA, homotaurine and muscimol are GABA(A) agonists, while GABA and (-)-baclofen are GABA(B) agonists.

  8. At Immature Mossy Fibers-CA3 Connections, Activation of Presynaptic GABAB Receptors by Endogenously Released GABA Contributes to Synapses Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Safiulina, Victoria F.; Cherubini, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Early in postnatal life correlated GABAergic activity in the hippocampus is thought to play a crucial role in synaptogenesis and in the development of adult neuronal networks. Unlike adulthood, at this developmental stage, mossy fibers (MF) which are the axons of granule cells, release GABA into CA3 principal cells and interneurons. Here, we tested the hypothesis that at MF-CA3 connections, tonic activation of GABAB autoreceptors by GABA is responsible for the low probability of release and synapse silencing. Blocking GABAB receptors with CGP55845 enhanced the probability of GABA release and switched on silent synapses while the opposite was observed with baclofen. Both these effects were presynaptic and were associated with changes in paired-pulse ratio and coefficient of variation. In addition, enhancing the extracellular GABA concentration by repetitive stimulation of MF or by blocking the GABA transporter GAT-1, switched off active synapses, an effect that was prevented by CGP55845. In the presence of CGP55845, stimulation of MF-induced synaptic potentiation. The shift of EGABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with bumetanide, a blocker of the cation-chloride co-transporter NKCC1, prevented synaptic potentiation and caused synaptic depression, suggesting that the depolarizing action of GABA observed in the presence of CGP55845 is responsible for the potentiating effect. It is proposed that, activation of GABAB receptors by spillover of GABA from MF terminals reduces the probability of release and contributes to synapses silencing. This would act as a filter to prevent excessive activation of the auto-associative CA3 network and the emergence of seizures. PMID:19277216

  9. At immature mossy fibers-CA3 connections, activation of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors by endogenously released GABA contributes to synapses silencing.

    PubMed

    Safiulina, Victoria F; Cherubini, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Early in postnatal life correlated GABAergic activity in the hippocampus is thought to play a crucial role in synaptogenesis and in the development of adult neuronal networks. Unlike adulthood, at this developmental stage, mossy fibers (MF) which are the axons of granule cells, release GABA into CA3 principal cells and interneurons. Here, we tested the hypothesis that at MF-CA3 connections, tonic activation of GABA(B) autoreceptors by GABA is responsible for the low probability of release and synapse silencing. Blocking GABA(B) receptors with CGP55845 enhanced the probability of GABA release and switched on silent synapses while the opposite was observed with baclofen. Both these effects were presynaptic and were associated with changes in paired-pulse ratio and coefficient of variation. In addition, enhancing the extracellular GABA concentration by repetitive stimulation of MF or by blocking the GABA transporter GAT-1, switched off active synapses, an effect that was prevented by CGP55845. In the presence of CGP55845, stimulation of MF-induced synaptic potentiation. The shift of E(GABA) from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with bumetanide, a blocker of the cation-chloride co-transporter NKCC1, prevented synaptic potentiation and caused synaptic depression, suggesting that the depolarizing action of GABA observed in the presence of CGP55845 is responsible for the potentiating effect. It is proposed that, activation of GABA(B) receptors by spillover of GABA from MF terminals reduces the probability of release and contributes to synapses silencing. This would act as a filter to prevent excessive activation of the auto-associative CA3 network and the emergence of seizures.

  10. GABA-A and GABA-B receptors in the cuneate nucleus of the rat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Orviz, P; Cecchini, B G; Andrés-Trelles, F

    1986-09-01

    Electric stimulation of the rat forepaw evokes a negative potential (N-wave) at the ipsilateral cuneate nucleus. The responses of the N-wave to microiontophoretically applied GABA agonists and antagonists have been studied. Applications of GABA-A agonists (3-amino-propanesulfonic acid and muscimol) reduce the amplitude of the N-wave. This effect decreases during prolonged application, suggesting a desensitization of GABA-A receptors. In addition the effect of muscimol is reduced by (-)-bicuculline methiodide. Baclofen (a GABA-B agonist) also depresses the N-wave but its action lasts longer, is less reversible, shows no desensitization and is not blocked by (-)-bicuculline methiodide. The different responses of the N-wave to GABA-A and GABA-B agonists are compatible with the existence of different types of functional receptors for them in the cuneate nucleus of the rat. The receptors activated by muscimol (GABA-A) are clearly not the same as the ones activated by baclofen (conceivably GABA-B).

  11. Characterization of the binding of [3H]CGP54626 to GABAB receptors in the male bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    PubMed

    Asay, Matthew J; Boyd, Sunny K

    2006-06-13

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain. GABA activates both ionotropic (GABA(A)) and metabotropic (GABA(B)) receptors in mammals. Whether non-mammalian vertebrates possess receptors with similar characteristics is not well understood. We used a mammalian GABA(B)-specific antagonist to determine the pharmacology of putative receptors in the brain of an anuran amphibian, the male bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). Receptor binding assays with the antagonist [(3)H]CGP54626 revealed a single class of high affinity binding sites (with a K(D) of 2.97 nM and a B(max) of 2619 fmol/mg protein). Binding was time- and temperature-dependent, saturable and specific. Specific binding of [(3)H]CGP54626 was inhibited by several mammalian GABA(B) receptor agonists and antagonists. The rank order potency of agonists was: GABA = SKF97541 > (R)-Baclofen > 3-APPA. The rank order for antagonists was: CGP54626 = CGP55845 > CGP52432 > CGP35348. The GABA(A) receptor ligands muscimol and SR95531 had very low affinity for [(3)H]CGP54626 binding sites, while bicuculline compounds had no affinity. Binding of GABA was positively modulated by CGP7930. Taurine did not allosterically modulate GABA binding but did inhibit [(3)H]CGP54626 binding in a linear fashion. Bullfrog brain thus possesses binding sites with significant similarity to mammalian GABA(B) receptors. These receptors differ from mammalian receptors, however, in dissociation kinetics, ligand specificity and allosteric modulation.

  12. KK-92A, a novel GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator, attenuates nicotine self-administration and cue-induced nicotine seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Kaczanowska, Katarzyna; Cameron, Michael; Finn, M G; Griffin, Patrick; McDonald, Patricia; Markou, Athina

    2017-05-01

    GABAB receptors (GABABR) play a critical role in GABAergic neurotransmission in the brain and are thought to be one of the most promising targets for the treatment of drug addiction. GABABR positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have shown promise as potential anti-addictive therapies, as they lack the sedative and muscle relaxant properties of full GABAB receptor agonists such as baclofen. The present study was aimed at developing novel, selective, and potent GABABR PAMs with efficacy on abuse-related effects of nicotine. We synthetized ~100 analogs of BHF177, a GABABR PAM that has been shown to inhibit nicotine taking and seeking, and tested their activity in multiple cell-based functional assays. Among these compounds, KK-92A displayed superior PAM properties at the GABABR. Interestingly, our results revealed the existence of pathway-selective differential modulation of GABABR signaling by the structurally related GABABR allosteric modulators BHF177 and KK-92A. In vivo, similarly to BHF177, KK-92A inhibited intravenous nicotine self-administration under both fixed- and progressive-ratio schedules of reinforcement in rats. In contrast to BHF177, KK-92A had no effect on food self-administration. Furthermore, KK-92A decreased cue-induced nicotine-seeking behavior without affecting food seeking. These results indicate that KK-92A is a selective GABABR PAM with efficacy in inhibition of the primary reinforcing and incentive motivational effects of nicotine, and attenuation of nicotine seeking, further confirming that GABABR PAMs may be useful antismoking medications.

  13. Effect of GABAB receptor antagonists (CGP 35348 and CGP 55845) on serum interleukin 6 and 18 concentrations in albino mice following neonatal hypoxia ischemia insult.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Quratulane; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2016-09-01

    Interleukin (IL) 6 and 18 plays an important role in inflammatory response following hypoxia ischemia encephalopathy (HIE). Present study was designed to demonstrate the effect of two GABAB receptor antagonists (CGP 35348 and 55845), respectively, on the serum IL6 and IL 18 concentrations in albino mice. Albino mice pups (of both genders) were subjected to Murine model of hypoxia-ischemia encephalopathy on postnatal day 10 (right common carotid artery was ligated followed by 8% hypoxia for 25 minutes). After neonatal brain damage and following weaning, mice were divided in three groups, in gender specific manner, and fed on normal rodent diet till they were 13 week old. At this time point, group 1 received intraperitonial saline solution (control group), group 2 was supplemented with CGP 35348 (1mg/ml solvent/Kg body weight) and group 3 with CGP 55845 (1mg/ml solvent/Kg body weight), intraperitonially, for 12 days and IL 6 and 18 concentrations were determined in serum by ELISA. It was observed that CGP 35348 supplementation resulted in reduced interlukin-6 and interlukin-18 concentrations in male albino mice. While CGP 55845 supplementation increased IL-6 and IL-18 concentrations in female albino mice following HIE. Our results are indicating that GABAB receptor antagonist's supplementation affects IL concentrations in albino mice in a gender specific manner following neonatal brain damage and can be further explored for the treatments of hypoxia ischemia associated neurological ailments.

  14. Coexistence of GABAA and GABAB receptors on A delta and C primary afferents.

    PubMed Central

    Désarmenien, M.; Feltz, P.; Occhipinti, G.; Santangelo, F.; Schlichter, R.

    1984-01-01

    Intracellular recordings from adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurones were performed in vitro and the coexistence of two gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors on the membrane of identified A delta and C primary afferents was demonstrated. Transient applications of GABA (10(-6)-10(-2) M) evoked dose-dependent depolarizations and increased membrane conductance. The responses were mimicked by muscimol, isoguvacine, THIP and 3 amino propane sulphonic acid (3 APS); they were blocked by bicuculline and picrotoxin. Pentobarbitone induced an increase of GABA-induced depolarizations. Perfusion of tetraethylammonium (TEA, 7.5 mM) and intracellular injection of Cs+ ions unmasked the Ca2+ component of action potentials, which appeared as long-lasting plateau depolarizations. Such action potentials were shortened in the presence of methoxyverapamil (D600, 5 X 10(-6)-10(-5) M) and in a medium without Ca+ ions. Prolonged (5-10 min) perfusion of GABA (10(-9)-10(-5) M) shortened the Ca2+ component of action potentials. This effect was mimicked by baclofen (10(-7)-5 X 10(-6) M) and muscimol (5 X 10(-7)-10(-5) M) and was not affected by bicuculline perfusion (5 X 10(-6)-10(-5) M). Isoguvacine (2.5 X 10(-5) M) did not affect action potential duration. It is concluded that two GABA receptors coexist on the membrane of slow conducting primary afferents: the bicuculline-sensitive GABAA receptor mediates depolarizations and the bicuculline-insensitive GABAB receptor shortens the calcium component of action potentials. PMID:6322896

  15. Opposing effects of activation of central GABAA and GABAB receptors on brown fat thermogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Horton, R W; LeFeuvre, R A; Rothwell, N J; Stock, M J

    1988-04-01

    Baclofen (a GABAB agonist) stimulates body temperature, metabolic rate and brown adipose tissue (BAT) in the rat through a central action, but no effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) itself on these parameters were observed. In the present study, it was found that the central effects of (+/-)baclofen (0.5-2.0 micrograms injection i.c.v.) on the temperature (1.2 degrees C increase) and metabolic rate (44-76% increase) of brown adipose tissue were inhibited by previous treatment with the GABAA agonist, muscimol (0.05 micrograms). Injection of GABA alone (12 micrograms) did not significantly affect these parameters, but in the presence of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (2.5 micrograms), GABA significantly increased the temperature (0.3 degrees C) and oxygen consumption (22%) of brown fat. (-)Baclofen was found to be approximately 50-times more effective in stimulating the temperature of brown adipose tissue than (+/-)baclofen. The results indicate that activation of central GABAB receptors stimulates the activity and hence metabolic rate of brown adipose tissue. However, activation of the GABAA receptors opposes the effects of GABAB stimulation on the thermogenesis of brown fat.

  16. The GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, contributes to three distinct varieties of amnesia in the human brain - A detailed case report.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Adam; Hoefeijzers, Serge; Milton, Fraser; Dewar, Michaela; Carr, Melanie; Streatfield, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We describe a patient in whom long-term, therapeutic infusion of the selective gamma-amino-butyric acid type B (GABAB) receptor agonist, baclofen, into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) gave rise to three distinct varieties of memory impairment: i) repeated, short periods of severe global amnesia, ii) accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF), evident over intervals of days and iii) a loss of established autobiographical memories. This pattern of impairment has been reported in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), in particular the subtype of Transient Epileptic Amnesia (TEA). The amnesic episodes and accelerated forgetting remitted on withdrawal of baclofen, while the autobiographical amnesia (AbA) persisted. This exceptional case highlights the occurrence of 'non-standard' forms of human amnesia, reflecting the biological complexity of memory processes. It suggests a role for GABAB signalling in the modulation of human memory over multiple time-scales and hints at its involvement in 'epileptic amnesia'.

  17. The modified Geller-Seifter test in rats was insensitive to GABAB receptor positive modulation or blockade, or 5-HT1A receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Neil E; Hanania, Taleen

    2010-03-17

    Both the GABA(B) receptor positive modulator GS39783 and the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP46381 exhibit anxiolytic-like properties in animal models. In the present studies, the effects of GS39783 and CGP46381 in the modified Geller-Seifter task were assessed. First, the predictive validity of the task was confirmed by assessing the effects of multiple anxiolytic and non-anxiolytic compounds on punished and unpunished responding. Rats were trained in the modified Geller-Seifter task. After successful acquisition of the task, chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, MPEP, haloperidol, GS39783, 8-OH-DPAT, alprazolam and CGP46381 were tested consecutively. For each test compound, doses were administered in a randomized, counter-balanced, within-subjects design. Drug tests were performed only when rats exhibited baseline performance (the punished and time-out response rates were less than 10% of the unpunished response rate). Chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, alprazolam and MPEP released punished responding with variable effects on unpunished responding. Haloperidol had a small but significant effect on punished responding at an intermediate dose, and decreased unpunished responding at the highest dose tested. In contrast, administration of the GABA(B) receptor positive modulator GS398783 or the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP46381 at doses up to 30 mg/kg had no effects on either punished or unpunished responding. The 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT did not release punished responding, but significantly decreased unpunished responding at the highest dose tested. The modified Geller-Seifter task generally exhibits good predictive validity for anxiolytic-like compounds. Neither GABA(B) receptor positive allosteric modulation nor blockade exhibited anxiolytic-like properties in the modified Geller-Seifter task. The 5-HT(1A) partial agonist buspirone was similarly ineffective. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Activation of Presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) Receptors Inhibits Synaptic Transmission at Mammalian Inhibitory Cholinergic Olivocochlear–Hair Cell Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wedemeyer, Carolina; Zorrilla de San Martín, Javier; Ballestero, Jimena; Gómez-Casati, María Eugenia; Torbidoni, Ana Vanesa; Fuchs, Paul A.; Bettler, Bernhard; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    The synapse between olivocochlear (OC) neurons and cochlear mechanosensory hair cells is cholinergic, fast, and inhibitory. The inhibitory sign of this cholinergic synapse is accounted for by the activation of Ca2+-permeable postsynaptic α9α10 nicotinic receptors coupled to the opening of hyperpolarizing Ca2+-activated small-conductance type 2 (SK2)K+ channels. Acetylcholine (ACh) release at this synapse is supported by both P/Q- and N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Although the OC synapse is cholinergic, an abundant OC GABA innervation is present along the mammalian cochlea. The role of this neurotransmitter at the OC efferent innervation, however, is for the most part unknown. We show that GABA fails to evoke fast postsynaptic inhibitory currents in apical developing inner and outer hair cells. However, electrical stimulation of OC efferent fibers activates presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) receptors [GABAB(1a,2)Rs] that downregulate the amount of ACh released at the OC–hair cell synapse, by inhibiting P/Q-type VGCCs. We confirmed the expression of GABABRs at OC terminals contacting the hair cells by coimmunostaining for GFP and synaptophysin in transgenic mice expressing GABAB1–GFP fusion proteins. Moreover, coimmunostaining with antibodies against the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and synaptophysin support the idea that GABA is directly synthesized at OC terminals contacting the hair cells during development. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a physiological role for GABA in cochlear synaptic function. In addition, our data suggest that the GABAB1a isoform selectively inhibits release at efferent cholinergic synapses. PMID:24068816

  19. Changes in GABA(B) receptor mRNA expression in the rodent basal ganglia and thalamus following lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway.

    PubMed

    Johnston, T; Duty, S

    2003-01-01

    Loss of striatal dopaminergic innervation in Parkinson's disease (PD) is accompanied by widespread alterations in GABAergic activity within the basal ganglia and thalamus. Accompanying changes in GABA(B) receptor binding have been noted in some basal ganglia regions in parkinsonian primates, suggesting that plasticity of this receptor may also occur in PD. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the changes in receptor binding and the manner and extent to which different GABA(B) receptor mRNA subunits and splice-variants are affected remain unknown. This study used in situ hybridisation to examine the full profile of changes in expression of the known rat GABA(B) receptor genes and gene variants in the basal ganglia and thalamus of rats, brought about by degeneration of the nigrostriatal tract. All of the GABA(B) mRNA species examined showed unique expression patterns throughout the basal ganglia and thalamus. In addition, all exhibited a marked loss of expression (between 46 and 80%) in the substantia nigra pars compacta of animals bearing a complete 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion of the nigrostriatal tract, confirming the presence of these variants in dopaminergic neurones in this region. Further analysis of autoradioagrams revealed additional changes only in GABA(B(1a)) mRNA in discrete anatomical regions. Expression of the GABA(B(1a)) variant was significantly increased in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (33+/-2%), entopeduncular nucleus (26+/-1%) and the subthalamic nucleus (16+/-1%). Since these regions all receive reduced GABAergic innervation following nigrostriatal tract lesioning, it is possible that the increased expression occurs as a compensatory measure. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that GABA(B) receptor genes exhibit regional- and subunit/variant-specific plasticity at the molecular level under parkinsonian conditions.

  20. Increased efficiency of the GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kleschevnikov, Alexander M; Belichenko, Pavel V; Gall, Jessica; George, Lizzy; Nosheny, Rachel; Maloney, Michael T; Salehi, Ahmad; Mobley, William C

    2012-02-01

    Cognitive impairment in Down syndrome (DS) involves the hippocampus. In the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and synaptic plasticity were linked to enhanced inhibition. However, the mechanistic basis of changes in inhibitory efficiency remains largely unexplored, and efficiency of the GABAergic synaptic neurotransmission has not yet been investigated in direct electrophysiological experiments. To investigate this important feature of neurobiology of DS, we examined synaptic and molecular properties of the GABAergic system in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adult Ts65Dn mice. Both GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated components of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were significantly increased in Ts65Dn vs. control (2N) DG granule cells. These changes were unaccompanied by alterations in hippocampal levels of GABAA (α1, α2, α3, α5 and γ2) or GABAB (Gbr1a and Gbr1b) receptor subunits. Immunoreactivity for GAD65, a marker for GABAergic terminals, was also unchanged. In contrast, there was a marked change in functional parameters of GABAergic synapses. Paired stimulations showed reduced paired-pulse ratios of both GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated IPSC components (IPSC2/IPSC1), suggesting an increase in presynaptic release of GABA. Consistent with increased gene dose, the level of the Kir3.2 subunit of potassium channels, effectors for postsynaptic GABAB receptors, was increased. This change was associated with enhanced postsynaptic GABAB/Kir3.2 signaling following application of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen. Thus, both GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated synaptic efficiency is increased in the Ts65Dn DG, thus likely contributing to deficient synaptic plasticity and poor learning in DS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. GABAA and GABAB receptors in detrusor strips from guinea-pig bladder dome.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Santicioli, P; Meli, A

    1985-03-01

    The effects of various GABAA and GABAB receptor agonists and antagonists on electrically induced contractions of detrusor strips from guinea-pig urinary bladder dome were investigated by using both supra and submaximal parameters of stimulation. In supramaximally stimulated preparations GABA (1 mM) inhibited amplitude of contractions. This effect was mimicked, to a lesser degree, by the selective GABAB receptor agonist, (+/-)-baclofen (0.1 mM). Exposure to (+/-)-baclofen reduced markedly the effects of a subsequent challenge with GABA. The GABAA receptor agonists, muscimol (0.3 mM) and homotaurine (1 mM), produced a slight inhibition of contractions and reduced the effects of a subsequent challenge with GABA. The selective GABAA receptor antagonist, picrotoxin (0.1 mM), had a slight, but significant, antagonistic effect toward GABA, but had no effect against (+/-)-baclofen. GABA inhibition of supramaximally stimulated contractions was partly reduced by previous exposure to atropine (3 microM) or to the putative P2-purinoreceptor antagonist, reactive blue 2 (0.3 mM) as well as by desensitization of P2-purinoreceptors produced by the stable ATP analogue beta-gamma-methylene ATP (APPCP). GABA inhibition was unaffected by phentolamine (0.2 microM), propranolol (0.3 microM) or hexamethonium (10 microM). The inhibition produced by atropine plus reactive blue 2 or APPCP desensitization was additive or more than additive. In submaximally stimulated preparations GABA (0.01-1 mM) produced a transient, concentration related enhancement of amplitude of contractions. This effect was mimicked by either muscimol (0.3 mM) or homotaurine (1 mM) but not by (+/-)-baclofen (0.1 mM). A cross desensitization could be observed between the effects of muscimol or homotaurine on one hand and GABA on the other, but not between (+/-)-baclofen and GABA. Picrotoxin (0.03-0.1 mM) produced a concentration dependent antagonism of a noncompetitive type against the excitatory effect of GABA in

  2. Characterization of (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one as a positive allosteric modulator of GABAB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Malherbe, P; Masciadri, R; Norcross, R D; Knoflach, F; Kratzeisen, C; Zenner, M-T; Kolb, Y; Marcuz, A; Huwyler, J; Nakagawa, T; Porter, R H P; Thomas, A W; Wettstein, J G; Sleight, A J; Spooren, W; Prinssen, E P

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: As baclofen is active in patients with anxiety disorders, GABAB receptors have been implicated in the modulation of anxiety. To avoid the side effects of baclofen, allosteric enhancers of GABAB receptors have been studied to provide an alternative therapeutic avenue for modulation of GABAB receptors. The aim of this study was to characterize derivatives of (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF) as enhancers of GABAB receptors. Experimental approach: Enhancing properties of rac-BHFF were assessed in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-Gα16-hGABAB(1a,2a) cells by Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader and GTPγ[35S]-binding assays, and in rat hippocampal slices by population spike (PS) recordings. In vivo activities of rac-BHFF were assessed using the loss of righting reflex (LRR) and stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) models. Key results: In GTPγ[35S]-binding assays, 0.3 μM rac-BHFF or its pure enantiomer (+)-BHFF shifted the GABA concentration–response curve to the left, an effect that resulted in a large increase in both GABA potency (by 15.3- and 87.3-fold) and efficacy (149% and 181%), respectively. In hippocampal slices, rac-BHFF enhanced baclofen-induced inhibition of PS of CA1 pyramidal cells. In an in vivo mechanism-based model in mice, rac-BHFF increased dose-dependently the LRR induced by baclofen with a minimum effective dose of 3 mg kg−1 p.o. rac-BHFF (100 mg kg−1 p.o.) tested alone had no effect on LRR nor on spontaneous locomotor activity, but exhibited anxiolytic-like activity in the SIH model in mice. Conclusions and implications: rac-BHFF derivatives may serve as valuable pharmacological tools to elucidate the pathophysiological roles played by GABAB receptors in the central and peripheral nervous systems. PMID:18536733

  3. Reduction of excessive alcohol drinking by a novel GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator ADX71441 in mice.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Lara S; Kalinichev, Mikhail; Haddouk, Hasnaà; Poli, Sonia; Miczek, Klaus A

    2014-01-01

    A promising pharmacotherapy for alcohol use disorders has been positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor B (GABAB R) since GABAB R PAMs reduce ethanol drinking and self-administration in rodents. The current studies investigated a novel, selective GABAB R PAM, ADX71441, in comparison to naltrexone in a protocol of ethanol binge-like drinking, drinking-in-the-dark (DID), and in a model of long-term, excessive drinking, intermittent access to ethanol (IA). Male C57BL/6 J mice were given doses of ADX71441 (3, 10, 30 mg/kg, p.o.) before the fourth test day of repeated DID access to 20 % ethanol. Another group of mice had a history of 4 weeks of IA before ADX71441 (3, 10, 17 mg/kg, p.o.) treatment. The opioid antagonist, naltrexone (0.1, 1, 10 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to different groups of mice in both protocols as a positive control. In both DID and IA protocols, ADX71441 showed a selective and potent reduction of ethanol drinking, but not water drinking, while naltrexone had a more modest and transient effect on reducing ethanol drinking. The long-lasting effect of ADX71441 agrees with its plasma pharmacokinetics in showing peak concentrations at 2 h followed by a slow decay lasting well beyond 8 h. These findings support previous studies demonstrating that GABAB R PAMs decrease voluntary ethanol intake without altering water intake. ADX71441 may be a worthwhile candidate for developing a treatment of alcoholism, yet its site of action in the brain and long-term pharmacological effects require further exploration.

  4. Reduced inhibitory action of a GABAB receptor agonist on [3H]-dopamine release from rat ventral tegmental area in vitro after chronic nicotine administration

    PubMed Central

    Amantea, Diana; Bowery, Norman G

    2004-01-01

    Background The activation of GABAB receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) has been suggested to attenuate the rewarding properties of psychostimulants, including nicotine. However, the neurochemical mechanism that underlie this effect remains unknown. Since GABAB receptors modulate the release of several neurotransmitters in the mammalian brain, we have characterised the effect of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on the release of [3H]-dopamine ([3H]-DA) from VTA slices of naïve rats and of rats pre-treated with nicotine. Results In naïve rats, baclofen concentration-dependently inhibited the electrically evoked release of [3H]-DA from the isolated VTA (EC50 = 0.103 μM, 95% CI = 0.043–0.249), without affecting the basal [3H]-monoamine overflow. This effect was mediated by activation of GABAB receptors as it was blocked by the selective receptor antagonist CGP55845A. Chronic administration of nicotine (0.4 mg kg-1, s.c., for 14 days) affected neither the basal nor the electrically evoked release of [3H]-DA from VTA slices. However, the inhibitory effect of baclofen (10 μM) on the stimulated [3H]-monoamine overflow was abolished in rats pre-treated with nicotine as compared to saline-injected controls. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that GABAB receptor activation reduces the release of DA from the rat VTA. In addition, a reduced sensitivity of VTA GABAB receptors appears to develop after chronic exposure to nicotine. The resulting disinhibition of VTA DA neurones might therefore contribute to the sensitised dopaminergic responses observed in the rat mesocorticolimbic system following repeated administration of nicotine. PMID:15494079

  5. Multiple motifs regulate the trafficking of GABA(B) receptors at distinct checkpoints within the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Restituito, Sophie; Couve, Andrés; Bawagan, Hinayana; Jourdain, Sabine; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Freeman, Katie B; Moss, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate GABAergic inhibition in the brain. Their functional expression is dependent upon the formation of heterodimers between GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits, a process that occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the mechanisms that regulate receptor surface expression remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that access to the cell surface for GABA(B)R1 is sequentially controlled by an RSR(R) motif and a LL motif within its cytoplasmic domain. In addition, we reveal that msec7-1, a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) for the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of GTPases, critical regulators of vesicular membrane trafficking, interacts with GABA(B)R1 via the LL motif in this subunit. Finally, we establish that msec7-1 modulates the cell surface expression of GABA(B) receptors, a process that is dependent upon the integrity of the LL motif in GABA(B)R1. Together, our results demonstrate that the cell surface expression of the GABA(B)R1 subunit is regulated by multiple motifs, which act at distinct checkpoints in the secretory pathway, and also suggest a novel role for msec7-1 in regulating the membrane trafficking of GABA(B)R1 subunits.

  6. Association of GABA(B) receptors and members of the 14-3-3 family of signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Couve, A; Kittler, J T; Uren, J M; Calver, A R; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Moss, S J

    2001-02-01

    Two GABA(B) receptors, GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2, have been cloned recently. Unlike other G protein-coupled receptors, the formation of a heterodimer between GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 is required for functional expression. We have used the yeast two hybrid system to identify proteins that interact with the C-terminus of GABA(B)R1. We report a direct association between GABA(B) receptors and two members of the 14-3-3 protein family, 14-3-3eta and 14-3-3zeta. We demonstrate that the C-terminus of GABA(B)R1 associates with 14-3-3zeta in rat brain preparations and tissue cultured cells, that they codistribute after rat brain fractionation, colocalize in neurons, and that the binding site overlaps partially with the coiled-coil domain of GABA(B)R1. Furthermore we show a reduced interaction between the C-terminal domains of GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 in the presence of 14-3-3. The results strongly suggest that GABA(B)R1 and 14-3-3 associate in the nervous system and begin to reveal the signaling complexities of the GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptor heterodimer.

  7. GABAB Receptor Antagonist CGP46381 Inhibits Form-Deprivation Myopia Development in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu-Ping; Schmid, Katrina L.; Han, Yu-Fei; Han, Xu-Guang; Tang, Hong-Wei; Tang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the effects of the GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP46381, on form-deprivation myopia (FDM) in guinea pigs. Twenty-four guinea pigs had monocular visual deprivation induced using a diffuser for 11 days (day 14 to 25). The deprived eyes were treated with daily subconjunctival injections (100 μl) of either 2% CGP46381, 0.2% CGP46381, or saline or received no injection. The fellow eyes were left untreated. Another six animals received no treatment. At the start and end of the treatment period, ocular refractions were measured using retinoscopy and vitreous chamber depth (VCD) and axial length (AL) using A-scan ultrasound. All of the deprived eyes developed relative myopia (treated versus untreated eyes, P < 0.05). The amount of myopia was significantly affected by the drug treatment (one-way ANOVA, P < 0.0001). The highest dose tested, 2% CGP46381, significantly inhibited myopia development compared to saline (2% CGP46381: −1.08 ± 0.40 D, saline: −4.33 ± 0.67 D, P < 0.01). The majority of these effects were due to less AL (2% CGP46381: 0.03 ± 0.01 mm, saline: 0.13 ± 0.02 mm, P < 0.01) and VCD (2% CGP46381: 0.02 ± 0.01 mm, saline: 0.08 ± 0.01 mm, P < 0.01) elongation. The lower dose tested, 0.2% CGP46381, did not significantly inhibit FDM (P > 0.05). Subconjunctival injections of CGP46381 inhibit FDM development in guinea pigs in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25649745

  8. Puerarin alleviates noise-induced hearing loss via affecting PKCγ and GABAB receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Qu, Juan; Liao, Yong-Hui; Kou, Zhen-Zhen; Wei, Yan-Yan; Huang, Jing; Chen, Jing; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Shi, Ming; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-02-15

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) often results from prolonged exposure to high levels of noise. Our previous study revealed that during the development of NIHL, the expression of protein kinase C γ subunit (PKCγ) and GABAB receptor (GABABR) was changed within the cochlear nuclear complex (CNC), suggesting that these molecules might be the potential targets for the treatment of NIHL. As an extending study, here we focused on puerarin, a major isoflavonoid extracted from Pueraria lobota, which has been used in the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and investigated whether it could protect against NIHL by acting on PKCγ and GABABR. Transgenic GAD67-GFP knock-in mice were subjected to the NIHL model and their auditory functions were evaluated by the auditory brainstem response thresholds and distortion product oto-acoustic emission signals. Our results showed that 200mg/kg puerarin treatment ameliorated the thresholds of auditory brainstem response of NIHL mice significantly. Triple immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopy results revealed that GFP-positive neurons in the superficial layers of CNC expressed both PKCγ and GABABR1, and GAD67-positive terminals contacted PKCγ- or GABABR1-positive neurons. Immunoblotting and RT-PCR results showed that NIHL increased the expression of PKCγ but decreased that of GABABR1 and GABABR2 at both protein and mRNA levels in the CNC. Puerarin significantly attenuated the increased expression of PKCγ but elevated the reduced expression of GABABR1 and GABABR2 after noise exposure. Thus, we provided the first evidence that puerarin ameliorated the auditory functions of NIHL mice, and this effect may be due to its ability to regulate the expression of PKCγ and GABABR.

  9. Effects of acute administration of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen on behavioral flexibility in rats.

    PubMed

    Beas, B Sofia; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    The ability to adjust response strategies when faced with changes in the environment is critical for normal adaptive behavior. Such behavioral flexibility is compromised by experimental disruption of cortical GABAergic signaling, as well as in conditions such as schizophrenia and normal aging that are characterized by cortical hyperexcitability. The current studies were designed to determine whether stimulation of GABAergic signaling using the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen can facilitate behavioral flexibility. Male Fischer 344 rats were trained in a set-shifting task in which they learned to discriminate between two response levers to obtain a food reward. Correct levers were signaled in accordance with two distinct response rules (rule 1: correct lever signaled by a cue light; rule 2: correct lever signaled by its left/right position). The order of rule presentation varied, but they were always presented sequentially, with the trials and errors to reach criterion performance on the second (set shift) rule providing the measure of behavioral flexibility. Experiments determined the effects of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen (intraperitoneal, 0, 1.0, 2.5, and 4.0 mg/kg) administered acutely before the shift to the second rule. Baclofen enhanced set-shifting performance. Control experiments demonstrated that this enhancement was not simply due to improved discrimination learning, nor was it due to impaired recall of the initial discrimination rule. The results demonstrate that baclofen can facilitate behavioral flexibility, suggesting that GABA(B) receptor agonists may have utility for treating behavioral dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Postsynaptic GABA(B) Receptors Contribute to the Termination of Giant Depolarizing Potentials in CA3 Neonatal Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Khalilov, Ilgam; Minlebaev, Marat; Mukhtarov, Marat; Juzekaeva, Elvira; Khazipov, Roustem

    2017-01-01

    During development, hippocampal CA3 network generates recurrent population bursts, so-called Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs). GDPs are characterized by synchronous depolarization and firing of CA3 pyramidal cells followed by afterhyperpolarization (GDP-AHP). Here, we explored the properties of GDP-AHP in CA3 pyramidal cells using gramicidin perforated patch clamp recordings from neonatal rat hippocampal slices. We found that GDP-AHP occurs independently of whether CA3 pyramidal cells fire action potentials (APs) or remain silent during GDPs. However, the amplitude of GDP-AHP increased with the number of APs the cells fired during GDPs. The reversal potential of the GDP-AHP was close to the potassium equilibrium potential. During voltage-clamp recordings, current-voltage relationships of the postsynaptic currents activated during GDP-AHP were characterized by reversal near the potassium equilibrium potential and inward rectification, similar to the responses evoked by the GABA(B) receptor agonists. Finally, the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP55845 strongly reduced GDP-AHP and prolonged GDPs, eventually transforming them to the interictal and ictal-like discharges. Together, our findings suggest that the GDP-AHP involves two mechanisms: (i) postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor activated potassium currents, which are activated independently on whether the cell fires or not during GDPs; and (ii) activity-dependent, likely calcium activated potassium currents, whose contribution to the GDP-AHP is dependent on the amount of firing during GDPs. We propose that these two complementary inhibitory postsynaptic mechanisms cooperate in the termination of GDP. PMID:28701925

  11. Repeated administration of the GABAB receptor positive modulator BHF177 decreased nicotine self-administration, and acute administration decreased cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Vlachou, Styliani; Guery, Sebastien; Froestl, Wolfgang; Banerjee, Deboshri; Benedict, Jessica; Finn, M G; Markou, Athina

    2011-05-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain and is implicated in the modulation of central reward processes. Acute or chronic administration of GABA(B) receptor agonists or positive modulators decreased self-administration of various drugs of abuse. Furthermore, GABA(B) receptor agonists inhibited cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine- and cocaine-seeking behavior. Because of their fewer adverse side effects compared with GABA(B) receptor agonists, GABA(B) receptor positive modulators are potentially improved therapeutic compounds for the treatment of drug dependence compared with agonists. We examined whether the acute effects of the GABA(B) receptor positive modulator N-[(1R,2R,4S)-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl]-2-methyl-5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-pyrimidinamine (BHF177) on nicotine self-administration and food-maintained responding under a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of reinforcement were maintained after repeated administration. The effects of acute BHF177 administration on cue-induced nicotine- and food-seeking behavior, a putative animal model of relapse, were also examined. Repeated administration of BHF177 for 14 days decreased nicotine self-administration, with small tolerance observed during the last 7 days of treatment, whereas BHF177 minimally affected food-maintained responding. Acute BHF177 administration dose-dependently blocked cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-, but not food-, seeking behavior after a 10-day extinction period. These results showed that BHF177 selectively blocked nicotine self-administration and prevented cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking, with minimal effects on responding for food and no effect on cue-induced reinstatement of food seeking. Thus, GABA(B) receptor positive modulators could be useful therapeutics for the treatment of different aspects of nicotine dependence by facilitating smoking cessation by decreasing nicotine intake and preventing relapse to smoking in humans.

  12. Comparative immunohistochemical localisation of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b) and GABA(B2) subunits in rat brain, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Charles, K J; Evans, M L; Robbins, M J; Calver, A R; Leslie, R A; Pangalos, M N

    2001-01-01

    GABA(B) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors mediating the slow onset and prolonged synaptic actions of GABA in the CNS. The recent cloning of two genes, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), has revealed a novel requirement for GABA(B) receptor signalling. Studies have demonstrated that the two receptor subunits associate as a GABA(B1)/GABA(B2) heterodimer to form a functional GABA(B) receptor. In this study we have developed polyclonal antisera specific to two splice variants of the GABA(B1) subunit, GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b), as well as an antiserum to the GABA(B2) subunit. Using affinity-purified antibodies derived from these antisera we have mapped out the distribution profile of each subunit in rat brain, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion. In brain the highest areas of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b) and GABA(B2) subunit expression were found in neocortex, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum and habenula. In spinal cord, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits were expressed in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn, as well as in motor neurones in the deeper layers of the ventral horn. GABA(B) receptor subunit immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglion suggested that expression of GABA(B1b) was restricted to the large diameter neurones, in contrast to GABA(B1a) and GABA(B2) subunits which were expressed in both large and small diameter neurones. Although expression levels of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits varied we found no areas in which GABA(B1) was expressed in the absence of GABA(B2). This suggests that most, if not all, GABA(B1) immunoreactivity may represent functional GABA(B) receptors. Although our data are in general agreement with functional studies, some discrepancies in GABA(B1) subunit expression occurred with respect to other immunohistochemical studies. Overall our data suggest that GABA(B) receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain and spinal cord, and that GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) subunits can associate with GABA(B2) to form both pre- and post-synaptic receptors.

  13. GABA(B) and NMDA receptors contribute to spindle-like oscillations in rat thalamus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, R B; Ulrich, D; Huguenard, J R

    2001-09-01

    Thalamic slice preparations, in which intrathalamic connectivity between the reticular nucleus and relay nuclei is maintained, are capable of sustaining rhythmic burst firing activity in rodents and ferret. These in vitro oscillations occur spontaneously in the ferret and have frequencies (6-10 Hz) within the range of sleep spindles observed in vivo. In the rat, mainly lower frequency (2-4 Hz) oscillations, evoked under conditions of low bath [Mg(2+)] and/or GABA(A) receptor blockade, have been described. Here we show that faster rhythms in the range of 4-9 Hz can be evoked in rat thalamic slices by electrical stimulation of the internal capsule and also occur spontaneously. When bath [Mg(2+)] was 2 mM, these spindle-like oscillations were most common in a brief developmental time window, peaking at postnatal day 12 (P12). The oscillations were almost completely blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonist picrotoxin, and, in some cases, the frequency of oscillations was increased by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-35348. The selective blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors by the antagonists 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid or 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-6-nitro-2,3-dioxo-benzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX), respectively, significantly shortened oscillations but did not completely block them. A combination of the two drugs was necessary to abolish oscillatory activity. The barbituate pentobarbital, which enhances GABA(A)R responses, initially slowed and synchronized oscillations before completely blocking them. When bath [Mg(2+)] was reduced from 2 to 0.65 mM, evoked oscillations became more robust and were often accompanied by spontaneously arising oscillations. Under these conditions, GABA(A) receptor blockade no longer inhibited oscillations, but instead converted them into the slow, synchronous rhythms that have been observed in other studies. The effects of GABA(B) or NMDA receptor

  14. Subcellular compartment-specific molecular diversity of pre- and postsynaptic GABAB-activated GIRK channels in Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alacid, Laura; Aguado, Carolina; Ciruela, Francisco; Martín, Ricardo; Colón, José; Cabañero, María José; Gassmann, Martin; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Wickman, Kevin; Bettler, Bernhard; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Luján, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Activation of G protein-gated inwardly-rectifying K+ (GIRK or Kir3) channels by metabotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid (B) (GABAB) receptors is an essential signalling pathway controlling neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission in the brain. To investigate the relationship between GIRK channel subunits and GABAB receptors in cerebellar Purkinje cells at post- and pre-synaptic sites, we used biochemical, functional and immunohistochemical techniques. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that GIRK subunits are co-assembled with GABAB receptors in the cerebellum. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the subunit composition of GIRK channels in Purkinje cell spines is compartment-dependent. Thus, at extrasynaptic sites GIRK channels are formed by GIRK1/GIRK2/GIRK3, postsynaptic densities contain GIRK2/GIRK3 and dendritic shafts contain GIRK1/GIRK3. The postsynaptic association of GIRK subunits with GABAB receptors in Purkinje cells is supported by the subcellular regulation of the ion channel and the receptor in mutant mice. At presynaptic sites, GIRK channels localized to parallel fibre terminals are formed by GIRK1/GIRK2/GIRK3 and co-localize with GABAB receptors. Consistent with this morphological evidence we demonstrate their functional interaction at axon terminals in the cerebellum by showing that GIRK channels play a role in the inhibition of glutamate release by GABAB receptors. The association of GIRK channels and GABAB receptors with excitatory synapses at both post- and presynaptic sites indicates their intimate involvement in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cerebellum. PMID:19558451

  15. [The pharmacological differences between kynurenine- and korazol-induced seizures (the participation of GABA-B receptors and dopamine)].

    PubMed

    Lapin, I P

    1998-01-01

    In experiments of male SHR (nonbred) and C57B1/6 mice [correction of rats] bicucullin intensified corasole-induced convulsions but had no effect on kynurenine convulsions, removed the anticonvulsive effect of phenibut against kynurenine and did not affect the anticonvulsive effect of diazepam against corasole. Phenibut and baclofen reduced the anticonvulsive effect of diazepam against corasole and caffeine. Haloperidol increased kynurenine-induced convulsions and had no effect on those caused by corasole. Dopamine removed the effect of haloperidol. Haloperidol and 6-oxydopamine weakened the sedative effect of phenibut. Blockade of GAMAB-receptors and weakening of dopaminergic activity are important in the mechanisms of kynurenine convulsions, and blockage of GABAA-receptors unrelated to it is important in the mechanisms of corasole convulsions. A functional antagonism in anticonvulsive activity may exist between these receptors. Bicucullin may probably have an effect both on GABAA- and GABAB-receptors.

