Science.gov

Sample records for gabab receptors play

  1. GABA(B) receptors in neuroendocrine regulation.

    PubMed

    Lux-Lantos, Victoria A; Bianchi, María S; Catalano, Paolo N; Libertun, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), in addition to being a metabolic intermediate and the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the synaptic cleft, is postulated as a neurohormone, a paracrine signaling molecule, and a trophic factor. It acts through pre- and post-synaptic receptors, named GABA(A) and GABA(C) (ionotropic receptors) and GABA(B) (metabotropic receptor). Here we reviewed the participation of GABA(B) receptors in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, using physiological, biochemical, and pharmacological approaches in rats, as well as in GABA(B1) knock-out mice, that lack functional GABA(B) receptors. Our general conclusion indicates that GABA(B )receptors participate in the regulation of pituitary hormone secretion acting both in the central nervous system and directly on the gland. PRL and gonadotropin axes are affected by GABA(B) receptor activation, as demonstrated in the rat and also in the GABA(B1) knock-out mouse. In addition, hypothalamic and pituitary GABA(B) receptor expression is modulated by steroid hormones. GABA participation in the brain control of pituitary secretion through GABA(B) receptors depends on physiological conditions, being age and sex critical factors.These results indicate that patients receiving GABA(B) agonists/antagonists should be monitored for possible endocrine side effects.

  2. Chemistry and pharmacology of GABAB receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents new clinical applications of the prototypic GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen for the treatment of addiction by drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and heroin, a novel baclofen prodrug Arbaclofen placarbil, the GABA(B) receptor agonist AZD3355 (Lesogabaran) currently in Phase 2 clinical trials for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and four positive allosteric modulators of GABA(B) receptors (CGP7930, GS39783, NVP-BHF177, and BHFF), which have less propensity for the development of tolerance due to receptor desensitization than classical GABA(B) receptor agonists. All four compounds showed anxiolytic affects. In the presence of positive allosteric modulators the "classical" GABA(B) receptor antagonists CGP35348 and 2-hydroxy-saclofen showed properties of partial GABA(B) receptor agonists. Seven micromolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists, phaclofen; 2-hydroxy-saclofen; CGP's 35348, 36742, 46381, 51176; and SCH50911, are discussed. CGP36742 (SGS742) showed statistically significant improvements of working memory and attention in a Phase 2 clinical trial in mild, but not in moderate Alzheimer patients. Eight nanomolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists are presented (CGP's 52432, 54626, 55845, 56433, 56999, 61334, 62349, and 63360) that were used by pharmacologists for numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. CGP's 36742, 51176, 55845, and 56433 showed antidepressant effects. Several compounds are also available as radioligands, such as [(3)H]CGP27492, [(3)H]CGP54626, [(3)H]CGP5699, and [(3)H]CGP62349. Three novel fluorescent and three GABA(B) receptor antagonists with very high specific radioactivity (>2,000 Ci/mmol) are presented. [(125)I]CGP64213 and the photoaffinity ligand [(125)I]CGP71872 allowed the identification of GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) receptors in the expression cloning work. PMID:20655477

  3. Conditional gene deletion reveals functional redundancy of GABAB receptors in peripheral nociceptors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    deletion of GABAB receptors from peripheral nociceptive neurons in vivo. This lets us conclude that GABAB receptors in the peripheral nervous system play a less important role than those in the central nervous system in the regulation of pain. PMID:19925671

  4. GABAB receptors modulate NMDA receptor calcium signals in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Chalifoux, Jason R; Carter, Adam G

    2010-04-15

    Metabotropic GABA(B) receptors play a fundamental role in modulating the excitability of neurons and circuits throughout the brain. These receptors influence synaptic transmission by inhibiting presynaptic release or activating postsynaptic potassium channels. However, their ability to directly influence different types of postsynaptic glutamate receptors remains unresolved. Here we examine GABA(B) receptor modulation in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from the mouse prefrontal cortex. We use two-photon laser-scanning microscopy to study synaptic modulation at individual dendritic spines. Using two-photon optical quantal analysis, we first demonstrate robust presynaptic modulation of multivesicular release at single synapses. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging, we then reveal that GABA(B) receptors strongly inhibit NMDA receptor calcium signals. This postsynaptic modulation occurs via the PKA pathway and does not affect synaptic currents mediated by AMPA or NMDA receptors. This form of GABA(B) receptor modulation has widespread implications for the control of calcium-dependent neuronal function.

  5. Emerging neurotrophic role of GABAB receptors in neuronal circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Porcher, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The proper development of highly organized structures in the central nervous system is a complex process during which key events – neurogenesis, migration, growth, differentiation, and synaptogenesis – have to take place in an appropriate manner to create functional neuronal networks. It is now well established that GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian brain, plays more than a classical inhibitory role and can function as an important developmental signal early in life. GABA binds to chloride-permeable ionotropic GABAA receptors and to G-protein-coupled GABAB receptors (GABAB-Rs). Although most of the trophic actions of GABA have been attributed to the activation of GABAA receptors, recent advances show that GABAB-Rs also regulate fundamental steps of network development. This review summarizes some of the recent progress about the neurotrophic role of GABAB-Rs to neuronal development. PMID:24282395

  6. A Gut Feeling about GABA: Focus on GABAB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Niall P.; Cryan, John F.

    2010-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the body and hence GABA-mediated neurotransmission regulates many physiological functions, including those in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. GABA is located throughout the GI tract and is found in enteric nerves as well as in endocrine-like cells, implicating GABA as both a neurotransmitter and an endocrine mediator influencing GI function. GABA mediates its effects via GABA receptors which are either ionotropic GABAA or metabotropic GABAB. The latter which respond to the agonist baclofen have been least characterized, however accumulating data suggest that they play a key role in GI function in health and disease. Like GABA, GABAB receptors have been detected throughout the gut of several species in the enteric nervous system, muscle, epithelial layers as well as on endocrine-like cells. Such widespread distribution of this metabotropic GABA receptor is consistent with its significant modulatory role over intestinal motility, gastric emptying, gastric acid secretion, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and visceral sensation of painful colonic stimuli. More intriguing findings, the mechanisms underlying which have yet to be determined, suggest GABAB receptors inhibit GI carcinogenesis and tumor growth. Therefore, the diversity of GI functions regulated by GABAB receptors makes it a potentially useful target in the treatment of several GI disorders. In light of the development of novel compounds such as peripherally acting GABAB receptor agonists, positive allosteric modulators of the GABAB receptor and GABA producing enteric bacteria, we review and summarize current knowledge on the function of GABAB receptors within the GI tract. PMID:21833169

  7. Astrocytes as Gatekeepers of GABAB Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Beenhakker, Mark P.; Huguenard, John R.

    2010-01-01

    The long-lasting actions of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) result from the activation of metabotropic GABAB receptors. Enhanced GABAB-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) are critical for the generation of generalized thalamocortical seizures. Here, we demonstrate that GABAB-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) recorded in the thalamus are largely defined by GABA diffusion and activation of distal extrasynaptic receptors potentially up to tens of μm from synapses. We also show that this diffusion is differentially regulated by two astrocytic GABA transporters, GAT1 and GAT3, which are localized near and far from synapses, respectively. A biologically constrained model of GABA diffusion and uptake shows how the two GATs differentially modulate amplitude and duration of GABAB IPSCs. Specifically, the perisynaptic expression of GAT1 enables it to regulate GABA levels near synapses and selectively modulate peak IPSC amplitude, which is largely dependent on perisynaptic receptor occupancy. GAT3 expression, on the other hand, is broader and includes distal extrasynaptic regions. As such, GAT3 acts as a gatekeeper to prevent diffusion of GABA away from synapses towards extrasynaptic regions that contain a potentially enormous pool of GABAB receptors. Targeting this gatekeeper function may provide new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities to prevent the excessive GABAB receptor activation that appears necessary for thalamic seizure generation. PMID:21068331

  8. GABAB receptors and glucose homeostasis: evaluation in GABAB receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, M M; Catalano, P N; Chamson-Reig, A; Arany, E; Hill, D; Bettler, B; Saravia, F; Libertun, C; Lux-Lantos, V A

    2008-01-01

    GABA has been proposed to inhibit insulin secretion through GABAB receptors (GABABRs) in pancreatic beta-cells. We investigated whether GABABRs participated in the regulation of glucose homeostasis in vivo. The animals used in this study were adult male and female BALB/C mice, mice deficient in the GABAB1 subunit of the GABABR (GABAB(-/-)), and wild types (WT). Blood glucose was measured under fasting/fed conditions and in glucose tolerance tests (GTTs) with a Lifescan Glucose meter, and serum insulin was measured by ELISA. Pancreatic insulin content and islet insulin were released by RIA. Western blots for the GABAB1 subunit in islet membranes and immunohistochemistry for insulin and GABAB1 were performed in both genotypes. BALB/C mice preinjected with Baclofen (GABABR agonist, 7.5 mg/kg ip) presented impaired GTTs and decreased insulin secretion compared with saline-preinjected controls. GABAB(-/-) mice showed fasting and fed glucose levels similar to WT. GABAB(-/-) mice showed improved GTTs at moderate glucose overloads (2 g/kg). Baclofen pretreatment did not modify GTTs in GABAB(-/-) mice, whereas it impaired normal glycemia reinstatement in WT. Baclofen inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in WT isolated islets but was without effect in GABAB(-/-) islets. In GABAB(-/-) males, pancreatic insulin content was increased, basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were augmented, and impaired insulin tolerance test and increased homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index were determined. Immunohistochemistry for insulin demonstrated an increase of very large islets in GABAB(-/-) males. Results demonstrate that GABABRs are involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis in vivo and that the constitutive absence of GABABRs induces alterations in pancreatic histology, physiology, and insulin resistance. PMID:17971510

  9. Post-transcriptional regulation of GABAB receptor and GIRK1 channels by Nogo receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Type B GABA receptors (GABA Rs) play a critical role in synaptic transmission. We carried out studies to determine whether neuronal cell surface expression of GABAB-Rs might be regulated by the Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1). Results siRNA knock-down of NgR1 resulted in a selective increase of GABAB R1 and GABAB R2 protein without altering the expression of GABAA receptor or GAD65. The increase in GABAB receptor subunits was unaccompanied by a change in mRNA, but inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin blocked the increase in GABAB protein. NgR1 siRNA also caused an increase in G protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1). The increase in GABAB receptor and GIRK1 channel proteins was in the plasma membrane, determined by cell surface biotinylation. In NgR1 knockout mice, the amount of GABAB R2 and GIRK1 in hippocampus-derived synaptosomes was increased. Conclusions Together these findings suggest that NgR1 mediated modulation of synaptic transmission may be accomplished, at least in part, through modulation of G protein coupled receptors and channels. PMID:23829864

  10. GABAB receptor ligands do not modify conditioned fear responses in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Fabian F; O'Leary, Olivia F; Cryan, John F

    2013-11-01

    The GABA(B) receptor has been well characterised as a substrate of unconditioned anxiety behaviour. Indeed, the anxiolytic effects of positive modulators of the GABA(B) receptor have been demonstrated across a range of behavioural tests of innate anxiety, whereas GABA(B) receptor deficient mice have an elevated anxiety phenotype. However, the role of the GABA(B) receptor in regulating conditioned anxiety behaviour; an important facet of the preclinical study of anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder is less well understood. In vitro data suggests that the GABA(B) receptor plays an important role in regulating the neural circuitry that underpins conditioned fear learning and extinction, but whether these effects translate into alterations in conditioned anxiety behaviour has not been widely investigated. This represents a crucial deficit in the preclinical characterisation of these drugs as putative anxiolytic agents. Using the highly anxious mouse strain, BALB/c, and an auditory fear conditioning protocol, we sought to characterise the GABA(B) receptor positive modulator GS39783 and GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP52432, two compounds not previously evaluated for their effects on conditioned fear. Neither GS39783 nor CGP52432 altered freezing behaviour irrespective of whether drugs were administered before the acquisition, recall or extinction training sessions. These findings suggest limitations to the potential role of GABA(B) receptor active drugs as clinical agents in the treatment of anxiety.

  11. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Olivia F; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M; Bravo, Javier A; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2014-10-21

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)(-/-) mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression.

  12. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Olivia F.; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M.; Bravo, Javier A.; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)−/− mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:25288769

  13. Sushi domains confer distinct trafficking profiles on GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Saad; Wilkins, Megan E; Smart, Trevor G

    2012-07-24

    GABA(B) receptors mediate slow inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain and feature during excitatory synaptic plasticity, as well as various neurological conditions. These receptors are obligate heterodimers composed of GABA(B)R1 and R2 subunits. The two predominant R1 isoforms differ by the presence of two complement control protein modules or Sushi domains (SDs) in the N terminus of R1a. By using live imaging, with an α-bungarotoxin-binding site (BBS) and fluorophore-linked bungarotoxin, we studied how R2 stabilizes R1b subunits at the cell surface. Heterodimerization with R2 reduced the rate of internalization of R1b, compared with R1b homomers. However, R1aR2 heteromers exhibited increased cell surface stability compared with R1bR2 receptors in hippocampal neurons, suggesting that for receptors containing the R1a subunit, the SDs play an additional role in the surface stability of GABA(B) receptors. Both SDs were necessary to increase the stability of R1aR2 because single deletions caused the receptors to be internalized at the same rate and extent as R1bR2 receptors. Consistent with these findings, a chimera formed from the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)2 and the SDs from R1a increased the surface stability of mGluR2. These results suggest a role for SDs in stabilizing cell surface receptors that could impart different pre- and postsynaptic trafficking itineraries on GABA(B) receptors, thereby contributing to their physiological and pathological roles.

  14. GABAB1 receptor subunit isoforms exert a differential influence on baseline but not GABAB receptor agonist-induced changes in mice.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Laura H; Bettler, Bernhard; Kaupmann, Klemens; Cryan, John F

    2006-12-01

    GABA(B) receptor agonists produce hypothermia and motor incoordination. Two GABA(B(1)) receptor subunit isoforms exist, but because of lack of specific molecular or pharmacological tools, the relevance of these isoforms in controlling basal body temperature, locomotor activity, or in vivo responses to GABA(B) receptor agonists has been unknown. Here, we used mice deficient in the GABA(B(1a)) and GABA(B(1b)) subunit isoforms to examine the influence of these isoforms on both baseline motor behavior and body temperature and on the motor-incoordinating and hypothermic responses to the GABA(B) receptor agonists l-baclofen and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). GABA(B(1b))(-/-) mice were hyperactive in a novel environment and showed slower habituation than either GABA(B(1a))(-/-) or wild-type mice. GABA(B(1b))(-/-) mice were hyperactive throughout the circadian dark phase. Hypothermia in response to l-baclofen (6 and 12 mg/kg) or GHB (1 g/kg), baclofen-induced ataxia as determined on the fixed-speed Rotarod, and GHB-induced hypolocomotion were significantly, but for the most part similarly, attenuated in both GABA(B(1a))(-/-) and GABA(B(1b))(-/-) mice. We conclude that l-baclofen and GHB are nonselective for either GABA(B(1)) receptor isoform in terms of in vivo responses. However, GABA(B(1)) receptor isoforms have distinct and different roles in mediating locomotor behavioral responses to a novel environment. Therefore, GABA(B(1a)) and GABA(B(1b)) isoforms are functionally relevant molecular variants of the GABA(B(1)) receptor subunit, which are differentially involved in specific neurophysiological processes and behaviors.

  15. Mouse hippocampal GABAB1 but not GABAB2 subunit-containing receptor complex levels are paralleling retrieval in the multiple-T-maze.

    PubMed

    Falsafi, Soheil K; Ghafari, Maryam; Miklósi, András G; Engidawork, Ephrem; Gröger, Marion; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors known to be involved in learning and memory. Although a role for GABAB receptors in cognitive processes is evident, there is no information on hippocampal GABAB receptor complexes in a multiple T maze (MTM) task, a robust paradigm for evaluation of spatial learning. Trained or untrained (yoked control) C57BL/6J male mice (n = 10/group) were subjected to the MTM task and sacrificed 6 h following their performance. Hippocampi were taken, membrane proteins extracted and run on blue native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies against GABAB1, GABAB1a, and GABAB2. Immunoprecipitation with subsequent mass spectrometric identification of co-precipitates was carried out to show if GABAB1 and GABAB2 as well as other interacting proteins co-precipitate. An antibody shift assay (ASA) and a proximity ligation assay (PLA) were also used to see if the two GABAB subunits are present in the receptor complex. Single bands were observed on Western blots, each representing GABAB1, GABAB1a, or GABAB2 at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 100 kDa. Subsequently, densitometric analysis revealed that levels of GABAB1 and GABAB1a but not GABAB2- containing receptor complexes were significantly higher in trained than untrained groups. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric studies confirmed the presence of GABAB1, GABAB2, calcium calmodulin kinases I and II, GluA1 and GluA2 as constituents of the complex. ASA and PLA also showed the presence of the two subunits of GABAB receptor within the complex. It is shown that increased levels of GABAB1 subunit-containing complexes are paralleling performance in a land maze.

  16. CGP7930: a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Adams, C L; Lawrence, A J

    2007-01-01

    CGP7930 (3-(3',5'-Di-tert-butyl-4'-hydroxy)phenyl-2,2-dimethylpropanol) is a positive allosteric modulator of the metabotropic GABAB receptor. CGP7930 has been found to modulate the GABAB receptor in the open, or high affinity, state increasing agonist affinity for the receptor and signal transduction efficacy following agonist stimulation. The GABAB heteromeric subunit B2, involved in signal transduction but not ligand binding, seems to be the site of action of CGP7930 and similar allosteric modulators. When administered alone in naïve animals, CGP7930 acts as an anxiolytic in rodents without other overt behavioral effects and has also been demonstrated to reduce self-administration of nicotine, cocaine, or alcohol in rodents, suggesting that "fine tuning" of the GABAB receptor by positive allosteric modulators may be able to regulate abuse of these drugs. Baclofen, the GABAB agonist, is currently finding use in treating addiction and various other disorders, but this can result in off-target effects and tolerance. CGP7930 when co-administered with baclofen enhances its potency, which could in theory minimize deleterious effects. Further study of CGP7930 is required, but this compound, and others like it, holds potential in a clinical setting. PMID:17894647

  17. Increased GABAB receptor signaling in a rat model for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Selten, Martijn M.; Meyer, Francisca; Ba, Wei; Vallès, Astrid; Maas, Dorien A.; Negwer, Moritz; Eijsink, Vivian D.; van Vugt, Ruben W. M.; van Hulten, Josephus A.; van Bakel, Nick H. M.; Roosen, Joey; van der Linden, Robert J.; Schubert, Dirk; Verheij, Michel M. M.; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Martens, Gerard J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder that affects cognitive function and has been linked, both in patients and animal models, to dysfunction of the GABAergic system. However, the pathophysiological consequences of this dysfunction are not well understood. Here, we examined the GABAergic system in an animal model displaying schizophrenia-relevant features, the apomorphine-susceptible (APO-SUS) rat and its phenotypic counterpart, the apomorphine-unsusceptible (APO-UNSUS) rat at postnatal day 20–22. We found changes in the expression of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 specifically in the prelimbic- but not the infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), indicative of reduced inhibitory function in this region in APO-SUS rats. While we did not observe changes in basal synaptic transmission onto LII/III pyramidal cells in the mPFC of APO-SUS compared to APO-UNSUS rats, we report reduced paired-pulse ratios at longer inter-stimulus intervals. The GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845 abolished this reduction, indicating that the decreased paired-pulse ratio was caused by increased GABAB signaling. Consistently, we find an increased expression of the GABAB1 receptor subunit in APO-SUS rats. Our data provide physiological evidence for increased presynaptic GABAB signaling in the mPFC of APO-SUS rats, further supporting an important role for the GABAergic system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:27687783

  18. The Sushi domains of GABAB receptors function as axonal targeting signals.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Barbara; Ivankova-Susankova, Klara; Bradaia, Amyaouch; Abdel Aziz, Said; Besseyrias, Valerie; Kapfhammer, Josef P; Missler, Markus; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard

    2010-01-27

    GABA(B) receptors are the G-protein-coupled receptors for GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Two receptor subtypes, GABA(B(1a,2)) and GABA(B(1b,2)), are formed by the assembly of GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) subunits with GABA(B2) subunits. The GABA(B1b) subunit is a shorter isoform of the GABA(B1a) subunit lacking two N-terminal protein interaction motifs, the sushi domains. Selectively GABA(B1a) protein traffics into the axons of glutamatergic neurons, whereas both the GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) proteins traffic into the dendrites. The mechanism(s) and targeting signal(s) responsible for the selective trafficking of GABA(B1a) protein into axons are unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the sushi domains are axonal targeting signals that redirect GABA(B1a) protein from its default dendritic localization to axons. Specifically, we show that mutations in the sushi domains preventing protein interactions preclude axonal localization of GABA(B1a). When fused to CD8alpha, the sushi domains polarize this uniformly distributed protein to axons. Likewise, when fused to mGluR1a the sushi domains redirect this somatodendritic protein to axons, showing that the sushi domains can override dendritic targeting information in a heterologous protein. Cell surface expression of the sushi domains is not required for axonal localization of GABA(B1a). Altogether, our findings are consistent with the sushi domains functioning as axonal targeting signals by interacting with axonally bound proteins along intracellular sorting pathways. Our data provide a mechanistic explanation for the selective trafficking of GABA(B(1a,2)) receptors into axons while at the same time identifying a well defined axonal delivery module that can be used as an experimental tool.

  19. The role of GABAB receptors in human reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Ort, Andres; Kometer, Michael; Rohde, Judith; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-10-01

    Behavioral evidence from human studies suggests that the γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABAB receptor) agonist baclofen modulates reinforcement learning and reduces craving in patients with addiction spectrum disorders. However, in contrast to the well established role of dopamine in reinforcement learning, the mechanisms by which the GABAB receptor influences reinforcement learning in humans remain completely unknown. To further elucidate this issue, a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed in healthy human subjects (N=15) to test the effects of baclofen (20 and 50mg p.o.) on probabilistic reinforcement learning. Outcomes were the feedback-induced P2 component of the event-related potential, the feedback-related negativity, and the P300 component of the event-related potential. Baclofen produced a reduction of P2 amplitude over the course of the experiment, but did not modulate the feedback-related negativity. Furthermore, there was a trend towards increased learning after baclofen administration relative to placebo over the course of the experiment. The present results extend previous theories of reinforcement learning, which focus on the importance of mesolimbic dopamine signaling, and indicate that stimulation of cortical GABAB receptors in a fronto-parietal network leads to better attentional allocation in reinforcement learning. This observation is a first step in our understanding of how baclofen may improve reinforcement learning in healthy subjects. Further studies with bigger sample sizes are needed to corroborate this conclusion and furthermore, test this effect in patients with addiction spectrum disorder.

  20. Presynaptic Excitation via GABAB Receptors in Habenula Cholinergic Neurons Regulates Fear Memory Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juen; Tan, Lubin; Ren, Yuqi; Liang, Jingwen; Lin, Rui; Feng, Qiru; Zhou, Jingfeng; Hu, Fei; Ren, Jing; Wei, Chao; Yu, Tao; Zhuang, Yinghua; Bettler, Bernhard; Wang, Fengchao; Luo, Minmin

    2016-07-28

    Fear behaviors are regulated by adaptive mechanisms that dampen their expression in the absence of danger. By studying circuits and the molecular mechanisms underlying this adaptive response, we show that cholinergic neurons of the medial habenula reduce fear memory expression through GABAB presynaptic excitation. Ablating these neurons or inactivating their GABAB receptors impairs fear extinction in mice, whereas activating the neurons or their axonal GABAB receptors reduces conditioned fear. Although considered exclusively inhibitory, here, GABAB mediates excitation by amplifying presynaptic Ca(2+) entry through Cav2.3 channels and potentiating co-release of glutamate, acetylcholine, and neurokinin B to excite interpeduncular neurons. Activating the receptors for these neurotransmitters or enhancing neurotransmission with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor reduces fear responses of both wild-type and GABAB mutant mice. We identify the role of an extra-amygdalar circuit and presynaptic GABAB receptors in fear control, suggesting that boosting neurotransmission in this pathway might ameliorate some fear disorders. PMID:27426949

  1. Functioning of the dimeric GABA(B) receptor extracellular domain revealed by glycan wedge scanning.

    PubMed

    Rondard, Philippe; Huang, Siluo; Monnier, Carine; Tu, Haijun; Blanchard, Bertrand; Oueslati, Nadia; Malhaire, Fanny; Li, Ying; Trinquet, Eric; Labesse, Gilles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Liu, Jianfeng

    2008-05-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by the neurotransmitter GABA is made up of two subunits, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2). GABA(B1) binds agonists, whereas GABA(B2) is required for trafficking GABA(B1) to the cell surface, increasing agonist affinity to GABA(B1), and activating associated G proteins. These subunits each comprise two domains, a Venus flytrap domain (VFT) and a heptahelical transmembrane domain (7TM). How agonist binding to the GABA(B1) VFT leads to GABA(B2) 7TM activation remains unknown. Here, we used a glycan wedge scanning approach to investigate how the GABA(B) VFT dimer controls receptor activity. We first identified the dimerization interface using a bioinformatics approach and then showed that introducing an N-glycan at this interface prevents the association of the two subunits and abolishes all activities of GABA(B2), including agonist activation of the G protein. We also identified a second region in the VFT where insertion of an N-glycan does not prevent dimerization, but blocks agonist activation of the receptor. These data provide new insight into the function of this prototypical GPCR and demonstrate that a change in the dimerization interface is required for receptor activation.

  2. GABA acting on GABAB receptors located in a medullary pain facilitatory area enhances nociceptive behaviors evoked by intraplantar formalin injection.

    PubMed

    Martins, Isabel; Carvalho, Paulina; de Vries, Martin G; Teixeira-Pinto, Armando; Wilson, Steven P; Westerink, Ben H C; Tavares, Isaura

    2015-08-01

    The dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt) plays a key role in facilitation of nociceptive transmission at the spinal cord. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms involved in GABA-mediated control of the DRt focusing on the role of local GABAB receptors. First, we used in vivo microdialysis to study the release of GABA in the DRt during the course of the formalin test. An increase of GABA levels in comparison with baseline values was detected in the second phase of the test. Because we previously showed that GABAB receptors are expressed by opioidergic DRt neurons, which respond to nociceptive stimuli and inhibit spinally projecting DRt neurons involved in descending pronociception, we then interfered with local GABAB receptors using gene transfer and pharmacological approaches. Lentiviral-mediated knockdown of GABAB1a expression decreased nociceptive responses during the second phase of the test. Local administration of the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 also decreased nociceptive responses in the second phase of the test, whereas the opposite was detected after injection of the GABAB agonist baclofen. Finally, we determined the GABAergic afferents of the DRt, namely those arising from its main brain afferents, which are located at the telencephalon and diencephalon. For that purpose, we combined retrograde tract-tracing from the DRt with immunodetection of glutamate decarboxylase, the GABA-synthesizing enzyme. The higher numbers of retrogradely labelled glutamate decarboxylase-immunoreactive neurons were located at insular, somatosensory, and motor cortices. Collectively, the results suggest that GABA acting on GABAB receptors may enhance pain facilitation from the DRt during inflammatory pain.

  3. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Regulate Hippocampal Synapses during Associative Learning in Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-Parras, M. Teresa; Delgado-García, José M.; Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    GABAB receptors are the G-protein-coupled receptors for GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Pharmacological activation of GABAB receptors regulates neurotransmission and neuronal excitability at pre- and postsynaptic sites. Electrophysiological activation of GABAB receptors in brain slices generally requires strong stimulus intensities. This raises the question as to whether behavioral stimuli are strong enough to activate GABAB receptors. Here we show that GABAB1a-/- mice, which constitutively lack presynaptic GABAB receptors at glutamatergic synapses, are impaired in their ability to acquire an operant learning task. In vivo recordings during the operant conditioning reveal a deficit in learning-dependent increases in synaptic strength at CA3-CA1 synapses. Moreover, GABAB1a-/- mice fail to synchronize neuronal activity in the CA1 area during the acquisition process. Our results support that activation of presynaptic hippocampal GABAB receptors is important for acquisition of a learning task and for learning-associated synaptic changes and network dynamics. PMID:26848590

  4. GABA-B receptor activation and conflict behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelaars, C.E.J.; Bollen, E.L.; Rigter, H.; Bruinvels, J.

    1988-01-01

    Baclofen and oxazepam enhance extinction of conflict behavior in the Geller-Seifter test while baclofen and diazepam release punished behavior in Vogel's conflict test. In order to investigate the possibility that the effect of the selective GABA-B receptor agonist baclofen is mediated indirectly via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex, the effect of pretreatment of rats with baclofen on (/sup 3/H)-diazepam binding to washed and unwashed cortical and cerebellar membranes of rats has been studied. Baclofen pretreatment increase Bmax in washed cerebellar membranes when bicuculline was present in the incubation mixture. No effect was seen in cortical membranes. The present results render it unlikely that the effect of baclofen on extinction of conflict behavior and punished drinking is mediated via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex. 50 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  5. Alterations in cortical GABAB receptors in neonatal rats exposed to hypoxic stress: role of glucose, oxygen, and epinephrine resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Abraham, Pretty Mary; Antony, Sherin; Paulose, C S

    2010-10-01

    Hypoxia in neonates can cause permanent brain damage by gene and receptor level alterations mediated through changes in neurotransmitters. The present study evaluated GABA(B) receptor alterations, gene expression changes in glutamate decarboxylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1A in the cerebral cortex of hypoxic neonatal rats and the resuscitation groups with glucose, oxygen, and epinephrine. Under hypoxic stress, a significant decrease in total GABA and GABA(B) receptors, GABA(B) and GAD gene expression was observed in the cerebral cortex, which accounts for the respiratory inhibition. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1A was upregulated under hypoxia to maintain body homeostasis. Hypoxic rats supplemented with glucose alone and with oxygen showed a reversal of the receptor alterations and changes in GAD and HIF-1A to near control. Being a source of immediate energy, glucose can reduce the ATP-depletion-induced changes in GABA and oxygenation, which helps in encountering hypoxia. Resuscitation with oxygen alone and epinephrine was less effective in reversing the receptor alterations. Thus, our study suggests that reduction in the GABA(B) receptors functional regulation during hypoxia plays an important role in cortical damage. Resuscitation with glucose alone and glucose and oxygen to hypoxic neonatal rats helps in protecting the brain from severe hypoxic damage.

  6. Modular composition and dynamics of native GABAB receptors identified by high-resolution proteomics.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Jochen; Pérez-Garci, Enrique; Schneider, Andy; Kollewe, Astrid; Gauthier-Kemper, Anne; Fritzius, Thorsten; Raveh, Adi; Dinamarca, Margarita C; Hanuschkin, Alexander; Bildl, Wolfgang; Klingauf, Jürgen; Gassmann, Martin; Schulte, Uwe; Bettler, Bernhard; Fakler, Bernd

    2016-02-01

    GABAB receptors, the most abundant inhibitory G protein-coupled receptors in the mammalian brain, display pronounced diversity in functional properties, cellular signaling and subcellular distribution. We used high-resolution functional proteomics to identify the building blocks of these receptors in the rodent brain. Our analyses revealed that native GABAB receptors are macromolecular complexes with defined architecture, but marked diversity in subunit composition: the receptor core is assembled from GABAB1a/b, GABAB2, four KCTD proteins and a distinct set of G-protein subunits, whereas the receptor's periphery is mostly formed by transmembrane proteins of different classes. In particular, the periphery-forming constituents include signaling effectors, such as Cav2 and HCN channels, and the proteins AJAP1 and amyloid-β A4, both of which tightly associate with the sushi domains of GABAB1a. Our results unravel the molecular diversity of GABAB receptors and their postnatal assembly dynamics and provide a roadmap for studying the cellular signaling of this inhibitory neurotransmitter receptor. PMID:26691831

  7. Lack of GABAB receptors modifies behavioural and biochemical alterations induced by precipitated nicotine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Varani, Andrés P; Pedrón, Valeria T; Machado, Lirane Moutinho; Antonelli, Marta C; Bettler, Bernhard; Balerio, Graciela N

    2015-03-01

    The nicotine (NIC) withdrawal syndrome is considered to be a major cause of the high relapse rate among individuals undergoing smoking cessation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible role of GABAB receptors in NIC withdrawal, by comparing GABAB1 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. We analysed the time course of the global withdrawal score, the anxiety-like effects, monoamine concentrations, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, the corticosterone plasmatic levels and [(3)H]epibatidine binding sites during NIC withdrawal precipitated by mecamylamine, a nicotinic receptor antagonist (MEC). In NIC withdrawn wild-type mice, we observed a global withdrawal score, an anxiety-like effect in the elevated plus maze, a decrease of the striatal dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid concentrations, an increase of corticosterone plasma levels, a reduction of BDNF expression in several brain areas and an increase of [(3)H]epibatidine binding sites in specific brain regions. Interestingly, the effects found in NIC withdrawn wild-type mice were absent in GABAB1 knockout mice, suggesting that GABAB1 subunit of the GABAB receptor is involved in the regulation of the behavioural and biochemical alterations induced by NIC withdrawal in mice. These results reveal an interaction between the GABAB receptors and the neurochemical systems through which NIC exerts its long-term effects.

  8. Baclofen and Other GABAB Receptor Agents Are Allosteric Modulators of the CXCL12 Chemokine Receptor CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Kussrow, Amanda; Olmsted, Ian Roys; Sandoz, Guillaume; Bornhop, Darryl J.; Nahon, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    CXCR4, a receptor for the chemokine CXCL12 (stromal-cell derived factor-1α), is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), expressed in the immune and CNS and integrally involved in various neurological disorders. The GABAB receptor is also a GPCR that mediates metabotropic action of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and is located on neurons and immune cells as well. Using diverse approaches, we report novel interaction between GABAB receptor agents and CXCR4 and demonstrate allosteric binding of these agents to CXCR4. First, both GABAB antagonists and agonists block CXCL12-elicited chemotaxis in human breast cancer cells. Second, a GABAB antagonist blocks the potentiation by CXCL12 of high-threshold Ca2+ channels in rat neurons. Third, electrophysiology in Xenopus oocytes and human embryonic kidney cell line 293 cells in which we coexpressed rat CXCR4 and the G-protein inward rectifier K+ (GIRK) channel showed that GABAB antagonist and agonist modified CXCL12-evoked activation of GIRK channels. To investigate whether GABAB ligands bind to CXCR4, we expressed this receptor in heterologous systems lacking GABAB receptors and performed competition binding experiments. Our fluorescent resonance energy transfer experiments suggest that GABAB ligands do not bind CXCR4 at the CXCL12 binding pocket suggesting allosteric modulation, in accordance with our electrophysiology experiments. Finally, using backscattering interferometry and lipoparticles containing only the CXCR4 receptor, we quantified the binding affinity for the GABAB ligands, confirming a direct interaction with the CXCR4 receptor. The effect of GABAergic agents on CXCR4 suggests new therapeutic potentials for neurological and immune diseases. PMID:23843532

  9. Activation of GABA(B) receptors inhibits protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Frances Fangjia; Su, Ping; Liu, Fang; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2012-11-28

    Accumulated evidence has suggested that potentiation of cortical GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission may be a key mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, the downstream molecular mechanisms related to GABA potentiation remain unexplored. Recent studies have suggested that dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, which are used in the clinical treatment of schizophrenia, modulate protein kinase B (Akt)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 signaling. Here we report that activation of GABA(B) receptors significantly inhibits Akt/GSK-3 signaling in a β-arrestin-dependent pathway. Agonist stimulation of GABA(B) receptors enhances the phosphorylation of Akt (Thr-308) and enhances the phosphorylation of GSK-3α (Ser-21)/β (Ser-9) in both HEK-293T cells expressing GABA(B) receptors and rat hippocampal slices. Furthermore, knocking down the expression of β-arrestin2 using siRNA abolishes the GABA(B) receptor-mediated modulation of GSK-3 signaling. Our data may help to identify potentially novel targets through which GABA(B) receptor agents may exert therapeutic effects in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  10. GABAB receptors modulate catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells by a mechanism involving cyclic AMP formation.

    PubMed Central

    Oset-Gasque, M. J.; Parramón, M.; González, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The function of gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors in modulation of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells and the possible mechanism involved in this action have been examined. 2. The GABAB agonists (-)-baclofen and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APPA) were found to induce a dose-dependent increase of basal catecholamine secretion. The EC50s were 151 +/- 35 microM and 225 +/- 58 microM for baclofen and 3-APPA, respectively. This stimulatory effect was specific since it could be blocked by 0.5 mM of the specific GABAB antagonist CGP-35348. 3. In contrast, preincubation of chromaffin cells with the GABAB agonists was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the catecholamine secretion evoked by 10 microM nicotine and 200 microM muscimol. 4. The effects of GABAB agonists on both basal and evoked catecholamine secretion were found to be accompanied by parallel changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). GABAB agonists produced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i which was partially blocked by CGP 35348, but they produced a strong inhibition of the [Ca2+]i increase induced by nicotine and muscimol. 5. The GABAB agonists also produced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP levels, there being a direct correlation between both increase in catecholamine secretion and in intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The pretreatment of chromaffin cells with pertussis toxin doubled the catecholamine secretion and increased by four times the intracellular cyclic AMP levels evoked by GABAB agonists. 7. The possible involvement of adenylate cyclase in the mechanism of GABAA receptor modulation of catecholamine secretion is discussed. PMID:8306105

  11. Neuroprotective effect of vitamin C against the ethanol and nicotine modulation of GABA(B) receptor and PKA-alpha expression in prenatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Naseer, M I; Lee, H Y; Kim, M O

    2010-06-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure has various deleterious effects on neuronal development and can induce various defects in developing brain, resulting in fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA(B)) receptor (R) is known to play an important role during the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Our study was designed to investigate the effect of ethanol (100 mM), nicotine (50 microM) (for 30 min and 1 h), vitamin C (vitC, 0.5 mM), ethanol plus vitC, and nicotine plus vitC on expression level of GABA(B1), GABA(B2)R, and protein kinase A-alpha (PKA) in prenatal rat cortical and hippocampal neurons at gestational days (GD) 17.5. The results showed that, upon ethanol and nicotine exposure, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2)R protein expression increased significantly in the cortex and hippocampus for a short (30 min) and long term (1 h), whereas only GABA(B2)R subunit was decreased upon nicotine exposure for a long term in the cortex. Furthermore, PKA expression in cortex and hippocampus increased with ethanol exposure during short term, whereas long-term exposure results increased in cortex and decreased in hippocampus. Moreover, the cotreatment of vitC with ethanol and nicotine showed significantly decreased expression of GABA(B1), GABA(B2)R, and PKA in cortex and hippocampus for a long-term exposure. Mitochondrial membrane potential, Fluoro-jade-B, and propidium iodide staining were used to elucidate possible neurodegeneration. Our results suggest the involvement of GABA(B)R and PKA in nicotine and ethanol-mediated neurodevelopmental defects and the potential use of vitC as a effective protective agent for FAS-related deficits.

  12. Structure and functional interaction of the extracellular domain of human GABA(B) receptor GBR2.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Xiong, Dazhi; Mosyak, Lidia; Malito, David L; Kniazeff, Julie; Chen, Yan; Burmakina, Svetlana; Quick, Matthias; Bush, Martin; Javitch, Jonathan A; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fan, Qing R

    2012-06-03

    Inhibitory neurotransmission is mediated primarily by GABA. The metabotropic GABA(B) receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor central to mammalian brain function. Malfunction of GABA(B) receptor has been implicated in several neurological disorders. GABA(B) receptor functions as a heterodimeric assembly of GBR1 and GBR2 subunits, where GBR1 is responsible for ligand-binding and GBR2 is responsible for G protein coupling. Here we demonstrate that the GBR2 ectodomain directly interacts with the GBR1 ectodomain to increase agonist affinity by selectively stabilizing the agonist-bound conformation of GBR1. We present the crystal structure of the GBR2 ectodomain, which reveals a polar heterodimeric interface. We also identify specific heterodimer contacts from both subunits, and GBR1 residues involved in ligand recognition. Lastly, our structural and functional data indicate that the GBR2 ectodomain adopts a constitutively open conformation, suggesting a structural asymmetry in the active state of GABA(B) receptor that is unique to the GABAergic system.

  13. Structure and functional interaction of the extracellular domain of human GABAB receptor GBR2

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Xiong, Dazhi; Mosyak, Lidia; Malito, David L.; Kniazeff, Julie; Chen, Yan; Burmakina, Svetlana; Quick, Matthias; Bush, Martin; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fan, Qing R.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory neurotransmission is mediated primarily by GABA. Metabotropic GABAB receptor is a G protein coupled receptor central to mammalian brain function. Malfunction of GABAB receptor has been implicated in a number of neurological disorders. GABAB receptor functions as a heterodimeric assembly of GBR1 and GBR2 subunits, where GBR1 is responsible for ligand-binding and GBR2 is responsible for G protein coupling. Here we demonstrate that the GBR2 ectodomain directly interacts with the GBR1 ectodomain to increase agonist affinity by selectively stabilizing the agonist-bound conformation of GBR1. We present the crystal structure of the GBR2 ectodomain, which reveals a polar heterodimeric interface. We also identify specific heterodimer contacts from both subunits, and GBR1 residues involved in ligand recognition. Lastly, our structural and functional data indicate that the GBR2 ectodomain adopts a constitutively open conformation, suggesting a structural asymmetry in the active state of GABAB receptor that is unique to the GABAergic system. PMID:22660477

  14. GABAB RECEPTORS CONTRIBUTE TO THE RESTORATION OF BALANCE DURING VESTIBULAR COMPENSATION IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Heskin-Sweezie, Raquel; Titley, Heather K.; Baizer, Joan S.; Broussard, Dianne M.

    2010-01-01

    Following unilateral vestibular damage (UVD), vestibular compensation restores both static and dynamic vestibular reflexes. The cerebellar cortex provides powerful GABAergic inhibitory input to the vestibular nuclei which is necessary for compensation. Metabotropic GABA type B (GABAB) receptors in the vestibular nuclei are thought to be involved. However, the contribution of GABAB receptors may differ between static and dynamic compensation. We tested static and dynamic postural reflexes and gait in young mice, while they compensated for unilateral vestibular damage (UVD) caused by injection of air into the vestibular labyrinth. The effects of an agonist (baclofen), an antagonist (CGP56433A) and a positive allosteric modulator (CGP7930) of the GABAB receptor were evaluated during compensation. Static postural reflexes recovered very rapidly in our model, and baclofen slightly accelerated recovery. However, CGP56433A significantly impaired static compensation. Dynamic reflexes were evaluated by balance-beam performance and by gait; both showed significant decrements following UVD and performance improved over the next 2 days. Both CGP56433A and baclofen temporarily impaired the ability to walk on a balance beam after UVD. Two days later, there were no longer any significant effects of drug treatments on balance-beam performance. Baclofen slightly accelerated the recovery of stride length on a flat surface, but CGP7930 worsened the gait impairment following UVD. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that GABAB receptors are abundantly expressed on the vestibulospinal neurons of Deiters in mice. Our results suggest that GABAB receptors contribute to the compensation of static vestibular reflexes following unilateral peripheral damage. We also conclude that impairment of the first stage of compensation, static recovery, does not necessarily result in an impairment of dynamic recovery in the long term. PMID:20394801

  15. Modulation of synaptic depression of the calyx of Held synapse by GABAB receptors and spontaneous activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiantian; Rusu, Silviu I; Hruskova, Bohdana; Turecek, Rostislav; Borst, J Gerard G

    2013-01-01

    The calyx of Held synapse of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body is a giant axosomatic synapse in the auditory brainstem, which acts as a relay synapse showing little dependence of its synaptic strength on firing frequency. The main mechanism that is responsible for its resistance to synaptic depression is its large number of release sites with low release probability. Here, we investigated the contribution of presynaptic GABAB receptors and spontaneous activity to release probability both in vivo and in vitro in young-adult mice. Maximal activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors by baclofen reduced synaptic output by about 45% in whole-cell voltage clamp slice recordings, which was accompanied by a reduction in short-term depression. A similar reduction in transmission was observed when baclofen was applied in vivo by microiontophoresis during juxtacellular recordings using piggyback electrodes. No significant change in synaptic transmission was observed during application of the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP54626 both during in vivo and slice recordings, suggesting a low ambient GABA concentration. Interestingly, we observed that synapses with a high spontaneous frequency showed almost no synaptic depression during auditory stimulation, whereas synapses with a low spontaneous frequency did depress during noise bursts. Our data thus suggest that spontaneous firing can tonically reduce release probability in vivo. In addition, our data show that the ambient GABA concentration in the auditory brainstem is too low to activate the GABAB receptor at the calyx of Held significantly, but that activation of GABAB receptors can reduce sound-evoked synaptic depression. PMID:23940376

  16. Role of GABAB Receptor and L-Arg in GABA-Induced Vasorelaxation in Non-diabetic and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rat Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Kharazmi, Fatemah; Soltani, Nepton; Rezaei, Sana; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Farsi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is considered an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality in diabetic patients. The present study was designed to determine the role of gamma amino butyric acid B (GABAB) receptor and L-arginine (L-Arg) in GABA-induced vasorelaxation in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat vessels. Methods: Diabetes was induced by a single i.p. injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 60 mg/kg). Eight weeks later, superior mesenteric arteries of all groups were isolated and perfused according to the McGregor method. Results: Baseline perfusion pressure of STZ diabetic rats was significantly higher than non-diabetic rats in both intact and denuded endothelium. In the presence of faclofen, a selective GABAB receptor blocker, GABA-induced relaxation in intact and denuded endothelium mesenteric beds of STZ diabetic rats was suppressed, but this response in non-diabetic rats was not suppressed. Our results showed that in the presence of L-Arg, a nitric oxide precursor, GABA induced vasorelaxation in both diabetic and non-diabetic vessels. Conclusion: From the results of this study, it may be concluded that the vasorelaxatory effect of GABA in diabetic vessel is mediated by the GABAB receptor and nitric oxide, but it seems that in non-diabetic vessel GABAB receptor does not play any role in GABA-induced vasorelaxation, but nitric oxide induced GABA relaxation in non-diabetic vessel. PMID:25864813

  17. Comparison of the effects of the GABAB receptor positive modulator BHF177 and the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on anxiety-like behavior, learning, and memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Risbrough, Victoria B; Cates-Gatto, Chelsea; Kaczanowska, Katarzyna; Finn, M G; Roberts, Amanda J; Markou, Athina

    2013-07-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) receptor activation is a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of drug addiction, pain, anxiety, and depression. However, full agonists of this receptor induce side-effects, such as sedation, muscle relaxation, tolerance, and cognitive disruption. Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the GABAB receptor may have similar therapeutic effects as agonists with superior side-effect profiles. The present study behaviorally characterized N-([1R,2R,4S]-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl)-2-methyl-5-(4-[trifluoromethyl]phenyl)-4-pyrimidinamine (BHF177), a GABAB receptor PAM, in mouse models of anxiety-like behavior, learning and memory. In addition, the effects of BHF177 were compared with the agonist baclofen. Unlike the anxiolytic chlordiazepoxide, baclofen (0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and BHF177 (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg, orally) had no effect on anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze, light/dark box, or Vogel conflict test. Baclofen increased punished drinking in the Vogel conflict test, but this effect may be attributable to the analgesic actions of baclofen. At the highest dose tested (2.5 mg/kg), baclofen-treated mice exhibited sedation-like effects (i.e., reduced locomotor activity) across many of the tests, whereas BHF177-treated mice exhibited no sedation-like effects. BHF177 exhibited pro-convulsion properties only in mice, but not in rats, indicating that this effect may be species-specific. At doses that were not sedative or pro-convulsant, baclofen and BHF177 had no selective effects on fear memory retrieval in contextual and cued fear conditioning or spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. These data suggest that BHF177 has little sedative activity, no anxiolytic-like profile, and minimal impairment of learning and memory in mice.

  18. CGP 36216 is a selective antagonist at GABA(B) presynaptic receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ong, J; Bexis, S; Marino, V; Parker, D A; Kerr, D I; Froestl, W

    2001-03-01

    In rat neocortical preparations maintained in Mg(2+)-free Krebs medium, baclofen depressed the frequency of spontaneous discharges in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50) = 6 microM), sensitive to (3-aminopropyl)ethylphosphinic acid (CGP 36216) (100, 300 and 500 microM) (pA(2) = 3.9 +/- 0.1). By contrast, CGP 36216, up to 1 mM, was ineffective in antagonising baclofen-induced hyperpolarisations, mediated through gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) (GABA(B)) postsynaptic receptors. In electrically stimulated brain slices preloaded with [3H]GABA, CGP 36216 increased [3H]GABA release (IC(50) = 43 microM), which was reversed by baclofen (20 microM). While CGP 36216 is ineffective at GABA(B) postsynaptic receptors, it is appreciably more active at presynaptic receptors.

  19. Sodium salicylate reduces the level of GABAB receptors in the rat's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Butt, S; Ashraf, F; Porter, L A; Zhang, H

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that sodium salicylate (SS) can cause hearing abnormalities through affecting the central auditory system. In order to understand central effects of the drug, we examined how a single intraperitoneal injection of the drug changed the level of subunits of the type-B γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAB receptor) in the rat's inferior colliculus (IC). Immunohistochemical and western blotting experiments were conducted three hours following a drug injection, as previous studies indicated that a tinnitus-like behavior could be reliably induced in rats within this time period. Results revealed that both subunits of the receptor, GABABR1 and GABABR2, reduced their level over the entire area of the IC. Such a reduction was observed in both cell body and neuropil regions. In contrast, no changes were observed in other brain structures such as the cerebellum. Thus, a coincidence existed between a structure-specific reduction in the level of GABAB receptor subunits in the IC and the presence of a tinnitus-like behavior. This coincidence likely suggests that a reduction in the level of GABAB receptor subunits was involved in the generation of a tinnitus-like behavior and/or used by the nervous system to restore normal hearing following application of SS. PMID:26705739

  20. Expression of GABAB receptors in magnocellular neurosecretory cells of male, virgin female and lactating rats.

    PubMed

    Richards, D S; Villalba, R M; Alvarez, F J; Stern, J E

    2005-07-01

    GABA is one of the key neurotransmitters that regulate the firing activity of neurones in the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei. In the present study, we used immunohistochemical techniques to study the distribution and subcellular localisation of metabotropic GABA(B) receptors in magnocellular neurones in the SON and PVN. Robust GABA(B) receptor immunoreactivity (GABA(B)R; both subunit 1 and subunit 2 of the heterodimer), was observed in the SON and PVN. At the light microcope level, GABA(B)R immonoreactivity displayed a clustered pattern localised both intracytoplasmically and at the plasma membrane. Densitometry analysis indicated that GABA(B)R immunoreactivity was significantly more intense in vasopressin cells than in oxytocin cells, both in male, virgin female and lactating rats, and was denser in males than in virgin females. Light and electron microscope studies indicated that cytoplasmic GABA(B)R was localised in various organelles, including the Golgi, early endosomes and lysosomes, suggesting the cycling of the receptor within the endocytic and trafficking pathways. Some smaller clusters at the level of the cell plasma membrane were apposed to glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactive boutons, and appeared to be colocalised with gephyrin, a constituent protein of the postsynaptic density at inhibitory synapses. The presence of GABA(B)R immunoreactivity at synaptic and extrasynaptic sites was supported by electron microscopy. These results provide anatomical evidence for the expression of postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors in magnocellular neurosecretory cells. PMID:15946159

  1. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) induces cognitive deficits and affects GABAB receptors and IGF-1 receptors in male rats.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jenny; Grönbladh, Alfhild; Hallberg, Mathias

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the abuse of the club drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has become increasingly popular among adolescents. The drug induces euphoria but can also result in sedation, anaesthesia as well as short-term amnesia. In addition, the abuse of GHB causes cognitive impairments and the mechanism by which GHB induces these impairments is not clarified. The present study investigates the impact of GHB treatment on spatial learning and memory using a water maze (WM) test in rats. Furthermore, the behavioural data is combined with an autoradiographic analysis of the GABAB and the IGF-1 receptor systems. The results demonstrate that the animals administered with GHB display an impaired performance in the WM test as compared to controls. In addition, significant alterations in GABAB and IGF-1 receptor density as well as GABAB receptor functionality, were observed in several brain regions associated with cognitive functions e.g. hippocampus. To conclude, our findings suggest that GHB treatment can affect spatial learning and memory, and that this outcome at least to some extent is likely to involve both GABAB and IGF-1 receptors.

  2. GABAB receptor ligands for the treatment of alcohol use disorder: preclinical and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Agabio, Roberta; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies conducted to define the “anti-alcohol” pharmacological profile of the prototypic GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, and its therapeutic potential for treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Numerous studies have reported baclofen-induced suppression of alcohol drinking (including relapse- and binge-like drinking) and alcohol reinforcing, motivational, stimulating, and rewarding properties in rodents and monkeys. The majority of clinical surveys conducted to date—including case reports, retrospective chart reviews, and randomized placebo-controlled studies—suggest the ability of baclofen to suppress alcohol consumption, craving for alcohol, and alcohol withdrawal symptomatology in alcohol-dependent patients. The recent identification of a positive allosteric modulatory binding site, together with the synthesis of in vivo effective ligands, represents a novel, and likely more favorable, option for pharmacological manipulations of the GABAB receptor. Accordingly, data collected to date suggest that positive allosteric modulators of the GABAB receptor reproduce several “anti-alcohol” effects of baclofen and display a higher therapeutic index (with larger separation—in terms of doses—between “anti-alcohol” effects and sedation). PMID:24936171

  3. 3-Chloro,4-methoxyfendiline is a potent GABA(B) receptor potentiator in rat neocortical slices.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jennifer; Parker, David A S; Marino, Victor; Kerr, David I B; Puspawati, Ni Made; Prager, Rolf H

    2005-01-10

    Using grease-gap recording from rat neocortical slices, the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen elicited reversible and concentration-dependent hyperpolarizing responses (EC50=18+/-2.3 microM). The hyperpolarizations were antagonised by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist Sch 50911 [(+)-(S)-5,5-dimethylmorpholinyl-2-acetic acid). (+)-N-1-(3-chloro-4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl-3,3-diphenylpropylamine (3-chloro,4-methoxyfendiline; 3-Cl,4-MeO-fendiline) reversibly potentiated baclofen-induced hyperpolarizing responses, which were reduced by Sch 50911, producing leftward shifts of the baclofen concentration-response curves, with a marked increase in the maximal hyperpolarization (EC50=2+/-0.5 microM). In slices preincubated with either [3H]GABA or [3H]glutamic acid, 3-Cl,4-MeO-fendiline (1 microM) potentiated the inhibitory effect of baclofen (2 microM) on the electrically evoked release of [3H]GABA and had a similar effect on the release of [3H]glutamic acid at a concentration of 0.5 microM, without affecting the basal release. These effects were blocked by Sch 50911 (10 microM). Our findings suggest that 3-Cl,4-MeO-fendiline is a potent potentiator of pre- and postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor-mediated functions.

  4. GABAB receptor cell-surface export is controlled by an endoplasmic reticulum gatekeeper.

    PubMed

    Doly, S; Shirvani, H; Gäta, G; Meye, F J; Emerit, M-B; Enslen, H; Achour, L; Pardo-Lopez, L; Yang, S-K; Armand, V; Gardette, R; Giros, B; Gassmann, M; Bettler, B; Mameli, M; Darmon, M; Marullo, S

    2016-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) release and cell-surface export of many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are tightly regulated. For gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors of GABA, the major mammalian inhibitory neurotransmitter, the ligand-binding GB1 subunit is maintained in the ER by unknown mechanisms in the absence of hetero-dimerization with the GB2 subunit. We report that GB1 retention is regulated by a specific gatekeeper, PRAF2. This ER resident transmembrane protein binds to GB1, preventing its progression in the biosynthetic pathway. GB1 release occurs upon competitive displacement from PRAF2 by GB2. PRAF2 concentration, relative to that of GB1 and GB2, tightly controls cell-surface receptor density and controls GABAB function in neurons. Experimental perturbation of PRAF2 levels in vivo caused marked hyperactivity disorders in mice. These data reveal an unanticipated major impact of specific ER gatekeepers on GPCR function and identify PRAF2 as a new molecular target with therapeutic potential for psychiatric and neurological diseases involving GABAB function.

  5. Evidence of a pathogenic role for CD8+ T cells in anti-GABAB receptor limbic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Golombeck, Kristin S.; Bönte, Kathrin; Mönig, Constanze; van Loo, Karen M.; Hartwig, Marvin; Schwindt, Wolfram; Widman, Guido; Lindenau, Matthias; Becker, Albert J.; Glatzel, Markus; Elger, Christian E.; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G.; Lohmann, Hubertus; Gross, Catharina C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To characterize the cellular autoimmune response in patients with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor antibody–associated limbic encephalitis (GABAB-R LE). Methods: Patients underwent MRI, extensive neuropsychological assessment, and multiparameter flow cytometry of peripheral blood and CSF. Results: We identified a series of 3 cases of nonparaneoplastic GABAB-R LE and one case of paraneoplastic GABAB-R LE associated with small cell lung cancer. All patients exhibited temporal lobe epilepsy, neuropsychological deficits, and MRI findings typical of LE. Absolute numbers of CD19+ B cells, CD138+ CD19+ plasma cells, CD4+ T cells, activated HLADR+ CD4+ T cells, as well as CD8+ T cells and HLADR+ CD8+ T cells did not differ in peripheral blood but were elevated in CSF of patients with GABAB-R LE compared to controls. Augmented absolute numbers of CD138+ CD19+ plasma cells and activated HLADR+ CD8+ T cells in CSF corresponded to higher overall neuropsychological and memory deficits in patients with GABAB-R LE. A histologic specimen of one patient following selective amygdalohippocampectomy revealed perivascular infiltrates of CD138+ plasma cells and CD4+ T cells, whereas cytotoxic CD8+ T cells were detected within the brain parenchyma in close contact to neurons. Conclusion: Our data suggest a pathogenic role for CD8+ T cells in addition to the established role of plasma cell–derived autoantibodies in GABAB-R LE. PMID:27213174

  6. Lys-63-linked Ubiquitination of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA), Type B1, at Multiple Sites by the E3 Ligase Mind Bomb-2 Targets GABAB Receptors to Lysosomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Zemoura, Khaled; Trümpler, Claudia; Benke, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors, which control neuronal excitability by mediating prolonged inhibition. The magnitude of GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition essentially depends on the amount of receptors in the plasma membrane. However, the factors regulating cell surface expression of GABAB receptors are poorly characterized. Cell surface GABAB receptors are constitutively internalized and either recycled to the plasma membrane or degraded in lysosomes. The signal that sorts GABAB receptors to lysosomes is currently unknown. Here we show that Mind bomb-2 (MIB2)-mediated Lys-63-linked ubiquitination of the GABAB1 subunit at multiple sites is the lysosomal sorting signal for GABAB receptors. We found that inhibition of lysosomal activity in cultured rat cortical neurons increased the fraction of Lys-63-linked ubiquitinated GABAB receptors and enhanced the expression of total as well as cell surface GABAB receptors. Mutational inactivation of four putative ubiquitination sites in the GABAB1 subunit significantly diminished Lys-63-linked ubiquitination of GABAB receptors and prevented their lysosomal degradation. We identified MIB2 as the E3 ligase triggering Lys-63-linked ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of GABAB receptors. Finally, we show that sustained activation of glutamate receptors, a condition occurring in brain ischemia that down-regulates GABAB receptors, considerably increased the expression of MIB2 and Lys-63-linked ubiquitination of GABAB receptors. Interfering with Lys-63-linked ubiquitination by overexpressing ubiquitin mutants or GABAB1 mutants deficient in Lys-63-linked ubiquitination prevented glutamate-induced down-regulation of the receptors. These findings indicate that Lys-63-linked ubiquitination of GABAB1 at multiple sites by MIB2 controls sorting of GABAB receptors to lysosomes for degradation under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27573246

  7. GABAB receptor blockade enhances theta and gamma rhythms in the hippocampus of behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Shen, Bixia

    2007-01-01

    The participation of GABA(B) receptors in hippocampal EEG generation was studied by intracerebroventricular (icv) and intracerebral infusions of GABA(B) receptor antagonist p-(3-aminopropyl)-p-diethoxymethyl-phosphinic acid (CGP35348) in freely behaving rats. During awake-immobility, icv CGP35348 induced a theta rhythm and increased gamma waves (30-100 Hz) in the hippocampus. The immobility theta peaked at 6-7 Hz and had a theta phase in CA1 stratum radiatum of approximately 160 degrees with reference to the theta at the alveus, when compared with approximately 130 degrees during walking. Immobility theta power peaks at 6-7 Hz was also found in normal rats, and it was detected in 27% of the EEG segments during immobility. Incidence of immobility theta increased to 87.5% after 480 nmol of CGP35348 icv. Muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (5 mg/kg, ip) suppressed the induction of immobility theta and the gamma power increase after icv CGP35348. CGP35348 icv did not significantly change the hippocampal theta power at 7-8 Hz during walking (theta fundamental), but it increased power at 12-15 Hz, at the second harmonic of theta. CGP35348 icv also increased 30-50 Hz gamma power during walking. Medial septal infusion of CGP35348 (12 nmol in 0.4 microl) increased the power and the frequency of the hippocampal theta second harmonic during walking, but did not increase gamma activity. Infusion of CGP35348 (8 nmol in 0.4 microl) in the hippocampus increased the local gamma activity at 30-100 Hz, but did not induce immobility theta or affect the walking theta rhythm. In conclusion, icv GABA(B) receptor blockade increased an atropine-sensitive input that generated an immobility theta rhythm, while GABA(B) receptor blockade of the medial septum increased atropine-resistant theta harmonics possibly generated by apical dendritic spikes. GABA(B) receptor blockade may enhance cognitive task performance by activating hippocampal theta and gamma rhythms in behaving rats.

