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Sample records for gabaergic interneuron survival

  1. Development and specification of GABAergic cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons are inhibitory neurons of the nervous system that play a vital role in neural circuitry and activity. They are so named due to their release of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and occupy different areas of the brain. This review will focus primarily on GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex from a developmental standpoint. There is a diverse amount of cortical interneuronal subtypes that may be categorized by a number of characteristics; this review will classify them largely by the protein markers they express. The developmental origins of GABAergic interneurons will be discussed, as well as factors that influence the complex migration routes that these interneurons must take in order to ultimately localize in the cerebral cortex where they will integrate with the neural circuitry set in place. This review will also place an emphasis on the transcriptional network of genes that play a role in the specification and maintenance of GABAergic interneuron fate. Gaining an understanding of the different aspects of cortical interneuron development and specification, especially in humans, has many useful clinical applications that may serve to treat various neurological disorders linked to alterations in interneuron populations. PMID:23618463

  2. Presynaptic miniature GABAergic currents in developing interneurons.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Bouhours, Brice; Rostaing, Philippe; Papageorgiou, George; Corrie, John E T; Triller, Antoine; Ogden, David; Marty, Alain

    2010-04-29

    Miniature synaptic currents have long been known to represent random transmitter release under resting conditions, but much remains to be learned about their nature and function in central synapses. In this work, we describe a new class of miniature currents ("preminis") that arise by the autocrine activation of axonal receptors following random vesicular release. Preminis are prominent in gabaergic synapses made by cerebellar interneurons during the development of the molecular layer. Unlike ordinary miniature postsynaptic currents in the same cells, premini frequencies are strongly enhanced by subthreshold depolarization, suggesting that the membrane depolarization they produce belongs to a feedback loop regulating neurotransmitter release. Thus, preminis could guide the formation of the interneuron network by enhancing neurotransmitter release at recently formed synaptic contacts.

  3. GABAergic Interneurons in the Neocortex: From Cellular Properties to Circuits.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Robin; Lee, Soohyun; Rudy, Bernardo

    2016-07-20

    Cortical networks are composed of glutamatergic excitatory projection neurons and local GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that gate signal flow and sculpt network dynamics. Although they represent a minority of the total neocortical neuronal population, GABAergic interneurons are highly heterogeneous, forming functional classes based on their morphological, electrophysiological, and molecular features, as well as connectivity and in vivo patterns of activity. Here we review our current understanding of neocortical interneuron diversity and the properties that distinguish cell types. We then discuss how the involvement of multiple cell types, each with a specific set of cellular properties, plays a crucial role in diversifying and increasing the computational power of a relatively small number of simple circuit motifs forming cortical networks. We illustrate how recent advances in the field have shed light onto the mechanisms by which GABAergic inhibition contributes to network operations.

  4. Local Connections of Layer 5 GABAergic Interneurons to Corticospinal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yasuyo H.; Tanaka, Yasuhiro R.; Fujiyama, Fumino; Furuta, Takahiro; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    In the local circuit of the cerebral cortex, GABAergic inhibitory interneurons are considered to work in collaboration with excitatory neurons. Although many interneuron subgroups have been described in the cortex, local inhibitory connections of each interneuron subgroup are only partially understood with respect to the functional neuron groups that receive these inhibitory connections. In the present study, we morphologically examined local inhibitory inputs to corticospinal neurons (CSNs) in motor areas using transgenic rats in which GABAergic neurons expressed fluorescent protein Venus. By analysis of biocytin-filled axons obtained with whole-cell recording/staining in cortical slices, we classified fast-spiking (FS) neurons in layer (L) 5 into two types, FS1 and FS2, by their high and low densities of axonal arborization, respectively. We then investigated the connections of FS1, FS2, somatostatin (SOM)-immunopositive, and other (non-FS/non-SOM) interneurons to CSNs that were retrogradely labeled in motor areas. When close appositions between the axon boutons of the intracellularly labeled interneurons and the somata/dendrites of the retrogradely labeled CSNs were examined electron-microscopically, 74% of these appositions made symmetric synaptic contacts. The axon boutons of single FS1 neurons were two- to fourfold more frequent in appositions to the somata/dendrites of CSNs than those of FS2, SOM, and non-FS/non-SOM neurons. Axosomatic appositions were most frequently formed with axon boutons of FS1 and FS2 neurons (approximately 30%) and least frequently formed with those of SOM neurons (7%). In contrast, SOM neurons most extensively sent axon boutons to the apical dendrites of CSNs. These results might suggest that motor outputs are controlled differentially by the subgroups of L5 GABAergic interneurons in cortical motor areas. PMID:21994491

  5. Losing your inhibition: linking cortical GABAergic interneurons to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Inan, Melis; Petros, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex (cINs) play crucial roles in many aspects of cortical function. The diverse types of cINs are classified into subgroups according to their morphology, intrinsic physiology, neurochemical markers and synaptic targeting. Recent advances in mouse genetics, imaging and electrophysiology techniques have greatly advanced our efforts to understand the role of normal cIN function and its dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders. In schizophrenia (SCZ), a wealth of data suggests that cIN function is perturbed, and that interneuron dysfunction may underlie key symptoms of the disease. In this review, we discuss the link between cINs and SCZ, focusing on the evidence for GABAergic signaling deficits from both SCZ patients and mouse models. PMID:23201207

  6. Assortment of GABAergic plasticity in the cortical interneuron melting pot.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Pablo; Bacci, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Cortical structures of the adult mammalian brain are characterized by a spectacular diversity of inhibitory interneurons, which use GABA as neurotransmitter. GABAergic neurotransmission is fundamental for integrating and filtering incoming information and dictating postsynaptic neuronal spike timing, therefore providing a tight temporal code used by each neuron, or ensemble of neurons, to perform sophisticated computational operations. However, the heterogeneity of cortical GABAergic cells is associated to equally diverse properties governing intrinsic excitability as well as strength, dynamic range, spatial extent, anatomical localization, and molecular components of inhibitory synaptic connections that they form with pyramidal neurons. Recent studies showed that similarly to their excitatory (glutamatergic) counterparts, also inhibitory synapses can undergo activity-dependent changes in their strength. Here, some aspects related to plasticity and modulation of adult cortical and hippocampal GABAergic synaptic transmission will be reviewed, aiming at providing a fresh perspective towards the elucidation of the role played by specific cellular elements of cortical microcircuits during both physiological and pathological operations.

