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Sample records for gabaergic interneuron survival

  1. Heterogeneity and Diversity of Striatal GABAergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, James M.; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Koós, Tibor; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo

    2010-01-01

    The canonical view of striatal GABAergic interneurons has evolved over several decades of neuroanatomical/neurochemical and electrophysiological studies. From the anatomical studies, three distinct GABAergic interneuronal subtypes are generally recognized. The best-studied subtype expresses the calcium-binding protein, parvalbumin. The second best known interneuron type expresses a number of neuropeptides and enzymes, including neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, and nitric oxide synthase. The last GABAergic interneuron subtype expresses the calcium binding protein, calretinin. There is no overlap or co-localization of these three different sets of markers. The parvalbumin-immunoreactive GABAergic interneurons have been recorded in vitro and shown to exhibit a fast-spiking phenotype characterized by short duration action potentials with large and rapid spike AHPs. They often fire in a stuttering pattern of high frequency firing interrupted by periods of silence. They are capable of sustained firing rates of over 200 Hz. The NPY/SOM/NOS interneurons have been identified as PLTS cells, exhibiting very high input resistances, low threshold spike and prolonged plateau potentials in response to intracellular depolarization or excitatory synaptic stimulation. Thus far, no recordings from identified CR interneurons have been obtained. Recent advances in technological approaches, most notably the generation of several BAC transgenic mouse strains which express a fluorescent marker, enhanced green fluorescent protein, specifically and selectively only in neurons of a certain genetic makeup (e.g., parvalbumin-, neuropeptide Y-, or tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing neurons etc.) have led to the ability of electrophysiologists to visualize and patch specific neuron types in brain slices with epifluorescence illumination. This has led to a rapid expansion of the number of neurochemically and/or electrophysiologically identified interneuronal cell types in the striatum and elsewhere

  2. Presynaptic miniature GABAergic currents in developing interneurons.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Bouhours, Brice; Rostaing, Philippe; Papageorgiou, George; Corrie, John E T; Triller, Antoine; Ogden, David; Marty, Alain

    2010-04-29

    Miniature synaptic currents have long been known to represent random transmitter release under resting conditions, but much remains to be learned about their nature and function in central synapses. In this work, we describe a new class of miniature currents ("preminis") that arise by the autocrine activation of axonal receptors following random vesicular release. Preminis are prominent in gabaergic synapses made by cerebellar interneurons during the development of the molecular layer. Unlike ordinary miniature postsynaptic currents in the same cells, premini frequencies are strongly enhanced by subthreshold depolarization, suggesting that the membrane depolarization they produce belongs to a feedback loop regulating neurotransmitter release. Thus, preminis could guide the formation of the interneuron network by enhancing neurotransmitter release at recently formed synaptic contacts.

  3. Hilar GABAergic Interneuron Activity Controls Spatial Learning and Memory Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Gillespie, Anna K.; Kravitz, Alexxai V.; Nelson, Alexandra B.; Devidze, Nino; Lo, Iris; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Bien-Ly, Nga; Ring, Karen; Zwilling, Daniel; Potter, Gregory B.; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Huang, Yadong

    2012-01-01

    Background Although extensive research has demonstrated the importance of excitatory granule neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in normal learning and memory and in the pathogenesis of amnesia in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the role of hilar GABAergic inhibitory interneurons, which control the granule neuron activity, remains unclear. Methodology and Principal Findings We explored the function of hilar GABAergic interneurons in spatial learning and memory by inhibiting their activity through Cre-dependent viral expression of enhanced halorhodopsin (eNpHR3.0)—a light-driven chloride pump. Hilar GABAergic interneuron-specific expression of eNpHR3.0 was achieved by bilaterally injecting adeno-associated virus containing a double-floxed inverted open-reading frame encoding eNpHR3.0 into the hilus of the dentate gyrus of mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of an enhancer specific for GABAergic interneurons. In vitro and in vivo illumination with a yellow laser elicited inhibition of hilar GABAergic interneurons and consequent activation of dentate granule neurons, without affecting pyramidal neurons in the CA3 and CA1 regions of the hippocampus. We found that optogenetic inhibition of hilar GABAergic interneuron activity impaired spatial learning and memory retrieval, without affecting memory retention, as determined in the Morris water maze test. Importantly, optogenetic inhibition of hilar GABAergic interneuron activity did not alter short-term working memory, motor coordination, or exploratory activity. Conclusions and Significance Our findings establish a critical role for hilar GABAergic interneuron activity in controlling spatial learning and memory retrieval and provide evidence for the potential contribution of GABAergic interneuron impairment to the pathogenesis of amnesia in AD. PMID:22792368

  4. GABAergic interneuron development and function is modulated by the Tsc1 gene.

    PubMed

    Fu, Cary; Cawthon, Bryan; Clinkscales, William; Bruce, Adrienne; Winzenburger, Peggy; Ess, Kevin C

    2012-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disease with severe neurologic and psychiatric manifestations including epilepsy, developmental delay, and autism. Despite much progress in defining abnormal signaling pathways including the contribution of increased mTORC1 signaling, specific abnormalities that underlie the severe neurologic features in TSC remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that epilepsy and autism in TSC result from abnormalities of γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) interneurons. To test this hypothesis, we generated conditional knockout mice with selective deletion of the Tsc1 gene in GABAergic interneuron progenitor cells. These interneuron-specific Tsc1 conditional knockout (CKO) mice have impaired growth and decreased survival. Cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons of CKO mice are enlarged and show increased mTORC1 signaling. Total numbers of GABAergic cells are reduced in the cortex with differential reduction of specific GABAergic subtypes. Ectopic clusters of cells with increased mTORC1 signaling are also seen suggesting impaired interneuron migration. The functional consequences of these cellular changes are evident in the decreased seizure threshold on exposure to the proconvulsant flurothyl. These findings support an important role for the Tsc1 gene during GABAergic interneuron development, function, and possibly migration.

  5. Genetics and function of neocortical GABAergic interneurons in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, E

    2011-01-01

    A dysfunction of cortical and limbic GABAergic circuits has been postulated to contribute to multiple neurodevelopmental disorders in humans, including schizophrenia, autism, and epilepsy. In the current paper, I summarize the characteristics that underlie the great diversity of cortical GABAergic interneurons and explore how the multiple roles of these cells in developing and mature circuits might contribute to the aforementioned disorders. Furthermore, I review the tightly controlled genetic cascades that determine the fate of cortical interneurons and summarize how the dysfunction of genes important for the generation, specification, maturation, and function of cortical interneurons might contribute to these disorders.

  6. Genetics and Function of Neocortical GABAergic Interneurons in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, E.

    2011-01-01

    A dysfunction of cortical and limbic GABAergic circuits has been postulated to contribute to multiple neurodevelopmental disorders in humans, including schizophrenia, autism, and epilepsy. In the current paper, I summarize the characteristics that underlie the great diversity of cortical GABAergic interneurons and explore how the multiple roles of these cells in developing and mature circuits might contribute to the aforementioned disorders. Furthermore, I review the tightly controlled genetic cascades that determine the fate of cortical interneurons and summarize how the dysfunction of genes important for the generation, specification, maturation, and function of cortical interneurons might contribute to these disorders. PMID:21876820

  7. Neurotensin activates GABAergic interneurons in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Kimberly A; Schmidt, Dennis; Bubser, Michael; Fadel, Jim; Carraway, Robert E; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2005-02-16

    Converging data suggest a dysfunction of prefrontal cortical GABAergic interneurons in schizophrenia. Morphological and physiological studies indicate that cortical GABA cells are modulated by a variety of afferents. The peptide transmitter neurotensin may be one such modulator of interneurons. In the rat prefrontal cortex (PFC), neurotensin is exclusively localized to dopamine axons and has been suggested to be decreased in schizophrenia. However, the effects of neurotensin on cortical interneurons are poorly understood. We used in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats to assess whether neurotensin regulates PFC GABAergic interneurons. Intra-PFC administration of neurotensin concentration-dependently increased extracellular GABA levels; this effect was impulse dependent, being blocked by treatment with tetrodotoxin. The ability of neurotensin to increase GABA levels in the PFC was also blocked by pretreatment with 2-[1-(7-chloro-4-quinolinyl)-5-(2,6-dimethoxyphenyl)pyrazole-3-yl)carbonylamino]tricyclo(3.3.1.1 [EC] .3.7)decan-2-carboxylic acid (SR48692), a high-affinity neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) antagonist. This finding is consistent with our observation that NTR1 was localized to GABAergic interneurons in the PFC, particularly parvalbumin-containing interneurons. Because neurotensin is exclusively localized to dopamine axons in the PFC, we also determined whether neurotensin plays a role in the ability of dopamine agonists to increase extracellular GABA levels. We found that D2 agonist-elicited increases in PFC GABA levels were blocked by pretreatment with SR48692, consistent with data indicating that D2 autoreceptor agonists increase neurotensin release from dopamine-neurotensin axons in the PFC. These findings suggest that neurotensin plays an important role in regulating prefrontal cortical interneurons and that it may be useful to consider neurotensin agonists as an adjunct in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  8. The early fetal development of human neocortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Al-Jaberi, Nahidh; Lindsay, Susan; Sarma, Subrot; Bayatti, Nadhim; Clowry, Gavin J

    2015-03-01

    GABAergic interneurons are crucial to controlling the excitability and responsiveness of cortical circuitry. Their developmental origin may differ between rodents and human. We have demonstrated the expression of 12 GABAergic interneuron-associated genes in samples from human neocortex by quantitative rtPCR from 8 to 12 postconceptional weeks (PCW) and shown a significant anterior to posterior expression gradient, confirmed by in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry for GAD1 and 2, DLX1, 2, and 5, ASCL1, OLIG2, and CALB2. Following cortical plate (CP) formation from 8 to 9 PCW, a proportion of cells were strongly stained for all these markers in the CP and presubplate. ASCL1 and DLX2 maintained high expression in the proliferative zones and showed extensive immunofluorescent double-labeling with the cell division marker Ki-67. CALB2-positive cells increased steadily in the SVZ/VZ from 10 PCW but were not double-labeled with Ki-67. Expression of GABAergic genes was generally higher in the dorsal pallium than in the ganglionic eminences, with lower expression in the intervening ventral pallium. It is widely accepted that the cortical proliferative zones may generate CALB2-positive interneurons from mid-gestation; we now show that the anterior neocortical proliferative layers especially may be a rich source of interneurons in the early neocortex.

  9. Interneurons. Fast-spiking, parvalbumin⁺ GABAergic interneurons: from cellular design to microcircuit function.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hua; Gan, Jian; Jonas, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The success story of fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive (PV(+)) GABAergic interneurons (GABA, γ-aminobutyric acid) in the mammalian central nervous system is noteworthy. In 1995, the properties of these interneurons were completely unknown. Twenty years later, thanks to the massive use of subcellular patch-clamp techniques, simultaneous multiple-cell recording, optogenetics, in vivo measurements, and computational approaches, our knowledge about PV(+) interneurons became more extensive than for several types of pyramidal neurons. These findings have implications beyond the "small world" of basic research on GABAergic cells. For example, the results provide a first proof of principle that neuroscientists might be able to close the gaps between the molecular, cellular, network, and behavioral levels, representing one of the main challenges at the present time. Furthermore, the results may form the basis for PV(+) interneurons as therapeutic targets for brain disease in the future. However, much needs to be learned about the basic function of these interneurons before clinical neuroscientists will be able to use PV(+) interneurons for therapeutic purposes.

  10. Bayesian network classifiers for categorizing cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    An accepted classification of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex is a major goal in neuroscience. A recently proposed taxonomy based on patterns of axonal arborization promises to be a pragmatic method for achieving this goal. It involves characterizing interneurons according to five axonal arborization features, called F1-F5, and classifying them into a set of predefined types, most of which are established in the literature. Unfortunately, there is little consensus among expert neuroscientists regarding the morphological definitions of some of the proposed types. While supervised classifiers were able to categorize the interneurons in accordance with experts' assignments, their accuracy was limited because they were trained with disputed labels. Thus, here we automatically classify interneuron subsets with different label reliability thresholds (i.e., such that every cell's label is backed by at least a certain (threshold) number of experts). We quantify the cells with parameters of axonal and dendritic morphologies and, in order to predict the type, also with axonal features F1-F4 provided by the experts. Using Bayesian network classifiers, we accurately characterize and classify the interneurons and identify useful predictor variables. In particular, we discriminate among reliable examples of common basket, horse-tail, large basket, and Martinotti cells with up to 89.52% accuracy, and single out the number of branches at 180 μm from the soma, the convex hull 2D area, and the axonal features F1-F4 as especially useful predictors for distinguishing among these types. These results open up new possibilities for an objective and pragmatic classification of interneurons.

  11. An Overview of the Mechanisms of Abnormal GABAergic Interneuronal Cortical Migration Associated with Prenatal Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shenoda, Botros B

    2017-02-03

    GABAergic Interneuronal migration constitutes an essential process during corticogenesis. Derived from progenitor cells located in the proliferative zones of the ventral telencephalon, newly generated GABAergic Interneuron migrate to their cortical destinations. Cortical dysfunction associated with defects in neuronal migration results in severe developmental consequences. There is growing evidence linking prenatal ethanol exposure to abnormal GABAergic interneuronal migration and subsequent cortical dysfunction. Investigating the pathophysiological mechanisms behind disrupted GABAergic interneuronal migration encountered with prenatal alcohol exposure is crucial for understanding and managing fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. This review explores the molecular pathways regulating GABAergic interneuronal cortical migration that might be altered by prenatal ethanol exposure thus opening new avenues for further research in this topic.

  12. Properties of Mouse Spinal Lamina I GABAergic Interneurons.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Kimberly J.; Sawchuk, Michael A.; Hochman, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Lamina I is a sensory relay region containing projection cells and local interneurons involved in thermal and nociceptive signaling. These neurons differ in morphology, sensory response modality, and firing characteristics. We examined intrinsic properties of mouse lamina I GABAergic neurons expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). GABAergic neuron identity was confirmed by a high correspondence between GABA immunolabeling and EGFP fluorescence. Morphologies of these EGFP+/GABA+ cells were multipolar (65%), fusiform (31%), and pyramidal (4%). In whole cell recordings, cells fired a single spike (44%), tonically (35%), or an initial burst (21%) in response to current steps, representing a subset of reported lamina I firing properties. Membrane properties of tonic and initial burst cells were indistinguishable and these neurons may represent one functional population because, in individual neurons, their firing patterns could interconvert. Single spike cells were less excitable with lower membrane resistivity and higher rheobase. Most fusiform cells (64%) fired tonically while most multipolar cells (56%) fired single spikes. In summary, lamina I inhibitory interneurons are functionally divisible into at least two major groups both of which presumably function to limit excitatory transmission. PMID:16014799

  13. An interneuron progenitor maintains neurogenic potential in vivo and differentiates into GABAergic interneurons after transplantation in the postnatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Hong, Peiwei; Gao, Hui; Chen, Yuntian; Yang, Qi; Jiang, Mei; Li, Hedong

    2016-01-11

    Dysfunction of cortical GABAergic interneurons are involved in numerous neurological disorders including epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism; and replenishment of these cells by transplantation strategy has proven to be a feasible and effective method to help revert the symptoms in several animal models. To develop methodology of generating transplantable GABAergic interneurons for therapy, we previously reported the isolation of a v-myc-induced GABAergic interneuron progenitor clone GE6 from embryonic ganglionic eminence (GE). These cells can proliferate and form functional inhibitory synapses in culture. Here, we tested their differentiation behavior in vivo by transplanting them into the postnatal rat forebrain. We found that GE6 cells migrate extensively in the neonatal forebrain and differentiate into both neurons and glia, but preferentially into neurons when compared with a sister progenitor clone CTX8. The neurogenic potential of GE6 cells is also maintained after transplantation into a non-permissive environment such as adult cortex or when treated with inflammatory cytokine in culture. The GE6-derived neurons were able to mature in vivo as GABAergic interneurons expressing GABAergic, not glutamatergic, presynaptic puncta. Finally, we propose that v-myc-induced human interneuron progenitor clones could be an alternative cell source of transplantable GABAergic interneurons for treating related neurological diseases in future clinic.

  14. Dendritic and Axonal Wiring Optimization of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    The way in which a neuronal tree expands plays an important role in its functional and computational characteristics. We aimed to study the existence of an optimal neuronal design for different types of cortical GABAergic neurons. To do this, we hypothesized that both the axonal and dendritic trees of individual neurons optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. We took the branching points of real three-dimensional neuronal reconstructions of the axonal and dendritic trees of different types of cortical interneurons and searched for the minimal wiring arborization structure that respects the branching points. We compared the minimal wiring arborization with real axonal and dendritic trees. We tested this optimization problem using a new approach based on graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques. We concluded that neuronal wiring is near-optimal in most of the tested neurons, although the wiring length of dendritic trees is generally nearer to the optimum. Therefore, wiring economy is related to the way in which neuronal arborizations grow irrespective of the marked differences in the morphology of the examined interneurons.

  15. Dopamine-deprived striatal GABAergic interneurons burst and generate repetitive gigantic IPSCs in medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Dehorter, Nathalie; Guigoni, Celine; Lopez, Catherine; Hirsch, June; Eusebio, Alexandre; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Hammond, Constance

    2009-06-17

    Striatal GABAergic microcircuits modulate cortical responses and movement execution in part by controlling the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). How this is altered by chronic dopamine depletion, such as in Parkinson's disease, is not presently understood. We now report that, in dopamine-depleted slices of the striatum, MSNs generate giant spontaneous postsynaptic GABAergic currents (single or in bursts at 60 Hz) interspersed with silent episodes, rather than the continuous, low-frequency GABAergic drive (5 Hz) observed in control MSNs. This shift was observed in one-half of the MSN population, including both "D(1)-negative" and "D(1)-positive" MSNs. Single GABA and NMDA channel recordings revealed that the resting membrane potential and reversal potential of GABA were similar in control and dopamine-depleted MSNs, and depolarizing, but not excitatory, actions of GABA were observed. Glutamatergic and cholinergic antagonists did not block the GABAergic oscillations, suggesting that they were generated by GABAergic neurons. In support of this, cell-attached recordings revealed that a subpopulation of intrastriatal GABAergic interneurons generated bursts of spikes in dopamine-deprived conditions. This subpopulation included low-threshold spike interneurons but not fast-spiking interneurons, cholinergic interneurons, or MSNs. Therefore, a population of local GABAergic interneurons shifts from tonic to oscillatory mode when dopamine deprived and gives rise to spontaneous repetitive giant GABAergic currents in one-half the MSNs. We suggest that this may in turn alter integration of cortical signals by MSNs.

  16. Thalamo-cortical axons regulate the radial dispersion of neocortical GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Zechel, Sabrina; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical GABAergic interneuron migration and thalamo-cortical axon (TCA) pathfinding follow similar trajectories and timing, suggesting they may be interdependent. The mechanisms that regulate the radial dispersion of neocortical interneurons are incompletely understood. Here we report that disruption of TCA innervation, or TCA-derived glutamate, affected the laminar distribution of GABAergic interneurons in mouse neocortex, resulting in abnormal accumulation in deep layers of interneurons that failed to switch from tangential to radial orientation. Expression of the KCC2 cotransporter was elevated in interneurons of denervated cortex, and KCC2 deletion restored normal interneuron lamination in the absence of TCAs. Disruption of interneuron NMDA receptors or pharmacological inhibition of calpain also led to increased KCC2 expression and defective radial dispersion of interneurons. Thus, although TCAs are not required to guide the tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons, they provide crucial signals that restrict interneuron KCC2 levels, allowing coordinated neocortical invasion of TCAs and interneurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20770.001 PMID:27935475

  17. New insights into the classification and nomenclature of cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    DeFelipe, Javier; López-Cruz, Pedro L; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Anderson, Stewart; Burkhalter, Andreas; Cauli, Bruno; Fairén, Alfonso; Feldmeyer, Dirk; Fishell, Gord; Fitzpatrick, David; Freund, Tamás F; González-Burgos, Guillermo; Hestrin, Shaul; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R; Huang, Josh; Jones, Edward G; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kisvárday, Zoltán; Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Lewis, David A; Marín, Oscar; Markram, Henry; McBain, Chris J; Meyer, Hanno S; Monyer, Hannah; Nelson, Sacha B; Rockland, Kathleen; Rossier, Jean; Rubenstein, John L R; Rudy, Bernardo; Scanziani, Massimo; Shepherd, Gordon M; Sherwood, Chet C; Staiger, Jochen F; Tamás, Gábor; Thomson, Alex; Wang, Yun; Yuste, Rafael; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2013-03-01

    A systematic classification and accepted nomenclature of neuron types is much needed but is currently lacking. This article describes a possible taxonomical solution for classifying GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex based on a novel, web-based interactive system that allows experts to classify neurons with pre-determined criteria. Using Bayesian analysis and clustering algorithms on the resulting data, we investigated the suitability of several anatomical terms and neuron names for cortical GABAergic interneurons. Moreover, we show that supervised classification models could automatically categorize interneurons in agreement with experts' assignments. These results demonstrate a practical and objective approach to the naming, characterization and classification of neurons based on community consensus.

  18. Distinct roles of GABAergic interneurons in the regulation of striatal output pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gittis, Aryn H.; Nelson, Alexandra B.; Thwin, Myo T.; Palop, Jorge J.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2010-01-01

    Striatal GABAergic microcircuits are critical for motor function, yet their properties remain enigmatic due to difficulties in targeting striatal interneurons for electrophysiological analysis. Here, we utilize Lhx6-GFP transgenic mice to identify GABAergic interneurons and investigate their regulation of striatal direct- and indirect-pathway medium spiny neurons (MSNs). We find that the two major interneuron populations, persistent low-threshold spiking (PLTS) and fast spiking (FS) interneurons, differ substantially in their excitatory inputs and inhibitory outputs. Excitatory synaptic currents recorded from PLTS interneurons are characterized by a small, non-rectifying AMPA receptor-mediated component and a NMDA receptor-mediated component. In contrast, glutamatergic synaptic currents in FS interneurons have a large, strongly-rectifying AMPA receptor-mediated component, but no detectable NMDA receptor-mediated responses. Consistent with their axonal morphology, the output of individual PLTS interneurons is relatively weak and sparse, whereas FS interneurons are robustly connected to MSNs and other FS interneurons and appear to mediate the bulk of feedforward inhibition. Synaptic depression of FS outputs is relatively insensitive to firing frequency, and dynamic-clamp experiments reveal that these short-term dynamics enable feedforward inhibition to remain efficacious across a broad frequency range. Surprisingly, we find that FS interneurons preferentially target direct-pathway MSNs over indirect-pathway MSNs, suggesting a potential mechanism for rapid pathway-specific regulation of striatal output pathways. PMID:20147549

  19. Cholinergic Axons Modulate GABAergic Signaling among Hippocampal Interneurons via Postsynaptic α7 Nicotinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wanaverbecq, Nicolas; Semyanov, Alexey; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2010-01-01

    Homopentameric α7 nicotinic receptors have a high affinity for acetylcholine (ACh), are permeable to Ca2+ ions, and are abundant in hippocampal interneurons. Although nicotinic agonists evoke inward currents and Ca2+ transients in stratum radiatum interneurons, the role of endogenous ACh in modulating synaptic integration by interneurons is incompletely understood. Many cholinergic axonal varicosities do not have postsynaptic specializations, but α7 receptors frequently occur close to synaptic GABAA receptors. These observations raise the possibility that α7 nicotinic receptors activated by ACh released from cholinergic axons modulate GABAergic transmission in interneurons. We show that agonists of α7 receptors profoundly depress GABAergic IPSCs recorded in stratum radiatum interneurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. This depression is accompanied by a small increase in GABA release. α7 nicotinic receptor agonists also depress GABA- or muscimol-evoked currents in interneurons, indicating that the major effect is a postsynaptic modulation of GABAA receptors. The depression of GABA-evoked currents is abolished by chelating Ca2+ in the recorded interneuron and attenuated by inhibitors of PKC. We also show that stimuli designed to release endogenous ACh from cholinergic axons evoke an α7 receptor-dependent heterosynaptic depression of GABAergic IPSCs in interneurons. This heterosynaptic modulation is amplified by blocking cholinesterases. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which cholinergic neurons modulate information processing in the hippocampus. PMID:17522313

  20. Migratory pathways of GABAergic interneurons when they enter the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Daisuke H; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    Inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric-acid-containing interneurons play important roles in the functions of the neocortex. During rodent development, most neocortical interneurons are generated in the subpallium and migrate tangentially toward the neocortex. They migrate through multiple pathways to enter the neocortex. Failure of interneuron migration through these pathways during development leads to an abnormal distribution and abnormal functions of interneurons in the postnatal brain. Because of recent discoveries regarding the novel origins and migratory pathways of neocortical interneurons, in this article we review the literature on the migratory pathways of interneurons when they enter the neocortex.

  1. Hippocampal GABAergic interneurons coexpressing alpha7-nicotinic receptors and connexin-36 are able to improve neuronal viability under oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Voytenko, L P; Lushnikova, I V; Savotchenko, A V; Isaeva, E V; Skok, M V; Lykhmus, O Yu; Patseva, M A; Skibo, G G

    2015-08-07

    The hippocampal interneurons are very diverse by chemical profiles and rather inconsistent by sensitivity to CI. Some hippocampal GABAergic interneurons survive certain time after ischemia while ischemia-sensitive interneurons and pyramidal neurons are damaged. GABAergic signaling, nicotinic receptors expressing α7-subunit (α7nAChRs(+)) and connexin-36 (Cx36(+), electrotonic gapjunctions protein) contradictory modulate post-ischemic environment. We hypothesized that hippocampal ischemia-resistant GABAergic interneurons coexpressing glutamate decarboxylase-67 isoform (GAD67(+)), α7nAChRs(+), Cx36(+) are able to enhance neuronal viability. To check this hypothesis the histochemical and electrophysiological investigations have been performed using rat hippocampal organotypic culture in the condition of 30-min oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Post-OGD reoxygenation (4h) revealed in CA1 pyramidal layer numerous damaged cells, decreased population spike amplitude and increased pair-pulse depression. In these conditions GAD67(+) interneurons displayed the OGD-resistance and significant increase of GABA synthesis/metabolism (GAD67-immunofluorescence, mitochondrial activity). The α7nAChRs(+) and Cx36(+) co-localizations were revealed in resistant GAD67(+) interneurons. Under OGD: GABAA-receptors (GABAARs) blockade increased cell damage and exacerbated the pair-pulse depression in CA1 pyramidal layer; α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels separate blockades sufficiently decreased cell damage while interneuronal GAD67-immunofluorescence and mitochondrial activity were similar to the control. Thus, hippocampal GABAergic interneurons co-expressing α7nAChRs and Cx36 remained resistant certain time after OGD and were able to modulate CA1 neuron survival through GABAARs, α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels activity. The enhancements of the neuronal viability together with GABA synthesis/metabolism normalization suggest cooperative neuroprotective mechanism that could be used for increase in

  2. Lineage-specific laminar organization of cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Gabriele; Dehorter, Nathalie; Sols, Ignasi; Huang, Z Josh; Maravall, Miguel; Marín, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    In the cerebral cortex, pyramidal cells and interneurons are generated in distant germinal zones, and so the mechanisms that control their precise assembly into specific microcircuits remain an enigma. Here we report that cortical interneurons labeled at the clonal level do not distribute randomly but rather have a strong tendency to cluster in the mouse neocortex. This behavior is common to different classes of interneurons, independently of their origin. Interneuron clusters are typically contained within one or two adjacent cortical layers, are largely formed by isochronically generated neurons and populate specific layers, as revealed by unbiased hierarchical clustering methods. Our results suggest that different progenitor cells give rise to interneurons populating infra- and supragranular cortical layers, which challenges current views of cortical neurogenesis. Thus, specific lineages of cortical interneurons seem to be produced to primarily mirror the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex, rather than its columnar organization.

  3. Neuregulin 1 promotes excitatory synapse development and function in GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ting, Annie K; Chen, Yongjun; Wen, Lei; Yin, Dong-Min; Shen, Chengyong; Tao, Yanmei; Liu, Xihui; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2011-01-05

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and its receptor ErbB4 are both susceptibility genes of schizophrenia. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of their malfunction. Although ErbB4 is enriched in GABAergic interneurons, the role of NRG1 in excitatory synapse formation in these neurons remains poorly understood. We showed that NRG1 increased both the number and size of PSD-95 puncta and the frequency and amplitude of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) in GABAergic interneurons, indicating that NRG1 stimulates the formation of new synapses and strengthens existing synapses. In contrast, NRG1 treatment had no effect on either the number or size of excitatory synapses in glutamatergic neurons, suggesting its synaptogenic effect is specific to GABAergic interneurons. Ecto-ErbB4 treatment diminished both the number and size of excitatory synapses, suggesting that endogenous NRG1 may be critical for basal synapse formation. NRG1 could stimulate the stability of PSD-95 in the manner that requires tyrosine kinase activity of ErbB4. Finally, deletion of ErbB4 in parvalbumin-positive interneurons led to reduced frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs, providing in vivo evidence that ErbB4 is important in excitatory synaptogenesis in interneurons. Together, our findings suggested a novel synaptogenic role of NRG1 in excitatory synapse development, possibly via stabilizing PSD-95, and this effect is specific to GABAergic interneurons. In light of the association of the genes of both NRG1 and ErbB4 with schizophrenia and dysfunction of GABAergic system in this disorder, these results provide insight into its potential pathological mechanism.

  4. Cracking Down on Inhibition: Selective Removal of GABAergic Interneurons from Hippocampal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Flavia; Alpár, Alán; Kacza, Johannes; Caleo, Matteo; Verderio, Claudia; Giani, Alice; Martens, Henrik; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Allegra, Manuela; Grosche, Jens; Michalski, Dominik; Erck, Christian; Hoffmann, Anke; Härtig, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory (GABAergic) interneurons entrain assemblies of excitatory principal neurons to orchestrate information processing in the hippocampus. Disrupting the dynamic recruitment as well as the temporally precise activity of interneurons in hippocampal circuitries can manifest in epileptiform seizures, and impact specific behavioral traits. Despite the importance of GABAergic interneurons during information encoding in the brain, experimental tools to selectively manipulate GABAergic neurotransmission are limited. Here, we report the selective elimination of GABAergic interneurons by a ribosome inactivation approach through delivery of saporin-conjugated anti-vesicular GABA transporter antibodies (SAVAs) in vitro as well as in the mouse and rat hippocampus in vivo. We demonstrate the selective loss of GABAergic—but not glutamatergic—synapses, reduced GABA release, and a shift in excitation/inhibition balance in mixed cultures of hippocampal neurons exposed to SAVAs. We also show the focal and indiscriminate loss of calbindin+, calretinin+, parvalbumin/system A transporter 1+, somatostatin+, vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3)/cholecystokinin/CB1 cannabinoid receptor+ and neuropeptide Y+ local-circuit interneurons upon SAVA microlesions to the CA1 subfield of the rodent hippocampus, with interneuron debris phagocytosed by infiltrating microglia. SAVA microlesions did not affect VGLUT1+ excitatory afferents. Yet SAVA-induced rearrangement of the hippocampal circuitry triggered network hyperexcitability associated with the progressive loss of CA1 pyramidal cells and the dispersion of dentate granule cells. Overall, our data identify SAVAs as an effective tool to eliminate GABAergic neurons from neuronal circuits underpinning high-order behaviors and cognition, and whose manipulation can recapitulate pathogenic cascades of epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric illnesses. PMID:22323713

  5. Exogenous Sonic hedgehog modulates the pool of GABAergic interneurons during cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Parmigiani, E; Tosatto, G; Martire, S; Hoshino, M; Buffo, A; Leto, K; Rossi, F

    2015-04-01

    All cerebellar GABAergic interneurons were derived from a common pool of precursor cells residing in the embryonic ventricular zone (VZ) and migrating in the prospective white matter (PWM) after birth, where both intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to regulate their amplification. Among the environmental factors, we focused on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a morphogen well known to regulate neural progenitor cell proliferation. We asked if and how exogenous Shh treatment affects the lineage of cerebellar GABAergic interneurons. To address these issues, exogenous Shh was administered to embryonic and postnatal organotypic slices. We found that Shh is able to expand the pool of interneuron progenitors residing in the embryonic epithelium and in the postnatal PWM. In particular, Shh signalling pathway was highly mitogenic at early developmental stages of interneuron production, whereas its effect decreased after the first postnatal week. Gene expression analysis of sorted cells and in situ hybridization further showed that immature interneurons express both the Shh receptor patched and the Shh target gene Gli1. Thus, within the interneuron lineage, Shh might exert regulatory functions also in postmitotic cells. On the whole, our data enlighten the role of Shh during cerebellar maturation and further broaden our knowledge on the amplification mechanisms of the interneuron progenitor pool.

  6. Rac1 and Rac3 GTPases Control Synergistically the Development of Cortical and Hippocampal GABAergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Vaghi, Valentina; Pennucci, Roberta; Talpo, Francesca; Corbetta, Sara; Montinaro, Valentina; Barone, Cinzia; Croci, Laura; Spaiardi, Paolo; Consalez, G. Giacomo; Biella, Gerardo; de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular mechanisms driving postmitotic development of cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons are poorly understood. We have addressed the function of Rac GTPases in cortical and hippocampal interneuron development. Developing neurons express both Rac1 and Rac3. Previous work has shown that Rac1 ablation does not affect the development of migrating cortical interneurons. Analysis of mice with double deletion of Rac1 and Rac3 shows that these GTPases are required during postmitotic interneuron development. The number of parvalbumin-positive cells was affected in the hippocampus and cortex of double knockout mice. Rac depletion also influences the maturation of interneurons that reach their destination, with reduction of inhibitory synapses in both hippocampal CA1 and cortical pyramidal cells. The decreased number of cortical migrating interneurons and their altered morphology indicate a role of Rac1 and Rac3 in regulating the motility of cortical interneurons, thus interfering with their final localization. While electrophysiological passive and active properties of pyramidal neurons including membrane capacity, resting potential, and spike amplitude and duration were normal, these cells showed reduced spontaneous inhibitory currents and increased excitability. Our results show that Rac1 and Rac3 contribute synergistically to postmitotic development of specific populations of GABAergic cells, suggesting that these proteins regulate their migration and differentiation. PMID:23258346

  7. VTA glutamatergic inputs to nucleus accumbens drive aversion by acting on GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jia; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Hui-Ling; Barker, David J.; Miranda-Barrientos, Jorge; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is best known for its dopamine neurons, some of which project to nucleus accumbens (nAcc). However, the VTA also has glutamatergic neurons that project to nAcc. The function of the mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic pathway remains unknown. Here, we report that nAcc photoactivation of mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic fibers promotes aversion. Although we found that these mesoaccumbens-glutamate-fibers lack GABA, the aversion evoked by their photoactivation depends on glutamate and GABA receptor signaling, and not on dopamine receptor signaling. We found that mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic-fibers establish multiple asymmetric synapses on single parvalbumin-GABAergic interneurons, and that nAcc photoactivation of these fibers drives AMPA-mediated cellular firing of parvalbumin-GABAergic interneurons. These parvalbumin-GABAergic-interneurons, in turn, inhibit nAcc medium spiny output neurons, as such, controlling inhibitory neurotransmission within nAcc. The mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic pathway is the first glutamatergic input to nAcc shown to mediate aversion, instead of reward, and the first pathway shown to establish excitatory synapses on nAcc parvalbumin-GABAergic interneurons. PMID:27019014

  8. Rac-GTPases Regulate Microtubule Stability and Axon Growth of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tivodar, Simona; Kalemaki, Katerina; Kounoupa, Zouzana; Vidaki, Marina; Theodorakis, Kostas; Denaxa, Myrto; Kessaris, Nicoletta; de Curtis, Ivan; Pachnis, Vassilis; Karagogeos, Domna

    2015-09-01

    Cortical interneurons are characterized by extraordinary functional and morphological diversity. Although tremendous progress has been made in uncovering molecular and cellular mechanisms implicated in interneuron generation and function, several questions still remain open. Rho-GTPases have been implicated as intracellular mediators of numerous developmental processes such as cytoskeleton organization, vesicle trafficking, transcription, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Specifically in cortical interneurons, we have recently shown a cell-autonomous and stage-specific requirement for Rac1 activity within proliferating interneuron precursors. Conditional ablation of Rac1 in the medial ganglionic eminence leads to a 50% reduction of GABAergic interneurons in the postnatal cortex. Here we examine the additional role of Rac3 by analyzing Rac1/Rac3 double-mutant mice. We show that in the absence of both Rac proteins, the embryonic migration of medial ganglionic eminence-derived interneurons is further impaired. Postnatally, double-mutant mice display a dramatic loss of cortical interneurons. In addition, Rac1/Rac3-deficient interneurons show gross cytoskeletal defects in vitro, with the length of their leading processes significantly reduced and a clear multipolar morphology. We propose that in the absence of Rac1/Rac3, cortical interneurons fail to migrate tangentially towards the pallium due to defects in actin and microtubule cytoskeletal dynamics.

  9. Prefrontal cognitive deficits in mice with altered cerebral cortical GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Bissonette, Gregory B.; Bae, Mihyun H.; Suresh, Tejas; Jaffe, David E.; Powell, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations of inhibitory GABAergic neurons are implicated in multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. In particular, interneuron deficits in prefrontal areas, along with presumed decreased inhibition, have been reported in several human patients. The majority of forebrain GABAergic interneurons arise from a single subcortical source before migrating to their final regional destination. Factors that govern the interneuron populations have been identified, demonstrating that a single gene mutation may globally affect forebrain structures or a single area. In particular, mice lacking the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (Plaur) gene have decreased GABAergic interneurons in frontal and parietal, but not caudal, cortical regions. Plaur assists in the activation of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), and several of the interneuron deficits are correlated with decreased levels of HGF/SF. In some cortical regions, the interneuron deficit can be remediated by endogenous overexpression of HGF/SF. In this study, we demonstrate decreased parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the medial frontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus or basal lateral amygdala in the Plaur null mouse. The Plaur null mouse demonstrates impaired medial frontal cortical function in extinction of cued fear conditioning and the inability to form attentional sets. Endogenous HGF/SF overexpression increased the number of PV-expressing cells in medial frontal cortical areas to levels greater than found in wildtype mice, but did not remediate the behavioral deficits. These data suggest that proper medial frontal cortical function is dependent upon optimum levels of inhibition and that a deficit or excess of interneuron numbers impairs normal cognition. PMID:24211452

  10. New insights into the classification and nomenclature of cortical GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    DeFelipe, Javier; López-Cruz, Pedro L.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Anderson, Stewart; Burkhalter, Andreas; Cauli, Bruno; Fairén, Alfonso; Feldmeyer, Dirk; Fishell, Gord; Fitzpatrick, David; Freund, Tamás F.; González-Burgos, Guillermo; Hestrin, Shaul; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R.; Huang, Josh; Jones, Edward G.; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kisvárday, Zoltán; Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Lewis, David A.; Marín, Oscar; Markram, Henry; McBain, Chris J.; Meyer, Hanno S.; Monyer, Hannah; Nelson, Sacha B.; Rockland, Kathleen; Rossier, Jean; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Rudy, Bernardo; Scanziani, Massimo; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Staiger, Jochen F.; Tamás, Gábor; Thomson, Alex; Wang, Yun; Yuste, Rafael; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic classification and accepted nomenclature of neuron types is much needed but is currently lacking. This article describes a possible taxonomical solution for classifying GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex based on a novel, web-based interactive system that allows experts to classify neurons with pre-determined criteria. Using Bayesian analysis and clustering algorithms on the resulting data, we investigated the suitability of several anatomical terms and neuron names for cortical GABAergic interneurons. Moreover, we show that supervised classification models could automatically categorize interneurons in agreement with experts’ assignments. These results demonstrate a practical and objective approach to the naming, characterization and classification of neurons based on community consensus. PMID:23385869

  11. Selective loss and axonal sprouting of GABAergic interneurons in the sclerotic hippocampus induced by LiCl-pilocarpine.

    PubMed

    Long, Lili; Xiao, Bo; Feng, Li; Yi, Fang; Li, Guoliang; Li, Shuyu; Mutasem, M Abuhamed; Chen, Si; Bi, Fangfang; Li, Yi

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we performed immunohistochemistry for somatostatin (SS), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and parvalbumin (PV) in LiCl-pilocarpine-treated rats to observe quantitative changes and axonal sprouting of GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus, especially in the sclerotic hippocampus. Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) was performed to detect the specific degeneration of GABAergic interneurons. Compared with age-matched control rats, there were fewer SS/NPY/PV-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons in the hilus of the sclerotic hippocampus in pilocarpine-treated rats; hilar dentritic inhibitory interneurons were most vulnerable. FJB stain revealed degeneration was evident at 2 months after status epilepticus. Some SS-IR and NPY-IR interneurons were also stained for FJB, but there was no evidence of degeneration of PV-IR interneurons. Axonal sprouting of GABAergic interneurons was present in the hippocampus of epileptic rats, and a dramatic increase of SS-IR fibers was observed throughout all layers of CA1 region in the sclerotic hippocampus. These results confirm selective loss and degeneration of a specific subset of GABAergic interneurons in specific subfields of the hippocampus. Axonal sprouting of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, especially numerous increase of SS-IR neutrophils within CA1 region of the sclerotic hippocampus, may constitute the aberrant inhibitory circum and play a significant role in the generation and compensation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  12. GABAergic interneuron migration and the evolution of the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Daisuke H; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2012-04-01

    A neocortex is present in all mammals but is not present in other classes of vertebrates, and the neocortex is extremely elaborate in humans. Changes in excitatory projection neurons and their progenitors within the developing dorsal pallium in the most recent common ancestor of mammals are thought to have been involved in the evolution of the neocortex. Our recent findings suggest that changes in the migratory ability of inhibitory interneurons derived from outside the neocortex may also have been involved in the evolution of the neocortex. In this article we review the literature on the migratory profile of inhibitory interneurons in several different species and the literature on comparisons between the intrinsic migratory ability of interneurons derived from different species. Finally, we propose a hypothesis about the mammalian-specific evolution of the migratory ability of interneurons and its potential contribution to the establishment of a functional neocortex.

  13. The effect of propofol postconditioning on the expression of K(+)-Cl(-)-co-transporter 2 in GABAergic inhibitory interneurons of acute ischemia/reperfusion injury rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbai; Liu, Shuying; Wang, Haiyun; Wang, Guolin; Zhu, Ai

    2015-02-09

    It has been shown in our previous study that propofol postconditioning enhanced the activity of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and prevented the internalization of GluR2 subunit of α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, thus provided neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Regarding inhibitory system in CNS, K(+)-Cl(-)-co-transporter 2 (KCC2), a Cl(-) extruder, plays a critical role in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibitory effect in mature central neurons. However, the effect of propofol postconditioning on the expression of KCC2 in GABAergic interneurons is unclear. Therefore, in this article we describe the role of KCC2 in GABAergic interneurons in the ipsilateral hippocampal CA1 region of adult rats and the effects of propofol postconditioning on this region. Herein we demonstrate that propofol postconditioning (20mg/kg/h, 2h) improved rats' neurobehavioral abilities, increased the number of survival neurons, and up-regulated neuronal KCC2 expression in glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) expressing GABAergic interneurons in hippocampal CA1 region at 24h after I/R. In contrast, when rats were injected with the KCC2 antagonist, [(dihydroindenyl)oxy] alkanoic acid (DIOA), the neuroprotective effects induced by propofol postconditioning were reversed. Our study indicated that propofol postconditioning increased the expression of KCC2 in inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, thus providing acute neuroprotection to rats who had undergone cerebral I/R injury.

  14. Selective plasticity of hippocampal GABAergic interneuron populations following kindling of different brain regions.

    PubMed

    Botterill, J J; Nogovitsyn, N; Caruncho, H J; Kalynchuk, L E

    2017-02-01

    The vulnerability and plasticity of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons is a topic of broad interest and debate in the field of epilepsy. In this experiment, we used the electrical kindling model of epilepsy to determine whether seizures that originate in different brain regions have differential effects on hippocampal interneuron subpopulations. Long-Evans rats received 99 electrical stimulations of the hippocampus, amygdala, or caudate nucleus, followed by sacrifice and immunohistochemical or western blot analyses. We analyzed markers of dendritic (somatostatin), perisomatic (parvalbumin), and interneuron-selective (calretinin) inhibition, as well as an overall indicator (GAD67) of interneuron distribution across all major hippocampal subfields. Our results indicate that kindling produces selective effects on the number and morphology of different functional classes of GABAergic interneurons. In particular, limbic kindling appears to enhance dendritic inhibition, indicated by a greater number of somatostatin-immunoreactive (-ir) cells in the CA1 pyramidal layer and robust morphological sprouting in the dentate gyrus. We also found a reduction in the number of interneuron-selective calretinin-ir cells in the dentate gyrus of hippocampal-kindled rats, which suggests a possible reduction of synchronized dendritic inhibition. In contrast, perisomatic inhibition indicated by parvalbumin immunoreactivity appears to be largely resilient to the effects of kindling. Finally, we found a significant induction in the number of GAD67-cells in caudate-kindled rats in the dentate gyrus and CA3 hippocampal subfields. Taken together, our results demonstrate that kindling has subfield-selective effects on the different functional classes of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:389-406, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. GABAergic interneurons form transient layer-specific circuits in early postnatal neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiades, Paul G.; Marques-Smith, Andre; Lyngholm, Daniel; Lickiss, Tom; Raffiq, Sayda; Kätzel, Dennis; Miesenböck, Gero; Butt, Simon J. B.

    2016-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons play key roles in cortical circuits, yet little is known about their early connectivity. Here we use glutamate uncaging and a novel optogenetic strategy to track changes in the afferent and efferent synaptic connections of developing neocortical interneuron subtypes. We find that Nkx2-1-derived interneurons possess functional synaptic connections before emerging pyramidal cell networks. Subsequent interneuron circuit maturation is both subtype and layer dependent. Glutamatergic input onto fast spiking (FS), but not somatostatin-positive, non-FS interneurons increases over development. Interneurons of both subtype located in layers (L) 4 and 5b engage in transient circuits that disappear after the somatosensory critical period. These include a pathway mediated by L5b somatostatin-positive interneurons that specifically targets L4 during the first postnatal week. The innervation patterns of immature cortical interneuron circuits are thus neither static nor progressively strengthened but follow a layer-specific choreography of transient connections that differ from those of the adult brain. PMID:26843463

  16. GABAergic interneurons form transient layer-specific circuits in early postnatal neocortex.

    PubMed

    Anastasiades, Paul G; Marques-Smith, Andre; Lyngholm, Daniel; Lickiss, Tom; Raffiq, Sayda; Kätzel, Dennis; Miesenböck, Gero; Butt, Simon J B

    2016-02-04

    GABAergic interneurons play key roles in cortical circuits, yet little is known about their early connectivity. Here we use glutamate uncaging and a novel optogenetic strategy to track changes in the afferent and efferent synaptic connections of developing neocortical interneuron subtypes. We find that Nkx2-1-derived interneurons possess functional synaptic connections before emerging pyramidal cell networks. Subsequent interneuron circuit maturation is both subtype and layer dependent. Glutamatergic input onto fast spiking (FS), but not somatostatin-positive, non-FS interneurons increases over development. Interneurons of both subtype located in layers (L) 4 and 5b engage in transient circuits that disappear after the somatosensory critical period. These include a pathway mediated by L5b somatostatin-positive interneurons that specifically targets L4 during the first postnatal week. The innervation patterns of immature cortical interneuron circuits are thus neither static nor progressively strengthened but follow a layer-specific choreography of transient connections that differ from those of the adult brain.

  17. Development and physiology of GABAergic feedback excitation in parvalbumin expressing interneurons of the mouse basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Spampanato, Jay; Sullivan, Robert K P; Perumal, Madhusoothanan B; Sah, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), action potentials in one type of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing GABAergic interneuron can evoke a disynaptic feedback excitatory postsynaptic potential (fbEPSP) onto the same presynaptic interneuron. Here, using whole-cell recordings from PV-expressing interneurons in acute brain slices we expand on this finding to show that this response is first detectable at 2-week postnatal, and is most prevalent in animals beyond 3 weeks of age (>P21). This circuit has a very high fidelity, and single action potential evoked fbEPSPs display few failures. Reconstruction of filled neurons, and electron microscopy show that interneurons that receive feedback excitation make symmetrical synapses on both the axon initial segments (AIS), as well as the soma and proximal dendrites of local pyramidal neurons, suggesting fbEPSP interneurons are morphologically distinct from the highly specialized chandelier neurons that selectively target the axon initial segment of pyramidal neurons. Single PV interneurons could trigger very large (~ 1 nA) feedback excitatory postsynaptic currents (fbEPSCs) suggesting that these neurons are heavily reciprocally connected to local glutamatergic principal cells. We conclude that in the BLA, a subpopulation of PV interneurons forms a distinct neural circuit in which a single action potential can recruit multiple pyramidal neurons to discharge near simultaneously and feed back onto the presynaptic interneuron.

  18. Distribution of GABAergic Interneurons and Dopaminergic Cells in the Functional Territories of the Human Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Bernácer, Javier; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Background The afferent projections of the striatum (caudate nucleus and putamen) are segregated in three territories: associative, sensorimotor and limbic. Striatal interneurons are in part responsible for the integration of these different types of information. Among them, GABAergic interneurons are the most abundant, and can be sorted in three populations according to their content in the calcium binding proteins calretinin (CR), parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin (CB). Conversely, striatal dopaminergic cells (whose role as interneurons is still unclear) are scarce. This study aims to analyze the interneuron distribution in the striatal functional territories, as well as their organization regarding to the striosomal compartment. Methodology/Principal Findings We used immunohistochemical methods to visualize CR, PV, CB and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive striatal neurons. The interneuronal distribution was assessed by stereological methods applied to every striatal functional territory. Considering the four cell groups altogether, their density was higher in the associative (2120±91 cells/mm3) than in the sensorimotor (959±47 cells/mm3) or limbic (633±119 cells/mm3) territories. CB- and TH-immunoreactive(-ir) cells were distributed rather homogeneously in the three striatal territories. However, the density of CR and PV interneurons were more abundant in the associative and sensorimotor striatum, respectively. Regarding to their compartmental organization, CR-ir interneurons were frequently found in the border between compartments in the associative and sensorimotor territories, and CB-ir interneurons abounded at the striosome/matrix border in the sensorimotor domain. Conclusions/Significance The present study demonstrates that the architecture of the human striatum in terms of its interneuron composition varies in its three functional territories. Furthermore, our data highlight the importance of CR-ir striatal interneurons in the integration of associative

  19. Postnatal development of GABAergic interneurons in the neocortical subplate of mice.

    PubMed

    Qu, G-J; Ma, J; Yu, Y-C; Fu, Y

    2016-05-13

    The subplate (SP) plays important roles in developmental and functional events in the neocortex, such as thalamocortical and corticofugal projection, cortical oscillation generation and corticocortical connectivity. Although accumulated evidence indicates that SP interneurons are crucial for SP function, the molecular composition of SP interneurons as well as their developmental profile and distribution remain largely unclear. In this study, we systematically investigated dynamic development of SP thickness and chemical marker expression in SP interneurons in distinct cortical regions during the first postnatal month. We found that, although the relative area of the SP in the cerebral cortex significantly declined with postnatal development, the absolute thickness did not change markedly. We also found that somatostatin (SOM), the ionotropic serotonin receptor 3A (5HT3AR), and parvalbumin (PV) reliably identify three distinct non-overlapping subpopulations of SP interneurons. The SOM group, which represents ~30% of total SP interneurons, expresses neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and calbindin (CB) and colocalizes entirely with neuropeptide Y (NPY). The 5HT3AR group, which accounts for ~60% of the total interneuronal population, expresses calretinin (CR) and GABA-A receptor subunit delta (GABAARδ). The PV group accounts for ~10% of total SP interneurons and coexpressed GABAARδ. Moreover, distinct interneuron subtypes show characteristic temporal and spatial distribution in the SP. nNOS(+) interneurons in the SP increase from the anterior motor cortex to posterior visual cortex, while CR(+) and CB(+) interneurons the opposite. Interestedly, the majority of GABAARδ(+) neurons in SP are non-GABAergic neurons in contrast to other cortical layers. These findings clarify and extend our understanding of SP interneurons in the developing cerebral cortex and will underpin further study of SP function.

  20. GABAergic Projections from the Medial Septum Selectively Inhibit Interneurons in the Medial Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Sulser, Alfredo; Parthier, Daniel; Candela, Antonio; McClure, Christina; Pastoll, Hugh; Garden, Derek; Sürmeli, Gülşen

    2014-01-01

    The medial septum (MS) is required for theta rhythmic oscillations and grid cell firing in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). While GABAergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic neurons project from the MS to the MEC, their synaptic targets are unknown. To investigate whether MS neurons innervate specific layers and cell types in the MEC, we expressed channelrhodopsin-2 in mouse MS neurons and used patch-clamp recording in brain slices to determine the response to light activation of identified cells in the MEC. Following activation of MS axons, we observed fast monosynaptic GABAergic IPSPs in the majority (>60%) of fast-spiking (FS) and low-threshold-spiking (LTS) interneurons in all layers of the MEC, but in only 1.5% of nonstellate principal cells (NSPCs) and in no stellate cells. We also observed fast glutamatergic responses to MS activation in a minority (<5%) of NSPCs, FS, and LTS interneurons. During stimulation of MS inputs at theta frequency (10 Hz), the amplitude of GABAergic IPSPs was maintained, and spike output from LTS and FS interneurons was entrained at low (25–60 Hz) and high (60–180 Hz) gamma frequencies, respectively. By demonstrating cell type-specific targeting of the GABAergic projection from the MS to the MEC, our results support the idea that the MS controls theta frequency activity in the MEC through coordination of inhibitory circuits. PMID:25505326

  1. GABAergic projections from the medial septum selectively inhibit interneurons in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Sulser, Alfredo; Parthier, Daniel; Candela, Antonio; McClure, Christina; Pastoll, Hugh; Garden, Derek; Sürmeli, Gülşen; Nolan, Matthew F

    2014-12-10

    The medial septum (MS) is required for theta rhythmic oscillations and grid cell firing in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). While GABAergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic neurons project from the MS to the MEC, their synaptic targets are unknown. To investigate whether MS neurons innervate specific layers and cell types in the MEC, we expressed channelrhodopsin-2 in mouse MS neurons and used patch-clamp recording in brain slices to determine the response to light activation of identified cells in the MEC. Following activation of MS axons, we observed fast monosynaptic GABAergic IPSPs in the majority (>60%) of fast-spiking (FS) and low-threshold-spiking (LTS) interneurons in all layers of the MEC, but in only 1.5% of nonstellate principal cells (NSPCs) and in no stellate cells. We also observed fast glutamatergic responses to MS activation in a minority (<5%) of NSPCs, FS, and LTS interneurons. During stimulation of MS inputs at theta frequency (10 Hz), the amplitude of GABAergic IPSPs was maintained, and spike output from LTS and FS interneurons was entrained at low (25-60 Hz) and high (60-180 Hz) gamma frequencies, respectively. By demonstrating cell type-specific targeting of the GABAergic projection from the MS to the MEC, our results support the idea that the MS controls theta frequency activity in the MEC through coordination of inhibitory circuits.

  2. Plasticity in Single Axon Glutamatergic Connection to GABAergic Interneurons Regulates Complex Events in the Human Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Szegedi, Viktor; Paizs, Melinda; Csakvari, Eszter; Molnar, Gabor; Barzo, Pal; Tamas, Gabor; Lamsa, Karri

    2016-01-01

    In the human neocortex, single excitatory pyramidal cells can elicit very large glutamatergic EPSPs (VLEs) in inhibitory GABAergic interneurons capable of triggering their firing with short (3–5 ms) delay. Similar strong excitatory connections between two individual neurons have not been found in nonhuman cortices, suggesting that these synapses are specific to human interneurons. The VLEs are crucial for generating neocortical complex events, observed as single pyramidal cell spike-evoked discharge of cell assemblies in the frontal and temporal cortices. However, long-term plasticity of the VLE connections and how the plasticity modulates neocortical complex events has not been studied. Using triple and dual whole-cell recordings from synaptically connected human neocortical layers 2–3 neurons, we show that VLEs in fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons exhibit robust activity-induced long-term depression (LTD). The LTD by single pyramidal cell 40 Hz spike bursts is specific to connections with VLEs, requires group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, and has a presynaptic mechanism. The LTD of VLE connections alters suprathreshold activation of interneurons in the complex events suppressing the discharge of fast-spiking GABAergic cells. The VLEs triggering the complex events may contribute to cognitive processes in the human neocortex, and their long-term plasticity can alter the discharging cortical cell assemblies by learning. PMID:27828957

  3. Plasticity in Single Axon Glutamatergic Connection to GABAergic Interneurons Regulates Complex Events in the Human Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Szegedi, Viktor; Paizs, Melinda; Csakvari, Eszter; Molnar, Gabor; Barzo, Pal; Tamas, Gabor; Lamsa, Karri

    2016-11-01

    In the human neocortex, single excitatory pyramidal cells can elicit very large glutamatergic EPSPs (VLEs) in inhibitory GABAergic interneurons capable of triggering their firing with short (3-5 ms) delay. Similar strong excitatory connections between two individual neurons have not been found in nonhuman cortices, suggesting that these synapses are specific to human interneurons. The VLEs are crucial for generating neocortical complex events, observed as single pyramidal cell spike-evoked discharge of cell assemblies in the frontal and temporal cortices. However, long-term plasticity of the VLE connections and how the plasticity modulates neocortical complex events has not been studied. Using triple and dual whole-cell recordings from synaptically connected human neocortical layers 2-3 neurons, we show that VLEs in fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons exhibit robust activity-induced long-term depression (LTD). The LTD by single pyramidal cell 40 Hz spike bursts is specific to connections with VLEs, requires group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, and has a presynaptic mechanism. The LTD of VLE connections alters suprathreshold activation of interneurons in the complex events suppressing the discharge of fast-spiking GABAergic cells. The VLEs triggering the complex events may contribute to cognitive processes in the human neocortex, and their long-term plasticity can alter the discharging cortical cell assemblies by learning.

  4. Generation of GABAergic and dopaminergic interneurons from endogenous embryonic olfactory bulb precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Vergaño-Vera, Eva; Yusta-Boyo, María J; de Castro, Fernando; Bernad, Antonio; de Pablo, Flora; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2006-11-01

    During the embryonic period, many olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons arise in the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) from precursor cells expressing Dlx2, Gsh2 and Er81 transcription factors. Whether GABAergic and dopaminergic interneurons are also generated within the embryonic OB has not been studied thoroughly. In contrast to abundant Dlx2 and Gsh2 expression in ganglionic eminences (GE), Dlx2 and Gsh2 proteins are not expressed in the E12.5-13.5 mouse OB, whereas the telencephalic pallial domain marker Pax6 is abundant. We found GABAergic and dopaminergic neurons originating from dividing precursor cells in E13.5 OB and in short-term dissociated cultures prepared from the rostral half of E13.5 OB. In OB cultures, 22% of neurons were GAD+, of which 53% were Dlx2+, whereas none expressed Gsh2. By contrast, 70% of GAD+ cells in GE cultures were Dlx2+ and 16% expressed Gsh2. In E13.5 OB slices transplanted with EGFP-labeled E13.5 OB precursor cells, 31.7% of EGFP+ cells differentiated to GABAergic neurons. OB and LGE precursors transplanted into early postnatal OB migrated and differentiated in distinct patterns. Transplanted OB precursors gave rise to interneurons with dendritic spines in close proximity to synaptophysin-positive boutons. Interneurons were also abundant in differentiating OB neural stem cell cultures; the neurons responded to the neurotrophin Bdnf and expressed presynaptic proteins. In vivo, the Bdnf receptor TrkB colocalized with synaptic proteins at the glomeruli. These findings suggest that, in addition to receiving interneurons from the LGE, the embryonic OB contains molecularly distinct local precursor cells that generate mature GABAergic and dopaminergic neurons.

  5. Different correlation patterns of cholinergic and GABAergic interneurons with striatal projection neurons

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Avital; Katabi, Shiran; Finkes, Inna; Prut, Yifat; Bergman, Hagai

    2013-01-01

    The striatum is populated by a single projection neuron group, the medium spiny neurons (MSNs), and several groups of interneurons. Two of the electrophysiologically well-characterized striatal interneuron groups are the tonically active neurons (TANs), which are presumably cholinergic interneurons, and the fast spiking interneurons (FSIs), presumably parvalbumin (PV) expressing GABAergic interneurons. To better understand striatal processing it is thus crucial to define the functional relationship between MSNs and these interneurons in the awake and behaving animal. We used multiple electrodes and standard physiological methods to simultaneously record MSN spiking activity and the activity of TANs or FSIs from monkeys engaged in a classical conditioning paradigm. All three cell populations were highly responsive to the behavioral task. However, they displayed different average response profiles and a different degree of response synchronization (signal correlation). TANs displayed the most transient and synchronized response, MSNs the most diverse and sustained response and FSIs were in between on both parameters. We did not find evidence for direct monosynaptic connectivity between the MSNs and either the TANs or the FSIs. However, while the cross correlation histograms of TAN to MSN pairs were flat, those of FSI to MSN displayed positive asymmetrical broad peaks. The FSI-MSN correlogram profile implies that the spikes of MSNs follow those of FSIs and both are driven by a common, most likely cortical, input. Thus, the two populations of striatal interneurons are probably driven by different afferents and play complementary functional roles in the physiology of the striatal microcircuit. PMID:24027501

  6. Synchronization of GABAergic interneuronal network in CA3 subfield of neonatal rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Khazipov, R; Leinekugel, X; Khalilov, I; Gaiarsa, J L; Ben-Ari, Y

    1997-02-01

    1. Cell-attached and whole-cell recordings from interneurons localized in the stratum radiatum of the CA3 subfield (SR-CA3) of neonatal (postnatal days 2-5) rat hippocampal slices were performed to study their activity during the generation of GABAergic giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in CA3 pyramidal cells. 2. Dual recordings revealed that during the generation of GDPs in CA3 pyramidal cells, the interneurons fire bursts of spikes, on average 4.5 +/- 1.4 spikes per burst (cell-attached mode). There bursts were induced by periodical large inward currents (interneuronal GDPs) recorded in whole-cell mode. 3. Interneuronal GDPs revealed typical features of polysynaptic neuronal network-driven events: they were blocked by TTX and by high divalent cation medium and they could be evoked in an all-or-none manner by electrical stimulation in different regions of the hippocampus. The network elements required for the generation of GDPs are present in local CA3 circuits since spontaneous GDPs were present in the isolated CA3 subfield of the hippocampal slice. 4. Interneuronal GDPs were mediated by GABAA and glutamate receptors, since: (i) their reversal potential strongly depended on [Cl-]i; (ii) at the reversal potential of GABAA postsynaptic currents an inward component of GDPs was composed of events with the same kinetics as alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptor-mediated EPSCs; and (iii) once GABAA receptors were blocked intracellularly by dialysis with F(-)-MgATP-free solution, the remaining component of interneuronal GDPs reversed near 0 mV and rectified at membrane potentials more negative than -20 mV, suggesting an important contribution of NMDA receptors in addition to AMPA receptors. 5. In cell-attached recordings from interneurons, electrical stimulation in the stratum radiatum evoked a burst of spikes that corresponded to evoked GDPs. Pharmacological study of this response revealed that excitation of SR-CA3 interneurons during

  7. Synchronization of GABAergic interneuronal network in CA3 subfield of neonatal rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Khazipov, R; Leinekugel, X; Khalilov, I; Gaiarsa, J L; Ben-Ari, Y

    1997-01-01

    1. Cell-attached and whole-cell recordings from interneurons localized in the stratum radiatum of the CA3 subfield (SR-CA3) of neonatal (postnatal days 2-5) rat hippocampal slices were performed to study their activity during the generation of GABAergic giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in CA3 pyramidal cells. 2. Dual recordings revealed that during the generation of GDPs in CA3 pyramidal cells, the interneurons fire bursts of spikes, on average 4.5 +/- 1.4 spikes per burst (cell-attached mode). There bursts were induced by periodical large inward currents (interneuronal GDPs) recorded in whole-cell mode. 3. Interneuronal GDPs revealed typical features of polysynaptic neuronal network-driven events: they were blocked by TTX and by high divalent cation medium and they could be evoked in an all-or-none manner by electrical stimulation in different regions of the hippocampus. The network elements required for the generation of GDPs are present in local CA3 circuits since spontaneous GDPs were present in the isolated CA3 subfield of the hippocampal slice. 4. Interneuronal GDPs were mediated by GABAA and glutamate receptors, since: (i) their reversal potential strongly depended on [Cl-]i; (ii) at the reversal potential of GABAA postsynaptic currents an inward component of GDPs was composed of events with the same kinetics as alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptor-mediated EPSCs; and (iii) once GABAA receptors were blocked intracellularly by dialysis with F(-)-MgATP-free solution, the remaining component of interneuronal GDPs reversed near 0 mV and rectified at membrane potentials more negative than -20 mV, suggesting an important contribution of NMDA receptors in addition to AMPA receptors. 5. In cell-attached recordings from interneurons, electrical stimulation in the stratum radiatum evoked a burst of spikes that corresponded to evoked GDPs. Pharmacological study of this response revealed that excitation of SR-CA3 interneurons during

  8. Multiple anxiogenic drugs recruit a parvalbumin-containing subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons in the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Hale, Matthew W; Johnson, Philip L; Westerman, Alex M; Abrams, Jolane K; Shekhar, Anantha; Lowry, Christopher A

    2010-10-01

    The basolateral amygdala is a nodal structure within a distributed and interconnected network that regulates anxiety states and anxiety-related behavior. Administration of multiple anxiogenic drugs increases cellular responses (i.e., increases c-Fos expression) in a subregion of the basolateral amygdala, but the neurochemical phenotypes of these cells are not known. The basolateral amygdala contains glutamatergic projection neurons and several populations of γ-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing (GABAergic) interneurons, including a population of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing GABAergic interneurons that co-express the excitatory 5-HT(2A) receptor. The role for these PV-expressing GABAergic interneurons in anxiety-states is unclear. In this experiment we examined the effects of multiple anxiogenic drugs including the 5-HT(2C/2A) receptor agonist m-chlorophenyl piperazine (mCPP), the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, the α(2)-adrenoreceptor antagonist yohimbine and the partial inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine allosteric site on the GABA(A) receptor, N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide (FG-7142), on c-Fos expression in PV-immunoreactive (PV-ir) interneurons in subdivisions of the basolateral amygdala. All drugs with the exception of mCPP increased c-Fos expression in PV-ir neurons in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus, anterior part (BLA). The numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive (c-Fos-ir)/PV-ir GABAergic interneurons in the BLA were positively correlated with the numbers of c-Fos-ir serotonergic neurons in the mid-rostrocaudal dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and with a measure of anxiety-related behavior. All four drugs increased c-Fos expression in non-PV-ir cells in most of the subdivisions of the basolateral amygdala that were sampled, compared with vehicle-injected controls. Together, these data suggest that the PV/5-HT(2A) receptor expressing GABAergic interneurons in the basolateral amygdala are part of a DR-basolateral amygdala neuronal circuit modulating

  9. Prenatal Protein Malnutrition Affects the Density of GABAergic Interneurons During Hippocampus Development in Rats.

    PubMed

    González-Maciel, Angélica; Romero-Velázquez, Rosa María; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Vargas-Sánchez, Javier; de la Garza-Montaño, Paloma; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal protein malnutrition disrupts the pattern of maturation and development of the hippocampus and its neuroanatomy and increases inhibition of the granular cell layer of the fascia dentata. If local gamma-aminobutyric acid inter-neurons are partly responsible for inhibition of the hippocampus, it is reasonable to assume that there may be an increase in the gamma-aminobutyric acid cell population of prenatal protein malnutrition rats. This experimental study was conducted to ascertain the effects of prenatal protein malnutrition on the density of GABAergic interneurons at the cornus ammonis and fascia dentata in rats. Animals were investigated under two nutritional conditions: (i) prenatal protein malnutrition group fed 6% protein, and (ii) well-nourished control group fed 25% protein. Using an antibody for gamma-aminobutyric acid, immunoreactive cells (GABAergic) were assessed in the rostral-caudal direction of the dorsal hippocampus at four levels. (i) In 30-day-old rats with prenatal malnutrition, the fascia dentata had an average of 27% more GABAergic cells than the control group; this higher amount was not detectable at 90 days. (ii) There was a significant 18% increase in GABAergic neurons at level 1 of the cornus ammonis at 90 days of age. There was an increase in the population of interneurons in the fascia dentata and cornus ammonis in prenatal protein malnutrition rats. We conclude that prenatal hypoprotein malnutrition produces changes at 30 days in the fascia dentata. Results suggest that prenatal malnutrition also produces a delay in the programmed chronology of gamma-aminobutyric acid interneurons. Finally, in cornus ammonis, at 90 days of age, prenatal protein malnutrition showed an increase only at level 1; this effect may be evidenced in the long term, despite postnatal rehabilitation.

  10. Gap junctions linking the dendritic network of GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, T; Kosaka, T

    2000-02-15

    The network of GABAergic interneurons connected by chemical synapses is a candidate for the generator of synchronized oscillations in the hippocampus. We present evidence that parvalbumin (PV)-containing GABAergic neurons in the rat hippocampal CA1 region, known to form a network by mutual synaptic contacts, also form another network connected by dendrodendritic gap junctions. Distal dendrites of PV neurons run parallel to the alveus (hippocampal white matter) and establish multiple contacts with one another at the border between the stratum oriens and the alveus. In electron microscopic serial section analysis, gap junctions could be identified clearly at 24% of these contact sites. A dendrodendritic chemical synapse and a mixed synapse also were found between PV-immunoreactive dendrites. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the dendritic arborization revealed that both PV neurons of the well known vertical type (presumptive basket cells and axoaxonic cells) and those of another horizontal type constitute the dendritic network at the light microscopic level. The extent of dendritic fields of single PV neurons in the lateral direction was 538 +/- 201 micrometer (n = 5) in the vertical type and 838 +/- 159 micrometer (n = 6) in the horizontal type. Our previous and present observations indicate that PV-containing GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus form the dual networks connected by chemical and electrical synapses located at axosomatic and dendrodendritic contact sites, respectively. Gap junctions linking the dendritic network may mediate coherent synaptic inputs to distant interneurons and thereby facilitate the synchronization of oscillatory activities generated in the interneuron network.