  16. Involvement of GABAB Receptor Signaling in Antipsychotic-like Action of the Novel Orthosteric Agonist of the mGlu4 Receptor, LSP4-2022

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Monika; Acher, Francine; Marciniak, Marcin; Łasoń-Tyburkiewicz, Magdalena; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Pilc, Andrzej; Wierońska, Joanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Considering that ligands of metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors may exert beneficial effects on schizophrenia, we assessed the actions of the first mGlu4-selective orthosteric agonist, LSP4-2022, in several tests reflecting positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Moreover, we investigated the possible involvement of GABAB receptors in LSP4-2022-induced actions. Hyperactivity induced by MK-801 or amphetamine and DOI-induced head twitches in mice were used as the models of positive symptoms. The social interaction test, modified forced swim test (FST), and novel object recognition (NOR) test were used as the models of negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. LSP4-2022 inhibited hyperactivity (in a dose-dependent manner, 0.5-2 mg/kg) induced by MK-801 or amphetamine and DOI-induced head twitches. In mGlu4 receptor knockout mice, LSP4-2022 was not effective. However, it reversed MK-801-induced impairment in the social interaction test and the MK-801-induced increase of immobility in the modified FST. In the NOR test, LSP4-2022 was active at a dose of 2 mg/kg. GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP55845 (10 mg/kg), reversed LSP4-2022-induced effects in hyperactivity and head twitch tests. At the same time, the simultaneous administration of subeffective doses of LSP4-2022 (0.1 mg/kg) and a positive allosteric modulator of GABAB receptor PAM, GS39783 (0.1 mg/kg), induced clear antipsychotic-like effects in those two tests. Such an interaction between mGlu4 and GABAB receptors was not observed in the social interaction and NOR tests. Therefore, we suggest that the activation of the mGlu4 receptor is a promising approach facilitating the discovery of novel antipsychotic drugs, and that the interplay between mGlu4 and GABAB receptors may become the basis for a novel therapy for schizophrenic patients with predomination of positive symptoms. PMID:26769224

  17. Effect of androgens on sexual differentiation of pituitary gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit GABA(B) expression.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, María S; Catalano, Paolo N; Bonaventura, María M; Silveyra, Patricia; Bettler, Bernhard; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A R

    2004-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated a sexually dimorphic ontogenic expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(B)R) in rat pituitary. As sex steroids determine sex-specific expression patterns, we now studied the effect of sex hormones on pituitary GABA(B)R expression. GABA(B)R subunits, measured by Western blot and by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone measured by RIA were determined in two experimental designs: First experimental design: 8- and 15-day-old females (8F, 15F); 8F and 15F treated with 100 mug testosterone propionate (TP) on day 1 of life (8F100TP, 15F100TP), 8- and 15-day-old males (8M, 15M) and 8M and 15M castrated on day 1 (8MC, 15MC). Second experimental design: 8-day-old female and male animals: 8F, 8F100TP, 8F treated with 1 mug/day TP on days 1-4 (8F1TP), 8F treated with the androgen antagonist Flutamide (Flut: 2.5 mg/100 g BW of pregnant mother on days E17-E23) (8F-Flut), 8M, 8MC, 8M treated with Flut as above (8M-Flut) and 8MC-Flut. In these animals, in addition, GABA, glutamate, aspartate and taurine were measured by HPLC in hypothalami and cortex. In the first set of experiments, GABA(B1)R mRNA/protein expression was higher in 8F than in 15F, 8M or 15M. In 8F100TP, GABA(B1)R mRNA/protein decreased to male levels. TP treatment did not alter GABA(B1)R expression in 15F. There was no difference in GABA(B1)R expression between 8M and 15M and neonatal castration did not modify its expression. In the second set of experiments, TP (1 mug) or Flut did not modify GABA(B1)R in 8F, while 100 microg TP continued to decrease GABA(B1)R expression. In 8M, Flut, alone or with castration, increased GABA(B1)R mRNA/protein expression to 8F. Hypothalamic GABA content followed the same pattern as pituitary GABA(B)R expression in 8-day-old animals, suggesting a cross-regulation. With regard to hormonal levels, 100 microg, but not 1 microg TP altered gonadotropins at 8 days, although both

  18. Involvement of GABAB receptors in biochemical alterations induced by anxiety-related responses to nicotine in mice: genetic and pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Varani, Andrés P; Pedrón, Valeria T; Bettler, Bernhard; Balerio, Graciela N

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory showed that anxiety-related responses induced by nicotine (NIC), measured by the elevated plus maze, were abolished by 2-OH-saclofen (GABAB receptor antagonist) (1 mg/kg; ip) or the lack of GABAB receptors (GABAB1 knockout mice). Based on these behavioral data, the aims of the present study were: 1) to evaluate the possible neurochemical changes (dopamine, DA, serotonin, 5-HT, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA and noradrenaline, NA) and the c-Fos expression induced by the anxiolytic (0.05 mg/kg) or anxiogenic (0.8 mg/kg) doses of NIC in the dorsal raphe (DRN) and lateral septal (LSN) nucleus; 2) to study the possible involvement of GABAB receptors on the neurochemical alterations and c-Fos expression induced by NIC (0.05 and 0.8 mg/kg), using both pharmacological (2-OH-saclofen) and genetic (mice GABAB1 knockout) approaches. The results revealed that in wild-type mice, NIC (0.05 mg/kg) increased the concentration of 5-HT and 5-HIAA (p < 0.05) in the DRN, and NIC (0.8 mg/kg) increased the levels of 5-HT (p < 0.01) and NA (p < 0.05) in the LSN. Additionally, 2-OH-saclofen pretreatment (1 mg/kg, ip) or the lack of GABAB receptors abolished these neurochemical changes induced by NIC (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). On the other hand, NIC 0.05 and 0.8 mg/kg increased (p < 0.01) the c-Fos expression in the DRN and LSN respectively, in wild-type mice. In addition, 2-OH-saclofen pretreatment (1 mg/kg, ip) or the lack of GABAB receptors prevented the c-Fos alterations induced by NIC (p < 0.01). In summary, both approaches show that GABAB receptors would participate in the modulation of anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like responses induced by NIC, suggesting the potential therapeutic target of these receptors for the tobacco addiction treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The inhibition of release by mGlu7 receptors is independent of the Ca2+ channel type but associated to GABAB and adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Martín, Ricardo; Ladera, Carolina; Bartolomé-Martín, David; Torres, Magdalena; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2008-09-01

    Neurotransmitter release is inhibited by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) through signalling pathways that are negatively coupled to Ca2+ channels and adenylyl cyclase. Through Ca2+ imaging and immunocytochemistry, we have recently shown that adenosine A1, GABAB and the metabotropic glutamate type 7 receptors coexist in a subset of cerebrocortical nerve terminals. As these receptors inhibit glutamate release through common intracellular signalling pathways, their co-activation occluded each other responses. Here we have addressed whether the occlusion of receptor responses is restricted to the glutamate release mediated by N-type Ca2+ channels by analysing this process in nerve terminals from mice lacking the alpha1B subunit (Cav 2.2) of these channels. We found that glutamate release from cerebrocortical nerve terminals without these channels, in which release relies exclusively on P/Q type Ca2+ channels, is not modulated by mGlu7 receptors. Furthermore, there is no occlusion of the release inhibition by GABAB and adenosine A1. Hence, in the cerebrocortical preparation, these three receptors only appear to coexist in N-type channel containing nerve terminals. In contrast, in hippocampal nerve terminals lacking this subunit, where mGlu7 receptors modulate glutamate release via P/Q type channels, the occlusion of inhibitory responses by co-stimulation of adenosine A1, GABAB and mGlu7 receptors was observed. Thus, occlusion of the responses by the three GPCRs is independent of the Ca2+ channel type but rather, it is associated to functional mGlu7 receptors.

  20. Dynamics of binaural processing in the mammalian sound localization pathway--the role of GABA(B) receptors.

    PubMed

    Grothe, Benedikt; Koch, Ursula

    2011-09-01

    The initial binaural processing in the superior olive represents the fastest computation known in the entire mammalian brain. Although the binaural system has to perform under very different and often highly dynamic acoustic conditions, the integration of binaural information in the superior olivary complex (SOC) has not been considered to be adaptive or dynamic itself. Recent evidence, however, shows that the initial processing of interaural level and interaural time differences relies on well-adjusted interactions of both the excitatory and the inhibitory projections, respectively. Under static conditions, these inputs seem to be tightly balanced, but may also require dynamic adjustment for proper function when the acoustic environment changes. GABA(B) receptors are at least one mechanism rendering the system more dynamic than considered so far. A comprehensive description of how binaural processing in the SOC is dynamically regulated by GABA(B) receptors in adults and in early development is important for understanding how spatial auditory processing changes with acoustic context. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. GABAB Receptor Agonist R-Baclofen Reverses Social Deficits and Reduces Repetitive Behavior in Two Mouse Models of Autism.

    PubMed

    Silverman, J L; Pride, M C; Hayes, J E; Puhger, K R; Butler-Struben, H M; Baker, S; Crawley, J N

    2015-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is diagnosed by two core behavioral criteria, unusual reciprocal social interactions and communication, and stereotyped, repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Excitatory/inhibitory imbalance is a prominent hypothesis for the etiology of autism. The selective GABAB receptor agonist R-baclofen previously reversed social deficits and reduced repetitive behaviors in a mouse model of Fragile X syndrome, and Arbaclofen improved some clinical symptoms in some Fragile X and ASD patients. To evaluate R-baclofen in a broader range of mouse models of ASD, we tested both the R-baclofen enantiomer and the less potent S-baclofen enantiomer in two inbred strains of mice that display low sociability and/or high repetitive or stereotyped behaviors. R-baclofen treatment reversed social approach deficits in BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR), reduced repetitive self-grooming and high marble burying scores in BTBR, and reduced stereotyped jumping in C58/J (C58), at nonsedating doses. S-baclofen produced minimal effects at the same doses. These findings encourage investigations of R-baclofen in other preclinical model systems. Additional clinical studies may be warranted to further evaluate the hypothesis that the GABAB receptor represents a promising pharmacological target for treating appropriately stratified subsets of individuals with ASD.

  2. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen prevents heroin-induced reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Spano, Maria Sabrina; Fattore, Liana; Fratta, Walter; Fadda, Paola

    2007-06-01

    Opiate addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by high rates of relapse. The gamma-aminobutyric acid GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen is known to affect the reinforcing effects of several drugs of abuse, including heroin, as well as to decrease cue-maintained responding for heroin, cocaine and nicotine and suppress alcohol deprivation effect in rats. Here we studied the effect of baclofen on the reinstatement of extinguished heroin-seeking behavior triggered by a priming injection of heroin in abstinent rats trained to stably self-administer heroin (30 microg/kg per infusion) under a continuous reinforcement schedule. Following extinction, the effect of non-contingent non-reinforced primings with heroin, baclofen or heroin/baclofen combination on the resumption of responding was evaluated. Results indicate that heroin priming (0.25mg/kg) promptly reinitiated heroin-seeking behavior, an effect dose-dependently reduced by baclofen at doses (0.625 and 1.25mg/kg) not affecting responding per sè. Importantly, baclofen did not affect locomotion either alone or in combination with heroin, dispelling any doubt as to the eliciting of possible non-specific (motor) effects. The present results show that GABA(B) receptor activation may reduce the propensity to resume drug-induced heroin-seeking behavior thus offering a possible approach in maintaining opiate abstinence.

  3. Suppressing effect of COR659 on alcohol, sucrose, and chocolate self-administration in rats: involvement of the GABAB and cannabinoid CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Paola; Colombo, Giancarlo; Lorrai, Irene; Zaru, Alessandro; Carai, Mauro A M; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Brizzi, Antonella; Mugnaini, Claudia; Corelli, Federico

    2017-05-24

    COR659 [methyl2-(4-chlorophenylcarboxamido)-4-ethyl-5-methylthiophene-3-carboxylate] is a new, positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the GABAB receptor. This study evaluated whether COR659 shared with previously tested GABAB PAMs the capacity to reduce alcohol self-administration in rats. Treatment with non-sedative doses of COR659 (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg; i.p.) suppressed lever-responding for alcohol (15% v/v) in Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats under the fixed ratio (FR) 4 (FR4) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement; COR659 was more potent and effective than the reference GABAB PAM, GS39783. Treatment with COR659, but not GS39783, suppressed (a) lever-responding for a sucrose solution (1-3% w/v) in sP rats under the FR4 and PR schedules, (b) lever-responding for a chocolate solution [5% (w/v) Nesquik®] in Wistar rats under the FR10 and PR schedules, and (c) cue-induced reinstatement of chocolate seeking in Wistar rats. Treatment with COR659 was completely ineffective on lever-responding (FR10) for regular food pellets in food-deprived Wistar rats. Pretreatment with the GABAB receptor antagonist, SCH50911, partially blocked COR659-induced reduction of alcohol self-administration, being ineffective on reduction of chocolate self-administration. Pretreatment with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, AM4113, fully blocked COR659-induced reduction of chocolate self-administration, being ineffective on reduction of alcohol self-administration. COR659 might exert its behavioral effects via a composite mechanism: (i) positive allosteric modulation of the GABAB receptor, responsible for a large proportion of reduction of alcohol self-administration; (ii) an action at other receptor system(s), including the cannabinoid CB1 receptor, through which COR659 affects seeking and consumption of highly palatable foods.

  4. GABA(B) receptor activation in the ventral tegmental area inhibits the acquisition and expression of opiate-induced motor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Leite-Morris, Kimberly A; Fukudome, Eugene Y; Shoeb, Marwa H; Kaplan, Gary B

    2004-02-01

    Opiate-induced motor sensitization refers to the progressive and enduring motor response that develops after intermittent drug administration, and results from neuroadaptive changes in ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons. Repeated activation of mu-opioid receptors localized on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in the VTA enhances dopaminergic cell activity and stimulates dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. We hypothesize that GABA(B) receptor agonist treatment in the VTA blocks morphine-induced motor stimulation, motor sensitization, and accumbal Fos immunoreactivity by inhibiting the activation of dopaminergic neurons. First, C57BL/6 mice were coadministered a single subcutaneous injection of morphine with intra-VTA baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist. Baclofen produced a dose-dependent inhibition of opiate-induced motor stimulation that was attenuated by 2-hydroxysaclofen, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Next, morphine was administered on days 1, 3, 5, and 9 and mice demonstrated sensitization to its motor stimulant effects and concomitant induction of Fos immunoreactivity in the NAc shell (NAcS) but not NAc core. Intra-VTA baclofen administered during morphine pretreatment blocked the acquisition of morphine-induced motor sensitization and Fos activation in the NAcS. Intra-VTA baclofen administered only on day 9 blocked the expression of morphine-induced motor sensitization and Fos activation in the NAcS. A linear relationship was found between morphine-induced motor activity and accumbal Fos in single- and repeated-dose treatment groups. In conclusion, GABA(B) receptor stimulation in the VTA blocked opiate-induced motor stimulation and motor sensitization by inhibiting the activation of NAcS neurons. GABA(B) receptor agonists may be useful pharmacological treatments in altering the behavioral effects of opiates.

  5. Baclofen, an agonist at peripheral GABAB receptors, induces antinociception via activation of TEA-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Reis, G M L; Duarte, I D G

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Central anti-nociceptive actions of baclofen involve activation of K+ channels. Here we assessed what types of K+ channel might participate in the peripheral anti-nociception induced by baclofen. Experimental approach: Nociceptive thresholds to mechanical stimulation in rat paws treated with intraplantar prostaglandin E2.(PGE2) to induce hyperalgesia were measured 3h after PGE2 injection. Other agents were also given by intraplantar injection Key results: Baclofen elicited a dose-dependent (15 - 240 μg per paw) anti-nociceptive effect. An intermediate dose of baclofen (60 μg) did not produce antinociception in the contralateral paw, showing its peripheral site of action. The GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen (12.5 - 100 μg per paw) antagonized, in a dose-dependent manner, peripheral antinociception induced by baclofen (60 μg), suggesting a specific effect. This antinociceptive action of baclofen was unaffected by bicuculline, GABAA receptor antagonist (80 μg per paw), or by (1,2,5,6 tetrahydropyridin-4-yl) methylphosphinic acid, GABAC receptor antagonist (20 μg per paw). The peripheral antinociception induced by baclofen (60 μg) was reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, by the voltage-dependent K+ channel blockers tetraethylammonium (7.5 - 30 μg per paw) and 4-aminopyridine (2.5 - 10 μg per paw). The blockers of other K+ channels, glibenclamide (160 μg), tolbutamide (320 μg), charybdotoxin (2 μg), dequalinium (50 μg) and caesium (500 μg) had no effect. Conclusions and Implications: This study provides evidence that the peripheral antinociceptive effect of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen results from the activation of tetraethylammonium-sensitive K+ channels. Other K+ channels appear not to be involved. PMID:17016510

  6. GABAB receptors as a common target for hypothermia and spike and wave seizures: intersecting mechanisms of thermoregulation and absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Z S; Ilić, T V; Vesković, S M; Andjus, P R

    2013-05-15

    In the current study the link among the γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB)/pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced absence-like seizures and concomitant decreases in the core temperature, as well as electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during rewarming from deep hypothermia produced by a drug-free protocol were investigated. During the rewarming period after deep cooling, most Wistar rats suffered from bilaterally synchronous spike and waves with no or mild behavioral correlates. Spike and wave seizures were temperature-dependent and were initially registered when body temperature (Tb) reached 25-27°C, but mostly during the mild hypothermia of 0.3-1.3°C (Tb of 36.3-37.3°C). In chemical absence models, spike and wave discharges were also closely accompanied by mild systemic hypothermia, as both PTZ- and GHB-induced temperature decreases ranged from about 1-1.4°C respectively, together with EEG markers of absence activity. Thus, throughout the different experimental designs, the occurrence of spike and wave discharges was always related to a mild (0.3-1.4°C) decrease of Tb. Benzodiazepine diazepam as the GABAA-positive allosteric modulator and CGP 62349 as the selective antagonist of GABAB receptors were used to determine if their well-known anticonvulsant properties also affect hypothermia elicited by these drugs. Finally, during the course of spontaneous rewarming from deep hypothermia, another selective GABAB-blocking agent, CGP 35348, was used to elucidate if GABAB inhibitory system could be critically implicated in the generation of hypothermia-dependent spike and waves. Diazepam prevented both the PTZ-induced hypothermia and electrographic absence seizures, but these two beneficial effects did not occur in the GHB model. Even though diazepam delayed GHB-induced maximal temperature decrease, the GHB effects remained highly significant. The GABAB antagonist CGP 62349 completely prevented hypothermia as well as absence seizures in both chemical models. Likewise, spike and

  7. Administration of GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulators inhibit the expression of previously established methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Herrold, Amy A.; Riddle, Jennifer L.; Napier, T. Celeste

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the role of GABAB receptors (GABABRs) in the maintenance of memories associated with using abused substances. We have embarked on a series of studies designed to determine if enhancing the efficacy of GABA-occupied GABABRs with positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) can negate previously established conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by methamphetamine. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of acute administration of GABABR PAMs, GS39783 and CGP7930. We determined that post-conditioning treatments with these PAMs, administered in the home cage, blocked the subsequent expression of methamphetamine-induced CPP. These data indicate that selectively augmenting GABA-occupied GABABR signaling is sufficient to reduce memory maintenance and/or the salience of contextual cues previously associated with methamphetamine. PMID:20804788

  8. The positive allosteric modulator of the GABA(B) receptor, rac-BHFF, suppresses alcohol self-administration.

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Paola; Thomas, Andrew W; Carai, Mauro A M; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Malherbe, Pari; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2010-06-01

    The present study was designed to extend to the newly synthesized rac-BHFF [(R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one] the investigation on the capacity of positive allosteric modulators of the GABA(B) receptor to reduce alcohol self-administration in rats. To this end, selectively bred Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats were initially trained to respond on a lever [on a fixed ratio 4 (FR4) schedule of reinforcement] to orally self-administer alcohol (15%, v/v) or sucrose (0.7%, w/v) in daily 30-min sessions. Once responding reached stable levels, the effect of rac-BHFF (0, 50, 100, and 200mg/kg; i.g.) on responding for alcohol and sucrose was determined. Pretreatment with rac-BHFF produced a dose-dependent suppression in responding for alcohol; reduction in the total number of responses for alcohol, in comparison to vehicle-treated rats, averaged approximately 30%, 65%, and 90% in 50, 100, and 200mg/kg rac-BHFF-treated rats, respectively. Pretreatment with 200mg/kg rac-BHFF markedly increased the latency to the first response on the alcohol lever. The effect of pretreatment with rac-BHFF on alcohol self-administration was highly specific, since (a) responding for sucrose was reduced (to approximately 50%, in comparison to vehicle-treated rats) only by pretreatment with 200mg/kg rac-BHFF, and (b) latency to the first response on the sucrose lever was completely unaltered by any rac-BHFF dose. Treatment with rac-BHFF did not alter spontaneous locomotor activity in an independent group of sP rats. The present data constitute a further piece of evidence on the capacity of positive allosteric modulators of the GABA(B) receptor to reduce alcohol's reinforcing properties in rats.

  9. The GABA Transporters GAT-1 and GAT-3 modulate glutamatergic transmission via activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors in the rat globus pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Paré, Jean-Francois; Smith, Yoland

    2012-01-01

    Intrapallidal application of GAT-1 or GAT-3 transporter blockers (SKF 89976A or SNAP 5114) reduces the activity of pallidal neurons in monkey. This effect could be mediated through activation of presynaptic GABAB heteroreceptors in glutamatergic terminals by GABA spillover following GABA transporters (GATs) blockade. To test this hypothesis, we applied the whole-cell recording technique to study the effects of SKF 89976A and SNAP 5114 on evoked excitatory post synaptic currents (eEPSCs) in presence of gabazine, a GABAA receptor antagonist, in rat GP slice preparations. Under the condition of postsynaptic GABAB receptor blockade by intracellular application of OX314, bath application of SKF 89976A (10 μM) or SNAP 5114 (10 μM) decreased the amplitude of eEPSCs, without significant effect on its holding current and whole cell input resistance. The inhibitory effect of GATs blockade on eEPSCs was blocked by CGP 58845, a GABAB receptor antagonist. The paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of evoked EPSCs was increased, while the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) was reduced in presence of either GAT blockers, demonstrating a presynaptic effect. These results suggest that synaptically released GABA can inhibit glutamatergic transmission through activation of presynaptic GABAB heteroreceptors following GAT-1 or GAT-3 blockade. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that pre-synaptic GABAB heteroreceptors in putative glutamatergic subthalamic afferents to GP are sensitive to increases in extracellular GABA induced by GATs inactivation, thereby suggesting that GATs blockade represents a potential mechanism by which overactive subthalamopallidal activity may be reduced in parkinsonism. PMID:22616751

  10. GABAA receptor subunit composition and competition at synapses are tuned by GABAB receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Gerrow, K; Triller, A

    2014-05-01

    GABABRs have a well-established role in controlling neuronal excitability and presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We examined the role of GABABR activity in modulating the number and lateral diffusion of GABAARs at inhibitory synapses. Changes in diffusion of GABAARs at synapses were observed when subunit heterogeneity was taken into account. While α1-GABAARs were unaffected, α2- and α5-GABAARs showed inverse changes in enrichment and diffusion. The intracellular TM3-4 loop of α2 was sufficient to observe the changes in diffusion by GABABR activity, whereas the loop of α5 was not. The opposing effect on α2- and α5-GABAARs was caused by a competition between GABAARs for binding slots at synapses. Receptor immobilization by cross-linking revealed that α5-GABAAR trapping at synapses is regulated by modulation of α2-GABAAR mobility. Finally, PKC activity was determined to be part of the signaling pathway through which GABABR activity modulates α2-GABAAR diffusion at synapses. These results outline a novel mechanism for tuning inhibitory transmission in a subunit-specific manner, and for the first time describe competition between GABAARs with different subunit compositions for binding slots at synapses.

  11. Acamprosate enhances N-methyl-D-apartate receptor-mediated neurotransmission but inhibits presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in nucleus accumbens neurons.

    PubMed

    Berton, F; Francesconi, W G; Madamba, S G; Zieglgänsberger, W; Siggins, G R

    1998-02-01

    Acamprosate (calcium acetylhomotaurine) is used therapeutically in Europe to reduce relapse in weaned alcoholics. However, the mechanisms of acamprosate action in the central nervous system are still obscure, although early studies suggested an action on GABA receptors. The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is a brain region thought to underlie ethanol reinforcement. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that ethanol inhibits both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA types of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the NAcc. In the present study, we used voltage- and current-clamp intracellular recording of NAcc core neurons in a slice preparation to examine acamprosate actions on resting membrane properties and pharmacologically isolated synaptic responses. We isolated NMDA and non-NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials or currents (EPSP/Cs) with 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (d-APV), respectively. Bicuculline was also included to block GABA(A) receptors. Superfusion of acamprosate (5, 50, and 300 microM) did not alter the resting membrane properties of NAcc neurons. However, 300 microM acamprosate significantly increased the NMDA receptor-mediated components of EPSP/Cs (NMDA-EPSP/Cs) with recovery on washout. In contrast, 300 microM acamprosate had no significant effect on the non-NMDA receptor component of the EPSP/Cs (non-NMDA-EPSP/Cs). To test acamprosate actions on the GABA system, we superfused 60 microM d-APV and 20 microM CNQX to block glutamatergic transmission and evoked monosynaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic responses within the NAcc. Acamprosate (300 microM) did not change these monosynaptic GABA(A)-IPSCs. We also used a paired-pulse paradigm to test whether acamprosate could act on presynaptic GABA(B) autoreceptors, in the presence of d-APV and CNQX to block glutamatergic transmission. Like 0.5 microM CGP 34358 (a GABA[B] receptor blocker), acamprosate significantly

  12. GABAB receptors in the NTS mediate the inhibitory effect of trigeminal nociceptive inputs on parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hisayoshi; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The present study was designed to examine whether trigeminal nociceptive inputs are involved in the modulation of parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the jaw muscles. This was accomplished by investigating the effects of noxious stimulation to the orofacial area with capsaicin, and by microinjecting GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor agonists or antagonists into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), on masseter hemodynamics in urethane-anesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the cervical vagus nerve (cVN) in sympathectomized animals bilaterally increased blood flow in the masseter muscle (MBF). Increases in MBF evoked by cVN stimulation were markedly reduced following injection of capsaicin into the anterior tongue in the distribution of the lingual nerve or lower lip, but not when injected into the skin of the dorsum of the foot. Intravenous administration of either phentolamine or propranolol had no effect on the inhibitory effects of capsaicin injection on the increases of MBF evoked by cVN stimulation, which were largely abolished by microinjecting the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen into the NTS. Microinjection of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-35348 into the NTS markedly attenuated the capsaicin-induced inhibition of MBF increase evoked by cVN stimulation, while microinjection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline did not. Our results indicate that trigeminal nociceptive inputs inhibit vagal-parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the masseter muscle and suggest that the activation of GABA(B) rather than GABA(A) receptors underlies the observed inhibition in the NTS.

  13. The inhibitory effects on sexual behavior and ambulatory activity of the mixed GABAA/GABAB agonist progabide are differentially blocked by GABA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Agmo, A; Paredes, R G; Sierra, L; Garcés, I

    1997-01-01

    Progabide inhibited male rat sexual behavior at a dose of 200 mg/kg. This dose had only modest effects on ambulatory activity and no effect at all on motor coordination as evaluated by a rotarod test. The GABAA antagonist bicuculline, at a dose of 1 mg/kg, blocked the effects of progabide on sex behavior. In contrast, the GABAB antagonist CGP 35348, at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg, was ineffective. These doses have previously been shown to block the actions of baclofen on sexual behavior. It was concluded that the GABAA but not the GABAB receptor is important for the inhibitory effects of progabide on that behavior. The actions of progabide on ambulatory activity were not blocked by bicuculline or CGP 35348 at any of the doses used (up to 2 and 200 mg/kg, respectively). Even the combination of both antagonists was ineffective. This suggests that the motor effects of progabide are mediated by either a non-GABAergic receptor or by a subtype of the GABAA or the GABAB receptor that is not sensitive to the antagonists. Present results show that the effects of progabide on motor functions depend on mechanisms different from those involved in its effects on sexual behavior. They further suggest that the GABAA receptor may be important for drug actions on male sexual behavior.

  14. Neurons in the rat arcuate nucleus are hyperpolarized by GABAB and mu-opioid receptor agonists: evidence for convergence at a ligand-gated potassium conductance.

    PubMed

    Loose, M D; Ronnekleiv, O K; Kelly, M J

    1991-12-01

    Both gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the endogenous opioid peptides have pervasive effects on neuroendocrine function. This study examined the effects of selective activation of GABAB and/or mu-opioid receptors on neurons of the arcuate nucelus (ARC) of the rat hypothalamus using intracellular recording of cells in a hypothalamic slice. Some recorded neurons were filled with biocytin allowing subsequent identification and immunocytochemical evaluation for the presence of beta-endorphin. ARC neurons exhibited a broad array of active and passive conductances. Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAGOL), a mu-opioid receptor agonist, inhibited spontaneous firing, hyperpolarized 68% of ARC cells in a dose-dependent manner and increased cell conductance. Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, hyperpolarized all cells tested. The reversal potentials for both the DAGOL- and baclofen-induced currents were near that of a potassium conductance. Maximal activation by either of the agonists blocked the effects of the other agonist. Identified beta-endorphin cells were inhibited by both DAGOL and baclofen. The results of these in vitro studies suggest that GABAB and mu-opioid receptors are coupled to the same set of potassium channels and that these channels directly and powerfully inhibit most ARC cells, including beta-endorphin neurons. We propose that convergence of inhibitory influences at the ligand-gated potassium conductance described here may be an important site of interaction for opioidergic, GABAergic and other putative neurotransmitter systems in the control of neuroendocrine circuits by the ARC.

  15. Taurine activates GABA(A) but not GABA(B) receptors in rat hippocampal CA1 area.

    PubMed

    del Olmo, N; Bustamante, J; del Río, R M; Solís, J M

    2000-05-12

    We investigated if taurine, an endogenous GABA analog, could mimic both hyperpolarizing and depolarizing GABA(A)-mediated responses as well as pre- and postsynaptic GABA(B)-mediated actions in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. Taurine (10 mM) perfusion induced changes in membrane potential and input resistance that are compatible with GABA(A) receptor activation. Local pressure application of taurine and GABA from a double barrel pipette positioned along the dendritic shaft of pyramidal cells revealed that taurine evoked a very small change of membrane potential and resistance compared with the large changes induced by GABA in these parameters. Moreover, in the presence of GABA(A) antagonists, local application of GABA on the dendrites evoked a GABA(B)-mediated hyperpolarization while taurine did not induce any change. Taurine neither mimicked baclofen inhibitory actions on presynaptic release of glutamate and GABA as judging by the lack of taurine effect on paired-pulse facilitation ratio and slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials, respectively. These results show that taurine mainly activates GABA(A) receptors located on the cell body, indicating therefore that if taurine has any action on the dendrites it will not be mediated by either GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptors activation.

  16. Lack of functional GABA(B) receptors alters GnRH physiology and sexual dimorphic expression of GnRH and GAD-67 in the brain.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Paolo N; Di Giorgio, Noelia; Bonaventura, María M; Bettler, Bernhard; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A

    2010-03-01

    GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter, acts through GABA(A/C) and GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs); it is critical for gonadotropin regulation. We studied whether the lack of functional GABA(B)Rs in GABA(B1) knockout (GABA(B1)KO) mice affected the gonadotropin axis physiology. Adult male and female GABA(B1)KO and wild-type (WT) mice were killed to collect blood and tissue samples. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) content in whole hypothalami (HT), olfactory bulbs (OB), and frontoparietal cortexes (CT) were determined (RIA). GnRH expression by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was evaluated in preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus (POA-AH), medial basal-posterior hypothalamus (MBH-PH), OB, and CT. Pulsatile GnRH secretion from hypothalamic explants was measured by RIA. GABA, glutamate, and taurine contents in HT and CT were determined by HPLC. Glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD-67) mRNA was measured by qRT-PCR in POA-AH, MBH-PH, and CT. Gonadotropin content, serum levels, and secretion from adenohypophyseal cell cultures (ACC) were measured by RIA. GnRH mRNA expression was increased in POA-AH of WT males compared with females; this pattern of expression was inversed in GABA(B1)KO mice. MBH-PH, OB, and CT did not follow this pattern. In GABA(B1)KO females, GnRH pulse frequency was increased and GABA and glutamate contents were augmented. POA-AH GAD-67 mRNA showed the same expression pattern as GnRH mRNA in this area. Gonadotropin pituitary contents and serum levels showed no differences between genotypes. Increased basal LH secretion and decreased GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin response were observed in GABA(B1)KO female ACCs. These results support the hypothesis that the absence of functional GABA(B)Rs alters GnRH physiology and critically affects sexual dimorphic expression of GnRH and GAD-67 in POA-AH.

  17. The GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen, and the positive allosteric modulator, CGP7930, inhibit visceral pain-related responses to colorectal distension in rats.

    PubMed

    Brusberg, Mikael; Ravnefjord, Anna; Martinsson, Rakel; Larsson, Håkan; Martinez, Vicente; Lindström, Erik

    2009-02-01

    Activation of GABA(B) receptors by the selective agonist baclofen produces anti-nociceptive effects in animal models of somatic pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of baclofen and the GABA(B) receptor positive allosteric modulator CGP7930 on pseudo-affective responses to colorectal distension in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to repeated, noxious colorectal distension (CRD) (12 distensions at 80 mmHg, for 30 s with 5 min intervals). The visceromotor response (VMR) and cardiovascular responses (mean arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate (HR)) to CRD were monitored in conscious, telemetrized animals. Baclofen (0.3-3 micromol/kg, i.v.) reduced the VMR to CRD dose-dependently, reaching a 61% maximal inhibition (p < 0.001). The highest doses of baclofen attenuated CRD-evoked increases in ABP by 17% (p > 0.05) and reduced the change in HR by 48% (p < 0.01). CGP7930 (3-30 micromol/kg, i.v.) reduced the VMR to CRD in a dose-dependent fashion with a maximal inhibition of 31% (p < 0.05). The highest dose of CGP7930 also attenuated the increase in ABP by 18% (p > 0.05) and inhibited the increase in HR by 24% (p < 0.05) associated with CRD. Neither baclofen nor CGP7930 affected colorectal compliance. The results suggest that activation of GABA(B) receptors produces anti-nociceptive effects in a rat model of mechanically induced visceral pain. While CGP7930 was less efficacious than baclofen overall, positive allosteric modulation of GABA(B) receptors may represent a valid approach in the treatment of visceral pain conditions, with the possibility of an improved safety profile compared to full agonism.

  18. GABAB receptor transduction mechanisms, and cross-talk between protein kinases A and C, in GABAergic terminals synapsing onto neurons of the rat nucleus basalis of Meynert

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Hisahiko; Katsurabayashi, Shutaro; Moorhouse, Andrew J; Murakami, Nobuya; Koga, Hitoshi; Akaike, Norio

    2003-01-01

    The transduction mechanisms underlying presynaptic GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition of transmitter release have been characterized for a variety of synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). These studies have suggested a range of transduction mechanisms, including a role for second messengers such as protein kinases A (PKA) and C (PKC). In the present study, we have examined the intracellular signalling pathways underlying baclofen-induced inhibition of GABA release from terminals synapsing onto rat basalis of Meynert neurons using patch-clamp recordings. Baclofen, a selective GABAB receptor agonist, reversibly decreased both evoked and spontaneous, miniature, GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs and mIPSCs, respectively). Such baclofen actions were completely abolished by CGP55845A, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist, and by staurosporine, a non-selective PKA and PKC inhibitor. The mIPSC frequency was still decreased by baclofen even in the presence of 4 AP, a K+ channel blocker, and Cd2+, a voltage-dependent calcium channel blocker. Pharmacological activation or inhibition of PKC activity affected basal GABA release and mildly affected the response to baclofen. Inhibition of the cAMP/PKA cascade also affected basal GABA release and, in a subset of neurons, occluded the effects of baclofen, suggesting that the GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory action on GABA release was mediated via decreases in PKA activity. In addition, PKA inhibition occluded the effects of PKC modulation on both basal GABA release and on the response to baclofen. Our results characterize the transduction pathway of baclofen at these nucleus basalis of Maynert (nBM) synapses and show, for the first time, some cross-talk between the cAMP/PKA and PKC pathways in mammalian presynaptic nerve terminals. PMID:12815184

  19. Comparison of the effect of the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, and the positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, GS39783, on alcohol self-administration in three different lines of alcohol-preferring rats

    PubMed Central

    Maccioni, Paola; Zaru, Alessandro; Loi, Barbara; Lobina, Carla; Carai, Mauro A.M.; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Capra, Alessandro; Mugnaini, Claudia; Pasquini, Serena; Corelli, Federico; Hyytiä, Petri; Lumeng, Lawrence; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    Background Administration of the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, and positive allosteric modulator (PAM), GS39783, has been repeatedly reported to suppress multiple alcohol-related behaviors, including operant oral alcohol self-administration, in rats. The present study was designed to compare the effect of baclofen and GS39783 on alcohol self-administration in three lines of selectively bred, alcohol-preferring rats: Indiana alcohol-preferring (P), Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP), and Alko Alcohol (AA). Methods Rats of each line were initially trained to respond on a lever, on a fixed ratio (FR) 4 (FR4) schedule of reinforcement, to orally self-administer alcohol (15%, v/v) in daily 30-min sessions. Once responding reached stable levels, rats were exposed to a sequence of experiments testing baclofen (0, 1, 1.7, and 3 mg/kg; i.p.) and GS39783 (0, 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg; i.g.) on FR4 and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. Finally, to assess the specificity of baclofen and GS39783 action, rats were slightly food-deprived and trained to lever-respond for food pellets. Results The rank of order of the reinforcing and motivational properties of alcohol was: P>sP>AA rats. Under both FR and PR schedules of reinforcement, the rank of order of potency and efficacy of baclofen and GS39783 in suppressing alcohol self-administration was: P>sP>AA rats. Only the highest dose of baclofen reduced lever-responding for food pellets; this effect was common to all three rat lines. Conversely, no dose of GS39783 altered lever-responding for food in any rat line. Conclusions These results suggest that: (a) the strength of the reinforcing and motivational properties of alcohol differ among P, sP, and AA rats; (b) the reinforcing and motivational properties of alcohol in P, sP, and AA rats are differentially sensitive to treatment with baclofen and GS39783; (c) the heterogeneity in sensitivity to baclofen and GS39783 of alcohol self-administration in P, sP, and AA rats

  20. The polymorphism GABABR1 T1974C[rs29230] of the GABAB receptor gene is not associated with the diagnosis of alcoholism or alcohol withdrawal seizures.

    PubMed

    Köhnke, Michael; Schick, Sandra; Lutz, Ulrich; Köhnke, Annette; Vonthein, Reinhard; Kolb, Werner; Batra, Anil

    2006-06-01

    As the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) modulates ethanol consumption, alcohol withdrawal symptoms and seizure generation by interacting with the GABAB receptor, the genes encoding for the GABAB receptor can be considered as candidate genes for alcoholism and alcohol withdrawal seizures (AWS). As the polymorphism GABABR1 T1974C[rs29230] of the GABAB receptor gene had been associated with alcoholism and EEG abnormalities in prior studies, the present examination investigated if the polymorphism is associated with the diagnosis of alcoholism or AWS. After genotyping the allele and genotype frequencies of a group of alcoholics with a history of AWS (n = 69) were compared with the results of a group of alcoholics with only mild withdrawal symptoms (n = 97). Additionally a group of healthy controls (n = 101) was compared with individuals with the diagnosis of alcoholism (n = 220). As no significant differences were found between the compared groups, this study gave no further evidence for GABABR1 T1974C[rs29230] as a candidate for alcoholism or AWS.

  1. The gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptor agonist baclofen inhibits morphine sensitization by decreasing the dopamine level in rat nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Repeated morphine exposure can induce behavioral sensitization. There are evidences have shown that central gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system is involved in morphine dependence. However, the effect of a GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats is unclear. Methods We used morphine-induced behavioral sensitization model in rat to investigate the effects of baclofen on behavioral sensitization. Moreover, dopamine release in the shell of the nucleus accumbens was evaluated using microdialysis assay in vivo. Results The present study demonstrated that morphine challenge (3 mg/kg, s.c.) obviously enhanced the locomotor activity following 4-day consecutive morphine administration and 3-day withdrawal period, which indicated the expression of morphine sensitization. In addition, chronic treatment with baclofen (2.5, 5 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the development of morphine sensitization. It was also found that morphine challenge 3 days after repeated morphine administration produced a significant increase of extracellular dopamine release in nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, chronic treatment with baclofen decreased the dopamine release induced by morphine challenge. Conclusions Our results indicated that gamma-aminobutyric acid system plays an important role in the morphine sensitization in rat and suggested that behavioral sensitization is a promising model to study the mechanism underlying drug abuse. PMID:22559224

  2. Administration of growth hormone and nandrolone decanoate alters mRNA expression of the GABAB receptor subunits as well as of the GH receptor, IGF-1, and IGF-2 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Grönbladh, Alfhild; Johansson, Jenny; Nyberg, Fred; Hallberg, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), especially among young adults, is of major concern. Among AAS users it is common to combine the AAS nandrolone decanoate (ND), with intake of growth hormone (GH) and a connection between gonadal steroids and the GH system has been suggested. Both AAS and GH affect functions in the brain, for example those associated with the hypothalamus and pituitary, and several GH actions are mediated by growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2). The GABAergic system is implicated in actions induced by AAS and previous studies have provided evidence for a link between GH and GABAB receptors in the brain. Our aim was to examine the impact of AAS administration and a subsequent administration of GH, on the expression of GABAB receptors and important GH mediators in rat brain. The aim was to investigate the CNS effects of a high-dose ND, and to study if a low, but physiological relevant, dose of GH could reverse the ND-induced effects. In the present study, male rats were administered a high dose of ND every third day during three weeks, and subsequently the rats were given recombinant human GH (rhGH) during ten days. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to analyze gene expression in hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. In the pituitary gland, the expression of GABAB receptor subunits was affected differently by the steroid treatment; the GABAB1 mRNA expression was decreased whereas a distinct elevation of the GABAB2 expression was found. Administration of ND also caused a decrease of GHR, IGF-1, and IGF-2 mRNA expression in the pituitary while the corresponding expression in the hypothalamus, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala was unaffected. The rhGH administration did not alter the GABAB2 expression but increased the GABAB1 gene expression in the hypothalamus as compared to the AAS treated group. These results

  3. GABAB receptor-mediated, layer-specific synaptic plasticity reorganizes gamma-frequency neocortical response to stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Matthew; Lee, Shane; Kaiser, Marcus; Simonotto, Jennifer; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated presentations of sensory stimuli generate transient gamma-frequency (30–80 Hz) responses in neocortex that show plasticity in a task-dependent manner. Complex relationships between individual neuronal outputs and the mean, local field potential (population activity) accompany these changes, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible. Here we show that transient stimulation of input layer 4 sufficient to generate gamma oscillations induced two different, lamina-specific plastic processes that correlated with lamina-specific changes in responses to further, repeated stimulation: Unit rates and recruitment showed overall enhancement in supragranular layers and suppression in infragranular layers associated with excitatory or inhibitory synaptic potentiation onto principal cells, respectively. Both synaptic processes were critically dependent on activation of GABAB receptors and, together, appeared to temporally segregate the cortical representation. These data suggest that adaptation to repetitive sensory input dramatically alters the spatiotemporal properties of the neocortical response in a manner that may both refine and minimize cortical output simultaneously. PMID:27118845

  4. GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen attenuates the development and expression of d-methamphetamine-induced place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, S M; Yin, L L; Ren, Y H; Pan, L S; Zheng, J W

    2001-12-07

    The present study investigated the effect of systemic administration of the GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen, on the development and expression of d-methamphetamine (d-MA)-induced place preference in male Wistar rats. Using a biased and 8-day schedule of conditioning, it was found that administration of d-MA (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) produced significant place preference. The administration of baclofen (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior to the exposure to d-MA attenuated the development of d-MA-induced place preference (p<0.05). In addition, when it was acutely administered 30 min prior to the testing session of an already established d-MA place preference, baclofen (1.25-5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the expression of this conditioned response in a dose-dependent manner. These results showed that baclofen suppressed the rewarding effect produced by d-MA and may be potentially effective in the treatment of methamphetamine dependence and craving.