  7. Bayesian network classifiers for categorizing cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    An accepted classification of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex is a major goal in neuroscience. A recently proposed taxonomy based on patterns of axonal arborization promises to be a pragmatic method for achieving this goal. It involves characterizing interneurons according to five axonal arborization features, called F1-F5, and classifying them into a set of predefined types, most of which are established in the literature. Unfortunately, there is little consensus among expert neuroscientists regarding the morphological definitions of some of the proposed types. While supervised classifiers were able to categorize the interneurons in accordance with experts' assignments, their accuracy was limited because they were trained with disputed labels. Thus, here we automatically classify interneuron subsets with different label reliability thresholds (i.e., such that every cell's label is backed by at least a certain (threshold) number of experts). We quantify the cells with parameters of axonal and dendritic morphologies and, in order to predict the type, also with axonal features F1-F4 provided by the experts. Using Bayesian network classifiers, we accurately characterize and classify the interneurons and identify useful predictor variables. In particular, we discriminate among reliable examples of common basket, horse-tail, large basket, and Martinotti cells with up to 89.52% accuracy, and single out the number of branches at 180 μm from the soma, the convex hull 2D area, and the axonal features F1-F4 as especially useful predictors for distinguishing among these types. These results open up new possibilities for an objective and pragmatic classification of interneurons. PMID:25420745

  8. Bayesian network classifiers for categorizing cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    An accepted classification of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex is a major goal in neuroscience. A recently proposed taxonomy based on patterns of axonal arborization promises to be a pragmatic method for achieving this goal. It involves characterizing interneurons according to five axonal arborization features, called F1-F5, and classifying them into a set of predefined types, most of which are established in the literature. Unfortunately, there is little consensus among expert neuroscientists regarding the morphological definitions of some of the proposed types. While supervised classifiers were able to categorize the interneurons in accordance with experts' assignments, their accuracy was limited because they were trained with disputed labels. Thus, here we automatically classify interneuron subsets with different label reliability thresholds (i.e., such that every cell's label is backed by at least a certain (threshold) number of experts). We quantify the cells with parameters of axonal and dendritic morphologies and, in order to predict the type, also with axonal features F1-F4 provided by the experts. Using Bayesian network classifiers, we accurately characterize and classify the interneurons and identify useful predictor variables. In particular, we discriminate among reliable examples of common basket, horse-tail, large basket, and Martinotti cells with up to 89.52% accuracy, and single out the number of branches at 180 μm from the soma, the convex hull 2D area, and the axonal features F1-F4 as especially useful predictors for distinguishing among these types. These results open up new possibilities for an objective and pragmatic classification of interneurons.

  9. An interneuron progenitor maintains neurogenic potential in vivo and differentiates into GABAergic interneurons after transplantation in the postnatal rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Hong, Peiwei; Gao, Hui; Chen, Yuntian; Yang, Qi; Jiang, Mei; Li, Hedong

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of cortical GABAergic interneurons are involved in numerous neurological disorders including epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism; and replenishment of these cells by transplantation strategy has proven to be a feasible and effective method to help revert the symptoms in several animal models. To develop methodology of generating transplantable GABAergic interneurons for therapy, we previously reported the isolation of a v-myc-induced GABAergic interneuron progenitor clone GE6 from embryonic ganglionic eminence (GE). These cells can proliferate and form functional inhibitory synapses in culture. Here, we tested their differentiation behavior in vivo by transplanting them into the postnatal rat forebrain. We found that GE6 cells migrate extensively in the neonatal forebrain and differentiate into both neurons and glia, but preferentially into neurons when compared with a sister progenitor clone CTX8. The neurogenic potential of GE6 cells is also maintained after transplantation into a non-permissive environment such as adult cortex or when treated with inflammatory cytokine in culture. The GE6-derived neurons were able to mature in vivo as GABAergic interneurons expressing GABAergic, not glutamatergic, presynaptic puncta. Finally, we propose that v-myc-induced human interneuron progenitor clones could be an alternative cell source of transplantable GABAergic interneurons for treating related neurological diseases in future clinic. PMID:26750620

  10. Four GABAergic interneurons impose feeding restraint in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pool, Allan-Hermann; Kvello, Pal; Mann, Kevin; Cheung, Samantha K.; Gordon, Michael D.; Wang, Liming; Scott, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Feeding is dynamically regulated by the palatability of the food source and the physiological needs of the animal. How consumption is controlled by external sensory cues and internal metabolic state remains under intense investigation. Here, we identify four GABAergic interneurons in the Drosophila brain that establish a central feeding threshold which is required to inhibit consumption. Inactivation of these cells results in indiscriminate and excessive intake of all compounds, independent of taste quality or nutritional state. Conversely, acute activation of these neurons suppresses consumption of water and nutrients. The output from these neurons is required to gate activity in motor neurons that control meal initiation and consumption. Thus, our study reveals a new layer of inhibitory control in feeding circuits that is required to suppress a latent state of unrestricted and non-selective consumption. PMID:24991960

  11. Dendritic and Axonal Wiring Optimization of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    The way in which a neuronal tree expands plays an important role in its functional and computational characteristics. We aimed to study the existence of an optimal neuronal design for different types of cortical GABAergic neurons. To do this, we hypothesized that both the axonal and dendritic trees of individual neurons optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. We took the branching points of real three-dimensional neuronal reconstructions of the axonal and dendritic trees of different types of cortical interneurons and searched for the minimal wiring arborization structure that respects the branching points. We compared the minimal wiring arborization with real axonal and dendritic trees. We tested this optimization problem using a new approach based on graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques. We concluded that neuronal wiring is near-optimal in most of the tested neurons, although the wiring length of dendritic trees is generally nearer to the optimum. Therefore, wiring economy is related to the way in which neuronal arborizations grow irrespective of the marked differences in the morphology of the examined interneurons.