  11. GABAergic inputs from direct and indirect striatal projection neurons onto cholinergic interneurons in the primate putamen.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Kalynda Kari; Pare, Jean-Francois; Wichmann, Thomas; Smith, Yoland

    2013-08-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) are involved in reward-dependent learning and the regulation of attention. The activity of these neurons is modulated by intrinsic and extrinsic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic afferents, but the source and relative prevalence of these diverse regulatory inputs remain to be characterized. To address this issue, we performed a quantitative ultrastructural analysis of the GABAergic and glutamatergic innervation of ChIs in the postcommissural putamen of rhesus monkeys. Postembedding immunogold localization of GABA combined with peroxidase immunostaining for choline acetyltransferase showed that 60% of all synaptic inputs to ChIs originate from GABAergic terminals, whereas 21% are from putatively glutamatergic terminals that establish asymmetric synapses, and 19% from other (non-GABAergic) sources of symmetric synapses. Double pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy using substance P and Met-/Leu-enkephalin antibodies to label GABAergic terminals from collaterals of "direct" and "indirect" striatal projection neurons, respectively, revealed that 47% of the indirect pathway terminals and 36% of the direct pathway terminals target ChIs. Together, substance P- and enkephalin-positive terminals represent 24% of all synapses onto ChIs in the monkey putamen. These findings show that ChIs receive prominent GABAergic inputs from multiple origins, including a significant contingent from axon collaterals of direct and indirect pathway projection neurons. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Vulnerability of hippocampal GABA-ergic interneurons to kainate-induced excitotoxic injury during old age.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ashok K; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Muddanna S

    2009-08-01

    Hippocampal inhibitory interneurons expressing glutamate decarboxylase-67 (GAD-67) considerably decline in number during old age. Studies in young adult animals further suggest that hippocampal GAD-67+ interneuron population is highly vulnerable to excitotoxic injury. However, the relative susceptibility of residual GAD-67+ interneurons in the aged hippocampus to excitotoxic injury is unknown. To elucidate this, using both adult and aged F344 rats, we performed stereological counting of GAD-67+ interneurons in different layers of the dentate gyrus and CA1 & CA3 sub-fields, at 3 months post-excitotoxic hippocampal injury inflicted through an intracerebroventricular administration of kainic acid (KA). Substantial reductions of GAD-67+ interneurons were found in all hippocampal layers and sub-fields after KA-induced injury in adult animals. Contrastingly, there was no significant change in GAD-67+ interneuron population in any of the hippocampal layers and sub-fields following similar injury in aged animals. Furthermore, the stability of GAD-67+ interneurons in aged rats after KA was not attributable to milder injury, as the overall extent of KA-induced hippocampal principal neuron loss was comparable between adult and aged rats. Interestingly, because of the age-related disparity in vulnerability of interneurons to injury, the surviving GAD-67+ interneuron population in the injured aged hippocampus remained comparable to that observed in the injured adult hippocampus despite enduring significant reductions in interneuron number with aging. Thus, unlike in the adult hippocampus, an excitotoxic injury to the aged hippocampus does not result in significantly decreased numbers of GAD-67+ interneurons. Persistence of GAD-67+ interneuron population in the injured aged hippocampus likely reflects an age-related change in the response of GAD-67+ interneurons to excitotoxic hippocampal injury. These results have implications towards understanding mechanisms underlying the

  13. Unitary GABAergic volume transmission from individual interneurons to astrocytes in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Rózsa, Márton; Baka, Judith; Bordé, Sándor; Rózsa, Balázs; Katona, Gergely; Tamás, Gábor

    2017-01-01

    Communication between individual GABAergic cells and their target neurons is mediated by synapses and, in the case of neurogliaform cells (NGFCs), by unitary volume transmission. Effects of non-synaptic volume transmission might involve non-neuronal targets, and astrocytes not receiving GABAergic synapses but expressing GABA receptors are suitable for evaluating this hypothesis. Testing several cortical interneuron types in slices of the rat cerebral cortex, we show selective unitary transmission from NGFCs to astrocytes with an early, GABAA receptor and GABA transporter-mediated component and a late component that results from the activation of GABA transporters and neuronal GABAB receptors. We could not detect Ca(2+) influx in astrocytes associated with unitary GABAergic responses. Our experiments identify a presynaptic cell-type-specific, GABA-mediated communication pathway from individual neurons to astrocytes, assigning a role for unitary volume transmission in the control of ionic and neurotransmitter homeostasis.

  14. Recruitment of early postnatal parvalbumin-positive hippocampal interneurons by GABAergic excitation.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Jonas-Frederic; Bartos, Marlene

    2010-01-06

    GABAergic synaptic inputs targeting cortical principal cells undergo marked changes in their functional properties from depolarizing at early postnatal life to hyperpolarizing at mature stages. In contrast, the nature of GABA(A) receptor-mediated signaling in interneurons during maturation of neuronal networks is controversial. By using gramicidin perforated-patch and whole-cell recordings from LIM homeobox 6 (Lhx6)-positive dentate gyrus perisomatic-targeting parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV-INs), we show that signaling at first formed GABAergic synapses at postnatal day 3 (P3) is excitatory and switches to shunting during the course of the first to second postnatal week. GABAergic synaptic inputs at P3-P6 reliably evoke action potentials in 65% of Lhx6-EGFP-expressing perisomatic-targeting cells and boost spike induction upon conjoint activation of glutamatergic fibers. Thus, GABAergic inputs change their functional role during maturation. They facilitate the recruitment of perisomatic-targeting INs in early postnatal circuits when network connectivity and synaptic glutamate receptor-mediated excitation are low and control spike timing at later stages when connectivity and glutamate-mediated drive are high.

  15. Expression of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit mRNAs in rat hippocampal GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Son, Jong-Hyun; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H

    2008-11-10

    Hippocampal inhibitory interneurons are a diverse population of cells widely scattered in the hippocampus, where they regulate hippocampal circuit activity. The hippocampus receives cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain, and functional studies have suggested the presence of different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons. Single-cell polymerase chain reaction analysis had confirmed that several nAChR subunit mRNAs are co-expressed with glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), the marker for GABAergic interneurons. In this anatomical study, we systematically investigated the co-expression of GAD67 with different nAChR subunits by using double in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled GAD67 probe and (35)S-labeled probes for nAChR subunits (alpha2, alpha3, alpha4, alpha5, alpha6, alpha7, beta2, beta3, and beta4). The results revealed that most GAD67-positive interneurons expressed beta2, and 67 % also expressed alpha7 mRNA. In contrast, mRNA expression of other subunits was limited; only 13 % of GAD67-positive neurons co-expressed alpha4, and less than 10% expressed transcripts for alpha2, alpha3, alpha5, or beta4. Most GAD67/alpha2 co-expression was located in CA1/CA3 stratum oriens, and GAD67/alpha5 co-expression was predominantly detected in CA1/CA3 stratum radiatum/lacunosum moleculare and the dentate gyrus. Expression of alpha6 and beta3 mRNAs was rarely detected in the hippocampus, and mRNAs were not co-expressed with GAD67. These findings suggest that the majority of nicotinic responses in GABAergic interneurons should be mediated by a homomeric alpha7 or heteromeric alpha7*-containing nAChRs. Other possible combinations such as alpha2beta2*, alpha4beta2*, or alpha5beta2* heteromeric nAChRs could contribute to functional nicotinic response in subsets of GABAergic interneurons but overall would have a minor role.

  16. Molecular and Electrophysiological Characterization of GABAergic Interneurons Expressing the Transcription Factor COUP-TFII in the Adult Human Temporal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba; Tamas, Gabor; Barzo, Pal; Olah, Szabolcs; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors contribute to the differentiation of cortical neurons, orchestrate specific interneuronal circuits, and define synaptic relationships. We have investigated neurons expressing chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII), which plays a role in the migration of GABAergic neurons. Whole-cell, patch-clamp recording in vitro combined with colocalization of molecular cell markers in the adult cortex differentiates distinct interneurons. The majority of strongly COUP-TFII-expressing neurons were in layers I-III. Most calretinin (CR) and/or cholecystokinin- (CCK) and/or reelin-positive interneurons were also COUP-TFII-positive. CR-, CCK-, or reelin-positive neurons formed 80%, 20%, or 17% of COUP-TFII-positive interneurons, respectively. About half of COUP-TFII-/CCK-positive interneurons were CR-positive, a quarter of them reelin-positive, but none expressed both. Interneurons positive for COUP-TFII fired irregular, accommodating and adapting trains of action potentials (APs) and innervated mostly small dendritic shafts and rarely spines or somata. Paired recording showed that a calretinin-/COUP-TFII-positive interneuron elicited inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in a reciprocally connected pyramidal cell. Calbindin, somatostatin, or parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons and most pyramidal cells express no immunohistochemically detectable COUP-TFII. In layers V and VI, some pyramidal cells expressed a low level of COUP-TFII in the nucleus. In conclusion, COUP-TFII is expressed in a diverse subset of GABAergic interneurons predominantly innervating small dendritic shafts originating from both interneurons and pyramidal cells.

  17. Turning the heterogeneous into homogeneous: studies on selectively isolated GABAergic interneuron subsets.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, Paul; Dobszay, Marton B; Ibanez, Raquel Martin; Ernfors, Patrik; Harkany, Tibor

    2004-11-01

    The amazing morphological and electrophysiological diversity of cortical GABAergic interneurons subserves the broad diversity of processes these cells modulate in neuronal networks. Until recently, interneuron development and functions have been extensively studied in heterogeneous in vitro and in vivo systems containing both excitatory and inhibitory components. However, mechanisms of interneuron specification during development, key signaling mechanisms controlling the establishment of particular inhibitory neuron subsets, and the spatial and temporal regulation of their integration in neuronal microcircuits remain poorly understood. Selective isolation of particular interneuron subsets may significantly extend our knowledge on the scenario of neurochemical and electrophysiological specification of developing interneurons, identification of signaling cues directing their axon growth, and principles of their anterograde and retrograde synaptic communication with other cell types. Here, we show that selective isolation of perisomatic inhibitory cells containing either parvalbumin or cholecystokinin reveals major differences in the temporal dynamics of their functional differentiation, and their dependence on target-derived signals like brain-derived neurotrophic factor and endocannabinoids. In addition, we discuss therapeutic prospects of modulating increased excitatory output in the hippocampus and subthalamic nucleus by re-adjusting the inhibitory control of principal cells.

  18. Evidence for the existence of non-GABAergic, cholinergic interneurons in the rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Frotscher, M; Vida, I; Bender, R

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed a small number of hippocampal interneurons immunoreactive for choline acetyltransferase, the acetylcholine-synthesizing enzyme. It remained an open question, however, whether these neurons represented a subgroup of inhibitory GABAergic neurons co-localizing acetylcholine. In this study, we have combined immunocytochemistry for choline acetyltransferase and in situ hybridization for glutamate decarboxylase messenger RNA, the GABA-synthesizing enzyme. None of the choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive neurons in the various layers of the hippocampus proper and fascia dentata were found to co-localize glutamate decarboxylase messenger RNA. The lack of an in situ hybridization signal in these neurons is unlikely to result from the combination of the two labeling techniques. When combining in situ hybridization for glutamate decarboxylase messenger RNA with immunostaining for parvalbumin, a calcium-binding protein expressed by many GABAergic hippocampal interneurons, numerous double-labeled cells were observed. These data provide neurochemical evidence for the existence of non-GABAergic, supposedly cholinergic non-principal cells in the hippocampus.

  19. Dopamine D4 receptors regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and glutamatergic transmission in GABAergic interneurons of prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Eunice Y; Yan, Zhen

    2009-01-14

    GABAergic interneurons in prefrontal cortex (PFC) play a critical role in cortical circuits by providing feedforward and feedback inhibition and synchronizing neuronal activity. Impairments in GABAergic inhibition to PFC pyramidal neurons have been implicated in the abnormal neural synchrony and working memory disturbances in schizophrenia. The dopamine D(4) receptor, which is strongly linked to neuropsychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia, is highly expressed in PFC GABAergic interneurons, while the physiological role of D(4) in these interneurons is largely unknown. In this study, we found that D(4) activation caused a persistent suppression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission in PFC interneurons. This effect of D(4) receptors on AMPAR-EPSC was via a mechanism dependent on actin/myosin V motor-based transport of AMPA receptors, which was regulated by cofilin, a major actin depolymerizing factor. Moreover, we demonstrated that the major cofilin-specific phosphatase Slingshot, which was activated by calcineurin downstream of D(4) signaling, was required for the D(4) regulation of glutamatergic transmission. Thus, D(4) receptors, by using the unique calcineurin/Slingshot/cofilin signaling mechanism, regulate actin dynamics and AMPAR trafficking in PFC GABAergic interneurons. It provides a potential mechanism for D(4) receptors to control the excitatory synaptic strength in local-circuit neurons and GABAergic inhibition in the PFC network, which may underlie the role of D(4) receptors in normal cognitive processes and mental disorders.

  20. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors are localized primarily on cholecystokinin-containing GABAergic interneurons in the rat hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Tsou, K; Mackie, K; Sañudo-Peña, M C; Walker, J M

    1999-01-01

    Localization of cannabinoid CB 1 receptors on GABAergic interneurons in the rat hippocampal formation was studied by double-labeling immunohistochemistry with confocal microscopy. Virtually all CB1-immunoreactive neurons (95%) are GABAergic. CB 1 fluorescence showed a punctate pattern. In contrast, the GABA fluorescence was distributed homogeneously, suggesting that while CB 1 receptors and GABA exist in the same cells they are not localized in the same subcellular compartments. Although virtually all CB1 neurons were GABAergic, many GABAergic neurons did not contain CB1 receptors. GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampal formation can be further divided into subpopulations with distinct connections and functions, using cell markers such as neuropeptides and calcium binding proteins. CB1 receptors were highly co-localized with cholecystokinin and partially co-localized with calretinin and calbindin, but not with parvalbumin. This suggests that cannabinoids may modulate GABAergic neurotransmission at the synapses on the soma and at synapses on the proximal dendrites of the principal neurons, as well as at synapses on other GABAergic interneurons.

  1. Ketamine alters cortical integration of GABAergic interneurons and induces long-term sex-dependent impairments in transgenic Gad67-GFP mice

    PubMed Central

    Aligny, C; Roux, C; Dourmap, N; Ramdani, Y; Do-Rego, J-C; Jégou, S; Leroux, P; Leroux-Nicollet, I; Marret, S; Gonzalez, B J

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, widely used as an anesthetic in neonatal pediatrics, is also an illicit drug named Super K or KitKat consumed by teens and young adults. In the immature brain, despite several studies indicating that NMDA antagonists are neuroprotective against excitotoxic injuries, there is more and more evidence indicating that these molecules exert a deleterious effect by suppressing a trophic function of glutamate. In the present study, we show using Gad67-GFP mice that prenatal exposure to ketamine during a time-window in which GABAergic precursors are migrating results in (i) strong apoptotic death in the ganglionic eminences and along the migratory routes of GABAergic interneurons; (ii) long-term deficits in interneuron density, dendrite numbers and spine morphology; (iii) a sex-dependent deregulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels and GABA transporter expression; (iv) sex-dependent changes in the response to glutamate-induced calcium mobilization; and (v) the long-term sex-dependent behavioral impairment of locomotor activity. In conclusion, using a preclinical approach, the present study shows that ketamine exposure during cortical maturation durably affects the integration of GABAergic interneurons by reducing their survival and differentiation. The resulting molecular, morphological and functional modifications are associated with sex-specific behavioral deficits in adults. In light of the present data, it appears that in humans, ketamine could be deleterious for the development of the brain of preterm neonates and fetuses of addicted pregnant women. PMID:24991763

  2. Altered postnatal maturation of striatal GABAergic interneurons in a phenotypic animal model of dystonia.

    PubMed

    Bode, Christoph; Richter, Franziska; Spröte, Christine; Brigadski, Tanja; Bauer, Anne; Fietz, Simone; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Richter, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    GABAergic disinhibition has been suggested to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of several basal ganglia disorders, including dystonia, a common movement disorder. Previous studies have shown a deficit of striatal GABAergic interneurons (IN) in the dt(sz) mutant hamster, one of the few phenotypic animal models of dystonia. However, mechanisms underlying this deficit are largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the migration and maturation of striatal IN during postnatal development (18days of age) and at age of highest severity of dystonia (33days of age) in this hamster model. In line with previous findings, the density of GAD67-positive IN and the level of parvalbumin mRNA, a marker for fast spiking GABAergic IN, were lower in the dt(sz) mutant than in control hamsters. However, an unaltered density of Nkx2.1 labeled cells and Nkx2.1 mRNA level suggested that the migration of GABAergic IN into the striatum was not retarded. Therefore, different factors that indicate maturation of GABAergic IN were determined. While mRNA of the KCC2 cation/chloride transporters and the cytosolic carboanhydrase VII, used as markers for the so called GABA switch, as well as BDNF were unaltered, we found a reduced number of IN expressing the alpha1 subunit of the GABAA-receptor (37.5%) in dt(sz) hamsters at an age of 33days, but not after spontaneous remission of dystonia at an age of 90days. Since IN shift expression from alpha2 to alpha1 subunits during postnatal maturation, this result together with a decreased parvalbumin mRNA expression suggest a delayed maturation of striatal GABAergic IN in this animal model, which might underlie abnormal neuronal activity and striatal plasticity.

  3. Petilla terminology: nomenclature of features of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Neuroscience produces a vast amount of data from an enormous diversity of neurons. A neuronal classification system is essential to organize such data and the knowledge that is derived from them. Classification depends on the unequivocal identification of the features that distinguish one type of neuron from another. The problems inherent in this are particularly acute when studying cortical interneurons. To tackle this, we convened a representative group of researchers to agree on a set of terms to describe the anatomical, physiological and molecular features of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex. The resulting terminology might provide a stepping stone towards a future classification of these complex and heterogeneous cells. Consistent adoption will be important for the success of such an initiative, and we also encourage the active involvement of the broader scientific community in the dynamic evolution of this project. PMID:18568015

  4. Synchrony of fast-spiking interneurons interconnected by GABAergic and electrical synapses.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Masaki; Fukai, Tomoki; Aoyagi, Toshio

    2003-09-01

    Fast-spiking (FS) interneurons have specific types (Kv3.1/3.2 type) of the delayed potassium channel, which differ from the conventional Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) type potassium channel (Kv1.3 type) in several aspects. In this study, we show dramatic effects of the Kv3.1/3.2 potassium channel on the synchronization of the FS interneurons. We show analytically that two identical electrically coupled FS interneurons modeled with Kv3.1/3.2 channel fire synchronously at arbitrary firing frequencies, unlike similarly coupled FS neurons modeled with Kv1.3 channel that show frequency-dependent synchronous and antisynchronous firing states. Introducing GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic connections into an FS neuron pair tends to induce an antisynchronous firing state, even if the chemical synapses are bidirectional. Accordingly, an FS neuron pair connected simultaneously by electrical and chemical synapses achieves both synchronous firing state and antisynchronous firing state in a physiologically plausible range of the conductance ratio between electrical and chemical synapses. Moreover, we find that a large-scale network of FS interneurons connected by gap junctions and bidirectional GABAergic synapses shows similar bistability in the range of gamma frequencies (30-70 Hz).

  5. Identification of a Protein Network Driving Neuritogenesis of MGE-Derived GABAergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Franchi, Sira A.; Astro, Veronica; Macco, Romina; Tonoli, Diletta; Barnier, Jean-Vianney; Botta, Martina; de Curtis, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Interneurons are essential modulators of brain activity and their abnormal maturation may lead to neural and intellectual disabilities. Here we show that cultures derived from murine medial ganglionic eminences (MGEs) produce virtually pure, polarized γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons that can form morphologically identifiable inhibitory synapses. We show that Rac GTPases and a protein complex including the GIT family scaffold proteins are expressed during maturation in vitro, and are required for the normal development of neurites. GIT1 promotes neurite extension in a conformation-dependent manner, while affecting its interaction with specific partners reduces neurite branching. Proteins of the GIT network are concentrated at growth cones, and interaction mutants may affect growth cone behavior. Our findings identify the PIX/GIT1/liprin-α1/ERC1 network as critical for the regulation of interneuron neurite differentiation in vitro, and show that these cultures represent a valuable system to identify the molecular mechanisms driving the maturation of cortical/hippocampal interneurons. PMID:28066185

  6. Activation of CB1 specifically located on GABAergic interneurons inhibits LTD in the lateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Shahnaz Christina; Kurz, Jörg; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Rammes, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we found that in the lateral amygdala (LA) of the mouse, WIN55,212-2 decreases both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission via activation of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1), yet produces an overall reduction of neuronal excitability. This suggests that the effects on excitatory transmission override those on inhibitory transmission. Here we show that CB1 activation by WIN55,212-2 and Δ9-THC inhibits long-term depression (LTD) of basal synaptic transmission in the LA, induced by low-frequency stimulation (LFS; 900 pulses/1 Hz). The CB1 agonist WIN55,212-2 blocked LTD via Gi/o proteins, activation of inwardly rectifying K+ channels (Kirs), inhibition of the adenylate cyclase-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, and PKA-dependent inhibition of voltage-gated N-type Ca2+ channels (N-type VGCCs). Interestingly, WIN55,212-2 effects on LTD were abolished in CB1 knock-out mice (CB1-KO), and in conditional mutants lacking CB1 expression only in GABAergic interneurons, but were still present in mutants lacking CB1 in principal forebrain neurons. LTD induction per se was unaffected by the CB1 antagonist SR141716A and was normally expressed in CB1-KO as well as in both conditional CB1 mutants. Our data demonstrate that activation of CB1 specifically located on GABAergic interneurons inhibits LTD in the LA. These findings suggest that CB1 expressed on either glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons play a differential role in the control of synaptic transmission and plasticity. PMID:18323569

  7. Parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y expressing hippocampal GABA-ergic inhibitory interneuron numbers decline in a model of Gulf War illness

    PubMed Central

    Megahed, Tarick; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is amongst the most conspicuous symptoms in Gulf War illness (GWI). Combined exposure to the nerve gas antidote pyridostigmine bromide (PB), pesticides and stress during the Persian Gulf War-1 (PGW-1) are presumed to be among the major causes of GWI. Indeed, our recent studies in rat models have shown that exposure to GWI-related (GWIR) chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks engenders cognitive impairments accompanied with several detrimental changes in the hippocampus. In this study, we tested whether reduced numbers of hippocampal gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons are among the pathological changes induced by GWIR-chemicals and stress. Animals were exposed to low doses of GWIR-chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks. Three months after this exposure, subpopulations of GABA-ergic interneurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), the neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS) in the hippocampus were stereologically quantified. Animals exposed to GWIR-chemicals and stress for 4 weeks displayed reduced numbers of PV-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus and NPY-expressing interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields. However, no changes in SS+ interneuron population were observed in the hippocampus. Furthermore, GABA-ergic interneuron deficiency in these animals was associated with greatly diminished hippocampus neurogenesis. Because PV+ and NPY+ interneurons play roles in maintaining normal cognitive function and neurogenesis, and controlling the activity of excitatory neurons in the hippocampus, reduced numbers of these interneurons may be one of the major causes of cognitive dysfunction and reduced neurogenesis observed in GWI. Hence, strategies that improve inhibitory neurotransmission in the hippocampus may prove beneficial for reversing cognitive dysfunction in GWI. PMID:25620912

  8. Parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y expressing hippocampal GABA-ergic inhibitory interneuron numbers decline in a model of Gulf War illness.

    PubMed

    Megahed, Tarick; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is amongst the most conspicuous symptoms in Gulf War illness (GWI). Combined exposure to the nerve gas antidote pyridostigmine bromide (PB), pesticides and stress during the Persian Gulf War-1 (PGW-1) are presumed to be among the major causes of GWI. Indeed, our recent studies in rat models have shown that exposure to GWI-related (GWIR) chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks engenders cognitive impairments accompanied with several detrimental changes in the hippocampus. In this study, we tested whether reduced numbers of hippocampal gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons are among the pathological changes induced by GWIR-chemicals and stress. Animals were exposed to low doses of GWIR-chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks. Three months after this exposure, subpopulations of GABA-ergic interneurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), the neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS) in the hippocampus were stereologically quantified. Animals exposed to GWIR-chemicals and stress for 4 weeks displayed reduced numbers of PV-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus and NPY-expressing interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields. However, no changes in SS+ interneuron population were observed in the hippocampus. Furthermore, GABA-ergic interneuron deficiency in these animals was associated with greatly diminished hippocampus neurogenesis. Because PV+ and NPY+ interneurons play roles in maintaining normal cognitive function and neurogenesis, and controlling the activity of excitatory neurons in the hippocampus, reduced numbers of these interneurons may be one of the major causes of cognitive dysfunction and reduced neurogenesis observed in GWI. Hence, strategies that improve inhibitory neurotransmission in the hippocampus may prove beneficial for reversing cognitive dysfunction in GWI.

  9. Electrical and chemical synapses among parvalbumin fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons in adult mouse neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Galarreta, Mario; Hestrin, Shaul

    2002-01-01

    Networks of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons connected via electrical and chemical synapses are thought to play an important role in detecting and promoting synchronous activity in the cerebral cortex. Although the properties of electrical and chemical synaptic interactions among inhibitory interneurons are critical for their function as a network, they have only been studied systematically in juvenile animals. Here, we have used transgenic mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein in cells containing parvalbumin (PV) to study the synaptic connectivity among fast-spiking (FS) cells in slices from adult animals (2–7 months old). We have recorded from pairs of PV-FS cells and found that the majority of them were electrically coupled (61%, 14 of 23 pairs). In addition, 78% of the pairs were connected via GABAergic chemical synapses, often reciprocally. The average coupling coefficient for step injections was 1.5% (n = 14), a smaller value than that reported in juvenile animals. GABA-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents and potentials decayed with exponential time constants of 2.6 and 5.9 ms, respectively, and exhibited paired-pulse depression (50-ms interval). The inhibitory synaptic responses in the adult were faster than those observed in young animals. Our results indicate that PV-FS cells are highly interconnected in the adult cerebral cortex by both electrical and chemical synapses, establishing networks that can have important implications for coordinating activity in cortical circuits. PMID:12213962

  10. Selective suppression of excitatory synapses on GABAergic interneurons by norepinephrine in juvenile rat prefrontal cortical microcircuitry.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-X; Waterhouse, B D; Gao, W-J

    2013-08-29

    The noradrenergic system of the brain is thought to facilitate neuronal processes that promote behavioral activation, alertness, and attention. It is known that norepinephrine (NE) can be significantly elevated in the prefrontal cortex under normal conditions such as arousal and attention, and following the administration of psychostimulants and various other drugs prescribed for psychiatric disorders. However, how NE modulates neuronal activity and synapses in the local prefrontal circuitry remains elusive. In this study, we characterized the actions of NE on individual monosynaptic connections among layer V pyramidal neurons (P) and fast-spiking (FS) GABAergic interneurons in the juvenile (postnatal days 20-23) rat prefrontal local circuitry. We found that NE selectively depresses excitatory synaptic transmission in P-FS connections but has no detectable effect on the excitatory synapses in P-P connections and the inhibitory synapses in FS-P connections. NE apparently exerts distinctly different modulatory actions on identified synapses that target GABAergic interneurons but has no effect on those in the pyramidal neurons in this specific developmental period. These results indicate that, depending on the postsynaptic targets, the effects of NE in prefrontal cortex are synapse-specific, at least in the juvenile animals.

  11. Temporal organization of GABAergic interneurons in the intermediate CA1 hippocampus during network oscillations.

    PubMed

    Forro, Thomas; Valenti, Ornella; Lasztoczi, Balint; Klausberger, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Travelling theta oscillations and sharp wave-associated ripples (SWRs) provide temporal structures to neural activity in the CA1 hippocampus. The contribution of rhythm-generating GABAergic interneurons to network timing across the septotemporal CA1 axis remains unknown. We recorded the spike-timing of identified parvalbumin (PV)-expressing basket, axo-axonic, oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons, and pyramidal cells in the intermediate CA1 (iCA1) of anesthetized rats in relation to simultaneously detected network oscillations in iCA1 and dorsal CA1 (dCA1). Distinct interneuron types were coupled differentially to SWR, and the majority of iCA1 SWR events occurred simultaneously with dCA1 SWR events. In contrast, iCA1 theta oscillations were shifted in time relative to dCA1 theta oscillations. During theta cycles, the highest firing of iCA1 axo-axonic cells was followed by PV-expressing basket cells and subsequently by O-LM together with pyramidal cells, similar to the firing sequence of dCA1 cell types reported previously. However, we observed that this temporal organization of cell types is shifted in time between dCA1 and iCA1, together with the respective shift in theta oscillations. We show that GABAergic activity can be synchronized during SWR but is shifted in time from dCA1 to iCA1 during theta oscillations, highlighting the flexible inhibitory control of excitatory activity across a brain structure.

  12. Roles of Rac1 and Rac3 GTPases during the development of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Rac GTPases are regulators of the cytoskeleton that play an important role in several aspects of neuronal and brain development. Two distinct Rac GTPases are expressed in the developing nervous system, the widely expressed Rac1 and the neural-specific Rac3 proteins. Recent experimental evidence supports a central role of these two Rac proteins in the development of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, important modulatory elements of the brain circuitry. The combined inactivation of the genes for the two Rac proteins has profound effects on distinct aspects of interneuron development, and has highlighted a synergistic contribution of the two proteins to the postmitotic maturation of specific populations of cortical and hippocampal interneurons. Rac function is modulated by different types of regulators, and can influence the activity of specific effectors. Some of these proteins have been associated to the development and maturation of interneurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric diseases characterized by cognitive impairment. Therefore the description of the cellular processes regulated by the Rac GTPases, and the identification of the molecular networks underlying these processes during interneuron development is relevant to the understanding of the role of GABAergic interneurons in cognitive functions.

  13. Roles of Rac1 and Rac3 GTPases during the development of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Rac GTPases are regulators of the cytoskeleton that play an important role in several aspects of neuronal and brain development. Two distinct Rac GTPases are expressed in the developing nervous system, the widely expressed Rac1 and the neural-specific Rac3 proteins. Recent experimental evidence supports a central role of these two Rac proteins in the development of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, important modulatory elements of the brain circuitry. The combined inactivation of the genes for the two Rac proteins has profound effects on distinct aspects of interneuron development, and has highlighted a synergistic contribution of the two proteins to the postmitotic maturation of specific populations of cortical and hippocampal interneurons. Rac function is modulated by different types of regulators, and can influence the activity of specific effectors. Some of these proteins have been associated to the development and maturation of interneurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric diseases characterized by cognitive impairment. Therefore the description of the cellular processes regulated by the Rac GTPases, and the identification of the molecular networks underlying these processes during interneuron development is relevant to the understanding of the role of GABAergic interneurons in cognitive functions. PMID:25309333

  14. GABAergic stimulation regulates the phenotype of hippocampal interneurons through the regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Marty, S; Berninger, B; Carroll, P; Thoenen, H

    1996-03-01

    Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) switches from enhancing to repressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA synthesis during the maturation of hippocampal neurons in vitro. Interneurons do not produce BDNF themselves, but BDNF enhances their differentiation. Therefore, the question arose whether hippocampal interneurons regulate their phenotype by regulating BDNF expression and release from adjacent cells. The GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol and BDNF increased the size and neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactivity of hippocampal interneurons. However, GABAergic stimulation failed to increase NPY immunoreactivity in cultures from BDNF knockout embryos. At later developmental stages, when GABA represses BDNF synthesis, treatment with muscimol induced a decrease in cell size and NPY immunoreactivity of interneurons. Interneurons might thus control their phenotype through the regulation of BDNF synthesis in, and release from, their target neurons.

  15. Antipsychotics promote GABAergic interneuron genesis in the adult rat brain: Role of heat-shock protein production.

    PubMed

    Kaneta, Hiroo; Ukai, Wataru; Tsujino, Hanako; Furuse, Kengo; Kigawa, Yoshiyasu; Tayama, Masaya; Ishii, Takao; Hashimoto, Eri; Kawanishi, Chiaki

    2017-09-01

    Current antipsychotics reduce positive symptoms and reverse negative symptoms in conjunction with cognitive behavioral issues with the goal of restoring impaired occupational and social functioning. However, limited information is available on their influence on gliogenesis or their neurogenic properties in adult schizophrenia brains, particularly on GABAergic interneuron production. In the present study, we used young adult subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived progenitor cells expressing proteoglycan NG2 cultures to examine the oligodendrocyte and GABAergic interneuron genesis effects of several kinds of antipsychotics on changes in differentiation function induced by exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. We herein demonstrated that antipsychotics promoted or restored changes in the oligodendrocyte/GABAergic interneuron differentiation functions of NG2(+) cells induced by the exposure to MK-801, which was considered to be one of the drug-induced schizophrenia model. We also demonstrated that antipsychotics restored heat-shock protein (HSP) production in NG2(+) cells with differentiation impairment. The antipsychotics olanzapine, aripiprazole, and blonanserin, but not haloperidol increased HSP90 levels, which were reduced by the exposure to MK-801. Our results showed that antipsychotics, particularly those recently synthesized, exerted similar GABAergic interneuron genesis effects on NG2(+) neuronal/glial progenitor cells in the adult rat brain by increasing cellular HSP production, and also suggest that HSP90 may play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and is a key target for next drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular and Electrophysiological Characterization of GABAergic Interneurons Expressing the Transcription Factor COUP-TFII in the Adult Human Temporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Csaba; Tamas, Gabor; Barzo, Pal; Olah, Szabolcs; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors contribute to the differentiation of cortical neurons, orchestrate specific interneuronal circuits, and define synaptic relationships. We have investigated neurons expressing chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII), which plays a role in the migration of GABAergic neurons. Whole-cell, patch-clamp recording in vitro combined with colocalization of molecular cell markers in the adult cortex differentiates distinct interneurons. The majority of strongly COUP-TFII-expressing neurons were in layers I–III. Most calretinin (CR) and/or cholecystokinin- (CCK) and/or reelin-positive interneurons were also COUP-TFII-positive. CR-, CCK-, or reelin-positive neurons formed 80%, 20%, or 17% of COUP-TFII-positive interneurons, respectively. About half of COUP-TFII-/CCK-positive interneurons were CR-positive, a quarter of them reelin-positive, but none expressed both. Interneurons positive for COUP-TFII fired irregular, accommodating and adapting trains of action potentials (APs) and innervated mostly small dendritic shafts and rarely spines or somata. Paired recording showed that a calretinin-/COUP-TFII-positive interneuron elicited inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in a reciprocally connected pyramidal cell. Calbindin, somatostatin, or parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons and most pyramidal cells express no immunohistochemically detectable COUP-TFII. In layers V and VI, some pyramidal cells expressed a low level of COUP-TFII in the nucleus. In conclusion, COUP-TFII is expressed in a diverse subset of GABAergic interneurons predominantly innervating small dendritic shafts originating from both interneurons and pyramidal cells. PMID:25787832

  17. BCL11B/CTIP2 is highly expressed in GABAergic interneurons of the mouse somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Nikouei, Kasra; Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In the nervous system, BCL11B is crucial for the development of deep layer corticospinal projection neurons and striatal medium spiny neurons and is often used as a marker for the aforementioned cell types. However, the expression of BCL11B in subtypes of non-excitatory neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) has not been reported in the mouse. In this study we show that BCL11B is extensively expressed in S1 GABAergic interneurons, throughout the three main subgroups (somatostatin-, parvalbumin- and 5HT3a-expresssing). Almost all BCL11B positive cells in the upper S1 layers were GABAergic interneurons and surprisingly, almost 40% of the BCL11B positive neurons in layer V were GABAergic interneurons. Single cell mRNA sequencing data revealed higher Bcl11b expression in S1 interneurons compared to deep layer pyramidal neurons. The highest levels of Bcl11b expression were found within the 5HT3a population, specifically in putative neurogliaform interneuron subclasses (5HT3a-positive but not expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide). In the light of our findings we suggest caution using BCL11B as a single marker to identify neurons.

  18. Evidence for GABAergic interneurons in the red nucleus of the painted turtle.

    PubMed

    Keifer, J; Vyas, D; Houk, J C; Berrebi, A S; Mugnaini, E

    1992-07-01

    Immunocytochemical and electrophysiological evidence supporting the presence of GABAergic interneurons in the turtle red nucleus is presented. Injections of HRP into the spinal cord produced labeling of large neurons in the contralateral red nucleus. The peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) method revealed smaller cells immunoreactive to an antibody against glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), the synthetic enzyme for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, that were interspersed among larger immunonegative neurons. Similar small neurons were densely immunostained by antibodies to GABA-glutaraldehyde conjugates obtained from different sources and applied according to pre-embedding and postembedding protocols. Rubrospinal neurons retrogradely labeled with HRP measured 16 and 27 microns in mean minor and major cell body diameters, while GABA-like immunopositive neurons situated within the red nucleus measured 7 and 13 microns. There was very little overlap in soma size between the two cell populations. Therefore, we suggest that the GAD- and GABA-positive neurons may be local inhibitory interneurons. This notion is further supported by observations of pre-embedding immunostaining for GAD and postembedding immunostaining for GABA showing that the turtle red nucleus is amply innervated by immunoreactive axon terminals. These puncta are closely apposed to cell bodies and dendrites of both immunonegative large neurons and immunopositive small neurons. Moreover, immunogold staining at the electron microscopic level demonstrated that GABA-like immunoreactive axon terminals with pleomorphic synaptic vesicles formed symmetric synapses with cell bodies and dendrites of the two types of red nucleus cells. These ultrastructural features are commonly assumed to indicate inhibitory synapses. A moderately labeled bouton with round vesicles and asymmetric synapses was also observed. In addition, the two types of red nucleus neurons received asymmetric axosomatic and axodendritic synapses with

  19. Enrichment of mGluR7a in the presynaptic active zones of GABAergic and non-GABAergic terminals on interneurons in the rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Dalezios, Yannis; Luján, Rafael; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Roberts, J David B; Somogyi, Peter

    2002-09-01

    The release of glutamate and GABA is modulated by presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). We used immunocytochemical methods to define the location of the group III receptor mGluR7a in glutamatergic and GABAergic terminals innervating GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal cells. Immunoreactivity for mGluR7a was localized in the presynaptic active zone of both identified GABAergic and presumed glutamatergic terminals. Terminals innervating dendritic spines showed a variable level of receptor immunoreactivity, ranging from immunonegative to strongly immunopositive. The frequency of strongly mGluR7a positive terminals innervating the soma and dendrites of mGluR1 alpha/somatostatin-expressing interneurons was very high relative to other neurons. On dendrites that received mGluR7a-enriched glutamatergic innervation, at least 80% of GABAergic terminals were immunopositive for mGluR7a. On such dendrites virtually all (95%) vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) positive (GABAergic) terminals were enriched in mGluR7a. The targets of VIP/mGluR7a-expressing terminals were mainly (88%) mGluR1 alpha-expressing interneurons, which were mostly somatostatin immunopositive. Parvalbumin positive terminals were immunonegative for mGluR7a. Some parvalbumin immunoreactive dendrites received strongly mGluR7a positive terminals. The subcellular location, as well as the cell type and synapse-specific distribution of mGluR7a in isocortical neuronal circuits, is homologous to its distribution in the hippocampus. The specific location of mGluR7a in the presynaptic active zone of both glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses may be related to the proximity of calcium channels and the vesicle fusion machinery. The enrichment of mGluR7a in the main GABAergic, as well as in the glutamatergic, innervation of mGluR1 alpha/somatostatin-expressing interneurons suggests that their activation is under unique regulation by extracellular glutamate.

  20. An olfactory sensory map develops in the absence of normal projection neurons or GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Bulfone, A; Wang, F; Hevner, R; Anderson, S; Cutforth, T; Chen, S; Meneses, J; Pedersen, R; Axel, R; Rubenstein, J L

    1998-12-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given odorant receptor project to two topographically fixed glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. We have examined the contribution of different cell types in the olfactory bulb to the establishment of this topographic map. Mice with a homozygous deficiency in Tbr-1 lack most projection neurons, whereas mice with a homozygous deficiency in Dlx-1 and Dlx-2 lack most GABAergic interneurons. Mice bearing a P2-IRES-tau-lacZ allele and deficient in either Tbr-1 or Dlx-1/Dlx-2 reveal the convergence of axons to one medial and one lateral site at positions analogous to those observed in wild-type mice. These observations suggest that the establishment of a topographic map is not dependent upon cues provided by, or synapse formation with, the major neuronal cell types in the olfactory bulb.

  1. Disturbed function of GABAergic interneurons in schizophrenia: relevance for medical treatment?

    PubMed

    Genius, J; Giegling, I; Benninghoff, J; Rujescu, D

    2012-06-01

    For decades treatment of schizophrenia was restricted to drugs, which mainly target positive symptoms by interfering with the dopaminergic neurotransmission. Since a large body of experimental and clinical data implicate that schizophrenia may primarily be a consequence of an imbalance in the glutamatergic system, specifically the networks containing GABAergic interneurons (γ-amino butyric acid), new drugs modulating glutamatergic neurotransmission are being developed. Targeting this dysfunction may follow different strategies, including application of direct or indirect NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor agonists or drugs modulating the function of metabotropic glutamate receptors. Meanwhile, the first substances have proven to be effective in animal models of schizophrenia and now enter the stage of clinical trials. The most promising data have been obtained in studies employing agonists of the metabotropic glutamate receptor. A choice of these substances is presented in this review.

  2. The germinal zones of the basal ganglia but not the septum generate GABAergic interneurons for the cortex.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Anna N; Alfonsi, Fabienne; Humphreys, Michael P; Choi, Christina K P; Rocha, Susana F; Kessaris, Nicoletta

    2010-09-08

    Cortical interneurons originate from subpallial precursors and migrate into the cortex during development. Using genetic lineage tracing in transgenic mice we examine the contribution of two germinal zones, the septum and the lateral ganglionic eminence/caudal ganglionic eminence (LGE/CGE) to interneurons of the cortex. We find that the septal neuroepithelium does not generate interneurons for the neocortex. There is, however, clear migration of cells from the LGE/CGE to the cortex. Comparison of the dynamics of cortical colonization by the two major cohorts of interneurons originating in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and the LGE/CGE has shown differences in the timing of migration and initial route of entry into the cortex. LGE/CGE-derived interneurons enter the cortex later than the MGE-derived ones. They invade the cortex through the subventricular/intermediate zone route and only later disperse within the cortical plate and the marginal zone. During the first postnatal week MGE interneurons move extensively to acquire their laminar position within the cortical plate whereas LGE/CGE-derived cells remain largely within the upper layers of the cortex. The two populations intermingle in the adult cortex but have distinct neurochemical properties and different overall distributions. LGE/CGE-derived interneurons account for one third of the total GABAergic interneuron population in the adult cortex.

  3. Striatal cholinergic interneurons and D2 receptor-expressing GABAergic medium spiny neurons regulate tardive dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Bordia, Tanuja; Zhang, Danhui; Perez, Xiomara A; Quik, Maryka

    2016-12-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a drug-induced movement disorder that arises with antipsychotics. These drugs are the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and are also prescribed for major depression, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity, obsessive compulsive and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is thus a need for therapies to reduce TD. The present studies and our previous work show that nicotine administration decreases haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) in rodent TD models, suggesting a role for the nicotinic cholinergic system. Extensive studies also show that D2 dopamine receptors are critical to TD. However, the precise involvement of striatal cholinergic interneurons and D2 medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in TD is uncertain. To elucidate their role, we used optogenetics with a focus on the striatum because of its close links to TD. Optical stimulation of striatal cholinergic interneurons using cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT)-Cre mice expressing channelrhodopsin2-eYFP decreased haloperidol-induced VCMs (~50%), with no effect in control-eYFP mice. Activation of striatal D2 MSNs using Adora2a-Cre mice expressing channelrhodopsin2-eYFP also diminished antipsychotic-induced VCMs, with no change in control-eYFP mice. In both ChAT-Cre and Adora2a-Cre mice, stimulation or mecamylamine alone similarly decreased VCMs with no further decline with combined treatment, suggesting nAChRs are involved. Striatal D2 MSN activation in haloperidol-treated Adora2a-Cre mice increased c-Fos(+) D2 MSNs and decreased c-Fos(+) non-D2 MSNs, suggesting a role for c-Fos. These studies provide the first evidence that optogenetic stimulation of striatal cholinergic interneurons and GABAergic MSNs modulates VCMs, and thus possibly TD. Moreover, they suggest nicotinic receptor drugs may reduce antipsychotic-induced TD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ovarian steroids alter mu opioid receptor trafficking in hippocampal parvalbumin GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Williams, Tanya J; Chapleau, Jeanette D; Waters, Elizabeth M; McEwen, Bruce S; Drake, Carrie T; Milner, Teresa A

    2009-09-01

    The endogenous hippocampal opioid systems are implicated in learning associated with drug use. Recently, we showed that ovarian hormones regulate enkephalin levels in the mossy fiber pathway. This pathway overlaps with parvalbumin (PARV)-basket interneurons that contain the enkephalin-activated mu opioid receptors (MORs) and are important for controlling the "temporal timing" of granule cells. Here, we evaluated the influence of ovarian steroids on the trafficking of MORs in PARV interneurons. Two groups of female rats were analyzed: cycling rats in proestrus (relatively high estrogens) or diestrus; and ovariectomized rats euthanized 6, 24 or 72 h after estradiol benzoate (10 microg, s.c.) administration. Dorsal hippocampal sections were dually immunolabeled for MOR and PARV and examined by light and electron microscopy. As in males, in females MOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) was in numerous PARV-labeled perikarya, dendrites and terminals in the dentate hilar region. Variation in ovarian steroid levels altered the subcellular distribution of MORs in PARV-labeled dendrites but not terminals. In normal cycling rats, MOR-gold particles on the plasma membrane of small PARV-labeled dendrites (area <1 microm2) had higher density in proestrus rats than in diestrus rats. Likewise, in ovariectomized rats MORs showed higher density on the plasma membrane of small PARV-labeled dendrites 72 h after estradiol exposure. The number of PARV-labeled cells was not affected by estrous cycle phase or estrogen levels. These results demonstrate that estrogen levels positively regulate the availability of MORs on GABAergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating principal cell excitability.

  5. Prox1 Regulates the Subtype-Specific Development of Caudal Ganglionic Eminence-Derived GABAergic Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allison; Petros, Timothy; Karayannis, Theofanis; McKenzie Chang, Melissa; Lavado, Alfonso; Iwano, Tomohiko; Nakajima, Miho; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Huang, Z. Josh; Heintz, Nathaniel; Oliver, Guillermo; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Machold, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogliaform (RELN+) and bipolar (VIP+) GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex provide critical inhibition locally within the superficial layers. While these subtypes are known to originate from the embryonic caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), the specific genetic programs that direct their positioning, maturation, and integration into the cortical network have not been elucidated. Here, we report that in mice expression of the transcription factor Prox1 is selectively maintained in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and that loss of Prox1 impairs the integration of these cells into superficial layers. Moreover, Prox1 differentially regulates the postnatal maturation of each specific subtype originating from the CGE (RELN, Calb2/VIP, and VIP). Interestingly, Prox1 promotes the maturation of CGE-derived interneuron subtypes through intrinsic differentiation programs that operate in tandem with extrinsically driven neuronal activity-dependent pathways. Thus Prox1 represents the first identified transcription factor specifically required for the embryonic and postnatal acquisition of CGE-derived cortical interneuron properties. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite the recognition that 30% of GABAergic cortical interneurons originate from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), to date, a specific transcriptional program that selectively regulates the development of these populations has not yet been identified. Moreover, while CGE-derived interneurons display unique patterns of tangential and radial migration and preferentially populate the superficial layers of the cortex, identification of a molecular program that controls these events is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is expressed in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and is maintained into adulthood. We found that Prox1 function is differentially required during both embryonic and postnatal stages of development to

  6. Selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex of maternally stressed Gad1-heterozygous mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Furukawa, T; Iwata, S; Yanagawa, Y; Fukuda, A

    2014-03-11

    Exposure to maternal stress (MS) and mutations in GAD1, which encodes the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 67, are both risk factors for psychiatric disorders. However, the relationship between these risk factors remains unclear. Interestingly, the critical period of MS for psychiatric disorders in offspring corresponds to the period of GABAergic neuron neurogenesis and migration in the fetal brain, that is, in the late stage of gestation. Indeed, decrement of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HIP) has often been observed in schizophrenia patients. In the present study, we used GAD67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice (that is, mice in which the Gad1 gene is heterozygously deleted; GAD67(+/GFP)) that underwent prenatal stress from embryonic day 15.0 to 17.5 and monitored PV-positive GABAergic neurons to address the interaction between Gad1 disruption and stress. Administration of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine revealed that neurogenesis of GFP-positive GABAergic neurons, but not cortical plate cells, was significantly diminished in fetal brains during MS. Differential expression of glucocorticoid receptors by different progenitor cell types may underlie this differential outcome. Postnatally, the density of PV-positive, but not PV-negative, GABAergic neurons was significantly decreased in the mPFC, HIP and somatosensory cortex but not in the motor cortex of GAD67(+/GFP) mice. By contrast, these findings were not observed in wild-type (GAD67(+/+)) offspring. These results suggest that prenatal stress, in addition to heterozygous deletion of Gad1, could specifically disturb the proliferation of neurons destined to be PV-positive GABAergic interneurons.

  7. GABAergic Interneuron Dysfunction Impairs Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Adult Apolipoprotein E4 Knock-in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Bien-Ly, Nga; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Xu, Qin; Bernardo, Aubrey; Ring, Karen; Halabisky, Brian; Deng, Changhui; Mahley, Robert W.; Huang, Yadong

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Apolipoprotein (apo) E has important and diverse functions in neurobiology, and apoE4 is the major known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Here we report that adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) express apoE. In apoE knockout mice, neurogenesis in the hippocampus was ~60% lower than in wildtype mice, and most newborn cells developed into astrocytes rather than into neurons as in wildtype mice. This impairment was not observed in human apoE3 knock-in mice. In apoE4 knock-in mice, however, the maturation and dendritic development of newborn hippocampal neurons was significantly impaired as a result of apoE4 and its fragment-caused GABAergic interneuron dysfunction. This impairment was fully rescued by treatment with a GABAA receptor potentiator. These findings demonstrate the importance of apoE in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and show that apoE4 inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis by impairing neuronal maturation mediated by GABA signaling. PMID:19951691

  8. Kindling-associated SV2A expression in hilar GABAergic interneurons of the mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yukihiro; Okumura, Takahiro; Terada, Ryo; Ishihara, Shizuka; Serikawa, Tadao; Sasa, Masashi

    2012-02-29

    Immunohistochemical studies were performed to analyze the expressional changes in hippocampal synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) following pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling. Repeated treatments of mice with sub-convulsive PTZ (40 mg/kg, i.p.) for 15 days progressively enhanced seizure susceptibility and induced clonic convulsions in most animals examined. Topographical analysis of hippocampal SV2A-immunoreactivity revealed that SV2A was densely expressed in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus, stratum lucidum of the CA3 field and around the periphery of CA3 pyramidal neurons. PTZ kindling region-specifically increased SV2A expression in the dentate hilus without affecting that in the stratum lucidum or the pyramidal cell layer of the CA3 field. Confocal laser microscopic analysis using PTZ-kindled mice illustrated that most SV2A was co-expressed with glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 in the cell bodies and dendrites of hilar interneurons. However, SV2A-immunoreactivity was negligibly observed in the hilar glutamatergic nerve terminals (mossy fibers) probed with the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 antibody. The present study suggests that SV2A specifically regulates hilar GABAergic neurotransmission in the kindled hippocampus probably as a compensatory or prophylactic mechanism against kindling epileptogenesis.

  9. Ethanol consumption during early pregnancy alters the disposition of tangentially migrating GABAergic interneurons in the fetal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Verginia C; Yeh, Pamela W L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Yeh, Hermes H

    2008-02-20

    Consumption of alcohol (ethanol) during pregnancy can lead to developmental defects in the offspring, the most devastating being the constellation of symptoms collectively referred to as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). In the brain, a hallmark of FAS is abnormal cerebral cortical morphology consistent with insult during corticogenesis. Here, we report that exposure to a relatively low level of ethanol in utero (average maternal and fetal blood alcohol level of 25 mg/dl) promotes premature tangential migration into the cortical anlage of primordial GABAergic interneurons, including those originating in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE). This ethanol-induced effect was evident in vivo at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in GAD67 knock-in and BAC-Lhx6 embryos, as well as in vitro in isotypic telencephalic slice cocultures obtained from E14.5 embryos exposed to ethanol in utero. Analysis of heterotypic cocultures indicated that both cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors contribute to the aberrant migratory profile of MGE-derived cells. In this light, we provide evidence for an interaction between ethanol exposure in utero and the embryonic GABAergic system. Exposure to ethanol in utero elevated the ambient level of GABA and increased the sensitivity to GABA of MGE-derived cells. Our results uncovered for the first time an effect of ethanol consumption during pregnancy on the embryonic development of GABAergic cortical interneurons. We propose that ethanol exerts its effect on the tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons extrinsically by modulating extracellular levels of GABA and intrinsically by altering GABA(A) receptor function.

  10. Neurocalcin-immunoreactive cells in the rat hippocampus are GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guijarro, F J; Briñón, J G; Blasco-Ibáñez, J M; Okazaki, K; Hidaka, H; Alonso, J R

    1998-01-01

    dentate gyrus; however, 9% of the NC-IR cells in the CA fields also contained CCK. No coexistence of NC with PV, SOM or NPY was found in any hippocampal region. We conclude that NC is exclusively expressed by interneurons in the rat hippocampus. NC-IR cells are a morphologically and neurochemically heterogeneous subset of GABAergic non-principal cells, which, on the basis of the known termination pattern of the colocalizing markers, are also functionally heterogeneous and are mainly involved in feed-forward dendritic inhibition in the commissural-associational and Schaffer collateral termination zones (CB containing cells), in innervation of other interneurons (CR- and VIP-containing cells), and in perisomatic inhibition (CCK-containing cells). NC is never present in perisomatic inhibitory PV-containing cells, or in feed-back distal dendritic inhibitory SOM/NPY-containing cells.

  11. Long-Term Seizure Suppression and Optogenetic Analyses of Synaptic Connectivity in Epileptic Mice with Hippocampal Grafts of GABAergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Katharine W.; Gupta, Jyoti; Tagliatela, Stephanie; Litvina, Elizabeth; Zheng, XiaoTing; Van Zandt, Meghan A.; Woods, Nicholas; Grund, Ethan; Lin, Diana; Royston, Sara; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Aaron, Gloster B.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in rodent epilepsy models suggest that GABAergic interneuron progenitor grafts can reduce hyperexcitability and seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Although integration of the transplanted cells has been proposed as the underlying mechanism for these disease-modifying effects, prior studies have not explicitly examined cell types and synaptic mechanisms for long-term seizure suppression. To address this gap, we transplanted medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) cells from embryonic day 13.5 VGAT-Venus or VGAT-ChR2-EYFP transgenic embryos into the dentate gyrus (DG) of adult mice 2 weeks after induction of TLE with pilocarpine. Beginning 3–4 weeks after status epilepticus, we conducted continuous video-electroencephalographic recording until 90–100 d. TLE mice with bilateral MGE cell grafts in the DG had significantly fewer and milder electrographic seizures, compared with TLE controls. Immunohistochemical studies showed that the transplants contained multiple neuropeptide or calcium-binding protein-expressing interneuron types and these cells established dense terminal arborizations onto the somas, apical dendrites, and axon initial segments of dentate granule cells (GCs). A majority of the synaptic terminals formed by the transplanted cells were apposed to large postsynaptic clusters of gephyrin, indicative of mature inhibitory synaptic complexes. Functionality of these new inhibitory synapses was demonstrated by optogenetically activating VGAT-ChR2-EYFP-expressing transplanted neurons, which generated robust hyperpolarizations in GCs. These findings suggest that fetal GABAergic interneuron grafts may suppress pharmacoresistant seizures by enhancing synaptic inhibition in DG neural circuits. PMID:25274826

  12. The dual network of GABAergic interneurons linked by both chemical and electrical synapses: a possible infrastructure of the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, T; Kosaka, T

    2000-10-01

    To know the structural feature of individual nerve cells and of the network they form is essentially important for understanding how the brain works. We have recently shown that a certain subpopulation of hippocampal GABAergic neurons that contain a calcium-binding protein parvalbumin form the dual network connected by both chemical synapses and gap junctions. The mutual chemical synaptic contacts are formed between their axon terminals and somata whereas gap junctions are located between their dendrites. In this article, we demonstrate that the dual network of parvalbumin-containing GABAergic interneurons is not restricted to the hippocampus but found also in the neocortex and, therefore, appears to be a fundamental structure of the cerebral cortex, possibly having some relevance to the synchronized activities observed broadly in various cortical areas.

  13. Endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of afferent excitatory synapses in hippocampal pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Péterfi, Zoltán; Urbán, Gabriella M; Papp, Orsolya I; Németh, Beáta; Monyer, Hannah; Szabó, Gábor; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Mackie, Ken; Freund, Tamás F; Hájos, Norbert; Katona, István

    2012-10-10

    Although endocannabinoids have emerged as essential retrograde messengers in several forms of synaptic plasticity, it remains controversial whether they mediate long-term depression (LTD) of glutamatergic synapses onto excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampus. Here, we show that parvalbumin- and somatostatin/metabotropic glutamate receptor 1(a) (mGlu(1a))-positive GABAergic interneurons express diacylglycerol lipase-α (DGL-α), a synthesizing enzyme of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), albeit at lower levels than principal cells. Moreover, this lipase accumulates postsynaptically around afferent excitatory synapses in all three cell types. To address the role of retrograde 2-AG signaling in LTD, we investigated two forms: (1) produced by postsynaptic spiking paired with subsequent presynaptic stimulation or (2) induced by group I mGlu activation by (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG). Neither form of LTD was evoked in the presence of the mGlu(5) antagonist MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine], the DGL inhibitor THL [N-formyl-l-leucine (1S)-1-[[(2S,3S)-3-hexyl-4-oxo-2-oxetanyl]methyl]dodecyl ester], or the intracellularly applied Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA in CA1 pyramidal cells, fast-spiking interneurons (representing parvalbumin-containing cells) and interneurons projecting to stratum lacunosum-moleculare (representing somatostatin/mGlu(1a)-expressing interneurons). Both forms of LTD were completely absent in CB(1) cannabinoid receptor knock-out mice, whereas pharmacological blockade of CB(1) led to inconsistent results. Notably, in accordance with their lower DGL-α level, a higher stimulation frequency or higher DHPG concentration was required for LTD induction in interneurons compared with pyramidal cells. These findings demonstrate that hippocampal principal cells and interneurons produce endocannabinoids to mediate LTD in a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different manner. The shifted induction threshold implies that

  14. Causal Evidence for the Role of Specific GABAergic Interneuron Types in Entorhinal Recruitment of Dentate Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Ta; Kao, Min-Hua; Hou, Wen-Hsien; Wei, Yu-Ting; Chen, Chin-Lin; Lien, Cheng-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) is the primary gate of the hippocampus and controls information flow from the cortex to the hippocampus proper. To maintain normal function, granule cells (GCs), the principal neurons in the DG, receive fine-tuned inhibition from local-circuit GABAergic inhibitory interneurons (INs). Abnormalities of GABAergic circuits in the DG are associated with several brain disorders, including epilepsy, autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer disease. Therefore, understanding the network mechanisms of inhibitory control of GCs is of functional and pathophysiological importance. GABAergic inhibitory INs are heterogeneous, but it is unclear how individual subtypes contribute to GC activity. Using cell-type-specific optogenetic perturbation, we investigated whether and how two major IN populations defined by parvalbumin (PV) and somatostatin (SST) expression, regulate GC input transformations. We showed that PV-expressing (PV+) INs, and not SST-expressing (SST+) INs, primarily suppress GC responses to single cortical stimulation. In addition, these two IN classes differentially regulate GC responses to θ and γ frequency inputs from the cortex. Notably, PV+ INs specifically control the onset of the spike series, whereas SST+ INs preferentially regulate the later spikes in the series. Together, PV+ and SST+ GABAergic INs engage differentially in GC input-output transformations in response to various activity patterns. PMID:27830729

  15. A supercritical density of fast Na+ channels ensures rapid propagation of action potentials in GABAergic interneuron axons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing GABAergic interneurons/basket cells (BCs) play a key role in feedforward and feedback inhibition, gamma oscillations, and complex information processing. For these functions, fast propagation of action potentials (APs) from the soma to the presynaptic terminals is important. However, the functional properties of interneuron axons remain elusive. Here, we examined interneuron axons by confocally targeted subcellular patch-clamp recording in rat hippocampal slices. APs were initiated in the proximal axon ~20 μm from the soma, and propagated to the distal axon with high reliability and speed. Subcellular mapping revealed a stepwise increase of Na+ conductance density from the soma to the proximal axon, followed by a further gradual increase in the distal axon. Active cable modeling and experiments with partial channel block indicated that low axonal Na+ conductance density was sufficient for reliability, but high Na+ density was necessary for both speed of propagation and fast-spiking AP phenotype. Our results suggest that a supercritical density of Na+ channels compensates for the morphological properties of interneuron axons (small segmental diameter, extensive branching, and high bouton density), ensuring fast AP propagation and high-frequency repetitive firing. PMID:24657965

  16. Modulation of cell-cycle dynamics is required to regulate the number of cerebellar GABAergic interneurons and their rhythm of maturation.

    PubMed

    Leto, Ketty; Bartolini, Alice; Di Gregorio, Alessandra; Imperiale, Daniele; De Luca, Annarita; Parmigiani, Elena; Filipkowski, Robert K; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2011-08-01

    The progenitors of cerebellar GABAergic interneurons proliferate up to postnatal development in the prospective white matter, where they give rise to different neuronal subtypes, in defined quantities and according to precise spatiotemporal sequences. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate the specification of distinct interneuron phenotypes, we examined mice lacking the G1 phase-active cyclin D2. It has been reported that these mice show severe reduction of stellate cells, the last generated interneuron subtype. We found that loss of cyclin D2 actually impairs the whole process of interneuron genesis. In the mutant cerebella, progenitors of the prospective white matter show reduced proliferation rates and enhanced tendency to leave the cycle, whereas young postmitotic interneurons undergo severe delay of their maturation and migration. As a consequence, the progenitor pool is precociously exhausted and the number of interneurons is significantly reduced, although molecular layer interneurons are more affected than those of granular layer or deep nuclei. The characteristic inside-out sequence of interneuron placement in the cortical layers is also reversed, so that later born cells occupy deeper positions than earlier generated ones. Transplantation experiments show that the abnormalities of cyclin D2(-/-) interneurons are largely caused by cell-autonomous mechanisms. Therefore, cyclin D2 is not required for the specification of particular interneuron subtypes. Loss of this protein, however, disrupts regulatory mechanisms of cell cycle dynamics that are required to determine the numbers of interneurons of different types and impairs their rhythm of maturation and integration in the cerebellar circuitry.

  17. Environmental enrichment as a therapeutic avenue for anxiety in aged Wistar rats: Effect on cat odor exposition and GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sampedro-Piquero, P; Castilla-Ortega, E; Zancada-Menendez, C; Santín, L J; Begega, A

    2016-08-25

    The use of more ethological animal models to study the neurobiology of anxiety has increased in recent years. We assessed the effect of an environmental enrichment (EE) protocol (24h/day over a period of two months) on anxiety-related behaviors when aged Wistar rats (21months old) were confronted with cat odor stimuli. Owing to the relationship between GABAergic interneurons and the anxiety-related neuronal network, we examined changes in the expression of Parvalbumin (PV) and 67kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-67) immunoreactive cells in different brain regions involved in stress response. Behavioral results revealed that enriched rats traveled further and made more grooming behaviors during the habituation session. In the cat odor session, they traveled longer distances and they showed more active interaction with the odor stimuli and less time in freezing behavior. Zone analysis revealed that the enriched group spent more time in the intermediate zone according to the proximity of the predator odor. Regarding the neurobiological data, the EE increased the expression of PV-positive cells in some medial prefrontal regions (cingulate (Cg) and prelimbic (PL) cortices), whereas the GAD-67 expression in the basolateral amygdala was reduced in the enriched group. Our results suggest that EE is able to reduce anxiety-like behaviors in aged animals even when ethologically relevant stimuli are used. Moreover, GABAergic interneurons could be involved in mediating this resilient behavior. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential GABAergic and glycinergic inputs of inhibitory interneurons and Purkinje cells to principal cells of the cerebellar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Husson, Zoé; Rousseau, Charly V; Broll, Ilja; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2014-07-09

    The principal neurons of the cerebellar nuclei (CN), the sole output of the olivo-cerebellar system, receive a massive inhibitory input from Purkinje cells (PCs) of the cerebellar cortex. Morphological evidence suggests that CN principal cells are also contacted by inhibitory interneurons, but the properties of this connection are unknown. Using transgenic, tracing, and immunohistochemical approaches in mice, we show that CN interneurons form a large heterogeneous population with GABA/glycinergic phenotypes, distinct from GABAergic olive-projecting neurons. CN interneurons are found to contact principal output neurons, via glycine receptor (GlyR)-enriched synapses, virtually devoid of the main GABA receptor (GABAR) subunits α1 and γ2. Those clusters account for 5% of the total number of inhibitory receptor clusters on principal neurons. Brief optogenetic stimulations of CN interneurons, through selective expression of channelrhodopsin 2 after viral-mediated transfection of the flexed gene in GlyT2-Cre transgenic mice, evoked fast IPSCs in principal cells. GlyR activation accounted for 15% of interneuron IPSC amplitude, while the remaining current was mediated by activation of GABAR. Surprisingly, small GlyR clusters were also found at PC synapses onto principal CN neurons in addition to α1 and γ2 GABAR subunits. However, GlyR activation was found to account for <3% of the PC inhibitory synaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation. This work establishes CN glycinergic neurons as a significant source of inhibition to CN principal cells, forming contacts molecularly distinct from, but functionally similar to, Purkinje cell synapses. Their impact on CN output, motor learning, and motor execution deserves further investigation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349418-14$15.00/0.

  19. Apolipoprotein E4 causes age- and sex-dependent impairments of hilar GABAergic interneurons and learning and memory deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Leung, Laura; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Jain, Sachi; Ring, Karen; Dai, Jessica; Wang, Max Mu; Tong, Leslie; Walker, David; Huang, Yadong

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE4 has sex-dependent effects, whereby the risk of developing AD is higher in apoE4-expressing females than males. However, the mechanism underlying the sex difference, in relation to apoE4, is unknown. Previous findings indicate that apoE4 causes age-dependent impairments of hilar GABAergic interneurons in female mice, leading to learning and memory deficits. Here, we investigate whether the detrimental effects of apoE4 on hilar GABAergic interneurons are sex-dependent using apoE knock-in (KI) mice across different ages. We found that in female apoE-KI mice, there was an age-dependent depletion of hilar GABAergic interneurons, whereby GAD67- or somatostatin-positive--but not NPY- or parvalbumin-positive-interneuron loss was exacerbated by apoE4. Loss of these neuronal populations was correlated with the severity of spatial learning deficits at 16 months of age in female apoE4-KI mice; however, this effect was not observed in female apoE3-KI mice. In contrast, we found an increase in the numbers of hilar GABAergic interneurons with advancing age in male apoE-KI mice, regardless of apoE genotype. Moreover, male apoE-KI mice showed a consistent ratio of hilar inhibitory GABAergic interneurons to excitatory mossy cells approximating 1.5 that is independent of apoE genotype and age, whereas female apoE-KI mice exhibited an age-dependent decrease in this ratio, which was exacerbated by apoE4. Interestingly, there are no apoE genotype effects on GABAergic interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subregions of the hippocampus as well as the entorhinal and auditory cortexes. These findings suggest that the sex-dependent effects of apoE4 on developing AD is in part attributable to inherent sex-based differences in the numbers of hilar GABAergic interneurons, which is further modulated by apoE genotype.

  20. Multi-dimensional classification of GABAergic interneurons with Bayesian network-modeled label uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Interneuron classification is an important and long-debated topic in neuroscience. A recent study provided a data set of digitally reconstructed interneurons classified by 42 leading neuroscientists according to a pragmatic classification scheme composed of five categorical variables, namely, of the interneuron type and four features of axonal morphology. From this data set we now learned a model which can classify interneurons, on the basis of their axonal morphometric parameters, into these five descriptive variables simultaneously. Because of differences in opinion among the neuroscientists, especially regarding neuronal type, for many interneurons we lacked a unique, agreed-upon classification, which we could use to guide model learning. Instead, we guided model learning with a probability distribution over the neuronal type and the axonal features, obtained, for each interneuron, from the neuroscientists' classification choices. We conveniently encoded such probability distributions with Bayesian networks, calling them label Bayesian networks (LBNs), and developed a method to predict them. This method predicts an LBN by forming a probabilistic consensus among the LBNs of the interneurons most similar to the one being classified. We used 18 axonal morphometric parameters as predictor variables, 13 of which we introduce in this paper as quantitative counterparts to the categorical axonal features. We were able to accurately predict interneuronal LBNs. Furthermore, when extracting crisp (i.e., non-probabilistic) predictions from the predicted LBNs, our method outperformed related work on interneuron classification. Our results indicate that our method is adequate for multi-dimensional classification of interneurons with probabilistic labels. Moreover, the introduced morphometric parameters are good predictors of interneuron type and the four features of axonal morphology and thus may serve as objective counterparts to the subjective, categorical axonal features.

  1. Multi-dimensional classification of GABAergic interneurons with Bayesian network-modeled label uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Interneuron classification is an important and long-debated topic in neuroscience. A recent study provided a data set of digitally reconstructed interneurons classified by 42 leading neuroscientists according to a pragmatic classification scheme composed of five categorical variables, namely, of the interneuron type and four features of axonal morphology. From this data set we now learned a model which can classify interneurons, on the basis of their axonal morphometric parameters, into these five descriptive variables simultaneously. Because of differences in opinion among the neuroscientists, especially regarding neuronal type, for many interneurons we lacked a unique, agreed-upon classification, which we could use to guide model learning. Instead, we guided model learning with a probability distribution over the neuronal type and the axonal features, obtained, for each interneuron, from the neuroscientists' classification choices. We conveniently encoded such probability distributions with Bayesian networks, calling them label Bayesian networks (LBNs), and developed a method to predict them. This method predicts an LBN by forming a probabilistic consensus among the LBNs of the interneurons most similar to the one being classified. We used 18 axonal morphometric parameters as predictor variables, 13 of which we introduce in this paper as quantitative counterparts to the categorical axonal features. We were able to accurately predict interneuronal LBNs. Furthermore, when extracting crisp (i.e., non-probabilistic) predictions from the predicted LBNs, our method outperformed related work on interneuron classification. Our results indicate that our method is adequate for multi-dimensional classification of interneurons with probabilistic labels. Moreover, the introduced morphometric parameters are good predictors of interneuron type and the four features of axonal morphology and thus may serve as objective counterparts to the subjective, categorical axonal features

  2. The amyloid precursor protein controls adult hippocampal neurogenesis through GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baiping; Wang, Zilai; Sun, Lu; Yang, Li; Li, Hongmei; Cole, Allysa L; Rodriguez-Rivera, Jennifer; Lu, Hui-Chen; Zheng, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Impaired neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has been implicated in AD pathogenesis. Here we reveal that the APP plays an important role in the neural progenitor proliferation and newborn neuron maturation in the mouse dentate gyrus. APP controls adult neurogenesis through a non cell-autonomous mechanism by GABAergic neurons, as selective deletion of GABAergic, but not glutamatergic, APP disrupts adult hippocampal neurogenesis. APP, highly expressed in the majority of GABAergic neurons in the dentate gyrus, enhances the inhibitory tone to granule cells. By regulating both tonic and phasic GABAergic inputs to dentate granule cells, APP maintains excitatory-inhibitory balance and preserves cognitive functions. Our studies uncover an indispensable role of APP in the GABAergic system for controlling adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and our findings indicate that APP dysfunction may contribute to impaired neurogenesis and cognitive decline associated with AD.