  8. GabaB receptors activation in the NTS blocks the glycemic responses induced by carotid body receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lemus, Mónica; Montero, Sergio; Cadenas, José Luis; Lara, José Jesús; Tejeda-Chávez, Héctor Rafael; Alvarez-Buylla, Ramón; de Alvarez-Buylla, Elena Roces

    2008-08-18

    The carotid body receptors participate in glucose regulation sensing glucose levels in blood entering the cephalic circulation. The carotid body receptors information, is initially processed within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and elicits changes in circulating glucose and brain glucose uptake. Previous work has shown that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in NTS modulates respiratory reflexes, but the role of GABA within NTS in glucose regulation remains unknown. Here we show that GABA(B) receptor agonist (baclofen) or antagonists (phaclofen and CGP55845A) locally injected into NTS modified arterial glucose levels and brain glucose retention. Control injections outside NTS did not elicit these responses. In contrast, GABA(A) agonist and antagonist (muscimol or bicuculline) produced no significant changes in blood glucose levels. When these GABAergic drugs were applied before carotid body receptors stimulation, again, only GABA(B) agonist or antagonist significantly affected glycemic responses; baclofen microinjection significantly reduced the hyperglycemic response and brain glucose retention observed after carotid body receptors stimulation, while phaclofen produced the opposite effect, increasing significantly hyperglycemia and brain glucose retention. These results indicate that activation of GABA(B), but not GABA(A), receptors in the NTS modulates the glycemic responses after anoxic stimulation of the carotid body receptors, and suggest the presence of a tonic inhibitory mechanism in the NTS to avoid hyperglycemia.

  9. Suppression of ATP-induced excitability in rat small-diameter trigeminal ganglion neurons by activation of GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mamoru; Ikeda, Mizuho; Takahashi, Masayuki; Kanazawa, Takuya; Nasu, Masanori; Matsumoto, Shigeji

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a GABAB receptor agonist could modulate ATP-activated neuronal excitability of nociceptive TRG neurons using perforated whole-cell patch-clamp and immunohistochemical techniques. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that 86% of P2X3 receptor-immunoreactive, small-diameter TRG neurons co-expressed GABAB receptor. Under voltage-clamp conditions (Vh=-60mV), application of ATP activated the inward current in acutely isolated rat TRG neurons in a dose-dependent manner (10-50 μM) and this current could be blocked by pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-27,47-disulfonic acid (PPADS) (10 μM), a selective P2 purinoreceptor antagonist. The peak amplitude of ATP-activated currents was significantly inhibited after application of GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen (10-50 μM), in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner. The baclofen-induced inhibition of ATP-activated current was abolished by co-application of 3-amino-2 (4-chlorophenyl)-2hydroxypropysufonic acid) saclofen, a GABAB receptor antagonist (50 μM). Under current-clamp conditions, application of 20 μM ATP significantly depolarized the membrane potential resulting in increased mean action potential frequencies, and these ATP-induced effects were significantly inhibited by baclofen and these effects were antagonized by co-application of saclofen. Together, the results suggested that GABAB receptor activation could inhibit the ATP-induced excitability of small-diameter TRG neurons activated through the P2X3 receptor. Thus, the interaction between P2X3 and GABAB receptors of small-diameter TRG neuronal cell bodies is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of trigeminal nociception. PMID:24004472

  10. Evaluation of peripheral versus central effects of GABAB receptor activation using a novel, positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor ADX71943, a pharmacological tool compound with a fully peripheral activity profile

    PubMed Central

    Kalinichev, M; Donovan-Rodriguez, T; Girard, F; Riguet, E; Rouillier, M; Bournique, B; Haddouk, H; Mutel, V; Poli, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, has shown promising effects in patients suffering from pain, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcoholism, overactive bladder and gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, baclofen's short duration of action and side effects limit its wider use. Here we characterized a novel, GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) ADX71943. Experimental Approach In vitro, ADX71943 was assessed for pharmacological activity and selectivity using recombinant and native GABAB receptors. In vivo ADX71943 was assessed in the acetic acid-induced writhing (AAW) test in mice and formalin tests (FTs) in mice and rats. Marble burying (MB) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests, rotarod, spontaneous locomotor activity (sLMA) and body temperature (BT) tests in mice and rats were used to investigate centrally-mediated effects. Key Results In vitro, in the presence of GABA, ADX71943 increased the potency and efficacy of agonists and showed selectivity at the GABAB receptor. ADX71943 reduced pain-associated behaviours in AAW; an effect blocked by GABAB receptor antagonist CGP63360. ADX71943 reduced pain in the FT in mice and rats, but was inactive in the MB and EPM despite reaching high concentrations in plasma. ADX71943 had no effect on BT, rotarod and sLMA. Conclusions and Implications ADX71943 showed consistent and target-related efficacy in tests of disorders that have a significant peripheral component (acute and chronic pain), while having no effect in those associated with centrally-mediated anxiety-like reactivity and side effects. Thus, ADX71943 is a useful pharmacological tool for delineation of peripherally- versus centrally-mediated effects of GABAB receptor activation. PMID:24923436

  11. Proteasomal Degradation of γ-Aminobutyric AcidB Receptors Is Mediated by the Interaction of the GABAB2 C Terminus with the Proteasomal ATPase Rtp6 and Regulated by Neuronal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Zemoura, Khaled; Benke, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cell surface expression of neurotransmitter receptors is crucial for determining synaptic strength and plasticity, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We previously showed that proteasomal degradation of GABAB receptors via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) machinery determines the number of cell surface GABAB receptors and thereby GABAB receptor-mediated neuronal inhibition. Here, we show that proteasomal degradation of GABAB receptors requires the interaction of the GABAB2 C terminus with the proteasomal AAA-ATPase Rpt6. A mutant of Rpt6 lacking ATPase activity prevented degradation of GABAB receptors but not the removal of Lys48-linked ubiquitin from GABAB2. Blocking ERAD activity diminished the interaction of Rtp6 with GABAB receptors resulting in increased total as well as cell surface expression of GABAB receptors. Modulating neuronal activity affected proteasomal activity and correspondingly the interaction level of Rpt6 with GABAB2. This resulted in altered cell surface expression of the receptors. Thus, neuronal activity-dependent proteasomal degradation of GABAB receptors by the ERAD machinery is a potent mechanism regulating the number of GABAB receptors available for signaling and is expected to contribute to homeostatic neuronal plasticity. PMID:24482233

  12. GABAB receptor-mediated contractile effects resistant to tetrodotoxin in isolated cat ileum.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Venkova, K; Radomirov, R

    1990-06-21

    The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABAergic drugs were studied on longitudinal strips from cat terminal ileum prepared after removing the myenteric plexus. GABA and baclofen exerted concentration-dependent contractile effects. Muscimol was ineffective, and bicuculline did not antagonize the effect of GABA. The complete elimination of the neural input to the smooth muscle cells by tetrodotoxin failed to prevent the action of GABA and baclofen. Pharmacological analyses of the effects indicated the existence of GABAB receptors on the smooth muscle cells in the longitudinal layer of cat terminal ileum.

  13. GABAB receptor deficiency causes failure of neuronal homeostasis in hippocampal networks

    PubMed Central

    Vertkin, Irena; Styr, Boaz; Slomowitz, Edden; Ofir, Nir; Shapira, Ilana; Berner, David; Fedorova, Tatiana; Laviv, Tal; Barak-Broner, Noa; Greitzer-Antes, Dafna; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Lotan, Ilana; Slutsky, Inna

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of neuronal activity by homeostatic control systems is fundamental for proper functioning of neural circuits. Failure in neuronal homeostasis has been hypothesized to underlie common pathophysiological mechanisms in a variety of brain disorders. However, the key molecules regulating homeostasis in central mammalian neural circuits remain obscure. Here, we show that selective inactivation of GABAB, but not GABAA, receptors impairs firing rate homeostasis by disrupting synaptic homeostatic plasticity in hippocampal networks. Pharmacological GABAB receptor (GABABR) blockade or genetic deletion of the GB1a receptor subunit disrupts homeostatic regulation of synaptic vesicle release. GABABRs mediate adaptive presynaptic enhancement to neuronal inactivity by two principle mechanisms: First, neuronal silencing promotes syntaxin-1 switch from a closed to an open conformation to accelerate soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex assembly, and second, it boosts spike-evoked presynaptic calcium flux. In both cases, neuronal inactivity removes tonic block imposed by the presynaptic, GB1a-containing receptors on syntaxin-1 opening and calcium entry to enhance probability of vesicle fusion. We identified the GB1a intracellular domain essential for the presynaptic homeostatic response by tuning intermolecular interactions among the receptor, syntaxin-1, and the CaV2.2 channel. The presynaptic adaptations were accompanied by scaling of excitatory quantal amplitude via the postsynaptic, GB1b-containing receptors. Thus, GABABRs sense chronic perturbations in GABA levels and transduce it to homeostatic changes in synaptic strength. Our results reveal a novel role for GABABR as a key regulator of population firing stability and propose that disruption of homeostatic synaptic plasticity may underlie seizure's persistence in the absence of functional GABABRs. PMID:26056260

  14. GABAB receptor modulation of serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphé nucleus and escalation of aggression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Shimamoto, Akiko; Boyson, Christopher O.; DeBold, Joseph F.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) system in the brain has been studied more than any other neurotransmitter for its role in the neurobiological basis of aggression. However, which mechanisms modulate the 5-HT system to promote escalated aggression is not clear. We here explore the role of GABAergic modulation in the raphé nuclei, from where most 5-HT in the forebrain originates, on escalated aggression in male mice. Pharmacological activation of GABAB, but not GABAA, receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) escalated aggressive behaviors. In contrast, GABA agonists did not escalate aggressive behaviors after microinjection into the median raphé nucleus (MRN). The aggression-heightening effect of the GABAB agonist baclofen depended on the activation of 5-HT neurons in the DRN because it was blocked by co-administration of the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT, which acts on autoreceptors and inhibits 5-HT neural activity. In vivo microdialysis showed that GABAB activation in the DRN increased extracellular 5-HT level in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). This may be due to an indirect action via presynaptic GABAB receptors. The presynaptic GABAB receptors suppress Ca2+ channel activity and inhibit neurotransmission, and the co-administration of N-type Ca2+ channel blocker facilitated the effect of baclofen. These findings suggest that the indirect disinhibition of 5-HT neuron activity by presynaptic GABAB receptors on non-5-HT neurons in the DRN is one of the neurobiological mechanisms of escalated aggression. PMID:20810897

  15. The role of GABAB receptors in the vestibular oculomotor system in mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Naoki; Wood, Scott; Kushiro, Keisuke; Perachio, Adrian; Makishima, Tomoko

    2016-04-01

    Systemic administration of a gamma-amino butyric acid type B (GABAB) receptor agonist, baclofen, affects various physiological and psychological processes. To date, the effects on oculomotor system have been well characterized in primates, however those in mice have not been explored. In this study, we investigated the effects of baclofen focusing on vestibular-related eye movements. Two rotational paradigms, i.e. sinusoidal rotation and counter rotation were employed to stimulate semicircular canals and otolith organs in the inner ear. Experimental conditions (dosage, routes and onset of recording) were determined based on the prior studies exploring the behavioral effects of baclofen in mice. With an increase in dosage, both canal and otolith induced ocular responses were gradually affected. There was a clear distinction in the drug sensitivity showing that eye movements derived from direct vestibulo-ocular reflex pathways were relatively unaltered, while the responses through higher-order neural networks in the vestibular system were substantially decreased. These findings were consistent with those observed in primates suggesting a well-conserved role of GABAB receptors in the oculomotor system across frontal-eyed and lateral-eyed animals. We showed here a previously unrecognized effect of baclofen on the vestibular oculomotor function in mice. When interpreting general animal performance under the drug, the potential contribution of altered balance system should be taken into consideration. PMID:26778789

  16. Conjoint occurrence of GABAB receptor antibodies in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome with antibodies to the voltage gated calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Dogan Onugoren, Müjgan; Rauschka, Helmut; Bien, Christian G

    2014-08-15

    Antibodies (abs) to the GABAB receptor have been recently found to be responsible for immune-mediated encephalitis with dominant seizures. They are in approximately 50% of cases associated with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). GABAB receptors are mainly located in the hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum in the presynaptic and postsynaptic regions of synapses. The main function of these receptors is to reduce activity states of neurons. In some instances, GABAB receptor abs in these patients were accompanied by other antibodies, among them VGCC abs (Lancaster et al., 2010, Boronat et al., 2011). VGCC abs cause paraneoplastic Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) by reduction of presynaptic VGCCs (Titulaer et al., 2011). In the domain of CNS disease, VGCC abs have been found in association with paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia (Mason et al., 1997) and rarely and at low titres also in other paraneoplastic encephalopathies together with Hu abs (Lennon et al., 1995). It has been a long-standing debate if abs in paraneoplastic conditions associate rather with the neurological syndrome or the tumour. Here, we describe the conjoint occurrence of abs to the GABAB receptor and to the VGCC in a patient with SCLC presenting only symptoms of the peripheral nervous system giving another example of the latter hypothesis. PMID:24929678

  17. gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) induces GABA(B) receptor independent intracellular Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, but has no effect on GHB or GABA(B) receptors of medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Molnár, T; Antal, K; Nyitrai, G; Emri, Z

    2009-08-18

    We report on cellular actions of the illicit recreational drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in the brain reward area nucleus accumbens. First, we compared the effects of GHB and the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen. Neither of them affected the membrane currents of medium spiny neurons in rat nucleus accumbens slices. GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic potentials of medium spiny neurons, however, were reduced by baclofen but not GHB. These results indicate the lack of GHB as well as postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors, and the presence of GHB insensitive presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in medium spiny neurons. In astrocytes GHB induced intracellular Ca(2+) transients, preserved in slices from GABA(B) receptor type 1 subunit knockout mice. The effects of tetrodotoxin, zero added Ca(2+) with/without intracellular Ca(2+) store depletor cyclopiazonic acid or vacuolar H-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 indicate that GHB-evoked Ca(2+) transients depend on external Ca(2+) and intracellular Ca(2+) stores, but not on vesicular transmitter release. GHB-induced astrocytic Ca(2+) transients were not affected by the GHB receptor-specific antagonist NCS-382, suggesting the presence of a novel NCS-382-insensitive target for GHB in astrocytes. The activation of astrocytes by GHB implies their involvement in physiological actions of GHB. Our findings disclose a novel profile of GHB action in the nucleus accumbens. Here, unlike in other brain areas, GHB does not act on GABA(B) receptors, but activates an NCS-382 insensitive GHB-specific target in a subpopulation of astrocytes. The lack of either post- or presynaptic effects on medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens distinguishes GHB from many drugs and natural rewards with addictive properties and might explain why GHB has only a weak reinforcing capacity.

  18. LACK OF FUNCTIONAL GABAB RECEPTORS ALTERS Kiss1, Gnrh1 AND Gad1 mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE MEDIAL BASAL HYPOTHALAMUS AT POSTNATAL DAY 4

    PubMed Central

    Di Giorgio, Noelia P.; Catalano, Paolo N.; López, Paula V.; González, Betina; Semaan, Sheila J.; López, Gabriela C.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Rulli, Susana B.; Somoza, Gustavo M.; Bettler, Bernhard; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Adult mice lacking functional GABAB receptors (GABAB1KO) show altered Gnrh1 and Gad1 expressions in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus (POA-AH) and females display disruption of cyclicity and fertility. Here we addressed whether sexual differentiation of the brain and the proper wiring of the GnRH and kisspeptin systems were already disturbed in postnatal day 4 (PND4) GABAB1KO mice. Methods PND4 wild type (WT) and GABAB1KO mice of both sexes were sacrificed; tissues were collected to determine mRNA expression (qPCR), amino acids (HPLC), and hormones (RIA and/or IHC). Results GnRH neuron number (IHC) did not differ among groups in olfactory bulbs or OVLT-POA. Gnrh1 mRNA (qPCR) in POA-AH was similar among groups. Gnrh1 mRNA in medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) was similar in WTs but was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Hypothalamic GnRH (RIA) was sexually different in WTs (males > females) but this sex difference was lost in GABAB1KOs; the same pattern was observed when analyzing only the MBH, but not in the POA-AH. Arcuate nucleus Kiss1 mRNA (micropunch-qPCR) was higher in WT females than in WT males and GABAB1KO females. Gad1 mRNA in MBH was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Serum LH and gonadal estradiol content were also increased in GABAB1KOs. Conclusion We demonstrate that GABABRs participate in the sexual differentiation of the ARC/MBH, because sex differences in several reproductive genes, such as Gad1, Kiss1 and Gnrh1, are critically disturbed in GABAB1KO mice at PND4, probably altering the organization and development of neural circuits governing the reproductive axis. PMID:24080944

  19. Positive allosteric modulator of GABAB receptor alters behavioral effects but not afterdischarge progression induced by partial hippocampal kindling.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Jin, Miao; Chu, Liangwei; Ma, Jingyi

    2016-11-01

    Hippocampal seizures decreased the function of GABAB receptors, which may further increase seizure susceptibility and contribute to development of schizophrenia-like behaviors. Recent literature indicates that GABAB receptor agonist may normalize schizophrenia-like behaviors and prevent drug-induced behavioral sensitization. We hypothesized that positive modulation of GABAB receptor function during seizure induction will reduce seizure-induced schizophrenia-like behaviors. Using a partial hippocampal kindling model, afterdischarges were induced after injection of saline or dimethyl sulfoxide (vehicle-kindled rats), or a GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator CGP7930, at 1 mg/kg i.p. (CGP1-kindled) or 5 mg/kg i.p. (CGP5-kindled). The increase in the primary afterdischarge duration during kindling was not different among the groups. However, the CGP5-kindled group showed a lower afterdischarge starting frequency as compared to vehicle-kindled or CGP1-kindled groups. Partial hippocampal kindling (21 afterdischarges) resulted in decreased prepulse inhibition and decreased gating of hippocampal auditory evoked potentials in vehicle-kindled and CGP1-kindled rats, as compared to saline-injected non-kindled rats, recorded 3-4 days after the last afterdischarge. However, CGP5-kindled rats showed normal prepulse inhibition and hippocampal auditory gating (compared to non-kindled rats), which was significantly higher than the respective measure in vehicle-kindled rats. CGP5-kindled group also showed methamphetamine-induced locomotion that was significant lower than the vehicle-kindled or CGP1-kindled group, but slightly higher than the saline-injected non-kindled rats. In conclusion, this study provides original data that a GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator could therapeutically prevent or normalize some seizure-induced behavioral disruptions in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:27436721

  20. Positive allosteric modulator of GABAB receptor alters behavioral effects but not afterdischarge progression induced by partial hippocampal kindling.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Jin, Miao; Chu, Liangwei; Ma, Jingyi

    2016-11-01

    Hippocampal seizures decreased the function of GABAB receptors, which may further increase seizure susceptibility and contribute to development of schizophrenia-like behaviors. Recent literature indicates that GABAB receptor agonist may normalize schizophrenia-like behaviors and prevent drug-induced behavioral sensitization. We hypothesized that positive modulation of GABAB receptor function during seizure induction will reduce seizure-induced schizophrenia-like behaviors. Using a partial hippocampal kindling model, afterdischarges were induced after injection of saline or dimethyl sulfoxide (vehicle-kindled rats), or a GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator CGP7930, at 1 mg/kg i.p. (CGP1-kindled) or 5 mg/kg i.p. (CGP5-kindled). The increase in the primary afterdischarge duration during kindling was not different among the groups. However, the CGP5-kindled group showed a lower afterdischarge starting frequency as compared to vehicle-kindled or CGP1-kindled groups. Partial hippocampal kindling (21 afterdischarges) resulted in decreased prepulse inhibition and decreased gating of hippocampal auditory evoked potentials in vehicle-kindled and CGP1-kindled rats, as compared to saline-injected non-kindled rats, recorded 3-4 days after the last afterdischarge. However, CGP5-kindled rats showed normal prepulse inhibition and hippocampal auditory gating (compared to non-kindled rats), which was significantly higher than the respective measure in vehicle-kindled rats. CGP5-kindled group also showed methamphetamine-induced locomotion that was significant lower than the vehicle-kindled or CGP1-kindled group, but slightly higher than the saline-injected non-kindled rats. In conclusion, this study provides original data that a GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator could therapeutically prevent or normalize some seizure-induced behavioral disruptions in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  1. Embryonic GABA(B) receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Matthew S; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B) receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B) receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B) receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B) receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B) receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

  2. Embryonic GABAB Receptor Blockade Alters Cell Migration, Adult Hypothalamic Structure, and Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors Sex Specifically in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T.; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J.; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABAB receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABAB receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11–E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABAB receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABAB receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABAB receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABAB receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  3. Analysis of G-protein-activated inward rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channel currents upon GABAB receptor activation in rat supraoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Harayama, Nobuya; Kayano, Tomohiko; Moriya, Taiki; Kitamura, Naoki; Shibuya, Izumi; Tanaka-Yamamoto, Keiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueta, Yoichi; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2014-12-01

    While magnocellular neurons in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) possess rich Gi/o-mediated mechanisms, molecular and cellular properties of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channels have been controversial. Here, properties of GIRK channels are examined by RT-PCR and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat SON neurons. Patch clamp experiments showed that the selective GABAB agonist, baclofen, enhanced currents in a high K(+) condition. The baclofen-enhanced currents exhibited evident inward rectification and were blocked by the selective GABAB antagonist, CGP55845A, the IRK channel blocker, Ba(2+), and the selective GIRK channel blocker, tertiapin, indicating that baclofen activates GIRK channels via GABAB receptors. The GIRK currents were abolished by N-ethylmaleimide pretreatment, and prolonged by GTPγS inclusion in the patch pipette, suggesting that Gi/o proteins are involved. RT-PCR analysis revealed mRNAs for all four GIRK 1-4 channels and for both GABABR1 and GABABR2 receptors in rat SON. However, the concentration-dependency of the baclofen-induced activation of GIRK currents had an EC50 of 110 µM, which is about 100 times higher than that of baclofen-induced inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, baclofen caused no significant changes in the membrane potential and the firing rate. These results suggest that although GIRK channels can be activated by GABAB receptors via the Gi/o pathway, this occurs at high agonist concentrations, and thus may not be a physiological mechanism regulating the function of SON neurons. This property that the membrane potential receives little influence from GIRK currents seems to be uncommon for CNS neurons possessing rich Gi/o-coupled receptors, and could be a special feature of rat SON neurons.

  4. The GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, contributes to three distinct varieties of amnesia in the human brain - A detailed case report.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Adam; Hoefeijzers, Serge; Milton, Fraser; Dewar, Michaela; Carr, Melanie; Streatfield, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We describe a patient in whom long-term, therapeutic infusion of the selective gamma-amino-butyric acid type B (GABAB) receptor agonist, baclofen, into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) gave rise to three distinct varieties of memory impairment: i) repeated, short periods of severe global amnesia, ii) accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF), evident over intervals of days and iii) a loss of established autobiographical memories. This pattern of impairment has been reported in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), in particular the subtype of Transient Epileptic Amnesia (TEA). The amnesic episodes and accelerated forgetting remitted on withdrawal of baclofen, while the autobiographical amnesia (AbA) persisted. This exceptional case highlights the occurrence of 'non-standard' forms of human amnesia, reflecting the biological complexity of memory processes. It suggests a role for GABAB signalling in the modulation of human memory over multiple time-scales and hints at its involvement in 'epileptic amnesia'. PMID:26599496

  5. Effect of GABAB receptor antagonist (CGP35348) on learning and memory in albino mice.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Quratulane; Iqbal, Shahid; Arfa, Fatima; Khakwani, Saba; Akbar, Atif; Ullah, Asmat; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to demonstrate the potential effect of CGP 35348 (GABAB receptor antagonist) on the learning, memory formation, and neuromuscular coordination in albino mouse. Mice were intrapertoneally injected with 1 mg CGP 35348/mL of distilled water/Kg body weight, while the control animals were injected with equal volume of saline solution. A battery of neurological tests was applied following the intrapertoneal injections. Results of rota rod indicated that CGP 35348 had no effect on neuromuscular coordination in both male (P=0.528) and female (P=0.125) albino mice. CGP 35348 treated females demonstrated poor exploratory behavior during open filed for several parameters (time mobile (P=0.04), time immobile (P=0.04), rotations (P=0.04), and anticlockwise rotations (P=0.038)). The results for Morris water maze (MWM) retention phase indicated that CGP 35348 treated male mice took shorter latency to reach the hidden platform (P=0.04) than control indicating improved memory. This observation was complemented by the swim strategies used by mice during training days in MWM as CGP 35348 treated males used more direct and focal approach to reach the platform as the training proceeded.

  6. GABAB receptor-mediated activation of astrocytes by gamma-hydroxybutyric acid

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Timothy; Chen, Lixin; Emri, Zsuzsa; Pirttimaki, Tiina; Errington, Adam C.; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Parri, H. Rheinallt

    2014-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolite gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) shows a variety of behavioural effects when administered to animals and humans, including reward/addiction properties and absence seizures. At the cellular level, these actions of GHB are mediated by activation of neuronal GABAB receptors (GABABRs) where it acts as a weak agonist. Because astrocytes respond to endogenous and exogenously applied GABA by activation of both GABAA and GABABRs, here we investigated the action of GHB on astrocytes on the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the ventrobasal (VB) thalamic nucleus, two brain areas involved in the reward and proepileptic action of GHB, respectively, and compared it with that of the potent GABABR agonist baclofen. We found that GHB and baclofen elicited dose-dependent (ED50: 1.6 mM and 1.3 µM, respectively) transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ in VTA and VB astrocytes of young mice and rats, which were accounted for by activation of their GABABRs and mediated by Ca2+ release from intracellular store release. In contrast, prolonged GHB and baclofen exposure caused a reduction in spontaneous astrocyte activity and glutamate release from VTA astrocytes. These findings have key (patho)physiological implications for our understanding of the addictive and proepileptic actions of GHB. PMID:25225100

  7. Altered emotionality and neuronal excitability in mice lacking KCTD12, an auxiliary subunit of GABAB receptors associated with mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cathomas, F; Stegen, M; Sigrist, H; Schmid, L; Seifritz, E; Gassmann, M; Bettler, B; Pryce, C R

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, is fundamental to brain function and implicated in the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders. GABA activates G-protein-coupled GABAB receptors comprising principal GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits as well as auxiliary KCTD8, 12, 12b and 16 subunits. The KCTD12 gene has been associated with bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. Here we compare Kctd12 null mutant (Kctd12−/−) and heterozygous (Kctd12+/−) with wild-type (WT) littermate mice to determine whether lack of or reduced KCTD12 expression leads to phenotypes that, extrapolating to human, could constitute endophenotypes for neuropsychiatric disorders with which KCTD12 is associated. Kctd12−/− mice exhibited increased fear learning but not increased memory of a discrete auditory-conditioned stimulus. Kctd12+/− mice showed increased activity during the inactive (light) phase of the circadian cycle relative to WT and Kctd12−/− mice. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices, a region of high Kctd12 expression, revealed an increased intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons in Kctd12−/− and Kctd12+/− mice. This is the first direct evidence for involvement of KCTD12 in determining phenotypes of emotionality, behavioral activity and neuronal excitability. This study provides empirical support for the polymorphism and expression evidence that KCTD12 confers risk for and is associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25689571

  8. Prolonged GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition in the cat spinal cord: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, D R; Lacey, G

    1998-08-01

    In pentobarbitone-anaesthetised spinal cats, a comparison was made of the effects of intravenous bicuculline hydrochloride, a GABA(A)-receptor antagonist, and several (-)-baclofen (GABA(B)-receptor) antagonists (CGP 35348, 4638 , 56999A) on the prolonged inhibition of extensor-muscle monosynaptic reflexes, recorded from lumbar ventral roots, by brief or continuous tetanic stimulation of low-threshold afferent fibres of hindlimb flexor muscles. Two components of brief tetanus inhibition were detected. Whilst possibly of similar central latency, the inhibition associated with GABA(B) receptors had a longer time course than that reduced by bicuculline. Furthermore, whereas bicuculline reduced primary afferent depolarization, generated by the inhibitory volleys, and detected as dorsal-root potentials, such potentials were generally enhanced by intravenous baclofen antagonists. The inhibition of reflexes during and after continuous (333 Hz) tetanic flexor-nerve stimulation appeared to be predominantly associated with the activation of GABA(B) receptors. In the period following continuous tetanic flexor-nerve stimulation, during which monosynaptic extensor reflexes were reduced in amplitude, the action potentials of the intraspinal terminations of extensor-muscle group-Ia afferent fibres were reduced in duration, as detected by the time course of the recovery of the threshold to extracellular microstimulation following the arrival of an orthodromic impulse. A reduction in termination action-potential duration also accompanied the reduction by microelectrophoretic (-)-baclofen of the release of excitatory transmitter from group-Ia terminations, both presynaptic effects being blocked by microelectrophoretic baclofen antagonists. However, the reduction of the duration of the action potential of individual group-Ia terminations, which followed continuous flexor-nerve stimulation, was not sensitive to the baclofen antagonist CGP 55845A, but was diminished by bicuculline

  9. Reversal of disease-related pathologies in the fragile X mouse model by selective activation of GABAB receptors with arbaclofen.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Christina; Wijetunge, Lasani; Kinoshita, Mika Nakamoto; Shumway, Matthew; Hammond, Rebecca S; Postma, Friso R; Brynczka, Christopher; Rush, Roger; Thomas, Alexia; Paylor, Richard; Warren, Stephen T; Vanderklish, Peter W; Kind, Peter C; Carpenter, Randall L; Bear, Mark F; Healy, Aileen M

    2012-09-19

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism, results from the transcriptional silencing of FMR1 and loss of the mRNA translational repressor protein fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Patients with FXS exhibit changes in neuronal dendritic spine morphology, a pathology associated with altered synaptic function. Studies in the mouse model of fragile X have shown that loss of FMRP causes excessive synaptic protein synthesis, which results in synaptic dysfunction and altered spine morphology. We tested whether the pharmacologic activation of the γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B)) receptor could correct or reverse these phenotypes in Fmr1-knockout mice. Basal protein synthesis, which is elevated in the hippocampus of Fmr1-knockout mice, was corrected by the in vitro application of the selective GABA(B) receptor agonist STX209 (arbaclofen, R-baclofen). STX209 also reduced to wild-type values the elevated AMPA receptor internalization in Fmr1-knockout cultured neurons, a known functional consequence of increased protein synthesis. Acute administration of STX209 in vivo, at doses that modify behavior, decreased mRNA translation in the cortex of Fmr1-knockout mice. Finally, the chronic administration of STX209 in juvenile mice corrected the increased spine density in Fmr1-knockout mice without affecting spine density in wild-type mice. Thus, activation of the GABA(B) receptor with STX209 corrected synaptic abnormalities considered central to fragile X pathophysiology, a finding that suggests that STX209 may be a potentially effective therapy to treat the core symptoms of FXS.

  10. γ-Aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptor expression is needed for inhibition of N-type (Cav2.2) calcium channels by analgesic α-conotoxins.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Hartmut; de Faoite, Andrew; Huynh, Thuan G; Yasuda, Takahiro; Berecki, Géza; Adams, David J

    2012-07-01

    α-Conotoxins Vc1.1 and RgIA are small peptides isolated from the venom of marine cone snails. They have effective anti-nociceptive actions in rat models of neuropathic pain. Pharmacological studies in rodent dorsal root ganglion (DRG) show their analgesic effect is mediated by inhibition of N-type (Ca(v)2.2) calcium channels via a pathway involving γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B)) receptor. However, there is no direct demonstration that functional GABA(B) receptors are needed for inhibition of the Ca(v)2.2 channel by analgesic α-conotoxins. This study examined the effect of the GABA(B) agonist baclofen and α-conotoxins Vc1.1 and RgIA on calcium channel currents after transient knockdown of the GABA(B) receptor using RNA interference. Isolated rat DRG neurons were transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNA) targeting GABA(B) subunits R1 and R2. Efficient knockdown of GABA(B) receptor expression at mRNA and protein levels was confirmed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunocytochemical analysis, respectively. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings conducted 2-4 days after transfection showed that inhibition of N-type calcium channels in response to baclofen, Vc1.1 and RgIA was significantly reduced in GABA(B) receptor knockdown DRG neurons. In contrast, neurons transfected with a scrambled nontargeting siRNA were indistinguishable from untransfected neurons. In the HEK 293 cell heterologous expression system, Vc1.1 and RgIA inhibition of Ca(v)2.2 channels needed functional expression of both human GABA(B) receptor subunits. Together, these results confirm that GABA(B) receptors must be activated for the modulation of N-type (Ca(v)2.2) calcium channels by analgesic α-conotoxins Vc1.1 and RgIA.

  11. GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated effects on the spontaneous activity of the longitudinal layer in cat terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Radomirov, R; Venkova, K

    1991-01-01

    1. GABA and GABAergic agonists-muscimol and (+/-)baclofen changed the spontaneous mechanical activity in isolated cat terminal ileum. 2. GABA at doses ranging from 5 microM to 2 mM produced concentration-dependent biphasic responses consisting of a transient relaxation followed by contractions with a tonic and a phasic components. 3. The GABA-induced relaxation was sensitive to bicuculline and picrotoxinin and was mimicked by muscimol, while the GABA-induced contractions were insensitive to bicuculline and picrotoxinin and were mimicked by (+/-)baclofen. Specific cross desensitization occurred between GABA and muscimol or GABA and (+/-)baclofen. 4. The bicuculline-sensitive relaxation induced by GABA and muscimol was abolished by atropine or tetrodotoxin (TTX), while the bicuculline-insensitive contractions induced by GABA and (+/-)baclofen were not antagonized by atropine or TTX, though they were slightly suppressed. 5. The GABA effects in the longitudinal layer of cat terminal ileum were mediated by the following receptors: -GABAA prejunctional receptors whose activation causes relaxation, probably through an inhibitory action on cholinergic neurons; -GABAB prejunctional receptors whose activation cause contractions; -GABAB postjunctional receptors located on the smooth muscle membrane whose activation induces tonic and phasic contractions.

  12. Sleep-Deprivation Induces Changes in GABAB and mGlu Receptor Expression and Has Consequences for Synaptic Long-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Tadavarty, Ramakrishna; Rajput, Padmesh S.; Wong, Jennifer M.; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R.

    2011-01-01

    Long term depression (LTD) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, induced with a 20-Hz, 30 s tetanus to Schaffer collaterals, is enhanced in sleep-deprived (SD) rats. In the present study, we investigated the role of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptors (GABAB-Rs) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs) in the LTD of the population excitatory postsynaptic potential (pEPSP). The requirement of Ca2+ from L- and T- type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and intracellular stores was also studied. Results indicate that mGluRs, a release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and GABAB-Rs are required for LTD. Interestingly, while mGlu1Rs seem to be involved in both short-term depression and LTD, mGlu5Rs appear to participate mostly in LTD. CGP 55845, a GABAB-R antagonist, partially suppressed LTD in normally sleeping (NS) rats, while completely blocking LTD in SD rats. Moreover, GS-39783, a positive allosteric modulator for GABAB-R, suppressed the pEPSP in SD, but not NS rats. Since both mGluRs and GABAB-Rs seem to be involved in the LTD, especially in SD rats, we examined if the receptor expression pattern and/or dimerization changed, using immunohistochemical, co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. Sleep-deprivation induced an increase in the expression of GABAB-R1 and mGlu1αR in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. In addition, co-localization and heterodimerization between mGlu1αR/GABAB-R1 and mGlu1αR/GABAB-R2 is enhanced in SD rats. Taken together, our findings present a novel form of LTD sensitive to the activation of mGluRs and GABAB-Rs, and reveal, for the first time, that sleep-deprivation induces alterations in the expression and dimerization of these receptors. PMID:21980366

  13. Subcellular compartment-specific molecular diversity of pre- and postsynaptic GABAB-activated GIRK channels in Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alacid, Laura; Aguado, Carolina; Ciruela, Francisco; Martín, Ricardo; Colón, José; Cabañero, María José; Gassmann, Martin; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Wickman, Kevin; Bettler, Bernhard; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Luján, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Activation of G protein-gated inwardly-rectifying K+ (GIRK or Kir3) channels by metabotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid (B) (GABAB) receptors is an essential signalling pathway controlling neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission in the brain. To investigate the relationship between GIRK channel subunits and GABAB receptors in cerebellar Purkinje cells at post- and pre-synaptic sites, we used biochemical, functional and immunohistochemical techniques. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that GIRK subunits are co-assembled with GABAB receptors in the cerebellum. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the subunit composition of GIRK channels in Purkinje cell spines is compartment-dependent. Thus, at extrasynaptic sites GIRK channels are formed by GIRK1/GIRK2/GIRK3, postsynaptic densities contain GIRK2/GIRK3 and dendritic shafts contain GIRK1/GIRK3. The postsynaptic association of GIRK subunits with GABAB receptors in Purkinje cells is supported by the subcellular regulation of the ion channel and the receptor in mutant mice. At presynaptic sites, GIRK channels localized to parallel fibre terminals are formed by GIRK1/GIRK2/GIRK3 and co-localize with GABAB receptors. Consistent with this morphological evidence we demonstrate their functional interaction at axon terminals in the cerebellum by showing that GIRK channels play a role in the inhibition of glutamate release by GABAB receptors. The association of GIRK channels and GABAB receptors with excitatory synapses at both post- and presynaptic sites indicates their intimate involvement in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cerebellum. PMID:19558451

  14. Involvement of GABAB Receptor Signaling in Antipsychotic-like Action of the Novel Orthosteric Agonist of the mGlu4 Receptor, LSP4-2022.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Monika; Acher, Francine; Marciniak, Marcin; Lasoń-Tyburkiewicz, Magdalena; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Pilc, Andrzej; Wierońska, Joanna M

    2016-01-01

    Considering that ligands of metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors may exert beneficial effects on schizophrenia, we assessed the actions of the first mGlu4-selective orthosteric agonist, LSP4-2022, in several tests reflecting positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Moreover, we investigated the possible involvement of GABAB receptors in LSP4-2022-induced actions. Hyperactivity induced by MK-801 or amphetamine and DOI-induced head twitches in mice were used as the models of positive symptoms. The social interaction test, modified forced swim test (FST), and novel object recognition (NOR) test were used as the models of negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. LSP4-2022 inhibited hyperactivity (in a dose-dependent manner, 0.5-2 mg/kg) induced by MK-801 or amphetamine and DOI-induced head twitches. In mGlu4 receptor knockout mice, LSP4-2022 was not effective. However, it reversed MK-801-induced impairment in the social interaction test and the MK-801-induced increase of immobility in the modified FST. In the NOR test, LSP4-2022 was active at a dose of 2 mg/kg. GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP55845 (10 mg/kg), reversed LSP4-2022-induced effects in hyperactivity and head twitch tests. At the same time, the simultaneous administration of subeffective doses of LSP4-2022 (0.1 mg/kg) and a positive allosteric modulator of GABAB receptor PAM, GS39783 (0.1 mg/kg), induced clear antipsychotic-like effects in those two tests. Such an interaction between mGlu4 and GABAB receptors was not observed in the social interaction and NOR tests. Therefore, we suggest that the activation of the mGlu4 receptor is a promising approach facilitating the discovery of novel antipsychotic drugs, and that the interplay between mGlu4 and GABAB receptors may become the basis for a novel therapy for schizophrenic patients with predomination of positive symptoms.

  15. Comparative activities of the enantiomeric GABA(B) receptor agonists CGP 44532 and 44533 in central and peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Ong, J; Bexis, S; Marino, V; Parker, D A; Kerr, D I; Froestl, W

    2001-01-19

    In neocortical slices maintained in Mg(2+)-free Krebs medium, the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(B)) receptor agonists baclofen, (3-amino-2(S)-hydroxypropyl)methylphosphinic acid (CGP 44532), and its (R)-enantiomer CGP 44533 depressed the frequency of spontaneous discharges in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50)=10, 6.5, and 50 microM, respectively). These effects were reversibly antagonised by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist (+)-(S)-5,5 dimethylmorpholinyl-2-acetic acid (Sch 50911) (3, 10, and 30 microM) (average pA(2) value=6.0+/-0.2). In neocortical wedges, baclofen, CGP 44532 and CGP 44533 elicited concentration-dependent hyperpolarisations (the EC(50)s were 14, 7.5 and 16 microM, respectively) sensitive to Sch 50911 (1, 5, 10 microM) (average pA(2) value=6.0+/-0.1), whilst they also depressed ileal electrically elicited cholinergic twitch contractions (EC(50)=11, 7, and 50 microM) that were antagonised by Sch 50911 (average pA(2) value=6.0+/-0.1). In electrically stimulated brain slices preloaded with [3H]GABA, baclofen, CGP 44532 and CGP 44533 decreased [3H]GABA release (IC(50)=5, 0.45, and 10 microM); this effect was reversed by Sch 50911 (50 microM). It is concluded that CGP 44532 is a far more potent agonist at GABA(B) autoreceptors than at central or peripheral heteroreceptors.

  16. Involvement of GABAB receptors in biochemical alterations induced by anxiety-related responses to nicotine in mice: genetic and pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Varani, Andrés P; Pedrón, Valeria T; Bettler, Bernhard; Balerio, Graciela N

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory showed that anxiety-related responses induced by nicotine (NIC), measured by the elevated plus maze, were abolished by 2-OH-saclofen (GABAB receptor antagonist) (1 mg/kg; ip) or the lack of GABAB receptors (GABAB1 knockout mice). Based on these behavioral data, the aims of the present study were: 1) to evaluate the possible neurochemical changes (dopamine, DA, serotonin, 5-HT, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA and noradrenaline, NA) and the c-Fos expression induced by the anxiolytic (0.05 mg/kg) or anxiogenic (0.8 mg/kg) doses of NIC in the dorsal raphe (DRN) and lateral septal (LSN) nucleus; 2) to study the possible involvement of GABAB receptors on the neurochemical alterations and c-Fos expression induced by NIC (0.05 and 0.8 mg/kg), using both pharmacological (2-OH-saclofen) and genetic (mice GABAB1 knockout) approaches. The results revealed that in wild-type mice, NIC (0.05 mg/kg) increased the concentration of 5-HT and 5-HIAA (p < 0.05) in the DRN, and NIC (0.8 mg/kg) increased the levels of 5-HT (p < 0.01) and NA (p < 0.05) in the LSN. Additionally, 2-OH-saclofen pretreatment (1 mg/kg, ip) or the lack of GABAB receptors abolished these neurochemical changes induced by NIC (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). On the other hand, NIC 0.05 and 0.8 mg/kg increased (p < 0.01) the c-Fos expression in the DRN and LSN respectively, in wild-type mice. In addition, 2-OH-saclofen pretreatment (1 mg/kg, ip) or the lack of GABAB receptors prevented the c-Fos alterations induced by NIC (p < 0.01). In summary, both approaches show that GABAB receptors would participate in the modulation of anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like responses induced by NIC, suggesting the potential therapeutic target of these receptors for the tobacco addiction treatment.

  17. GABAB Receptor Agonist R-Baclofen Reverses Social Deficits and Reduces Repetitive Behavior in Two Mouse Models of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, J L; Pride, M C; Hayes, J E; Puhger, K R; Butler-Struben, H M; Baker, S; Crawley, J N

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is diagnosed by two core behavioral criteria, unusual reciprocal social interactions and communication, and stereotyped, repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Excitatory/inhibitory imbalance is a prominent hypothesis for the etiology of autism. The selective GABAB receptor agonist R-baclofen previously reversed social deficits and reduced repetitive behaviors in a mouse model of Fragile X syndrome, and Arbaclofen improved some clinical symptoms in some Fragile X and ASD patients. To evaluate R-baclofen in a broader range of mouse models of ASD, we tested both the R-baclofen enantiomer and the less potent S-baclofen enantiomer in two inbred strains of mice that display low sociability and/or high repetitive or stereotyped behaviors. R-baclofen treatment reversed social approach deficits in BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR), reduced repetitive self-grooming and high marble burying scores in BTBR, and reduced stereotyped jumping in C58/J (C58), at nonsedating doses. S-baclofen produced minimal effects at the same doses. These findings encourage investigations of R-baclofen in other preclinical model systems. Additional clinical studies may be warranted to further evaluate the hypothesis that the GABAB receptor represents a promising pharmacological target for treating appropriately stratified subsets of individuals with ASD. PMID:25754761

  18. GABAB Receptor Agonist R-Baclofen Reverses Social Deficits and Reduces Repetitive Behavior in Two Mouse Models of Autism.

    PubMed

    Silverman, J L; Pride, M C; Hayes, J E; Puhger, K R; Butler-Struben, H M; Baker, S; Crawley, J N

    2015-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is diagnosed by two core behavioral criteria, unusual reciprocal social interactions and communication, and stereotyped, repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Excitatory/inhibitory imbalance is a prominent hypothesis for the etiology of autism. The selective GABAB receptor agonist R-baclofen previously reversed social deficits and reduced repetitive behaviors in a mouse model of Fragile X syndrome, and Arbaclofen improved some clinical symptoms in some Fragile X and ASD patients. To evaluate R-baclofen in a broader range of mouse models of ASD, we tested both the R-baclofen enantiomer and the less potent S-baclofen enantiomer in two inbred strains of mice that display low sociability and/or high repetitive or stereotyped behaviors. R-baclofen treatment reversed social approach deficits in BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR), reduced repetitive self-grooming and high marble burying scores in BTBR, and reduced stereotyped jumping in C58/J (C58), at nonsedating doses. S-baclofen produced minimal effects at the same doses. These findings encourage investigations of R-baclofen in other preclinical model systems. Additional clinical studies may be warranted to further evaluate the hypothesis that the GABAB receptor represents a promising pharmacological target for treating appropriately stratified subsets of individuals with ASD. PMID:25754761

  19. GABAB Receptor Agonist R-Baclofen Reverses Social Deficits and Reduces Repetitive Behavior in Two Mouse Models of Autism.

    PubMed

    Silverman, J L; Pride, M C; Hayes, J E; Puhger, K R; Butler-Struben, H M; Baker, S; Crawley, J N

    2015-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is diagnosed by two core behavioral criteria, unusual reciprocal social interactions and communication, and stereotyped, repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Excitatory/inhibitory imbalance is a prominent hypothesis for the etiology of autism. The selective GABAB receptor agonist R-baclofen previously reversed social deficits and reduced repetitive behaviors in a mouse model of Fragile X syndrome, and Arbaclofen improved some clinical symptoms in some Fragile X and ASD patients. To evaluate R-baclofen in a broader range of mouse models of ASD, we tested both the R-baclofen enantiomer and the less potent S-baclofen enantiomer in two inbred strains of mice that display low sociability and/or high repetitive or stereotyped behaviors. R-baclofen treatment reversed social approach deficits in BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR), reduced repetitive self-grooming and high marble burying scores in BTBR, and reduced stereotyped jumping in C58/J (C58), at nonsedating doses. S-baclofen produced minimal effects at the same doses. These findings encourage investigations of R-baclofen in other preclinical model systems. Additional clinical studies may be warranted to further evaluate the hypothesis that the GABAB receptor represents a promising pharmacological target for treating appropriately stratified subsets of individuals with ASD.

  20. The sushi domains of secreted GABA(B1) isoforms selectively impair GABA(B) heteroreceptor function.

    PubMed

    Tiao, Jim Y; Bradaia, Amyaouch; Biermann, Barbara; Kaupmann, Klemens; Metz, Michaela; Haller, Corinne; Rolink, Antonius G; Pless, Elin; Barlow, Paul N; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard

    2008-11-01

    GABA(B) receptors are the G-protein-coupled receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. GABA(B) receptors are promising drug targets for a wide spectrum of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Receptor subtypes exhibit no pharmacological differences and are based on the subunit isoforms GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b). GABA(B1a) differs from GABA(B1b) in its ectodomain by the presence of a pair of conserved protein binding motifs, the sushi domains (SDs). Previous work showed that selectively GABA(B1a) contributes to heteroreceptors at glutamatergic terminals, whereas both GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) contribute to autoreceptors at GABAergic terminals or to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we describe GABA(B1j), a secreted GABA(B1) isoform comprising the two SDs. We show that the two SDs, when expressed as a soluble protein, bind to neuronal membranes with low nanomolar affinity. Soluble SD protein, when added at nanomolar concentrations to dissociated hippocampal neurons or to acute hippocampal slices, impairs the inhibitory effect of GABA(B) heteroreceptors on evoked and spontaneous glutamate release. In contrast, soluble SD protein neither impairs the activity of GABA(B) autoreceptors nor impairs the activity of postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors. We propose that soluble SD protein scavenges an extracellular binding partner that retains GABA(B1a)-containing heteroreceptors in proximity of the presynaptic release machinery. Soluble GABA(B1) isoforms like GABA(B1j) may therefore act as dominant-negative inhibitors of heteroreceptors and control the level of GABA(B)-mediated inhibition at glutamatergic terminals. Of importance for drug discovery, our data also demonstrate that it is possible to selectively impair GABA(B) heteroreceptors by targeting their SDs.

  1. GABA(B) receptors modulate depolarization-stimulated [³H]glutamate release in slices of the pars reticulata of the rat substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Hernán; Paz, Francisco; Erlij, David; Aceves, Jorge; Florán, Benjamín

    2010-12-15

    GABA(B) receptors decrease the release of GABA from the striatal terminals within the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra by opposing the increase in the release caused by dopamine D₁ receptors. The dopamine D₁ receptors also increase the release of glutamate from subthalamic terminals in the pars reticulata. Because GABA(B) receptors decrease the glutamate release from these terminals, we have explored if the effect of GABA(B) receptors also opposed the effect of the dopamine D₁ receptors. The effect of baclofen, a selective GABA(B)-receptor agonist, was tested on the release of [³H]glutamate caused by highly (40 mM) concentrated K(+) solutions in slices of the pars reticulata. Baclofen decreased (the concentration causing 50% inhibition, IC₅₀, was 8.15 μM) the increase in the release of the [³H]glutamate caused by the dopamine D₁ receptors and it also decreased (IC₅₀ was 0.51 μM) this release in the absence of the activation of the dopamine D₁ receptors. The GABA(B) receptors appear then to inhibit glutamate release in two ways; one dependent on the activation of the dopamine D₁ receptors and the other independent of such activation. The protein kinase A-inhibitor H89 blocked the increase in the release of the [³H]glutamate caused by the dopamine D₁ receptors, though it did not block the dopamine D₁ receptor-independent baclofen inhibition of the release. This finding indicates that this inhibition was not via the protein kinase A signal-transduction pathway. N-ethylmaleimide, an alkylating agent that inactivates pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi proteins, eliminated both the dopamine D₁ receptor-dependent and -independent baclofen inhibition, showing that both were mediated by these proteins. The injection of baclofen into the pars reticulata of unanesthetized rats caused contralateral rotation, suggesting a reduced glutamate release from the subthalamic terminals, thereby stopping the inhibition of the premotor thalamic nuclei

  2. Biphasic Effects of Cannabinoids in Anxiety Responses: CB1 and GABAB Receptors in the Balance of GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Alejandro Aparisi; Purrio, Martin; Viveros, Maria-Paz; Lutz, Beat

    2012-01-01

    Biphasic effects of cannabinoids have been shown in processes such as feeding behavior, motor activity, motivational processes and anxiety responses. Using two different tests for the characterization of anxiety-related behavior (elevated plus-maze and holeboard), we first identified in wild-type C57BL/6N mice, two doses of the synthetic CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist CP-55,940 with anxiolytic (1 μg/kg) and anxiogenic properties (50 μg/kg), respectively. To clarify the role of CB1 receptors in this biphasic effect, both doses were applied to two different conditional CB1 receptor knockout (KO) mouse lines, GABA-CB1-KO (CB1 receptor inactivation in forebrain GABAergic neurons) and Glu-CB1-KO (CB1 receptor inactivation in cortical glutamatergic neurons). We found that the anxiolytic-like effects of the low dose of cannabinoids are mediated via the CB1 receptor on cortical glutamatergic terminals, because this anxiolytic-like response was abrogated only in Glu-CB1-KO mice. On the contrary, the CB1 receptor on the GABAergic terminals is required to induce an anxiogenic-like effect under a high-dose treatment because of the fact that this effect was abolished specifically in GABA-CB1-KO mice. These experiments were carried out in both sexes, and no differences occurred with the doses tested in the mutant mice. Interestingly, the positive allosteric modulation of GABAB receptor with GS-39783 was found to largely abrogate the anxiogenic-like effect of the high dose of CP-55,940. Our results shed new light in further understanding the biphasic effects of cannabinoids at the molecular level and, importantly, pave the way for the development of novel anxiolytic cannabinoid drugs, which may have favorable effect profiles targeting the CB1 receptor on glutamatergic terminals. PMID:22850737

  3. GABAB receptors in the NTS mediate the inhibitory effect of trigeminal nociceptive inputs on parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hisayoshi; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The present study was designed to examine whether trigeminal nociceptive inputs are involved in the modulation of parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the jaw muscles. This was accomplished by investigating the effects of noxious stimulation to the orofacial area with capsaicin, and by microinjecting GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor agonists or antagonists into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), on masseter hemodynamics in urethane-anesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the cervical vagus nerve (cVN) in sympathectomized animals bilaterally increased blood flow in the masseter muscle (MBF). Increases in MBF evoked by cVN stimulation were markedly reduced following injection of capsaicin into the anterior tongue in the distribution of the lingual nerve or lower lip, but not when injected into the skin of the dorsum of the foot. Intravenous administration of either phentolamine or propranolol had no effect on the inhibitory effects of capsaicin injection on the increases of MBF evoked by cVN stimulation, which were largely abolished by microinjecting the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen into the NTS. Microinjection of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-35348 into the NTS markedly attenuated the capsaicin-induced inhibition of MBF increase evoked by cVN stimulation, while microinjection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline did not. Our results indicate that trigeminal nociceptive inputs inhibit vagal-parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the masseter muscle and suggest that the activation of GABA(B) rather than GABA(A) receptors underlies the observed inhibition in the NTS.

  4. AMPA and GABA(B) receptor antagonists and their interaction in rats with a genetic form of absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, R M; Van Rijn, C M; Turski, W A; Czuczwar, S J; Van Luijtelaar, G

    2001-11-01

    The effects of combined and single administration of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, 7,8-methylenedioxy-1-(4-aminophenyl)-4-methyl-3-acetyl-4,5-dihydro-2,3-benzodiazepine (LY 300164), and of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist gamma-aminopropyl-n-butyl-phosphinic acid (CGP 36742), on spontaneously occurring spike-wave discharges were investigated in WAG/Rij rats. LY 300164 had minor effects; only the highest dose (16 mg/kg) reduced the number of spike-wave discharges in a short time window. CGP 36742 was more effective as it significantly reduced the number of spike-wave discharges and shortened their duration at the doses of 25 and 100 mg/kg. The ED(50) values for the inhibition of spike-wave discharges by LY 300164 and CGP 36742 in a time window 30-60 min after injection were 15.5 and 16.6 mg/kg, respectively. The ED(50) of CGP 36742 was reduced to 8.0 mg/kg when this antagonist was administered in combination with LY 300164 (6 mg/kg). The interaction between the two antagonists appeared to be additive according to isobolographic analysis. Importantly, CGP 36742 and LY 300164 administered either alone or in combination had no apparent effects on behavior. These results may provide information for a rational approach to polytherapy for the treatment of generalized absence epilepsy. PMID:11711038

  5. Long-lasting auditory gating deficit accompanied by GABA(B) receptor dysfunction in the hippocampus after early-life limbic seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Min-Lan; Crutchley, Melanie; Boyce, Richard; Ma, Jingyi; Boon, Francis; Cain, D Peter; Leung, L Stan

    2012-06-25

    In a previous study, we reported a rat model of early-life limbic seizures which resulted in a loss of GABA(B) receptor inhibition in the hippocampus. Since gating of auditory evoked potentials in the hippocampus (auditory gating) requires GABA(B) receptors and spatial behaviors depend on the hippocampus, we hypothesize that rats with early-life limbic seizures manifest deficits of auditory gating and spatial behaviors. Seizure rats were given a single injection of GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP56999A (1-1.2 mg/kg i.p.) on postnatal day (PND) 15, which induced multiple limbic seizures in 8h; control rats were given saline injection. When tested at 3-9 weeks after seizure/control treatment, seizure as compared to control rats showed no difference in finding a hidden platform in the water maze, but were deficient in learning and maintaining consecutive criterion performance in the 8-arm radial arm maze. Auditory gating, as measured by paired-click (conditioning followed by test click) average auditory evoked potentials in the hippocampus, revealed a significant difference between seizure rats and controls. Seizure as compared to control rats showed an increased ratio of the test to conditioning click response as adolescents (50 days old) or adults (70 days old). Heterosynaptic electric paired-pulse depression of hippocampal population excitatory postsynaptic potential in freely moving rats, a measure of hippocampal GABA(B)-receptor mediated inhibition, was decreased in seizure as compared to control rats. Seizure as compared to control rats showed increased locomotor activity in a novel open field for the first 10 min, and decreased activity at 15-60 min. However, auditory prepulse inhibition, a measure of sensorimotor gating, revealed no difference between seizure and control rats. In conclusion, early-life limbic seizures induced a long-lasting deficit in auditory gating, likely caused by GABA(B) receptor-mediated inhibition loss in the hippocampus. Auditory

  6. Long-lasting auditory gating deficit accompanied by GABA(B) receptor dysfunction in the hippocampus after early-life limbic seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Min-Lan; Crutchley, Melanie; Boyce, Richard; Ma, Jingyi; Boon, Francis; Cain, D Peter; Leung, L Stan

    2012-06-25

    In a previous study, we reported a rat model of early-life limbic seizures which resulted in a loss of GABA(B) receptor inhibition in the hippocampus. Since gating of auditory evoked potentials in the hippocampus (auditory gating) requires GABA(B) receptors and spatial behaviors depend on the hippocampus, we hypothesize that rats with early-life limbic seizures manifest deficits of auditory gating and spatial behaviors. Seizure rats were given a single injection of GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP56999A (1-1.2 mg/kg i.p.) on postnatal day (PND) 15, which induced multiple limbic seizures in 8h; control rats were given saline injection. When tested at 3-9 weeks after seizure/control treatment, seizure as compared to control rats showed no difference in finding a hidden platform in the water maze, but were deficient in learning and maintaining consecutive criterion performance in the 8-arm radial arm maze. Auditory gating, as measured by paired-click (conditioning followed by test click) average auditory evoked potentials in the hippocampus, revealed a significant difference between seizure rats and controls. Seizure as compared to control rats showed an increased ratio of the test to conditioning click response as adolescents (50 days old) or adults (70 days old). Heterosynaptic electric paired-pulse depression of hippocampal population excitatory postsynaptic potential in freely moving rats, a measure of hippocampal GABA(B)-receptor mediated inhibition, was decreased in seizure as compared to control rats. Seizure as compared to control rats showed increased locomotor activity in a novel open field for the first 10 min, and decreased activity at 15-60 min. However, auditory prepulse inhibition, a measure of sensorimotor gating, revealed no difference between seizure and control rats. In conclusion, early-life limbic seizures induced a long-lasting deficit in auditory gating, likely caused by GABA(B) receptor-mediated inhibition loss in the hippocampus. Auditory

  7. Reducing effect of saikosaponin A, an active ingredient of Bupleurum falcatum, on alcohol self-administration in rats: Possible involvement of the GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Paola; Lorrai, Irene; Carai, Mauro A M; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Mugnaini, Claudia; Corelli, Federico; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2016-05-16

    Recent studies demonstrated that treatment with saikosaponin A (SSA) - an active ingredient of the medicinal herb, Bupleurum falcatum L. - selectively suppressed, likely via a GABAB receptor-mediated mechanism, intravenous self-administration of morphine and cocaine in rats [Yoon et al., 2012; 2013]. The present study was designed to investigate whether the capacity of SSA to suppress morphine and cocaine self-administration extends to oral alcohol self-administration. To this end, selectively bred Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats were trained to lever-respond on a Fixed Ratio (FR) 4 (FR4) schedule of reinforcement for alcohol (15%, v/v) in daily 30-min sessions. Once responding had stabilized, rats were tested under the FR4 (measure of alcohol reinforcing properties) and Progressive Ratio (PR; measure of alcohol motivational properties) schedules of reinforcement. The possible involvement of the GABAB receptor system was investigated testing the effect of (a) pretreatment with the GABAB receptor antagonist, SCH50911, and (b) combined treatment with the positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, GS39783. Treatment with SSA (0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1mg/kg, i.p.) markedly reduced lever-responding for alcohol, amount of self-administered alcohol, and breakpoint for alcohol (defined as the lowest response requirement not achieved in the PR experiment). Pretreatment with 2mg/kg SCH50911 (i.p.) resulted in a partial blockade of the reducing effect of 0.5mg/kg SSA on lever-responding for alcohol and amount of self-administered alcohol. Combination of per se ineffective doses of GS39783 (5mg/kg, i.g.) and SSA (0.1mg/kg, i.p.) reduced lever-responding for alcohol and amount of self-administered alcohol. These results (a) extend to alcohol self-administration the capacity of SSA to suppress morphine and cocaine self-administration in rats and (b) suggest that the GABAB receptor system is likely part of the neural substrate underlying the reducing effect of SSA on

  8. CGP 44532, a GABAB receptor agonist, is hedonically neutral and reduces cocaine-induced enhancement of reward.

    PubMed

    Dobrovitsky, V; Pimentel, P; Duarte, A; Froestl, W; Stellar, J R; Trzcińska, M

    2002-04-01

    Drugs that alter the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission seem to reduce cocaine reinforcement, and as such may be useful in pharmacologically treating cocaine addiction. In the present experiment, the anti-cocaine effects of CGP 44532, a phosphinic acid analogue of GABA, and a highly selective GABA(B) receptor agonist were examined in male Sprague-Dawley rats using brain stimulation reward (BSR) paradigm. In this method, the relationship between the rate of bar pressing and the frequency of stimulation pulses was analyzed in two measures: the maximum rate of responding (MAX) and the frequency necessary to sustain half maximal rate of responding known as the locus of rise (LOR). CGP 44532 was found to be hedonically neutral without producing any measurable effects on performance (MAX). It also dose-dependently reduced cocaine-induced BSR enhancement, in the order of 15-31%, as shown by progressive shifts in LOR towards baseline. Thus, in theory, administration of CGP 44532 might reduce cocaine's hedonic effects, while also maintaining patient compliance. Whether this agent would also be effective at curbing craving, a long-term consequence of drug abuse, remains to be determined.