  5. GABAB receptor GTP-binding is decreased in the prefrontal cortex but not the hippocampus of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    McQuail, Joseph A.; Bañuelos, Cristina; LaSarge, Candi L.; Nicolle, Michelle M.; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    GABAB receptors (GABABRs) have been linked to a wide range of physiological and cognitive processes and are of interest for treating a number of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. As many of these diseases are associated with advanced age, it is important to understand how the normal aging process impacts GABABR expression and signaling. Thus, we investigated GABABR expression and function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of young and aged rats characterized in a spatial learning task. Baclofen-stimulated GTP-binding and GABABR1 and GABABR2 proteins were reduced in the PFC of aged rats but these reductions were not associated with spatial learning abilities. In contrast, hippocampal GTP-binding was comparable between young and aged rats but reduced hippocampal GABABR1 expression was observed in aged rats with spatial learning impairment. These data demonstrate marked regional differences in GABABR complexes in the adult and aged brain and could have implications for both understanding the role of GABAergic processes in normal brain function and the development of putative interventions that target this system. PMID:22169202

  6. Roles of GABAA and GABAB receptors in regulating thalamic activity by the zona incerta: a computational study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Anthony; Hoffman, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The posterior thalamic nucleus (PO) is a higher order nucleus heavily implicated in the processing of somatosensory information. We have previously shown in rodent models that activity in PO is tightly regulated by inhibitory inputs from a GABAergic nucleus known as the zona incerta (ZI). The level of incertal inhibition varies under both physiological and pathological conditions, leading to concomitant changes in PO activity. These changes are causally linked to variety of phenomena from altered sensory perception to pathological pain. ZI regulation of PO is mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors (GABAAR and GABABR) that differ in their binding kinetics and their electrophysiological properties, suggesting that each may have distinct roles in incerto-thalamic regulation. We developed a computational model to test this hypothesis. We created a two-cell Hodgkin-Huxley model representing PO and ZI with kinetically realistic GABAAR- and GABABR-mediated synapses. We simulated spontaneous and evoked firing in PO and observed how these activities were affected by inhibition mediated by each receptor type. Our model predicts that spontaneous PO activity is preferentially regulated by GABABR-mediated mechanisms, while evoked activity is preferentially regulated by GABAAR. Our model also predicts that modulation of ZI firing rate and synaptic GABA concentrations is an effective means to regulate the incerto-thalamic circuit. The coupling of distinct functions to GABAAR and GABABR presents an opportunity for the development of therapeutics, as particular aspects of incerto-thalamic regulation can be targeted by manipulating the corresponding receptor class. Thus these findings may provide interventions for pathologies of sensory processing. PMID:25143541

  7. 5-HT2C and GABAB receptors influence handling-induced convulsion severity in chromosome 4 congenic and DBA/2J background strain mice

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Matthew T.; Milner, Lauren C.; Shirley, Renee L.; Crabbe, John C.; Buck, Kari J.

    2008-01-01

    Progress towards elucidating the underlying genetic variation for susceptibility to complex central nervous system (CNS) hyperexcitability states has just begun. Genetic mapping analyses suggest that a gene(s) on mid-chromosome 4 has pleiotropic effects on multiple CNS hyperexcitability states in mice, including alcohol and barbiturate withdrawal and convulsions elicited by chemical and audiogenic stimuli. We recently identified Mpdz within this chromosomal region as a gene that influences alcohol and barbiturate withdrawal convulsions. Mpdz encodes the multi-PDZ domain protein (MPDZ). Currently, there is limited information available about the mechanism by which MPDZ influences drug withdrawal and/or other CNS hyperexcitability states, but may involve its interaction with 5-HT2C and/or GABAB receptors. One of the most useful tools we have developed thus far is a congenic strain that possesses a segment of chromosome 4 from the C57BL/6J (donor) mouse strain superimposed on a genetic background that is >99% from the DBA/2J strain. The introduced segment spans the Mpdz gene. Here, we demonstrate that handling-induced convulsions are less severe in congenic vs. background strain mice in response to either a 5-HT2C receptor antagonist (SB242084) or a GABAB receptor agonist (baclofen), but not a GABAA receptor channel blocker (pentylenetetrazol). These data suggest that allelic variation in Mpdz, or a linked gene, influences SB242084- and baclofen-enhanced convulsions. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that Mpdz’s effects on CNS hyperexcitability, including alcohol and barbiturate withdrawal, involve MPDZ interaction with 5-HT2C and/or GABAB receptors. However, additional genes reside within the congenic interval and may also influence CNS hyperexcitability. PMID:18262506

  8. Inhibition of presynaptic calcium transients in cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum by metabotropic GABAB and mGlu2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kupferschmidt, David A; Lovinger, David M

    2015-01-01

    Cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) are dynamically regulated during skill learning and habit formation, and are dysregulated in disorders characterized by impaired action control. Therefore, a mechanistic investigation of the processes regulating corticostriatal transmission is key to understanding DLS-associated circuit function, behaviour and pathology. Presynaptic GABAB and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors exert marked inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamate release in the DLS, yet the signalling pathways through which they do so are unclear. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 to assess presynaptic Ca2+ in corticostriatal projections to the DLS. Using simultaneous photometric presynaptic Ca2+ and striatal field potential recordings, we report that relative to P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, N-type channels preferentially contributed to evoked presynaptic Ca2+ influx in motor cortex projections to, and excitatory transmission in, the DLS. Activation of GABAB or mGlu2/3 receptors inhibited both evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients and striatal field potentials. mGlu2/3 receptor-mediated depression did not require functional N-type Ca2+ channels, but was attenuated by blockade of P/Q-type channels. These findings reveal presynaptic mechanisms of inhibitory modulation of corticostriatal function that probably contribute to the selection and shaping of behavioural repertoires. Key points Plastic changes at cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) underlie skill learning and habit formation, so characterizing the mechanisms by which these inputs are regulated is important for understanding the neural basis of action control. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 and brain slice photometry to assess evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients in cortical inputs to the DLS and study their regulation by GABAB and mGlu2

  9. Control of Spike Transfer at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses In Vivo by GABAA and GABAB Receptor-Mediated Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Stefano; Griguoli, Marilena; Malézieux, Meryl; Grosjean, Noëlle; Carta, Mario; Mulle, Christophe

    2017-01-18

    Despite extensive studies in hippocampal slices and incentive from computational theories, the synaptic mechanisms underlying information transfer at mossy fiber (mf) connections between the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 neurons in vivo are still elusive. Here we used an optogenetic approach in mice to selectively target and control the activity of DG granule cells (GCs) while performing whole-cell and juxtacellular recordings of CA3 neurons in vivo In CA3 pyramidal cells (PCs), mf-CA3 synaptic responses consisted predominantly of an IPSP at low stimulation frequency (0.05 Hz). Upon increasing the frequency of stimulation, a biphasic response was observed consisting of a brief mf EPSP followed by an inhibitory response lasting on the order of 100 ms. Spike transfer at DG-CA3 interneurons recorded in the juxtacellular mode was efficient at low presynaptic stimulation frequency and appeared insensitive to an increased frequency of GC activity. Overall, this resulted in a robust and slow feedforward inhibition of spike transfer at mf-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. Short-term plasticity of EPSPs with increasing frequency of presynaptic activity allowed inhibition to be overcome to reach spike discharge in CA3 PCs. Whereas the activation of GABAA receptors was responsible for the direct inhibition of light-evoked spike responses, the slow inhibition of spiking activity required the activation of GABAB receptors in CA3 PCs. The slow inhibitory response defined an optimum frequency of presynaptic activity for spike transfer at ∼10 Hz. Altogether these properties define the temporal rules for efficient information transfer at DG-CA3 synaptic connections in the intact circuit.

  10. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 6 (RGS6) Protein Ensures Coordination of Motor Movement by Modulating GABAB Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Biswanath; Stewart, Adele; Yang, Jianqi; Loo, Lipin; Sheff, David; Shepherd, Andrew J.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; Fisher, Rory A.

    2012-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons located within the cerebellar cortex limits the extent of neuronal excitation in part through activation of metabotropic GABAB receptors. Stimulation of these receptors triggers a number of downstream signaling events, including activation of GIRK channels by the Gβγ dimer resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and inhibition of neurotransmitter release from presynaptic sites. Here, we identify RGS6, a member of the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins, as a key regulator of GABABR signaling in cerebellum. RGS6 is enriched in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum along with neuronal GIRK channel subunits 1 and 2 where RGS6 forms a complex with known binding partners Gβ5 and R7BP. Mice lacking RGS6 exhibit abnormal gait and ataxia characterized by impaired rotarod performance improved by treatment with a GABABR antagonist. RGS6−/− mice administered baclofen also showed exaggerated motor coordination deficits compared with their wild-type counterparts. Isolated cerebellar neurons natively expressed RGS6, GABABR, and GIRK channel subunits, and cerebellar granule neurons from RGS6−/− mice showed a significant delay in the deactivation kinetics of baclofen-induced GIRK channel currents. These results establish RGS6 as a key component of GABABR signaling and represent the first demonstration of an essential role for modulatory actions of RGS proteins in adult cerebellum. Dysregulation of RGS6 expression in human patients could potentially contribute to loss of motor coordination and, thus, pharmacological manipulation of RGS6 levels might represent a viable means to treat patients with ataxias of cerebellar origin. PMID:22179605

  11. GABAB receptors inhibit low-voltage activated and high-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels in sensory neurons via distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2015-09-18

    Growing evidence suggests that mammalian peripheral somatosensory neurons express functional receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid, GABAA and GABAB. Moreover, local release of GABA by pain-sensing (nociceptive) nerve fibres has also been suggested. Yet, the functional significance of GABA receptor triggering in nociceptive neurons is not fully understood. Here we used patch-clamp recordings from small-diameter cultured DRG neurons to investigate effects of GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents. We found that baclofen inhibited both low-voltage activated (LVA, T-type) and high-voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) currents in a proportion of DRG neurons by 22% and 32% respectively; both effects were sensitive to Gi/o inhibitor pertussis toxin. Inhibitory effect of baclofen on both current types was about twice less efficacious as compared to that of the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO. Surprisingly, only HVA but not LVA current modulation by baclofen was partially prevented by G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S. In contrast, only LVA but not HVA current modulation was reversed by the application of a reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT). Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) current by baclofen and the recovery of such inhibition by DTT were successfully reconstituted in the expression system. Our data suggest that inhibition of LVA current in DRG neurons by baclofen is partially mediated by an unconventional signaling pathway that involves a redox mechanism. These findings reinforce the idea of targeting peripheral GABA receptors for pain relief.

  12. GABAB and adenosine receptors mediate enhancement of the K+ current, IAHP, by reducing adenylyl cyclase activity in rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gerber, U; Gähwiler, B H

    1994-11-01

    1. Gamma-aminobuturic acid-B (GABAB) and adenosine A1 receptors, which are expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cells, are linked to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins known to be coupled negatively to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. This study investigates the electrophysiological consequences of adenylyl cyclase inhibition in response to stimulation of these receptors. 2. Single-electrode voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slice cultures in presence of tetrodotoxin. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IAHP), which is very sensitive to intracellular levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used as an electrophysiological indicator of adenylyl cyclase activity. 3. Application of baclofen (10 microM), a selective agonist at GABAB receptors, or adenosine (50 microM) each resulted in a transient decrease followed by a significant enhancement in the amplitude of evoked IAHP. The initial reduction in amplitude of IAHP probably reflects inadequacies in voltage clamp of electronically distant dendritic sites, due to the shunting caused by concomitant activation of potassium conductance by baclofen/adenosine. Comparable increases in membrane conductance in response to the GABAA agonist, muscimol, caused a similar reduction in IAHP. The enhancement of IAHP is consistent with an inhibition of constitutively active adenylyl cyclase. 4. The receptor mediating the responses to adenosine was identified as belonging to the A1 subtype on the basis of its sensitivity to the selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Bidirectional enantioselective effects of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen in two mouse models of excessive ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Kasten, Chelsea R; Blasingame, Shelby N; Boehm, Stephen L

    2015-02-01

    The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen has been studied extensively in preclinical models of alcohol-use disorders, yet results on its efficacy have been uncertain. Racemic baclofen, which is used clinically, can be broken down into separate enantiomers of the drug. Baclofen has been shown to produce enantioselective effects in behavioral assays, including those modeling reflexive and sexual behavior. The current studies sought to characterize the enantioselective effects of baclofen in two separate models of ethanol consumption. The first was a Drinking-in-the-Dark procedure that provides "binge-like" ethanol access to mice by restricting access to a 2-h period, 3 h into the dark cycle. The second was a two-bottle choice procedure that utilized selectively bred High Alcohol Preferring 1 (HAP1) mice to model chronic ethanol access. HAP1 mice are selectively bred to consume pharmacologically relevant amounts of ethanol in a 24-h two-bottle choice paradigm. The results showed that baclofen yields enantioselective effects on ethanol intake in both models, and that these effects are bidirectional. Total ethanol intake was decreased by R(+)-baclofen, while total intake was increased by S(-)-baclofen in the binge-like and chronic drinking models. Whereas overall binge-like saccharin intake was significantly reduced by R(+)-baclofen, chronic intake was not significantly altered. S(-)-baclofen did not significantly alter saccharin intake. Neither enantiomer significantly affected locomotion during binge-like reinforcer consumption. Collectively, these results demonstrate that baclofen produces enantioselective effects on ethanol consumption. More importantly, the modulation of consumption is bidirectional. The opposing enantioselective effects may explain some of the variance seen in published baclofen literature.

  14. Differential surface density and modulatory effects of presynaptic GABAB receptors in hippocampal cholecystokinin and parvalbumin basket cells.

    PubMed

    Booker, Sam A; Althof, Daniel; Degro, Claudius E; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kulik, Ákos; Vida, Imre

    2017-05-02

    The perisomatic domain of cortical neurons is under the control of two major GABAergic inhibitory interneuron types: regular-spiking cholecystokinin (CCK) basket cells (BCs) and fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) BCs. CCK and PV BCs are different not only in their intrinsic physiological, anatomical and molecular characteristics, but also in their presynaptic modulation of their synaptic output. Most GABAergic terminals are known to contain GABAB receptors (GABABR), but their role in presynaptic inhibition and surface expression have not been comparatively characterized in the two BC types. To address this, we performed whole-cell recordings from CCK and PV BCs and postsynaptic pyramidal cells (PCs), as well as freeze-fracture replica-based quantitative immunogold electron microscopy of their synapses in the rat hippocampal CA1 area. Our results demonstrate that while both CCK and PV BCs contain functional presynaptic GABABRs, their modulatory effects and relative abundance are markedly different at these two synapses: GABA release is dramatically inhibited by the agonist baclofen at CCK BC synapses, whereas a moderate reduction in inhibitory transmission is observed at PV BC synapses. Furthermore, GABABR activation has divergent effects on synaptic dynamics: paired-pulse depression (PPD) is enhanced at CCK BC synapses, but abolished at PV BC synapses. Consistent with the quantitative differences in presynaptic inhibition, virtually all CCK BC terminals were found to contain GABABRs at high densities, but only 40% of PV BC axon terminals contain GABABRs at detectable levels. These findings add to an increasing list of differences between these two interneuron types, with implications for their network functions.

  15. A Role for the GIRK3 Subunit in Methamphetamine-Induced Attenuation of GABAB Receptor-Activated GIRK Currents in VTA Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Michaelanne B.; Padgett, Claire L.; Rifkin, Robert; Terunuma, Miho; Wickman, Kevin; Contet, Candice; Moss, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to psychostimulants induces locomotor sensitization and leads to persistent changes in the circuitry of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system. G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK; also known as Kir3) channels mediate a slow IPSC and control the excitability of DA neurons. Repeated 5 d exposure to psychostimulants decreases the size of the GABAB receptor (GABABR)-activated GIRK currents (IBaclofen) in ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA neurons of mice, but the mechanism underlying this plasticity is poorly understood. Here, we show that methamphetamine-dependent attenuation of GABABR-GIRK currents in VTA DA neurons required activation of both D1R-like and D2R-like receptors. The methamphetamine-dependent decrease in GABABR-GIRK currents in VTA DA neurons did not depend on a mechanism of dephosphorylation of the GABAB R2 subunit found previously for other neurons in the reward pathway. Rather, the presence of the GIRK3 subunit appeared critical for the methamphetamine-dependent decrease of GABABR-GIRK current in VTA DA neurons. Together, these results highlight different regulatory mechanisms in the learning-evoked changes that occur in the VTA with repeated exposure to psychostimulants. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Exposure to addictive drugs such as psychostimulants produces persistent adaptations in inhibitory circuits within the mesolimbic dopamine system, suggesting that addictive behaviors are encoded by changes in the reward neural circuitry. One form of neuroadaptation that occurs with repeated exposure to psychostimulants is a decrease in slow inhibition, mediated by a GABAB receptor and a potassium channel. Here, we examine the subcellular mechanism that links psychostimulant exposure with changes in slow inhibition and reveal that one type of potassium channel subunit is important for mediating the effect of repeated psychostimulant exposure. Dissecting out the components of drug-dependent plasticity and uncovering novel

  16. Contribution of Ih and GABAB to synaptically induced afterhyperpolarizations in CA1: a brake on the NMDA response.

    PubMed

    Otmakhova, Nonna A; Lisman, John E

    2004-10-01

    CA1 pyramidal cells receive two major excitatory inputs: the perforant path (PP) terminates in the most distal dendrites, whereas the Schaffer collaterals (SC) terminate more proximally. We have examined the mechanism of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that follows single subthreshold excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in these inputs. The AHPs were not reduced by a GABAA antagonist or by agents that block Ca2+ entry. Application of the Ih blocker, ZD7288, partially blocked the AHP in the PP; the substantial remaining component was blocked by 2-hydroxysaclofen, a GABAB antagonist. In contrast, the AHP in the SC depends nearly completely on Ih, with almost no GABAB component. Thus postsynaptic GABAB receptors appear to be preferentially involved at distal synapses, consistent with the spatial distribution of GABAB receptors and g protein-coupled inward rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels. GABAB does, however, play a role at proximal synapses through presynaptic suppression of glutamate release, a mechanism that is much weaker at distal synapses. Experiments were conducted to explore the functional role of the AHP in the PP, which has a higher N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)/AMPA ratio than the SC. Blockade of the AHP converted a response that had a small NMDA component to one that had a large component. These results indicate that the Ih and postsynaptic GABAB conductances act as a brake on distally generated NMDA responses.

  17. Intrathecal baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, inhibits the expression of p-CREB and NR2B in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with diabetic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Guo, Wen-Ya; Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Bai, Hui-Ping; Wang, Qian; Wang, Xiu-Li; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of baclofen, a γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) receptor agonist, on the expression of p-CREB and NR2B in the spinal dorsal horn of rats with diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP). The DNP rats, which were successfully induced with streptozocin, were distributed among 3 groups that were treated with saline (D1 group), baclofen (D2 group), or CGP55845 + baclofen (D3 group) continuously for 4 days. The rats induced with saline and subsequently treated with saline were used as controls (C group). The times for the paw withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency of the D1 group were lower than those for the C group, and were significantly increased after baclofen treatment, but not when GABA receptor was pre-blocked with CGP55845 (D3 group). Increased protein expression levels of NR2B and p-CREB and mRNA levels of NR2B were found in the D1 group when compared with the controls. Baclofen treatment significantly suppressed their expression, bringing it close to the levels of controls. However, in the D3 group, the expression of p-CREB and NR2B were still significantly higher than that of the controls. Activation of GABAB receptor by baclofen attenuates diabetic neuropathic pain, which may partly be accomplished via down-regulating the expression of p-CREB and NR2B.

  18. Activation of GABAB receptors ameliorates cognitive impairment via restoring the balance of HCN1/HCN2 surface expression in the hippocampal CA1 area in rats with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-jun; Lu, Yun; Zhou, Mei; Zong, Xian-gang; Li, Cai; Xu, Xu-lin; Guo, Lian-jun; Lu, Qing

    2014-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated cation nonselective (HCN) channels are involved in the pathology of nervous system diseases. HCN channels and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors can mutually co-regulate the function of neurons in many brain areas. However, little is known about the co-regulation of HCN channels and GABA receptors in the chronic ischemic rats with possible features of vascular dementia. Protein kinase A (PKA) and TPR containing Rab8b interacting protein (TRIP8b) can modulate GABAB receptors cell surface stability and HCN channel trafficking, respectively, and adaptor-associated kinase 1 (AAK1) inhibits the function of the major TRIP8b-interacting protein adaptor protein 2 (AP2) via phosphorylating the AP2 μ2 subunit. Until now, the role of these regulatory factors in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion is unclear. In the present study, we evaluated whether and how HCN channels and GABAB receptors were pathologically altered and investigated neuroprotective effects of GABAB receptors activation and cross-talk networks between GABAB receptors and HCN channels in the hippocampal CA1 area in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion rat model. We found that cerebral hypoperfusion for 5 weeks by permanent occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) induced marked spatial and nonspatial learning and memory deficits, significant neuronal loss and decrease in dendritic spine density, impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, and reduction of surface expression of GABAB R1, GABAB R2, and HCN1, but increase in HCN2 surface expression. Meanwhile, the protein expression of TRIP8b (1a-4), TRIP8b (1b-2), and AAK1 was significantly decreased. Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, markedly improved the memory impairment and alleviated neuronal damage. Besides, baclofen attenuated the decrease of surface expression of GABAB R1, GABAB R2, and HCN1, but downregulated HCN2 surface expression

  19. Ca2+ activity at GABAB receptors constitutively promotes metabotropic glutamate signaling in the absence of GABA

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Toshihide; Araishi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Hashimotodani, Yuki; van der Putten, Herman; Bettler, Bernhard; Kano, Masanobu

    2004-01-01

    Type B γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABABR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability throughout the brain. In various neurons, GABABRs are concentrated at excitatory synapses. Although these receptors are assumed to respond to GABA spillover from neighboring inhibitory synapses, their function is not fully understood. Here we show a previously undescribed function of GABABR exerted independent of GABA. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, interaction of GABABR with extracellular Ca2+ (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Ca}}_{{\\mathrm{o}}}^{2+}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) leads to a constitutive increase in the glutamate sensitivity of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1). mGluR1 sensitization is clearly mediated by GABABR because it is absent in GABABR1 subunit-knockout cells. However, the mGluR1 sensitization does not require Gi/o proteins that mediate the GABABR's classical functions. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation reveals complex formation between GABABR and mGluR1 in the cerebellum. These findings demonstrate that GABABR can act as \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Ca}}_{{\\mathrm{o}}}^{2+}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}-dependent cofactors to enhance neuronal metabotropic glutamate signaling. PMID:15550547

  20. The role of CA3 GABAB receptors on anxiolytic-like behaviors and avoidance memory deficit induced by D-AP5 with respect to Ca(2+) ions.

    PubMed

    Zarrabian, Shahram; Nasehi, Mohammad; Farrahizadeh, Maryam; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-10-03

    Glutamatergic and GABAergic systems play key roles in the hippocampus and affect the pathogenesis of anxiety- and memory-related processes. Some investigations have assessed the role of balancing the function of these two systems in different areas of the central nervous system (CNS) as an approach to manage the related disorders. We investigated the anxiety and avoidance memory states using the test-retest protocol in the elevated plus maze to understand the role of GABAB receptors (GABABRs) in relation to the NMDA receptor blockade by D-AP5 (an NMDA receptor antagonist). Also, we examined the function of Ca(2+) ions by blocking its entrance to the cell using SKF96365 (a Ca(2+) channel blocker). The drugs were injected into the CA3 region before the test. Our data showed that D-AP5 induced anxiolytic-like behaviors and impaired the avoidance memory. Injection of baclofen (a GABABR agonist), but not phaclofen (a GABABR antagonist) induced anxiolytic-like behaviors. Neither baclofen nor phaclofen altered avoidance memory-related behaviors. When baclofen was injected before D-AP5, it potentiated the anxiolytic-like behaviors induced by D-AP5, but counteracted its effect on avoidance memory. Phaclofen pretreatment attenuated D-AP5-induced anxiolytic-like behaviors, but potentiated its effect on avoidance memory. The effect of baclofen application before D-AP5 on anxiety and phaclofen application before D-AP5 on avoidance memory at the heist doses were accompanied by a decrease in locomotion. The application of SKF96365 did not alter anxiety-like behaviors but induced avoidance memory impairment. SKF96365 application before the combination of baclofen and D-AP5 counteracted the effects produced by the combination of baclofen and D-AP5 on anxiety and memory states. Our findings showed that the CA3 GABABRs had a critical role in anxiolytic-like behaviors and avoidance memory deficit induced by D-AP5 and confirmed the role of Ca(2+) ions in the observed results. Copyright

  1. Role of GABAA and GABAB receptors and peripheral cholinergic mechanisms in the antinociceptive action of taurine.

    PubMed

    Serrano, M I; Serrano, J S; Guerrero, M R; Fernández, A

    1994-10-01

    1. Gabaergic and cholinergic mediation in the antinociceptive effect of taurine has been investigated in mice (acetic acid test) and rats (tail-flick test). 2. Scopolamine sulfate and methylnitrate exhibit intrinsic antinociceptive activity and increase the effect of taurine in mice. 3. Baclofen also increases the antinociceptive effect of taurine in mice. 4. Anticholinergic agents and bicuculline but not CGP 35348 antagonize the effect of taurine in rats. 5. These results suggest that the antinociceptive effect of taurine may be partly mediated by spinal GABAA receptors and peripheral cholinergic mechanisms.

  2. Antinociceptive effects of H₃ (R-methylhistamine) and GABA(B) (baclofen)-receptor ligands in an orofacial model of pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Przemysław; Kowalińska-Kania, Magdalena; Nowak, Damian; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Malinowska-Borowska, Jolanta

    2013-08-01

    The present study explored the antinociceptive effects of H₃ (R-methylhistamine) and GABA(B) (baclofen) receptor ligands in an orofacial model of pain in rats. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin (50 μl, 5 %) in the upper lip region, and the number of jumps and time spent face rubbing was recorded for 40 min. Formalin produced a marked biphasic pain response; first phase, 0-10 min (jumps), and second phase, 15-40 min, (rubbing). Baclofen (50 μg) injected into the rat wiskerpad 5 min before formalin administration suppressed both phases of pain whereas R-alpha-methylhistamine (12.5 μg) abolished the first phase only. Brains were taken immediately after behavioral testing was completed. HPLC/ED analysis showed that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) turnover was increased in hippocampus, thalamus, and brain stem of all formalin groups, excepting the baclofen group in which the balance of 5-HT metabolism was restored to control values. These findings demonstrate that GABA(B) receptors represent peripheral targets for analgesia. Consequently, locally administered baclofen may be a useful approach in treating inflammatory trigeminal pain.

  3. ADX71441, a novel, potent and selective positive allosteric modulator of the GABA(B) receptor, shows efficacy in rodent models of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Kalinichev, M; Palea, S; Haddouk, H; Royer-Urios, I; Guilloteau, V; Lluel, P; Schneider, M; Saporito, M; Poli, S

    2014-02-01

    The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces urethral resistance and detrusor overactivity in patients with spasticity. However, baclofen's side effects limit its use for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Here, we tested a novel GABAB positive allosteric modulator (PAM) ADX71441 in models of OAB in mice and guinea pigs. Mice were left untreated or given (p.o.) vehicle (1% CMC), ADX71441 (1, 3, 10 mg kg(-1) ) or oxybutynin (100 mg kg(-1) ; Experiment 1) or vehicle (1% CMC), baclofen (1, 3, 6 mg kg(-1) ) or oxybutynin (Experiment 2). Treated mice were then overhydrated with water, challenged with furosemide, before being placed into micturition chambers and monitored for urinary parameters. In anaesthetized guinea pigs, intravesical infusion of acetic acid was used to induce OAB and the effects of ADX71441 (1, 3 mg kg(-1) ) or baclofen (1 mg kg(-1) ), administered i.v., on cystometric parameters were monitored. In mice, 10 mg kg(-1) ADX71441 increased urinary latencies, reduced the number of urinary events and the total and average urinary volumes. In guinea pigs, ADX71441 (1 and 3 mg kg(-1) ) increased the intercontraction interval (ICI) and bladder capacity (BC), and reduced micturition frequency (MF) compared to vehicle. At 3 mg kg(-1) ADX71441 completely inhibited the micturition reflex and induced overflow incontinence in five out of 10 animals. Baclofen slightly increased ICI and BC and reduced MF. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that a GABAB PAM has potential as a novel approach for the treatment of OAB. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. ADX71441, a novel, potent and selective positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, shows efficacy in rodent models of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kalinichev, M; Palea, S; Haddouk, H; Royer-Urios, I; Guilloteau, V; Lluel, P; Schneider, M; Saporito, M; Poli, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces urethral resistance and detrusor overactivity in patients with spasticity. However, baclofen's side effects limit its use for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Here, we tested a novel GABAB positive allosteric modulator (PAM) ADX71441 in models of OAB in mice and guinea pigs. Experimental Approach Mice were left untreated or given (p.o.) vehicle (1= CMC), ADX71441 (1, 3, 10 mg kg−1) or oxybutynin (100 mg kg−1; Experiment 1) or vehicle (1= CMC), baclofen (1, 3, 6 mg kg−1) or oxybutynin (Experiment 2). Treated mice were then overhydrated with water, challenged with furosemide, before being placed into micturition chambers and monitored for urinary parameters. In anaesthetized guinea pigs, intravesical infusion of acetic acid was used to induce OAB and the effects of ADX71441 (1, 3 mg kg−1) or baclofen (1 mg kg−1), administered i.v., on cystometric parameters were monitored. Key Results In mice, 10 mg kg−1 ADX71441 increased urinary latencies, reduced the number of urinary events and the total and average urinary volumes. In guinea pigs, ADX71441 (1 and 3 mg kg−1) increased the intercontraction interval (ICI) and bladder capacity (BC), and reduced micturition frequency (MF) compared to vehicle. At 3 mg kg−1 ADX71441 completely inhibited the micturition reflex and induced overflow incontinence in five out of 10 animals. Baclofen slightly increased ICI and BC and reduced MF. Conclusion and Implications Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that a GABAB PAM has potential as a novel approach for the treatment of OAB. PMID:24224799

  5. Long-term inhibition of Rho-kinase restores the LTP impaired in chronic forebrain ischemia rats by regulating GABAA and GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Zhao, L B; Yu, Z Y; He, X J; Ma, L P; Li, N; Guo, L J; Feng, W Y

    2014-09-26

    We previously demonstrated that inactivation of Rho-kinase by hydroxyfasudil could impact N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) excitatory interneurons in the hippocampus and attenuate the spatial learning and memory dysfunction of rats caused by chronic forebrain hypoperfusion ischemia. Complementary interactions between the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA form the molecular basis of synaptic plasticity and cognitive performance. However, whether the GABAergic inhibitory interneurons are involved in the mechanisms underlying these processes remains unclear. Here, we further examined the role of GABAergic interneurons in the neuroprotective effect of the Rho-kinase inhibitor. Chronic forebrain ischemia was induced in Wistar rats by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The general synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal CA3 neurons were evaluated at 30 days after sham surgery or BCAO. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were conducted to determine the effect of the Rho-kinase inhibitor hydroxyfasudil on GABAergic inhibitory interneuron expression and function after ischemia. Hydroxyfasudil showed no significant effect on general synaptic transmission, but it could abolish the inhibition of LTP induced by chronic forebrain ischemia. Moreover, the mRNA and protein levels of GABAA and GABAB in three brain regions after ischemia were markedly decreased, and hydroxyfasudil could up-regulate all mRNA and protein expression levels in these areas except for GABAA mRNA in the cerebral cortex and striatum. Using phosphorylation antibodies against specific sites on the GABAA and GABAB receptors, we further demonstrated that hydroxyfasudil could inhibit GABAergic interneuron phosphorylation triggered by the theta burst stimulation. In summary, our results indicated that the inactivation of Rho-kinase could enhance GABAA and GABAB expressions by different mechanisms to guarantee the induction of

  6. Co-Treatment with Anthocyanins and Vitamin C Ameliorates Ethanol- Induced Neurodegeneration via Modulation of GABAB Receptor Signaling in the Adult Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Haroon; Ali, Tahir; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Kim, Min J; Abid, Noman Bin; Shah, Shahid A; Yoon, Gwang H; Lee, Hae Y; Kim, Myeong O

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol exposure is known to cause neuronal damage in both humans and experimental animal models. Ethanol treatment induces neurotoxicity via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while anthocyanins (extracted from black soybean) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) are free radical scavengers that can be used as neuroprotective agents against ROS. In this study the underlying neuroprotective potential of black soybean anthocyanins and vitamin C was determined. For this purpose, adult rats were exposed to 10% (v/v) ethanol for 8 weeks, followed by co-treatment with anthocyanins (24 mg/kg) and vitamin C (100 mg/kg) during the last 4 weeks. Our results showed that ethanol administration increased the expression of γ -aminobutyric acid B1 receptor (GABAB1R) and induced neuronal apoptosis via alterations to the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, release of cytochrome C and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Anthocyanins alone and supplementation with vitamin C showed an additive effect in reversing the trend of apoptotic signals induced by ethanol in the cortex and hippocampus. Consequently, anthocyanins also decreased the expression of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase-1 induced by ethanol and prevented DNA damage. Furthermore, anthocyanins and vitamin C reversed the ethanol-induced expression of GABAB1R and its downstream signaling molecule phospho-cAMP response element binding protein. Moreover, histopathology and immunohistochemistry results showed that anthocyanins and vitamin C significantly reduced ethanol-induced neuronal cell death. Our study revealed a neuroprotective role of anthocyanins and vitamin C via modulation of GABAB1R expression in the adult brain. Hence, we suggest that anthocyanins or co-treatment with anthocyanins and vitamin C may be a new and potentially effective neuroprotective agent for alcohol abuse.

  7. Noradrenaline release in the rat vena cava is inhibited by gamma-aminobutyric acid via GABAB receptors but not affected by histamine.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, D.; Schlicker, E.; Malinowska, B.; Molderings, G.

    1991-01-01

    1. Segments of the rat vena cava preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline were superfused with [3H]-noradrenaline-free solution containing desipramine and corticosterone and the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor ligands and of histamine on tritium overflow evoked by transmural electrical stimulation were studied. 2. GABA inhibited, and histamine failed to affect, the electrically (0.66 Hz) evoked tritium overflow both in the absence and presence of rauwolscine (which was present in the superfusion medium in the subsequent experiments). The effect of GABA was less pronounced at a stimulation frequency of 2 Hz. 3. The inhibitory effect of GABA (pIC35 5.83) on the electrically (0.66 Hz) evoked overflow was mimicked by the GABAB receptor agonist, R-(-)-baclofen (6.07) and less potently by S-(+)-baclofen (3.30) and the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol (3.70). The concentration-response curve of GABA was shifted to the right by the GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP 35348 (P-(3-aminopropyl)-P- diethoxymethyl-phosphinic acid; apparent pA2 4.76), but not affected by the GABAA receptor antagonist, (-)-bicuculline methiodide 100 mumol l-1. Given alone, (-)-bicuculline methiodide slightly increased, and CGP 35348 did not affect, the evoked overflow. 4. The effect of GABA in veins from rats treated for 14 days with RS-baclofen (10 mg kg-1, i.p. once daily) did not differ from that in veins from rats which received the vehicle instead. The effect of GABA also did not differ in veins from rats treated once either with RS-baclofen or with its vehicle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1665738

  8. GABA(B) receptors mediate motility signals for migrating embryonic cortical cells.

    PubMed

    Behar, T N; Smith, S V; Kennedy, R T; McKenzie, J M; Maric, I; Barker, J L

    2001-08-01

    During development, postmitotic neurons migrate from germinal regions into the cortical plate (cp), where lamination occurs. In rats, GABA is transiently expressed in the cp, near target destinations for migrating neurons. In vitro GABA stimulates neuronal motility, suggesting cp cells release GABA, which acts as a chemoattractant during corticogenesis. Pharmacological studies indicate GABA stimulates migration via GABA(B)-receptor (GABA(B)-R) activation. Using immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and Western blotting, we examined embryonic cortical cell expression of GABA(B)-Rs in vivo. At E17, GABA(B)-R1(+) cells were identified in the ventricular zone (vz) and cp. RT-PCR and Western blotting demonstrated the presence of GABA(B)-R1a and GABA(B)-R1b mRNA and proteins. Using immuno- cytochemistry, GABA(B)-R expression was examined in vz and cp cell dissociates before and after migration to GABA in an in vitro chemotaxis assay. GABA-induced migration resulted in an increase of GABA(B)-R(+) cells in the migrated population. While <20% of each starting dissociate was GABA(B)-R(+), >70% of migrated cells were immunopositive. We used a microchemotaxis assay to analyze cp cell release of diffusible chemotropic factor(s). In vitro, cp dissociates induced vz cell migration in a cell density-dependent manner that was blocked by micromolar saclofen (a GABA(B)-R antagonist). HPLC demonstrated cp cells release micromolar levels of GABA and taurine in several hours. Micromolar levels of both molecules stimulated cell migration that was blocked by micromolar saclofen. Thus, migratory cortical cells express GABA(B)-Rs, cp cells release GABA and taurine, and both molecules stimulate cortical cell movement. Together these findings suggest GABA and/or taurine act as chemoattractants for neurons during rat cortical histogenesis via mechanisms involving GABA(B)-Rs.

  9. Differential roles of GABAB1 subunit isoforms on locomotor responses to acute and repeated administration of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Laura H; Sweeney, Fabian F; Kaupmann, Klemens; O'Leary, Olivia F; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Cryan, John F

    2016-02-01

    GABAB receptors are crucial modulators of the behavioural effects of drug abuse, and agonists and positive allosteric modulators show promise as pharmacological strategies for anti-addiction therapeutics. GABAB receptors are functional heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits. The predominant neuronal GABAB1 subunit isoforms are GABAB1a and GABAB1b. Selective ablation of these isoforms in mice revealed differential behavioural responses in fear, cognition and stress sensitivity. However, the influence of the two GABAB1 isoforms on responses to drugs of abuse is unclear. Therefore we examined the responses of GABAB1 subunit isoform null mice to cocaine in acute locomotor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigms. During habituation for the acute locomotor activity assay, GABAB1b(-/-) mice showed higher levels of locomotor activity relative to wild-type (WT) and GABAB1a(-/-) mice, in accordance with previous studies. Acute cocaine (10 mg/kg) increased locomotor activity in habituated mice of all three genotypes, with GABAB1a(-/-) mice showing sustained hyperlocomotor responses 30 min after cocaine relative to WT and GABAB1b(-/-) mice. No genotypes demonstrated a cocaine-induced place preference, however, GABAB1a(-/-) mice demonstrated enhanced locomotor sensitisation to chronic cocaine in the CPP paradigm in comparison to WT mice, whereas GABAB1b(-/-) mice failed to develop locomotor sensitisation, despite higher levels of basal locomotor activity. These findings indicate that GABAB1a and GABAB1b isoforms differentially regulate behavioural responses to cocaine, with deletion of GABAB1a enhancing cocaine-induced locomotor activity and deletion of GABAB1b protecting from cocaine-induced sensitisation.

  10. Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) disruption of passive avoidance learning in the day-old chick appears to be due to its effect on GABAB not gamma-hydroxybutyric [corrected] acid (GHB) receptors.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Joanne M; Hazi, Agnes; Hale, Mathew W; Milsome, Sarah L; Crowe, Simon F

    2009-02-11

    Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) is a prodrug to gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and metabolises to GHB when ingested. Discrimination stimulus studies report generalisation of effects of GHB to GBL. While amnesia is one of the most commonly reported symptoms of GHB's ingestion in human users, as yet few studies have examined this effect. Although an endogenous GHB specific receptor is present in the brain, several studies have indicated that the clinical effects of exogenous doses of GBL/GHB are due to its action on GABA(B) receptors rather than on the GHB receptor. In this series of studies, New Hampshire x White leghorn cockerels were trained using a modified version of the passive avoidance learning task. Subcutaneous injections of GBL induced a memory deficit by 10 min post-training, which persisted for at least 24 h. No effect on memory was seen with administration of the specific GHB agonist NCS-356 (gamma-p-chlorophenyl-trans-4-hydroxycrotonate). The GBL-induced memory deficit appeared similar to the deficit produced by baclofen, where the antagonist facilitated learning. Additionally, GBL-induced memory deficit was ameliorated by application of a GABA(B) antagonist. The results support the hypothesis that GBL exerts its influence on memory via the GABA(B) receptor rather than by the specific GHB receptor.

  11. Effects of imipramine or GABA(B) receptor ligands on the immobility, swimming and climbing in the forced swim test in rats following discontinuation of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Frankowska, Małgorzata; Gołda, Anna; Wydra, Karolina; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Filip, Małgorzata

    2010-02-10

    We tested if discontinuation of cocaine self-administration can lead to the development of depressive-like symptoms in the forced swim test expressed as changes in immobility, swimming and climbing behaviors in rats. A "yoked" procedure in which rats were run simultaneously in groups of three, with two rats received the passive injection of cocaine or saline, was employed. Later, we examined whether acute treatment with the classical antidepressant imipramine or GABA(B) receptor ligands could alter the increases in immobility recorded after discontinuation of self-administered cocaine. We found a significant increase (44%) in the immobility time 3 days following discontinuation of cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion/2h daily) self-administration for 14 days; such enhancement resembled that observed in rats following the chronic mild stress. Acute administration with imipramine (15 or 30 mg/kg), the GABA(B) receptor agonists baclofen (0.125 mg/kg) and SKF 97541 (0.005 mg/kg), the positive allosteric modulator CGP 7930 (0.3mg/kg) or the antagonist SCH 50911 (0.3mg/kg) counteracted the cocaine discontinuation-induced enhancement in the immobility time. The enhanced immobility time in rats that self-administered cocaine (but not given cocaine passively) may reflect the motivated or cognitive processes of reinforced responding of cocaine and could be a potential driver of the addiction process per se. Moreover, either blockade or stimulation of GABA(B) receptors by their ligands in very low doses attenuated the enhanced immobility time in rats after discontinuation of cocaine self-administration and these findings extend preclinical studies demonstrating the potential involvement of GABA(B) receptor ligands to reduce cocaine craving.