  3. Structural and functional characterization of dendritic arbors and GABAergic synaptic inputs on interneurons and principal cells in the rat basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Klenowski, Paul M.; Fogarty, Matthew J.; Belmer, Arnauld; Noakes, Peter G.; Bellingham, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is a complex brain region associated with processing emotional states, such as fear, anxiety, and stress. Some aspects of these emotional states are driven by the network activity of synaptic connections, derived from both local circuitry and projections to the BLA from other regions. Although the synaptic physiology and general morphological characteristics are known for many individual cell types within the BLA, the combination of morphological, electrophysiological, and distribution of neurochemical GABAergic synapses in a three-dimensional neuronal arbor has not been reported for single neurons from this region. The aim of this study was to assess differences in morphological characteristics of BLA principal cells and interneurons, quantify the distribution of GABAergic neurochemical synapses within the entire neuronal arbor of each cell type, and determine whether GABAergic synaptic density correlates with electrophysiological recordings of inhibitory postsynaptic currents. We show that BLA principal neurons form complex dendritic arborizations, with proximal dendrites having fewer spines but higher densities of neurochemical GABAergic synapses compared with distal dendrites. Furthermore, we found that BLA interneurons exhibited reduced dendritic arbor lengths and spine densities but had significantly higher densities of putative GABAergic synapses compared with principal cells, which was correlated with an increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents. The quantification of GABAergic connectivity, in combination with morphological and electrophysiological measurements of the BLA cell types, is the first step toward a greater understanding of how fear and stress lead to changes in morphology, local connectivity, and/or synaptic reorganization of the BLA. PMID:26041829

  4. GABAergic input onto CA3 hippocampal interneurons remains shunting throughout development.

    PubMed

    Banke, Tue G; McBain, Chris J

    2006-11-08

    In hippocampus, the net flow of excitability is controlled by inhibitory input provided by the many populations of local circuit inhibitory interneurons. In principal cells, GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic input undergoes a highly coordinated shift from depolarizing early in life to a more conventional hyperpolarizing inhibition on maturation. This switch in inhibitory input polarity is controlled by the developmental regulation of two chloride cotransporters (NKCC1 and KCC2) that results in a net shift from high to low intracellular Cl(-). Whether inhibitory input onto inhibitory interneurons demonstrates a similar developmental shift in intracellular Cl(-) is unexplored. Using the gramicidin perforated-patch configuration, we recorded from CA3 hippocampal stratum lucidum interneurons and pyramidal cells to monitor inhibitory input across a broad developmental range. GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic input onto stratum lucidum inhibitory interneurons was shunting in nature across the entire developmental age range tested, as resting membrane potential and the IPSC reversal potential remained within a few millivolts (1-4 mV) between postnatal day 5 (P5) and P31. Furthermore, sensitivity to block of the two chloride cotransporters KCC2 and NKCC1 did not differ across the same age range, suggesting that their relative expression is fixed across development. In contrast, pyramidal cell synaptic inhibition demonstrated the well described switch from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing over the same age range. Thus, in contrast to principal cells, inhibitory synaptic input onto CA3 interneurons remains shunting throughout development.

  5. Post-weaning social isolation attenuates c-Fos expression in GABAergic interneurons in the basolateral amygdala of adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Lukkes, Jodi L; Burke, Andrew R; Zelin, Naomi S; Hale, Matthew W; Lowry, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Previous studies have found that adolescent social isolation of rats can lead to an increased anxiety state during adulthood, while chronic anxiety states are associated with dysregulated local GABAergic inhibition within the basolateral amygdala (BL). Therefore, we investigated the effects of post-weaning social isolation of female rats, in combination with a challenge with the anxiogenic drug, N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide (FG-7142), on a subset of GABAergic interneurons in the BL in adulthood using dual immunohistochemical staining for c-Fos and parvalbumin. Juvenile female rats were reared in isolation or in groups of three for a 3-week period from weaning to mid-adolescence, after which all rats were group-housed for an additional 2 weeks. Group-reared rats and isolation-reared rats injected with FG-7142 had increased c-Fos expression in GABAergic interneurons in the anterior part of the BL compared to group-reared rats and isolation-reared rats, respectively, injected with vehicle. Isolation rearing had a main effect to decrease c-Fos expression in GABAergic interneurons in the anterior part of the BL compared to group-reared rats. These data suggest that post-weaning social isolation of female rats leads to dysregulation of a parvalbumin-containing subset of local GABAergic interneurons in the anterior part of the BL, which have previously been implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic anxiety states. These cellular changes may lead to an increased vulnerability to stress- and anxiety-related responses in adulthood.

  6. VIP enhances both pre- and postsynaptic GABAergic transmission to hippocampal interneurones leading to increased excitatory synaptic transmission to CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Reis, Diana; Sebastião, Ana M; Wirkner, Kerstin; Illes, Peter; Ribeiro, Joaquim Alexandre

    2004-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is present in the hippocampus in three subtypes of GABAergic interneurones, two of which innervate preferentially other interneurones, responsible for pyramidal cell inhibition. We investigated how pre- and postsynaptic modulation of GABAergic transmission (to both pyramidal cells and interneurones) by VIP could influence excitatory synaptic transmission in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. VIP (0.1-100 nM) increased [(3)H]GABA release from hippocampal synaptosomes (maximum effect at 1 nM VIP; 63.8 +/- 4.0%) but did not change [(3)H]glutamate release. VIP (0.3-30 nM) enhanced synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices (maximum effect at 1 nM VIP; field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (epsp) slope: 23.7 +/- 1.1%; population spike amplitude: 20.3 +/- 1.7%). The action on field epsp slope was fully dependent on GABAergic transmission since it was absent in the presence of picrotoxin (50 microM) plus CGP55845 (1 microM). VIP (1 nM) did not change paired-pulse facilitation but increased paired-pulse inhibition in CA1 pyramidal cells (16.0 +/- 0.9%), reinforcing the involvement of GABAergic transmission in the action of VIP. VIP (1 nM) increased muscimol-evoked inhibitory currents by 36.4 +/- 8.7% in eight out of ten CA1 interneurones in the stratum radiatum. This suggests that VIP promotes increased inhibition of interneurones that control pyramidal cells, leading to disinhibition of synaptic transmission to pyramidal cell dendrites. In conclusion, concerted pre- and postsynaptic actions of VIP lead to disinhibition of pyramidal cell dendrites causing an enhancement of synaptic transmission.

  7. Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 channel subunit expression in murine spinal dorsal horn GABAergic interneurones.

    PubMed

    Nowak, A; Mathieson, H R; Chapman, R J; Janzsó, G; Yanagawa, Y; Obata, K; Szabo, G; King, A E

    2011-09-01

    GABAergic interneurones, including those within spinal dorsal horn, contain one of the two isoforms of the synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), either GAD65 or GAD67. The physiological significance of these two GABAergic phenotypes is unknown but a more detailed anatomical and functional characterization may help resolve this issue. In this study, two transgenic Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) knock-in murine lines, namely GAD65-GFP and GAD67-GFP (Δneo) mice, were used to profile expression of Shaw-related Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 K(+)-channel subunits in dorsal horn interneurones. Neuronal expression of these subunits confers specific biophysical characteristic referred to as 'fast-spiking'. Immuno-labelling for Kv3.1b or Kv3.3 revealed the presence of both of these subunits across the dorsal horn, most abundantly in laminae I-III. Co-localization studies in transgenic mice indicated that Kv3.1b but not Kv3.3 was associated with GAD65-GFP and GAD67-GFP immunopositive neurones. For comparison the distributions of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 K(+)-channel subunits which are linked to an excitatory neuronal phenotype were characterized. No co-localization was found between GAD-GFP +ve neurones and Kv4.2 or Kv4.3. In functional studies to evaluate whether either GABAergic population is activated by noxious stimulation, hindpaw intradermal injection of capsaicin followed by c-fos quantification in dorsal horn revealed co-expression c-fos and GAD65-GFP (quantified as 20-30% of GFP +ve population). Co-expression was also detected for GAD67-GFP +ve neurones and capsaicin-induced c-fos but at a much reduced level of 4-5%. These data suggest that whilst both GAD65-GFP and GAD67-GFP +ve neurones express Kv3.1b and therefore may share certain biophysical traits, their responses to peripheral noxious stimulation are distinct.

  8. GABAergic Interneuron Differentiation in the Basal Forebrain Is Mediated through Direct Regulation of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Isoforms by Dlx Homeobox Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Le, Trung N; Zhou, Qing-Ping; Cobos, Inma; Zhang, Shunzhen; Zagozewski, Jamie; Japoni, Sara; Vriend, Jerry; Parkinson, Tracie; Du, Guoyan; Rubenstein, John L; Eisenstat, David D

    2017-09-06

    GABA is the key inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cortex but regulation of its synthesis during forebrain development is poorly understood. In the telencephalon, members of the distal-less (Dlx) homeobox gene family are expressed in, and regulate the development of, the basal ganglia primodia from which many GABAergic neurons originate and migrate to other forebrain regions. The Dlx1/Dlx2 double knock-out mice die at birth with abnormal cortical development, including loss of tangential migration of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons to the neocortex (Anderson et al., 1997a). We have discovered that specific promoter regulatory elements of glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms (Gad1 and Gad2), which regulate GABA synthesis from the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, are direct transcriptional targets of both DLX1 and DLX2 homeoproteins in vivo Further gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that both DLX1 and DLX2 are necessary and sufficient for Gad gene expression. DLX1 and/or DLX2 activated the transcription of both Gad genes, and defects in Dlx function disrupted the differentiation of GABAergic interneurons with global reduction in GABA levels in the forebrains of the Dlx1/Dlx2 double knock-out mouse in vivo Identification of Gad genes as direct Dlx transcriptional targets is significant; it extends our understanding of Dlx gene function in the developing forebrain beyond the regulation of tangential interneuron migration to the differentiation of GABAergic interneurons arising from the basal telencephalon, and may help to unravel the pathogenesis of several developmental brain disorders.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. We show that Dlx1/Dlx2 homeobox genes regulate GABA synthesis during forebrain development through direct activation of glutamic acid decarboxylase enzyme isoforms that convert glutamate to GABA. This discovery helps explain how Dlx mutations result in abnormal

  9. Chronic stress reduces the number of GABAergic interneurons in the adult rat hippocampus, dorsal-ventral and region-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Czéh, Boldizsár; Varga, Zsófia K Kalangyáné; Henningsen, Kim; Kovács, Gábor L; Miseta, Attila; Wiborg, Ove

    2015-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is a common and complex mental disorder with unknown etiology. GABAergic dysfunction is likely to contribute to the pathophysiology since disrupted GABAergic systems are well documented in depressed patients. Here we studied structural changes in the hippocampal GABAergic network using the chronic mild stress (CMS) model, as one of the best validated animal models for depression. Rats were subjected to 9 weeks of daily stress and behaviorally characterized using the sucrose consumption test into anhedonic and resilient animals based on their response to stress. Different subtypes of GABAergic interneurons were visualized by immunohistochemistry using antibodies for parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR), calbindin (CB), cholecystokinin (CCK), somatostatin (SOM), and neuropeptide Y (NPY). We used an unbiased quantification method to systematically count labeled cells in different subareas of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Chronic stress reduced the number of specific interneurons in distinct hippocampal subregions significantly. PV+ and CR+ neurons were reduced in all dorsal subareas, whereas in the ventral part only the CA1 was affected. Stress had the most pronounced effect on the NPY+ and SOM+ cells and reduced their number in almost all dorsal and ventral subareas. Stress had no effect on the CCK+ and CB+ interneurons. In most cases the effect of stress was irrespective to the behavioral phenotype. However, in a few specific areas the number of SOM+, NPY+, and CR+ neurons were significantly reduced in anhedonic animals compared to the resilient group. Overall, these data clearly demonstrate that chronic stress affects the structural integrity of specific GABAergic neuronal subpopulations and this should also affect the functioning of these hippocampal GABAergic networks.

  10. Preserving GABAergic interneurons in acute brain slices of mice using the N-methyl-D-glucamine-based artificial cerebrospinal fluid method.

    PubMed

    Pan, Geng; Li, Yue; Geng, Hong-Yan; Yang, Jian-Ming; Li, Ke-Xin; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Defects in the function and development of GABAergic interneurons have been linked to psychiatric disorders, so preservation of these interneurons in brain slices is important for successful electrophysiological recording in various ex vivo methods. However, it is difficult to maintain the activity and morphology of neurons in slices from mice of >30 days old. Here we evaluated the N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG)-based artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) method for the preservation of interneurons in slices from mice of up to ∼6 months old and discussed the steps that may affect their quality during slicing. We found that the NMDG-aCSF method rescued more cells than sucrose-aCSF and successfully preserved different types of interneurons including parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons. In addition, both the chemical and electrical synaptic signaling of interneurons were maintained. These results demonstrate that the NMDG-aCSF method is suitable for the preservation of interneurons, especially in studies of gap junctions.

  11. The impact of NMDA Receptor hypofunction on GABAergic interneurons in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Samuel M.; Tsien, Richard W.; Goff, Donald C.; Halassa, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    While the dopamine hypothesis has dominated schizophrenia research for several decades, more recent studies have highlighted the role of fast synaptic transmitters and their receptors in schizophrenia etiology. Here we review evidence that schizophrenia is associated with a reduction in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function. By highlighting post mortem, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies, we provide evidence for preferential disruption of GABAergic circuits in the context of NMDAR hypo-activity states. The functional relationship between NMDARs and GABAergic neurons is realized at the molecular, cellular, microcircuit and systems levels. A synthesis of findings across these levels explains how NMDA-mediated inhibitory dysfunction may lead to aberrant interactions among brain regions, accounting for key clinical features of schizophrenia. This synthesis of schizophrenia unifies observations from diverse fields and may help chart pathways for developing novel diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25583246

  12. Parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons are increased in the dorsal hippocampus of the dystrophic mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Del Tongo, Claudia; Carretta, Donatella; Fulgenzi, Gianluca; Catini, Claudio; Minciacchi, Diego

    2009-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by variable alterations of the dystrophin gene and by muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We postulated an association between cognitive impairment and architectural changes of the hippocampal GABAergic system. We investigated a major subpopulation of GABAergic neurons, the parvalbumin-immunopositive (PV-I) cells, in the dorsal hippocampus of the mdx mouse, an acknowledged model of DMD. PV-I neurons were quantified and their distribution was compared in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus in wild-type and mdx mice. The cell morphology and topography of PV-I neurons were maintained. Conversely, the number of PV-I neurons was significantly increased in the mdx mouse. The percent increase of PV-I neurons was from 45% for CA2, up to 125% for the dentate gyrus. In addition, the increased parvalbumin content in the mdx hippocampus was confirmed by Western blot. A change in the hippocampus processing abilities is the expected functional counterpart of the modification displayed by PV-I GABAergic neurons. Altered hippocampal functionality can be responsible for part of the cognitive impairment in DMD.

  13. Enhancing GABA Signaling during Middle Adulthood Prevents Age-Dependent GABAergic Interneuron Decline and Learning and Memory Deficits in ApoE4 Mice.

    PubMed

    Tong, Leslie M; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Yang, Alyssa; Lin, Victoria; Lei, Hanci; Huang, Yadong

    2016-02-17

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. We previously reported that female apoE4 knock-in (KI) mice had an age-dependent decline in hilar GABAergic interneurons that correlated with the extent of learning and memory deficits, as determined by Morris water maze (MWM), in aged mice. Enhancing GABA signaling by treating aged apoE4-KI mice with the GABAA receptor potentiator pentobarbital (PB) for 4 weeks before and during MWM rescued the learning and memory deficits. Here, we report that withdrawal of PB treatment for 2 weeks before MWM abolished the rescue in aged apoE4-KI mice, suggesting the importance of continuously enhancing GABA signaling in the rescue. However, treating apoE4-KI mice during middle adulthood (9-11 months of age) with PB for 6 weeks prevented age-dependent hilar GABAergic interneuron decline and learning and memory deficits, when examined at 16 month of age. These data imply that increasing inhibitory tone after substantial GABAergic interneuron loss may be an effective symptomatic, but not a disease-modifying, treatment for AD related to apoE4, whereas a similar intervention before substantial interneuron loss could be a disease-modifying therapeutic. We previously reported that female apoE4-KI mice had an age-dependent decline in hilar GABAergic interneurons that correlated with the extent of cognitive deficits in aged mice. The current study demonstrates that enhancing GABA signaling by treating aged apoE4-KI mice with a GABAA receptor potentiator pentobarbital (PB) before and during behavioral tests rescued the cognitive deficits; but withdrawal of PB treatment for 2 weeks before the tests abolished the rescue, suggesting the importance of continuously enhancing GABA signaling. However, treating apoE4-KI mice during middle adulthood with PB for a short period of time prevented age-dependent hilar GABAergic interneuron decline and

  14. Classifying GABAergic interneurons with semi-supervised projected model-based clustering.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Guerra, Luis; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro; Bielza, Concha

    2015-09-01

    A recently introduced pragmatic scheme promises to be a useful catalog of interneuron names. We sought to automatically classify digitally reconstructed interneuronal morphologies according to this scheme. Simultaneously, we sought to discover possible subtypes of these types that might emerge during automatic classification (clustering). We also investigated which morphometric properties were most relevant for this classification. A set of 118 digitally reconstructed interneuronal morphologies classified into the common basket (CB), horse-tail (HT), large basket (LB), and Martinotti (MA) interneuron types by 42 of the world's leading neuroscientists, quantified by five simple morphometric properties of the axon and four of the dendrites. We labeled each neuron with the type most commonly assigned to it by the experts. We then removed this class information for each type separately, and applied semi-supervised clustering to those cells (keeping the others' cluster membership fixed), to assess separation from other types and look for the formation of new groups (subtypes). We performed this same experiment unlabeling the cells of two types at a time, and of half the cells of a single type at a time. The clustering model is a finite mixture of Gaussians which we adapted for the estimation of local (per-cluster) feature relevance. We performed the described experiments on three different subsets of the data, formed according to how many experts agreed on type membership: at least 18 experts (the full data set), at least 21 (73 neurons), and at least 26 (47 neurons). Interneurons with more reliable type labels were classified more accurately. We classified HT cells with 100% accuracy, MA cells with 73% accuracy, and CB and LB cells with 56% and 58% accuracy, respectively. We identified three subtypes of the MA type, one subtype of CB and LB types each, and no subtypes of HT (it was a single, homogeneous type). We got maximum (adapted) Silhouette width and ARI values of

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor controls functional differentiation and microcircuit formation of selectively isolated fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, Paul; Dobszay, Marton B; Sousa, Kyle M; Schulte, Gunnar; Mager, Peter P; Härtig, Wolfgang; Görcs, Tamás J; Zilberter, Yuri; Ernfors, Patrik; Harkany, Tibor

    2004-09-01

    GABAergic interneurons with high-frequency firing, fast-spiking (FS) cells, form synapses on perisomatic regions of principal cells in the neocortex and hippocampus to control the excitability of cortical networks. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for the differentiation of multiple interneuron subtypes and the formation of their synaptic contacts. Here, we examined whether BDNF, alone or in conjunction with sustained KCl-induced depolarization, drives functional FS cell differentiation and the formation of inhibitory microcircuits. Homogeneous FS cell cultures were established by target-specific isolation using the voltage-gated potassium channel 3.1b subunit as the selection marker. Isolated FS cells expressed parvalbumin, were surrounded by perineuronal nets, formed immature inhibitory connections and generated slow action potentials at 12 days in vitro. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoted FS cell differentiation by increasing the somatic diameter, dendritic branching and the frequency of action potential firing. In addition, BDNF treatment led to a significant up-regulation of synaptophysin and vesicular GABA transporter expression, components of the synaptic machinery critical for GABA release, which was paralleled by an increase in synaptic strength. Long-term membrane depolarization alone was detrimental to dendritic branching. However, we observed that BDNF and KCl exerted additive effects, as reflected by the significantly accelerated maturation of synaptic contacts and high discharge frequencies, and was required for the formation of reciprocal connections between FS cells. Our results show that BDNF, along with membrane depolarization, is critical for FS cells to establish inhibitory circuitries during corticogenesis.

  16. Hippocampal CA1 lacunosum-moleculare interneurons: modulation of monosynaptic GABAergic IPSCs by presynaptic GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Khazipov, R; Congar, P; Ben-Ari, Y

    1995-11-01

    1. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were employed to characterize monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in morphologically and electrophysiologically identified interneurons located in the stratum lacunosum moleculare, or near the border of the stratum radiatum (LM interneurons), in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices taken from 3- to 4-wk-old rats. Monosynaptic IPSCs, evoked in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX; 20 microM) and D-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoate (APV; 50 microM) were biphasic. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptor antagonist, bicuculline (20 microM), blocked the fast IPSC, and the slow IPSC was blocked by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP35348 (500 microM). 2. Monosynaptic IPSCs were evoked by electrical stimulation in several distant regions including the stratum radiatum, the stratum oriens, the stratum lacunosum-moleculare, and the molecular layer of dentate gyrus, suggesting an extensive network of inhibitory interneurons in the hippocampus. In paired recordings of CA1 interneurons and pyramidal cells, IPSCs were evoked by electrical stimulation of most of these distal regions with the exception of the molecular layer of dentate gyrus, which evoked an IPSC only in LM interneurons. 3. Frequent (> 0.1 Hz) stimulation depressed the evoked IPSCs. With a paired-pulse protocol, the second IPSC was depressed and the maximal depression (40-50%) was observed with an interstimulus interval of 100-200 ms. 4. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (1 microM) reduced the amplitude of evoked IPSCs and the paired-pulse depression of the second IPSC. The GABAB receptor antagonist CGP35348 (0.5-1 mM) had no significant effect on the amplitude of isolated IPSCs. However, CGP35348 reduced but did not fully block paired-pulse depression, suggesting that this depression is partly due to the activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors. 5. The paired-pulse depression depended on the level of

  17. Dissociation of CA3 pyramidal cells with attached, functional, identified mossy fiber and interneuronal boutons for studying glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Jesús Q; Reyes, Sebastián; Pérez-Guzmán, José A; Elías-Viñas, David; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2012-07-15

    Pyramidal cells of CA3 area receive glutamatergic signals from the mossy fibers (MFs), perforant path and collaterals of other pyramidal cells, as well as GABAergic inputs from interneurons. In hippocampal slices, an extracellular stimulation electrode is often used to activate the MFs, with the disadvantage of possibly activating fibers other than MFs. We set-up a preparation that allows the analysis of the glutamatergic input from identified, giant MF boutons as well as of GABAergic inputs from boutons of interneurons on single CA3 pyramidal cells. Mossy fiber boutons were labeled by exposing hippocampal slices to a zinc-reactive fluorescent dye, or by injecting a fluorescent dye in the granule cell layer and allowing its transport along the MFs to their terminals in CA3 area. After conducting an enzyme-free, mechanical dissociation of CA3 area, we obtained pyramidal cells containing fluorescent, giant MF boutons attached to their apical dendrites, as well as boutons of interneuronal origin. Whole cell recordings were then performed, whereby synaptic responses could be evoked by selective stimulation of the identified boutons. The synaptic currents evoked by stimulation of MF boutons, unlike those evoked by stimulation of interneuronal boutons, underwent strong frequency potentiation and were depressed by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, which are characteristics of transmission of MF origin. Combination of fluorophores can be used to label different tracts/boutons allowing the study of the different characteristics of neurotransmitter release from a variety of sources on single target cells.

  18. Rapid and slow chemical synaptic interactions of cholinergic projection neurons and GABAergic local interneurons in the insect antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ben; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2014-09-24

    The antennal lobe (AL) of insects constitutes the first synaptic relay and processing center of olfactory information, received from olfactory sensory neurons located on the antennae. Complex synaptic connectivity between olfactory neurons of the AL ultimately determines the spatial and temporal tuning profile of (output) projection neurons to odors. Here we used paired whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in the cockroach Periplaneta americana to characterize synaptic interactions between cholinergic uniglomerular projection neurons (uPNs) and GABAergic local interneurons (LNs), both of which are key components of the insect olfactory system. We found rapid, strong excitatory synaptic connections between uPNs and LNs. This rapid excitatory transmission was blocked by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor blocker mecamylamine. IPSPs, elicited by synaptic input from a presynaptic LN, were recorded in both uPNs and LNs. IPSPs were composed of both slow, sustained components and fast, transient components which were coincident with presynaptic action potentials. The fast IPSPs were blocked by the GABAA receptor chloride channel blocker picrotoxin, whereas the slow sustained IPSPs were blocked by the GABAB receptor blocker CGP-54626. This is the first study to directly show the predicted dual fast- and slow-inhibitory action of LNs, which was predicted to be key in shaping complex odor responses in the AL of insects. We also provide the first direct characterization of rapid postsynaptic potentials coincident with presynaptic spikes between olfactory processing neurons in the AL.

  19. Impact of single-site axonal GABAergic synaptic events on cerebellar interneuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla de San Martin, Javier; Jalil, Abdelali

    2015-01-01

    Axonal ionotropic receptors are present in a variety of neuronal types, and their function has largely been associated with the modulation of axonal activity and synaptic release. It is usually assumed that activation of axonal GABAARs comes from spillover, but in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) the GABA source is different: in these cells, GABA release activates presynaptic GABAA autoreceptors (autoRs) together with postsynaptic targets, producing an autoR-mediated synaptic event. The frequency of presynaptic, autoR-mediated miniature currents is twice that of their somatodendritic counterparts, suggesting that autoR-mediated responses have an important effect on interneuron activity. Here, we used local Ca2+ photolysis in MLI axons of juvenile rats to evoke GABA release from individual varicosities to study the activation of axonal autoRs in single release sites. Our data show that single-site autoR conductances are similar to postsynaptic dendritic conductances. In conditions of high [Cl−]i, autoR-mediated conductances range from 1 to 5 nS; this corresponds to ∼30–150 GABAA channels per presynaptic varicosity, a value close to the number of channels in postsynaptic densities. Voltage responses produced by the activation of autoRs in single varicosities are amplified by a Nav-dependent mechanism and propagate along the axon with a length constant of 91 µm. Immunolabeling determination of synapse location shows that on average, one third of the synapses produce autoR-mediated signals that are large enough to reach the axon initial segment. Finally, we show that single-site activation of presynaptic GABAA autoRs leads to an increase in MLI excitability and thus conveys a strong feedback signal that contributes to spiking activity. PMID:26621773

  20. Impact of single-site axonal GABAergic synaptic events on cerebellar interneuron activity.

    PubMed

    de San Martin, Javier Zorrilla; Jalil, Abdelali; Trigo, Federico F

    2015-12-01

    Axonal ionotropic receptors are present in a variety of neuronal types, and their function has largely been associated with the modulation of axonal activity and synaptic release. It is usually assumed that activation of axonal GABA(A)Rs comes from spillover, but in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) the GABA source is different: in these cells, GABA release activates presynaptic GABA(A) autoreceptors (autoRs) together with postsynaptic targets, producing an autoR-mediated synaptic event. The frequency of presynaptic, autoR-mediated miniature currents is twice that of their somatodendritic counterparts, suggesting that autoR-mediated responses have an important effect on interneuron activity. Here, we used local Ca(2+) photolysis in MLI axons of juvenile rats to evoke GABA release from individual varicosities to study the activation of axonal autoRs in single release sites. Our data show that single-site autoR conductances are similar to postsynaptic dendritic conductances. In conditions of high [Cl(-)](i), autoR-mediated conductances range from 1 to 5 nS; this corresponds to ∼30-150 GABA(A) channels per presynaptic varicosity, a value close to the number of channels in postsynaptic densities. Voltage responses produced by the activation of autoRs in single varicosities are amplified by a Na(v)-dependent mechanism and propagate along the axon with a length constant of 91 µm. Immunolabeling determination of synapse location shows that on average, one third of the synapses produce autoR-mediated signals that are large enough to reach the axon initial segment. Finally, we show that single-site activation of presynaptic GABA(A) autoRs leads to an increase in MLI excitability and thus conveys a strong feedback signal that contributes to spiking activity.

  1. Differentiation and Functional Incorporation of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived GABAergic Interneurons in the Dentate Gyrus of Mice with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Maisano, Xu; Litvina, Elizabeth; Tagliatela, Stephanie; Aaron, Gloster B.; Grabel, Laura B.; Naegele, Janice R.

    2012-01-01

    Cell therapies for neurological disorders require an extensive knowledge of disease-associated neuropathology and procedures for generating neurons for transplantation. In many patients with severe acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the dentate gyrus exhibits sclerosis and GABAergic interneuron degeneration. Mounting evidence suggests that therapeutic benefits can be obtained by transplanting fetal GABAergic progenitors into the dentate gyrus in rodents with TLE, but the scarcity of human fetal cells limits applicability in patient populations. By contrast, virtually limitless quantities of neural progenitors can be obtained from embryonic stem (ES) cells. ES cell-based therapies for neurological repair in TLE require evidence that the transplanted neurons integrate functionally and replace cell types that degenerate. To address these issues, we transplanted mouse ES cell-derived neural progenitors (ESNPs) with ventral forebrain identities into the hilus of the dentate gyrus of mice with TLE and evaluated graft differentiation, mossy fiber sprouting, cellular morphology and electrophysiological properties of the transplanted neurons. Additionally we compared electrophysiological properties of the transplanted neurons to endogenous hilar interneurons in mice without TLE. The majority of transplanted ESNPs differentiated into GABAergic interneuron subtypes expressing calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin or calretinin. Global suppression of mossy fiber sprouting was not observed, however, ESNP-derived neurons formed dense axonal arborizations in the inner molecular layer and throughout the hilus. Whole-cell hippocampal slice electrophysiological recordings and morphological analyses of the transplanted neurons identified five basic types; most with strong after-hyperpolarizations and smooth or sparsely spiny dendritic morphologies resembling endogenous hippocampal interneurons. Moreover, intracellular recordings of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic

  2. Short-Term Exposure to Enriched Environment in Adult Rats Restores MK-801-Induced Cognitive Deficits and GABAergic Interneuron Immunoreactivity Loss.

    PubMed

    Murueta-Goyena, Ane; Ortuzar, Naiara; Gargiulo, Pascual; Lafuente, José Vicente; Bengoetxea, Harkaitz

    2017-08-18

    Perinatal injections of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist in rodents emulate some cognitive impairments and neurochemical alterations, such as decreased GABAergic (gamma aminobutyric acid) interneuron immunoreactivity, also found in schizophrenia. These features are pervasive, and developing neuroprotective or neurorestorative strategies is of special interest. In this work, we aimed to investigate if a short exposure to enriched environment (EE) in early adulthood (P55-P73) was an effective strategy to improve cognitive dysfunction and to restore interneuron expression in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HPC). For that purpose, we administered MK-801 intraperitoneally to Long Evans rats from postnatal days 10 to 20. Twenty-four hours after the last injection, MK-801 produced a transient decrease in spontaneous motor activity and exploration, but those abnormalities were absent at P24 and P55. The open field test on P73 manifested that EE reduced anxiety-like behavior. In addition, MK-801-treated rats showed cognitive impairment in novel object recognition test that was reversed by EE. We quantified different interneuron populations based on their calcium-binding protein expression (parvalbumin, calretinin, and calbindin), glutamic acid decarboxylase 67, and neuronal nuclei-positive cells by means of unbiased stereology and found that EE enhanced interneuron immunoreactivity up to normal values in MK-801-treated rats. Our results demonstrate that a timely intervention with EE is a powerful tool to reverse long-lasting changes in cognition and neurochemical markers of interneurons in an animal model of schizophrenia.

  3. High level of mGluR7 in the presynaptic active zones of select populations of GABAergic terminals innervating interneurons in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, Peter; Dalezios, Yannis; Luján, Rafael; Roberts, J David B; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi

    2003-06-01

    The release of neurotransmitters is modulated by presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which show a highly selective expression and subcellular location in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Using immunocytochemistry, we investigated whether one of the receptors, mGluR7, whose level of expression is governed by the postsynaptic target, was present in GABAergic terminals and whether such terminals targeted particular cells. A total of 165 interneuron dendritic profiles receiving 466 synapses (82% mGluR7a-positive) were analysed. The presynaptic active zones of most GAD-(77%) or GABA-positive (94%) synaptic boutons on interneurons innervated by mGluR7a-enriched glutamatergic terminals (mGluR7a-decorated) were immunopositive for mGluR7a. GABAergic terminals on pyramidal cells and most other interneurons in str. oriens were mGluR7a-immunonegative. The mGluR7a-decorated cells were mostly somatostatin- and mGluR1alpha-immunopositive neurons in str. oriens and the alveus. Their GABAergic input mainly originated from VIP-positive terminals, 90% of which expressed high levels of mGluR7a in the presynaptic active zone. Parvalbumin-positive synaptic terminals were rare on mGluR7a-decorated cells, but on these neurons 73% of them were mGluR7a-immunopositive. Some type II synapses innervating interneurons were immunopositive for mGluR7b, as were some type I synapses. Because not all target cells of VIP-positive neurons are known it has not been possible to determine whether mGluR7 is expressed in a target-cell-specific manner in the terminals of single GABAergic cells. The activation of mGluR7 may decrease GABA release to mGluR7-decorated cells at times of high pyramidal cell activity, which elevates extracellular glutamate levels. Alternatively, the presynaptic receptor may be activated by as yet unidentified endogenous ligands released by the GABAergic terminals or the postsynaptic dendrites.

  4. Distinct nonuniform cable properties optimize rapid and efficient activation of fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Nörenberg, Anja; Hu, Hua; Vida, Imre; Bartos, Marlene; Jonas, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing basket cells (BCs) play a key role in feedforward and feedback inhibition in the hippocampus. However, the dendritic mechanisms underlying rapid interneuron recruitment have remained unclear. To quantitatively address this question, we developed detailed passive cable models of BCs in the dentate gyrus based on dual somatic or somatodendritic recordings and complete morphologic reconstructions. Both specific membrane capacitance and axial resistivity were comparable to those of pyramidal neurons, but the average somatodendritic specific membrane resistance (Rm) was substantially lower in BCs. Furthermore, Rm was markedly nonuniform, being lowest in soma and proximal dendrites, intermediate in distal dendrites, and highest in the axon. Thus, the somatodendritic gradient of Rm was the reverse of that in pyramidal neurons. Further computational analysis revealed that these unique cable properties accelerate the time course of synaptic potentials at the soma in response to fast inputs, while boosting the efficacy of slow distal inputs. These properties will facilitate both rapid phasic and efficient tonic activation of BCs in hippocampal microcircuits. PMID:20080772

  5. Distinct nonuniform cable properties optimize rapid and efficient activation of fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Nörenberg, Anja; Hu, Hua; Vida, Imre; Bartos, Marlene; Jonas, Peter

    2010-01-12

    Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing basket cells (BCs) play a key role in feedforward and feedback inhibition in the hippocampus. However, the dendritic mechanisms underlying rapid interneuron recruitment have remained unclear. To quantitatively address this question, we developed detailed passive cable models of BCs in the dentate gyrus based on dual somatic or somatodendritic recordings and complete morphologic reconstructions. Both specific membrane capacitance and axial resistivity were comparable to those of pyramidal neurons, but the average somatodendritic specific membrane resistance (R(m)) was substantially lower in BCs. Furthermore, R(m) was markedly nonuniform, being lowest in soma and proximal dendrites, intermediate in distal dendrites, and highest in the axon. Thus, the somatodendritic gradient of R(m) was the reverse of that in pyramidal neurons. Further computational analysis revealed that these unique cable properties accelerate the time course of synaptic potentials at the soma in response to fast inputs, while boosting the efficacy of slow distal inputs. These properties will facilitate both rapid phasic and efficient tonic activation of BCs in hippocampal microcircuits.

  6. NADPH diaphorase-positive neurons in the lizard hippocampus: a distinct subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Dávila, J C; Megías, M; Andreu, M J; Real, M A; Guirado, S

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed the distribution and light-microscopic features of the NADPH diaphorase-containing structures in the lizard hippocampus, likely to correspond to nitric oxide synthase-containing cells and fibers, and thus likely to release nitric oxide. We also studied co-localization of NADPH diaphorase with the neurotransmitter GABA, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, and the neuropeptide somatostatin, in order to examine whether putative nitric oxide-synthesizing neurons represent a different subpopulation of GABA cells, on which the authors recently reported in lizards. We also studied co-localization of NADPH diaphorase with parvalbumin or somatostatin in mice to ascertain whether the characteristics of this population in reptiles parallel the situation in mammals. Most of the positive NADPH diaphorase neurons were stained in a Golgi-like manner and were in the plexiform layers of the lizard hippocampus with morphologies ranging from bipolar to multipolar. Co-localization with GABA was 100%, and NADPH diaphorase-positive neurons in the lizard hippocampus did not contain parvalbumin or somatostatin. The results indicate that putative nitric oxide-synthesizing neurons represent a distinct subpopulation of GABA interneurons in the lizard hippocampus. Two different types of fibers were described in the plexiform layers: one type bearing thick varicosities, and the other thinner ones. We discuss the possibility that at least part of the positive fibers arise from a hypothalamic aminergic nucleus contacting the third ventricle, the periventricular hypothalamic organ. Most radial glia were stained almost completely and formed typical end-feet both at the pia and around capillaries. The results of this study confirm that the capacity for synthesizing nitric oxide is linked to a determined set of neuronal markers depending on the specific brain region, and they provide new resemblances between hippocampal regions in different classes of vertebrates.

  7. Antiallodynic effect of tianeptine via modulation of the 5-HT7 receptor of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord of neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai; Heo, Bong Ha; Kim, Woong Mo; Kim, Yong Chul; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2015-06-26

    Although tianeptine, an atypical antidepressant has been reported to have antinociceptive effects, the mode of action is different from that of tricyclic antidepressants despite structural similarities. We examined the antiallodynic effect of intrathecal tianeptine in neuropathic pain rats and determined the involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 (5-HT7) receptor of the GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord. Neuropathic pain was induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL). After observation of the effect from intrathecal tianeptine, a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (SB-269970) was administered intrathecally 10 min before delivery of tianeptine, to determine the contribution of spinal 5-HT7 receptor on the activity of tianeptine. GAD expression and GABA concentrations were assessed. Intrathecal tianeptine dose-dependently attenuated mechanical allodynia in SNL rats. Pre-treatment with intrathecal SB-269970 reversed the antiallodynic effect of tianeptine. Both GAD65 expression and the GABA concentration in the spinal cord were decreased in neuropathic rats but were increased by tianeptine. Additionally, 5-HT7 receptor and GAD65 were co-localized in the spinal cord. Intrathecal tianeptine reduces neuropathic pain. 5-HT7 receptor of the GABAergic interneurons together with GAD65 plays a role in the activity of tianeptine at the spinal cord level.

  8. Nicotine-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity at CA3-CA1 synapses requires GABAergic interneurons in adult anti-NGF mice.

    PubMed

    Rosato-Siri, Marcelo; Cattaneo, Antonino; Cherubini, Enrico

    2006-10-15

    The hippocampus, a key structure for learning and memory processes, receives an important cholinergic innervation and is densely packed with a variety of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) localized on principal cells and interneurons. Activation of these receptors by nicotine or endogenously released acetylcholine enhances activity-dependent synaptic plasticity processes. Deficits in the cholinergic system produce impairment of cognitive functions that are particularly relevant during senescence and in age-related neurodegenerative pathologies. In particular, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a selective loss of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and nAChRs in particular regions controlling memory processes such as the cortex and the hippocampus. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials were recorded in order to examine whether nicotine was able to regulate induction of long-term potentiation at CA3-CA1 synapses in hippocampal slices from adult anti-NGF transgenic mice (AD 11), a comprehensive animal model of AD, in which cholinergic deficits due to nerve growth factor depletion are accompanied by progressive Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration. Both AD 11 and wild-type (WT) mice exhibited short- and long-lasting synaptic plasticity processes that were boosted by nicotine. The effects of nicotine on WT and AD 11 mice were mediated by both alpha7- and beta2-containing nAChRs. In the presence of GABA(A) receptor antagonists, nicotine failed to boost synaptic plasticity in AD 11 but not in WT mice, indicating that in anti-NGF transgenic mice GABAergic interneurons are able to compensate for the deficit in cholinergic modulation of glutamatergic transmission. This compensation may occur at different levels and may involve the reorganization of the GABAergic circuit. However, patch-clamp whole-cell recordings from principal cells failed to reveal any change in spontaneous release of GABA following pressure application of nicotine to nearby

  9. Fewer GABAergic interneurons, heightened anxiety and decreased high-frequency electroencephalogram components in Bronx waltzer mice, a model of hereditary deafness.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshiki; Inoue, Yuki; Izumi, Hitomi; Kaga, Makiko; Inagaki, Masumi; Goto, Yu-ichi

    2011-02-10

    The homozygous Bronx waltzer mutation (bv/bv) results in the degeneration of most but not all of the primary auditory receptors, the inner hair cells and their afferent neurons, and leads to perceptive deafness. However, the influence of the mutation on the central nervous system (CNS) remains largely unclear. In this study, we have conducted behavioral, morphological and electrophysiological investigations to clarify the CNS dysfunction in bv/bv mice. These mutant mice exhibited heightened levels of anxiety with normal levels of motor activity. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a significant reduction in parvalbumin-containing GABAergic interneurons in the anterior cingulate, somatosensory and auditory cortices of bv/bv mice. The current results suggest that interneuron development may be disrupted in the bv/bv cerebrum. Moreover, the high-frequency electroencephalogram components of the cortical activity, including the frequency range containing high gamma, were markedly decreased in bv/bv mice compared with controls, probably indicating a disturbance in cortical inhibitory function. Together, these results suggest that the cortical development of interneurons and their electrophysiological profiles are altered in bv/bv mice. We propose that these novel phenotypes identified in bv/bv mice provide new perspectives on the basic neuronal mechanisms of developmental disorders.

  10. Parvalbumin interneurons mediate neuronal circuitry-neurogenesis coupling in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Song, Juan; Sun, Jiaqi; Moss, Jonathan; Wen, Zhexing; Sun, Gerald J; Hsu, Derek; Zhong, Chun; Davoudi, Heydar; Christian, Kimberly M; Toni, Nicolas; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2013-12-01

    Using immunohistology, electron microscopy, electrophysiology and optogenetics, we found that proliferating adult mouse hippocampal neural precursors received immature GABAergic synaptic inputs from parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Recently shown to suppress adult quiescent neural stem cell activation, parvalbumin interneuron activation promoted newborn neuronal progeny survival and development. Our results suggest a niche mechanism involving parvalbumin interneurons that couples local circuit activity to the diametric regulation of two critical early phases of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  11. Early-life lead exposure recapitulates the selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons and subcortical dopamine system hyperactivity present in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, K H; Ruby, K N; Soares, B D; McGlothan, J L; Liu, X; Guilarte, T R

    2015-03-10

    Environmental factors have been associated with psychiatric disorders and recent epidemiological studies suggest an association between prenatal lead (Pb(2+)) exposure and schizophrenia (SZ). Pb(2+) is a potent antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and converging evidence indicates that NMDAR hypofunction has a key role in the pathophysiology of SZ. The glutamatergic hypothesis of SZ posits that NMDAR hypofunction results in the loss of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons (PVGI) in the brain. Loss of PVGI inhibitory control to pyramidal cells alters the excitatory drive to midbrain dopamine neurons increasing subcortical dopaminergic activity. We hypothesized that if Pb(2+) exposure in early life is an environmental risk factor for SZ, it should recapitulate the loss of PVGI and reproduce subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. We report that on postnatal day 50 (PN50), adolescence rats chronically exposed to Pb(2+) from gestation through adolescence exhibit loss of PVGI in SZ-relevant brain regions. PV and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 kDa (GAD67) protein were significantly decreased in Pb(2+) exposed rats with no apparent change in calretinin or calbindin protein levels suggesting a selective effect on the PV phenotype of GABAergic interneurons. We also show that Pb(2+) animals exhibit a heightened locomotor response to cocaine and express significantly higher levels of dopamine metabolites and D2-dopamine receptors relative to controls indicative of subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. Our results show that developmental Pb(2+) exposure reproduces specific neuropathology and functional dopamine system changes present in SZ. We propose that exposure to environmental toxins that produce NMDAR hypofunction during critical periods of brain development may contribute significantly to the etiology of mental disorders.

  12. Neural activity and neurotransmission regulate the maturation of the innervation field of cortical GABAergic interneurons in an age-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Baho, Elie; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2012-01-18

    Neural activity guides the patterning of neuron synaptic territory in the developing nervous system. Evidence supporting this hypothesis comes from numerous studies on projection neurons in neuromuscular and visual systems. It is unknown whether the innervation field of GABAergic interneurons, which forms local dense innervations, follows similar rules. Cortical basket cells innervate hundreds of pyramidal cell somata and proximal dendrites. Thanks to this connectivity pattern, they can tightly control neural excitability and synchronization. Here we show that reducing excitation, and thus neurotransmitter release, in mouse cortical single basket cells in slice cultures decreases the number of innervated cells without changing the pattern of perisomatic innervation, both at the peak and after the proliferation phase of perisomatic synapse formation. Conversely, suppressing neurotransmitter release in single basket cells can have completely opposite effects depending on the developmental stage. Our results reveal a remarkably specific and age-dependent role of neural activity and neurotransmission levels in the establishment of the synaptic territory of cortical GABAergic cells.

  13. Major amyloid-β-degrading enzymes, endothelin-converting enzyme-2 and neprilysin, are expressed by distinct populations of GABAergic interneurons in hippocampus and neocortex.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Quinto, Javier; Eckman, Christopher B; Eckman, Elizabeth A

    2016-12-01

    Impaired clearance of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) has been postulated to significantly contribute to the amyloid accumulation typical of Alzheimer's disease. Among the enzymes known to degrade Aβ in vivo are endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE)-1, ECE-2, and neprilysin (NEP), and evidence suggests that they regulate independent pools of Aβ that may be functionally significant. To better understand the differential regulation of Aβ concentration by its physiological degrading enzymes, we characterized the cell and region-specific expression pattern of ECE-1, ECE-2, and NEP by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in brain areas relevant to Alzheimer's disease. In contrast to the broader distribution of ECE-1, ECE-2 and NEP were found enriched in GABAergic neurons. ECE-2 was majorly expressed by somatostatin-expressing interneurons and was active in isolated synaptosomes. NEP messenger RNA was found mainly in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, with NEP protein localized to perisomatic parvalbuminergic synapses. The identification of somatostatinergic and parvalbuminergic synapses as hubs for Aβ degradation is consistent with the possibility that Aβ may have a physiological function related to the regulation of inhibitory signaling.

  14. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Promotes Clustering and Activation of EphA3 Receptors in GABAergic Interneurons to Induce Ras Homolog Gene Family, Member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK)-mediated Growth Cone Collapse.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Chelsea S; Kümper, Maike; Temple, Brenda S; Maness, Patricia F

    2016-12-16

    Establishment of a proper balance of excitatory and inhibitory connectivity is achieved during development of cortical networks and adjusted through synaptic plasticity. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA3 regulate the perisomatic synapse density of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons in the mouse frontal cortex through ephrin-A5-induced growth cone collapse. In this study, it was demonstrated that binding of NCAM and EphA3 occurred between the NCAM Ig2 domain and EphA3 cysteine-rich domain (CRD). The binding interface was further refined through molecular modeling and mutagenesis and shown to be comprised of complementary charged residues in the NCAM Ig2 domain (Arg-156 and Lys-162) and the EphA3 CRD (Glu-248 and Glu-264). Ephrin-A5 induced co-clustering of surface-bound NCAM and EphA3 in GABAergic cortical interneurons in culture. Receptor clustering was impaired by a charge reversal mutation that disrupted NCAM/EphA3 association, emphasizing the importance of the NCAM/EphA3 binding interface for cluster formation. NCAM enhanced ephrin-A5-induced EphA3 autophosphorylation and activation of RhoA GTPase, indicating a role for NCAM in activating EphA3 signaling through clustering. NCAM-mediated clustering of EphA3 was essential for ephrin-A5-induced growth cone collapse in cortical GABAergic interneurons, and RhoA and a principal effector, Rho-associated protein kinase, mediated the collapse response. This study delineates a mechanism in which NCAM promotes ephrin-A5-dependent clustering of EphA3 through interaction of the NCAM Ig2 domain and the EphA3 CRD, stimulating EphA3 autophosphorylation and RhoA signaling necessary for growth cone repulsion in GABAergic interneurons in vitro, which may extend to remodeling of axonal terminals of interneurons in vivo.

  15. Sleep and movement differentiates actions of two types of somatostatin-expressing GABAergic interneuron in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Katona, Linda; Lapray, Damien; Viney, Tim J; Oulhaj, Abderrahim; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Micklem, Benjamin R; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter

    2014-05-21

    Neuropeptides acting on pre- and postsynaptic receptors are coreleased with GABA by interneurons including bistratified and O-LM cells, both expressing somatostatin but innervating segregated dendritic domains of pyramidal cells. Neuropeptide release requires high-frequency action potentials, but the firing patterns of most peptide/GABA-releasing interneurons during behavior are unknown. We show that behavioral and network states differentiate the activities of bistratified and O-LM cells in freely moving rats. Bistratified cells fire at higher rates during sleep than O-LM cells and, unlike O-LM cells, strongly increase spiking during sharp wave-associated ripples (SWRs). In contrast, O-LM interneurons decrease firing during sleep relative to awake states and are mostly inhibited during SWRs. During movement, both cell types fire cooperatively at the troughs of theta oscillations but with different frequencies. Somatostatin and GABA are differentially released to distinct dendritic zones of CA1 pyramidal cells during sleep and wakefulness to coordinate segregated glutamatergic inputs from entorhinal cortex and CA3.

  16. Enhanced GABAergic Inputs Contribute to Functional Alterations of Cholinergic Interneurons in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Holley, Sandra M; Joshi, Prasad R; Parievsky, Anna; Galvan, Laurie; Chen, Jane Y; Fisher, Yvette E; Huynh, My N; Cepeda, Carlos; Levine, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    In Huntington's disease (HD), a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, striatal medium-sized spiny neurons undergo degenerative changes. In contrast, large cholinergic interneurons (LCIs) are relatively spared. However, their ability to release acetylcholine (ACh) is impaired. The present experiments examined morphological and electrophysiological properties of LCIs in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. R6/2 mice show a severe, rapidly progressing phenotype. Immunocytochemical analysis of choline acetyltransferase-positive striatal neurons showed that, although the total number of cells was not changed, somatic areas were significantly smaller in symptomatic R6/2 mice compared to wildtype (WT) littermates, For electrophysiology, brain slices were obtained from presymptomatic (3-4 weeks) and symptomatic (>8 weeks) R6/2 mice and their WT littermates. Striatal LCIs were identified by somatic size and spontaneous action potential firing in the cell-attached mode. Passive and active membrane properties of LCIs were similar in presymptomatic R6/2 and WT mice. In contrast, LCIs from symptomatic R6/2 animals displayed smaller membrane capacitance and higher input resistance, consistent with reduced somatic size. In addition, more LCIs from symptomatic mice displayed irregular firing patterns and bursts of action potentials. They also displayed a higher frequency of spontaneous GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and larger amplitude of electrically evoked IPSCs. Selective optogenetic stimulation of somatostatin- but not parvalbumin-containing interneurons also evoked larger amplitude IPSCs in LCIs from R6/2 mice. In contrast, glutamatergic spontaneous or evoked postsynaptic currents were not affected. Morphological and electrophysiological alterations, in conjunction with the presence of mutant huntingtin in LCIs, could explain impaired ACh release in HD mouse models.

  17. Epigenetic modifications of GABAergic interneurons are associated with the schizophrenia-like phenotype induced by prenatal stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Matrisciano, Francesco; Tueting, Patricia; Dalal, Ishani; Kadriu, Bashkim; Grayson, Dennis R; Davis, John M; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    Human studies suggest that a variety of prenatal stressors are related to high risk for cognitive and behavioral abnormalities associated with psychiatric illness (Markham and Koenig, 2011). Recently, a downregulation in the expression of GABAergic genes (i.e., glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 and reelin) associated with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) overexpression in GABAergic neurons has been regarded as a characteristic phenotypic component of the neuropathology of psychotic disorders (Guidotti et al., 2011). Here, we characterized mice exposed to prenatal restraint stress (PRS) in order to study neurochemical and behavioral abnormalities related to development of schizophrenia in the adult. Offspring born from non-stressed mothers (control mice) showed high levels of DNMT1 and 3a mRNA expression in the frontal cortex at birth, but these levels progressively decreased at post-natal days (PND) 7, 14, and 60. Offspring born from stressed mothers (PRS mice) showed increased levels of DNMTs compared to controls at all time-points studied including at birth and at PND 60. Using GAD67-GFP transgenic mice, we established that, in both control and PRS mice, high levels of DNMT1 and 3a were preferentially expressed in GABAergic neurons of frontal cortex and hippocampus. Importantly, the overexpression of DNMT in GABAergic neurons was associated with a decrease in reelin and GAD67 expression in PRS mice in early and adult life. PRS mice also showed an increased binding of DNMT1 and MeCP2, and an increase in 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in specific CpG-rich regions of the reelin and GAD67 promoters. Thus, the epigenetic changes in PRS mice are similar to changes observed in the post-mortem brains of psychiatric patients. Behaviorally, adult PRS mice showed hyperactivity and deficits in social interaction, prepulse inhibition, and fear conditioning that were corrected by administration of valproic acid (a histone deacetylase inhibitor) or clozapine (an

  18. Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2) promotes BDNF secretion and is critical for the development of GABAergic interneuron network.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Yo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Nakao, Kazuhito; Katoh-Semba, Ritsuko; Kinameri, Emi; Furuya, Asako; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Hirase, Hajime; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2011-01-04

    Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2) is a dense-core vesicle-associated protein that is involved in the secretion of BDNF. BDNF has a pivotal role in neuronal survival and development, including the development of inhibitory neurons and their circuits. However, how CAPS2 affects BDNF secretion and its biological significance in inhibitory neurons are largely unknown. Here we reveal the role of CAPS2 in the regulated secretion of BDNF and show the effect of CAPS2 on the development of hippocampal GABAergic systems. We show that CAPS2 is colocalized with BDNF, both synaptically and extrasynaptically in axons of hippocampal neurons. Overexpression of exogenous CAPS2 in hippocampal neurons of CAPS2-KO mice enhanced depolarization-induced BDNF exocytosis events in terms of kinetics, frequency, and amplitude. We also show that in the CAPS2-KO hippocampus, BDNF secretion is reduced, and GABAergic systems are impaired, including a decreased number of GABAergic neurons and their synapses, a decreased number of synaptic vesicles in inhibitory synapses, and a reduced frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Conversely, excitatory neurons in the CAPS2-KO hippocampus were largely unaffected with respect to field excitatory postsynaptic potentials, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, and synapse number and morphology. Moreover, CAPS2-KO mice exhibited several GABA system-associated deficits, including reduced late-phase long-term potentiation at CA3-CA1 synapses, decreased hippocampal theta oscillation frequency, and increased anxiety-like behavior. Collectively, these results suggest that CAPS2 promotes activity-dependent BDNF secretion during the postnatal period that is critical for the development of hippocampal GABAergic networks.

  19. Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2) promotes BDNF secretion and is critical for the development of GABAergic interneuron network

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Yo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Nakao, Kazuhito; Katoh-Semba, Ritsuko; Kinameri, Emi; Furuya, Asako; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Hirase, Hajime; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2) is a dense-core vesicle-associated protein that is involved in the secretion of BDNF. BDNF has a pivotal role in neuronal survival and development, including the development of inhibitory neurons and their circuits. However, how CAPS2 affects BDNF secretion and its biological significance in inhibitory neurons are largely unknown. Here we reveal the role of CAPS2 in the regulated secretion of BDNF and show the effect of CAPS2 on the development of hippocampal GABAergic systems. We show that CAPS2 is colocalized with BDNF, both synaptically and extrasynaptically in axons of hippocampal neurons. Overexpression of exogenous CAPS2 in hippocampal neurons of CAPS2-KO mice enhanced depolarization-induced BDNF exocytosis events in terms of kinetics, frequency, and amplitude. We also show that in the CAPS2-KO hippocampus, BDNF secretion is reduced, and GABAergic systems are impaired, including a decreased number of GABAergic neurons and their synapses, a decreased number of synaptic vesicles in inhibitory synapses, and a reduced frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Conversely, excitatory neurons in the CAPS2-KO hippocampus were largely unaffected with respect to field excitatory postsynaptic potentials, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, and synapse number and morphology. Moreover, CAPS2-KO mice exhibited several GABA system-associated deficits, including reduced late-phase long-term potentiation at CA3–CA1 synapses, decreased hippocampal theta oscillation frequency, and increased anxiety-like behavior. Collectively, these results suggest that CAPS2 promotes activity-dependent BDNF secretion during the postnatal period that is critical for the development of hippocampal GABAergic networks. PMID:21173225

  20. Kv3.1/Kv3.2 channel positive modulators enable faster activating kinetics and increase firing frequency in fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Boddum, Kim; Hougaard, Charlotte; Xiao-Ying Lin, Julie; von Schoubye, Nadia Lybøl; Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas

    2017-02-24

    Due to their fast kinetic properties, Kv3.1 voltage gated potassium channels are important in setting and controlling firing frequency in neurons and pivotal in generating high frequency firing of interneurons. Pharmacological activation of Kv3.1 channels may possess therapeutic potential for treatment of epilepsy, hearing disorders, schizophrenia and cognitive impairments. Here we thoroughly investigate the selectivity and positive modulation of the two small molecules, EX15 and RE01, on Kv3 channels. Selectivity studies, conducted in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirmed a positive modulatory effect of the two compounds on Kv3.1 and to a minor extent on Kv3.2 channels. RE01 had no effect on the Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 channels, whereas EX15 had an inhibitory impact on the Kv3.4 mediated current. Voltage-clamp experiments in monoclonal hKv3.1b/HEK293 cells (34 °C) revealed that the two compounds indeed induced larger currents and faster activation kinetics. They also decrease the speed of deactivation and shifted the voltage dependence of activation, to a more negative activation threshold. Application of action potential clamping and repetitive stimulation protocols of hKv3.1b expressing HEK293 cells revealed that EX15 and RE01 significantly increased peak amplitude, half width and decay time of Kv3.1 mediated currents, even during high-frequency action potential clamping (250 Hz). In rat hippocampal slices, EX15 and RE01 increased neuronal excitability in fast-spiking interneurons in dentate gyrus. Action potential frequency was prominently increased at minor depolarizing steps, whereas more marginal effects of EX15 and RE01 were observed after stronger depolarizations. In conclusion, our results suggest that EX15 and RE01 positive modulation of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 currents facilitate increased firing frequency in fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons.

  1. Similar distribution changes of GABAergic interneuron subpopulations in contrast to the different impact on neurogenesis between developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in rats.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Ayako; Akane, Hirotoshi; Ohishi, Takumi; Wang, Liyun; Morita, Reiko; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2012-10-01

    Hypothyroidism affects neurogenesis. The present study was performed to clarify the sensitivity of neurogenesis-related cellular responses in the hippocampal dentate gyrus between developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism. An exposure study of methimazole (MMI) as an anti-thyroid agent at 0, 50, 200 ppm in the drinking water was performed using pregnant rats from gestation day 10 to postnatal day (PND) 21 (developmental hypothyroidism) and adult male rats by setting an identical exposure period from PND 46 through to PND 77 (adult-stage hypothyroidism). Offspring with developmental hypothyroidism were killed at PND 21 or PND 77, and animals with adult-stage hypothyroidism were killed at PND 77. Proliferation and apoptosis were unchanged in the dentate subgranular zone by either developmental or adult-stage hypothyroidism. With regard to precursor granule cells, a sustained reduction of paired box 6-positive stem or early progenitor cells and a transient reduction of doublecortin-positive late-stage progenitor cells were observed after developmental hypothyroidism with MMI at 50 and 200 ppm. These cells were unchanged by adult-stage hypothyroidism. With regard to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) ergic interneuron subpopulations in the dentate hilus, the number of parvalbumin-positive cells was decreased and the number of calretinin-positive cells was increased after both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism with MMI at 50 and 200 ppm. Fluctuations in GABAergic interneuron numbers with developmental hypothyroidism continued through to PND 77 with 200 ppm MMI. Considering the roles of GABAergic interneuron subpopulations in neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation, subpopulation changes in GABAergic interneurons by hypothyroidism may be the signature of aberrant neurogenesis even at the adult stage.

  2. Deletion of Dlx1 results in reduced glutamatergic input to hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel L; Howard, MacKenzie A; Stanco, Amelia; Rubenstein, John L R; Baraban, Scott C

    2011-05-01

    Dlx transcription factors are important in the differentiation of GABAergic interneurons. In mice lacking Dlx1, early steps in interneuron development appear normal. Beginning at ∼ 1 mo of age, primarily dendrite-innervating interneuron subtypes begin to undergo apoptosis in Dlx1(-/-) mice; this is accompanied by a reduction in GABAergic transmission and late-onset epilepsy. The reported reduction of synaptic inhibition is greater than might be expected given that interneuron loss is relatively modest in Dlx1(-/-) mice. Here we report that voltage-clamp recordings of CA1 interneurons in hippocampal slices prepared from Dlx1(-/-) animals older than postnatal day 30 (>P30) revealed a significant reduction in excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) amplitude. No changes in EPSCs onto interneurons were observed in cells recorded from younger animals (P9-12). Current-clamp recordings from interneurons at these early postnatal ages showed that interneurons in Dlx1(-/-) mutants were immature and more excitable, although membrane properties normalized by P30. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-mediated nick-end labeling, caspase-3, and NeuN staining did not reveal frank cell damage or loss in area CA3 of hippocampal sections from adult Dlx1(-/-) mice. Delayed interneuron maturation may lead to interneuron hyperexcitability, followed by a compensatory reduction in the strength of excitatory transmission onto interneurons. This reduced excitation onto surviving interneurons, coupled with the loss of a significant fraction of GABAergic inputs to excitatory neurons starting at P30, may underlie cortical dysrhythmia and seizures previously observed in adult Dlx1(-/-) mice.

  3. Parvalbumin, somatostatin and cholecystokinin as chemical markers for specific GABAergic interneuron types in the rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kondo, Satoru

    2002-01-01

    It remains to be clarified how many classes of GABAergic nonpyramidal cells exist in the cortical circuit. We have divided GABA cells in the rat frontal cortex into 3 groups, based on their firing characteristics: fast-spiking (FS) cells, late-spiking (LS) cells, and non-FS cells. Expression of calcium-binding proteins and peptides could be shown in separate groups of GABA cells in layers II/III and V of the frontal cortex: (1) parvalbumin cells, (2) somatostatin cells, (3) calretinin and/or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) cells [partially positive for cholecystokinin (CCK)] and (4) large CCK cells (almost negative for VIP/calretinin). Combining the physiological and chemical properties of morphologically diverse nonpyramidal cells allows division into several groups, including FS basket cells containing parvalbumin, non-FS somatostatin Martinotti cells with ascending axonal arbors, and non-FS large basket cells positive for CCK. These subtypes show characteristic spatial distributions of axon collaterals and the innervation tendency of postsynaptic elements. With synchronized activity induced by cortical excitatory or inhibitory circuits, firing patterns were also found to differ. Subtype-selective occurrence of electrical coupling, finding for potassium channel Kv3.1 proteins, and cholinergic and serotonergic modulation supports our tentative classification. To clarify the functional architecture in the frontal cortex, it is important to reveal the connectional characteristics of GABA cell subtypes and determine whether they are similar to those in other cortical regions.

  4. Phenotype-dependent Ca(2+) dynamics in single boutons of various anatomically identified GABAergic interneurons in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Tibor; Kisfali, Máté; Lendvai, Balázs; Sylvester Vizi, Elek

    2016-02-01

    Interneurons (INs) of the hippocampus exert versatile inhibition on pyramidal cells by silencing the network at different oscillation frequencies. Although IN discharge can phase-lock to various rhythms in the hippocampus, under high-frequency axon firing, the boutons may not be able to follow the fast activity. Here, we studied Ca(2+) responses to action potentials (APs) in single boutons using combined two-photon microscopy and patch clamp electrophysiology in three types of INs: non-fast-spiking (NFS) neurons showing cannabinoid 1 receptor labelling and dendrite targeting, fast-spiking partially parvalbumin-positive cells synapsing with dendrites (DFS), and parvalbumin-positive cells with perisomatic innervation (PFS). The increase in [Ca(2+) ]i from AP trains was substantially higher in NFS boutons than in DFS or PFS boutons. The decay of bouton Ca(2+) responses was markedly faster in DFS and PFS cells compared with NFS neurons. The bouton-to-bouton variability of AP-evoked Ca(2+) transients in the same axon was surprisingly low in each cell type. Importantly, local responses were saturated after shorter trains of APs in NFS cells than in PFS cells. This feature of fast-spiking neurons might allow them to follow higher-frequency gamma oscillations for a longer time than NFS cells. The function of NFS boutons may better support asynchronous GABA release. In conclusion, we demonstrate several neuron-specific Ca(2+) transients in boutons of NFS, PFS and DFS neurons, which may serve differential functions in hippocampal networks.

  5. Irreversible loss of a subpopulation of cortical interneurons in the absence of glutamatergic network activity.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Ana Dolabela; Opitz, Thoralf; Voigt, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    In the cerebral cortex of mammals, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons represent 15-25% of all neurons, depending on the species and area being examined. Because converging evidence suggests that activity may play an important role in the neuritic maturation and synaptic function of GABAergic neurons, it is feasible that activity plays a role in the regulation of the proportion of GABAergic neurons. Here we provide direct evidence that early in cortical development activity blockade may deplete the network of a subpopulation of GABA immunoreactive neurons characterized by their small size and late generation in vitro. In a period of time coinciding with the emergence of synchronous network activity, the survival and morphological differentiation of GABAergic neurons was influenced by long-term blockade of synaptic activity. While GABA(A) receptor antagonists had a minor promoting effect on interneuronal survival during the second week in vitro, antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors strongly impaired survival and differentiation of immature GABAergic interneurons. Interneuronal loss was more severe when N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors were blocked than after blockade of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptors. The decrease in the density of GABAergic neurons was irreversible, but could be prevented by the simultaneous addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These results suggest that there is a narrow time window during neocortical development when glutamatergic activity, and specially NMDA receptor stimulation, is crucial to assure survival and maturation of a subpopulation of late developing GABAergic interneurons.

  6. Proteomic pathway analysis of the hippocampus in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder implicates 14-3-3 signaling, aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling, and glucose metabolism: potential roles in GABAergic interneuron pathology.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Klaus Oliver; Föcking, Melanie; Cotter, David R

    2015-09-01

    Neuropathological changes of the hippocampus have been associated with psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Recent work has particularly implicated hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in the pathophysiology of these diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying structural and cellular hippocampal pathology remain poorly understood. We used data from comprehensive difference-in-gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) investigations of postmortem human hippocampus of people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, covering the acidic (isoelectric point (pI) between pH4 and 7) and, separately, the basic (pI between pH6 and 11) sub-proteome, for Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of implicated protein networks and pathways. Comparing disease and control cases, we identified 58 unique differentially expressed proteins in schizophrenia, and 70 differentially expressed proteins in bipolar disorder, using mass spectrometry. IPA implicated, most prominently, 14-3-3 and aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in schizophrenia, and gluconeogenesis/glycolysis in bipolar disorder. Both disorders were characterized by alterations of proteins involved in the oxidative stress response, mitochondrial function, and protein-endocytosis, -trafficking, -degradation, and -ubiquitination. These findings are interpreted with a focus on GABAergic interneuron pathology in the hippocampus.

  7. Impaired action potential initiation in GABAergic interneurons causes hyperexcitable networks in an epileptic mouse model carrying a human Na(V)1.1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Hedrich, Ulrike B S; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz; Mantegazza, Massimo; Lerche, Holger

    2014-11-05

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na(+) channels in interneurons and persistent Na(+) currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca(2+) imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414874-16$15.00/0.