  9. GABAB receptor-mediated, layer-specific synaptic plasticity reorganizes gamma-frequency neocortical response to stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Matthew; Lee, Shane; Kaiser, Marcus; Simonotto, Jennifer; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated presentations of sensory stimuli generate transient gamma-frequency (30–80 Hz) responses in neocortex that show plasticity in a task-dependent manner. Complex relationships between individual neuronal outputs and the mean, local field potential (population activity) accompany these changes, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible. Here we show that transient stimulation of input layer 4 sufficient to generate gamma oscillations induced two different, lamina-specific plastic processes that correlated with lamina-specific changes in responses to further, repeated stimulation: Unit rates and recruitment showed overall enhancement in supragranular layers and suppression in infragranular layers associated with excitatory or inhibitory synaptic potentiation onto principal cells, respectively. Both synaptic processes were critically dependent on activation of GABAB receptors and, together, appeared to temporally segregate the cortical representation. These data suggest that adaptation to repetitive sensory input dramatically alters the spatiotemporal properties of the neocortical response in a manner that may both refine and minimize cortical output simultaneously. PMID:27118845

  10. Electrophysiological characterization of potent agonists and antagonists at pre- and postsynaptic GABAB receptors on neurones in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    Seabrook, G R; Howson, W; Lacey, M G

    1990-12-01

    .4 (n = 3), 14.0 + 1.5 (n = 4), and >400 microM (n = 1) respectively. CGP 35348 appeared competitive (Schild plot slope of 0.99). Antagonists were also tested with baclofen as agonist, yielding similar KB estimates as for SK&F 97541. 6. It is concluded that at both the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites examined, SK&F 97541 was about 10 fold more potent than baclofen or 3-APPA. The antagonists CGP 35348 and 3-APHPA (KB 1O-20 microM) were about 20 fold more potent than phaclofen. The similarities in relative agonist potency and estimated antagonist affinity between these two functionally distinct GABAB receptors renders them pharmacologically indistinguishable at present.

  11. GABA transporter subtype 1 and GABA transporter subtype 3 modulate glutamatergic transmission via activation of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in the rat globus pallidus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Paré, Jean-Francois; Smith, Yoland

    2012-08-01

    The intra-pallidal application of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter subtype 1 (GAT-1) or GABA transporter subtype 3 (GAT-3) transporter blockers [1-(4,4-diphenyl-3-butenyl)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride (SKF 89976A) or 1-[2-[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-(S)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid (SNAP 5114)] reduces the activity of pallidal neurons in monkey. This effect could be mediated through the activation of presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors in glutamatergic terminals by GABA spillover following GABA transporter (GAT) blockade. To test this hypothesis, we applied the whole-cell recording technique to study the effects of SKF 89976A and SNAP 5114 on evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in the presence of gabazine, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, in rat globus pallidus slice preparations. Under the condition of postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor blockade by the intra-cellular application of N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl)-triethylammonium bromide (OX314), bath application of SKF 89976A (10 μM) or SNAP 5114 (10 μM) decreased the amplitude of eEPSCs, without a significant effect on its holding current and whole cell input resistance. The inhibitory effect of GAT blockade on eEPSCs was blocked by (2S)-3-[[(1S)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino-2-hydroxypropyl](phenylmethyl)phosphinic acid, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist. The paired-pulse ratio of eEPSCs was increased, whereas the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was reduced in the presence of either GAT blocker, demonstrating a presynaptic effect. These results suggest that synaptically released GABA can inhibit glutamatergic transmission through the activation of presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors following GAT-1 or GAT-3 blockade. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors in putative glutamatergic subthalamic afferents to the globus pallidus are sensitive to increases in extracellular GABA induced

  12. 5-HT2C and GABAB receptors influence handling-induced convulsion severity in chromosome 4 congenic and DBA/2J background strain mice.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Matthew T; Milner, Lauren C; Shirley, Renee L; Crabbe, John C; Buck, Kari J

    2008-03-10

    Progress towards elucidating the underlying genetic variation for susceptibility to complex central nervous system (CNS) hyperexcitability states has just begun. Genetic mapping analyses suggest that a gene(s) on mid-chromosome 4 has pleiotropic effects on multiple CNS hyperexcitability states in mice, including alcohol and barbiturate withdrawal and convulsions elicited by chemical and audiogenic stimuli. We recently identified Mpdz within this chromosomal region as a gene that influences alcohol and barbiturate withdrawal convulsions. Mpdz encodes the multi-PDZ domain protein (MPDZ). Currently, there is limited information available about the mechanism by which MPDZ influences drug withdrawal and/or other CNS hyperexcitability states, but may involve its interaction with 5-HT2C and/or GABAB receptors. One of the most useful tools we have developed thus far is a congenic strain that possesses a segment of chromosome 4 from the C57BL/6J (donor) mouse strain superimposed on a genetic background that is >99% from the DBA/2J strain. The introduced segment spans the Mpdz gene. Here, we demonstrate that handling-induced convulsions are less severe in congenic vs. background strain mice in response to either a 5-HT2C receptor antagonist (SB242084) or a GABAB receptor agonist (baclofen), but not a GABAA receptor channel blocker (pentylenetetrazol). These data suggest that allelic variation in Mpdz, or a linked gene, influences SB242084- and baclofen-enhanced convulsions. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that Mpdz's effects on CNS hyperexcitability, including alcohol and barbiturate withdrawal, involve MPDZ interaction with 5-HT2C and/or GABAB receptors. However, additional genes reside within the congenic interval and may also influence CNS hyperexcitability.

  13. Modulation of TLR3/TLR4 inflammatory signaling by the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen in glia and immune cells: relevance to therapeutic effects in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Tadhg; Fitzpatrick, John-Mark; Kuijper, Teun; Cryan, John F.; O’Toole, Orna; O’Leary, Olivia F.; Downer, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    The GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, is used to treat muscle tightness and cramping caused by spasticity in a number of disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS), but its precise mechanism of action is unknown. Neuroinflammation drives the central pathology in MS and is mediated by both immunoreactive glial cells and invading lymphocytes. Furthermore, a body of data indicates that the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family of innate immune receptors is implicated in MS progression. In the present study we investigated whether modulation of GABAB receptors using baclofen can exert anti-inflammatory effects by targeting TLR3 and(or) TLR4-induced inflammatory signaling in murine glial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy control individuals and patients with the relapse-remitting (RR) form of MS. TLR3 and TLR4 stimulation promoted the nuclear sequestration of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in murine glia, while TLR4, but not TLR3, promoted pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in PBMCs isolated from both healthy donors and RR-MS patients. Importantly, this effect was exacerbated in RR-MS patient immune cells. We present further evidence that baclofen dose-dependently attenuated TLR3- and TLR4-induced inflammatory signaling in primary glial cells. Pre-exposure of PBMCs isolated from healthy donors to baclofen attenuated TLR4-induced TNF-α expression, but did not affect TLR4-induced TNF-α expression in RR-MS patient PBMCs. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the GABAB receptor was reduced in PBMCs from RR-MS donors when compared to healthy controls, an effect that might contribute to the differential sensitivity to baclofen seen in healthy and RR-MS patient cells. Overall these findings indicate that baclofen differentially regulates TLR3 and TLR4 signaling in glia and immune cells, and offers insight on the role of baclofen in the treatment of neuroinflammatory disease states including MS. PMID:26283920

  14. Inhibition of presynaptic calcium transients in cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum by metabotropic GABAB and mGlu2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kupferschmidt, David A; Lovinger, David M

    2015-01-01

    Cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) are dynamically regulated during skill learning and habit formation, and are dysregulated in disorders characterized by impaired action control. Therefore, a mechanistic investigation of the processes regulating corticostriatal transmission is key to understanding DLS-associated circuit function, behaviour and pathology. Presynaptic GABAB and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors exert marked inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamate release in the DLS, yet the signalling pathways through which they do so are unclear. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 to assess presynaptic Ca2+ in corticostriatal projections to the DLS. Using simultaneous photometric presynaptic Ca2+ and striatal field potential recordings, we report that relative to P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, N-type channels preferentially contributed to evoked presynaptic Ca2+ influx in motor cortex projections to, and excitatory transmission in, the DLS. Activation of GABAB or mGlu2/3 receptors inhibited both evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients and striatal field potentials. mGlu2/3 receptor-mediated depression did not require functional N-type Ca2+ channels, but was attenuated by blockade of P/Q-type channels. These findings reveal presynaptic mechanisms of inhibitory modulation of corticostriatal function that probably contribute to the selection and shaping of behavioural repertoires. Key points Plastic changes at cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) underlie skill learning and habit formation, so characterizing the mechanisms by which these inputs are regulated is important for understanding the neural basis of action control. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 and brain slice photometry to assess evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients in cortical inputs to the DLS and study their regulation by GABAB and mGlu2

  15. Bidirectional enantioselective effects of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen in two mouse models of excessive ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Kasten, Chelsea R; Blasingame, Shelby N; Boehm, Stephen L

    2015-02-01

    The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen has been studied extensively in preclinical models of alcohol-use disorders, yet results on its efficacy have been uncertain. Racemic baclofen, which is used clinically, can be broken down into separate enantiomers of the drug. Baclofen has been shown to produce enantioselective effects in behavioral assays, including those modeling reflexive and sexual behavior. The current studies sought to characterize the enantioselective effects of baclofen in two separate models of ethanol consumption. The first was a Drinking-in-the-Dark procedure that provides "binge-like" ethanol access to mice by restricting access to a 2-h period, 3 h into the dark cycle. The second was a two-bottle choice procedure that utilized selectively bred High Alcohol Preferring 1 (HAP1) mice to model chronic ethanol access. HAP1 mice are selectively bred to consume pharmacologically relevant amounts of ethanol in a 24-h two-bottle choice paradigm. The results showed that baclofen yields enantioselective effects on ethanol intake in both models, and that these effects are bidirectional. Total ethanol intake was decreased by R(+)-baclofen, while total intake was increased by S(-)-baclofen in the binge-like and chronic drinking models. Whereas overall binge-like saccharin intake was significantly reduced by R(+)-baclofen, chronic intake was not significantly altered. S(-)-baclofen did not significantly alter saccharin intake. Neither enantiomer significantly affected locomotion during binge-like reinforcer consumption. Collectively, these results demonstrate that baclofen produces enantioselective effects on ethanol consumption. More importantly, the modulation of consumption is bidirectional. The opposing enantioselective effects may explain some of the variance seen in published baclofen literature.

  16. A Role for the GIRK3 Subunit in Methamphetamine-Induced Attenuation of GABAB Receptor-Activated GIRK Currents in VTA Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Michaelanne B.; Padgett, Claire L.; Rifkin, Robert; Terunuma, Miho; Wickman, Kevin; Contet, Candice; Moss, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to psychostimulants induces locomotor sensitization and leads to persistent changes in the circuitry of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system. G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK; also known as Kir3) channels mediate a slow IPSC and control the excitability of DA neurons. Repeated 5 d exposure to psychostimulants decreases the size of the GABAB receptor (GABABR)-activated GIRK currents (IBaclofen) in ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA neurons of mice, but the mechanism underlying this plasticity is poorly understood. Here, we show that methamphetamine-dependent attenuation of GABABR-GIRK currents in VTA DA neurons required activation of both D1R-like and D2R-like receptors. The methamphetamine-dependent decrease in GABABR-GIRK currents in VTA DA neurons did not depend on a mechanism of dephosphorylation of the GABAB R2 subunit found previously for other neurons in the reward pathway. Rather, the presence of the GIRK3 subunit appeared critical for the methamphetamine-dependent decrease of GABABR-GIRK current in VTA DA neurons. Together, these results highlight different regulatory mechanisms in the learning-evoked changes that occur in the VTA with repeated exposure to psychostimulants. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Exposure to addictive drugs such as psychostimulants produces persistent adaptations in inhibitory circuits within the mesolimbic dopamine system, suggesting that addictive behaviors are encoded by changes in the reward neural circuitry. One form of neuroadaptation that occurs with repeated exposure to psychostimulants is a decrease in slow inhibition, mediated by a GABAB receptor and a potassium channel. Here, we examine the subcellular mechanism that links psychostimulant exposure with changes in slow inhibition and reveal that one type of potassium channel subunit is important for mediating the effect of repeated psychostimulant exposure. Dissecting out the components of drug-dependent plasticity and uncovering novel

  17. In vitro and in vivo characterization of the novel GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator, 2-{1-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-methylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl]-2-piperidinyl}ethanol (CMPPE).

    PubMed

    Perdona', Elisabetta; Costantini, Vivian J A; Tessari, Michela; Martinelli, Prisca; Carignani, Corrado; Valerio, Enzo; Mok, M H Selina; Zonzini, Laura; Visentini, Filippo; Gianotti, Massimo; Gordon, Laurie; Rocheville, Magalie; Corsi, Mauro; Capelli, Anna Maria

    2011-01-01

    There is preclinical evidence supporting the finding that the GABA(B) receptor orthosteric agonist, baclofen, has significant effects on eating behavior suggesting the potential therapeutic application of this compound for the treatment of eating related disorders. However, the wide clinical use of baclofen might be limited by the appearance of sedative and motor impairment effects. The identification of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of GABA(B) receptors represents a novel therapeutic approach to reduce the centrally-mediated adverse effects typical of the GABA(B) receptor orthosteric agonist. In the present work, we report the in vitro profile of a novel chemical structure, 2-{1-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-methylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl]-2-piperidinyl}ethanol (CMPPE) identified by screening the GSK compound collection. CMPPE potentiates GABA-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding to membranes of human recombinant cell line and of rat brain cortex. GABA concentration-response curves (CRC) in the presence of fixed concentrations of CMPPE, in rat native tissue, revealed an increase of both the potency and maximal efficacy of GABA. A similar modulatory effect was observed in GABA(B) receptor-mediated activation of inwardly rectifying potassium channels in hippocampal neurons. CMPPE (30-100 mg/kg) and GS39783 (100 mg/kg) significantly decreased food consumption in rat without impairment on the animal locomotor activity. On the contrary, baclofen (2.5 mg/kg) decreased both food intake and motor performance. All together these findings confirm the role of GABA(B) system in controlling animal food intake and for the first time demonstrate that GABA(B) receptor PAMs may represent a novel pharmacological approach to treat eating disorders without unwanted sedative effects.

  18. Gender-specific effects of CGP 55845, GABAB receptor antagonist, on neuromuscular coordination, learning and memory formation in albino mouse following neonatal hypoxia-ischemia insult.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Quratul Ane; Akbar, Atif; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-06-01

    GABAB receptor antagonists are experimentally proved as spatial memory enhancers in mouse models but their role has not been described following hypoxic-ischemic insult. 10-day-old albino mice were subjected to Murine model of hypoxia and ischemia. Following brain damage, mice were fed on normal rodent diet till they were 13 weeks old. At this time point, mice were divided into two groups. Group 1 received saline and group 2 received intraperitoneally CGP 55845 (1 mg/ml solvent/Kg body weight) for 12 days. Behavioural observations were made during rota rod, open field and Morris water maze test along with brain infarct measurement in both CGP 55845 treated and untreated groups. It was observed that application of GABAB receptor antagonist improved the over all motor function in male and female albino mice but effects were more pronounced in males. In open field, CGP 55845-treated female mice showed poor performance. CGP 55845 had no significant effect on learning and memory formation during Morris water maze test and also on brain infract size in both genders following hypoxia ischemia encephalopathy. Effects of CGP 55845 can be further explored in a dose and duration dependent manner to improve the learning and memory in albino mice following neonatal brain damage.

  19. GABA(B) receptor isoforms GBR1a and GBR1b, appear to be associated with pre- and post-synaptic elements respectively in rat and human cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Billinton, A; Upton, N; Bowery, N G

    1999-03-01

    1. Metabotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, GABA(B), are coupled through G-proteins to K+ and Ca2+ channels in neuronal membranes. Cloning of the GABAB receptor has not uncovered receptor subtypes, but demonstrated two isoforms, designated GBR1a and GBR1b, which differ in their N terminal regions. In the rodent cerebellum GABA(B) receptors are localized to a greater extent in the molecular layer, and are reported to exist on granule cell parallel fibre terminals and Purkinje cell (PC) dendrites, which may represent pre- and post-synaptic receptors. 2. The objective of this study was to localize the mRNA splice variants, GBR1a and GBR1b for GABA(B) receptors in rat cerebellum, for comparison with the localization in human cerebellum using in situ hybridization. 3. Receptor autoradiography was performed utilizing [3H]-CGP62349 to localize GABA(B) receptors in rat and human cerebellum. Radioactively labelled oligonucleotide probes were used to localize GBR1a and GBR1b, and by dipping slides in photographic emulsion, silver grain images were obtained for quantification at the cellular level. 4. Binding of 0.5 nM [3H]-CGP62349 demonstrated significantly higher binding to GABA(B) receptors in the molecular layer than the granule cell (GC) layer of rat cerebellum (molecular layer binding 200+/-11% of GC layer; P<0.0001). GBR1a mRNA expression was found to be predominantly in the GC layer (PC layer grains 6+/-6% of GC layer grains; P<0.05), and GBR1b expression predominantly in PCs (PC layer grains 818+/-14% of GC layer grains; P<0.0001). 5. The differential distribution of GBR1a and GBR1b mRNA splice variants for GABA(B) receptors suggests a possible association of GBR1a and GBR1b with pre- and post-synaptic elements respectively.

  20. ADX71441, a novel, potent and selective positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, shows efficacy in rodent models of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kalinichev, M; Palea, S; Haddouk, H; Royer-Urios, I; Guilloteau, V; Lluel, P; Schneider, M; Saporito, M; Poli, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces urethral resistance and detrusor overactivity in patients with spasticity. However, baclofen's side effects limit its use for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Here, we tested a novel GABAB positive allosteric modulator (PAM) ADX71441 in models of OAB in mice and guinea pigs. Experimental Approach Mice were left untreated or given (p.o.) vehicle (1= CMC), ADX71441 (1, 3, 10 mg kg−1) or oxybutynin (100 mg kg−1; Experiment 1) or vehicle (1= CMC), baclofen (1, 3, 6 mg kg−1) or oxybutynin (Experiment 2). Treated mice were then overhydrated with water, challenged with furosemide, before being placed into micturition chambers and monitored for urinary parameters. In anaesthetized guinea pigs, intravesical infusion of acetic acid was used to induce OAB and the effects of ADX71441 (1, 3 mg kg−1) or baclofen (1 mg kg−1), administered i.v., on cystometric parameters were monitored. Key Results In mice, 10 mg kg−1 ADX71441 increased urinary latencies, reduced the number of urinary events and the total and average urinary volumes. In guinea pigs, ADX71441 (1 and 3 mg kg−1) increased the intercontraction interval (ICI) and bladder capacity (BC), and reduced micturition frequency (MF) compared to vehicle. At 3 mg kg−1 ADX71441 completely inhibited the micturition reflex and induced overflow incontinence in five out of 10 animals. Baclofen slightly increased ICI and BC and reduced MF. Conclusion and Implications Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that a GABAB PAM has potential as a novel approach for the treatment of OAB. PMID:24224799

  1. Co-Treatment with Anthocyanins and Vitamin C Ameliorates Ethanol- Induced Neurodegeneration via Modulation of GABAB Receptor Signaling in the Adult Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Haroon; Ali, Tahir; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Kim, Min J; Abid, Noman Bin; Shah, Shahid A; Yoon, Gwang H; Lee, Hae Y; Kim, Myeong O

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol exposure is known to cause neuronal damage in both humans and experimental animal models. Ethanol treatment induces neurotoxicity via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while anthocyanins (extracted from black soybean) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) are free radical scavengers that can be used as neuroprotective agents against ROS. In this study the underlying neuroprotective potential of black soybean anthocyanins and vitamin C was determined. For this purpose, adult rats were exposed to 10% (v/v) ethanol for 8 weeks, followed by co-treatment with anthocyanins (24 mg/kg) and vitamin C (100 mg/kg) during the last 4 weeks. Our results showed that ethanol administration increased the expression of γ -aminobutyric acid B1 receptor (GABAB1R) and induced neuronal apoptosis via alterations to the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, release of cytochrome C and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Anthocyanins alone and supplementation with vitamin C showed an additive effect in reversing the trend of apoptotic signals induced by ethanol in the cortex and hippocampus. Consequently, anthocyanins also decreased the expression of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase-1 induced by ethanol and prevented DNA damage. Furthermore, anthocyanins and vitamin C reversed the ethanol-induced expression of GABAB1R and its downstream signaling molecule phospho-cAMP response element binding protein. Moreover, histopathology and immunohistochemistry results showed that anthocyanins and vitamin C significantly reduced ethanol-induced neuronal cell death. Our study revealed a neuroprotective role of anthocyanins and vitamin C via modulation of GABAB1R expression in the adult brain. Hence, we suggest that anthocyanins or co-treatment with anthocyanins and vitamin C may be a new and potentially effective neuroprotective agent for alcohol abuse. PMID:25714970

  2. Thymoquinone and vitamin C attenuates pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures via activation of GABAB1 receptor in adult rats cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ikram; Badshah, Haroon; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that leads to neuronal excitability and provoke various forms of cellular reorganization in the brain. In this study, we investigate the anti-convulsant and neuroprotective effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and vitamin C against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizures. Epileptic seizures were induced in adult rats using systemic intraperitoneal injections of PTZ (50 mg/kg) for 7 days. Animals pretreated with either TQ or vitamin C or in combination attenuated PTZ-induced seizures and mortality in rats as well neurodegeneration in the cells. Compared to PTZ, TQ and vitamin C significantly prolonged the onset of seizures (p > 0.05) as well decrease the high-grade seizures. Analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings revealed that TQ or vitamin C supplementation significantly reduced polyspike and epileptiform discharges. Epileptic seizures caused a decline in expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid B1 receptor (GABAB1R) (p > 0.05), unchanged expression of protein kinase A (PKA), decreased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) (p > 0.05) and inhibit the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) (p > 0.05) in cortex and hippocampus, respectively, compared with control. Changes in expression of GABAB1R, CaMKII and CREB by PTZ were reversed by TQ and vitamin C supplementation. Moreover, PTZ significantly increased Bax, decreased Bcl-2 expression and finally the activation of caspase-3. TQ and vitamin C pretreatment reversed all these deleterious effects induced by PTZ. TQ and vitamin C showed anticonvulsant effects via activation of GABAB1R/CaMKII/CREB pathway and suggest a potential therapeutic role in epilepsy. PMID:25429759

  3. Thymoquinone and vitamin C attenuates pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures via activation of GABAB1 receptor in adult rats cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ikram; Badshah, Haroon; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that leads to neuronal excitability and provoke various forms of cellular reorganization in the brain. In this study, we investigate the anti-convulsant and neuroprotective effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and vitamin C against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizures. Epileptic seizures were induced in adult rats using systemic intraperitoneal injections of PTZ (50 mg/kg) for 7 days. Animals pretreated with either TQ or vitamin C or in combination attenuated PTZ-induced seizures and mortality in rats as well neurodegeneration in the cells. Compared to PTZ, TQ and vitamin C significantly prolonged the onset of seizures (p > 0.05) as well decrease the high-grade seizures. Analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings revealed that TQ or vitamin C supplementation significantly reduced polyspike and epileptiform discharges. Epileptic seizures caused a decline in expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid B1 receptor (GABAB1R) (p > 0.05), unchanged expression of protein kinase A (PKA), decreased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) (p > 0.05) and inhibit the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) (p > 0.05) in cortex and hippocampus, respectively, compared with control. Changes in expression of GABAB1R, CaMKII and CREB by PTZ were reversed by TQ and vitamin C supplementation. Moreover, PTZ significantly increased Bax, decreased Bcl-2 expression and finally the activation of caspase-3. TQ and vitamin C pretreatment reversed all these deleterious effects induced by PTZ. TQ and vitamin C showed anticonvulsant effects via activation of GABAB1R/CaMKII/CREB pathway and suggest a potential therapeutic role in epilepsy.

  4. Co-Treatment with Anthocyanins and Vitamin C Ameliorates Ethanol- Induced Neurodegeneration via Modulation of GABAB Receptor Signaling in the Adult Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Haroon; Ali, Tahir; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Kim, Min J; Abid, Noman Bin; Shah, Shahid A; Yoon, Gwang H; Lee, Hae Y; Kim, Myeong O

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol exposure is known to cause neuronal damage in both humans and experimental animal models. Ethanol treatment induces neurotoxicity via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while anthocyanins (extracted from black soybean) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) are free radical scavengers that can be used as neuroprotective agents against ROS. In this study the underlying neuroprotective potential of black soybean anthocyanins and vitamin C was determined. For this purpose, adult rats were exposed to 10% (v/v) ethanol for 8 weeks, followed by co-treatment with anthocyanins (24 mg/kg) and vitamin C (100 mg/kg) during the last 4 weeks. Our results showed that ethanol administration increased the expression of γ -aminobutyric acid B1 receptor (GABAB1R) and induced neuronal apoptosis via alterations to the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, release of cytochrome C and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Anthocyanins alone and supplementation with vitamin C showed an additive effect in reversing the trend of apoptotic signals induced by ethanol in the cortex and hippocampus. Consequently, anthocyanins also decreased the expression of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase-1 induced by ethanol and prevented DNA damage. Furthermore, anthocyanins and vitamin C reversed the ethanol-induced expression of GABAB1R and its downstream signaling molecule phospho-cAMP response element binding protein. Moreover, histopathology and immunohistochemistry results showed that anthocyanins and vitamin C significantly reduced ethanol-induced neuronal cell death. Our study revealed a neuroprotective role of anthocyanins and vitamin C via modulation of GABAB1R expression in the adult brain. Hence, we suggest that anthocyanins or co-treatment with anthocyanins and vitamin C may be a new and potentially effective neuroprotective agent for alcohol abuse.

  5. Differential roles of GABAB1 subunit isoforms on locomotor responses to acute and repeated administration of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Laura H; Sweeney, Fabian F; Kaupmann, Klemens; O'Leary, Olivia F; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Cryan, John F

    2016-02-01

    GABAB receptors are crucial modulators of the behavioural effects of drug abuse, and agonists and positive allosteric modulators show promise as pharmacological strategies for anti-addiction therapeutics. GABAB receptors are functional heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits. The predominant neuronal GABAB1 subunit isoforms are GABAB1a and GABAB1b. Selective ablation of these isoforms in mice revealed differential behavioural responses in fear, cognition and stress sensitivity. However, the influence of the two GABAB1 isoforms on responses to drugs of abuse is unclear. Therefore we examined the responses of GABAB1 subunit isoform null mice to cocaine in acute locomotor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigms. During habituation for the acute locomotor activity assay, GABAB1b(-/-) mice showed higher levels of locomotor activity relative to wild-type (WT) and GABAB1a(-/-) mice, in accordance with previous studies. Acute cocaine (10 mg/kg) increased locomotor activity in habituated mice of all three genotypes, with GABAB1a(-/-) mice showing sustained hyperlocomotor responses 30 min after cocaine relative to WT and GABAB1b(-/-) mice. No genotypes demonstrated a cocaine-induced place preference, however, GABAB1a(-/-) mice demonstrated enhanced locomotor sensitisation to chronic cocaine in the CPP paradigm in comparison to WT mice, whereas GABAB1b(-/-) mice failed to develop locomotor sensitisation, despite higher levels of basal locomotor activity. These findings indicate that GABAB1a and GABAB1b isoforms differentially regulate behavioural responses to cocaine, with deletion of GABAB1a enhancing cocaine-induced locomotor activity and deletion of GABAB1b protecting from cocaine-induced sensitisation.

  6. Biphasic effects of cannabinoids in anxiety responses: CB1 and GABA(B) receptors in the balance of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Rey, Alejandro Aparisi; Purrio, Martin; Viveros, Maria-Paz; Lutz, Beat

    2012-11-01

    Biphasic effects of cannabinoids have been shown in processes such as feeding behavior, motor activity, motivational processes and anxiety responses. Using two different tests for the characterization of anxiety-related behavior (elevated plus-maze and holeboard), we first identified in wild-type C57BL/6N mice, two doses of the synthetic CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist CP-55,940 with anxiolytic (1 μg/kg) and anxiogenic properties (50 μg/kg), respectively. To clarify the role of CB1 receptors in this biphasic effect, both doses were applied to two different conditional CB1 receptor knockout (KO) mouse lines, GABA-CB1-KO (CB1 receptor inactivation in forebrain GABAergic neurons) and Glu-CB1-KO (CB1 receptor inactivation in cortical glutamatergic neurons). We found that the anxiolytic-like effects of the low dose of cannabinoids are mediated via the CB1 receptor on cortical glutamatergic terminals, because this anxiolytic-like response was abrogated only in Glu-CB1-KO mice. On the contrary, the CB1 receptor on the GABAergic terminals is required to induce an anxiogenic-like effect under a high-dose treatment because of the fact that this effect was abolished specifically in GABA-CB1-KO mice. These experiments were carried out in both sexes, and no differences occurred with the doses tested in the mutant mice. Interestingly, the positive allosteric modulation of GABA(B) receptor with GS-39783 was found to largely abrogate the anxiogenic-like effect of the high dose of CP-55,940. Our results shed new light in further understanding the biphasic effects of cannabinoids at the molecular level and, importantly, pave the way for the development of novel anxiolytic cannabinoid drugs, which may have favorable effect profiles targeting the CB1 receptor on glutamatergic terminals.

  7. Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) disruption of passive avoidance learning in the day-old chick appears to be due to its effect on GABAB not gamma-hydroxybutyric [corrected] acid (GHB) receptors.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Joanne M; Hazi, Agnes; Hale, Mathew W; Milsome, Sarah L; Crowe, Simon F

    2009-02-11

    Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) is a prodrug to gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and metabolises to GHB when ingested. Discrimination stimulus studies report generalisation of effects of GHB to GBL. While amnesia is one of the most commonly reported symptoms of GHB's ingestion in human users, as yet few studies have examined this effect. Although an endogenous GHB specific receptor is present in the brain, several studies have indicated that the clinical effects of exogenous doses of GBL/GHB are due to its action on GABA(B) receptors rather than on the GHB receptor. In this series of studies, New Hampshire x White leghorn cockerels were trained using a modified version of the passive avoidance learning task. Subcutaneous injections of GBL induced a memory deficit by 10 min post-training, which persisted for at least 24 h. No effect on memory was seen with administration of the specific GHB agonist NCS-356 (gamma-p-chlorophenyl-trans-4-hydroxycrotonate). The GBL-induced memory deficit appeared similar to the deficit produced by baclofen, where the antagonist facilitated learning. Additionally, GBL-induced memory deficit was ameliorated by application of a GABA(B) antagonist. The results support the hypothesis that GBL exerts its influence on memory via the GABA(B) receptor rather than by the specific GHB receptor.

  8. Effects of imipramine or GABA(B) receptor ligands on the immobility, swimming and climbing in the forced swim test in rats following discontinuation of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Frankowska, Małgorzata; Gołda, Anna; Wydra, Karolina; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Filip, Małgorzata

    2010-02-10

    We tested if discontinuation of cocaine self-administration can lead to the development of depressive-like symptoms in the forced swim test expressed as changes in immobility, swimming and climbing behaviors in rats. A "yoked" procedure in which rats were run simultaneously in groups of three, with two rats received the passive injection of cocaine or saline, was employed. Later, we examined whether acute treatment with the classical antidepressant imipramine or GABA(B) receptor ligands could alter the increases in immobility recorded after discontinuation of self-administered cocaine. We found a significant increase (44%) in the immobility time 3 days following discontinuation of cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion/2h daily) self-administration for 14 days; such enhancement resembled that observed in rats following the chronic mild stress. Acute administration with imipramine (15 or 30 mg/kg), the GABA(B) receptor agonists baclofen (0.125 mg/kg) and SKF 97541 (0.005 mg/kg), the positive allosteric modulator CGP 7930 (0.3mg/kg) or the antagonist SCH 50911 (0.3mg/kg) counteracted the cocaine discontinuation-induced enhancement in the immobility time. The enhanced immobility time in rats that self-administered cocaine (but not given cocaine passively) may reflect the motivated or cognitive processes of reinforced responding of cocaine and could be a potential driver of the addiction process per se. Moreover, either blockade or stimulation of GABA(B) receptors by their ligands in very low doses attenuated the enhanced immobility time in rats after discontinuation of cocaine self-administration and these findings extend preclinical studies demonstrating the potential involvement of GABA(B) receptor ligands to reduce cocaine craving.

  9. Antagonism of GABA-B but not GABA-A receptors in the VTA prevents stress- and intra-VTA CRF-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Blacktop, Jordan M; Vranjkovic, Oliver; Mayer, Matthieu; Van Hoof, Matthew; Baker, David A; Mantsch, John R

    2016-03-01

    Stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking requires corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) actions in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However the mechanisms through which CRF regulates VTA function to promote cocaine use are not fully understood. Here we examined the role of GABAergic neurotransmission in the VTA mediated by GABA-A or GABA-B receptors in the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking by a stressor, uncontrollable intermittent footshock, or bilateral intra-VTA administration of CRF. Rats underwent repeated daily cocaine self-administration (1.0 mg/kg/ing; 14 × 6 h/day) and extinction and were tested for reinstatement in response to footshock (0.5 mA, 0.5" duration, average every 40 s; range 10-70 s) or intra-VTA CRF delivery (500 ng/side) following intra-VTA pretreatment with the GABA-A antagonist, bicuculline, the GABA-B antagonist, 2-hydroxysaclofen or vehicle. Intra-VTA bicuculline (1, 10 or 20 ng/side) failed to block footshock- or CRF-induced cocaine seeking at either dose tested. By contrast, 2-hydroxysaclofen (0.2 or 2 μg/side) prevented reinstatement by both footshock and intra-VTA CRF at a concentration that failed to attenuate food-reinforced lever pressing (45 mg sucrose-sweetened pellets; FR4 schedule) in a separate group of rats. These data suggest that GABA-B receptor-dependent CRF actions in the VTA mediate stress-induced cocaine seeking and that GABA-B receptor antagonists may have utility for the management of stress-induced relapse in cocaine addicts.

  10. G(o) transduces GABAB-receptor modulation of N-type calcium channels in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Menon-Johansson, A S; Berrow, N; Dolphin, A C

    1993-11-01

    High-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channel currents (IBa) were recorded from acutely replated cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. IBa was irreversibly inhibited by 56.9 +/- 2.7% by 1 microM omega-conotoxin-GVIA (omega-CTx-GVIA), whereas the 1,4-dihydropyridine antagonist nicardipine was ineffective. The selective gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist, (-)-baclofen (50 microM), inhibited the HVA IBa by 30.7 +/- 5.4%. Prior application of omega-CTx-GVIA completely occluded inhibition of the HVA IBa by (-)-baclofen, indicating that in this preparation (-)-baclofen inhibits N-type current. To investigate which G protein subtype was involved, cells were replated in the presence of anti-G protein antisera. Under these conditions the antibodies were shown to enter the cells through transient pores created during the replating procedure. Replating DRGs in the presence of anti-G(o) antiserum, raised against the C-terminal decapeptide of the G alpha o subunit, reduced (-)-baclofen inhibition of the HVA IBa, whereas replating DRGs in the presence of the anti-Gi antiserum did not. Using anti-G alpha o antisera (1:2000) and confocal laser microscopy, G alpha o localisation was investigated in both unreplated and replated neurons. G alpha o immunoreactivity was observed at the plasma membrane, neurites, attachment plaques and perinuclear region, and was particularly pronounced at points of cell-to-cell contact. The plasma membrane G alpha o immunoreactivity was completely blocked by preincubation with the immunising G alpha o undecapeptide (1 microgram.ml-1) for 1 h at 37 degrees C. A similar treatment also blocked recognition of G alpha o in brain membranes on immunoblots.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. G(o) transduces GABAB-receptor modulation of N-type calcium channels in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Menon-Johansson, A S; Berrow, N; Dolphin, A C

    1993-11-01

    High-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channel currents (IBa) were recorded from acutely replated cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. IBa was irreversibly inhibited by 56.9 +/- 2.7% by 1 microM omega-conotoxin-GVIA (omega-CTx-GVIA), whereas the 1,4-dihydropyridine antagonist nicardipine was ineffective. The selective gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist, (-)-baclofen (50 microM), inhibited the HVA IBa by 30.7 +/- 5.4%. Prior application of omega-CTx-GVIA completely occluded inhibition of the HVA IBa by (-)-baclofen, indicating that in this preparation (-)-baclofen inhibits N-type current. To investigate which G protein subtype was involved, cells were replated in the presence of anti-G protein antisera. Under these conditions the antibodies were shown to enter the cells through transient pores created during the replating procedure. Replating DRGs in the presence of anti-G(o) antiserum, raised against the C-terminal decapeptide of the G alpha o subunit, reduced (-)-baclofen inhibition of the HVA IBa, whereas replating DRGs in the presence of the anti-Gi antiserum did not. Using anti-G alpha o antisera (1:2000) and confocal laser microscopy, G alpha o localisation was investigated in both unreplated and replated neurons. G alpha o immunoreactivity was observed at the plasma membrane, neurites, attachment plaques and perinuclear region, and was particularly pronounced at points of cell-to-cell contact. The plasma membrane G alpha o immunoreactivity was completely blocked by preincubation with the immunising G alpha o undecapeptide (1 microgram.ml-1) for 1 h at 37 degrees C. A similar treatment also blocked recognition of G alpha o in brain membranes on immunoblots.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8309795

  12. Acute cocaine exposure weakens GABA(B) receptor-dependent G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ signaling in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Arora, Devinder; Hearing, Matthew; Haluk, Desirae M; Mirkovic, Kelsey; Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Wessendorf, Martin W; Watanabe, Masahiko; Luján, Rafael; Wickman, Kevin

    2011-08-24

    Enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission in dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), triggered by a single cocaine injection, represents an early adaptation linked to the more enduring effects of abused drugs that characterize addiction. Here, we examined the impact of in vivo cocaine exposure on metabotropic inhibitory signaling involving G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) (Girk) channels in VTA DA neurons. Somatodendritic Girk currents evoked by the GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) agonist baclofen were diminished in a dose-dependent manner in mice given a single cocaine injection. This adaptation persisted for 3-4 d, was specific for DA neurons of the VTA, and occurred in parallel with an increase in spontaneous glutamatergic neurotransmission. No additional suppression of GABA(B)R-Girk signaling was observed following repeated cocaine administration. While total Girk2 and GABA(B)R1 mRNA and protein levels were unaltered by cocaine exposure in VTA DA neurons, the cocaine-induced decrease in GABA(B)R-Girk signaling correlated with a reduction in Girk2-containing channels at the plasma membrane in VTA DA neurons. Systemic pretreatment with sulpiride, but not SCH23390 (7-chloro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepin-8-ol), prevented the cocaine-induced suppression of GABA(B)R-Girk signaling, implicating D(2/3) DA receptor activation in this adaptation. The acute cocaine-induced weakening of somatodendritic Girk signaling complements the previously demonstrated cocaine-induced strengthening of glutamatergic neurotransmission, likely contributing to enhanced output of VTA DA neurons during the early stages of addiction. PMID:21865468

  13. Effects of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen administered orally on normal food intake and intraperitoneally on fat intake in non-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Bains, Rasneer S; Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2013-01-01

    It has been previously reported that the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen decreases food intake after oral administration and fat intake after intraperitoneal administration. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of baclofen (1-4 mg/ kg) administered orally (Experiment 1) on food intake in non-deprived rats (n=6) and intraperitoneally (Experiment 2) on fat intake in non-deprived rats (n=8) that were naïve to baclofen (1st set of trials) and in the same group of rats after they were sub-chronically exposed to baclofen (2nd set of trials). The results from Experiment 1 show that baclofen had no effects on food intake during the 1st set of trials, but the 2 and 4 mg/kg doses significantly increased food consumption during the 2nd set of trials. Baclofen produced sedation during the 1st set of trials, but tolerance occurred to this effect and was not apparent during the 2nd set of trials. These observations suggest that the motor effects may have competed with the hyperphagic effects of baclofen during the 1st set of trials. The data from Experiment 2 show that baclofen had no effects on fat intake during either the 1st or 2nd set of trials. The results of the study thus indicate that orally administrated baclofen increases food intake and intraperitoneal administration has no effect on fat intake in non-deprived rats under the conditions used in this study. These findings may have important implications for research on the use of baclofen in studies concerned with ingestive behaviours.

  14. GABAB Encephalitis: A Fifty-Two-Year-Old Man with Seizures, Dysautonomia, and Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Loftspring, Matthew C.; Landsness, Eric; Wooliscroft, Lindsey; Rudock, Robert; Jo, Sally; Patel, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor, subtype B (GABAB), are a known cause of limbic encephalitis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations attributable to this antibody is not well defined at the present time. Here we present a case of GABAB encephalitis presenting with encephalopathy, status epilepticus, dysautonomia, and acute heart failure. To our knowledge, heart failure and dysautonomia have not yet been reported with this syndrome. PMID:26609456

  15. L-baclofen-sensitive GABAB binding sites in the medial vestibular nucleus localized by immunocytochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, G. R.; Martinelli, G. P.; Cohen, B.

    1992-01-01

    L-Baclofen-sensitive GABAB binding sites in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) were identified immunocytochemically and visualized ultrastructurally in L-baclofen-preinjected rats and monkeys, using a mouse monoclonal antibody with specificity for the p-chlorophenyl moiety of baclofen. Saline-preinjected animals showed no immunostain. In drug-injected animals, there was evidence for both pre- and postsynaptic GABAergic inhibition in MVN mediated by GABAB receptors. These neural elements could be utilized in control of velocity storage in the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

  16. Optogenetic evocation of field inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in hippocampal slices: a simple and reliable approach for studying pharmacological effects on GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Dine, Julien; Kühne, Claudia; Deussing, Jan M.; Eder, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The GABAergic system is the main source of inhibition in the mammalian brain. Consequently, much effort is still made to develop new modulators of GABAergic synaptic transmission. In contrast to glutamatergic postsynaptic potentials (PSPs), accurate monitoring of GABA receptor-mediated PSPs (GABAR-PSPs) and their pharmacological modulation in brain tissue invariably requires the use of intracellular recording techniques. However, these techniques are expensive, time- and labor-consuming, and, in case of the frequently employed whole-cell patch-clamp configuration, impact on intracellular ion concentrations, signaling cascades, and pH buffering systems. Here, we describe a novel approach to circumvent these drawbacks. In particular, we demonstrate in mouse hippocampal slices that selective optogenetic activation of interneurons leads to prominent field inhibitory GABAAR- and GABABR-PSPs in area CA1 which are easily and reliably detectable by a single extracellular recording electrode. The field PSPs exhibit typical temporal and pharmacological characteristics, display pronounced paired-pulse depression, and remain stable over many consecutive evocations. Additionally validating the methodological value of this approach, we further show that the neuroactive steroid 5α-THDOC (5 μM) shifts the inhibitory GABAAR-PSPs towards excitatory ones. PMID:24478627

  17. Electrophysiological study of SR 42641, a novel aminopyridazine derivative of GABA: antagonist properties and receptor selectivity of GABAA versus GABAB responses.

    PubMed Central

    Desarmenien, M.; Desaulles, E.; Feltz, P.; Hamann, M.

    1987-01-01

    A new arylamino-pyridazine gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) derivative, SR 42641, has been tested for its ability to antagonize the actions of GABA on mammalian sensory neurones. SR 42641 and bicuculline reversibly decreased GABAA-induced depolarizations and currents recorded intracellularly from dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG). Dose-response curves were shifted to the right in a parallel fashion. KB values (determined under voltage clamp conditions) were respectively 0.12 +/- 0.05 and 0.38 +/- 0.08 microM. Similar values were obtained with current clamp recording conditions. The study of the GABA-induced Cl- current under voltage-clamp conditions did not show any voltage-dependency of the antagonist effect of SR 42641. In nodose ganglion neurones, SR 42641 (0.4-4.5 microM) did not alter the (-)-baclofen-induced shortening of the calcium component of action potentials. At concentrations higher than 10 microM, SR 42641 itself prolonged calcium-dependent action potentials. Patch-clamp recordings from DRG cultured neurones indicated that SR 42641 did not affect the calcium current responsible for sustained calcium entry into cells. We conclude that SR 42641 is a potent competitive GABA antagonist, specific for the GABAA receptor. It does not act at the level of the chloride ionophore. PMID:2435350

  18. GABAB Agonism Promotes Sleep and Reduces Cataplexy in Murine Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Sarah Wurts; Morairty, Stephen R.; Chen, Tsui-Ming; Leung, Andrew K.; Wisor, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is an approved therapeutic for the excessive sleepiness and sudden loss of muscle tone (cataplexy) characteristic of narcolepsy. The mechanism of action for these therapeutic effects is hypothesized to be GABAB receptor dependent. We evaluated the effects of chronic administration of GHB and the GABAB agonist R-baclofen (R-BAC) on arousal state and cataplexy in two models of narcolepsy: orexin/ataxin-3 (Atax) and orexin/tTA; TetO diphtheria toxin mice (DTA). Mice were implanted for EEG/EMG monitoring and dosed with GHB (150 mg/kg), R-BAC (2.8 mg/kg), or vehicle (VEH) bid for 15 d–a treatment paradigm designed to model the twice nightly GHB dosing regimen used by human narcoleptics. In both models, R-BAC increased NREM sleep time, intensity, and consolidation during the light period; wake bout duration increased and cataplexy decreased during the subsequent dark period. GHB did not increase NREM sleep consolidation or duration, although NREM delta power increased in the first hour after dosing. Cataplexy decreased from baseline in 57 and 86% of mice after GHB and R-BAC, respectively, whereas cataplexy increased in 79% of the mice after VEH. At the doses tested, R-BAC suppressed cataplexy to a greater extent than GHB. These results suggest utility of R-BAC-based therapeutics for narcolepsy. PMID:24806675

  19. Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Fred; Sharapan, Hedda

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, in childhood, work and play seem to come together. Says that for young children their play is their work, and the more adults encourage children to play, the more they emphasize important lifelong resource. Examines some uses of children's play, making and building, artwork, dramatic play, monsters and superheroes, gun play, and…

  20. Rescue of GABAB and GIRK function in the lateral habenula by protein phosphatase 2A inhibition ameliorates depression-like phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Lecca, Salvatore; Pelosi, Assunta; Tchenio, Anna; Moutkine, Imane; Lujan, Rafael; Hervé, Denis; Mameli, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) encodes aversive signals, and its aberrant activity contributes to depression-like symptoms. However, a limited understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying LHb hyperactivity has precluded the development of pharmacological strategies to ameliorate depression-like phenotypes. Here we report that an aversive experience in mice, such as foot-shock exposure (FsE), induces LHb neuronal hyperactivity and depression-like symptoms. This occurs along with increased protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, a known regulator of GABAB receptor (GABABR) and G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel surface expression. Accordingly, FsE triggers GABAB1 and GIRK2 internalization, leading to rapid and persistent weakening of GABAB-activated GIRK-mediated (GABAB-GIRK) currents. Pharmacological inhibition of PP2A restores both GABAB-GIRK function and neuronal excitability. As a consequence, PP2A inhibition ameliorates depression-like symptoms after FsE and in a learned-helplessness model of depression. Thus, GABAB-GIRK plasticity in the LHb represents a cellular substrate for aversive experience. Furthermore, its reversal by PP2A inhibition may provide a novel therapeutic approach to alleviate symptoms of depression in disorders that are characterized by LHb hyperactivity. PMID:26808347

  1. Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    Designing a game with a serious purpose involves considering the worlds of Reality and Meaning yet it is undeniably impossible to create a game without a third world, one that is specifically concerned with what makes a game a game: the play elements. This third world, the world of people like designers and artists, and disciplines as computer science and game design, I call the world of Play and this level is devoted to it. The level starts off with some of the misperceptions people have of play. Unlike some may think, we play all the time, even when we grow old—this was also very noticeable in designing the game Levee Patroller as the team exhibited very playful behavior at many occasions. From there, I go into the aspects that characterize this world. The first concerns the goal of the game. This relates to the objectives people have to achieve within the game. This is constituted by the second aspect: the gameplay. Taking actions and facing challenges is subsequently constituted by a gameworld, which concerns the third aspect. And all of it is not possible without the fourth and final aspect, the type of technology that creates and facilitates the game. The four aspects together make up a “game concept” and from this world such a concept can be judged on the basis of three closely interrelated criteria: engagement, immersion, and fun.

  2. Differential Effects of GABAB Autoreceptor Activation on Ethanol Potentiation of Local and Lateral Paracapsular GABAergic Synapses in the Rat Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J.; Weiner, Jeff L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Many studies have demonstrated that GABAergic inhibition within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays an integral role in the regulation of anxiety, an important behavioral component in the etiology of alcoholism. Although ethanol has recently been shown to enhance BLA GABAergic inhibition via two distinct populations of inhibitory cells, local and lateral paracapsular (lpcs) interneurons, little is known about the mechanisms underlying ethanol potentiation of these two inhibitory pathways. Ethanol is known to enhance GABAergic inhibition in many brain regions via a complex array of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. In addition, ethanol’s presynaptic effects are often subject to GABAB autoreceptor (GABAB-R) modulation. Therefore, in this study, we characterized GABAB-R function and modulation of ethanol actions at local and lpcs GABAergic synapses. At local synapses, we found significant paired-pulse depression (PPD, 250 msec interpulse interval) which was abated by SCH-50911 (GABAB-R antagonist). No significant PPD was detected at lpcs synapses, but SCH-50911 significantly potentiated lpcs-evoked IPSCs. Baclofen (GABAB-R agonist) had similar depressant effects on local- and lpcs-evoked IPSCs, however baclofen pretreatment only reduced ethanol potentiation at local synapses. Ethanol also significantly enhanced the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs, and these effects were also sensitive to GABAB-R modulators. Collectively, these data suggest that stimulus-independent inhibitory responses recorded from BLA principal neurons primarily reflect the activity of local GABAergic interneurons and provide additional evidence that ethanol potentiates local BLA inhibitory synapses primarily via a presynaptic enhancement of GABA release that is tightly regulated by GABAB-R. In contrast, ethanol potentiation of lpcs GABAergic synapses is not sensitive to GABAB-R activation and does not appear to involve increased presynaptic GABA release. PMID:19371578

  3. Epigenetic regulation of dorsal raphe GABA(B1a) associated with isolation-induced abnormal responses to social stimulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Araki, Ryota; Hiraki, Yosuke; Nishida, Shoji; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Kinzo; Yabe, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    In isolation-reared mice, social encounter stimulation induces locomotor hyperactivity and activation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), suggesting that dysregulation of dorsal raphe function may be involved in abnormal behaviors. In this study, we examined the involvement of dorsal raphe GABAergic dysregulation in the abnormal behaviors of isolation-reared mice. We also studied an epigenetic mechanism underlying abnormalities of the dorsal raphe GABAergic system. Both mRNA and protein levels of GABA(B1a), a GABA(B) receptor subunit, were increased in the DRN of isolation-reared mice, compared with these levels in group-reared mice. In contrast, mRNA levels for other GABAergic system-related genes (GABA(A) receptor α1, β2 and γ2 subunits, GABA(B) receptor 1b and 2 subunits, and glutamate decarboxylase 67 and 65) were unchanged. Intra-DRN microinjection of 0.06 nmol baclofen (a GABA(B) receptor agonist) exacerbated encounter-induced hyperactivity and aggressive behavior, while microinjection of 0.3 nmol phaclofen (a GABA(B) receptor antagonist) attenuated encounter-induced hyperactivity and aggressive behavior in isolation-reared mice. Furthermore, microinjection of 0.06 nmol baclofen elicited encounter-induced hyperactivity in group-reared mice. Neither baclofen nor phaclofen affected immobility time in the forced swim test and hyperactivity in a novel environment of isolation reared mice. Bisulfite sequence analyses revealed that the DNA methylation level of the CpG island around the transcription start site (TSS) of GABA(B1a) was decreased in the DRN of isolation-reared mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that histone H3 was hyperacetylated around the TSS of GABA(B1a) in the DRN of isolation-reared mice. These findings indicate that an increase in dorsal raphe GABA(B1a) expression via epigenetic regulation is associated with abnormal responses to social stimulation such as encounter-induced hyperactivity and aggressive behavior in isolation

  4. Spinal Nerve Ligation Decreases γ-Aminobutyric AcidB Receptors on Specific Populations of Immunohistochemically Identified Neurons in L5 Dorsal Root Ganglion of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Mitchell P.; Merrill, Michelle A.; De Prado, Blanca Marquez; Hammond, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the distribution of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors on immunohistochemically identified neurons, and levels of GABAB(1) and GABAB(2) mRNA, in the L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of the rat in the absence of injury and 2 weeks after L5 spinal nerve ligation. In uninjured DRG, GABAB(1) immunoreactivity colocalized exclusively with the neuronal marker (NeuN) and did not colocalize with the satellite cell marker S-100. The GABAB(1) subunit colocalized to >97% of DRG neurons immunoreactive (IR) for neurofilament 200 (N52) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), or labeled by isolectin B4 (IB4). Immunoreactivity for GABAB(2) was not detectable. L5 spinal nerve ligation did not alter the number of GABAB(1)-IR neurons or its colocalization pattern in the L4 DRG. However, ligation reduced the number of GABAB(1)-IR neurons in the L5 DRG by ≈38% compared with sham-operated and naïve rats. Specifically, ligation decreased the number of CGRP-IR neurons in the L5 DRG by 75%, but did not decrease the percent colocalization of GABAB(1) in those that remained. In the few IB4-positive neurons that remained in the L5 DRG, colocalization of GABAB(1)-IR decreased to 75%. Ligation also decreased levels of GABAB(1) and GABAB(2) mRNA in the L5, but not the L4 DRG compared with sham-operated or naïve rats. These findings indicate that the GABAB receptor is positioned to presynaptically modulate afferent transmission by myelinated, unmyelinated, and peptidergic afferents in the dorsal horn. Loss of GABAB receptors on primary afferent neurons may contribute to the development of mechanical allodynia after L5 spinal nerve ligation. PMID:22120979

  5. On the properties and origin of the GABAB inhibitory postsynaptic potential recorded in morphologically identified projection cells of the cat dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Soltesz, I; Lightowler, S; Leresche, N; Crunelli, V

    1989-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were performed from projection cells of the cat dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus in vitro to investigate the properties and origin of optic tract evoked inhibitory postsynaptic potentials mediated by GABAB receptors and their relationship to the physiologically different cell classes present in this nucleus. In all three main laminae of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, stimulation of the optic tract evoked an excitatory postsynaptic potential followed by two inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. The first is a GABAA receptor mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potential since it was blocked by bicuculline, reversed in polarity following intracellular Cl- injection and had a reversal potential similar to the bicuculline sensitive hyperpolarizing effect of GABA. The second is a GABAB receptor mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potential. Its amplitude was not linearly related to membrane potential (maximal amplitude at -60 mV), it decreased when using frequencies of stimulation higher than 0.05 Hz and it was reversibly increased by addition of bicuculline to the perfusion medium. The reversal potential of GABAB inhibitory postsynaptic potentials was dependent on the extracellular K+ concentration but did not change in the presence of bicuculline or when recording with Cl- filled microelectrodes. While GABAA inhibitory postsynaptic potentials always abolished repetitive firing of projection cells, GABAB inhibitory postsynaptic potentials were able to block weak firing but unable to decrease strong activation of projection cells evoked by direct current injection. Optic tract evoked GABAB (as well as GABAA) inhibitory postsynaptic potentials could be recorded in slices which did not include the perigeniculate nucleus, thus indicating that they are generated by the interneurons of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. Using intracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase, we have found that the GABAB inhibitory postsynaptic potentials are

  6. Platelet activating factor receptor binding plays a critical role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gerardo; Kazimi, Nasser; Nghiem, Dat X; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2004-03-15

    Applying military jet fuel (JP-8) or commercial jet fuel (Jet-A) to the skin of mice suppresses the immune response in a dose-dependent manner. The release of biological response modifiers, particularly prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), is a critical step in activating immune suppression. Previous studies have shown that injecting selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors into jet fuel-treated mice blocks immune suppression. Because the inflammatory phospholipid mediator, platelet-activating factor (PAF), up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2 production and PGE2 synthesis by keratinocytes, we tested the hypothesis that PAF-receptor binding plays a role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression. Treating keratinocyte cultures with PAF and/or jet fuel (JP-8 and Jet-A) stimulates PGE2 secretion. Jet fuel-induced PGE2 production was suppressed by treating the keratinocytes with specific PAF-receptor antagonists. Injecting mice with PAF, or treating the skin of the mice with JP-8, or Jet-A, induced immune suppression. Jet fuel-induced immune suppression was blocked when the jet fuel-treated mice were injected with PAF-receptor antagonists before treatment. Jet fuel treatment has been reported to activate oxidative stress and treating the mice with anti-oxidants (Vitamins C, or E or beta-hydroxy toluene), before jet fuel application, interfered with immune suppression. These findings confirm previous studies showing that PAF-receptor binding can modulate immune function. Furthermore, they suggest that PAF-receptor binding may be an early event in the induction of immune suppression by immunotoxic environmental agents that target the skin. PMID:15020195

  7. GPR55, a G-protein coupled receptor for lysophosphatidylinositol, plays a role in motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Chen, Hongmei; Sun, Hao; Zhu, Jie; Jew, Chris P; Wager-Miller, James; Straiker, Alex; Spencer, Corinne; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is activated by lysophosphatidylinositols and some cannabinoids. Recent studies found prominent roles for GPR55 in neuropathic/inflammatory pain, cancer and bone physiology. However, little is known about the role of GPR55 in CNS development and function. To address this question, we performed a detailed characterization of GPR55 knockout mice using molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays. Quantitative PCR studies found that GPR55 mRNA was expressed (in order of decreasing abundance) in the striatum, hippocampus, forebrain, cortex, and cerebellum. GPR55 deficiency did not affect the concentrations of endocannabinoids and related lipids or mRNA levels for several components of the endocannabinoid system in the hippocampus. Normal synaptic transmission and short-term as well as long-term synaptic plasticity were found in GPR55 knockout CA1 pyramidal neurons. Deleting GPR55 function did not affect behavioral assays assessing muscle strength, gross motor skills, sensory-motor integration, motor learning, anxiety or depressive behaviors. In addition, GPR55 null mutant mice exhibited normal contextual and auditory-cue conditioned fear learning and memory in a Pavlovian conditioned fear test. In contrast, when presented with tasks requiring more challenging motor responses, GPR55 knockout mice showed impaired movement coordination. Taken together, these results suggest that GPR55 plays a role in motor coordination, but does not strongly regulate CNS development, gross motor movement or several types of learned behavior.