  12. Dendritic and Axonal Wiring Optimization of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    The way in which a neuronal tree expands plays an important role in its functional and computational characteristics. We aimed to study the existence of an optimal neuronal design for different types of cortical GABAergic neurons. To do this, we hypothesized that both the axonal and dendritic trees of individual neurons optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. We took the branching points of real three-dimensional neuronal reconstructions of the axonal and dendritic trees of different types of cortical interneurons and searched for the minimal wiring arborization structure that respects the branching points. We compared the minimal wiring arborization with real axonal and dendritic trees. We tested this optimization problem using a new approach based on graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques. We concluded that neuronal wiring is near-optimal in most of the tested neurons, although the wiring length of dendritic trees is generally nearer to the optimum. Therefore, wiring economy is related to the way in which neuronal arborizations grow irrespective of the marked differences in the morphology of the examined interneurons. PMID:27345531

  13. Pathological alterations in GABAergic interneurons and reduced tonic inhibition in the basolateral amygdala during epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Brita; Qashu, Felicia; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Rogawski, Michael A.; Braga, Maria F.M.

    2009-01-01

    An acute brain insult such as traumatic head/brain injury, stroke, or an episode of status epilepticus can trigger epileptogenesis, which, after a latent, seizure-free period, leads to epilepsy. The discovery of effective pharmacological interventions that can prevent the development of epilepsy requires knowledge of the alterations that occur during epileptogenesis in brain regions that play a central role in the induction and expression of epilepsy. In the present study, we investigated pathological alterations in GABAergic interneurons in the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA), and the functional impact of these alterations on inhibitory synaptic transmission, on days 7 to 10 after SE induced by kainic acid. Using design-based stereology combined with GAD67 immunohistochemistry, we found a more extensive loss of GABAergic interneurons compared to the loss of principal cells. Fluoro-Jade C staining showed that neuronal degeneration was still ongoing. These alterations were accompanied by an increase in the levels of glutamate decarboxylase and the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor, and a reduction in the GluK1 (previously known as GluR5) subunit, as determined by Western blots. Whole-cell recordings from BLA pyramidal neurons showed a significant reduction in the frequency and amplitude of action potential-dependent spontaneous IPSCs, a reduced frequency but not amplitude of miniature IPSCs, and impairment in the modulation of IPSCs via GluK1-containing kainate receptors (GluK1Rs). Thus, in the BLA, GABAergic interneurons are more vulnerable to seizure-induced damage than principal cells. Surviving interneurons increase their expression of glutamate decarboxylase and the α1 GABAA receptor subunit, but this does not compensate for the interneuronal loss; the result is a dramatic reduction of tonic inhibition in the BLA circuitry. As activation of GluK1Rs by ambient levels of glutamate facilitates GABA release, the reduced level and function of these receptors may

  14. A Transient Translaminar GABAergic Interneuron Circuit Connects Thalamocortical Recipient Layers in Neonatal Somatosensory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Marques-Smith, Andre; Lyngholm, Daniel; Kaufmann, Anna-Kristin; Stacey, Jacqueline A; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Becker, Esther B E; Wilson, Michael C; Molnár, Zoltán; Butt, Simon J B

    2016-02-01

    GABAergic activity is thought to influence developing neocortical sensory circuits. Yet the late postnatal maturation of local layer (L)4 circuits suggests alternate sources of GABAergic control in nascent thalamocortical networks. We show that a population of L5b, somatostatin (SST)-positive interneuron receives early thalamic synaptic input and, using laser-scanning photostimulation, identify an early transient circuit between these cells and L4 spiny stellates (SSNs) that disappears by the end of the L4 critical period. Sensory perturbation disrupts the transition to a local GABAergic circuit, suggesting a link between translaminar and local control of SSNs. Conditional silencing of SST+ interneurons or conversely biasing the circuit toward local inhibition by overexpression of neuregulin-1 type 1 results in an absence of early L5b GABAergic input in mutants and delayed thalamic innervation of SSNs. These data identify a role for L5b SST+ interneurons in the control of SSNs in the early postnatal neocortex. PMID:26844833

  15. GABA Regulates the Multidirectional Tangential Migration of GABAergic Interneurons in Living Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Miho; Uchida, Taku; Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Wake, Hiroaki; Nemoto, Tomomi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Fukuda, Atsuo; Nabekura, Junichi

    2011-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic interneurons originate from ganglionic eminences and tangentially migrate into the cortical plate at early developmental stages. To elucidate the characteristics of this migration of GABAergic interneurons in living animals, we established an experimental design specialized for in vivo time-lapse imaging of the neocortex of neonate mice with two-photon laser-scanning microscopy. In vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mice from birth (P0) through P3, we observed multidirectional tangential migration of genetically-defined GABAergic interneurons in the neocortical marginal zone. The properties of this migration, such as the motility rate (distance/hr), the direction moved, and the proportion of migrating neurons to stationary neurons, did not change through P0 to P3, although the density of GABAergic neurons at the marginal zone decreased with age. Thus, the characteristics of the tangential motility of individual GABAergic neurons remained constant in development. Pharmacological block of GABAA receptors and of the Na+-K+-Cl− cotransporters, and chelating intracellular Ca2+, all significantly reduced the motility rate in vivo. The motility rate and GABA content within the cortex of neonatal VGAT-Venus transgenic mice were significantly greater than those of GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, suggesting that extracellular GABA concentration could facilitate the multidirectional tangential migration. Indeed, diazepam applied to GAD67-GFP mice increased the motility rate substantially. In an in vitro neocortical slice preparation, we confirmed that GABA induced a NKCC sensitive depolarization of GABAergic interneurons in VGAT-Venus mice at P0-P3. Thus, activation of GABAAR by ambient GABA depolarizes GABAergic interneurons, leading to an acceleration of their multidirectional motility in vivo. PMID:22180776

  16. Lineage-specific laminar organization of cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Gabriele; Dehorter, Nathalie; Sols, Ignasi; Huang, Z Josh; Maravall, Miguel; Marín, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    In the cerebral cortex, pyramidal cells and interneurons are generated in distant germinal zones, and so the mechanisms that control their precise assembly into specific microcircuits remain an enigma. Here we report that cortical interneurons labeled at the clonal level do not distribute randomly but rather have a strong tendency to cluster in the mouse neocortex. This behavior is common to different classes of interneurons, independently of their origin. Interneuron clusters are typically contained within one or two adjacent cortical layers, are largely formed by isochronically generated neurons and populate specific layers, as revealed by unbiased hierarchical clustering methods. Our results suggest that different progenitor cells give rise to interneurons populating infra- and supragranular cortical layers, which challenges current views of cortical neurogenesis. Thus, specific lineages of cortical interneurons seem to be produced to primarily mirror the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex, rather than its columnar organization.