  8. Impaired Action Potential Initiation in GABAergic Interneurons Causes Hyperexcitable Networks in an Epileptic Mouse Model Carrying a Human NaV1.1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hedrich, Ulrike B.S.; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na+ channels in interneurons and persistent Na+ currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca2+ imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. PMID:25378155

  9. Loss of Dopamine D2 Receptors Increases Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Disruption to dopamine homeostasis during brain development has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. Inappropriate expression or activity of GABAergic interneurons are common features of many of these disorders. We discovered a persistent upregulation of GAD67+ and parvalbumin+ neurons within the anterior cingulate cortex of dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice, while other GABAergic interneuron markers were unaffected. Interneuron distribution and number were not altered in the striatum or in the dopamine-poor somatosensory cortex. The changes were already present by postnatal day 14, indicating a developmental etiology. D2eGFP BAC transgenic mice demonstrated the presence of D2 receptor expression within a subset of parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons, suggesting the possibility of a direct cellular mechanism through which D2 receptor stimulation regulates interneuron differentiation or survival. D2 receptor knockout mice also exhibited decreased depressive-like behavior compared with wild-type controls in the tail suspension test. These data indicate that dopamine signaling modulates interneuron number and emotional behavior and that developmental D2 receptor loss or blockade could reveal a potential mechanism for the prodromal basis of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25393953

  10. Loss of dopamine D2 receptors increases parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Graham, Devon L; Durai, Heather H; Garden, Jamie D; Cohen, Evan L; Echevarria, Franklin D; Stanwood, Gregg D

    2015-02-18

    Disruption to dopamine homeostasis during brain development has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. Inappropriate expression or activity of GABAergic interneurons are common features of many of these disorders. We discovered a persistent upregulation of GAD67+ and parvalbumin+ neurons within the anterior cingulate cortex of dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice, while other GABAergic interneuron markers were unaffected. Interneuron distribution and number were not altered in the striatum or in the dopamine-poor somatosensory cortex. The changes were already present by postnatal day 14, indicating a developmental etiology. D2eGFP BAC transgenic mice demonstrated the presence of D2 receptor expression within a subset of parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons, suggesting the possibility of a direct cellular mechanism through which D2 receptor stimulation regulates interneuron differentiation or survival. D2 receptor knockout mice also exhibited decreased depressive-like behavior compared with wild-type controls in the tail suspension test. These data indicate that dopamine signaling modulates interneuron number and emotional behavior and that developmental D2 receptor loss or blockade could reveal a potential mechanism for the prodromal basis of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  11. Subcortical origins of human and monkey neocortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tong; Wang, Congmin; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Xing; Tian, Miao; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Yue; Li, Jiwen; Liu, Zhidong; Cai, Yuqun; Liu, Fang; You, Yan; Chen, Chao; Campbell, Kenneth; Song, Hongjun; Ma, Lan; Rubenstein, John L; Yang, Zhengang

    2013-11-01

    Cortical GABAergic inhibitory interneurons have crucial roles in the development and function of the cerebral cortex. In rodents, nearly all neocortical interneurons are generated from the subcortical ganglionic eminences. In humans and nonhuman primates, however, the developmental origin of neocortical GABAergic interneurons remains unclear. Here we show that the expression patterns of several key transcription factors in the developing primate telencephalon are very similar to those in rodents, delineating the three main subcortical progenitor domains (the medial, lateral and caudal ganglionic eminences) and the interneurons tangentially migrating from them. On the basis of the continuity of Sox6, COUP-TFII and Sp8 transcription factor expression and evidence from cell migration and cell fate analyses, we propose that the majority of primate neocortical GABAergic interneurons originate from ganglionic eminences of the ventral telencephalon. Our findings reveal that the mammalian neocortex shares basic rules for interneuron development, substantially reshaping our understanding of the origin and classification of primate neocortical interneurons.

  12. Tin chloride enhances parvalbumin-positive interneuron survival by modulating heme metabolism in a model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li Volti, Giovanni; Zappalà, Agata; Leggio, Gian Marco; Mazzola, Carmen; Drago, Filippo; La Delia, Francesco; Serapide, Maria Francesca; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Giannone, Ignazio; Spatuzza, Michela; Cicirata, Valentina; Cicirata, Federico

    2011-03-29

    SnCl(2) has been reported to increase the expression of heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a major antioxidant enzyme, and to decrease ischemic injury, in non-nervous tissues. This study examined the neuroprotective effect of SnCl(2) in the hippocampus of rats submitted to cerebral ischemia. SnCl(2) was administered 18 h before bilateral carotids obstruction. Changes in HO-1 expression and activity, heme content, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and parvalbumin positive interneuron survival were studied. Thereafter both behavior and memory recovery were tested. The administration of SnCl(2) increased the expression of HO-1 protein and HO activity in the hippocampus and concomitantly decreased heme content at both mitochondrial and nuclear level. Furthermore, ischemized animals showed a strong increase in iNOS expression in the hippocampus, where a loss of parvalbumin positive interneurons also occurred. Pre-treatment with SnCl(2), decreased both iNOS expression in ischemized rats and increased cell survival. The beneficial effects of SnCl(2) were prevented by concomitant treatment with SnMP, a strong inhibitor of HO activity. SnCl(2) also caused an improvement in short term memory recovery. Our results showed that following SnCl(2) administration, HO-1 is strongly induced in the hippocampus and modulate iNOS expression, resulting in a strong neuroprotective effect.

  13. Genetic dissection of GABAergic neural circuits in mouse neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Diverse and flexible cortical functions rely on the ability of neural circuits to perform multiple types of neuronal computations. GABAergic inhibitory interneurons significantly contribute to this task by regulating the balance of activity, synaptic integration, spiking, synchrony, and oscillation in a neural ensemble. GABAergic interneurons display a high degree of cellular diversity in morphology, physiology, connectivity, and gene expression. A considerable number of subtypes of GABAergic interneurons diversify modes of cortical inhibition, enabling various types of information processing in the cortex. Thus, comprehensively understanding fate specification, circuit assembly, and physiological function of GABAergic interneurons is a key to elucidate the principles of cortical wiring and function. Recent advances in genetically encoded molecular tools have made a breakthrough to systematically study cortical circuitry at the molecular, cellular, circuit, and whole animal levels. However, the biggest obstacle to fully applying the power of these to analysis of GABAergic circuits was that there were no efficient and reliable methods to express them in subtypes of GABAergic interneurons. Here, I first summarize cortical interneuron diversity and current understanding of mechanisms, by which distinct classes of GABAergic interneurons are generated. I then review recent development in genetically encoded molecular tools for neural circuit research, and genetic targeting of GABAergic interneuron subtypes, particularly focusing on our recent effort to develop and characterize Cre/CreER knockin lines. Finally, I highlight recent success in genetic targeting of chandelier cells, the most unique and distinct GABAergic interneuron subtype, and discuss what kind of questions need to be addressed to understand development and function of cortical inhibitory circuits. PMID:24478631

  14. Initial Loss but Later Excess of GABAergic Synapses with Dentate Granule Cells in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Khushdev K.; Yamawaki, Ruth; Phanwar, Ibanri; Zhang, Guofeng; Wen, Xiling; Buckmaster, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    Many patients with temporal lobe epilepsy display neuron loss in the dentate gyrus. One potential epileptogenic mechanism is loss of GABAergic interneurons and inhibitory synapses with granule cells. Stereological techniques were used to estimate numbers of gephyrin-positive punctae in the dentate gyrus, which were reduced short-term (5 days after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus) but later rebounded beyond controls in epileptic rats. Stereological techniques were used to estimate numbers of synapses in electron micrographs of serial sections processed for postembedding GABA-immunoreactivity. Adjacent sections were used to estimate numbers of granule cells and glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive neurons per dentate gyrus. GABAergic neurons were reduced to 70% of control levels short-term, where they remained in epileptic rats. Integrating synapse and cell counts yielded average numbers of GABAergic synapses per granule cell, which decreased short-term and rebounded in epileptic animals beyond control levels. Axo-shaft and axo-spinous GABAergic synapse numbers in the outer molecular layer changed most. These findings suggest interneuron loss initially reduces numbers of GABAergic synapses with granule cells, but later, synaptogenesis by surviving interneurons over-shoots control levels. In contrast, the average number of excitatory synapses per granule cell decreased short-term but recovered only toward control levels, although in epileptic rats excitatory synapses in the inner molecular layer were larger than in controls. These findings reveal a relative excess of GABAergic synapses and suggest that reports of reduced functional inhibitory synaptic input to granule cells in epilepsy might be attributable not to fewer but instead to abundant but dysfunctional GABAergic synapses. PMID:20034063

  15. Interneuron precursor transplants in adult hippocampus reverse psychosis-relevant features in a mouse model of hippocampal disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Ahmed I; Chohan, Muhammad O; Inan, Melis; Schobel, Scott A; Chaudhury, Nashid H; Paskewitz, Samuel; Chuhma, Nao; Glickstein, Sara; Merker, Robert J; Xu, Qing; Small, Scott A; Anderson, Stewart A; Ross, Margaret Elizabeth; Moore, Holly

    2014-05-20

    GABAergic interneuron hypofunction is hypothesized to underlie hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenia. Here, we use the cyclin D2 knockout (Ccnd2(-/-)) mouse model to test potential links between hippocampal interneuron deficits and psychosis-relevant neurobehavioral phenotypes. Ccnd2(-/-) mice show cortical PV(+) interneuron reductions, prominently in hippocampus, associated with deficits in synaptic inhibition, increased in vivo spike activity of projection neurons, and increased in vivo basal metabolic activity (assessed with fMRI) in hippocampus. Ccnd2(-/-) mice show several neurophysiological and behavioral phenotypes that would be predicted to be produced by hippocampal disinhibition, including increased ventral tegmental area dopamine neuron population activity, behavioral hyperresponsiveness to amphetamine, and impairments in hippocampus-dependent cognition. Remarkably, transplantation of cells from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (the major origin of cerebral cortical interneurons) into the adult Ccnd2(-/-) caudoventral hippocampus reverses these psychosis-relevant phenotypes. Surviving neurons from these transplants are 97% GABAergic and widely distributed within the hippocampus. Up to 6 mo after the transplants, in vivo hippocampal metabolic activity is lowered, context-dependent learning and memory is improved, and dopamine neuron activity and the behavioral response to amphetamine are normalized. These findings establish functional links between hippocampal GABA interneuron deficits and psychosis-relevant dopaminergic and cognitive phenotypes, and support a rationale for targeting limbic cortical interneuron function in the prevention and treatment of schizophrenia.

  16. Necdin promotes tangential migration of neocortical interneurons from basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Kuwajima, Takaaki; Hasegawa, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2010-03-10

    Necdin is a pleiotropic protein that promotes neuronal differentiation and survival. In mammals, the necdin gene on the maternal chromosome is silenced by genomic imprinting, and only the paternal necdin gene is expressed in virtually all postmitotic neurons. Necdin forms a complex with the homeodomain protein Dlx2 to enhance its transcriptional activity. Dlx2 plays a major role in controlling tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons from the basal forebrain to the neocortex. Here, we examined whether Dlx2-expressing interneurons migrate properly in vivo in mutant mice lacking the paternal necdin gene. In necdin-deficient mice at birth, the population of Dlx2-expressing cells significantly decreased in the neocortex but increased in the preoptic area. DiI-labeled cell migration assay using organotypic forebrain slice cultures revealed that the number of cells migrating from the medial ganglionic eminence into the neocortex was significantly reduced in necdin-deficient embryos. Furthermore, necdin-deficient mice had a decreased population of neocortical GABA-containing neurons and were highly susceptible to pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. These results suggest that necdin promotes tangential migration of neocortical GABAergic interneurons during mammalian forebrain development.

  17. Long-lasting memory deficits in mice withdrawn from cocaine are concomitant with neuroadaptations in hippocampal basal activity, GABAergic interneurons and adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ladrón de Guevara-Miranda, David; Millón, Carmelo; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Pérez-Fernández, Mercedes; Missiroli, Michele; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Martínez-Losa, Magdalena; Álvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Santín, Luis J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cocaine addiction disorder is notably aggravated by concomitant cognitive and emotional pathology that impedes recovery. We studied whether a persistent cognitive/emotional dysregulation in mice withdrawn from cocaine holds a neurobiological correlate within the hippocampus, a limbic region with a key role in anxiety and memory but that has been scarcely investigated in cocaine addiction research. Mice were submitted to a chronic cocaine (20 mg/kg/day for 12 days) or vehicle treatment followed by 44 drug-free days. Some mice were then assessed on a battery of emotional (elevated plus-maze, light/dark box, open field, forced swimming) and cognitive (object and place recognition memory, cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, continuous spontaneous alternation) behavioral tests, while other mice remained in their home cage. Relevant hippocampal features [basal c-Fos activity, GABA+, parvalbumin (PV)+ and neuropeptide Y (NPY)+ interneurons and adult neurogenesis (cell proliferation and immature neurons)] were immunohistochemically assessed 73 days after the chronic cocaine or vehicle protocol. The cocaine-withdrawn mice showed no remarkable exploratory or emotional alterations but were consistently impaired in all the cognitive tasks. All the cocaine-withdrawn groups, independent of whether they were submitted to behavioral assessment or not, showed enhanced basal c-Fos expression and an increased number of GABA+ cells in the dentate gyrus. Moreover, the cocaine-withdrawn mice previously submitted to behavioral training displayed a blunted experience-dependent regulation of PV+ and NPY+ neurons in the dentate gyrus, and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Results highlight the importance of hippocampal neuroplasticity for the ingrained cognitive deficits present during chronic cocaine withdrawal. PMID:28138095

  18. Long-lasting memory deficits in mice withdrawn from cocaine are concomitant with neuroadaptations in hippocampal basal activity, GABAergic interneurons and adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ladrón de Guevara-Miranda, David; Millón, Carmelo; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Pérez-Fernández, Mercedes; Missiroli, Michele; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Martínez-Losa, Magdalena; Álvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Santín, Luis J; Castilla-Ortega, Estela

    2017-03-01

    Cocaine addiction disorder is notably aggravated by concomitant cognitive and emotional pathology that impedes recovery. We studied whether a persistent cognitive/emotional dysregulation in mice withdrawn from cocaine holds a neurobiological correlate within the hippocampus, a limbic region with a key role in anxiety and memory but that has been scarcely investigated in cocaine addiction research. Mice were submitted to a chronic cocaine (20 mg/kg/day for 12 days) or vehicle treatment followed by 44 drug-free days. Some mice were then assessed on a battery of emotional (elevated plus-maze, light/dark box, open field, forced swimming) and cognitive (object and place recognition memory, cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, continuous spontaneous alternation) behavioral tests, while other mice remained in their home cage. Relevant hippocampal features [basal c-Fos activity, GABA(+), parvalbumin (PV)(+) and neuropeptide Y (NPY)(+) interneurons and adult neurogenesis (cell proliferation and immature neurons)] were immunohistochemically assessed 73 days after the chronic cocaine or vehicle protocol. The cocaine-withdrawn mice showed no remarkable exploratory or emotional alterations but were consistently impaired in all the cognitive tasks. All the cocaine-withdrawn groups, independent of whether they were submitted to behavioral assessment or not, showed enhanced basal c-Fos expression and an increased number of GABA(+) cells in the dentate gyrus. Moreover, the cocaine-withdrawn mice previously submitted to behavioral training displayed a blunted experience-dependent regulation of PV(+) and NPY(+) neurons in the dentate gyrus, and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Results highlight the importance of hippocampal neuroplasticity for the ingrained cognitive deficits present during chronic cocaine withdrawal.

  19. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM REDUCES PARVALBUMIN EXPRESSION IN GABAERGIC NEURONS OF CORTEX AND HIPPOCAMPUS: IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL FINDINGS AND FUNCTIONAL CORRELATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    GABAergic interneurons comprise the bulk of local inhibitory neuronal circuitry in cortex and hippocampus and a subpopulation of these interneurons contain the calcium binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). A previous report indicated that severe hypothyroidism reduced PV immunoreact...

  20. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM REDUCES PARVALBUMIN EXPRESSION IN GABAERGIC NEURONS OF CORTEX AND HIPPOCAMPUS: IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL FINDINGS AND FUNCTIONAL CORRELATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    GABAergic interneurons comprise the bulk of local inhibitory neuronal circuitry in cortex and hippocampus and a subpopulation of these interneurons contain the calcium binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). A previous report indicated that severe hypothyroidism reduced PV immunoreact...

  1. Presynaptic kainate receptors that enhance the release of GABA on CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Cossart, R; Tyzio, R; Dinocourt, C; Esclapez, M; Hirsch, J C; Ben-Ari, Y; Bernard, C

    2001-02-01

    We report that kainate receptors are present on presynaptic GABAergic terminals contacting interneurons and that their activation increases GABA release. Application of kainate increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents recorded in CA1 interneurons. Local applications of glutamate but not of AMPA or NMDA also increased GABA quantal release. Application of kainate as well as synaptically released glutamate reduced the number of failures of GABAergic neurotransmission between interneurons. Thus, activation of presynaptic kainate receptors increases the probability of GABA release at interneuron-interneuron synapses. Glutamate may selectively control the communication between interneurons by increasing their mutual inhibition.

  2. Laterodorsal tegmentum interneuron subtypes oppositely regulate olfactory cue-induced innate fear.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongbin; Yang, Junhua; Xi, Wang; Hao, Sijia; Luo, Benyan; He, Xiaobin; Zhu, Liya; Lou, Huifang; Yu, Yan-qin; Xu, Fuqiang; Duan, Shumin; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Innate fear has a critical role in survival of animals. Unlike conditioned fear, the neuronal circuitry underlying innate fear is largely unknown. We found that the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) and lateral habenula (LHb) are specifically activated by the mouse predator odorant trimethylthiazoline (TMT). Using optogenetics to selectively stimulate GABAergic neurons in the LDT immediately produced fear-like responses (freezing, accelerated heart rate and increased serum corticosterone), whereas prolonged stimulation caused anxiety-like behaviors. Notably, although selective stimulation of parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons similarly induced fear-like responses, stimulation of somatostatin-positive interneurons or inhibition of PV neurons in the LDT suppressed TMT-induced fear-like responses without affecting conditioned fear. Finally, activation of LHb glutamatergic inputs to LDT interneurons was sufficient to generate fear-like responses. Thus, the LHb-LDT pathway is important for regulating olfactory cue-induced innate fear. Our results provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for anxiety disorder.

  3. Different populations of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-immunoreactive interneurons are specialized to control pyramidal cells or interneurons in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Acsády, L; Görcs, T J; Freund, T F

    1996-07-01

    The postsynaptic targets of three vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing GABAergic interneuron types were examined in the rat hippocampus. Two of them showed remarkable target selectivity for other GABAergic neurons, while the third contacted the somata and proximal dendrites of pyramidal cells. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive interneurons innervating the stratum oriens/alveus border in the CA1 region were shown to establish multiple contacts with horizontal GABAergic interneurons immunoreactive for type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor. Similarly, identified axons of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive interneurons projecting to stratum radiatum were found to establish symmetrical synapses largely on GABAergic dendrites. The majority of these postsynaptic GABAergic neurons were shown to contain calbindin or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. In contrast to the first two vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing cell populations, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive interneurons arborizing in stratum pyramidale formed baskets around pyramidal cells. These results revealed a new element in cortical microcircuits, interneurons which are specialized to innervate other GABAergic interneurons. The role of this new component may be the synchronization of dendritic inhibition, or an input-specific disinhibition of pyramidal cells in various dendritic domains. In contrast, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing basket cells are likely to be involved in perisomatic inhibition of pyramidal neurons, and represents a new basket cell type different from that containing parvalbumin.

  4. Fgfr1 inactivation in the mouse telencephalon results in impaired maturation of interneurons expressing parvalbumin.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen Müller; Maragnoli, Maria Elisabetta; Phull, Pooja M; Tran, Kathy May; Choubey, Lisha; Vaccarino, Flora M

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) and their receptors (Fgfr) are expressed in the developing and adult CNS. Previous studies demonstrated a decrease in cortical interneurons and locomotor hyperactivity in mice with a conditional Fgfr1 deletion generated in radial glial cells during midneurogenesis (Fgfr1(f/f);hGfapCre+). Here, we report earlier and more extensive inactivation of Fgfr1 in neuroepithelial cells of the CNS (Fgfr1(f/f);NesCre+). Similar to findings in Fgfr1(f/f);hGfapCre+ mice, parvalbumin positive (PV+) cortical interneurons are also decreased in the neocortex of Fgfr1(f/f);NesCre+ mice when compared to control littermates (Fgfr1(f/f)). Fgfr1(f/f);NesCre+ embryos do not differ from controls in the initial specification of GABAergic cells in the ganglionic eminence (GE) as assessed by in situ hybridization for Dlx2, Mash1 and Nkx2. Equal numbers of GABAergic neuron precursors genetically labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were observed at P0 in Fgfr1(f/f);hGfapCre+;Gad1-GFP mutant mice. However, fewer GFP+ and GFP+/PV+ interneurons were observed in these mutants at adulthood, indicating that a decrease in cortical interneuron markers is occurring postnatally. Fgfr1 is expressed in cortical astrocytes in the postnatal brain. To test whether the astrocytes of mice lacking Fgfr1 are less capable of supporting interneurons, we co-cultured wild type Gad1-GFP+ interneuron precursors isolated from the medial GE (MGE) with astrocytes from Fgfr1(f/f) control or Fgfr1(f/f);hGfapCre+ mice. Interneurons grown on Fgfr1 deficient astrocytes had small soma size and fewer neurites per cell, but no differences in cell survival. Decreased soma size of Gad67 immunopositive interneurons was also observed in the cortex of adult Fgfr1(f/f);NesCre+ mice. Our data indicate that astrocytes from Fgfr1 mutants are impaired in supporting the maturation of cortical GABAergic neurons in the postnatal period. This model may elucidate potential mechanisms of impaired PV

  5. GABAergic transmission in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Olga A

    2013-08-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE)(1) is a neuropsychiatric disorder caused by chronic or acute liver failure. Nearly thirty years ago a hypothesis was formulated explaining the neuropathology of HE by increased GABAergic tone. Recent progress in the GABAA-receptor (GABAAR) molecular pharmacology and biochemistry as well as the physiology of GABAergic transmission provided better understanding of GABA's role in health and disease. A detailed analysis of neuronal populations and their GABAergic afferents affected in HE is still missing. The slow progress in understanding the pathology of GABAergic transmission in HE is due to the high complexity of brain circuitries controlled by multiple types of GABAergic interneurons and the large variety of GABAAR, which are differently affected by pathological conditions and not yet fully identified. The mechanisms of action of the GABAAR agonist taurine, allosteric positive modulators (inhibitory neurosteroids, anaesthetics, benzodiazepines and histamine) and inhibitors of the GABAAR (excitatory neurosteroids, Ro15-4513) are discussed with respect to HE pathophysiology. Perspectives for GABAergic drugs in the symptomatic treatment of HE are suggested.

  6. GABAergic cell types in the lizard hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Guirado, S; Dávila, J C

    1999-04-01

    The neurochemical classification of GABAergic cells in the lizard hippocampus resulted in a further division into four major, non-overlapping subtypes. Each GABAergic cell subtype displays specific targets on the principal hippocampal neurons. The synaptic targets of the GABA/neuropeptide subtype are the distal apical dendrites of principal neurons. Calretinin- and parvalbumin-containing GABAergic cells synapse on the cell body and proximal dendrites of principal cells. Calbindin is expressed in a distinct group of interneurons, the synapses of which are directed to the dendrites of principal neurons. Finally, another subtype displays NADPH-diaphorase activity, but its synaptic target has not been established.

  7. Duration of culture and sonic hedgehog signaling differentially specify PV versus SST cortical interneuron fates from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Jennifer A; Goldberg, Ethan M; Maroof, Asif M; Xu, Qing; Petros, Timothy J; Anderson, Stewart A

    2015-04-01

    Medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-derived GABAergic cortical interneurons (cINs) consist of multiple subtypes that are involved in many cortical functions. They also have a remarkable capacity to migrate, survive and integrate into cortical circuitry after transplantation into postnatal cortex. These features have engendered considerable interest in generating distinct subgroups of interneurons from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) for the study of interneuron fate and function, and for the development of cell-based therapies. Although advances have been made, the capacity to generate highly enriched pools of subgroup fate-committed interneuron progenitors from PSCs has remained elusive. Previous studies have suggested that the two main MGE-derived interneuron subgroups--those expressing somatostatin (SST) and those expressing parvalbumin (PV)--are specified in the MGE from Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors at higher or lower levels of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, respectively. To further explore the role of Shh and other factors in cIN fate determination, we generated a reporter line such that Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors express mCherry and postmitotic Lhx6-expressing MGE-derived interneurons express GFP. Manipulations of Shh exposure and time in culture influenced the subgroup fates of ESC-derived interneurons. Exposure to higher Shh levels, and collecting GFP-expressing precursors at 12 days in culture, resulted in the strongest enrichment for SST interneurons over those expressing PV, whereas the strongest enrichment for PV interneurons was produced by lower Shh and by collecting mCherry-expressing cells after 17 days in culture. These findings confirm that fate determination of cIN subgroups is crucially influenced by Shh signaling, and provide a system for the further study of interneuron fate and function.

  8. Duration of culture and sonic hedgehog signaling differentially specify PV versus SST cortical interneuron fates from embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Jennifer A.; Goldberg, Ethan M.; Maroof, Asif M.; Xu, Qing; Petros, Timothy J.; Anderson, Stewart A.

    2015-01-01

    Medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-derived GABAergic cortical interneurons (cINs) consist of multiple subtypes that are involved in many cortical functions. They also have a remarkable capacity to migrate, survive and integrate into cortical circuitry after transplantation into postnatal cortex. These features have engendered considerable interest in generating distinct subgroups of interneurons from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) for the study of interneuron fate and function, and for the development of cell-based therapies. Although advances have been made, the capacity to generate highly enriched pools of subgroup fate-committed interneuron progenitors from PSCs has remained elusive. Previous studies have suggested that the two main MGE-derived interneuron subgroups – those expressing somatostatin (SST) and those expressing parvalbumin (PV) – are specified in the MGE from Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors at higher or lower levels of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, respectively. To further explore the role of Shh and other factors in cIN fate determination, we generated a reporter line such that Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors express mCherry and postmitotic Lhx6-expressing MGE-derived interneurons express GFP. Manipulations of Shh exposure and time in culture influenced the subgroup fates of ESC-derived interneurons. Exposure to higher Shh levels, and collecting GFP-expressing precursors at 12 days in culture, resulted in the strongest enrichment for SST interneurons over those expressing PV, whereas the strongest enrichment for PV interneurons was produced by lower Shh and by collecting mCherry-expressing cells after 17 days in culture. These findings confirm that fate determination of cIN subgroups is crucially influenced by Shh signaling, and provide a system for the further study of interneuron fate and function. PMID:25804737

  9. Corticotropin-releasing Factor (CRF) and Urocortin Promote the Survival of Cultured Cerebellar GABAergic Neurons Through the Type 1 CRF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Sun; Pham, Thao Thi Hien; Jang, Yoon-Jin; Bui, Bao Chi; Lee, Bong-Hee; Joo, Kyeong-Min; Cha, Choong-Ik

    2006-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is known to be involved in the stress response and in some degenerative brain disorders. In addition, CRF has a role as a neuromodulator in adult cerebellar circuits. Data from developmental studies suggest a putative role for CRF as a trophic factor during cerebellar development. In this study, we investigated the trophic role for CRF family of peptides by culturing cerebellar neurons in the presence of CRF, urocortin or urocortin II. Primary cell cultures of cerebella from embryonic day 18 mice were established, and cells were treated for either 1, 5 or 9 days with Basal Medium Eagles complete medium alone or complete medium with 1 µM CRF, urocortin, or urocortin II. The number of GABA-positive neurons in each treatment condition was counted at each culture age for monitoring the changes in neuronal survival. Treatment with 1 µM CRF or 1 µM urocortin increased the survival of GABAergic neurons at 6 days in vitro and 10 days in vitro, and this survival promoting effect was abolished by treatment with astressin in the presence of those peptides. Based on these data, we suggest that CRF or urocortin has a trophic role promoting the survival of cerebellar GABAergic neurons in cultures. PMID:16778399

  10. Circadian Plasticity of Mammalian Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons participate in all neuronal circuits in the mammalian brain, including the circadian clock system, and are indispensable for their effective function. Although the clock neurons have different molecular and electrical properties, their main function is the generation of circadian oscillations. Here we review the circadian plasticity of GABAergic interneurons in several areas of the mammalian brain, suprachiasmatic nucleus, neocortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, cerebellum, striatum, and in the retina. PMID:28367335

  11. Parvalbumin-positive CA1 interneurons are required for spatial working but not for reference memory.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew J; Sauer, Jonas-Frederic; Riedel, Gernot; McClure, Christina; Ansel, Laura; Cheyne, Lesley; Bartos, Marlene; Wisden, William; Wulff, Peer

    2011-03-01

    Parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons in cortical circuits are hypothesized to control cognitive function. To test this idea directly, we functionally removed parvalbumin-positive interneurons selectively from hippocampal CA1 in mice. We found that parvalbumin-positive interneurons are dispensable for spatial reference, but are essential for spatial working memory.

  12. Interneurons set the tune of developing networks.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khalilov, Ilgam; Represa, Alfonso; Gozlan, Henri

    2004-07-01

    Despite a rather long migratory journey, interneurons are functional before vertically migrating pyramidal neurons and they constitute the source and target of the first functional synapses in the developing hippocampus. Interneuron-driven network patterns are already present in utero while principal cells are mostly quiescent. At that early stage, GABAergic synapses--which are formed before glutamatergic ones--are excitatory, suggesting that GABA is a pioneer, much like the neurons from which it is released. This review discusses this sequence of events, its functional significance and the role that interneurons might play in the construction of cortical networks.

  13. Development of Cortical GABAergic Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Jasmina N.; Thomson, Alex M.

    2011-01-01

    The mature neocortex contains many different classes of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons, distributed, with some degree of selectivity, through six layers, and through many different regions. Some of the events in the early lives of these neurones that may determine their ultimate destination, their maturation and their selective innervation of targets appropriate for each subtype, are discussed. Both time and place of birth influence the class of interneuron that an early post-mitotic interneuronal precursor will become, driven by the selective expression of different combinations of transcription factors in different regions of their birth places in the ganglionic eminence and ventricular zone. The long distance migration of these precursors along tangential routes in marginal, subventricular, and intermediate zones and their final radial movement, into the developing cortex, is regulated by chemical cues, both attractant and repellent. Once they arrive at their final destination, they must integrate into the developing circuitry. As they mature within the cortex, their axons grow and branch in highly specific patterns that may be partially determined by the genetic blueprint for each interneuronal class and partly by the environment in which they find themselves. Finally, as each interneuron class begins to form synapses with only certain postsynaptic targets, cell–cell recognition, most probably via protein–protein interactions across the synaptic cleft, facilitate the formation of appropriate synapses. PMID:21808605

  14. Are striatal tyrosine hydroxylase interneurons dopaminergic?

    PubMed

    Xenias, Harry S; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M

    2015-04-22

    Striatal GABAergic interneurons that express the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) have been identified previously by several methods. Although generally assumed to be dopaminergic, possibly serving as a compensatory source of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's disease, this assumption has never been tested directly. In TH-Cre mice whose nigrostriatal pathway had been eliminated unilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine, we injected a Cre-dependent virus coding for channelrhodopsin-2 and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein unilaterally into the unlesioned midbrain or bilaterally into the striatum. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slices revealed that both optical and electrical stimulation readily elicited DA release in control striata but not from contralateral striata when nigrostriatal neurons were transduced. In contrast, neither optical nor electrical stimulation could elicit striatal DA release in either the control or lesioned striata when the virus was injected directly into the striatum transducing only striatal TH interneurons. This demonstrates that striatal TH interneurons do not release DA. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-TH mice revealed colocalization of DA, l-amino acid decarboxylase, the DA transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 with EGFP in midbrain dopaminergic neurons but not in any of the striatal EGFP-TH interneurons. Optogenetic activation of striatal EGFP-TH interneurons produced strong GABAergic inhibition in all spiny neurons tested. These results indicate that striatal TH interneurons are not dopaminergic but rather are a type of GABAergic interneuron that expresses TH but none of the other enzymes or transporters necessary to operate as dopaminergic neurons and exert widespread GABAergic inhibition onto direct and indirect spiny neurons.

  15. Are Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons Dopaminergic?

    PubMed Central

    Xenias, Harry S.; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Striatal GABAergic interneurons that express the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) have been identified previously by several methods. Although generally assumed to be dopaminergic, possibly serving as a compensatory source of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's disease, this assumption has never been tested directly. In TH–Cre mice whose nigrostriatal pathway had been eliminated unilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine, we injected a Cre-dependent virus coding for channelrhodopsin-2 and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein unilaterally into the unlesioned midbrain or bilaterally into the striatum. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slices revealed that both optical and electrical stimulation readily elicited DA release in control striata but not from contralateral striata when nigrostriatal neurons were transduced. In contrast, neither optical nor electrical stimulation could elicit striatal DA release in either the control or lesioned striata when the virus was injected directly into the striatum transducing only striatal TH interneurons. This demonstrates that striatal TH interneurons do not release DA. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)–TH mice revealed colocalization of DA, l-amino acid decarboxylase, the DA transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 with EGFP in midbrain dopaminergic neurons but not in any of the striatal EGFP–TH interneurons. Optogenetic activation of striatal EGFP–TH interneurons produced strong GABAergic inhibition in all spiny neurons tested. These results indicate that striatal TH interneurons are not dopaminergic but rather are a type of GABAergic interneuron that expresses TH but none of the other enzymes or transporters necessary to operate as dopaminergic neurons and exert widespread GABAergic inhibition onto direct and indirect spiny neurons. PMID:25904808

  16. Impact of inhibitory constraint of interneurons on neuronal excitability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vallent; Maguire, Jamie

    2013-12-01

    Tonic inhibition is thought to dampen the excitability of principal neurons; however, little is known about the role of tonic GABAergic inhibition in interneurons and the impact on principal neuron excitability. In many brain regions, tonic GABAergic inhibition is mediated by extrasynaptic, δ-subunit-containing GABAA receptors (GABAARs). In the present study we demonstrate the importance of GABAAR δ-subunit-mediated tonic inhibition in interneurons. Selective elimination of the GABAAR δ-subunit from interneurons was achieved by crossing a novel floxed Gabrd mouse model with GAD65-Cre mice (Gabrd/Gad mice). Deficits in GABAAR δ-subunit expression in GAD65-positive neurons result in a decrease in tonic GABAergic inhibition and increased excitability of both molecular layer (ML) and stratum radiatum (SR) interneurons. Disinhibition of interneurons results in robust alterations in the neuronal excitability of principal neurons and decreased seizure susceptibility. Gabrd/Gad mice have enhanced tonic and phasic GABAergic inhibition in both CA1 pyramidal neurons and dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGCs). Consistent with alterations in hippocampal excitability, CA1 pyramidal neurons and DGGCs from Gabrd/Gad mice exhibit a shift in the input-output relationship toward decreased excitability compared with those from Cre(-/-) littermates. Furthermore, seizure susceptibility, in response to 20 mg/kg kainic acid, is significantly decreased in Gabrd/Gad mice compared with Cre(-/-) controls. These data demonstrate a critical role for GABAAR δ-subunit-mediated tonic GABAergic inhibition of interneurons on principal neuronal excitability and seizure susceptibility.

  17. Electrical coupling regulates layer 1 interneuron microcircuit formation in the neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xing-Hua; Wang, Min; He, Xiang-Nan; He, Fei; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Lu, Wenlian; Qiu, Zi-Long; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of electrical and chemical synapses among interneurons is essential for interneuron function in the neocortex. However, it remains largely unclear whether electrical coupling between interneurons influences chemical synapse formation and microcircuit assembly during development. Here, we show that electrical and GABAergic chemical connections robustly develop between interneurons in neocortical layer 1 over a similar time course. Electrical coupling promotes action potential generation and synchronous firing between layer 1 interneurons. Furthermore, electrically coupled interneurons exhibit strong GABA-A receptor-mediated synchronous synaptic activity. Disruption of electrical coupling leads to a loss of bidirectional, but not unidirectional, GABAergic connections. Moreover, a reduction in electrical coupling induces an increase in excitatory synaptic inputs to layer 1 interneurons. Together, these findings strongly suggest that electrical coupling between neocortical interneurons plays a critical role in regulating chemical synapse development and precise formation of circuits. PMID:27510304

  18. Rapamycin suppresses axon sprouting by somatostatin interneurons in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Buckmaster, Paul S; Wen, Xiling

    2011-11-01

    In temporal lobe epilepsy many somatostatin interneurons in the dentate gyrus die. However, some survive and sprout axon collaterals that form new synapses with granule cells. The functional consequences of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic synaptic reorganization are unclear. Development of new methods to suppress epilepsy-related interneuron axon sprouting might be useful experimentally. Status epilepticus was induced by systemic pilocarpine treatment in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing inhibitory nerurons (GIN) mice in which a subset of somatostatin interneurons expresses GFP. Beginning 24 h later, mice were treated with vehicle or rapamycin (3 mg/kg intraperitoneally) every day for 2 months. Stereologic methods were then used to estimate numbers of GFP-positive hilar neurons per dentate gyrus and total length of GFP-positive axon in the molecular layer plus granule cell layer. GFP-positive axon density was calculated. The number of GFP-positive axon crossings of the granule cell layer was measured. Regression analyses were performed to test for correlations between GFP-positive axon length versus number of granule cells and dentate gyrus volume. After pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, rapamycin- and vehicle-treated mice had approximately half as many GFP-positive hilar neurons as did control animals. Despite neuron loss, vehicle-treated mice had over twice the GFP-positive axon length per dentate gyrus as controls, consistent with GABAergic axon sprouting. In contrast, total GFP-positive axon length was similar in rapamycin-treated mice and controls. GFP-positive axon length correlated most closely with dentate gyrus volume. These findings suggest that rapamycin suppressed axon sprouting by surviving somatostatin/GFP-positive interneurons after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in GIN mice. It is unclear whether the effect of rapamycin on axon length was on interneurons directly or secondary, for example, by suppressing growth of granule

  19. Firing regulation of fast-spiking interneurons by autaptic inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daqing; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Wu, Shengdun; Xia, Chuan; Zhang, Yangsong; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    Fast-spiking (FS) interneurons in the brain are self-innervated by powerful inhibitory GABAergic autaptic connections. By computational modelling, we investigate how autaptic inhibition regulates the firing response of such interneurons. Our results indicate that autaptic inhibition both boosts the current threshold for action potential generation and modulates the input-output gain of FS interneurons. The autaptic transmission delay is identified as a key parameter that controls the firing patterns and determines multistability regions of FS interneurons. Furthermore, we observe that neuronal noise influences the firing regulation of FS interneurons by autaptic inhibition and extends their dynamic range for encoding inputs. Importantly, autaptic inhibition modulates noise-induced irregular firing of FS interneurons, such that coherent firing appears at an optimal autaptic inhibition level. Our results reveal the functional roles of autaptic inhibition in taming the firing dynamics of FS interneurons.

  20. Differential susceptibility of interneurons expressing neuropeptide Y or parvalbumin in the aged hippocampus to acute seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Kuruba, Ramkumar; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Parihar, Vipan K; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2011-01-01

    Acute seizure (AS) activity in old age has an increased predisposition for evolving into temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Furthermore, spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction after AS activity are often intense in the aged population than in young adults. This could be due to an increased vulnerability of inhibitory interneurons in the aged hippocampus to AS activity. We investigated this issue by comparing the survival of hippocampal GABA-ergic interneurons that contain the neuropeptide Y (NPY) or the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV) between young adult (5-months old) and aged (22-months old) F344 rats at 12 days after three-hours of AS activity. Graded intraperitoneal injections of the kainic acid (KA) induced AS activity and a diazepam injection at 3 hours after the onset terminated AS-activity. Measurement of interneuron numbers in different hippocampal subfields revealed that NPY+ interneurons were relatively resistant to AS activity in the aged hippocampus in comparison to the young adult hippocampus. Whereas, PV+ interneurons were highly susceptible to AS activity in both age groups. However, as aging alone substantially depleted these populations, the aged hippocampus after three-hours of AS activity exhibited 48% reductions in NPY+ interneurons and 70% reductions in PV+ interneurons, in comparison to the young hippocampus after similar AS activity. Thus, AS activity-induced TLE in old age is associated with far fewer hippocampal NPY+ and PV+ interneuron numbers than AS-induced TLE in the young adult age. This discrepancy likely underlies the severe spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction observed in the aged people after AS activity.

  1. GABAergic circuit dysfunctions in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Cristo, Graziella Di

    2012-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons control neuronal excitability, integration, and plasticity. Further, they regulate the generation of temporal synchrony and oscillatory behavior among networks of pyramidal neurons. Such oscillations within and across neural systems are believed to serve various complex functions, such as perception, movement initiation, and memory. Alterations in the development of GABAergic circuits have been implicated in various brain diseases with neurodevelopmental origin. Here, we highlight recent studies suggesting a role for alterations of GABA transmission in the pathophysiology of two neurodevelopmental diseases, schizophrenia, and autism. We further discuss how manipulations of GABA signaling may be used for novel therapeutic interventions.

  2. GABAergic Circuit Dysfunctions in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Cristo, Graziella Di

    2012-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons control neuronal excitability, integration, and plasticity. Further, they regulate the generation of temporal synchrony and oscillatory behavior among networks of pyramidal neurons. Such oscillations within and across neural systems are believed to serve various complex functions, such as perception, movement initiation, and memory. Alterations in the development of GABAergic circuits have been implicated in various brain diseases with neurodevelopmental origin. Here, we highlight recent studies suggesting a role for alterations of GABA transmission in the pathophysiology of two neurodevelopmental diseases, schizophrenia, and autism. We further discuss how manipulations of GABA signaling may be used for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:22666213

  3. Development of cortical GABAergic circuits and its implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Cristo, G

    2007-07-01

    GABAergic interneurons powerfully control the function of cortical networks. In addition, they strongly regulate cortical development by modulating several cellular processes such as neuronal proliferation, migration, differentiation and connectivity. Not surprisingly, aberrant development of GABAergic circuits has been implicated in many neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism and Tourette's syndrome. Unfortunately, efforts directed towards the comprehension of the mechanisms regulating GABAergic circuits formation and function have been impaired by the strikingly heterogeneity, both at the morphological and functional level, of GABAergic interneurons. Recent technical advances, including the improvement of interneurons-specific labelling techniques, have started to reveal the basic principles underlying this process. This review summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms underlying the construction of GABAergic circuits in the cortex, with a particular focus on potential implications for brain diseases with neurodevelopmental origin.

  4. Persistent Hyperactivity of Hippocampal Dentate Interneurons After a Silent Period in the Rat Pilocarpine Model of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaochen; Song, Xinyu; Wu, Lin; Nadler, J. Victor; Zhan, Ren-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Profile of GABAergic interneuron activity after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) was examined in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus by analyzing immediate early gene expression and recording spontaneous firing at near resting membrane potential (REM). SE for exact 2 h or more than 2 h was induced in the male Sprague-Dawley rats by an intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine. Expression of immediate early genes (IEGs) was examined at 1 h, 1 week, 2 weeks or more than 10 weeks after SE. For animals to be examined at 1 h after SE, SE lasted for exact 2 h was terminated by an intraperitoneal injection of diazepam. Spontaneous firing at near the REM was recorded in interneurons located along the border between the granule cell layer and the hilus more than 10 weeks after SE. Results showed that both c-fos and activity-regulated cytoskeleton associated protein (Arc) in hilar GABAergic interneurons were up-regulated after SE in a biphasic manner; they were increased at 1 h and more than 2 weeks, but not at 1 week after SE. Ten weeks after SE, nearly 60% of hilar GABAergic cells expressed c-fos. With the exception of calretinin (CR)-positive cells, percentages of hilar neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-, neuropeptide Y (NPY)-, parvalbumin (PV)-, and somatostatin (SOM)-positive cells with c-fos expression are significantly higher than those of controls more than 10 weeks after SE. Without the REM to be more depolarizing and changed threshold potential level in SE-induced rats, cell-attached recording revealed that nearly 90% of hilar interneurons fired spontaneously at near the REM while only 22% of the same cell population did so in the controls. In conclusion, pilocarpine-induced SE eventually leads to a state in which surviving dentate GABAergic interneurons become hyperactive with a subtype-dependent manner; this implies that a fragile balance between excitation and inhibition exists in the dentate gyrus and in addition, the activity-dependent up

  5. Interneurons are the source and the targets of the first synapses formed in the rat developing hippocampal circuit.

    PubMed

    Gozlan, Henri; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2003-06-01

    In hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, GABAergic synapses are established before glutamatergic synapses. GABAergic interneurons should therefore develop and acquire synapses at an earlier stage to provide the source for GABAergic synapses. We now report that this is indeed the case. At birth and in utero, when nearly all pyramidal neurons are not yet functional, most interneurons have already either GABAergic only or GABAergic and glutamatergic postsynaptic currents. At birth, the morphological maturation of interneurons parallels their individual functional responses. In addition, the formation of functional interneurons types appears to be a sequential process. Interneurons that innervate other interneurons acquire GABA(A) synapses before peridendritic interneurons, but also before perisomatic interneurons that are not yet functional at birth. Therefore, interneurons are the source and the targets of the first synapses formed in the developing circuit. Since GABA was shown to be excitatory in utero, interneurons provide all the excitatory drive at a time when the principal cells are silent. They could therefore play a central role in the formation of the cortical circuit at early developmental stages.

  6. A novel functionally distinct subtype of striatal neuropeptide Y interneuron.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Unal, Bengi; Shah, Fulva; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M

    2011-11-16

    We investigated the properties of neostriatal neuropeptide Y (NPY)-expressing interneurons in transgenic GFP (green fluorescent protein)-NPY reporter mice. In vitro whole-cell recordings and biocytin staining demonstrated the existence of a novel class of neostriatal NPY-expressing GABAergic interneurons that exhibit electrophysiological, neurochemical, and morphological properties strikingly different from those of previously described NPY-containing, plateau-depolarization low-threshold spike (NPY-PLTS) interneurons. The novel NPY interneuron type (NPY-neurogliaform) differed from previously described NPY-PLTS interneurons by exhibiting a significantly lower input resistance and hyperpolarized membrane potential, regular, nonaccommodating spiking in response to depolarizing current injections, and an absence of plateau depolarizations or low-threshold spikes. NPY-neurogliaform interneurons were also easily distinguished morphologically by their dense, compact, and highly branched dendritic and local axonal arborizations that contrasted sharply with the sparse and extended axonal and dendritic arborizations of NPY-PLTS interneurons. Furthermore, NPY-neurogliaform interneurons did not express immunofluorescence for somatostatin or nitric oxide synthase that was ubiquitous in NPY-PLTS interneurons. IPSP/Cs could only rarely be elicited in spiny projection neurons (SPNs) in paired recordings with NPY-PLTS interneurons. In contrast, the probability of SPN innervation by NPY-neurogliaform interneurons was extremely high, the synapse very reliable (no failures were observed), and the resulting postsynaptic response was a slow, GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSC that has not been previously described in striatum but that has been elicited from NPY-GABAergic neurogliaform interneurons in cortex and hippocampus. These properties suggest unique and distinctive roles for NPY-PLTS and NPY-neurogliaform interneurons in the integrative properties of the neostriatum.

  7. A NOVEL FUNCTIONALLY DISTINCT SUBTYPE OF STRIATAL NPY INTERNEURON

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Unal, Bengi; Shah, Fulva; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the properties of neostriatal neuropeptide Y (NPY)-expressing interneurons in transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP)-NPY reporter mice. In vitro whole cell recordings and biocytin staining demonstrated the existence of a novel class of neostriatal NPY-expressing GABAergic interneurons that exhibit electrophysiological, neurochemical and morphological properties strikingly different from those of previously described NPY-containing, plateau-depolarization low-threshold spike (NPY-PLTS) interneurons. The novel NPY interneuron type (NPY-neurogliaform) differed from previously described NPY-PLTS interneurons by exhibiting a significantly lower input resistance and hyperpolarized membrane potential, regular, non-accommodating spiking in response to depolarizing current injections and an absence of plateau depolarizations or low threshold spikes. NPY-neurogliaform interneurons were also easily distinguished morphologically by their dense compact and highly branched dendritic and local axonal arborizations that contrasted sharply with the sparse and extended axonal and dendritic arborizations of NPY-PLTS interneurons. Further, NPY-neurogliaform interneurons did not express immunofluorescence for somatostatin or nitric oxide synthase that was ubiquitous in NPY-PLTS interneurons. IPSP/Cs could only rarely be elicited in spiny projection neurons (SPN) in paired recordings with NPY-PLTS interneurons. In contrast, the probability of SPN innervation by NPY-neurogliaform interneurons was extremely high, the synapse very reliable (no failures were observed), and the resulting postsynaptic response was a slow, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) that has not been previously described in striatum, but that has been elicited from NPY-GABAergic neurogliaform interneurons in cortex and hippocampus. These properties suggest unique and distinctive roles for NPY-PLTS and NPY-neurogliaform interneurons in the integrative properties of the

  8. Cell type-specific long-term plasticity at glutamatergic synapses onto hippocampal interneurons expressing either parvalbumin or CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Wiebke; Szabo, Andras; Somogyi, Jozsef; Somogyi, Peter; Lamsa, Karri P

    2010-01-27

    Different GABAergic interneuron types have specific roles in hippocampal function, and anatomical as well as physiological features vary greatly between interneuron classes. Long-term plasticity of interneurons has mostly been studied in unidentified GABAergic cells and is known to be very heterogeneous. Here we tested whether cell type-specific plasticity properties in distinct GABAergic interneuron types might underlie this heterogeneity. We show that long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD), two common forms of synaptic plasticity, are expressed in a highly cell type-specific manner at glutamatergic synapses onto hippocampal GABAergic neurons. Both LTP and LTD are generated in interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV+), whereas interneurons with similar axon distributions but expressing cannabinoid receptor-1 show no lasting plasticity in response to the same protocol. In addition, LTP or LTD occurs in PV+ interneurons with different efferent target domains. Perisomatic-targeting PV+ basket and axo-axonic interneurons express LTP, whereas glutamatergic synapses onto PV+ bistratified cells display LTD. Both LTP and LTD are pathway specific, independent of NMDA receptors, and occur at synapses with calcium-permeable (CP) AMPA receptors. Plasticity in interneurons with CP-AMPA receptors strongly modulates disynaptic GABAergic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal cells. We propose that long-term plasticity adjusts the synaptic strength between pyramidal cells and interneurons in a cell type-specific manner and, in the defined CA1 interneurons, shifts the spatial pattern of inhibitory weight from pyramidal cell dendrites to the perisomatic region.

  9. Dopamine excites fast-spiking interneurons in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Bracci, Enrico; Centonze, Diego; Bernardi, Giorgio; Calabresi, Paolo

    2002-04-01

    The striatum is the main recipient of dopaminergic innervation. Striatal projection neurons are controlled by cholinergic and GABAergic interneurons. The effects of dopamine on projection neurons and cholinergic interneurons have been described. Its action on GABAergic interneurons, however, is still unknown. We studied the effects of dopamine on fast-spiking (FS) GABAergic interneurons in vitro, with intracellular recordings. Bath application of dopamine elicited a depolarization accompanied by an increase in membrane input resistance (an effect that persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin) and action-potential discharge. These effects were mimicked by the D1-like dopamine receptor agonist SKF38393 but not by the D2-like agonist quinpirole. Evoked corticostriatal glutamatergic synaptic currents were not affected by dopamine. Conversely, GABAergic currents evoked by intrastriatal stimulation were reversibly depressed by dopamine and D2-like, but not D1-like, agonists. Cocaine elicited effects similar to those of dopamine on membrane potential and synaptic currents. These results show that endogenous dopamine exerts a dual excitatory action on FS interneurons, by directly depolarizing them (through D1-like receptors) and by reducing their synaptic inhibition (through presynaptic D2-like receptors).

  10. Mature BDNF, but not proBDNF, reduces excitability of fast-spiking interneurons in mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Holm, Mai Marie; Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis; Vardya, Irina; Vaegter, Christian Bjerggaard; Nykjaer, Anders; Jensen, Kimmo

    2009-10-07

    Mature BDNF and its precursor proBDNF may both be secreted to exert opposite effects on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. However, it is unknown how proBDNF and mature BDNF affect the excitability of GABAergic interneurons and thereby regulate GABAergic inhibition. We made recordings of GABAergic spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs) in mouse dentate gyrus granule cells and found that chronic or acute BDNF reductions led to large increases in the sIPSC frequencies, which were TTX (tetrodotoxin) sensitive and therefore action-potential driven. Conversely, addition of mature BDNF, but not proBDNF, within minutes led to a decrease in the sIPSC frequency to 44%. Direct recordings from fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons revealed that mature BDNF reduced their excitability and depressed their action potential firing, whereas proBDNF had no effect. Using the TrkB inhibitor K-252a, or mice deficient for the common neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR), the regulation of GABAergic activity was shown specifically to be mediated by BDNF binding to the neurotrophin receptor TrkB. In agreement, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TrkB, but not p75(NTR), was expressed in parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Our results suggest that mature BDNF decreases the excitability of GABAergic interneurons via activation of TrkB, while proBDNF does not impact on GABAergic activity. Thus, by affecting the firing of GABAergic interneurons, mature BDNF may play an important role in regulating network oscillations in the hippocampus.

  11. Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation to Treat CNS Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Muhammad O.; Moore, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field. PMID:27582692

  12. Efficient specification of interneurons from human pluripotent stem cells by dorsoventral and rostrocaudal modulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Gon; Yao, Ruiqin; Monnell, Travis; Cho, Jun-Hyeong; Vasudevan, Anju; Koh, Alice; Peeyush, Kumar T; Moon, Minho; Datta, Debkanya; Bolshakov, Vadim Y; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Chung, Sangmi

    2014-07-01

    GABAergic interneurons regulate cortical neural networks by providing inhibitory inputs, and their malfunction, resulting in failure to intricately regulate neural circuit balance, is implicated in brain diseases such as Schizophrenia, Autism, and Epilepsy. During early development, GABAergic interneuron progenitors arise from the ventral telencephalic area such as medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) by the actions of secreted signaling molecules from nearby organizers, and migrate to their target sites where they form local synaptic connections. In this study, using combinatorial and temporal modulation of developmentally relevant dorsoventral and rostrocaudal signaling pathways (SHH, Wnt, and FGF8), we efficiently generated MGE cells from multiple human pluripotent stem cells. Most importantly, modulation of FGF8/FGF19 signaling efficiently directed MGE versus CGE differentiation. Human MGE cells spontaneously differentiated into Lhx6-expressing GABAergic interneurons and showed migratory properties. These human MGE-derived neurons generated GABA, fired action potentials, and displayed robust GABAergic postsynaptic activity. Transplantation into rodent brains results in well-contained neural grafts enriched with GABAergic interneurons that migrate in the host and mature to express somatostatin or parvalbumin. Thus, we propose that signaling modulation recapitulating normal developmental patterns efficiently generate human GABAergic interneurons. This strategy represents a novel tool in regenerative medicine, developmental studies, disease modeling, bioassay, and drug screening.

  13. Early sequential formation of functional GABA(A) and glutamatergic synapses on CA1 interneurons of the rat foetal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hennou, Sonia; Khalilov, Ilgam; Diabira, Diabé; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gozlan, Henri

    2002-07-01

    During postnatal development of CA1 pyramidal neurons, GABAergic synapses are excitatory and established prior to glutamatergic synapses. As interneurons are generated before pyramidal cells, we have tested the hypothesis that the GABAergic interneuronal network is operative before glutamate pyramidal neurons and provides the initial patterns of activity. We patch-clamp recorded interneurons in foetal (69 neurons) and neonatal P0 (162 neurons) hippocampal slices and performed a morphofunctional analysis of biocytin-filled neurons. At P0, three types of interneurons were found: (i) non-innervated "silent" interneurons (5%) with no spontaneous or evoked synaptic currents; (ii) G interneurons (17%) with GABA(A) synapses only; and (iii) GG interneurons with GABA and glutamatergic synapses (78%). Relying on the neuronal capacitance, cell body size and arborization of dendrites and axons, the three types of interneurons correspond to three stages of development with non-innervated neurons and interneurons with GABA(A) and glutamatergic synapses being, respectively, the least and the most developed. Recordings from both pyramidal neurons and interneurons in foetuses (E18-20) revealed that the majority of interneurons (65%) had functional synapses whereas nearly 90% of pyramidal neurons were quiescent. Therefore, interneurons follow the same GABA-glutamate sequence of synapse formation but earlier than the principal cells. Interneurons are the source and the target of the first synapses formed in the hippocampus and are thus in a position to modulate the development of the hippocampus in the foetal stage.

  14. Novel fast adapting interneurons mediate cholinergic-induced fast GABAA inhibitory postsynaptic currents in striatal spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Faust, Thomas W; Assous, Maxime; Shah, Fulva; Tepper, James M; Koós, Tibor

    2015-07-01

    Previous work suggests that neostriatal cholinergic interneurons control the activity of several classes of GABAergic interneurons through fast nicotinic receptor-mediated synaptic inputs. Although indirect evidence has suggested the existence of several classes of interneurons controlled by this mechanism, only one such cell type, the neuropeptide-Y-expressing neurogliaform neuron, has been identified to date. Here we tested the hypothesis that in addition to the neurogliaform neurons that elicit slow GABAergic inhibitory responses, another interneuron type exists in the striatum that receives strong nicotinic cholinergic input and elicits conventional fast GABAergic synaptic responses in projection neurons. We obtained in vitro slice recordings from double transgenic mice in which Channelrhodopsin-2 was natively expressed in cholinergic neurons and a population of serotonin receptor-3a-Cre-expressing GABAergic interneurons were visualized with tdTomato. We show that among the targeted GABAergic interneurons a novel type of interneuron, termed the fast-adapting interneuron, can be identified that is distinct from previously known interneurons based on immunocytochemical and electrophysiological criteria. We show using optogenetic activation of cholinergic inputs that fast-adapting interneurons receive a powerful supra-threshold nicotinic cholinergic input in vitro. Moreover, fast adapting neurons are densely connected to projection neurons and elicit fast, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic current responses. The nicotinic receptor-mediated activation of fast-adapting interneurons may constitute an important mechanism through which cholinergic interneurons control the activity of projection neurons and perhaps the plasticity of their synaptic inputs when animals encounter reinforcing or otherwise salient stimuli.

  15. The origins of cortical interneurons: mouse versus monkey and human.

    PubMed

    Jones, Edward G

    2009-09-01

    The neocortex of primates, including humans, is thought to contain significantly higher numbers and more diverse forms of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) interneurons than that of rodents. The mouse cortex displays a number of other features that distinguish it from the cortex of primates and suggest a somewhat less complex pattern of organization. Nevertheless, dramatic findings on the origins and migratory patterns of newly specified GABAergic cortical interneurons in the embryonic mouse have led to a prevailing view that GABAergic cortical interneurons of all species are born in the ganglionic eminence and undergo the same long tangential migration toward the cortex that is seen in the mouse. Recent observations in fetal human and monkey brains, although clearly identifying GABAergic neurons that reach the neocortex via the tangential route, also demonstrate that substantial numbers of GABA neurons are generated in the lateral ventricular neuroepithelium and migrate into the cortex via the same radial route followed by glutamatergic neurons. In the course of evolution of the higher primate cortex, it is likely that new forms of cortical interneuron with origins in the ventricular neuroepithelium have been added to an older population derived from the ganglionic eminence.

  16. Hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells selectively innervate aspiny interneurons.

    PubMed

    Wittner, Lucia; Henze, Darrell A; Záborszky, László; Buzsáki, György

    2006-09-01

    The specific connectivity among principal cells and interneurons determines the flow of activity in neuronal networks. To elucidate the connections between hippocampal principal cells and various classes of interneurons, CA3 pyramidal cells were intracellularly labelled with biocytin in anaesthetized rats and the three-dimensional distribution of their axon collaterals was reconstructed. The sections were double-stained for substance P receptor (SPR)- or metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha (mGluR-1alpha)-immunoreactivity to investigate interneuron targets of the CA3 pyramidal cells. SPR-containing interneurons represent a large portion of the GABAergic population, including spiny and aspiny classes. Axon terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells contacted SPR-positive interneuron dendrites in the hilus and in all hippocampal strata in both CA3 and CA1 regions (7.16% of all boutons). The majority of axons formed single contacts (87.5%), but multiple contacts (up to six) on single target neurons were also found. CA3 pyramidal cell axon collaterals innervated several types of morphologically different aspiny SPR-positive interneurons. In contrast, spiny SPR-interneurons or mGluR-1alpha-positive interneurons in the hilus, CA3 and CA1 regions were rarely contacted by the filled pyramidal cells. These findings indicate a strong target selection of CA3 pyramidal cells favouring the activation of aspiny classes of interneurons.

  17. Morpho-physiological criteria divide dentate gyrus interneurons into classes.

    PubMed

    Hosp, Jonas A; Strüber, Michael; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Vida, Imre; Jonas, Peter; Bartos, Marlene

    2014-02-01

    GABAergic inhibitory interneurons control fundamental aspects of neuronal network function. Their functional roles are assumed to be defined by the identity of their input synapses, the architecture of their dendritic tree, the passive and active membrane properties and finally the nature of their postsynaptic targets. Indeed, interneurons display a high degree of morphological and physiological heterogeneity. However, whether their morphological and physiological characteristics are correlated and whether interneuron diversity can be described by a continuum of GABAergic cell types or by distinct classes has remained unclear. Here we perform a detailed morphological and physiological characterization of GABAergic cells in the dentate gyrus, the input region of the hippocampus. To achieve an unbiased and efficient sampling and classification we used knock-in mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67)-positive neurons and performed cluster analysis. We identified five interneuron classes, each of them characterized by a distinct set of anatomical and physiological parameters. Cross-correlation analysis further revealed a direct relation between morphological and physiological properties indicating that dentate gyrus interneurons fall into functionally distinct classes which may differentially control neuronal network activity.

  18. Morpho-physiological Criteria Divide Dentatecc Gyrus Interneurons into Classes

    PubMed Central

    Hosp, Jonas A; Strüber, Michael; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Vida, Imre; Jonas, Peter; Bartos, Marlene

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory interneurons control fundamental aspects of neuronal network function. Their functional roles are assumed to be defined by the identity of their input synapses, the architecture of their dendritic tree, the passive and active membrane properties and finally the nature of their postsynaptic targets. Indeed, interneurons display a high degree of morphological and physiological heterogeneity. However, whether their morphological and physiological characteristics are correlated and whether interneuron diversity can be described by a continuum of GABAergic cell types or by distinct classes has remained unclear. Here we perform a detailed morphological and physiological characterization of GABAergic cells in the dentate gyrus, the input region of the hippocampus. To achieve an unbiased and efficient sampling and classification we used knock-in mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67)-positive neurons and performed cluster analysis. We identified five interneuron classes, each of them characterized by a distinct set of anatomical and physiological parameters. Cross-correlation analysis further revealed a direct relation between morphological and physiological properties indicating that dentate gyrus interneurons fall into functionally distinct classes which may differentially control neuronal network activity. © 2013 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24108530

  19. Canonical Organization of Layer 1 Neuron-Led Cortical Inhibitory and Disinhibitory Interneuronal Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice J.; Wang, Guangfu; Jiang, Xiaolong; Johnson, Seraphina M.; Hoang, Elizabeth T.; Lanté, Fabien; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Beenhakker, Mark P.; Shen, Ying; Julius Zhu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Interneurons play a key role in cortical function and dysfunction, yet organization of cortical interneuronal circuitry remains poorly understood. Cortical Layer 1 (L1) contains 2 general GABAergic interneuron groups, namely single bouquet cells (SBCs) and elongated neurogliaform cells (ENGCs). SBCs predominantly make unidirectional inhibitory connections (SBC→) with L2/3 interneurons, whereas ENGCs frequently form reciprocal inhibitory and electric connections (ENGC↔) with L2/3 interneurons. Here, we describe a systematic investigation of the pyramidal neuron targets of L1 neuron-led interneuronal circuits in the rat barrel cortex with simultaneous octuple whole-cell recordings and report a simple organizational scheme of the interneuronal circuits. Both SBCs→ and ENGC ↔ L2/3 interneuronal circuits connect to L2/3 and L5, but not L6, pyramidal neurons. SBC → L2/3 interneuronal circuits primarily inhibit the entire dendritic–somato–axonal axis of a few L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons located within the same column. In contrast, ENGC ↔ L2/3 interneuronal circuits generally inhibit the distal apical dendrite of many L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons across multiple columns. Finally, L1 interneuron-led circuits target distinct subcellular compartments of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons in a L2/3 interneuron type-dependent manner. These results suggest that L1 neurons form canonical interneuronal circuits to control information processes in both supra- and infragranular cortical layers. PMID:24554728

  20. Canonical Organization of Layer 1 Neuron-Led Cortical Inhibitory and Disinhibitory Interneuronal Circuits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alice J; Wang, Guangfu; Jiang, Xiaolong; Johnson, Seraphina M; Hoang, Elizabeth T; Lanté, Fabien; Stornetta, Ruth L; Beenhakker, Mark P; Shen, Ying; Julius Zhu, J

    2015-08-01

    Interneurons play a key role in cortical function and dysfunction, yet organization of cortical interneuronal circuitry remains poorly understood. Cortical Layer 1 (L1) contains 2 general GABAergic interneuron groups, namely single bouquet cells (SBCs) and elongated neurogliaform cells (ENGCs). SBCs predominantly make unidirectional inhibitory connections (SBC→) with L2/3 interneurons, whereas ENGCs frequently form reciprocal inhibitory and electric connections (ENGC↔) with L2/3 interneurons. Here, we describe a systematic investigation of the pyramidal neuron targets of L1 neuron-led interneuronal circuits in the rat barrel cortex with simultaneous octuple whole-cell recordings and report a simple organizational scheme of the interneuronal circuits. Both SBCs→ and ENGC ↔ L2/3 interneuronal circuits connect to L2/3 and L5, but not L6, pyramidal neurons. SBC → L2/3 interneuronal circuits primarily inhibit the entire dendritic-somato-axonal axis of a few L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons located within the same column. In contrast, ENGC ↔ L2/3 interneuronal circuits generally inhibit the distal apical dendrite of many L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons across multiple columns. Finally, L1 interneuron-led circuits target distinct subcellular compartments of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons in a L2/3 interneuron type-dependent manner. These results suggest that L1 neurons form canonical interneuronal circuits to control information processes in both supra- and infragranular cortical layers.

  1. Excitatory input onto hilar somatostatin interneurons is increased in a chronic model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Halabisky, Brian; Parada, Isabel; Buckmaster, Paul S; Prince, David A

    2010-10-01

    The density of somatostatin (SOM)-containing GABAergic interneurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus is significantly decreased in both human and experimental temporal lobe epilepsy. We used the pilocarpine model of status epilepticus and temporal lobe epilepsy in mice to study anatomical and electrophysiological properties of surviving somatostatin interneurons and determine whether compensatory functional changes occur that might offset loss of other inhibitory neurons. Using standard patch-clamp techniques and pipettes containing biocytin, whole cell recordings were obtained in hippocampal slices maintained in vitro. Hilar SOM cells containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were identified with fluorescent and infrared differential interference contrast video microscopy in epileptic and control GIN (EGFP-expressing Inhibitory Neurons) mice. Results showed that SOM cells from epileptic mice had 1) significant increases in somatic area and dendritic length; 2) changes in membrane properties, including a small but significant decrease in resting membrane potential, and increases in time constant and whole cell capacitance; 3) increased frequency of slowly rising spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) due primarily to increased mEPSC frequency, without changes in the probability of release; 4) increased evoked EPSC amplitude; and 5) increased spontaneous action potential generation in cell-attached recordings. Results suggest an increase in excitatory innervation, perhaps on distal dendrites, considering the slower rising EPSCs and increased output of hilar SOM cells in this model of epilepsy. In sum, these changes would be expected to increase the inhibitory output of surviving SOM interneurons and in part compensate for interneuronal loss in the epileptogenic hippocampus.

  2. The Basolateral Amygdala GABAergic System in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prager, Eric M; Bergstrom, Hadley C; Wynn, Gary H; Braga, Maria F. M.

    2015-01-01

    The brain comprises an excitatory/inhibitory neuronal network that maintains a finely tuned balance of activity critical for normal functioning. Excitatory activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region that plays a central role in emotion and motivational processing, is tightly regulated by a relatively small population of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibitory neurons. Disruption in GABAergic inhibition in the BLA can occur when there is a loss of local GABAergic interneurons, alterations in GABAA receptor activation, or dysregulation of mechanisms that modulate BLA GABAergic inhibition. Disruptions in GABAergic control of the BLA emerge during development, in aging populations, or after a trauma, ultimately resulting in hyperexcitability. BLA hyperexcitability manifests behaviorally as an increase in anxiety, emotional dysregulation, or the development of seizure activity. This article reviews the anatomy, development, and physiology of the GABAergic system in the BLA, and circuits that modulate GABAergic inhibition, including the dopaminergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and cholinergic systems. We highlight how alterations in various neurotransmitter receptors, including the acid sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a), cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), and glutamate receptor subtypes, expressed on BLA interneurons, modulate GABAergic transmission and how defects of these systems affects inhibitory tonus within the BLA. Finally, we discuss alterations in the BLA GABAergic system in neurodevelopmental (autism/Fragile X syndrome) and neurodegenerative (Alzheimer’s disease) diseases, and after the development of epilepsy, anxiety, and traumatic brain injury. A more complete understanding of the intrinsic excitatory/inhibitory circuit balance of the amygdala and how imbalances in inhibitory control contribute to excessive BLA excitability will guide the development of novel therapeutic approaches in neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:26586374

  3. Quantitative Classification of Somatostatin-Positive Neocortical Interneurons Identifies Three Interneuron Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, Laura M.; Packer, Adam M.; Fino, Elodie; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Sippy, Tanya; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Deciphering the circuitry of the neocortex requires knowledge of its components, making a systematic classification of neocortical neurons necessary. GABAergic interneurons contribute most of the morphological, electrophysiological and molecular diversity of the cortex, yet interneuron subtypes are still not well defined. To quantitatively identify classes of interneurons, 59 GFP-positive interneurons from a somatostatin-positive mouse line were characterized by whole-cell recordings and anatomical reconstructions. For each neuron, we measured a series of physiological and morphological variables and analyzed these data using unsupervised classification methods. PCA and cluster analysis of morphological variables revealed three groups of cells: one comprised of Martinotti cells, and two other groups of interneurons with short asymmetric axons targeting layers 2/3 and bending medially. PCA and cluster analysis of electrophysiological variables also revealed the existence of these three groups of neurons, particularly with respect to action potential time course. These different morphological and electrophysiological characteristics could make each of these three interneuron subtypes particularly suited for a different function within the cortical circuit. PMID:20617186

  4. A hippocampal interneuron associated with the mossy fiber system.

    PubMed

    Vida, I; Frotscher, M

    2000-02-01

    Network properties of the hippocampus emerge from the interaction of principal cells and a heterogeneous population of interneurons expressing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To understand these interactions, the synaptic connections of different types of interneurons need to be elucidated. Here we describe a type of inhibitory interneuron of the hippocampal CA3 region that has an axon coaligned with the mossy fibers. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, in combination with intracellular biocytin filling, were made from nonpyramidal cells of the stratum lucidum under visual control. Mossy fiber-associated (MFA) interneurons generated brief action potentials followed by a prominent after-hyperpolarization. Subsequent visualization revealed an extensive axonal arbor which was preferentially located in the stratum lucidum of CA3 and often invaded the hilus. The dendrites of MFA interneurons were mainly located in the strata radiatum and oriens, suggesting that these cells are primarily activated by associational and commissural fibers. Electron microscopic analysis showed that axon terminals of MFA interneurons established symmetric synaptic contacts predominantly on proximal apical dendritic shafts, and to a lesser degree, on somata of pyramidal cells. Synaptic contacts were also found on GABAergic interneurons of the CA3 region and putative mossy cells of the hilus. Inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) elicited by MFA interneurons in simultaneously recorded pyramidal cells had fast kinetics (half duration, 3.6 ms) and were blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. Thus, MFA interneurons are GABAergic cells in a position to selectively suppress the mossy fiber input, an important requirement for the recall of memory traces from the CA3 network.