  8. GPR55, a G-Protein Coupled Receptor for Lysophosphatidylinositol, Plays a Role in Motor Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Chen, Hongmei; Sun, Hao; Zhu, Jie; Jew, Chris P.; Wager-Miller, James; Straiker, Alex; Spencer, Corinne; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is activated by lysophosphatidylinositols and some cannabinoids. Recent studies found prominent roles for GPR55 in neuropathic/inflammatory pain, cancer and bone physiology. However, little is known about the role of GPR55 in CNS development and function. To address this question, we performed a detailed characterization of GPR55 knockout mice using molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays. Quantitative PCR studies found that GPR55 mRNA was expressed (in order of decreasing abundance) in the striatum, hippocampus, forebrain, cortex, and cerebellum. GPR55 deficiency did not affect the concentrations of endocannabinoids and related lipids or mRNA levels for several components of the endocannabinoid system in the hippocampus. Normal synaptic transmission and short-term as well as long-term synaptic plasticity were found in GPR55 knockout CA1 pyramidal neurons. Deleting GPR55 function did not affect behavioral assays assessing muscle strength, gross motor skills, sensory-motor integration, motor learning, anxiety or depressive behaviors. In addition, GPR55 null mutant mice exhibited normal contextual and auditory-cue conditioned fear learning and memory in a Pavlovian conditioned fear test. In contrast, when presented with tasks requiring more challenging motor responses, GPR55 knockout mice showed impaired movement coordination. Taken together, these results suggest that GPR55 plays a role in motor coordination, but does not strongly regulate CNS development, gross motor movement or several types of learned behavior. PMID:23565223

  9. Importance of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) receptor C-termini for G-protein coupling.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Sylvia; Schupp, Bettina J; Ikeda, Stephen R; Kuner, Rohini; Steigerwald, Frank; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Köhr, Georg

    2002-05-01

    Functional gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) (GABA(B)) receptors assemble from two subunits, GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2).) This heteromerization, which involves a C-terminal coiled-coil interaction, ensures efficient surface trafficking and agonist-dependent G-protein activation. In the present study, we took a closer look at the implications of the intracellular C termini of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) for G-protein coupling. We generated a series of C-terminal mutants of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) and tested them for physical interaction, surface trafficking, coupling to adenylyl cyclase, and G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells as well as on endogenous calcium channels in sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG). We found that the C-terminal interaction contributes only partly to the heterodimeric assembly of the subunits, indicating the presence of an additional interaction site. The described endoplasmic reticulum retention signal within the C terminus of GABA(B(1)) functioned only in the context of specific amino acids, which constitute part of the GABA(B(1)) coiled-coil sequence. This finding may provide a link between the retention signal and its shielding by the coiled coil of GABA(B(2).) In HEK293 cells, we observed that the two well-known GABA(B) receptor antagonists [S-(R*,R*)]-[3-[[1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino]-2-hydroxypropyl](cyclohexylmethyl) phosphinic acid (CGP54626) and (+)-(2S)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH50911) CGP54626 and SCH50911 function as inverse agonists. The C termini of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) strongly influenced agonist-independent G-protein coupling, although they were not necessary for agonist-dependent G-protein coupling. The C-terminal GABA(B) receptor mutants described here demonstrate that the active receptor conformation is stabilized by the coiled-coil interaction. Thus, the C-terminal conformation of the GABA(B) receptor may determine its

  10. The selective GABAB antagonist CGP-35348 blocks spike-wave bursts in the cholesterol synthesis rat absence epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Smith, K A; Fisher, R S

    1996-08-12

    Slow IPSPs, which are believed to be involved in generation of the wave of spike-wave epileptiform discharges, are mediated by the GABAB receptor. We therefore examined the effect of the GABAB antagonist, Ciba Geigy Product, CGP-35348, in the cholesterol synthesis inhibitor model of absence epilepsy in rat. Rats received Ayerst-9944 (AY-9944), from 6-45 mg i.p. in the first few weeks of life. By 2 months after AY-9944 administration these rats exhibited recurrent spike-waves and behavioral arrests. In 10 such animals CGP-35348 was administered intraperitoneally in doses of 0 (vehicle), 10, 25 or 100 mg/kg. EEG recordings were obtained via previously implanted bone screws. Technologists blinded to treatment group counted spike-waves over a 4 h period post-injection. The average number of spike-wave burst seconds per 4 h of recording for all dosages and times was 52.4 +/- 81.4 (mean +/- S.D.) s. Mean burst times (seconds) were vehicle = 93.5 +/- 106.5; 10 mg/kg = 69.9 +/- 79.7; 25 mg/kg = 30.8 +/- 46.9; 100 mg/kg = 15.2 +/- 54, a mean 84% reduction at 100 mg/kg (ANOVA regression significant at 0.0001). Spike-waves were suppressed for at least 4 h after injection of CGP-35348. These findings supplement similar findings in other absence models, and support a potential role for GABAB antagonists in treatment of absence seizures.

  11. γ-Aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor α subunits play a direct role in synaptic versus extrasynaptic targeting.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Wu, Zheng; Ning, Gang; Guo, Yao; Ali, Rashid; Macdonald, Robert L; De Blas, Angel L; Luscher, Bernhard; Chen, Gong

    2012-08-10

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)-Rs) are localized at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites, mediating phasic and tonic inhibition, respectively. Previous studies suggest an important role of γ2 and δ subunits in synaptic versus extrasynaptic targeting of GABA(A)-Rs. Here, we demonstrate differential function of α2 and α6 subunits in guiding the localization of GABA(A)-Rs. To study the targeting of specific subtypes of GABA(A)-Rs, we used a molecularly engineered GABAergic synapse model to precisely control the GABA(A)-R subunit composition. We found that in neuron-HEK cell heterosynapses, GABAergic events mediated by α2β3γ2 receptors were very fast (rise time ∼2 ms), whereas events mediated by α6β3δ receptors were very slow (rise time ∼20 ms). Such an order of magnitude difference in rise time could not be attributed to the minute differences in receptor kinetics. Interestingly, synaptic events mediated by α6β3 or α6β3γ2 receptors were significantly slower than those mediated by α2β3 or α2β3γ2 receptors, suggesting a differential role of α subunit in receptor targeting. This was confirmed by differential targeting of the same δ-γ2 chimeric subunits to synaptic or extrasynaptic sites, depending on whether it was co-assembled with the α2 or α6 subunit. In addition, insertion of a gephyrin-binding site into the intracellular domain of α6 and δ subunits brought α6β3δ receptors closer to synaptic sites. Therefore, the α subunits, together with the γ2 and δ subunits, play a critical role in governing synaptic versus extrasynaptic targeting of GABA(A)-Rs, possibly through differential interactions with gephyrin.

  12. The roles played by highly truncated splice variants of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes greatly increases the total number of receptor isoforms which may be expressed in a cell-dependent and time-dependent manner. This increased diversity of cell signaling options caused by the generation of splice variants is further enhanced by receptor dimerization. When alternative splicing generates highly truncated GPCRs with less than seven transmembrane (TM) domains, the predominant effect in vitro is that of a dominant-negative mutation associated with the retention of the wild-type receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). For constitutively active (agonist-independent) GPCRs, their attenuated expression on the cell surface, and consequent decreased basal activity due to the dominant-negative effect of truncated splice variants, has pathological consequences. Truncated splice variants may conversely offer protection from disease when expression of co-receptors for binding of infectious agents to cells is attenuated due to ER retention of the wild-type co-receptor. In this review, we will see that GPCRs retained in the ER can still be functionally active but also that highly truncated GPCRs may also be functionally active. Although rare, some truncated splice variants still bind ligand and activate cell signaling responses. More importantly, by forming heterodimers with full-length GPCRs, some truncated splice variants also provide opportunities to generate receptor complexes with unique pharmacological properties. So, instead of assuming that highly truncated GPCRs are associated with faulty transcription processes, it is time to reassess their potential benefit to the host organism. PMID:22938630

  13. Lrp1/LDL Receptor Play Critical Roles in Mannose 6-Phosphate-Independent Lysosomal Enzyme Targeting.

    PubMed

    Markmann, Sandra; Thelen, Melanie; Cornils, Kerstin; Schweizer, Michaela; Brocke-Ahmadinejad, Nahal; Willnow, Thomas; Heeren, Joerg; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Braulke, Thomas; Kollmann, Katrin

    2015-07-01

    Most lysosomal enzymes require mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) residues for efficient receptor-mediated lysosomal targeting. Although the lack of M6P residues results in missorting and hypersecretion, selected lysosomal enzymes reach normal levels in lysosomes of various cell types, suggesting the existence of M6P-independent transport routes. Here, we quantify the lysosomal proteome in M6P-deficient mouse fibroblasts (PT(ki)) using Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC)-based comparative mass spectrometry, and find unchanged amounts of 20% of lysosomal enzymes, including cathepsins D and B (Ctsd and Ctsb). Examination of fibroblasts from a new mouse line lacking both M6P and sortilin, a candidate for M6P-independent transport of lysosomal enzymes, revealed that sortilin does not act as cargo receptor for Ctsb and Ctsd. Using fibroblast lines deficient for endocytic lipoprotein receptors, we could demonstrate that both LDL receptor and Lrp1 mediate the internalization of non-phosphorylated Ctsb and Ctsd. Furthermore, the presence of Lrp1 inhibitor increased the secretion of Ctsd from PT(ki) cells. These findings establish Lrp1 and LDL receptors in M6P-independent secretion-recapture targeting mechanism for lysosomal enzymes.

  14. Kinin B2 receptor can play a neuroprotective role in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Caetano, A L; Dong-Creste, K E; Amaral, F A; Monteiro-Silva, K C; Pesquero, J B; Araujo, M S; Montor, W R; Viel, T A; Buck, H S

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by cognitive decline, presence of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) aggregates and neurofibrillary tangles. Kinins act through B1 and B2 G-protein coupled receptors (B1R and B2R). Chronic infusion of Aβ peptide leads to memory impairment and increases in densities of both kinin receptors in memory processing areas. Similar memory impairment was observed in C57BL/6 mice (WTAβ) but occurred earlier in mice lacking B2R (KOB2Aβ) and was absent in mice lacking B1R (KOB1Aβ). Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of B1R and B2R in Aβ peptide induced cognitive deficits through the evaluation of densitiesof kinin receptors, synapses, cell bodies and number of Aβ deposits in brain ofWTAβ, KOB1Aβ and KOB2Aβ mice. An increase in B2R density was observed in both WTAβ and KOB1Aβ in memory processing related areas. KOB1Aβ showed a decrease in neuronal density and an increase in synaptic density and, in addition, an increase in Aβ deposits in KOB2Aβ was observed. In conclusion, memory preservation in KOB1Aβ, could be due to the increase in densities of B2R, suggesting a neuroprotective role for B2R, reinforced by the increased number of Aβ plaques in KOB2Aβ. Our data point to B2R as a potential therapeutic target in AD.

  15. Host kinin B1 receptor plays a protective role against melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Maria, Andrea G; Dillenburg-Pilla, Patrícia; Reis, Rosana I; Floriano, Elaine M; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Ramos, Simone G; Pesquero, João B; Nahmias, Clara; Costa-Neto, Claudio M

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a very aggressive tumor that arises from melanocytes. Late stage and widely spread diseases do not respond to standard therapeutic approaches. The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) participates in biological processes such as vasodilatation, pain and inflammatory response. However, the role of KKS in tumor formation and progression is not completely understood. The role of the host kinin B1 receptor in melanoma development was evaluated using a syngeneic melanoma model. Primary tumors and metastasis were respectively induced by injecting B16F10 melanoma cells, which are derived from C57BL/6 mice, subcutaneously or in the tail vein in wild type C57BL/6 and B1 receptor knockout mice (B1(-/-)). Tumors developed in B1(-/-) mice presented unfavorable prognostic factors such as increased incidence of ulceration, higher levels of IL-10, higher activation of proliferative pathways such as ERK1/2 and Akt, and increased mitotic index. Furthermore, in the metastasis model, B1(-/-) mice developed larger metastatic colonies in the lung and lower CD8(+)immune effector cells when compared with WT animals. Altogether, our results provide evidences that B1(-/-) animals developed primary tumors with multiple features associated with poor prognosis and unfavorable metastatic onset, indicating that the B1 receptor may contribute to improve the host response against melanoma progression. PMID:26898917

  16. Host kinin B1 receptor plays a protective role against melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Andrea G.; Dillenburg-Pilla, Patrícia; Reis, Rosana I.; Floriano, Elaine M.; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Ramos, Simone G.; Pesquero, João B.; Nahmias, Clara; Costa-Neto, Claudio M.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a very aggressive tumor that arises from melanocytes. Late stage and widely spread diseases do not respond to standard therapeutic approaches. The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) participates in biological processes such as vasodilatation, pain and inflammatory response. However, the role of KKS in tumor formation and progression is not completely understood. The role of the host kinin B1 receptor in melanoma development was evaluated using a syngeneic melanoma model. Primary tumors and metastasis were respectively induced by injecting B16F10 melanoma cells, which are derived from C57BL/6 mice, subcutaneously or in the tail vein in wild type C57BL/6 and B1 receptor knockout mice (B1−/−). Tumors developed in B1−/− mice presented unfavorable prognostic factors such as increased incidence of ulceration, higher levels of IL-10, higher activation of proliferative pathways such as ERK1/2 and Akt, and increased mitotic index. Furthermore, in the metastasis model, B1−/− mice developed larger metastatic colonies in the lung and lower CD8+immune effector cells when compared with WT animals. Altogether, our results provide evidences that B1−/− animals developed primary tumors with multiple features associated with poor prognosis and unfavorable metastatic onset, indicating that the B1 receptor may contribute to improve the host response against melanoma progression. PMID:26898917

  17. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) plays a crucial role in experimental global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Eliana Cristina de Brito; Silva, Bruno Costa; Victoria, Edna Constaza Gómez; Cardoso, Ana Clara de Souza; Miranda, Aline Silva de; Sugimoto, Michelle Adriane; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires; Carvalho, Bárbara Andrade de; Kangussu, Lucas Miranda; Silva, Daniele Gonçalves da; Rodrigues, Flávia Guimarães; Barcelos, Lucíola da Silva; Vasconcelos, Anilton César; Amaral, Flávio Almeida; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide leading to a significant clinical and socioeconomic burden. Although different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of stroke, inflammatory response occurs after ischemia and contributes to the expansion of brain injury. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF) plays crucial roles in both physiological and pathological conditions in the brain. PAF receptor (PAFR) may be expressed on cellular and nuclear membranes of various cell types, especially leukocytes, platelets, endothelial cells, neuronal cells and microglia. Herein, using mice lacking the PAFR receptor (PAFR(-/-)), we investigate a potential role for this receptor during experimental transient global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (BCCAo). In PAFR deficiency, we observed a significant improvement in the neurological deficits, which were associated with a reduction of brain infarcted area as evaluated by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). Moreover, a decrease in the percentage of necrotic cavities areas and in the frequency of ischemic neurons was also found by employing histometric analysis. In addition, in PAFR(-/-) mice there was prevention of caspase-3 activation and decreased vascular permeability and brain edema. Decreased brain levels of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) by ELISA were also detected in PAFR(-/-) BCCAo animals. Taken together, our results suggest that PAFR activation might be crucial for the global brain ischemia and reperfusion injury.

  18. Ischemia-like Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation Mediates Down-regulation of Cell Surface γ-Aminobutyric AcidB Receptors via the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress-induced Transcription Factor CCAAT/Enhancer-binding Protein (C/EBP)-homologous Protein (CHOP)*

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Patrick J.; Zemoura, Khaled; Acuña, Mario A.; Yévenes, Gonzalo E.; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Benke, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia frequently leads to long-term disability and death. Excitotoxicity is believed to be the main cause for ischemia-induced neuronal death. Although a role of glutamate receptors in this process has been firmly established, the contribution of metabotropic GABAB receptors, which control excitatory neurotransmission, is less clear. A prominent characteristic of ischemic insults is endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress associated with the up-regulation of the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP). After inducing ER stress in cultured cortical neurons by sustained Ca2+ release from intracellular stores or by a brief episode of oxygen and glucose deprivation (in vitro model of cerebral ischemia), we observed an increased expression of CHOP accompanied by a strong reduction of cell surface GABAB receptors. Our results indicate that down-regulation of cell surface GABAB receptors is caused by the interaction of the receptors with CHOP in the ER. Binding of CHOP prevented heterodimerization of the receptor subunits GABAB1 and GABAB2 and subsequent forward trafficking of the receptors to the cell surface. The reduced level of cell surface receptors diminished GABAB receptor signaling and, thus, neuronal inhibition. These findings indicate that ischemia-mediated up-regulation of CHOP down-regulates cell surface GABAB receptors by preventing their trafficking from the ER to the plasma membrane. This mechanism leads to diminished neuronal inhibition and may contribute to excitotoxicity in cerebral ischemia. PMID:24668805

  19. Two dopamine receptors play different roles in phase change of the migratory locust

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojiao; Ma, Zongyuan; Kang, Le

    2015-01-01

    The migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, shows remarkable phenotypic plasticity at behavioral, physiological, and morphological levels in response to fluctuation in population density. Our previous studies demonstrated that dopamine (DA) and the genes in the dopamine metabolic pathway mediate phase change in Locusta. However, the functions of different dopamine receptors in modulating locust phase change have not been fully explored. In the present study, DA concentration in the brain increased during crowding and decreased during isolation. The expression level of dopamine receptor 1 (Dop1) increased from 1 to 4 h of crowding, but remained unchanged during isolation. Injection of Dop1 agonist SKF38393 into the brains of solitary locusts promoted gregarization, induced conspecific attraction-response and increased locomotion. RNAi knockdown of Dop1 and injection of antagonist SCH23390 in gregarious locusts induced solitary behavior, promoted the shift to repulsion-response and reduced locomotion. By contrast, the expression level of dopamine receptor 2 (Dop2) gradually increased during isolation, but remained stable during crowding. During the isolation of gregarious locusts, injection of Dop2 antagonist S(–)-sulpiride or RNAi knockdown of Dop2 inhibited solitarization, maintained conspecific attraction-response and increased locomotion; by comparison, the isolated controls displayed conspecific repulsion-response and weaker motility. Activation of Dop2 in solitary locusts through injection of agonist, R(-)-TNPA, did not affect their behavioral state. Thus, DA-Dop1 signaling in the brain of Locusta induced the gregariousness, whereas DA-Dop2 signaling mediated the solitariness. Our study demonstrated that Dop1 and Dop2 modulated locust phase change in two different directions. Further investigation of Locusta Dop1 and Dop2 functions in modulating phase change will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying phenotypic plasticity in locusts

  20. Ts65Dn, a mouse model of Down syndrome, exhibits increased GABAB-induced potassium current.

    PubMed

    Best, Tyler K; Siarey, Richard J; Galdzicki, Zygmunt

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common nonheritable cause of mental retardation. DS is the result of the presence of an extra chromosome 21 and its phenotype may be a consequence of overexpressed genes from that chromosome. One such gene is Kcnj6/Girk2, which encodes the G-protein-coupled inward rectifying potassium channel subunit 2 (GIRK2). We have recently shown that the DS mouse model, Ts65Dn, overexpresses GIRK2 throughout the brain and in particular the hippocampus. Here we report that this overexpression leads to a significant increase ( approximately 2-fold) in GABA(B)-mediated GIRK current in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. The dose response curves for peak and steady-state GIRK current density is significantly shifted left toward lower concentrations of baclofen in Ts65Dn neurons compared with diploid controls, consistent with increased functional expression of GIRK channels. Stationary fluctuation analysis of baclofen-induced GIRK current from Ts65Dn neurons indicated no significant change in single-channel conductance compared with diploid. However, significant increases in GIRK channel density was found in Ts65Dn neurons. In normalized baclofen-induced GIRK current and GIRK current kinetics no difference was found between diploid and Ts65Dn neurons, which suggests unimpaired mechanisms of interaction between GIRK channel and GABA(B) receptor. These results indicate that increased expression of GIRK2 containing channels have functional consequences that likely affect the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neuronal transmission.

  1. Liver X Receptors (LXRs) Alpha and Beta Play Distinct Roles in the Mouse Epididymis.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Marjorie; Ouvrier, Aurélia; Cadet, Rémi; Damon-Soubeyrand, Christelle; Guiton, Rachel; Janny, Laurent; Kocer, Ayhan; Marceau, Geoffroy; Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Trousson, Amalia; Drevet, Joël R; Saez, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    After its production in the testis, a spermatozoon has to undergo posttesticular maturation steps to become fully motile and fertile. The first step is epididymal maturation, during which immature spermatozoa are transformed into biochemically mature cells ready to proceed to the next step, capacitation, a physiological process occurring in the female genital tract. The biochemical transformations include modification of sperm lipid composition during epididymal transit, with significant changes in fatty acids, phospholipids, and sterols between the caput and the cauda epididymal spermatozoa. Although quantitative aspects of these changes are well documented for several mammalian species, molecular mechanisms governing these steps are poorly understood. Transgenic male mice invalidated for the two liver X receptors (LXRalpha and LXRbeta, nuclear oxysterol receptors regulating cholesterol and lipid metabolism) become sterile when aging, showing an epididymal phenotype. We used single-knockout-model mice to characterize the role of each LXR isoform during sperm maturation in the epididymis. We show here that although a certain redundancy exists in the functions of the two LXR isoforms, some physiological processes are more under the influence of only one of them. In both cases, aging males showed slight subfertility, associated with dyslipidemia, emphasizing the importance of lipid metabolism in relation with male fertility.

  2. Structural, signalling and regulatory properties of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors: prototypic family C G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, E; Challiss, R A

    2001-01-01

    In 1991 a new type of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was cloned, the type 1a metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor, which, despite possessing the defining seven-transmembrane topology of the GPCR superfamily, bore little resemblance to the growing number of other cloned GPCRs. Subsequent studies have shown that there are eight mammalian mGlu receptors that, together with the calcium-sensing receptor, the GABA(B) receptor (where GABA is gamma-aminobutyric acid) and a subset of pheromone, olfactory and taste receptors, make up GPCR family C. Currently available data suggest that family C GPCRs share a number of structural, biochemical and regulatory characteristics, which differ markedly from those of the other GPCR families, most notably the rhodopsin/family A GPCRs that have been most widely studied to date. This review will focus on the group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5). This subgroup of receptors is widely and differentially expressed in neuronal and glial cells within the brain, and receptor activation has been implicated in the control of an array of key signalling events, including roles in the adaptative changes needed for long-term depression or potentiation of neuronal synaptic connectivity. In addition to playing critical physiological roles within the brain, the mGlu receptors are also currently the focus of considerable attention because of their potential as drug targets for the treatment of a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:11672421

  3. Endoperoxide 4 receptors play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in rats with simulated peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kim, Joyce S; Stone, Audrey J; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-01-01

    Ligating the femoral artery for 72 h in decerebrated rats exaggerates the exercise pressor reflex. The sensory arm of this reflex is comprised of group III and IV afferents, which can be either sensitized or stimulated by PGE2. In vitro studies showed that endoperoxide (EP) 3 and 4 receptors were responsible for the PGE2-induced sensitization of rat dorsal root ganglion cells. This in vitro finding prompted us to test the hypothesis that blockade of EP3 and/or EP4 receptors attenuated the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries. We measured the cardiovascular responses to static hindlimb contraction or tendon stretch before and after femoral arterial injection of L798106 (an EP3 antagonist) or L161982 (an EP4 antagonist). The pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to either contraction or tendon stretch were not attenuated by L798106 in either the ligated or freely perfused rats. Likewise in five rats whose hindlimb muscles were freely perfused, the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to either contraction or tendon stretch were not attenuated by L161982. In the six ligated rats, however, the pressor response to contraction was attenuated by L161982, averaging 37 ± 3 mmHg before, 18 ± 2 mmHg afterward (P < 0.05). Western blotting analysis revealed that ligation of the femoral artery for 72 h increased the EP4 receptor protein in the L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia over their freely perfused counterparts by 24% (P < 0.05). We conclude that EP4 receptors, but not EP3 receptors, play an important role in the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex found in rats with ligated femoral arteries. PMID:23568893

  4. CHASE domain-containing receptors play an essential role in the cytokinin response of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    von Schwartzenberg, Klaus; Lindner, Ann-Cathrin; Gruhn, Njuscha; Šimura, Jan; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Gonneau, Martine; Nogué, Fabien; Heyl, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    While the molecular basis for cytokinin action is quite well understood in flowering plants, little is known about the cytokinin signal transduction in early diverging land plants. The genome of the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S. encodes three classical cytokinin receptors, the CHASE domain-containing histidine kinases, CHK1, CHK2, and CHK3. In a complementation assay with protoplasts of receptor-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana as well as in cytokinin binding assays, we found evidence that CHK1 and CHK2 receptors can function in cytokinin perception. Using gene targeting, we generated a collection of CHK knockout mutants comprising single (Δchk1, Δchk2, Δchk3), double (Δchk1,2, Δchk1,3, Δchk2,3), and triple (Δchk1,2,3) mutants. Mutants were characterized for their cytokinin response and differentiation capacities. While the wild type did not grow on high doses of cytokinin (1 µM benzyladenine), the Δchk1,2,3 mutant exhibited normal protonema growth. Bud induction assays showed that all three cytokinin receptors contribute to the triggering of budding, albeit to different extents. Furthermore, while the triple mutant showed no response in this bioassay, the remaining mutants displayed budding responses in a diverse manner to different types and concentrations of cytokinins. Determination of cytokinin levels in mutants showed no drastic changes for any of the cytokinins; thus, in contrast to Arabidopsis, revealing only small impacts of cytokinin signaling on homeostasis. In summary, our study provides a first insight into the molecular action of cytokinin in an early diverging land plant and demonstrates that CHK receptors play an essential role in bud induction and gametophore development.

  5. CHASE domain-containing receptors play an essential role in the cytokinin response of the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    von Schwartzenberg, Klaus; Lindner, Ann-Cathrin; Gruhn, Njuscha; Šimura, Jan; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Gonneau, Martine; Nogué, Fabien; Heyl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    While the molecular basis for cytokinin action is quite well understood in flowering plants, little is known about the cytokinin signal transduction in early diverging land plants. The genome of the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S. encodes three classical cytokinin receptors, the CHASE domain-containing histidine kinases, CHK1, CHK2, and CHK3. In a complementation assay with protoplasts of receptor-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana as well as in cytokinin binding assays, we found evidence that CHK1 and CHK2 receptors can function in cytokinin perception. Using gene targeting, we generated a collection of CHK knockout mutants comprising single (Δchk1, Δchk2, Δchk3), double (Δchk1,2, Δchk1,3, Δchk2,3), and triple (Δchk1,2,3) mutants. Mutants were characterized for their cytokinin response and differentiation capacities. While the wild type did not grow on high doses of cytokinin (1 µM benzyladenine), the Δchk1,2,3 mutant exhibited normal protonema growth. Bud induction assays showed that all three cytokinin receptors contribute to the triggering of budding, albeit to different extents. Furthermore, while the triple mutant showed no response in this bioassay, the remaining mutants displayed budding responses in a diverse manner to different types and concentrations of cytokinins. Determination of cytokinin levels in mutants showed no drastic changes for any of the cytokinins; thus, in contrast to Arabidopsis, revealing only small impacts of cytokinin signaling on homeostasis. In summary, our study provides a first insight into the molecular action of cytokinin in an early diverging land plant and demonstrates that CHK receptors play an essential role in bud induction and gametophore development. PMID:26596764

  6. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus--which role do GLP-1 receptor agonists play?].

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, J

    2011-07-21

    The results of the ACCORD-, ADVANCE- and VADT- and further recent studies raised doubts regarding whether the guidelined therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus, which aims at achieving HbA1c values of < 6.5%, is always beneficial. The higher rate of severe hypoglycemia and weight gain under intensive glycemic control has raised debates of whether the current guidelines should be adopted accordingly. Modern state-of-the-art treatment should consider: a) early treatment start, b) sustained blood sugar decrease, and c) simultaneously prevention of hypoglycemia and weight gain, d) prevention of little investigated multiple glucose-lowering agents, e) easy handling and easy to be integrated into daily schedules. The present work reviews current options with regard to these requirements with special focus on the new GLP-1 receptor agonists. PMID:23964469

  7. Dopamine D1 Receptor Signaling: Does GαQ–Phospholipase C Actually Play a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; Yang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous studies showing therapeutic potential, no central dopamine D1 receptor ligand has ever been approved, because of potential limitations, such as hypotension, seizures, and tolerance. Functional selectivity has been widely recognized as providing a potential mechanism to develop novel therapeutics from existing targets, and a highly biased, functionally selective D1 ligand might overcome some of the past limitations. SKF-83959 [6-chloro-3-methyl-1-(m-tolyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-benzo[d]azepine-7,8-diol] is reported to be a highly biased D1 ligand, having full agonism at D1-mediated activation of phospholipase C (PLC) signaling (via GαQ) and antagonism at D1-mediated adenylate cyclase signaling (via GαOLF/S). For this reason, numerous studies have used this compound to elucidate the physiologic role of D1-PLC signaling, including a novel molecular mechanism (GαQ-PLC activation via D1-D2 heterodimers). There is, however, contradictory literature that suggests that SKF-83959 is actually a partial agonist at both D1-mediated adenylate cyclase and β-arrestin recruitment. Moreover, the D1-mediated PLC stimulation has also been questioned. This Minireview examines 30 years of relevant literature and proposes that the data strongly favor alternate hypotheses: first, that SKF-83959 is a typical D1 partial agonist; and second, that the reported activation of PLC by SKF-83959 and related benzazepines likely is due to off-target effects, not actions at D1 receptors. If these hypotheses are supported by future studies, it would suggest that caution should be used regarding the role of PLC and downstream pathways in D1 signaling. PMID:25052835

  8. G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Plays a Relevant Role in Insulin Resistance and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Guerra, Lucia; Nieto-Vazquez, Iria; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Jurado-Pueyo, María; Zalba, Guillermo; Díez, Javier; Murga, Cristina; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Mayor, Federico; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Given the emerging role of signal transduction in these syndromes, we set out to explore the possible role that G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), first identified as a G protein–coupled receptor regulator, could have as a modulator of insulin responses. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed the influence of GRK2 levels in insulin signaling in myoblasts and adipocytes with experimentally increased or silenced levels of GRK2, as well as in GRK2 hemizygous animals expressing 50% lower levels of this kinase in three different models of insulin resistance: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) infusion, aging, and high-fat diet (HFD). Glucose transport, whole-body glucose and insulin tolerance, the activation status of insulin pathway components, and the circulating levels of important mediators were measured. The development of obesity and adipocyte size with age and HFD was analyzed. RESULTS Altering GRK2 levels markedly modifies insulin-mediated signaling in cultured adipocytes and myocytes. GRK2 levels are increased by ∼2-fold in muscle and adipose tissue in the animal models tested, as well as in lymphocytes from metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, hemizygous GRK2 mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and do not develop insulin resistance by TNF-α, aging, or HFD. Furthermore, reduced GRK2 levels induce a lean phenotype and decrease age-related adiposity. CONCLUSIONS Overall, our data identify GRK2 as an important negative regulator of insulin effects, key to the etiopathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity, which uncovers this protein as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:20627936

  9. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors are divided into three classes (A, B and C) based on homology of their seven transmembrane domains. Class C is the smallest class with 22 human receptor subtypes including eight metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1-8) receptors, two GABAB receptors (GABAB1 and GABAB2), three taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we review the existence of post-translational modifications in class C G protein-coupled receptors and their regulatory roles, with particular focus on glycosylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, disulphide bonding and lipidation.

  10. Adaptation Mechanism of the Aspartate Receptor: Electrostatics of the Adaptation Subdomain Play a Key Role in Modulating Kinase Activity†

    PubMed Central

    Starrett, Diane J.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The aspartate receptor of the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium chemotaxis pathway generates a transmembrane signal that regulates the activity of the cytoplasmic kinase CheA. Previous studies have identified a region of the cytoplasmic domain that is critical to receptor adaptation and kinase regulation. This region, termed the adaptation subdomain, contains a high density of acidic residues, including specific glutamate residues that serve as receptor adaptation sites. However, the mechanism of signal propagation through this region remains poorly understood. This study uses site-directed mutagenesis to neutralize each acidic residue within the subdomain to probe the hypothesis that electrostatics in this region play a significant role in the mechanism of kinase activation and modulation. Each point mutant was tested for its ability to regulate chemotaxis in vivo and kinase activity in vitro. Four point mutants (D273N, E281Q, D288N, and E477Q) were found to superactivate the kinase relative to the wild-type receptor, and all four of these kinase-activating substitutions are located along the same intersubunit interface as the adaptation sites. These activating substitutions retained the wild-type ability of the attractant-occupied receptor to inhibit kinase activity. When combined in a quadruple mutant (D273N/E281Q/D288N/E477Q), the four charge-neutralizing substitutions locked the receptor in a kinase-superactivating state that could not be fully inactivated by the attractant. Similar lock-on character was observed for a charge reversal substitution, D273R. Together, these results implicate the electrostatic interactions at the intersubunit interface as a major player in signal transduction and kinase regulation. The negative charge in this region destabilizes the local structure in a way that enhances conformational dynamics, as detected by disulfide trapping, and this effect is reversed by charge neutralization of the adaptation sites. Finally, two

  11. [GABA-Receptors in Modulation of Fear Memory Extinction].

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, N I

    2016-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system determining the efficacy of neuronal interaction. GABA-receptors play a key role in different aspects of fear memory--acquisition and consolidation, retention, reconsolidation and extinction. Extinction is an important behavioural phenomenon which allows organism to adapt its behavior to a changing environment. Extinction of fear memory is a form of new inhibitory learning which interferes with expression of the initial acquired fear conditioning. Resistance to extinction is symptom of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. The aim of the present review was to summarize own and literary data about GABAergic modulation of fear extinction and pharmacological correction of extinction impairment at influences on GABA(A)- and GABA(B)- receptors. PMID:27538279

  12. Understanding the Role α7 Nicotinic Receptors Play in Dopamine Efflux in Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (NNRs) of the α7 subtype have been shown to contribute to the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. The site of action and the underlying mechanism, however, are unclear. Here we applied a circuit modeling approach, supported by electrochemical in vivo recordings, to clarify this issue. Modeling revealed two potential mechanisms for the drop in accumbal dopamine efflux evoked by the selective α7 partial agonist TC-7020. TC-7020 could desensitize α7 NNRs located predominantly on dopamine neurons or glutamatergic afferents to them or, alternatively, activate α7 NNRs located on the glutamatergic afferents to GABAergic interneurons in the ventral tegmental area. Only the model based on desensitization, however, was able to explain the neutralizing effect of coapplied PNU-120596, a positive allosteric modulator. According to our results, the most likely sites of action are the preterminal α7 NNRs controlling glutamate release from cortical afferents to the nucleus accumbens. These findings offer a rationale for the further investigation of α7 NNR agonists as therapy for diseases associated with enhanced mesolimbic dopaminergic tone, such as schizophrenia and addiction. PMID:25147933

  13. Calcium-Sensing Receptors of Human Neural Cells Play Crucial Roles in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Liu, Daisong; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    In aged subjects, late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) starts in the lateral entorhinal allocortex where a failure of clearance mechanisms triggers an accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid-β42 oligomers (Aβ42-os). In neurons and astrocytes, Aβ42-os enhance the transcription of Aβ precursor protein (APP) and β-secretase/BACE1 genes. Thus, by acting together with γ-secretase, the surpluses of APP and BACE1 amplify the endogenous production of Aβ42-os which pile up, damage mitochondria, and are oversecreted. At the plasmalemma, exogenous Aβ42-os bind neurons' and astrocytes' calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) activating a set of intracellular signaling pathways which upkeep Aβ42-os intracellular accumulation and oversecretion by hindering Aβ42-os proteolysis. In addition, Aβ42-os accumulating in the extracellular milieu spread and reach mounting numbers of adjacent and remoter teams of neurons and astrocytes which in turn are recruited, again via Aβ42-os•CaSR-governed mechanisms, to produce and release additional Aβ42-os amounts. This relentless self-sustaining mechanism drives AD progression toward upper cortical areas. Later on accumulating Aβ42-os elicit the advent of hyperphosphorylated (p)-Tau oligomers which acting together with Aβ42-os and other glial neurotoxins cooperatively destroy wider and wider cognition-related cortical areas. In parallel, Aβ42-os•CaSR signals also elicit an excess production and secretion of nitric oxide and vascular endothelial growth factor-A from astrocytes, of Aβ42-os and myelin basic protein from oligodendrocytes, and of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide and (likely) Aβ42-os from microglia. Activated astrocytes and microglia survive the toxic onslaught, whereas neurons and oligodendrocytes increasingly die. However, we have shown that highly selective allosteric CaSR antagonists (calcilytics), like NPS 2143 and NPS 89626, efficiently suppress all the neurotoxic effects Aβ42-os•CaSR signaling drives in

  14. Yes and Lyn play a role in nuclear translocation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Iida, M; Brand, T M; Campbell, D A; Li, C; Wheeler, D L

    2013-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a central regulator of tumor progression in human cancers. Cetuximab is an anti-EGFR antibody that has been approved for use in oncology. Previously we investigated mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab using a model derived from the non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H226. We demonstrated that cetuximab-resistant clones (Ctx(R)) had increased nuclear localization of the EGFR. This process was mediated by Src family kinases (SFKs), and nuclear EGFR had a role in resistance to cetuximab. To better understand SFK-mediated nuclear translocation of EGFR, we investigated which SFK member(s) controlled this process as well as the EGFR tyrosine residues that are involved. Analyses of mRNA and protein expression indicated upregulation of the SFK members Yes (v-Yes-1 yamaguchi sarcoma viral oncogene) and Lyn (v-yes-1 Yamaguchi sarcoma viral-related oncogene homolog) in all Ctx(R) clones. Further, immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that EGFR interacts with Yes and Lyn in Ctx(R) clones, but not in cetuximab-sensitive (Ctx(S)) parental cells. Using RNAi interference, we found that knockdown of either Yes or Lyn led to loss of EGFR translocation to the nucleus. Conversely, overexpression of Yes or Lyn in low nuclear EGFR-expressing Ctx(S) parental cells led to increased nuclear EGFR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed nuclear EGFR complexes associated with the promoter of the known EGFR target genes B-Myb and iNOS. Further, all Ctx(R) clones exhibited upregulation of B-Myb and iNOS at the mRNA and protein levels. siRNAs directed at Yes or Lyn led to decreased binding of EGFR complexes to the B-Myb and iNOS promoters based on ChIP analyses. SFKs have been shown to phosphorylate EGFR on tyrosines 845 and 1101 (Y845 and Y1101), and mutation of Y1101, but not Y845, impaired nuclear entry of the EGFR. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Yes and Lyn phosphorylate EGFR at Y1101, which influences EGFR

  15. Thyroid Hormone Receptor α Plays an Essential Role in Male Skeletal Muscle Myoblast Proliferation, Differentiation, and Response to Injury.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Anna; Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Nam-Ho; Liu, Yan-Yun; Yang, An; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Kahng, Andrew; Cervantes, Vanessa; Tripuraneni, Nikita; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Perin, Laura; Brent, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone plays an essential role in myogenesis, the process required for skeletal muscle development and repair, although the mechanisms have not been established. Skeletal muscle develops from the fusion of precursor myoblasts into myofibers. We have used the C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblast cell line, primary myoblasts, and mouse models of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) α and β, to determine the role of thyroid hormone in the regulation of myoblast differentiation. T3, which activates thyroid hormone receptor (TR) α and β, increased myoblast differentiation whereas GC1, a selective TRβ agonist, was minimally effective. Genetic approaches confirmed that TRα plays an important role in normal myoblast proliferation and differentiation and acts through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Myoblasts with TRα knockdown, or derived from RTH-TRα PV (a frame-shift mutation) mice, displayed reduced proliferation and myogenic differentiation. Moreover, skeletal muscle from the TRα1PV mutant mouse had impaired in vivo regeneration after injury. RTH-TRβ PV mutant mouse model skeletal muscle and derived primary myoblasts did not have altered proliferation, myogenic differentiation, or response to injury when compared with control. In conclusion, TRα plays an essential role in myoblast homeostasis and provides a potential therapeutic target to enhance skeletal muscle regeneration.

  16. Interferon-Gamma Receptor Signaling Plays an Important Role in Restraining Murine Ovarian Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Guanglin; Leigh, Nicholas D.; Du, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Li; Cao, Xuefang

    2016-01-01

    Immune cell-derived cytotoxic pathways have been implicated in antitumor immune responses. The goal of this study is to characterize how these cytotoxic pathways influence ovarian cancer development. We have utilized the TgMISIIR-TAg transgenic mouse model which expresses the transforming SV40 TAg in the ovary, leading to spontaneous development of ovarian tumors that closely mimic human epithelial ovarian cancer. To test how perforin (Prf1), granzyme B (GzmB) and interferon-gamma (IFNg) impact tumor occurrence and progression, we bred the TgMISIIR-TAg transgene into Prf1−/−, GzmB−/−, and IFNgR1−/− mice. The transgenic females developed peritoneal tumors at 9–15 weeks and succumbed at 184 ± 37 days of age with 100% penetrance (n=41). Knockout of these cytotoxic genes does not affect tumor occurrence. However, loss of function in the IFNg signaling pathway significantly expedited tumor progression with all of the IFNg R1−/− TgMISIIR-TAg females succumbing to tumor outgrowth at 167 ± 27 days of age (p=0.0074, n=24). In contrast, loss of function of Prf1 or GzmB did not significantly impact tumor progression and host survival. Since tumor cells in the IFNg R1−/− TgMISIIR-TAg mice are IFNg R1 deficient, we used the implantable MOSEC (mouse ovarian surface epithelial cell) tumor line to validate that IFNg R signaling in host immune cells but not in tumor cells impacts tumor progression. Indeed, when the IFNg -responsive MOSEC cells were inoculated, IFNg R1−/− mice exhibited significantly higher tumor burden compared to WT mice. Furthermore, a MOSEC-splenocyte co-culture system confirmed that IFNg R1−/− immune cells were less effective than WT immune cells in controlling MOSEC tumor growth in vitro. Together, these results indicate that the IFNg R signaling pathway plays an important role in restraining murine ovarian tumor progression.

  17. IgG receptor FcγRIIB plays a key role in obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sundgren, Nathan C; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Boggan, Brigid-Meghan D; Tanigaki, Keiji; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Chambliss, Ken L; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W

    2015-02-01

    There is a well-recognized association between obesity, inflammation, and hypertension. Why obesity causes hypertension is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated using a C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic mouse that CRP induces hypertension that is related to NO deficiency. Our prior work in cultured endothelial cells identified the Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) as the receptor for CRP whereby it antagonizes endothelial NO synthase. Recognizing known associations between CRP and obesity and hypertension in humans, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that FcγRIIB plays a role in obesity-induced hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry, we first demonstrated that the hypertension observed in transgenic mouse-CRP is mediated by the receptor, indicating that FcγRIIB is capable of modifying blood pressure. We then discovered in a model of diet-induced obesity yielding equal adiposity in all study groups that whereas FcγRIIB(+/+) mice developed obesity-induced hypertension, FcγRIIB(-/-) mice were fully protected. Levels of CRP, the related pentraxin serum amyloid P component which is the CRP-equivalent in mice, and total IgG were unaltered by diet-induced obesity; FcγRIIB expression in endothelium was also unchanged. However, whereas IgG isolated from chow-fed mice had no effect, IgG from high-fat diet-fed mice inhibited endothelial NO synthase in cultured endothelial cells, and this was an FcγRIIB-dependent process. Thus, we have identified a novel role for FcγRIIB in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension, independent of processes regulating adiposity, and it may entail an IgG-induced attenuation of endothelial NO synthase function. Approaches targeting FcγRIIB may potentially offer new means to treat hypertension in obese individuals. PMID:25368023

  18. IgG receptor FcγRIIB plays a key role in obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sundgren, Nathan C; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Boggan, Brigid-Meghan D; Tanigaki, Keiji; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Chambliss, Ken L; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W

    2015-02-01

    There is a well-recognized association between obesity, inflammation, and hypertension. Why obesity causes hypertension is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated using a C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic mouse that CRP induces hypertension that is related to NO deficiency. Our prior work in cultured endothelial cells identified the Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) as the receptor for CRP whereby it antagonizes endothelial NO synthase. Recognizing known associations between CRP and obesity and hypertension in humans, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that FcγRIIB plays a role in obesity-induced hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry, we first demonstrated that the hypertension observed in transgenic mouse-CRP is mediated by the receptor, indicating that FcγRIIB is capable of modifying blood pressure. We then discovered in a model of diet-induced obesity yielding equal adiposity in all study groups that whereas FcγRIIB(+/+) mice developed obesity-induced hypertension, FcγRIIB(-/-) mice were fully protected. Levels of CRP, the related pentraxin serum amyloid P component which is the CRP-equivalent in mice, and total IgG were unaltered by diet-induced obesity; FcγRIIB expression in endothelium was also unchanged. However, whereas IgG isolated from chow-fed mice had no effect, IgG from high-fat diet-fed mice inhibited endothelial NO synthase in cultured endothelial cells, and this was an FcγRIIB-dependent process. Thus, we have identified a novel role for FcγRIIB in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension, independent of processes regulating adiposity, and it may entail an IgG-induced attenuation of endothelial NO synthase function. Approaches targeting FcγRIIB may potentially offer new means to treat hypertension in obese individuals.

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Scheving, Lawrence A; Zhang, Xiuqi; Garcia, Oscar A; Wang, Rebecca F; Stevenson, Mary C; Threadgill, David W; Russell, William E

    2014-03-01

    Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies.

  20. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Scheving, Lawrence A; Zhang, Xiuqi; Garcia, Oscar A; Wang, Rebecca F; Stevenson, Mary C; Threadgill, David W; Russell, William E

    2014-03-01

    Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies. PMID:24407590

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuqi; Garcia, Oscar A.; Wang, Rebecca F.; Stevenson, Mary C.; Threadgill, David W.; Russell, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies. PMID:24407590

  3. Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3) plays a critical role in implantation via progesterone receptor in uterus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Hoon; Oh, Seo Jin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Akira, Shizuo; Ku, Bon Jeong; Lydon, John P.; Jeong, Jae-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3) is required for decidualization, interacting with progesterone receptor (PR) in uterus. Based on previous reports, we hypothesized that crosstalk between STAT3 and PR signaling is required for successful implantation. To identify the interaction between STAT3 and PR isoforms, we performed immunoprecipitation following transient cotransfection and found that STAT3 physically interacted with PR-A, which is known to be important for uterine development and function, but not with PR-B. To further investigate the role of Stat3 in uterine function, Stat3 was conditionally ablated only in the PR-positive cells (PRcre/+ Stat3f/f; Stat3d/d). Our studies revealed that ovarian function and uterine development of Stat3d/d mice were normal. However, Stat3d/d female mice were infertile due to defective embryo implantation. Unlike Stat3f/f mice, Stat3d/d mice exhibited an unclosed uterine lumen. Furthermore, uteri of Stat3d/d mice were unable to undergo a well-characterized hormonally induced decidual reaction. The expression of stromal PR was decreased during decidualization and preimplantation period in Stat3d/d mice, and PR target genes were significantly down-regulated after progesterone induction. Our results suggest that STAT3 and PR crosstalk is required for successful implantation in the mouse uterus.—Lee, J. H., Kim, T. H., Oh, S. J., Yoo, J.-Y., Akira, S., Ku, B. J., Lydon, J. P., Jeong, J.-W. Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3) plays a critical role in implantation via progesterone receptor in uterus. PMID:23531596

  4. Interleukin-6, but not the interleukin-6 receptor plays a role in recovery from dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Jan; Engelowski, Erika; Baran, Paul; Garbers, Christoph; Floss, Doreen M; Scheller, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6-deficient, but not IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)‑deficient mice present with a delayed skin wound healing phenotype. Since IL-6 solely signals via the IL-6R and glycoprotein 130 (gp130), Il-6r-deficient mice are expected to exhibit a similar phenotype as Il-6-deficient mice. However, p28 (IL-30) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) have been identified as additional low‑affinity ligands of the IL-6R/gp130/LIFR complex. IL-6 plays an inflammatory and regenerative role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, we compared Il-6r-deficient mice with mice treated with neutralizing IL-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Our results, in agreement with those of previous reports, demonstrated that IL-6 mAbs slightly attenuated DSS-induced colitis during the regeneration phase. Il-6r-deficient mice and mice with tissue-specific deletion of the Il-6r in the myeloid cell lineage (LysMCre) with acute and chronic DSS-induced colitis were, however, indistinguishable from wild-type mice. Our data suggest that IL-6 and IL-6R have an additional role in colitis, apart from the IL-6/IL-6R classic and trans-signaling.

  5. The membrane estrogen receptor ligand STX rapidly enhances GABAergic signaling in NPY/AgRP neurons: role in mediating the anorexigenic effects of 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Smith, A W; Bosch, M A; Wagner, E J; Rønnekleiv, O K; Kelly, M J

    2013-09-01

    Besides its quintessential role in reproduction, 17β-estradiol (E2) is a potent anorexigenic hormone. E2 and the selective Gq-coupled membrane estrogen receptor (Gq-mER) ligand STX rapidly increase membrane excitability in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons by desensitizing the coupling of GABAB receptors to G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRKs), which upon activation elicit a hyperpolarizing outward current. However, it is unknown whether E2 and STX can modulate GABAB signaling in neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons. We used single-cell RT-PCR and whole cell patch clamping with selective pharmacological reagents to show that NPY/AgRP cells of mice express the GABAB-R1 and -R2 receptors and are hyperpolarized by the GABAB agonist baclofen in an E2-dependent manner. In males, E2 rapidly attenuated the coupling of GABAB receptors to GIRKs, which was blocked by the general PI3K inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002 or the selective p110β subunit inhibitor TGX-221. The ERα-selective agonist propyl pyrazole triol mimicked the effects of E2. STX, in contrast, enhanced the GABAB response in males, which was abrogated by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780. In gonadectomized mice of both sexes, E2 enhanced or attenuated the GABAB response in different NPY/AgRP cells. Coperfusing wortmannin with E2 or simply applying STX always enhanced the GABAB response. Thus, in NPY/AgRP neurons, activation of the Gq-mER by E2 or STX enhances the GABAergic postsynaptic response, whereas activation of ERα by E2 attenuates it. These findings demonstrate a clear functional dichotomy of rapid E2 membrane-initiated signaling via ERα vs. Gq-mER in a CNS neuron vital for regulating energy homeostasis.

  6. Regional Fos-expression induced by γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB): comparison with γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and effects of co-administration of the GABAB antagonist SCH 50911 and putative GHB antagonist NCS-382.

    PubMed

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, P S; McGregor, I S; Chebib, M; Hunt, G E

    2014-09-26

    γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has a complex array of neural actions that include effects on its own high-affinity GHB receptor, the release of neuroactive steroids, and agonist actions at GABAA and GABAB receptors. We previously reported partial overlap in the c-Fos expression patterns produced by GHB and the GABAB agonist, baclofen in rats. The present study extends these earlier findings by examining the extent to which GHB Fos expression and behavioral sedation are prevented by (2S)-(+)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH 50911), a GABAB antagonist, and NCS-382, a putative antagonist at the high-affinity GHB receptor. We also compare Fos expression caused by GHB and its precursor γ-butyrolactone (GBL), which is a pro-drug for GHB but lacks the high sodium content of the parent GHB molecule. Both GHB (1,000 mg/kg) and GBL (600 mg/kg) induced rapid sedation in rats that lasted over 90 min and caused similar Fos expression patterns, albeit with GBL causing greater activation of the nucleus accumbens (core and shell) and dentate gyrus (granular layer). Pretreatment with SCH 50911 (100mg/kg) partly reversed the sedative effects of GHB and significantly reduced GHB-induced Fos expression in only four regions: the tenia tecta, lateral habenula, dorsal raphe and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. NCS-382 (50mg/kg) had no effect on GHB-induced sedation or Fos expression. When given alone, both NCS-382 and SCH 50911 increased Fos expression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala, parasubthalamic nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract. SCH 50911 alone affected the Islands of Calleja and the medial, central and paraventricular thalamic nuclei. Overall, this study shows a surprising lack of reversal of GHB-induced Fos expression by two relevant antagonists, both of which have marked intrinsic actions. This may reflect the limited doses tested but also suggests that GHB Fos expression reflects mechanisms independent of GHB and GABAB receptors.

  7. Olfactory receptor responding to gut microbiota-derived signals plays a role in renin secretion and blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Pluznick, Jennifer L; Protzko, Ryan J; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Peterlin, Zita; Sipos, Arnold; Han, Jinah; Brunet, Isabelle; Wan, La-Xiang; Rey, Federico; Wang, Tong; Firestein, Stuart J; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Eichmann, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Caplan, Michael J

    2013-03-12

    Olfactory receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that mediate olfactory chemosensation and serve as chemosensors in other tissues. We find that Olfr78, an olfactory receptor expressed in the kidney, responds to short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Olfr78 is expressed in the renal juxtaglomerular apparatus, where it mediates renin secretion in response to SCFAs. In addition, both Olfr78 and G protein-coupled receptor 41 (Gpr41), another SCFA receptor, are expressed in smooth muscle cells of small resistance vessels. Propionate, a SCFA shown to induce vasodilation ex vivo, produces an acute hypotensive response in wild-type mice. This effect is differentially modulated by disruption of Olfr78 and Gpr41 expression. SCFAs are end products of fermentation by the gut microbiota and are absorbed into the circulation. Antibiotic treatment reduces the biomass of the gut microbiota and elevates blood pressure in Olfr78 knockout mice. We conclude that SCFAs produced by the gut microbiota modulate blood pressure via Olfr78 and Gpr41. PMID:23401498

  8. Olfactory receptor responding to gut microbiota-derived signals plays a role in renin secretion and blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Pluznick, Jennifer L; Protzko, Ryan J; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Peterlin, Zita; Sipos, Arnold; Han, Jinah; Brunet, Isabelle; Wan, La-Xiang; Rey, Federico; Wang, Tong; Firestein, Stuart J; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Eichmann, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Caplan, Michael J

    2013-03-12

    Olfactory receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that mediate olfactory chemosensation and serve as chemosensors in other tissues. We find that Olfr78, an olfactory receptor expressed in the kidney, responds to short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Olfr78 is expressed in the renal juxtaglomerular apparatus, where it mediates renin secretion in response to SCFAs. In addition, both Olfr78 and G protein-coupled receptor 41 (Gpr41), another SCFA receptor, are expressed in smooth muscle cells of small resistance vessels. Propionate, a SCFA shown to induce vasodilation ex vivo, produces an acute hypotensive response in wild-type mice. This effect is differentially modulated by disruption of Olfr78 and Gpr41 expression. SCFAs are end products of fermentation by the gut microbiota and are absorbed into the circulation. Antibiotic treatment reduces the biomass of the gut microbiota and elevates blood pressure in Olfr78 knockout mice. We conclude that SCFAs produced by the gut microbiota modulate blood pressure via Olfr78 and Gpr41.

  9. The Arabidopsis F-box E3 ligase RIFP1 plays a negative role in abscisic acid signalling by facilitating ABA receptor RCAR3 degradation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Liang; Li, Dekuan; Liu, Zhibin; Wang, Jianmei; Li, Xufeng; Yang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role in plant growth and development. The function of ABA is mediated by a group of newly discovered ABA receptors, named PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE 1/PYR-LIKE/REGULATORY COMPONENTS OF ABA RECEPTORs (PYR1/PYLs/RCARs). Here, we report that an Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein RCAR3 INTERACTING F-BOX PROTEIN 1 (RIFP1) interacts with ABA receptor (RCAR3) and SCF E3 ligase complex subunits Arabidopsis SKP1-LIKE PROTEINs (ASKs) in vitro and in vivo. The rifp1 mutant plants displayed increased ABA-mediated inhibition of seed germination and water loss of detached leaves, while the overexpression of RIFP1 in Arabidopsis led to plants being insensitive to ABA. Meanwhile, the rifp1 mutant plants showed greater tolerance to water deficit. In addition, the RCAR3 protein level was more stable in the rifp1 mutant plants than in the wild-type plants, indicating that RIFP1 facilitates the proteasome degradation of RCAR3. Accordingly, the loss of RIFP1 increased the transcript levels of several ABA-responsive genes. Taken together, these data indicate that RIFP1 plays a negative role in the RCAR3-mediated ABA signalling pathway and likely functions as an adaptor subunit of the SCF ubiquitin ligase complex to regulate ABA receptor RCAR3 stability. PMID:26386272

  10. GENES, IN ADDITION TO TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 2, PLAY A ROLE IN ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streptococcus infection in human populations continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mic...