  17. Neuregulin 1 promotes excitatory synapse development and function in GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ting, Annie K; Chen, Yongjun; Wen, Lei; Yin, Dong-Min; Shen, Chengyong; Tao, Yanmei; Liu, Xihui; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2011-01-01

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and its receptor ErbB4 are both susceptibility genes of schizophrenia. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of their malfunction. Although ErbB4 is enriched in GABAergic interneurons, the role of NRG1 in excitatory synapse formation in these neurons remains poorly understood. We showed that NRG1 increased both the number and size of PSD-95 puncta and the frequency and amplitude of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) in GABAergic interneurons, indicating that NRG1 stimulates the formation of new synapses and strengthens existing synapses. In contrast, NRG1 treatment had no effect on either the number or size of excitatory synapses in glutamatergic neurons, suggesting its synaptogenic effect is specific to GABAergic interneurons. Ecto-ErbB4 treatment diminished both the number and size of excitatory synapses, suggesting that endogenous NRG1 may be critical for basal synapse formation. NRG1 could stimulate the stability of PSD-95 in the manner that requires tyrosine kinase activity of ErbB4. Finally, deletion of ErbB4 in parvalbumin-positive interneurons led to reduced frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs, providing in vivo evidence that ErbB4 is important in excitatory synaptogenesis in interneurons. Together, our findings suggested a novel synaptogenic role of NRG1 in excitatory synapse development, possibly via stabilizing PSD-95, and this effect is specific to GABAergic interneurons. In light of the association of the genes of both NRG1 and ErbB4 with schizophrenia and dysfunction of GABAergic system in this disorder, these results provide insight into its potential pathological mechanism.

  18. Novel GABAergic circuits mediate the reinforcement-related signals of striatal cholinergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    English, Daniel F.; Ibanez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Stark, Eran; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Buzsaki, Gyorgy; Deisseroth, Karl; Tepper, James M.; Koos, Tibor

    2011-01-01

    Neostriatal cholinergic interneurons are believed to play an important role in reinforcement mediated learning and response selection by signaling the occurrence and motivational value of behaviorally relevant stimuli through precisely timed multiphasic population responses. An important problem is to understand how these signals regulate the functioning of the neostriatum. Here we describe the synaptic organization of a novel circuit that involves direct nicotinic excitation of GABAergic interneurons and enables cholinergic interneurons to exert rapid inhibitory control of the activity of projection neurons. We also demonstrate that the dominant effect of an optogenetically reproduced pause-excitation population response of cholinergic interneurons is powerful and rapid inhibition of the firing of projection neurons that is coincident with synchronous cholinergic activation. These results reveal a previously unknown circuit mechanism that transmits reinforcement-related information of ChAT interneurons in the mouse neostriatal network. PMID:22158514

  19. Apolipoprotein E4 produced in GABAergic interneurons causes learning and memory deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Knoferle, Johanna; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Walker, David; Leung, Laura; Gillespie, Anna K; Tong, Leslie M; Bien-Ly, Nga; Huang, Yadong

    2014-10-15

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is expressed in many types of brain cells, is associated with age-dependent decline of learning and memory in humans, and is the major genetic risk factor for AD. To determine whether the detrimental effects of apoE4 depend on its cellular sources, we generated human apoE knock-in mouse models in which the human APOE gene is conditionally deleted in astrocytes, neurons, or GABAergic interneurons. Here we report that deletion of apoE4 in astrocytes does not protect aged mice from apoE4-induced GABAergic interneuron loss and learning and memory deficits. In contrast, deletion of apoE4 in neurons does protect aged mice from both deficits. Furthermore, deletion of apoE4 in GABAergic interneurons is sufficient to gain similar protection. This study demonstrates a detrimental effect of endogenously produced apoE4 on GABAergic interneurons that leads to learning and memory deficits in mice and provides a novel target for drug development for AD related to apoE4.

  20. VTA glutamatergic inputs to nucleus accumbens drive aversion by acting on GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jia; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Hui-Ling; Barker, David J.; Miranda-Barrientos, Jorge; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is best known for its dopamine neurons, some of which project to nucleus accumbens (nAcc). However, the VTA also has glutamatergic neurons that project to nAcc. The function of the mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic pathway remains unknown. Here, we report that nAcc photoactivation of mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic fibers promotes aversion. Although we found that these mesoaccumbens-glutamate-fibers lack GABA, the aversion evoked by their photoactivation depends on glutamate and GABA receptor signaling, and not on dopamine receptor signaling. We found that mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic-fibers establish multiple asymmetric synapses on single parvalbumin-GABAergic interneurons, and that nAcc photoactivation of these fibers drives AMPA-mediated cellular firing of parvalbumin-GABAergic interneurons. These parvalbumin-GABAergic-interneurons, in turn, inhibit nAcc medium spiny output neurons, as such, controlling inhibitory neurotransmission within nAcc. The mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic pathway is the first glutamatergic input to nAcc shown to mediate aversion, instead of reward, and the first pathway shown to establish excitatory synapses on nAcc parvalbumin-GABAergic interneurons. PMID:27019014