  5. A hippocampal interneuron associated with the mossy fiber system

    PubMed Central

    Vida, Imre; Frotscher, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Network properties of the hippocampus emerge from the interaction of principal cells and a heterogeneous population of interneurons expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To understand these interactions, the synaptic connections of different types of interneurons need to be elucidated. Here we describe a type of inhibitory interneuron of the hippocampal CA3 region that has an axon coaligned with the mossy fibers. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, in combination with intracellular biocytin filling, were made from nonpyramidal cells of the stratum lucidum under visual control. Mossy fiber-associated (MFA) interneurons generated brief action potentials followed by a prominent after-hyperpolarization. Subsequent visualization revealed an extensive axonal arbor which was preferentially located in the stratum lucidum of CA3 and often invaded the hilus. The dendrites of MFA interneurons were mainly located in the strata radiatum and oriens, suggesting that these cells are primarily activated by associational and commissural fibers. Electron microscopic analysis showed that axon terminals of MFA interneurons established symmetric synaptic contacts predominantly on proximal apical dendritic shafts, and to a lesser degree, on somata of pyramidal cells. Synaptic contacts were also found on GABAergic interneurons of the CA3 region and putative mossy cells of the hilus. Inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) elicited by MFA interneurons in simultaneously recorded pyramidal cells had fast kinetics (half duration, 3.6 ms) and were blocked by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. Thus, MFA interneurons are GABAergic cells in a position to selectively suppress the mossy fiber input, an important requirement for the recall of memory traces from the CA3 network. PMID:10655521

  6. GABAergic networks jump-start focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Marco; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Abnormally enhanced glutamatergic excitation is commonly believed to mark the onset of a focal seizure. This notion, however, is not supported by firm evidence, and it will be challenged here. A general reduction of unit firing has been indeed observed in association with low-voltage fast activity at the onset of seizures recorded during presurgical intracranial monitoring in patients with focal, drug-resistant epilepsies. Moreover, focal seizures in animal models start with increased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneuronal activity that silences principal cells. In vitro studies have shown that synchronous activation of GABAA receptors occurs at seizure onset and causes sizeable elevations in extracellular potassium, thus facilitating neuronal recruitment and seizure progression. A paradoxical involvement of GABAergic networks is required for the initiation of focal seizures characterized by low-voltage fast activity, which represents the most common seizure-onset pattern in focal epilepsies. PMID:27061793

  7. Synaptic reorganization of inhibitory hilar interneuron circuitry after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Robert F; Scheff, Stephen W; Smith, Bret N

    2011-05-04

    Functional plasticity of synaptic networks in the dentate gyrus has been implicated in the development of posttraumatic epilepsy and in cognitive dysfunction after traumatic brain injury, but little is known about potentially pathogenic changes in inhibitory circuits. We examined synaptic inhibition of dentate granule cells and excitability of surviving GABAergic hilar interneurons 8-13 weeks after cortical contusion brain injury in transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein in a subpopulation of inhibitory neurons. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in granule cells revealed a reduction in spontaneous and miniature IPSC frequency after head injury; no concurrent change in paired-pulse ratio was found in granule cells after paired electrical stimulation of the hilus. Despite reduced inhibitory input to granule cells, action potential and EPSC frequencies were increased in hilar GABA neurons from slices ipsilateral to the injury versus those from control or contralateral slices. Furthermore, increased excitatory synaptic activity was detected in hilar GABA neurons ipsilateral to the injury after glutamate photostimulation of either the granule cell or CA3 pyramidal cell layers. Together, these findings suggest that excitatory drive to surviving hilar GABA neurons is enhanced by convergent input from both pyramidal and granule cells, but synaptic inhibition of granule cells is not fully restored after injury. This rewiring of circuitry regulating hilar inhibitory neurons may reflect an important compensatory mechanism, but it may also contribute to network destabilization by increasing the relative impact of surviving individual interneurons in controlling granule cell excitability in the posttraumatic dentate gyrus.

  8. Interneurons spark seizure-like activity in the entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Maxime; Herrington, Rochelle; Hamidi, Shabnam; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Excessive neuronal synchronization is presumably involved in epileptiform synchronization. However, the respective roles played by interneurons (GABAergic) and principal (glutamatergic) cells during interictal and ictal discharges remain unclear. Here, we employed tetrode wire recordings to establish the involvement of these two cell types in 4-aminopyridine-induced interictal- and low-voltage fast (LVF) onset ictal-like discharges in the rat entorhinal cortex in an in vitro slice preparation. We recorded a total of 90 single units (69 putative interneurons, 17 putative principal and 4 unclassified cells) from 36 slices, and found that: (i) interneurons (66.7%) were more likely to fire during interictal discharges than principal cells (35.3%); (ii) interneuron activity increased shortly before LVF ictal onset, whereas principal cell activity did not change; (iii) interneurons and principal cells fired at high rates throughout the tonic phase of the ictal discharge; however, (iv) only interneurons showed phase-locked relationship with LVF activity at 5-15Hz during the tonic phase. Finally, the association of interneuron firing with interictal discharges was maintained during blockade of ionotropic glutamatergic transmission. Our findings demonstrate the prominent involvement of interneurons in interictal discharge generation and in the transition to LVF ictal activity in this in vitro model of epileptiform synchronization.

  9. Rat hippocampal GABAergic molecular markers are differentially affected by ageing.

    PubMed

    Vela, José; Gutierrez, Antonia; Vitorica, Javier; Ruano, Diego

    2003-04-01

    We previously reported that the pharmacological properties of the hippocampal GABAA receptor and the expression of several subunits are modified during normal ageing. However, correlation between these post-synaptic modifications and pre-synaptic deficits were not determined. To address this issue, we have analysed the mRNA levels of several GABAergic molecular markers in young and old rat hippocampus, including glutamic acid decarboxylase enzymes, parvalbumin, calretinin, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). There was a differential age-related decrease in these interneuronal mRNAs that was inversely correlated with up-regulation of the alpha1 GABA receptor subunit. Somatostatin and neuropeptide Y mRNAs were most frequently affected (75% of the animals), then calretinin and VIP mRNAs (50% of the animals), and parvalbumin mRNA (25% of the animals) in the aged hippocampus. This selective vulnerability was well correlated at the protein/cellular level as analysed by immunocytochemistry. Somatostatin interneurones, which mostly innervate principal cell distal dendrites, were more vulnerable than calretinin interneurones, which target other interneurones. Parvalbumin interneurones, which mostly innervate perisomatic domains of principal cells, were preserved. This age-dependent differential reduction of specific hippocampal inteneuronal subpopulations might produce functional alterations in the GABAergic tone which might be compensated, at the post-synaptic level, by up-regulation of the expression of the alpha1 GABAA receptor subunit.

  10. Parvalbumin-Positive Inhibitory Interneurons Oppose Propagation But Favor Generation of Focal Epileptiform Activity.

    PubMed

    Sessolo, Michele; Marcon, Iacopo; Bovetti, Serena; Losi, Gabriele; Cammarota, Mario; Ratto, Gian Michele; Fellin, Tommaso; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2015-07-01

    Parvalbumin (Pv)-positive inhibitory interneurons effectively control network excitability, and their optogenetic activation has been reported to block epileptic seizures. An intense activity in GABAergic interneurons, including Pv interneurons, before seizures has been described in different experimental models of epilepsy, raising the hypothesis that an increased GABAergic inhibitory signal may, under certain conditions, initiate seizures. It is therefore unclear whether the activity of Pv interneurons enhances or opposes epileptiform activities. Here we use a mouse cortical slice model of focal epilepsy in which the epileptogenic focus can be identified and the role of Pv interneurons in the generation and propagation of seizure-like ictal events is accurately analyzed by a combination of optogenetic, electrophysiological, and imaging techniques. We found that a selective activation of Pv interneurons at the focus failed to block ictal generation and induced postinhibitory rebound spiking in pyramidal neurons, enhancing neuronal synchrony and promoting ictal generation. In contrast, a selective activation of Pv interneurons distant from the focus blocked ictal propagation and shortened ictal duration at the focus. We revealed that the reduced ictal duration was a direct consequence of the ictal propagation block, probably by preventing newly generated afterdischarges to travel backwards to the original focus of ictal initiation. Similar results were obtained upon individual Pv interneuron activation by intracellular depolarizing current pulses. The functional dichotomy of Pv interneurons here described opens new perspectives to our understanding of how local inhibitory circuits govern generation and spread of focal epileptiform activities.

  11. Striatal cholinergic interneurons Drive GABA release from dopamine terminals.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Alexandra B; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F; Shah, Nirao M; Seal, Rebecca P; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2014-04-02

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. New dimensions of interneuronal specialization unmasked by principal cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Varga, Csaba; Lee, Sang-Hun; Soltesz, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    While the diversity of neocortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons is recognized in terms of their anatomical, molecular, and functional properties, principal cells are usually assumed to constitute homogenous populations. However, even within a single layer, subpopulations of principal cells can often be differentiated by their distinct long-range projection targets. Such subpopulations of principal cells can have different local connection properties and excitatory inputs, forming subnetworks that may serve as separate information-processing channels. Interestingly, as reviewed here, recent evidence has revealed specific instances where interneuron cell types selectively innervated distinct subpopulations of principal cells, targeting only those with particular long-distance projection targets. This organization represents a novel form of interneuron specialization, providing interneurons with the potential to selectively regulate specific information-processing streams. PMID:22119146

  13. Striatal cholinergic interneurons drive GABA release from dopamine terminals

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexandra B.; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F.; Shah, Nirao M.; Seal, Rebecca P.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically-driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons, but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons. PMID:24613418

  14. Multiple facets of GABAergic neurons and synapses: multiple fates of GABA signalling in epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Cossart, Rosa; Bernard, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2005-02-01

    Because blocking GABAergic neurotransmission in control tissue generates seizures and because GABA boosters control epilepsy in many patients, studies on epilepsies have been dominated by the axiom that seizures are generated by a failure of GABA-mediated inhibition. However, GABAergic interneurons and synapses are heterogeneous and have many roles that go beyond the straightforward concept of "inhibition of the target". Operation of such a diversified system cannot be ascribed to a single mechanism. In epileptic tissue, GABAergic networks undergo complex rewiring at the anatomical, physiological and functional levels; GABAergic synapses are still operative but show unique features, including excitatory effects. Therefore, inhibition is not a uniform notion and the concept of "failure" of inhibition in epilepsies must be reassessed. Seizures are not generated in a normal circuit in which GABA-mediated inhibition is simply impaired, but in a profoundly rewired network in which several properties of GABA function are altered. This review is part of the TINS Interneuron Diversity series.

  15. Cortical plasticity induced by transplantation of embryonic somatostatin or parvalbumin interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yunshuo; Stryker, Michael P; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Espinosa, Juan Sebastian

    2014-12-23

    GABAergic inhibition has been shown to play an important role in the opening of critical periods of brain plasticity. We recently have shown that transplantation of GABAergic precursors from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), the source of neocortical parvalbumin- (PV(+)) and somatostatin-expressing (SST(+)) interneurons, can induce a new period of ocular dominance plasticity (ODP) after the endogenous period has closed. Among the diverse subtypes of GABAergic interneurons PV(+) cells have been thought to play the crucial role in ODP. Here we have used MGE transplantation carrying a conditional allele of diphtheria toxin alpha subunit and cell-specific expression of Cre recombinase to deplete PV(+) or SST(+) interneurons selectively and to investigate the contributions of each of these types of interneurons to ODP. As expected, robust plasticity was observed in transplants containing PV(+) cells but in which the majority of SST(+) interneurons were depleted. Surprisingly, transplants in which the majority of PV(+) cells were depleted induced plasticity as effectively as those containing PV(+) cells. In contrast, depleting both cell types blocked induction of plasticity. These findings reveal that PV(+) cells do not play an exclusive role in ODP; SST(+) interneurons also can drive cortical plasticity and contribute to the reshaping of neural networks. The ability of both PV(+) and SST(+) interneurons to induce de novo cortical plasticity could help develop new therapeutic approaches for brain repair.

  16. Distinct behavioral consequences of short-term and prolonged GABAergic depletion in prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Judith M.; Nissel, Sabine; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mederer, Anna; Käfer, Karola; Bedenk, Benedikt T.; Martens, Henrik; Anders, Rebecca; Grosche, Jens; Michalski, Dominik; Härtig, Wolfgang; Wotjak, Carsten T.

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons are essential for a functional equilibrium between excitatory and inhibitory impulses throughout the CNS. Disruption of this equilibrium can lead to various neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders such as epilepsy or schizophrenia. Schizophrenia itself is clinically defined by negative (e.g., depression) and positive (e.g., hallucinations) symptoms as well as cognitive dysfunction. GABAergic interneurons are proposed to play a central role in the etiology and progression of schizophrenia; however, the specific mechanisms and the time-line of symptom development as well as the distinct involvement of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in the etiology of schizophrenia-related symptoms are still not conclusively resolved. Previous work demonstrated that GABAergic interneurons can be selectively depleted in adult mice by means of saporin-conjugated anti-vesicular GABA transporter antibodies (SAVAs) in vitro and in vivo. Given their involvement in schizophrenia-related disease etiology, we ablated GABAergic interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) in adult male C57BL/6N mice. Subsequently we assessed alterations in anxiety, sensory processing, hyperactivity and cognition after long-term (>14 days) and short-term (<14 days) GABAergic depletion. Long-term GABAergic depletion in the mPFC resulted in a decrease in sensorimotor-gating and impairments in cognitive flexibility. Notably, the same treatment at the level of the dHPC completely abolished spatial learning capabilities. Short-term GABAergic depletion in the dHPC revealed a transient hyperactive phenotype as well as marked impairments regarding the acquisition of a spatial memory. In contrast, recall of a spatial memory was not affected by the same intervention. These findings emphasize the importance of functional local GABAergic networks for the encoding but not the recall of hippocampus-dependent spatial memories. PMID:25628548

  17. Distinct behavioral consequences of short-term and prolonged GABAergic depletion in prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Judith M; Nissel, Sabine; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mederer, Anna; Käfer, Karola; Bedenk, Benedikt T; Martens, Henrik; Anders, Rebecca; Grosche, Jens; Michalski, Dominik; Härtig, Wolfgang; Wotjak, Carsten T

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons are essential for a functional equilibrium between excitatory and inhibitory impulses throughout the CNS. Disruption of this equilibrium can lead to various neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders such as epilepsy or schizophrenia. Schizophrenia itself is clinically defined by negative (e.g., depression) and positive (e.g., hallucinations) symptoms as well as cognitive dysfunction. GABAergic interneurons are proposed to play a central role in the etiology and progression of schizophrenia; however, the specific mechanisms and the time-line of symptom development as well as the distinct involvement of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in the etiology of schizophrenia-related symptoms are still not conclusively resolved. Previous work demonstrated that GABAergic interneurons can be selectively depleted in adult mice by means of saporin-conjugated anti-vesicular GABA transporter antibodies (SAVAs) in vitro and in vivo. Given their involvement in schizophrenia-related disease etiology, we ablated GABAergic interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) in adult male C57BL/6N mice. Subsequently we assessed alterations in anxiety, sensory processing, hyperactivity and cognition after long-term (>14 days) and short-term (<14 days) GABAergic depletion. Long-term GABAergic depletion in the mPFC resulted in a decrease in sensorimotor-gating and impairments in cognitive flexibility. Notably, the same treatment at the level of the dHPC completely abolished spatial learning capabilities. Short-term GABAergic depletion in the dHPC revealed a transient hyperactive phenotype as well as marked impairments regarding the acquisition of a spatial memory. In contrast, recall of a spatial memory was not affected by the same intervention. These findings emphasize the importance of functional local GABAergic networks for the encoding but not the recall of hippocampus-dependent spatial memories.

  18. GABAergic hub neurons orchestrate synchrony in developing hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Bonifazi, P; Goldin, M; Picardo, M A; Jorquera, I; Cattani, A; Bianconi, G; Represa, A; Ben-Ari, Y; Cossart, R

    2009-12-04

    Brain function operates through the coordinated activation of neuronal assemblies. Graph theory predicts that scale-free topologies, which include "hubs" (superconnected nodes), are an effective design to orchestrate synchronization. Whether hubs are present in neuronal assemblies and coordinate network activity remains unknown. Using network dynamics imaging, online reconstruction of functional connectivity, and targeted whole-cell recordings in rats and mice, we found that developing hippocampal networks follow a scale-free topology, and we demonstrated the existence of functional hubs. Perturbation of a single hub influenced the entire network dynamics. Morphophysiological analysis revealed that hub cells are a subpopulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid-releasing (GABAergic) interneurons possessing widespread axonal arborizations. These findings establish a central role for GABAergic interneurons in shaping developing networks and help provide a conceptual framework for studying neuronal synchrony.

  19. Diversity of Cortical Interneurons in Primates: The Role of the Dorsal Proliferative Niche

    PubMed Central

    Radonjić, Nevena V.; Ayoub, Albert E.; Memi, Fani; Yu, Xiaojing; Maroof, Asif; Jakovcevski, Igor; Anderson, Stewart A.; Rakic, Pasko; Zecevic, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Summary Evolutionary elaboration of tissues starts with changes in the genome and location of the stem cells. For example, GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian neocortex are generated in the ventral telencephalon and migrate tangentially to the neocortex, in contrast to the projection neurons originating in the ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ) of the dorsal telencephalon. In human and nonhuman primates, evidence suggests that an additional subset of neocortical GABAergic interneurons is generated in the cortical VZ and a proliferative niche, the outer SVZ. The origin, magnitude, and significance of this species-specific difference are not known. We use a battery of assays applicable to the human, monkey, and mouse organotypic cultures and supravital tissue to identify neuronal progenitors in the cortical VZ/SVZ niche that produce a subset of GABAergic interneurons. Our findings suggest that these progenitors constitute an evolutionary novelty contributing to the elaboration of higher cognitive functions in primates. PMID:25497090

  20. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from morphologically- and neurochemically-identified hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Booker, Sam A; Song, Jie; Vida, Imre

    2014-09-30

    GABAergic inhibitory interneurons play a central role within neuronal circuits of the brain. Interneurons comprise a small subset of the neuronal population (10-20%), but show a high level of physiological, morphological, and neurochemical heterogeneity, reflecting their diverse functions. Therefore, investigation of interneurons provides important insights into the organization principles and function of neuronal circuits. This, however, requires an integrated physiological and neuroanatomical approach for the selection and identification of individual interneuron types. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording from acute brain slices of transgenic animals, expressing fluorescent proteins under the promoters of interneuron-specific markers, provides an efficient method to target and electrophysiologically characterize intrinsic and synaptic properties of specific interneuron types. Combined with intracellular dye labeling, this approach can be extended with post-hoc morphological and immunocytochemical analysis, enabling systematic identification of recorded neurons. These methods can be tailored to suit a broad range of scientific questions regarding functional properties of diverse types of cortical neurons.

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Activity-Dependent GABAergic Synapse Development and Plasticity and Its Implications for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha

    2011-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons are critical for the normal function and development of neural circuits, and their dysfunction is implicated in a large number of neurodevelopmental disorders. Experience and activity-dependent mechanisms play an important role in GABAergic circuit development, also recent studies involve a number of molecular players involved in the process. Emphasizing the molecular mechanisms of GABAergic synapse formation, in particular basket cell perisomatic synapses, this paper draws attention to the links between critical period plasticity, GABAergic synapse maturation, and the consequences of its dysfunction on the development of the nervous system. PMID:21826279

  2. Mu opioid receptors are in discrete hippocampal interneuron subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Drake, Carrie T; Milner, Teresa A

    2002-01-01

    In the rat hippocampal formation, application of mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonists disinhibits principal cells, promoting excitation-dependent processes such as epileptogenesis and long-term potentiation. However, the precise location of MORs in particular inhibitory circuits, has not been determined, and the roles of MORs in endogenous functioning are unclear. To address these issues, the distribution of MOR-like immunoreactivity (-li) was examined in several populations of inhibitory hippocampal neurons in the CA1 region using light and electron microscopy. We found that MOR-li was present in many parvalbumin-containing basket cells, but absent from cholecystokinin-labeled basket cells. MOR-li was also commonly in interneurons containing somatostatin-li or neuropeptide Y-li that resembled the "oriens-lacunosum-moleculare" (O-LM) interneurons innervating pyramidal cell distal dendrites. Finally, MOR-li was in some vasoactive intestinal peptide- or calretinin-containing profiles resembling interneurons that primarily innervate other interneurons. These findings indicate that MOR-containing neurons form a neurochemically and functionally heterogeneous subset of hippocampal GABAergic neurons. MORs are most frequently on interneurons that are specialized to inhibit pyramidal cells, and are on a limited number of interneurons that target other interneurons. Moreover, the distribution of MORs to different neuronal types in several laminae, some relatively far from endogenous opioids, suggests normal functional roles that are different from the actions seen with exogenous agonists such as morphine.

  3. Medial septal and median raphe innervation of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing interneurons in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Papp, E C; Hajos, N; Acsády, L; Freund, T F

    1999-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-immunoreactive interneurons are known to form three anatomically and neurochemically well-characterized neuron populations in the hippocampus. Two of these establish synaptic contacts selectively with other GABAergic cells (interneuron-selective cells), whereas the third type innervates pyramidal cell bodies and proximal dendrites like a conventional basket cell. Our aim was to examine which of the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing interneuron populations are among the targets of GABAergic septohippocampal and serotonergic raphe-hippocampal pathways. Anterograde tracing with Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin combined with double immunocytochemistry for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide was used at the light and electron microscopic levels. Our results show that both interneuron-selective cells and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing basket cells receive synaptic input from the medial septum and median raphe nucleus. The GABAergic component of the septohippocampal pathway establishes multiple contacts on both cell types. In the case of the raphe-hippocampal projection, single or double contacts were more frequent on vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive interneuron selective cells (76%), whereas multiple contacts predominated on basket cells (83%). The extrinsic GABAergic innervation of interneuron-selective cells in the hippocampus indicates a complex interaction among GABAergic systems, which might ensure the timing and rhythmic synchronization of inhibitory processes in the hippocampus. On the other hand, our results suggest that the serotonergic effect on perisomatic inhibition is exerted via vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing basket cells that are functionally distinct from their parvalbumin-positive relatives, which appear to escape control of serotonergic as well as local interneuron-selective cells.

  4. Cryopreservation of GABAergic Neuronal Precursors for Cell-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are essential for stem cells storage in order to apply them in the clinic. Here we describe a new standardized cryopreservation protocol for GABAergic neural precursors derived from the medial glanglionic eminence (MGE), a promising source of GABAergic neuronal progenitors for cell therapy against interneuron-related pathologies. We used 10% Me2SO as cryoprotectant and assessed the effects of cell culture amplification and cellular organization, as in toto explants, neurospheres, or individualized cells, on post-thaw cell viability and retrieval. We confirmed that in toto cryopreservation of MGE explants is an optimal preservation system to keep intact the interneuron precursor properties for cell transplantation, together with a high cell viability (>80%) and yield (>70%). Post-thaw proliferation and self-renewal of the cryopreserved precursors were tested in vitro. In addition, their migration capacity, acquisition of mature neuronal morphology, and potency to differentiate into multiple interneuron subtypes were also confirmed in vivo after transplantation. The results show that the cryopreserved precursor features remained intact and were similar to those immediately transplanted after their dissection from the MGE. We hope this protocol will facilitate the generation of biobanks to obtain a permanent and reliable source of GABAergic precursors for clinical application in cell-based therapies against interneuronopathies. PMID:28122047

  5. Parvalbumin-producing cortical interneurons receive inhibitory inputs on proximal portions and cortical excitatory inputs on distal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Hiroshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyo H; Tanaka, Takuma; Sohn, Jaerin; Sonomura, Takahiro; Furuta, Takahiro; Fujiyama, Fumino; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2012-03-01

    To examine inputs to parvalbumin (PV)-producing interneurons, we generated transgenic mice expressing somatodendritic membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein specifically in the interneurons, and completely visualized their dendrites and somata. Using immunolabeling for vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT)1, VGluT2, and vesicular GABA transporter, we found that VGluT1-positive terminals made contacts 4- and 3.1-fold more frequently with PV-producing interneurons than VGluT2-positive and GABAergic terminals, respectively, in the primary somatosensory cortex. Even in layer 4, where VGluT2-positive terminals were most densely distributed, VGluT1-positive inputs to PV-producing interneurons were 2.4-fold more frequent than VGluT2-positive inputs. Furthermore, although GABAergic inputs to PV-producing interneurons were as numerous as VGluT2-positive inputs in most cortical layers, GABAergic inputs clearly preferred the proximal dendrites and somata of the interneurons, indicating that the sites of GABAergic inputs were more optimized than those of VGluT2-positive inputs. Simulation analysis with a PV-producing interneuron model compatible with the present morphological data revealed a plausible reason for this observation, by showing that GABAergic and glutamatergic postsynaptic potentials evoked by inputs to distal dendrites were attenuated to 60 and 87%, respectively, of those evoked by somatic inputs. As VGluT1-positive and VGluT2-positive axon terminals were presumed to be cortical and thalamic glutamatergic inputs, respectively, cortical excitatory inputs to PV-producing interneurons outnumbered the thalamic excitatory and intrinsic inhibitory inputs more than two-fold in any cortical layer. Although thalamic inputs are known to evoke about two-fold larger unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials than cortical ones, the present results suggest that cortical inputs control PV-producing interneurons at least as strongly as thalamic inputs.

  6. Relationships between the Firing of Identified Striatal Interneurons and Spontaneous and Driven Cortical Activities In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sharott, Andrew; Doig, Natalie M.; Mallet, Nicolas; Magill, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The striatum is comprised of medium-sized spiny projection neurons (MSNs) and several types of interneuron, and receives massive glutamatergic input from the cerebral cortex. Understanding of striatal function requires definition of the electrophysiological properties of neurochemically identified interneurons sampled in the same context of ongoing cortical activity in vivo. To address this, we recorded the firing of cholinergic interneurons (expressing choline acetyltransferase; ChAT) and GABAergic interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV) or nitric oxide synthase (NOS), as well as MSNs, in anesthetized rats during cortically defined brain states. Depending on the cortical state, these interneurons were partly distinguished from each other, and MSNs, on the basis of firing rate and/or pattern. During slow-wave activity (SWA), ChAT+ interneurons, and some PV+ and NOS+ interneurons, were tonically active; NOS+ interneurons fired prominent bursts but, contrary to investigations in vitro, these were not typical low-threshold spike bursts. Identified MSNs, and other PV+ and NOS+ interneurons, were phasically active. Contrasting with ChAT+ interneurons, whose firing showed poor brain state dependency, PV+ and NOS+ interneurons displayed robust firing increases and decreases, respectively, upon spontaneous or driven transitions from SWA to cortical activation. The firing of most neurons was phase locked to cortical slow oscillations, but only PV+ and ChAT+ interneurons also fired in time with cortical spindle and gamma oscillations. Complementing this diverse temporal coupling, each interneuron type exhibited distinct responses to cortical stimulation. Thus, these striatal interneuron types have distinct temporal signatures in vivo, including relationships to spontaneous and driven cortical activities, which likely underpin their specialized contributions to striatal microcircuit function. PMID:22993438

  7. Mutual Control of Cholinergic and Low-Threshold Spike Interneurons in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Elghaba, Rasha; Vautrelle, Nicolas; Bracci, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is the largest nucleus of the basal ganglia and is crucially involved in action selection and reward processing. Cortical and thalamic inputs to the striatum are processed by local networks in which several classes of interneurons play an important, but still poorly understood role. Here we investigated the interactions between cholinergic and low-threshold spike (LTS) interneurons. LTS interneurons were hyperpolarized by co-application of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor antagonists (atropine and mecamylamine, respectively). Mecamylamine alone also caused hyperpolarizations, while atropine alone caused depolarizations and increased firing. LTS interneurons were also under control of tonic GABA, as application of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin caused depolarizations and increased firing. Frequency of spontaneous GABAergic events in LTS interneurons was increased by co-application of atropine and mecamylamine or by atropine alone, but reduced by mecamylamine alone. In the presence of picrotoxin and tetrodotoxin (TTX), atropine and mecamylamine depolarized the LTS interneurons. We concluded that part of the excitatory effects of tonic acetylcholine (ACh) on LTS interneurons were due to cholinergic modulation of tonic GABA. We then studied the influence of LTS interneurons on cholinergic interneurons. Application of antagonists of somatostatin or neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors or of an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME) did not cause detectable effects in cholinergic interneurons. However, prolonged synchronized depolarizations of LTS interneurons (elicited with optogenetics tools) caused slow-onset depolarizations in cholinergic interneurons, which were often accompanied by strong action potential firing and were fully abolished by L-NAME. Thus, a mutual excitatory influence exists between LTS and cholinergic interneurons in the striatum, providing an opportunity for sustained activation of the two cell types. This activation may

  8. Regulation of cortical microcircuits by unitary GABAergic volume transmission

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Szabolcs; Füle, Miklós; Komlósi, Gergely; Varga, Csaba; Báldi, Rita; Barzó, Pál; Tamás, Gábor

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is predominantly released by local interneurons in the cerebral cortex to particular subcellular domains of the target cells1,2. This suggests that compartmentalized, synapse specific action of GABA is required in cortical networks for phasic inhibition2–4. However, GABA released at the synaptic cleft diffuses to receptors outside the postsynaptic density and thus tonically activates extrasynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors, which include subtypes of both receptor families especially sensitive to low concentrations of GABA3–7. The synaptic and extrasynaptic action of GABA is in line with idea that neurons of the brain use synaptic (or wiring) transmission and nonsynaptic (or volume) transmission for communication8,9. However, reuptake mechanisms restrict the spatial extent of extrasynaptic GABAergic effects10,11 and it was proposed that concerted action of several presynaptic interneurons or sustained firing of individual cells or increased release site density is required to reach ambient GABA levels sufficient to activate extrasynaptic receptors4,9,11–13. Here we show that individual neurogliaform cells release GABA sufficient for volume transmission within the axonal cloud and thus neurogliaform cells do not require synapses to produce inhibitory responses in the overwhelming majority of nearby neurons. Neurogliaform cells suppress connections between other neurons acting on presynaptic terminals which do not receive synapses at all in the cerebral cortex and, moreover, reach extrasynaptic, δ subunit containing GABAA (GABAAδ) receptors responsible for tonic inhibition. We reveal that GABAAδ receptors are localized to neurogliaform cells preferentially among cortical interneurons. Neurosteroids, which are modulators of GABAAδ receptors, alter unitary GABAergic effects between neurogliaform cells. In contrast to the specifically placed synapses formed by other interneurons, the output of neurosteroid sensitive neurogliaform

  9. Interneurons targeting similar layers receive synaptic inputs with similar kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cossart, Rosa; Petanjek, Zdravko; Dumitriu, Dani; Hirsch, June C; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Esclapez, Monique; Bernard, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons play diverse and important roles in controlling neuronal network dynamics. They are characterized by an extreme heterogeneity morphologically, neurochemically, and physiologically, but a functionally relevant classification is still lacking. Present taxonomy is essentially based on their postsynaptic targets, but a physiological counterpart to this classification has not yet been determined. Using a quantitative analysis based on multidimensional clustering of morphological and physiological variables, we now demonstrate a strong correlation between the kinetics of glutamate and GABA miniature synaptic currents received by CA1 hippocampal interneurons and the laminar distribution of their axons: neurons that project to the same layer(s) receive synaptic inputs with similar kinetics distributions. In contrast, the kinetics distributions of GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic events received by a given interneuron do not depend upon its somatic location or dendritic arborization. Although the mechanisms responsible for this unexpected observation are still unclear, our results suggest that interneurons may be programmed to receive synaptic currents with specific temporal dynamics depending on their targets and the local networks in which they operate.

  10. Developmental origin dictates interneuron AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit composition and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Matta, Jose A; Pelkey, Kenneth A; Craig, Michael T; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Jeffries, Brian W; McBain, Chris J

    2013-08-01

    Disrupted excitatory synapse maturation in GABAergic interneurons may promote neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. However, establishing developmental programs for nascent synapses in GABAergic cells is confounded by their sparsity, heterogeneity and late acquisition of subtype-defining characteristics. We investigated synaptic development in mouse interneurons targeting cells by lineage from medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) or caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) progenitors. MGE-derived interneuron synapses were dominated by GluA2-lacking AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), with little contribution from NMDA-type receptors (NMDARs) throughout development. In contrast, CGE-derived cell synapses had large NMDAR components and used GluA2-containing AMPARs. In neonates, both MGE- and CGE-derived interneurons expressed primarily GluN2B subunit-containing NMDARs, which most CGE-derived interneurons retained into adulthood. However, MGE-derived interneuron NMDARs underwent a GluN2B-to-GluN2A switch that could be triggered acutely with repetitive synaptic activity. Our findings establish ganglionic eminence-dependent rules for early synaptic integration programs of distinct interneuron cohorts, including parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing basket cells.

  11. GABA interneurons mediate the rapid antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine

    PubMed Central

    Wohleb, Eric S.; Wu, Min; Gerhard, Danielle M.; Taylor, Seth R.; Picciotto, Marina R.; Alreja, Meenakshi; Duman, Ronald S.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a recurring psychiatric illness that causes substantial health and socioeconomic burdens. Clinical reports have revealed that scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, produces rapid antidepressant effects in individuals with MDD. Preclinical models suggest that these rapid antidepressant effects can be recapitulated with blockade of M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M1-AChR); however, the cellular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent synaptic and behavioral responses to scopolamine have not been determined. Here, we demonstrate that the antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine are mediated by GABA interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Both GABAergic (GAD67+) interneurons and glutamatergic (CaMKII+) interneurons in the mPFC expressed M1-AChR. In mice, viral-mediated knockdown of M1-AChR specifically in GABAergic neurons, but not glutamatergic neurons, in the mPFC attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine. Immunohistology and electrophysiology showed that somatostatin (SST) interneurons in the mPFC express M1-AChR at higher levels than parvalbumin interneurons. Moreover, knockdown of M1-AChR in SST interneurons in the mPFC demonstrated that M1-AChR expression in these neurons is required for the rapid antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine. These data indicate that SST interneurons in the mPFC are a promising pharmacological target for developing rapid-acting antidepressant therapies. PMID:27270172

  12. Cell type-specific tuning of hippocampal interneuron firing during gamma oscillations in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tukker, John J; Fuentealba, Pablo; Hartwich, Katja; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Cortical gamma oscillations contribute to cognitive processing and are thought to be supported by perisomatic-innervating GABAergic interneurons. We performed extracellular recordings of identified interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 area of anesthetized rats, revealing that the firing patterns of five distinct interneuron types are differentially correlated to spontaneous gamma oscillations. The firing of bistratified cells, which target dendrites of pyramidal cells coaligned with the glutamatergic input from hippocampal area CA3, is strongly phase locked to field gamma oscillations. Parvalbumin-expressing basket, axo-axonic, and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons exhibit moderate gamma modulation, whereas the spike timing of distal dendrite-innervating oriens-lacunosum moleculare interneurons is not correlated to field gamma oscillations. Cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons fire earliest in the gamma cycle, a finding that is consistent with their suggested function of thresholding individual pyramidal cells. Furthermore, we show that field gamma amplitude correlates with interneuronal spike-timing precision and firing rate. Overall, our recordings suggest that gamma synchronization in vivo is assisted by temporal- and domain-specific GABAergic inputs to pyramidal cells and is initiated in pyramidal cell dendrites in addition to somata and axon initial segments.

  13. Aging in the rat hippocampus is associated with widespread reductions in the number of glutamate decarboxylase-67 positive interneurons but not interneuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dirk P; Shetty, Ashok K

    2004-04-01

    Increased excitability of principal excitatory neurons is one of the hallmarks of aging in the hippocampus, signifying a diminution in the number and/or function of inhibitory interneurons with aging. To elucidate this, we performed comprehensive GABA-ergic interneuron cell counts in all layers of the dentate gyrus and the CA1 and CA3 subfields, using serial sections from adult, middle-aged and aged Fischer 344 rats. Sections were immunostained for glutamate decarboxylase-67 (GAD-67, a synthesizing enzyme of GABA) and GAD-67 immunopositive interneurons were counted using an unbiased cell counting method, the optical fractionator. Substantial declines in the absolute number of GAD-67 immunopositive interneurons were found in all hippocampal layers/subfields of middle-aged and aged animals, in comparison with the adult animals. However, the counts were comparable between the middle-aged and aged groups for all regions. Interestingly, determination of the absolute number of interneurons using neuron-specific nuclear antigen (NeuN) expression in the strata oriens and radiatum of CA1 and CA3 subfields revealed an analogous number of interneurons across the three age groups. Furthermore, the ratio of GAD-67 immunopositive and NeuN positive interneurons decreased from adult age to middle age but remained relatively static between middle age and old age. Collectively, the results underscore that aging in the hippocampus is associated with wide-ranging decreases in the number of GAD-67 immunopositive interneurons and most of the age-related changes in GAD-67 immunopositive interneuron numbers transpire by middle age. Additionally, this study provides novel evidence that age-related reductions in hippocampal GAD-67 immunopositive interneuron numbers are due to loss of GAD-67 expression in interneurons rather than interneuron degeneration.

  14. Dense, unspecific connectivity of neocortical parvalbumin-positive interneurons: a canonical microcircuit for inhibition?

    PubMed

    Packer, Adam M; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-09-14

    GABAergic interneurons play a major role in the function of the mammalian neocortex, but their circuit connectivity is still poorly understood. We used two-photon RuBi-Glutamate uncaging to optically map how the largest population of cortical interneurons, the parvalbumin-positive cells (PV+), are connected to pyramidal cells (PCs) in mouse neocortex. We found locally dense connectivity from PV+ interneurons onto PCs across cortical areas and layers. In many experiments, all nearby PV+ cells were connected to every local PC sampled. In agreement with this, we found no evidence for connection specificity, as PV+ interneurons contacted PC pairs similarly regardless of whether they were synaptically connected or not. We conclude that the microcircuit architecture for PV+ interneurons, and probably neocortical inhibition in general, is an unspecific, densely homogenous matrix covering all nearby pyramidal cells.

  15. Regulation of interneuron excitability by gap junction coupling with principal cells.

    PubMed

    Apostolides, Pierre F; Trussell, Laurence O

    2013-12-01

    Electrical coupling of inhibitory interneurons can synchronize activity across multiple neurons, thereby enhancing the reliability of inhibition onto principal cell targets. It is unclear whether downstream activity in principal cells controls the excitability of such inhibitory networks. Using paired patch-clamp recordings, we show that excitatory projection neurons (fusiform cells) and inhibitory stellate interneurons of the dorsal cochlear nucleus form an electrically coupled network through gap junctions containing connexin36 (Cxc36, also called Gjd2). Remarkably, stellate cells were more strongly coupled to fusiform cells than to other stellate cells. This heterologous coupling was functionally asymmetric, biasing electrical transmission from the principal cell to the interneuron. Optogenetically activated populations of fusiform cells reliably enhanced interneuron excitability and generated GABAergic inhibition onto the postsynaptic targets of stellate cells, whereas deep afterhyperpolarizations following fusiform cell spike trains potently inhibited stellate cells over several hundred milliseconds. Thus, the excitability of an interneuron network is bidirectionally controlled by distinct epochs of activity in principal cells.

  16. Regulation of interneuron excitability by gap junction coupling with principal cells

    PubMed Central

    Apostolides, Pierre F.; Trussell, Laurence O.

    2014-01-01

    Electrical coupling of inhibitory interneurons can synchronize activity across multiple neurons, thereby enhancing the reliability of inhibition onto principal cell targets. It is unclear whether downstream activity in principal cells controls the excitability of such inhibitory networks. Using paired patch-clamp recordings, we show that excitatory projection neurons (fusiform cells) and inhibitory stellate interneurons of the dorsal cochlear nucleus form an electrically coupled network via connexin36-containing gap junctions. Remarkably, stellate cells were more strongly coupled to fusiform cells than to other stellate cells. This heterologous coupling was functionally asymmetric, biasing electrical transmission from principal cell to interneuron. Optogenetically-activated populations of fusiform cells reliably enhanced interneuron excitability and generated GABAergic inhibition onto postsynaptic targets of stellate cells, whereas deep afterhyperpolarizations following fusiform cell spike trains potently inhibited stellate cells over several hundred milliseconds. Thus, the excitability of an interneuron network is bi-directionally-controlled by distinct epochs of activity in principal cells. PMID:24185427

  17. Ferret Interneurons Defy Expectations.

    PubMed

    Znamenskiy, Petr; Hofer, Sonja B

    2017-03-08

    Parvalbumin interneurons in the cortex are believed to pool inputs from most surrounding excitatory cells independent of their functional properties. Response properties of interneurons in columnar visual cortex of ferrets, described by Wilson et al. (2017) in this issue of Neuron, challenge this view.

  18. Fluoxetine impairs GABAergic signaling in hippocampal slices from neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Caiati, Maddalena D.; Cherubini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac), an antidepressant known to selectively inhibit serotonin reuptake, is widely used to treat mood disorders in women suffering from depression during pregnancy and postpartum period. Several lines of evidence suggest that this drug, which crosses the human placenta and is secreted into milk during lactation, exerts its action not only by interfering with serotoninergic but also with GABAergic transmission. GABA is known to play a crucial role in the construction of neuronal circuits early in postnatal development. The immature hippocampus is characterized by an early type of network activity, the so-called Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs), generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA, both depolarizing and excitatory. Here we tested the hypothesis that fluoxetine may interfere with GABAergic signaling during the first postnatal week, thus producing harmful effects on brain development. At micromolar concentrations fluoxetine severely depressed GDPs frequency (IC50 22 μM) in a reversible manner and independently of its action on serotonin reuptake. This effect was dependent on a reduced GABAergic (but not glutamatergic) drive to principal cells most probably from parvalbumin-positive fast spiking neurons. Cholecystokinin-positive GABAergic interneurons were not involved since the effects of the drug persisted when cannabinoid receptors were occluded with WIN55,212-2, a CB1/CB2 receptor agonist. Fluoxetine effects on GABAergic transmission were associated with a reduced firing rate of both principal cells and interneurons further suggesting that changes in network excitability account for GDPs disruption. This may have critical consequences on the functional organization and stabilization of neuronal circuits early in postnatal development. PMID:23641199

  19. Loss of calbindin-immunoreactivity in CA1 hippocampal stratum radiatum and stratum lacunosum-moleculare interneurons in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Potier, B; Krzywkowski, P; Lamour, Y; Dutar, P

    1994-10-24

    Alterations in hippocampal circuitry may underly age-related learning and memory impairment. We showed in a previous study that the GABAB-mediated slow inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) induced in CA1 pyramidal neurons by electrical stimulation of stratum radiatum, is depressed in the hippocampus of the aged rat. This could be due to alterations in GABAergic interneuron functions. We report in this study that the number of hippocampal calbindin-immunoreactive (CaBP-IR) GABAergic interneurons is decreased in the aged rat. The mean number of CaBP-IR interneurons per slice decreases by 50% in the aged rat. The most severe loss was observed in the stratum radiatum of CA1 (78%), with a less consistent loss of immunoreactivity in CA3 (35%). In contrast, the mean number of interneurons containing parvalbumin (PV), was not significantly decreased in the aged rat. Our results show a loss of CaBP immunoreactivity in a population of GABAergic interneurons, which might be related to an altered function of these interneurons and consequently of GABAergic synaptic transmission in the aged rat. In contrast, PV immunoreactivity in interneurons located close to the pyramidal layer does not decrease in the hippocampus of the aged rat.

  20. GABA-ergic Cell Therapy for Epilepsy: Advances, Limitations and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ashok K.; Upadhya, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Diminution in the number of gamma-amino butyric acid positive (GABA-ergic) interneurons and their axon terminals, and/or alterations in functional inhibition are conspicuous brain alterations believed to contribute to the persistence of seizures in acquired epilepsies such as temporal lobe epilepsy. This has steered a perception that replacement of lost GABA-ergic interneurons would improve inhibitory synaptic neurotransmission in the epileptic brain region and thereby reduce the occurrence of seizures. Indeed, studies using animal prototypes have reported that grafting of GABA-ergic progenitors derived from multiple sources into epileptic regions can reduce seizures. This review deliberates recent advances, limitations and challenges concerning the development of GABA-ergic cell therapy for epilepsy. The efficacy and limitations of grafts of primary GABA-ergic progenitors from the embryonic lateral ganglionic eminence and medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), neural stem/progenitor cells expanded from MGE, and MGE-like progenitors generated from human pluripotent stem cells for alleviating seizures and co-morbidities of epilepsy are conferred. Additional studies required for possible clinical application of GABA-ergic cell therapy for epilepsy are also summarized. PMID:26748379

  1. GABA-ergic cell therapy for epilepsy: Advances, limitations and challenges.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ashok K; Upadhya, Dinesh

    2016-03-01

    Diminution in the number of gamma-amino butyric acid positive (GABA-ergic) interneurons and their axon terminals, and/or alterations in functional inhibition are conspicuous brain alterations believed to contribute to the persistence of seizures in acquired epilepsies such as temporal lobe epilepsy. This has steered a perception that replacement of lost GABA-ergic interneurons would improve inhibitory synaptic neurotransmission in the epileptic brain region and thereby reduce the occurrence of seizures. Indeed, studies using animal prototypes have reported that grafting of GABA-ergic progenitors derived from multiple sources into epileptic regions can reduce seizures. This review deliberates recent advances, limitations and challenges concerning the development of GABA-ergic cell therapy for epilepsy. The efficacy and limitations of grafts of primary GABA-ergic progenitors from the embryonic lateral ganglionic eminence and medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), neural stem/progenitor cells expanded from MGE, and MGE-like progenitors generated from human pluripotent stem cells for alleviating seizures and co-morbidities of epilepsy are conferred. Additional studies required for possible clinical application of GABA-ergic cell therapy for epilepsy are also summarized. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Dynamic changes in interneuron morpho-physiological properties mark the maturation of hippocampal network activity

    PubMed Central

    Allene, C.; Picardo, M. A.; Becq, H.; Miyoshi, G.; Fishell, G.; Cossart, R.

    2012-01-01

    During early postnatal development, neuronal networks successively produce various forms of spontaneous patterned activity that provide key signals for circuit maturation. Initially, in both rodent hippocampus and neocortex, coordinated activity emerges in the form of Synchronous Plateau Assemblies (SPAs) that are initiated by sparse groups of gap-junction coupled oscillating neurons. Subsequently, SPAs are replaced by synapse-driven Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs). Whether these sequential changes in mechanistically distinct network activities correlate with modifications in single-cell properties is unknown. To understand this, we have studied the morpho-physiological fate of single SPA-cells as a function of development. We focused on CA3 GABAergic interneurons, which are centrally involved in generating GDPs in the hippocampus. As the network matures, GABAergic neurons are engaged more in GDPs and less in SPAs. Using inducible genetic fate mapping, we show that the individual involvement of GABAergic neurons in SPAs is correlated to their temporal origin. In addition, we demonstrate that the SPA to GDP transition is paralleled by a remarkable maturation in the morpho-physiological properties of GABAergic neurons. Compared to those involved in GDPs, interneurons participating in SPAs possess immature intrinsic properties, receive synaptic inputs spanning a wide amplitude range, and display large somata as well as membrane protrusions. Thus, a developmental switch in the morpho-physiological properties of GABAergic interneurons as they progress from SPA to GDPs marks the emergence of synapse-driven network oscillations. PMID:22573691

  3. A novel network of multipolar bursting interneurons generates theta frequency oscillations in neocortex.

    PubMed

    Blatow, Maria; Rozov, Andrei; Katona, Istvan; Hormuzdi, Sheriar G; Meyer, Axel H; Whittington, Miles A; Caputi, Antonio; Monyer, Hannah

    2003-06-05

    GABAergic interneurons can phase the output of principal cells, giving rise to oscillatory activity in different frequency bands. Here we describe a new subtype of GABAergic interneuron, the multipolar bursting (MB) cell in the mouse neocortex. MB cells are parvalbumin positive but differ from fast-spiking multipolar (FS) cells in their morphological, neurochemical, and physiological properties. MB cells are reciprocally connected with layer 2/3 pyramidal cells and are coupled with each other by chemical and electrical synapses. MB cells innervate FS cells but not vice versa. MB to MB cell as well as MB to pyramidal cell synapses exhibit paired-pulse facilitation. Carbachol selectively induced synchronized theta frequency oscillations in MB cells. Synchrony required both gap junction coupling and GABAergic chemical transmission, but not excitatory glutamatergic input. Hence, MB cells form a distinct inhibitory network, which upon cholinergic drive can generate rhythmic and synchronous theta frequency activity, providing temporal coordination of pyramidal cell output.

  4. Coordinated developmental recruitment of latent fast spiking interneurons in layer IV barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Daw, Michael I; Ashby, Michael C; Isaac, John T R

    2007-04-01

    Feedforward inhibitory GABAergic transmission is critical for mature cortical circuit function; in the neonate, however, GABA is depolarizing and believed to have a different role. Here we show that the GABAA receptor-mediated conductance is depolarizing in excitatory (stellate) cells in neonatal (postnatal day [P]3-5) layer IV barrel cortex, but GABAergic transmission at this age is not engaged by thalamocortical input in the feedforward circuit and has no detectable circuit function. However, recruitment occurs at P6-7 as a result of coordinated increases in thalamic drive to fast-spiking interneurons, fast-spiking interneuron-stellate cell connectivity and hyperpolarization of the GABAA receptor-mediated response. Thus, GABAergic circuits are not engaged by thalamocortical input in the neonate, but are poised for a remarkably coordinated development of feedforward inhibition at the end of the first postnatal week, which has profound effects on circuit function at this critical time in development.

  5. Hippocampal interneuron transplants reverse aberrant dopamine system function and behavior in a rodent model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Perez, S M; Lodge, D J

    2013-11-01

    Schizophrenia patients exhibit increased hippocampal activity that is correlated with positive symptoms. Although the cause of this hippocampal hyperactivity has not been demonstrated, it likely involves a decrease in GABAergic signaling. Thus, we posit that restoring GABAergic function may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of schizophrenia. It has been demonstrated that transplanted GABAergic precursor cells from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) can migrate and differentiate into mature interneurons. Here, we demonstrate that ventral hippocampal MGE transplants can restore hippocampal function and normalize downstream dopamine neuron activity in a rodent model of schizophrenia. Furthermore, MGE transplants also reverse the hyper-responsive locomotor response to amphetamine. Taken together, these data demonstrate that restoring interneuron function reverses neurophysiological and behavioral deficits in a rodent model of schizophrenia and moreover, demonstrate the feasibility of a neuronal transplant procedure as a potential novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  6. OLM interneurons differentially modulate CA3 and entorhinal inputs to hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Richardson N; Mikulovic, Sanja; Leão, Katarina E; Munguba, Hermany; Gezelius, Henrik; Enjin, Anders; Patra, Kalicharan; Eriksson, Anders; Loew, Leslie M.; Tort, Adriano BL; Kullander, Klas

    2012-01-01

    The vast diversity of GABAergic interneurons is believed to endow hippocampal microcircuits with the required flexibility for memory encoding and retrieval. However, dissection of the functional roles of defined interneuron types have been hampered by the lack of cell specific tools. Here we report a precise molecular marker for a population of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons known as oriens lacunosum-moleculare (OLM) cells. By combining novel transgenic mice and optogenetic tools, we demonstrate that OLM cells have a key role in gating the information flow in CA1, facilitating the transmission of intrahippocampal information (from CA3) while reducing the influence of extrahippocampal inputs (from the entorhinal cortex). We further demonstrate that OLM cells are interconnected by gap junctions, receive direct cholinergic inputs from subcortical afferents, and account for the effect of nicotine on synaptic plasticity of the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results suggest that acetylcholine acting through OLM cells can control the mnemonic processes executed by the hippocampus. PMID:23042082

  7. OLM interneurons differentially modulate CA3 and entorhinal inputs to hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Leão, Richardson N; Mikulovic, Sanja; Leão, Katarina E; Munguba, Hermany; Gezelius, Henrik; Enjin, Anders; Patra, Kalicharan; Eriksson, Anders; Loew, Leslie M; Tort, Adriano B L; Kullander, Klas

    2012-11-01

    The vast diversity of GABAergic interneurons is believed to endow hippocampal microcircuits with the required flexibility for memory encoding and retrieval. However, dissection of the functional roles of defined interneuron types has been hampered by the lack of cell-specific tools. We identified a precise molecular marker for a population of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons known as oriens lacunosum-moleculare (OLM) cells. By combining transgenic mice and optogenetic tools, we found that OLM cells are important for gating the information flow in CA1, facilitating the transmission of intrahippocampal information (from CA3) while reducing the influence of extrahippocampal inputs (from the entorhinal cortex). Furthermore, we found that OLM cells were interconnected by gap junctions, received direct cholinergic inputs from subcortical afferents and accounted for the effect of nicotine on synaptic plasticity of the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results suggest that acetylcholine acting through OLM cells can control the mnemonic processes executed by the hippocampus.

  8. Dopaminergic Regulation of Striatal Interneurons in Reward and Addiction: Focus on Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Rhona; Adermark, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal ganglia networks coursing through the striatum are key structures for reward-guided behaviors. The ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens (nAc)) and its reciprocal connection with the ventral tegmental area (VTA) represent a primary component of the reward system, but reward-guided learning also involves the dorsal striatum and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra. The majority of neurons in the striatum (>90%) are GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs), but both the input to and the output from these neurons are dynamically controlled by striatal interneurons. Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter in reward and reward-guided learning, and the physiological activity of GABAergic and cholinergic interneurons is regulated by dopaminergic transmission in a complex manner. Here we review the role of striatal interneurons in modulating striatal output during drug reward, with special emphasis on alcohol. PMID:26246915

  9. Selective activation of parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons triggers epileptic seizurelike activity in mouse medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Yekhlef, Latefa; Breschi, Gian Luca; Lagostena, Laura; Russo, Giovanni; Taverna, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    GABAergic interneurons are thought to play a critical role in eliciting interictal spikes (IICs) and triggering ictal discharges in temporal lobe epilepsy, yet the contribution of different interneuronal subtypes to seizure initiation is still largely unknown. Here we took advantage of optogenetic techniques combined with patch-clamp and field recordings to selectively stimulate parvalbumin (PV)- or somatostatin (SOM)-positive interneurons expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (CHR-2) in layers II-III of adult mouse medial entorhinal cortical slices during extracellular perfusion with the proconvulsive compound 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 100-200 μM). In control conditions, blue laser photostimulation selectively activated action potential firing in either PV or SOM interneurons and, in both cases, caused a robust GABAA-receptor-mediated inhibition in pyramidal cells (PCs). During perfusion with 4-AP, brief photostimuli (300 ms) activating either PV or SOM interneurons induced patterns of epileptiform activity that closely replicated spontaneously occurring IICs and tonic-clonic ictal discharges. Laser-induced synchronous firing in both interneuronal types elicited large compound GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) correlating with IICs and preictal spikes. In addition, spontaneous and laser-induced epileptic events were similarly initiated in concurrence with a large increase in extracellular potassium concentration. Finally, interneuron activation was unable to stop or significantly shorten the progression of seizurelike episodes. These results suggest that entorhinal PV and SOM interneurons are nearly equally effective in triggering interictal and ictal discharges that closely resemble human temporal lobe epileptic activity.

  10. Use-dependent shift from inhibitory to excitatory GABAA receptor action in SP-O interneurons in the rat hippocampal CA3 area.

    PubMed

    Lamsa, Karri; Taira, Tomi

    2003-09-01

    Cortical inhibitory interneurons set the pace of synchronous neuronal oscillations implicated in synaptic plasticity and various cognitive functions. The hyperpolarizing nature of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in interneurons has been considered crucial for the generation of oscillations at beta (15-30 Hz) and gamma (30-100 Hz) frequency. Hippocampal basket cells and axo-axonic cells in stratum pyramidale-oriens (S-PO) play a central role in the synchronization of the local interneuronal network as well as in pacing of glutamatergic principal cell firing. A lack of conventional forms of plasticity in excitatory synapses onto interneurons facilitates their function as stable neuronal oscillators. We have used gramicidin-perforated and whole cell clamp recordings to study properties of GABAAR-mediated transmission in CA3 SP-O interneurons and in CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slices during electrical 5- to 100-Hz stimulation and during spontaneous activity. We show that GABAergic synapses onto SP-O interneurons can easily switch their mode from inhibitory to excitatory during heightened activity. This is based on a depolarizing shift in the GABAA reversal potential (EGABA-A), which is much faster and more pronounced in interneurons than in pyramidal cells. We also found that the shift in interneuronal function was frequency dependent, being most prominent at 20- to 40-Hz activation of the GABAergic synapses. After 40-Hz tetanic stimulation (100 pulses), GABAA responses remained depolarizing for approximately 45 s in the interneurons, promoting bursting in the GABAergic network. Hyperpolarizing EGABA-A was restored >60 s after the stimulus train. Similar but spontaneous GABAergic bursting was induced by application of 4-aminopyridine (100 microM) to slices. A shift to depolarizing IPSPs by the GABAAR permeant weak acid anion formate provoked interneuronal population bursting, supporting the role of GABAergic excitation in burst generation

  11. Modulation of behavioral networks by selective interneuronal inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, MJ; Horvath, S; Ebert, P; Norris, JL; Seeley, EH; Brown, J; Gellert, L; Everheart, M; Garbett, KA; Grice, TW; Caprioli, RM; Mirnics, K

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic disturbances are hallmark features of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders and encompass multiple interneuronal cell types. Using bacterial artificial chromosome-driven, miRNA silencing technology we generated transgenic mouse lines that suppress glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) in either cholecystokinin (CCK)- or neuropeptide Y (NPY)-expressing interneurons. In situ lipidomic and proteomic analyses on brain tissue sections revealed distinct, brain region-specific profiles in each transgenic line. Behavioral analyses revealed that suppression of GAD1 in CCK+ interneurons resulted in locomotor and olfactory sensory changes, whereas suppression in NPY+ interneurons affected anxiety-related behaviors and social interaction. Both transgenic mouse lines had altered sensitivity to amphetamine albeit in opposite directions. Together, these data argue that reduced GAD1 expression leads to altered molecular and behavioral profiles in a cell type-dependent manner, and that these subpopulations of interneurons are strong and opposing modulators of dopamine system function. Furthermore, our findings also support the hypothesis that neuronal networks are differentially controlled by diverse inhibitory subnetworks. PMID:24322205

  12. The GABAergic septohippocampal connection is impaired in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Soler, Helena; Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; González, Marta; Rubio, Sara Esmeralda; Ávila, Jesús; Soriano, Eduardo; Pascual, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia nowadays, has been linked to alterations in the septohippocampal pathway (SHP), among other circuits in the brain. In fact, the GABAergic component of the SHP, which controls hippocampal rhythmic activity crucial for learning and memory, is altered in the J20 mouse model of AD-a model that mimics the amyloid pathology of this disease. However, AD is characterized by another pathophysiological hallmark: the hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau. To evaluate whether tauopathies alter the GABAergic SHP, we analyzed transgenic mice expressing human mutated Tau (mutations G272V, P301L, and R406W, VLW transgenic strain). We show that pyramidal neurons, mossy cells, and some parvalbumin (PARV)-positive hippocampal interneurons in 2- and 8-month-old (mo) VLW mice accumulate phosphorylated forms of Tau (P-Tau). By tract-tracing studies of the GABAergic SHP, we describe early-onset deterioration of GABAergic septohippocampal (SH) innervation on PARV-positive interneurons in 2-mo VLW mice. In 8-mo animals, this alteration was more severe and affected mainly P-Tau-accumulating PARV-positive interneurons. No major loss of GABAergic SHP neurons or PARV-positive hippocampal interneurons was observed, thereby indicating that this decline is not caused by neuronal loss but by the reduced number and complexity of GABAergic SHP axon terminals. The decrease in GABAergic SHP described in this study, targeted onto the PARV-positive/P-Tau-accumulating inhibitory neurons in the hippocampus, establishes a cellular correlation with the dysfunctions in rhythmic neuronal activity and excitation levels in the hippocampus. These dysfunctions are associated with the VLW transgenic strain in particular and with AD human pathology in general. These data, together with our previous results in the J20 mouse model, indicate that the GABAergic SHP is impaired in response to both amyloid-β and P

  13. Cortical inputs innervate calbindin-immunoreactive interneurons of the rat basolateral amygdaloid complex.

    PubMed

    Unal, Gunes; Paré, Jean-Francois; Smith, Yoland; Paré, Denis

    2014-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to shed light on the synaptic organization of the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA). The BLA contains multiple types of GABAergic interneurons that are differentially connected with extrinsic afferents and other BLA cells. Previously, it was reported that parvalbumin immunoreactive (PV(+) ) interneurons receive strong excitatory inputs from principal BLA cells but very few cortical inputs, implying a prevalent role in feedback inhibition. However, because prior physiological studies indicate that cortical afferents do trigger feedforward inhibition in principal cells, the present study aimed to determine whether a numerically important subtype of interneurons, expressing calbindin (CB(+) ), receives cortical inputs. Rats received injections of the anterograde tracer Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHAL) in the perirhinal cortex or adjacent temporal neocortex. Light and electron microscopic observations of the relations between cortical inputs and BLA neurons were performed in the lateral (LA) and basolateral (BL) nuclei. Irrespective of the injection site (perirhinal or temporal neocortex) and target nucleus (LA or BL), ~90% of cortical axon terminals formed asymmetric synapses with dendritic spines of principal BLA neurons, while 10% contacted the dendritic shafts of presumed interneurons, half of which were CB(+) . Given the previously reported pattern of CB coexpression among GABAergic interneurons of the BLA, these results suggest that a subset of PV-immunonegative cells that express CB, most likely the somatostatin-positive interneurons, are important mediators of cortically evoked feedforward inhibition in the BLA.

  14. "Small axonless neurons": postnatally generated neocortical interneurons with delayed functional maturation.

    PubMed

    Le Magueresse, Corentin; Alfonso, Julieta; Khodosevich, Konstantin; Arroyo Martín, Angel A; Bark, Christine; Monyer, Hannah

    2011-11-16

    GABAergic interneurons of the mouse cortex are generated embryonically in the ventral telencephalon. Recent evidence, however, indicated that a subset of cortical cells expressing interneuronal markers originate in the neonatal subventricular zone. This has raised interest in the functional development and incorporation of these postnatally generated cells into cortical circuits. Here we demonstrate that these cells integrate in the cortex, and that they constitute two distinct GABAergic interneuronal classes. Whereas one class reflects the tail end of embryonic interneuron genesis, the other class comprises interneurons that are exclusively generated perinatally and postnatally. The latter constitute a novel subclass of interneurons. They are preferentially located in the deeper layers of the olfactory and orbital cortices, exhibit a unique firing pattern and slow functional maturation. Based on their distinct morphology we termed them "small axonless neurons" and indeed, unlike other cortical neurons, they communicate with their neuronal partners via dendrodendritic synapses. Finally, we provide evidence that the number of small axonless neurons is enhanced by odor enrichment, a further indication that they integrate into neural circuits and participate to olfactory processing.

  15. Maternal Immune Activation Leads to Selective Functional Deficits in Offspring Parvalbumin Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Canetta, Sarah; Bolkan, Scott; Padilla-Coreano, Nancy; Song, LouJin; Sahn, Ryan; Harrison, Neil; Gordon, Joshua A.; Brown, Alan; Kellendonk, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Summary Abnormalities in prefrontal GABAergic transmission, particularly in fast-spiking interneurons that express parvalbumin (PV), are hypothesized to contribute to the pathophysiology of multiple psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders and depression. While primarily histological abnormalities have been observed in patients and in animal models of psychiatric disease, evidence for abnormalities in functional neurotransmission at the level of specific interneuron populations has been lacking in animal models and is difficult to establish in human patients. Using an animal model of a psychiatric disease risk factor, prenatal maternal immune activation (MIA), we found reduced functional GABAergic transmission in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of adult MIA offspring. Decreased transmission was selective for interneurons expressing PV, and was not observed in calretinin-expressing neurons. This deficit in PV function in MIA offspring was associated with increased anxiety-like behavior and impairments in attentional set shifting, but did not affect working memory. Furthermore, cell-type specific optogenetic inhibition of mPFC PV interneurons was sufficient to impair attentional set shifting and enhance anxiety levels. Finally, we found that in vivo mPFC gamma oscillations, which are supported by PV interneuron function, were linearly correlated with the degree of anxiety displayed in adult mice, and that this correlation was disrupted in MIA offspring. These results demonstrate a selective functional vulnerability of PV interneurons to maternal immune activation, leading to affective and cognitive symptoms that have high relevance for schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:26830140

  16. Taurine activates GABAergic networks in the neocortex of immature mice

    PubMed Central

    Sava, Bogdan A.; Chen, Rongqing; Sun, Haiyan; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Kilb, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that taurine is the main endogenous neurotransmitter acting on glycine receptors, the implications of glycine receptor-mediated taurine actions on immature neocortical networks have not been addressed yet. To investigate the influence of taurine on the excitability of neuronal networks in the immature neocortex, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified pyramidal neurons and interneurons in coronal slices from C57Bl/6 and GAD67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice (postnatal days 2–4). In 46% of the pyramidal neurons bath-application of taurine at concentrations ≥ 300 μM significantly enhanced the frequency of postsynaptic currents (PSCs) by 744.3 ± 93.8% (n = 120 cells). This taurine-induced increase of PSC frequency was abolished by 0.2 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX), 1 μM strychnine or 3 μM gabazine, but was unaffected by the glutamatergic antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and (±) R(-)-3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP), suggesting that taurine specifically activates GABAergic network activity projecting to pyramidal neurons. Cell-attached recordings revealed that taurine enhanced the frequency of action potentials (APs) in pyramidal neurons, indicating an excitatory action of the GABAergic PSCs. In order to identify the presynaptic targets of taurine we demonstrate that bath application of taurine induced in GAD67-GFP labeled interneurons an inward current that is mainly mediated by glycine receptors and can generate APs in these cells. We conclude from these results that taurine can enhance network excitability in the immature neocortex by selectively activating GABAergic interneurons via interactions with glycine receptors. PMID:24550782

  17. Interneurons containing calretinin are specialized to control other interneurons in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, A I; Hájos, N; Freund, T F

    1996-05-15

    Spine-free calretinin-immunoreactive (CR-IR) interneurons form a subpopulation of GABAergic cells in the rat hippocampus. A characteristic feature of these cells--located in all areas and layers--is the frequent dendro-dendritic and axo-dendritic contacts they form with each other. In this study we examined in detail the connectivity of these neurons by reconstructing their dendritic and axonal arbor and by identifying their postsynaptic targets. Radially running dendrites of CR-IR cells, located in different layers, intermingled into long braids. An average cell was in contact with dendrites of three to seven other CR-IR cells. Reconstruction of the dendritic trees from six consecutive sections demonstrated that at least 15 cells may participate in a dendro-dendritically connected cluster. Electron microscopical examination revealed that regularly spaced zonula adherentia connect the touching dendrites. The postsynaptic targets of CR-IR neurons have been examined using postembedding immunogold staining for GABA. CR-containing GABA-immunoreactive axons of local origin formed multiple symmetrical synaptic contacts (two to five) exclusively on GABAergic dendrites (CR-negative as well as CR-positive). Two to 10 CR-IR axons may converge onto a single CR-IR neuron, often from cells belonging to the same dendro-dendritically connected cluster. Using double immunocytochemistry, CR-IR cells were shown to heavily innervate calbindin D28k-containing interneurons and VIP-containing basket cells but avoided the parvalbumin-containing basket and axo-axonic cells. The unique connectivity of CR-IR cells may enable them to play a crucial role in the generation of synchronous, rhythmic hippocampal activity by controlling other interneurons terminating on different dendritic and somatic compartments of principal cells.

  18. Terminal field and firing selectivity of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons in the hippocampal CA3 area.

    PubMed

    Lasztóczi, Bálint; Tukker, John J; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2011-12-07

    Hippocampal oscillations reflect coordinated neuronal activity on many timescales. Distinct types of GABAergic interneuron participate in the coordination of pyramidal cells over different oscillatory cycle phases. In the CA3 area, which generates sharp waves and gamma oscillations, the contribution of identified GABAergic neurons remains to be defined. We have examined the firing of a family of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons during network oscillations in urethane-anesthetized rats and compared them with firing of CA3 pyramidal cells. The position of the terminals of individual visualized interneurons was highly diverse, selective, and often spatially coaligned with either the entorhinal or the associational inputs to area CA3. The spike timing in relation to theta and gamma oscillations and sharp waves was correlated with the innervated pyramidal cell domain. Basket and dendritic-layer-innervating interneurons receive entorhinal and associational inputs and preferentially fire on the ascending theta phase, when pyramidal cell assemblies emerge. Perforant-path-associated cells, driven by recurrent collaterals of pyramidal cells fire on theta troughs, when established pyramidal cell assemblies are most active. In the CA3 area, slow and fast gamma oscillations occurred on opposite theta oscillation phases. Perforant-path-associated and some COUP-TFII-positive interneurons are strongly coupled to both fast and slow gamma oscillations, but basket and dendritic-layer-innervating cells are weakly coupled to fast gamma oscillations only. During sharp waves, different interneuron types are activated, inhibited, or remain unaffected. We suggest that specialization in pyramidal cell domain and glutamatergic input-specific operations, reflected in the position of GABAergic terminals, is the evolutionary drive underlying the diversity of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons.