  11. Rats selectively bred for low levels of play-induced 50 kHz vocalizations as a model for Autism Spectrum Disorders: a role for NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Moskal, Joseph R.; Brudzynski, Stefan M.; Panksepp, Jaak

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood autism is characterized by deficits in social approach and play behaviors, socio-emotional relatedness, and communication/speech abnormalities, as well as repetitive behaviors. These core neuropsychological features of autism can be modeled in laboratory rats, and the results may be useful for drug discovery and therapeutic development. We review data that show that rats selectively bred for low rates of play-related pro-social ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) can be used to model social deficit symptoms of autism. Low-line animals engage in less social contact time with conspecifics, show lower rates of play induced pro-social USVs, and show an increased proportion of non-frequency modulated (i.e. monotonous) ultrasonic vocalizations compared to non-selectively bred random-line animals. Gene expression patterns in the low-line animals show significant enrichment in autism-associated genes, and the NMDA receptor family was identified as a significant hub. Treatment of low-line animals with the NMDAR functional glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, rescued the deficits in play-induced pro-social 50-kHz USVs and reduced monotonous USVs. Since the NMDA receptor has been implicated in the genesis of autistic symptoms, it is possible that GLYX-13 may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of autism. PMID:23623884

  12. Rats selectively bred for low levels of play-induced 50 kHz vocalizations as a model for autism spectrum disorders: a role for NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Moskal, Joseph R; Brudzynski, Stefan M; Panksepp, Jaak

    2013-08-15

    Early childhood autism is characterized by deficits in social approach and play behaviors, socio-emotional relatedness, and communication/speech abnormalities, as well as repetitive behaviors. These core neuropsychological features of autism can be modeled in laboratory rats, and the results may be useful for drug discovery and therapeutic development. We review data that show that rats selectively bred for low rates of play-related pro-social ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) can be used to model social deficit symptoms of autism. Low-line animals engage in less social contact time with conspecifics, show lower rates of play induced pro-social USVs, and show an increased proportion of non-frequency modulated (i.e. monotonous) ultrasonic vocalizations compared to non-selectively bred random-line animals. Gene expression patterns in the low-line animals show significant enrichment in autism-associated genes, and the NMDA receptor family was identified as a significant hub. Treatment of low-line animals with the NMDAR functional glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, rescued the deficits in play-induced pro-social 50-kHz USVs and reduced monotonous USVs. Since the NMDA receptor has been implicated in the genesis of autistic symptoms, it is possible that GLYX-13 may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of autism. PMID:23623884

  13. Tuning and playing a motor rhythm: how metabotropic glutamate receptors orchestrate generation of motor patterns in the mammalian central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Nistri, Andrea; Ostroumov, Konstantin; Sharifullina, Elina; Taccola, Giuliano

    2006-01-01

    Repeated motor activities like locomotion, mastication and respiration need rhythmic discharges of functionally connected neurons termed central pattern generators (CPGs) that cyclically activate motoneurons even in the absence of descending commands from higher centres. For motor pattern generation, CPGs require integration of multiple processes including activation of ion channels and transmitter receptors at strategic locations within motor networks. One emerging mechanism is activation of glutamate metabotropic receptors (mGluRs) belonging to group I, while group II and III mGluRs appear to play an inhibitory function on sensory inputs. Group I mGluRs generate neuronal membrane depolarization with input resistance increase and rapid fluctuations in intracellular Ca2+, leading to enhanced excitability and rhythmicity. While synchronicity is probably due to modulation of inhibitory synaptic transmission, these oscillations occurring in coincidence with strong afferent stimuli or application of excitatory agents can trigger locomotor-like patterns. Hence, mGluR-sensitive spinal oscillators play a role in accessory networks for locomotor CPG activation. In brainstem networks supplying tongue muscle motoneurons, group I receptors facilitate excitatory synaptic inputs and evoke synchronous oscillations which stabilize motoneuron firing at regular, low frequency necessary for rhythmic tongue contractions. In this case, synchronicity depends on the strong electrical coupling amongst motoneurons rather than inhibitory transmission, while cyclic activation of KATP conductances sets its periodicity. Activation of mGluRs is therefore a powerful strategy to trigger and recruit patterned discharges of motoneurons. PMID:16469790

  14. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB1–2) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABAB receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1–3), a promiscuous L-α-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABAB1–2 and T1R2–3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity and the initial steps in receptor activation. PMID:19298394

  15. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 plays an essential role for Toll-like receptor (TLR)7- and TLR9-mediated interferon-α induction

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Satoshi; Sato, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hirotani, Tomonori; Kato, Hiroki; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J.; Kawai, Taro; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo

    2005-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial pathogens and trigger innate immune responses. Among TLR family members, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 induce interferon (IFN)-α in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). This induction requires the formation of a complex consisting of the adaptor MyD88, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 7. Here we show an essential role of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-1 in TLR7- and TLR9-mediated IRF7 signaling pathway. IRAK-1 directly bound and phosphorylated IRF7 in vitro. The kinase activity of IRAK-1 was necessary for transcriptional activation of IRF7. TLR7- and TLR9-mediated IFN-α production was abolished in Irak-1–deficient mice, whereas inflammatory cytokine production was not impaired. Despite normal activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases, IRF7 was not activated by a TLR9 ligand in Irak-1–deficient pDCs. These results indicated that IRAK-1 is a specific regulator for TLR7- and TLR9-mediated IFN-α induction in pDCs. PMID:15767370

  16. The ABA receptor PYL9 together with PYL8 plays an important role in regulating lateral root growth.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lu; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Jinghui; Xiang, Chengbin; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid is a phytohormone regulating plant growth, development and stress responses. PYR1/PYL/RCAR proteins are ABA receptors that function by inhibiting PP2Cs to activate SnRK2s, resulting in phosphorylation of ABFs and other effectors of ABA response pathways. Exogenous ABA induces growth quiescence of lateral roots, which is prolonged by knockout of the ABA receptor PYL8. Among the 14 members of PYR1/PYL/RCAR protein family, PYL9 is a close relative of PYL8. Here we show that knockout of both PYL9 and PYL8 resulted in a longer ABA-induced quiescence on lateral root growth and a reduced sensitivity to ABA on primary root growth and lateral root formation compared to knockout of PYL8 alone. Induced overexpression of PYL9 promoted the lateral root elongation in the presence of ABA. The prolonged quiescent phase of the pyl8-1pyl9 double mutant was reversed by exogenous IAA. PYL9 may regulate auxin-responsive genes in vivo through direct interaction with MYB77 and MYB44. Thus, PYL9 and PYL8 are both responsible for recovery of lateral root from ABA inhibition via MYB transcription factors. PMID:27256015

  17. The ABA receptor PYL9 together with PYL8 plays an important role in regulating lateral root growth

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lu; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Jinghui; Xiang, Chengbin; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid is a phytohormone regulating plant growth, development and stress responses. PYR1/PYL/RCAR proteins are ABA receptors that function by inhibiting PP2Cs to activate SnRK2s, resulting in phosphorylation of ABFs and other effectors of ABA response pathways. Exogenous ABA induces growth quiescence of lateral roots, which is prolonged by knockout of the ABA receptor PYL8. Among the 14 members of PYR1/PYL/RCAR protein family, PYL9 is a close relative of PYL8. Here we show that knockout of both PYL9 and PYL8 resulted in a longer ABA-induced quiescence on lateral root growth and a reduced sensitivity to ABA on primary root growth and lateral root formation compared to knockout of PYL8 alone. Induced overexpression of PYL9 promoted the lateral root elongation in the presence of ABA. The prolonged quiescent phase of the pyl8-1pyl9 double mutant was reversed by exogenous IAA. PYL9 may regulate auxin-responsive genes in vivo through direct interaction with MYB77 and MYB44. Thus, PYL9 and PYL8 are both responsible for recovery of lateral root from ABA inhibition via MYB transcription factors. PMID:27256015

  18. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Type 1 (LPA1) Plays a Functional Role in Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorption Activity*

    PubMed Central

    David, Marion; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Kikuta, Junichi; Ottewell, Penelope; Mima, Fuka; Leblanc, Raphael; Bonnelye, Edith; Ribeiro, Johnny; Holen, Ingunn; Vales, Rùben Lopez; Jurdic, Pierre; Chun, Jerold; Clézardin, Philippe; Ishii, Masaru; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural bioactive lipid that acts through six different G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–6) with pleiotropic activities on multiple cell types. We have previously demonstrated that LPA is necessary for successful in vitro osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow cells. Bone cells controlling bone remodeling (i.e. osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes) express LPA1, but delineating the role of this receptor in bone remodeling is still pending. Despite Lpar1−/− mice displaying a low bone mass phenotype, we demonstrated that bone marrow cell-induced osteoclastogenesis was reduced in Lpar1−/− mice but not in Lpar2−/− and Lpar3−/− animals. Expression of LPA1 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis, and LPA1 antagonists (Ki16425, Debio0719, and VPC12249) inhibited osteoclast differentiation. Blocking LPA1 activity with Ki16425 inhibited expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein and interfered with the fusion but not the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. Similar to wild type osteoclasts treated with Ki16425, mature Lpar1−/− osteoclasts had reduced podosome belt and sealing zone resulting in reduced mineralized matrix resorption. Additionally, LPA1 expression markedly increased in the bone of ovariectomized mice, which was blocked by bisphosphonate treatment. Conversely, systemic treatment with Debio0719 prevented ovariectomy-induced cancellous bone loss. Moreover, intravital multiphoton microscopy revealed that Debio0719 reduced the retention of CX3CR1-EGFP+ osteoclast precursors in bone by increasing their mobility in the bone marrow cavity. Overall, our results demonstrate that LPA1 is essential for in vitro and in vivo osteoclast activities. Therefore, LPA1 emerges as a new target for the treatment of diseases associated with excess bone loss. PMID:24429286

  19. Gender Effect in Experimental Models of Human Medulloblastoma: Does the Estrogen Receptor β Signaling Play a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Ciucci, Alessandra; Meco, Daniela; De Stefano, Ilaria; Travaglia, Daniele; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Scambia, Giovanni; Riccardi, Riccardo; Saran, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background The male-to-female sex ratio for medulloblastoma (MB) is approximately 1.5∶1, female gender being also a favorable prognostic factor. This study aimed at evaluating the impact of gender on MB tumorigenesis. Methods In vitro activity of 17β-estradiol (E2), DPN [2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile, a selective estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-agonist], PPT [4,4′,4″-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol, a selective ERα-agonist] or DHT (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone) was evaluated in three human MB cell lines. D283 Med cells were transplanted into athymic mice. Results A significant expression of ERβ, with little or no ERα, and low AR (androgen receptor) was found in MB cell lines. The compounds tested did not affect cell proliferation. In vivo, we observed a significantly lower growth of D283 Med in nude female mice compared to males. At microscopic examination, tumors from females showed a shift towards differentiation, as evaluated by lower nestin, and higher NSE (neuron-specific enolase) and GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein) expression compared to males. Tumors from females also showed lower Ki67 and p53 expression. The wild-type ERβ protein (ERβ1) was lost in male tumors, while it was a permanent feature in females, and a strong negative correlation was found between Ki67 and ERβ1 expression. Conversely, tumor levels of ERβ2 and ERβ5 did not significantly differ between genders. Increased levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 were observed in females, suggesting that estrogen may decrease tumor growth through blocking cell cycle progression. An inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) signaling was also evident in females. Conclusion We provides mechanistic evidence supporting the idea that ERβ1 signaling may have pro-differentiation and tumor suppressive function in medulloblastomas. PMID:25000562

  20. Behavioral analyses of GHB: receptor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lawrence P; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    GHB is used therapeutically and recreationally, although the precise mechanism of action responsible for its different behavioral effects is not entirely clear. The purpose of this review is to summarize how behavioral procedures, especially drug discrimination procedures, have been used to study the mechanism of action of GHB. More specifically, we will review several different drug discrimination procedures and discuss how they have been used to qualitatively and quantitatively study different components of the complex mechanism of action of GHB. A growing number of studies have provided evidence that the behavioral effects of GHB are mediated predominantly by GABAB receptors. However, there is also evidence that the mechanisms mediating the effects of GHB and the prototypical GABAB receptor agonist baclofen are not identical, and that other mechanisms such as GHB receptors and subtypes of GABAA and GABAB receptors might contribute to the effects of GHB. These findings are consistent with the different behavioral profile, abuse liability, and therapeutic indications of GHB and baclofen. A better understanding of the similarities and differences between GHB and baclofen, as well as the pharmacological mechanisms of action underlying the recreational and therapeutic effects of GHB, could lead to more effective medications with fewer adverse effects.

  1. The Nuclear Orphan Receptor COUP-TFII Plays an Essential Role in Adipogenesis, Glucose Homeostasis, and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luoping; Xie, Xin; Qin, Jun; Jeha, George S.; Saha, Pradip K.; Yan, Jun; Haueter, Claire Menoza; Chan, Lawrence; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Adipose tissue development and function play a central role in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of metabolic syndromes. Here we show that Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor II (COUP-TFII) plays a pivotal role in adipogenesis and energy homeostasis. COUP-TFII is expressed in the early stages of white adipocyte (WAT) development. COUP-TFII heterozygous mice (COUP-TFII+/-) have much less WAT than wild type mice (COUP-TFII+/+). COUP-TFII+/- mice display a decreased expression of key regulators for WAT development. Knock down COUP-TFII in 3T3-L1 cells resulted in an increased expression of Wnt10b, while chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Wnt10b is a direct target of COUP-TFII. Moreover, COUP-TFII+/− mice have increased mitochondrial biogenesis in WAT, and COUP-TFII+/− mice have improved glucose homeostasis and increased energy expenditure. Thus, COUP-TFII regulates adipogenesis by regulating the key molecules in adipocyte development, and can serve as a new target for regulating energy metabolism. PMID:19117548

  2. Syntrophin isoforms play specific functional roles in the α1D-adrenergic receptor/DAPC signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Lyssand, John S.; Lee, Kyung-Soon; DeFino, Mia; Adams, Marvin E.; Hague, Chris

    2014-01-01

    α1D-Adrenergic receptors, key regulators of cardiovascular system function, are organized as a multi-protein complex in the plasma membrane. Using a Type-I PDZ-binding motif in their distal C-terminal domain, α1D-ARs associate with syntrophins and dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) members utrophin, dystrobrevin and α-catulin. Three of the five syntrophin isoforms (α, β1 and β2) interact with α1D-ARs and our previous studies suggest multiple isoforms are required for proper α1D-AR function in vivo. This study determined the contribution of each specific syntrophin isoform to α1D-AR function. Radioligand binding experiments reveal α-syntrophin enhances α1D-AR binding site density, while phosphoinositol and ERK1/2 signaling assays indicate β2-syntrophin augments full and partial agonist efficacy for coupling to downstream signaling mechanisms. The results of this study provide clear evidence that the cytosolic components within the α1D-AR/DAPC signalosome significantly alter the pharmacological properties of α1-AR ligands in vitro. PMID:21846462

  3. Nod-like receptor protein-3 inflammasome plays an important role during early stages of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M; Mirza, Rita E; Koh, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    The Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome/IL-1β pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory skin diseases, but its biological role in wound healing remains to be elucidated. Since inflammation is typically thought to impede healing, we hypothesized that loss of NLRP-3 activity would result in a downregulated inflammatory response and accelerated wound healing. NLRP-3 null mice, caspase-1 null mice and C57Bl/6 wild type control mice (WT) received four 8 mm excisional cutaneous wounds; inflammation and healing were assessed during the early stage of wound healing. Consistent with our hypothesis, wounds from NLRP-3 null and caspase-1 null mice contained lower levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α compared to WT mice and had reduced neutrophil and macrophage accumulation. Contrary to our hypothesis, re-epithelialization, granulation tissue formation, and angiogenesis were delayed in NLRP-3 null mice and caspase-1 null mice compared to WT mice, indicating that NLRP-3 signaling is important for early events in wound healing. Topical treatment of excisional wounds with recombinant IL-1β partially restored granulation tissue formation in wounds of NLRP-3 null mice, confirming the importance of NLRP-3-dependent IL-1β production during early wound healing. Despite the improvement in healing, angiogenesis and levels of the pro-angiogenic growth factor VEGF were further reduced in IL-1β treated wounds, suggesting that IL-1β has a negative effect on angiogenesis and that NLRP-3 promotes angiogenesis in an IL-1β-independent manner. These findings indicate that the NLRP-3 inflammasome contributes to the early inflammatory phase following skin wounding and is important for efficient healing.

  4. Nod-Like Receptor Protein-3 Inflammasome Plays an Important Role during Early Stages of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M.; Mirza, Rita E.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome/IL-1β pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory skin diseases, but its biological role in wound healing remains to be elucidated. Since inflammation is typically thought to impede healing, we hypothesized that loss of NLRP-3 activity would result in a downregulated inflammatory response and accelerated wound healing. NLRP-3 null mice, caspase-1 null mice and C57Bl/6 wild type control mice (WT) received four 8 mm excisional cutaneous wounds; inflammation and healing were assessed during the early stage of wound healing. Consistent with our hypothesis, wounds from NLRP-3 null and caspase-1 null mice contained lower levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α compared to WT mice and had reduced neutrophil and macrophage accumulation. Contrary to our hypothesis, re-epithelialization, granulation tissue formation, and angiogenesis were delayed in NLRP-3 null mice and caspase-1 null mice compared to WT mice, indicating that NLRP-3 signaling is important for early events in wound healing. Topical treatment of excisional wounds with recombinant IL-1β partially restored granulation tissue formation in wounds of NLRP-3 null mice, confirming the importance of NLRP-3-dependent IL-1β production during early wound healing. Despite the improvement in healing, angiogenesis and levels of the pro-angiogenic growth factor VEGF were further reduced in IL-1β treated wounds, suggesting that IL-1β has a negative effect on angiogenesis and that NLRP-3 promotes angiogenesis in an IL-1β-independent manner. These findings indicate that the NLRP-3 inflammasome contributes to the early inflammatory phase following skin wounding and is important for efficient healing. PMID:25793779

  5. Toll-Like Receptor 6 Plays an Important Role in Host Innate Resistance to Brucella abortus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Leonardo A.; Macedo, Gilson C.; Marinho, Fábio A. V.; Gomes, Marco T. R.; Corsetti, Patrícia P.; Silva, Aristóbolo M.; Cassataro, Juliana; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2013-01-01

    Brucella abortus is recognized by several Toll-like receptor (TLR)-associated pathways triggering proinflammatory responses that affect both the nature and intensity of the immune response. Previously, we demonstrated that B. abortus-mediated dendritic cell (DC) maturation and control of infection are dependent on the adaptor molecule MyD88. However, the involvement of all TLRs in response to B. abortus infection is not completely understood. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the requirement for TLR6 in host resistance to B. abortus. Here, we demonstrated that TLR6 is an important component for triggering an innate immune response against B. abortus. An in vitro luciferase assay indicated that TLR6 cooperates with TLR2 to sense Brucella and further activates NF-κB signaling. However, in vivo analysis showed that TLR6, not TLR2, is required for the efficient control of B. abortus infection. Additionally, B. abortus-infected dendritic cells require TLR6 to induce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Furthermore, our findings demonstrated that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is impaired in TLR2, TLR6, and TLR2/6 knockout (KO) DCs when infected with B. abortus, which may account for the lower proinflammatory cytokine production observed in TLR6 KO mouse dendritic cells. In summary, the results presented here indicate that TLR6 is required to trigger innate immune responses against B. abortus in vivo and is required for the full activation of DCs to induce robust proinflammatory cytokine production. PMID:23460520

  6. Negative regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling plays an essential role in homeostasis of the intestine.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Amlan; Wilmanski, Jeanette; Forsman, Huamei; Hrncir, Tomas; Hao, Liming; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2011-01-01

    A healthy intestinal tract is characterized by controlled homeostasis due to the balanced interaction between commensal bacteria and the host mucosal immune system. Human and animal model studies have supported the hypothesis that breakdown of this homeostasis may underlie the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it is not well understood how intestinal microflora stimulate the intestinal mucosal immune system and how such activation is regulated. Using a spontaneous, commensal bacteria-dependent colitis model in IL-10-deficient mice, we investigated the role of TLR and their negative regulation in intestinal homeostasis. In addition to IL-10(-/-) MyD88(-/-) mice, IL-10(-/-) TLR4(-/-) mice exhibited reduced colitis compared to IL-10(-/-) mice, indicating that TLR4 signaling plays an important role in inducing colitis. Interestingly, the expression of IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, is dependent on intestinal commensal flora, as IRAK-M expression was reduced in mice re-derived into a germ-free environment, and introduction of commensal bacteria into germ-free mice induced IRAK-M expression. IL-10(-/-) IRAK-M(-/-) mice exhibited exacerbated colitis with increased inflammatory cytokine gene expression. Therefore, this study indicates that intestinal microflora stimulate the colitogenic immune system through TLR and negative regulation of TLR signaling is essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis.

  7. Do HLA genes play a prominent role in determining T cell receptor V{alpha} segment usage in humans?

    SciTech Connect

    Gulwani-Akolkar, B.; Shi, B.; Akolkar, P.N.

    1995-04-15

    Previous studies in humans have demonstrated that HLA genes can profoundly influence the TCR V{beta} repertoire. To similarly assess the influence of HLA genes on the TCR V{alpha} segment repertoire, the V{alpha} repertoires of 12 individuals from three unrelated families were determined by quantitative PCR. Each family contained at least one pair of HLA-identical and -nonidentical siblings. Repertoire analysis was performed on purified CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} cells by using V{alpha}-specific primers. We were unable to demonstrate more similar V{alpha} repertoires between HLA-identical siblings than between HLA-nonidentical siblings. In contrast, when a similar analysis was performed on the same individuals for the V{beta} repertoire, HLA-identical siblings were found to have significantly more similar repertoires than HLA-nonidentical siblings. Furthermore, both the V{alpha} and V{beta} repertoires of monozygotic twins showed striking similarity. Despite our inability to shown an influence of HLA genes on the V{alpha} repertoire, we did observe a very strong skewing in terms of preferential expression on CD4{sup +} or CD8{sup +} cells of several V{alpha} segments, notably TCRAV1, -2, -5, -6, -7, -11, -12, and -13. These studies suggest that HLA genes play less of a role in determining V{alpha} segment usage than V{beta}. Nevertheless, the pronounced skewing of V{alpha} segment expression in the CD4{sup +} or CD8{sup +} populations suggests some role for HLA genes in determining the V{alpha} TCR repertoire. Furthermore, the striking similarity of V{alpha} repertoires of identical twins suggests a major role for non-HLA genes in determining the V{alpha} repertoire. 35 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in nucleus accumbens plays a more important role than that in dorsal striatum in cognitive flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xuekun; Qiao, Yanhua; Piao, Chengji; Zheng, Xigeng; Liu, Zhengkui; Liang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive flexibility is a critical ability for adapting to an ever-changing environment in humans and animals. Deficits in cognitive flexibility are observed in most schizophrenia patients. Previous studies reported that the medial prefrontal cortex-to-ventral striatum and orbital frontal cortex-to-dorsal striatum circuits play important roles in extra- and intra-dimensional strategy switching, respectively. However, the precise function of striatal subregions in flexible behaviors is still unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are major glutamate receptors in the striatum that receive glutamatergic projections from the frontal cortex. The membrane insertion of Ca2+-permeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) depends on NMDAR activation and is required in learning and memory processes. In the present study, we measured set-shifting and reversal learning performance in operant chambers in rats and assessed the effects of blocking NMDARs and Ca2+-permeable AMPARs in striatal subregions on behavioral flexibility. The blockade of NMDARs in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core by AP5 impaired set-shifting ability by causing a failure to modify prior learning. The suppression of NMDAR-mediated transmission in the NAc shell induced a deficit in set-shifting by disrupting the learning and maintenance of novel strategies. During reversal learning, infusions of AP5 into the NAc shell and core impaired the ability to learn and maintain new strategies. However, behavioral flexibility was not significantly affected by blocking NMDARs in the dorsal striatum. We also found that the blockade of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs by NASPM in any subregion of the striatum did not affect strategy switching. These findings suggest that NMDAR-mediated glutamate transmission in the NAc contributes more to cognitive execution compared with the dorsal striatum. PMID:25249952

  9. CRF receptor type 1 (but not type 2) located within the amygdala plays a role in the modulation of anxiety in mice exposed to the elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Ana Cláudia; Gomes, Karina Santos; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz

    2016-05-01

    The amygdala (Amy) is an important center that processes threatening stimuli. Among the neurotransmitters implicated in the control of emotional states, the corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) is an important modulator, acting at CRF1 and CRF2 receptors. Few studies have investigated the role of CRF and its receptors in the Amy on anxiety in mice. Here, we investigated the effects of intra-Amy (aimed at the basolateral nucleus) injections of CRF (37.5 and 75pmol/0.1μl), urocortin 3 (UCn3, a selective CRF2 agonist; 4, 8, 16 or 24pmol/0.1μl), CP376395 (a selective CRF1 antagonist; 0.375, 0.75 or 1.5nmol/0.1μl), antisauvagine-30 (ASV-30, a selective CRF2 antagonist; 1 or 3nmol/0.1μl) on the behavior of mice exposed to the elevated plus maze (EPM). Both spatiotemporal (e.g., percentage of open-arm entries and percentage of open-arm time; %OE and %OT) and complementary [e.g., frequency of protected and unprotected stretched attend postures (pSAP and uSAP) and head dips (pHD and uHD); frequency and time spent on open arm end exploration (OAEE)] measures were recorded during a 5-min test in the EPM. While intra-Amy injections of CRF decreased %OE, %OT and OAEE, suggesting an anxiogenic-like action, UCn3 (all doses) did not change any behavior. In contrast, injections of CP376395 (0.75nmol) produced an anxiolytic-like effect, by increasing %OT and OAEE and decreasing pSAP and pHD. Neither spatiotemporal nor complementary measures were changed by intra-Amy ASV-30. These results suggest that CRF plays a marked anxiogenic role at CRF1 receptors in the amygdala of mice exposed to the EPM.

  10. Central beta-adrenergic receptors play an important role in the enhancing effect of voluntary exercise on learning and memory in rat.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Shima; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas A; Akhavan, Maziar M

    2010-03-17

    The beneficial effects of physical activity and exercise on brain functions such as improvement in learning and memory are well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the beta-adrenergic system in voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rat. In order to block the beta-adrenergic receptors, the animals were received propranolol (a beta-blocker), or nadolol (a peripherally acting beta-blocker) before each night of five consecutive nights of exercise. Then their learning and memory were tested on the water maze task using a two-trials-per-day for 5 consecutive days. A probe trial was performed 2 days after the last training day. Our results showed that propranolol, but not nadolol reversed the exercise-induced improvement in learning and memory in rat. Our findings indicate that central beta-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mediating the beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on learning and memory.

  11. Scavenger Receptor Class A Plays a Central Role in Mediating Mortality and the Development of the Pro-Inflammatory Phenotype in Polymicrobial Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ozment, Tammy R.; Ha, Tuanzhu; Breuel, Kevin F.; Ford, Tiffany R.; Ferguson, Donald A.; Kalbfleisch, John; Schweitzer, John B.; Kelley, Jim L.; Li, Chuanfu; Williams, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a frequent complication in critical illness. The mechanisms that are involved in initiation and propagation of the disease are not well understood. Scavenger receptor A (SRA) is a membrane receptor that binds multiple polyanions such as oxidized LDL and endotoxin. Recent studies suggest that SRA acts as a pattern recognition receptor in the innate immune response. The goal of the present study was to determine the role of SRA in polymicrobial sepsis. SRA deficient (SRA−/−) and C57BL/6JB/6J (WT) male mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce polymicrobial sepsis. NFκB activity, myeloperoxidase activity, and co-association of SRA with toll like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR2 was analyzed in the lungs. Spleens were analyzed for apoptosis. Serum cytokines and chemokines were assayed. Blood and peritoneal fluid were cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacterial burdens. Long term survival was significantly increased in SRA−/− septic mice (53.6% vs. 3.6%, p<0.05) when compared to WT mice. NFκB activity was 45.5% lower in the lungs of SRA−/− septic mice versus WT septic mice (p<0.05). Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-10 and monocyte chemoattractant protein −1 were significantly lower in septic SRA−/− mice when compared to septic WT mice (p<0.05). We found that SRA immuno-precipitated with TLR4, but not TLR2, in the lungs of WT septic mice. We also found that septic SRA−/− mice had lower bacterial burdens than WT septic mice. SRA deficiency had no effect on pulmonary neutrophil infiltration or splenocyte apoptosis during sepsis. We conclude that SRA plays a pivotal, and previously unknown, role in mediating the pathophysiology of sepsis/septic shock in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Mechanistically, SRA interacts with TLR4 to enhance the development of the pro-inflammatory phenotype and mediate the morbidity and mortality of sepsis/septic shock. PMID:23071440

  12. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Plays Protective Roles against High Fat Diet (HFD)-induced Hepatic Steatosis and the Subsequent Lipotoxicity via Direct Transcriptional Regulation of Socs3 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wada, Taira; Sunaga, Hiroshi; Miyata, Kazuki; Shirasaki, Haruno; Uchiyama, Yuki; Shimba, Shigeki

    2016-03-25

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor regulating the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic response. Recent studies have suggested that AhR plays essential roles not only in xenobiotic detoxification but also energy metabolism. Thus, in this study, we studied the roles of AhR in lipid metabolism. Under high fat diet (HFD) challenge, liver-specific AhR knock-out (AhR LKO) mice exhibited severe steatosis, inflammation, and injury in the liver. Gene expression analysis and biochemical study revealed thatde novolipogenesis activity was significantly increased in AhR LKO mice. In contrast, induction of suppressor of cytokine signal 3 (Socs3) expression by HFD was attenuated in the livers of AhR LKO mice. Rescue of theSocs3gene in the liver of AhR LKO mice cancelled the HFD-induced hepatic lipotoxicities. Promoter analysis established Socs3 as novel transcriptional target of AhR. These results indicated that AhR plays a protective role against HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and the subsequent lipotoxicity effects, such as inflammation, and that the mechanism of protection involves the direct transcriptional regulation ofSocs3expression by AhR. PMID:26865635

  13. Outdoor Play and Play Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Heather

    1985-01-01

    Discusses aspects of the play environment and its effect on children's play behavior. Indoor and outdoor play spaces are considered along with factors affecting the use of outdoor environments for play. Children's preferences for different outdoor play environments and for various play structures are explored. Guides for choosing play equipment…

  14. p90 ribosomal S6 kinases play a significant role in early gene regulation in the cardiomyocyte response to G(q)-protein-coupled receptor stimuli, endothelin-1 and α(1)-adrenergic receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Amirak, Emre; Fuller, Stephen J; Sugden, Peter H; Clerk, Angela

    2013-03-01

    ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and their substrates RSKs (p90 ribosomal S6 kinases) phosphorylate different transcription factors, contributing differentially to transcriptomic profiles. In cardiomyocytes ERK1/2 are required for >70% of the transcriptomic response to endothelin-1. In the present study we investigated the role of RSKs in the transcriptomic responses to the G(q)-protein-coupled receptor agonists endothelin-1, phenylephrine (a generic α(1)-adrenergic receptor agonist) and A61603 (α(1A)-adrenergic receptor selective). Phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-RSKs appeared in cardiomyocyte nuclei within 2-3 min of stimulation (endothelin-1>A61603≈phenylephrine). All agonists increased nuclear RSK2, but only endothelin-1 increased the nuclear RSK1 content. PD184352 (inhibits ERK1/2 activation) and BI-D1870 (inhibits RSKs) were used to dissect the contribution of RSKs to the endothelin-1-responsive transcriptome. Of the 213 RNAs up-regulated after 1 h, 51% required RSKs for their up-regulation, whereas 29% required ERK1/2 but not RSKs. The transcriptomic response to phenylephrine overlapped with, but was not identical with, endothelin-1. As with endothelin-1, PD184352 inhibited the up-regulation of most phenylephrine-responsive transcripts, but the greater variation in the effects of BI-D1870 suggests that differential RSK signalling influences global gene expression. A61603 induced similar changes in RNA expression in cardiomyocytes as phenylephrine, indicating that the signal was mediated largely through α(1A)-adrenergic receptors. A61603 also increased expression of immediate early genes in perfused adult rat hearts and, as in cardiomyocytes, up-regulation of the majority of genes was inhibited by PD184352. PD184352 or BI-D1870 prevented the increased surface area induced by endothelin-1 in cardiomyocytes. Thus RSKs play a significant role in regulating cardiomyocyte gene expression and hypertrophy in response to G

  15. Playful Gaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makedon, Alexander

    A philosophical analysis of play and games is undertaken in this paper. Playful gaming, which is shown to be a synthesis of play and games, is utilized as a category for undertaking the examination of play and games. The significance of playful gaming to education is demonstrated through analyses of Plato's, Dewey's, Sartre's, and Marcuse's…

  16. Plectin regulates the signaling and trafficking of the HIV-1 co-receptor CXCR4 and plays a role in HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Yun; Zhang Li; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Wang Ziqing; Liu Bingdong; Zhang Jingwu; Fan Guohuang

    2008-02-01

    The CXC chemokine CXCL12 and its cognate receptor CXCR4 play an important role in inflammation, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and cancer metastasis. The signal transduction and intracellular trafficking of CXCR4 are involved in these functions, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that the CXCR4 formed a complex with the cytolinker protein plectin in a ligand-dependent manner in HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4. The glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-CXCR4 C-terminal fusion proteins co-precipitated with the full-length and the N-terminal fragments of plectin isoform 1 but not with the N-terminal deletion mutants of plectin isoform 1, thereby suggesting an interaction between the N-terminus of plectin and the C-terminus of CXCR4. This interaction was confirmed by confocal microscopic reconstructions showing co-distribution of these two proteins in the internal vesicles after ligand-induced internalization of CXCR4 in HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4. Knockdown of plectin with RNA interference (RNAi) significantly inhibited ligand-dependent CXCR4 internalization and attenuated CXCR4-mediated intracellular calcium mobilization and activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). CXCL12-induced chemotaxis of HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4 and of Jurkat T cells was inhibited by the plectin RNAi. Moreover, CXCR4 tropic HIV-1 infection in MAGI (HeLa-CD4-LTR-Gal) cells was inhibited by the RNAi of plectin. Thus, plectin appears to interact with CXCR4 and plays an important role in CXCR4 signaling and trafficking and HIV-1 infection.

  17. Receptor for advanced glycation end products plays a more important role in cellular survival than in neurite outgrowth during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sajithlal, Gangadharan; Huttunen, Henri; Rauvala, Heikki; Munch, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is known to interact with amphoterin. This interaction has been proposed to play a role in neurite outgrowth and process elongation during neurodifferentiation. However, there is as yet no direct evidence of the relevance of this pathway to neurodifferentiation under physiological conditions. In this study we have investigated a possible role of RAGE and amphoterin in the retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. The functional inactivation of RAGE by dominant negative and antisense strategies showed that RAGE is not required for process outgrowth or differentiation, although overexpression of RAGE accelerates the elongation of neuritic processes. Using the antisense strategy, amphoterin was shown to be essential for process outgrowth and differentiation, suggesting that amphoterin may interact with other molecules to exert its effect in this context. Interestingly, the survival of the neuroblastoma cells treated with retinoic acid was partly dependent on the expression of RAGE, and inhibition of RAGE function partially blocked the increase in anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 following retinoic acid treatment. Based on these results we propose that a combination therapy using RAGE blockers and retinoic acid may prove as a useful approach for chemotherapy for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  18. SARI, a novel target gene of glucocorticoid receptor, plays an important role in dexamethasone-mediated killing of B lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yinghui; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Yan; He, Jintao; Wang, Yuting; Yang, Chaohui; Liu, Dongbo; Zhang, Li; He, Fengtian

    2016-04-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex) has been commonly used in lymphoma and leukemia treatment, but the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. Suppressor of AP-1 regulated by interferon (SARI) has tumor-selective growth inhibitory effect. However, it's unclear whether SARI is involved in the Dex-mediated lymphoma growth suppression. In this study, we found that Dex-treated B lymphoma tissues had a higher level of SARI. Dex repressed the growth of B lymphoma cells and upregulated SARI expression by activating glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in vitro and in vivo. Silencing of SARI attenuated the Dex-mediated growth suppression of B lymphoma cells and inhibition of AP-1 activity. Reporter assays revealed that activation of GR enhanced the transcriptional activity of SARI promoter. EMSA and ChIP assays showed that GR directly bound to the ER9 element in SARI promoter region. These results for the first time demonstrated that SARI is a novel target gene of GR, and the upregulation of SARI plays an important role in Dex's killing effect on B lymphoma cells, suggesting that SARI may serve as a novel target and a potential indicator of Dex sensitivity in B lymphoma treatment. PMID:26808579

  19. Pseudo-piano playing motions and nocturnal hypoventilation in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: response to prompt tumor removal and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akiko; Iizuka, Takahiro; Urano, Yoshiaki; Arai, Masahide; Hara, Atsuko; Hamada, Junichi; Hirose, Ryuichi; Dalmau, Josep; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Tumor resection is recommended in anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis, however it is often difficult during an early stage of the disease. We report here the efficacy of early tumor removal in a patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. This 21-year-old woman was admitted to another hospital with rapidly progressive psychiatric symptoms, a decreased level of consciousness, and seizures. Abdominal CT showed a pelvic mass. On day 1 of admission to our center, she developed hypoventilation requiring mechanical support. She had orofacial dyskinesias with well-coordinated, pseudo-piano playing involuntary finger movements. Based on these clinical features, she was immediately scheduled for tumor resection on day 3. While awaiting surgery, she began to receive high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone. After tumor removal, she received plasma exchange, followed by intravenous immunoglobulin and additional high-dose methylprednisolone. Two weeks after tumor removal, she started following simple commands and progressive improvement, although she remained on mechanical ventilation for 10 weeks due to nocturnal central hypoventilation. Anti-NMDAR antibodies in serum/CSF were detected. Pathological examination showed immature teratoma with foci of infiltrates of B- and T-cells. Early tumor resection with immunotherapy facilitates recovery from this disease, but central hypoventilation may require long mechanical support. Non-jerky elaborate finger movements suggest antibody-mediated disinhibition of the cortico-striatal systems. PMID:21422691

  20. Pseudo-Piano Playing Motions and Nocturnal Hypoventilation in Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis: Response to Prompt Tumor Removal and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Uchino, Akiko; Iizuka, Takahiro; Urano, Yoshiaki; Arai, Masahide; Hara, Atsuko; Hamada, Junichi; Hirose, Ryuichi; Dalmau, Josep; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor resection is recommended in anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis, however it is often difficult during an early stage of the disease. We report here the efficacy of early tumor removal in a patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. This 21-year-old woman was admitted to another hospital with rapidly progressive psychiatric symptoms, a decreased level of consciousness, and seizures. Abdominal CT showed a pelvic mass. On day 1 of admission to our center, she developed hypoventilation requiring mechanical support. She had orofacial dyskinesias with well-coordinated, pseudo-piano playing involuntary finger movements. Based on these clinical features, she was immediately scheduled for tumor resection on day 3. While awaiting surgery, she began to receive high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone. After tumor removal, she received plasma exchange, followed by intravenous immunoglobulin and additional high-dose methylprednisolone. Two weeks after tumor removal, she started following simple commands and progressive improvement, although she remained on mechanical ventilation for 10 weeks due to nocturnal central hypoventilation. Anti-NMDAR antibodies in serum/CSF were detected. Pathological examination showed immature teratoma with foci of infiltrates of B- and T-cells. Early tumor resection with immunotherapy facilitates recovery from this disease, but central hypoventilation may require long mechanical support. Non-jerky elaborate finger movements suggest antibody-mediated disinhibition of the cortico-striatal systems. PMID:21422691

  1. TGF-β1 signaling plays a dominant role in the crosstalk between TGF-β1 and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand in prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Staršíchová, Andrea; Hrubá, Eva; Slabáková, Eva; Pernicová, Zuzana; Procházková, Jiřina; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Seda, Václav; Kabátková, Markéta; Vondráček, Jan; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav; Souček, Karel

    2012-08-01

    Crosstalk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling has been observed in various experimental models. However, both molecular mechanism underlying this crosstalk and tissue-specific context of this interaction are still only partially understood. In a model of human non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells BPH-1, derived from the benign prostatic hyperplasia, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) persistently activates the AhR signaling pathway and induces expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as CYP1A1 or CYP1B1. Here we demonstrate that TGF-β1 suppresses the AhR-mediated gene expression through multiple mechanisms, involving inhibition of AhR expression and down-regulation of nuclear AhR, via a SMAD4-dependent pathway. In contrast, TCDD-induced AhR signaling does not affect either TGF-β1-regulated gene expression or epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. These observations suggest that, in the context of prostate epithelium, TGF-β1 signaling plays a dominant role in the crosstalk with AhR signaling pathway. Given the importance of TGF-β1 signaling in regulation of prostate epithelial tissue homeostasis, as well as the recently revealed role of AhR in prostate development and tumorigenesis, the above findings contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between the two signaling pathways in the prostate-specific context.

  2. Epileptiform activity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus becomes refractory to attenuation by cannabinoids in part because of endogenous γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Messer, Ricka D; Levine, Eric S

    2012-07-01

    The anticonvulsant properties of marijuana have been known for centuries. The recently characterized endogenous cannabinoid system thus represents a promising target for novel anticonvulsant agents; however, administration of exogenous cannabinoids has shown mixed results in both human epilepsy and animal models. The ability of cannabinoids to attenuate release of both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters may explain the variable effects of cannabinoids in different models of epilepsy, but this has not been well explored. Using acute mouse brain slices, we monitored field potentials in the CA1 region of the hippocampus to characterize systematically the effects of the cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) on evoked basal and epileptiform activity. WIN, acting presynaptically, significantly reduced the amplitude and slope of basal field excitatory postsynaptic potentials as well as stimulus-evoked epileptiform responses induced by omission of magnesium from the extracellular solution. In contrast, the combination of omission of magnesium plus elevation of potassium induced an epileptiform response that was refractory to attenuation by WIN. The effect of WIN in this model was partially restored by blocking γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B) ), but not GABA(A) , receptors. Subtle differences in models of epileptiform activity can profoundly alter the efficacy of cannabinoids. Endogenous GABA(B) receptor activation played a role in the decreased cannabinoid sensitivity observed for epileptiform activity induced by omission of magnesium plus elevation of potassium. These results suggest that interplay between presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors with overlapping downstream targets may underlie the variable efficacy of cannabinoids in different models of epilepsy.

  3. Language Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Judy I.

    This paper discusses kinds and characteristics of language play, explores the relationship of such play to wider domains of language and play, and speculates on the possible contributions of language play for language mastery and cognitive development. Jump rope chants and ritual insults ("Off my case, potato face") and other expressive language…

  4. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  5. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Play therapy represents a unique form of treatment that is not only geared toward young children, but is translated into a language children can comprehend and utilize—the language of play. For the referring provider or practitioner, questions may remain regarding the nature, course, and efficacy of play therapy. This article reviews the theoretical underpinnings of play therapy, some practical considerations, and finally a summary of the current state of research in regard to play therapy. The authors present the practicing psychiatrist with a road map for referring a patient to play therapy or initiating it in appropriate cases. PMID:21103141

  6. Smooth Muscle Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Plays a Critical Role in Formation and Rupture of Cerebral Aneurysms in Mice In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Hasan, David M; Starke, Robert M; Gu, He; Wilson, Katina; Chu, Yi; Chalouhi, Nohra; Heistad, Donald D; Faraci, Frank M; Sigmund, Curt D

    2015-07-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysms. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) protects against vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis, whereas dominant-negative mutations in PPARγ promote atherosclerosis and vascular dysfunction. We tested the role of PPARγ in aneurysm formation and rupture. Aneurysms were induced with a combination of systemic infusion of angiotensin-II and local injection of elastase in (1) mice that received the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone, (2) mice carrying dominant-negative PPARγ mutations in endothelial or smooth muscle cells, and (3) mice that received the Cullin inhibitor MLN4924. Incidence of aneurysm formation, rupture, and mortality was quantified. Cerebral arteries were analyzed for expression of Cullin3, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone)1 (NQO1), and inflammatory marker mRNAs. Neither pioglitazone nor GW9662 altered the incidence of aneurysm formation. GW9662 significantly increased the incidence of aneurysm rupture, whereas pioglitazone tended to decrease the incidence of rupture. Dominant-negative endothelial-specific PPARγ did not alter the incidence of aneurysm formation or rupture. In contrast, dominant-negative smooth muscle-specific PPARγ resulted in an increase in aneurysm formation (P<0.05) and rupture (P=0.05). Dominant-negative smooth muscle-specific PPARγ, but not dominant-negative endothelial-specific PPARγ, resulted in significant decreases in expression of genes encoding Cullin3, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1, and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, along with significant increases in tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1, CD68, matrix metalloproteinase-3, -9, and -13. MLN4924 did not alter incidence of aneurysm formation, but increased the incidence of rupture (P<0

  7. Neonatal melanocortin receptor agonist treatment reduces play fighting and promotes adult attachment in prairie voles in a sex-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Catherine E.; Modi, Meera E.; Zhang, Billy C.; Walum, Hasse; Inuoe, Kiyoshi; Young, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    The melanocortin receptor (MCR) system has been studied extensively for its role in feeding and sexual behavior, but effects on social behavior have received little attention. α-MSH interacts with neural systems involved in sociality, including oxytocin, dopamine, and opioid systems. Acute melanotan-II (MTII), an MC3/4R agonist, potentiates brain oxytocin (OT) release and facilitates OT-dependent partner preference formation in socially monogamous prairie voles. Here we examined the long-term impact of early-life MCR stimulation on hypothalamic neuronal activity and social development in prairie voles. Male and female voles were given daily subcutaneous injections of 10 mg/kg MTII or saline between postnatal days (PND) 1-7. Neonatally-treated males displayed a reduction in initiated play fighting bouts as juveniles compared to control males. Neonatal exposure to MTII facilitated partner preference formation in adult females, but not males, after a brief cohabitation with an opposite-sex partner. Acute MTII injection elicited a significant burst of the immediate early gene EGR-1 immunoreactivity in hypothalamic OT, vasopressin, and corticotrophin releasing factor neurons, when tested in PND 6-7 animals. Daily neonatal treatment with 1 mg/kg of a more selective, brain penetrant MC4R agonist, PF44687, promoted adult partner preferences in both females and males compared with vehicle controls. Thus, developmental exposure to MCR agonists lead to a persistent change in social behavior, suggestive of structural or functional changes in the neural circuits involved in the formation of social relationships. PMID:24923239

  8. Toll-Like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR9 play opposing roles in host innate immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Renhui; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily conserved host proteins that are essential for effective host defense against pathogens. However, recent studies suggest that some TLRs can negatively regulate immune responses. We observed here that TLR2 and TLR9 played opposite roles in regulating innate immunity against oral infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice. While TLR9-/- mice exhibited shortened survival, an increased cytokine storm, and more severe Salmonella hepatitis than wild-type (WT) mice, TLR2-/- mice exhibited the opposite phenomenon. Further studies demonstrated that TLR2 deficiency and TLR9 deficiency in macrophages both disrupted NK cell cytotoxicity against S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages by downregulating NK cell degranulation and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production through decreased macrophage expression of the RAE-1 NKG2D ligand. But more importantly, we found that S. Typhimurium-infected TLR2-/- macrophages upregulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, resulting in a lower bacterial load than that in WT macrophages in vitro and livers in vivo as well as low proinflammatory cytokine levels. In contrast, TLR9-/- macrophages showed decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) expression concomitant with a high bacterial load in the macrophages and in livers of TLR9-/- mice. TLR9-/- macrophages were also more susceptible than WT macrophages to S. Typhimurium-induced necroptosis in vitro, likely contributing to bacterial spread and transmission in vivo. Collectively, these findings indicate that TLR2 negatively regulates anti-S. Typhimurium immunity, whereas TLR9 is vital to host defense and survival against S. Typhimurium invasion. TLR2 antagonists or TLR9 agonists may thus serve as potential anti-S. Typhimurium therapeutic agents.

  9. The nuclear receptors NUR77 and SF1 play additive roles with c-JUN through distinct elements on the mouse Star promoter.

    PubMed

    Martin, Luc J; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2009-02-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein plays an essential role in steroid biosynthesis in steroidogenic cells. It is involved in the transport of cholesterol through the mitochondrial membrane where the first step of steroidogenesis occurs. Star gene expression in testicular Leydig cells is regulated by the pituitary LH through the cAMP signaling pathway. So far, several transcription factors have been implicated in the regulation of Star promoter activity in these cells. These include the nuclear receptors NUR77 and SF1, AP-1 family members (particularly c-JUN), GATA4, C/EBPbeta, DLX5/6, and CREB. Some of these factors were also shown to act in a cooperative manner to further enhance Star promoter activity. Here, we report that NUR77 and c-JUN have additive effects on the Star promoter. These effects were abolished only when both elements, NUR77 at -95 bp and AP-1 at -78 bp, were mutated. Consistent with this, in vitro co-immunoprecipitation revealed that NUR77 and c-JUN interact and that this interaction is mediated through part of the ligand binding domain of NUR77. Furthermore, we found that SF1 could cooperate with c-JUN on the mouse Star promoter but this cooperation involved different regulatory elements. Collectively, our data not only provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that control mouse Star transcription in Leydig cells but also reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of NR4A1-dependent genes in tissues where NUR77 and c-JUN factors are co-expressed.

  10. COUP-TFI and -TFII nuclear receptors are expressed in amacrine cells and play roles in regulating the differentiation of retinal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mariko; Iida, Atsumi; Satoh, Shinya; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2010-01-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factors (COUP-TFs) are members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. We have shown that two homologous COUP-TF genes, COUP-TFI and COUP-TFII, are expressed in developing mouse retina with a unique gradient along the dorsal-ventral axis. In this work, we aimed to characterize the detailed expression patterns of COUP-TFs in mature retina. Their functions in retinal progenitor cell differentiation into subtypes of mature retinal cells were also examined. Immunostaining of frozen mouse retinal sections with antibodies against COUP-TFs and markers for retinal subtypes revealed that COUP-TFI and -TFII are expressed in amacrine cells, especially in a glycinergic subtype in mature mouse retina. Forced expression of COUP-TFI and -TFII in mouse retinal explant culture by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer promoted amacrine and cone photoreceptor cell differentiation, whereas that of rod photoreceptors decreased. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were not affected by the perturbation of COUP-TFI and -TFII expression levels. Using the Y79 retinoblastoma cell line, we observed that COUP-TFI and -TFII suppressed the transcriptional activation of the Nrl gene. We then analyzed one another member of COUP-TF transcription factors, COUP-TFgamma, whose structure is relatively distant from those of COUP-TFI and -TFII. It is expressed mainly in horizontal cells and has weak activity in inducing amacrine cells when COUP-TFgamma was ectopically expressed in retinal explants. In summary, we found that COUP-TFI and -TFII play roles in amacrine cell differentiation, and COUP-TFgamma has distinct expression pattern and roles during retinal development. PMID:19766631

  11. GPR39, a receptor of the ghrelin receptor family, plays a role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis in a mouse model of early onset diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Verhulst, P J; Lintermans, A; Janssen, S; Loeckx, D; Himmelreich, U; Buyse, J; Tack, J; Depoortere, I

    2011-06-01

    GPR39, which may function as a Zn(2+) sensor, is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family that also includes the receptor for the hunger hormone ghrelin. The down-regulation of GPR39 mRNA in adipose tissue of obese type 2 diabetic patients suggests that GPR39 may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. The present study aimed to investigate the role of GPR39 in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis in wild-type (GPR39(+/+) ) and GPR39 knockout mice (GPR39(-/-) ) with obesity-related type 2 diabetes. GPR39 mRNA levels in adipose tissue of fasted GPR39(+/+) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 30 weeks were reduced and correlated positively with blood glucose levels. Body weight, fat percentage and energy intake were increased in the HFD group but did not differ between both genotypes. Within the HFD group, blood glucose levels were lower in GPR39(-/-) than in GPR39(+/+) mice, despite significant reductions in prandial plasma insulin levels. The latter may not be a result of changes in β-cell hyperplasia because immunohistochemical staining of pancreata of mice on a HFD showed no differences between genotypes. The lower blood glucose levels may involve alterations in insulin sensitivity as revealed by glucose tolerance tests and respiratory quotient measurements that showed a preference of obese GPR39(-/-) mice for the use of carbohydrates as metabolic fuel. The increase in plasma ghrelin levels in GPR39(-/-) mice fed a HFD may contribute to the alterations in glucose homeostasis, whereas changes in gastric emptying or intestinal Zn(2+) absorption are not involved. The results obtained in the present study suggest that GPR39 plays a role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related type 2 diabetes by affecting the regulation of glucose homeostasis. PMID:21470317

  12. The dopamine D1 but not D3 receptor plays a fundamental role in spatial working memory and BDNF expression in prefrontal cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Xing, Bo; Guo, Juan; Meng, Xia; Wei, Shu-guang; Li, Sheng-bin

    2012-11-01

    Although dopamine within the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in working memory, how different dopamine receptor subtypes contribute to this process need to be further characterized. Previous studies have suggest the importance of dopamine receptors signaling in regulating the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) function that is associated with synaptic plasticity underlying normal memory formation. Changes in BDNF expression through the dopamine receptors within the prefrontal cortex may accompany and mediate the spatial working memory. To test the possibility, dopamine D1 and D3 receptor mutant mice were tested in Morris water maze for spatial working memory. We found that trial-dependent, matching-to-sample, learning of the platform location, an index of short-term spatial working memory in mice, was significantly impaired in D1 receptor knockout mice compared to wild-type mice, and regular performance of D3 receptor mutants was observed in the similar working memory task. BDNF protein was significantly decreased in prefrontal cortex, though not in hippocampus, of the D1 receptor knockout mice, whereas no changes were found in both prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of D3 receptor knockout mice. These data suggest that dopamine D1 but not D3 receptors are critical for prefrontal cortex BDNF expression which may be related to spatial working memory processes.

  13. NMDA GluN2A and GluN2B receptors play separate roles in the induction of LTP and LTD in the amygdala and in the acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Gemma L; Wu, Dong Chuan; Wang, Yu Tian; Floresco, Stan B; Phillips, Anthony G

    2012-02-01

    Synaptic plasticity mediated by NMDA glutamate receptors is thought to be a primary mechanism underlying the formation of new memories. Activation of GluN2A NMDA receptor subunits may induce long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas low-frequency stimulation of GluN2B receptors induces long-term depression (LTD). In the present study, we show that blockade of GluN2A, but not GluN2B receptors with NVP-AAM077 and Ro25-6981 respectively, prevented LTP of auditory thalamic inputs to the lateral amygdala. Conversely, LTD induction in this pathway was prevented by blockade of GluN2B, but not GluN2A receptors. As this pathway plays a critical role in the acquisition, retrieval and extinction of a learned auditory-cue fear association, we next examined the effects of blockade of GluN2A and GluN2B receptors on the development and retention of a conditioned fear response. Administration of NVP-AAM077, but not Ro25-6981, prior to conditioning disrupted the expression of conditioned fear 24h later. Conversely, Ro25-6981 but not NVP-AAM077 impaired extinction of the conditioned fear response. These data expand on previous work showing that LTP/D in the thalamic-lateral amygdala pathway is dependent on NMDA receptors, by demonstrating selective roles for GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits in LTP and LTD respectively. Furthermore, GluN2A receptor activation and associated LTP may be involved specifically in the initial formation and/or stabilization of a learned fear response, whereas GluN2B receptor activation and associated LTD may facilitate the suppression of Pavlovian fear responses during extinction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder'.

  14. City Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dargan, Amanda; Zeitlin, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Today, fewer city blocks preserve the confidence of lifestyle and urban geography that sustain traditional games and outdoor play. Large groups of children choosing sides and organizing Red Rover games are no longer commonplace. Teachers must encourage free play; urban planners must build cities that are safe play havens. (MLH)

  15. Angiopoietins-1 and -2 play opposing roles in endothelial sprouting of embryoid bodies in 3D culture and their receptor Tie-2 associates with the cell-cell adhesion molecule PECAM1.

    PubMed

    Gu, Angel; Shively, John E

    2011-09-10

    Angiopoietins 1 and 2, ligands for the receptor kinase Tie-2, have been proposed to play critical but opposing roles in vascular development. Since signaling by Tie-2 is likely affected by other endothelial cell receptors such as Flk-1, the receptor for VEGF, and cell-cell adhesion receptors PECAM1 and VE-cad, we explored their interactions in a 3D model of vasculogenesis. When murine embryoid bodies (EBs) were treated with VEGF in Matrigel in the presence or absence of Ang-1 or Ang-2 for eight days, Ang-1 abrogated vascular sprouting for treatments started at days 0 or 3. In contrast, Ang-2 greatly accelerated vascular sprouting compared to untreated EBs. These results were confirmed in a second model system where VEGF treated HUVECs were grown in Matrigel in the presence or absence of Ang-1 or Ang-2. Since vascular sprouting must be precisely controlled in the developing embryo, it is likely that cell-cell adhesion molecules play a role in sensing the density of vascular sprouts. In this respect, we have shown that PECAM1 and CEACAM1 play essential roles in vascular sprouting. We now show that PECAM1 is associated with Tie-2, becomes phosphorylated on its ITIMs, and recruits the inhibitory phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. In addition, PECAM1 is associated with VE-cad and may similarly regulate its signaling via recruitment of SHP-1/2.

  16. α4β2 nicotinic receptors play a role in the nAChR-mediated decline in L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Quik, Maryka; Campos, Carla; Bordia, Tanuja; Strachan, Jon-Paul; Zhang, Jenny; McIntosh, J. Michael; Letchworth, Sharon; Jordan, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    L-dopa-induced dyskinesias are a serious long-term side effect of dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease for which there are few treatment options. Our previous studies showed that nicotine decreased L-dopa-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs). Subsequent work with knockout mice demonstrated that α6β2* nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) play a key role. The present experiments were done to determine if α4β2* nAChRs are also involved in L-dopa-induced dyskinesias. To approach this, we took advantage of the finding that α6β2* nAChRs are predominantly present on striatal dopaminergic nerve terminals, while a significant population of α4β2* nAChRs are located on other neurons. Thus, a severe dopaminergic lesion would cause a major loss in α6β2*, but not α4β2* nAChRs. Experiments were therefore done in which rats were unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine, at a dose that lead to severe nigrostriatal damage. The dopamine transporter, a dopamine nerve terminal marker, was decreased by >99%. This lesion also decreased striatal α6β2* nAChRs by 97%, while α4β2* nAChRs were reduced by only 12% compared to control. A series of β2* nAChR compounds, including TC-2696, TI-10165, TC-8831, TC-10600 and sazetidine reduced L-dopa-induced AIMs in these rats by 23–32%. TC-2696, TI-10165, TC-8831 were also tested for parkinsonism, with no effect on this behavior. Tolerance did not develop with up to 3 months of treatment. Since α4a5β2 nAChRs are also predominantly on striatal dopamine terminals, these data suggest that drugs targeting α4β2 nAChRs may reduce L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in late stage Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23583932

  17. Pretend play.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Deena Skolnick

    2015-01-01

    Pretend play is a form of playful behavior that involves nonliteral action. Although on the surface this activity appears to be merely for fun, recent research has discovered that children's pretend play has connections to important cognitive and social skills, such as symbolic thinking, theory of mind, and counterfactual reasoning. The current article first defines pretend play and then reviews the arguments and evidence for these three connections. Pretend play has a nonliteral correspondence to reality, hence pretending may provide children with practice with navigating symbolic relationships, which may strengthen their language skills. Pretend play and theory of mind reasoning share a focus on others' mental states in order to correctly interpret their behavior, hence pretending and theory of mind may be mutually supportive in development. Pretend play and counterfactual reasoning both involve representing nonreal states of affairs, hence pretending may facilitate children's counterfactual abilities. These connections make pretend play an important phenomenon in cognitive science: Studying children's pretend play can provide insight into these other abilities and their developmental trajectories, and thereby into human cognitive architecture and its development.

  18. Pretend play.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Deena Skolnick

    2015-01-01

    Pretend play is a form of playful behavior that involves nonliteral action. Although on the surface this activity appears to be merely for fun, recent research has discovered that children's pretend play has connections to important cognitive and social skills, such as symbolic thinking, theory of mind, and counterfactual reasoning. The current article first defines pretend play and then reviews the arguments and evidence for these three connections. Pretend play has a nonliteral correspondence to reality, hence pretending may provide children with practice with navigating symbolic relationships, which may strengthen their language skills. Pretend play and theory of mind reasoning share a focus on others' mental states in order to correctly interpret their behavior, hence pretending and theory of mind may be mutually supportive in development. Pretend play and counterfactual reasoning both involve representing nonreal states of affairs, hence pretending may facilitate children's counterfactual abilities. These connections make pretend play an important phenomenon in cognitive science: Studying children's pretend play can provide insight into these other abilities and their developmental trajectories, and thereby into human cognitive architecture and its development. PMID:26263228

  19. Playing Shakespeare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashian, Kathleen Ryniker

    1993-01-01

    Describes a yearlong project at 12 Catholic middle schools in the Diocese of Arlington, Virginia, to incorporate the plays of William Shakespeare into the curriculum. Teachers attended university lectures and directed students in performances of the plays. Concludes that Shakespeare can be understood and enjoyed by middle school students. (BCY)

  20. Why Play?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weininger, O.

    This paper draws together briefly theories and knowledge from research in morphology and cognitive psychology, as well as some hypothetical information from traditional psychiatry, to show the ramifications of play in children's development. Play is defined as any of a wide variety of behaviors through which an individual attempts to discover what…

  1. Shadow Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Hilson, Margilee P.

    2012-01-01

    A bunny rabbit playfully hops across the wall. Then hands realign and fingers shift to make a hawk soar toward the ceiling. Most children have enjoyed the delightful experience of playing with shadow puppets. The authors build on this natural curiosity to help students link shadows to complex astronomical concepts such as seasons. The…

  2. Tyrosines 559 and 807 in the cytoplasmic tail of the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor play distinct roles in osteoclast differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xu; Takeshita, Sunao; Namba, Noriyuki; Wei, Shi; Teitelbaum, Steven L; Ross, F Patrick

    2002-12-01

    Osteoclast (OC) differentiation requires that precursors, such as macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent bone marrow macrophages, receive signals transduced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB (RANK) and c-Fms, receptors for RANK ligand (RANKL) and M-CSF, respectively. Activated c-Fms autophosphorylates cytoplasmic tail tyrosine residues, which, by recruiting adaptor molecules, initiate specific signaling pathways. To identify which tyrosine residues are involved in c-Fms signaling in primary cells, we retrovirally transduced M-CSF-dependent bone marrow macrophages with a chimera comprising the external domain of the erythropoietin (Epo) receptor linked to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of c-Fms. Transduced cells differentiate into bone-resorbing osteoclasts when treated with RANKL and either M-CSF or Epo, confirming that both endogenous and chimeric receptors transmit osteoclastogenic signals. Cells expressing chimeric receptors with Y(697)F, Y(706)F, Y(721)F, and Y(921)F single point mutations generate normal numbers of bone-resorbing OCs, with normal bone-resorbing activity when treated with RANKL and Epo. In contrast, those expressing Y(559)F generate fewer OCs, whereas theY807F mutant is incapable of osteoclastogenesis. Finally, although mature OCs expressing Y(559)F exhibit impaired bone resorption, those bearing Y807F do not. Thus, we have identified specific tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of c-Fms that are critical for transmitting M-CSF-initiated signals individually required for OC formation or function, respectively.