  1. Prefrontal cognitive deficits in mice with altered cerebral cortical GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Bissonette, Gregory B.; Bae, Mihyun H.; Suresh, Tejas; Jaffe, David E.; Powell, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations of inhibitory GABAergic neurons are implicated in multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. In particular, interneuron deficits in prefrontal areas, along with presumed decreased inhibition, have been reported in several human patients. The majority of forebrain GABAergic interneurons arise from a single subcortical source before migrating to their final regional destination. Factors that govern the interneuron populations have been identified, demonstrating that a single gene mutation may globally affect forebrain structures or a single area. In particular, mice lacking the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (Plaur) gene have decreased GABAergic interneurons in frontal and parietal, but not caudal, cortical regions. Plaur assists in the activation of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), and several of the interneuron deficits are correlated with decreased levels of HGF/SF. In some cortical regions, the interneuron deficit can be remediated by endogenous overexpression of HGF/SF. In this study, we demonstrate decreased parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the medial frontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus or basal lateral amygdala in the Plaur null mouse. The Plaur null mouse demonstrates impaired medial frontal cortical function in extinction of cued fear conditioning and the inability to form attentional sets. Endogenous HGF/SF overexpression increased the number of PV-expressing cells in medial frontal cortical areas to levels greater than found in wildtype mice, but did not remediate the behavioral deficits. These data suggest that proper medial frontal cortical function is dependent upon optimum levels of inhibition and that a deficit or excess of interneuron numbers impairs normal cognition. PMID:24211452

  2. New insights into the classification and nomenclature of cortical GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    DeFelipe, Javier; López-Cruz, Pedro L.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Anderson, Stewart; Burkhalter, Andreas; Cauli, Bruno; Fairén, Alfonso; Feldmeyer, Dirk; Fishell, Gord; Fitzpatrick, David; Freund, Tamás F.; González-Burgos, Guillermo; Hestrin, Shaul; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R.; Huang, Josh; Jones, Edward G.; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kisvárday, Zoltán; Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Lewis, David A.; Marín, Oscar; Markram, Henry; McBain, Chris J.; Meyer, Hanno S.; Monyer, Hannah; Nelson, Sacha B.; Rockland, Kathleen; Rossier, Jean; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Rudy, Bernardo; Scanziani, Massimo; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Staiger, Jochen F.; Tamás, Gábor; Thomson, Alex; Wang, Yun; Yuste, Rafael; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic classification and accepted nomenclature of neuron types is much needed but is currently lacking. This article describes a possible taxonomical solution for classifying GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex based on a novel, web-based interactive system that allows experts to classify neurons with pre-determined criteria. Using Bayesian analysis and clustering algorithms on the resulting data, we investigated the suitability of several anatomical terms and neuron names for cortical GABAergic interneurons. Moreover, we show that supervised classification models could automatically categorize interneurons in agreement with experts’ assignments. These results demonstrate a practical and objective approach to the naming, characterization and classification of neurons based on community consensus. PMID:23385869

  3. Development and physiology of GABAergic feedback excitation in parvalbumin expressing interneurons of the mouse basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Spampanato, Jay; Sullivan, Robert K P; Perumal, Madhusoothanan B; Sah, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), action potentials in one type of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing GABAergic interneuron can evoke a disynaptic feedback excitatory postsynaptic potential (fbEPSP) onto the same presynaptic interneuron. Here, using whole-cell recordings from PV-expressing interneurons in acute brain slices we expand on this finding to show that this response is first detectable at 2-week postnatal, and is most prevalent in animals beyond 3 weeks of age (>P21). This circuit has a very high fidelity, and single action potential evoked fbEPSPs display few failures. Reconstruction of filled neurons, and electron microscopy show that interneurons that receive feedback excitation make symmetrical synapses on both the axon initial segments (AIS), as well as the soma and proximal dendrites of local pyramidal neurons, suggesting fbEPSP interneurons are morphologically distinct from the highly specialized chandelier neurons that selectively target the axon initial segment of pyramidal neurons. Single PV interneurons could trigger very large (~ 1 nA) feedback excitatory postsynaptic currents (fbEPSCs) suggesting that these neurons are heavily reciprocally connected to local glutamatergic principal cells. We conclude that in the BLA, a subpopulation of PV interneurons forms a distinct neural circuit in which a single action potential can recruit multiple pyramidal neurons to discharge near simultaneously and feed back onto the presynaptic interneuron.

  4. GABAergic interneurons form transient layer-specific circuits in early postnatal neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiades, Paul G.; Marques-Smith, Andre; Lyngholm, Daniel; Lickiss, Tom; Raffiq, Sayda; Kätzel, Dennis; Miesenböck, Gero; Butt, Simon J. B.

    2016-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons play key roles in cortical circuits, yet little is known about their early connectivity. Here we use glutamate uncaging and a novel optogenetic strategy to track changes in the afferent and efferent synaptic connections of developing neocortical interneuron subtypes. We find that Nkx2-1-derived interneurons possess functional synaptic connections before emerging pyramidal cell networks. Subsequent interneuron circuit maturation is both subtype and layer dependent. Glutamatergic input onto fast spiking (FS), but not somatostatin-positive, non-FS interneurons increases over development. Interneurons of both subtype located in layers (L) 4 and 5b engage in transient circuits that disappear after the somatosensory critical period. These include a pathway mediated by L5b somatostatin-positive interneurons that specifically targets L4 during the first postnatal week. The innervation patterns of immature cortical interneuron circuits are thus neither static nor progressively strengthened but follow a layer-specific choreography of transient connections that differ from those of the adult brain. PMID:26843463

  5. The effect of propofol postconditioning on the expression of K(+)-Cl(-)-co-transporter 2 in GABAergic inhibitory interneurons of acute ischemia/reperfusion injury rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbai; Liu, Shuying; Wang, Haiyun; Wang, Guolin; Zhu, Ai