  12. Antagonism of GABA-B but not GABA-A receptors in the VTA prevents stress- and intra-VTA CRF-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Blacktop, Jordan M.; Vranjkovic, Oliver; Mayer, Matthieu; Van Hoof, Matthew; Baker, David A.; Mantsch, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking requires corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) actions in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However the mechanisms through which CRF regulates VTA function to promote cocaine use are not fully understood. Here we examined the role of GABAergic neurotransmission in the VTA mediated by GABA-A or GABA-B receptors in the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking by a stressor, uncontrollable intermittent footshock, or bilateral intra-VTA administration of CRF. Rats underwent repeated daily cocaine self-administration (1.0 mg/kg/ing; 14 × 6 hrs/day) and extinction and were tested for reinstatement in response to footshock (0.5 mA, 0.5” duration, average every 40 sec; range 10–70 sec) or intra-VTA CRF delivery (500 ng/side) following intra-VTA pretreatment with the GABA-A antagonist, bicuculline, the GABA-B antagonist, 2-hydroxysaclofen or vehicle. Intra-VTA bicuculline (1, 10 or 20 ng/side) failed to block footshock- or CRF-induced cocaine seeking at either dose tested. By contrast, 2-hydroxysaclofen (0.2 or 2 µg/side) prevented reinstatement by both footshock and intra-VTA CRF at a concentration that failed to attenuate food-reinforced lever pressing (45 mg sucrose-sweetened pellets; FR4 schedule) in a separate group of rats. These data suggest that GABA-B receptor-dependent CRF actions in the VTA mediate stress-induced cocaine seeking and that GABA-B receptor antagonists may have utility for the management of stress-induced relapse in cocaine addicts. PMID:26596556

  13. Antagonism of GABA-B but not GABA-A receptors in the VTA prevents stress- and intra-VTA CRF-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Blacktop, Jordan M; Vranjkovic, Oliver; Mayer, Matthieu; Van Hoof, Matthew; Baker, David A; Mantsch, John R

    2016-03-01

    Stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking requires corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) actions in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However the mechanisms through which CRF regulates VTA function to promote cocaine use are not fully understood. Here we examined the role of GABAergic neurotransmission in the VTA mediated by GABA-A or GABA-B receptors in the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking by a stressor, uncontrollable intermittent footshock, or bilateral intra-VTA administration of CRF. Rats underwent repeated daily cocaine self-administration (1.0 mg/kg/ing; 14 × 6 h/day) and extinction and were tested for reinstatement in response to footshock (0.5 mA, 0.5" duration, average every 40 s; range 10-70 s) or intra-VTA CRF delivery (500 ng/side) following intra-VTA pretreatment with the GABA-A antagonist, bicuculline, the GABA-B antagonist, 2-hydroxysaclofen or vehicle. Intra-VTA bicuculline (1, 10 or 20 ng/side) failed to block footshock- or CRF-induced cocaine seeking at either dose tested. By contrast, 2-hydroxysaclofen (0.2 or 2 μg/side) prevented reinstatement by both footshock and intra-VTA CRF at a concentration that failed to attenuate food-reinforced lever pressing (45 mg sucrose-sweetened pellets; FR4 schedule) in a separate group of rats. These data suggest that GABA-B receptor-dependent CRF actions in the VTA mediate stress-induced cocaine seeking and that GABA-B receptor antagonists may have utility for the management of stress-induced relapse in cocaine addicts.

  14. Novel mechanism of voltage-gated N-type (Cav2.2) calcium channel inhibition revealed through α-conotoxin Vc1.1 activation of the GABA(B) receptor.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Thuan G; Cuny, Hartmut; Slesinger, Paul A; Adams, David J

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal voltage-gated N-type (Cav2.2) calcium channels are expressed throughout the nervous system and regulate neurotransmitter release and hence synaptic transmission. They are predominantly modulated via G protein-coupled receptor activated pathways, and the well characterized Gβγ subunits inhibit Cav2.2 currents. Analgesic α-conotoxin Vc1.1, a peptide from predatory marine cone snail venom, inhibits Cav2.2 channels by activating pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o proteins via the GABAB receptor (GABA(B)R) and potently suppresses pain in rat models. Using a heterologous GABA(B)R expression system, electrophysiology, and mutagenesis, we showed α-conotoxin Vc1.1 modulates Cav2.2 via a different pathway from that of the GABA(B)R agonists GABA and baclofen. In contrast to GABA and baclofen, Vc1.1 changes Cav2.2 channel kinetics by increasing the rate of activation and shifting its half-maximum inactivation to a more hyperpolarized potential. We then systematically truncated the GABA(B)(1a) C terminus and discovered that removing the proximal carboxyl terminus of the GABA(B)(1a) subunit significantly reduced Vc1.1 inhibition of Cav2.2 currents. We propose a novel mechanism by which Vc1.1 activates GABA(B)R and requires the GABA(B)(1a) proximal carboxyl terminus domain to inhibit Cav2.2 channels. These findings provide important insights into how GABA(B)Rs mediate Cav2.2 channel inhibition and alter nociceptive transmission. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. Changes in GABA and GABA(B) receptor expressions are involved in neuropathy in the rat cuneate nucleus following median nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Seu-Hwa; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Lin, Chi-Te; Wang, Hsin-Ying; Li, Shin-Fang; Lue, June-Horng

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between changes in GABA transmission and behavioral abnormalities after median nerve transection. Following unilateral median nerve transection, the percentage of GABA-like immunoreactive neurons in the cuneate nucleus and that of GABA(B) receptor-like immunoreactive neurons in the dorsal root ganglion in the injured side decreased and reached a nadir at 4 weeks after median nerve transection. Four weeks after bilateral median nerve transection and intraperitoneal application with saline, baclofen (2 mg kg⁻¹), or phaclofen (2 mg kg⁻¹) before unilateral electrical stimulation of the injured median nerve, we investigated the level of neuropeptide Y release and c-Fos expression in the stimulated side of the cuneate nucleus. The neuropeptide Y release level and the number of c-Fos-like immunoreactive neurons in the baclofen group were significantly attenuated, whereas those in the phaclofen group had increased compared to the saline group. These findings indicate that median nerve transection reduces GABA transmission, promoting injury-induced neuropeptide Y release and consequently evoking c-Fos expression in cuneate nucleus neurons. Furthermore, this study used the CatWalk method to assess behavioral abnormalities in rats following median nerve transection. These abnormalities were reversed by baclofen treatment. Overall, the results suggest that baclofen treatment block neuropeptide Y release, subsequently lessening c-Fos expression in cuneate neurons and consequently attenuating neuropathic signal transmission to the thalamus. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. 3-Aminopropylphosphinic acid--a potent, selective GABAB receptor agonist in the guinea-pig ileum and rat anococcygeus muscle.

    PubMed

    Hills, J M; Dingsdale, R A; Parsons, M E; Dolle, R E; Howson, W

    1989-08-01

    1. 3-Aminopropylphosphinic acid, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogue, was tested for activity on guinea-pig isolated ileum and rat isolated anococcygeus muscle preparations. The effects of 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid were compared with those of GABA and baclofen. 2. In the electrically stimulated ileum, 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid, like GABA and baclofen, caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of the cholinergic twitch contraction, the IC50 value being 1.84 +/- 0.23 microM (n = 12). Unlike GABA, but like baclofen, 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid did not produce an initial contraction. 3. The inhibitory effects of 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid and baclofen in the guinea-pig ileum were not significantly antagonized by bicuculline (10 microM), phentolamine plus propranolol (both 1 microM), yohimbine (1 microM), naloxone (1 microM), impromidine (1 microM) or 8-phenyltheophylline (10 microM). The inhibitory effects of 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid, but not of baclofen, were however antagonized by phaclofen (500 microM). In addition the effects of 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid were abolished by baclofen desensitization in the guinea-pig ileum. 4. 3-Aminopropylphosphinic acid, GABA and baclofen reduced the twitch contraction evoked by electrical field stimulation in the rat anococcygeus muscle. The IC50 for 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid inhibition of the anococcygeus contraction was 0.89 +/- 0.15 microM (n = 8). 5. It is concluded that 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid is a potent, selective GABAB agonist, being seven times more potent than baclofen in the guinea-pig ileum and five times more potent than baclofen in the rat anococcygues muscle preparations.

  17. G(o) transduces GABAB-receptor modulation of N-type calcium channels in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Menon-Johansson, A S; Berrow, N; Dolphin, A C

    1993-11-01

    High-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channel currents (IBa) were recorded from acutely replated cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. IBa was irreversibly inhibited by 56.9 +/- 2.7% by 1 microM omega-conotoxin-GVIA (omega-CTx-GVIA), whereas the 1,4-dihydropyridine antagonist nicardipine was ineffective. The selective gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist, (-)-baclofen (50 microM), inhibited the HVA IBa by 30.7 +/- 5.4%. Prior application of omega-CTx-GVIA completely occluded inhibition of the HVA IBa by (-)-baclofen, indicating that in this preparation (-)-baclofen inhibits N-type current. To investigate which G protein subtype was involved, cells were replated in the presence of anti-G protein antisera. Under these conditions the antibodies were shown to enter the cells through transient pores created during the replating procedure. Replating DRGs in the presence of anti-G(o) antiserum, raised against the C-terminal decapeptide of the G alpha o subunit, reduced (-)-baclofen inhibition of the HVA IBa, whereas replating DRGs in the presence of the anti-Gi antiserum did not. Using anti-G alpha o antisera (1:2000) and confocal laser microscopy, G alpha o localisation was investigated in both unreplated and replated neurons. G alpha o immunoreactivity was observed at the plasma membrane, neurites, attachment plaques and perinuclear region, and was particularly pronounced at points of cell-to-cell contact. The plasma membrane G alpha o immunoreactivity was completely blocked by preincubation with the immunising G alpha o undecapeptide (1 microgram.ml-1) for 1 h at 37 degrees C. A similar treatment also blocked recognition of G alpha o in brain membranes on immunoblots.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Effects of GABA(B), 5-HT(1A), and 5-HT(2) receptor stimulation on activation and inhibition of the rat lateral amygdala following medial geniculate nucleus stimulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sokal, David M; Giarola, Alessandra S; Large, Charles H

    2005-01-07

    The input from the medial geniculate nucleus of the thalamus (MGN) to the lateral amygdala is known to be important in the regulation of fear and anxiety. Modulation of this pathway may be useful for the treatment of anxiety disorders. We set out to determine whether simple extracellular electrophysiological techniques could be used to study pharmacological modulation of this pathway in vivo. We studied the effects of GABA(B), 5-HT(1), and 5-HT(2) receptor agonists on activity in the lateral amygdala following stimulation of the MGN in isoflurane-anaesthetised rats. Electrical stimulation of the MGN evoked a characteristic biphasic field potential in the lateral amygdala. Baclofen (10 mg kg(-1), iv) inhibited the evoked potential with an effect that was most marked on the positive-going component (80+/-9% inhibition; P<0.05). Baclofen also significantly reduced paired-pulse inhibition of the negative-going component at short interpulse intervals (<200 ms). The 5-HT(1A) receptor ligands, 8-OH-DPAT (60 microg kg(-1), iv) and WAY-100635 (0.5 mg kg(-1), iv) were without effect on evoked responses or paired-pulse relationship. In contrast, the 5-HT(2) receptor agonist, DOI, caused a rapid inhibition of the field potential (to 59.33+/-11.41% of the baseline response; P<0.05). This effect was blocked by ketanserin, either following systemic (0.5 mg kg(-1), iv) or intra-amygdala administration. These results show that GABA(B) and 5-HT(2) receptor agonists can modulate activation of the lateral amygdala following MGN stimulation; furthermore, GABA(B) receptor agonists appear to have a profound effect on local circuit inhibition within the lateral amygdala. The results support the use of in vivo field potential recording within the MGN-lateral amygdala pathway to evaluate this as a possible site of action for novel anxiolytic drugs.

  19. Effects of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen administered orally on normal food intake and intraperitoneally on fat intake in non-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Bains, Rasneer S; Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2013-01-05

    It has been previously reported that the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen decreases food intake after oral administration and fat intake after intraperitoneal administration. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of baclofen (1-4 mg/ kg) administered orally (Experiment 1) on food intake in non-deprived rats (n=6) and intraperitoneally (Experiment 2) on fat intake in non-deprived rats (n=8) that were naïve to baclofen (1st set of trials) and in the same group of rats after they were sub-chronically exposed to baclofen (2nd set of trials). The results from Experiment 1 show that baclofen had no effects on food intake during the 1st set of trials, but the 2 and 4 mg/kg doses significantly increased food consumption during the 2nd set of trials. Baclofen produced sedation during the 1st set of trials, but tolerance occurred to this effect and was not apparent during the 2nd set of trials. These observations suggest that the motor effects may have competed with the hyperphagic effects of baclofen during the 1st set of trials. The data from Experiment 2 show that baclofen had no effects on fat intake during either the 1st or 2nd set of trials. The results of the study thus indicate that orally administrated baclofen increases food intake and intraperitoneal administration has no effect on fat intake in non-deprived rats under the conditions used in this study. These findings may have important implications for research on the use of baclofen in studies concerned with ingestive behaviours.

  20. The GABA-B antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen reverses the effects of baclofen on the discriminative stimulus effects of D-amphetamine in the conditioned taste aversion procedure.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Florencio; Jiménez, Juan C; Cedillo, Laura N; Sandoval-Sánchez, Alma; Millán-Mejía, Patricia; Sánchez-Castillo, Hugo; Velázquez-Martínez, David N

    2009-07-01

    Some of the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) are mediated by an increase in dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. However, there is evidence that gamma-amino-butyric-acid-B (GABA-B) receptors are involved in some behavioral effects of D-AMPH and cocaine. Here, we examined the effects of baclofen on the discriminative stimulus properties of D-AMPH, using conditioned taste aversion (CTA) as the drug discrimination procedure. Male Wistar rats were deprived of water and trained in the CTA procedure. They received D-AMPH (1 mg/kg, i.p.) before gaining access to saccharin, which was followed by an injection of LiCl. On alternate days, the subjects received saline before and after the access to saccharin. After the rats learned the D-AMPH-saline discrimination, the standard dose of D-AMPH was replaced by different doses of D-AMPH, baclofen (a GABA-B receptor agonist), 2-hydroxysaclofen (a GABA-B receptor antagonist), a combination of baclofen+D-AMPH, or a combination of 2-hydroxysaclofen+baclofen+D-AMPH. Baclofen did not substitute for D-AMPH, but, when combined with D-AMPH, it produced a small but significant decrease in the discriminative stimulus effects of D-AMPH. This effect was reversed by administration of 2-hydroxysaclofen. These data suggest that GABA-B receptors play a regulatory role in the discriminative stimulus effects of D-AMPH.

  1. Differential Cav2.1 and Cav2.3 channel inhibition by baclofen and α-conotoxin Vc1.1 via GABAB receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Jeffrey R.; Cuny, Hartmut; Clark, Richard J.; Adams, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal Cav2.1 (P/Q-type), Cav2.2 (N-type), and Cav2.3 (R-type) calcium channels contribute to synaptic transmission and are modulated through G protein–coupled receptor pathways. The analgesic α-conotoxin Vc1.1 acts through γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptors (GABABRs) to inhibit Cav2.2 channels. We investigated GABABR-mediated modulation by Vc1.1, a cyclized form of Vc1.1 (c-Vc1.1), and the GABABR agonist baclofen of human Cav2.1 or Cav2.3 channels heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney cells. 50 µM baclofen inhibited Cav2.1 and Cav2.3 channel Ba2+ currents by ∼40%, whereas c-Vc1.1 did not affect Cav2.1 but potently inhibited Cav2.3, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ∼300 pM. Depolarizing paired pulses revealed that ∼75% of the baclofen inhibition of Cav2.1 was voltage dependent and could be relieved by strong depolarization. In contrast, baclofen or Vc1.1 inhibition of Cav2.3 channels was solely mediated through voltage-independent pathways that could be disrupted by pertussis toxin, guanosine 5′-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt, or the GABABR antagonist CGP55845. Overexpression of the kinase c-Src significantly increased inhibition of Cav2.3 by c-Vc1.1. Conversely, coexpression of a catalytically inactive double mutant form of c-Src or pretreatment with a phosphorylated pp60c-Src peptide abolished the effect of c-Vc1.1. Site-directed mutational analyses of Cav2.3 demonstrated that tyrosines 1761 and 1765 within exon 37 are critical for inhibition of Cav2.3 by c-Vc1.1 and are involved in baclofen inhibition of these channels. Remarkably, point mutations introducing specific c-Src phosphorylation sites into human Cav2.1 channels conferred c-Vc1.1 sensitivity. Our findings show that Vc1.1 inhibition of Cav2.3, which defines Cav2.3 channels as potential targets for analgesic α-conotoxins, is caused by specific c-Src phosphorylation sites in the C terminus. PMID:24688019

  2. Differential Cav2.1 and Cav2.3 channel inhibition by baclofen and α-conotoxin Vc1.1 via GABAB receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Berecki, Géza; McArthur, Jeffrey R; Cuny, Hartmut; Clark, Richard J; Adams, David J

    2014-04-01

    Neuronal Cav2.1 (P/Q-type), Cav2.2 (N-type), and Cav2.3 (R-type) calcium channels contribute to synaptic transmission and are modulated through G protein-coupled receptor pathways. The analgesic α-conotoxin Vc1.1 acts through γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptors (GABABRs) to inhibit Cav2.2 channels. We investigated GABABR-mediated modulation by Vc1.1, a cyclized form of Vc1.1 (c-Vc1.1), and the GABABR agonist baclofen of human Cav2.1 or Cav2.3 channels heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney cells. 50 µM baclofen inhibited Cav2.1 and Cav2.3 channel Ba(2+) currents by ∼40%, whereas c-Vc1.1 did not affect Cav2.1 but potently inhibited Cav2.3, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ∼300 pM. Depolarizing paired pulses revealed that ∼75% of the baclofen inhibition of Cav2.1 was voltage dependent and could be relieved by strong depolarization. In contrast, baclofen or Vc1.1 inhibition of Cav2.3 channels was solely mediated through voltage-independent pathways that could be disrupted by pertussis toxin, guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt, or the GABABR antagonist CGP55845. Overexpression of the kinase c-Src significantly increased inhibition of Cav2.3 by c-Vc1.1. Conversely, coexpression of a catalytically inactive double mutant form of c-Src or pretreatment with a phosphorylated pp60c-Src peptide abolished the effect of c-Vc1.1. Site-directed mutational analyses of Cav2.3 demonstrated that tyrosines 1761 and 1765 within exon 37 are critical for inhibition of Cav2.3 by c-Vc1.1 and are involved in baclofen inhibition of these channels. Remarkably, point mutations introducing specific c-Src phosphorylation sites into human Cav2.1 channels conferred c-Vc1.1 sensitivity. Our findings show that Vc1.1 inhibition of Cav2.3, which defines Cav2.3 channels as potential targets for analgesic α-conotoxins, is caused by specific c-Src phosphorylation sites in the C terminus.

  3. Localization of GABA(B) (R1) receptors in the rat hippocampus by immunocytochemistry and high resolution autoradiography, with specific reference to its localization in identified hippocampal interneuron subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Sloviter, R S; Ali-Akbarian, L; Elliott, R C; Bowery, B J; Bowery, N G

    1999-11-01

    Immunocytochemical and autoradiographic methods were used to localize the GABA(B) receptor in the normal rat hippocampus. GABA(B) receptor 1-like immunoreactivity (GBR1-LI) was most intense in presumed GABAergic interneurons of all hippocampal subregions. It was also present throughout the hippocampal neuropil, where it was most intense in the dendritic strata of the dentate gyrus, which are innervated by the perforant pathway and inhibitory dentate hilar cells, and in strata oriens and radiatum of area CA3. The dendritic regions of area CA1 exhibited less GBR1-LI than area CA3. GBR1-LI was detectable in the somata of CA1 pyramidal cells, but was minimal or undetectable within the somata of dentate granule cells and CA3 pyramidal cells. GBR1-LI was similarly minimal in the dentate hilar neuropil, and in stratum lucidum, the two regions that contain granule cell axons and terminals. Nor was GBR1-LI detectable in the inhibitory basket cell fiber systems that surround hippocampal principal cell somata. Fluorescence co-localization studies indicated that significant proportions of interneurons expressing somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, calbindin, or calretinin also expressed GBR1-LI constitutively. Conversely, parvalbumin-positive GABAergic basket cells of the dentate gyrus and hippocampus, which form GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory axo-somatic synapses, rarely contained detectable GBR1-LI. High resolution autoradiography with the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP 62349 revealed a close correspondence between receptor ligand binding and GBR1-LI, with several notable exceptions. Ligand binding closely matched GBR1-LI throughout the hippocampal, cortical, thalamic, and cerebellar neuropil. However, the hippocampal interneuron somata and dendrites that exhibited the most intense GBR1-LI, and the GBR1-positive somata of CA1 pyramidal cells, did not exhibit a similar density of [3H]-CGP 62349 binding. These data clarify the relationship between

  4. The GABAB agonist baclofen blocks the expression of sensitisation to the locomotor stimulant effect of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti, M; Gubellini, C; Ricci, F; Gaiardi, M

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the possible influence of baclofen, a GABAB agonist, on the long-term sensitisation to amphetamine in rats. As expected, chronic amphetamine treatment (1.5 mg/kg i.p. daily for 10 days) led to an increased locomotor response to amphetamine (0.75 mg/kg i.p.), when the animals were challenged 20 days after the end of repeated treatment. Baclofen (2 mg/kg i.p.), administered before the test session, did not significantly modify the spontaneous locomotor activity of rats, but decreased the normal and, to a greater extent, the sensitised locomotor response to amphetamine; thus baclofen prevented the expression of sensitisation to amphetamine. Moreover a previous chronic treatment with baclofen (2 mg/kg i.p. daily for 10 days) attenuated the amphetamine-induced locomotor activity in sensitised, but not in control animals. This effect was observed 20 days after the last baclofen administration. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate that GABAB receptors play an important role in the expression of the sensitised behavioural response to amphetamine and further support a potential role of GABAB agonists in the treatment of psychostimulant addiction.

  5. Neuroendocrine tumour metastatic brain disease during immunosuppressive treatment for paraneoplastic GABAB receptor antibodies encephalitis: Is immunosuppression always beneficial?

    PubMed

    André, Ana; Félix, Ana; Shamasna, Motasem; Nzwalo, Hipólito; Basílio, Carlos

    2017-09-15

    Limbic autoimmune encephalitis (LE) should be considered in any patient with acute or subacute neuropsychiatric manifestations, without other common causes of encephalitis. Y-Aminobutyric-acid-B-receptor (anti-GABABR) antibodies are rarely encountered in association with LE. A 74-year-old patient presented with a progressive cognitive degradation and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, with positive anti-GABABR. He declined under immunosuppression treatment. Control magnetic resonance revealed brain lesions, which became positive for pulmonary neuroendocrine tumour metastatic disease. The occurrence of diversified neurological manifestations of an underling tumour is difficult to manage. We speculate if in some cases, immunosuppression can itself facilitate tumour progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. α-Conotoxin Vc1.1 inhibits human dorsal root ganglion neuroexcitability and mouse colonic nociception via GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Castro, Joel; Harrington, Andrea M; Garcia-Caraballo, Sonia; Maddern, Jessica; Grundy, Luke; Zhang, Jingming; Page, Guy; Miller, Paul E; Craik, David J; Adams, David J; Brierley, Stuart M

    2017-06-01

    α-Conotoxin Vc1.1 is a small disulfide-bonded peptide from the venom of the marine cone snail Conus victoriae. Vc1.1 has antinociceptive actions in animal models of neuropathic pain, but its applicability to inhibiting human dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuroexcitability and reducing chronic visceral pain (CVP) is unknown. We determined the inhibitory actions of Vc1.1 on human DRG neurons and on mouse colonic sensory afferents in healthy and chronic visceral hypersensitivity (CVH) states. In mice, visceral nociception was assessed by neuronal activation within the spinal cord in response to noxious colorectal distension (CRD). Quantitative-reverse-transcription-PCR, single-cell-reverse-transcription-PCR and immunohistochemistry determined γ-aminobutyric acid receptor B (GABABR) and voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2, CaV2.3) expression in human and mouse DRG neurons. Vc1.1 reduced the excitability of human DRG neurons, whereas a synthetic Vc1.1 analogue that is inactive at GABABR did not. Human DRG neurons expressed GABABR and its downstream effector channels CaV2.2 and CaV2.3. Mouse colonic DRG neurons exhibited high GABABR, CaV2.2 and CaV2.3 expression, with upregulation of the CaV2.2 exon-37a variant during CVH. Vc1.1 inhibited mouse colonic afferents ex vivo and nociceptive signalling of noxious CRD into the spinal cord in vivo, with greatest efficacy observed during CVH. A selective GABABR antagonist prevented Vc1.1-induced inhibition, whereas blocking both CaV2.2 and CaV2.3 caused inhibition comparable with Vc1.1 alone. Vc1.1-mediated activation of GABABR is a novel mechanism for reducing the excitability of human DRG neurons. Vc1.1-induced activation of GABABR on the peripheral endings of colonic afferents reduces nociceptive signalling. The enhanced antinociceptive actions of Vc1.1 during CVH suggest it is a novel candidate for the treatment for CVP. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  7. Pre-synaptic GABA receptors inhibit glutamate release through GIRK channels in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ladera, Carolina; del Carmen Godino, María; José Cabañero, María; Torres, Magdalena; Watanabe, Masahiko; Luján, Rafael; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2008-12-01

    Neuronal G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels mediate the slow inhibitory effects of many neurotransmitters post-synaptically. However, no evidence exists that supports that GIRK channels play any role in the inhibition of glutamate release by GABA(B) receptors. In this study, we show for the first time that GABA(B) receptors operate through two mechanisms in nerve terminals from the cerebral cortex. As shown previously, GABA(B) receptors reduces glutamate release and the Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-type Ca(2+) channels in a mode insensitive to the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q and consistent with direct inhibition of this voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. However, by means of weak stimulation protocols, we reveal that GABA(B) receptors also reduce glutamate release mediated by P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, and that these responses are reversed by the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q. Consistent with the functional interaction between GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels at nerve terminals we demonstrate by immunogold electron immunohistochemistry that pre-synaptic boutons of asymmetric synapses co-express GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels, thus suggesting that the functional interaction of these two proteins, found at the post-synaptic level, also occurs at glutamatergic nerve terminals.

  8. Involvement of both GABAA and GABAB receptors in tonic inhibitory control of blood pressure at the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the rat.

    PubMed

    Amano, M; Kubo, T

    1993-08-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) contains vasopressor neurons which increase vasomotor tone. Endogenous GABA is suggested to be involved in mediation of the tonic inhibition of vasopressor neurons in the RVLM. To obtain more precise information about GABAergic mechanisms in the RVLM, we microinjected GABA agonists and antagonists unilaterally into the RVLM and examined their effects on blood pressure and heart rate. In addition, involvement of the other inhibitory amino acids glycine, beta-alanine and taurine in blood pressure regulation in the rat RVLM was also investigated. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane, paralyzed and artificially ventilated. The GABAA agonist muscimol (3-30 pmol) and the GABAB agonist baclofen (10-100 pmol) microinjected into the RVLM produced a decrease in blood pressure. The GABAA antagonist bicuculline (300 pmol) abolished the depressor response to muscimol (10 pmol) but not to baclofen (30 pmol) whereas the GABAB antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen (1 nmol) abolished the depressor response to baclofen (30 pmol) but not to muscimol (10 pmol). Either bicuculline or 2-hydroxysaclofen alone produced a pressor response. Both antagonists inhibited depressor responses to nipecotic acid (7.7 nmol) and GABA (0.3 nmol). Glycine (0.13-4.0 nmol), beta-alanine (0.11-3.4 nmol) and taurine (0.08-2.4 nmol) microinjected into the RVLM also produced decreases in blood pressure. The glycine antagonist strychnine (0.58 nmol) abolished the depressor response to glycine, beta-alanine and taurine but not to GABA. The taurine antagonist 6-aminomethyl-3-methyl-4H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxide) (1.3 nmol) inhibited the depressor response to beta-alanine and taurine but not to glycine and GABA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Effect of baclofen, a GABAB-agonist, on forced swimming-induced immobility in mice.

    PubMed

    Aley, K O; Kulkarni, S K

    1990-01-01

    The effect of baclofen, a GABAB-agonist, was studied on both forced swimming-induced immobility and isoprenaline-induced enhancement of forced swimming-induced immobility in mice. (+/-) Baclofen (0.5 and 1 mg/kg), and (-) baclofen (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) attenuated forced swimming-induced immobility. The effect of baclofen was not reversed by bicuculline, a GABAA-antagonist. Baclofen also reduced isoprenaline-induced enhancement of forced swimming-induced immobility. On concomitant administration of a subeffective dose of baclofen with a subeffective dose of propranolol, desipramine and amitriptyline, a potentiating effect was observed. These results are corroborative of our previous finding that GABAergic agents, particularly GABAB-receptors, play a role in the modulation of despair behavior in mice and in the action of antidepressant drugs. Baclofen (5 mg/kg) did not produce any significant effect on forced swimming-induced immobility, but reduced significantly the locomotor activity of the animals. Lower doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) of baclofen, which reduced the forced swimming-induced immobility, did not affect the locomotor activity. At higher and lower tissue concentrations of the drug, involvement of different receptor populations is suggested.

  10. Structure-Activity Studies of Cysteine-Rich α-Conotoxins that Inhibit High-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels via GABA(B) Receptor Activation Reveal a Minimal Functional Motif.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Bodil B; Berecki, Géza; Daniel, James T; Lee, Han Siean; Jackson, Kathryn A V; Tae, Han-Shen; Sadeghi, Mahsa; Castro, Joel; O'Donnell, Tracy; Deiteren, Annemie; Brierley, Stuart M; Craik, David J; Adams, David J; Clark, Richard J

    2016-04-04

    α-Conotoxins are disulfide-rich peptides that target nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Recently we identified several α-conotoxins that also modulate voltage-gated calcium channels by acting as G protein-coupled GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) agonists. These α-conotoxins are promising drug leads for the treatment of chronic pain. To elucidate the diversity of α-conotoxins that act through this mechanism, we synthesized and characterized a set of peptides with homology to α-conotoxins known to inhibit high voltage-activated calcium channels via GABA(B)R activation. Remarkably, all disulfide isomers of the active α-conotoxins Pu1.2 and Pn1.2, and the previously studied Vc1.1 showed similar levels of biological activity. Structure determination by NMR spectroscopy helped us identify a simplified biologically active eight residue peptide motif containing a single disulfide bond that is an excellent lead molecule for developing a new generation of analgesic peptide drugs.

  11. The GABA(B) antagonist CGP 52432 attenuates the stimulatory effect of the GABA(B) agonist SKF 97541 on luteinizing hormone secretion in the male sheep.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Gary L; Kuehl, David

    2002-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(B) agonist, 3-aminopropyl (methyl) phosphinic acid (SKF97541), would increase luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion when infused by microdialysis into the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) of the castrated ram, and to determine if the action of SKF97541 would be attenuated by co-infusion of the GABA(B) antagonist CGP52432. Initial experiments established that infusion of SKF alone, at concentrations as low as 5 microM, increased mean LH, LH pulse amplitude, and in some cases, pulse interval. In the last experiment, animals were treated with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alone, SKF alone (30 microM), 3-[[(3, 4-dichlorophenol) methyl] amino] propyl] diethoxymethyl) phosphinic acid (CGP) alone (500 microM), or SKF plus CGP. SKF increased both mean LH and LH pulse amplitude as compared with CSF. CGP alone had no significant effect on LH, but it attenuated the effect of SKF on mean LH. These observations indicate that the stimulatory effects of GABA(B) agonists on LH pulse patterns are mediated through GABA(B) receptors and provide further evidence that GABA(B) receptors located in the MBH can regulate pulsatile GnRH-LH release.

  12. A comparison of the relative activities of a number of GABAB antagonists in the isolated vas deferens of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hills, J. M.; Larkin, M. M.; Howson, W.

    1991-01-01

    1. A series of GABAB receptor antagonists were tested against (+/-)-baclofen for activity on the presynaptic GABAB receptor in the rat vas deferens. 2. All the antagonists tested caused a rightward shift in the concentration-response curve to (+/-)-baclofen. 3. pA2 values calculated from full Schild analysis were as follows: phaclofen, pA2 = 4.3; delta-amino valeric acid, pA2 = 4.4; 3-aminopropyl(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP 35348), pA2 = 5.0; 3-amino-propyl(n-hexyl)phosphinic acid (3-APHPA), pA2 = 4.5. 4. These results show that none of the above compounds possess potent antagonist activity at the GABAB receptor (i.e. pA2 > 6) in this peripheral tissue. In addition, the more recently available phosphinic acid antagonists, appear to offer no great advance over the GABAB antagonists previously available. PMID:1364830

  13. Upregulation of genes related to bone formation by γ-amino butyric acid and γ-oryzanol in germinated brown rice is via the activation of GABAB-receptors and reduction of serum IL-6 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Sani Ismaila; Maznah, Ismail; Mahmud, Rozi; Zuki, Abu Bakar Zakaria; Imam, Mustapha Umar

    2013-01-01

    -treated groups. Conclusion GABA and ORZ from GBR stimulates osteoblastogenesis by upregulation of bone formation genes, possibly via the activation of GABAB receptors and by inhibiting the activity of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Therefore, it could be used effectively in the management of osteoporosis. PMID:24098073

  14. Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Fred; Sharapan, Hedda

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, in childhood, work and play seem to come together. Says that for young children their play is their work, and the more adults encourage children to play, the more they emphasize important lifelong resource. Examines some uses of children's play, making and building, artwork, dramatic play, monsters and superheroes, gun play, and…

  15. L-baclofen-sensitive GABAB binding sites in the medial vestibular nucleus localized by immunocytochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, G. R.; Martinelli, G. P.; Cohen, B.

    1992-01-01

    L-Baclofen-sensitive GABAB binding sites in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) were identified immunocytochemically and visualized ultrastructurally in L-baclofen-preinjected rats and monkeys, using a mouse monoclonal antibody with specificity for the p-chlorophenyl moiety of baclofen. Saline-preinjected animals showed no immunostain. In drug-injected animals, there was evidence for both pre- and postsynaptic GABAergic inhibition in MVN mediated by GABAB receptors. These neural elements could be utilized in control of velocity storage in the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

  16. Growth hormone response to the GABA-B agonist baclofen in 3-week abstinent alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Saliha; Esel, Ertugrul; Turan, Tayfun; Kula, Mustafa

    2007-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) dysfunction is a known feature of alcoholism. We investigated GABA-B receptor activity in 3-week abstinent alcoholics using the growth hormone (GH) response to baclofen, a GABA-B receptor agonist. The study aimed to investigate the relationship between GABA-B receptor activity and alcohol withdrawal. GH response to baclofen was measured in alcohol-dependent males without depression (n = 22) who were on day 21 of alcohol abstinence and in healthy control male subjects (n = 23). After 20mg baclofen was given orally to the subjects, blood samples for GH assay were obtained every 30 min for the subsequent 150 min. The patients were divided into two subgroups (continuing withdrawal and recovered withdrawal subgroups) according to their withdrawal symptom severity scores on day 21 of alcohol cessation. Baclofen administration significantly altered GH secretion in the controls, but not in the patients. When GH response to baclofen was assessed as DeltaGH, it was lower in the patients with continuing withdrawal symptoms than in the controls and in the recovered withdrawal group. Impaired GH response to baclofen in all patients mainly pertained to the patients whose withdrawal symptoms partly continued. Our results suggest that reduced GABA-B receptor activity might be associated with longer-term alcohol withdrawal symptoms in alcoholic patients.

  17. Rapid antidepressants stimulate the decoupling of GABA(B) receptors from GIRK/Kir3 channels through increased protein stability of 14-3-3η.

    PubMed

    Workman, E R; Haddick, P C G; Bush, K; Dilly, G A; Niere, F; Zemelman, B V; Raab-Graham, K F

    2015-03-01

    A single injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists produces a rapid antidepressant response. Lasting changes in the synapse structure and composition underlie the effectiveness of these drugs. We recently discovered that rapid antidepressants cause a shift in the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABABR) signaling pathway, such that GABABR activation shifts from opening inwardly rectifiying potassium channels (Kir/GIRK) to increasing resting dendritic calcium signal and mammalian Target of Rapamycin activity. However, little is known about the molecular and biochemical mechanisms that initiate this shift. Herein, we show that GABABR signaling to Kir3 (GIRK) channels decreases with NMDAR blockade. Blocking NMDAR signaling stabilizes the adaptor protein 14-3-3η, which decouples GABABR signaling from Kir3 and is required for the rapid antidepressant efficacy. Consistent with these results, we find that key proteins involved in GABABR signaling bidirectionally change in a depression model and with rapid antidepressants. In socially defeated rodents, a model for depression, GABABR and 14-3-3η levels decrease in the hippocampus. The NMDAR antagonists AP5 and Ro-25-6981, acting as rapid antidepressants, increase GABABR and 14-3-3η expression and decrease Kir3.2. Taken together, these data suggest that the shift in GABABR function requires a loss of GABABR-Kir3 channel activity mediated by 14-3-3η. Our findings support a central role for 14-3-3η in the efficacy of rapid antidepressants and define a critical molecular mechanism for activity-dependent alterations in GABABR signaling.

  18. GABAB R/GSK-3β/NF-κB signaling pathway regulates the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shu, Qing; Liu, Jun; Liu, Xiupeng; Zhao, Sufang; Li, Hualin; Tan, Yonggang; Xu, Jianming

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of highly fatal cancer-related deaths in the whole world. Fast growth is critical characteristic of colorectal cancer, the underlying regulatory mechanism of colorectal cell fast proliferation remains largely unknown. Here, we reported that activation of metabotropic γ-Aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAB R) signaling significantly inhibited the colorectal cell HT29 proliferation by arresting the cell at G1 phase. Inhibition of GABAB R activated GSK-3β by reducing the phosphorylation level of GSK-3β. Activation of GSK-3β blocked the function of GABAB R signaling on repressing cell proliferation. We further found that GABAB R activation inhibited NF-κB activity. The promotion of cell proliferation caused by downregulation of GABRB R could be blocked by inhibition of NF-κB activation. Overall, activation of GABAB R leaded to inhibition of GSK-3β activation to repress the NF-κB function during colorectal cancer cell proliferation. This study revealed critical function of GABAB R/GSK-3β/NF-κB signaling pathway on regulating proliferation of colorectal cancer cell, which might provide a potential therapeutic target for clinical colorectal cancer treatment.

  19. G-protein-coupled GABAB receptors inhibit Ca2+ channels and modulate transmitter release in descending turtle spinal cord terminal synapsing motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Castro, Alberto; Aguilar, Justo; Elias, David; Felix, Ricardo; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo

    2007-08-10

    Presynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)Rs) regulate transmitter release at many central synapses by inhibiting Ca(2+) channels. However, the mechanisms by which GABA(B)Rs modulate neurotransmission at descending terminals synapsing on motoneurons in the spinal cord remain unexplored. To address this issue, we characterized the effects of baclofen, an agonist of GABA(B)Rs, on the monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked in motoneurons by stimulation of the dorsolateral funiculus (DLF) terminals in a slice preparation from the turtle spinal cord. We found that baclofen depressed neurotransmission in a dose-dependent manner (IC(50) of approximately 2 microM). The membrane time constant of the motoneurons did not change, whereas the amplitude ratio of the evoked EPSPs in response to a paired pulse was altered in the presence of the drug, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. Likewise, the use of N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel antagonists (omega-conotoxin GVIA and omega-agatoxin IVA, respectively) also depressed EPSPs significantly. Therefore, these channels are likely involved in the Ca(2+) influx that triggers transmitter release from DLF terminals. To determine whether the N and P/Q channels were regulated by GABA(B)R activation, we analyzed the action of the toxins in the presence of baclofen. Interestingly, baclofen occluded omega-conotoxin GVIA action by approximately 50% without affecting omega-agatoxin IVA inhibition, indicating that the N-type channels are the target of GABA(B)Rs. Lastly, the mechanism underlying this effect was further assessed by inhibiting G-proteins with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). Our data show that EPSP depression caused by baclofen was prevented by NEM, suggesting that GABA(B)Rs inhibit N-type channels via G-protein activation.

  20. Frequency-dependent depression of inhibition in guinea-pig neocortex in vitro by GABAB receptor feed-back on GABA release.