  3. Play & Play Grounds. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Jeannette Galambos

    Using camera and tape recorder, a photographer and an early childhood specialist explored as a team the universe of children's outdoor play, seeking worthy and innovative ideas and stressing urban playground problems and solutions. The resulting photographs and text focus on (1) the characteristics of play, (2) the nature of playgrounds, and (3)…

  4. Shadow Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of shadows to explain such scientific phenomena as umbra and penumbra, eclipses, day and night, seasons, and length of day. Indicates that shadow plays can serve to help the students in understanding more about light. (CC)

  5. N-methyl D-aspartate receptor synaptonuclear signaling and neuronal migration factor (Nsmf) plays a novel role in myoblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyo Youl

    2015-01-01

    Myogenesis, the formation and regeneration of muscular tissue, is a fundamental factor in embryonic development. N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor synaptonuclear signaling and neuronal migration factor (Nsmf) mediates NMDA receptor endocytosis in GnRH neuronal cells. NMDA receptor is involved in myoblast differentiation by regulating Ca2 (+) dependent fusion of myocytes. In this study, we investigated the role of Nsmf in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Quantitative-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry results showed that the Nsmf expression levels increased during both the differentiation and proliferation of myocytes. Knockdown of Nsmf in myocytes by siRNA did not affect the myocyte differentiation marker myogenin. However, flow cytometry showed that the proliferation rate of the Nsmf-knockdown cells was reduced compared to the control cells. Therefore, our results indicate that Nsmf is a novel myogenic factor that can enhance myoblast proliferation. Furthermore, Nsmf may be an important therapeutic target in diseases associated with aging, muscular dystrophy, or cachexia.

  6. Hippocampal angiotensin II receptors play an important role in mediating the effect of voluntary exercise on learning and memory in rat.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Maziar M; Emami-Abarghoie, Mitra; Sadighi-Moghaddam, Bizhan; Safari, Manouchehr; Yousefi, Yasaman; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2008-09-26

    The beneficial effects of physical activity and exercise on brain functions such as improvement in learning and memory are well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the possible role of hippocampal angiotensin II receptors in voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rat. In order to block the hippocampal angiotension II receptors, the animals received a single injection of latex microbeads for delivery of [Sar1 Thr8]-Angiotensin II into the hippocampus. The animals were exposed to five consecutive nights of exercise and then their learning and memory were tested on the Morris water maze (MWM) task using a two-trial-per-day for five consecutive days. A probe trial was performed 2 days after the last training day. Our results showed that hippocampal angiotensin II receptor blockade reversed the exercise-induced improvement in learning and memory in rat.

  7. The ATP-gated P2X1 receptor plays a pivotal role in activation of aspirin-treated platelets by thrombin and epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Grenegård, Magnus; Vretenbrant-Oberg, Karin; Nylander, Martina; Désilets, Stéphanie; Lindström, Eva G; Larsson, Anders; Ramström, Ida; Ramström, Sofia; Lindahl, Tomas L

    2008-07-01

    Human platelets express protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and PAR4 but limited data indicate for differences in signal transduction. We studied the involvement of PAR1 and PAR4 in the cross-talk between thrombin and epinephrine. The results show that epinephrine acted via alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors to provoke aggregation, secretion, and Ca(2+) mobilization in aspirin-treated platelets pre-stimulated with subthreshold concentrations of thrombin. Incubating platelets with antibodies against PAR4 or the PAR4-specific inhibitor pepducin P4pal-i1 abolished the aggregation. Furthermore, platelets pre-exposed to the PAR4-activating peptide AYPGKF, but not to the PAR1-activating peptide SFLLRN, were aggregated by epinephrine, whereas both AYPGKF and SFLLRN synergized with epinephrine in the absence of aspirin. The roles of released ATP and ADP were elucidated by using antagonists of the purinergic receptors P2X(1), P2Y(1), and P2Y(12) (i.e. NF449, MRS2159, MRS2179, and cangrelor). Intriguingly, ATP, but not ADP, was required for the epinephrine/thrombin-induced aggregation. In Western blot analysis, a low concentration of AYPGKF, but not SFLLRN, stimulated phosphorylation of Akt on serine 473. Moreover, the phosphatidyl inositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 antagonized the effect of epinephrine combined with thrombin or AYPGKF. Thus, in aspirin-treated platelets, PAR4, but not PAR1, interacts synergistically with alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors, and the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway is involved in this cross-talk. Furthermore, in PAR4-pretreated platelets, epinephrine caused dense granule secretion, and subsequent signaling from the ATP-gated P2X(1)-receptor and the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor induced aggregation. These results suggest a new mechanism that has ATP as a key element and circumvents the action of aspirin on epinephrine-facilitated PAR4-mediated platelet activation. PMID:18480058

  8. The Cannabinoid Receptor CB1 Interacts with the WAVE1 Complex and Plays a Role in Actin Dynamics and Structural Plasticity in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Njoo, Christian; Agarwal, Nitin; Lutz, Beat; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-10-01

    The molecular composition of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor complex beyond the classical G-protein signaling components is not known. Using proteomics on mouse cortex in vivo, we pulled down proteins interacting with CB1 in neurons and show that the CB1 receptor assembles with multiple members of the WAVE1 complex and the RhoGTPase Rac1 and modulates their activity. Activation levels of CB1 receptor directly impacted on actin polymerization and stability via WAVE1 in growth cones of developing neurons, leading to their collapse, as well as in synaptic spines of mature neurons, leading to their retraction. In adult mice, CB1 receptor agonists attenuated activity-dependent remodeling of dendritic spines in spinal cord neurons in vivo and suppressed inflammatory pain by regulating the WAVE1 complex. This study reports novel signaling mechanisms for cannabinoidergic modulation of the nervous system and demonstrates a previously unreported role for the WAVE1 complex in therapeutic applications of cannabinoids.

  9. The Cannabinoid Receptor CB1 Interacts with the WAVE1 Complex and Plays a Role in Actin Dynamics and Structural Plasticity in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Njoo, Christian; Agarwal, Nitin; Lutz, Beat; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    The molecular composition of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor complex beyond the classical G-protein signaling components is not known. Using proteomics on mouse cortex in vivo, we pulled down proteins interacting with CB1 in neurons and show that the CB1 receptor assembles with multiple members of the WAVE1 complex and the RhoGTPase Rac1 and modulates their activity. Activation levels of CB1 receptor directly impacted on actin polymerization and stability via WAVE1 in growth cones of developing neurons, leading to their collapse, as well as in synaptic spines of mature neurons, leading to their retraction. In adult mice, CB1 receptor agonists attenuated activity-dependent remodeling of dendritic spines in spinal cord neurons in vivo and suppressed inflammatory pain by regulating the WAVE1 complex. This study reports novel signaling mechanisms for cannabinoidergic modulation of the nervous system and demonstrates a previously unreported role for the WAVE1 complex in therapeutic applications of cannabinoids. PMID:26496209

  10. Differential effects of GABAB autoreceptor activation on ethanol potentiation of local and lateral paracapsular GABAergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Weiner, Jeff L

    2009-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that GABAergic inhibition within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays an integral role in the regulation of anxiety, an important behavioral component in the etiology of alcoholism. Although ethanol has recently been shown to enhance BLA GABAergic inhibition via two distinct populations of inhibitory cells, local and lateral paracapsular (lpcs) interneurons, little is known about the mechanisms underlying ethanol potentiation of these two inhibitory pathways. Ethanol is known to enhance GABAergic inhibition in many brain regions via a complex array of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. In addition, ethanol's presynaptic effects are often subject to GABA(B) autoreceptor (GABA(B)-R) modulation. Therefore, in this study, we characterized GABA(B)-R function and modulation of ethanol actions at local and lpcs GABAergic synapses. At local synapses, we found significant paired-pulse depression (PPD, 250 ms inter-pulse interval) which was abated by SCH-50911 (GABA(B)-R antagonist). No significant PPD was detected at lpcs synapses, but SCH-50911 significantly potentiated lpcs-evoked IPSCs. Baclofen (GABA(B)-R agonist) had similar depressant effects on local- and lpcs-evoked IPSCs, however baclofen pretreatment only reduced ethanol potentiation at local synapses. Ethanol also significantly enhanced the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs, and these effects were also sensitive to GABA(B)-R modulators. Collectively, these data suggest that stimulus-independent inhibitory responses recorded from BLA principal neurons primarily reflect the activity of local GABAergic interneurons and provide additional evidence that ethanol potentiates local BLA inhibitory synapses primarily via a presynaptic enhancement of GABA release that is tightly regulated by GABA(B)-Rs. In contrast, ethanol potentiation of lpcs GABAergic synapses is not sensitive to GABA(B)-R activation and does not appear to involve increased presynaptic GABA release.

  11. Loss of striatal cannabinoid CB1 receptor function in attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder mice with point-mutation of the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Maura; Federici, Mauro; Rossi, Silvia; De Chiara, Valentina; Napolitano, Francesco; Studer, Valeria; Motta, Caterina; Sacchetti, Lucia; Romano, Rosaria; Musella, Alessandra; Bernardi, Giorgio; Siracusano, Alberto; Gu, Howard H; Mercuri, Nicola B; Usiello, Alessandro; Centonze, Diego

    2011-11-01

    Abnormal dopamine (DA) transmission in the striatum plays a pivotal role in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As striatal DA signalling modulates the endocannabinoid system (ECS), the present study was aimed at investigating cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) function in a model of ADHD obtained by triple point-mutation in the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene in mice, making them insensitive to cocaine [DAT cocaine-insensitive (DAT-CI) mice]. DAT-CI mice had a marked hyperactive phenotype, and neurophysiological recordings revealed that the sensitivity of CB1Rs controlling GABA-mediated synaptic currents [CB1Rs((GABA)) ] in the striatum was completely lost. In contrast, CB1Rs modulating glutamate transmission [CB1Rs((Glu)) ], and GABA(B) receptors were not affected in this model of ADHD. In DAT-CI mice, the blockade of CB1R((GABA)) function was complete even after cocaine or environmental manipulations activating the endogenous DA-dependent reward system, which are known to sensitize these receptors in control animals. Conversely, the hedonic property of sucrose was intact in DAT-CI mice, indicating normal sweet perception in these animals. Our results point to CB1Rs as novel molecular players in ADHD, and suggest that therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with the ECS might prove effective in this disorder. PMID:22034972

  12. Loss of striatal cannabinoid CB1 receptor function in attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder mice with point-mutation of the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Maura; Federici, Mauro; Rossi, Silvia; De Chiara, Valentina; Napolitano, Francesco; Studer, Valeria; Motta, Caterina; Sacchetti, Lucia; Romano, Rosaria; Musella, Alessandra; Bernardi, Giorgio; Siracusano, Alberto; Gu, Howard H; Mercuri, Nicola B; Usiello, Alessandro; Centonze, Diego

    2011-11-01

    Abnormal dopamine (DA) transmission in the striatum plays a pivotal role in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As striatal DA signalling modulates the endocannabinoid system (ECS), the present study was aimed at investigating cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) function in a model of ADHD obtained by triple point-mutation in the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene in mice, making them insensitive to cocaine [DAT cocaine-insensitive (DAT-CI) mice]. DAT-CI mice had a marked hyperactive phenotype, and neurophysiological recordings revealed that the sensitivity of CB1Rs controlling GABA-mediated synaptic currents [CB1Rs((GABA)) ] in the striatum was completely lost. In contrast, CB1Rs modulating glutamate transmission [CB1Rs((Glu)) ], and GABA(B) receptors were not affected in this model of ADHD. In DAT-CI mice, the blockade of CB1R((GABA)) function was complete even after cocaine or environmental manipulations activating the endogenous DA-dependent reward system, which are known to sensitize these receptors in control animals. Conversely, the hedonic property of sucrose was intact in DAT-CI mice, indicating normal sweet perception in these animals. Our results point to CB1Rs as novel molecular players in ADHD, and suggest that therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with the ECS might prove effective in this disorder.

  13. γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is not an agonist of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Connelly, William M; Errington, Adam C; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents.

  14. Sweet Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Shuk-kwan S.; Lo, Jane-Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article features Sweet play math, a "math by the month" activity that involves decorating and making sugar cubes. Teachers may want to substitute straws, paper squares, alphabet blocks, or such commercially made manipulatives as Unifix[R] cubes for the real sweets. Given no allergy concerns, teachers and students alike would enjoy some sweet…

  15. Game playing.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Christopher D

    2014-03-01

    Game playing has been a core domain of artificial intelligence research since the beginnings of the field. Game playing provides clearly defined arenas within which computational approaches can be readily compared to human expertise through head-to-head competition and other benchmarks. Game playing research has identified several simple core algorithms that provide successful foundations, with development focused on the challenges of defeating human experts in specific games. Key developments include minimax search in chess, machine learning from self-play in backgammon, and Monte Carlo tree search in Go. These approaches have generalized successfully to additional games. While computers have surpassed human expertise in a wide variety of games, open challenges remain and research focuses on identifying and developing new successful algorithmic foundations. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:193-205. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1278 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304308

  16. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  17. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor Subunits Play a Direct Structural Role in Synaptic Contact Formation via Their N-terminal Extracellular Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Laura E.; Nicholson, Martin W.; Arama, Jessica E.; Thomson, Alex M.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of cell-cell contacts between presynaptic GABAergic neurons and their postsynaptic targets initiates the process of GABAergic synapse formation. GABAA receptors (GABAARs), the main postsynaptic receptors for GABA, have been recently demonstrated to act as synaptogenic proteins that can single-handedly induce the formation and functional maturation of inhibitory synapses. To establish how the subunit composition of GABAARs influences their ability to induce synaptogenesis, a co-culture model system incorporating GABAergic medium spiny neurons and the HEK293 cells, stably expressing different combinations of receptor subunits, was developed. Analyses of HEK293 cell innervation by medium spiny neuron axons using immunocytochemistry, activity-dependent labeling, and electrophysiology have indicated that the γ2 subunit is required for the formation of active synapses and that its effects are influenced by the type of α/β subunits incorporated into the functional receptor. To further characterize this process, the large N-terminal extracellular domains (ECDs) of α1, α2, β2, and γ2 subunits were purified using the baculovirus/Sf9 cell system. When these proteins were applied to the co-cultures of MSNs and α1/β2/γ2-expressing HEK293 cells, the α1, β2, or γ2 ECD each caused a significant reduction in contact formation, in contrast to the α2 ECD, which had no effect. Together, our experiments indicate that the structural role of GABAARs in synaptic contact formation is determined by their subunit composition, with the N-terminal ECDs of each of the subunits directly participating in interactions between the presynaptic and postsynaptic elements, suggesting the these interactions are multivalent and specific. PMID:27129275

  18. Torso, a Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinase, plays a novel role in the larval fat body in regulating insulin signaling and body growth.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jong Woo; Han, Gangsik; Yun, Hyun Myoung; Lee, Gang Jun; Hyun, Seogang

    2016-08-01

    Torso is a receptor tyrosine kinase whose localized activation at the termini of the Drosophila embryo is mediated by its ligand, Trunk. Recent studies have unveiled a second function of Torso in the larval prothoracic gland (PG) as the receptor for the prothoracicotropic hormone, which triggers pupariation. As such, inhibition of Torso in the PG prolongs the larval growth period, thereby increasing the final pupa size. Here, we report that Torso also acts in the larval fat body, regulating body size in a manner opposite from that of Torso in PG. We confirmed the expression of torso mRNA in the larval fat body and its reduction by RNA interference (RNAi). Fat body-specific knockdown of torso, by either of the two independent RNAi transgenes, significantly decreased the final pupal size. We found that torso knockdown suppresses insulin/target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling in the fat body, as confirmed by repression of Akt and S6K. Notably, the decrease in insulin/TOR signaling and decrease of pupal size induced by the knockdown of torso were rescued by the expression of a constitutively active form of the insulin receptor or by the knockdown of FOXO. Our study revealed a novel role for Torso in the fat body with respect to regulation of insulin/TOR signaling and body size. This finding exemplifies the contrasting effects of the same gene expressed in two different organs on organismal physiology. PMID:27126913

  19. The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) plays a key role in the formation of nanotubes (NTs) between peritoneal mesothelial cells and in murine kidneys.

    PubMed

    Ranzinger, Julia; Rustom, Amin; Heide, Danijela; Morath, Christian; Schemmer, Peter; Nawroth, Peter P; Zeier, Martin; Schwenger, Vedat

    2014-09-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), a multiligand receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, takes part in various inflammatory processes. The role of this receptor in the context of intercellular communication, like nanotube (NT)-mediated interaction, is largely unknown. Here, we use cell cultures of human and murine peritoneal mesothelial cells as well as murine kidneys from wild-type and RAGE knockout mouse models to assess the role of RAGE in NT formation and function. We show that loss of RAGE function results in reduced NT numbers under physiological conditions and demonstrate the involvement of MAP kinase signaling in NT formation. Additionally, we show for the first time the existence of NTs in murine kidney tissue and confirm the correlation of RAGE expression and NT numbers. Under elevated oxidative stress conditions like renal ischemia or peritoneal dialysis, we demonstrate that RAGE absence does not prevent NT formation. Rather, increased NT numbers and attenuated kidney tissue damage could be observed, indicating that, depending on the predominant conditions, RAGE affects NT formation with implications for cellular communication.

  20. Members of the gibberellin receptor gene family GID1 (GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF1) play distinct roles during Lepidium sativum and Arabidopsis thaliana seed germination

    PubMed Central

    Voegele, Antje; Linkies, Ada; Müller, Kerstin; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Germination of endospermic seeds is partly regulated by the micropylar endosperm, which acts as constraint to radicle protrusion. Gibberellin (GA) signalling pathways control coat-dormancy release, endosperm weakening, and organ expansion during seed germination. Three GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF1 (GID1) GA receptors are known in Arabidopsis thaliana: GID1a, GID1b, and GID1c. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of angiosperm GID1s reveals that they cluster into two eudicot (GID1ac, GID1b) groups and one monocot group. Eudicots have at least one gene from each of the two groups, indicating that the different GID1 receptors fulfil distinct roles during plant development. A comparative Brassicaceae approach was used, in which gid1 mutant and whole-seed transcript analyses in Arabidopsis were combined with seed-tissue-specific analyses of its close relative Lepidium sativum (garden cress), for which three GID1 orthologues were cloned. GA signalling via the GID1ac receptors is required for Arabidopsis seed germination, GID1b cannot compensate for the impaired germination of the gid1agid1c mutant. Transcript expression patterns differed temporarily, spatially, and hormonally, with GID1b being distinct from GID1ac in both species. Endosperm weakening is mediated, at least in part, through GA-induced genes encoding cell-wall-modifying proteins. A suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) cDNA library enriched for sequences that are highly expressed during early germination in the micropylar endosperm contained expansins and xyloglucan endo-transglycosylases/hydrolases (XTHs). Their transcript expression patterns in both species strongly suggest that they are regulated by distinct GID1-mediated GA signalling pathways. The GID1ac and GID1b pathways seem to fulfil distinct regulatory roles during Brassicaceae seed germination and seem to control their downstream targets distinctly. PMID:21778177

  1. Activation of family C G-protein-coupled receptors by the tripeptide glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghua; Yao, Yi; Kuang, Donghui; Hampson, David R

    2006-03-31

    The Family C G-protein-coupled receptors include the metabotropic glutamate receptors, the gamma-aminobutyric acid, type B (GABAB) receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), which participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in the body, and a diverse group of sensory receptors that encompass the amino acid-activated fish 5.24 chemosensory receptor, the mammalian T1R taste receptors, and the V2R pheromone receptors. A common feature of Family C receptors is the presence of an amino acid binding site. In this study, a preliminary in silico analysis of the size and shape of the amino acid binding pocket in selected Family C receptors suggested that some members of this family could accommodate larger ligands such as peptides. Subsequent screening and docking experiments identified GSH as a potential ligand or co-ligand at the fish 5.24 receptor and the rat CaSR. These in silico predictions were confirmed using an [3H]GSH radioligand binding assay and a fluorescence-based functional assay performed on wild-type and chimeric receptors. Glutathione was shown to act as an orthosteric agonist at the 5.24 receptor and as a potent enhancer of calcium-induced activation of the CaSR. Within the mammalian receptors, this effect was specific to the CaSR because GSH neither directly activated nor potentiated other Family C receptors including GPRC6A (the putative mammalian homolog of the fish 5.24 receptor), the metabotropic glutamate receptors, or the GABAB receptor. Our findings reveal a potential new role for GSH and suggest that this peptide may act as an endogenous modulator of the CaSR in the parathyroid gland where this receptor is known to control the release of parathyroid hormone, and in other tissues such as the brain and gastrointestinal tract where the role of the calcium receptor appears to subserve other, as yet unknown, physiological functions. PMID:16455645

  2. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism.

  3. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  4. Stabilization by urea during thermal unfolding-mediated aggregation of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor (type II): does solvation entropy play a role?

    PubMed

    Remmele, Richard L; Zhang-van Enk, Jian; Phan, Duke; Yu, Lei

    2012-06-21

    The protein denaturing properties of urea are well-known and still the subject of debate. It has been noted that in some cases where urea concentrations are relatively low stabilization is afforded against aggregation. An explanation for this unusual effect has seemingly remained elusive. Evidence is offered to propose urea stabilization is related to its influence on the solvation property of the protein molecules when in contact with an unfolded hydrophobic surface that tends to increase the entropy of the local aqueous solvent. This property of urea is expected to lower the entropic driving force of unfolded-mediated aggregation despite the increase in enthalpy. The data presented from toluene transfer experiments into 2 M urea + 0.1 M sodium phosphate solutions showed that the solvation free energy change was negative up to ∼75 °C. The associated ΔΔH was positive, leading to the conclusion that entropy drives the solvation process within the temperature domain from ∼20° to 75 °C. Using thermodynamic parameters from the toluene solvation experiments, it was possible to accurately determine the T(m) shift of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor type II (rhuIL-1R(II)). Heating experiments above the apparent T(m) in the same urea/phosphate solution support the thesis that urea inhibits the entropy-driven aggregation process of rhuIL-1R(II), adding yet another molecule to the list of low urea concentration stabilized molecules. PMID:22571594

  5. Urokinase Plasminogen Receptor and the Fibrinolytic Complex Play a Role in Nerve Repair after Nerve Crush in Mice, and in Human Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Rivellini, Cristina; Dina, Giorgia; Porrello, Emanuela; Cerri, Federica; Scarlato, Marina; Domi, Teuta; Ungaro, Daniela; Carro, Ubaldo Del; Bolino, Alessandra; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Previtali, Stefano C.

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical step in peripheral nerve regeneration. In fact, in human neuropathies, endoneurial ECM enriched in fibrin and vitronectin associates with poor regeneration and worse clinical prognosis. Accordingly in animal models, modification of the fibrinolytic complex activity has profound effects on nerve regeneration: high fibrinolytic activity and low levels of fibrin correlate with better nerve regeneration. The urokinase plasminogen receptor (uPAR) is a major component of the fibrinolytic complex, and binding to urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) promotes fibrinolysis and cell movement. uPAR is expressed in peripheral nerves, however, little is known on its potential function on nerve development and regeneration. Thus, we investigated uPAR null mice and observed that uPAR is dispensable for nerve development, whereas, loss of uPAR affects nerve regeneration. uPAR null mice showed reduced nerve repair after sciatic nerve crush. This was a consequence of reduced fibrinolytic activity and increased deposition of endoneurial fibrin and vitronectin. Exogenous fibrinolysis in uPAR null mice rescued nerve repair after sciatic nerve crush. Finally, we measured the fibrinolytic activity in sural nerve biopsies from patients with peripheral neuropathies. We showed that neuropathies with defective regeneration had reduced fibrinolytic activity. On the contrary, neuropathies with signs of active regeneration displayed higher fibrinolytic activity. Overall, our results suggest that enforced fibrinolysis may facilitate regeneration and outcome of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:22363796

  6. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Richard A.; Peffer, Richard C.; Goetz, Amber K.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Goodman, Jay I.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA. PMID:24675475

  7. Variation in the dopamine D2 receptor gene plays a key role in human pain and its modulation by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, Satu K; Lindholm, Pauliina; Valmunen, Tanja; Pesonen, Ullamari; Taiminen, Tero; Virtanen, Arja; Lamusuo, Salla; Forssell, Heli; Hagelberg, Nora; Hietala, Jarmo; Pertovaara, Antti

    2014-10-01

    We tested whether variation of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene contributes to individual differences in thermal pain sensitivity and analgesic efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in healthy subjects (n=29) or susceptibility to neuropathic pain in patients with neurophysiologically confirmed diagnosis (n=16). Thermal sensitivity of healthy subjects was assessed before and after navigated rTMS provided to the S1/M1 cortex. All subjects were genotyped for the DRD2 gene 957C>T and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) protein Val158Met polymorphisms. In healthy subjects, 957C>T influenced both innocuous and noxious thermal detection thresholds that were lowest in 957TT homozygotes (P values from .0277 to .0462). rTMS to S1 cortex had analgesic effect only in 957TT homozygote genotype (P=.0086). In patients, prevalence of 957TT homozygote genotype was higher than in a healthy Finnish population (50% vs 27%; P=.0191). Patients with 957TT genotype reported more severe pain than patients with other genotypes (P=.0351). COMT Val158Met polymorphism was not independently associated with the studied variables. Genetic regulation of DRD2 function by 957C>T polymorphism thus seems to influence thermal and pain sensitivity, its modulation by rTMS, and susceptibility to neuropathic pain. This indicates a central role for the dopamine system and DRD2 in pain and analgesia. This may have clinical implications regarding individualized selection of patients for rTMS treatment and assessment of risks for neuropathic pain.

  8. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action.

    PubMed

    Currie, Richard A; Peffer, Richard C; Goetz, Amber K; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Goodman, Jay I

    2014-07-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA.

  9. 12-HETER1/GPR31, a high-affinity 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid receptor, is significantly up-regulated in prostate cancer and plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Honn, Kenneth V; Guo, Yande; Cai, Yinlong; Lee, Menq-Jer; Dyson, Gregory; Zhang, Wenliang; Tucker, Stephanie C

    2016-06-01

    Previously we identified and deorphaned G-protein-coupled receptor 31 (GPR31) as the high-affinity 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid [12(S)-HETE] receptor (12-HETER1). Here we have determined its distribution in prostate cancer tissue and its role in prostate tumorigenesis using in vitro and in vivo assays. Data-mining studies strongly suggest that 12-HETER1 expression positively correlates with the aggressiveness and progression of prostate tumors. This was corroborated with real-time PCR analysis of human prostate tumor tissue arrays that revealed the expression of 12-HETER1 positively correlates with the clinical stages of prostate cancers and Gleason scores. Immunohistochemistry analysis also proved that the expression of 12-HETER1 is positively correlated with the grades of prostate cancer. Knockdown of 12-HETER1 in prostate cancer cells markedly reduced colony formation and inhibited tumor growth in animals. To discover the regulatory factors, 5 candidate 12-HETER1 promoter cis elements were assayed as luciferase reporter fusions in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, where the putative cis element required for gene regulation was mapped 2 kb upstream of the 12-HETER1 transcriptional start site. The data implicate 12-HETER1 in a critical new role in the regulation of prostate cancer progression and offer a novel alternative target for therapeutic intervention.-Honn, K. V., Guo, Y., Cai, Y., Lee, M.-J., Dyson, G., Zhang, W., Tucker, S. C. 12-HETER1/GPR31, a high-affinity 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid receptor, is significantly up-regulated in prostate cancer and plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression. PMID:26965684

  10. AMPA Receptor-mTOR Activation is Required for the Antidepressant-Like Effects of Sarcosine during the Forced Swim Test in Rats: Insertion of AMPA Receptor may Play a Role.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuang-Ti; Tsai, Mang-Hung; Wu, Ching-Hsiang; Jou, Ming-Jia; Wei, I-Hua; Huang, Chih-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Sarcosine, an endogenous amino acid, is a competitive inhibitor of the type I glycine transporter and an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) coagonist. Recently, we found that sarcosine, an NMDAR enhancer, can improve depression-related behaviors in rodents and humans. This result differs from previous studies, which have reported antidepressant effects of NMDAR antagonists. The mechanisms underlying the therapeutic response of sarcosine remain unknown. This study examines the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor (AMPAR) activation, which are involved in the antidepressant-like effects of several glutamatergic system modulators. The effects of sarcosine in a forced swim test (FST) and the expression levels of phosphorylated mTOR signaling proteins were examined in the absence or presence of mTOR and AMPAR inhibitors. In addition, the influence of sarcosine on AMPAR trafficking was determined by analyzing the phosphorylation of AMPAR subunit GluR1 at the PKA site (often considered an indicator for GluR1 membrane insertion in neurons). A single injection of sarcosine exhibited antidepressant-like effects in rats in the FST and rapidly activated the mTOR signaling pathway, which were significantly blocked by mTOR inhibitor rapamycin or the AMPAR inhibitor 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX) pretreatment. Moreover, NBQX pretreatment eliminated the ability of sarcosine to stimulate the phosphorylated mTOR signaling proteins. Furthermore, GluR1 phosphorylation at its PKA site was significantly increased after an acute in vivo sarcosine treatment. The results demonstrated that sarcosine exerts antidepressant-like effects by enhancing AMPAR-mTOR signaling pathway activity and facilitating AMPAR membrane insertion. Highlights-A single injection of sarcosine rapidly exerted antidepressant-like effects with a concomitant increase in the activation of the mammalian

  11. NMDA and GABA receptors as potential targets in cough hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-06-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom that can be difficult to treat. It is proposed to be part of a cough hypersensitivity syndrome characterised by troublesome coughing often triggered by low levels of thermal, mechanical or chemical exposure. Upper airway and laryngeal neural dysfunction may also be present. There is evidence that this hypersensitivity may be due to sensory nerve damage caused by inflammatory, infective and allergic factors. Antitussive therapies based on opioid medications are generally not efficacious. Antagonists of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in the brain stem and use of GABAB receptor agonists such as baclofen acting centrally and possibly peripherally may represent novel therapeutic approaches.

  12. Striatal GABA receptor alterations in hypoxic neonatal rats: role of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Binoy, J; Anitha, M; Paulose, C S

    2012-03-01

    Hypoxia in neonates disrupts the oxygen flow to the brain, essentially starving the brain and preventing it from performing vital biochemical processes important for central nervous system development. Hypoxia results in a permanent brain damage by gene and receptor level alterations mediated through neurotransmitters. The present study evaluated GABA, GABAA, GABAB receptor functions and gene expression changes in glutamate decarboxylase in the corpus striatum of hypoxic neonatal rats and the treatment groups with glucose, oxygen and epinephrine. Since GABA is the principal neurotransmitter involved in hypoxic ventilatory decline, the alterations in its level under hypoxic stress points to an important aspect of respiratory control. Following hypoxic stress, a significant decrease in total GABA, GABAA and GABAB receptors function and GAD expression was observed in the striatum, which accounts for the ventilator decline. Hypoxic rats treated with glucose alone and with oxygen showed a reversal of the receptor alterations and changes in GAD to near control. Being a source of immediate energy, glucose can reduce the ATP-depletion-induced changes in GABA and oxygenation helps in overcoming reduction in oxygen supply. Treatment with oxygen alone and epinephrine was not effective in reversing the altered receptor functions. Thus, our study point to the functional role of GABA receptors in mediating ventilatory response to hypoxia and the neuroprotective role of glucose treatment. This has immense significance in the proper management of neonatal hypoxia for a better intellect in the later stages of life.

  13. Identification of the transmitter and receptor mechanisms responsible for REM sleep paralysis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Patricia L; Peever, John H

    2012-07-18

    During REM sleep the CNS is intensely active, but the skeletal motor system is paradoxically forced into a state of muscle paralysis. The mechanisms that trigger REM sleep paralysis are a matter of intense debate. Two competing theories argue that it is caused by either active inhibition or reduced excitation of somatic motoneuron activity. Here, we identify the transmitter and receptor mechanisms that function to silence skeletal muscles during REM sleep. We used behavioral, electrophysiological, receptor pharmacology and neuroanatomical approaches to determine how trigeminal motoneurons and masseter muscles are switched off during REM sleep in rats. We show that a powerful GABA and glycine drive triggers REM paralysis by switching off motoneuron activity. This drive inhibits motoneurons by targeting both metabotropic GABA(B) and ionotropic GABA(A)/glycine receptors. REM paralysis is only reversed when motoneurons are cut off from GABA(B), GABA(A) and glycine receptor-mediated inhibition. Neither metabotropic nor ionotropic receptor mechanisms alone are sufficient for generating REM paralysis. These results demonstrate that multiple receptor mechanisms trigger REM sleep paralysis. Breakdown in normal REM inhibition may underlie common sleep motor pathologies such as REM sleep behavior disorder.

  14. The modulation by chlormethiazole of the GABAA-receptor complex in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, A. J.; Stirling, J. M.; Robinson, T. N.; Bowen, D. M.; Francis, P. T.; Green, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    1. The interactions of chlormethiazole with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and release, and with ligand binding to sites associated with the GABAA-receptor complex and the GABAB-receptor have been studied in the rat. The GABAA-receptor was studied using [3H]-muscimol, [3H]-flunitrazepam was used to label the benzodiazepine modulatory site, and [35S]-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]-TBPS) to label the chloride channel. 2. Chlormethiazole had no effect on GABA synthesis in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum or on GABA release from cortical slices in vitro. Chlormethiazole did not displace [3H]-baclofen binding to the GABAB-receptor. 3. Chlormethiazole (IC50 = 140 microM) and pentobarbitone (IC50 = 95 microM) both inhibited [35S]-TBPS binding by increasing the rate of [35S]-TBPS dissociation. In addition, chlormethiazole caused an apparent decrease in the affinity of [35S]-TBPS binding. 4. Chlormethiazole enhanced the binding of [3H]-muscimol but had no effect on [3H]-flunitrazepam binding. In contrast, the sedative barbiturate pentobarbitone enhanced both [3H]-muscimol and [3H]-flunitrazepam binding. 5. It is concluded that the sedative and anticonvulsant effects of chlormethiazole are probably mediated through an action at the GABAA-receptor. However, chlormethiazole does not interact with the GABAA-receptor complex in an identical manner to the sedative barbiturate pentobarbitone. PMID:2553191

  15. Identification of the transmitter and receptor mechanisms responsible for REM sleep paralysis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Patricia L; Peever, John H

    2012-07-18

    During REM sleep the CNS is intensely active, but the skeletal motor system is paradoxically forced into a state of muscle paralysis. The mechanisms that trigger REM sleep paralysis are a matter of intense debate. Two competing theories argue that it is caused by either active inhibition or reduced excitation of somatic motoneuron activity. Here, we identify the transmitter and receptor mechanisms that function to silence skeletal muscles during REM sleep. We used behavioral, electrophysiological, receptor pharmacology and neuroanatomical approaches to determine how trigeminal motoneurons and masseter muscles are switched off during REM sleep in rats. We show that a powerful GABA and glycine drive triggers REM paralysis by switching off motoneuron activity. This drive inhibits motoneurons by targeting both metabotropic GABA(B) and ionotropic GABA(A)/glycine receptors. REM paralysis is only reversed when motoneurons are cut off from GABA(B), GABA(A) and glycine receptor-mediated inhibition. Neither metabotropic nor ionotropic receptor mechanisms alone are sufficient for generating REM paralysis. These results demonstrate that multiple receptor mechanisms trigger REM sleep paralysis. Breakdown in normal REM inhibition may underlie common sleep motor pathologies such as REM sleep behavior disorder. PMID:22815493

  16. Inhibition of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Input to Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli Mediated by Suppression of Presynaptic Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, Matt; McGann, John P.; Heyward, Philip M.; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C.; Shipley, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the cellular mechanism underlying presynaptic regulation of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) input to the mouse olfactory bulb using optical-imaging techniques that selectively report activity in the ORN pre-synaptic terminal. First, we loaded ORNs with calcium-sensitive dye and imaged stimulus-evoked calcium influx in a slice preparation. Single olfactory nerve shocks evoked rapid fluorescence increases that were largely blocked by the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin GVIA. Paired shocks revealed a long-lasting suppression of calcium influx with ~40% suppression at 400-ms interstimulus intervals and a recovery time constant of ~450 ms. Blocking activation of postsynaptic olfactory bulb neurons with APV/CNQX reduced this suppression. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibited calcium influx, whereas GABAB antagonists reduced paired-pulse suppression without affecting the response to the conditioning pulse. We also imaged transmitter release directly using a mouse line that expresses synaptopHluorin selectively in ORNs. We found that the relationship between calcium influx and transmitter release was superlinear and that paired-pulse suppression of transmitter release was reduced, but not eliminated, by APV/CNQX and GABAB antagonists. These results demonstrate that primary olfactory input to the CNS can be presynaptically regulated by GABAergic interneurons and show that one major intracellular pathway for this regulation is via the suppression of calcium influx through N-type calcium channels in the pre-synaptic terminal. This mechanism is unique among primary sensory afferents. PMID:15917320

  17. GABA Receptors on Orexin and Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Neurons Are Differentially Homeostatically Regulated Following Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Toossi, Hanieh; Del Cid-Pellitero, Esther; Jones, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Though overlapping in distribution through the hypothalamus, orexin (Orx) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons play opposite roles in the regulation of sleep-wake states. Orx neurons discharge during waking, whereas MCH neurons discharge during sleep. In the present study, we examined in mice whether GABAA and GABAB receptors (Rs) are present on Orx and MCH neurons and might undergo differential changes as a function of their different activities following sleep deprivation (SD) and sleep recovery (SR). Applying quantitative stereological image analysis to dual-immunofluorescent stained sections, we determined that the proportion of Orx neurons positively immunostained for GABAARs was significantly higher following SD (∼48%) compared with sleep control (SC; ∼24%) and SR (∼27%), and that the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly greater. In contrast, the average proportion of the MCH neurons immunostained for GABAARs was insignificantly lower following SD (∼43%) compared with SC (∼54%) and SR (56%), and the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly less. Although, GABABRs were observed in all Orx and MCH neurons (100%), the luminance of these receptors was differentially altered following SD. The intensity of GABABRs in the Orx neurons was significantly greater after SD than after SC and SR, whereas that in the MCH neurons was significantly less. The present results indicate that GABA receptors undergo dynamic and differential changes in the wake-active Orx neurons and the sleep-active MCH neurons as a function of and homeostatic adjustment to their preceding activity and sleep-wake state. PMID:27294196

  18. GABA Receptors on Orexin and Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Neurons Are Differentially Homeostatically Regulated Following Sleep Deprivation123

    PubMed Central

    Toossi, Hanieh; del Cid-Pellitero, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Though overlapping in distribution through the hypothalamus, orexin (Orx) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons play opposite roles in the regulation of sleep–wake states. Orx neurons discharge during waking, whereas MCH neurons discharge during sleep. In the present study, we examined in mice whether GABAA and GABAB receptors (Rs) are present on Orx and MCH neurons and might undergo differential changes as a function of their different activities following sleep deprivation (SD) and sleep recovery (SR). Applying quantitative stereological image analysis to dual-immunofluorescent stained sections, we determined that the proportion of Orx neurons positively immunostained for GABAARs was significantly higher following SD (∼48%) compared with sleep control (SC; ∼24%) and SR (∼27%), and that the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly greater. In contrast, the average proportion of the MCH neurons immunostained for GABAARs was insignificantly lower following SD (∼43%) compared with SC (∼54%) and SR (56%), and the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly less. Although, GABABRs were observed in all Orx and MCH neurons (100%), the luminance of these receptors was differentially altered following SD. The intensity of GABABRs in the Orx neurons was significantly greater after SD than after SC and SR, whereas that in the MCH neurons was significantly less. The present results indicate that GABA receptors undergo dynamic and differential changes in the wake-active Orx neurons and the sleep-active MCH neurons as a function of and homeostatic adjustment to their preceding activity and sleep–wake state. PMID:27294196

  19. MicroRNA-27b plays a role in pulmonary arterial hypertension by modulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ dependent Hsp90-eNOS signaling and nitric oxide production

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Rui; Bao, Chunrong; Jiang, Lianyong; Liu, Hao; Yang, Yang; Mei, Ju; Ding, Fangbao

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary artery endothelial dysfunction is associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Based on recent studies showing that microRNA (miR)-27b is aberrantly expressed in PAH, we hypothesized that miR-27b may contribute to pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling in PAH. The effect of miR-27b on pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and the underlying mechanism were investigated in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) in vitro and in a monocrotaline (MCT)-induced model of PAH in vivo. miR-27b expression was upregulated in MCT-induced PAH and inversely correlated with the levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, and miR-27b inhibition attenuated MCT-induced endothelial dysfunction and remodeling and prevented PAH associated right ventricular hypertrophy and systolic pressure in rats. PPARγ was confirmed as a direct target of miR-27b in HPAECs and shown to mediate the effect of miR-27b on the disruption of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) coupling to Hsp90 and the suppression of NO production associated with the PAH phenotype. We showed that miR-27b plays a role endothelial function and NO release and elucidated a potential mechanism by which miR-27b regulates Hsp90-eNOS and NO signaling by modulating PPARγ expression, providing potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAH. - Highlights: • miR-27b plays a role in endothelial function and NO release. • miR-27b inhibition ameliorates MCT-induced endothelial dysfunction and PAH. • miR-27b targets PPARγ in HPAECs. • miR-27b regulates PPARγ dependent Hsp90-eNOS and NO signaling.

  20. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Plays a Pro-Apoptotic Role in β-Adrenergic Receptor-Stimulated Apoptosis in Adult Rat Ventricular Myocytes: Role of β1 Integrins

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Johnson, Jennifer N.; Ross, Robert S.; Singh, Mahipal; Singh, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation induces apoptosis in adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM). β1 integrin signaling plays a protective role in β-AR-stimulated apoptosis. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase, negatively regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Here we show that β-AR stimulation (isoproterenol; 15 min) increases tyr216 phosphorylation and GSK-3β activity. Inclusion of LiCl, inhibitor of GSK-3β, in the reaction mix or expression of catalytically inactive GSK-3β (KM-GSK) inhibited β-AR-stimulated GSK-3β activity. Inhibition of tyrosine kinase using genistein or chelation of intracellular Ca2+ using BAPTA-AM inhibited β-AR-stimulated increases in tyr216 phosphorylation and GSK-3β activity. Inhibition of GSK-3β using pharmacological inhibitors or infection with KM-GSK decreased β-AR-stimulated cytosolic cytochrome C release and apoptosis. Expression of β1 integrins increased ser9 phosphorylation and inhibited β-AR-stimulated increase in GSK-3β activity. Wortmannin, inhibitor of PI3-kinase, reversed the effects of β1 integrins on GSK-3β activity and apoptosis. Purified active matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), shown to interfere with β1 integrin signaling, increased GSK-3β activity, while inhibition of MMP-2 inhibited β-AR-stimulated increases in GSK-3β activity. β-AR stimulation induced nuclear accumulation of GSK-3β. β-AR stimulation (3 h) increased the expression of transcription factor Gadd153 (growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153). These data suggest that β-AR stimulation increases GSK-3β activity. Activation of GSK-3β plays a pro-apoptotic role in β-AR stimulated apoptosis via the involvement of mitochondrial death pathway. β1 integrins inactivate GSK-3β and play an anti-apoptotic role via the involvement of PI3-kinase pathway. The apoptotic effects of GSK-3β may be mediated, at least in part, via its nuclear localization and induction of pro-apoptotic genes

  1. γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB)-induced respiratory depression: combined receptor-transporter inhibition therapy for treatment in GHB overdose.

    PubMed

    Morse, Bridget L; Vijay, Nisha; Morris, Marilyn E

    2012-08-01

    Overdose of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) frequently causes respiratory depression, occasionally resulting in death; however, little is known about the dose-response relationship or effects of potential overdose treatment strategies on GHB-induced respiratory depression. In these studies, the parameters of respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute volume were measured using whole-body plethysmography in rats administered GHB. Intravenous doses of 200, 600, and 1500 mg/kg were administered to assess the dose-dependent effects of GHB on respiration. To determine the receptors involved in GHB-induced respiratory depression, a specific GABA(B) receptor antagonist, (2S)-(+)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH50911), and a specific GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline, were administered before GHB. The potential therapeutic strategies of receptor inhibition and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) inhibition were assessed by inhibitor administration 5 min after GHB. The primary effect of GHB on respiration was a dose-dependent decrease in respiratory rate, accompanied by an increase in tidal volume, resulting in little change in minute volume. Pretreatment with 150 mg/kg SCH50911 completely prevented the decrease in respiratory rate, indicating agonism at GABA(B) receptors to be primarily responsible for GHB-induced respiratory depression. Administration of 50 mg/kg SCH50911 after GHB completely reversed the decrease in respiratory rate; lower doses had partial effects. Administration of the MCT inhibitor l-lactate increased GHB renal and total clearance, also improving respiratory rate. Administration of 5 mg/kg SCH50911 plus l-lactate further improved respiratory rate compared with the same dose of either agent alone, indicating that GABA(B) and MCT inhibitors, alone and in combination, represent potential treatment options for GHB-induced respiratory depression.

  2. Play Therapy: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Maggie L.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Jessee, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the current issues in play therapy and its implications for play therapists. A brief history of play therapy is provided along with the current play therapy approaches and techniques. This article also touches on current issues or problems that play therapists may face, such as interpreting children's play, implementing…

  3. They Too Should Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Cyntha C.; Shelley, Eva Y.

    1989-01-01

    Children with mental retardation and multiple handicaps can effectively participate in play activities and games, but the experience must be structured for them. Techniques for organizing play activities involving handicapped and nonhandicapped children are offered. Examples of singles play, rotation play, and associative play are described. (JDD)

  4. Children's Play and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discusses adverse effects of FCC deregulation of children's television programming on children's play behavior. Discusses the difference between play and imitation, the role of high quality dramatic play in healthy child development, the popularity of war play, and use of toys to increase dramatic play. Considers ways to help children gain control…

  5. The Denial of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Smith, Brian

    Well meaning parents and teachers often use children's play for the purposes of literacy and socialization. Yet, these attempts may deny play to children by subordinating play to some other concept. Evidence shows that even when parents play with their very young children they generally play games like shopping, cooking, and eating; whereas when…

  6. War, Conflict and Play. Debating Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyder, Tina

    2004-01-01

    Young refugees from many parts of the world are increasingly present in UK early years settings. This book explores the crucial importance of play for young refugee children's development. It considers the implications of war and conflict on young children and notes how opportunities for play are denied. It provides a framework for early years…

  7. Calcium-stores mediate adaptation in axon terminals of Olfactory Receptor Neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In vertebrates and invertebrates, sensory neurons adapt to variable ambient conditions, such as the duration or repetition of a stimulus, a physiological mechanism considered as a simple form of non-associative learning and neuronal plasticity. Although various signaling pathways, as cAMP, cGMP, and the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (InsP3R) play a role in adaptation, their precise mechanisms of action at the cellular level remain incompletely understood. Recently, in Drosophila, we reported that odor-induced Ca2+-response in axon terminals of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is related to odor duration. In particular, a relatively long odor stimulus (such as 5 s) triggers the induction of a second component involving intracellular Ca2+-stores. Results We used a recently developed in-vivo bioluminescence imaging approach to quantify the odor-induced Ca2+-activity in the axon terminals of ORNs. Using either a genetic approach to target specific RNAs, or a pharmacological approach, we show that the second component, relying on the intracellular Ca2+-stores, is responsible for the adaptation to repetitive stimuli. In the antennal lobes (a region analogous to the vertebrate olfactory bulb) ORNs make synaptic contacts with second-order neurons, the projection neurons (PNs). These synapses are modulated by GABA, through either GABAergic local interneurons (LNs) and/or some GABAergic PNs. Application of GABAergic receptor antagonists, both GABAA or GABAB, abolishes the adaptation, while RNAi targeting the GABABR (a metabotropic receptor) within the ORNs, blocks the Ca2+-store dependent component, and consequently disrupts the adaptation. These results indicate that GABA exerts a feedback control. Finally, at the behavioral level, using an olfactory test, genetically impairing the GABABR or its signaling pathway specifically in the ORNs disrupts olfactory adapted behavior. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that a relatively long lasting

  8. The Uses of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabaniss, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Teaching artists have techniques for keeping play alive and vital in their work. But how do they think of play as TAs? In this article, the author examines the role of play in the work and life of teaching artists.

  9. Understanding Playful Pedagogies, Play Narratives and Play Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goouch, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a tentative attempt to unwrap and understand one aspect of playful practice and the influences which determine its existence in early years settings. "Storying" events, those occasions when teachers and children together "make up" stories or parts of stories, develop roles or co-construct fantasies, occur moment by moment in some…

  10. The Play of Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews the role of play within psychotherapy. She does not discuss the formal play therapy especially popular for young children, nor play from the Jungian perspective that encourages the use of the sand tray with adults. Instead, she focuses on the informal use of play during psychotherapy as it is orchestrated intuitively. Because…

  11. Play: early and eternal.

    PubMed Central

    Mears, C E; Harlow, H F

    1975-01-01

    A systematic 12-week investigation of development of play behavior was conducted with eight socially reared rhesus monkey infants. A new, basic and primary play form termed self-motion play or peragration was identified and examined. This behavior follows a human model which includes a wide range of pleasurable activities involving motion of the body through space, e.g., rocking, swinging, running, leaping, and water or snow skiing. It can be argued that self-motion play is the initial primate play form and because of its persistence constitutes a reinforcing agent for maintaining many complex patterns and even pastimes. Monkey self-motion play in the present study was divided into five separate patterns in order to compare the relative importance of social and individual peragration play, the role of apparatus and the overall developmental relationships between the different individual and social self-motion play patterns. The data showed that from 90 to 180 days of age self-motion play was independent of other forms of play, that individual self-motion play appeared earlier and with significantly greater increases in frequency than did social self-motion play, and that apparatus was a necessary component for significant increases in social self-motion play. Other findings were that self-motion play existed independent of locomotion and, though initiated by exploration, was separate from it. Therapeutic implications of self-motion play were discussed. Images PMID:1057178

  12. Optical control of endogenous proteins with a photoswitchable conditional subunit reveals a role for TREK1 in GABA(B) signaling.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Guillaume; Levitz, Joshua; Kramer, Richard H; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2012-06-21

    Selective ligands are lacking for many neuronal signaling proteins. Photoswitched tethered ligands (PTLs) have enabled fast and reversible control of specific proteins containing a PTL anchoring site and have been used to remote control overexpressed proteins. We report here a scheme for optical remote control of native proteins using a "photoswitchable conditional subunit" (PCS), which contains the PTL anchoring site as well as a mutation that prevents it from reaching the plasma membrane. In cells lacking native subunits for the protein, the PCS remains nonfunctional internally. However, in cells expressing native subunits, the native subunit and PCS coassemble, traffic to the plasma membrane, and place the native protein under optical control provided by the coassembled PCS. We apply this approach to the TREK1 potassium channel, which lacks selective, reversible blockers. We find that TREK1, typically considered to be a leak channel, contributes to the hippocampal GABA(B) response. PMID:22726831

  13. Decreased GABA receptor in the cerebral cortex of epileptic rats: effect of Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstact Background Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex, maintains the inhibitory tones that counter balances neuronal excitation. When this balance is perturbed, seizures may ensue. Methods In the present study, alterations of the general GABA, GABAA and GABAB receptors in the cerebral cortex of the epileptic rat and the therapeutic application of Bacopa monnieri were investigated. Results Scatchard analysis of [3H]GABA, [3H]bicuculline and [3H]baclofen in the cerebral cortex of the epileptic rat showed significant decrease in Bmax (P < 0.001) compared to control. Real Time PCR amplification of GABA receptor subunits such as GABAAά1, GABAAγ, GABAAδ, GABAB and GAD where down regulated (P < 0.001) in epileptic rats. GABAAά5 subunit and Cyclic AMP responsible element binding protein were up regulated. Confocal imaging study confirmed the decreased GABA receptors in epileptic rats. Epileptic rats have deficit in radial arm and Y maze performance. Conclusions Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A treatment reverses epilepsy associated changes to near control suggesting that decreased GABA receptors in the cerebral cortex have an important role in epileptic occurrence; Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A have therapeutic application in epilepsy management. PMID:22364254

  14. Role-Playing Mitosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Mark A.; Stegink, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a role playing activity that actively engages students in the learning process of mitosis. Students play either chromosomes carrying information, or cells in the cell membrane. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/YDS)

  15. The Excellence of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyles, Janet R., Ed.

    Recognizing that for young children, play is a tool for learning, this book compiles contributions by different authors, reflecting both up-to-date research and current classroom practice as they relate to children's play. Part 1 of the book explores the value of play as a cross-cultural concept as well as one rooted in the Western world. Gender…

  16. Play Is the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Steve; Sanderson, Rebecca Cornelli

    2012-01-01

    Historically, play has been viewed as a frivolous break from important endeavors like working and learning when, in fact, a child's ability to fully and freely engage in play is essential to their learning, productivity, and overall development. A natural drive to play is universal across all young mammals. Children from every society on earth…

  17. Dimensions of Infant Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenson, Larry

    Changes in manipulative play with objects were examined in a longitudinal sample of 10 boys and 9 girls tested at ages 9, 13, and 18 months. Stability of individual differences in play was also examined. Each child was observed individually for 7 minutes in a room in which a tea set was the only toy present. Seven types of play behavior were…

  18. The Pedagogy of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    Play is important. Environmental educators Sobel and Louv write about the relationship between children and outside play and suggest that early transcendental experiences within nature allow children to develop empathetic orientations towards the natural world. Children who play out-of-doors develop an appreciation for the environment and…

  19. The Importance of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher, Allen

    Play is the spontaneous or organized recreational activity of children; it is at the heart of the preschool curriculum. Play aids in the development of physical, intellectual, and social skills. Children's play progresses through three developmental stages: solitary, parallel, and social. Preschool teachers should arrange for four kinds of…

  20. Literacy through Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owocki, Gretchen

    When young children play in a purposefully designed, literacy-rich environment, teachers can discover and capitalize on teachable moments. This book discusses how children develop literacy and how early childhood teachers use play and other child-centered experiences to facilitate literacy development. Chapter 1, "Play and Developmentally…

  1. Play, Policy & Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klugman, Edgar, Ed.

    In 1992, the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF), in conjunction with Wheelock College (Boston), sponsored its second workshop on children's play, entitled "Play and Cognitive Ability: The Cultural Context." This volume reflects the presentations and discussions held at the workshop, offering perspectives on children's play that, taken…

  2. Characterization and pharmacology of the GHB receptor.

    PubMed

    Ticku, Maharaj K; Mehta, Ashok K

    2008-10-01

    Radioligand binding using [(3)H]NCS-382, an antagonist of the GHB receptor, revealed specific binding sites in the rat cerebrocortical and hippocampal membranes. Scatchard analysis of saturation isotherms revealed two different populations of binding sites. NCS-382 was about 10 times more potent than GHB in inhibiting [(3)H]NCS-382 binding. A variety of ligands for other receptors did not affect [(3)H]NCS-382 binding. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of [(3)H]NCS-382 binding revealed similar characteristics. Thus [(3)H]NCS-382, being more potent and selective, offers advantage over [(3)H]GHB as a radioligand. Unlike GHB, several analogues of GHB such as UMB68 (a tertiary alcohol analogue of GHB), UMB86 (4-hydroxy-4-napthylbutanoic acid, sodium salt), UMB72 [4-(3-phenylpropyloxy)butyric acid, sodium salt], UMB73 (4-benzyloxybutyric acid, sodium salt), UMB66 (3-chloropropanoic acid), gamma-hydroxyvaleric acid (that is, GHV, a 4-methyl-substituted analogue of GHB), 3-HPA (3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid), and ethers of 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (UMB108, UMB109, and UMB119) displaced [(3)H]NCS-382 without affecting [(3)H]GABA binding to GABA(B) receptor. Thus these compounds offer an advantage over GHB as an experimental tool. Our study, aimed at exploring the potential involvement of the GHB receptor in the pharmacology of ethanol, indicated that ethanol does not affect [(3)H]NCS-382 binding in the rat brain, thereby suggesting that ethanol does not interact directly with the GHB receptor. Our study, aimed at exploring the involvement of the GHB receptor in the pathology of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, which is known to cause elevation of GHB levels, revealed no change in the affinity, receptor density or displacement potency as determined by using [(3)H]NCS-382 as a radioligand in Aldh5a1(-/-) vs. Aldh5a1(+/+) mouse brain.

  3. Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Participates in Amyloid-β Processing in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease but Plays a Minor Role in the Therapeutic Properties of a Cannabis-Based Medicine.

    PubMed

    Aso, Ester; Andrés-Benito, Pol; Carmona, Margarita; Maldonado, Rafael; Ferrer, Isidre

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target to modify neurodegenerative pathways linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the specific contribution of CB2 receptor to the progression of AD-like pathology and its role in the positive effect of a cannabis-based medicine (1:1 combination of Δ9-tetrahidrocannabinol and cannabidiol) previously demonstrated to be beneficial in the AβPP/PS1 transgenic model of the disease. A new mouse strain was generated by crossing AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice with CB2 knockout mice. Results show that lack of CB2 exacerbates cortical Aβ deposition and increases the levels of soluble Aβ40. However, CB2 receptor deficiency does not affect the viability of AβPP/PS1 mice, does not accelerate their memory impairment, does not modify tau hyperphosphorylation in dystrophic neurites associated to Aβ plaques, and does not attenuate the positive cognitive effect induced by the cannabis-based medicine in these animals. These findings suggest a minor role for the CB2 receptor in the therapeutic effect of the cannabis-based medicine in AβPP/PS1 mice, but also constitute evidence of a link between CB2 receptor and Aβ processing. PMID:26890764

  4. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  5. Play and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James E.; Christie, James F.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how play is affected by computers and digital toys. Research indicates that when computer software targeted at children is problem-solving oriented and open-ended, children tend to engage in creative play and interact with peers in a positive manner. On the other hand, drill-and-practice programs can be quite boring and limit…

  6. Play as Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henricks, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The author investigates what he believes one of the more important aspects of play--the experience it generates in its participants. He considers the quality of this experience in relation to five ways of viewing play--as action, interaction, activity, disposition, and within a context. He treats broadly the different forms of affect, including…

  7. Play, Toys and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brougere, Gilles

    In Western societies, television has transformed the life, culture, and points of reference of the child. Its particular sphere of influence is the child's play culture. This play culture is not hermetic: it is very oriented toward manipulation; has a symbolic role as a representational medium; evolves along with the child; has a certain amount of…

  8. An Invitation to Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Jenny; Zieher, Connie

    The manual is intended to provide suggestions for play to parents of young children with exceptional educational needs. Nineteen types of activities are described and pictured, including make believe with boxes, dress-up activities, kitchen play, bubbles, small motor activities using beans and buttons, use of throw-away materials, painting,…

  9. Let's Just Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Children have a right to play. The idea is so simple it seems self-evident. But a stroll through any toy superstore, or any half-hour of so-called "children's" programming on commercial TV, makes it clear that violence, not play, dominates what's being sold. In this article, the author discusses how teachers and parents share the responsibility in…

  10. Television at Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Leonard N.; Frazer, Charles F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses children as television viewers capable of manipulating the co-viewing setting by interpreting, constructing, and carrying out planned lines of play in relation to television and its content. Examples illustrate program-oriented and free-form improvisational play situations. (JMF)

  11. Return to Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Call it physical activity, call it games, or call it play. Whatever its name, it's a place we all need to return to. In the physical education, recreation, and dance professions, we need to redesign programs to address the need for and want of play that is inherent in all of us.