    2015-02-01

    It has been shown in our previous study that propofol postconditioning enhanced the activity of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and prevented the internalization of GluR2 subunit of α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, thus provided neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Regarding inhibitory system in CNS, K(+)-Cl(-)-co-transporter 2 (KCC2), a Cl(-) extruder, plays a critical role in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibitory effect in mature central neurons. However, the effect of propofol postconditioning on the expression of KCC2 in GABAergic interneurons is unclear. Therefore, in this article we describe the role of KCC2 in GABAergic interneurons in the ipsilateral hippocampal CA1 region of adult rats and the effects of propofol postconditioning on this region. Herein we demonstrate that propofol postconditioning (20mg/kg/h, 2h) improved rats' neurobehavioral abilities, increased the number of survival neurons, and up-regulated neuronal KCC2 expression in glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) expressing GABAergic interneurons in hippocampal CA1 region at 24h after I/R. In contrast, when rats were injected with the KCC2 antagonist, [(dihydroindenyl)oxy] alkanoic acid (DIOA), the neuroprotective effects induced by propofol postconditioning were reversed. Our study indicated that propofol postconditioning increased the expression of KCC2 in inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, thus providing acute neuroprotection to rats who had undergone cerebral I/R injury.

  6. Distribution of GABAergic Interneurons and Dopaminergic Cells in the Functional Territories of the Human Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Bernácer, Javier; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Background The afferent projections of the striatum (caudate nucleus and putamen) are segregated in three territories: associative, sensorimotor and limbic. Striatal interneurons are in part responsible for the integration of these different types of information. Among them, GABAergic interneurons are the most abundant, and can be sorted in three populations according to their content in the calcium binding proteins calretinin (CR), parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin (CB). Conversely, striatal dopaminergic cells (whose role as interneurons is still unclear) are scarce. This study aims to analyze the interneuron distribution in the striatal functional territories, as well as their organization regarding to the striosomal compartment. Methodology/Principal Findings We used immunohistochemical methods to visualize CR, PV, CB and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive striatal neurons. The interneuronal distribution was assessed by stereological methods applied to every striatal functional territory. Considering the four cell groups altogether, their density was higher in the associative (2120±91 cells/mm3) than in the sensorimotor (959±47 cells/mm3) or limbic (633±119 cells/mm3) territories. CB- and TH-immunoreactive(-ir) cells were distributed rather homogeneously in the three striatal territories. However, the density of CR and PV interneurons were more abundant in the associative and sensorimotor striatum, respectively. Regarding to their compartmental organization, CR-ir interneurons were frequently found in the border between compartments in the associative and sensorimotor territories, and CB-ir interneurons abounded at the striosome/matrix border in the sensorimotor domain. Conclusions/Significance The present study demonstrates that the architecture of the human striatum in terms of its interneuron composition varies in its three functional territories. Furthermore, our data highlight the importance of CR-ir striatal interneurons in the integration of associative

  7. A Transient Translaminar GABAergic Interneuron Circuit Connects Thalamocortical Recipient Layers in Neonatal Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Marques-Smith, Andre; Lyngholm, Daniel; Kaufmann, Anna-Kristin; Stacey, Jacqueline A.; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Becker, Esther B.E.; Wilson, Michael C.; Molnár, Zoltán; Butt, Simon J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary GABAergic activity is thought to influence developing neocortical sensory circuits. Yet the late postnatal maturation of local layer (L)4 circuits suggests alternate sources of GABAergic control in nascent thalamocortical networks. We show that a population of L5b, somatostatin (SST)-positive interneuron receives early thalamic synaptic input and, using laser-scanning photostimulation, identify an early transient circuit between these cells and L4 spiny stellates (SSNs) that disappears by the end of the L4 critical period. Sensory perturbation disrupts the transition to a local GABAergic circuit, suggesting a link between translaminar and local control of SSNs. Conditional silencing of SST+ interneurons or conversely biasing the circuit toward local inhibition by overexpression of neuregulin-1 type 1 results in an absence of early L5b GABAergic input in mutants and delayed thalamic innervation of SSNs. These data identify a role for L5b SST+ interneurons in the control of SSNs in the early postnatal neocortex. PMID:26844833

  8. Serotonin excites hippocampal CA1 GABAergic interneurons at the stratum radiatum-stratum lacunosum moleculare border.

    PubMed

    Wyskiel, Daniel R; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    The hippocampus receives robust serotonergic innervation that is thought to control the excitability of both pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons. Previous work has addressed serotonergic regulation of pyramidal cells but considerable gaps remain in our understanding of how serotonin regulates different interneuron subclasses. 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A Rs) appear to localize predominantly, if not solely, on interneurons in the hippocampus and have been implicated in the regulation of hippocampal function including mnemonic and novelty recognition processes. Interneurons are functionally diverse. Therefore in the current work, we have used a BAC transgenic mouse line expressing EGFP under the control of the 5-HT2A R promoter to identify the interneuron subtype(s) regulated by serotonin via 5-HT2A Rs. We find that EGFP expression in this mouse identifies a group of interneurons that resides predominantly along the border of the stratum radiatum (SR) and stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM) of the CA1 region. We then show that these cells are depolarized and excited by serotonin acting through 5-HT2A Rs and appear to belong predominantly to the perforant pathway-associated and Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway-associated subtypes. These results indicate that serotonin interneurons expressing 5-HT2A Rs are localized primarily along the SR-SLM border of the CA1 region and represent a newly identified target for serotonin regulation in the hippocampus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Serotonin excites hippocampal CA1 GABAergic interneurons at the stratum radiatum-stratum lacunosum moleculare border.