    PubMed Central

    Deisz, R A; Prince, D A

    1989-01-01

    1. The mechanisms involved in the lability of inhibition at higher frequencies of stimulation were investigated in the guinea-pig in vitro neocortical slice preparation by intracellular recording techniques. We attempted to test the possibility of a feedback depression of GABA on subsequent release. 2. At resting membrane potential (Em, -75.8 +/- 5.2 mV) stimulation of either the pial surface or subcortical white matter evoked a sequence of depolarizing and hyperpolarizing synaptic components in most neurones. An early hyperpolarizing component (IPSPA) was usually only obvious as a pronounced termination of the EPSP, followed by a later hyperpolarizing event (IPSPB). Current-voltage relationships revealed two different conductances of about 200 and 20 nS and reversal potentials of -73.0 +/- 4.4 and -88.6 +/- 6.1 mV for the early and late component, respectively. 3. The conductances of IPSPA and IPSPB were fairly stable at a stimulus frequency of 0.1 Hz. At frequencies between 0.5 and 2 Hz both IPSPs were attenuated with the second stimulus and after about five stimuli a steady state was reached. Concomitantly IPSPs were shortened. The average decrease in synaptic conductance between 0.1 and 1 Hz was 80% for the IPSPA and 60% for the IPSPB. At these frequencies the reversal potentials decreased by 5 and 2 mV, respectively; Em and input resistance (Rin) were not consistently affected. 4. The amplitudes of field potentials, action potentials and EPSPs of pyramidal cells were attenuated less than 10% at stimulus frequencies up to 1 Hz, suggesting that alterations in local circuits between the stimulation site and excitatory input onto inhibitory interneurones may play only a minor role in the frequency-dependent decay of IPSPs. 5. Localized application of GABA produced multiphasic responses. With low concentrations and application near the soma an early hyperpolarization prevailed followed by a depolarizing late component. Brief application of GABA at low frequencies

  1. GABAB Agonism Promotes Sleep and Reduces Cataplexy in Murine Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Sarah Wurts; Morairty, Stephen R.; Chen, Tsui-Ming; Leung, Andrew K.; Wisor, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is an approved therapeutic for the excessive sleepiness and sudden loss of muscle tone (cataplexy) characteristic of narcolepsy. The mechanism of action for these therapeutic effects is hypothesized to be GABAB receptor dependent. We evaluated the effects of chronic administration of GHB and the GABAB agonist R-baclofen (R-BAC) on arousal state and cataplexy in two models of narcolepsy: orexin/ataxin-3 (Atax) and orexin/tTA; TetO diphtheria toxin mice (DTA). Mice were implanted for EEG/EMG monitoring and dosed with GHB (150 mg/kg), R-BAC (2.8 mg/kg), or vehicle (VEH) bid for 15 d–a treatment paradigm designed to model the twice nightly GHB dosing regimen used by human narcoleptics. In both models, R-BAC increased NREM sleep time, intensity, and consolidation during the light period; wake bout duration increased and cataplexy decreased during the subsequent dark period. GHB did not increase NREM sleep consolidation or duration, although NREM delta power increased in the first hour after dosing. Cataplexy decreased from baseline in 57 and 86% of mice after GHB and R-BAC, respectively, whereas cataplexy increased in 79% of the mice after VEH. At the doses tested, R-BAC suppressed cataplexy to a greater extent than GHB. These results suggest utility of R-BAC-based therapeutics for narcolepsy. PMID:24806675

  2. Olfactory receptor accessory proteins play crucial roles in receptor function and gene choice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ruchira; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Davison, Ian; Ikegami, Kentaro; Chien, Ming-Shan; You, Helena; Chi, Quiyi; Kubota, Momoka; Yohda, Masafumi; Ehlers, Michael; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Each of the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) chooses to express a single G protein-coupled olfactory receptor (OR) from a pool of hundreds. Here, we show the receptor transporting protein (RTP) family members play a dual role in both normal OR trafficking and determining OR gene choice probabilities. Rtp1 and Rtp2 double knockout mice (RTP1,2DKO) show OR trafficking defects and decreased OSN activation. Surprisingly, we discovered a small subset of the ORs are expressed in larger numbers of OSNs despite the presence of fewer total OSNs in RTP1,2DKO. Unlike typical ORs, some overrepresented ORs show robust cell surface expression in heterologous cells without the co-expression of RTPs. We present a model in which developing OSNs exhibit unstable OR expression until they choose to express an OR that exits the ER or undergo cell death. Our study sheds light on the new link between OR protein trafficking and OR transcriptional regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21895.001 PMID:28262096

  3. Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    Designing a game with a serious purpose involves considering the worlds of Reality and Meaning yet it is undeniably impossible to create a game without a third world, one that is specifically concerned with what makes a game a game: the play elements. This third world, the world of people like designers and artists, and disciplines as computer science and game design, I call the world of Play and this level is devoted to it. The level starts off with some of the misperceptions people have of play. Unlike some may think, we play all the time, even when we grow old—this was also very noticeable in designing the game Levee Patroller as the team exhibited very playful behavior at many occasions. From there, I go into the aspects that characterize this world. The first concerns the goal of the game. This relates to the objectives people have to achieve within the game. This is constituted by the second aspect: the gameplay. Taking actions and facing challenges is subsequently constituted by a gameworld, which concerns the third aspect. And all of it is not possible without the fourth and final aspect, the type of technology that creates and facilitates the game. The four aspects together make up a “game concept” and from this world such a concept can be judged on the basis of three closely interrelated criteria: engagement, immersion, and fun.

  4. Long-term administration of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol desensitizes CB1-, adenosine A1-, and GABAB-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Selley, Dana E; Cassidy, Michael P; Martin, Billy R; Sim-Selley, Laura J

    2004-11-01

    Cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in the cerebellum mediate the inhibitory effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on motor coordination. Intracellular effects of CB(1) receptors include inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via activation of G(i/o) proteins. There is evidence for the convergence of other neuronal receptors, such as adenosine A(1) and GABA(B), with the cannabinoid system on this signaling pathway to influence motor function. Previous studies have shown that brain CB(1) receptors are desensitized and down-regulated by long-term THC treatment, but few studies have examined the effects of long-term THC treatment on downstream effector activity in brain. Therefore, these studies examined the relationship between CB(1), adenosine A(1), and GABA(B) receptors in cerebella of mice undergoing prolonged treatment with vehicle or THC at the level of G protein activation and adenylyl cyclase inhibition. In control cerebella, CB(1) receptors produced less than additive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase with GABA(B) and A(1) receptors, indicating that these receptors are localized on overlapping populations of cells. Long-term THC treatment produced CB(1) receptor down-regulation and desensitization of both cannabinoid agonist-stimulated G protein activation and inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase. However, G protein activation by GABA(B) or A(1) receptors was unaffected. It is noteworthy that heterologous attenuation of GABA(B) and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase was observed, even though absolute levels of basal and forskolin- or G(s)-stimulated activity were unchanged. These results indicate that long-term THC administration produces a disruption of inhibitory receptor control of cerebellar adenylyl cyclase and suggest a potential mechanism of cross-tolerance to the motor incoordinating effects of cannabinoid, GABA(B), and A(1) agonists.

  5. Tibolone Rapidly Attenuates the GABAB Response in Hypothalamic Neurones

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kloosterboer, Helenius J.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Tibolone is primarily used for the treatment of climacteric symptoms. Tibolone is rapidly converted into three major metabolites: 3α- and 3β-hydroxy-tibolone (3α- and 3βOH-tibolone), which have oestrogenic effects, and the Δ4-isomer (Δ4-tibolone), which has progestogenic and androgenic effects. Since tibolone is effective in treating climacteric symptoms, the effects on the brain may be explained by the oestrogenic activity of tibolone. Previously using whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found that 17β-oestradiol (E2) rapidly altered GABA neurotransmission in hypothalamic neurones through a membrane oestrogen receptor (mER). E2 reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate G-protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying K+ channels in hypothalamic neurones. Therefore, we hypothesized that tibolone may have some rapid effects through the mER and sought to elucidate the signalling pathway of tibolone’s action using selective inhibitors and whole cell recording in ovariectomized female guinea pigs and mice. A sub-population of neurones was identified post hoc as proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones by immunocytochemical staining. Similar to E2, we have found that tibolone and its active metabolite 3βOH-tibolone rapidly reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate GIRK channels in POMC neurones. The effects were blocked by the ER antagonist ICI 182,780. Other metabolites of tibolone (3αOH-tibolone and Δ4-tibolone) had no effect. Furthermore, tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) was fully efficacious in ERαKO and ERβKO mice to attenuate GABAB responses. The effects of tibolone were blocked by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. However, in contrast to E2, the effects of tibolone were not blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors or protein kinase A inhibitors. It appears that tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) activates phospholipase C leading to PIP2 metabolism and direct alteration of GIRK channel function. Therefore, tibolone

  6. Increased efficiency of the GABAA and GABAB receptor–mediated neurotransmission in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kleschevnikov, Alexander M.; Belichenko, Pavel V.; Gall, Jessica; George, Lizzy; Nosheny, Rachel; Maloney, Michael T.; Salehi, Ahmad; Mobley, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in Down syndrome (DS) involves the hippocampus. In the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and synaptic plasticity were linked to enhanced inhibition. However, the mechanistic basis of changes in inhibitory efficiency remains largely unexplored, and efficiency of the GABAergic synaptic neurotransmission has not yet been investigated in direct electrophysiological experiments. To investigate this important feature of neurobiology of DS, we examined synaptic and molecular properties of the GABAergic system in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adult Ts65Dn mice. Both GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated components of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were significantly increased in Ts65Dn vs. control (2N) DG granule cells. These changes were unaccompanied by alterations in hippocampal levels of GABAA (α1, α2, α3, α5 and γ2) or GABAB (Gbr1a and Gbr1b) receptor subunits. Immunoreactivity for GAD65, a marker for GABAergic terminals, was also unchanged. In contrast, there was a marked change in functional parameters of GABAergic synapses. Paired stimulations showed reduced paired-pulse ratios of both GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated IPSC components (IPSC2/IPSC1), suggesting an increase in presynaptic release of GABA. Consistent with increased gene dose, the level of the Kir3.2 subunit of potassium channels, effectors for postsynaptic GABAB receptors, was increased. This change was associated with enhanced postsynaptic GABAB/Kir3.2 signaling following application of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen. Thus, both GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated synaptic efficiency is increased in the Ts65Dn DG, thus likely contributing to deficient synaptic plasticity and poor learning in DS. PMID:22062771

  7. Receptor distribution studies.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Renzo; Tacconi, Stefano; Mugnaini, Manolo; Gerrard, Philip

    2017-08-10

    Receptor distribution studies have played a key role in the characterization of receptor systems (e.g. GABAB, NMDA (GluNRs), and Neurokinin 1) and in generating hypotheses to exploit these systems as potential therapeutic targets. Distribution studies can provide important information on the potential role of candidate receptors in normal physiology/disease and alert for possible adverse effects of targeting the receptors. Moreover, they can provide valuable information relating to quantitative target engagement (e.g. % receptor occupancy) to drive mechanistic pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) hypotheses for compounds in the Drug Discovery process. Finally, receptor distribution and quantitative target engagement studies can be used to validate truly translational technologies such as PET ligands and pharmacoEEG paradigms to facilitate bridging of the preclinical/clinical interface and thus increase probability of success. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential effects of R-isovaline and the GABAB agonist, baclofen, in the guinea pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Fung, Timothy; Asseri, Khalid A; Asiri, Yahya I; Wall, Richard A; Schwarz, Stephan K W; Puil, Ernest; MacLeod, Bernard A

    2016-11-15

    R-isovaline is a non-proteinogenic amino acid which produces analgesia in a range of nociceptive assays. Mediation of this effect by metabotropic receptors for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, demonstrated by previous work, may depend on the type of tissue or receptor system. The objective of this study was to assess the activity of R-isovaline acting at GABAB and group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in guinea pig ileum, which is known to exhibit well-defined responses to GABAB agonists such as baclofen. The effects of bath-applied R-isovaline and RS-baclofen were examined on electrically evoked contractions of guinea pig ileum and during GABAB antagonism by CGP52432. In separate experiments, the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, LY354740 was applied to determine the functional presence of these receptors. R-isovaline (1-100mM) decreased the amplitude of ileal muscle contractions and increased tension. RS-baclofen reduced contraction amplitude, but decreased tension. CGP52432 did not prevent the effects of R-isovaline on contraction amplitude, but antagonized effects of RS-baclofen on contraction amplitude. The group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, LY354740, produced no detectable effects on evoked contractions. R-isovaline differed significantly from RS-baclofen in its actions in the guinea pig ileum, indicated in particular by the finding that CGP52432 blocked only the effects of RS-baclofen. The ileal tissue did not respond to a group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, previously shown to co-mediate R-isovaline analgesia. These findings raise the possibility of a novel therapeutic target at unknown receptors for R-isovaline-like compounds in the guinea pig ileum.

  9. Nerve Regenerative Effects of GABA-B Ligands in a Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Erica; Pajardi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the peripheral somatosensory system. It may be associated with allodynia and increased pain sensitivity. Few studies correlated neuropathic pain with nerve morphology and myelin proteins expression. Our aim was to test if neuropathic pain is related to nerve degeneration, speculating whether the modulation of peripheral GABA-B receptors may promote nerve regeneration and decrease neuropathic pain. We used the partial sciatic ligation- (PSL-) induced neuropathic model. The biochemical, morphological, and behavioural outcomes of sciatic nerve were analysed following GABA-B ligands treatments. Simultaneous 7-days coadministration of baclofen (10 mg/kg) and CGP56433 (3 mg/kg) alters tactile hypersensitivity. Concomitantly, specific changes of peripheral nerve morphology, nerve structure, and myelin proteins (P0 and PMP22) expression were observed. Nerve macrophage recruitment decreased and step coordination was improved. The PSL-induced changes in nociception correlate with altered nerve morphology and myelin protein expression. Peripheral synergic effects, via GABA-B receptor activation, promote nerve regeneration and likely ameliorate neuropathic pain. PMID:25165701

  10. Differential effects of phosphonic analogues of GABA on GABA(B) autoreceptors in rat neocortical slices.

    PubMed

    Ong, J; Marino, V; Parker, D A; Kerr, D I

    1998-04-01

    The effects of five phosphonic derivatives of GABA on the release of [3H]-GABA from rat neocortical slices, preloaded with [3H]-GABA, were investigated. Phaclofen and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid (4-ABPA) increased the overflow of [3H] evoked by electrical stimulation (2 Hz) in a concentration-dependent manner, with similar potencies (phaclofen EC50=0.3 mmol/l, 4-ABPA EC50=0.4 mmol/l). At 3 mmol/l, phaclofen increased the release of [3H]-GABA by 82.6+/-8.6%, and 4-ABPA increased the release by 81.3+/-9.0%. 2-Amino-ethylphosphonic acid (2-AEPA) increased the overflow of [3H] by 46.8+/-10.9% at the highest concentration tested (3 mmol/l). In contrast, the lower phosphonic homologue 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid (3-APPA), and 2-amino-2-(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylphosphonic acid (2-CPEPA), a baclofen analogue, did not modify the stimulated overflow. These results suggest that phaclofen, 4-ABPA and 2-AEPA are antagonists at GABA(B) autoreceptors, the latter being the weakest antagonist, whilst neither 3-APPA nor 2-CPEPA are active at these receptors. Since phaclofen, 4-ABPA and 2-CPEPA are antagonists and 3-APPA a partial agonist/antagonist on GABA(B) heteroreceptors, the lack of effect of 3-APPA and 2-CPEPA on [3H]-GABA release in this study suggests that GABA(B) autoreceptors may be pharmacologically distinct from the heteroreceptors.

  11. The GABAB Positive Allosteric Modulator, ADX71441 Attenuates Alcohol Self-Administration and Relapse to Alcohol Seeking in Rats.

    PubMed

    Augier, Eric; Dulman, Russell S; Damadzic, Ruslan; Pilling, Andrew; Hamilton, J Paul; Heilig, Markus

    2017-03-15

    GABAergic signaling is involved in modulating the reinforcing properties of alcohol, and GABAB receptors have been proposed as a potential target for clinical treatment of alcoholism. The orthosteric GABAB receptor agonist baclofen has been shown to suppress operant self-administration of alcohol in animals and alcohol use in alcohol dependent patients, but its utility is limited by a narrow therapeutic index. We tested the effects of ADX71441, a novel GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator on alcohol-related behaviors in rats. We first assessed the effects of ADX71441 (1, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, I.P.) on both non-dependent and dependent male Wistar rats trained to self-administer 20% alcohol. We then determined the effects of ADX71441 on stress-induced as well as cue-induced relapse-like behavior. Finally, we sought to identify the brain regions through which ADX71441 may act to prevent relapse-like behavior by mapping the neuronal activation induced by stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. ADX71441 dose-dependently decreased alcohol self-administration of both dependent and non-dependent animals, but its potency was higher in alcohol-dependent rats. Furthermore, both cue- and stress-induced alcohol seeking were blocked by the GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator. Finally, pretreatment with 3 mg/kg of ADX71441 before stress-induced reinstatement significantly decreased c-Fos expression in a network of brain regions implicated in stress induced relapse, comprising the nucleus accumbens shell, the dorsal raphe nucleus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Our findings support a causal role of GABAB receptors in alcohol reinforcement and relapse to alcohol seeking. These effects are observed in the absence of significant sedative side effects. Jointly, these observations indicate that GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulators merit being tested clinically for the treatment of alcoholism. Our data also point to

  12. Adenosine A2A receptors play a role in the pathogenesis of hepatic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edwin S L; Montesinos, Maria Carmen; Fernandez, Patricia; Desai, Avani; Delano, David L; Yee, Herman; Reiss, Allison B; Pillinger, Michael H; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Friedman, Scott L; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine is a potent endogenous regulator of inflammation and tissue repair. Adenosine, which is released from injured and hypoxic tissue or in response to toxins and medications, may induce pulmonary fibrosis in mice, presumably via interaction with a specific adenosine receptor. We therefore determined whether adenosine and its receptors contribute to the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. As in other tissues and cell types, adenosine is released in vitro in response to the fibrogenic stimuli ethanol (40 mg dl−1) and methotrexate (100 nM). Adenosine A2A receptors are expressed on rat and human hepatic stellate cell lines and adenosine A2A receptor occupancy promotes collagen production by these cells. Liver sections from mice treated with the hepatotoxins carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) (0.05 ml in oil, 50 : 50 v : v, subcutaneously) and thioacetamide (100 mg kg−1 in PBS, intraperitoneally) released more adenosine than those from untreated mice when cultured ex vivo. Adenosine A2A receptor-deficient, but not wild-type or A3 receptor-deficient, mice are protected from development of hepatic fibrosis following CCl4 or thioacetamide exposure. Similarly, caffeine (50 mg kg−1 day−1, po), a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, and ZM241385 (25 mg kg−1 bid), a more selective antagonist of the adenosine A2A receptor, diminished hepatic fibrosis in wild-type mice exposed to either CCl4 or thioacetamide. These results demonstrate that hepatic adenosine A2A receptors play an active role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis, and suggest a novel therapeutic target in the treatment and prevention of hepatic cirrhosis. PMID:16783407

  13. Analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptor function in the in vitro and in vivo regulation of alpha-melanotropin-stimulating hormone secretion from melanotrope cells of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    De Koning, H P; Jenks, B G; Roubos, E W

    1993-02-01

    The activity of many endocrine cells is regulated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The effects of GABA are mediated by GABAA and/or GABAB receptors. While GABAB receptors in the central nervous system have now been extensively characterized, little is known of the function and pharmacology of GABAB receptors on endocrine cells. In the amphibian Xenopus laevis, GABA inhibits the release of alpha MSH from the endocrine melanotrope cells through both GABAA and GABAB receptors. We have investigated the following aspects of the GABAB receptor of the melanotrope cells of X. laevis: 1) the pharmacology of this receptor, using antagonists previously established to demonstrate GABAB receptors in the mammalian central nervous system; 2) the relative contribution to the regulation of hormone secretion by the GABAA and GABAB receptors on melanotrope cells in vitro; and 3) the role of the GABAB receptor with respect to the physiological function of the melanotrope cell in vivo, i.e. regulation of pigment dispersion in skin melanophores in relation to background color. Our results demonstrate that phaclofen, 2-hydroxysaclofen, and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid dose-dependently blocked the inhibition of alpha MSH release by GABAB receptor activation, but not by GABAA receptor activation. The GABAB receptor antagonist delta-aminovaleric acid appeared to be a selective agonist on the GABAB receptor of melanotrope cells. The inhibitory secretory response to a low dose of GABA (10(-5) M) was not affected by bicuculline, but was significantly reduced by phaclofen, indicating that at a low GABA concentration, the GABAB receptor mechanism would dominate in inhibiting the melanotrope cells. Different thresholds of activation may form the basis for differential action of GABA through both GABA receptor types. The tonic inhibition of alpha MSH release in animals adapted to a white background was not affected by 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid, indicating that the GABAB receptor is not (solely

  14. Epigenetic regulation of dorsal raphe GABA(B1a) associated with isolation-induced abnormal responses to social stimulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Araki, Ryota; Hiraki, Yosuke; Nishida, Shoji; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Kinzo; Yabe, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    In isolation-reared mice, social encounter stimulation induces locomotor hyperactivity and activation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), suggesting that dysregulation of dorsal raphe function may be involved in abnormal behaviors. In this study, we examined the involvement of dorsal raphe GABAergic dysregulation in the abnormal behaviors of isolation-reared mice. We also studied an epigenetic mechanism underlying abnormalities of the dorsal raphe GABAergic system. Both mRNA and protein levels of GABA(B1a), a GABA(B) receptor subunit, were increased in the DRN of isolation-reared mice, compared with these levels in group-reared mice. In contrast, mRNA levels for other GABAergic system-related genes (GABA(A) receptor α1, β2 and γ2 subunits, GABA(B) receptor 1b and 2 subunits, and glutamate decarboxylase 67 and 65) were unchanged. Intra-DRN microinjection of 0.06 nmol baclofen (a GABA(B) receptor agonist) exacerbated encounter-induced hyperactivity and aggressive behavior, while microinjection of 0.3 nmol phaclofen (a GABA(B) receptor antagonist) attenuated encounter-induced hyperactivity and aggressive behavior in isolation-reared mice. Furthermore, microinjection of 0.06 nmol baclofen elicited encounter-induced hyperactivity in group-reared mice. Neither baclofen nor phaclofen affected immobility time in the forced swim test and hyperactivity in a novel environment of isolation reared mice. Bisulfite sequence analyses revealed that the DNA methylation level of the CpG island around the transcription start site (TSS) of GABA(B1a) was decreased in the DRN of isolation-reared mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that histone H3 was hyperacetylated around the TSS of GABA(B1a) in the DRN of isolation-reared mice. These findings indicate that an increase in dorsal raphe GABA(B1a) expression via epigenetic regulation is associated with abnormal responses to social stimulation such as encounter-induced hyperactivity and aggressive behavior in isolation

  15. Interacting Cannabinoid and Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Core Control Adolescent Social Play

    PubMed Central

    Manduca, Antonia; Lassalle, Olivier; Sepers, Marja; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Kieffer, Brigitte; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J; Trezza, Viviana; Manzoni, Olivier J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Social play behavior is a highly rewarding, developmentally important form of social interaction in young mammals. However, its neurobiological underpinnings remain incompletely understood. Previous work has suggested that opioid and endocannabinoid neurotransmission interact in the modulation of social play. Therefore, we combined behavioral, pharmacological, electrophysiological, and genetic approaches to elucidate the role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in social play, and how cannabinoid and opioid neurotransmission interact to control social behavior in adolescent rodents. Systemic administration of the 2-AG hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 or the opioid receptor agonist morphine increased social play behavior in adolescent rats. These effects were blocked by systemic pretreatment with either CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) or mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists. The social play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine or JZL184 treatment were also prevented by direct infusion of the CB1R antagonist SR141716 and the MOR antagonist naloxone into the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC). Searching for synaptic correlates of these effects in adolescent NAcC excitatory synapses, we observed that CB1R antagonism blocked the effect of the MOR agonist DAMGO and, conversely, that naloxone reduced the effect of a cannabinoid agonist. These results were recapitulated in mice, and completely abolished in CB1R and MOR knockout mice, suggesting that the functional interaction between CB1R and MOR in the NAcC in the modulation of social behavior is widespread in rodents. The data shed new light on the mechanism by which endocannabinoid lipids and opioid peptides interact to orchestrate rodent socioemotional behaviors. PMID:27899885

  16. Interacting Cannabinoid and Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Core Control Adolescent Social Play.

    PubMed

    Manduca, Antonia; Lassalle, Olivier; Sepers, Marja; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Kieffer, Brigitte; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Trezza, Viviana; Manzoni, Olivier J J

    2016-01-01

    Social play behavior is a highly rewarding, developmentally important form of social interaction in young mammals. However, its neurobiological underpinnings remain incompletely understood. Previous work has suggested that opioid and endocannabinoid neurotransmission interact in the modulation of social play. Therefore, we combined behavioral, pharmacological, electrophysiological, and genetic approaches to elucidate the role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in social play, and how cannabinoid and opioid neurotransmission interact to control social behavior in adolescent rodents. Systemic administration of the 2-AG hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 or the opioid receptor agonist morphine increased social play behavior in adolescent rats. These effects were blocked by systemic pretreatment with either CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) or mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists. The social play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine or JZL184 treatment were also prevented by direct infusion of the CB1R antagonist SR141716 and the MOR antagonist naloxone into the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC). Searching for synaptic correlates of these effects in adolescent NAcC excitatory synapses, we observed that CB1R antagonism blocked the effect of the MOR agonist DAMGO and, conversely, that naloxone reduced the effect of a cannabinoid agonist. These results were recapitulated in mice, and completely abolished in CB1R and MOR knockout mice, suggesting that the functional interaction between CB1R and MOR in the NAcC in the modulation of social behavior is widespread in rodents. The data shed new light on the mechanism by which endocannabinoid lipids and opioid peptides interact to orchestrate rodent socioemotional behaviors.

  17. Anticonvulsant effects of structurally diverse GABA(B) positive allosteric modulators in the DBA/2J audiogenic seizure test: Comparison to baclofen and utility as a pharmacodynamic screening model.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jordan W; Moeller, Achim; Schmidt, Martin; Turner, Sean C; Nimmrich, Volker; Ma, Junli; Rueter, Lynne E; van der Kam, Elizabeth; Zhang, Min

    2016-02-01

    The GABA(B) receptor has been indicated as a promising target for multiple CNS-related disorders. Baclofen, a prototypical orthosteric agonist, is used clinically for the treatment of spastic movement disorders, but is associated with unwanted side-effects, such as sedation and motor impairment. Positive allosteric modulators (PAM), which bind to a topographically-distinct site apart from the orthosteric binding pocket, may provide an improved side-effect profile while maintaining baclofen-like efficacy. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS, plays an important role in the etiology and treatment of seizure disorders. Baclofen is known to produce anticonvulsant effects in the DBA/2J mouse audiogenic seizure test (AGS), suggesting it may be a suitable assay for assessing pharmacodynamic effects. Little is known about the effects of GABA(B) PAMs, however. The studies presented here sought to investigate the AGS test as a pharmacodynamic (PD) screening model for GABA(B) PAMs by comparing the profile of structurally diverse PAMs to baclofen. GS39783, rac-BHFF, CMPPE, A-1295120 (N-(3-(4-(4-chloro-3-fluorobenzyl)-6-methoxy-3,5-dioxo-4,5-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-2(3H)-yl)phenyl)acetamide), and A-1474713 (N-(3-(4-(4-chlorobenzyl)-3,5-dioxo-4,5-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-2(3H)-yl)phenyl)acetamide) all produced robust, dose-dependent anticonvulsant effects; a similar profile was observed with baclofen. Pre-treatment with the GABA(B) antagonist SCH50911 completely blocked the anticonvulsant effects of baclofen and CMPPE in the AGS test, indicating such effects are likely mediated by the GABA(B) receptor. In addition to the standard anticonvulsant endpoint of the AGS test, video tracking software was employed to assess potential drug-induced motor side-effects during the acclimation period of the test. This analysis was sensitive to detecting drug-induced changes in total distance traveled, which was used to establish a therapeutic index (TI = hypoactivity

  18. Release-regulating autoreceptors of the GABAB-type in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, G.; Cavazzani, P.; Andrioli, G. C.; Asaro, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Raiteri, M.

    1989-01-01

    1. The depolarization-evoked release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its modulation mediated by autoreceptors were investigated in superfused synaptosomes prepared from fresh human cerebral cortex. 2. The release of [3H]-GABA provoked by 15 mM K+ from human cortex nerve endings was almost totally (85%) calcium-dependent. 3. In the presence of the GABA uptake inhibitor SK&F 89976A (N-(4,4-diphenyl-3-butenyl)-nipecotic acid), added to prevent carrier-mediated homoexchange, GABA (1-10 microM) decreased in a concentration-dependent manner the K+-evoked release of [3H]-GABA. The effect of GABA was mimicked by the GABAB receptor agonist (-)-baclofen (1-100 microM) but not by the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (1-100 microM). Moreover, the GABA-induced inhibition of [3H]-GABA release was not affected by two GABAA receptor antagonists, bicuculline or SR 95531 (2-(3'-carbethoxy-2'-propenyl)-3-amino-6-paramethoxy-phenyl-pyr idazinium bromide). 4. (-)-Baclofen also inhibited the depolarization-evoked release of endogenous GABA from human cortical synaptosomes. 5. It is concluded that GABA autoreceptors regulating the release of both newly taken up and endogenous GABA are present in human brain and appear to belong to the GABAB subtype. PMID:2538189

  19. Acute kidney injury: what part do toll-like receptors play?

    PubMed Central

    Vallés, Patricia G; Lorenzo, Andrea Gil; Bocanegra, Victoria; Vallés, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system plays an important role as a first response to tissue injury. This first response is carried out via germline-encoded receptors. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the first identified and best studied family of pattern recognition receptors. TLRs are expressed on a variety of cell types, including epithelial cells, endothelia, dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B- and T-cells. TLRs initiate innate immune responses and concurrently shape the subsequent adaptive immune response. They are sensors of both pathogens, through the exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and tissue injury, through the endogenous danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). TLR signaling is critical in defending against invading microorganisms; however, sustained receptor activation is also implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Ischemic kidney injury involves early TLR-driven immunopathology, and the resolution of inflammation is needed for rapid regeneration of injured tubule cells. Notably, the activation of TLRs also has been implicated in epithelial repair. This review focuses on the role of TLRs and their endogenous ligands within the inflammatory response of acute kidney injury. PMID:24971030

  20. Repulsive axon guidance: Abelson and Enabled play opposing roles downstream of the roundabout receptor.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, G J; Kidd, T; Murray, D; Pawson, T; Goodman, C S

    2000-06-23

    Drosophila Roundabout (Robo) is the founding member of a conserved family of repulsive axon guidance receptors that respond to secreted Slit proteins. Little is known about the signaling mechanisms which function downstream of Robo to mediate repulsion. Here, we present genetic and biochemical evidence that the Abelson (Abl) tyrosine kinase and its substrate Enabled (Ena) play direct and opposing roles in Robo signal transduction. Genetic interactions support a model in which Abl functions to antagonize Robo signaling, while Ena is required in part for Robo's repulsive output. Both Abl and Ena can directly bind to Robo's cytoplasmic domain. A mutant form of Robo that interferes with Ena binding is partially impaired in Robo function, while a mutation in a conserved cytoplasmic tyrosine that can be phosphorylated by Abl generates a hyperactive Robo receptor.

  1. The GABA-B positive modulator GS39783 decreases psychostimulant conditioned-reinforcement and conditioned-reward.

    PubMed

    Halbout, Briac; Quarta, Davide; Valerio, Enzo; Heidbreder, Christian A; Hutcheson, Daniel M

    2011-07-01

    Baclofen, a γ-amino-butyric-acid (GABA)(B) receptor agonist, can reduce cue-enhanced cocaine-seeking in rats and attenuate cue-evoked craving in cocaine addicts. However, baclofen also has sedative effects that might interfere with its efficacy in reducing cocaine's rewarding effects. The present study aimed at comparing the effects of baclofen with the GABA(B) -receptor positive allosteric modulator GS39783 on psychostimulant conditioned cues. Two identically trained groups of male Lister-Hooded rats were baselined on a new responding for a light stimulus previously paired with cocaine self-administration. One group was treated with the GABA(B) -receptor positive allosteric modulator GS39783 (0, 10, 30, 100 mg/kg, i.p.), the other with baclofen (0, 0.6, 1.25, 1.9, 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). In another series of experiments, male Wistar rats received GS39783 (0, 10, 30, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) or baclofen (1.25 mg/kg) prior to the expression of a conditioned place preference (CPP) to amphetamine (2 mg/kg i.p.). Both GS39783 (30 and 100 mg/kg) and baclofen (2.5 mg/kg) significantly decreased responding for the cocaine cue; however, only GS39783 (30 mg/kg) reduced lever pressing responding without interfering with locomotor activity. Both GS39783 (30 and 100 mg/kg) and baclofen (1.25 mg/kg), significantly blocked the expression of amphetamine CPP without affecting locomotor activity. These findings suggest that GABA(B) positive allosteric modulators can modulate discrete and contextual psychostimulant conditioned stimuli in a manner dissociable from unwanted sedative effects and may offer a novel therapeutic approach to treat cravings and relapse to drug-taking triggered by stimuli associated with psychostimulant use.

  2. The TGFβ type II receptor plays a critical role in the endothelial cells during cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Robson, Andrew; Allinson, Kathleen R; Anderson, Robert H; Henderson, Deborah J; Arthur, Helen M

    2010-09-01

    TGFβ signalling is required for normal cardiac development. To investigate which cell types are involved, we used mice carrying a floxed Type II TGFβ receptor (Tgfbr2fl) allele and Cre-lox genetics to deplete this receptor in different regions of the heart. The three target tissues and corresponding Cre transgenic lines were atrioventricular myocardium (using cGata6-Cre), ventricular myocardium (using Mlc2v-Cre), and vascular endothelium (using tamoxifen-activated Cdh5(PAC)-CreERT2). Spatio-temporal Cre activity in each case was tracked via lacZ activation from the Rosa26R locus. Atrioventricular-myocardial-specific Tgfbr2 knockout (KO) embryos had short septal leaflets of the tricuspid valve, whereas ventricular myocardial-specific KO embryos mainly exhibited a normal cardiac phenotype. Inactivation of Tgfbr2 in endothelial cells from E11.5 resulted in deficient ventricular septation, accompanied by haemorrhage from cerebral blood vessels. We conclude that TGFβ signalling through the Tgfbr2 receptor, in endothelial cells, plays an important role in cardiac development, and is essential for cerebral vascular integrity.

  3. The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α5 Subunit Plays a Key Role in Attention Circuitry and Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Craig D. C.; De Biasi, Mariella; Fletcher, Paul J.; Lambe, Evelyn K.

    2010-01-01

    Stimulation of the prefrontal cortex by acetylcholine is critical for attention; however, the cellular mechanisms underlying its influence on attention pathways within the brain are not well understood. Pyramidal neurons in layer VI of the prefrontal cortex are believed to play an important role in this process because they are excited by acetylcholine and provide a major source of feedback projections to the thalamus. Here, we show using whole-cell electrophysiology that the relatively rare α5 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor powerfully enhances nicotinic currents in layer VI pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical brain slices from adult mice. In addition, behavioral experiments using the five-choice serial reaction time test show that the presence of the nicotinic receptor α5 subunit also increases the accuracy of adult mice on this visual attention task under highly demanding conditions. Together, these findings demonstrate a novel and important role for the nicotinic receptor α5 subunit in adult brain circuitry required for attentional performance. PMID:20610759

  4. GABAA receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus of mice: escalation of aggression after alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Kwa, Carolyn; DeBold, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN), the origin for serotonin (5-HT) in forebrain areas, has been implicated in the neural control of escalated aggression. Gamma aminobutyric acid type-A (GABAA) and type-B (GABAB) receptors are expressed in the DRN and modulate 5-HT neuronal activity, and both play a role in the behavioral effect of alcohol. Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the interaction between drugs acting on GABA receptors in the DRN and alcohol in their effects on aggressive behaviors. Method Male CFW mice, housed with a female, were trained to self-administer ethanol (1.0 g/kg) or water via an operant conditioning panel in their home cage. Immediately after they drank either ethanol or water, the animals were microinfused with a GABAergic drug into the DRN, and their aggressive behaviors were assessed 10 min later. Muscimol (0.006 nmol), a GABAA receptor agonist, escalated alcohol-heightened aggression but had no effect in the absence of ethanol. This effect of muscimol was prominent in the animals that showed alcohol-heightened aggression, but not the animals that reduced or did not change aggressive behavior after ethanol infusion compared to water. On the other hand, the GABAB agonist baclofen (0.06 nmol) increased aggressive behavior similarly in both water and ethanol conditions. Antagonists of the GABAA and GABAB receptors, bicuculline (0.006 nmol) and phaclofen (0.3 nmol) respectively, did not suppress heightened-aggressive behavior induced by ethanol self-administration. Conclusion GABAA receptors in the DRN are one of the neurobiological targets of alcohol-heightened aggression. Activation of the GABAB receptors in the DRN also produced escalated aggression, but that is independent of the effect of alcohol. PMID:20589493

  5. Prejunctional GABA-B inhibition of cholinergic, neurally-mediated airway contractions in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Chapman, R W; Danko, G; Rizzo, C; Egan, R W; Mauser, P J; Kreutner, W

    1991-01-01

    GABA is a known inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Recent studies have also demonstrated the presence of GABA in peripheral tissue, including lung. To delineate a role for GABA in lung, the effect of GABA and selective GABA agonists and antagonists on neuronally-induced airway contractions in guinea pigs were studied. In vitro, tracheal contractions induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were inhibited by tetrodotoxin and atropine indicating that the contractions were mediated by neuronal release of acetylcholine. The contractions caused by EFS, but not those by exogenous acetylcholine, were inhibited by GABA (EC50 = 4.5 microM) and the selective GABA-B agonist baclofen (EC50 = 9 microM), but not by the GABA-A agonist, muscimol. The inhibitory effect of baclofen was not affected by the GABA-A antagonist, bicuculline, but was significantly reversed with the GABA-B antagonists, 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid (3-APPA) (pA2 = 4.5) and 2-hydroxysaclofen (pA2 = 4.1). In vivo, vagal nerve stimulation (5 V, 20 Hz, 0.5 ms, 5 s) in anesthetized, mechanically ventilated guinea-pigs caused cholinergic-dependent bronchospasms that were inhibited by intravenous GABA (3 and 10 mg/kg) and baclofen (1-10 mg/kg), but not by muscimol. The inhibitory effects of GABA and baclofen against vagal bronchospasm were blocked by 3-APPA (5 mg/kg, i.v.), but not by bicuculline. Responses to the GABA-B agonists were unaltered after the treatment of animals with phentolamine or propranolol to block alpha-adrenergic and beta-adrenergic receptors, respectively. Bronchospasm due to intravenous methacholine was also unchanged by GABA and baclofen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Spinal nerve ligation decreases γ-aminobutyric acidB receptors on specific populations of immunohistochemically identified neurons in L5 dorsal root ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed

    Engle, Mitchell P; Merrill, Michelle A; Marquez De Prado, Blanca; Hammond, Donna L

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the distribution of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(B) receptors on immunohistochemically identified neurons, and levels of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) mRNA, in the L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of the rat in the absence of injury and 2 weeks after L5 spinal nerve ligation. In uninjured DRG, GABA(B(1)) immunoreactivity colocalized exclusively with the neuronal marker (NeuN) and did not colocalize with the satellite cell marker S-100. The GABA(B(1)) subunit colocalized to >97% of DRG neurons immunoreactive (IR) for neurofilament 200 (N52) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), or labeled by isolectin B4 (IB4). Immunoreactivity for GABA(B(2)) was not detectable. L5 spinal nerve ligation did not alter the number of GABA(B(1)) -IR neurons or its colocalization pattern in the L4 DRG. However, ligation reduced the number of GABA(B(1)) -IR neurons in the L5 DRG by ≈38% compared with sham-operated and naïve rats. Specifically, ligation decreased the number of CGRP-IR neurons in the L5 DRG by 75%, but did not decrease the percent colocalization of GABA(B(1)) in those that remained. In the few IB4-positive neurons that remained in the L5 DRG, colocalization of GABA(B(1)) -IR decreased to 75%. Ligation also decreased levels of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) mRNA in the L5, but not the L4 DRG compared with sham-operated or naïve rats. These findings indicate that the GABA(B) receptor is positioned to presynaptically modulate afferent transmission by myelinated, unmyelinated, and peptidergic afferents in the dorsal horn. Loss of GABA(B) receptors on primary afferent neurons may contribute to the development of mechanical allodynia after L5 spinal nerve ligation.

  7. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor but not nicotinic acetylcholine receptor plays a role in morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinling; Tian, Lin; Cui, Ruisi; Ruan, Heng; Li, Xinwang

    2017-09-01

    Background and Aim The cholinergic system can affect drug reward. The present study aimed to examine the roles of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. To analyze the roles of mAChR and nAChR in behavioral sensitization induced by morphine (5mg/kg), seven experiments were designed. Experiments 1 and 2 examined the effects of 3, 1, and 0.3 mg/kg scopolamine and 0.2, 0.1, and 0.05mg/kg scopolamine, respectively, on the locomotor activity when administered alone. Experiments 3 and 4 explored the effect of scopolamine on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. Experiment 5 studied the effect of mecamylamine on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. Experiments 6 and 7 investigated the effects of scopolamine+huperzine A and mecamylamine+huperzine A, respectively, on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. The results revealed that 3mg/kg scopolamine, which significantly enhanced locomotor activity when administered alone, inhibited the acquisition of morphine-induced sensitization. However, mecamylamine (0.5, 1, 2mg/kg) did not have these effects. The co-administration of scopolamine (0.05 mg/kg)+huperzine A (0.4mg/kg) or mecamylamine (1mg/kg)+huperzine A (0.4mg/kg) did not affect the acquisition of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. Scopolamine (0.05mg/kg) which did not affect the locomotor activity when administered alone, but not mecamylamine (1mg/kg), reversed the acute attenuation effect of huperzine A (0.4mg/kg) on morphine-induced locomotor activity at the acquisition stage and reversed the inhibition of huperzine A on the expression of morphine-induced sensitization. The mAChR might play a more important role in morphine-induced locomotor activity and the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. The mechanisms of mAChR and nAChR were relatively separate in morphine-induced sensitization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Hepatic Glucocorticoid Receptor Plays a Greater Role Than Adipose GR in Metabolic Syndrome Despite Renal Compensation.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sandip K; Hutson, Irina; Harris, Charles A

    2016-12-01

    Exogenous glucocorticoid administration results in hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hepatic dyslipidemia, and hypertension, a constellation of findings known as Cushing's syndrome. These effects are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Because GR activation in liver and adipose has been implicated in metabolic syndrome (MS), we wanted to determine the role of GR in these tissues in the development of MS. Because GR knockout (KO) mice (whole-body KO) exhibit perinatal lethality due to respiratory failure, we generated tissue-specific (liver or adipose) GRKO mice using cre-lox technology. Real-time PCR analysis of liver mRNA from dexamethasone-treated wildtype (WT) and liver GRKO mice indicated that hepatic GR regulates the expression of key genes involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism. Interestingly, we have observed that liver-specific deletion of GR resulted in a significant increase in mRNA expression of key genes involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in kidney tissue, indicating a compensatory mechanism to maintain glucose homeostasis. We have also observed that GR plays an important role in regulating the mRNA expression of key genes involved in lipid metabolism. Liver GRKO mice demonstrated decreased fat mass and liver glycogen content compared with WT mice administered dexamethasone for 2 weeks. Adipose-specific deletion of GR did not alter glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity of adipose GRKO mice compared with WT mice administrated dexamethasone. This indicates that liver GR might be more important in development of MS in dexamethasone-treated mice, whereas adipose GR plays a little role in these paradigms.