  19. Terminal Field and Firing Selectivity of Cholecystokinin-Expressing Interneurons in the Hippocampal CA3 Area

    PubMed Central

    Lasztóczi, Bálint; Tukker, John J.; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal oscillations reflect coordinated neuronal activity on many timescales. Distinct types of GABAergic interneuron participate in the coordination of pyramidal cells over different oscillatory cycle phases. In the CA3 area, which generates sharp waves and gamma oscillations, the contribution of identified GABAergic neurons remains to be defined. We have examined the firing of a family of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons during network oscillations in urethane-anesthetized rats and compared them with firing of CA3 pyramidal cells. The position of the terminals of individual visualized interneurons was highly diverse, selective, and often spatially coaligned with either the entorhinal or the associational inputs to area CA3. The spike timing in relation to theta and gamma oscillations and sharp waves was correlated with the innervated pyramidal cell domain. Basket and dendritic-layer-innervating interneurons receive entorhinal and associational inputs and preferentially fire on the ascending theta phase, when pyramidal cell assemblies emerge. Perforant-path-associated cells, driven by recurrent collaterals of pyramidal cells fire on theta troughs, when established pyramidal cell assemblies are most active. In the CA3 area, slow and fast gamma oscillations occurred on opposite theta oscillation phases. Perforant-path-associated and some COUP-TFII-positive interneurons are strongly coupled to both fast and slow gamma oscillations, but basket and dendritic-layer-innervating cells are weakly coupled to fast gamma oscillations only. During sharp waves, different interneuron types are activated, inhibited, or remain unaffected. We suggest that specialization in pyramidal cell domain and glutamatergic input-specific operations, reflected in the position of GABAergic terminals, is the evolutionary drive underlying the diversity of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. PMID:22159120

  20. Maturation of the GABAergic Transmission in Normal and Pathologic Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Allain, Anne-Emilie; Le Corronc, Hervé; Delpy, Alain; Cazenave, William; Meyrand, Pierre; Legendre, Pascal; Branchereau, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) acting on Cl−-permeable ionotropic type A (GABAA) receptors (GABAAR) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system of vertebrates. In immature brain structures, GABA exerts depolarizing effects mostly contributing to the expression of spontaneous activities that are instructive for the construction of neural networks but GABA also acts as a potent trophic factor. In the present paper, we concentrate on brainstem and spinal motoneurons that are largely targeted by GABAergic interneurons, and we bring together data on the switch from excitatory to inhibitory effects of GABA, on the maturation of the GABAergic system and GABAAR subunits. We finally discuss the role of GABA and its GABAAR in immature hypoglossal motoneurons of the spastic (SPA) mouse, a model of human hyperekplexic syndrome. PMID:21785735

  1. Substance P selectively modulates GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Govindaiah, G; Wang, Yanyan; Cox, Charles L

    2010-02-01

    Substance P (SP) is co-localized and co-released with gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) from approximately 50% of GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum. MSNs innervate several cellular targets including neighboring MSNs and cholinergic interneurons via collaterals. However, the functional role of SP release onto striatal interneurons is unknown. Here we examined SP-mediated actions on inhibitory synaptic transmission in cholinergic interneurons using whole-cell recordings in mouse corticostriatal slices. We found that SP selectively suppressed GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs), but not excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) in cholinergic interneurons. In contrast, SP did not alter IPSCs in fast-spiking interneurons and MSNs. SP suppressed IPSC amplitude in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner, and the NK1 receptor antagonist RP67580 attenuated the SP-mediated suppression. In addition, RP67580 alone enhanced the evoked IPSC amplitude in cholinergic interneurons, suggesting an endogenous action of SP on regulation of inhibitory synaptic transmission. SP did not alter the paired-pulse ratio, but reduced the amplitudes of GABA(A) agonist muscimol-induced outward currents and miniature IPSCs in cholinergic interneurons, suggesting SP exerts its effects primarily at the post-synaptic site. Our results indicate that the physiological effects of SP are to enhance the activity of striatal cholinergic interneurons and provide a rationale for designing potential new antiparkinsonian agents.

  2. LMO4 controls the balance between excitatory and inhibitory spinal V2 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kaumudi; Lee, Seunghee; Lee, Bora; Lee, Jae W; Lee, Soo-Kyung

    2009-03-26

    Multiple excitatory and inhibitory interneurons form the motor circuit with motor neurons in the ventral spinal cord. Notch signaling initiates the diversification of immature V2-interneurons into excitatory V2a-interneurons and inhibitory V2b-interneurons. Here, we provide a transcriptional regulatory mechanism underlying their balanced production. LIM-only protein LMO4 controls this binary cell fate choice by regulating the activity of V2a- and V2b-specific LIM complexes inversely. In the spinal cord, LMO4 induces GABAergic V2b-interneurons in collaboration with SCL and inhibits Lhx3 from generating glutamatergic V2a-interneuons. In LMO4;SCL compound mutant embryos, V2a-interneurons increase markedly at the expense of V2b-interneurons. We further demonstrate that LMO4 nucleates the assembly of a novel LIM-complex containing SCL, Gata2, and NLI. This complex activates specific enhancers in V2b-genes consisting of binding sites for SCL and Gata2, thereby promoting V2b-interneuron fate. Thus, LMO4 plays essential roles in directing a balanced generation of inhibitory and excitatory neurons in the ventral spinal cord.

  3. Functional switching of GABAergic synapses by ryanodine receptor activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Miao-Kun; Nelson, Thomas J.; Alkon, Daniel L.

    2000-10-01

    The role of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) in modifiability of synapses made by the basket interneurons onto the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells was examined in rats. Associating single-cell RyR activation with postsynaptic depolarization increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations and reversed the basket interneuron-CA1 inhibitory postsynaptic potential into an excitatory postsynaptic potential. This synaptic transformation was accompanied by a shift of the reversal potential from that of chloride toward that of bicarbonate. This inhibitory postsynaptic potential-excitatory postsynaptic potential transformation was prevented by blocking RyR or carbonic anhydrase. Associated postsynaptic depolarization and RyR activation, therefore, changes GABAergic synapses from excitation filters to amplifier and, thereby, shapes information flow through the hippocampal network.

  4. Neocortical disynaptic inhibition requires somatodendritic integration in interneurons.

    PubMed

    Hull, Court; Adesnik, Hillel; Scanziani, Massimo

    2009-07-15

    In his theory of functional polarity, Ramon y Cajal first identified the soma and dendrites as the principal recipient compartments of a neuron and the axon as its main output structure. Despite notable exceptions in other parts of the nervous system (Schoppa and Urban, 2003; Wässle, 2004; Howard et al., 2005), this route of signal propagation has been shown to underlie the functional properties of most neocortical circuits studied so far. Recent evidence, however, suggests that neocortical excitatory cells may trigger the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA by directly depolarizing the axon terminals of inhibitory interneurons, thus bypassing their somatodendritic compartments (Ren et al., 2007). By using a combination of optical and electrophysiological approaches, we find that synaptically released glutamate fails to trigger GABA release through a direct action on GABAergic terminals under physiological conditions. Rather, our evidence suggests that glutamate triggers GABA release only after somatodendritic depolarization and action potential generation at GABAergic interneurons. These data indicate that neocortical inhibition is recruited by classical somatodendritic integration rather than direct activation of interneuron axon terminals.

  5. Impaired GABAergic inhibition in the prefrontal cortex of early postnatal phencyclidine (PCP)-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kjaerby, Celia; Broberg, Brian V; Kristiansen, Uffe; Dalby, Nils Ole

    2014-09-01

    A compromised γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system is hypothesized to be part of the underlying pathophysiology of schizophrenia. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction during neurodevelopment is proposed to disrupt maturation of interneurons causing an impaired GABAergic transmission in adulthood. The present study examines prefrontal GABAergic transmission in adult rats administered with the NMDA receptor channel blocker, phencyclidine (PCP), for 3 days during the second postnatal week. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from pyramidal cells in PCP-treated rats showed a 22% reduction in the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in layer II/III, but not in layer V pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, early postnatal PCP treatment caused insensitivity toward effects of the GABA transporter 1 (GAT-1) inhibitor, 1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-[2-[[(diphenyl-methylene)amino]oxy]ethyl]-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid, and also diminished currents passed by δ-subunit-containing GABAA receptors in layer II/III pyramidal neurons. The observed impairments in GABAergic function are compatible with the alteration of GABAergic markers as well as cognitive dysfunction observed in early postnatal PCP-treated rats and support the hypothesis that PCP administration during neurodevelopment affects the functionality of interneurons in later life. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Differential expression of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in functionally distinct hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    van Hooft, J A; Giuffrida, R; Blatow, M; Monyer, H

    2000-05-15

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) have been proposed to be involved in oscillatory rhythmic activity in the hippocampus. However, the subtypes of mGluRs involved and their precise distribution in different populations of interneurons is unclear. In this study, we combined functional analysis of mGluR-mediated inward currents in CA1 oriens-alveus interneurons with anatomical and immunocytochemical identification of these interneurons and expression analysis of group I mGluR using single-cell reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Four major interneuron subtypes could be distinguished based on the mGluR-mediated inward current induced by the application of 100 microm trans-(1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1, 3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD) under voltage-clamp conditions and the action potential firing pattern under current-clamp conditions. Type I interneurons responded with a large inward current of approximately 224 pA, were positive for somatostatin, and the majority expressed both mGluR1 and mGluR5. Type II interneurons responded with an inward current of approximately 80 pA, contained calbindin, and expressed mainly mGluR1. Type III interneurons responded with an inward current of approximately 60 pA. These interneurons were fast-spiking, contained parvalbumin, and expressed mainly mGluR5. Type IV interneurons did not respond with an inward current upon application of ACPD, yet they expressed group I mGluRs. Activation of group I mGluRs under current-clamp conditions increased spike frequency and resulted in rhythmic firing activity in type I and II, but not in type III and IV, interneurons. RT-PCR results suggest that activation of mGluR1 in the subsets of GABAergic interneurons, classified here as type I and II, may play an important role in mediating synchronous activity.

  7. Targeted Interneuron Ablation in the Mouse Hippocampus Can Cause Spontaneous Recurrent Seizures

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The death of GABAergic interneurons has long been hypothesized to contribute to acquired epilepsy. These experiments tested the hypothesis that focal interneuron lesions cause acute seizures [i.e., status epilepticus (SE)] and/or chronic epilepsy [i.e., persistent spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs)]. To selectively ablate interneurons, Gad2-ires-Cre mice were injected unilaterally in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus with an adeno-associated virus containing the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR). Simultaneously, an electrode, connected to a miniature telemetry device, was positioned at the injection site for chronic recordings of local field potentials (LFPs). Two weeks after virus transfection, intraperitoneal injection of DT consistently caused focal, specific, and extensive ablation of interneurons. Long-term, continuous monitoring revealed that all mice with DT-induced interneuron lesions had SRSs. Seizures lasted tens of seconds and interseizure intervals were several hours (or days); therefore, these interneuron lesions did not induce SE. The SRSs occurred 3-5 d after DT treatment, which is the estimated time required for DT-induced cell death; therefore, induction of SRSs occurred without the latent period typical of acquired epilepsy. In five of six DT-treated mice, SRSs stopped within days, suggesting that the DT-induced interneuron lesions did not usually cause epilepsy. In one mouse, however, SRSs occurred for ≥34 d after interneuron ablation, similar to epilepsy after experimental SE. Sham control mice had no detectable seizures, confirming that the SRSs were due to ablation of interneurons. These data show that selective interneuron ablation consistently caused SRSs but not SE; and, at least under the conditions used here, interneuron lesions rarely led to persistent SRSs (i.e., epilepsy). PMID:28785726

  8. Activity-dependent switch of GABAergic inhibition into glutamatergic excitation in astrocyte-neuron networks.

    PubMed

    Perea, Gertrudis; Gómez, Ricardo; Mederos, Sara; Covelo, Ana; Ballesteros, Jesús J; Schlosser, Laura; Hernández-Vivanco, Alicia; Martín-Fernández, Mario; Quintana, Ruth; Rayan, Abdelrahman; Díez, Adolfo; Fuenzalida, Marco; Agarwal, Amit; Bergles, Dwight E; Bettler, Bernhard; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Martín, Eduardo D; Kirchhoff, Frank; Araque, Alfonso

    2016-12-24

    Interneurons are critical for proper neural network function and can activate Ca(2+) signaling in astrocytes. However, the impact of the interneuron-astrocyte signaling into neuronal network operation remains unknown. Using the simplest hippocampal Astrocyte-Neuron network, i.e., GABAergic interneuron, pyramidal neuron, single CA3-CA1 glutamatergic synapse, and astrocytes, we found that interneuron-astrocyte signaling dynamically affected excitatory neurotransmission in an activity- and time-dependent manner, and determined the sign (inhibition vs potentiation) of the GABA-mediated effects. While synaptic inhibition was mediated by GABAA receptors, potentiation involved astrocyte GABAB receptors, astrocytic glutamate release, and presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors. Using conditional astrocyte-specific GABAB receptor (Gabbr1) knockout mice, we confirmed the glial source of the interneuron-induced potentiation, and demonstrated the involvement of astrocytes in hippocampal theta and gamma oscillations in vivo. Therefore, astrocytes decode interneuron activity and transform inhibitory into excitatory signals, contributing to the emergence of novel network properties resulting from the interneuron-astrocyte interplay.

  9. Activity-dependent switch of GABAergic inhibition into glutamatergic excitation in astrocyte-neuron networks

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Gertrudis; Gómez, Ricardo; Mederos, Sara; Covelo, Ana; Ballesteros, Jesús J; Schlosser, Laura; Hernández-Vivanco, Alicia; Martín-Fernández, Mario; Quintana, Ruth; Rayan, Abdelrahman; Díez, Adolfo; Fuenzalida, Marco; Agarwal, Amit; Bergles, Dwight E; Bettler, Bernhard; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Martín, Eduardo D; Kirchhoff, Frank; Araque, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Interneurons are critical for proper neural network function and can activate Ca2+ signaling in astrocytes. However, the impact of the interneuron-astrocyte signaling into neuronal network operation remains unknown. Using the simplest hippocampal Astrocyte-Neuron network, i.e., GABAergic interneuron, pyramidal neuron, single CA3-CA1 glutamatergic synapse, and astrocytes, we found that interneuron-astrocyte signaling dynamically affected excitatory neurotransmission in an activity- and time-dependent manner, and determined the sign (inhibition vs potentiation) of the GABA-mediated effects. While synaptic inhibition was mediated by GABAA receptors, potentiation involved astrocyte GABAB receptors, astrocytic glutamate release, and presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors. Using conditional astrocyte-specific GABAB receptor (Gabbr1) knockout mice, we confirmed the glial source of the interneuron-induced potentiation, and demonstrated the involvement of astrocytes in hippocampal theta and gamma oscillations in vivo. Therefore, astrocytes decode interneuron activity and transform inhibitory into excitatory signals, contributing to the emergence of novel network properties resulting from the interneuron-astrocyte interplay. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20362.001 PMID:28012274

  10. Akting up in the GABA hypothesis of schizophrenia: Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic functions and hippocampus-dependent functions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implies that both AKT1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunit genes are involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. Activated Akt promotes GABAergic neuron differentiation and increases GABAAR expression on the plasma membrane. To elucidate the role of Akt1 in modulating GABAergic functions and schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits, a set of 6 in vitro and in vivo experiments was conducted. First, an Akt1/2 inhibitor was applied to evaluate its effect on GABAergic neuron-like cell formation from P19 cells. Inhibiting Akt resulted in a reduction in parvalbumin-positive neuron-like cells. In Akt1−/− and wild-type mice, seizures induced using pentylenetetrazol (a GABAAR antagonist) were measured, and GABAAR expression and GABAergic interneuron abundance in the brain were examined. Female Akt1−/− mice, but not male Akt1−/− mice, exhibited less pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsive activity than their corresponding wild-type controls. Reduced parvalbumin-positive interneuron abundance and GABAAR subunit expression, especially in the hippocampus, were also observed in female Akt1−/− mice compared to female wild-type mice. Neuromorphometric analyses revealed significantly reduced neurite complexity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Additionally, female Akt1−/− mice displayed increased hippocampal oscillation power and impaired spatial memory compared to female wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic interneurons and GABAAR expression, contributing to hippocampus-dependent cognitive functional impairment. PMID:27615800

  11. Bidirectional homeostatic plasticity induced by interneuron cell death and transplantation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Howard, MacKenzie Allen; Rubenstein, John L R; Baraban, Scott C

    2014-01-07

    Chronic changes in excitability and activity can induce homeostatic plasticity. These perturbations may be associated with neurological disorders, particularly those involving loss or dysfunction of GABA interneurons. In distal-less homeobox 1 (Dlx1(-/-)) mice with late-onset interneuron loss and reduced inhibition, we observed both excitatory synaptic silencing and decreased intrinsic neuronal excitability. These homeostatic changes do not fully restore normal circuit function, because synaptic silencing results in enhanced potential for long-term potentiation and abnormal gamma oscillations. Transplanting medial ganglionic eminence interneuron progenitors to introduce new GABAergic interneurons, we demonstrate restoration of hippocampal function. Specifically, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, input resistance, hippocampal long-term potentiation, and gamma oscillations are all normalized. Thus, in vivo homeostatic plasticity is a highly dynamic and bidirectional process that responds to changes in inhibition.

  12. Dendritic but not somatic GABAergic inhibition is decreased in experimental epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cossart, R; Dinocourt, C; Hirsch, J C; Merchan-Perez, A; De Felipe, J; Ben-Ari, Y; Esclapez, M; Bernard, C

    2001-01-01

    Impaired inhibition is thought to be important in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common form of epilepsy in adult patients. We report that, in experimental TLE, spontaneous GABAergic inhibition was increased in the soma but reduced in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. The former resulted from the hyperactivity of somatic projecting interneurons, whereas the latter was probably due to the degeneration of a subpopulation of dendritic projecting interneurons. A deficit in dendritic inhibition could reduce seizure threshold, whereas enhanced somatic inhibition would prevent the continuous occurrence of epileptiform activity.

  13. Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors provide a common mechanism for LTP in glutamatergic synapses of distinct hippocampal interneuron types.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Andras; Somogyi, Jozsef; Cauli, Bruno; Lambolez, Bertrand; Somogyi, Peter; Lamsa, Karri P

    2012-05-09

    Glutamatergic synapses on some hippocampal GABAergic interneurons exhibit activity-induced long-term potentiation (LTP). Interneuron types within the CA1 area expressing mutually exclusive molecular markers differ in LTP responses. Potentiation that depends on calcium-permeable (CP) AMPA receptors has been characterized in oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons, which express parvalbumin and somatostatin (SM). However, it is unknown how widely CP-AMPAR-dependent plasticity is expressed among different GABAergic interneuron types. Here we examine synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampal O-LM cells and two other interneuron types expressing either nitric oxide synthase (NOS) or cholecystokinin (CCK), which are known to be physiologically and developmentally distinct. We report similar CP-AMPAR-dependent LTP in NOS-immunopositive ivy cells and SM-expressing O-LM cells to afferent fiber theta burst stimulation. The potentiation in both cell types is induced at postsynaptic membrane potentials below firing threshold, and induction is blocked by intense spiking simultaneously with afferent stimulation. The strong inward rectification and calcium permeability of AMPARs is explained by a low level of GluA2 subunit mRNA expression. LTP is not elicited in CCK-expressing Schaffer collateral-associated cells, which lack CP-AMPARs and express high levels of the GluA2 subunit. The results show that CP-AMPAR-mediated synaptic potentiation is common in hippocampal interneuron types and occurs in interneurons of both feedforward and feedback inhibitory pathways.

  14. Loss of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 from parvalbumin interneurons leads to hyperinhibition, decreased anxiety, and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, Andrii; Seo, Jinsoo; Hu, Ji; Su, Susan C; de Anda, Froylan Calderon; Durak, Omer; Ericsson, Maria; Carlén, Marie; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2015-02-11

    Perturbations in fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) interneurons are hypothesized to be a major component of various neuropsychiatric disorders; however, the mechanisms regulating PV interneurons remain mostly unknown. Recently, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been shown to function as a major regulator of synaptic plasticity. Here, we demonstrate that genetic ablation of Cdk5 in PV interneurons in mouse brain leads to an increase in GABAergic neurotransmission and impaired synaptic plasticity. PVCre;fCdk5 mice display a range of behavioral abnormalities, including decreased anxiety and memory impairment. Our results reveal a central role of Cdk5 expressed in PV interneurons in gating inhibitory neurotransmission and underscore the importance of such regulation during behavioral tasks. Our findings suggest that Cdk5 can be considered a promising therapeutic target in a variety of conditions attributed to inhibitory interneuronal dysfunction, such as epilepsy, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia.

  15. Differential regulation of parvalbumin and calretinin interneurons in the prefrontal cortex during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Adriana; Flores-Barrera, Eden; Cass, Daryn K; Tseng, Kuei Y

    2014-01-01

    Determining the normal developmental trajectory of individual GABAergic components in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during the adolescent transition period is critical because local GABAergic interneurons are thought to play an important role in the functional maturation of cognitive control that occurs in this developmental window. Based on the expression of calcium-binding proteins, three distinctive subtypes of interneurons have been identified in the PFC: parvalbumin (PV)-, calretinin (CR)-, and calbindin (CB)-positive cells. Using biochemical and histochemical measures, we found that the protein level of PV is lowest in juveniles [postnatal days (PD) 25-35] and increases during adolescence (PD 45-55) to levels similar to those observed in adulthood (PD 65-75). In contrast, the protein expression of CR is reduced in adults compared to juvenile and adolescent animals, whereas CB levels remain mostly unchanged across the developmental window studied here. Semi-quantitative immunostaining analyses revealed that the periadolescent upregulation of PV and the loss of the CR signal appear to be attributable to changes in PV- and CR-positive innervation, which are dissociable from the trajectory of PV- and CR-positive cell number. At the synaptic level, our electrophysiological data revealed that a developmental facilitation of spontaneous glutamatergic synaptic inputs onto PV-positive/fast-spiking interneurons parallels the increase in prefrontal PV signal during the periadolescent transition. In contrast, no age-dependent changes in glutamatergic transmission were observed in PV-negative/non fast-spiking interneurons. Together, these findings emphasize that GABAergic inhibitory interneurons in the PFC undergo a dynamic, cell type-specific remodeling during adolescence and provide a developmental framework for understanding alterations in GABAergic circuits that occur in psychiatric disorders.

  16. Identification of an interneuronal population that mediates recurrent inhibition of motoneurons in the developing chick spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wenner, P; O'Donovan, M J

    1999-09-01

    Studies on the development of synaptic specificity, embryonic activity, and neuronal specification in the spinal cord have all been limited by the absence of a functionally identified interneuron class (defined by its unique set of connections). Here, we identify an interneuron population in the embryonic chick spinal cord that appears to be the avian equivalent of the mammalian Renshaw cell (R-interneurons). These cells receive monosynaptic nicotinic, cholinergic input from motoneuron recurrent collaterals. They make predominately GABAergic connections back onto motoneurons and to other R-interneurons but project rarely to other spinal interneurons. The similarity between the connections of the developing R-interneuron, shortly after circuit formation, and the mature mammalian Renshaw cell raises the possibility that R-interneuronal connections are formed precisely from the onset. Using a newly developed optical approach, we identified the location of R-interneurons in a column, dorsomedial to the motor nucleus. Functional characterization of the R-interneuron population provides the basis for analyses that have so far only been possible for motoneurons.

  17. Early establishment of multiple release site connectivity between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in the developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Groc, Laurent; Gustafsson, Bengt; Hanse, Eric

    2003-05-01

    The strength of the synaptic transmission between two neurons critically depends on the number of release sites connecting the neurons. Here we examine the development of connectivity between gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. GABAergic postsynaptic currents (PSCs) were recorded in whole-cell voltage-clamped CA1 pyramidal neurons. By comparing spontaneous and miniature (action potential-independent) GABAergic PSCs, we found that multiple release site connectivity is established already at the first postnatal day and that the degree of connectivity remains unaltered into adulthood. During the same time there is a dramatic increase in the number of GABAergic synapses on each pyramidal neuron as indicated by the increase in frequency of miniature GABAergic PSCs. These results indicate that during development a given interneuron contacts an increasing number of target pyramidal neurons but with the same multiple release site connectivity. It has been shown previously that the connectivity between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons is initially restricted to one release site, and develops gradually. The present result thus suggests different mechanisms to govern the maturation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmissions.

  18. Reduced excitatory drive onto interneurons in the dentate gyrus after status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Doherty, J; Dingledine, R

    2001-03-15

    Impaired GABAergic inhibition may contribute to the development of hyperexcitability in epilepsy. We used the pilocarpine model of epilepsy to demonstrate that regulation of excitatory synaptic drive onto GABAergic interneurons is impaired during epileptogenesis. Synaptic input from granule cells (GCs), perforant path, and CA3 inputs onto hilar border interneurons of the dentate gyrus were examined in rat hippocampal slices during the latent period (1-8 d) after induction of status epilepticus (SE). Short-term depression (STD) of GC inputs to interneurons induced by brief (500-800 msec), repetitive (5-20 Hz) stimulation, as well as paired-pulse depression at both GC and CA3 inputs to interneurons, were significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced in SE-experienced rats. In contrast, we found no significant differences between SE-experienced and age-matched control rats in the properties of minimal EPSCs evoked at low frequency (0.3 Hz). Consistent with reduced GABAergic inhibition onto granule cells, paired-pulse depression of perforant path-evoked granule cell population spikes was lost in SE-experienced rats. Enhanced STD was partially mediated by group II metabotropic glutamate receptors, because the selective antagonist, 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropyl-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoic acid, attenuated STD in SE-experienced rats but had no effect on STD of GC inputs in the normal adult rat. The group II mGluR agonist, (2S',1R',2R',3R')-2-(2,3-dicarboxylcyclopropyl) glycine (1 micrometer), produced a greater depression of GC input to hilar border interneurons in SE-experienced rats than in controls. These results indicate that, in the SE-experienced rat, excitatory drive to hilar border inhibitory interneurons is weakened through a use-dependent mechanism involving group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  19. Forebrain GABAergic neuron precursors integrate into adult spinal cord and reduce injury-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, JM; Sharif-Naeini, R; Vogt, D; Kriegstein, A; Alvarez-Buylla, A; Rubenstein, JL; Basbaum, AI

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain. Because symptoms are often unresponsive to conventional methods of pain treatment, new therapeutic approaches are essential. Here, we describe a strategy that not only ameliorates symptoms of neuropathic pain, but is also potentially disease modifying. We show that transplantation of immature telencephalic GABAergic interneurons from the mouse medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) into the adult mouse spinal cord completely reverses the mechanical hypersensitivity produced by peripheral nerve injury. Underlying this improvement is a remarkable integration of the MGE transplants into the host spinal cord circuitry, in which the transplanted cells make functional connections with both primary afferent and spinal cord neurons. By contrast, MGE transplants were not effective against inflammatory pain. Our findings suggest that MGE-derived GABAergic interneurons overcome the spinal cord hyperexcitability that is a hallmark of nerve-injury induced neuropathic pain. PMID:22632725

  20. Bistable Network Behavior of Layer I Interneurons in Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Merriam, Elliott B.; Netoff, Theoden I.; Banks, Matthew I.

    2006-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons in many areas of the neocortex are mutually connected via chemical and electrical synapses. Previous computational studies have explored how these coupling parameters influence the firing patterns of interneuronal networks. These models have predicted that the stable states of such interneuronal networks will be either synchrony (near zero phase lag) or antisynchrony (phase lag near one-half of the interspike interval), depending on network connectivity and firing rates. In certain parameter regimens, the network can be bistable, settling into either stable state depending on the initial conditions. Here, we investigated how connectivity parameters influence spike patterns in paired recordings from layer I interneurons in brain slices from juvenile mice. Observed properties of chemical and electrical synapses were used to simulate connections between uncoupled cells via dynamic clamp. In uncoupled pairs, action potentials induced by constant depolarizing currents had randomly distributed phase differences between the two cells. When coupled with simulated chemical (inhibitory) synapses, however, these pairs exhibited a bimodal firing pattern, tending to fire either in synchrony or in antisynchrony. Combining electrical with chemical synapses, prolonging τDecay of inhibitory connections, or increasing the firing rate of the network all resulted in enhanced stability of the synchronous state. Thus, electrical and inhibitory synaptic coupling constrain the relative timing of spikes in a two-cell network to, at most, two stable states, the stability and precision of which depend on the exact parameters of coupling. PMID:15987947

  1. Reduction in parvalbumin-positive interneurons and inhibitory input in the cortex of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Falco, Anna; Pennucci, Roberta; Brambilla, Elena; de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), inflammation leads to damage of central nervous system myelin and axons. Previous studies have postulated impaired GABA transmission in MS, and recent postmortem analysis has shown that GABAergic parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons are decreased in the primary motor cortex (M1) of patients with MS. In this report, we present evidence for the loss of a specific population of GABAergic interneurons in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of MS. Using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we evaluated the distribution of both PV-positive interneurons and of the inhibitory presynaptic input in the M1 of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and control mice. Our results demonstrate a specific decrease in the number of PV-positive interneurons in the M1 of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We detected a significant reduction in the number of PV-positive interneurons in the layers II and III of the M1 of diseased mice, while there was no difference in the number of calretinin (CR)-positive cells between animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and control animals. Moreover, we observed a significant reduction in the inhibitory presynaptic input in the M1 of treated mice. These changes were specific for the mice with elevated clinical score, while they were not detectable in the mice with low clinical score. Our results support the hypothesis that reinforcing the action of the GABAergic network may represent a therapeutic alternative to limit the progression of the neuronal damage in MS patients.

  2. Targeted ablation of cholinergic interneurons in the dorsolateral striatum produces behavioral manifestations of Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meiyu; Kobets, Andrew; Du, Jung-Chieh; Lennington, Jessica; Li, Lina; Banasr, Mounira; Duman, Ronald S; Vaccarino, Flora M; DiLeone, Ralph J; Pittenger, Christopher

    2015-01-20

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by tics, which are transiently worsened by stress, acute administration of dopaminergic drugs, and by subtle deficits in motor coordination and sensorimotor gating. It represents the most severe end of a spectrum of tic disorders that, in aggregate, affect ∼ 5% of the population. Available treatments are frequently inadequate, and the pathophysiology is poorly understood. Postmortem studies have revealed a reduction in specific striatal interneurons, including the large cholinergic interneurons, in severe disease. We tested the hypothesis that this deficit is sufficient to produce aspects of the phenomenology of TS, using a strategy for targeted, specific cell ablation in mice. We achieved ∼ 50% ablation of the cholinergic interneurons of the striatum, recapitulating the deficit observed in patients postmortem, without any effect on GABAergic markers or on parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking interneurons. Interneuron ablation in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS), corresponding roughly to the human putamen, led to tic-like stereotypies after either acute stress or d-amphetamine challenge; ablation in the dorsomedial striatum, in contrast, did not. DLS interneuron ablation also led to a deficit in coordination on the rotorod, but not to any abnormalities in prepulse inhibition, a measure of sensorimotor gating. These results support the causal sufficiency of cholinergic interneuron deficits in the DLS to produce some, but not all, of the characteristic symptoms of TS.

  3. Dendritic inhibition mediated by O-LM and bistratified interneurons in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christina; Remy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In the CA1 region of the hippocampus pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons form local microcircuits. CA1 interneurons are a diverse group consisting of many subtypes, some of which provide compartment-specific inhibition specifically onto pyramidal neuron dendrites. In fact, the majority of inhibitory synapses on pyramidal neurons is found on their dendrites. The specific role of a dendrite-innervating interneuron subtype is primarily determined by its innervation pattern on the distinct dendritic domains of pyramidal neurons. The efficacy of dendritic inhibition in reducing dendritic excitation depends on the relative timing and location of the activated excitatory and inhibitory synapses. In vivo, synaptic properties such as short-term plasticity and neuro-modulation by the basal forebrain, govern the degree of inhibition in distinct dendritic domains in a dynamic, behavior dependent manner, specifically during network oscillation such as the theta rhythm. In this review we focus on two subtypes of dendrite-innervating interneurons: the oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneuron and the bistratified interneuron. Their molecular marker profile, morphology, and function in vivo and in vitro are well studied. We strive to integrate this diverse information from the cellular to the network level, and to provide insight into how the different characteristics of O-LM and bistratified interneurons affect dendritic excitability, network activity, and behavior. PMID:25324774

  4. Parvalbumin interneurons provide grid cell-driven recurrent inhibition in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Buetfering, Christina; Allen, Kevin; Monyer, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) generate metric spatial representations. Recent attractor-network models suggest an essential role for GABAergic interneurons in the emergence of the grid-cell firing pattern through recurrent inhibition dependent on grid-cell phase. To test this hypothesis, we studied identified parvalbumin-expressing (PV(+)) interneurons that are the most likely candidate for providing this recurrent inhibition onto grid cells. Using optogenetics and tetrode recordings in mice, we found that PV(+) interneurons exhibited high firing rates, low spatial sparsity and no spatial periodicity. PV(+) interneurons inhibited all functionally defined cell types in the MEC and were in turn recruited preferentially by grid cells. To our surprise, we found that individual PV(+) interneurons received input from grid cells with various phases, which most likely accounts for the broadly tuned spatial firing activity of PV(+) interneurons. Our data argue against the notion that PV(+) interneurons provide phase-dependent recurrent inhibition and challenge recent attractor-network models of grid cells.

  5. Diversity and overlap of parvalbumin and somatostatin expressing interneurons in mouse presubiculum

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Lofredi, Roxanne; Cohen, Ivan; Savary, Etienne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-01-01

    The presubiculum, located between hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, plays a fundamental role in representing spatial information, notably head direction. Little is known about GABAergic interneurons of this region. Here, we used three transgenic mouse lines, Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98, to examine distinct interneurons labeled with tdTomato or green fluorescent protein. The distribution of interneurons in presubicular lamina for each animal line was compared to that in the GAD67-GFP knock-in animal line. Labeling was specific in the Pvalb-Cre line with 87% of labeled interneurons immunopositive for parvalbumin (PV). Immunostaining for somatostatin (SOM) revealed good specificity in the X98 line with 89% of fluorescent cells, but a lesser specificity in Sst-Cre animals where only 71% of labeled cells were immunopositive. A minority of ∼6% of interneurons co-expressed PV and SOM in the presubiculum of Sst-Cre animals. The electrophysiological and morphological properties of fluorescent interneurons from Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98 mice differed. Distinct physiological groups of presubicular interneurons were resolved by unsupervised cluster analysis of parameters describing passive properties, firing patterns and AP shapes. One group consisted of SOM-positive, Martinotti type neurons with a low firing threshold (cluster 1). Fast spiking basket cells, mainly from the Pvalb-Cre line, formed a distinct group (cluster 3). Another group (cluster 2) contained interneurons of intermediate electrical properties and basket-cell like morphologies. These labeled neurons were recorded from both Sst-Cre and Pvalb-Cre animals. Thus, our results reveal a wide variation in anatomical and physiological properties for these interneurons, a real overlap of interneurons immuno-positive for both PV and SOM as well as an off-target recombination in the Sst-Cre line, possibly linked to maternal cre inheritance. PMID:26005406

  6. Diversity and overlap of parvalbumin and somatostatin expressing interneurons in mouse presubiculum.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Lofredi, Roxanne; Cohen, Ivan; Savary, Etienne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-01-01

    The presubiculum, located between hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, plays a fundamental role in representing spatial information, notably head direction. Little is known about GABAergic interneurons of this region. Here, we used three transgenic mouse lines, Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98, to examine distinct interneurons labeled with tdTomato or green fluorescent protein. The distribution of interneurons in presubicular lamina for each animal line was compared to that in the GAD67-GFP knock-in animal line. Labeling was specific in the Pvalb-Cre line with 87% of labeled interneurons immunopositive for parvalbumin (PV). Immunostaining for somatostatin (SOM) revealed good specificity in the X98 line with 89% of fluorescent cells, but a lesser specificity in Sst-Cre animals where only 71% of labeled cells were immunopositive. A minority of ∼6% of interneurons co-expressed PV and SOM in the presubiculum of Sst-Cre animals. The electrophysiological and morphological properties of fluorescent interneurons from Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98 mice differed. Distinct physiological groups of presubicular interneurons were resolved by unsupervised cluster analysis of parameters describing passive properties, firing patterns and AP shapes. One group consisted of SOM-positive, Martinotti type neurons with a low firing threshold (cluster 1). Fast spiking basket cells, mainly from the Pvalb-Cre line, formed a distinct group (cluster 3). Another group (cluster 2) contained interneurons of intermediate electrical properties and basket-cell like morphologies. These labeled neurons were recorded from both Sst-Cre and Pvalb-Cre animals. Thus, our results reveal a wide variation in anatomical and physiological properties for these interneurons, a real overlap of interneurons immuno-positive for both PV and SOM as well as an off-target recombination in the Sst-Cre line, possibly linked to maternal cre inheritance.

  7. Reduced excitatory drive in interneurons in an animal model of cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hui; Chen, Huan-Xin; Yu, Xin-Xin; King, Michael A; Roper, Steven N

    2006-08-01

    Cortical dysplasia (CD) is strongly associated with epilepsy. Enhanced excitability in dysplastic neuronal networks is believed to contribute to epileptogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms for the hyperexcitability are poorly understood. Cortical GABAergic interneurons provide the principal inhibition in the neuronal networks by forming inhibitory synapses on excitatory neurons. The aim of the present study was to determine if the function of interneurons in CD is compromised. In a rat model of CD, in utero irradiation, we studied spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and mEPSCs) in cortical interneurons using whole cell recording techniques. Two types of interneurons, type I and type II, were identified based on their distinctive spike patterns and short-term synaptic plasticity. We found that the frequencies of sEPSCs and mEPSCs were significantly decreased in both types of interneurons in CD. However, the amplitude and kinetics of sEPSCs and mEPSCs were not different. Five-pulse, 20-Hz stimulation produced short-term depression in type I interneurons in both CD and control tissue. Type II interneurons showed a robust short-term facilitation in both CD and control tissue. Morphological analysis of biocytin-filled neurons revealed that dendritic trees of both types of interneurons were not altered in CD. Our results demonstrate that the excitatory drive, namely sEPSCs and mEPSCs, in two main types of interneuron is largely attenuated in CD, probably due to a reduction in the number of excitatory synapses on both types of interneurons in CD.

  8. POSTNATAL PHENOTYPE AND LOCALIZATION OF SPINAL CORD V1 DERIVED INTERNEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Francisco J.; Jonas, Philip C.; Sapir, Tamar; Hartley, Robert; Berrocal, Maria C.; Geiman, Eric J.; Todd, Andrew J.; Goulding, Martyn

    2010-01-01

    Developmental studies identified four classes (V0, V1, V2, V3) of embryonic interneurons in the ventral spinal cord. Very little however is known about their adult phenotypes. In order to further characterize interneuron cell types in the adult, the location, neurotransmitter phenotype, calcium-buffering protein expression and axon distributions of V1-derived neurons in the mouse spinal cord was determined. In the mature (P20 and older) spinal cord, most V1-derived neurons are located in lateral LVII and in LIX, few in medial LVII and none in LVIII. Approximately 40% express calbindin and/or parvalbumin, while few express calretinin. Of seven groups of ventral interneurons identified according to calcium-buffering protein expression, two groups (1 and 4) correspond with V1-derived neurons. Group 1 are Renshaw cells and intensely express calbindin and coexpress parvalbumin and calretinin. They represent 9% of the V1 population. Group 4 express only parvalbumin and represent 27% of V1-derived neurons. V1-derived group 4 neurons receive contacts from primary sensory afferents and are therefore proprioceptive interneurons and the most ventral neurons in this group receive convergent calbindin-IR Renshaw cell inputs. This subgroup resembles Ia inhibitory interneurons (IaINs) and represents 13% of V1-derived neurons. Adult V1-interneuron axons target LIX and LVII and some enter the deep dorsal horn. V1-axons do not cross the midline. V1 derived axonal varicosities were mostly (>80%) glycinergic and a third were GABAergic. None were glutamatergic or cholinergic. In summary, V1 interneurons develop into ipsilaterally projecting, inhibitory interneurons that include Renshaw cells, Ia inhibitory interneurons and other unidentified proprioceptive interneurons. PMID:16255029

  9. Topographical and physiological characterization of interneurons that express engrailed-1 in the embryonic chick spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wenner, P; O'Donovan, M J; Matise, M P

    2000-11-01

    A number of homeodomain transcription factors have been implicated in controlling the differentiation of various types of neurons including spinal motoneurons. Some of these proteins are also expressed in spinal interneurons, but their function is unknown. Progress in understanding the role of transcription factors in interneuronal development has been slow because the synaptic connections of interneurons, which in part define their identity, are difficult to establish. Using whole cell recording in the isolated spinal cord of chick embryos, we assessed the synaptic connections of lumbosacral interneurons expressing the Engrailed-1 (En1) transcription factor. Specifically we established whether En1-expressing interneurons made direct connections with motoneurons and whether they constitute a single interneuron class. Cells were labeled with biocytin and subsequently processed for En1 immunoreactivity. Our findings indicate that the connections of En1-expressing cells with motoneurons and with sensory afferents were diverse, suggesting that the population was heterogeneous. In addition, the synaptic connections we tested were similar in interneurons that expressed the En1 protein and in many that did not. The majority of sampled En1 cells did, however, exhibit a direct synaptic connection to motoneurons that is likely to be GABAergic. Because our physiological methods underestimate the number of direct connections with motoneurons, it is possible that the great majority, perhaps all, En1-expressing cells make direct synaptic connections with motoneurons. Our results raise the possibility that En1 could be involved in interneuron-motoneuron connectivity but that its expression is not restricted to a distinct functional subclass of ventral interneuron. These findings constrain hypotheses about the role of En-1 in interneuron development and function.

  10. Dopamine modulation of GABAergic function enables network stability and input selectivity for sustaining working memory in a computational model of the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Lew, Sergio E; Tseng, Kuei Y

    2014-12-01

    Dopamine modulation of GABAergic transmission in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to be critical for sustaining cognitive processes such as working memory and decision-making. Here, we developed a neurocomputational model of the PFC that includes physiological features of the facilitatory action of dopamine on fast-spiking interneurons to assess how a GABAergic dysregulation impacts on the prefrontal network stability and working memory. We found that a particular non-linear relationship between dopamine transmission and GABA function is required to enable input selectivity in the PFC for the formation and retention of working memory. Either degradation of the dopamine signal or the GABAergic function is sufficient to elicit hyperexcitability in pyramidal neurons and working memory impairments. The simulations also revealed an inverted U-shape relationship between working memory and dopamine, a function that is maintained even at high levels of GABA degradation. In fact, the working memory deficits resulting from reduced GABAergic transmission can be rescued by increasing dopamine tone and vice versa. We also examined the role of this dopamine-GABA interaction for the termination of working memory and found that the extent of GABAergic excitation needed to reset the PFC network begins to occur when the activity of fast-spiking interneurons surpasses 40 Hz. Together, these results indicate that the capability of the PFC to sustain working memory and network stability depends on a robust interplay of compensatory mechanisms between dopamine tone and the activity of local GABAergic interneurons.

  11. Dopamine Modulation of GABAergic Function Enables Network Stability and Input Selectivity for Sustaining Working Memory in a Computational Model of the Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Sergio E; Tseng, Kuei Y

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine modulation of GABAergic transmission in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to be critical for sustaining cognitive processes such as working memory and decision-making. Here, we developed a neurocomputational model of the PFC that includes physiological features of the facilitatory action of dopamine on fast-spiking interneurons to assess how a GABAergic dysregulation impacts on the prefrontal network stability and working memory. We found that a particular non-linear relationship between dopamine transmission and GABA function is required to enable input selectivity in the PFC for the formation and retention of working memory. Either degradation of the dopamine signal or the GABAergic function is sufficient to elicit hyperexcitability in pyramidal neurons and working memory impairments. The simulations also revealed an inverted U-shape relationship between working memory and dopamine, a function that is maintained even at high levels of GABA degradation. In fact, the working memory deficits resulting from reduced GABAergic transmission can be rescued by increasing dopamine tone and vice versa. We also examined the role of this dopamine–GABA interaction for the termination of working memory and found that the extent of GABAergic excitation needed to reset the PFC network begins to occur when the activity of fast-spiking interneurons surpasses 40 Hz. Together, these results indicate that the capability of the PFC to sustain working memory and network stability depends on a robust interplay of compensatory mechanisms between dopamine tone and the activity of local GABAergic interneurons. PMID:24975022

  12. The parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the mouse dentate gyrus express GABAA receptor subunits α1, β2, and δ along their extrasynaptic cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, I; Vasiljevic, M; Maurer, D; Höger, H; Klausberger, T; Sieghart, W

    2013-12-19

    Neuronal circuitries in the hippocampus are involved in navigation and memory and are controlled by major networks of GABAergic interneurons. Parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) are identified as fast-spiking cells, playing a crucial role in network oscillation and synchrony. The inhibitory modulation of these interneurons is thought to be mediated mainly through GABAA receptors, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. Here we show that all PV-positive interneurons in the granular/subgranular layer (GL/SGL) of the mouse DG express high levels of the GABAA receptor δ subunit. PV-containing interneurons in the hilus and the molecular layer, however, express the δ subunit to a lower extent. Only 8% of the somatostatin-containing interneurons express the δ subunit, whereas calbindin- or calretinin-containing interneurons in the DG seem not to express the GABAA receptor δ subunit at all. Hence, these cells receive a GABAergic control different from that of PV-containing interneurons in the GL/SGL. Experiments investigating a possible co-expression of GABAA receptor α1, α2, α3, α4, α5, β1, β2, β3, or γ2 subunits with PV and δ subunits indicated that α1 and β2 subunits are co-expressed with δ subunits along the extrasynaptic membranes of PV-interneurons. These results suggest a robust tonic GABAergic control of PV-containing interneurons in the GL/SGL of the DG via δ subunit-containing receptors. Our data are important for better understanding of the neuronal circuitries in the DG and the role of specific cell types under pathological conditions.

  13. Differential modulation of repetitive firing and synchronous network activity in neocortical interneurons by inhibition of A-type K+ channels and Ih

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sidney B.; Hablitz, John J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons provide the main source of inhibition in the neocortex and are important in regulating neocortical network activity. In the presence 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), CNQX, and D-APV, large amplitude GABAA-receptor mediated depolarizing responses were observed in the neocortex. GABAergic networks are comprised of several types of interneurons, each with its own protein expression pattern, firing properties, and inhibitory role in network activity. Voltage-gated ion channels, especially A-type K+ channels, differentially regulate passive membrane properties, action potential (AP) waveform, and repetitive firing properties in interneurons depending on their composition and localization. HCN channels are known modulators of pyramidal cell intrinsic excitability and excitatory network activity. Little information is available regarding how HCN channels functionally modulate excitability of individual interneurons and inhibitory networks. In this study, we examined the effect of 4-AP on intrinsic excitability of fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) and Martinotti cells (MCs). 4-AP increased the duration of APs in both FS-BCs and MCs. The repetitive firing properties of MCs were differentially affected compared to FS-BCs. We also examined the effect of Ih inhibition on synchronous GABAergic depolarizations and synaptic integration of depolarizing IPSPs. ZD 7288 enhanced the amplitude and area of evoked GABAergic responses in both cell types. Similarly, the frequency and area of spontaneous GABAergic depolarizations in both FS-BCs and MCs were increased in presence of ZD 7288. Synaptic integration of IPSPs in MCs was significantly enhanced, but remained unaltered in FS-BCs. These results indicate that 4-AP differentially alters the firing properties of interneurons, suggesting MCs and FS-BCs may have unique roles in GABAergic network synchronization. Enhancement of GABAergic network synchronization by ZD 7288 suggests that HCN channels attenuate inhibitory

  14. Quantitative Study of NPY-Expressing GABAergic Neurons and Axons in Rat Spinal Dorsal Horn*

    PubMed Central

    Polgár, Erika; Sardella, Thomas CP; Watanabe, Masahiko; Todd, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Between 25–40% of neurons in laminae I–III are GABAergic, and some of these express neuropeptide Y (NPY). We previously reported that NPY-immunoreactive axons form numerous synapses on lamina III projection neurons that possess the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1r). The aims of this study were to determine the proportion of neurons and GABAergic boutons in this region that contain NPY, and to look for evidence that they selectively innervate different neuronal populations. We found that 4–6% of neurons in laminae I–III were NPY-immunoreactive and based on the proportions of neurons that are GABAergic, we estimate that NPY is expressed by 18% of inhibitory interneurons in laminae I–II and 9% of those in lamina III. GABAergic boutons were identified by the presence of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) and NPY was found in 13–15% of VGAT-immunoreactive boutons in laminae I–II, and 5% of those in lamina III. For both the lamina III NK1r-immunoreactive projection neurons and protein kinase Cγ (PKCγ)-immunoreactive interneurons in lamina II, we found that around one-third of the VGAT boutons that contacted them were NPY-immunoreactive. However, based on differences in the sizes of these boutons and the strength of their NPY-immunoreactivity, we conclude that these originate from different populations of interneurons. Only 6% of VGAT boutons presynaptic to large lamina I projection neurons that lacked NK1rs contained NPY. These results show that NPY-containing neurons make up a considerable proportion of the inhibitory interneurons in laminae I–III, and that their axons preferentially target certain classes of dorsal horn neuron. J. Comp. Neurol. 519:1007–1023, 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21344400

  15. GFR alpha-1 is expressed in parvalbumin GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sarabi, A; Hoffer, B J; Olson, L; Morales, M

    2000-09-22

    Glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent survival factor for several types of neurons. GDNF binds with high affinity to GDNF-family receptor alpha-1 (GFR alpha-1). This receptor is expressed in different areas of the brain, including the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. By using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we found that 19% to 37% of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) expressing neurons co-expressed GFR alpha-1 in the hippocampus. GFR alpha-1/GAD co-expression was found mainly in the stratum (s) pyramidale (29-37%) and s. oriens (20-25%). Further characterization of GFR alpha-1 expressing interneurons, based on their calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity, demonstrated that many parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactive neurons express GFR alpha-1 in the s. pyramidale of CA1 (72%), CA2 (70%) and CA3 (70%) subfields of the hippocampus. GFR alpha-1/PV double labeled neurons were also detected in the s. oriens of CA1 (52%), CA2 (27%) and CA3 (36%) subfields. The expression of GFR alpha-1 in principal neurons and in a specific sub-population of GABAergic neurons (PV-containing neurons) suggest that GDNF might modulate, in a selective manner, functions of the entire adult hippocampus.

  16. Behavior‐dependent activity patterns of GABAergic long‐range projecting neurons in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Micklem, Ben; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Swiejkowski, Daniel A.; Valenti, Ornella; Viney, Tim J.; Kotzadimitriou, Dimitrios; Klausberger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Long‐range glutamatergic and GABAergic projections participate in temporal coordination of neuronal activity in distributed cortical areas. In the hippocampus, GABAergic neurons project to the medial septum and retrohippocampal areas. Many GABAergic projection cells express somatostatin (SOM+) and, together with locally terminating SOM+ bistratified and O‐LM cells, contribute to dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells. We tested the hypothesis that diversity in SOM+ cells reflects temporal specialization during behavior using extracellular single cell recording and juxtacellular neurobiotin‐labeling in freely moving rats. We have demonstrated that rare GABAergic projection neurons discharge rhythmically and are remarkably diverse. During sharp wave‐ripples, most projection cells, including a novel SOM+ GABAergic back‐projecting cell, increased their activity similar to bistratified cells, but unlike O‐LM cells. During movement, most projection cells discharged along the descending slope of theta cycles, but some fired at the trough jointly with bistratified and O‐LM cells. The specialization of hippocampal SOM+ projection neurons complements the action of local interneurons in differentially phasing inputs from the CA3 area to CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites during sleep and wakefulness. Our observations suggest that GABAergic projection cells mediate the behavior‐ and network state‐dependent binding of neuronal assemblies amongst functionally‐related brain regions by transmitting local rhythmic entrainment of neurons in CA1 to neuronal populations in other areas. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27997999

  17. Differential synaptic integration of interneurons in the outer and inner molecular layers of the developing dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Chittajallu, Ramesh; Kunze, Albrecht; Mangin, Jean-Marie; Gallo, Vittorio

    2007-08-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) undergoes continued reorganization and lamination during early postnatal development. Interneurons with anatomically identified synaptic contacts migrate from the outer to the inner regions of the molecular layer (ML) of the DG. By using the 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP)-enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse, we were able to target and physiologically characterize Dlx2(+) developing ML interneurons. We investigated whether synapses on migrating ML interneurons were functional and defined properties of synaptic inputs onto interneurons that were located in the outer ML (OML) or inner ML (IML). Consistent with ongoing maturation, IML interneurons displayed lower input resistances and more hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials than OML interneurons. Both OML and IML interneurons received a direct excitatory monosynaptic input from the entorhinal cortex via the perforant paths, but this input was differentially sensitive to activation of presynaptic group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors. Furthermore, only IML interneurons also received significant synaptic input from the CA3/hilar region, especially under conditions of experimentally induced disinhibition. These changes are attributed to a significant reorganization of dendritic fields. GABA(A) receptor-mediated innervation of OML and IML interneurons also displayed significant differences in miniature IPSC amplitude, frequency, and decay kinetics. Finally, cell-attached recordings indicated that GABA(A) receptor activation was depolarizing in OML interneurons but predominantly shunting in IML interneurons. Our data provide evidence that developing ML interneurons receive functional glutamatergic and GABAergic inputs and undergo significant changes in synaptic integration during migration from the OML to the IML.

  18. Functional diversity of supragranular GABAergic neurons in the barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gentet, Luc J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the neocortex forms a distributed system comprised of several functional areas, its vertical columnar organization is largely conserved across areas and species, suggesting the existence of a canonical neocortical microcircuit. In order to elucidate the principles governing the organization of such a cortical diagram, a detailed understanding of the dynamics binding different types of cortical neurons into a coherent algorithm is essential. Within this complex circuitry, GABAergic interneurons, while forming approximately only 15–20% of all cortical neurons, appear critical in maintaining a dynamic balance between excitation and inhibition. Despite their importance, cortical GABAergic neurons have not been extensively studied in vivo and their precise role in shaping the local microcircuit sensory response still remains to be determined. Their paucity, combined with their molecular, anatomical, and physiological diversity, has made it difficult to even establish a consensual nomenclature. However, recent technological advances in microscopy and mouse genetics have fostered a renewed interest in neocortical interneurons by putting them within “visible” reach of experimenters. The anatomically well-defined whisker-to-barrel pathway of the rodent is particularly amenable to studies attempting to link cortical circuit dynamics to behavior. To each whisker corresponds a discrete cortical unit equivalent to a single column, specialized in the encoding and processing of the sensory information it receives. In this review, we will focus on the functional role that each subtype of supragranular GABAergic neuron embedded within such a single neocortical unit may play in shaping the dynamics of the local circuit during somatosensory integration. PMID:22912602

  19. Impaired synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex of mice with developmentally decreased number of interneurons.

    PubMed

    Konstantoudaki, X; Chalkiadaki, K; Tivodar, S; Karagogeos, D; Sidiropoulou, K

    2016-05-13

    Interneurons are inhibitory neurons, which protect neural tissue from excessive excitation. They are interconnected with glutamatergic pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex and regulate their function. Particularly in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), interneurons have been strongly implicated in regulating pathological states which display deficits in the PFC. The aim of this study is to investigate the adaptations in the adult glutamatergic system, when defects in interneuron development do not allow adequate numbers of interneurons to reach the cerebral cortex. To this end, we used a mouse model that displays ~50% fewer cortical interneurons due to the Rac1 protein loss from Nkx2.1/Cre expressing cells (Rac1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice), to examine how the developmental loss of interneurons may affect basal synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and neuronal morphology in the adult PFC. Despite the decrease in the number of interneurons, basal synaptic transmission, as examined by recording field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) from layer II networks, is not altered in the PFC of Rac1 cKO mice. However, there is decreased paired-pulse ratio (PPR) and decreased long-term potentiation (LTP), in response to tetanic stimulation, in the layer II PFC synapses of Rac1 cKO mice. Furthermore, expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subunits is decreased and dendritic morphology is altered, changes that could underlie the decrease in LTP in the Rac1 cKO mice. Finally, we find that treating Rac1 cKO mice with diazepam in early postnatal life can reverse changes in dendritic morphology observed in non-treated Rac1 cKO mice. Therefore, our data show that disruption in GABAergic inhibition alters glutamatergic function in the adult PFC, an effect that could be reversed by enhancement of GABAergic function during an early postnatal period.

  20. Profound regulation of neonatal CA1 rat hippocampal GABAergic transmission by functionally distinct kainate receptor populations

    PubMed Central

    Maingret, François; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi; Isaac, John TR

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal hippocampus exhibits distinct patterns of network activity that are dependent on the interaction between inhibitory and excitatory transmission. Kainate receptors are ideally positioned to regulate this activity by virtue of their ability to regulate presynaptic function in GABAergic interneurones. Indeed, kainate receptors are highly expressed in neonatal hippocampal interneurones, yet the role and mechanisms by which they might regulate neonatal circuitry are unexplored. To address this we investigated the kainate receptor-dependent regulation of GABAergic transmission onto neonatal CA1 pyramidal neurones. Kainate receptor activation produced two distinct opposing effects, a very large increase in the frequency of spontaneous IPSCs, and a robust depression of evoked GABAergic transmission. The up-regulation of spontaneous transmission was due to activation of somatodendritic and axonal receptors while the depression of evoked transmission could be fully accounted for by a direct regulation of GABA release by kainate receptors located at the terminals. None of the effects of kainate receptor agonists were sensitive to GABAB receptor antagonists, nor was there any postsynaptic kainate receptor-dependent effects observed in CA1 pyramidal cells that could account for our findings. Our data demonstrate that kainate receptors profoundly regulate neonatal CA1 GABAergic circuitry by two distinct opposing mechanisms, and indicate that these two effects are mediated by functionally distinct populations of receptors. Thus kainate receptors are strategically located to play a critical role in shaping early hippocampal network activity and by virtue of this have a key role in hippocampal development. PMID:15946969

  1. The Many Tunes of Perisomatic Targeting Interneurons in the Hippocampal Network

    PubMed Central

    Ellender, Tommas J.; Paulsen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    The axonal targets of perisomatic targeting interneurons make them ideally suited to synchronize excitatory neurons. As such they have been implicated in rhythm generation of network activity in many brain regions including the hippocampus. However, several recent publications indicate that their roles extend beyond that of rhythm generation. Firstly, it has been shown that, in addition to rhythm generation, GABAergic perisomatic inhibition also serves as a current generator contributing significantly to hippocampal oscillatory EEG signals. Furthermore, GABAergic interneurons have a previously unrecognized role in the initiation of hippocampal population bursts, both in the developing and adult hippocampus. In this review, we describe these new observations in detail and discuss the implications they have for our understanding of the mechanisms underlying physiological and pathological hippocampal network activities. This review is part of the Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience's special topic entitled “GABA signaling in health and disease” based on the meeting at the CNCR Amsterdam. PMID:20740069

  2. Opposing Dopaminergic and GABAergic Neurons Control the Duration and Persistence of Copulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Crickmore, Michael A.; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Behavioral persistence is a major factor in determiningwhen and under which circumstances animals will terminate their current activity and transition into more profitable, appropriate, or urgent behavior. We show that, for the first 5 min of copulation in Drosophila, stressful stimuli do not interrupt mating, whereas 10 min later, even minor perturbations are sufficient to terminate copulation. This decline in persistence occurs as the probability of successful mating increases and is promoted by approximately eight sexually dimorphic, GABAergic interneurons of the male abdominal ganglion. When these interneurons were silenced, persistence increased and males copulated far longer than required for successful mating. When these interneurons were stimulated, persistence decreased and copulations were shortened. In contrast, dopaminergic neurons of the ventral nerve cord promote copulation persistence and extend copulation duration. Thus, copulation duration in Drosophila is a product of gradually declining persistence controlled by opposing neuronal populations using conserved neurotransmission systems. PMID:24209625

  3. Cntnap4 differentially contributes to GABAergic and dopaminergic synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Karayannis, T; Au, E; Patel, J C; Kruglikov, I; Markx, S; Delorme, R; Héron, D; Salomon, D; Glessner, J; Restituito, S; Gordon, A; Rodriguez-Murillo, L; Roy, N C; Gogos, J A; Rudy, B; Rice, M E; Karayiorgou, M; Hakonarson, H; Keren, B; Huguet, G; Bourgeron, T; Hoeffer, C; Tsien, R W; Peles, E; Fishell, G

    2014-07-10

    Although considerable evidence suggests that the chemical synapse is a lynchpin underlying affective disorders, how molecular insults differentially affect specific synaptic connections remains poorly understood. For instance, Neurexin 1a and 2 (NRXN1 and NRXN2) and CNTNAP2 (also known as CASPR2), all members of the neurexin superfamily of transmembrane molecules, have been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. However, their loss leads to deficits that have been best characterized with regard to their effect on excitatory cells. Notably, other disease-associated genes such as BDNF and ERBB4 implicate specific interneuron synapses in psychiatric disorders. Consistent with this, cortical interneuron dysfunction has been linked to epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism. Using a microarray screen that focused upon synapse-associated molecules, we identified Cntnap4 (contactin associated protein-like 4, also known as Caspr4) as highly enriched in developing murine interneurons. In this study we show that Cntnap4 is localized presynaptically and its loss leads to a reduction in the output of cortical parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric acid producing) basket cells. Paradoxically, the loss of Cntnap4 augments midbrain dopaminergic release in the nucleus accumbens. In Cntnap4 mutant mice, synaptic defects in these disease-relevant neuronal populations are mirrored by sensory-motor gating and grooming endophenotypes; these symptoms could be pharmacologically reversed, providing promise for therapeutic intervention in psychiatric disorders.

  4. Physiological and morphological characterization of GABAergic neurons in the medial amygdala.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiling

    2013-05-06

    GABAergic neurons in the medial amygdala (MeA) have been indicated in information processing in reproductive behavior and fear/anxiety. However, basic knowledge of their physiological and morphological properties is still very limited, probably due to the technical challenge to selectively record the GABAergic neurons. In this study, I characterized properties of the MeA GABAergic neurons by performing whole-cell patch clamp recordings from brain slices of adult knock-in mice selectively expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) in GABAergic neurons. The majority (73%) of GABAergic neurons exhibiting low threshold calcium spike were classified as type I neurons, with morphological properties of being bitufted or stellate, and dendrites either aspiny or covered by various shapes of spines. Axonal collaterals of some neurons were observed near somata as well as in other amygdaloid nuclei. Neurons incapable of generate low threshold calcium spikes were divided into two types. Type II neurons (11%) exhibited hyperpolarization-activated sag and higher input resistance (>400 MΩ). Most Type II neurons exhibited asymmetric dendritic trees extending towards the superficial layer covered with long neck dendritic spines. The axons of type II neurons formed large collaterals and projected to other amygdaloid nuclei. Type III neurons (16%) lack prominent hyperpolarization-activated sag and possessed lower input resistance (<400 MΩ). These neurons were local interneurons with smooth multipolar dendritic trees. Since both MeA and nearby amygdaloid nuclei are involved in fear/anxiety processing, two types of MeA GABAergic projection neurons and a third type of interneurons that might participate in anxiety-related behavior were revealed by my present study.

  5. Interneurons are the local targets of hippocampal inhibitory cells which project to the medial septum.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, A I; Hájos, N; Katona, I; Freund, T F

    2003-05-01

    A subset of GABAergic neurons projecting to the medial septum has long been described in the hippocampus. However, the lack of information about their local connectivity pattern or their correspondence with any of the well-established hippocampal interneuron types has hampered the understanding of their functional role. Retrograde tracing combined with immunostaining for neurochemical markers in the adult rat hippocampus showed that nearly all hippocampo-septal (HS) neurons express somatostatin (>95%) and, in the hilus and CA3 stratum lucidum, many contain calretinin (>45%). In contrast, in stratum oriens of the CA1 and CA3 subfields, the majority of HS neurons contain somatostatin (>86%) and calbindin (>73%), but not calretinin. Because somatostatin-positive hippocampal interneurons have been most extensively characterized in the stratum oriens of CA1, we focused our further analysis on HS cells found in this region. In 18-20-day-old rats, intracellularly filled CA1-HS cells had extensive local axon collaterals crossing subfield boundaries and innervating the CA3 region and the dentate gyrus. Electron microscopic analysis provided evidence that the axon terminals of CA1-HS cells form symmetrical synapses selectively on GABAergic interneurons, both locally and in the CA3 region. In addition, double retrograde labelling experiments revealed that many CA1-HS neurons of the dorsal hippocampus also have collateral projections to the ventral hippocampus. Thus, CA1-HS cells innervate inhibitory interneurons locally and in remote hippocampal regions, in addition to targeting mostly GABAergic neurons in the medial septum. This dual projection with striking target selectivity for GABAergic neurons may be ideally suited to synchronize neuronal activity along the septo-hippocampal axis.

  6. Developmental expression of potassium-channel subunit Kv3.2 within subpopulations of mouse hippocampal inhibitory interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tansey, Emily Phillips; Chow, Alan; Rudy, Bernardo; McBain, Chris J

    2002-01-01

    The developmental expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel subunit, Kv3.2, and its localization within specific mouse hippocampal inhibitory interneuron populations were determined using immunoblotting and immunohistochemical techniques. Using immunoblotting techniques, the Kv3.2 protein was weakly detected at postnatal age day 7 (P7), and full expression was attained at P21 in tissue extracts from homogenized hippocampal preparations. A similar developmental profile was observed using immunohistochemical techniques in hippocampal tissue sections. Kv3.2 protein expression was clustered on the somata and proximal dendrites of presumed inhibitory interneurons. Using double immunofluorescence, Kv3.2 subunit expression was detected on subpopulations of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. Kv3.2 was detected in approximately 100% of parvalbumin-positive interneurons, 86% of interneurons expressing nitric oxide synthase, and approximately 50% of somatostatin-immunoreactive cells. Kv3.2 expression was absent from both calbindin- and calretinin-containing interneurons. Using immunoprecipitation, we further demonstrate that Kv3.2 and its related subunit Kv3.1b are coexpressed within the same protein complexes in the hippocampus. These data demonstrate that potassium channel subunit Kv3.2 expression is developmentally regulated in a specific set of interneurons. The vast majority of these interneuron subpopulations possess a "fast-spiking" phenotype, consistent with a role for currents through Kv3.2 containing channels in determining action potential kinetics in these cells.

  7. Transcriptomic and anatomic parcellation of 5-HT3AR expressing cortical interneuron subtypes revealed by single-cell RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Sarah; Prados, Julien; Niquille, Mathieu; Cadilhac, Christelle; Markopoulos, Foivos; Gomez, Lucia; Tomasello, Ugo; Telley, Ludovic; Holtmaat, Anthony; Jabaudon, Denis; Dayer, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic interneurons constitute a highly diverse population of inhibitory neurons that are key regulators of cortical microcircuit function. An important and heterogeneous group of cortical interneurons specifically expresses the serotonin receptor 3A (5-HT3AR) but how this diversity emerges during development is poorly understood. Here we use single-cell transcriptomics to identify gene expression patterns operating in Htr3a-GFP+ interneurons during early steps of cortical circuit assembly. We identify three main molecular types of Htr3a-GFP+ interneurons, each displaying distinct developmental dynamics of gene expression. The transcription factor Meis2 is specifically enriched in a type of Htr3a-GFP+ interneurons largely confined to the cortical white matter. These MEIS2-expressing interneurons appear to originate from a restricted region located at the embryonic pallial–subpallial boundary. Overall, this study identifies MEIS2 as a subclass-specific marker for 5-HT3AR-containing interstitial interneurons and demonstrates that the transcriptional and anatomical parcellation of cortical interneurons is developmentally coupled. PMID:28134272

  8. The vulnerability of calretinin-containing hippocampal interneurons to temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Kinga; Maglóczky, Zsófia

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the vulnerability of a special interneuron type—the calretinin (CR)-containing interneurons—in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). CR is a calcium-binding protein expressed mainly by GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus. Despite their morphological heterogeneity, CR-containing interneurons form a distinct subpopulation of inhibitory cells, innervating other interneurons in rodents and to some extent principal cells in the human. Their dendrites are strongly connected by zona adherentiae and presumably by gap junctions both in rats and humans. CR-containing interneurons are suggested to play a key role in the hippocampal inhibitory network, since they can effectively synchronize dendritic inhibitory interneurons. The sensitivity of CR-expressing interneurons to epilepsy was discussed in several reports, both in animal models and in humans. In the sclerotic hippocampus the density of CR-immunopositive cells is decreased significantly. In the non-sclerotic hippocampus, the CR-containing interneurons are preserved, but their dendritic tree is varicose, segmented, and zona-adherentia-type contacts can be less frequently observed among dendrites. Therefore, the dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells may be less effective in TLE. This can be partially explained by the impairment of the CR-containing interneuron ensemble in the epileptic hippocampus, which may result in an asynchronous and thus less effective dendritic inhibition of the principal cells. This phenomenon, together with the sprouting of excitatory pathway axons and enhanced innervation of principal cells, may be involved in seizure generation. Preventing the loss of CR-positive cells and preserving the integrity of CR-positive dendrite gap junctions may have antiepileptic effects, maintaining proper inhibitory function and helping to protect principal cells in epilepsy. PMID:25324731

  9. Intermediate Progenitors Facilitate Intracortical Progression of Thalamocortical Axons and Interneurons through CXCL12 Chemokine Signaling.

    PubMed

    Abe, Philipp; Molnár, Zoltán; Tzeng, Yi-Shiuan; Lai, Dar-Ming; Arnold, Sebastian J; Stumm, Ralf

    2015-09-23

    Glutamatergic principal neurons, GABAergic interneurons and thalamocortical axons (TCAs) are essential elements of the cerebrocortical network. Principal neurons originate locally from radial glia and intermediate progenitors (IPCs), whereas interneurons and TCAs are of extrinsic origin. Little is known how the assembly of these elements is coordinated. C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12), which is known to guide axons outside the neural tube and interneurons in the cortex, is expressed in the meninges and IPCs. Using mouse genetics, we dissected the influence of IPC-derived CXCL12 on TCAs and interneurons by showing that Cxcl12 ablation in IPCs, leaving meningeal Cxcl12 intact, attenuates intracortical TCA growth and disrupts tangential interneuron migration in the subventricular zone. In accordance with strong CXCR4 expression in the forming thalamus and TCAs, we identified a CXCR4-dependent growth-promoting effect of CXCL12 on TCAs in thalamus explants. Together, our findings indicate a cell-autonomous role of CXCR4 in promoting TCA growth. We propose that CXCL12 signals from IPCs link cortical neurogenesis to the progression of TCAs and interneurons spatially and temporally. Significance statement: The cerebral cortex exerts higher brain functions including perceptual and emotional processing. Evolutionary expansion of the mammalian cortex is mediated by intermediate progenitors, transient amplifying cells generating cortical excitatory neurons. During the peak period of cortical neurogenesis, migrating precursors of inhibitory interneurons originating in subcortical areas and thalamic axons invade the cortex. Although defects in the assembly of cortical network elements cause neurological and mental disorders, little is known how neurogenesis, interneuron recruitment, and axonal ingrowth are coordinated. We demonstrate that intermediate progenitors release the chemotactic cytokine CXCL12 to promote intracortical interneuron migration and growth of thalamic axons

  10. All-Trans-Retinoid Acid Induces the Differentiation of Encapsulated Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells into GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Addae, Cynthia; Yi, Xiaoping; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Cheng, Henrique; Musto, Alberto; Martinez-Ceballos, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells that can differentiate into all three main germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Although a number of methods have been developed to differentiate ES cells into neuronal phenotypes such as sensory and motor neurons, the efficient generation of GABAergic interneurons from ES cells still presents an ongoing challenge. Because the main output of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons is the gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter whose controlled homeostasis is required for normal brain function, the efficient generation in culture of functional interneurons may have future implications on the treatment of neurological disorders such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. The goal of this work was to examine the generation of GABAergic neurons from mouse ES cells by comparing an embryoid body-based methodology versus a hydrogel-based encapsulation protocol that involves the use of all-trans-retinoid acid (RA). We observed that 1) there was a 2-fold increase in neuronal differentiation in encapsulated versus non-encapsulated cells and 2) there was an increase in the specificity for interneuronal differentiation in encapsulated cells, as assessed by mRNA expression and electrophysiology approaches. Furthermore, our results indicate that most of the neurons obtained from encapsulated mouse ES cells are GABA-positive (~87%). Thus, these results suggest that combining encapsulation of ES cells and RA treatment provide a more efficient and scalable differentiation strategy for the generation in culture of functional GABAergic interneurons. This technology may have implications for future cell replacement therapies and the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:22466603

  11. Colocalization of allatotropin and tachykinin-related peptides with classical transmitters in physiologically distinct subtypes of olfactory local interneurons in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana).