    PubMed

    Wyskiel, Daniel R; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    The hippocampus receives robust serotonergic innervation that is thought to control the excitability of both pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons. Previous work has addressed serotonergic regulation of pyramidal cells but considerable gaps remain in our understanding of how serotonin regulates different interneuron subclasses. 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A Rs) appear to localize predominantly, if not solely, on interneurons in the hippocampus and have been implicated in the regulation of hippocampal function including mnemonic and novelty recognition processes. Interneurons are functionally diverse. Therefore in the current work, we have used a BAC transgenic mouse line expressing EGFP under the control of the 5-HT2A R promoter to identify the interneuron subtype(s) regulated by serotonin via 5-HT2A Rs. We find that EGFP expression in this mouse identifies a group of interneurons that resides predominantly along the border of the stratum radiatum (SR) and stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM) of the CA1 region. We then show that these cells are depolarized and excited by serotonin acting through 5-HT2A Rs and appear to belong predominantly to the perforant pathway-associated and Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway-associated subtypes. These results indicate that serotonin interneurons expressing 5-HT2A Rs are localized primarily along the SR-SLM border of the CA1 region and represent a newly identified target for serotonin regulation in the hippocampus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27328460

  10. Multiple anxiogenic drugs recruit a parvalbumin-containing subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons in the basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Matthew W.; Johnson, Philip L.; Westerman, Alex M.; Abrams, Jolane K.; Shekhar, Anantha; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala is a nodal structure within a distributed and interconnected network that regulates anxiety states and anxiety-related behavior. Administration of multiple anxiogenic drugs increases cellular responses (i.e., increases c-Fos expression) in a subregion of the basolateral amygdala, but the neurochemical phenotypes of these cells are not known. The basolateral amygdala contains glutamatergic projection neurons and several populations of γ-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing (GABAergic) interneurons, including a population of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing GABAergic interneurons that co-express the excitatory 5-HT2A receptor. The role for these PV-expressing GABAergic interneurons in anxiety-states is unclear. In this experiment we examined the effects of multiple anxiogenic drugs including the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist m-chlorophenyl piperazine (mCPP), the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, the α2-adrenoreceptor antagonist yohimbine and the partial inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine allosteric site on the GABAA receptor, N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide (FG-7142), on c-Fos expression in PV-immunoreactive (PV-ir) interneurons in subdivisions of the basolateral amygdala. All drugs with the exception of mCPP increased c-Fos expression in PV-ir neurons in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus, anterior part (BLA). The numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive (c-Fos-ir)/PV-ir GABAergic interneurons in the BLA were positively correlated with the numbers of c-Fos-ir serotonergic neurons in the mid-rostrocaudal dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and with a measure of anxiety-related behavior. All four drugs increased c-Fos expression in non-PV-ir cells in most of the subdivisions of the basolateral amygdala that were sampled, compared with vehicle-injected controls. Together, these data suggest that the PV/5-HT2A receptor expressing GABAergic interneurons in the basolateral amygdala are part of a DR-basolateral amygdala neuronal circuit modulating anxiety

  11. Parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y expressing hippocampal GABA-ergic inhibitory interneuron numbers decline in a model of Gulf War illness

    PubMed Central

    Megahed, Tarick; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is amongst the most conspicuous symptoms in Gulf War illness (GWI). Combined exposure to the nerve gas antidote pyridostigmine bromide (PB), pesticides and stress during the Persian Gulf War-1 (PGW-1) are presumed to be among the major causes of GWI. Indeed, our recent studies in rat models have shown that exposure to GWI-related (GWIR) chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks engenders cognitive impairments accompanied with several detrimental changes in the hippocampus. In this study, we tested whether reduced numbers of hippocampal gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons are among the pathological changes induced by GWIR-chemicals and stress. Animals were exposed to low doses of GWIR-chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks. Three months after this exposure, subpopulations of GABA-ergic interneurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), the neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS) in the hippocampus were stereologically quantified. Animals exposed to GWIR-chemicals and stress for 4 weeks displayed reduced numbers of PV-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus and NPY-expressing interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields. However, no changes in SS+ interneuron population were observed in the hippocampus. Furthermore, GABA-ergic interneuron deficiency in these animals was associated with greatly diminished hippocampus neurogenesis. Because PV+ and NPY+ interneurons play roles in maintaining normal cognitive function and neurogenesis, and controlling the activity of excitatory neurons in the hippocampus, reduced numbers of these interneurons may be one of the major causes of cognitive dysfunction and reduced neurogenesis observed in GWI. Hence, strategies that improve inhibitory neurotransmission in the hippocampus may prove beneficial for reversing cognitive dysfunction in GWI. PMID:25620912

  12. Roles of Rac1 and Rac3 GTPases during the development of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Rac GTPases are regulators of the cytoskeleton that play an important role in several aspects of neuronal and brain development. Two distinct Rac GTPases are expressed in the developing nervous system, the widely expressed Rac1 and the neural-specific Rac3 proteins. Recent experimental evidence supports a central role of these two Rac proteins in the development of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, important modulatory elements of the brain circuitry. The combined inactivation of the genes for the two Rac proteins has profound effects on distinct aspects of interneuron development, and has highlighted a synergistic contribution of the two proteins to the postmitotic maturation of specific populations of cortical and hippocampal interneurons. Rac function is modulated by different types of regulators, and can influence the activity of specific effectors. Some of these proteins have been associated to the development and maturation of interneurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric diseases characterized by cognitive impairment. Therefore the description of the cellular processes regulated by the Rac GTPases, and the identification of the molecular networks underlying these processes during interneuron development is relevant to the understanding of the role of GABAergic interneurons in cognitive functions.

  13. Roles of Rac1 and Rac3 GTPases during the development of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Rac GTPases are regulators of the cytoskeleton that play an important role in several aspects of neuronal and brain development. Two distinct Rac GTPases are expressed in the developing nervous system, the widely expressed Rac1 and the neural-specific Rac3 proteins. Recent experimental evidence supports a central role of these two Rac proteins in the development of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, important modulatory elements of the brain circuitry. The combined inactivation of the genes for the two Rac proteins has profound effects on distinct aspects of interneuron development, and has highlighted a synergistic contribution of the two proteins to the postmitotic maturation of specific populations of cortical and hippocampal interneurons. Rac function is modulated by different types of regulators, and can influence the activity of specific effectors. Some of these proteins have been associated to the development and maturation of interneurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric diseases characterized by cognitive impairment. Therefore the description of the cellular processes regulated by the Rac GTPases, and the identification of the molecular networks underlying these processes during interneuron development is relevant to the understanding of the role of GABAergic interneurons in cognitive functions. PMID:25309333