  9. Unbalanced upregulation of ryanodine receptor 2 plays a particular role in early development of daunorubicin cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kucerova, Dana; Doka, Gabriel; Kruzliak, Peter; Turcekova, Katarina; Kmecova, Jana; Brnoliakova, Zuzana; Kyselovic, Jan; Kirchhefer, Uwe; Müller, Frank U; Krenek, Peter; Boknik, Peter; Klimas, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Calcium release channel on the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes (ryanodine receptor type 2, RyR2) plays a critical role in the regulation of calcium and was identified as a crucial factor for development of chronic anthracycline cardiomyopathy. Its early stages are less well described although these determine the later development. Hence, we tested the effect of repeated, short-term anthracycline (daunorubicin) administration on cardiac performance, cardiomyocyte function and accompanied changes in calcium regulating proteins expression. Ten-twelve weeks old male Wistar rats were administered with 6 doses of daunorubicin (DAU, 3 mg/kg, i.p., every 48 h), controls (CON) received vehicle. Left ventricular function (left ventricular pressure, LVP; rate of pressure development, +dP/dt and decline, -dP/dt) was measured using left ventricular catheterization under tribromethanol anaesthesia (15 ml/kg b.w.). Cell shortening was measured in enzymatically isolated cardiomyocytes. The expressions of RyR2 and associated intracellular calcium regulating proteins, cytoskeletal proteins (alpha-actinin, alpha-tubul in) as well as oxidative stress regulating enzymes (gp91phox, MnSOD) were detected in ventricular tissue samples using immunoblotting. mRNA expressions of cardiac damage markers (Nppa and Nppb, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides; Myh6, Myh7 and Myh7b, myosin heavy chain alpha and beta) were detected using RT-PCR. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentration was measured to estimate oxidative stress. DAU rats exhibited significantly depressed left ventricular features (LVP by 14%, +dP/dt by 36% and -dP/dt by 30%; for all P<0.05), in line with concomitant increase in Nppa and Nppb gene expressions (3.23- and 2.18-fold, for both P<0.05), and a 4.34-fold increase in Myh7 (P<0.05). Controversially, we observed increased cell shortening of isolated cardiac cells by 31% (p<0.05). DAU administration was associated with a twofold upregulation of RyR2 (P<0

  10. BACE2 plays a role in the insulin receptor trafficking in pancreatic ß-cells.

    PubMed

    Casas, Silvia; Casini, Paola; Piquer, Sandra; Altirriba, Jordi; Soty, Maud; Cadavez, Lisa; Gomis, Ramon; Novials, Anna

    2010-12-01

    BACE1 (β-site amyloidogenic cleavage of precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1) is a β-secretase protein that plays a central role in the production of the β-amyloid peptide in the brain and is thought to be involved in the Alzheimer's pathogenesis. In type 2 diabetes, amyloid deposition within the pancreatic islets is a pathophysiological hallmark, making crucial the study in the pancreas of BACE1 and its homologous BACE2 to understand the pathological mechanisms of this disease. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the localization of BACE proteins in human pancreas and determine their function. High levels of BACE enzymatic activity were detected in human pancreas. In normal human pancreas, BACE1 was observed in endocrine as well as in exocrine pancreas, whereas BACE2 expression was restricted to β-cells. Intracellular analysis using immunofluorescence showed colocalization of BACE1 with insulin and BACE2 with clathrin-coated vesicles of the plasma membrane in MIN6 cells. When BACE1 and -2 were pharmacologically inhibited, BACE1 localization was not altered, whereas BACE2 content in clathrin-coated vesicles was increased. Insulin internalization rate was reduced, insulin receptor β-subunit (IRβ) expression was decreased at the plasma membrane and increased in the Golgi apparatus, and a significant reduction in insulin gene expression was detected. Similar results were obtained after specific BACE2 silencing in MIN6 cells. All these data point to a role for BACE2 in the IRβ trafficking and insulin signaling. In conclusion, BACE2 is hereby presented as an important enzyme in β-cell function.

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays an anabolic role in bone metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianrong; Tamasi, Joseph; Lu, Xin; Zhu, Ji; Chen, Haiyan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Lee, Tang-Cheng; Threadgill, David W; Kream, Barbara E; Kang, Yibin; Partridge, Nicola C; Qin, Ling

    2011-05-01

    While the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling pathway has been shown to have vital roles in many developmental and pathologic processes, its functions in the development and homeostasis of the skeletal system has been poorly defined. To address its in vivo role, we constructed transgenic and pharmacologic mouse models and used peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), micro-computed tomography (µCT) and histomorphometry to analyze their trabecular and cortical bone phenotypes. We initially deleted the EGFR in preosteoblasts/osteoblasts using a Cre/loxP system (Col-Cre Egfr(f/f)), but no bone phenotype was observed because of incomplete deletion of the Egfr genomic locus. To further reduce the remaining osteoblastic EGFR activity, we introduced an EGFR dominant-negative allele, Wa5, and generated Col-Cre Egfr(Wa5/f) mice. At 3 and 7 months of age, both male and female mice exhibited a remarkable decrease in tibial trabecular bone mass with abnormalities in trabecular number and thickness. Histologic analyses revealed decreases in osteoblast number and mineralization activity and an increase in osteoclast number. Significant increases in trabecular pattern factor and structural model index indicate that trabecular microarchitecture was altered. The femurs of these mice were shorter and smaller with reduced cortical area and periosteal perimeter. Moreover, colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay indicates that these mice had fewer bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and committed progenitors. Similarly, administration of an EGFR inhibitor into wild-type mice caused a significant reduction in trabecular bone volume. In contrast, Egfr(Dsk5/+) mice with a constitutively active EGFR allele displayed increases in trabecular and cortical bone content. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the EGFR signaling pathway is an important bone regulator and that it primarily plays an anabolic role in bone metabolism. Copyright © 2011

  12. What role does modulation of the ryanodine receptor play in cardiac inotropy and arrhythmogenesis?

    PubMed

    Eisner, D A; Kashimura, T; O'Neill, S C; Venetucci, L A; Trafford, A W

    2009-04-01

    In this article we review the role of the Ryanodine Receptor (RyR) in cardiac inotropy and arrhythmogenesis. Most of the calcium that activates cardiac contraction comes from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) from where it is released through the RyR. The amplitude of the systolic Ca transient depends steeply on the SR Ca content and it is therefore important that SR content be regulated. This regulation occurs via changes of SR Ca content affecting systolic Ca and thence sarcolemmal Ca fluxes. In the steady state, the cardiac myocyte must be in Ca flux balance on each beat and this has implications for understanding even simple inotropic manoeuvres. The main part of the review considers the effects of modulating the RyR on systolic Ca. Potentiation of RyR opening produces an increase of the amplitude of the Ca transient but this effect disappears within a few beats because the increased sarcolemmal efflux of Ca decreases SR Ca content. We conclude that it is therefore unlikely that potentiation of the RyR by phosphorylation plays a dominant role in the actions of positive inotropic agents such as beta-adrenergic stimulation. Some cardiac arrhythmias result from release of Ca from the SR in the form of waves. This is best known to occur when the SR is overloaded with calcium. Mutations in the RyR also produce cardiac arrhythmias attributed to Ca waves due to leaky RyRs and a similar leak has been suggested to contribute to arrhythmias in heart failure. We show that, due to compensatory changes of SR Ca content, simply making the RyR leaky does not produce Ca waves in the steady state and that SR Ca content is critical in determining whether Ca waves occur.

  13. Does mineralocorticoid receptor play a vital role in the development of depressive disorder?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiao; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Shuai; Zuo, Wei; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide. However, the biological and molecular mechanisms underlying this disease remain unclear. Stress, a disposing factor in the development of depression, leads to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation and glucocorticoids release. Glucocorticoids at physiological concentrations activate two types of steroid receptors including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). During the past decades, lots of studies have confirmed the role of GR in depression. An increasing number of studies, in recent years, indicate that abnormal function of MR is also a crucial component of the pathophysiology of depression. Thus, this review summarizes the role of MR in the HPA axis dysregulation, inflammation, decreased neurogenesis and stress-related behaviors in depression. All of which will provide more information about MR in depression.

  14. D1 receptors play a major role in the dopamine modulation of mouse ileum contractility.

    PubMed

    Zizzo, Maria Grazia; Mulè, Flavia; Mastropaolo, Mariangela; Serio, Rosa

    2010-05-01

    Since the role of dopamine in the bowel motility is far from being clear, our aim was to analyse pharmacologically the effects of dopamine on mouse ileum contractility. Contractile activity of mouse ileum was examined in vitro as changes in isometric tension. Dopamine caused a concentration-dependent reduction of the spontaneous contraction amplitude of ileal muscle up to their complete disappearance. SCH-23390, D1 receptor antagonist, which per se increased basal tone and amplitude of spontaneous contractions, antagonized the responses to dopamine, whilst sulpiride or domperidone, D2 receptor antagonists, were without effects. The application of both D1 and D2 antagonists had additive effects. SKF-38393, D1 receptor agonist, mimicked dopamine-induced effects. Dopamine responses were insensitive to tetrodotoxin, atropine, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor or adenosine receptor antagonists, but they were reduced by adenylyl cyclase inhibition or apamin. Dopamine at a concentration which did not cause a significant reduction of phasic contractions inhibited the cholinergic contractions in response to field stimulation. SCH-23390 per se induced an increase of the neural cholinergic contraction and antagonized the dopamine effects, whilst sulpiride or domperidone did not. The application of D1 and D2 antagonists had additive effects. In conclusion, mouse ileum is under basal inhibitory control by dopamine, through D1 receptor activation, linked to adenylyl cyclase and activation of apamin-sensitive potassium channels. An agonistic interaction of the dopamine receptor subtypes in the regulation intestinal contractility has being also highlighted. This study would provide new insight on the pharmacology of the modulation of the gastrointestinal contractility by dopamine. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Subpopulation of Neuronal M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Plays a Critical Role in Modulating Dopamine-Dependent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wortwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P. D.; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A.; Levey, Allan I.; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M1–M5 mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M4 mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M4 mAChRs are coexpressed with D1 dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M4 mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we used Cre/loxP technology to generate mutant mice that lack M4 mAChRs only in D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells. The newly generated mutant mice displayed several striking behavioral phenotypes including enhanced hyperlocomotor activity and increased behavioral sensitization following treatment with psychostimulants. These behavioral changes wereaccompanied by a lack of muscarinic inhibition of D1 dopamine receptor-mediated camp stimulation in the striatum and an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens. These novel findings demonstrate that a distinct subpopulation of neuronal M4 mAChRs plays a critical role in modulating several important dopamine-dependent behaviors. Since enhanced central dopaminergic neurotransmission is a hallmark of several severe disorders of the CNS, including schizophrenia and drug addiction, our findings have substantial clinical relevance. PMID:20147565

  16. Activin receptor-like kinases: a diverse family playing an important role in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loomans, Holli A; Andl, Claudia D

    2016-01-01

    The role and function of the members of the TGFβ superfamily has been a substantial area of research focus for the last several decades. During that time, it has become apparent that aberrations in TGFβ family signaling, whether through the BMP, Activin, or TGFβ arms of the pathway, can result in tumorigenesis or contribute to its progression. Downstream signaling regulates cellular growth under normal physiological conditions yet induces diverse processes during carcinogenesis, ranging from epithelial- to-mesenchymal transition to cell migration and invasion to angiogenesis. Due to these observations, the question has been raised how to utilize and target components of these signaling pathways in cancer therapy. Given that these cascades include both ligands and receptors, there are multiple levels at which to interfere. Activin receptor-like kinases (ALKs) are a group of seven type I receptors responsible for TGFβ family signal transduction and are utilized by many ligands within the superfamily. The challenge lies in specifically targeting the often-overlapping functional effects of BMP, Activin, or TGFβ signaling during cancer progression. This review focuses on the characteristic function of the individual receptors within each subfamily and their recognized roles in cancer. We next explore the clinical utility of therapeutically targeting ALKs as some have shown partial responses in Phase I clinical trials but disappointing outcomes when used in Phase II studies. Finally, we discuss the challenges and future directions of this body of work. PMID:27904762

  17. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2) plays a crucial role in the development of myopia in mice.

    PubMed

    Barathi, Veluchamy A; Kwan, Jia Lin; Tan, Queenie S W; Weon, Sung Rhan; Seet, Li Fong; Goh, Liang Kee; Vithana, Eranga N; Beuerman, Roger W

    2013-09-01

    Myopia is a huge public health problem worldwide, reaching the highest incidence in Asia. Identification of susceptible genes is crucial for understanding the biological basis of myopia. In this paper, we have identified and characterized a functional myopia-associated gene using a specific mouse-knockout model. Mice lacking the muscarinic cholinergic receptor gene (M2; also known as Chrm2) were less susceptible to lens-induced myopia compared with wild-type mice, which showed significantly increased axial length and vitreous chamber depth when undergoing experimental induction of myopia. The key findings of this present study are that the sclera of M2 mutant mice has higher expression of collagen type I and lower expression of collagen type V than do wild-type mice and mice that are mutant for other muscarinic subtypes, and, therefore, M2 mutant mice were resistant to the development of experimental myopia. Pharmacological blockade of M2 muscarinic receptor proteins retarded myopia progression in the mouse. These results suggest for the first time a role of M2 in growth-related changes in extracellular matrix genes during myopia development in a mammalian model. M2 receptor antagonists might thus provide a targeted therapeutic approach to the management of this refractive error.

  18. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2) plays a crucial role in the development of myopia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Kwan, Jia Lin; Tan, Queenie S. W.; Weon, Sung Rhan; Seet, Li Fong; Goh, Liang Kee; Vithana, Eranga N.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Myopia is a huge public health problem worldwide, reaching the highest incidence in Asia. Identification of susceptible genes is crucial for understanding the biological basis of myopia. In this paper, we have identified and characterized a functional myopia-associated gene using a specific mouse-knockout model. Mice lacking the muscarinic cholinergic receptor gene (M2; also known as Chrm2) were less susceptible to lens-induced myopia compared with wild-type mice, which showed significantly increased axial length and vitreous chamber depth when undergoing experimental induction of myopia. The key findings of this present study are that the sclera of M2 mutant mice has higher expression of collagen type I and lower expression of collagen type V than do wild-type mice and mice that are mutant for other muscarinic subtypes, and, therefore, M2 mutant mice were resistant to the development of experimental myopia. Pharmacological blockade of M2 muscarinic receptor proteins retarded myopia progression in the mouse. These results suggest for the first time a role of M2 in growth-related changes in extracellular matrix genes during myopia development in a mammalian model. M2 receptor antagonists might thus provide a targeted therapeutic approach to the management of this refractive error. PMID:23649821

  19. Two dopamine receptors play different roles in phase change of the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaojiao; Ma, Zongyuan; Kang, Le

    2015-01-01

    The migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, shows remarkable phenotypic plasticity at behavioral, physiological, and morphological levels in response to fluctuation in population density. Our previous studies demonstrated that dopamine (DA) and the genes in the dopamine metabolic pathway mediate phase change in Locusta. However, the functions of different dopamine receptors in modulating locust phase change have not been fully explored. In the present study, DA concentration in the brain increased during crowding and decreased during isolation. The expression level of dopamine receptor 1 (Dop1) increased from 1 to 4 h of crowding, but remained unchanged during isolation. Injection of Dop1 agonist SKF38393 into the brains of solitary locusts promoted gregarization, induced conspecific attraction-response and increased locomotion. RNAi knockdown of Dop1 and injection of antagonist SCH23390 in gregarious locusts induced solitary behavior, promoted the shift to repulsion-response and reduced locomotion. By contrast, the expression level of dopamine receptor 2 (Dop2) gradually increased during isolation, but remained stable during crowding. During the isolation of gregarious locusts, injection of Dop2 antagonist S(-)-sulpiride or RNAi knockdown of Dop2 inhibited solitarization, maintained conspecific attraction-response and increased locomotion; by comparison, the isolated controls displayed conspecific repulsion-response and weaker motility. Activation of Dop2 in solitary locusts through injection of agonist, R(-)-TNPA, did not affect their behavioral state. Thus, DA-Dop1 signaling in the brain of Locusta induced the gregariousness, whereas DA-Dop2 signaling mediated the solitariness. Our study demonstrated that Dop1 and Dop2 modulated locust phase change in two different directions. Further investigation of Locusta Dop1 and Dop2 functions in modulating phase change will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying phenotypic plasticity in locusts.

  20. Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 Plays a Deleterious Role During Influenza A Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Tcherniuk, Sergey; Cenac, Nicolas; Comte, Marjorie; Frouard, Julie; Errazuriz-Cerda, Elisabeth; Galabov, Angel; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Riteau, Béatrice

    2016-07-15

    The pathogenesis of influenza A virus (IAV) infections is a multifactorial process that includes the replication capacity of the virus and a harmful inflammatory response to infection. Formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) emerges as a central receptor in inflammatory processes controlling resolution of acute inflammation. Its role in virus pathogenesis has not been investigated yet. We used pharmacologic approaches to investigate the role of FPR2 during IAV infection in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, FPR2 expressed on A549 cells was activated by IAV, which harbors its ligand, annexin A1, in its envelope. FPR2 activation by IAV promoted viral replication through an extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent pathway. In vivo, activating FPR2 by administering the agonist WKYMVm-NH2 decreased survival and increased viral replication and inflammation after IAV infection. This effect was abolished by treating the mice with U0126, a specific ERK pathway inhibitor, showing that, in vivo, the deleterious role of FPR2 also occurs through an ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, administration of the FPR2 antagonist WRW4 protected mice from lethal IAV infections. These data show that viral replication and IAV pathogenesis depend on FPR2 signaling and suggest that FPR2 may be a promising novel strategy to treat influenza. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Marlin-1, a novel RNA-binding protein associates with GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Couve, Andrés; Restituito, Sophie; Brandon, Julia M; Charles, Kelly J; Bawagan, Hinayana; Freeman, Katie B; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Moss, Stephen J

    2004-04-02

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Whereas heterodimerization between GABA(B) receptor GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits is essential for functional expression, how neurons coordinate the assembly of these critical receptors remains to be established. Here we have identified Marlin-1, a novel GABA(B) receptor-binding protein that associates specifically with the GABA(B)R1 subunit in yeast, tissue culture cells, and neurons. Marlin-1 is expressed in the brain and exhibits a granular distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. Marlin-1 binds different RNA species including the 3'-untranslated regions of both the GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 mRNAs in vitro and also associates with RNA in cultured neurons. Inhibition of Marlin-1 expression via small RNA interference technology results in enhanced intracellular levels of the GABA(B)R2 receptor subunit without affecting the level of GABA(B)R1. Together our results suggest that Marlin-1 functions to regulate the cellular levels of GABA(B) R2 subunits, which may have significant effects on the production of functional GABA(B) receptor heterodimers. Therefore, our observations provide an added level of regulation for the control of GABA(B) receptor expression and for the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  2. CHASE domain-containing receptors play an essential role in the cytokinin response of the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    von Schwartzenberg, Klaus; Lindner, Ann-Cathrin; Gruhn, Njuscha; Šimura, Jan; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Gonneau, Martine; Nogué, Fabien; Heyl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    While the molecular basis for cytokinin action is quite well understood in flowering plants, little is known about the cytokinin signal transduction in early diverging land plants. The genome of the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S. encodes three classical cytokinin receptors, the CHASE domain-containing histidine kinases, CHK1, CHK2, and CHK3. In a complementation assay with protoplasts of receptor-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana as well as in cytokinin binding assays, we found evidence that CHK1 and CHK2 receptors can function in cytokinin perception. Using gene targeting, we generated a collection of CHK knockout mutants comprising single (Δchk1, Δchk2, Δchk3), double (Δchk1,2, Δchk1,3, Δchk2,3), and triple (Δchk1,2,3) mutants. Mutants were characterized for their cytokinin response and differentiation capacities. While the wild type did not grow on high doses of cytokinin (1 µM benzyladenine), the Δchk1,2,3 mutant exhibited normal protonema growth. Bud induction assays showed that all three cytokinin receptors contribute to the triggering of budding, albeit to different extents. Furthermore, while the triple mutant showed no response in this bioassay, the remaining mutants displayed budding responses in a diverse manner to different types and concentrations of cytokinins. Determination of cytokinin levels in mutants showed no drastic changes for any of the cytokinins; thus, in contrast to Arabidopsis, revealing only small impacts of cytokinin signaling on homeostasis. In summary, our study provides a first insight into the molecular action of cytokinin in an early diverging land plant and demonstrates that CHK receptors play an essential role in bud induction and gametophore development. PMID:26596764

  3. G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Plays a Relevant Role in Insulin Resistance and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Guerra, Lucia; Nieto-Vazquez, Iria; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Jurado-Pueyo, María; Zalba, Guillermo; Díez, Javier; Murga, Cristina; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Mayor, Federico; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Given the emerging role of signal transduction in these syndromes, we set out to explore the possible role that G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), first identified as a G protein–coupled receptor regulator, could have as a modulator of insulin responses. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed the influence of GRK2 levels in insulin signaling in myoblasts and adipocytes with experimentally increased or silenced levels of GRK2, as well as in GRK2 hemizygous animals expressing 50% lower levels of this kinase in three different models of insulin resistance: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) infusion, aging, and high-fat diet (HFD). Glucose transport, whole-body glucose and insulin tolerance, the activation status of insulin pathway components, and the circulating levels of important mediators were measured. The development of obesity and adipocyte size with age and HFD was analyzed. RESULTS Altering GRK2 levels markedly modifies insulin-mediated signaling in cultured adipocytes and myocytes. GRK2 levels are increased by ∼2-fold in muscle and adipose tissue in the animal models tested, as well as in lymphocytes from metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, hemizygous GRK2 mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and do not develop insulin resistance by TNF-α, aging, or HFD. Furthermore, reduced GRK2 levels induce a lean phenotype and decrease age-related adiposity. CONCLUSIONS Overall, our data identify GRK2 as an important negative regulator of insulin effects, key to the etiopathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity, which uncovers this protein as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:20627936

  4. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 plays a relevant role in insulin resistance and obesity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Guerra, Lucia; Nieto-Vazquez, Iria; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Jurado-Pueyo, María; Zalba, Guillermo; Díez, Javier; Murga, Cristina; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Mayor, Federico; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2010-10-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Given the emerging role of signal transduction in these syndromes, we set out to explore the possible role that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), first identified as a G protein-coupled receptor regulator, could have as a modulator of insulin responses. We analyzed the influence of GRK2 levels in insulin signaling in myoblasts and adipocytes with experimentally increased or silenced levels of GRK2, as well as in GRK2 hemizygous animals expressing 50% lower levels of this kinase in three different models of insulin resistance: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) infusion, aging, and high-fat diet (HFD). Glucose transport, whole-body glucose and insulin tolerance, the activation status of insulin pathway components, and the circulating levels of important mediators were measured. The development of obesity and adipocyte size with age and HFD was analyzed. Altering GRK2 levels markedly modifies insulin-mediated signaling in cultured adipocytes and myocytes. GRK2 levels are increased by ∼2-fold in muscle and adipose tissue in the animal models tested, as well as in lymphocytes from metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, hemizygous GRK2 mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and do not develop insulin resistance by TNF-α, aging, or HFD. Furthermore, reduced GRK2 levels induce a lean phenotype and decrease age-related adiposity. Overall, our data identify GRK2 as an important negative regulator of insulin effects, key to the etiopathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity, which uncovers this protein as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders.

  5. Do Advanced Glycation End Products and Its Receptor Play a Role in Pathophysiology of Hypertension?

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kailash; Mishra, Manish

    2017-03-01

    There is a close relationship between arterial stiffness and blood pressure. The studies suggest that the advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and its cell receptor (RAGE) are involved in the arterial stiffness in two ways: changes in arterial structure and vascular function. Plasma levels of AGEs and expression of RAGE are elevated, while the levels of soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) are lowered in patients with hypertension (HTN). There is a positive correlation between plasma levels of AGEs and arterial stiffness, and an inverse association between arterial stiffness/HTN, and serum levels of sRAGE and esRAGE. Various measures can reduce the levels of AGEs and expression of RAGE, and elevate sRAGE. Arterial stiffness and blood pressure could be reduced by lowering the serum levels of AGEs, and increasing the levels of sRAGE. Levels of AGEs can be lowered by reducing the consumption of AGE-rich diet, short duration of cooking in moist heat at low temperature, and cessation of cigarette smoking. Drugs such as aminoguanidine, vitamins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, statins, and metformin inhibit AGE formation. Alagebrium, an AGE breakers reduces levels of AGEs. Clinical trials with some drugs tend to reduce stiffness. Systemic administration of sRAGE has beneficial effect in animal studies. In conclusion, AGE-RAGE axis is involved in arterial stiffness and HTN. The studies suggest that inhibition of AGEs formation, reduction of AGE consumption, blockade of AGE-RAGE interaction, suppression of RAGE expression, and exogenous administration of sRAGE may be novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of arterial stiffness and HTN.

  6. Dopamine D1 Receptor Signaling: Does GαQ–Phospholipase C Actually Play a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; Yang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous studies showing therapeutic potential, no central dopamine D1 receptor ligand has ever been approved, because of potential limitations, such as hypotension, seizures, and tolerance. Functional selectivity has been widely recognized as providing a potential mechanism to develop novel therapeutics from existing targets, and a highly biased, functionally selective D1 ligand might overcome some of the past limitations. SKF-83959 [6-chloro-3-methyl-1-(m-tolyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-benzo[d]azepine-7,8-diol] is reported to be a highly biased D1 ligand, having full agonism at D1-mediated activation of phospholipase C (PLC) signaling (via GαQ) and antagonism at D1-mediated adenylate cyclase signaling (via GαOLF/S). For this reason, numerous studies have used this compound to elucidate the physiologic role of D1-PLC signaling, including a novel molecular mechanism (GαQ-PLC activation via D1-D2 heterodimers). There is, however, contradictory literature that suggests that SKF-83959 is actually a partial agonist at both D1-mediated adenylate cyclase and β-arrestin recruitment. Moreover, the D1-mediated PLC stimulation has also been questioned. This Minireview examines 30 years of relevant literature and proposes that the data strongly favor alternate hypotheses: first, that SKF-83959 is a typical D1 partial agonist; and second, that the reported activation of PLC by SKF-83959 and related benzazepines likely is due to off-target effects, not actions at D1 receptors. If these hypotheses are supported by future studies, it would suggest that caution should be used regarding the role of PLC and downstream pathways in D1 signaling. PMID:25052835

  7. Adaptation Mechanism of the Aspartate Receptor: Electrostatics of the Adaptation Subdomain Play a Key Role in Modulating Kinase Activity†

    PubMed Central

    Starrett, Diane J.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The aspartate receptor of the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium chemotaxis pathway generates a transmembrane signal that regulates the activity of the cytoplasmic kinase CheA. Previous studies have identified a region of the cytoplasmic domain that is critical to receptor adaptation and kinase regulation. This region, termed the adaptation subdomain, contains a high density of acidic residues, including specific glutamate residues that serve as receptor adaptation sites. However, the mechanism of signal propagation through this region remains poorly understood. This study uses site-directed mutagenesis to neutralize each acidic residue within the subdomain to probe the hypothesis that electrostatics in this region play a significant role in the mechanism of kinase activation and modulation. Each point mutant was tested for its ability to regulate chemotaxis in vivo and kinase activity in vitro. Four point mutants (D273N, E281Q, D288N, and E477Q) were found to superactivate the kinase relative to the wild-type receptor, and all four of these kinase-activating substitutions are located along the same intersubunit interface as the adaptation sites. These activating substitutions retained the wild-type ability of the attractant-occupied receptor to inhibit kinase activity. When combined in a quadruple mutant (D273N/E281Q/D288N/E477Q), the four charge-neutralizing substitutions locked the receptor in a kinase-superactivating state that could not be fully inactivated by the attractant. Similar lock-on character was observed for a charge reversal substitution, D273R. Together, these results implicate the electrostatic interactions at the intersubunit interface as a major player in signal transduction and kinase regulation. The negative charge in this region destabilizes the local structure in a way that enhances conformational dynamics, as detected by disulfide trapping, and this effect is reversed by charge neutralization of the adaptation sites. Finally, two

  8. Toll-like receptor 2 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis that is independent of dietary lipids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyan; Ukai, Takashi; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Davey, Michael; Goswami, Sulip; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a group of pathogen-associated microbial pattern recognition receptors, play an important role in innate immune signaling and are differentially regulated in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. However, the involvement of TLRs in the progression of atherosclerosis is still unclear. TLR2 and apolipoprotein E double knockout (Tlr2(-/-)Apoe(-/-)) mice were generated and the progressive formation of atherosclerotic plaque in the aortas was examined in mice fed a normal chow diet. We demonstrate that inactivation of TLR2 resulted in reduced progression of atherosclerosis in both male and female Apoe(-/-) mice. Likewise, TLR2 deficiency resulted in a reduction in lipid accumulation and decreased macrophage recruitment to the aortic sinus, as well as reduced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels. Furthermore, macrophages isolated from Tlr2(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice demonstrated significantly reduced MCP-1 production upon stimulation with a TLR2 ligand. However, no differences in acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and foam cell formation were observed in macrophages isolated from Tlr2(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice as compared to Apoe(-/-) mice. TLR2 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis in Apoe(-/-) mice, which is independent of dietary lipids and macrophage lipid uptake.

  9. Toll-like receptor 2 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis that is independent of dietary lipids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyan; Ukai, Takashi; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Davey, Michael; Goswami, Sulip; Gibson, Frank C.; Genco, Caroline A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a group of pathogen-associated microbial pattern recognition receptors, play an important role in innate immune signaling and are differentially regulated in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. However, the involvement of TLRs in the progression of atherosclerosis is still unclear. Methods and Results TLR2 and apolipoprotein E double knockout (Tlr2−/−Apoe−/−) mice were generated and the progressive formation of atherosclerotic plaque in the aortas was examined in mice fed a normal chow diet. We demonstrate that inactivation of TLR2 resulted in reduced progression of atherosclerosis in both male and female Apoe−/− mice. Likewise, TLR2 deficiency resulted in a reduction in lipid accumulation and decreased macrophage recruitment to the aortic sinus as well as reduced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels. Furthermore, macrophages isolated from Tlr2−/−Apoe−/− mice demonstrated significantly reduced MCP-1 production upon stimulation with a TLR2 ligand. However, no differences in acetylated-low-density lipoprotein uptake and foam cell formation were observed in macrophages isolated from Tlr2−/−Apoe−/− mice as compared to Apoe−/− mice. Conclusions TLR2 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis in Apoe−/− mice, which is independent of dietary lipids and macrophage lipid uptake. PMID:17466307

  10. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-IL; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y.L.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ -binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism. PMID:26348907

  11. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-Il; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y L; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ-binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  12. Receptor-associated protein (RAP) plays a central role in modulating Abeta deposition in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guilian; Karch, Celeste; Li, Ning; Lin, Nianwei; Fromholt, David; Gonzales, Victoria; Borchelt, David R

    2008-09-08

    Receptor associated protein (RAP) functions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to assist in the maturation of several membrane receptor proteins, including low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and lipoprotein receptor 11 (SorLA/LR11). Previous studies in cell and mouse model systems have demonstrated that these proteins play roles in the metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), including processes involved in the generation, catabolism and deposition of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides. Mice transgenic for mutant APPswe and mutant presenilin 1 (PS1dE9) were mated to mice with homozygous deletion of RAP. Unexpectedly, mice that were homozygous null for RAP and transgenic for APPswe/PS1dE9 showed high post-natal mortality, necessitating a shift in focus to examine the levels of amyloid deposition in APPswe/PS1dE9 that were hemizygous null for RAP. Immunoblot analysis confirmed 50% reductions in the levels of RAP with modest reductions in the levels of proteins dependent upon RAP for maturation [LRP trend towards a 20% reduction ; SorLA/LR11 statistically significant 15% reduction (p<0.05)]. Changes in the levels of these proteins in the brains of [APPswe/PS1dE9](+/-)/RAP(+/-) mice correlated with 30-40% increases in amyloid deposition by 9 months of age. Partial reductions in the ER chaperone RAP enhance amyloid deposition in the APPswe/PS1dE9 model of Alzheimer amyloidosis. Partial reductions in RAP also affect the maturation of LRP and SorLA/LR11, which are each involved in several different aspects of APP processing and Abeta catabolism. Together, these findings suggest a central role for RAP in Alzheimer amyloidogenesis.

  13. Yes and Lyn play a role in nuclear translocation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Iida, M; Brand, T M; Campbell, D A; Li, C; Wheeler, D L

    2013-02-07

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a central regulator of tumor progression in human cancers. Cetuximab is an anti-EGFR antibody that has been approved for use in oncology. Previously we investigated mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab using a model derived from the non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H226. We demonstrated that cetuximab-resistant clones (Ctx(R)) had increased nuclear localization of the EGFR. This process was mediated by Src family kinases (SFKs), and nuclear EGFR had a role in resistance to cetuximab. To better understand SFK-mediated nuclear translocation of EGFR, we investigated which SFK member(s) controlled this process as well as the EGFR tyrosine residues that are involved. Analyses of mRNA and protein expression indicated upregulation of the SFK members Yes (v-Yes-1 yamaguchi sarcoma viral oncogene) and Lyn (v-yes-1 Yamaguchi sarcoma viral-related oncogene homolog) in all Ctx(R) clones. Further, immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that EGFR interacts with Yes and Lyn in Ctx(R) clones, but not in cetuximab-sensitive (Ctx(S)) parental cells. Using RNAi interference, we found that knockdown of either Yes or Lyn led to loss of EGFR translocation to the nucleus. Conversely, overexpression of Yes or Lyn in low nuclear EGFR-expressing Ctx(S) parental cells led to increased nuclear EGFR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed nuclear EGFR complexes associated with the promoter of the known EGFR target genes B-Myb and iNOS. Further, all Ctx(R) clones exhibited upregulation of B-Myb and iNOS at the mRNA and protein levels. siRNAs directed at Yes or Lyn led to decreased binding of EGFR complexes to the B-Myb and iNOS promoters based on ChIP analyses. SFKs have been shown to phosphorylate EGFR on tyrosines 845 and 1101 (Y845 and Y1101), and mutation of Y1101, but not Y845, impaired nuclear entry of the EGFR. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Yes and Lyn phosphorylate EGFR at Y1101, which influences EGFR

  14. Calcium-Sensing Receptors of Human Neural Cells Play Crucial Roles in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Liu, Daisong; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    In aged subjects, late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) starts in the lateral entorhinal allocortex where a failure of clearance mechanisms triggers an accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid-β42 oligomers (Aβ42-os). In neurons and astrocytes, Aβ42-os enhance the transcription of Aβ precursor protein (APP) and β-secretase/BACE1 genes. Thus, by acting together with γ-secretase, the surpluses of APP and BACE1 amplify the endogenous production of Aβ42-os which pile up, damage mitochondria, and are oversecreted. At the plasmalemma, exogenous Aβ42-os bind neurons' and astrocytes' calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) activating a set of intracellular signaling pathways which upkeep Aβ42-os intracellular accumulation and oversecretion by hindering Aβ42-os proteolysis. In addition, Aβ42-os accumulating in the extracellular milieu spread and reach mounting numbers of adjacent and remoter teams of neurons and astrocytes which in turn are recruited, again via Aβ42-os•CaSR-governed mechanisms, to produce and release additional Aβ42-os amounts. This relentless self-sustaining mechanism drives AD progression toward upper cortical areas. Later on accumulating Aβ42-os elicit the advent of hyperphosphorylated (p)-Tau oligomers which acting together with Aβ42-os and other glial neurotoxins cooperatively destroy wider and wider cognition-related cortical areas. In parallel, Aβ42-os•CaSR signals also elicit an excess production and secretion of nitric oxide and vascular endothelial growth factor-A from astrocytes, of Aβ42-os and myelin basic protein from oligodendrocytes, and of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide and (likely) Aβ42-os from microglia. Activated astrocytes and microglia survive the toxic onslaught, whereas neurons and oligodendrocytes increasingly die. However, we have shown that highly selective allosteric CaSR antagonists (calcilytics), like NPS 2143 and NPS 89626, efficiently suppress all the neurotoxic effects Aβ42-os•CaSR signaling drives in

  15. Calcium-Sensing Receptors of Human Neural Cells Play Crucial Roles in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Liu, Daisong; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    In aged subjects, late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) starts in the lateral entorhinal allocortex where a failure of clearance mechanisms triggers an accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid-β42 oligomers (Aβ42-os). In neurons and astrocytes, Aβ42-os enhance the transcription of Aβ precursor protein (APP) and β-secretase/BACE1 genes. Thus, by acting together with γ-secretase, the surpluses of APP and BACE1 amplify the endogenous production of Aβ42-os which pile up, damage mitochondria, and are oversecreted. At the plasmalemma, exogenous Aβ42-os bind neurons' and astrocytes' calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) activating a set of intracellular signaling pathways which upkeep Aβ42-os intracellular accumulation and oversecretion by hindering Aβ42-os proteolysis. In addition, Aβ42-os accumulating in the extracellular milieu spread and reach mounting numbers of adjacent and remoter teams of neurons and astrocytes which in turn are recruited, again via Aβ42-os•CaSR-governed mechanisms, to produce and release additional Aβ42-os amounts. This relentless self-sustaining mechanism drives AD progression toward upper cortical areas. Later on accumulating Aβ42-os elicit the advent of hyperphosphorylated (p)-Tau oligomers which acting together with Aβ42-os and other glial neurotoxins cooperatively destroy wider and wider cognition-related cortical areas. In parallel, Aβ42-os•CaSR signals also elicit an excess production and secretion of nitric oxide and vascular endothelial growth factor-A from astrocytes, of Aβ42-os and myelin basic protein from oligodendrocytes, and of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide and (likely) Aβ42-os from microglia. Activated astrocytes and microglia survive the toxic onslaught, whereas neurons and oligodendrocytes increasingly die. However, we have shown that highly selective allosteric CaSR antagonists (calcilytics), like NPS 2143 and NPS 89626, efficiently suppress all the neurotoxic effects Aβ42-os•CaSR signaling drives in

  16. Thyroid Hormone Receptor α Plays an Essential Role in Male Skeletal Muscle Myoblast Proliferation, Differentiation, and Response to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Nam-Ho; Liu, Yan-Yun; Yang, An; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Kahng, Andrew; Cervantes, Vanessa; Tripuraneni, Nikita; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Perin, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone plays an essential role in myogenesis, the process required for skeletal muscle development and repair, although the mechanisms have not been established. Skeletal muscle develops from the fusion of precursor myoblasts into myofibers. We have used the C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblast cell line, primary myoblasts, and mouse models of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) α and β, to determine the role of thyroid hormone in the regulation of myoblast differentiation. T3, which activates thyroid hormone receptor (TR) α and β, increased myoblast differentiation whereas GC1, a selective TRβ agonist, was minimally effective. Genetic approaches confirmed that TRα plays an important role in normal myoblast proliferation and differentiation and acts through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Myoblasts with TRα knockdown, or derived from RTH-TRα PV (a frame-shift mutation) mice, displayed reduced proliferation and myogenic differentiation. Moreover, skeletal muscle from the TRα1PV mutant mouse had impaired in vivo regeneration after injury. RTH-TRβ PV mutant mouse model skeletal muscle and derived primary myoblasts did not have altered proliferation, myogenic differentiation, or response to injury when compared with control. In conclusion, TRα plays an essential role in myoblast homeostasis and provides a potential therapeutic target to enhance skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:26451739

  17. Ischemia-like Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation Mediates Down-regulation of Cell Surface γ-Aminobutyric AcidB Receptors via the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress-induced Transcription Factor CCAAT/Enhancer-binding Protein (C/EBP)-homologous Protein (CHOP)*

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Patrick J.; Zemoura, Khaled; Acuña, Mario A.; Yévenes, Gonzalo E.; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Benke, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia frequently leads to long-term disability and death. Excitotoxicity is believed to be the main cause for ischemia-induced neuronal death. Although a role of glutamate receptors in this process has been firmly established, the contribution of metabotropic GABAB receptors, which control excitatory neurotransmission, is less clear. A prominent characteristic of ischemic insults is endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress associated with the up-regulation of the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP). After inducing ER stress in cultured cortical neurons by sustained Ca2+ release from intracellular stores or by a brief episode of oxygen and glucose deprivation (in vitro model of cerebral ischemia), we observed an increased expression of CHOP accompanied by a strong reduction of cell surface GABAB receptors. Our results indicate that down-regulation of cell surface GABAB receptors is caused by the interaction of the receptors with CHOP in the ER. Binding of CHOP prevented heterodimerization of the receptor subunits GABAB1 and GABAB2 and subsequent forward trafficking of the receptors to the cell surface. The reduced level of cell surface receptors diminished GABAB receptor signaling and, thus, neuronal inhibition. These findings indicate that ischemia-mediated up-regulation of CHOP down-regulates cell surface GABAB receptors by preventing their trafficking from the ER to the plasma membrane. This mechanism leads to diminished neuronal inhibition and may contribute to excitotoxicity in cerebral ischemia. PMID:24668805

  18. Structural, signalling and regulatory properties of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors: prototypic family C G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, E; Challiss, R A

    2001-01-01

    In 1991 a new type of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was cloned, the type 1a metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor, which, despite possessing the defining seven-transmembrane topology of the GPCR superfamily, bore little resemblance to the growing number of other cloned GPCRs. Subsequent studies have shown that there are eight mammalian mGlu receptors that, together with the calcium-sensing receptor, the GABA(B) receptor (where GABA is gamma-aminobutyric acid) and a subset of pheromone, olfactory and taste receptors, make up GPCR family C. Currently available data suggest that family C GPCRs share a number of structural, biochemical and regulatory characteristics, which differ markedly from those of the other GPCR families, most notably the rhodopsin/family A GPCRs that have been most widely studied to date. This review will focus on the group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5). This subgroup of receptors is widely and differentially expressed in neuronal and glial cells within the brain, and receptor activation has been implicated in the control of an array of key signalling events, including roles in the adaptative changes needed for long-term depression or potentiation of neuronal synaptic connectivity. In addition to playing critical physiological roles within the brain, the mGlu receptors are also currently the focus of considerable attention because of their potential as drug targets for the treatment of a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:11672421

  19. IgG Receptor FcγRIIB Plays a Key Role in Obesity-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sundgren, Nathan C.; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Boggan, Brigid-Meghan D.; Tanigaki, Keiji; Yuhanna, Ivan S.; Chambliss, Ken L.; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    There is a well-recognized association between obesity, inflammation, and hypertension. Why obesity causes hypertension is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated using a C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic mouse that CRP induces hypertension that is related to NO deficiency. Our prior work in cultured endothelial cells identified the Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) as the receptor for CRP whereby it antagonizes endothelial NO synthase. Recognizing known associations between CRP and obesity and hypertension in humans, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that FcγRIIB plays a role in obesity-induced hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry, we first demonstrated that the hypertension observed in transgenic mouse-CRP is mediated by the receptor, indicating that FcγRIIB is capable of modifying blood pressure. We then discovered in a model of diet-induced obesity yielding equal adiposity in all study groups that whereas FcγRIIB+/+ mice developed obesity-induced hypertension, FcγRIIB−/− mice were fully protected. Levels of CRP, the related pentraxin serum amyloid P component which is the CRP-equivalent in mice, and total IgG were unaltered by diet-induced obesity; FcγRIIB expression in endothelium was also unchanged. However, whereas IgG isolated from chow-fed mice had no effect, IgG from high-fat diet–fed mice inhibited endothelial NO synthase in cultured endothelial cells, and this was an FcγRIIB-dependent process. Thus, we have identified a novel role for FcγRIIB in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension, independent of processes regulating adiposity, and it may entail an IgG-induced attenuation of endothelial NO synthase function. Approaches targeting FcγRIIB may potentially offer new means to treat hypertension in obese individuals. PMID:25368023

  20. IgG receptor FcγRIIB plays a key role in obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sundgren, Nathan C; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Boggan, Brigid-Meghan D; Tanigaki, Keiji; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Chambliss, Ken L; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W

    2015-02-01

    There is a well-recognized association between obesity, inflammation, and hypertension. Why obesity causes hypertension is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated using a C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic mouse that CRP induces hypertension that is related to NO deficiency. Our prior work in cultured endothelial cells identified the Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) as the receptor for CRP whereby it antagonizes endothelial NO synthase. Recognizing known associations between CRP and obesity and hypertension in humans, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that FcγRIIB plays a role in obesity-induced hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry, we first demonstrated that the hypertension observed in transgenic mouse-CRP is mediated by the receptor, indicating that FcγRIIB is capable of modifying blood pressure. We then discovered in a model of diet-induced obesity yielding equal adiposity in all study groups that whereas FcγRIIB(+/+) mice developed obesity-induced hypertension, FcγRIIB(-/-) mice were fully protected. Levels of CRP, the related pentraxin serum amyloid P component which is the CRP-equivalent in mice, and total IgG were unaltered by diet-induced obesity; FcγRIIB expression in endothelium was also unchanged. However, whereas IgG isolated from chow-fed mice had no effect, IgG from high-fat diet-fed mice inhibited endothelial NO synthase in cultured endothelial cells, and this was an FcγRIIB-dependent process. Thus, we have identified a novel role for FcγRIIB in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension, independent of processes regulating adiposity, and it may entail an IgG-induced attenuation of endothelial NO synthase function. Approaches targeting FcγRIIB may potentially offer new means to treat hypertension in obese individuals.