  12. Role Playing and Skits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letwin, Robert, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    Explores non-scripted role playing, dialogue role playing, sociodrama, and skits as variations of simulation techniques. Provides step-by-step guidelines for conducting such sessions. Successful Meetings, Bill Communications, Inc., 1422 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102. Subscription Rates: yearly (US, Canada, Mexico) $14.00; elsewhere,…

  13. The Fear of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almon, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Real play--play that is initiated and directed by children and that bubbles up from within the child rather than being imposed by adults--has largely disappeared from the landscape of childhood in the United States. There are many reasons for this, such as the long hours spent in front of screens each day or in activities organized by adults. In…

  14. Theories of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peller, Lili E.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses several theories of play advanced before the development of psychoanalysis, including the theories of surplus energy, recreation, and practice. Examines the psychoanalytical view advanced by Freud and others, which focuses on the emotional release of play and its role in discovery and learning. (MDM)

  15. Why People Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, M. J.

    A critical analysis is made of the content and assumptions of the many theories or explanations for play behavior. The seven chapters of the book are as follows. Chapter One, A Purview of the Problems, is a brief overview of the problems inherent in attempting to manage play, and the arguments for and against. The second chapter, Definitions of…

  16. Poetry and Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Richard A.

    Philosophers and poets from classical times to the present have argued that playful and amiable discourse are conducive to teaching and learning. The play principle enhances reading and study and should be applied by teachers to benefit their students. Teachers should help their students see that it is fun to enliven the imagination with good…

  17. Clinical Intuition at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2014-01-01

    A clinical psychologist and consulting psychotherapist discusses how elements of play, inherent in the intuition required in analysis, can provide a cornerstone for serious therapeutic work. She argues that many aspects of play--its key roles in human development, individual growth, and personal creativity, among others--can help therapists and…

  18. Intergenerational Learning through Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lindsay; Larkin, Elizabeth; Graves, Stephen B.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that shared play experiences are a good way to build mutually beneficial relationships among older and younger generations. Outlines why intergenerational play is important, focusing on its cognitive, social, physical, and emotional benefits for both older adults and young children. Describes toys, materials, and games conducive to positive…

  19. Family Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Shlomo

    This paper examines a case study of family play therapy in Israel. The unique contributions of play therapy are evaluated including the therapy's accessibility to young children, its richness and flexibility, its exposure of covert patterns, its wealth of therapeutic means, and its therapeutic economy. The systematization of the therapy attempts…

  20. Microglial neurotransmitter receptors trigger superoxide production in microglia; consequences for microglial-neuronal interactions.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma L; Mosley, Angelina; Eaton, Simon; Dobson, Lucianne; Heales, Simon J; Pocock, Jennifer M

    2012-04-01

    Microglia express three isoforms of the NADPH oxidase, Nox1, Nox2 and Nox4, with the potential to produce superoxide (O(2) ˙(-) ). Microglia also express neurotransmitter receptors, which can modulate microglial responses. In this study, microglial activity of Nox1, Nox2 and Nox4 in primary rat cultured microglia or the rodent BV2 cell line were altered by microglial neurotransmitter receptor modulation. Glutamate, GABA or ATP triggered microglial O(2) ˙(-) production via Nox activation. Nox activation was elicited by agonists of metabotropic mGlu3 receptors and by group III receptors, by GABA(A) but not GABA(B) receptors, and by purinergic P2X(7) or P2Y(2/4) receptors but not P2Y(1) receptors, and inhibited by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonists. The neurotransmitters also modulated Nox mRNA expression and NADPH activity. The activation of Nox by BzATP or GABA promoted a neuroprotective phenotype whilst the activation of Nox by glutamate promoted a neurotoxic phenotype. Taken together, these data indicate that microglial neurotransmitter receptors can signal via Nox to promote neuroprotection or neurotoxicity. This has implications for the subsequent neurotoxic profile of microglia when neurotransmitter levels may become skewed in neurodegeneration. PMID:22243365

  1. Play Spaces in Denmark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Edna; Anderson, Robert T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the variety of play spaces found in urban areas in Denmark: in banks, stores and individual businesses, neighborhood parks and small pocket playgrounds, specialized adventure and traffic playgrounds with supervised activities, and commercial amusement parks. (CM)

  2. The Scottish Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheat, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Recounts an episode when, as young schoolboys, Prince Charles and classmates presented "Macbeth" as an end-of-term-play. Traces the events at school that took on different meanings when viewed from maturity. (NH)

  3. Play: Children's Business and a Guide to Play Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markun, Patricia Maloney, Ed.

    This collection of articles presents ideas about the value of children's play and suggests practical ways to implement good play experiences and select appropriate play materials. Articles examine play as an agent of social values, play and thinking, play and child development, the environmental opportunities for play factors that can destroy the…

  4. Cholinergic receptor activation induces a relative facilitation of synaptic responses in the entorhinal cortex during theta- and gamma-frequency stimulation of parasubicular inputs.

    PubMed

    Sparks, D W; Chapman, C A

    2013-01-29

    The parasubiculum sends its single major output to layer II of the entorhinal cortex, and it may therefore interact with inputs to the entorhinal cortex from other cortical areas, and help to shape the activity of layer II entorhinal cells that project to the hippocampal formation. Cholinergic inputs are thought to contribute to the generation of theta- and gamma-frequency activities in the parasubiculum and entorhinal cortex, and the present study assessed how cholinergic receptor activation affects synaptic responses of the entorhinal cortex to theta- and gamma-frequency stimulation. Depth profiles of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in acute brain slices showed a short-latency negative fEPSP in layer II, consistent with the activation of excitatory synaptic inputs to layer II. Application of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh) suppressed synaptic responses and enhanced paired-pulse facilitation. CCh also resulted in a marked relative facilitation of synaptic responses evoked during short 5-pulse trains of stimulation at both theta- and gamma-frequencies. Application of the M(1) antagonist pirenzepine, but not the M(2) antagonist methoctramine, blocked the facilitation of responses. Inhibition of the M-current or block of GABA(B) receptors had no effect, but the facilitation effect was partially blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist APV, indicating that NMDA receptors play a role. Application of ZD7288, a selective inhibitor of the hyperpolarization-activated cationic current I(h), almost completely blocked the relative facilitation of responses, and the less potent I(h)-blocker Cs(+) also resulted in a partial block. The relative facilitation of synaptic responses induced by CCh is therefore likely mediated by multiple mechanisms including the cholinergic suppression of transmitter release that enhances transmitter availability during repetitive stimulation, NMDA receptor-mediated effects on pre- or postsynaptic function, and

  5. Game-playing epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Siegel, M; Kurzrok, N; Barr, W B; Rowan, A J

    1992-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman with documented generalized seizures evoked by playing checkers was given a battery of psychological tests as well as a series of cognitive and non-game-related tasks during a session of intensive EEG-video monitoring. Generalized epileptiform discharges during each task, as well as during intervals of checkers playing, were quantified to determine possible triggering factors. Previous reports have discussed the roles of attention, concentration, stress, thinking, and spatial processing in similar cases. Our analysis showed significant activation of the EEG only with tasks involving strategic thinking, i.e., considering a sequence of moves based on evaluating the consequences of previous moves.

  6. Looking into Children's Play Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabry, Mark; Fucigna, Carolee

    2009-01-01

    Play, particularly children's sociodramatic play, is the cornerstone of early childhood classrooms in the United States. Early childhood educators learn and expound mantras of "the value of play," "play-based programs," "children learning through play," and "play as child's work." They strive to promote the importance of making a place for play in…

  7. "Playing" with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dave

    2012-01-01

    When faced with a multitude of tasks, any opportunity to "kill two birds with one stone" is welcome. Drama has always excited the author: as a child performing in plays, later as a student and now as a teacher directing performances and improvising within lessons. The author was lucky enough to have inspirational teachers during his primary and…

  8. Play's Importance in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette; Heden, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute knowledge on and gain an understanding of elementary school teachers' perspectives on the function of play in children's learning processes. The study is qualitative with a hermeneutical approach and has George Herbert Mead as a theoretical frame of reference. Interviews have been carried out with seven…

  9. Who's Calling the Plays?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    1990-01-01

    Without an enforceable policy, school athletics programs are beset by politics, high finance, and public sentiment. The most nettlesome problems include loss of instructional time to sports and extracurricular activities; the appropriateness and effectiveness of no-pass/no-play rules; lack of sportsmanship; proliferation of interstate competition;…

  10. Bicentennial Plays and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Aileen

    This book contains royalty-free material on bicentennial themes for presentation by schools and amateur groups. The first section, Plays and Pageants, contains "Our Great Declaration,""A Star for Old Glory,""Sing, America, Sing,""Washington Marches On,""When Freedom Was News," and "A Dish of Green Peas." The second section, Playlets and…

  11. Abstraction through Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamidou, Antri; Monaghan, John; Walker, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the computer game play of an 11-year-old boy. In the course of building a virtual house he developed and used, without assistance, an artefact and an accompanying strategy to ensure that his house was symmetric. We argue that the creation and use of this artefact-strategy is a mathematical abstraction. The discussion…

  12. Writing as Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rensenbrink, Carla

    1987-01-01

    Reveals ways to help students learn that writing can be similar to play, in that they can use their imaginations to create new settings and even new worlds. Suggests using toys, imaginary trips, and including friends in stories as inspiration for writing. (SKC)

  13. The Games Children Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padak, Nancy; Rasinski, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The games that children play are not just for fun-they often lead to important skill development. Likewise, word games are fun opportunities for parents and children to spend time together and for children to learn a lot about sounds and words. In this Family Involvement column, the authors describe 12 easy-to-implement word games that parents and…

  14. Statistics at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.

    2014-01-01

    An exciting event had occurred for the grade 3 classes at Woodlands State School. A new play space designated for the older grades had now been opened to the third graders. In sharing their excitement over this "real treat, real privilege," the teachers invited the children to find out more about playgrounds and, in particular, their new…

  15. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like a waste of parents' time and money, and she refused…

  16. Playing It Safe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca

    1997-01-01

    Offers tips for avoiding sports-related injuries: (1) expect more of coaches; (2) develop an athletic-safety plan; (3) consider hiring an athletic trainer; (4) check facilities and equipment regularly; (5) recognize athletes' limitations; (6) take precautions beyond the playing field; and (7) check liability coverage and obtain informed consent.…

  17. Games Professors Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, James A.; Herzing, Thomas W.

    1969-01-01

    The games are Build a Reputation (REP), Confuse the Student (CON), Blame the Opposition (BOP), and Pass the Buck (BUCK). Professors play these games because they "want to show off on occasion, . . . want to get off the hook and avoid responsibility, . . . are prone to blame others, or simply because they are lazy. (WM)

  18. PlayWrite.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amodeo, Janis

    This report describes the PlayWrite Program, which was developed in the Montville Township School District, New Jersey, to encourage children in grades K-6 to write. The primary objectives of the program are to increase students' motivation to write; to improve their writing skills through the process of brainstorming, composing, revising, and…

  19. Creative Outdoor Play Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peggy L.

    Considering the creation of proper play areas for children (school sites, municipal and mini parks, private homes and backyards, shopping centers, apartment complexes, recreational areas, roadside parks, nursery schools, churches, summer camps, and drive-in theaters) as one of today's major challenges, the author recommends that professional…

  20. One Play a Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate theater students rarely get the chance to work on a major world premiere, but this year hundreds of them will. Currently, more than 70 colleges and universities are participating in "365 Days/365 Plays," an ambitious project from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. Every week, as they mount their portion of this epic…

  1. The Paradoxes of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    1988-01-01

    The article makes a case against the structuring of intramural sports programs on the basis of the varsity athletics model, arguing that the latter model's components of competition and aggression mar the former's intrinsic rewards of play, creativity, and enhanced human relationships. (CB)

  2. Do the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein Variants (Q228K and Q307R) Play a Role in Patients with Familial and Sporadic Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas?

    PubMed Central

    Ogret, Yeliz Duvarci; Oguz, Fatma Savran

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene by sequence analysis of exons 1–6 using leukocyte genomic DNA obtained from a cohort of familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) and apparent sporadic functional pituitary adenoma Turkish patients. Methods: Fourteen FIPA and 90 sporadic pituitary adenoma (somatotrophinoma, prolactinoma, and corticotrophinoma) patients, 1 sporadic gigantism case, and 70 healthy controls were included in the study. Results: We did not detect AIP mutations in patients with FIPAs or sporadic pituitary adenomas, including the gigantism case. Only two exonic homozygous missense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs641081 [Q228K] and rs4930195 [Q307R]) were identified in the AIP locus. Minor allele frequencies of the Q307R and Q228K variants were significantly higher in FIPA patients compared to controls. In addition, the minor allele frequency of the Q228K variant was significantly increased in patients with sporadic somatotrophinomas compared to controls, whereas the minor allele frequency of the Q307R variant was significantly increased in corticotrophinoma patients compared to controls. Conversely, the minor allele frequencies of Q228R and Q307R variants were similar between patients with prolactinomas and controls. No AIP gene mutation or variant was observed in the sporadic gigantism patient. These results suggest that Q228K and Q307R variants in the AIP gene might be involved in the genetic susceptibility to familial and sporadic pituitary adenomas (somatotrophinoma and corticotrophinoma) in the Turkish population. PMID:25938168

  3. Optogenetic activation of septal GABAergic afferents entrains neuronal firing in the medial habenula

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyuhyun; Lee, Youngin; Lee, Changwoo; Hong, Seokheon; Lee, Soonje; Kang, Shin Jung; Shin, Ki Soon

    2016-01-01

    The medial habenula (MHb) plays an important role in nicotine-related behaviors such as nicotine aversion and withdrawal. The MHb receives GABAergic input from the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB), yet the synaptic mechanism that regulates MHb activity is unclear. GABA (γ -aminobutyric acid) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter activating both GABAA receptors and GABAB receptors. Depending on intracellular chloride concentration, however, GABAA receptors also function in an excitatory manner. In the absence of various synaptic inputs, we found that MHb neurons displayed spontaneous tonic firing at a rate of about ~4.4 Hz. Optogenetic stimulation of MS/DB inputs to the MHb evoked GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic currents, which produced stimulus-locked neuronal firing. Subsequent delayed yet lasting activation of GABAB receptors attenuated the intrinsic tonic firing. Consequently, septal GABAergic input alone orchestrates both excitatory GABAA and inhibitory GABAB receptors, thereby entraining the firing of MHb neurons. PMID:27703268

  4. Canada's east coast play

    SciTech Connect

    Doig, I.M.

    1984-02-01

    The intent of this paper is to give a basic overview presentation on Canada's east coast play - most likely the number one offshore play in the free world - and possibly the world. The play stretches 2,500 miles north and south, as it follows the Labrador Coast, past the Strait of Belle Isle and onto the Grand Banks of Newfoundland and as it makes a 90 degree turn, 1,000 miles east to west along the coast of Nova Scotia to the Georges Bank. 3,500 miles in all - which if placed in western Canada, would stretch from northern Alberta to southern Mexico. It's geologic potential is immense - 15-20 billion barrels of oil and 80-90 Tcf of natural gas. And so far only approximately 2 billion barrels of oil and 5 Tcf of natural gas have been found. There is more out there. And less than 200 wells have been drilled - still very virgin territory. Two world size discoveries have been made in the area. Hibernia, on the Grand Banks, is estimated to contain 1.8 billion barrels. Venture, on the Scotian Shelf, has a natural gas reserve of 2.5 Tcf - big by Canadian standards and significant in that Mobil Oil has also made some other interesting discoveries on the same Sable Island block which have not been delineated.

  5. Play in Practice: Case Studies in Young Children's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cheryl Render, Ed.; Marchant, Catherine, Ed.

    This book uses a collection of stories, or "cases," as a basis for reflection, discussion, and learning about the many roles "play" has in children's lives. Each of the 12 cases addresses an issue of play from one of three categories--the role of adults in play, the cultural meanings of play, and the issues related to play in special settings.…

  6. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID

  7. Development through Work and Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    Five proposals are made for incorporating a work-play perspective in career development research: (1) fuse work and play conceptually over the life course; (2) imbue developmental career theory with a work-play fusion; (3) study work and play across the life span; (4) investigate work and play within the life space; and (5) consider a work-play…

  8. The Neglected Factor-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feitelson, Dina; Ross, Gail S.

    1973-01-01

    Spontaneous thematic play behavior in children is investigated. Environmental prerequisites of play and possible functions of play in cognitive and personality development are discussed. Whether modelling is a prerequisite for thematic play, and the relationship between level of play and creativity test performance in children are assessed. (DP)

  9. Farm Hall: The Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, David C.

    2013-03-01

    It's July 1945. Germany is in defeat and the atomic bombs are on their way to Japan. Under the direction of Samuel Goudsmit, the Allies are holding some of the top German nuclear scientists-among them Heisenberg, Hahn, and Gerlach-captive in Farm Hall, an English country manor near Cambridge, England. As secret microphones record their conversations, the scientists are unaware of why they are being held or for how long. Thinking themselves far ahead of the Allies, how will they react to the news of the atomic bombs? How will these famous scientists explain to themselves and to the world their failure to achieve even a chain reaction? How will they come to terms with the horror of the Third Reich, their work for such a regime, and their behavior during that period? This one-act play is based upon the transcripts of their conversations as well as the author's historical work on the subject.

  10. Playing My Heart Out: Original Play as Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, O. Fred

    1999-01-01

    "Original" play denotes play that is pre-cultural--before conceptualizations and learned responses. Four anecdotes about play with an infant with Down's syndrome, a child with leukemia, a lioness, and a dying woman illustrate the connections between beings and between the ordinary and the sacred during trusting, fearless, playful encounters. (SV)

  11. Imagination, Playfulness, and Creativity in Children's Play with Different Toys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mo????ller, Signe?? Juhl?

    2015-01-01

    Based on a four-month experimental study of preschool children's play with creative-construction and social-fantasy toys, the author examines the in?uence of both types of toys on the play of preschool children. Her comparative analysis considers the impact of transformative play on the development of imagination during play activities and…

  12. Child's Play: Revisiting Play in Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dau, Elizabeth, Ed.; Jones, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Noting that play is an essential aspect of learning for young children, this book presents a collection of articles on children's play in Australia. Part 1, "Play, Development, and Learning," contains the following chapters: (1) "The Role of Play in Development and Learning" (Ann Glover); (2) "Stop, Look, and Listen: Adopting an Investigative…

  13. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for.

  14. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for. PMID:25604388

  15. Play and Positive Group Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Pam; White, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    Play is an important part of a child's life and essential to learning and development (Vygotsky, 1978). It is vital that students participate in play and that play be conducted in a restorative manner. Play allows a variety of group dynamics to emerge. Irvin Yalom (1995) identifies 11 curative factors of the group experience. These factors include…

  16. Play Therapy in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landreth, Garry L.; Ray, Dee C.; Bratton, Sue C.

    2009-01-01

    Because the child's world is a world of action and activity, play therapy provides the psychologist in elementary-school settings with an opportunity to enter the child's world. In the play therapy relationship, toys are like the child's words and play is the child's language. Therefore, children play out their problems, experiences, concerns, and…

  17. Playful Learning and Montessori Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillard, Angeline S.

    2013-01-01

    Although Montessori education is often considered a form of playful learning, Maria Montessori herself spoke negatively about a major component of playful learning--pretend play, or fantasy--for young children. In this essay, the author discusses this apparent contradiction: how and why Montessori education includes elements of playful learning…

  18. Rough and Tumble Play 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Many people fear that play-fighting or rough and tumble play is the same as real fighting. There is also a fear that this rough play will become real fighting if allowed to continue. Most of all, parents and teachers fear that during the course of rough and tumble play a child may be hurt. To provide for and allow children to play rough without…

  19. A Toll/interleukin (IL)-1 receptor domain protein from Yersinia pestis interacts with mammalian IL-1/Toll-like receptor pathways but does not play a central role in the virulence of Y. pestis in a mouse model of bubonic plague.

    PubMed

    Spear, Abigail M; Rana, Rohini R; Jenner, Dominic C; Flick-Smith, Helen C; Oyston, Petra C F; Simpson, Peter; Matthews, Stephen J; Byrne, Bernadette; Atkins, Helen S

    2012-06-01

    The Toll/interleukin (IL)-1 receptor (TIR) domain is an essential component of eukaryotic innate immune signalling pathways. Interaction between TIR domains present in Toll-like receptors and associated adaptors initiates and propagates an immune signalling cascade. Proteins containing TIR domains have also been discovered in bacteria. Studies have subsequently shown that these proteins are able to modulate mammalian immune signalling pathways dependent on TIR interactions and that this may represent an evasion strategy for bacterial pathogens. Here, we investigate a TIR domain protein from the highly virulent bacterium Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. When overexpressed in vitro this protein is able to downregulate IL-1β- and LPS-dependent signalling to NFκB and to interact with the TIR adaptor protein MyD88. This interaction is dependent on a single proline residue. However, a Y. pestis knockout mutant lacking the TIR domain protein was not attenuated in virulence in a mouse model of bubonic plague. Minor alterations in the host cytokine response to the mutant were indicated, suggesting a potential subtle role in pathogenesis. The Y. pestis mutant also showed increased auto-aggregation and reduced survival in high-salinity conditions, phenotypes which may contribute to pathogenesis or survival.

  20. Play, Play Therapy, Play Research. Proceedings of the International Symposium (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, September 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kooij, Rimmert van der; Hellendoorn, Joop

    After an introduction which briefly discusses emotional, therapeutic, phenomenological, cognitive, and developmental perspectives on play, this volume presents the complete texts of all the main lectures and a few short papers that were given at the International Symposium on Play, Play Therapy, and Play Research. Papers in part 1 concern certain…

  1. Molecular, pharmacological and functional properties of GABAA receptors in anterior pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    Zemkova, Hana W; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Tomic, Melanija; Zemkova, Hana; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2008-01-01

    Anterior pituitary cells express γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A receptor-channels, but their structure, distribution within the secretory cell types, and nature of action have not been clarified. Here we addressed these questions using cultured anterior pituitary cells from postpubertal female rats and immortalized αT3-1 and GH3 cells. Our results show that mRNAs for all GABAA receptor subunits are expressed in pituitary cells and that α1/β1 subunit proteins are present in all secretory cells. In voltage-clamped gramicidin-perforated cells, GABA induced dose-dependent increases in current amplitude that were inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin and facilitated by diazepam and zolpidem in a concentration-dependent manner. In intact cells, GABA and the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol caused a rapid and transient increase in intracellular calcium, whereas the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen was ineffective, suggesting that chloride-mediated depolarization activates voltage-gated calcium channels. Consistent with this finding, RT-PCR analysis indicated high expression of NKCC1, but not KCC2 cation/chloride transporter mRNAs in pituitary cells. Furthermore, the GABAA channel reversal potential for chloride ions was positive to the baseline membrane potential in most cells and the activation of ion channels by GABA resulted in depolarization of cells and modulation of spontaneous electrical activity. These results indicate that secretory pituitary cells express functional GABAA receptor-channels that are depolarizing. PMID:18450776

  2. Neuronal transmembrane chloride electrochemical gradient: a key player in GABA A receptor activation physiological effect.

    PubMed

    Cupello, A

    2003-06-01

    It has long been accepted that GABA is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, acting via GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptors. However, new evidences have shown that it may work as an excitatory transmitter, especially in the brain of newly-born animals and acting via GABA(A) receptors. The difference in the end results of GABA(A) receptors activation in the two cases is not due to the receptor associated channels, which in both cases are chloride channels. The different physiological effect in the two cases is due to different electrochemical gradients for chloride. When GABA acting via GABA(A) receptors is inhibitory, either there is no transmembrane electrochemical gradient for chloride or there is one forcing such negative ions into the nerve cell, once chloride channels are open. Viceversa, GABA is excitatory when the electrochemical gradient is such to make chloride ions flow outside the cell, upon opening of the GABA activated chloride channels.In this review this concept is discussed in details and evidence in the scientific literature for the existence of different types of chloride pumps (either internalizing or extruding chloride) is compiled.

  3. Playing with Switches, Birth through Two. Let's Play! Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Buffalo. Center for Assistive Technology.

    This guide to playing with switches for parents and early intervention personnel was developed by the "Let's Play! Project," a 3-year federally supported project that worked to promote play in infants and toddlers with disabilities through the use of assistive technology. Switches are used with electronic toys to help young children easily…

  4. "Normal" Childhood Sexual Play and Games: Differentiating Play from Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon; Coakley, Mary

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 128 undergraduate female students indicated that 44% had experienced cross-gender sexual play as children, which was often seen as involving persuasion, manipulation, or coercion. A typology of six kinds of sexual play experiences was derived. Discussion focuses on the differentiation of childhood sexual abuse from play and gender…

  5. Solar Power at Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    For the very first time, astronomers have witnessed the speeding up of an asteroid's rotation, and have shown that it is due to a theoretical effect predicted but never seen before. The international team of scientists used an armada of telescopes to discover that the asteroid's rotation period currently decreases by 1 millisecond every year, as a consequence of the heating of the asteroid's surface by the Sun. Eventually it may spin faster than any known asteroid in the solar system and even break apart. ESO PR Photo 11a/07 ESO PR Photo 11a/07 Asteroid 2000 PH5 "The Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect is believed to alter the way small bodies in the Solar System rotate," said Stephen Lowry (Queens University Belfast, UK), lead-author of one of the two companion papers in which this work is reported [1, 2]. "The warming caused by sunlight hitting the surfaces of asteroids and meteoroids leads to a gentle recoil effect as the heat is released," he added. "By analogy, if one were to shine light on a propeller over a long enough period, it would start spinning." Although this is an almost immeasurably weak force, its effect over millions of years is far from negligible. Astronomers believe the YORP effect may be responsible for spinning some asteroids up so fast that they break apart, perhaps leading to the formation of double asteroids. Others may be slowed down so that they take many days to complete a full turn. The YORP effect also plays an important role in changing the orbits of asteroids between Mars and Jupiter, including their delivery to planet-crossing orbits, such as those of near-Earth asteroids. Despite its importance, the effect has never been seen acting on a solar system body, until now. Using extensive optical and radar imaging from powerful Earth-based observatories, astronomers have directly observed the YORP effect in action on a small near-Earth asteroid, known as (54509) 2000 PH5. Shortly after its discovery in 2000, it was

  6. Play technique in psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yanof, Judith A

    2013-04-01

    Imaginary play is often a child's best way of communicating affects, fantasies, and internal states. In play children are freer to express their forbidden and conflicted thoughts. Consequently, one of the best ways for the therapist to enter the child's world is to do so from within the displacement of the play process. For children who cannot play, the therapist's goal is to teach the child to use play as a means of communication and to create meaning. This article present clinical examples to illustrate how the author uses play in the clinical situation.

  7. Medical Play for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessee, Peggy O.; Wilson, Heidi; Morgan, Dee

    2000-01-01

    Discusses young children's emotional responses during medical examinations and procedures, developmental changes in how they conceptualize illness causation, and the role of play to reduce stress. Describes how teachers can best facilitate structured dramatic medical play therapeutically. (KB)

  8. Safety Play Surfaces Buying Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Describes standards for playing surfaces and characteristics of play surfaces made of organic loose material, inorganic loose material, and compact materials. Necessary site preparation is discussed. An extensive, annotated list of manufacturers of surfaces is included. (DR)

  9. Learning, Play, and Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Learning, Play, and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, ... juega su recién nacido What Is My Newborn Learning? Play is the chief way that infants learn ...

  10. Problematic Game Play: The Diagnostic Value of Playing Motives, Passion, and Playing Time in Men

    PubMed Central

    Kneer, Julia; Rieger, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Internet gaming disorder is currently listed in the DSM—not in order to diagnose such a disorder but to encourage research to investigate this phenomenon. Even whether it is still questionable if Internet Gaming Disorder exists and can be judged as a form of addiction, problematic game play is already very well researched to cause problems in daily life. Approaches trying to predict problematic tendencies in digital game play have mainly focused on playing time as a diagnostic criterion. However, motives to engage in digital game play and obsessive passion for game play have also been found to predict problematic game play but have not yet been investigated together. The present study aims at (1) analyzing if obsessive passion can be distinguished from problematic game play as separate concepts, and (2) testing motives of game play, passion, and playing time for their predictive values for problematic tendencies. We found (N = 99 males, Age: M = 22.80, SD = 3.81) that obsessive passion can be conceptually separated from problematic game play. In addition, the results suggest that compared to solely playing time immersion as playing motive and obsessive passion have added predictive value for problematic game play. The implications focus on broadening the criteria in order to diagnose problematic playing. PMID:25942516

  11. Play Therapy: Basics and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry

    This book provides an atheoretical orientation to basic concepts involved in play therapy and an introduction to different skills used in play therapy. The demand for mental professionals and school counselors who have training and expertise in using play as a therapeutic tool when working with children has increased tremendously. In response to…

  12. Play in Evolution and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrini, Anthony D.; Dupuis, Danielle; Smith, Peter K.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of play in human ontogeny and phylogeny, following Surplus Resource Theory. We consider how juveniles use play to sample their environment in order to develop adaptive behaviors. We speculate about how innovative behaviors developed in play in response to environmental novelty may influence subsequent evolutionary…

  13. The Importance of Being Playful.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodrova, Elena; Leong, Deborah J.

    2003-01-01

    Recent research provides evidence of the strong connections between quality of play in preschool years and children's readiness for school instruction. Mature play, characterized by imaginary situations, multiple roles, clearly defined rules, flexible themes, language development, length of play, helps students' cognitive development. (Contains 12…

  14. Preschoolers' Thinking during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccolo, Diana L.; Test, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Children build foundations for mathematical thinking in early play and exploration. During the preschool years, children enjoy exploring mathematical concepts--such as patterns, shape, spatial relationships, and measurement--leading them to spontaneously engage in mathematical thinking during play. Block play is one common example that engages…

  15. Pretend Play and Creative Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ, Sandra W.; Wallace, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    The authors contend that many cognitive abilities and affective processes important in creativity also occur in pretend play and that pretend play in childhood affects the development of creativity in adulthood. They discuss a variety of theories and observations that attempt to explain the importance of pretend play to creativity. They argue that…

  16. Play Therapy in School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trice-Black, Shannon; Bailey, Carrie Lynn; Kiper Riechel, Morgan E.

    2013-01-01

    Play therapy is an empirically supported intervention used to address a number of developmental issues faced in childhood. Through the natural language of play, children and adolescents communicate feelings, thoughts, and experiences. Schools provide an ideal setting for play therapy in many ways; however, several challenges exist in implementing…

  17. Meanings of Play among Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Nicole M.; Knight, Camilla J.; Holt, Nicholas L.; Spence, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine meanings of play among children. Thirty-eight students aged 7-9 years from a suburban public school in Western Canada participated in focus groups. Data analysis revealed participants saw almost anything as an opportunity for play and would play almost anywhere with anyone. However, they perceived parents…

  18. Diversification of TAM receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Zagórska, Anna; Través, Paqui G.; Lew, Erin D.; Dransfield, Ian; Lemke, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance is critical for both tissue homeostasis and the resolution of inflammation. We found that the TAM receptor tyrosine kinases Axl and Mer played distinct roles as phagocytic receptors in these two settings, where they exhibited divergent expression, regulation, and activity. Mer acted as a tolerogenic receptor in resting macrophages and in settings of immune suppression. Conversely, Axl was an inflammatory response receptor whose expression was induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. Axl and Mer displayed distinct ligand specificities, ligand-receptor complex formation in tissues, and receptor shedding upon activation. These differences notwithstanding, phagocytosis by either protein was strictly dependent on receptor activation that was triggered by bridging TAM receptor–ligand complexes to the ‘eat-me’ signal phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cell surfaces. PMID:25194421

  19. gamma-Aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptors modulate [3H]GABA release from isolated neuronal growth cones in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Gordon-Weeks, P R

    1985-04-19

    Potassium-induced release of gamma-[3H]aminobutyric acid [( 3H]GABA) from a growth cone-enriched fraction isolated from neonatal rat forebrain was inhibited by the GABA mimetic muscimol in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 15 nM). The GABA antagonist bicuculline completely reversed the effect of muscimol. Bicuculline alone slightly potentiated the K+-induced release of [3H]GABA. Baclofen, a proposed selective agonist for a bicuculline-insensitive GABAB receptor, was found to cause only a slight reduction in the K+-induced release of [3H]GABA. These results are compatible with the presence of a negative feedback mechanism mediated by GABAA receptors for controlling [3H]GABA release from growth cones of the developing rat forebrain.

  20. Why do adult dogs 'play'?

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, John W S; Pullen, Anne J; Rooney, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Among the Carnivora, play behaviour is usually made up of motor patterns characteristic of predatory, agonistic and courtship behaviour. Domestic dogs are unusual in that play is routinely performed by adults, both socially, with conspecifics and with humans, and also asocially, with objects. This enhanced playfulness is commonly thought to be a side effect of paedomorphosis, the perpetuation of juvenile traits into adulthood, but here we suggest that the functions of the different types of play are sufficiently distinct that they are unlikely to have arisen through a single evolutionary mechanism. Solitary play with objects appears to be derived from predatory behaviour: preferred toys are those that can be dismembered, and a complex habituation-like feedback system inhibits play with objects that are resistant to alteration. Intraspecific social play is structurally different from interspecific play and may therefore be motivationally distinct and serve different goals; for example, dogs often compete over objects when playing with other dogs, but are usually more cooperative when the play partner is human. The majority of dogs do not seem to regard competitive games played with a human partner as "dominance" contests: rather, winning possession of objects during games appears to be simply rewarding. Play may be an important factor in sociality, since dogs are capable of extracting social information not only from games in which they participate, but also from games that they observe between third parties. We suggest that the domestic dog's characteristic playfulness in social contexts is an adaptive trait, selected during domestication to facilitate both training for specific purposes, and the formation of emotionally-based bonds between dog and owner. Play frequency and form may therefore be an indicator of the quality of dog-owner relationships. PMID:25251020

  1. Thinking about Children's Play: Play Is Not Work, Nor Is Work Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    2001-01-01

    Addresses the concept of "play as a child's work," from the viewpoints of Montessori, Freud, and Piaget. Contends that children's play: (1) like adult play, may be individual or social; (2) has immediate value for the child as a way of expressing feelings; and (3) is a healthy counterpoise to work. (SD)

  2. Toy play, play tempo, and reaction to frustration in infants.

    PubMed

    Longo, J; Harvey, A; Wilson, S; Deni, R

    1982-08-01

    Measures of toy play including duration and tempo of play were obtained for a combined sample of 7 male and 5 female infants 22 to 26 mo. of age. Additional measures of reaction to frustration were obtained during a second session where toys were placed out of reach of the subjects. Measures of frustration included crying, squirm/escape attempts, and non-crying vocalizations. Several correlations between toy play and reaction to frustration were found and were indicative of a general relationship between response persistence during play and attempts to escape from the frustrating situation. PMID:7133910

  3. Play and the Peer Culture: Play Styles and Object Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elgas, Peggy M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Findings suggested that: (1) peer culture is not a unitary whole but rather a differentiated social system comprised of various groups and different types of players; (2) objects play an important role in peer culture as entry vehicles and social markers; and (3) play periods are social arenas in which the dynamics of the peer culture are enacted.…

  4. Well Played: The Origins and Future of Playfulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Gwen

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author synthesizes research from several disciplines to shed light on play's central role in healthy development. Gordon builds on research in attachment theory that correlates secure attachment in infancy with adult well-being to demonstrate how playfulness might be a lifelong outcome of secure attachment and a primary…

  5. Playing with the Multiple Intelligences: How Play Helps Them Grow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Scott G.

    2011-01-01

    Howard Gardner first posited a list of "multiple intelligences" as a liberating alternative to the assumptions underlying traditional IQ testing in his widely read study "Frames of Mind" (1983). Play has appeared only in passing in Gardner's thinking about intelligence, however, even though play instructs and trains the verbal, interpersonal,…

  6. Children's Play in Diverse Cultures. Children's Play in Society Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roopnarine, Jaipaul L., Ed.; And Others

    This book illuminates play as a universal and culture-specific activity. It provides needed information about the behavior of children in diverse cultural contexts as well as about the play of children in unassimilated cultural or subcultural contexts. It offers readers the opportunity to develop greater sensitivity to and better understanding of…

  7. Partners in Play: An Adlerian Approach to Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry

    In response to increasing concern about the mental health of young children, the field of play therapy is expanding rapidly. This book explains the principles of Adlerian therapy and offers step-by-step instructions on how to integrate these concepts and techniques into the practice of play therapy. Ideas are presented on how to build an…

  8. The Importance of Play: Why Children Need to Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodrova, Elena; Leong, Deborah J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the important role of dramatic ("pretend") play in early childhood with increasing emphasis at school on developing academic skills in children at younger and younger ages. Play is especially beneficial to children's learning when it reaches a certain degree of sophistication. In other words, "unproductive"…

  9. Playing It Safe: Risk Management for Games Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Nancy

    1996-01-01

    Considering the players, the game, and the environment in which games are played can make games play at camp safer, more successful, and more enjoyable. Presents factors concerning the players, the game, roughhousing, excessive competitiveness, the environment, space, boundaries, weather, time, and overall game objectives that need to be…

  10. Understanding Young Children's Learning through Play: Building Playful Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadhead, Pat; Burt, Andy

    2011-01-01

    This timely and accessible text introduces, theorises and practically applies two important concepts which now underpin early years practice: those of "playful learning" and "playful pedagogies". Pat Broadhead and Andy Burt draw upon filmed material, conversations with children, reflection, observation, and parental and staff interviews, in their…

  11. Symbolic play and language development.

    PubMed

    Orr, Edna; Geva, Ronny

    2015-02-01

    Symbolic play and language are known to be highly interrelated, but the developmental process involved in this relationship is not clear. Three hypothetical paths were postulated to explore how play and language drive each other: (1) direct paths, whereby initiation of basic forms in symbolic action or babbling, will be directly related to all later emerging language and motor outputs; (2) an indirect interactive path, whereby basic forms in symbolic action will be associated with more complex forms in symbolic play, as well as with babbling, and babbling mediates the relationship between symbolic play and speech; and (3) a dual path, whereby basic forms in symbolic play will be associated with basic forms of language, and complex forms of symbolic play will be associated with complex forms of language. We micro-coded 288 symbolic vignettes gathered during a yearlong prospective bi-weekly examination (N=14; from 6 to 18 months of age). Results showed that the age of initiation of single-object symbolic play correlates strongly with the age of initiation of later-emerging symbolic and vocal outputs; its frequency at initiation is correlated with frequency at initiation of babbling, later-emerging speech, and multi-object play in initiation. Results support the notion that a single-object play relates to the development of other symbolic forms via a direct relationship and an indirect relationship, rather than a dual-path hypothesis. PMID:25658200

  12. Risk analysis of exploration plays

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P.R.

    1996-08-01

    The most difficult and crucial decision in petroleum exploration is not which prospect to drill, but rather, which new play to enter. Such a decision, whether ultimately profitable or not, commits the Organization to years of involvement, expenditures of $millions, and hundreds of man-years of effort. Even though uncertainties and risks are high, organizations commonly make the new-play decision in a disjointed, non-analytic, even superficial way. The economic consequences of a bad play choice can be disastrous. Using established principles of prospect risk analysis, modern petroleum exploration organizations routinely assign economic value to individual prospects, but they actually operate via exploration programs in plays and trends. Accordingly, the prospect is the economic unit of exploration, whereas the play is the operational unit. Plays can be successfully analyzed as full-cycle economic risk ventures, however, using many principles of prospect risk analysis. Economic measures such as Expected Present Value, DCFROR, etc. apply equally to plays or prospects. The predicted field-size distribution of the play is analogous to the forecast prospect reserves distribution, Economic truncation applies to both. Variance of play reserves is usually much greater than for prospect reserves. Geologic chance factors such as P{sub reservoir}, P{sub generation}, etc., must be distinguished as independent or shared among prospects in the play, so they should be defined so as to apply equally to the play and to its constituent prospects. They are analogous to multiple objectives on a prospect, and are handled differently in performing the risk analysis.

  13. Risk analysis of exploration plays

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P.R.

    1996-06-01

    The most difficult and crucial decision in petroleum exploration is not which prospect to drill, but rather, which new play to enter. Such a decision, whether ultimately profitable or not, commits the Organization to years of involvement, expenditures of $millions, and hundreds of man-years of effort. Even though uncertainties and risks are high, organizations commonly make the new-play decision in a disjointed, non-analytic, even superficial way. The economic consequences of a bad play choice can be disastrous. Using established principles of prospect risk analysis, modern petroleum exploration organizations routinely assign economic value to individual prospects, but they actually operate via exploration programs in plays and trends. Accordingly, the prospect is the economic unit of exploration, whereas the play is the operational unit. Plays can be successfully analyzed as full-cycle economic risk ventures, however, using many principles of prospect risk analysis. Economic measures such as Expected Present Value, DCFROR, etc. apply equally to plays or prospects. The predicted field-size distribution of the play is analogous to the forecast prospect reserves distribution. Economic truncation applies to both. Variance of play reserves is usually much greater than for prospect reserves. Geologic chance factors such as P{sub reservoir}, P{sub generation}, etc., must be distinguished as independent or shared among prospects in the play, so they should be defined so as to apply equally to the play and to its constituent prospects. They are analogous to multiple objectives on a prospect, and are handled differently in performing the risk analysis.

  14. Play Therapy with Special Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper notes that therapists often feel unqualified to deal with special populations of children because of a lack of understanding of the universalness of play therapy. Suggestions are offered for beginning play therapists who may work with a number of special populations of children. It is recommended that the social learning approach to…

  15. Principles of Play for Soccer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellette, John

    2004-01-01

    Soccer coaches must understand the principles of play if they want to succeed. The principles of play are the rules of action that support the basic objectives of soccer and the foundation of a soccer coaching strategy. They serve as a set of permanent criteria that coaches can use to evaluate the efforts of their team. In this article, the author…

  16. The Disruptive Child's Play Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleck, Robert T.; Bleck, Bonnie L.

    1982-01-01

    Examined the effects of the Disruptive Child's Play Group (DCPG) on the self-concept of children with disruptive behavior problems. Results indicated that counselors using structured play can have positive effects on the attitudes of disruptive children. The DCPG significantly increased self-concept scores of disruptive children. (RC)

  17. Engaging Families through Artful Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores how aligned arts and play experiences can extend child and family engagement in a public outdoor space. The importance of outdoor play for children is strongly advocated and in response local governments provide playgrounds and recreational open spaces. To extend further the experiences afforded in such spaces some local…

  18. Transmedia Play: Literacy across Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Meryl; Herr-Stephenson, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Transmedia play is a new way to understand how children develop critical media literacy and new media literacies through their interactions with contemporary media that links stories and structures across platforms. This essay highlights five characteristics of transmedia play that make it particularly useful for learning:…

  19. A Place for Block Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of block play--including its contributions to perceptual, fine motor, and cognitive development--and components of a good preschool block play area. Recommends unit blocks complemented by stacking blocks, toys, beads, cubes, and Brio wooden toys. Makes recommendations for space, size, locations and connections to other…

  20. Empowering Groups that Enable Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David Sloan; Marshall, Danielle; Iserhott, Hindi

    2011-01-01

    Creating play environments for children usually requires groups of adults working together. An extensive scientific literature describes how groups function to achieve shared goals in general terms, and groups attempting to empower play may find this literature useful. Design principles for managing natural resources, identified by Elinor Ostrom…

  1. Invention at Play. Educators' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Michael; Lacasse, Jane; Smith, Monica; Reilly, Katie

    A Smithsonian exhibition was developed that looked at invention in an innovative way. It aimed to encourage visitors to make connections between their own lives and abilities and those of inventors. The role of play in the invention process was examined. Play is a universal and familiar activity and can help people find the link between their own…

  2. The Play of Socratic Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of philosophy for children generally see themselves as heirs to the "Socratic" tradition. They often claim too that children's aptitude for play leads them naturally to play with abstract, philosophical ideas. However in Plato's dialogues we find in the mouth of "Socrates" many warnings against philosophising with the young. Those…

  3. Let's Play Three on Three!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Jack; Calleja, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Over the course of nine years as a supervisor of intern teachers, the first author collected observations of game play during lessons taught by intern teachers or their mentors. In general, the observations indicated that the majority of students got limited practice opportunities during game play. A close look at the data revealed an interesting…

  4. The Fractal Self at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author draws on contemporary science to illuminate the relationship between early play experiences, processes of self-development, and the later emergence of the fractal self. She argues that orientation within social space is a primary function of early play and developmentally a two-step process. With other people and with…

  5. Sand and Water Table Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  6. Making Play Work for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisberg, Deena Skolnick; Kittredge, Audrey K.; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Klahr, David

    2015-01-01

    Children, especially in the preschool years, learn a tremendous amount through play. Research on guided play demonstrates how schools can couple a curriculum-centered preschool program with a developmentally appropriate pedagogical approach to classroom teaching. However, to fully test this claim, we need a clear definition of the term…

  7. Niger Delta play types, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Akinpelu, A.O.

    1995-08-01

    Exploration databases can be more valuable when sorted by play type. Play specific databases provide a system to organize E & P data used in evaluating the range of values of parameters for reserve estimation and risk assessment. It is important both in focusing the knowledge base and in orienting research effort. A play in this context is any unique combination of trap, reservoir and source properties with the right dynamics of migration and preservation that results in hydrocarbon accumulation. This definitions helps us to discriminate the subtle differences found with these accumulation settings. About 20 play types were identified around the Niger Delta oil province in Nigeria. These are grouped into three parts: (1) The proven plays-constituting the bulk of exploration prospects in Nigeria today. (2) The unproven or semi-proven plays usually with some successes recorded in a few tries but where knowledge is still inadequate. (3) The unproven or analogous play concept. These are untested but geologically sound ideas which may or may not have been tried elsewhere. With classification and sub grouping of these play types into specific databases, intrinsic attributes and uniqueness of each of them with respect to the four major risk elements and the eight parameters for reserve estimation can be better understood.

  8. The Social Competence of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Greta G.

    This is a study of how young children gain social competence through pretend play or role playing. Subjects were 38 Caucasian children (19 females, 19 males) who were observed at four ages: 12, 18, 24 and 30 months. The same set of toys, which included a doll, a saucepan, doll bottles, coffee mug, teacup, teaspoon, doll crib, blanket, toy phone…

  9. Child's Play Is Serious Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKimmey, Martha A.

    1993-01-01

    Play, long seen as an outlet for unused physical and emotional energy, and as a way of learning adult roles, is also recognized for its role in language development in children. Through play, children gain the skill to use symbols and representation for things and events in the environment, providing the basis of their further use of language.…

  10. Playground Play: Educational and Inclusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    It is easy to understand that fun is one of the key ingredients to any playground activity. But what one may not realize is that play systems--including slides, tunnels, activity panels, and more--encourage a lot more than just fun: there is learning at work in playground play, as well as the opportunity to include children of all abilities in…

  11. Three Plays from the Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, M. Kent

    This study is both an interpretation and a translation of three modern Japanese plays, providing an artistic perspective on the radical reordering of experience and thought with which modern man must grapple in cross-cultural encounters. An introductory essay prefaces each play, providing a historical, critical, or appreciative perspective from…

  12. Outdoor Play: Combating Sedentary Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thigpen, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly sedentary lifestyles are contributing to overweight and other health concerns as children spend less and less time outside engaged in active play. Outdoor play provides important opportunities to explore the natural world, interact with peers, engage in vigorous physical activity, and learn about our environment. However, outdoor…

  13. Neuroscience, Play, and Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Joe L.

    This paper presents a brief overview of the array of neuroscience research as it applies to play and child development. The paper discusses research showing the importance of play for brain growth and child development, and recommends that families, schools and other social and corporate institutions rearrange their attitudes and priorities about…

  14. A New Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases with a Venus Flytrap Binding Domain in Insects and Other Invertebrates Activated by Aminoacids

    PubMed Central

    Ahier, Arnaud; Rondard, Philippe; Gouignard, Nadège; Khayath, Naji; Huang, Siluo; Trolet, Jacques; Donoghue, Daniel J.; Gauthier, Monique; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Dissous, Colette

    2009-01-01

    Background Tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) comprise a large family of membrane receptors that regulate various cellular processes in cell biology of diverse organisms. We previously described an atypical RTK in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, composed of an extracellular Venus flytrap module (VFT) linked through a single transmembrane domain to an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain similar to that of the insulin receptor. Methods and Findings Here we show that this receptor is a member of a new family of RTKs found in invertebrates, and particularly in insects. Sixteen new members of this family, named Venus Kinase Receptor (VKR), were identified in many insects. Structural and phylogenetic studies performed on VFT and TK domains showed that VKR sequences formed monophyletic groups, the VFT group being close to that of GABAB receptors and the TK one being close to that of insulin receptors. We show that a recombinant VKR is able to autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues, and report that it can be activated by L-arginine. This is in agreement with the high degree of conservation of the alpha amino acid binding residues found in many amino acid binding VFTs. The presence of high levels of vkr transcripts in larval forms and in female gonads indicates a putative function of VKR in reproduction and/or development. Conclusion The identification of RTKs specific for parasites and insect vectors raises new perspectives for the control of human parasitic and infectious diseases. PMID:19461966

  15. Group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors contribute to different aspects of visual response processing in the rat superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Cirone, Jennifer; Salt, Thomas E

    2001-01-01

    Neurones in the superior colliculus (SC) respond to novel sensory stimuli and response habituation is a key feature of this. It is known that both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors participate in visual responses of superficial SC neurones. A feature of Group II and Group III mGlu receptors is that they may modulate specific neural pathways, possibly via presynaptic mechanisms. However, less is known about how this may relate to functions of systems in whole animals. We have therefore investigated whether these receptors affect specific attributes of visual responses in the superficial SC. Recordings were made from visually responsive neurones in anaesthetised rats, and agonists and antagonists of Group II and III mGlu receptors were applied iontophoretically at the recording site. We found that application of the Group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) produced an increase in visual response habituation, whilst Group III antagonists decreased habituation. These effects were independent of the response habituation mediated via GABAB receptors. In contrast, modulation of Group II mGlu receptors with the specific agonist LY354740 or the antagonist LY341495 did not affect response habituation, although these compounds did modulate visual responses. This suggests a specific role for Group III mGlu receptors in visual response habituation. The magnitude of Group II effects was smaller during presentation of low contrast stimuli compared with high contrast stimuli. This suggests that activation of Group II receptors may be activity dependent and that these receptors can translate this into a functional effect in adapting to high contrast stimuli. PMID:11433000

  16. Playful biometrics: controversial technology through the lens of play.

    PubMed

    Ellerbrok, Ariane

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the role of play in the context of technological emergence and expansion, particularly as it relates to recently emerging surveillance technologies. As a case study, I consider the trajectory of automated face recognition—a biometric technology of numerous applications, from its more controversial manifestations under the rubric of national security to a clearly emerging orientation toward play. This shift toward “playful” biometrics—or from a technology traditionally coded as “hard” to one now increasingly coded as “soft”—is critical insofar as it renders problematic the traditional modes of critique that have, up until this point, challenged the expansion of biometric systems into increasingly ubiquitous realms of everyday life. In response to this dynamic, I propose theorizing the expansion of face recognition specifically in relation to “play,” a step that allows us to broaden the critical space around newly emerging playful biometrics, as well as playful surveillance more generally. In addition, play may also have relevance for theorizing other forms of controversial technology, particularly given its potential role in processes of obfuscation, normalization, and marginalization. PMID:22175066

  17. Playful biometrics: controversial technology through the lens of play.

    PubMed

    Ellerbrok, Ariane

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the role of play in the context of technological emergence and expansion, particularly as it relates to recently emerging surveillance technologies. As a case study, I consider the trajectory of automated face recognition—a biometric technology of numerous applications, from its more controversial manifestations under the rubric of national security to a clearly emerging orientation toward play. This shift toward “playful” biometrics—or from a technology traditionally coded as “hard” to one now increasingly coded as “soft”—is critical insofar as it renders problematic the traditional modes of critique that have, up until this point, challenged the expansion of biometric systems into increasingly ubiquitous realms of everyday life. In response to this dynamic, I propose theorizing the expansion of face recognition specifically in relation to “play,” a step that allows us to broaden the critical space around newly emerging playful biometrics, as well as playful surveillance more generally. In addition, play may also have relevance for theorizing other forms of controversial technology, particularly given its potential role in processes of obfuscation, normalization, and marginalization.

  18. Risk analysis of prospects vs. plays: The play`s the thing!

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P.R.

    1996-09-01

    The most difficult and crucial decision in petroleum exploration is not which prospect to drill, but rather, which new play to enter. Such a decision, whether ultimately profitable or not, commits the Organization to years of involvement, expenditures of $millions, and hundreds of man-years of effort. Even though uncertainties and risks are high, organizations commonly make the new-play decision in a disjointed, non-analytic, even superficial way. The economic consequences of a bad play choice can be disastrous. Using established principles of prospect risk analysis, modern petroleum exploration organizations routinely assign economic value to individual prospects, but they actually operate via exploration programs in plays and trends. Accordingly, the prospect is the economic unit of exploration, whereas the play is the operational unit. Plays can be successfully analyzed as full-cycle economic risk ventures, however, using many principles of prospect risk analysis. Economic measures such as Expected Present Value, DCFROR, etc. apply equally to plays or prospects. The predicted field-size distribution of the play is analogous to the forecast prospect reserves distribution. Economic truncation applies to both. Variance of play reserves is usually much greater than for prospect reserves. Geologic chance factors such as P{sub reservoir}, P{sub generation}, etc., must be distinguished as independent or shared among prospects in the play, so they should be defined so as to apply as well to the play as to its constituent prospects. They are analogous to multiple objectives on a prospect, and are handled different in reforming the risk analysis.

  19. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  20. A multiverse play divides opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2015-03-01

    The stage lights rise. A man and woman meet in a cute way - "Do you know why it's impossible to lick the tips of your elbows?" she asks - they chat momentarily, and separate. The play is Constellations by Nick Payne.

  1. Play for Children in Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardgrove, Carol; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Contains six short articles on therapeutic play. Each article is an edited version of a paper delivered at the XIV World Congress of Pediatrics in Buenos Aires on the subject of children in the hospital. (JMB)

  2. [Sports participation and fair play].

    PubMed

    Cecchini Estrada, José A; González-Mesa, Carmen González; Méndez, Javier Montero

    2007-02-01

    This study examined whether the participation in intermediate contact sports affects the opinions about the behaviors and attitudes of fair play in the sports context and whether these effects are influenced by ego orientation. The participants were high level sportsmen from university and professional basketball and football players (N = 131). They filled in questionnaires to assess their participation in sports, their goal orientations, and their fair play attitudes and behaviors. The analyses of the structural equation model indicated that participation in intermediate contact sports predicted ego orientation; these analyses consecutively predicted low levels of fair play. The direct effects of sports participation in fair play decreased significantly in the presence of ego orientation, indicating that the last construct partially mediates the relation between the first two variables. These discoveries help us to better understand the processes that operate in contact sports. Finally, their implications for eliminating unsportsmanlike behaviors are discussed.

  3. Sex-specific modulation of juvenile social play by vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Veenema, Alexa H; Bredewold, Remco; De Vries, Geert J

    2013-11-01

    Social play activities among juveniles are thought to contribute to the development of social and emotional skills in humans and animals. Conversely, social play deficits are observed in developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. Importantly, many of these disorders show sex differences in incidence, course of the disease, and severity of symptoms. We hypothesized that sex differences in the neural systems controlling social behavior can contribute to these differences. We therefore studied the involvement of the sexually dimorphic vasopressin and oxytocin systems, which have been implicated in these disorders, in juvenile social play behavior. Single-housed 5-week-old juvenile male and female rats were exposed in their home cage to an age-and sex-matched novel conspecific for 10 min, and social play behaviors were recorded. We found no consistent sex differences in duration or elements of social play in vehicle-treated rats. However, intracerebroventricular injection of the specific vasopressin 1a receptor (V1aR) antagonist (CH2)5Tyr(Me(2))AVP significantly reduced social play behaviors in males while increasing them in females. Intracerebroventricular injection of the specific oxytocin receptor antagonist des-Gly-NH2,d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)(2),Thr(4)]OVT did not alter social play in either sex. To locate the effects of V1aR blockade on social play, we targeted the lateral septum, a sexually dimorphic brain region showing denser vasopressin fibers in males than in females and an abundant expression of V1aR in both sexes. Surprisingly, blockade of V1aR in the lateral septum increased social play behaviors in males, but decreased them in females. These findings suggest sex- and brain region-specific roles for vasopressin in the regulation of social play behavior in juvenile rats. PMID:23838102

  4. Digital Play: A New Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Jackie; Plowman, Lydia; Yamada-Rice, Dylan; Bishop, Julia; Scott, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    This paper draws on an ESRC-funded study of play and creativity in preschool-aged children's use of apps in the UK. The main objectives of the study were to collect information about access to and use of apps in the home, establish the most popular apps and identify the features of those apps that are successful in promoting play and creativity. A…

  5. Structure, Dynamics, and Allosteric Potential of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor N-Terminal Domains

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James; Bahar, Ivet; Greger, Ingo H.

    2015-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are tetrameric cation channels that mediate synaptic transmission and plasticity. They have a unique modular architecture with four domains: the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) that is involved in synaptic targeting, the transmembrane domain (TMD) that forms the ion channel, the membrane-proximal ligand-binding domain (LBD) that binds agonists such as L-glutamate, and the distal N-terminal domain (NTD), whose function is the least clear. The extracellular portion, comprised of the LBD and NTD, is loosely arranged, mediating complex allosteric regulation and providing a rich target for drug development. Here, we briefly review recent work on iGluR NTD structure and dynamics, and further explore the allosteric potential for the NTD in AMPA-type iGluRs using coarse-grained simulations. We also investigate mechanisms underlying the established NTD allostery in NMDA-type iGluRs, as well as the fold-related metabotropic glutamate and GABAB receptors. We show that the clamshell motions intrinsically favored by the NTD bilobate fold are coupled to dimeric and higher-order rearrangements that impact the iGluR LBD and ultimately the TMD. Finally, we explore the dynamics of intact iGluRs and describe how it might affect receptor operation in a synaptic environment. PMID:26255587

  6. Progesterone Receptor Signaling Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sandra L; Hartig, Sean M; Edwards, Dean P

    2016-09-25

    Progesterone receptor (PR) is a master regulator in female reproductive tissues that controls developmental processes and proliferation and differentiation during the reproductive cycle and pregnancy. PR also plays a role in progression of endocrine-dependent breast cancer. As a member of the nuclear receptor family of ligand-dependent transcription factors, the main action of PR is to regulate networks of target gene expression in response to binding its cognate steroid hormone, progesterone. This paper summarizes recent advances in understanding the structure-function properties of the receptor protein and the tissue/cell-type-specific PR signaling pathways that contribute to the biological actions of progesterone in the normal breast and in breast cancer. PMID:27380738

  7. Playing in the Gutters: Enhancing Children's Cognitive and Social Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinwiddie, Sue A.

    1993-01-01

    Adding plastic gutters to the nursery school's sand area began as a science curriculum enhancement and evolved into a whole curriculum that stimulated cognitive exploration, cooperative dramatic play, language enhancement, and general fun. The children manipulated the gutters and materials such as sand, water, buckets, and tennis balls in a…

  8. Parent-Child Play across Cultures: Advancing Play Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roopnarine, Jaipaul L.; Davidson, Kimberly L.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue for a greater understanding of children's play across cultures through better integration of scientific thinking about the developed and developing societies, through consideration of socialization beliefs and goals, and, finally, through the use of more complex models in research investigations. They draw on…

  9. Guided Play: Where Curricular Goals Meet a Playful Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisberg, Deena Skolnick; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick

    2013-01-01

    Decades of research demonstrate that a strong curricular approach to preschool education is important for later developmental outcomes. Although these findings have often been used to support the implementation of educational programs based on direct instruction, we argue that "guided play" approaches can be equally effective at delivering content…

  10. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  11. "Cum play" among gay men.