    PubMed

    Fusca, Debora; Schachtner, Joachim; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2015-07-01

    In the insect antennal lobe different types of local interneurons mediate complex excitatory and inhibitory interactions between the glomerular pathways to structure the spatiotemporal representation of odors. Mass spectrometric and immunohistochemical studies have shown that in local interneurons classical neurotransmitters are likely to colocalize with a variety of substances that can potentially act as cotransmitters or neuromodulators. In the antennal lobe of the cockroach Periplaneta americana, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been identified as the potential inhibitory transmitter of spiking type I local interneurons, whereas acetylcholine is most likely the excitatory transmitter of nonspiking type IIa1 local interneurons. This study used whole-cell patch clamp recordings combined with single-cell labeling and immunohistochemistry to test if the GABAergic type I local interneurons and the cholinergic type IIa1 local interneurons express allatotropin and tachykinin-related neuropeptides (TKRPs). These are two of the most abundant types of peptides in the insect antennal lobe. GABA-like and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-like immunoreactivity were used as markers for GABAergic and cholinergic neurons, respectively. About 50% of the GABA-like immunoreactive (-lir) spiking type I local interneurons were allatotropin-lir, and ∼ 40% of these neurons were TKRP-lir. About 20% of nonspiking ChAT-lir type IIa1 local interneurons were TKRP-lir. Our results suggest that in subpopulations of GABAergic and cholinergic local interneurons, allatotropin and TKRPs might act as cotransmitters or neuromodulators. To unequivocally assign neurotransmitters, cotransmitters, and neuromodulators to identified classes of antennal lobe neurons is an important step to deepen our understanding of information processing in the insect olfactory system.

  12. Dopaminergic innervation of interneurons in the rat basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Pinard, Courtney R.; Muller, Jay F.; Mascagni, Franco; McDonald, Alexander J.

    2008-01-01

    The basolateral nuclear complex of the amygdala (BLC) receives a dense dopaminergic innervation that plays a critical role in the formation of emotional memory. Dopamine has been shown to influence the activity of BLC GABAergic interneurons, which differentially control the activity of pyramidal cells. However, little is known about how dopaminergic inputs interface with different interneuronal subpopulations in this region. To address this question, dual-labeling immunohistochemical techniques were used at the light and electron microscopic levels to examine inputs from tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH+) dopaminergic terminals to two different interneuronal populations in the rat basolateral nucleus labeled using antibodies to parvalbumin (PV) or calretinin (CR). The basolateral nucleus exhibited a dense innervation by TH+ axons. Partial serial section reconstruction of TH+ terminals found that at least 43–50% of these terminals formed synaptic junctions in the basolateral nucleus. All of the synapses examined were symmetrical. In both TH/PV and TH/CR preparations the main targets of TH+ terminals were spines and distal dendrites of unlabeled cells. In sections dual-labeled for TH/PV 59% of the contacts of TH+ terminals with PV+ neurons were synapses, whereas in sections dual-labeled for TH/CR only 13% of the contacts of TH+ terminals with CR+ cells were synapses. In separate preparations examined in complete serial sections for TH+ basket-like innervation of PV+ perikarya, most (76.2%) of TH+ terminal contacts with PV+ perikarya were synapses. These findings suggest that PV+ interneurons, but not CR+ interneurons, are prominent synaptic targets of dopaminergic terminals in the BLC. PMID:18948174

  13. Excitatory effects of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons maintain hippocampal epileptiform activity via synchronous afterdischarges.

    PubMed

    Ellender, Tommas J; Raimondo, Joseph V; Irkle, Agnese; Lamsa, Karri P; Akerman, Colin J

    2014-11-12

    Epileptic seizures are characterized by periods of hypersynchronous, hyperexcitability within brain networks. Most seizures involve two stages: an initial tonic phase, followed by a longer clonic phase that is characterized by rhythmic bouts of synchronized network activity called afterdischarges (ADs). Here we investigate the cellular and network mechanisms underlying hippocampal ADs in an effort to understand how they maintain seizure activity. Using in vitro hippocampal slice models from rats and mice, we performed electrophysiological recordings from CA3 pyramidal neurons to monitor network activity and changes in GABAergic signaling during epileptiform activity. First, we show that the highest synchrony occurs during clonic ADs, consistent with the idea that specific circuit dynamics underlie this phase of the epileptiform activity. We then show that ADs require intact GABAergic synaptic transmission, which becomes excitatory as a result of a transient collapse in the chloride (Cl(-)) reversal potential. The depolarizing effects of GABA are strongest at the soma of pyramidal neurons, which implicates somatic-targeting interneurons in AD activity. To test this, we used optogenetic techniques to selectively control the activity of somatic-targeting parvalbumin-expressing (PV(+)) interneurons. Channelrhodopsin-2-mediated activation of PV(+) interneurons during the clonic phase generated excitatory GABAergic responses in pyramidal neurons, which were sufficient to elicit and entrain synchronous AD activity across the network. Finally, archaerhodopsin-mediated selective silencing of PV(+) interneurons reduced the occurrence of ADs during the clonic phase. Therefore, we propose that activity-dependent Cl(-) accumulation subverts the actions of PV(+) interneurons to perpetuate rather than terminate pathological network hyperexcitability during the clonic phase of seizures.

  14. Excitatory Effects of Parvalbumin-Expressing Interneurons Maintain Hippocampal Epileptiform Activity via Synchronous Afterdischarges

    PubMed Central

    Ellender, Tommas J.; Raimondo, Joseph V.; Irkle, Agnese; Lamsa, Karri P.

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are characterized by periods of hypersynchronous, hyperexcitability within brain networks. Most seizures involve two stages: an initial tonic phase, followed by a longer clonic phase that is characterized by rhythmic bouts of synchronized network activity called afterdischarges (ADs). Here we investigate the cellular and network mechanisms underlying hippocampal ADs in an effort to understand how they maintain seizure activity. Using in vitro hippocampal slice models from rats and mice, we performed electrophysiological recordings from CA3 pyramidal neurons to monitor network activity and changes in GABAergic signaling during epileptiform activity. First, we show that the highest synchrony occurs during clonic ADs, consistent with the idea that specific circuit dynamics underlie this phase of the epileptiform activity. We then show that ADs require intact GABAergic synaptic transmission, which becomes excitatory as a result of a transient collapse in the chloride (Cl−) reversal potential. The depolarizing effects of GABA are strongest at the soma of pyramidal neurons, which implicates somatic-targeting interneurons in AD activity. To test this, we used optogenetic techniques to selectively control the activity of somatic-targeting parvalbumin-expressing (PV+) interneurons. Channelrhodopsin-2-mediated activation of PV+ interneurons during the clonic phase generated excitatory GABAergic responses in pyramidal neurons, which were sufficient to elicit and entrain synchronous AD activity across the network. Finally, archaerhodopsin-mediated selective silencing of PV+ interneurons reduced the occurrence of ADs during the clonic phase. Therefore, we propose that activity-dependent Cl− accumulation subverts the actions of PV+ interneurons to perpetuate rather than terminate pathological network hyperexcitability during the clonic phase of seizures. PMID:25392490

  15. GDNF-based therapies, GDNF-producing interneurons, and trophic support of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. Implications for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    d’Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Pascual, Alberto; López-Barneo, José

    2015-01-01

    The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a well-established trophic agent for dopaminergic (DA) neurons in vitro and in vivo. GDNF is necessary for maintenance of neuronal morphological and neurochemical phenotype and protects DA neurons from toxic damage. Numerous studies on animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) have reported beneficial effects of GDNF on nigrostriatal DA neuron survival. However, translation of these observations to the clinical setting has been hampered so far by side effects associated with the chronic continuous intra-striatal infusion of recombinant GDNF. In addition, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials have not reported any clinically relevant effect of GDNF on PD patients. In the past few years, experiments with conditional Gdnf knockout mice have suggested that GDNF is necessary for maintenance of DA neurons in adulthood. In parallel, new methodologies for exogenous GDNF delivery have been developed. Recently, it has been shown that a small population of scattered, electrically interconnected, parvalbumin positive (PV+) GABAergic interneurons is responsible for most of the GDNF produced in the rodent striatum. In addition, cholinergic striatal interneurons appear to be also involved in the modulation of striatal GDNF. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on brain GDNF delivery, homeostasis, and its effects on nigrostriatal DA neurons. Special attention is paid to the therapeutic potential of endogenous GDNF stimulation in PD. PMID:25762899

  16. Interneurons and oligodendrocyte progenitors form a structured synaptic network in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Orduz, David; Maldonado, Paloma P; Balia, Maddalena; Vélez-Fort, Mateo; de Sars, Vincent; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Emiliani, Valentina; Angulo, Maria Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    NG2 cells, oligodendrocyte progenitors, receive a major synaptic input from interneurons in the developing neocortex. It is presumed that these precursors integrate cortical networks where they act as sensors of neuronal activity. We show that NG2 cells of the developing somatosensory cortex form a transient and structured synaptic network with interneurons that follows its own rules of connectivity. Fast-spiking interneurons, highly connected to NG2 cells, target proximal subcellular domains containing GABAA receptors with γ2 subunits. Conversely, non-fast-spiking interneurons, poorly connected with these progenitors, target distal sites lacking this subunit. In the network, interneuron-NG2 cell connectivity maps exhibit a local spatial arrangement reflecting innervation only by the nearest interneurons. This microcircuit architecture shows a connectivity peak at PN10, coinciding with a switch to massive oligodendrocyte differentiation. Hence, GABAergic innervation of NG2 cells is temporally and spatially regulated from the subcellular to the network level in coordination with the onset of oligodendrogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06953.001 PMID:25902404

  17. Whole-cell Patch-clamp Recordings from Morphologically- and Neurochemically-identified Hippocampal Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Sam A.; Song, Jie; Vida, Imre

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory interneurons play a central role within neuronal circuits of the brain. Interneurons comprise a small subset of the neuronal population (10-20%), but show a high level of physiological, morphological, and neurochemical heterogeneity, reflecting their diverse functions. Therefore, investigation of interneurons provides important insights into the organization principles and function of neuronal circuits. This, however, requires an integrated physiological and neuroanatomical approach for the selection and identification of individual interneuron types. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording from acute brain slices of transgenic animals, expressing fluorescent proteins under the promoters of interneuron-specific markers, provides an efficient method to target and electrophysiologically characterize intrinsic and synaptic properties of specific interneuron types. Combined with intracellular dye labeling, this approach can be extended with post-hoc morphological and immunocytochemical analysis, enabling systematic identification of recorded neurons. These methods can be tailored to suit a broad range of scientific questions regarding functional properties of diverse types of cortical neurons. PMID:25350149

  18. Interneurons and oligodendrocyte progenitors form a structured synaptic network in the developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Orduz, David; Maldonado, Paloma P; Balia, Maddalena; Vélez-Fort, Mateo; de Sars, Vincent; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Emiliani, Valentina; Angulo, Maria Cecilia

    2015-04-22

    NG2 cells, oligodendrocyte progenitors, receive a major synaptic input from interneurons in the developing neocortex. It is presumed that these precursors integrate cortical networks where they act as sensors of neuronal activity. We show that NG2 cells of the developing somatosensory cortex form a transient and structured synaptic network with interneurons that follows its own rules of connectivity. Fast-spiking interneurons, highly connected to NG2 cells, target proximal subcellular domains containing GABAA receptors with γ2 subunits. Conversely, non-fast-spiking interneurons, poorly connected with these progenitors, target distal sites lacking this subunit. In the network, interneuron-NG2 cell connectivity maps exhibit a local spatial arrangement reflecting innervation only by the nearest interneurons. This microcircuit architecture shows a connectivity peak at PN10, coinciding with a switch to massive oligodendrocyte differentiation. Hence, GABAergic innervation of NG2 cells is temporally and spatially regulated from the subcellular to the network level in coordination with the onset of oligodendrogenesis.

  19. Revisiting the Lamotrigine-Mediated Effect on Hippocampal GABAergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Yin; Liu, Yu-Chao; Lee, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Yen-Chu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chang, Kaung-Yi; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Lamotrigine (LTG) is generally considered as a voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel blocker. However, recent studies suggest that LTG can also serve as a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel enhancer and can increase the excitability of GABAergic interneurons (INs). Perisomatic inhibitory INs, predominantly fast-spiking basket cells (BCs), powerfully inhibit granule cells (GCs) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Notably, BCs express abundant Nav channels and HCN channels, both of which are able to support sustained action potential generation. Using whole-cell recording in rat hippocampal slices, we investigated the net LTG effect on BC output. We showed that bath application of LTG significantly decreased the amplitude of evoked compound inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in GCs. In contrast, simultaneous paired recordings from BCs to GCs showed that LTG had no effect on both the amplitude and the paired-pulse ratio of the unitary IPSCs, suggesting that LTG did not affect GABA release, though it suppressed cell excitability. In line with this, LTG decreased spontaneous IPSC (sIPSC) frequency, but not miniature IPSC frequency. When re-examining the LTG effect on GABAergic transmission in the cornus ammonis region 1 (CA1) area, we found that LTG markedly inhibits both the excitability of dendrite-targeting INs in the stratum oriens and the concurrent sIPSCs recorded on their targeting pyramidal cells (PCs) without significant hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) enhancement. In summary, LTG has no effect on augmenting Ih in GABAergic INs and does not promote GABAergic inhibitory output. The antiepileptic effect of LTG is likely through Nav channel inhibition and the suppression of global neuronal network activity. PMID:27455251

  20. Key Metabolic Enzymes Underlying Astrocytic Upregulation of GABAergic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kaczor, Przemysław T.; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2017-01-01

    GABAergic plasticity is recognized as a key mechanism of shaping the activity of the neuronal networks. However, its description is challenging because of numerous neuron-specific mechanisms. In particular, while essential role of glial cells in the excitatory plasticity is well established, their involvement in GABAergic plasticity only starts to emerge. To address this problem, we used two models: neuronal cell culture (NC) and astrocyte-neuronal co-culture (ANCC), where we chemically induced long-term potentiation at inhibitory synapses (iLTP). iLTP could be induced both in NC and ANCC but in ANCC its extent was larger. Importantly, this functional iLTP manifestation was accompanied by an increase in gephyrin puncta size. Furthermore, blocking astrocyte Krebs cycle with fluoroacetate (FA) in ANCC prevented enhancement of both mIPSC amplitude and gephyrin puncta size but this effect was not observed in NC, indicating a key role in neuron-astrocyte cross-talk. Blockade of monocarboxylate transport with α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4CIN) abolished iLTP both in NC and ANCC and in the latter model prevented also enlargement of gephyrin puncta. Similarly, blockade of glycogen phosphorylase with BAYU6751 prevented enlargement of gephyrin puncta upon iLTP induction. Finally, block of glutamine synthetase with methionine sulfoxide (MSO) nearly abolished mIPSC increase in both NMDA stimulated cell groups but did not prevent enlargement of gephyrin puncta. In conclusion, we provide further evidence that GABAergic plasticity is strongly regulated by astrocytes and the underlying mechanisms involve key metabolic enzymes. Considering the strategic role of GABAergic interneurons, the plasticity described here indicates possible mechanism whereby metabolism regulates the network activity. PMID:28559800

  1. Vulnerability of hippocampal GABA‐ergic interneurons to kainate‐induced excitotoxic injury during old age

    PubMed Central

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Muddanna S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Hippocampal inhibitory interneurons expressing glutamate decarboxylase‐67 (GAD‐67) considerably decline in number during old age. Studies in young adult animals further suggest that hippocampal GAD‐67+ interneuron population is highly vulnerable to excitotoxic injury. However, the relative susceptibility of residual GAD‐67+ interneurons in the aged hippocampus to excitotoxic injury is unknown. To elucidate this, using both adult and aged F344 rats, we performed stereological counting of GAD‐67+ interneurons in different layers of the dentate gyrus and CA1 & CA3 sub‐fields, at 3 months post‐excitotoxic hippocampal injury inflicted through an intracerebroventricular administration of kainic acid (KA). Substantial reductions of GAD‐67+ interneurons were found in all hippocampal layers and sub‐fields after KA‐induced injury in adult animals. Contrastingly, there was no significant change in GAD‐67+ interneuron population in any of the hippocampal layers and sub‐fields following similar injury in aged animals. Furthermore, the stability of GAD‐67+ interneurons in aged rats after KA was not attributable to milder injury, as the overall extent of KA‐induced hippocampal principal neuron loss was comparable between adult and aged rats. Interestingly, because of the age‐related disparity in vulnerability of interneurons to injury, the surviving GAD‐67+ interneuron population in the injured aged hippocampus remained comparable to that observed in the injured adult hippocampus despite enduring significant reductions in interneuron number with aging. Thus, unlike in the adult hippocampus, an excitotoxic injury to the aged hippocampus does not result in significantly decreased numbers of GAD‐67+ interneurons. Persistence of GAD‐67+ interneuron population in the injured aged hippocampus likely reflects an age‐related change in the response of GAD‐67+ interneurons to excitotoxic hippocampal injury. These results have implications

  2. Tectal-derived interneurons contribute to phasic and tonic inhibition in the visual thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Jager, Polona; Ye, Zhiwen; Yu, Xiao; Zagoraiou, Laskaro; Prekop, Hong-Ting; Partanen, Juha; Jessell, Thomas M.; Wisden, William; Brickley, Stephen G.; Delogu, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    The release of GABA from local interneurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN-INs) provides inhibitory control during visual processing within the thalamus. It is commonly assumed that this important class of interneurons originates from within the thalamic complex, but we now show that during early postnatal development Sox14/Otx2-expressing precursor cells migrate from the dorsal midbrain to generate dLGN-INs. The unexpected extra-diencephalic origin of dLGN-INs sets them apart from GABAergic neurons of the reticular thalamic nucleus. Using optogenetics we show that at increased firing rates tectal-derived dLGN-INs generate a powerful form of tonic inhibition that regulates the gain of thalamic relay neurons through recruitment of extrasynaptic high-affinity GABAA receptors. Therefore, by revising the conventional view of thalamic interneuron ontogeny we demonstrate how a previously unappreciated mesencephalic population controls thalamic relay neuron excitability. PMID:27929058

  3. Distribution of D1 and D2-dopamine receptors in calcium-binding-protein expressing interneurons in rat anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Han

    2015-04-25

    Dopamine plays an important role in cognitive functions including decision making, attention, learning and memory in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). However, little is known about dopamine receptors (DAR) expression patterns in ACC neurons, especially GABAergic interneurons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of the most abundant DAR subtypes, D1 receptors (D1Rs) and D2 receptors (D2Rs), in major types of GABAergic interneurons in rat ACC, including parvalbumin (PV)-, calretinin (CR)-, and calbindin D-28k (CB)-containing interneurons. Double immunofluorescence staining and confocal scanning were used to detect protein expression in rat brain sections. The results showed a high proportion of PV-containing interneurons express D1Rs and D2Rs, while a low proportion of CR-positive interneurons express D1Rs and D2Rs. D1R- and D2R-expressing PV interneurons are more prevalently distributed in deep layers than superficial layers of ACC. Moreover, we found the proportion of D2Rs expressed in CR cells is much greater than that of D1Rs. These regional and interneuron type-specific differences of D1Rs and D2Rs indicate functionally distinct roles for dopamine in modulating ACC activities via stimulating D1Rs and D2Rs.

  4. Pitx3 deficiency in mice affects cholinergic modulation of GABAergic synapses in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    de Rover, Mischa; Lodder, Johannes C; Smidt, Marten P; Brussaard, Arjen B

    2006-10-01

    We investigated to what extent Pitx3 deficiency, causing hyperdopaminergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens microcircuitry, may lead to developmental changes. First, spontaneous firing activity of cholinergic interneurons in the nucleus accumbens was recorded in vitro. Firing patterns in the Pitx3-deficient mice were more variable and intrinsically different from those observed in wild-type mice. Next, to test whether the irregular firing patterns observed in mutant mice affected the endogenous nicotinic modulation of the GABAergic input of medium spiny neurons, we recorded spontaneous GABAergic inputs to these cells before and after the application of the nicotinic receptor blocker mecamylamine. Effects of mecamylamine were found in slices of either genotype, but in a rather inconsistent manner. Possibly this was attributable to heterogeneity in firing of nearby cholinergic interneurons. Thus paired recordings of cholinergic interneurons and medium spiny neurons were performed to more precisely control the experimental conditions of the cholinergic modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. We found that controlling action potential firing in cholinergic neurons leads to a conditional increase in GABAergic input frequency in wild-type mice but not in Pitx3-deficient mice. We conclude that Pitx3-deficient mice have neural adaptations at the level of the nucleus accumbens microcircuitry that in turn may have behavioral consequences. It is discussed to what extent dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens may be a long-term gating mechanism leading to alterations in cholinergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens, in line with previously reported neural adaptations found as consequences of repeated drug treatment in rodents.

  5. Characterization of GABAergic marker expression in the chronic unpredictable stress model of depression

    PubMed Central

    Banasr, Mounira; Lepack, Ashley; Fee, Corey; Duric, Vanja; Maldonado-Aviles, Jaime; DiLeone, Ralph; Sibille, Etienne; Duman, Ronald S.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Evidence continues to build suggesting that the GABAergic neurotransmitter system is altered in brains of patients with major depressive disorder. However, there is little information available related to the extent of these changes or the potential mechanisms associated with these alterations. As stress is a well-established precipitant to depressive episodes, we sought to explore the impact of chronic stress on GABAergic interneurons. Using western blot analyses and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) we assessed the effects of five-weeks of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) exposure on the expression of GABA-synthesizing enzymes (GAD65 and GAD67), calcium-binding proteins (calbindin (CB), parvalbumin (PV) and calretinin (CR)), and neuropeptides co-expressed in GABAergic neurons (somatostatin (SST), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and cholecystokinin (CCK)) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) of rats. We also investigated the effects of corticosterone (CORT) and dexamethasone (DEX) exposure on these markers in vitro in primary cortical and hippocampal cultures. We found that CUS induced significant reductions of GAD67 protein levels in both the PFC and HPC of CUS-exposed rats, but did not detect changes in GAD65 protein expression. Similar protein expression changes were found in vitro in cortical neurons. In addition, our results provide clear evidence of reduced markers of interneuron population(s), namely SST and NPY, in the PFC, suggesting these cell types may be selectively vulnerable to chronic stress. Together, this work highlights that chronic stress induces regional and cell type-selective effects on GABAergic interneurons in rats. These findings provide additional supporting evidence that stress-induced GABA neuron dysfunction and cell vulnerability play critical roles in the pathophysiology of stress-related illnesses, including major depressive disorder. PMID:28835932

  6. Patterns of connectivity of spinal interneurons with single muscle afferents.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R; Lomeli, J; Rudomin, P

    1997-07-01

    A technique was developed to measure, in the anesthetized and paralyzed cat under artificial ventilation, changes of excitability to intraspinal stimulation simultaneously in two different afferent fibers or in two collaterals of the same afferent fiber. Intraspinal stimulation reduced the threshold of single muscle afferent fibers ending in the intermediate nucleus. This effect was seen with strengths below those required to activate the afferent fiber tested (1.5-12 microA), occurred at a short latency (1.5-2.0 ms), reached a maximum between 15 and 30 ms, and lasted up to 100 ms. The effects produced by graded stimulation applied at the shortest conditioning-testing stimulus time intervals increased by fixed steps, suggesting recruitment of discrete elements, most likely of last-order interneurons mediating primary afferent depolarization (PAD). The short-latency increases in excitability produced by the weakest effective intraspinal stimuli were usually detected only in the collateral closest to the stimulating micropipette, indicating that the stimulated interneurons mediating PAD have spatially restricted actions. The short-latency PAD produced by intraspinal stimuli, as well as the PAD produced by stimulation of the posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) nerve or by stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation (RF), was depressed 19-30 min after the i.v. injection of 0.5 mg/kg of picrotoxin, suggesting that all these effects were mediated by GABAergic mechanisms. The PAD elicited by stimulation of muscle and/or cutaneous nerves was depressed following the i.v. injection of (-)-baclofen, whereas the PAD elicited in the same collateral by stimulation of the RF was baclofen-resistant. The short-latency PAD produced by intraspinal stimulation was not always depressed by i.v. injections of (-)-baclofen. Baclofen-sensitive and baclofen-resistant monosynaptic PADs could be produced in different collaterals of the same afferent fiber. The results suggest that

  7. Multiple Distinct Subtypes of GABAergic Neurons in Mouse Visual Cortex Identified by Triple Immunostaining

    PubMed Central

    Gonchar, Yuri; Wang, Quanxin; Burkhalter, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The majority of cortical interneurons use GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) as inhibitory neurotransmitter. GABAergic neurons are morphologically, connectionally, electrically and chemically heterogeneous. In rat cerebral cortex three distinct groups of GABAergic interneurons have been identified by the expression of parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR) and somatostatin (SOM). Recent studies in mouse cerebral cortex have revealed a different organization in which the CR and SOM populations are partially overlapping. Because CR and SOM neurons derive from different progenitors located in different embryonic structures, the coexpression of CR + SOM suggests that the chemical differentiation of interneurons is regulated postmitotically. Here, we have taken an important first step towards understanding this process by triple immunostaining mouse visual cortex with a panel of antibodies, which has been used extensively for classifying developing interneurons. We have found at least 13 distinct groups of GABAergic neurons which include PV, CR, SOM, CCK (cholecystokinin), CR + SOM, CR + NPY (neuropeptide Y), CR + VIP (vasointestinal polypeptide), SOM + NPY, SOM + VIP, VIP + ChAT (choline acetyltransferase), CCK + NPY, CR + SOM + NPY and CR + SOM + VIP expressing cells. Triple immunostaining with PV, CR and SOM antibodies during postnatal development further showed that PV is never colocalized with CR and SOM. Importantly, expression of SOM and CR + SOM developed after the percentage of CR cells that do not express SOM has reached the mature level, suggesting that the chemical differentiation of SOM and CR + SOM neurons is a postnatal event, which may be controlled by transcriptional regulation. PMID:18958197

  8. Impaired excitability of somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Abe, Yasuyuki; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2014-07-29

    Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable developmental epilepsy syndrome with seizure onset in the first year of life. Specific heterozygous deletion of NaV1.1 in forebrain GABAergic-inhibitory neurons is sufficient to cause all the manifestations of Dravet syndrome in mice, but the physiological roles of specific subtypes of GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex in this disease are unknown. Voltage-clamp studies of dissociated interneurons from cerebral cortex did not detect a significant effect of the Dravet syndrome mutation on sodium currents in cell bodies. However, current-clamp recordings of intact interneurons in layer V of neocortical slices from mice with haploinsufficiency in the gene encoding the NaV1.1 sodium channel, Scn1a, revealed substantial reduction of excitability in fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing interneurons and somatostatin-expressing interneurons. The threshold and rheobase for action potential generation were increased, the frequency of action potentials within trains was decreased, and action-potential firing within trains failed more frequently. Furthermore, the deficit in excitability of somatostatin-expressing interneurons caused significant reduction in frequency-dependent disynaptic inhibition between neighboring layer V pyramidal neurons mediated by somatostatin-expressing Martinotti cells, which would lead to substantial disinhibition of the output of cortical circuits. In contrast to these deficits in interneurons, pyramidal cells showed no differences in excitability. These results reveal that the two major subtypes of interneurons in layer V of the neocortex, parvalbumin-expressing and somatostatin-expressing, both have impaired excitability, resulting in disinhibition of the cortical network. These major functional deficits are likely to contribute synergistically to the pathophysiology of Dravet syndrome.

  9. Local dynamics of gap-junction-coupled interneuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Troy; Gage, Gregory J.; Berke, Joshua D.; Zochowski, Michal

    2010-03-01

    Interneurons coupled by both electrical gap-junctions (GJs) and chemical GABAergic synapses are major components of forebrain networks. However, their contributions to the generation of specific activity patterns, and their overall contributions to network function, remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate, using computational methods, that the topological properties of interneuron networks can elicit a wide range of activity dynamics, and either prevent or permit local pattern formation. We systematically varied the topology of GJ and inhibitory chemical synapses within simulated networks, by changing connection types from local to random, and changing the total number of connections. As previously observed we found that randomly coupled GJs lead to globally synchronous activity. In contrast, we found that local GJ connectivity may govern the formation of highly spatially heterogeneous activity states. These states are inherently temporally unstable when the input is uniformly random, but can rapidly stabilize when the network detects correlations or asymmetries in the inputs. We show a correspondence between this feature of network activity and experimental observations of transient stabilization of striatal fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), in electrophysiological recordings from rats performing a simple decision-making task. We suggest that local GJ coupling enables an active search-and-select function of striatal FSIs, which contributes to the overall role of cortical-basal ganglia circuits in decision-making.

  10. Dentate total molecular layer interneurons mediate cannabinoid-sensitive inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiandong; Swietek, Bogumila; Proddutur, Archana; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2015-08-01

    Activity of the dentate gyrus, which gates information flow to the hippocampus, is under tight inhibitory regulation by interneurons with distinctive axonal projections, intrinsic and synaptic characteristics and neurochemical identities. Total molecular layer cells (TML-Cs), a class of morphologically distinct GABAergic neurons with axonal projections across the molecular layer, are among the most frequent interneuronal type in the dentate subgranular region. However, little is known about their synaptic and neurochemical properties. We demonstrate that synapses from morphologically identified TML-Cs to dentate interneurons are characterized by low release probability, facilitating short-term dynamics and asynchronous release. TML-Cs consistently show somatic and axonal labeling for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 R) yet fail to express cholecystokinin (CCK) indicating their distinctive neurochemical identity. In paired recordings, the release probability at synapses between TML-Cs was increased by the CB1 R antagonist AM251, demonstrating baseline endocannabinoid regulation of TML-C synapses. Apart from defining the synaptic and neurochemical features of TML-Cs, our findings reveal the morphological identity of a class of dentate CB1 R-positive neurons that do not express CCK. Our findings indicate that TML-Cs can mediate cannabinoid sensitive feed-forward and feedback inhibition of dentate perforant path inputs.

  11. Function and Circuitry of VIP+ Interneurons in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Park, Silvia J.H.; Borghuis, Bart G.; Rahmani, Pouyan; Zeng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Visual processing in the retina depends on coordinated signaling by interneurons. Photoreceptor signals are relayed to ∼20 ganglion cell types through a dozen excitatory bipolar interneurons, each responsive to light increments (ON) or decrements (OFF). ON and OFF bipolar cell pathways become tuned through specific connections with inhibitory interneurons: horizontal and amacrine cells. A major obstacle for understanding retinal circuitry is the unknown function of most of the ∼30–40 amacrine cell types, each of which synapses onto a subset of bipolar cell terminals, ganglion cell dendrites, and other amacrine cells. Here, we used a transgenic mouse line in which vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-expressing (VIP+) GABAergic interneurons express Cre recombinase. Targeted whole-cell recordings of fluorescently labeled VIP+ cells revealed three predominant types: wide-field bistratified and narrow-field monostratified cells with somas in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and medium-field monostratified cells with somas in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Bistratified INL cells integrated excitation and inhibition driven by both ON and OFF pathways with little spatial tuning. Narrow-field INL cells integrated excitation driven by the ON pathway and inhibition driven by both pathways, with pronounced hyperpolarizations at light offset. Monostratified GCL cells integrated excitation and inhibition driven by the ON pathway and showed center-surround spatial tuning. Optogenetic experiments showed that, collectively, VIP+ cells made strong connections with OFF δ, ON-OFF direction-selective, and W3 ganglion cells but weak, inconsistent connections with ON and OFF α cells. Revealing VIP+ cell morphologies, receptive fields and synaptic connections advances our understanding of their role in visual processing. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The retina is a model system for understanding nervous system function. At the first stage, rod and cone photoreceptors encode light and

  12. Dendritic A-type potassium channel subunit expression in CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Menegola, M; Misonou, H; Vacher, H; Trimmer, J S

    2008-06-26

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are important and diverse determinants of neuronal excitability and exhibit specific expression patterns throughout the brain. Among Kv channels, Kv4 channels are major determinants of somatodendritic A-type current and are essential in controlling the amplitude of backpropagating action potentials (BAPs) into neuronal dendrites. BAPs have been well studied in a variety of neurons, and have been recently described in hippocampal and cortical interneurons, a heterogeneous population of GABAergic inhibitory cells that regulate activity of principal cells and neuronal networks. We used well-characterized mouse monoclonal antibodies against the Kv4.3 and potassium channel interacting protein (KChIP) 1 subunits of A-type Kv channels, and antibodies against different interneuron markers in single- and double-label immunohistochemistry experiments to analyze the expression patterns of Kv4.3 and KChIP1 in hippocampal Ammon's horn (CA1) neurons. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 40 mum rat brain sections using nickel-enhanced diaminobenzidine staining or multiple-label immunofluorescence. Our results show that Kv4.3 and KChIP1 component subunits of A-type channels are co-localized in the soma and dendrites of a large number of GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. These subunits co-localize extensively but not completely with markers defining the four major interneuron subpopulations tested (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and somatostatin). These results suggest that CA1 hippocampal interneurons can be divided in two groups according to the expression of Kv4.3/KChIP1 channel subunits. Antibodies against Kv4.3 and KChIP1 represent an important new tool for identifying a subpopulation of hippocampal interneurons with a unique dendritic A-type channel complement and ability to control BAPs.

  13. Dendritic A-type potassium channel subunit expression in CA1 hippocampal interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Menegola, Milena; Misonou, Hiroaki; Vacher, Helene; Trimmer, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are important and diverse determinants of neuronal excitability and exhibit specific expression patterns throughout the brain. Among Kv channels, Kv4 channels are major determinants of somatodendritic A-type current and are essential in controlling the amplitude of backpropagating action potentials (BAPs) into neuronal dendrites. BAPs have been well studied in a variety of neurons, and have been recently described in hippocampal and cortical interneurons, a heterogeneous population of GABAergic inhibitory cells that regulate activity of principal cells and neuronal networks. We used well-characterized mouse monoclonal antibodies against the Kv4.3 and KChIP1 subunits of A-type Kv channels, and antibodies against different interneuron markers in single- and double-label immunohistochemistry experiments to analyze the expression patterns of Kv4.3 and KChIP1 in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 40 μm rat brain sections using nickel-enhanced diaminobenzidine staining or multiple-label immunofluorescence. Our results show that Kv4.3 and KChIP1 component subunits of A-type channels are co-localized in the soma and dendrites of a large number of GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. These subunits co-localize extensively but not completely with markers defining the four major interneuron subpopulations tested (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and somatostatin). These results suggest that CA1 hippocampal interneurons can be divided in two groups according to the expression of Kv4.3/KChIP1 channel subunits. Antibodies against Kv4.3 and KChIP1 represent an important new tool for identifying a subpopulation of hippocampal interneurons with unique dendritic A-type channel complement and ability to control BAPs. PMID:18495361

  14. Diverse Ensembles of Inhibitory Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Shane R; Connors, Barry W

    2016-04-06

    In this issue of Neuron, Karnani et al. (2016) show that ensembles of specific types of inhibitory interneurons generate coordinated activity in mouse visual cortex. They also describe chemical and electrical synaptic mechanisms that may enable diverse interneuron ensembles to function as distinct operational units. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Whole-brain mapping of inputs to projection neurons and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingchun; Wang, Daqing; He, Xiaobin; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Xu, Fuqiang; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal striatum integrates inputs from multiple brain areas to coordinate voluntary movements, associative plasticity, and reinforcement learning. Its projection neurons consist of the GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express dopamine receptor type 1 (D1) or dopamine receptor type 2 (D2). Cholinergic interneurons account for a small portion of striatal neuron populations, but they play important roles in striatal functions by synapsing onto the MSNs and other local interneurons. By combining the modified rabies virus with specific Cre- mouse lines, a recent study mapped the monosynaptic input patterns to MSNs. Because only a small number of extrastriatal neurons were labeled in the prior study, it is important to reexamine the input patterns of MSNs with higher labeling efficiency. Additionally, the whole-brain innervation pattern of cholinergic interneurons remains unknown. Using the rabies virus-based transsynaptic tracing method in this study, we comprehensively charted the brain areas that provide direct inputs to D1-MSNs, D2-MSNs, and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum. We found that both types of projection neurons and the cholinergic interneurons receive extensive inputs from discrete brain areas in the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other subcortical areas, several of which were not reported in the previous study. The MSNs and cholinergic interneurons share largely common inputs from areas outside the striatum. However, innervations within the dorsal striatum represent a significantly larger proportion of total inputs for cholinergic interneurons than for the MSNs. The comprehensive maps of direct inputs to striatal MSNs and cholinergic interneurons shall assist future functional dissection of the striatal circuits.

  16. Comparison of numbers of interneurons in three thalamic nuclei of normal and epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Cavdar, Safiye; Bay, Hüsniye Hacioğlu; Yildiz, Sercan D; Akakin, Dilek; Sirvanci, Serap; Onat, Filiz

    2014-06-01

    The inhibitory sources in the thalamic nuclei are local interneurons and neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Studies of models of absence epilepsy have shown that the seizures are associated with an excess of inhibitory neurotransmission in the thalamus. In the present study, we used light-microscopic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunocytochemistry to quantify the interneurons in the lateral geniculate (LGN), ventral posteromedial (VPM), and ventral posterolateral (VPL) thalamic nuclei, and compared the values from normal Wistar rats and genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS). We found that in both Wistar rats and GAERS, the proportion of interneurons was significantly higher in the LGN than in the VPM and VPL. In the LGN of Wistar rats, 16.4% of the neurons were interneurons and in the GAERS, the value was 15.1%. In the VPM, the proportion of interneurons was 4.2% in Wistar and 14.9% in GAERS; in the VPL the values were 3.7% for Wistar and 11.1% for the GAERS. There was no significant difference between Wistar rats and the GAERS regarding the counts of interneurons in the LGN, whereas the VPM and VPL showed significantly higher counts in GAERS. Comparison of the mean areas of both relay cells and interneuronal profiles showed no significant differences between Wistar rats and GAERS. These findings show that in the VPL and the VPM there are relatively more GABAergic interneurons in GAERS than in Wistar rats. This may represent a compensatory response of the thalamocortical circuitry to the absence seizures or may be related to the production of absence seizures.

  17. Whole-Brain Mapping of Inputs to Projection Neurons and Cholinergic Interneurons in the Dorsal Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingchun; Wang, Daqing; He, Xiaobin; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Xu, Fuqiang; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal striatum integrates inputs from multiple brain areas to coordinate voluntary movements, associative plasticity, and reinforcement learning. Its projection neurons consist of the GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express dopamine receptor type 1 (D1) or dopamine receptor type 2 (D2). Cholinergic interneurons account for a small portion of striatal neuron populations, but they play important roles in striatal functions by synapsing onto the MSNs and other local interneurons. By combining the modified rabies virus with specific Cre- mouse lines, a recent study mapped the monosynaptic input patterns to MSNs. Because only a small number of extrastriatal neurons were labeled in the prior study, it is important to reexamine the input patterns of MSNs with higher labeling efficiency. Additionally, the whole-brain innervation pattern of cholinergic interneurons remains unknown. Using the rabies virus-based transsynaptic tracing method in this study, we comprehensively charted the brain areas that provide direct inputs to D1-MSNs, D2-MSNs, and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum. We found that both types of projection neurons and the cholinergic interneurons receive extensive inputs from discrete brain areas in the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other subcortical areas, several of which were not reported in the previous study. The MSNs and cholinergic interneurons share largely common inputs from areas outside the striatum. However, innervations within the dorsal striatum represent a significantly larger proportion of total inputs for cholinergic interneurons than for the MSNs. The comprehensive maps of direct inputs to striatal MSNs and cholinergic interneurons shall assist future functional dissection of the striatal circuits. PMID:25830919

  18. Excitatory and inhibitory intermediate zone interneurons in pathways from feline group I and II afferents: differences in axonal projections and input.

    PubMed

    Bannatyne, B A; Liu, T T; Hammar, I; Stecina, K; Jankowska, E; Maxwell, D J

    2009-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to compare properties of excitatory and inhibitory spinal intermediate zone interneurons in pathways from group I and II muscle afferents in the cat. Interneurons were labelled intracellularly and their transmitter phenotypes were defined by using immunocytochemistry. In total 14 glutamatergic, 22 glycinergic and 2 GABAergic/glycinergic interneurons were retrieved. All interneurons were located in laminae V-VII of the L3-L7 segments. No consistent differences were found in the location, the soma sizes or the extent of the dendritic trees of excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. However, major differences were found in their axonal projections; excitatory interneurons projected either ipsilaterally, bilaterally or contralaterally, while inhibitory interneurons projected exclusively ipsilaterally. Terminal projections of glycinergic and glutamatergic cells were found within motor nuclei as well as other regions of the grey matter which include the intermediate region, laminae VII and VIII. Cells containing GABA/glycine had more restricted projections, principally within the intermediate zone where they formed appositions with glutamatergic axon terminals and unidentified cells and therefore are likely to be involved in presynaptic as well as postsynaptic inhibition. The majority of excitatory and inhibitory interneurons were found to be coexcited by group I and II afferents (monosynaptically) and by reticulospinal neurons (mono- or disynaptically) and to integrate information from several muscles. Taken together the morphological and electrophysiological data show that individual excitatory and inhibitory intermediate zone interneurons may operate in a highly differentiated way and thereby contribute to a variety of motor synergies.

  19. Loss of interneurons innervating pyramidal cell dendrites and axon initial segments in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following pilocarpine-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Dinocourt, Celine; Petanjek, Zdravko; Freund, Tamas F; Ben-Ari, Yezekiel; Esclapez, Monique

    2003-05-12

    In the pilocarpine model of chronic limbic seizures, vulnerability of GABAergic interneurons to excitotoxic damage has been reported in the hippocampal CA1 region. However, little is known about the specific types of interneurons that degenerate in this region. In order to characterize these interneurons, we performed quantitative analyses of the different populations of GABAergic neurons labeled for their peptide or calcium-binding protein content. Our data demonstrate that the decrease in the number of GAD mRNA-containing neurons in the stratum oriens of CA1 in pilocarpine-treated rats involved two subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons: interneurons labeled for somatostatin only (O-LM and bistratified cells) and interneurons labeled for parvalbumin only (basket and axo-axonic cells). Stratum oriens interneurons labeled for somatostatin/calbindin or somatostatin/parvalbumin were preserved. The decrease in number of somatostatin- and parvalbumin-containing neurons was observed as early as 72 hours after the sustained seizures induced by pilocarpine injection. Many degenerating cell bodies in the stratum oriens and degenerating axon terminals in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare were observed at 1 and 2 weeks after injection. In addition, the synaptic coverage of the axon initial segment of CA1 pyramidal cells was significantly decreased in pilocarpine-treated animals. These results indicate that the loss of somatostatin-containing neurons corresponds preferentially to the degeneration of interneurons with an axon projecting to stratum lacunosum-moleculare (O-LM cells) and suggest that the death of these neurons is mainly responsible for the deficit of dendritic inhibition reported in this region. We demonstrate that the loss of parvalbumin-containing neurons corresponds to the death of axo-axonic cells, suggesting that perisomatic inhibition and mechanisms controlling action potential generation are also impaired in this model.

  20. Nicotine increases GABAergic input on rat dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vázquez, F; Chavarría, K; Garduño, J; Hernández-López, S; Mihailescu, S P

    2014-12-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains large populations of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. This nucleus receives GABAergic inhibitory afferents from many brain areas and from DRN interneurons. Both GABAergic and 5-HT DRN neurons express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine increases 5-HT release and 5-HT DRN neuron discharge rate by stimulating postsynaptic nAChRs and by increasing glutamate and norepinephrine release inside DRN. However, the influence of nicotine on the GABAergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons was poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of nicotine on GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) of 5-HT DRN neurons and the subtype of nAChR(s) involved in this response. Experiments were performed in coronal slices obtained from young Wistar rats. GABAergic sIPSCs were recorded from post hoc-identified 5-HT DRN neurons with the whole cell voltage patch-clamp technique. Administration of nicotine (1 μM) increased sIPSC frequency in 72% of identified 5-HT DRN neurons. This effect was not reproduced by the α4β2 nAChR agonist RJR-2403 and was not influenced by TTX (1 μM). It was mimicked by the selective agonist for α7 nAChR, PNU-282987, and exacerbated by the positive allosteric modulator of the same receptor, PNU-120596. The nicotine-induced increase in sIPSC frequency was independent on voltage-gated calcium channels and dependent on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). These results demonstrate that nicotine increases the GABAergic input to most 5-HT DRN neurons, by activating α7 nAChRs and producing CICR in DRN GABAergic terminals.

  1. Classification of NPY-Expressing Neocortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Anastassios; Gallopin, Thierry; Dávid, Csaba; Battaglia, Demian; Geoffroy, Hélène; Rossier, Jean; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Staiger, Jochen F.; Cauli, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an abundant neuropeptide of the neocortex involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Because of the large electrophysiological, molecular, and morphological diversity of NPY-expressing neurons their precise identity remains unclear. To define distinct populations of NPY neurons we characterized, in acute slices of rat barrel cortex, 200 cortical neurons of layers I–IV by means of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, biocytin labeling, and single-cell reverse transcriptase-PCR designed to probe for the expression of well established molecular markers for cortical neurons. To classify reliably cortical NPY neurons, we used and compared different unsupervised clustering algorithms based on laminar location and electrophysiological and molecular properties. These classification schemes confirmed that NPY neurons are nearly exclusively GABAergic and consistently disclosed three main types of NPY-expressing interneurons. (1) Neurogliaform-like neurons exhibiting a dense axonal arbor, were the most frequent and superficial, and substantially expressed the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase. (2) Martinotti-like cells characterized by an ascending axon ramifying in layer I coexpressed somatostatin and were the most excitable type. (3) Among fast-spiking and parvalbumin-positive basket cells, NPY expression was correlated with pronounced spike latency. By clarifying the diversity of cortical NPY neurons, this study establishes a basis for future investigations aiming at elucidating their physiological roles. PMID:19295167

  2. Neural cell adhesion molecule-mediated Fyn activation promotes GABAergic synapse maturation in postnatal mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Baho, Elie; Huang, Z Josh; Schachner, Melitta; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2013-04-03

    GABAergic basket interneurons form perisomatic synapses, which are essential for regulating neural networks, and their alterations are linked to various cognitive dysfunction. Maturation of basket synapses in postnatal cortex is activity dependent. In particular, activity-dependent downregulation of polysialiac acid carried by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) regulates the timing of their maturation. Whether and how NCAM per se affects GABAergic synapse development is unknown. Using single-cell genetics to knock out NCAM in individual basket interneurons in mouse cortical slice cultures, at specific developmental time periods, we found that NCAM loss during perisomatic synapse formation impairs the process of basket cell axonal branching and bouton formation. However, loss of NCAM once the synapses are already formed did not show any effect. We further show that NCAM120 and NCAM140, but not the NCAM180 isoform, rescue the phenotype. Finally, we demonstrate that a dominant-negative form of Fyn kinase mimics, whereas a constitutively active form of Fyn kinase rescues, the effects of NCAM knockdown. Altogether, our data suggest that NCAM120/NCAM140-mediated Fyn activation promotes GABAergic synapse maturation in postnatal cortex.

  3. Further characterization of autoantibodies to GABAergic neurons in the central nervous system produced by a subset of children with autism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in social interaction and deficits in verbal and nonverbal communication, together with the presence of repetitive behaviors or a limited repertoire of activities and interests. The causes of autism are currently unclear. In a previous study, we determined that 21% of children with autism have plasma autoantibodies that are immunoreactive with a population of neurons in the cerebellum that appear to be Golgi cells, which are GABAergic interneurons. Methods We have extended this analysis by examining plasma immunoreactivity in the remainder of the brain. To determine cell specificity, double-labeling studies that included one of the calcium-binding proteins that are commonly colocalized in GABAergic neurons (calbindin, parvalbumin or calretinin) were also carried out to determine which GABAergic neurons are immunoreactive. Coronal sections through the rostrocaudal extent of the macaque monkey brain were reacted with plasma from each of seven individuals with autism who had previously demonstrated positive Golgi cell staining, as well as six negative controls. In addition, brain sections from adult male mice were similarly examined. Results In each case, specific staining was observed for neurons that had the morphological appearance of interneurons. By double-labeling sections with plasma and with antibodies directed against γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), we determined that all autoantibody-positive neurons were GABAergic. However, not all GABAergic neurons were autoantibody-positive. Calbindin was colabeled in several of the autoantibody-labeled cells, while parvalbumin colabeling was less frequently observed. Autoantibody-positive cells rarely expressed calretinin. Sections from the mouse brain processed similarly to the primate sections also demonstrated immunoreactivity to interneurons distributed throughout the neocortex and many subcortical regions. Some cell populations stained in

  4. GABAergic cells are the major postsynaptic targets of mossy fibers in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Acsády, L; Kamondi, A; Sík, A; Freund, T; Buzsáki, G

    1998-05-01

    Dentate granule cells communicate with their postsynaptic targets by three distinct terminal types. These include the large mossy terminals, filopodial extensions of the mossy terminals, and smaller en passant synaptic varicosities. We examined the postsynaptic targets of mossy fibers by combining in vivo intracellular labeling of granule cells, immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy. Single granule cells formed large, complex "mossy" synapses on 11-15 CA3 pyramidal cells and 7-12 hilar mossy cells. In contrast, GABAergic interneurons, identified with immunostaining for substance P-receptor, parvalbumin, and mGluR1a-receptor, were selectively innervated by very thin (filopodial) extensions of the mossy terminals and by small en passant boutons in both the hilar and CA3 regions. These terminals formed single, often perforated, asymmetric synapses on the cell bodies, dendrites, and spines of GABAergic interneurons. The number of filopodial extensions and small terminals was 10 times larger than the number of mossy terminals. These findings show that in contrast to cortical pyramidal neurons, (1) granule cells developed distinct types of terminals to affect interneurons and pyramidal cells and (2) they innervated more inhibitory than excitatory cells. These findings may explain the physiological observations that increased activity of granule cells suppresses the overall excitability of the CA3 recurrent system and may form the structural basis of the target-dependent regulation of glutamate release in the mossy fiber system.

  5. Anatomically heterogeneous populations of CB1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing interneurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus show homogeneous input-output characteristics.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Gergely G; Papp, Orsolya I; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Hájos, Norbert

    2014-12-01

    A subpopulation of GABAergic cells in cortical structures expresses CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 ) on their axon terminals. To understand the function of these interneurons in information processing, it is necessary to uncover how they are embedded into neuronal circuits. Therefore, the proportion of GABAergic terminals expressing CB1 and the morphological and electrophysiological properties of CB1 -immunoreactive interneurons should be revealed. We investigated the ratio and the origin of CB1 -expressing inhibitory boutons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we estimated that ∼40% of GABAergic axon terminals in different layers of CA3 also expressed CB1 . To identify the inhibitory cell types expressing CB1 in this region, we recorded and intracellularly labeled interneurons in hippocampal slices. CB1 -expressing interneurons showed distinct axonal arborization, and were classified as basket cells, mossy-fiber-associated cells, dendritic-layer-innervating cells or perforant-path-associated cells. In each morphological category, a substantial variability in axonal projection was observed. In contrast to the diverse morphology, the active and passive membrane properties were found to be rather similar. Using paired recordings, we found that pyramidal cells displayed large and fast unitary postsynaptic currents in response to activating basket and mossy-fiber-associated cells, while they showed slower and smaller synaptic events in pairs originating from interneurons that innervate the dendritic layer, which may be due to dendritic filtering. In addition, CB1 activation significantly reduced the amplitude of the postsynaptic currents in each cell pair tested. Our data suggest that CB1 -expressing interneurons with different axonal projections have comparable physiological characteristics, contributing to a similar proportion of GABAergic inputs along the somato-dendritic axis of CA3 pyramidal cells.

  6. Differential GABAergic disinhibition during the development of painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Janssen, S P; Truin, M; Van Kleef, M; Joosten, E A

    2011-06-16

    An impaired spinal GABAergic inhibitory function is known to be pivotal in neuropathic pain (NPP). At present, data concerning time-dependent alterations within the GABAergic system itself and post-synaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory transmission are highly controversial, likely related to the experimental NPP model used. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the severity of NPP is determined by the degree of these GABAergic disturbances. In the present study we therefore examined in one experimental animal model whether anatomical changes within the spinal GABAergic system and its GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory function are gradually aggravated during the development of partial sciatic nerve injury (PSNL)-induced NPP and are related to the severity of PSNL-induced hypersensitivity. Three and 16 days after a unilateral PSNL (early and late NPP, respectively), GABA-immunoreactivity (GABA-IR) and the number of GABA-IR neuronal profiles were determined in Rexed laminae 1-3 of lumbar spinal cord cryosections. Additionally, the efficiency of dorsal horn GABA(A) receptor-induced inhibition was examined by cation chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2) immunoblotting. NPP-induced hypersensitivity was only observed at the ipsilateral side, both at early and late time points. During early NPP, a decrease in ipsilateral dorsal horn GABA-IR was observed without alterations in the number of GABA-IR neuronal profiles or KCC2 protein levels. In contrast, bilateral increases in spinal GABA-IR accompanied by an unchanged number of GABA-IR interneurons were observed during late NPP. This was furthermore attended with decreased ipsilateral KCC2 levels. Moreover, the degree of hypersensitivity was not related to disturbances within the spinal GABAergic system at all time points examined. In conclusion, our anatomical data suggest that a dysfunctional GABA production is likely to be involved in early NPP whereas late NPP is characterized by a combined dysfunctional GABA release

  7. Postsynaptic targets of somatostatin-immunoreactive interneurons in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Katona, I; Acsády, L; Freund, T F

    1999-01-01

    Two characteristic interneuron types in the hippocampus, the so-called hilar perforant path-associated cells in the dentate gyrus and stratum oriens/lacunosum-moleculare neurons in the CA3 and CA1 regions, were suggested to be involved in feedback circuits. In the present study, interneurons identical to these cell populations were visualized by somatostatin-immunostaining, then reconstructed, and processed for double-immunostaining and electron microscopy to establish their postsynaptic target selectivity. A combination of somatostatin-immunostaining with immunostaining for GABA or other interneuron markers revealed a quasi-random termination pattern. The vast majority of postsynaptic targets were GABA-negative dendritic shafts and spines of principal cells (76%), whereas other target elements contained GABA (8%). All of the examined neurochemically defined interneuron types (parvalbumin-, calretinin-, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-, cholecystokinin-, substance P receptor-immunoreactive neurons) received innervation from somatostatin-positive boutons. Recent anatomical and electrophysiological data showed that the main excitatory inputs of somatostatin-positive interneurons originate from local principal cells. The present data revealed a massive GABAergic innervation of distal dendrites of local principal cells by these feedback driven neurons, which are proposed to control the efficacy and plasticity of entorhinal synaptic input as a function of local principal cell activity and synchrony.

  8. Analysis of primary visual cortex in dementia with Lewy bodies indicates GABAergic involvement associated with recurrent complex visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Khundakar, Ahmad A; Hanson, Peter S; Erskine, Daniel; Lax, Nichola Z; Roscamp, Joseph; Karyka, Evangelia; Tsefou, Eliona; Singh, Preeti; Cockell, Simon J; Gribben, Andrew; Ramsay, Lynne; Blain, Peter G; Mosimann, Urs P; Lett, Deborah J; Elstner, Matthias; Turnbull, Douglass M; Xiang, Charles C; Brownstein, Michael J; O'Brien, John T; Taylor, John-Paul; Attems, Johannes; Thomas, Alan J; McKeith, Ian G; Morris, Christopher M

    2016-06-30

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) patients frequently experience well formed recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH). This is associated with reduced blood flow or hypometabolism on imaging of the primary visual cortex. To understand these associations in DLB we used pathological and biochemical analysis of the primary visual cortex to identify changes that could underpin RCVH. Alpha-synuclein or neurofibrillary tangle pathology in primary visual cortex was essentially absent. Neurone density or volume within the primary visual cortex in DLB was also unchanged using unbiased stereology. Microarray analysis, however, demonstrated changes in neuropeptide gene expression and other markers, indicating altered GABAergic neuronal function. Calcium binding protein and GAD65/67 immunohistochemistry showed preserved interneurone populations indicating possible interneurone dysfunction. This was demonstrated by loss of post synaptic GABA receptor markers including gephyrin, GABARAP, and Kif5A, indicating reduced GABAergic synaptic activity. Glutamatergic neuronal signalling was also altered with vesicular glutamate transporter protein and PSD-95 expression being reduced. Changes to the primary visual cortex in DLB indicate that reduced GABAergic transmission may contribute to RCVH in DLB and treatment using targeted GABAergic modulation or similar approaches using glutamatergic modification may be beneficial.

  9. Interneurons of the ganglionic layer in the mormyrid electrosensory lateral line lobe: morphology, immunohistochemistry, and synaptology.

    PubMed

    Meek, J; Grant, K; Sugawara, Y; Hafmans, T G; Veron, M; Denizot, J P

    1996-11-04

    This is the second paper in a series that describes the morphology, immunohistochemistry, and synaptology of the mormyrid electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL). The ELL is a highly laminated cerebellum-like structure in the rhombencephalon that subserves an active electric sense: Objects in the nearby environment of the fish are detected on the basis of changes in the reafferent electrosensory signals that are generated by the animal's own electric organ discharge. The present paper describes interneurons in the superficial (molecular, ganglionic, and plexiform) layers of the ELL cortex that were analyzed in the light and electron microscopes after Golgi impregnation, intracellular labeling, neuroanatomical tracing, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunohistochemistry. The most numerous interneurons in the ganglionic layer are GABAergic medium-sized ganglionic (MG) cells and small ganglionic (SG) cells. MG cells have 10-20 spiny apical dendrites in the molecular layer, a cell body of 10-12 microns diameter in the ganglionic layer, a single basal dendrite that gives rise to fine, beaded, axon-like branches in either the plexiform layer (MG1 subtype) or the deeper granular layer (MG2 subtype), and an axon that terminates in the plexiform layer. Their apical dendritic tree has 12,000-22,000 spines that are contacted by GABA-negative terminals, and it receives, 1,250-2,500 GABA-positive contacts on the smooth dendritic surface between the spines. The average ratio of GABA-negative to GABA-positive contacts on the interneuron apical dendrites (14:1) is significantly higher than that for the efferent projection cells that have been described previously (Grant et al. [1996] J. Comp. Neurol., this issue). The somata and basal dendrites of MG cells receive a low to moderate density of GABAergic synaptic input, and their axons make GABAergic synaptic contacts with the somata and cell bodies of MG as well as with large ganglionic (LG) cells. SG cells probably represent

  10. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord. PMID:27489533

  11. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord.

  12. Anatomical and Electrophysiological Changes in Striatal TH Interneurons after Loss of the Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Bengi; Shah, Fulva; Kothari, Janish; Tepper, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Using transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, we have previously shown that there are approximately 3000 striatal EGFP-TH interneurons per hemisphere in mice. Here we report that striatal TH-EGFP interneurons exhibit a small, transient but significant increase in number after unilateral destruction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. The increase in cell number is accompanied by electrophysiological and morphological changes. The intrinsic electrophysiological properties of EGFP-TH interneurons ipsilateral to 6-OHDA lesion were similar to those originally reported in intact mice except for a significant reduction in the duration of a characteristic depolarization induced plateau potential. There was a significant change in the distribution of the four previously described electrophysiologically distinct subtypes of striatal TH interneurons. There was a concomitant increase in the frequency of both spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents, while their amplitudes did not change. Nigrostriatal lesions did not affect somatic size or dendritic length or branching, but resulted in an increase in the density of proximal dendritic spines and spine-like appendages in EGFP-TH interneurons. The changes indicate that electrophysiology properties and morphology of striatal EGFP-TH interneurons depend on endogenous levels of dopamine arising from the nigrostriatal pathway. Furthermore, these changes may serve to help compensate for the changes in activity of spiny projection neurons that occur following loss of the nigrostriatal innervation in experimental or in early idiopathic Parkinson’s disease by increasing feedforward GABAergic inhibition exerted by these interneurons. PMID:24173616

  13. Extrinsic and Local Glutamatergic Inputs of the Rat Hippocampal CA1 Area Differentially Innervate Pyramidal Cells and Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Takács, Virág T.; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter; Freund, Tamás F.; Gulyás, Attila I.

    2015-01-01

    The two main glutamatergic pathways to the CA1 area, the Schaffer collateral/commissural input and the entorhinal fibers, as well as the local axons of CA1 pyramidal cells innervate both pyramidal cells and interneurons. To determine whether these inputs differ in their weights of activating GABAergic circuits, we have studied the relative proportion of pyramidal cells and interneurons among their postsynaptic targets in serial electron microscopic sections. Local axons of CA1 pyramidal cells, intracellularly labeled in vitro or in vivo, innervated a relatively high proportion of interneuronal postsynaptic targets (65.9 and 53.8%, in vitro and in vivo, respectively) in stratum (str.) oriens and alveus. In contrast, axons of in vitro labeled CA3 pyramidal cells in str. oriens and str. radiatum of the CA1 area made synaptic junctions predominantly with pyramidal cell spines (92.9%). The postsynaptic targets of anterogradely labeled medial entorhinal cortical boutons in CA1 str. lacunosum-moleculare were primarily pyramidal neuron dendritic spines and shafts (90.8%). The alvear group of the entorhinal afferents, traversing str. oriens, str. pyramidale, and str. radiatum showed a higher preference for innervating GABAergic cells (21.3%), particularly in str. oriens/alveus. These data demonstrate that different glutamatergic pathways innervate CA1 GABAergic cells to different extents. The results suggest that the numerically smaller CA1 local axonal inputs together with the alvear part of the entorhinal input preferentially act on GABAergic interneurons in contrast to the CA3, or the entorhinal input in str. lacunosum-moleculare. The results highlight differences in the postsynaptic target selection of the feed-forward versus recurrent glutamatergic inputs to the CA1 and CA3 areas. PMID:21956752

  14. Extrinsic and local glutamatergic inputs of the rat hippocampal CA1 area differentially innervate pyramidal cells and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Takács, Virág T; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter; Freund, Tamás F; Gulyás, Attila I

    2012-06-01

    The two main glutamatergic pathways to the CA1 area, the Schaffer collateral/commissural input and the entorhinal fibers, as well as the local axons of CA1 pyramidal cells innervate both pyramidal cells and interneurons. To determine whether these inputs differ in their weights of activating GABAergic circuits, we have studied the relative proportion of pyramidal cells and interneurons among their postsynaptic targets in serial electron microscopic sections. Local axons of CA1 pyramidal cells, intracellularly labeled in vitro or in vivo, innervated a relatively high proportion of interneuronal postsynaptic targets (65.9 and 53.8%, in vitro and in vivo, respectively) in stratum (str.) oriens and alveus. In contrast, axons of in vitro labeled CA3 pyramidal cells in str. oriens and str. radiatum of the CA1 area made synaptic junctions predominantly with pyramidal cell spines (92.9%). The postsynaptic targets of anterogradely labeled medial entorhinal cortical boutons in CA1 str. lacunosum-moleculare were primarily pyramidal neuron dendritic spines and shafts (90.8%). The alvear group of the entorhinal afferents, traversing str. oriens, str. pyramidale, and str. radiatum showed a higher preference for innervating GABAergic cells (21.3%), particularly in str. oriens/alveus. These data demonstrate that different glutamatergic pathways innervate CA1 GABAergic cells to different extents. The results suggest that the numerically smaller CA1 local axonal inputs together with the alvear part of the entorhinal input preferentially act on GABAergic interneurons in contrast to the CA3, or the entorhinal input in str. lacunosum-moleculare. The results highlight differences in the postsynaptic target selection of the feed-forward versus recurrent glutamatergic inputs to the CA1 and CA3 areas.

  15. POSTSYNAPTIC TARGETS OF GABAERGIC BASAL FOREBRAIN PROJECTIONS TO THE BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, A. J.; Muller, J. F.; Mascagni, F.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the basolateral amygdala, like the neocortex and hippocampus, receives GABAergic inputs from the basal forebrain in addition to the well-established cholinergic inputs. Since the neuronal targets of these inputs have yet to be determined, it is difficult to predict the functional significance of this innervation. The present study addressed this question in the rat by employing anterograde tract tracing combined with immunohistochemistry at the light and electron microscopic levels of analysis. Amygdalopetal axons from the basal forebrain mainly targeted the basolateral nucleus (BL) of the amygdala. The morphology of these axons was heterogeneous and included GABAergic axons that contained vesicular GABA transporter protein (VGAT). These axons, designated type 1, exhibited distinctive large axonal varicosities that were typically clustered along the length of the axon. Type 1 axons formed multiple contacts with the cell bodies and dendrites of parvalbumin-containing (PV+) interneurons, but relatively few contacts with calretinin-containing and somatostatin-containing interneurons. At the ultrastructural level of analysis, the large terminals of type 1 axons exhibited numerous mitochondria and were densely packed with synaptic vesicles. Individual terminals formed broad symmetrical synapses with BL PV+ interneurons, and often formed additional symmetrical synapses with BL pyramidal cells. Some solitary type 1 terminals formed symmetrical synapses solely with BL pyramidal cells. These results suggest that GABAergic neurons of the basal forebrain provide indirect disinhibition, as well as direct inhibition, of BL pyramidal neurons. The possible involvement of these circuits in rhythmic oscillations related to emotional learning, attention, and arousal is discussed. PMID:21435381

  16. Modulatory effects of activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors on GABAergic circuits in the mouse thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Petrof, Iraklis

    2015-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are widely distributed in the central nervous system and modulate the release of neurotransmitters in different ways. We have previously shown that activation of presynaptic group II mGluRs reduces the gain of GABAergic inputs in both primary visual and auditory cortices (V1 and A1). In the present study, we sought to determine whether activation of mGluRs can also affect the inhibitory inputs in thalamus. Using whole cell recordings in a mouse slice preparation, we studied two GABAergic inputs to thalamic relay cells: that of the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) to cells of the ventral posteromedial nucleus (VPM) and that of interneurons to cells of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). We found that activation of mGluRs significantly reduced the amplitudes of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) evoked from TRN inputs to VPM cells, and further experiments indicated that this was due to activation of presynaptic group I and group II mGluRs. Similar results were found in the interneuronal inputs to LGN cells. Activation of presynaptic group I (type 1 but not type 5) and group II mGluRs significantly reduced the amplitudes of evoked IPSCs of the axonal inputs to relay cells, and additional experiments were consistent with previous observations that activation of type 5 mGluRs on the dendritic terminals of interneurons enhanced postsynaptic IPSCs. We concluded that group I and II mGluRs may generally reduce the amplitude of evoked GABAergic IPSCs of axonal inputs to thalamic relay cells, operating through presynaptic mechanisms, and this extends our previous findings in cortex. PMID:25652932

  17. Alterations of hippocampal GAbaergic system contribute to development of spontaneous recurrent seizures in the rat lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    André, V; Marescaux, C; Nehlig, A; Fritschy, J M

    2001-01-01

    Reorganization of excitatory and inhibitory circuits in the hippocampal formation following seizure-induced neuronal loss has been proposed to underlie the development of chronic seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here, we investigated whether specific morphological alterations of the GABAergic system can be related to the onset of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) in the rat lithium-pilocarpine model of TLE. Immunohistochemical staining for markers of interneurons and their projections, including parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR), calbindin (CB), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and type 1 GABA transporter (GAT1), was performed in brain sections of rats treated with lithium-pilocarpine and sacrificed after 24 h, during the silent phase (6 and 12 days), or after the onset of SRS (10-18 days after treatment). Semiquantitative analysis revealed a selective loss of interneurons in the stratum oriens of CA1, associated with a reduction of GAT1 staining in the stratum radiatum and stratum oriens. In contrast, interneurons in CA3 were largely preserved, although GAT1 staining was also reduced. These changes occurred within 6 days after treatment and were therefore insufficient to cause SRS. In the dentate gyrus, extensive cell loss occurred in the hilus. The pericellular innervation of granule cells by PV-positive axons was markedly reduced, although the loss of PV-interneurons was only partial. Most strikingly, the density of GABAergic axons, positive for both GAD and GAT1, was dramatically increased in the inner molecular layer. This change emerged during the silent period, but was most marked in animals with SRS. Finally, supernumerary CB-positive neurons were detected in the hilus, selectively in rats with SRS. These findings suggest that alterations of GABAergic circuits occur early after lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus and contribute to epileptogenesis. In particular, the reorganization of GABAergic axons in the dentate gyrus might

  18. Target-specific suppression of GABA release from parvalbumin interneurons in the basolateral amygdala by dopamine.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hong-Yuan; Ito, Wataru; Li, Jiayang; Morozov, Alexei

    2012-10-17

    Dopamine (DA) in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) promotes fear learning by disinhibiting principal neurons (PNs) and enabling synaptic plasticity in their sensory inputs. While BLA interneurons (INs) are heterogeneous, it is unclear which interneuron subtypes decrease GABAergic input to PNs in the presence of DA. Here, using cell type-selective photostimulation by channelrhodopsin 2 in BLA slices from mouse brain, we examined the role of parvalbumin-positive INs (PV-INs), the major interneuronal subpopulation in BLA, in the disinhibitory effect of DA. We found that DA selectively suppressed GABAergic transmission from PV-INs to PNs by acting on presynaptic D(2) receptors, and this effect was mimicked by Rp-cAMP, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent signaling. In contrast, DA did not alter GABA release from PV-INs to INs. Furthermore, neither suppressing cAMP-dependent signaling by Rp-cAMP nor enhancing it by forskolin altered GABA release from PV-INs to BLA INs. Overall, DA disinhibits BLA, at least in part, by suppressing GABA release from PV-INs in the target cell-specific manner that results from differential control of this release by cAMP-dependent signaling.