  1. NMDA receptors in the midbrain play a critical role in dopamine-mediated hippocampal synaptic potentiation caused by morphine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ling; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Cui, Cai-Lian; Xing, Guo-Gang; Zhu, Bing

    2014-05-01

    A single exposure to drugs of abuse produces an NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor)-dependent synaptic potentiation at excitatory synapses of dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the midbrain. All addictive drugs can increase DA concentrations in projection areas of the midbrain, including the hippocampus. Hippocampal DA release subsequently modulates hippocampal plasticity and drug-associated memories. Using in vivo electrophysiological recording techniques in anesthetized rats, we show that systemic injection of morphine induced hippocampal synaptic potentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Intra-VTA but not intra-hippocampus injection of morphine evoked this potentiation. Local hippocampal dopamine D1 receptors (D1R) are required in the morphine-induced synaptic potentiation and conditioned place preference (CPP). Moreover, both NMDAR activation in the VTA and VTA/hippocampus dopaminergic connections are essential for the morphine-evoked potentiation and CPP. These findings suggest that NMDAR signalings in the midbrain play a key role in regulating dopamine-mediated hippocampal synaptic plasticity underlying drug-induced associative memory.

  2. [GABA-Receptors in Modulation of Fear Memory Extinction].

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, N I

    2016-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system determining the efficacy of neuronal interaction. GABA-receptors play a key role in different aspects of fear memory--acquisition and consolidation, retention, reconsolidation and extinction. Extinction is an important behavioural phenomenon which allows organism to adapt its behavior to a changing environment. Extinction of fear memory is a form of new inhibitory learning which interferes with expression of the initial acquired fear conditioning. Resistance to extinction is symptom of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. The aim of the present review was to summarize own and literary data about GABAergic modulation of fear extinction and pharmacological correction of extinction impairment at influences on GABA(A)- and GABA(B)- receptors.

  3. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors are divided into three classes (A, B and C) based on homology of their seven transmembrane domains. Class C is the smallest class with 22 human receptor subtypes including eight metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1-8) receptors, two GABAB receptors (GABAB1 and GABAB2), three taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we review the existence of post-translational modifications in class C G protein-coupled receptors and their regulatory roles, with particular focus on glycosylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, disulphide bonding and lipidation.

  4. [Effects of agonists and antagonists of benzodiazepine, GABA and NMDA receptors, on caffeine-induced seizures in mice].

    PubMed

    Inano, S

    1992-08-01

    In mice, tonic convulsive seizure induced by intravenous administration of caffeine (adenosine A1, A2 receptors antagonist) was significantly potentiated by any one of L-PIA (adenosine A1 receptor agonist), NECA (adenosine A2 receptor agonist) and 2-ClAd (adenosine A1, A2 receptors agonist). The caffeine-induced seizure was unaffected by diazepam (benzodiazepine receptor agonist), but was inhibited by Ro 15-1788 (antagonist or partial agonist). beta-DMCM (antagonist or inverse agonist) increased the seizure. Muscimol (GABA-a receptor agonist), baclofen (GABA-b receptor agonist) and AOAA (GABA transaminase inhibitor) did not show significant effect on caffeine-induced convulsion. Bicuculline (GABA-a receptor antagonist) and picrotoxin (chloride channel blocker) significantly potentiated the convulsion at the doses which did not induce it. Caffeine-induced convulsion was potentiated by NMDA with its non-convulsive dose. CPP (competitive NMDA receptor antagonist) and MK-801 (non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist) significantly inhibited the seizures. These results suggest that caffeine-induced seizure is not caused by blockade of adenosine receptors. Caffeine may act to beta-carboline sensitive benzodiazepine receptor (Type 1) which has no linkage with GABA-a receptor. Furthermore, it is implied that caffeine plays some role at NMDA receptor calcium ion channel complex.

  5. Tyrosine-610 in the receptor kinase BAK1 does not play a major role in brassinosteroid signaling or innate immunity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The plasma membrane-localized BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1) functions as a co-receptor with several receptor kinases including the brassinosteroid (BR) receptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1), which is involved in growth, and the receptors for bacterial flagellin and EF-Tu, FLAGELLIN-SENSING ...

  6. Profound regulation of neonatal CA1 rat hippocampal GABAergic transmission by functionally distinct kainate receptor populations

    PubMed Central

    Maingret, François; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi; Isaac, John TR

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal hippocampus exhibits distinct patterns of network activity that are dependent on the interaction between inhibitory and excitatory transmission. Kainate receptors are ideally positioned to regulate this activity by virtue of their ability to regulate presynaptic function in GABAergic interneurones. Indeed, kainate receptors are highly expressed in neonatal hippocampal interneurones, yet the role and mechanisms by which they might regulate neonatal circuitry are unexplored. To address this we investigated the kainate receptor-dependent regulation of GABAergic transmission onto neonatal CA1 pyramidal neurones. Kainate receptor activation produced two distinct opposing effects, a very large increase in the frequency of spontaneous IPSCs, and a robust depression of evoked GABAergic transmission. The up-regulation of spontaneous transmission was due to activation of somatodendritic and axonal receptors while the depression of evoked transmission could be fully accounted for by a direct regulation of GABA release by kainate receptors located at the terminals. None of the effects of kainate receptor agonists were sensitive to GABAB receptor antagonists, nor was there any postsynaptic kainate receptor-dependent effects observed in CA1 pyramidal cells that could account for our findings. Our data demonstrate that kainate receptors profoundly regulate neonatal CA1 GABAergic circuitry by two distinct opposing mechanisms, and indicate that these two effects are mediated by functionally distinct populations of receptors. Thus kainate receptors are strategically located to play a critical role in shaping early hippocampal network activity and by virtue of this have a key role in hippocampal development. PMID:15946969

  7. Changes in rectal temperature and ECoG spectral power of sensorimotor cortex elicited in conscious rabbits by i.c.v. injection of GABA, GABAA and GABAB agonists and antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Frosini, Maria; Valoti, Massimo; Sgaragli, Giampietro

    2003-01-01

    In order to ascertain whether both GABAA and GABAB, or only GABAB receptors, directly modulate thermoregulation in conscious rabbits, GABAA/GABAB agonist and antagonist agents were injected intracerebroventricularly in conscious rabbits while monitoring changes in rectal temperature (RT), gross motor behaviour (GMB) and electrocorticogram (ECoG) power spectra (ps) from sensorimotor cortices. GABA (48 μmol), nipecotic acid (50 nmol), THIP (60 nmol), muscimol (18 nmol) and baclofen (8 nmol) induced hypothermia (−ΔRTmax values of 1.70±0.1, 1.4±0.2, 1.0±0.4, 1.1±0.2 and 1.6±0.3°C, respectively), accompanied by inhibition of GMB and ECoG synchronization. THIP increased ps at δ frequency band (1.1−3.3 Hz), while GABA, nipecotic acid, muscimol and baclofen did the same at both δ and θ (4.6−6.5 Hz) frequency bands. ECoG ps changes were concomitant or even preceded hypothermia. Bicuculline (1.8 nmol) induced hyperthermia (ΔRTmax 1.2±0.5°C) and slight excitation of GMB, while CGP35348 (1.2 μmol) did not affect RT nor GMB. Both compounds did not affect ECoG ps. Bicuculline potentiated muscimol-induced hypothermia, inhibition of GMB and synchronization of ECoG, while CGP35348 fully antagonized these effects. In conclusion, the present results, while confirming the prevailing role of GABAB, also outline a direct involvement of GABAA receptors in the central mechanisms of thermoregulation. Ascending inhibition towards discrete cortical areas controlling muscular activity and thermogenesis may result from GABA receptor activation in neurones proximal to the ventricles, thus contributing to hypothermia, although hypothermia-induced reduction of neuronal activity of these cortical areas cannot be ruled out. PMID:14662729

  8. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  9. C-terminal threonines and serines play distinct roles in the desensitization of rhodopsin, a G protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Anthony W; Doan, Thuy; Moaven, Hormoz; Sokal, Iza; Baameur, Faiza; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Homan, Kristoff T; Tesmer, John JG; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Chen, Jeannie; Rieke, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Rod photoreceptors generate measurable responses to single-photon activation of individual molecules of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), rhodopsin. Timely rhodopsin desensitization depends on phosphorylation and arrestin binding, which quenches G protein activation. Rhodopsin phosphorylation has been measured biochemically at C-terminal serine residues, suggesting that these residues are critical for producing fast, low-noise responses. The role of native threonine residues is unclear. We compared single-photon responses from rhodopsin lacking native serine or threonine phosphorylation sites. Contrary to expectation, serine-only rhodopsin generated prolonged step-like single-photon responses that terminated abruptly and randomly, whereas threonine-only rhodopsin generated responses that were only modestly slower than normal. We show that the step-like responses of serine-only rhodopsin reflect slow and stochastic arrestin binding. Thus, threonine sites play a privileged role in promoting timely arrestin binding and rhodopsin desensitization. Similar coordination of phosphorylation and arrestin binding may more generally permit tight control of the duration of GPCR activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05981.001 PMID:25910054

  10. Estrogen receptor ERα plays a major role in ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction in conscious female rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fanrong; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2016-02-01

    Our previous studies showed that ethanol elicited estrogen (E2)-dependent myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that E2 signaling via the estrogen receptor (ER), ERα, mediates this myocardial detrimental effect of alcohol. To achieve this goal, conscious female rats in proestrus phase (highest endogenous E2 level) received a selective ER antagonist (200 μg/kg; intra-venous [i.v.]) for ERα (MPP), ERβ (PHTPP) or GPER (G15) or saline 30 min before ethanol (1 g/kg; i.v.) or saline infusion. ERα blockade virtually abrogated ethanol-evoked myocardial dysfunction and hypotension, while ERβ blockade had little effect on the hypotensive response, but caused delayed attenuation of the ethanol-evoked reductions in left ventricular developed pressure and the rate of left ventricle pressure rise. GPER blockade caused delayed attenuation of all cardiovascular effects of ethanol. All three antagonists attenuated the ethanol-evoked increases in myocardial catalase and ALDH2 activities, Akt, ERK1/2, p38, eNOS, and nNOS phosphorylation, except for a lack of effect of PHTPP on p38. Finally, all three ER antagonists attenuated ethanol-evoked elevation in myocardial ROS, but this effect was most notable with ERα blockade. In conclusion, ERα plays a greater role in, and might serve as a molecular target for ameliorating, the E2-dependent myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by ethanol.

  11. GABA type B receptor signaling in proopiomelanocortin neurons protects against obesity, insulin resistance, and hypothalamic inflammation in male mice on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshihiro; Banno, Ryoichi; Shibata, Miyuki; Adachi, Koichi; Hagimoto, Shigeru; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Ozawa, Yoshiharu; Goto, Motomitsu; Suga, Hidetaka; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Bettler, Bernhard; Oiso, Yutaka; Arima, Hiroshi

    2013-10-23

    There is evidence suggesting that the GABA system in the arcuate nucleus, where orexigenic neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide as well as anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) are expressed, plays an important role in energy balance. In this study, we generated POMC-specific GABAB receptor-deficient [knock-out (KO)] mice. Male KO mice on a high-fat diet (HFD) showed mild increases in body weight (BW) at the age of 9 weeks compared to wild-type (WT) mice, and the differences remained significant until 16 weeks old. However, there was no difference in BW in females between genotypes. While food intake was similar between genotypes, oxygen consumption was significantly decreased in the male KO mice. The insulin tolerance test revealed that the male KO mice were less insulin sensitive compared to WT mice at the age of 8 weeks, when there was no significant difference in BW between genotypes. Despite increased BW, POMC mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus was significantly decreased in the KO mice compared to WT mice at the age of 16 weeks. Furthermore, the expression of TNFα as well as IL-6, proinflammatory markers in the hypothalamus, was significantly increased in the KO mice on a HFD compared to WT mice. This demonstrates that the deletion of GABAB receptors in POMC neurons in the male mice on a HFD results in obesity, insulin resistance, and hypothalamic inflammation. Furthermore, the decreased POMC expression in the obese KO mice suggests that the regulation of POMC expression through GABAB receptors is essential for proper energy balance.

  12. On play and playing.

    PubMed

    Rudan, Dusko

    2013-12-01

    The paper offers a review of the development of the concept of play and playing. The true beginnings of the development of the theories of play are set as late as in the 19th century. It is difficult to define play as such; it may much more easily be defined through its antipode--work. In the beginning, play used to be connected with education; it was not before Freud's theory of psychoanalysis and Piaget's developmental psychology that the importance of play in a child's development began to be explained in more detail. The paper further tackles the role of play in the adult age. Detailed attention is paid to psychodynamic and psychoanalytic authors, in particular D. W. Winnicott and his understanding of playing in the intermediary (transitional) empirical or experiential space. In other words, playing occupies a space and time of its own. The neuroscientific concept of playing is also tackled, in the connection with development as well.

  13. Orexin receptor-1 in the locus coeruleus plays an important role in cue-dependent fear memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Soya, Shingo; Shoji, Hirotaka; Hasegawa, Emi; Hondo, Mari; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Mieda, Michihiro; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-09-04

    The noradrenergic (NA) projections arising from the locus ceruleus (LC) to the amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis have been implicated in the formation of emotional memory. Since NA neurons in the LC (LC-NA neurons) abundantly express orexin receptor-1 (OX1R) and receive prominent innervation by orexin-producing neurons, we hypothesized that an OX1R-mediated pathway is involved in the physiological fear learning process via regulation of LC-NA neurons. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined the phenotype of Ox1r(-/-) mice in the classic cued and contextual fear-conditioning test. We found that Ox1r(-/-) mice showed impaired freezing responses in both cued and contextual fear-conditioning paradigms. In contrast, Ox2r(-/-) mice showed normal freezing behavior in the cued fear-conditioning test, while they exhibited shorter freezing time in the contextual fear-conditioning test. Double immunolabeling of Fos and tyrosine hydroxylase showed that double-positive LC-NA neurons after test sessions of both cued and contextual stimuli were significantly fewer in Ox1r(-/-) mice. AAV-mediated expression of OX1R in LC-NA neurons in Ox1r(-/-) mice restored the freezing behavior to the auditory cue to a comparable level to that in wild-type mice in the test session. Decreased freezing time during the contextual fear test was not affected by restoring OX1R expression in LC-NA neurons. These observations support the hypothesis that the orexin system modulates the formation and expression of fear memory via OX1R in multiple pathways. Especially, OX1R in LC-NA neurons plays an important role in cue-dependent fear memory formation and/or retrieval.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha plays a crucial role in behavioral repetition and cognitive flexibility in mice

    PubMed Central

    D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Cristiano, Claudia; Lyons, David J.; Citraro, Rita; Russo, Emilio; Avagliano, Carmen; Russo, Roberto; Raso, Giuseppina Mattace; Meli, Rosaria; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Heisler, Lora K.; Calignano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background/objectives Nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) plays a fundamental role in the regulation of lipid homeostasis and is the target of medications used to treat dyslipidemia. However, little is known about the role of PPAR-α in mouse behavior. Methods To investigate the function of Ppar-α in cognitive functions, a behavioral phenotype analysis of mice with a targeted genetic disruption of Ppar-α was performed in combination with neuroanatomical, biochemical and pharmacological manipulations. The therapeutic exploitability of PPAR-α was probed in mice using a pharmacological model of psychosis and a genetic model (BTBR T + tf/J) exhibiting a high rate of repetitive behavior. Results An unexpected role for brain Ppar-α in the regulation of cognitive behavior in mice was revealed. Specifically, we observed that Ppar-α genetic perturbation promotes rewiring of cortical and hippocampal regions and a behavioral phenotype of cognitive inflexibility, perseveration and blunted responses to psychomimetic drugs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the antipsychotic and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) medication risperidone ameliorates the behavioral profile of Ppar-α deficient mice. Importantly, we reveal that pharmacological PPAR-α agonist treatment in mice improves behavior in a pharmacological model of ketamine-induced behavioral dysinhibition and repetitive behavior in BTBR T + tf/J mice. Conclusion Our data indicate that Ppar-α is required for normal cognitive function and that pharmacological stimulation of PPAR-α improves cognitive function in pharmacological and genetic models of impaired cognitive function in mice. These results thereby reveal an unforeseen therapeutic application for a class of drugs currently in human use. PMID:26137440

  15. The Ror1 receptor tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in regulating satellite cell proliferation during regeneration of injured muscle.

    PubMed

    Kamizaki, Koki; Doi, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Makoto; Saji, Takeshi; Kanagawa, Motoi; Toda, Tatsushi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Greenberg, Michael Eldon; Endo, Mitsuharu; Minami, Yasuhiro

    2017-09-22

    The Ror family receptor tyrosine kinases, Ror1 and Ror2, play important roles in regulating developmental morphogenesis and tissue- and organogenesis, but their roles in tissue regeneration in adult animals remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the expression and function of Ror1 and Ror2 during skeletal muscle regeneration. Using an in vivo skeletal muscle injury model, we show that expression of Ror1 and Ror2 in skeletal muscles is induced transiently by the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β, after injury and that inhibition of TNF-α and IL-1β by neutralizing antibodies suppresses expression of Ror1 and Ror2 in injured muscles. Importantly, expression of Ror1, but not Ror2, was induced primarily in Pax7-positive satellite cells (SCs) after muscle injury, and administration of neutralizing antibodies decreased the proportion of Pax7-positive proliferative SCs after muscle injury. We also found that stimulation of a mouse myogenic cell line, C2C12 cells, with TNF-α or IL-1β induced expression of Ror1 via NF-κB activation and that suppressed expression of Ror1 inhibited their proliferative responses in SCs. Intriguingly, SC-specific depletion of Ror1 decreased the number of Pax7-positive SCs after muscle injury. Collectively, these findings indicate for the first time that Ror1 has a critical role in regulating SC proliferation during skeletal muscle regeneration. We conclude that Ror1 might be a suitable target in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to manage muscular disorders. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Activation of Both CB1 and CB2 Endocannabinoid Receptors Is Critical for Masculinization of the Developing Medial Amygdala and Juvenile Social Play Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, David J; Whitaker, Allison R

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Juvenile social play behavior is a shared trait across a wide variety of mammalian species. When play is characterized by the frequency or duration of physical contact, males usually display more play relative to females. The endocannabinoid system contributes to the development of the sex difference in social play behavior in rats. Treating newborn pups with a nonspecific endocannabinoid agonist, WIN55,212-2, masculinizes subsequent juvenile rough-and-tumble play behavior by females. Here we use specific drugs to target signaling through either the CB1 or CB2 endocannabinoid receptor (CB1R or CB2R) to determine which modulates the development of sex differences in play. Our data reveal that signaling through both CB1R and CB2R must be altered neonatally to modify development of neural circuitry regulating sex differences in play. Neonatal co-agonism of CB1R and CB2R masculinized play by females, whereas co-antagonism of these receptors feminized rates of male play. Because of a known role for the medial amygdala in the sexual differentiation of play, we reconstructed Golgi-impregnated neurons in the juvenile medial amygdala and used factor analysis to identify morphological parameters that were sexually differentiated and responsive to dual agonism of CB1R and CB2R during the early postnatal period. Our results suggest that sex differences in the medial amygdala are modulated by the endocannabinoid system during early development. Sex differences in play behavior are loosely correlated with differences in neuronal morphology. PMID:28144625

  17. γ-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor Mediated Inhibition of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons Is Suppressed by Kisspeptin-G Protein-Coupled Receptor 54 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the most important neurotransmitters that regulate the excitability of GnRH neurons. Numerous studies have shown that GABA activates Cl− currents in GnRH neurons, and these effects are antagonized by GABAA receptor antagonists. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimer composed of GABAB R1 and R2, and although both subunits have been localized in GnRH neurons, nothing is known about the cellular signaling of this Gαi,o-coupled receptor in GnRH neurons. Using whole-cell recordings from mouse enhanced green fluorescent protein-GnRH neurons, we found that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen hyperpolarized GnRH neurons through activation of an inwardly rectifying K+ current in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of baclofen were antagonized by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432 with a Ki (inhibitory constant) of 85 nm. Furthermore, in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin, GABA hyperpolarized GnRH neurons in a similar manner. Treatment with 17β-estradiol as compared with oil vehicle did not significantly alter either the EC50 for the baclofen-induced response (0.8 ± 0.1 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1 μm, respectively) or the maximal outward current (10.8 ± 1.7 pA vs. 11.4 ± 0.6 pA, respectively) in GnRH neurons. However, the outward current (and membrane hyperpolarization) was abrogated by submaximal concentrations of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) agonist kisspeptin-10 in both groups, indicating that Gαq-coupled (GPR54) can desensitize the GABAB receptor-mediated response. Therefore, the activation of GABAB receptors in GnRH neurons may provide increased inhibitory tone during estrogen-negative feedback states that is attenuated by kisspeptin during positive feedback. PMID:19164470

  18. Repeated cocaine weakens GABAB-Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons in the prelimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hearing, Matthew; Kotecki, Lydia; de Velasco, Ezequiel Marron Fernandez; Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Luján, Rafael; Wickman, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Repeated cocaine exposure triggers adaptations in Layer 5/6 glutamatergic neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that promote behavioral sensitization and drug-seeking behavior. While suppression of metabotropic inhibitory signaling has been implicated in these behaviors, underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that Girk/KIR3 channels mediate most of the GABAB receptor (GABABR)-dependent inhibition of Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons in the mPFC and that repeated cocaine suppresses this pathway. This adaptation was selective for GABABR-dependent Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the prelimbic cortex (PrLC) and involved a D1/5 dopamine receptor- and phosphorylation-dependent internalization of GABABR and Girk channels. Persistent suppression of Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 of the dorsal mPFC enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor activity and occluded behavioral sensitization. Thus, the cocaine-induced suppression of GABABR-Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the prelimbic cortex appears to represent an early adaptation critical for promoting addiction-related behavior. PMID:24094109

  19. GABAA and GABAC receptors on hybrid bass retinal bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, H; Dowling, J E

    1995-11-01

    1. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) responses from solitory hybrid bass retinal bipolar cells were studied with the use of conventional and perforated whole cell patch-clamp recording. 2. GABA elicited a chloride current in bipolar cells that had both transient and sustained components. The transient component was sensitive to bicuculline and resembled GABAA-mediated currents, whereas the more sustained component was resistant to bicuculline and resembled the responses mediated by GABAC receptors. 3. The bicuculline-resistant GABA responses recorded from the bipolar cells could not be modulated by either diazepam or pentobarbital sodium, and they were unaffected by phaclofen and 2-hydroxysaclofen, GABAB receptor antagonists. On the other hand, the bicuculline-resistant GABA responses could be blocked substantially by imidazole-4-acetic acid (I4AA), a competitive antagonist of GABAC receptors. 4. Noise analysis of the GABA-elicited currents suggested a different single channel conductance for GABAA (10.1 pS) and GABAC receptors (3.6 pS). 5. Zinc, a putative modulator of synaptic transmission, strongly inhibited the GABAC responses on bipolar cells, whereas the GABAA responses were not significantly affected by zinc. 6. The proportion of the GABAC to GABAA responses varied widely between bipolar cells. Local application of GABA onto dendrites or axon terminals showed that both types of GABA receptors are present on both regions of the cell. 7. The distinct properties of these two GABA receptor types suggest that they play different roles in retinal function.

  20. Altered AMPA receptor expression plays an important role in inducing bidirectional synaptic plasticity during contextual fear memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Subhrajit; Kimble, Whitney; Buabeid, Manal; Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Bloemer, Jenna; Alhowail, Ahmad; Reed, Miranda; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan; Escobar, Martha; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu

    2017-03-01

    Retrieval of a memory appears to render it unstable until the memory is once again re-stabilized or reconsolidated. Although the occurrence and consequences of reconsolidation have received much attention in recent years, the specific mechanisms that underlie the process of reconsolidation have not been fully described. Here, we present the first electrophysiological model of the synaptic plasticity changes underlying the different stages of reconsolidation of a conditioned fear memory. In this model, retrieval of a fear memory results in immediate but transient alterations in synaptic plasticity, mediated by modified expression of the glutamate receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2 in the hippocampus of rodents. Retrieval of a memory results in an immediate impairment in LTP, which is enhanced 6h following memory retrieval. Conversely, memory retrieval results in an immediate enhancement of LTD, which decreases with time. These changes in plasticity are accompanied by decreased expression of GluA2 receptor subunits. Recovery of LTP and LTD correlates with progressive overexpression of GluA2 receptor subunits. The contribution of the GluA2 receptor was confirmed by interfering with receptor expression at the postsynaptic sites. Blocking GluA2 endocytosis restored LTP and attenuated LTD during the initial portion of the reconsolidation period. These findings suggest that altered GluA2 receptor expression is one of the mechanisms that controls different forms of synaptic plasticity during reconsolidation.

  1. Olfactory receptor responding to gut microbiota-derived signals plays a role in renin secretion and blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Pluznick, Jennifer L; Protzko, Ryan J; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Peterlin, Zita; Sipos, Arnold; Han, Jinah; Brunet, Isabelle; Wan, La-Xiang; Rey, Federico; Wang, Tong; Firestein, Stuart J; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Eichmann, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Caplan, Michael J

    2013-03-12

    Olfactory receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that mediate olfactory chemosensation and serve as chemosensors in other tissues. We find that Olfr78, an olfactory receptor expressed in the kidney, responds to short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Olfr78 is expressed in the renal juxtaglomerular apparatus, where it mediates renin secretion in response to SCFAs. In addition, both Olfr78 and G protein-coupled receptor 41 (Gpr41), another SCFA receptor, are expressed in smooth muscle cells of small resistance vessels. Propionate, a SCFA shown to induce vasodilation ex vivo, produces an acute hypotensive response in wild-type mice. This effect is differentially modulated by disruption of Olfr78 and Gpr41 expression. SCFAs are end products of fermentation by the gut microbiota and are absorbed into the circulation. Antibiotic treatment reduces the biomass of the gut microbiota and elevates blood pressure in Olfr78 knockout mice. We conclude that SCFAs produced by the gut microbiota modulate blood pressure via Olfr78 and Gpr41.

  2. Olfactory receptor responding to gut microbiota-derived signals plays a role in renin secretion and blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pluznick, Jennifer L.; Protzko, Ryan J.; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Peterlin, Zita; Sipos, Arnold; Han, Jinah; Brunet, Isabelle; Wan, La-Xiang; Rey, Federico; Wang, Tong; Firestein, Stuart J.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Eichmann, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Caplan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that mediate olfactory chemosensation and serve as chemosensors in other tissues. We find that Olfr78, an olfactory receptor expressed in the kidney, responds to short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Olfr78 is expressed in the renal juxtaglomerular apparatus, where it mediates renin secretion in response to SCFAs. In addition, both Olfr78 and G protein-coupled receptor 41 (Gpr41), another SCFA receptor, are expressed in smooth muscle cells of small resistance vessels. Propionate, a SCFA shown to induce vasodilation ex vivo, produces an acute hypotensive response in wild-type mice. This effect is differentially modulated by disruption of Olfr78 and Gpr41 expression. SCFAs are end products of fermentation by the gut microbiota and are absorbed into the circulation. Antibiotic treatment reduces the biomass of the gut microbiota and elevates blood pressure in Olfr78 knockout mice. We conclude that SCFAs produced by the gut microbiota modulate blood pressure via Olfr78 and Gpr41. PMID:23401498

  3. The endothelin B receptor plays a crucial role in the adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, Bérengère; Nivoit, Pierre; El Nemer, Wassim; Lenoir, Olivia; Hermand, Patricia; Pereira, Catia; Brousse, Valentine; Guyonnet, Léa; Ghinatti, Giulia; Benkerrou, Malika; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Although the primary origin of sickle cell disease is a hemoglobin disorder, many types of cells contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of the disease. The adhesion of neutrophils to activated endothelium is critical in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease and targeting neutrophils and their interactions with endothelium represents an important opportunity for the development of new therapeutics. We focused on endothelin-1, a mediator involved in neutrophil activation and recruitment in tissues, and investigated the involvement of the endothelin receptors in the interaction of neutrophils with endothelial cells. We used fluorescence intravital microscopy analyses of the microcirculation in sickle mice and quantitative microfluidic fluorescence microscopy of human blood. Both experiments on the mouse model and patients indicate that blocking endothelin receptors, particularly ETB receptor, strongly influences neutrophil recruitment under inflammatory conditions in sickle cell disease. We show that human neutrophils have functional ETB receptors with calcium signaling capability, leading to increased adhesion to the endothelium through effects on both endothelial cells and neutrophils. Intact ETB function was found to be required for tumor necrosis factor α-dependent upregulation of CD11b on neutrophils. Furthermore, we confirmed that human neutrophils synthesize endothelin-1, which may be involved in autocrine and paracrine pathophysiological actions. Thus, the endothelin-ETB axis should be considered as a cytokine-like potent pro-inflammatory pathway in sickle cell disease. Blockade of endothelin receptors, including ETB, may provide major benefits for preventing or treating vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell patients. PMID:28385784

  4. Membrane Receptor-Induced Changes of the Protein Kinases A and C Activity May Play a Leading Role in Promoting Developmental Synapse Elimination at the Neuromuscular Junction.

    PubMed

    Tomàs, Josep M; Garcia, Neus; Lanuza, Maria A; Nadal, Laura; Tomàs, Marta; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Cilleros, Víctor

    2017-01-01

    Synapses that are overproduced during histogenesis in the nervous system are eventually lost and connectivity is refined. Membrane receptor signaling leads to activity-dependent mutual influence and competition between axons directly or with the involvement of the postsynaptic cell and the associated glial cell/s. Presynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (subtypes mAChR; M1, M2 and M4), adenosine receptors (AR; A1 and A2A) and the tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB), among others, all cooperate in synapse elimination. Between these receptors there are several synergistic, antagonic and modulatory relations that clearly affect synapse elimination. Metabotropic receptors converge in a limited repertoire of intracellular effector kinases, particularly serine protein kinases A and C (PKA and PKC), to phosphorylate protein targets and bring about structural and functional changes leading to axon loss. In most cells A1, M1 and TrkB operate mainly by stimulating PKC whereas A2A, M2 and M4 inhibit PKA. We hypothesize that a membrane receptor-induced shifting in the protein kinases A and C activity (inhibition of PKA and/or stimulation of PKC) in some nerve endings may play an important role in promoting developmental synapse elimination at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). This hypothesis is supported by: (i) the tonic effect (shown by using selective inhibitors) of several membrane receptors that accelerates axon loss between postnatal days P5-P9; (ii) the synergistic, antagonic and modulatory effects (shown by paired inhibition) of the receptors on axonal loss; (iii) the fact that the coupling of these receptors activates/inhibits the intracellular serine kinases; and (iv) the increase of the PKA activity, the reduction of the PKC activity or, in most cases, both situations simultaneously that presumably occurs in all the situations of singly and paired inhibition of the mAChR, AR and TrkB receptors. The use of transgenic animals and various

  5. GENES, IN ADDITION TO TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 2, PLAY A ROLE IN ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streptococcus infection in human populations continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mic...

  6. A LysM receptor-like kinase plays a critical role in chitin signaling and fungal resistance in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, is found in fungal cell walls, but not in plants. Plant cells are capable of perceiving chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) to trigger plant defense. We identified a LysM receptor-like protein (AtLysM RLK1) that is required for the perception of chit...

  7. A LysM Receptor-like Kinase Plays a Critical Role in Chitin Signaling and Fungal Resistance in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, is found in fungal cell walls, but not in plants. Plant cells are capable of perceiving chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) to trigger plant defense. We identified a LysM receptor-like protein (AtLysM RLK1) that is required for the perception of chit...

  8. GENES, IN ADDITION TO TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 2, PLAY A ROLE IN ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streptococcus infection in human populations continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mic...

  9. The endothelin B receptor plays a crucial role in the adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Koehl, Bérengère; Nivoit, Pierre; El Nemer, Wassim; Lenoir, Olivia; Hermand, Patricia; Pereira, Catia; Brousse, Valentine; Guyonnet, Léa; Ghinatti, Giulia; Benkerrou, Malika; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2017-07-01

    Although the primary origin of sickle cell disease is a hemoglobin disorder, many types of cells contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of the disease. The adhesion of neutrophils to activated endothelium is critical in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease and targeting neutrophils and their interactions with endothelium represents an important opportunity for the development of new therapeutics. We focused on endothelin-1, a mediator involved in neutrophil activation and recruitment in tissues, and investigated the involvement of the endothelin receptors in the interaction of neutrophils with endothelial cells. We used fluorescence intravital microscopy analyses of the microcirculation in sickle mice and quantitative microfluidic fluorescence microscopy of human blood. Both experiments on the mouse model and patients indicate that blocking endothelin receptors, particularly ETB receptor, strongly influences neutrophil recruitment under inflammatory conditions in sickle cell disease. We show that human neutrophils have functional ETB receptors with calcium signaling capability, leading to increased adhesion to the endothelium through effects on both endothelial cells and neutrophils. Intact ETB function was found to be required for tumor necrosis factor α-dependent upregulation of CD11b on neutrophils. Furthermore, we confirmed that human neutrophils synthesize endothelin-1, which may be involved in autocrine and paracrine pathophysiological actions. Thus, the endothelin-ETB axis should be considered as a cytokine-like potent pro-inflammatory pathway in sickle cell disease. Blockade of endothelin receptors, including ETB, may provide major benefits for preventing or treating vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell patients. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. Rats selectively bred for low levels of play-induced 50 kHz vocalizations as a model for Autism Spectrum Disorders: a role for NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Moskal, Joseph R.; Brudzynski, Stefan M.; Panksepp, Jaak

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood autism is characterized by deficits in social approach and play behaviors, socio-emotional relatedness, and communication/speech abnormalities, as well as repetitive behaviors. These core neuropsychological features of autism can be modeled in laboratory rats, and the results may be useful for drug discovery and therapeutic development. We review data that show that rats selectively bred for low rates of play-related pro-social ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) can be used to model social deficit symptoms of autism. Low-line animals engage in less social contact time with conspecifics, show lower rates of play induced pro-social USVs, and show an increased proportion of non-frequency modulated (i.e. monotonous) ultrasonic vocalizations compared to non-selectively bred random-line animals. Gene expression patterns in the low-line animals show significant enrichment in autism-associated genes, and the NMDA receptor family was identified as a significant hub. Treatment of low-line animals with the NMDAR functional glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, rescued the deficits in play-induced pro-social 50-kHz USVs and reduced monotonous USVs. Since the NMDA receptor has been implicated in the genesis of autistic symptoms, it is possible that GLYX-13 may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of autism. PMID:23623884

  11. Stimulation of high affinity gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptors potentiates the depolarization-induced increase of intraneuronal ionized calcium content in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    De Erausquin, G; Brooker, G; Costa, E; Wojcik, W J

    1992-09-01

    In the treatment of spasticity, the therapeutic cerebrospinal fluid levels of (+/-)-baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor agonist, are below 1 microM. However, the mechanism of the therapeutic action of (+/-)-baclofen remains unknown, because, for the most part, the action of (+/-)-baclofen on GABAB receptors requires micromolar concentrations. Using fura-2 fluorescence microscopy, intracellular ionized calcium was measured in cerebellar granule neurons. Stimulation of a high affinity GABAB receptor potentiated by 2-3-fold the rise in intracellular calcium observed after depolarization of the cell with a Krebs Ringer's buffered solution containing 40 mM K+. Both GABA (100 nM) and (+/-)-baclofen (10-100 nM) stimulated this high affinity receptor. The potentiation of the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular calcium by (+/-)-baclofen (100 nM) was completely blocked by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 (200 microM). Also, the intracellular calcium response induced by the activation of high affinity GABAB receptors was prevented by dantrolene (10 microM). The cerebellar granule neurons contained calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) stores. Caffeine (3 mM) and ryanodine (100 microM) potentiated the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular calcium, and this response to both drugs was blocked by dantrolene (10 microM). Because dantrolene does not prevent the rise in intracellular calcium after cell depolarization (this calcium originated from the influx of extracellular calcium), (+/-)-baclofen acting via the high affinity GABAB receptor indirectly activates the CICR stores, allowing the influx of extracellular calcium to trigger the release of calcium from these dantrolene-sensitive CICR stores. Thus, this high affinity GABAB receptor might become activated during persistent depolarization caused by pathological states and could be a mechanism to be studied for the therapeutic action of (+/-)-baclofen in spasticity.

  12. A LysM receptor-like kinase plays a critical role in chitin signaling and fungal resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jinrong; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Neece, David; Ramonell, Katrina M; Clough, Steve; Kim, Sung-Yong; Stacey, Minviluz G; Stacey, Gary

    2008-02-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, is found in fungal cell walls but not in plants. Plant cells can perceive chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) leading to gene induction and defense responses. We identified a LysM receptor-like protein (LysM RLK1) required for chitin signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. The mutation in this gene blocked the induction of almost all chitooligosaccharide-responsive genes and led to more susceptibility to fungal pathogens but had no effect on infection by a bacterial pathogen. Additionally, exogenously applied chitooligosaccharides enhanced resistance against both fungal and bacterial pathogens in the wild-type plants but not in the mutant. Together, our data indicate that LysM RLK1 is essential for chitin signaling in plants (likely as part of the receptor complex) and is involved in chitin-mediated plant innate immunity. The LysM RLK1-mediated chitin signaling pathway is unique, but it may share a conserved downstream pathway with the FLS2/flagellin- and EFR/EF-Tu-mediated signaling pathways. Additionally, our work suggests a possible evolutionary relationship between the chitin and Nod factor perception mechanisms due to the similarities between their potential receptors and between the signal molecules perceived by them.

  13. Regional Fos-expression induced by γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB): comparison with γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and effects of co-administration of the GABAB antagonist SCH 50911 and putative GHB antagonist NCS-382.

    PubMed

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, P S; McGregor, I S; Chebib, M; Hunt, G E

    2014-09-26

    γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has a complex array of neural actions that include effects on its own high-affinity GHB receptor, the release of neuroactive steroids, and agonist actions at GABAA and GABAB receptors. We previously reported partial overlap in the c-Fos expression patterns produced by GHB and the GABAB agonist, baclofen in rats. The present study extends these earlier findings by examining the extent to which GHB Fos expression and behavioral sedation are prevented by (2S)-(+)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH 50911), a GABAB antagonist, and NCS-382, a putative antagonist at the high-affinity GHB receptor. We also compare Fos expression caused by GHB and its precursor γ-butyrolactone (GBL), which is a pro-drug for GHB but lacks the high sodium content of the parent GHB molecule. Both GHB (1,000 mg/kg) and GBL (600 mg/kg) induced rapid sedation in rats that lasted over 90 min and caused similar Fos expression patterns, albeit with GBL causing greater activation of the nucleus accumbens (core and shell) and dentate gyrus (granular layer). Pretreatment with SCH 50911 (100mg/kg) partly reversed the sedative effects of GHB and significantly reduced GHB-induced Fos expression in only four regions: the tenia tecta, lateral habenula, dorsal raphe and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. NCS-382 (50mg/kg) had no effect on GHB-induced sedation or Fos expression. When given alone, both NCS-382 and SCH 50911 increased Fos expression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala, parasubthalamic nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract. SCH 50911 alone affected the Islands of Calleja and the medial, central and paraventricular thalamic nuclei. Overall, this study shows a surprising lack of reversal of GHB-induced Fos expression by two relevant antagonists, both of which have marked intrinsic actions. This may reflect the limited doses tested but also suggests that GHB Fos expression reflects mechanisms independent of GHB and GABAB receptors.