    PubMed

    Prestage, Garrett; Hurley, Michael; Brown, Graham

    2013-10-01

    The exchange of semen, often referred to as "cum play," has featured in gay literature and may be a unique aspect of many gay men's sexual behavior. We investigated the prevalence of "cum play" and its context among 1153 HIV-negative and 147 HIV-positive Australian gay men in an online survey. Receptive cum play (partner ejaculating or rubbing his semen over participant's anus, or participant using partner's semen as lubricant) was reported by one in six HIV-negative and one quarter of HIV-positive men on the same occasion of protected anal intercourse with a casual partner (PAIC). HIV-negative men who engaged in receptive cum play during PAIC often believed that their partner was HIV seroconcordant and tended to trust that partner. They were also generally more optimistic about the likelihood of HIV transmission, and they often only used condoms at their partners' instigation. Cum play was not uncommon and highlights the narrowness (or danger) of focusing on condom use without considering the implications of broader sexual practices and their meaning for sexual health promotion. "Safe sex" for some gay and bisexual men does not necessarily mean consistent commitment to condom use or to avoiding semen exchange. Many feel confident in their knowledge of their partner's HIV serostatus and only use condoms with these partners at their partner's request. Their commitment to safe sex may not necessarily be compromised by their practice of cum play, but the extent to which this could represent a risk for HIV transmission depends on the reliability of their assessment of their partners' HIV serostatus.

  12. Steroid Hormone Receptor Signals as Prognosticators for Urothelial Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of preclinical or clinical evidence suggesting that steroid hormone receptor-mediated signals play a critical role in urothelial tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These receptors include androgen receptor, estrogen receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, progesterone receptor, vitamin D receptor, retinoid receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, and others including orphan receptors. In particular, studies using urothelial cancer tissue specimens have demonstrated that elevated or reduced expression of these receptors as well as alterations of their upstream or downstream pathways correlates with patient outcomes. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting that steroid hormone receptors and related signals serve as biomarkers for urothelial carcinoma and are able to predict tumor recurrence or progression. PMID:26770009

  13. Systematic regional variations of GABA, glutamine, and glutamate concentrations follow receptor fingerprints of human cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Dou, Weiqiang; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; van Tol, Marie-José; Kaufmann, Jörn; Zhong, Kai; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Speck, Oliver; Walter, Martin

    2013-07-31

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of glutamatergic or GABAergic measures in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was found altered in psychiatric disorders and predictive of interindividual variations of functional responses in healthy populations. Several ACC subregions have been parcellated into receptor-architectonically different portions with heterogeneous fingerprints for excitatory and inhibitory receptors. Similarly, these subregions overlap with functionally distinct regions showing opposed signal changes toward stimulation or resting conditions. We therefore investigated whether receptor-architectonical and functional segregation of the cingulate cortex in humans was also reflected in its local concentrations of glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), and GABA. To accomplish a multiregion estimation of all three metabolites in one robust and reliable session, we used an optimized 7T-stimulated echo-acquisition mode method with variable-rate selective excitation pulses. Our results demonstrated that, ensuring high data retest reliability, four cingulate subregions discerning e.g., pregenual ACC (pgACC) from anterior mid-cingulate cortex showed different metabolite concentrations and ratios reflective of regionally specific inhibition/excitation balance. These findings could be controlled for potential influences of local gray matter variations or MRS voxel-placement deviations. Pregenual ACC was found to have significantly higher GABA and Glu concentrations than other regions. This pattern was not paralleled by Gln concentrations, which for both absolute and relative values showed a rostrocaudal gradient with highest values in pgACC. Increased excitatory Glu and inhibitory GABA in pgACC were shown to follow a regional segregation agreeing with recently shown receptor-architectonic GABAB receptor distribution in ACC, whereas Gln distribution followed a pattern of AMPA receptors.

  14. Recommendations for Child Play Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Uriel; Hill, Ann B.; Lane, Carol G.; McGinty, Tim; Moore, Gary T.

    This interim criteria document provides descriptive information and planning, evaluation, and design guidelines for children's play areas located on military bases. The recommendations are presented in two major sections: planning & architecture design. Subcategories within the planning, criteria, and recommendations section address program master…

  15. Fort Play Children Recreate Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase…

  16. Science Adventures in Children's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Edythe

    The stated purpose of this pamphlet is to suggest simple, natural, interesting experiences in children's play that have science implications. It tells how the teacher may capitalize on the innate curiosity of children by incorporating science discovery in daily classroom experiences. This how-to-do-it manual directs map-making and activities for…

  17. Interpretive Reproduction in Children's Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsaro, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at children's play from the perspective of interpretive reproduction, emphasizing the way children create their own unique peer cultures, which he defines as a set of routines, artifacts, values, and concerns that children engage in with their playmates. The article focuses on two types of routines in the peer culture of preschool…

  18. Sculpting Cells with Play Doh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Virginia A.

    1982-01-01

    Suggests using Play Doh to mold models of the nucleus, mitochondria, and inner cellular structures. Students can conceptualize the cell's structures as three-dimensional even though they appear two-dimensional under a microscope. Includes instructions for preparing homemade dough. (Author/JN)

  19. Using Play to Teach Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batt, Tom

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the potential of play in the teaching of college composition. Drawing primarily on the theoretical framework of D. W. Winnicott, the author describes how he used ludic pedagogies to provide first-year writing students a "potential space" in which to explore a range of course elements including composing conventions,…

  20. Obama Plays Cheerleader for STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    Amid a struggling economy, a raft of foreign-policy headaches, and the tail end of a heated campaign season, President Barack Obama carved out time in his schedule last month to watch students in the State Dining Room demonstrate a solar-powered model car, a water-purification system, and a soccer-playing robot. The science fair was the fifth…

  1. Teaching Shakespeare Through Play Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stodder, Joseph H.

    1995-01-01

    A performance-oriented approach to teaching William Shakespeare's literature has been found to be effective and enthusiastically received by college students. Ten years of teaching Shakespeare through full play production has shown that the rewards, eloquently expressed in the testimony of students, more than compensate for extra work required of…

  2. Playing It Safe: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penman, Kenneth A.; Niccolai, Frances R.

    1985-01-01

    Explains how to prevent outdoor sports injuries; discusses related litigation and specific cases involving playing field turf, tennis, skiing, and pools; and sets out facility design and maintenance considerations and recommendations. A sidebar provides information about injury insurance available to NCAA schools. Part I of this article appeared…

  3. Developmental Studies of Pretend Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golomb, Claire

    This paper briefly reports on a series of studies that explore the relationship between symbolic or pretend modes of reasoning and cognitive processes which underlie conservation of quantity. It is hypothesized that the mental transformations which the child makes while playing a game of make-believe, namely, the transformation from his original…

  4. Moral Education through Play Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahalle, Salwa; Zakaria, Gamal Abdul Nasir; Nawi, Aliff

    2014-01-01

    This paper will discuss on how sand therapy (as one type of play therapies) can be applied as an additional technique or approach in counseling. The research questions for this study are to see what are the development, challenges faced by the therapist during the sessions given and how sand therapy can aid to the progress of the client. It is a…

  5. Building Curriculum during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Blocks are not just for play! In this article, Nicole Andrews describes observing the interactions of three young boys enthusiastically engaged in the kindergarten block center of their classroom, using blocks in a building project that displayed their ability to use critical thinking skills, physics exploration, and the development of language…

  6. Child-Centered Play Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanFleet, Rise; Sywulak, Andrea E.; Sniscak, Cynthia Caparosa

    2010-01-01

    Highly practical, instructive, and authoritative, this book vividly describes how to conduct child-centered play therapy. The authors are master clinicians who explain core therapeutic principles and techniques, using rich case material to illustrate treatment of a wide range of difficulties. The focus is on nondirective interventions that allow…

  7. Human and rat TR4 orphan receptors specify a subclass of the steroid receptor superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C; Da Silva, S L; Ideta, R; Lee, Y; Yeh, S; Burbach, J P

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a member of the steroid receptor superfamily and cloned it from human and rat hypothalamus, prostate, and testis cDNA libraries. The open reading frame between first ATG and terminator TGA can encode 615 (human) and 596 (rat) amino acids with calculated molecular mass of 67.3 (human) and 65.4 (rat) kDa. The amino acid sequence of this protein, called TR4 orphan receptor, is closely related to the previously identified TR2 orphan receptor. The high homology between TR2 and TR4 orphan receptor suggests that these two orphan receptors constitute a unique subfamily within the steroid receptor superfamily. These two orphan receptors are differentially expressed in rat tissues. Unlike TR2 orphan receptors, the TR4 orphan receptor appears to be predominantly located in granule cells of the hippocampus and the cerebellum, suggesting that it may play some role(s) in transcriptional regulation in these neurons. Images PMID:8016112

  8. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1985-01-01

    It is now well established that the biological actions of tetradecapeptide somatostatin (somatostatin-14, S-14) are receptor-mediated. These receptors were first quantified in GH4C pituitary tumor cells using [125I-Tyr1] S-14 as radioligand which was found to exhibit high non-specific binding to membrane receptor preparations from normal tissues. Our studies have shown that [125I-Tyr11] S-14 in which the radiolabel is situated away from the N-terminus exhibits significantly lower non-specific binding and therefore is more suitable for S-14 receptor studies. In the CNS, highest concentration of S-14 receptors was found in the cerebral cortex, followed by thalamus, hypothalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus while medulla-pons, cerebellum and spinal cord exhibited negligible binding. Outside the CNS membrane receptors for S-14 have been characterized in pituitary, adrenal cortex and pancreatic acini. In all these tissues a single class of high affinity binding sites for S-14 were present, the receptors in pancreatic acinar cells exhibiting significantly greater affinity for binding S-14 than in other tissues.

  9. Thermogenic characterization of ghrelin receptor null mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic hormone that increases food intake and promotes adiposity, and these physiological functions of ghrelin are mediated through its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin/GHS-R signaling plays a crucial role in energy homeostasis....

  10. Scavenger receptor class B type I: a multifunctional receptor.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Sticozzi, Claudia; Lim, Yunsook; Pecorelli, Alessandra

    2011-07-01

    The scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) plays an important role in meditating the uptake of HDL-derived cholesterol and cholesteryl ester in the liver and steroidogenic tissues. In addition to being ubiquitous, SR-B1 is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor in many tissues, though the mechanism by which SR-B1 does this is unclear. Other than its role as an HDL receptor, SR-B1 is also involved in pathogen recognition; its expression can be modulated by lipopolysaccharide and oxidative stress; and it plays a significant role in the uptake of lipid soluble vitamins, such as vitamin E and carotenoids. In this short review, we have summarized the biological aspects to which SR-B1 has been thus far associated.

  11. Cardiopulmonary changes during clarinet playing.

    PubMed

    Hahnengress, Maria L; Böning, Dieter

    2010-12-01

    Since playing wind instrument impedes normal respiratory functions, its effect on expiratory and blood gases as well as on cardiac function was investigated. In 15 skilled clarinettists expiratory PO(2) and PCO(2) were measured in gas drawn from a modified clarinet barrel when playing a composition (Robert Schumann's "Phantasiestücke" Op. 73 for clarinet and piano) with increasing difficulty from movement 1 to movement 3. Blood gases were measured in arterialized ear lobe blood at the end of each movement and the electrocardiogram was recorded continuously. From the expiratory gas pressures one may conclude that the most advanced players adapt their ventilation to the requirements of the composition and sustain expiration during difficult parts of the composition until hypoxic alveolar PO(2) values are reached (minimum 77 mmHg). Less trained clarinettists tend to hyperventilation or shallow breathing. Oxygen saturation in arterialized blood showed a slight step-wise decrease from movement to movement [control 96.6 ± 0.5 (SD)%, end of concert 95.6 ± 1.0%]. SO(2) was significantly higher because of possibly more effective ventilation in instrumentalists with practise time exceeding 2 h daily. Mean heart rate increased to values like during moderate to heavy physical exercise depending on artistic fitness and the difficulty of the movement (maximal individual value 173 beats/min). Additionally, a large variation might be caused through intrathoracic pressure changes, changing exertion, respiratory influences and emotion. The electrocardiogram showed no pathological events. In general, clarinet playing at a professional level imposes strain on ventilation and circulation but usually not on a pathophysiological level.

  12. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Srikant, C B

    1997-12-01

    The diverse biological effects of somatostatin (SRIF) are mediated by a family of G protein-coupled receptors (termed sst) that are encoded by five nonallelic genes located on separate chromosomes. The receptors can be further divided into two subfamilies: sst(2,3,5) react with octapeptide and hexapeptide SRIF analogues and belong to one subclass; sst(1,4) react poorly with these compounds and fall into another subclass. This review focuses on the molecular pharmacology and function of these receptors, with particular emphasis on the ligand-binding domain, subtype-selective analogues, agonist-dependent receptor regulation and desensitization responses, subtype-specific effector coupling, and signal transduction pathways responsible for inhibiting cell secretion and cell growth or induction of apoptosis.

  13. Supervising the uncanny: the play within the play.

    PubMed

    Leader, Carol

    2015-11-01

    The writer offers a combined experience in analysis and the performing arts to explore uncanny aspects of the unconscious subtext of the patient's inner drama; subtext which can remain hidden from view in supervision. Freud and Jung's understanding of uncanny experience is considered together with a painting from medieval alchemy and Matte Blanco's conceptions concerning the symmetrical nature of unconscious process. Theatre and the work of the theatre director and actor in approaching the multidimensional aspects of a play are then introduced. Finally clinical case material from group supervision demonstrates how the 'theatre of therapy' and the work of the supervisory couple and group promote the emergence of a more authentic conscious asymmetrical response to the patient's 'script' that can break the 'spell' of the transference/countertransference relationship. This in turn brings meaning to the underlying and implicit 'stage directions' that the patient has been unconsciously communicating.

  14. Supervising the uncanny: the play within the play.

    PubMed

    Leader, Carol

    2015-11-01

    The writer offers a combined experience in analysis and the performing arts to explore uncanny aspects of the unconscious subtext of the patient's inner drama; subtext which can remain hidden from view in supervision. Freud and Jung's understanding of uncanny experience is considered together with a painting from medieval alchemy and Matte Blanco's conceptions concerning the symmetrical nature of unconscious process. Theatre and the work of the theatre director and actor in approaching the multidimensional aspects of a play are then introduced. Finally clinical case material from group supervision demonstrates how the 'theatre of therapy' and the work of the supervisory couple and group promote the emergence of a more authentic conscious asymmetrical response to the patient's 'script' that can break the 'spell' of the transference/countertransference relationship. This in turn brings meaning to the underlying and implicit 'stage directions' that the patient has been unconsciously communicating. PMID:26499298

  15. Delineating a Ca2+ binding pocket within the venus flytrap module of the human calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Silve, Caroline; Petrel, Christophe; Leroy, Christine; Bruel, Henri; Mallet, Eric; Rognan, Didier; Ruat, Martial

    2005-11-11

    The Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) belongs to the class III G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which include receptors for pheromones, amino acids, sweeteners, and the neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). These receptors are characterized by a long extracellular amino-terminal domain called a Venus flytrap module (VFTM) containing the ligand binding pocket. To elucidate the molecular determinants implicated in Ca(2+) recognition by the CaSR VFTM, we developed a homology model of the human CaSR VFTM from the x-ray structure of the metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 (mGluR1), and a phylogenetic analysis of 14 class III GPCR VFTMs. We identified critical amino acids delineating a Ca(2+) binding pocket predicted to be adjacent to, but distinct from, a cavity reminiscent of the binding site described for amino acids in mGluRs, GABA-B receptor, and GPRC6a. Most interestingly, these Ca(2+)-contacting residues are well conserved within class III GPCR VFTMs. Our model was validated by mutational and functional analysis, including the characterization of activating and inactivating mutations affecting a single amino acid, Glu-297, located within the proposed Ca(2+) binding pocket of the CaSR and associated with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia and familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, respectively, genetic diseases characterized by perturbations in Ca(2+) homeostasis. Altogether, these data define a Ca(2+) binding pocket within the CaSR VFTM that may be conserved in several other class III GPCRs, thereby providing a molecular basis for extracellular Ca(2+) sensing by these receptors. PMID:16147994

  16. Opioid Receptor-Dependent Sex Differences in Synaptic Plasticity in the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway of the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Harte-Hargrove, Lauren C.; Varga-Wesson, Ada; Duffy, Aine M.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    The mossy fiber (MF) pathway is critical to hippocampal function and influenced by gonadal hormones. Physiological data are limited, so we asked whether basal transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP) differed in slices of adult male and female rats. The results showed small sex differences in basal transmission but striking sex differences in opioid receptor sensitivity and LTP. When slices were made from females on proestrous morning, when serum levels of 17β-estradiol peak, the nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 μm) enhanced MF transmission but there was no effect in males, suggesting preferential opioid receptor-dependent inhibition in females when 17β-estradiol levels are elevated. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist Cys2,Tyr3,Orn5,Pen7-amide (CTOP; 300 nm) had a similar effect but the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist naltrindole (NTI; 1 μm) did not, implicating MORs in female MF transmission. The GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen (200 μm) occluded effects of CTOP but the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 μm) did not. For LTP, a low-frequency (LF) protocol was used because higher frequencies elicited hyperexcitability in females. Proestrous females exhibited LF-LTP but males did not, suggesting a lower threshold for synaptic plasticity when 17β-estradiol is elevated. NTI blocked LF-LTP in proestrous females, but CTOP did not. Electron microscopy revealed more DOR-labeled spines of pyramidal cells in proestrous females than males. Therefore, we suggest that increased postsynaptic DORs mediate LF-LTP in proestrous females. The results show strong MOR regulation of MF transmission only in females and identify a novel DOR-dependent form of MF LTP specific to proestrus. PMID:25632146

  17. Nicotinic Receptors in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; López-Hernández, Beatriz; Ceña, Valentín

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have focused on expanding our knowledge of the structure and diversity of peripheral and central nicotinic receptors. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the Cys-loop superfamily of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which include GABA (A and C), serotonin, and glycine receptors. Currently, 9 alpha (α2-α10) and 3 beta (β2-β4) subunits have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS), and these subunits assemble to form a variety of functional nAChRs. The pentameric combination of several alpha and beta subunits leads to a great number of nicotinic receptors that vary in their properties, including their sensitivity to nicotine, permeability to calcium and propensity to desensitize. In the CNS, nAChRs play crucial roles in modulating presynaptic, postsynaptic, and extrasynaptic signaling, and have been found to be involved in a complex range of CNS disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), schizophrenia, Tourette´s syndrome, anxiety, depression and epilepsy. Therefore, there is growing interest in the development of drugs that modulate nAChR functions with optimal benefits and minimal adverse effects. The present review describes the main characteristics of nAChRs in the CNS and focuses on the various compounds that have been tested and are currently in phase I and phase II trials for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including PD, AD and age-associated memory and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:24179465

  18. Lipoxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Recchia, Irene; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO) and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL). In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1). This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed. PMID:17767357

  19. Targeting Nuclear Receptors with Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Qianrong; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators. PMID:24473166

  20. Targeting nuclear receptors with marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Qianrong; Li, Yong

    2014-01-27

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators.

  1. Biphasic GABA-A receptor-mediated effect on the spontaneous activity of the circular layer in cat terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Radomirov, R

    1993-07-01

    1. The GABA and GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol changed the spontaneous mechanical activity of a circular layer isolated from cat terminal ileum, while the selective GABA-B receptor agonist (+/-)baclofen had no effect. 2. GABA at doses ranging from 1 microM to 2 mM elicited concentration-dependent biphasic responses which consisted of a relaxation followed by contraction, with a tonic and a phasic component. The EC50 values, calculated at 95% confidence limits (CL), were 94.9 microM (83.5-109.8 microM) and 66.0 microM (51.2-75.5 microM) for the relaxation and contractile phases, respectively. 3. The GABA-induced biphasic responses were sensitive to bicuculline and picrotoxinin and were entirely mimicked by muscimol. Bicuculline competitively antagonized the effects of GABA and gave closely similar pA2 values for both phases of these responses--inhibitory and stimulatory. Cross-desensitization occurred only between GABA and muscimol and not between (+/-)baclofen and GABA, or (+/-)baclofen and muscimol. 4. Both bicuculline-sensitive phases evoked by GABA and muscimol were abolished by tetrodotoxin or atropine, but were unaffected by guanethidine or naloxone. 5. The present results suggested that the biphasic GABA effect on the mechanical activity of the circular layer in cat terminal ileum was mediated by prejunctional GABA-A receptors, most probably through an action on the cholinergic pathway.

  2. In vivo electroretinographic studies of the role of GABAC receptors in retinal signal processing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Mojumder, Deb Kumar; Yan, Jun; Xie, An; Standaert, Robert F; Qian, Haohua; Pepperberg, David R; Frishman, Laura J

    2015-10-01

    All three classes of receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (GABAR) are expressed in the retina. This study investigated roles of GABAR, especially GABACR (GABA(A)-ρ), in retinal signaling in vivo by studying effects on the mouse electroretinogram (ERG) of genetic deletion of GABACR versus pharmacological blockade using receptor antagonists. Brief full-field flash ERGs were recorded from anesthetized GABACR(-/-) mice, and WT C57BL/6 (B6) mice, before and after intravitreal injection of GABACR antagonists, TPMPA, 3-APMPA, or the more recently developed 2-AEMP; GABAAR antagonist, SR95531; GABABR antagonist, CGP, and agonist, baclofen. Intravitreal injections of TPMPA and SR95531 were also made in Brown Norway rats. The effect of 2-AEMP on GABA-induced current was tested directly in isolated rat rod bipolar cells, and 2-AEMP was found to preferentially block GABACR in those cells. Maximum amplitudes of dark (DA) and light-adapted (LA) ERG b-waves were reduced in GABACR(-/-) mice, compared to B6 mice, by 30-60%; a-waves were unaltered and oscillatory potential amplitudes were increased. In B6 mice, after injection of TPMPA (also in rats), 3-APMPA or 2-AEMP, ERGs became similar to ERGs of GABACR(-/-) mice. Blockade of GABAARs and GABABRs, or agonism of GABABRs did not alter B6 DA b-wave amplitude. The negative scotopic threshold response (nSTR) was slightly less sensitive in GABACR(-/-) than in B6 mice, and unaltered by 2-AEMP. However, amplitudes of nSTR and photopic negative response (PhNR), both of which originate from inner retina, were enhanced by TPMPA and 3-APMPA, each of which has GABAB agonist properties, and further increased by baclofen. The finding that genetic deletion of GABACR, the GABACR antagonist 2-AEMP, and other antagonists all reduced ERG b-wave amplitude, supports a role for GABACR in determining the maximum response amplitude of bipolar cells contributing to the b-wave. GABACR antagonists differed in their effects on nSTR and Ph

  3. In vivo electroretinographic studies of the role of GABAC receptors in retinal signal processing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Mojumder, Deb Kumar; Yan, Jun; Xie, An; Standaert, Robert F.; Qian, Haohua; Pepperberg, David R.; Frishman, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    All three classes of receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (GABAR) are expressed in the retina. This study investigated roles of GABAR, especially GABACR (GABA(A)-ρ), in retinal signaling in vivo by studying effects on the mouse electroretinogram (ERG) of genetic deletion of GABACR versus pharmacological blockade using receptor antagonists. Brief full-field flash ERGs were recorded from anesthetized GABACR−/− mice, and WT C57BL/6 (B6) mice, before and after intravitreal injection of GABACR antagonists, TPMPA, 3-APMPA, or the more recently developed 2-AEMP; GABAAR antagonist, SR95531; GABABR antagonist, CGP, and agonist, baclofen. Intravitreal injections of TPMPA and SR95531 were also made in Brown Norway rats. The effect of 2-AEMP on GABA- induced current was tested directly in isolated rat rod bipolar cells, and 2-AEMP was found to preferentially block GABACR in those cells. Maximum amplitudes of dark (DA) and light-adapted (LA) ERG b-waves were reduced in GABACR−/− mice, compared to B6 mice, by 30–60%; a-waves were unaltered and oscillatory potential amplitudes were increased. In B6 mice, after injection of TPMPA (also in rats), 3-APMPA or 2-AEMP, ERGs became similar to ERGs of GABACR−/− mice. Blockade of GABAARs and GABABRs, or agonism of GABABRs did not alter B6 DA b-wave amplitude. The negative scotopic threshold response (nSTR) was slightly less sensitive in GABACR−/− than in B6 mice, and unaltered by 2-AEMP. However, amplitudes of nSTR and photopic negative response (PhNR), both of which originate from inner retina, were enhanced by TPMPA and 3-APMPA, each of which has GABAB agonist properties, and further increased by baclofen. The finding that genetic deletion of GABACR, the GABACR antagonist 2-AEMP, and other antagonists all reduced ERG b-wave amplitude, supports a role for GABACR in determining the maximum response amplitude of bipolar cells contributing to the b-wave. GABACR antagonists differed in their effects on n

  4. In vivo electroretinographic studies of the role of GABAC receptors in retinal signal processing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Mojumder, Deb Kumar; Yan, Jun; Xie, An; Standaert, Robert F; Qian, Haohua; Pepperberg, David R; Frishman, Laura J

    2015-10-01

    All three classes of receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (GABAR) are expressed in the retina. This study investigated roles of GABAR, especially GABACR (GABA(A)-ρ), in retinal signaling in vivo by studying effects on the mouse electroretinogram (ERG) of genetic deletion of GABACR versus pharmacological blockade using receptor antagonists. Brief full-field flash ERGs were recorded from anesthetized GABACR(-/-) mice, and WT C57BL/6 (B6) mice, before and after intravitreal injection of GABACR antagonists, TPMPA, 3-APMPA, or the more recently developed 2-AEMP; GABAAR antagonist, SR95531; GABABR antagonist, CGP, and agonist, baclofen. Intravitreal injections of TPMPA and SR95531 were also made in Brown Norway rats. The effect of 2-AEMP on GABA-induced current was tested directly in isolated rat rod bipolar cells, and 2-AEMP was found to preferentially block GABACR in those cells. Maximum amplitudes of dark (DA) and light-adapted (LA) ERG b-waves were reduced in GABACR(-/-) mice, compared to B6 mice, by 30-60%; a-waves were unaltered and oscillatory potential amplitudes were increased. In B6 mice, after injection of TPMPA (also in rats), 3-APMPA or 2-AEMP, ERGs became similar to ERGs of GABACR(-/-) mice. Blockade of GABAARs and GABABRs, or agonism of GABABRs did not alter B6 DA b-wave amplitude. The negative scotopic threshold response (nSTR) was slightly less sensitive in GABACR(-/-) than in B6 mice, and unaltered by 2-AEMP. However, amplitudes of nSTR and photopic negative response (PhNR), both of which originate from inner retina, were enhanced by TPMPA and 3-APMPA, each of which has GABAB agonist properties, and further increased by baclofen. The finding that genetic deletion of GABACR, the GABACR antagonist 2-AEMP, and other antagonists all reduced ERG b-wave amplitude, supports a role for GABACR in determining the maximum response amplitude of bipolar cells contributing to the b-wave. GABACR antagonists differed in their effects on nSTR and Ph

  5. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  6. Play for All. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Robin C.; Goltsman, Susan M.

    A CD-ROM provides a tour of some of the world's greatest play environments, presenting 94 photographic images that illustrate the key concepts and recommendations from Play For All guidelines. It is organized into 10 categories covering a range of play area settings, including play equipment, sand settings, water settings, play props, and animal…

  7. Caring About Kids: The Importance of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Div. of Scientific and Public Information.

    In several brief sections, this pamphlet defines play, discusses how play helps a child develop, and how play changes as a child grows older, indicates the role of toys and certain play activities in promoting sex stereotypes, and identifies the role of fantasy and imagination in children's play. A discussion of the role of parents in fostering…

  8. Play: A Fundamental Equalizer for ESL Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Allan

    1999-01-01

    Investigated the effects of play on English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) children as part of a study on the use of play in upper elementary school children. Results found that play significantly facilitated communication and socialization while nurturing independence and self-esteem. The paper rationalizes the use of play, defines play, and…

  9. Play Therapy: Voice of a Silent Scream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakesh, Annuradha; H, Uma; Srinath, Shoba

    2010-01-01

    Play Therapy is based upon the fact that play is the child's natural medium of self-expression. It is an opportunity that is given to the child to "play out" his/her feelings and problems just as, in certain types of adult therapy, an individual "talks out" his difficulties. Children use play to express feelings and thoughts. Play emerges from the…

  10. Intensity of tennis match play

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, J; Mendez‐Villanueva, A; Pluim, B M

    2006-01-01

    This review focuses on the characteristics of tennis players during match play and provides a greater insight into the energy demands of tennis. A tennis match often lasts longer than an hour and in some cases more than five hours. During a match there is a combination of periods of maximal or near maximal work and longer periods of moderate and low intensity activity. Match intensity varies considerably depending on the players' level, style, and sex. It is also influenced by factors such as court surface and ball type. This has important implications for the training of tennis players, which should resemble match intensity and include interval training with appropriate work to rest ratios. PMID:16632566

  11. Nicotinic receptors and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Ripoll, Nadège; Dailly, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors (NRs) belong to the group of polymeric receptors of the cell membrane and are key elements of cholinergic transmission. Numerous subtypes of NRs exist with the alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 7 types being encountered most frequently. Deficiencies in NRs seem to play a role in Alzheimer's disease, which is characterised by accumulation of senile plaques, mainly composed of beta-amyloid peptide (beta A). Although the aetiology of this disease is unknown, different pathogenesis hypotheses implicating alpha 7 NRs have been proposed, with the receptors exerting a direct or indirect action on the mechanism of beta A toxicity. Allosteric modulators of NRs, such as the cholinesterase inhibitor galantamine, that facilitate the action of acetylcholine on these receptors may provide therapeutic benefits in the areas of cognition, attention and antineurodegenerative activity.

  12. Hand kinematics of piano playing

    PubMed Central

    Flanders, Martha; Soechting, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Dexterous use of the hand represents a sophisticated sensorimotor function. In behaviors such as playing the piano, it can involve strong temporal and spatial constraints. The purpose of this study was to determine fundamental patterns of covariation of motion across joints and digits of the human hand. Joint motion was recorded while 5 expert pianists played 30 excerpts from musical pieces, which featured ∼50 different tone sequences and fingering. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm revealed that joint velocities could be categorized into several patterns, which help to simplify the description of the movements of the multiple degrees of freedom of the hand. For the thumb keystroke, two distinct patterns of joint movement covariation emerged and they depended on the spatiotemporal patterns of the task. For example, the thumb-under maneuver was clearly separated into two clusters based on the direction of hand translation along the keyboard. While the pattern of the thumb joint velocities differed between these clusters, the motions at the metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-phalangeal joints of the four fingers were more consistent. For a keystroke executed with one of the fingers, there were three distinct patterns of joint rotations, across which motion at the striking finger was fairly consistent, but motion of the other fingers was more variable. Furthermore, the amount of movement spillover of the striking finger to the adjacent fingers was small irrespective of the finger used for the keystroke. These findings describe an unparalleled amount of independent motion of the fingers. PMID:21880938

  13. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars.

  14. Hand kinematics of piano playing.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Flanders, Martha; Soechting, John F

    2011-12-01

    Dexterous use of the hand represents a sophisticated sensorimotor function. In behaviors such as playing the piano, it can involve strong temporal and spatial constraints. The purpose of this study was to determine fundamental patterns of covariation of motion across joints and digits of the human hand. Joint motion was recorded while 5 expert pianists played 30 excerpts from musical pieces, which featured ∼50 different tone sequences and fingering. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm revealed that joint velocities could be categorized into several patterns, which help to simplify the description of the movements of the multiple degrees of freedom of the hand. For the thumb keystroke, two distinct patterns of joint movement covariation emerged and they depended on the spatiotemporal patterns of the task. For example, the thumb-under maneuver was clearly separated into two clusters based on the direction of hand translation along the keyboard. While the pattern of the thumb joint velocities differed between these clusters, the motions at the metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-phalangeal joints of the four fingers were more consistent. For a keystroke executed with one of the fingers, there were three distinct patterns of joint rotations, across which motion at the striking finger was fairly consistent, but motion of the other fingers was more variable. Furthermore, the amount of movement spillover of the striking finger to the adjacent fingers was small irrespective of the finger used for the keystroke. These findings describe an unparalleled amount of independent motion of the fingers. PMID:21880938

  15. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars. PMID:21952980

  16. Receptors for enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Yamayoshi, Seiya; Fujii, Ken; Koike, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Occasionally, EV71 infection is associated with severe neurological diseases, such as acute encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis and cardiopulmonary failure. Several molecules act as cell surface receptors that stimulate EV71 infection, including scavenger receptor B2 (SCARB2), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and annexin II (Anx2). SCARB2 plays critical roles in attachment, viral entry and uncoating, and it can facilitate efficient EV71 infection. The three-dimensional structures of the mature EV71 virion, procapsid and empty capsid, as well as the exofacial domain of SCARB2, have been elucidated. This structural information has greatly increased our understanding of the early steps of EV71 infection. Furthermore, SCARB2 plays essential roles in the development of EV71 neurological disease in vivo. Adult mice are not susceptible to infection by EV71, but transgenic mice that express human SCARB2 become susceptible to EV71 infection and develop similar neurological diseases to those found in humans. This mouse model facilitates the in vivo investigation of many issues related to EV71. PSGL-1, sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and Anx2 are attachment receptors, which enhance viral infection by retaining the virus on the cell surface. These molecules also contribute to viral infection in vitro either by interacting with SCARB2 or independently of SCARB2. However, the cooperative effects of these receptors, and their contribution to EV71 pathogenicity in vivo, remain to be elucidated. PMID:26038749

  17. Superhero Play: What's a Teacher to Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Karen L.; Dettore, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    Examines the appeal of superheroes to children and adults' beliefs about superhero play, and suggests some potential benefits of such play. Offers examples of ways to successfully incorporate superhero play into an early childhood classroom. (Author/KB)

  18. Angiotensin II receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek; Yee, Daniel K; Fluharty, Steven J

    2007-05-01

    Angiotensin II plays a key role in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. To correct body fluid deficits that occur during hypovolaemia, an animal needs to ingest both water and electrolytes. Thus, it is not surprising that angiotensin II, which is synthesized in response to hypovolaemia, acts centrally to increase both water and NaCl intake. Here, we review findings relating to the properties of angiotensin II receptors that give rise to changes in behaviour. Data are described to suggest that divergent signal transduction pathways are responsible for separable behavioural responses to angiotensin II, and a hypothesis is proposed to explain how this divergence may map onto neural circuits in the brain.

  19. Interaction of JAK with steroid receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nibedita; Mayer, Doris

    2013-01-01

    The function of steroid receptors is not only regulated by steroid hormones, but also by multiple cellular signaling cascades activated by membrane-bound receptors which are stimulated by growth factors or cytokines. Cross-talk between JAK and steroid receptors plays a central role in the regulation of a multitude of physiological processes and aberrant signaling is involved in the development of numerous diseases including cancer. In this review we provide a brief summary of the knowledge of interactions between JAK and the function of steroid receptors in normal cells and tissues and in diseases. PMID:24416641

  20. Endosome acidification and receptor trafficking: bafilomycin A1 slows receptor externalization by a mechanism involving the receptor's internalization motif.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L S; Dunn, K W; Pytowski, B; McGraw, T E

    1993-01-01

    To examine the relationship between endosome acidification and receptor trafficking, transferrin receptor trafficking was characterized in Chinese hamster ovary cells in which endosome acidification was blocked by treatment with the specific inhibitor of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, bafilomycin A1. Elevating endosome pH slowed the receptor externalization rate to approximately one-half of control but did not affect receptor internalization kinetics. The slowed receptor externalization required the receptor's cytoplasmic domain and was largely eliminated by substitutions replacing either of two aromatic amino acids within the receptor's cytoplasmic YTRF internalization motif. These results confirm, using a specific inhibitor of the vacuolar proton pump, that proper endosome acidification is necessary to maintain rapid recycling of intracellular receptors back to the plasma membrane. Moreover, receptor return to the plasma membrane is slowed in the absence of proper endosome acidification by a signal-dependent mechanism involving the receptor's cytoplasmic tyrosine-containing internalization motif. These results, in conjunction with results from other studies, suggest that the mechanism for clustering receptors in plasma membrane clathrin-coated pits may be an example of a more general mechanism that determines the dynamic distribution of membrane proteins among various compartments with luminal acidification playing a crucial role in this process. Images PMID:8167408

  1. Propofol depresses cerebellar Purkinje cell activity via activation of GABA(A) and glycine receptors in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ri; Liu, Heng; Jin, Wen-Zhe; Shi, Jin-Di; Jin, Qing-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2015-10-01

    Propofol is an intravenous sedative-hypnotic agen, which causes rapid and reliable loss of consciousness. Under in vitro conditions, propofol activates GABAA and glycine receptors in spinal cord, hippocampus and hypothalamus neurons. However, the effects of propofol on the cerebellar neuronal activity under in vivo conditions are currently unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of propofol on the spontaneous activity of Purkinje cells (PCs) in urethane-anesthetized mice by cell-attached recording and pharmacological methods. Our results showed that cerebellar surface perfusion of propofol (10-1000 μM) induced depression of the PC simple spike (SS) firing rate in a dose-dependent manner, but without significantly changing the properties of complex spikes (CS). The IC50 of propofol for inhibiting SS firing of PCs was 144.5 μM. Application of GABAA receptor antagonist, SR95531 (40 μM) or GABAB receptor antagonist, saclofen (20 μM), as well as glycine receptor antagonist, strychnine (10 μM) alone failed to prevent the propofol-induced inhibition of PCs spontaneous activity. However, application the mixture of SR95531 (40 μM) and strychnine (10 μM) completely blocked the propofol-induced inhibition of PC SS firing. These data indicated that cerebellar surface application of propofol depressed PC SS firing rate via facilitation of GABAA and functional glycine receptors activity in adult cerebellar PCs under in vivo conditions. Our present results provide a new insight of the anesthetic action of propofol in cerebellar cortex, suggesting that propofol depresses the SS outputs of cerebellar PCs which is involved in both GABAA and glycine receptors activity.

  2. Modulation of Glucagon Receptor Pharmacology by Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-2 (RAMP2)*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Cathryn; Lu, Jing; Li, Naichang; Barkan, Kerry; Richards, Gareth O.; Roberts, David J.; Skerry, Timothy M.; Poyner, David; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Dowell, Simon J.; Willars, Gary B.; Ladds, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors play important, opposing roles in regulating blood glucose levels. Consequently, these receptors have been identified as targets for novel diabetes treatments. However, drugs acting at the GLP-1 receptor, although having clinical efficacy, have been associated with severe adverse side-effects, and targeting of the glucagon receptor has yet to be successful. Here we use a combination of yeast reporter assays and mammalian systems to provide a more complete understanding of glucagon receptor signaling, considering the effect of multiple ligands, association with the receptor-interacting protein receptor activity-modifying protein-2 (RAMP2), and the role of individual G protein α-subunits. We demonstrate that RAMP2 alters both ligand selectivity and G protein preference of the glucagon receptor. Importantly, we also uncover novel cross-reactivity of therapeutically used GLP-1 receptor ligands at the glucagon receptor that is abolished by RAMP2 interaction. This study reveals the glucagon receptor as a previously unidentified target for GLP-1 receptor agonists and highlights a role for RAMP2 in regulating its pharmacology. Such previously unrecognized functions of RAMPs highlight the need to consider all receptor-interacting proteins in future drug development. PMID:26198634

  3. Regional mRNA expression of GABAergic receptor subunits in brains of C57BL/6J and 129P3/J mice: strain and heroin effects.

    PubMed

    Schlussman, S D; Buonora, M; Brownstein, A J; Zhang, Y; Ho, A; Kreek, M J

    2013-07-26

    C57BL/6J and 129 substrains of mice are known to differ in their basal levels of anxiety and behavioral response to drugs of abuse. We have previously shown strain differences in heroin-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) between C57BL/6J (C57) and 129P3/J (129) mice, and in the regional expression of several receptor and peptide mRNAs. In this study, we examined the contribution of the GABAergic system in the cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAc), caudate putamen (CPu) and the region containing the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA) to heroin reward by measuring mRNA levels of 7 of the most commonly expressed GABA-A receptor subunits, and both GABA-B receptor subunits, in these same mice following saline (control) or heroin administration in a CPP design. Using real-time PCR, we studied the effects of strain and heroin administration on GABA-A α1, α2, α3, β2, and γ2 subunits, which typically constitute synaptic GABA-A receptors, GABA-A α4 and δ subunits, which typically constitute extrasynaptic GABA-A receptors, and GABA-B R1 and R2 subunits. In saline-treated animals, we found an experiment-wise significant strain difference in GABA-Aα2 mRNA expression in the SN/VTA. Point-wise significant strain differences were also observed in GABA-Aα2, GABA-Aα3, and GABA-Aα4 mRNA expression in the NAc, as well as GABA-BR2 mRNA expression in the NAc and CPu, and GABA-BR1 mRNA expression in the cortex. For all differences, 129 mice had higher mRNA expression compared to C57 animals, with the exception of GABA-BR1 mRNA in the cortex where we observed lower levels in 129 mice. Therefore, it may be possible that known behavioral differences between these two strains are, in part, due to differences in their GABAergic systems. While we did not find heroin dose-related changes in mRNA expression levels in C57 mice, we did observe dose-related differences in 129 mice. These results may relate to our earlier behavioral finding that 129 mice are

  4. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  5. Play and the Young Child: Musical Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Tim

    After noting the near-universal presence of rhythmic response in play in all cultures, this paper looks first at the historical development of theories of play, and then examines current theories of play and their implications in the teaching of music to young children. The first section reviews 19th and early 20th century theories of play,…

  6. Play Deprivation: A Factor in Juvenile Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Joe; Jacobs, Paul J.

    1995-01-01

    Notes that the increasing number of violent crimes committed by children is a result of play deprivation. Discusses different forms of play and distinguishes between controlled and free play. Examines factors such as inadequate outdoor spaces, organized sports, and hi-tech entertainment which interfere with spontaneous play. Discusses the concept…

  7. Making Sense of Outdoor Pretend Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jane P.

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the independent outdoor pretend play of preschool children. Describes the complex learning occurring in a university child study center's play yard and in outdoor learning centers, how teachers complement children's play, and the importance of space. Illustrates the pattern of pretend play: initiation, negotiation, and enactment.…

  8. Active Gaming: The Future of Play?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherspoon, Lisa; Manning, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examine technology-driven games--especially active gaming--as an evolving form of children's play. They offer an overview of play and its developmental benefits, describe the literature on the emergence of technology-driven play, and reflect on the diminishment of physical play in contemporary culture. They suggest that active gaming,…

  9. Children, Play, and Development. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Fergus P.

    2010-01-01

    Children, Play, and Development, Fourth Edition, discusses the relationship of play to the physical, social, intellectual, and emotional growth of the child. Author Fergus P. Hughes focuses on the historical, sociocultural, and ethological context of play; the role of development in play; and the wide range of theories that provide a framework for…

  10. How the Brain Makes Play Fun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the empirical studies that have investigated whether play (mostly social play) is rewarding. He then discusses the brain circuits and neurotransmitters that underlie the pleasurable aspects of play. He concludes that the pleasure of play has the ability to reinforce learning activities and that the brain's…

  11. Parent-Child Play: Descriptions and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Kevin, Ed.

    This volume provides the latest research and theory in the area of children's play with their parents. It includes discussions of the basic processes involved in parent-child play, parent-child play in atypical populations of children, and parent-child play from a cross-cultural perspective. Fifteen chapters follow the introduction, "Parents and…

  12. Play and Social Interaction in Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Doris; Fromberg, Doris Pronin

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses traditional and contemporary definitions of middle childhood play, the value of such play for children's development and learning, the implications of home, school, and societal practices that have resulted in changing the play scenario of middle childhood, and suggestions for assuring that play's value will be maintained…

  13. Evaluative Intervention Research in Child's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yawkey, Thomas Daniels; Fox, Franklin Daniel

    1981-01-01

    Evaluative intervention research studies in pretend play are investigations that examine the potential of imaginative play in young children to demonstrate a relationship between play and cognitive, social, and emotional growth. A review of the research indicates that children who engage in imaginative play yield higher test scores than those in…

  14. Pretend Play in the Early Childhood Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEntire, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents and summarizes recent resources related to pretend play in the early childhood classroom. These include "Contemporary Perspectives on Play in Early Childhood Education" by Olivia N. Sarachoe and Bernard Spodek; "Dramatic Play: Bring It Back" by Tammy Benson; and "The Importance of Being Playful" by Elena Bodrova and Deborah…

  15. Children's Spontaneous Play in Writer's Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysaker, Judith T.; Wheat, Jennifer; Benson, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Research on the relationship between literacy and play has a rich history. Yet few studies have examined children's use of spontaneous play during literacy events as children are learning to read and write. This case study examines the use of play and the quality of playfulness in a kindergarten/first grade multiage classroom during Writer's…

  16. Teatro! Hispanic Plays for Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigil, Angel

    This collection of 14 folk drama scripts is drawn from the Hispanic culture and traditions of the American Southwest and designed for use in educational settings. The plays are short, simple, and easy to produce. A single play can fill a class period, while several plays grouped together would make a school assembly. Six plays, intended for grades…

  17. Introduction to Plays, English: 5112.44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozan, Ruth S.

    Several plays are studied to introduce students to theatrical terms and to the elements of a play in this quinmester course for Dade County High Schools. Several approaches to the study of the play are suggested such as individual and a large group production of a play, the use of a unified theme such as Youth vs. Tradition, or the line of…

  18. Strategies for Family Facilitation of Play Dates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Cynthia R.; Horn, Eva M.

    2010-01-01

    Play dates can serve several functions for young children, including children with social difficulties, such as developmental delays, behavioral disorders, autism spectrum disorders, and shyness. Play dates provide children with additional opportunities to be around peers and to practice skills associated with peer play interactions. Play dates…

  19. Index to Children's Plays in Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreider, Barbara

    This book is an index to plays suitable for study and performance in elementary schools and in children's groups. This volume updates the last such index, published in 1940 by the American Library Association, and supplements and updates "Play Index's" list of children's plays. Over 500 children's one-act plays and skits published in the United…

  20. Reconceptualizing Play: Aesthetic Self-Definitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guss, Faith

    2005-01-01

    This article aims to trouble the identity of children's dramatic play(ing). It contains two interweaving threads of discourse. In one thread lies a discussion of how children can trouble and extend their own identities through the aesthetic form-languages and conventions they employ and deploy in their dramatic playing/pretend playing.…

  1. Conceptualizing the Play Policies in Preschool Curriculums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sener, Tulin

    2013-01-01

    This research attempted to describe the play policies in preschool institutions in Ankara, Turkey. The aim of this study is to determine the approaches of the preschools to the children's play. "Play Policy Questionnaire" administered to all directors and teachers of 20 public preschools and 20 private preschools. Play policy of…

  2. Psychiatrists' Perceptions of Role-Playing Games.

    PubMed

    Lis, Eric; Chiniara, Carl; Biskin, Robert; Montoro, Richard

    2015-09-01

    The literature has seen a surge in research on the mental health impacts of technologies such as Facebook, video games, and massively-multiplayer online role-playing games such as World of Warcraft, but little is known regarding the mental health impact of non-video role-playing games, such as Dungeons & Dragons. The present study examines how psychiatrists' perceive role-playing games and whether they play them. Psychiatrists at a tertiary care centre in Canada completed a questionnaire assessing history of playing role-playing games and whether they associate them with psychopathology. Forty-eight psychiatrists responded. Twenty-three percent have played a role-playing game over their lifetimes. Twenty-two percent believed there was an association between psychopathology and role-playing games. A majority of psychiatrists who responded do not associate role-playing games with psychopathology. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:25589035

  3. Psychiatrists' Perceptions of Role-Playing Games.

    PubMed

    Lis, Eric; Chiniara, Carl; Biskin, Robert; Montoro, Richard

    2015-09-01

    The literature has seen a surge in research on the mental health impacts of technologies such as Facebook, video games, and massively-multiplayer online role-playing games such as World of Warcraft, but little is known regarding the mental health impact of non-video role-playing games, such as Dungeons & Dragons. The present study examines how psychiatrists' perceive role-playing games and whether they play them. Psychiatrists at a tertiary care centre in Canada completed a questionnaire assessing history of playing role-playing games and whether they associate them with psychopathology. Forty-eight psychiatrists responded. Twenty-three percent have played a role-playing game over their lifetimes. Twenty-two percent believed there was an association between psychopathology and role-playing games. A majority of psychiatrists who responded do not associate role-playing games with psychopathology. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  4. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  5. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  6. Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors in human disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Brian A; Rott, Alena; Butcher, Eugene C

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of leukocyte attractant ligands and cognate heptahelical receptors specify the systemic recruitment of circulating cells by triggering integrin-dependent adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting extravasation, and directing specific intratissue localization via gradient-driven chemotaxis. Chemoattractant receptors also control leukocyte egress from lymphoid organs and peripheral tissues. In this article, we summarize the fundamental mechanics of leukocyte trafficking, from the evolution of multistep models of leukocyte recruitment and navigation to the regulation of chemoattractant availability and function by atypical heptahelical receptors. To provide a more complete picture of the migratory circuits involved in leukocyte trafficking, we integrate a number of nonchemokine chemoattractant receptors into our discussion. Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors play key roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, allergy, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. We review recent advances in our understanding of chemoattractant receptors in disease pathogenesis, with a focus on genome-wide association studies in humans and the translational implications of mechanistic studies in animal disease models.

  7. GABAA Receptors at Hippocampal Mossy Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Arnaud; Fabian-Fine, Ruth; Scott, Ricardo; Walker, Matthew C.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Presynaptic GABAA receptors modulate synaptic transmission in several areas of the CNS but are not known to have this action in the cerebral cortex. We report that GABAA receptor activation reduces hippocampal mossy fibers excitability but has the opposite effect when intracellular Cl− is experimentally elevated. Synaptically released GABA mimics the effect of exogenous agonists. GABAA receptors modulating axonal excitability are tonically active in the absence of evoked GABA release or exogenous agonist application. Presynaptic action potential-dependent Ca2+ transients in individual mossy fiber varicosities exhibit a biphasic dependence on membrane potential and are altered by GABAA receptors. Antibodies against the α2 subunit of GABAA receptors stain mossy fibers. Axonal GABAA receptors thus play a potentially important role in tonic and activity-dependent heterosynaptic modulation of information flow to the hippocampus. PMID:12971896

  8. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  9. Transforming Play: An Analysis of First-, Third-, and Fifth-Graders' Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Donna M.; Chaille, Christine

    1996-01-01

    Compared children's play with transformational objects (vehicles that change to robots) to play with representational objects (cars and figures). Found that those playing with transformers engaged in more parallel play and manipulative activity, while those with representational objects displayed more social play and more symbolic play. Found no…

  10. Play Therapy: Facilitative Use of Child's Play in Elementary School Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landreth, Garry L.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews five major developments in play therapy: psychoanalysis, release therapy, relationship therapy, nondirective therapy, and play therapy in school settings. Suggests ways school counselors can use play therapy. Describes play therapy facilities, location selection, and play materials. Lists objectives of play therapy and how teachers can aid…

  11. Exploring Play/Playfulness and Learning in the Adult and Higher Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanis, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Play and playfulness and their role in learning are researched extensively in early childhood education. However, as the child matures into an adult, play and playfulness are given less attention in the teaching and learning process. In adult education, there is very little research about play/playfulness and its significance for learning. Despite…

  12. A second trigeminal CGRP receptor: function and expression of the AMY1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher S; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Bower, Rebekah L; Wilderman, Andrea; Insel, Paul A; Edvinsson, Lars; Waldvogel, Henry J; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Russo, Andrew F; Hay, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The trigeminovascular system plays a central role in migraine, a condition in need of new treatments. The neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is proposed as causative in migraine and is the subject of intensive drug discovery efforts. This study explores the expression and functionality of two CGRP receptor candidates in the sensory trigeminal system. Methods Receptor expression was determined using Taqman G protein-coupled receptor arrays and immunohistochemistry in trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the spinal trigeminal complex of the brainstem in rat and human. Receptor pharmacology was quantified using sensitive signaling assays in primary rat TG neurons. Results mRNA and histological expression analysis in rat and human samples revealed the presence of two CGRP-responsive receptors (AMY1: calcitonin receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein 1 [RAMP1]) and the CGRP receptor (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/RAMP1). In support of this finding, quantification of agonist and antagonist potencies revealed a dual population of functional CGRP-responsive receptors in primary rat TG neurons. Interpretation The unexpected presence of a functional non-canonical CGRP receptor (AMY1) at neural sites important for craniofacial pain has important implications for targeting the CGRP axis in migraine. PMID:26125036

  13. Guidance Receptors in the Nervous and Cardiovascular Systems.

    PubMed

    Rubina, K A; Tkachuk, V A

    2015-10-01

    Blood vessels and nervous fibers grow in parallel, for they express similar receptors for chemokine substances. Recently, much attention is being given to studying guidance receptors and their ligands besides the growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines necessary to form structures in the nervous and vascular systems. Such guidance molecules determine trajectory for growing axons and vessels. Guidance molecules include Ephrins and their receptors, Neuropilins and Plexins as receptors for Semaphorins, Robos as receptors for Slit-proteins, and UNC5B receptors binding Netrins. Apart from these receptors and their ligands, urokinase and its receptor (uPAR) and T-cadherin are also classified as guidance molecules. The urokinase system mediates local proteolysis at the leading edge of cells, thereby providing directed migration. T-cadherin is a repellent molecule that regulates the direction of growing axons and blood vessels. Guidance receptors also play an important role in the diseases of the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  14. Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking of Human Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Masilamani, Madhan; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the defense against viral infections and tumor development. NK cell function is primarily regulated by the sum of signals from a broad array of activation and inhibitory receptors. Key to generating the input level of either activating or inhibitory signals is the maintenance of receptor expression levels on the cell surface. Although the mechanisms of endocytosis and trafficking for some cell surface receptors, such as transferrin receptor, and certain immune receptors, are very well known, that is not the situation for receptors expressed by NK cells. Recent studies have uncovered that endocytosis and trafficking routes characteristic for specific activation and inhibitory receptors can regulate the functional responses of NK cells. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of receptor endocytosis and trafficking, and integrate this with our current understanding of NK cell receptor trafficking. PMID:19719476

  15. 2-Aryl-3-indoleacetamides (FGIN-1): a new class of potent and specific ligands for the mitochondrial DBI receptor (MDR).

    PubMed

    Romeo, E; Auta, J; Kozikowski, A P; Ma, D; Papadopoulos, V; Puia, G; Costa, E; Guidotti, A

    1992-09-01

    The 2 aryl-3-indoleacetamides (FGIN-1) are a new class of compounds that potently (nM) and selectively bind to glial mitochondrial diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) receptors (MDR), previously called peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, and increase mitochondrial steroidogenesis. The high-affinity binding of FGIN-1 to MDR derivatives depends on the following chemical characteristics: 1) the dialkylation of the amide; 2) the chain length of this alkyl substitution; and 3) the halogenation of aryl groups appended to the indole nucleus. FGIN-1 derivatives do not bind to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA), GABAB, glycine, glutamate, dopamine, serotonin, opiate, cholecystokinin, beta adrenergic, cannabinoid or sigma receptors. FGIN-1-27 [N, N-di-n-hexyl 2-(4-fluorophenyl)indole-3-acetamide] enters the brain, and for this reason, this FGIN-1 compound is potent and efficacious behaviorally. Like the neurosteroid 3 alpha-5 alpha tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC), FGIN-1-27 delays the onset of isoniazid-induced convulsions, but fails to delay the onset of bicuculline-induced convulsions. However, differently from THDOC, the FGIN-1-27 anticonvulsant action is blocked by the isoquinoline carboxamide PK 11195. In the elevated plus maze test, FGIN-1-27 inhibits neophobia manner that is antagonized by PK 11195 but not by flumazenil. Because FGIN-1-27 binds to MDR and does not bind to the GABAA receptors, it is inferred that FGIN-1-27 may act on GABAA receptors indirectly, presumably via a stimulation of neurosteroid synthesis and release from glial cells.

  16. Inhibitory nature of tiagabine-augmented GABAA receptor-mediated depolarizing responses in hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M F; Esplin, B; Capek, R

    1999-03-01

    . Independently of the stimulus intensity with which they were evoked, the charge transferred to the soma by excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), elicited in the presence of tiagabine (20 microM) during the large (1,428 +/- 331 pA) inward currents that underlie the DRs, was decreased on the average by 90.8 +/- 1.7%. Such inhibition occurred despite the presence of the GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP 52 432 (10 microM), indicating that GABAB heteroreceptors, located on glutamatergic terminals, do not mediate the observed reduction in the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic responses. The present results suggest that despite facilitating the induction of GABA-mediated depolarizations, tiagabine application may nevertheless increase the effectiveness of synaptic inhibition during the synchronous high-frequency activation of inhibitory interneurons by enhanced shunting.

  17. Forms of vitality play in infancy.

    PubMed

    Español, Silvia; Martínez, Mauricio; Bordoni, Mariana; Camarasa, Rosario; Carretero, Soledad

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we report a qualitative study based on the constant comparative method to initiate the systematic study of forms of vitality play. This is an unnoticed non-figurative play frame linked to early social play and temporal arts in which child and adult elaborate the dynamics of their own movements and sounds in a repetition-variation form. In the introduction we present the theoretical underpinnings and the sporadic observations we have done in previous studies. Then, by the iterative observations of the recorded material of a longitudinal case study on play during the third year of life, we generated the general category of forms of vitality play and four subcategories of display modes of forms of vitality play (improvised forms of vitality play, ritualized forms of vitality play, forms of vitality play combined with pretend play, and forms of vitality play combined with role playing) which are illustrated with descriptive narratives. We discuss the properties of the developed categories, the limits of the present study, and the need to continue systematizing the research on this playful activity.

  18. Forms of vitality play in infancy.

    PubMed

    Español, Silvia; Martínez, Mauricio; Bordoni, Mariana; Camarasa, Rosario; Carretero, Soledad

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we report a qualitative study based on the constant comparative method to initiate the systematic study of forms of vitality play. This is an unnoticed non-figurative play frame linked to early social play and temporal arts in which child and adult elaborate the dynamics of their own movements and sounds in a repetition-variation form. In the introduction we present the theoretical underpinnings and the sporadic observations we have done in previous studies. Then, by the iterative observations of the recorded material of a longitudinal case study on play during the third year of life, we generated the general category of forms of vitality play and four subcategories of display modes of forms of vitality play (improvised forms of vitality play, ritualized forms of vitality play, forms of vitality play combined with pretend play, and forms of vitality play combined with role playing) which are illustrated with descriptive narratives. We discuss the properties of the developed categories, the limits of the present study, and the need to continue systematizing the research on this playful activity. PMID:24909632

  19. Synergistic activity between the delta-opioid agonist SNC80 and amphetamine occurs via a glutamatergic NMDA-receptor dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Kelly E.; Jutkiewicz, Emily M.; Schultz, Kristin N.; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Gnegy, Margaret E.; Traynor, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate is known to cause the release of dopamine through a Ca2+-sensitive mechanism that involves activation of NMDA ionotropic glutamate receptors. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that the delta opioid agonist SNC80 acts indirectly, via the glutamatergic system, to enhance both amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux from striatal preparations and amphetamine-stimulated locomotor activity. SNC80 increased extracellular glutamate content, which was accompanied by a concurrent decrease in GABA levels. Inhibition of NMDA signaling with the selective antagonist MK801 blocked the enhancement of both amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux and hyperlocomotion observed with SNC80 pretreatment. Addition of exogenous glutamate also potentiated amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux in a Mg2+- and MK801-sensitive manner. After removal of Mg2+ to relieve the ion conductance inhibition of NMDA receptors, SNC80 both elicited dopamine release alone and produced a greater enhancement of amphetamine-evoked dopamine efflux. The action of SNC80 to enhance amphetamine-evoked dopamine efflux was mimicked by the GABAB antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen. These cumulative findings suggest SNC80 modulates amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux through an intra-striatal mechanism involving inhibition of GABA transmission leading to the local release of glutamate followed by subsequent activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:24035916

  20. Imaginary Play Companions: Characteristics and Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyan-Masih, V.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates some of the following characteristics associated with young children playing with imaginary play companions (IPCs): intelligence, parental and socioeconomic and educational background, family size, and birth order. Compares these children to those without IPCs. (HOD)