  19. Inhibition of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons results in complex behavioral changes.

    PubMed

    Brown, J A; Ramikie, T S; Schmidt, M J; Báldi, R; Garbett, K; Everheart, M G; Warren, L E; Gellért, L; Horváth, S; Patel, S; Mirnics, Károly

    2015-12-01

    Reduced expression of the Gad1 gene-encoded 67-kDa protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) is a hallmark of schizophrenia. GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal sub-populations, including the parvalbumin-positive (PVALB+) cells. To investigate the role of the PV-positive GABAergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we knocked down the Gad1 transcript using a microRNA engineered to target specifically Gad1 mRNA under the control of Pvalb bacterial artificial chromosome. Verification of construct expression was performed by immunohistochemistry. Follow-up electrophysiological studies revealed a significant reduction in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release probability without alterations in postsynaptic membrane properties or changes in glutamatergic release probability in the prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic (Tg) mice uncovered that the Pvalb/Gad1 Tg mice have pronounced sensorimotor gating deficits, increased novelty-seeking and reduced fear extinction. Furthermore, NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor antagonism by ketamine had an opposing dose-dependent effect, suggesting that the differential dosage of ketamine might have divergent effects on behavioral processes. All behavioral studies were validated using a second cohort of animals. Our results suggest that reduction of GABAergic transmission from PVALB+ interneurons primarily impacts behavioral domains related to fear and novelty seeking and that these alterations might be related to the behavioral phenotype observed in schizophrenia.

  20. GABAergic lateral interactions tune the early stages of visual processing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Freifeld, Limor; Clark, Damon A.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Horowitz, Mark A.; Clandinin, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Early stages of visual processing must capture complex, dynamic inputs. While peripheral neurons often implement efficient encoding by exploiting natural stimulus statistics, downstream neurons are specialized to extract behaviorally relevant features. How do these specializations arise? We use two-photon imaging in Drosophila to characterize a first order interneuron, L2, that provides input to a pathway specialized for detecting moving dark edges. GABAergic interactions, mediated in part pre-synaptically, create an antagonistic and anisotropic center-surround receptive field. This receptive field is spatiotemporally coupled, applying differential temporal processing to large and small dark objects, achieving significant specialization. GABAergic circuits also mediate OFF responses and balance these with responses to ON stimuli. Remarkably, the functional properties of L2 are strikingly similar to those of bipolar cells, yet emerge through different molecular and circuit mechanisms. Thus, evolution appears to have converged on a common strategy for processing visual information at the first synapse. PMID:23791198

  1. Role of Prelimbic GABAergic Circuits in Sensory and Emotional Aspects of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zizhen; Gadotti, Vinicius M; Chen, Lina; Souza, Ivana A; Stemkowski, Patrick L; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-08-04

    Noxious stimuli are detected by peripheral nociceptors and then transmitted to higher CNS centers, where they are perceived as an unpleasant sensation. The mechanisms that govern the emotional component associated with pain are still incompletely understood. Here, we used optogenetic approaches both in vitro and in vivo to address this issue. We found that peripheral nerve injury inhibits pyramidal cell firing in the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex as a result of feed-forward inhibition mediated by parvalbumin-expressing GABAergic interneurons. In addition, activation of inhibitory archaerhodopsin or excitatory channelrhodopsin-2 in these neurons decreased and increased pain responses, respectively, in freely moving mice and accordingly modulated conditioned place preference scores and place escape/avoidance behavior. Our findings thus demonstrate an important role of the prelimbic area in sensory and emotional aspects of pain and identify GABAergic circuits in this region as a potential target for pain therapeutics.

  2. Sugarcoated Perineuronal Nets Regulate "GABAergic" Transmission: Bittersweet Hypothesis in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Burket, Jessica A; Urbano, Maria R; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2017-03-09

    Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing "GABAergic" interneurons regulate synchronous oscillatory output of pyramidal neurons. Metabolic demands of these GABAergic projections are great because local ion concentrations must be optimally maintained; in addition, high rates of mitochondrial respiration necessitate exquisite redox regulation. Interestingly, only fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing basket cells coexpressing 3 metalloproteinases seem to be preferentially enwrapped in perineuronal nets (PNNs), a specialized lattice-like structure of the extracellular matrix. The PNNs maintain optimal local concentrations of ions, protect against oxidative stress, and concentrate transcription factors and chemorepulsive axon guidance cues. The PNNs mediate opening and closing of periods of heightened plasticity. Therapeutic strategies in autism spectrum disorders include promoting both maintenance and deliberate disruption of PNNs to promote new learning and cognitive flexibility.

  3. A loss of parvalbumin-containing interneurons is associated with diminished oscillatory activity in an animal model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lodge, Daniel J; Behrens, Margarita M; Grace, Anthony A

    2009-02-25

    Decreased GABAergic signaling is among the more robust pathologies observed postmortem in schizophrenia; however, the functional consequences of this deficit are still largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate, in a verified animal model of schizophrenia, that a reduced expression of parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons is correlated with a reduction in coordinated neuronal activity during task performance in freely moving rats. More specifically, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM)-treated rats display a decreased density of parvalbumin-positive interneurons throughout the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and ventral (but not dorsal) subiculum of the hippocampus. Furthermore, the reduction in interneuron functionality is correlated with a significantly reduced gamma-band response to a conditioned tone during a latent inhibition paradigm. Finally, deficits in mPFC and ventral hippocampal oscillatory activity are associated with an impaired behavioral expression of latent inhibition in MAM-treated rats. Thus, we propose that a decrease in intrinsic GABAergic signaling may be responsible, at least in part, for the prefrontal and hippocampal hypofunctionality observed during task performance, which is consistently observed in animal models as well as in schizophrenia in humans. In addition, a deficit in intrinsic GABAergic signaling may be the origin of the hippocampal hyperactivity purported to underlie the dopamine dysfunction in psychosis. Such information is central to gaining a better understanding of the disease pathophysiology and alternate pharmacotherapeutic approaches.

  4. Altered firing rates and patterns in interneurons in experimental cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fu-Wen; Roper, Steven N

    2011-07-01

    Cortical dysplasia (CD) is associated with severe epilepsy in humans, and the in utero irradiation of fetal rats provides a model of this disorder. These animals show a selective loss of inhibitory interneurons, and the surviving interneurons have a reduced excitatory synaptic drive. The current study was undertaken to see how alterations in synaptic input would affect spontaneous firing of interneurons in dysplastic cortex. We recorded spontaneous action potentials and excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs and IPSCs, respectively) from somatostatin (SST)-, parvalbumin (PV)-, and calretinin (CR)-immunoreactive (ir) interneurons. We found that SST- and PV-ir interneurons fired less frequently and with less regularity than controls. This corresponded to a relative imbalance in the ratio of EPSCs to IPSCs that favored inhibition. In contrast, CR-ir interneurons from CD showed no differences from controls in spontaneous firing or ratio of EPSCs to IPSCs. Additional studies demonstrated that synaptic input had a powerful effect on spontaneous firing in all interneurons. These findings demonstrate that a relative reduction in excitatory drive results in less active SST- and PV-ir interneurons in irradiated rats. This would further impair cortical inhibition in these animals and may be an important mechanism of epileptogenesis.

  5. Parvalbumin Interneurons of the Mouse Nucleus Accumbens are Required For Amphetamine-Induced Locomotor Sensitization and Conditioned Place Preference.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Gallegos, David A; Pogorelov, Vladimir M; O'Hare, Justin K; Calakos, Nicole; Wetsel, William C; West, Anne E

    2017-08-25

    To determine the requirement for parvalbumin (PV) expressing GABAergic interneurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the behavioral adaptations induced by amphetamine (AMPH), we blocked synaptic vesicle release from these neurons using Cre-inducible viral expression of the tetanus toxin light chain in male and female PV-Cre mice. Silencing PV+ interneurons of the NAc selectively inhibited the expression of locomotor sensitization following repeated injections of AMPH and blocked AMPH-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). AMPH induced significantly more expression of the activity-dependent gene Fos in both D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the NAc of PV+ interneuron silenced mice, suggesting a function for PV+ interneuron-mediated MSN inhibition in the expression of AMPH-induced locomotor sensitization and CPP. These data show a requirement for PV+ interneurons of the NAc in behavioral responses to AMPH, and they raise the possibility that modulation of PV+ interneuron function may alter the development or expression of psychostimulant-induced behavioral adaptations.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 27 September 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.178.

  6. Dichotomous Distribution of Putative Cholinergic Interneurons in Mouse Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Marking, Sarah; Krosnowski, Kurt; Ogura, Tatsuya; Lin, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Sensory information processing in the olfactory bulb (OB) relies on diverse populations of bulbar interneurons. In rodents, the accessory OB (AOB) is divided into two bulbar regions, the anterior (aAOB) and posterior (pAOB), which differ substantially in their circuitry connections and associated behaviors. We previously identified and characterized a large number of morphologically diverse cholinergic interneurons in the main OB (MOB) using transgenic mice to visualize the cell bodies of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-expressing neurons and immunolabeling (Krosnowski et al., 2012)). However, whether there are cholinergic neurons in the AOB is controversial and there is no detailed characterization of such neurons. Using the same line of ChAT(bacterial artificial chromosome, BAC)-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice, we investigated cholinergic neurons in the AOB. We found significant differences in the number and location of GFP-expressing (GFP+), putative cholinergic interneurons between the aAOB and pAOB. The highest numbers of GFP+ interneurons were found in the aAOB glomerular layer (aGL) and pAOB mitral/tufted cell layer (pMCL). We also noted a high density of GFP+ interneurons encircling the border region of the pMCL. Interestingly, a small subset of glomeruli in the middle of the GL receives strong MCL GFP+ nerve processes. These local putative cholinergic-innervated glomeruli are situated just outside the aGL, setting the boundary between the pGL and aGL. Many but not all GFP+ neurons in the AOB were weakly labeled with antibodies against ChAT and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). We further determined if these GFP+ interneurons differ from other previously characterized interneuron populations in the AOB and found that AOB GFP+ interneurons express neither GABAergic nor dopaminergic markers and most also do not express the glutamatergic marker. Similar to the cholinergic interneurons of the MOB, some AOB GFP+ interneurons

  7. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for interneuron connectivity at specific subcellular compartments of granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Beuter, Simone; Ardi, Ziv; Horovitz, Omer; Wuchter, Jennifer; Keller, Stefanie; Saha, Rinki; Tripathi, Kuldeep; Anunu, Rachel; Kehat, Orli; Kriebel, Martin; Richter-Levin, Gal; Volkmer, Hansjürgen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal transmission is regulated by the local circuitry which is composed of principal neurons targeted at different subcellular compartments by a variety of interneurons. However, mechanisms that contribute to the subcellular localisation and maintenance of GABAergic interneuron terminals are poorly understood. Stabilization of GABAergic synapses depends on clustering of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein gephyrin and its interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin. Lentiviral knockdown experiments in adult rats indicated that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for the stabilisation of basket cell terminals on proximal dendritic and somatic compartments of granular cells of the dentate gyrus. EphA7 deficiency and concomitant destabilisation of GABAergic synapses correlated with impaired long-term potentiation and reduced hippocampal learning. Reduced GABAergic innervation may be explained by an impact of EphA7 on gephyrin clustering. Overexpression or ephrin stimulation of EphA7 induced gephyrin clustering dependent on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) which is an interaction partner of gephyrin. Gephyrin interactions with mTOR become released after mTOR activation while enhanced interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin was observed in parallel. In conclusion, EphA7 regulates gephyrin clustering and the maintenance of inhibitory synaptic connectivity via mTOR signalling. PMID:27405707

  8. TrkB signaling in parvalbumin-positive interneurons is critical for gamma-band network synchronization in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kang; An, Juan Ji; Yang, Feng; Xu, Weifeng; Xu, Zhi-Qing David; Wu, Jianyoung; Hökfelt, Tomas G M; Fisahn, André; Xu, Baoji; Lu, Bai

    2011-10-11

    Although brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to regulate circuit development and synaptic plasticity, its exact role in neuronal network activity remains elusive. Using mutant mice (TrkB-PV(-/-)) in which the gene for the BDNF receptor, tyrosine kinase B receptor (trkB), has been specifically deleted in parvalbumin-expressing, fast-spiking GABAergic (PV+) interneurons, we show that TrkB is structurally and functionally important for the integrity of the hippocampal network. The amplitude of glutamatergic inputs to PV+ interneurons and the frequency of GABAergic inputs to excitatory pyramidal cells were reduced in the TrkB-PV(-/-) mice. Functionally, rhythmic network activity in the gamma-frequency band (30-80 Hz) was significantly decreased in hippocampal area CA1. This decrease was caused by a desynchronization and overall reduction in frequency of action potentials generated in PV+ interneurons of TrkB-PV(-/-) mice. Our results show that the integration of PV+ interneurons into the hippocampal microcircuit is impaired in TrkB-PV(-/-) mice, resulting in decreased rhythmic network activity in the gamma-frequency band.

  9. Persistently active cannabinoid receptors mute a subpopulation of hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Losonczy, Attila; Biró, Agota A; Nusser, Zoltan

    2004-02-03

    Cortical information processing requires an orchestrated interaction between a large number of pyramidal cells and albeit fewer, but highly diverse GABAergic interneurons (INs). The diversity of INs is thought to reflect functional and structural specializations evolved to control distinct network operations. Consequently, specific cortical functions may be selectively modified by altering the input-output relationship of unique IN populations. Here, we report that persistently active cannabinoid receptors, the site of action of endocannabinoids, and the psychostimulants marijuana and hashish, switch off the output (mute) of a unique class of hippocampal INs. In paired recordings between cholecystokinin-immunopositive, mossy fiber-associated INs, and their target CA3 pyramidal cells, no postsynaptic currents could be evoked with single presynaptic action potentials or with repetitive stimulations at frequencies <25 Hz. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists converted these "mute" synapses into high-fidelity ones. The selective muting of specific GABAergic INs, achieved by persistent presynaptic cannabinoid receptor activation, provides a state-dependent switch in cortical networks.

  10. Dopaminergic and Cholinergic Modulation of Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Xenias, Harry S.; Tepper, James M.; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The recent electrophysiological characterization of TH-expressing GABAergic interneurons (THINs) in the neostriatum revealed an unexpected degree of diversity of interneurons in this brain area (Ibáñez-Sandoval et al., 2010, Unal et al., 2011, 2013). Despite being relatively few in number, THINs may play a significant role in transmitting and distributing extra- and intrastriatal neuromodulatory signals in the striatal circuitry. Here we investigated the dopaminergic and cholinergic regulation of THINs in vitro. We found that the dominant effect of dopamine was a dramatic enhancement of the ability of THINs to generate long-lasting depolarizing plateau potentials (PPs). Interestingly, the same effect could also be elicited by amphetamine-induced release of endogenous dopamine suggesting that THINs may exhibit similar responses to changes in extracellular dopamine concentration in vivo. The enhancement of PPs in THINs is perhaps the most pronounced effect of dopamine on the intrinsic excitability of neostriatal neurons described to date. Further, we demonstrate that all subtypes of THINSs tested also express nicotinic cholinergic receptors. All THIS responded, albeit differentially, with depolarization, PPs and spiking to brief application of nicotinic agonists. Powerful modulation of the nonlinear integrative properties of THINs by dopamine and the direct depolarization of these neurons by acetylcholine may play important roles in mediating the effects of these neuromodulators in the neostriatum with potentially important implications for understanding the mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia. PMID:25908399

  11. Deletion of selenoprotein P results in impaired function of parvalbumin interneurons and alterations in fear learning and sensorimotor gating.

    PubMed

    Pitts, M W; Raman, A V; Hashimoto, A C; Todorovic, C; Nichols, R A; Berry, M J

    2012-04-19

    One of the primary lines of defense against oxidative stress is the selenoprotein family, a class of proteins that contain selenium in the form of the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine. Within this class of proteins, selenoprotein P (Sepp1) is unique, as it contains multiple selenocysteine residues and is postulated to act in selenium transport. Recent findings have demonstrated that neuronal selenoprotein synthesis is required for the development of parvalbumin (PV)-interneurons, a class of GABAergic neurons involved in the synchronization of neural activity. To investigate the potential influence of Sepp1 on PV-interneurons, we first mapped the distribution of the Sepp1 receptor, ApoER2, and parvalbumin in the mouse brain. Our results indicate that ApoER2 is highly expressed on PV-interneurons in multiple brain regions. Next, to determine whether PV-interneuron populations are affected by Sepp1 deletion, we performed stereology on several brain regions in which we observed ApoER2 expression on PV-interneurons, comparing wild-type and Sepp1(-/-) mice. We observed reduced numbers of PV-interneurons in the inferior colliculus of Sepp1(-/-) mice, which corresponded with a regional increase in oxidative stress. Finally, as impaired PV-interneuron function has been implicated in several neuropsychiatric conditions, we performed multiple behavioral tests on Sepp1(-/-) mice. Our behavioral results indicate that Sepp1(-/-) mice have impairments in contextual fear extinction, latent inhibition, and sensorimotor gating. In sum, these findings demonstrate the important supporting role of Sepp1 on ApoER2-expressing PV-interneurons.

  12. Structural-Functional Properties of Identified Excitatory and Inhibitory Interneurons within Pre-Bötzinger Complex Respiratory Microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Hidehiko; Koshiya, Naohiro; Chia, Justine X.; Cao, Fang; Nugent, Joseph; Zhang, Ruli

    2013-01-01

    We comparatively analyzed cellular and circuit properties of identified rhythmic excitatory and inhibitory interneurons within respiratory microcircuits of the neonatal rodent pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), the structure generating inspiratory rhythm in the brainstem. We combined high-resolution structural–functional imaging, molecular assays for neurotransmitter phenotype identification in conjunction with electrophysiological property phenotyping, and morphological reconstruction of interneurons in neonatal rat and mouse slices in vitro. This approach revealed previously undifferentiated structural–functional features that distinguish excitatory and inhibitory interneuronal populations. We identified distinct subpopulations of pre-BötC glutamatergic, glycinergic, GABAergic, and glycine-GABA coexpressing interneurons. Most commissural pre-BötC inspiratory interneurons were glutamatergic, with a substantial subset exhibiting intrinsic oscillatory bursting properties. Commissural excitatory interneurons projected with nearly planar trajectories to the contralateral pre-BötC, many also with axon collaterals to areas containing inspiratory hypoglossal (XII) premotoneurons and motoneurons. Inhibitory neurons as characterized in the present study did not exhibit intrinsic oscillatory bursting properties, but were electrophysiologically distinguished by more pronounced spike frequency adaptation properties. Axons of many inhibitory neurons projected ipsilaterally also to regions containing inspiratory XII premotoneurons and motoneurons, whereas a minority of inhibitory neurons had commissural axonal projections. Dendrites of both excitatory and inhibitory interneurons were arborized asymmetrically, primarily in the coronal plane. The dendritic fields of inhibitory neurons were more spatially compact than those of excitatory interneurons. Our results are consistent with the concepts of a compartmental circuit organization, a bilaterally coupled excitatory

  13. Regulation of GABAergic Inputs to CA1 Pyramidal Neurons by Nicotinic Receptors and Kynurenic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Pereira, Edna F. R.

    2012-01-01

    Impaired α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function and GABAergic transmission in the hippocampus and elevated brain levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an astrocyte-derived metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, are key features of schizophrenia. KYNA acts as a noncompetitive antagonist with respect to agonists at both α7 nAChRs and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in hippocampal slices tonically active α7 nAChRs control GABAergic transmission to CA1 pyramidal neurons and are sensitive to inhibition by rising levels of KYNA. The α7 nAChR-selective antagonist α-bungarotoxin (α-BGT; 100 nM) and methyllycaconitine (MLA; 10 nM), an antagonist at α7 and other nAChRs, reduced by 51.3 ± 1.3 and 65.2 ± 1.5%, respectively, the frequency of GABAergic postsynaptic currents (PSCs) recorded from CA1 pyramidal neurons. MLA had no effect on miniature GABAergic PSCs. Thus, GABAergic synaptic activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons is maintained, in part, by tonically active α7 nAChRs located on the preterminal region of axons and/or the somatodendritic region of interneurons that synapse onto the neurons under study. l-Kynurenine (20 or 200 μM) or KYNA (20–200 μM) suppressed concentration-dependently the frequency of GABAergic PSCs; the inhibitory effect of 20 μM l-kynurenine had an onset time of approximately 35 min and could not be detected in the presence of 100 nM α-BGT. These results suggest that KYNA levels generated from 20 μM kynurenine inhibit tonically active α7 nAChR-dependent GABAergic transmission to the pyramidal neurons. Disruption of nAChR-dependent GABAergic transmission by mildly elevated levels of KYNA can be an important determinant of the cognitive deficits presented by patients with schizophrenia. PMID:22344459

  14. Parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons in auditory cortex are well-tuned for frequency.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alexandra K; Wehr, Michael

    2013-08-21

    In the auditory cortex, synaptic inhibition is known to be involved in shaping receptive fields, enhancing temporal precision, and regulating gain. Cortical inhibition is provided by local GABAergic interneurons, which comprise 10-20% of the cortical population and can be separated into numerous subclasses. The morphological and physiological diversity of interneurons suggests that these different subclasses have unique roles in sound processing; however, these roles are yet unknown. Understanding the receptive field properties of distinct inhibitory cell types will be critical to elucidating their computational function in cortical circuits. Here we characterized the tuning and response properties of parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons, the largest inhibitory subclass. We used channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) as an optogenetic tag to identify PV+ and PV- neurons in vivo in transgenic mice. In contrast to PV+ neurons in mouse visual cortex, which are broadly tuned for orientation, we found that auditory cortical PV+ neurons were well tuned for frequency, although very tightly tuned PV+ cells were uncommon. This suggests that PV+ neurons play a minor role in shaping frequency tuning, and is consistent with the idea that PV+ neurons nonselectively pool input from the local network. PV+ interneurons had shallower response gain and were less intensity-tuned than PV- neurons, suggesting that PV+ neurons provide dynamic gain control and shape intensity tuning in auditory cortex. PV+ neurons also had markedly faster response latencies than PV- neurons, consistent with a computational role in enhancing the temporal precision of cortical responses.

  15. Fast synaptic inhibition promotes synchronized gamma oscillations in hippocampal interneuron networks

    PubMed Central

    Bartos, Marlene; Vida, Imre; Frotscher, Michael; Meyer, Axel; Monyer, Hannah; Geiger, Jörg R. P.; Jonas, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Networks of GABAergic interneurons are of critical importance for the generation of gamma frequency oscillations in the brain. To examine the underlying synaptic mechanisms, we made paired recordings from “basket cells” (BCs) in different subfields of hippocampal slices, using transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the parvalbumin promoter. Unitary inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) showed large amplitude and fast time course with mean amplitude-weighted decay time constants of 2.5, 1.2, and 1.8 ms in the dentate gyrus, and the cornu ammonis area 3 (CA3) and 1 (CA1), respectively (33–34°C). The decay of unitary IPSCs at BC–BC synapses was significantly faster than that at BC–principal cell synapses, indicating target cell-specific differences in IPSC kinetics. In addition, electrical coupling was found in a subset of BC–BC pairs. To examine whether an interneuron network with fast inhibitory synapses can act as a gamma frequency oscillator, we developed an interneuron network model based on experimentally determined properties. In comparison to previous interneuron network models, our model was able to generate oscillatory activity with higher coherence over a broad range of frequencies (20–110 Hz). In this model, high coherence and flexibility in frequency control emerge from the combination of synaptic properties, network structure, and electrical coupling. PMID:12235359

  16. Neuregulin directly decreases voltage-gated sodium current in hippocampal ErbB4-expressing interneurons.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Megan J; Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Buonanno, Andres

    2012-10-03

    The Neuregulin 1 (NRG1)/ErbB4 signaling pathway has been genetically and functionally implicated in the etiology underlying schizophrenia, and in the regulation of glutamatergic pyramidal neuron function and plasticity. However, ErbB4 receptors are expressed in subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons, but not in hippocampal or cortical pyramidal neurons, indicating that NRG1 effects on principal neurons are indirect. Consistent with these findings, NRG1 effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation at CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses in slices are mediated indirectly by dopamine. Here we studied whether NRG/ErbB signaling directly regulates interneuron intrinsic excitability by pharmacologically isolating ErbB4-expressing neurons in rat dissociated hippocampal cultures, which lack dopaminergic innervation. We found that NRG1 acutely attenuates ErbB4-expressing interneuron excitability by depolarizing the firing threshold; neurons treated with the pan-ErbB inhibitor PD158780 or negative for ErbB4 were unaffected. These effects of NRG1 are primarily attributable to decreased voltage-gated sodium channel activity, as current density was attenuated by ∼60%. In stark contrast, NRG1 had minor effects on whole-cell potassium currents. Our data reveal the direct actions of NRG1 signaling in ErbB4-expressing interneurons, and offer novel insight into how NRG1/ErbB4 signaling can impact hippocampal activity.

  17. Sleep Impairment and Reduced Interneuron Excitability in a Mouse Model of Dravet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalume, Franck; Oakley, John C.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Gile, Jennifer; de la Iglesia, Horacio O.; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Dravet Syndrome (DS) is caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.1. Our genetic mouse model of DS recapitulates its severe seizures and premature death. Sleep disturbance is common in DS, but its mechanism is unknown. Electroencephalographic studies revealed abnormal sleep in DS mice, including reduced delta wave power, reduced sleep spindles, increased brief wakes, and numerous interictal spikes in Non-Rapid-Eye-Movement sleep. Theta power was reduced in Rapid-Eye-Movement sleep. Mice with NaV1.1 deleted specifically in forebrain interneurons exhibited similar sleep pathology to DS mice, but without changes in circadian rhythm. Sleep architecture depends on oscillatory activity in the thalamocortical network generated by excitatory neurons in the ventrobasal nucleus (VBN) of the thalamus and inhibitory GABAergic neurons in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus (RNT). Whole-cell NaV current was reduced in GABAergic RNT neurons but not in VBN neurons. Rebound firing of action potentials following hyperpolarization, the signature firing pattern of RNT neurons during sleep, was also reduced. These results demonstrate imbalance of excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in this circuit. As predicted from this functional impairment, we found substantial deficit in homeostatic rebound of slow wave activity following sleep deprivation. Although sleep disorders in epilepsies have been attributed to anti-epileptic drugs, our results show that sleep disorder in DS mice arises from loss of NaV1.1 channels in forebrain GABAergic interneurons without drug treatment. Impairment of NaV currents and excitability of GABAergic RNT neurons are correlated with impaired sleep quality and homeostasis in these mice. PMID:25766678

  18. In vivo labeling of parvalbumin-positive interneurons and analysis of electrical coupling in identified neurons.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Axel H; Katona, István; Blatow, Maria; Rozov, Andrei; Monyer, Hannah

    2002-08-15

    GABAergic interneurons can pace the activity of principal cells and are thus critically involved in the generation of oscillatory and synchronous network activity. The specific role of various GABAergic subpopulations, however, has remained elusive. This is in part attributable to the scarcity of certain GABAergic neurons and the difficulty of identifying them in slices obtained from brain regions in which anatomical structures are not readily recognizable in the live preparation. To facilitate the functional analysis of GABAergic interneurons, we generated transgenic mice in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was specifically expressed in parvalbumin-positive neurons. The high fidelity of expression obtained using bacterial artificial chromosome transgenes resulted in EGFP-labeled neurons in nearly all brain regions known to contain parvalbumin-expressing neurons. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that EGFP expression was primarily restricted to parvalbumin-positive cells. In addition to cell body labeling, EGFP expression was high enough in many neurons to enable the visualization of dendritic structures. With the help of these mice, we investigated the presence of electrical coupling between parvalbumin-positive cells in brain slices obtained from young and adult animals. In dentate gyrus basket cells, electrical coupling was found in slices from young [postnatal day 14 (P14)] and adult (P28 and P42) animals, but both strength and incidence of coupling decreased during development. However, electrical coupling between parvalbumin-positive multipolar cells in layer II/III of the neocortex remains unaltered during development. Yet another developmental profile of electrical coupling was found between layer II/III parvalbumin-positive cells and excitatory principal cells. Between these neurons, electrical coupling was found at P14 but not at P28. The results indicate that the presence and strength of electrical coupling is developmentally

  19. Bipolar disorder type 1 and schizophrenia are accompanied by decreased density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons in the parahippocampal region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alice Y; Lohmann, Kathryn M; Yang, C Kevin; Zimmerman, Eric I; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Herring, Nicole; Berretta, Sabina; Heckers, Stephan; Konradi, Christine

    2011-11-01

    GABAergic interneurons synchronize network activities and monitor information flow. Post-mortem studies have reported decreased densities of cortical interneurons in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD). The entorhinal cortex (EC) and the adjacent subicular regions are a hub for integration of hippocampal and cortical information, a process that is disrupted in SZ. Here we contrast and compare the density of interneuron populations in the caudal EC and subicular regions in BPD type I (BPD-I), SZ, and normal control (NC) subjects. Post-mortem human parahippocampal specimens of 13 BPD-I, 11 SZ and 17 NC subjects were used to examine the numerical density of parvalbumin-, somatostatin- or calbindin-positive interneurons. We observed a reduction in the numerical density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons in the caudal EC and parasubiculum in BPD-I and SZ, but no change in the subiculum. Calbindin-positive interneuron densities were normal in all brain areas examined. The profile of decreased density was strikingly similar in BPD-I and SZ. Our results demonstrate a specific reduction of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons in the parahippocampal region in BPD-I and SZ, likely disrupting synchronization and integration of cortico-hippocampal circuits.

  20. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms control the termination of cortical interneuron migration.

    PubMed

    Inamura, Naoko; Kimura, Toshiya; Tada, Satoshi; Kurahashi, Takashi; Yanagida, Mitsutoshi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Fujio

    2012-04-25

    During development, neurons migrate from their site of origin to their final destinations. Upon reaching this destination, the termination of their migration is crucial for building functional architectures such as laminated structures and nuclei. How this termination is regulated, however, is not clear. Here, we investigated the contribution of cell-intrinsic mechanisms and extrinsic factors. Using GAD67-GFP knock-in mice and in utero electroporation cell labeling, we visualized GABAergic neurons and analyzed their motility in vitro. We find that the motility of GABAergic neurons in cortical slices gradually decreases as development proceeds and is almost abolished by the end of the first postnatal week. Consistent with this, a reduction of embryonic interneuron motility occurred in dissociated cultures. This is in part due to cell-intrinsic mechanisms, as a reduction in motility is observed during long-term culturing on glial feeder cells. Cell-intrinsic regulation is further supported by observations that interneurons labeled in early stages migrated more actively than those labeled in late stages in the same cortical explant. We found evidence suggesting that upregulation of the potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 underlies this intrinsic regulation. Reduced motility is also observed when embryonic interneurons are plated on postnatal cortical feeder cells, suggesting extrinsic factors derived from the postnatal cortex too contribute to termination. These factors should include secreted molecules, as cultured postnatal cortical cells could exercise this effect without directly contacting the interneuron. These findings suggest that intrinsic mechanisms and extrinsic factors coordinate to reduce the motility of migrating neurons, thereby leading to the termination of migration.

  1. Post hoc immunostaining of GABAergic neuronal subtypes following in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Langer, Dominik; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2012-02-01

    GABAergic neurons in the neocortex are diverse with regard to morphology, physiology, and axonal targeting pattern, indicating functional specializations within the cortical microcircuitry. Little information is available, however, about functional properties of distinct subtypes of GABAergic neurons in the intact brain. Here, we combined in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in supragranular layers of the mouse neocortex with post hoc immunohistochemistry against the three calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calretinin, and calbindin in order to assign subtype marker profiles to neuronal activity. Following coronal sectioning of fixed brains, we matched cells in corresponding volumes of image stacks acquired in vivo and in fixed brain slices. In GAD67-GFP mice, more than 95% of the GABAergic cells could be unambiguously matched, even in large volumes comprising more than a thousand interneurons. Triple immunostaining revealed a depth-dependent distribution of interneuron subtypes with increasing abundance of PV-positive neurons with depth. Most importantly, the triple-labeling approach was compatible with previous in vivo calcium imaging following bulk loading of Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1, which allowed us to classify spontaneous calcium transients recorded in vivo according to the neurochemically defined GABAergic subtypes. Moreover, we demonstrate that post hoc immunostaining can also be applied to wild-type mice expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator Yellow Cameleon 3.60 in cortical neurons. Our approach is a general and flexible method to distinguish GABAergic subtypes in cell populations previously imaged in the living animal. It should thus facilitate dissecting the functional roles of these subtypes in neural circuitry.

  2. β1-Adrenoceptor Activation Is Required for Ethanol Enhancement of Lateral Paracapsular GABAergic Synapses in the Rat Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J.

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) potentiation of GABAergic neurotransmission in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) may contribute to the acute anxiolytic effects of this drug. Previous studies have shown that BLA pyramidal neurons receive GABAergic input from two distinct sources: local interneurons and a cluster of GABAergic cells termed lateral paracapsular (LPCS) interneurons. It is noteworthy that whereas EtOH enhances local GABAergic synapses via a presynaptic increase in GABA release, EtOH potentiation of LPCS inhibition is mediated via a distinct mechanism that requires adrenoceptor (AR) activation. Here, we sought to further characterize the interaction between the AR system and EtOH enhancement of LPCS GABAergic synapses by using in vitro electrophysiology techniques in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Exogenous norepinephrine (NE) enhanced LPCS-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) via the activation of β-ARs, because this effect was blocked by propranolol. EtOH potentiation of LPCS eIPSCs was also blocked by propranolol and significantly reduced by NE pretreatment, suggesting that NE and EtOH may enhance LPCS inhibition via a common mechanism. EtOH enhancement of LPCS eIPSCs was significantly reduced by a selective β1-, but not β2- or β3-, AR antagonist, and both EtOH and NE potentiation of LPCS IPSCs was blocked by postsynaptic disruption of cAMP signaling. These data suggest that EtOH enhances LPCS synapses via a postsynaptic β1-AR, cAMP-dependent cascade. Because enhancement of LPCS inhibition can reduce anxiety-like behaviors, these findings shed light on a novel mechanism that may play a role in some of the anxiolytic effects of EtOH that are thought to contribute to the development and progression of alcoholism. PMID:22904357

  3. β1-adrenoceptor activation is required for ethanol enhancement of lateral paracapsular GABAergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Weiner, Jeff L

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) potentiation of GABAergic neurotransmission in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) may contribute to the acute anxiolytic effects of this drug. Previous studies have shown that BLA pyramidal neurons receive GABAergic input from two distinct sources: local interneurons and a cluster of GABAergic cells termed lateral paracapsular (LPCS) interneurons. It is noteworthy that whereas EtOH enhances local GABAergic synapses via a presynaptic increase in GABA release, EtOH potentiation of LPCS inhibition is mediated via a distinct mechanism that requires adrenoceptor (AR) activation. Here, we sought to further characterize the interaction between the AR system and EtOH enhancement of LPCS GABAergic synapses by using in vitro electrophysiology techniques in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Exogenous norepinephrine (NE) enhanced LPCS-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) via the activation of β-ARs, because this effect was blocked by propranolol. EtOH potentiation of LPCS eIPSCs was also blocked by propranolol and significantly reduced by NE pretreatment, suggesting that NE and EtOH may enhance LPCS inhibition via a common mechanism. EtOH enhancement of LPCS eIPSCs was significantly reduced by a selective β1-, but not β2- or β3-, AR antagonist, and both EtOH and NE potentiation of LPCS IPSCs was blocked by postsynaptic disruption of cAMP signaling. These data suggest that EtOH enhances LPCS synapses via a postsynaptic β1-AR, cAMP-dependent cascade. Because enhancement of LPCS inhibition can reduce anxiety-like behaviors, these findings shed light on a novel mechanism that may play a role in some of the anxiolytic effects of EtOH that are thought to contribute to the development and progression of alcoholism.

  4. Defined types of cortical interneurone structure space and spike timing in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The cerebral cortex encodes, stores and combines information about the internal and external environment in rhythmic activity of multiple frequency ranges. Neurones of the cortex can be defined, recognized and compared on the comprehensive application of the following measures: (i) brain area- and cell domain-specific distribution of input and output synapses, (ii) expression of molecules involved in cell signalling, (iii) membrane and synaptic properties reflecting the expression of membrane proteins, (iv) temporal structure of firing in vivo, resulting from (i)–(iii). Spatial and temporal measures of neurones in the network reflect an indivisible unity of evolutionary design, i.e. neurones do not have separate structure or function. The blueprint of this design is most easily accessible in the CA1 area of the hippocampus, where a relatively uniform population of pyramidal cells and their inputs follow an instantly recognizable laminated pattern and act within stereotyped network activity patterns. Reviewing the cell types and their spatio-temporal interactions, we suggest that CA1 pyramidal cells are supported by at least 16 distinct types of GABAergic neurone. During a given behaviour-contingent network oscillation, interneurones of a given type exhibit similar firing patterns. During different network oscillations representing two distinct brain states, interneurones of the same class show different firing patterns modulating their postsynaptic target-domain in a brain-state-dependent manner. These results suggest roles for specific interneurone types in structuring the activity of pyramidal cells via their respective target domains, and accurately timing and synchronizing pyramidal cell discharge, rather than providing generalized inhibition. Finally, interneurones belonging to different classes may fire preferentially at distinct time points during a given oscillation. As different interneurones innervate distinct domains of the pyramidal cells, the

  5. The Progenitor Zone of the Ventral MGE Requires Nkx2-1 to Generate Most of the Globus Pallidus but Few Neocortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Flandin, Pierre; Kimura, Shioko; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2010-01-01

    We show that most globus pallidus neurons, but very few neocortical interneurons, are generated from the ventral MGE and dorsal POA based on fate mapping using a Shh-Cre allele. The Shh-expressing subpallial lineage produces parvalbumin+ GABAergic neurons, ChAT+ cholinergic neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Loss of Nkx2-1 function from the Shh-expressing domain eliminated most globus pallidus neurons, whereas most cortical and striatal interneurons continued to be generated, except for striatal cholinergic neurons. Finally, our analysis provided evidence for a novel cellular component (Nkx2-1−;Npas1+) of the globus pallidus. PMID:20181579

  6. Chronic stress affects the number of GABAergic neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zsófia; Csabai, Dávid; Miseta, Attila; Wiborg, Ove; Czéh, Boldizsár

    2017-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic dysfunctions have been documented by clinical studies in major depression. We used here an animal model for depression and investigated whether long-term stress exposure can affect the number of GABAergic neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Adult male rats were subjected to 7-weeks of daily stress exposure and behaviorally phenotyped as anhedonic or stress-resilient animals. GABAergic interneurons were identified by immunohistochemistry and systematically quantified. We analyzed calbindin-(CB), calretinin-(CR), cholecystokinin-(CCK), parvalbumin-(PV), neuropeptide Y-(NPY) and somatostatin-positive (SST+) neurons in the following specific subareas of the OFC: medial orbital (MO), ventral orbital (VO), lateral orbital (LO) and dorsolateral orbital (DLO) cortex. For comparison, we also analyzed the primary motor cortex (M1) as a non-limbic cortical area. Stress had a pronounced effect on CB+ neurons and reduced their densities by 40-50% in the MO, VO and DLO. Stress had no effect on CCK+, CR+, PV+, NPY+ and SST+ neurons in any cortical areas. None of the investigated GABAergic neurons were affected by stress in the primary motor cortex. Interestingly, in the stress-resilient animals, we observed a significantly increased density of CCK+ neurons in the VO. NPY+ neuron densities were also significantly different between the anhedonic and stress-resilient rats, but only in the LO. Our present data demonstrate that chronic stress can specifically reduce the density of calbindin-positive GABAergic neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex and suggest that NPY and CCK expression in the OFC may relate to the stress resilience of the animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Secreted factors from ventral telencephalon induce the differentiation of GABAergic neurons in cortical cultures.

    PubMed

    Trinh, H-h; Reid, J; Shin, E; Liapi, A; Parnavelas, J G; Nadarajah, B

    2006-12-01

    It is widely believed that the pyramidal cells and interneurons of the cerebral cortex are distinct in their origin, lineage and genetic make up. In view of these findings, the current thesis is that the phenotype determination of cortical neurons is primarily directed by genetic mechanisms. Using in vitro assays, the present study demonstrates that secreted factors from ganglionic eminence (GE) of the ventral telencephalon have the potency to induce the differentiation of a subset of cortical neurons towards gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic lineage. Characterization of cortical cultures that were exposed to medium derived from GE illustrated a significant increase in the number of GABA-, calretinin- and calbindin-positive neurons. Calcium imaging together with pharmacological studies showed that the application of exogenous medium significantly elevated the intracellular calcium transients in cortical neurons through the activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. The increase in GABA+ neurons appeared to be associated with the elevated calcium activity; treatment with blockers specific for glutamate receptors abolished both the synchronized transients and reduced the differentiation of GABAergic neurons. Such studies demonstrate that although intrinsic mechanisms determine the fate of cortical interneurons, extrinsic factors have the potency to influence their neurochemical differentiation and contribute towards their molecular diversity.

  8. BDNF promotes differentiation and maturation of adult-born neurons through GABAergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Emily G; An, Juan Ji; Orefice, Lauren L; Baydyuk, Maryna; Liao, Guey-Ying; Zheng, Kang; Lu, Bai; Xu, Baoji

    2012-10-10

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in regulating adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus; however, the mechanism underlying this regulation remains unclear. In this study, we found that Bdnf mRNA localized to distal dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells isolated from wild-type (WT) mice, but not from Bdnf(klox/klox) mice where the long 3' untranslated region (UTR) of Bdnf mRNA is truncated. KCl-induced membrane depolarization stimulated release of dendritic BDNF translated from long 3' UTR Bdnf mRNA in cultured hippocampal neurons, but not from short 3' UTR Bdnf mRNA. Bdnf(klox/klox) mice exhibited reduced expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (a GABA synthase), increased proliferation of progenitor cells, and impaired differentiation and maturation of newborn neurons in the SGZ. These deficits in adult neurogenesis were rescued with administration of phenobarbital, an enhancer of GABA(A) receptor activity. Furthermore, we observed similar neurogenesis deficits in mice where the receptor for BDNF, TrkB, was selectively abolished in parvalbumin (PV)-expressing GABAergic interneurons. Thus, our data suggest that locally synthesized BDNF in dendrites of granule cells promotes differentiation and maturation of progenitor cells in the SGZ by enhancing GABA release, at least in part, from PV-expressing GABAergic interneurons.

  9. A key mechanism underlying sensory experience-dependent maturation of neocortical GABAergic circuits in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Chunzhao; Wang, Xinjun; Sakata, Kazuko; Lu, Bai; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2011-07-19

    Mechanisms underlying experience-dependent refinement of cortical connections, especially GABAergic inhibitory circuits, are unknown. By using a line of mutant mice that lack activity-dependent BDNF expression (bdnf-KIV), we show that experience regulation of cortical GABAergic network is mediated by activity-driven BDNF expression. Levels of endogenous BDNF protein in the barrel cortex are strongly regulated by sensory inputs from whiskers. There is a severe alteration of excitation and inhibition balance in the barrel cortex of bdnf-KIV mice as a result of reduced inhibitory but not excitatory conductance. Within the inhibitory circuits, the mutant barrel cortex exhibits significantly reduced levels of GABA release only from the parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking (FS) interneurons, but not other interneuron subtypes. Postnatal deprivation of sensory inputs markedly decreased perisomatic inhibition selectively from FS cells in wild-type but not bdnf-KIV mice. These results suggest that postnatal experience, through activity-driven BDNF expression, controls cortical development by regulating FS cell-mediated perisomatic inhibition in vivo.

  10. Postnatal Migration of Cerebellar Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Galas, Ludovic; Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Yutaro; Schapman, Damien; Vaudry, Hubert; Vaudry, David; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Due to its continuing development after birth, the cerebellum represents a unique model for studying the postnatal orchestration of interneuron migration. The combination of fluorescent labeling and ex/in vivo imaging revealed a cellular highway network within cerebellar cortical layers (the external granular layer, the molecular layer, the Purkinje cell layer, and the internal granular layer). During the first two postnatal weeks, saltatory movements, transient stop phases, cell-cell interaction/contact, and degradation of the extracellular matrix mark out the route of cerebellar interneurons, notably granule cells and basket/stellate cells, to their final location. In addition, cortical-layer specific regulatory factors such as neuropeptides (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), somatostatin) or proteins (tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1)) have been shown to inhibit or stimulate the migratory process of interneurons. These factors show further complexity because somatostatin, PACAP, or tPA have opposite or no effect on interneuron migration depending on which layer or cell type they act upon. External factors originating from environmental conditions (light stimuli, pollutants), nutrients or drug of abuse (alcohol) also alter normal cell migration, leading to cerebellar disorders. PMID:28587295

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates activity-dependent dendritic growth in nonpyramidal neocortical interneurons in developing organotypic cultures.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoming; Hu, Hang; Mathers, Peter H; Agmon, Ariel

    2003-07-02

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes postnatal maturation of GABAergic inhibition in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices, and its expression and release are enhanced by neuronal activity, suggesting that it acts in a feedback manner to maintain a balance between excitation and inhibition during development. BDNF promotes differentiation of cerebellar, hippocampal, and neostriatal inhibitory neurons, but its effects on the dendritic development of neocortical inhibitory interneurons remain unknown. Here, we show that BDNF mediates depolarization-induced dendritic growth and branching in neocortical interneurons. To visualize inhibitory interneurons, we biolistically transfected organotypic cortical slice cultures from neonatal mice with green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)67 promoter. Nearly all GAD67-GFP-expressing neurons were nonpyramidal, many contained GABA, and some expressed markers of neurochemically defined GABAergic subtypes, indicating that GAD67-GFP-expressing neurons were GABAergic. We traced dendritic trees from confocal images of the same GAD67-GFP-expressing neurons before and after a 5 d growth period, and quantified the change in total dendritic length (TDL) and total dendritic branch points (TDBPs) for each neuron. GAD67-GFP-expressing neurons growing in control medium exhibited a 20% increase in TDL, but in 200 ng/ml BDNF or 10 mm KCl, this increase nearly doubled and was accompanied by a significant increase in TDBPs. Blocking action potentials with TTX did not prevent the BDNF-induced growth, but antibodies against BDNF blocked the growth-promoting effect of KCl. We conclude that BDNF, released by neocortical pyramidal neurons in response to depolarization, enhances dendritic growth and branching in nearby inhibitory interneurons.

  12. Activity blockade and GABAA receptor blockade produce synaptic scaling through chloride accumulation in embryonic spinal motoneurons and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Lindsly, Casie; Gonzalez-Islas, Carlos; Wenner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic scaling represents a process whereby the distribution of a cell's synaptic strengths are altered by a multiplicative scaling factor. Scaling is thought to be a compensatory response that homeostatically controls spiking activity levels in the cell or network. Previously, we observed GABAergic synaptic scaling in embryonic spinal motoneurons following in vivo blockade of either spiking activity or GABAA receptors (GABAARs). We had determined that activity blockade triggered upward GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, thus increasing the driving force for these currents. To determine whether chloride accumulation also underlies GABAergic scaling following GABAAR blockade we have developed a new technique. We expressed a genetically encoded chloride-indicator, Clomeleon, in the embryonic chick spinal cord, which provides a non-invasive fast measure of intracellular chloride. Using this technique we now show that chloride accumulation underlies GABAergic scaling following blockade of either spiking activity or the GABAAR. The finding that GABAAR blockade and activity blockade trigger scaling via a common mechanism supports our hypothesis that activity blockade reduces GABAAR activation, which triggers synaptic scaling. In addition, Clomeleon imaging demonstrated the time course and widespread nature of GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, as it was also observed in spinal interneurons. This suggests that homeostatic scaling via chloride accumulation is a common feature in many neuronal classes within the embryonic spinal cord and opens the possibility that this process may occur throughout the nervous system at early stages of development.

  13. Postnatal development of intrinsic GABAergic rhythms in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wong, T; Zhang, X L; Asl, M Nassiri; Wu, C P; Carlen, P L; Zhang, L

    2005-01-01

    recurrent circuitry and associated GABAergic inhibitory interneurons.

  14. Reduced densities of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons in experimental cortical dysplasia and heterotopia in early postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Akakin, Dilek; Martinez-Diaz, Hildabelis; Chen, Huan-Xin; Roper, Steven N

    2013-05-01

    Cortical dysplasia (CD) is strongly associated with intractable epilepsy, probably due to hyperexcitability of neuronal networks. However, the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. GABAergic interneurons provide major inhibitory function in the CNS and have different subtypes, but it is not clear how each subtype is affected in CD during early post-natal development. We have examined the developmental alterations of the densities of two major subtypes of interneurons, parvalbumin (PV)- and somatostatin (SS)-expressing interneurons in an animal model of CD, in utero irradiation, using immunocytochemistry. We found that the density of PV- and SS-positive interneurons increases significantly in CD and controls during the first three weeks of postnatal life. However, compared to controls, the densities of both subtypes are significantly decreased in CD and heterotopia at all age groups although the time of onset for both PV and SS expression remained unchanged. Our results indicate that the densities of both PV- and SS-positive interneurons are significantly decreased in CD and heterotopia, which may be one important mechanism leading to hyperexcitability of CD.

  15. Distinct Physiological Effects of Dopamine D4 Receptors on Prefrontal Cortical Pyramidal Neurons and Fast-Spiking Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ping; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine D4 receptor (D4R), which is strongly linked to neuropsychiatric disorders, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia, is highly expressed in pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons in prefrontal cortex (PFC). In this study, we examined the impact of D4R on the excitability of these 2 neuronal populations. We found that D4R activation decreased the frequency of spontaneous action potentials (sAPs) in PFC pyramidal neurons, whereas it induced a transient increase followed by a decrease of sAP frequency in PFC parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons. D4R activation also induced distinct effects in both types of PFC neurons on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents, which drive the generation of sAP. Moreover, dopamine substantially decreased sAP frequency in PFC pyramidal neurons, but markedly increased sAP frequency in PV+ interneurons, and both effects were partially mediated by D4R activation. In the phencyclidine model of schizophrenia, the decreasing effect of D4R on sAP frequency in both types of PFC neurons was attenuated, whereas the increasing effect of D4R on sAP in PV+ interneurons was intact. These results suggest that D4R activation elicits distinct effects on synaptically driven excitability in PFC projection neurons versus fast-spiking interneurons, which are differentially altered in neuropsychiatric disorder-related conditions.

  16. Prenatal protein malnutrition results in increased frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in rat CA3 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ming; Galler, Janina R; Luebke, Jennifer I

    2003-08-01

    Electrophysiological studies have revealed an increase in the level of tonic inhibition in the hippocampus following prenatal protein malnutrition in rats. In the present study, whole cell patch clamp recordings of bipolar interneurons in the stratum radiatum of the CA3 subfield were used to determine whether this increase in inhibition can be accounted for by a change in the electrophysiological properties of GABAergic interneurons. Hippocampal slices were prepared from juvenile rats whose dams were fed either a normal (25% casein) or low (6% casein) protein diet throughout pregnancy. Intrinsic membrane and action potential properties were unaltered by the prenatal nutritional insult. In most respects the characteristics of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and the modulation of such currents by the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem were also similar in cells from the two nutritional groups. While the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory currents was unaltered, miniature (Tetrodotoxin resistant) inhibitory currents occurred at a significantly increased frequency in interneurons from prenatally protein malnourished rats. Thus, while the basic membrane properties of interneurons are preserved, there is a significant increase in the probability of GABA release from interneurons following prenatal protein malnutrition.

  17. Loss of Either Rac1 or Rac3 GTPase Differentially Affects the Behavior of Mutant Mice and the Development of Functional GABAergic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pennucci, Roberta; Talpo, Francesca; Astro, Veronica; Montinaro, Valentina; Morè, Lorenzo; Cursi, Marco; Castoldi, Valerio; Chiaretti, Sara; Bianchi, Veronica; Marenna, Silvia; Cambiaghi, Marco; Tonoli, Diletta; Leocani, Letizia; Biella, Gerardo; D'Adamo, Patrizia; de Curtis, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Rac GTPases regulate the development of cortical/hippocampal GABAergic interneurons by affecting the early development and migration of GABAergic precursors. We have addressed the function of Rac1 and Rac3 proteins during the late maturation of hippocampal interneurons. We observed specific phenotypic differences between conditional Rac1 and full Rac3 knockout mice. Rac1 deletion caused greater generalized hyperactivity and cognitive impairment compared with Rac3 deletion. This phenotype matched with a more evident functional impairment of the inhibitory circuits in Rac1 mutants, showing higher excitability and reduced spontaneous inhibitory currents in the CA hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Morphological analysis confirmed a differential modification of the inhibitory circuits: deletion of either Rac caused a similar reduction of parvalbumin-positive inhibitory terminals in the pyramidal layer. Intriguingly, cannabinoid receptor-1-positive terminals were strongly increased only in the CA1 of Rac1-depleted mice. This increase may underlie the stronger electrophysiological defects in this mutant. Accordingly, incubation with an antagonist for cannabinoid receptors partially rescued the reduction of spontaneous inhibitory currents in the pyramidal cells of Rac1 mutants. Our results show that Rac1 and Rac3 have independent roles in the formation of GABAergic circuits, as highlighted by the differential effects of their deletion on the late maturation of specific populations of interneurons. PMID:26582364

  18. GABAergic hyperinnervation of dentate granule cells in the Ts65Dn mouse model of down syndrome: Exploring the role of App.

    PubMed

    Mojabi, Fatemeh S; Fahimi, Atoossa; Moghadam, Shahrzad; Moghadam, Sarah; Windy McNerneny, M; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Kleschevnikov, Alexander; Mobley, William C; Salehi, Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    It has been suggested that increased GABAergic innervation in the hippocampus plays a significant role in cognitive dysfunction in Down syndrome (DS). Bolstering this notion, are studies linking hyper-innervation of the dentate gyrus (DG) by GABAergic terminals to failure in LTP induction in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Here, we used extensive morphometrical methods to assess the status of GABAergic interneurons in the DG of young and old Ts65Dn mice and their 2N controls. We detected an age-dependent increase in GABAergic innervation of dentate granule cells (DGCs) in Ts65Dn mice. The primary source of GABAergic terminals to DGCs somata is basket cells (BCs). For this reason, we assessed the status of these cells and found a significant increase in the number of BCs in Ts65Dn mice compared with controls. Then we aimed to identify the gene/s whose overexpression could be linked to increased number of BCs in Ts65Dn and found that deleting the third copy of App gene in Ts65Dn mice led to normalization of the number of BCs in these mice. Our data suggest that App overexpression plays a major role in the pathophysiology of GABAergic hyperinnervation of the DG in Ts65Dn mice. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Dizocilpine (MK-801) induces distinct changes of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunits in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in young adult rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Xi, Dong; Zhang, Wentong; Wang, Huai-Xing; Stradtman, George G; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2009-11-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction has long been implicated in schizophrenia and NMDARs on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons are proposed to play an essential role in the pathogenesis. However, controversial results have been reported regarding the regulation of NMDAR expression, and direct evidence of how NMDAR antagonists act on specific subpopulations of prefrontal interneurons is missing. We investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) on the expression of NMDAR subtypes in the identified interneurons in young adult rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) by using laser microdissection and real-time polymerase chain reaction, combined with Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. We found that MK-801 induced distinct changes of NMDAR subunits in the parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-ir) interneurons vs. pyramidal neurons in the PFC circuitry. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all NMDAR subtypes, including NR1 and NR2A to 2D, exhibited inverted-U dose-dependent changes in response to MK-801 treatment in the PFC. In contrast, subunit mRNAs of NMDARs in PV-ir interneurons were significantly down-regulated at low doses, unaltered at medium doses, and significantly decreased again at high doses, suggesting a biphasic dose response to MK-801. The differential effects of MK-801 in mRNA expression of NMDAR subunits were consistent with the protein expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits revealed with Western blotting and double immunofluorescent staining. These results suggest that PV-containing interneurons in the PFC exhibit a distinct responsiveness to NMDAR antagonism and that NMDA antagonist can differentially and dose-dependently regulate the functions of pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons in the prefrontal cortical circuitry.

  20. Functional Synaptic Integration of Forebrain GABAergic Precursors into the Adult Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Etlin, Alex; Bráz, Joao M.; Kuhn, Julia A.; Wang, Xidao; Hamel, Katherine A.; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord transplants of embryonic cortical GABAergic progenitor cells derived from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) can reverse mechanical hypersensitivity in the mouse models of peripheral nerve injury- and paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. Here, we used electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy to examine the extent to which MGE cells integrate into host circuitry and recapitulate endogenous inhibitory circuits. Whether the transplants were performed before or after nerve injury, the MGE cells developed into mature neurons and exhibited firing patterns characteristic of subpopulations of cortical and spinal cord inhibitory interneurons. Conversely, the transplanted cells preserved cortical morphological and neurochemical properties. We also observed a robust anatomical and functional synaptic integration of the transplanted cells into host circuitry in both injured and uninjured animals. The MGE cells were activated by primary afferents, including TRPV1-expressing nociceptors, and formed GABAergic, bicuculline-sensitive, synapses onto host neurons. Unexpectedly, MGE cells transplanted before injury prevented the development of mechanical hypersensitivity. Together, our findings provide direct confirmation of an extensive, functional synaptic integration of MGE cells into host spinal cord circuits. This integration underlies normalization of the dorsal horn inhibitory tone after injury and may be responsible for the prophylactic effect of preinjury transplants. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spinal cord transplants of embryonic cortical GABAergic interneuron progenitors from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), can overcome the mechanical hypersensitivity produced in different neuropathic pain models in adult mice. Here, we examined the properties of transplanted MGE cells and the extent to which they integrate into spinal cord circuitry. Using electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that MGE cells

  1. Synaptic Organization of Perisomatic GABAergic Inputs onto the Principal Cells of the Mouse Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Vereczki, Viktória K.; Veres, Judit M.; Müller, Kinga; Nagy, Gergö A.; Rácz, Bence; Barsy, Boglárka; Hájos, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Spike generation is most effectively controlled by inhibitory inputs that target the perisomatic region of neurons. Despite the critical importance of this functional domain, very little is known about the organization of the GABAergic inputs contacting the perisomatic region of principal cells (PCs) in the basolateral amygdala. Using immunocytochemistry combined with in vitro single-cell labeling we determined the number and sources of GABAergic inputs of PCs at light and electron microscopic levels in mice. We found that the soma and proximal dendrites of PCs were innervated primarily by two neurochemically distinct basket cell types expressing parvalbumin (PVBC) or cholecystokinin and CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CCK/CB1BC). The innervation of the initial segment of PC axons was found to be parceled out by PVBCs and axo-axonic cells (AAC), as the majority of GABAergic inputs onto the region nearest to the soma (between 0 and 10 μm) originated from PVBCs, while the largest portion of the axon initial segment was innervated by AACs. Detailed morphological investigations revealed that the three perisomatic region-targeting interneuron types significantly differed in dendritic and axonal arborization properties. We found that, although individual PVBCs targeted PCs via more terminals than CCK/CB1BCs, similar numbers (15–17) of the two BC types converge onto single PCs, whereas fewer (6–7) AACs innervate the axon initial segment of single PCs. Furthermore, we estimated that a PVBC and a CCK/CB1BC may target 800–900 and 700–800 PCs, respectively, while an AAC can innervate 600–650 PCs. Thus, BCs and AACs innervate ~10 and 20% of PC population, respectively, within their axonal cloud. Our results collectively suggest, that these interneuron types may be differently affiliated within the local amygdalar microcircuits in order to fulfill specific functions in network operation during various brain states. PMID:27013983

  2. KChIP1: a potential modulator to GABAergic system.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui; Xia, Kun; Li, Benshang; Zhao, Guoping; Zhang, Zhuohua

    2009-04-01

    Compelling evidences from transgenic mice, immunoprecipitation data, gene expression analysis, and functional heterologous expression studies supported the role of Kv channel interacting proteins (KChIPs) as modulators of Kv4 (Shal) channels underlying the cardiac transient outward current and neuronal A-type current. Till now, there are four members (KChIP1-4) identified in this family. KChIP1 is expressed predominantly in brain, with relative abundance in Purkinje cells of cerebellum, the reticular thalamic nuclei, the medial habenular nuclei, the hippocampus, and striatum. Our results from in situ hybridization and immunostaining assay revealed that KChIP1 was expressed in a subpopulation of parvalbumin-positive neurons suggesting its functional relationship with the GABAergic inhibitory neurons. Moreover, results obtained from KChIP1-deficient mice showed that KChIP1 mutation did not impair survival or alter the overall brain architecture, arguing against its essential function in brain development. However, the mice bearing KChIP1 deletion showed increased susceptibility to anti-GABAergic convulsive drug pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure, indicating that KChIP1 might play pivotal roles in the GABAergic inhibitory system.

  3. GABAergic effect on resting-state functional connectivity: Dynamics under pharmacological antagonism.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Singh, Kavita Kaur D/O Ranjit; Yeow, Ling Yun; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2017-01-21

    Resting state functional connectivity MRI measures synchronous activity among brain regions although the mechanisms governing the temporally coherent BOLD signals remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) levels are correlated with functional connectivity. To understand whether changes in GABA transmission alter functional connectivity, we modulated the GABAergic activity by a GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Resting and evoked electrophysiology and BOLD signals were measured in isoflurane-anesthetized rats under infusion of low-dose bicuculline or vehicle individually. Both somatosensory BOLD activations and evoked potentials induced by forepaw stimulation were increased significantly under bicuculline compared to vehicle, indicating increased excitability. Gradually elevated resting BOLD correlation within and between the somatosensory and visual cortices, as well as between somatosensory and caudate putamen but not within subcortical areas were found with the infusion of bicuculline. Increased cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the cortical and subcortical areas where the receptor density is high, but it didn't correlate with BOLD connectivity except in the primary somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, resting EEG coherence in the alpha and beta bands exhibited consistent change with the BOLD correlation. The increased cortico-cortical and cortico-striatal connectivity without dependence on the receptor distribution indicate that the functional connectivity may be mediated by long-range projection via the cortical and striatal GABAergic inter-neurons. Our results indicate an important role of the GABAergic system on neural and hemodynamic oscillations, which further supports the neuronal basis of functional connectivity MRI and its correlation with neurotransmission.

  4. General anesthesia as a possible GABAergic modulator affects visual processing in children

    PubMed Central

    Van den Boomen, C.; de Graaff, J. C.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.; Kalkman, C. J.; Kemner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) inhibitory interneurons play an important role in visual processing, as is revealed by studies administering drugs in human and monkey adults. Investigating this process in children requires different methodologies, due to ethical considerations. The current study aimed to investigate whether a new method, being general anesthesia using Sevoflurane, can be used to trace the effects of GABAergic modulation on visual brain functioning in children. To this aim, visual processing was investigated in children aged 4–12 years who were scheduled for minor urologic procedures under general anesthesia in day-care treatment. In a visual segmentation task, the difference in Event-Related Potential (ERP) response to homogeneous and textured stimuli was investigated. In addition, psychophysical performance on visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were measured. Results were compared between before and shortly after anesthesia. In two additional studies, effects at 1 day after anesthesia and possible effects of task-repetition were investigated. ERP results showed longer latency and lower amplitude of the Texture Negativity (TN) component shortly after compared to before anesthesia. No effects of anesthesia on psychophysical measurements were found. No effects at 1 day after anesthesia or of repetition were revealed either. These results show that GABAergic modulation through general anesthesia affects ERP reflections of visual segmentation in a similar way in children as benzodiazepine does in adults, but that effects are not permanent. This demonstrates that ERP measurement after anesthesia is a successful method to study effects of GABAergic modulation in children. PMID:23630461

  5. TrkB receptor signaling is required for establishment of GABAergic synapses in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Rico, Beatriz; Xu, Baoji; Reichardt, Louis F

    2002-03-01

    Neurotrophins are essential to the normal development and maintenance of the nervous system. Neurotrophin signaling is mediated by Trk family tyrosine kinases such as TrkA, TrkB and TrkC, as well as by the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR. Here we have deleted the trkB gene in cerebellar precursors by Wnt1-driven Cre--mediated recombination to study the function of the TrkB in the cerebellum. Despite the absence of TrkB, the mature cerebellum of mutant mice appears similar to that of wild type, with all types of cell present in normal numbers and positions. Granule and Purkinje cell dendrites appear normal and the former have typical numbers of excitatory synapses. By contrast, inhibitory interneurons are strongly affected: although present in normal numbers, they express reduced amounts of GABAergic markers and develop reduced numbers of GABAergic boutons and synaptic specializations. Thus, TrkB is essential to the development of GABAergic neurons and regulates synapse formation in addition to its role in the development of axon terminals.

  6. TrkB receptor signaling is required for establishment of GABAergic synapses in the cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Beatriz; Xu, Baoji; Reichardt, Louis F.

    2009-01-01

    Neurotrophins are essential to the normal development and maintenance of the nervous system. Neurotrophin signaling is mediated by Trk family tyrosine kinases such as TrkA, TrkB and TrkC, as well as by the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR. Here we have deleted the trkB gene in cerebellar precursors by Wnt1-driven Cre–mediated recombination to study the function of the TrkB in the cerebellum. Despite the absence of TrkB, the mature cerebellum of mutant mice appears similar to that of wild type, with all types of cell present in normal numbers and positions. Granule and Purkinje cell dendrites appear normal and the former have typical numbers of excitatory synapses. By contrast, inhibitory interneurons are strongly affected: although present in normal numbers, they express reduced amounts of GABAergic markers and develop reduced numbers of GABAergic boutons and synaptic specializations. Thus, TrkB is essential to the development of GABAergic neurons and regulates synapse formation in addition to its role in the development of axon terminals. PMID:11836532

  7. Neurogliaform and Ivy Cells: A Major Family of nNOS Expressing GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Caren; Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Soltesz, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Neurogliaform and Ivy cells are members of an abundant family of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expressing GABAergic interneurons found in diverse brain regions. These cells have a defining dense local axonal plexus, and display unique synaptic properties including a biphasic postsynaptic response with both a slow GABAA component and a GABAB component following even a single action potential. The type of transmission displayed by these cells has been termed “volume transmission,” distinct from both tonic and classical synaptic transmission. Electrical connections are also notable in that, unlike other GABAergic cell types, neurogliaform family cells will form gap junctions not only with other neurogliaform cells, but also with non-neurogliaform family GABAergic cells. In this review, we focus on neurogliaform and Ivy cells throughout the hippocampal formation, where recent studies highlight their role in feedforward inhibition, uncover their ability to display a phenomenon called persistent firing, and reveal their modulation by opioids. The unique properties of this family of cells, their abundance, rich connectivity, and modulation by clinically relevant drugs make them an attractive target for future studies in vivo during different behavioral and pharmacological conditions. PMID:22623913

  8. Direct Induction and Functional Maturation of Forebrain GABAergic Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Alfred Xuyang; Yuan, Qiang; Tan, Shawn; Xiao, Yixin; Wang, Danlei; Khoo, Audrey Tze Ting; Sani, Levena; Tran, Hoang-Dai; Kim, Paul; Chiew, Yong Seng; Lee, Kea Joo; Yen, Yi-Chun; Ng, Huck Hui; Lim, Bing; Je, Hyunsoo Shawn

    2016-08-16

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-releasing interneurons play an important modulatory role in the cortex and have been implicated in multiple neurological disorders. Patient-derived interneurons could provide a foundation for studying the pathogenesis of these diseases as well as for identifying potential therapeutic targets. Here, we identified a set of genetic factors that could robustly induce human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into GABAergic neurons (iGNs) with high efficiency. We demonstrated that the human iGNs express neurochemical markers and exhibit mature electrophysiological properties within 6-8 weeks. Furthermore, in vitro, iGNs could form functional synapses with other iGNs or with human-induced glutamatergic neurons (iENs). Upon transplantation into immunodeficient mice, human iGNs underwent synaptic maturation and integration into host neural circuits. Taken together, our rapid and highly efficient single-step protocol to generate iGNs may be useful to both mechanistic and translational studies of human interneurons.

  9. GABA signaling promotes synapse elimination and axon pruning in developing cortical inhibitory interneurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyun; Fu, Yu; Knott, Graham; Lu, Jiangteng; Di Cristo, Graziella; Huang, Z Josh

    2012-01-04

    Accumulating evidence indicates that GABA acts beyond inhibitory synaptic transmission and regulates the development of inhibitory synapses in the vertebrate brain, but the underlying cellular mechanism is not well understood. We have combined live imaging of cortical GABAergic axons across time scales from minutes to days with single-cell genetic manipulation of GABA release to examine its role in distinct steps of inhibitory synapse formation in the mouse neocortex. We have shown previously, by genetic knockdown of GABA synthesis in developing interneurons, that GABA signaling promotes the maturation of inhibitory synapses and axons. Here we found that a complete blockade of GABA release in basket interneurons resulted in an opposite effect, a cell-autonomous increase in axon and bouton density with apparently normal synapse structures. These results not only demonstrate that GABA is unnecessary for synapse formation per se but also uncover a novel facet of GABA in regulating synapse elimination and axon pruning. Live imaging revealed that developing GABAergic axons form a large number of transient boutons, but only a subset was stabilized. Release blockade led to significantly increased bouton stability and filopodia density, increased axon branch extension, and decreased branch retraction. Our results suggest that a major component of GABA function in synapse development is transmission-mediated elimination of subsets of nascent contacts. Therefore, GABA may regulate activity-dependent inhibitory synapse formation by coordinately eliminating certain nascent contacts while promoting the maturation of other nascent synapses.

  10. The Promise of an Interneuron-based Cell Therapy for Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sebe, Joy Y.; Baraban, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Of the nearly 3 million Americans diagnosed with epilepsy, approximately 30% are unresponsive to current medications. Recent data has shown that early postnatal transplantation of interneuronal precursor cells increases GABAergic inhibition in the host brain and dramatically suppresses seizure activity in epileptic mice. In this review, we will highlight findings from seizure-prone mice and humans that demonstrate the link between dysfunctional GABAergic inhibition and hyperexcitability. In particular, we will focus on rodent models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common and difficult to treat form of the disease, and interneuronopathies, an emerging classification. A wealth of literature showing a causal link between reduced GABA-mediated inhibition and seizures has directed our efforts to recover the loss of inhibition via transplantation of interneuronal precursors. Numerous related studies have explored the anticonvulsant potential of cell grafts derived from a variety of brain regions, yet the mechanism underlying the effect of such heterogeneous cell transplants is unknown. In discussing our recent findings and placing them in context with what is known about epilepsy, and how related transplant approaches have progressed, we hope to initiate a frank discussion of the best path toward the translation of this approach to patients with intractable forms of epilepsy. PMID:21154914

  11. GABA Signaling Promotes Synapse Elimination and Axon Pruning in Developing Cortical Inhibitory Interneurons