  14. Tyrosine-610 in the Receptor Kinase BAK1 Does Not Play a Major Role in Brassinosteroid Signaling or Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijayata; Perraki, Artemis; Kim, Sang Y.; Shrivastava, Stuti; Lee, Jae H.; Zhao, Youfu; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Oh, Man-Ho; Marshall-Colon, Amy; Zipfel, Cyril; Huber, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    The plasma membrane-localized BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1) functions as a co-receptor with several receptor kinases including the brassinosteroid (BR) receptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1), which is involved in growth, and the receptors for bacterial flagellin and EF-Tu, FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2) and EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), respectively, which are involved in immunity. BAK1 is a dual specificity protein kinase that can autophosphorylate on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues. It was previously reported that phosphorylation of Tyr-610 in the carboxy-terminal domain of BAK1 is required for its function in BR signaling and immunity. However, the functional role of Tyr-610 in vivo has recently come under scrutiny. Therefore, we have generated new BAK1 (Y610F) transgenic plants for functional studies. We first produced transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing BAK1 (Y610F)-Flag in the homozygous bak1-4 bkk1-1 double null background. In a complementary approach, we expressed untagged BAK1 and BAK1 (Y610F) in the bak1-4 null mutant. Neither BAK1 (Y610F) transgenic line had any obvious growth phenotype when compared to wild-type BAK1 expressed in the same background. In addition, the BAK1 (Y610F)-Flag plants responded similarly to plants expressing BAK1-Flag in terms of brassinolide (BL) inhibition of root elongation, and there were only minor changes in gene expression between the two transgenic lines as monitored by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. In terms of plant immunity, there were no significant differences between plants expressing BAK1 (Y610F)-Flag and BAK1-Flag in the growth of the non-pathogenic hrpA- mutant of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Furthermore, untagged BAK1 (Y610F) transgenic plants were as responsive as plants expressing BAK1 (in the bak1-4 background) and wild-type Col-0 plants toward treatment with the EF-Tu- and flagellin-derived peptide epitopes elf18- and flg22, respectively, as measured by reactive oxygen

  15. Insulin Receptor Signaling in the GnRH Neuron Plays a Role in the Abnormal GnRH Pulsatility of Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    DiVall, Sara A.; Herrera, Danny; Sklar, Bonnie; Wu, Sheng; Wondisford, Fredric; Radovick, Sally; Wolfe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Infertility associated with obesity is characterized by abnormal hormone release from reproductive tissues in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary. These tissues maintain insulin sensitivity upon peripheral insulin resistance. Insulin receptor signaling may play a role in the dysregulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in obesity, but the interdependence of hormone secretion in the reproductive axis and the multi-hormone and tissue dysfunction in obesity hinders investigations of putative contributing factors to the disrupted GnRH secretion. To determine the role of GnRH insulin receptor signaling in the dysregulation of GnRH secretion in obesity, we created murine models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) with and without intact insulin signaling in the GnRH neuron. Obese control female mice were infertile with higher luteinizing hormone levels and higher GnRH pulse amplitude and total pulsatile secretion compared to lean control mice. In contrast, DIO mice with a GnRH specific knockout of insulin receptor had improved fertility, luteinizing hormone levels approaching lean mice, and GnRH pulse amplitude and total secretion similar to lean mice. Pituitary responsiveness was similar between genotypes. These results suggest that in the obese state, insulin receptor signaling in GnRH neurons increases GnRH pulsatile secretion and consequent LH secretion, contributing to reproductive dysfunction. PMID:25780937

  16. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Regulates Cytosolic [Ca (2+) ] and Plays a Major Role in the Development of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kimberly A; Ayon, Ramon J; Tang, Haiyang; Makino, Ayako; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) leading to right heart failure and premature death. The increased PVR results in part from pulmonary vascular remodeling and sustained pulmonary vasoconstriction. Excessive pulmonary vascular remodeling stems from increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and decreased PASMC apoptosis. A rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) in PASMC is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and a key stimulus for PASMC proliferation and migration, both contributing to the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling. PASMC from patients with idiopathic PAH (IPAH) have increased resting [Ca(2+)]cyt and enhanced Ca(2+) influx. Enhanced Ca(2+) entry into PASMC due to upregulation of membrane receptors and/or Ca(2+) channels may contribute to PASMC contraction and proliferation and to pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary vascular remodeling. We have shown that the extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR), which is a member of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) subfamily C, is upregulated, and the extracellular Ca(2+)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt is enhanced in PASMC from patients with IPAH in comparison to PASMC from normal subjects. Pharmacologically blockade of CaSR significantly attenuate the development and progression of experimental pulmonary hypertension in animals. Additionally, we have demonstrated that dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blockers (e.g., nifedipine), which are used to treat PAH patients but are only effective in 15-20% of patients, activate CaSR resulting in an increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt in IPAH-PASMC, but not normal PASMC. Our data indicate that CaSR functionally couples with transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels to mediate extracellular Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) influx and increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt in IPAH-PASMC. Upregulated CaSR is necessary for the enhanced

  17. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Regulates Cytosolic [Ca2+] and Plays a Major Role in the Development of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kimberly A.; Ayon, Ramon J.; Tang, Haiyang; Makino, Ayako; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) leading to right heart failure and premature death. The increased PVR results in part from pulmonary vascular remodeling and sustained pulmonary vasoconstriction. Excessive pulmonary vascular remodeling stems from increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and decreased PASMC apoptosis. A rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) in PASMC is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and a key stimulus for PASMC proliferation and migration, both contributing to the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling. PASMC from patients with idiopathic PAH (IPAH) have increased resting [Ca2+]cyt and enhanced Ca2+ influx. Enhanced Ca2+ entry into PASMC due to upregulation of membrane receptors and/or Ca2+ channels may contribute to PASMC contraction and proliferation and to pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary vascular remodeling. We have shown that the extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR), which is a member of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) subfamily C, is upregulated, and the extracellular Ca2+-induced increase in [Ca2+]cyt is enhanced in PASMC from patients with IPAH in comparison to PASMC from normal subjects. Pharmacologically blockade of CaSR significantly attenuate the development and progression of experimental pulmonary hypertension in animals. Additionally, we have demonstrated that dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel blockers (e.g., nifedipine), which are used to treat PAH patients but are only effective in 15–20% of patients, activate CaSR resulting in an increase in [Ca2+]cyt in IPAH-PASMC, but not normal PASMC. Our data indicate that CaSR functionally couples with transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels to mediate extracellular Ca2+-induced Ca2+ influx and increase in [Ca2+]cyt in IPAH-PASMC. Upregulated CaSR is necessary for the enhanced extracellular Ca2+-induced

  18. Interactions between adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors in the rat hippocampal slice

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Ali; Stone, Trevor W

    2003-01-01

    We have examined excitatory postsynaptic potentials and paired-pulse interactions in rat hippocampal slices to obtain more information about the site and mechanism of interactions between metabotropic glutamate receptors and adenosine receptors. The results show that the suppression of adenosine sensitivity is explained by a selectively reduced responsiveness to A1 receptor stimulation, and does not involve any facilitation of A2A adenosine receptors, since it can be obtained in the absence of endogenous adenosine and is not prevented by the A2A receptor blocker ZM241385. The glutamate receptors involved are of the group I class since the suppression of adenosine sensitivity is produced by ACPD and the group I selective compound DHPG. Furthermore, the effects of DHPG could be prevented by LY367385, a selective antagonist at the mGlu1a subtype of group I receptors. The selective antagonist at mGlu5 receptors, SIB1893, did not prevent the suppression of adenosine sensitivity by DHPG. Blockade of the DHPG/adenosine interaction was also obtained by superfusion with the protein kinasae C inhibitor chelerythrine. Since the suppression of adenosine responses by metabotropic receptor agonists was seen in the paired-pulse paradigm, we conclude that the observed interactions occur at the level of the presynaptic terminals. The interaction with adenosine receptors is not specific, but applies also to a suppression of responses mediated by the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen. We conclude that activation of the mGlu1a subtype of receptor can suppress responses mediated via adenosine A1 receptors, probably by activating protein kinase C. Since the changes induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists last for at least 60 min, the data also imply that these interactions could play an important role in changes of synaptic function long after even transient increases of glutamate release in the CNS. PMID:12684261

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 3 (TLR3) Plays a Major Role in the Formation of Rabies Virus Negri Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ménager, Pauline; Roux, Pascal; Mégret, Françoise; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Le Sourd, Anne-Marie; Danckaert, Anne; Lafage, Mireille; Préhaud, Christophe; Lafon, Monique

    2009-01-01

    Human neurons express the innate immune response receptor, Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). TLR3 levels are increased in pathological conditions such as brain virus infection. Here, we further investigated the production, cellular localisation, and function of neuronal TLR3 during neuronotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection in human neuronal cells. Following RABV infection, TLR3 is not only present in endosomes, as observed in the absence of infection, but also in detergent-resistant perinuclear inclusion bodies. As well as TLR3, these inclusion bodies contain the viral genome and viral proteins (N and P, but not G). The size and composition of inclusion bodies and the absence of a surrounding membrane, as shown by electron microscopy, suggest they correspond to the previously described Negri Bodies (NBs). NBs are not formed in the absence of TLR3, and TLR3−/− mice—in which brain tissue was less severely infected—had a better survival rate than WT mice. These observations demonstrate that TLR3 is a major molecule involved in the spatial arrangement of RABV–induced NBs and viral replication. This study shows how viruses can exploit cellular proteins and compartmentalisation for their own benefit. PMID:19247444

  20. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a major role in the formation of rabies virus Negri Bodies.

    PubMed

    Ménager, Pauline; Roux, Pascal; Mégret, Françoise; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Le Sourd, Anne-Marie; Danckaert, Anne; Lafage, Mireille; Préhaud, Christophe; Lafon, Monique

    2009-02-01

    Human neurons express the innate immune response receptor, Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). TLR3 levels are increased in pathological conditions such as brain virus infection. Here, we further investigated the production, cellular localisation, and function of neuronal TLR3 during neuronotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection in human neuronal cells. Following RABV infection, TLR3 is not only present in endosomes, as observed in the absence of infection, but also in detergent-resistant perinuclear inclusion bodies. As well as TLR3, these inclusion bodies contain the viral genome and viral proteins (N and P, but not G). The size and composition of inclusion bodies and the absence of a surrounding membrane, as shown by electron microscopy, suggest they correspond to the previously described Negri Bodies (NBs). NBs are not formed in the absence of TLR3, and TLR3(-/-) mice -- in which brain tissue was less severely infected -- had a better survival rate than WT mice. These observations demonstrate that TLR3 is a major molecule involved in the spatial arrangement of RABV-induced NBs and viral replication. This study shows how viruses can exploit cellular proteins and compartmentalisation for their own benefit.

  1. The ABA receptor PYL9 together with PYL8 plays an important role in regulating lateral root growth

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lu; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Jinghui; Xiang, Chengbin; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid is a phytohormone regulating plant growth, development and stress responses. PYR1/PYL/RCAR proteins are ABA receptors that function by inhibiting PP2Cs to activate SnRK2s, resulting in phosphorylation of ABFs and other effectors of ABA response pathways. Exogenous ABA induces growth quiescence of lateral roots, which is prolonged by knockout of the ABA receptor PYL8. Among the 14 members of PYR1/PYL/RCAR protein family, PYL9 is a close relative of PYL8. Here we show that knockout of both PYL9 and PYL8 resulted in a longer ABA-induced quiescence on lateral root growth and a reduced sensitivity to ABA on primary root growth and lateral root formation compared to knockout of PYL8 alone. Induced overexpression of PYL9 promoted the lateral root elongation in the presence of ABA. The prolonged quiescent phase of the pyl8-1pyl9 double mutant was reversed by exogenous IAA. PYL9 may regulate auxin-responsive genes in vivo through direct interaction with MYB77 and MYB44. Thus, PYL9 and PYL8 are both responsible for recovery of lateral root from ABA inhibition via MYB transcription factors. PMID:27256015

  2. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Play a Phylogenetically Conserved Role in Endocrine Pancreas Morphogenesis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Heximer, Scott; Beis, Dimitris; Gavalas, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During development pancreatic endocrine cells migrate in a coordinated fashion. This migration is necessary to form fully functional islets, but the mechanisms involved remain unknown. Therapeutic strategies to restore β-cell mass and islet functionality by reprogramming endogenous exocrine cells would be strengthened from simultaneous treatments that enhance endocrine cell clustering. We found that endocrine progenitors respond to and regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in order to cluster in islets. Rgs4, a dedicated regulator of GPCR signaling, was specifically expressed in early epithelial endocrine progenitors of both zebrafish and mouse, and its expression in the mouse endocrine progenitors was strictly dependent upon Ngn3, the key specification gene of the endocrine lineage. Rgs4 loss of function resulted in defects in islet cell aggregation. By genetically inactivating Gαi-mediated GPCR signaling in endocrine progenitors, we established its role in islet cell aggregation in both mouse and zebrafish. Finally, we identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as a ligand mediating islet cell aggregation in both species acting through distinct but closely related receptors. PMID:21911471

  3. The interplay between intracellular progesterone receptor and PKC plays a key role in migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Marquina-Sánchez, Brenda; González-Jorge, Jesús; Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; Wegman-Ostrosky, Talia; Baranda-Ávila, Noemi; Mejía-Pérez, Sonia; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; González-Arenas, Aliesha

    2017-09-01

    Intracellular progesterone receptors (PRs) and protein kinases C (PKCs) are known regulators of cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Both PRs and PKCs are found overexpressed in grade IV human astrocytomas, also known as glioblastomas, which are the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. In the present study, we investigated whether PR activation by PKC induces the migration and invasion of glioblastoma derived cell lines and if PKCα and δ isoforms are involved in PR activation. We observed that PKC activation with tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) increases the migration and invasion capacity of two human glioblastoma derived human cell lines (U251 MG and U87) and that the treatment with the PR receptor antagonist RU486 blocks these processes. Interestingly, the pharmacological inhibition of the isoenzymes PKCα and PKCδ also resulted in a blocked PR transcriptional activity. Also, TPA-dependent PR activation increases the expression of progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), a known PR target gene. These results hint to an existing cross-talk between PKCs and PRs in regulating the infiltration process of human glioblastomas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Unsaturated phosphinic analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid as GABA(C) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chebib, M; Vandenberg, R J; Froestl, W; Johnston, G A

    1997-06-25

    The phosphinic and methylphosphinic analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are potent GABA(C) receptor antagonists but are even more potent as GABA(B) receptor agonists. Conformationally restricted unsaturated phosphinic and methylphosphinic analogues of GABA and some potent GABA(B) receptor phosphonoamino acid antagonists were tested on GABA(C) receptors in Xenopus oocytes expressing human retinal rho1 mRNA. 3-Aminopropyl-n-butyl-phosphinic acid (CGP36742), an orally active GABA(B) receptor antagonist, was found to be a moderately potent GABA(C) receptor antagonist (IC50 = 62 microM). The unsaturated methylphosphinic and phosphinic analogues of GABA were competitive antagonists of the GABA(C) receptors, the order of potency being [(E)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]methylphosphinic acid (CGP44530, IC50 = 5.53 microM) > [(E)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]phosphinic acid (CGP38593, IC50 = 7.68 microM) > [(Z)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]methylphosphinic acid (CGP70523, IC50 = 38.94 microM) > [(Z)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]phosphinic acid (CGP70522, IC50 > 100 microM). This order of potency differs from that reported for these compounds as GABA(B) receptor agonists, where the phosphinic acids are more potent than the corresponding methylphosphinic acids.

  5. NCoR1-independent mechanism plays a role in the action of the unliganded thyroid hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Arturo; Astapova, Inna; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Gallop, Molly R; Al-Sowaimel, Lujain; MacGowan, S M Dileas; Bergmann, Tim; Berg, Anders H; Tenen, Danielle E; Jacobs, Christopher; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Tsai, Linus; Hollenberg, Anthony N

    2017-09-18

    Nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1) is considered to be the major corepressor that mediates ligand-independent actions of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) during development and in hypothyroidism. We tested this by expressing a hypomorphic NCoR1 allele (NCoR1ΔID), which cannot interact with the TR, in Pax8-KO mice, which make no thyroid hormone. Surprisingly, abrogation of NCoR1 function did not reverse the ligand-independent action of the TR on many gene targets and did not fully rescue the high mortality rate due to congenital hypothyroidism in these mice. To further examine NCoR1's role in repression by the unliganded TR, we deleted NCoR1 in the livers of euthyroid and hypothyroid mice and examined the effects on gene expression and enhancer activity measured by histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27) acetylation. Even in the absence of NCoR1 function, we observed strong repression of more than 43% of positive T3 (3,3',5-triiodothyronine) targets in hypothyroid mice. Regulation of approximately half of those genes correlated with decreased H3K27 acetylation, and nearly 80% of these regions with affected H3K27 acetylation contained a bona fide TRβ1-binding site. Moreover, using liver-specific TRβ1-KO mice, we demonstrate that hypothyroidism-associated changes in gene expression and histone acetylation require TRβ1. Thus, many of the genomic changes mediated by the TR in hypothyroidism are independent of NCoR1, suggesting a role for additional signaling modulators in hypothyroidism.

  6. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor type 1 (LPA1) plays a functional role in osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption activity.

    PubMed

    David, Marion; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Kikuta, Junichi; Ottewell, Penelope; Mima, Fuka; Leblanc, Raphael; Bonnelye, Edith; Ribeiro, Johnny; Holen, Ingunn; Lopez Vales, Rùben; Jurdic, Pierre; Chun, Jerold; Clézardin, Philippe; Ishii, Masaru; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2014-03-07

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural bioactive lipid that acts through six different G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6) with pleiotropic activities on multiple cell types. We have previously demonstrated that LPA is necessary for successful in vitro osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow cells. Bone cells controlling bone remodeling (i.e. osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes) express LPA1, but delineating the role of this receptor in bone remodeling is still pending. Despite Lpar1(-/-) mice displaying a low bone mass phenotype, we demonstrated that bone marrow cell-induced osteoclastogenesis was reduced in Lpar1(-/-) mice but not in Lpar2(-/-) and Lpar3(-/-) animals. Expression of LPA1 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis, and LPA1 antagonists (Ki16425, Debio0719, and VPC12249) inhibited osteoclast differentiation. Blocking LPA1 activity with Ki16425 inhibited expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein and interfered with the fusion but not the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. Similar to wild type osteoclasts treated with Ki16425, mature Lpar1(-/-) osteoclasts had reduced podosome belt and sealing zone resulting in reduced mineralized matrix resorption. Additionally, LPA1 expression markedly increased in the bone of ovariectomized mice, which was blocked by bisphosphonate treatment. Conversely, systemic treatment with Debio0719 prevented ovariectomy-induced cancellous bone loss. Moreover, intravital multiphoton microscopy revealed that Debio0719 reduced the retention of CX3CR1-EGFP(+) osteoclast precursors in bone by increasing their mobility in the bone marrow cavity. Overall, our results demonstrate that LPA1 is essential for in vitro and in vivo osteoclast activities. Therefore, LPA1 emerges as a new target for the treatment of diseases associated with excess bone loss.

  7. Gender Effect in Experimental Models of Human Medulloblastoma: Does the Estrogen Receptor β Signaling Play a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Ciucci, Alessandra; Meco, Daniela; De Stefano, Ilaria; Travaglia, Daniele; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Scambia, Giovanni; Riccardi, Riccardo; Saran, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background The male-to-female sex ratio for medulloblastoma (MB) is approximately 1.5∶1, female gender being also a favorable prognostic factor. This study aimed at evaluating the impact of gender on MB tumorigenesis. Methods In vitro activity of 17β-estradiol (E2), DPN [2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile, a selective estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-agonist], PPT [4,4′,4″-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol, a selective ERα-agonist] or DHT (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone) was evaluated in three human MB cell lines. D283 Med cells were transplanted into athymic mice. Results A significant expression of ERβ, with little or no ERα, and low AR (androgen receptor) was found in MB cell lines. The compounds tested did not affect cell proliferation. In vivo, we observed a significantly lower growth of D283 Med in nude female mice compared to males. At microscopic examination, tumors from females showed a shift towards differentiation, as evaluated by lower nestin, and higher NSE (neuron-specific enolase) and GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein) expression compared to males. Tumors from females also showed lower Ki67 and p53 expression. The wild-type ERβ protein (ERβ1) was lost in male tumors, while it was a permanent feature in females, and a strong negative correlation was found between Ki67 and ERβ1 expression. Conversely, tumor levels of ERβ2 and ERβ5 did not significantly differ between genders. Increased levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 were observed in females, suggesting that estrogen may decrease tumor growth through blocking cell cycle progression. An inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) signaling was also evident in females. Conclusion We provides mechanistic evidence supporting the idea that ERβ1 signaling may have pro-differentiation and tumor suppressive function in medulloblastomas. PMID:25000562

  8. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Type 1 (LPA1) Plays a Functional Role in Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorption Activity*

    PubMed Central

    David, Marion; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Kikuta, Junichi; Ottewell, Penelope; Mima, Fuka; Leblanc, Raphael; Bonnelye, Edith; Ribeiro, Johnny; Holen, Ingunn; Vales, Rùben Lopez; Jurdic, Pierre; Chun, Jerold; Clézardin, Philippe; Ishii, Masaru; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural bioactive lipid that acts through six different G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–6) with pleiotropic activities on multiple cell types. We have previously demonstrated that LPA is necessary for successful in vitro osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow cells. Bone cells controlling bone remodeling (i.e. osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes) express LPA1, but delineating the role of this receptor in bone remodeling is still pending. Despite Lpar1−/− mice displaying a low bone mass phenotype, we demonstrated that bone marrow cell-induced osteoclastogenesis was reduced in Lpar1−/− mice but not in Lpar2−/− and Lpar3−/− animals. Expression of LPA1 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis, and LPA1 antagonists (Ki16425, Debio0719, and VPC12249) inhibited osteoclast differentiation. Blocking LPA1 activity with Ki16425 inhibited expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein and interfered with the fusion but not the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. Similar to wild type osteoclasts treated with Ki16425, mature Lpar1−/− osteoclasts had reduced podosome belt and sealing zone resulting in reduced mineralized matrix resorption. Additionally, LPA1 expression markedly increased in the bone of ovariectomized mice, which was blocked by bisphosphonate treatment. Conversely, systemic treatment with Debio0719 prevented ovariectomy-induced cancellous bone loss. Moreover, intravital multiphoton microscopy revealed that Debio0719 reduced the retention of CX3CR1-EGFP+ osteoclast precursors in bone by increasing their mobility in the bone marrow cavity. Overall, our results demonstrate that LPA1 is essential for in vitro and in vivo osteoclast activities. Therefore, LPA1 emerges as a new target for the treatment of diseases associated with excess bone loss. PMID:24429286

  9. Interleukin 21 and Its Receptor Play a Role in Proliferation, Migration and Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Na; Cui, Yu-Xin; Ruge, Fiona; Jiang, Wen G

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 21 (IL21) is a cytokine produced predominantly by cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4+) T-cells and natural killer T-cells. There exists evidence that IL21 is implicated in various immunological processes through its specific receptor (IL21R). However, the participation of IL21 in the pathogenesis of solid tumors is not fully conclusive. In the present study, we demonstrated that there was differential expression of IL21R in breast cancer cells using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting and sequence analysis. The expression of IL21R was stronger in MDA-231 cells, weaker in MCF7 but negative in ZR-75.1 cells. The invasion and migratory capacity of IL21R+ MDA-231 cells was enhanced by IL21 in a dose-dependent manner. After IL21R was knocked-down by siRNA gene silencing, the response of MDA-231 to treatment with IL21 was attenuated. We found that siRNA silencing of IL21R also spontaneously suppressed cell proliferation. However, IL21 had no additional effect on the proliferation of MDA-231 cells. We also found that IL21R was involved in signaling pathways of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), that are crucial for spreading and migration of metastatic MDA231 cells. In conclusion, we unveiled the roles of IL21R in breast cancer cells, which enhances our knowledge on immunological regulation of cancer cells through the axis of IL21 and its receptor. Copyright© 2015, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Sigma-2 Receptors Play a Role in Cellular Metabolism: Stimulation of Glycolytic Hallmarks by CM764 in Human SK-N-SH Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Hilary; Mesangeau, Christophe; McCurdy, Christopher R; Bowen, Wayne D

    2016-02-01

    Sigma-2 receptors are attractive antineoplastic targets due to their ability to induce apoptosis and their upregulation in rapidly proliferating cancer cells compared with healthy tissue. However, this role is inconsistent with overexpression in cancer, which is typically associated with upregulation of prosurvival factors. Here, we report a novel metabolic regulatory function for sigma-2 receptors. CM764 [6-acetyl-3-(4-(4-(2-amino-4-fluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one] binds with Ki values of 86.6 ± 2.8 and 3.5 ± 0.9 nM at the sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors, respectively. CM764 increased reduction of MTT [3-[4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide] in human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma compared with untreated cells, an effect not due to proliferation. This effect was attenuated by five different sigma antagonists, including CM572 [3-(4-(4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)-6-isothiocyanatobenzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one], which has no significant affinity for sigma-1 receptors. This effect was also observed in MG-63 osteosarcoma and HEK293T cells, indicating that this function is not exclusive to neuroblastoma or to cancer cells. CM764 produced an immediate, robust, and transient increase in cytosolic calcium, consistent with sigma-2 receptor activation. Additionally, we observed an increase in the total NAD(+)/NADH level and the ATP level in CM764-treated SK-N-SH cells compared with untreated cells. After only 4 hours of treatment, basal levels of reactive oxygen species were reduced by 90% in cells treated with CM764 over untreated cells, and HIF1α and VEGF levels were increased after 3-24 hours of treatment. These data indicate that sigma-2 receptors may play a role in induction of glycolysis, representing a possible prosurvival function for the sigma-2 receptor that is consistent with its upregulation in cancer cells compared with healthy tissue.

  11. Toll Like Receptor 3 Plays a Critical Role in the Progression and Severity of Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cavassani, Karen A.; Moreira, Ana Paula; Habiel, David; Ito, Toshihiro; Coelho, Ana Lucia; Allen, Ron M.; Hu, Bin; Raphelson, Janna; Carson, William F.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Omary, M. Bishr; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation has been implicated in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Herein, we hypothesize that TLR3 activation significantly contributed to APAP-induced liver injury. In fasted wildtype (WT) mice, APAP caused significant cellular necrosis, edema, and inflammation in the liver, and the de novo expression and activation of TLR3 was found to be necessary for APAP-induced liver failure. Specifically, liver tissues from similarly fasted TLR3-deficient (tlr3−/−) mice exhibited significantly less histological and biochemical evidence of injury after APAP challenge. Similar protective effects were observed in WT mice in which TLR3 was targeted through immunoneutralization at 3 h post-APAP challenge. Among three important death ligands (i.e. TNFα, TRAIL, and FASL) known to promote hepatocyte death after APAP challenge, TNFα was the only ligand that was significantly reduced in APAP-challenged tlr3−/− mice compared with APAP-challenged WT controls. In vivo studies demonstrated that TLR3 activation contributed to TNFα production in the liver presumably via F4/80+ and CD11c+ immune cells. In vitro studies indicated that there was cooperation between TNFα and TLR3 in the activation of JNK signaling in isolated and cultured liver epithelial cells (i.e. nMuLi). Moreover, TLR3 activation enhanced the expression of phosphorylated JNK in APAP injured livers. Thus, the current study demonstrates that TLR3 activation contributes to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:23762449

  12. Regulatory T cells play a role in T-cell receptor CDR2 peptide regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Buenafe, Abigail C; Andrew, Shayne; Offner, Halina; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2012-01-01

    Eliciting T-cell receptor (TCR) -specific responsiveness has been known to provide an effective autoregulatory mechanism for limiting inflammation mediated by T effector cells. Our previous use of TCR peptides derived from the CDR3 regions of a pathogenic TCR effectively reversed ongoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in a humanized TCR transgenic model. In this study, we use the TCR BV8S2 CDR2 peptide in the non-transgenic C57BL/6 EAE model to down-regulate the heterogeneous TCR BV8S2+ MOG-35-55-specific pathogenic T-cell population and demonstrate successful treatment of EAE after disease onset. Suppression of disease was associated with reduced MOG-35-55-specific and non-specific T-cell production of interleukin-17a and interferon-γ in the central nervous system, as well as reduced numbers of CD4+ and Foxp3+ T cells in the central nervous system. With the use of Foxp3-GFP and Foxp3 conditional knockout mice, we demonstrate that the TCR CDR2 peptide treatment effect is dependent on the presence of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and that regulatory T cell numbers are significantly expanded in the periphery of treated mice. Hence, TCR CDR2 peptide therapy is effective in regulating heterogeneous, pathogenic T-cell populations through the activity of the Foxp3+ regulatory T cell population. PMID:22044096

  13. Regulatory T cells play a role in T-cell receptor CDR2 peptide regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Buenafe, Abigail C; Andrew, Shayne; Offner, Halina; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2012-02-01

    Eliciting T-cell receptor (TCR) -specific responsiveness has been known to provide an effective autoregulatory mechanism for limiting inflammation mediated by T effector cells. Our previous use of TCR peptides derived from the CDR3 regions of a pathogenic TCR effectively reversed ongoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in a humanized TCR transgenic model. In this study, we use the TCR BV8S2 CDR2 peptide in the non-transgenic C57BL/6 EAE model to down-regulate the heterogeneous TCR BV8S2(+)  MOG-35-55-specific pathogenic T-cell population and demonstrate successful treatment of EAE after disease onset. Suppression of disease was associated with reduced MOG-35-55-specific and non-specific T-cell production of interleukin-17a and interferon-γ in the central nervous system, as well as reduced numbers of CD4(+) and Foxp3(+) T cells in the central nervous system. With the use of Foxp3-GFP and Foxp3 conditional knockout mice, we demonstrate that the TCR CDR2 peptide treatment effect is dependent on the presence of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and that regulatory T cell numbers are significantly expanded in the periphery of treated mice. Hence, TCR CDR2 peptide therapy is effective in regulating heterogeneous, pathogenic T-cell populations through the activity of the Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell population.

  14. T-cell receptor alpha chain plays a critical role in antigen-specific suppressor cell function.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchroo, V K; Byrne, M C; Atsumi, Y; Greenfield, E; Connolly, J B; Whitters, M J; O'Hara, R M; Collins, M; Dorf, M E

    1991-01-01

    Antigen-specific suppressor T-cell hybridomas release soluble suppressor factors (TsF) in the supernatant that modulate both in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity and in vitro plaque-forming cell responses in an antigen-specific manner. To study the relationship between the T-cell receptor (TcR) and TsF, we developed a series of TcR alpha- or TcR beta- expression variants from suppressor T-cell hybridomas that expressed the CD3-TcR alpha/beta complex. We demonstrate that loss of TcR alpha but not TcR beta mRNA was accompanied by the concomitant loss of suppressor bioactivity. Homologous transfection of TcR alpha cDNA into a TcR alpha- beta+ clone reconstituted both CD3-TcR expression and suppressor function. Furthermore, suppressor activity from TcR beta- variants was specifically absorbed by antigen and anti-TcR alpha antibodies, but not by anti-CD3 or anti-TcR beta affinity columns. These data directly establish a role for the TcR alpha chain in suppressor T-cell function and suggest that the TcR alpha chain is part of the antigen-specific TsF molecule. Images PMID:1833764

  15. Effects of LSD on Ca++ currents in central 5-HT-containing neurons: 5-HT1A receptors may play a role in hallucinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Penington, N J; Fox, A P

    1994-06-01

    Drugs that influence the activity of central serotonergic neurons by activating a 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype of receptor (5-HT1A) alter mood and perception. Previously, we demonstrated with whole-cell recordings from acutely isolated 5-HT-containing dorsal raphe (DR) neurons from the adult rat that 5-HT inhibited Ca++ current and activated K+ current in DR neurons. We now show that D-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) mimics the actions of 5-HT; it dramatically suppresses Ca++ current in a dose-dependent manner and activates an inwardly rectifying K+ conductance. Spiperone (0.2 microM), a 5-HT1A/5-HT2 antagonist, blocks the effect of both LSD and 5-HT. The nonhallucinogenic structural analog 2-bromo-LSD (2-Bol) at 10 microM has no effect on either Ca++ or K+ current by itself, but it competitively antagonizes both effects of LSD. Inhibition of 5-HT release resulting from 5-HT1A receptor activation may play an integral role in the hallucinogenic actions of LSD by reducing competition between 5-HT and LSD for the postsynaptic 5-HT receptors.

  16. G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor plays a key role in bile acid metabolism and fasting-induced hepatic steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Ajay C; Boehme, Shannon; Li, Feng; Chiang, John Y L

    2017-03-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that play a critical role in regulation of hepatic metabolic homeostasis by activating nuclear farnesoid X receptor (Fxr) and membrane G-protein-coupled receptor (Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5; Tgr5). The role of FXR in regulation of bile acid synthesis and hepatic metabolism has been studied extensively. However, the role of TGR5 in hepatic metabolism has not been explored. The liver plays a central role in lipid metabolism, and impaired response to fasting and feeding contributes to steatosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver and obesity. We have performed a detailed analysis of gallbladder bile acid and lipid metabolism in Tgr5(-/-) mice in both free-fed and fasted conditions. Lipid profiles of serum, liver and adipose tissues, bile acid composition, energy metabolism, and messenger RNA and protein expression of the genes involved in lipid metabolism were analyzed. Results showed that deficiency of the Tgr5 gene in mice alleviated fasting-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. Expression of liver oxysterol 7α-hydroxylase in the alternative bile acid synthesis pathway was reduced. Analysis of gallbladder bile acid composition showed marked increase of taurocholic acid and decrease of tauro-α and β-muricholic acid in Tgr5(-/-) mice. Tgr5(-/-) mice had increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation rate and decreased hepatic fatty acid uptake. Interestingly, fasting induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 in liver was attenuated. In addition, fasted Tgr5(-/-) mice had increased activation of hepatic growth hormone-signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (GH-Stat5) signaling compared to wild-type mice.

  17. Nod-Like Receptor Protein-3 Inflammasome Plays an Important Role during Early Stages of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M.; Mirza, Rita E.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome/IL-1β pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory skin diseases, but its biological role in wound healing remains to be elucidated. Since inflammation is typically thought to impede healing, we hypothesized that loss of NLRP-3 activity would result in a downregulated inflammatory response and accelerated wound healing. NLRP-3 null mice, caspase-1 null mice and C57Bl/6 wild type control mice (WT) received four 8 mm excisional cutaneous wounds; inflammation and healing were assessed during the early stage of wound healing. Consistent with our hypothesis, wounds from NLRP-3 null and caspase-1 null mice contained lower levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α compared to WT mice and had reduced neutrophil and macrophage accumulation. Contrary to our hypothesis, re-epithelialization, granulation tissue formation, and angiogenesis were delayed in NLRP-3 null mice and caspase-1 null mice compared to WT mice, indicating that NLRP-3 signaling is important for early events in wound healing. Topical treatment of excisional wounds with recombinant IL-1β partially restored granulation tissue formation in wounds of NLRP-3 null mice, confirming the importance of NLRP-3-dependent IL-1β production during early wound healing. Despite the improvement in healing, angiogenesis and levels of the pro-angiogenic growth factor VEGF were further reduced in IL-1β treated wounds, suggesting that IL-1β has a negative effect on angiogenesis and that NLRP-3 promotes angiogenesis in an IL-1β-independent manner. These findings indicate that the NLRP-3 inflammasome contributes to the early inflammatory phase following skin wounding and is important for efficient healing. PMID:25793779

  18. Nod-like receptor protein-3 inflammasome plays an important role during early stages of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M; Mirza, Rita E; Koh, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    The Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome/IL-1β pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory skin diseases, but its biological role in wound healing remains to be elucidated. Since inflammation is typically thought to impede healing, we hypothesized that loss of NLRP-3 activity would result in a downregulated inflammatory response and accelerated wound healing. NLRP-3 null mice, caspase-1 null mice and C57Bl/6 wild type control mice (WT) received four 8 mm excisional cutaneous wounds; inflammation and healing were assessed during the early stage of wound healing. Consistent with our hypothesis, wounds from NLRP-3 null and caspase-1 null mice contained lower levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α compared to WT mice and had reduced neutrophil and macrophage accumulation. Contrary to our hypothesis, re-epithelialization, granulation tissue formation, and angiogenesis were delayed in NLRP-3 null mice and caspase-1 null mice compared to WT mice, indicating that NLRP-3 signaling is important for early events in wound healing. Topical treatment of excisional wounds with recombinant IL-1β partially restored granulation tissue formation in wounds of NLRP-3 null mice, confirming the importance of NLRP-3-dependent IL-1β production during early wound healing. Despite the improvement in healing, angiogenesis and levels of the pro-angiogenic growth factor VEGF were further reduced in IL-1β treated wounds, suggesting that IL-1β has a negative effect on angiogenesis and that NLRP-3 promotes angiogenesis in an IL-1β-independent manner. These findings indicate that the NLRP-3 inflammasome contributes to the early inflammatory phase following skin wounding and is important for efficient healing.

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 derived PGE2 and PGI2 play an important role via EP2 and PPARdelta receptors in early steps of oil induced decidualization in mice.

    PubMed

    Pakrasi, P L; Jain, A K

    2008-06-01

    Differentiation of endometrial stromal cells into decidual cells (decidualization) is prerequisite for blastocyst implantation. Different prostanoids are shown to be involved in the cascade of events found in implantation and decidualization. Previous reports described that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) derived prostacyclin (PGI2) plays an important role via peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARdelta) nuclear receptor in implantation and decidualization. Herein, we investigated the role of COX2 derived PGE2 and PGI2 and examined the protein expression and regulation of COX1, COX2, membrane-bound prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES-1), prostaglandin I synthase (PGIS), PGE2 receptor (EP2) and PPARdelta in hormone primed oil infused uterine horn as well as in non-infused uterine horn (control horn). Our results show that selective COX2 inhibitor (Nimesulide) inhibits decidualization while COX1 inhibitor (SC560) does not affect decidualization. COX2, mPGES-1, PGIS, EP2 and PPARdelta immunostaining are strongly observed at 24 h and 48 h in oil-induced horn and than significantly reduced at 72 h and 120 h and absent in non-infused horn. However COX1 immunostaining is observed in infused as well as in non-infused horn. Our immunohistochemical studies corroborated well with follow up western blotting of the same proteins. PGE2 and PGI2 products were also elevated at 24h and 48 h after oil induction in infused horn in comparison to control horn. Our data suggest that COX2 derived both PGE2 and PGI2 mediate its function via EP2 and PPARdelta receptors in early steps of decidualization in mice.

  20. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 - a polymodal nociceptive receptor - plays a crucial role in formaldehyde-induced skin inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Usuda, Haruki; Endo, Takumi; Shimouchi, Ayumi; Saito, Asaka; Tominaga, Makoto; Yamashita, Hirotaka; Nagai, Hiroichi; Inagaki, Naoki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is irritating to the skin and is the main cause of sick building syndrome. However, the cutaneous reaction induced by long-term FA exposure has not been fully investigated. In our previous study, we demonstrated that repeated painting of 2% - 10% FA on mouse ears caused marked ear swelling and increased mRNA expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and neurotrophins in the ear. TRPV1 is reported to be involved in neurogenic inflammation; therefore, in the present study, we investigated the role of TRPV1 in FA-induced skin inflammation using TRPV1 gene-knockout mice. Mice were painted with 5% FA once a week for 5 weeks, and ear swelling and mRNA expression were investigated. Ear swelling and increased expression of neurotrophins mRNA by FA provocation in wild-type mice were attenuated by disruption of the TRPV1 gene. Furthermore, painting with a threshold dose of capsaicin, which does not induce ear swelling in intact mice, caused marked ear swelling after painting the ear 5 times with FA, indicating that inflamed tissues after FA application are hypersensitive to various ligands of TRPV1 in mice. These results demonstrated that neurogenic inflammation via TRPV1 and neurotrophins could be involved in FA-induced dermatitis.

  1. Do HLA genes play a prominent role in determining T cell receptor V{alpha} segment usage in humans?

    SciTech Connect

    Gulwani-Akolkar, B.; Shi, B.; Akolkar, P.N.

    1995-04-15

    Previous studies in humans have demonstrated that HLA genes can profoundly influence the TCR V{beta} repertoire. To similarly assess the influence of HLA genes on the TCR V{alpha} segment repertoire, the V{alpha} repertoires of 12 individuals from three unrelated families were determined by quantitative PCR. Each family contained at least one pair of HLA-identical and -nonidentical siblings. Repertoire analysis was performed on purified CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} cells by using V{alpha}-specific primers. We were unable to demonstrate more similar V{alpha} repertoires between HLA-identical siblings than between HLA-nonidentical siblings. In contrast, when a similar analysis was performed on the same individuals for the V{beta} repertoire, HLA-identical siblings were found to have significantly more similar repertoires than HLA-nonidentical siblings. Furthermore, both the V{alpha} and V{beta} repertoires of monozygotic twins showed striking similarity. Despite our inability to shown an influence of HLA genes on the V{alpha} repertoire, we did observe a very strong skewing in terms of preferential expression on CD4{sup +} or CD8{sup +} cells of several V{alpha} segments, notably TCRAV1, -2, -5, -6, -7, -11, -12, and -13. These studies suggest that HLA genes play less of a role in determining V{alpha} segment usage than V{beta}. Nevertheless, the pronounced skewing of V{alpha} segment expression in the CD4{sup +} or CD8{sup +} populations suggests some role for HLA genes in determining the V{alpha} TCR repertoire. Furthermore, the striking similarity of V{alpha} repertoires of identical twins suggests a major role for non-HLA genes in determining the V{alpha} repertoire. 35 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Outdoor Play and Play Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Heather

    1985-01-01

    Discusses aspects of the play environment and its effect on children's play behavior. Indoor and outdoor play spaces are considered along with factors affecting the use of outdoor environments for play. Children's preferences for different outdoor play environments and for various play structures are explored. Guides for choosing play equipment…

  3. Outdoor Play and Play Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Heather

    1985-01-01

    Discusses aspects of the play environment and its effect on children's play behavior. Indoor and outdoor play spaces are considered along with factors affecting the use of outdoor environments for play. Children's preferences for different outdoor play environments and for various play structures are explored. Guides for choosing play equipment…

  4. Behavioral analyses of GHB: receptor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lawrence P; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    GHB is used therapeutically and recreationally, although the precise mechanism of action responsible for its different behavioral effects is not entirely clear. The purpose of this review is to summarize how behavioral procedures, especially drug discrimination procedures, have been used to study the mechanism of action of GHB. More specifically, we will review several different drug discrimination procedures and discuss how they have been used to qualitatively and quantitatively study different components of the complex mechanism of action of GHB. A growing number of studies have provided evidence that the behavioral effects of GHB are mediated predominantly by GABAB receptors. However, there is also evidence that the mechanisms mediating the effects of GHB and the prototypical GABAB receptor agonist baclofen are not identical, and that other mechanisms such as GHB receptors and subtypes of GABAA and GABAB receptors might contribute to the effects of GHB. These findings are consistent with the different behavioral profile, abuse liability, and therapeutic indications of GHB and baclofen. A better understanding of the similarities and differences between GHB and baclofen, as well as the pharmacological mechanisms of action underlying the recreational and therapeutic effects of GHB, could lead to more effective medications with fewer adverse effects.

  5. Behavioral Analyses of GHB: Receptor Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P.

    2009-01-01

    GHB is used therapeutically and recreationally, although the precise mechanism of action responsible for its different behavioral effects is not entirely clear. The purpose of this review is to summarize how behavioral procedures, especially drug discrimination procedures, have been used to study the mechanism of action of GHB. More specifically, we will review several different drug discrimination procedures and discuss how they have been used to qualitatively and quantitatively study different components of the complex mechanism of action of GHB. A growing number of studies have provided evidence that the behavioral effects of GHB are mediated predominantly by GABAB receptors. However, there is also evidence that the mechanisms mediating the effects of GHB and the prototypical GABAB receptor agonist baclofen are not identical, and that other mechanisms such as GHB receptors and subtypes of GABAA and GABAB receptors might contribute to the effects of GHB. These findings are consistent with the different behavioral profile, abuse liability, and therapeutic indications of GHB and baclofen. A better understanding of the similarities and differences between GHB and baclofen, as well as the pharmacological mechanisms of action underlying the recreational and therapeutic effects of GHB, could lead to more effective medications with fewer adverse effects. PMID:19010351

  6. C-Terminal Di-leucine Motif of Dopamine D1 Receptor Plays an Important Role in Its Plasma Membrane Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Jose, Pedro A.

    2011-01-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor (D1R), a G protein-coupled receptor, plays a critical role in regulating blood pressure through its actions on renal hemodynamics and epithelial ion transport, which are highly linked to its intracellular trafficking. In this study, we generated a series of C-terminal mutants of D1R that were tagged with or without enhanced yellow fluorescent protein, and analyzed the consequences of these mutants on the plasma membrane trafficking of D1R and cyclic AMP response to D1R stimulation. D1R with mutations within the endocytic recycling signal (amino acid residues 360–382) continued to be functional, albeit decreased relative to wild-type D1R. Mutation of the palmitoylation site (347C>S) of D1R did not impair its trafficking to the plasma membrane, but abolished its ability to increase cyclic AMP accumulation. In contrast, replacement of di-leucines (344–345L>A) by alanines resulted in the retention of D1R in the early endosome, decreased its glycosylation, and prevented its targeting to the plasma membrane. Our studies suggest that di-L motif at the C-terminus of D1R is critical for the glycosylation and cell surface targeting of D1R. PMID:22206002

  7. The Ron Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Regulates Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plays a Protective Role in Diet-Induced Obesity, Atherosclerosis, and Hepatosteatosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Allen, Joselyn N; Dey, Adwitia; Zhang, Limin; Balandaram, Gayathri; Kennett, Mary J; Xia, Mingcan; Xiong, Na; Peters, Jeffrey M; Patterson, Andrew; Hankey-Giblin, Pamela A

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory disease mediated in large part by the activation of inflammatory macrophages. This chronic inflammation underlies a whole host of diseases including atherosclerosis, hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, among others. Macrophages are generally classified as either inflammatory or alternatively activated. Some tissue-resid