  14. Trajectory of the main GABAergic interneuron populations from early development to old age in the rat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Lydia; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    In both humans and rodents, decline in cognitive function is a hallmark of the aging process; the basis for this decrease has yet to be fully characterized. However, using aged rodent models, deficits in auditory processing have been associated with significant decreases in inhibitory signaling attributed to a loss of GABAergic interneurons. Not only are these interneurons crucial for pattern detection and other large-scale population dynamics, but they have also been linked to mechanisms mediating plasticity and learning, making them a prime candidate for study and modeling of modifications to cortical communication pathways in neurodegenerative diseases. Using the rat primary auditory cortex (A1) as a model, we probed the known markers of GABAergic interneurons with immunohistological methods, using antibodies against gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), calretinin (CR), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and cholecystokinin (CCK) to document the changes observed in interneuron populations across the rat's lifespan. This analysis provided strong evidence that several but not all GABAergic neurons were affected by the aging process, showing most dramatic changes in expression of parvalbumin (PV) and somatostatin (SOM) expression. With this evidence, we show how understanding these trajectories of cell counts may be factored into a simple model to quantify changes in inhibitory signaling across the course of life, which may be applied as a framework for creating more advanced simulations of interneuronal implication in normal cerebral processing, normal aging, or pathological processes.

  15. Prox1 Regulates the Subtype-Specific Development of Caudal Ganglionic Eminence-Derived GABAergic Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allison; Petros, Timothy; Karayannis, Theofanis; McKenzie Chang, Melissa; Lavado, Alfonso; Iwano, Tomohiko; Nakajima, Miho; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Huang, Z. Josh; Heintz, Nathaniel; Oliver, Guillermo; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Machold, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogliaform (RELN+) and bipolar (VIP+) GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex provide critical inhibition locally within the superficial layers. While these subtypes are known to originate from the embryonic caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), the specific genetic programs that direct their positioning, maturation, and integration into the cortical network have not been elucidated. Here, we report that in mice expression of the transcription factor Prox1 is selectively maintained in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and that loss of Prox1 impairs the integration of these cells into superficial layers. Moreover, Prox1 differentially regulates the postnatal maturation of each specific subtype originating from the CGE (RELN, Calb2/VIP, and VIP). Interestingly, Prox1 promotes the maturation of CGE-derived interneuron subtypes through intrinsic differentiation programs that operate in tandem with extrinsically driven neuronal activity-dependent pathways. Thus Prox1 represents the first identified transcription factor specifically required for the embryonic and postnatal acquisition of CGE-derived cortical interneuron properties. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite the recognition that 30% of GABAergic cortical interneurons originate from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), to date, a specific transcriptional program that selectively regulates the development of these populations has not yet been identified. Moreover, while CGE-derived interneurons display unique patterns of tangential and radial migration and preferentially populate the superficial layers of the cortex, identification of a molecular program that controls these events is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is expressed in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and is maintained into adulthood. We found that Prox1 function is differentially required during both embryonic and postnatal stages of development to

  16. New GABAergic interneurons in the adult neocortex and striatum are generated from different precursors.

    PubMed

    Dayer, Alexandre G; Cleaver, Kathryn M; Abouantoun, Thamara; Cameron, Heather A

    2005-01-31

    Ongoing neurogenesis in the adult mammalian dentate gyrus and olfactory bulb is generally accepted, but its existence in other adult brain regions is highly controversial. We labeled newly born cells in adult rats with the S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and used neuronal markers to characterize new cells at different time points after cell division. In the neocortex and striatum, we found BrdU-labeled cells that expressed each of the eight neuronal markers. Their size as well as staining for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid decarboxylase 67, calretinin and/or calbindin, suggest that new neurons in both regions are GABAergic interneurons. BrdU and doublecortin-immunoreactive (BrdU+/DCX+) cells were seen within the striatum, suggesting migration of immature neurons from the subventricular zone. Surprisingly, no DCX+ cells were found within the neocortex. NG2 immunoreactivity in some new neocortical neurons suggested that they may instead be generated from the NG2+ precursors that reside within the cortex itself.

  17. Ethanol consumption during early pregnancy alters the disposition of tangentially migrating GABAergic interneurons in the fetal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Verginia C; Yeh, Pamela W L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Yeh, Hermes H

    2008-02-20

    Consumption of alcohol (ethanol) during pregnancy can lead to developmental defects in the offspring, the most devastating being the constellation of symptoms collectively referred to as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). In the brain, a hallmark of FAS is abnormal cerebral cortical morphology consistent with insult during corticogenesis. Here, we report that exposure to a relatively low level of ethanol in utero (average maternal and fetal blood alcohol level of 25 mg/dl) promotes premature tangential migration into the cortical anlage of primordial GABAergic interneurons, including those originating in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE). This ethanol-induced effect was evident in vivo at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in GAD67 knock-in and BAC-Lhx6 embryos, as well as in vitro in isotypic telencephalic slice cocultures obtained from E14.5 embryos exposed to ethanol in utero. Analysis of heterotypic cocultures indicated that both cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors contribute to the aberrant migratory profile of MGE-derived cells. In this light, we provide evidence for an interaction between ethanol exposure in utero and the embryonic GABAergic system. Exposure to ethanol in utero elevated the ambient level of GABA and increased the sensitivity to GABA of MGE-derived cells. Our results uncovered for the first time an effect of ethanol consumption during pregnancy on the embryonic development of GABAergic cortical interneurons. We propose that ethanol exerts its effect on the tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons extrinsically by modulating extracellular levels of GABA and intrinsically by altering GABA(A) receptor function.

  18. Endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of afferent excitatory synapses in hippocampal pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Péterfi, Zoltán; Urbán, Gabriella M; Papp, Orsolya I; Németh, Beáta; Monyer, Hannah; Szabó, Gábor; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Mackie, Ken; Freund, Tamás F; Hájos, Norbert; Katona, István

    2012-10-10

    Although endocannabinoids have emerged as essential retrograde messengers in several forms of synaptic plasticity, it remains controversial whether they mediate long-term depression (LTD) of glutamatergic synapses onto excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampus. Here, we show that parvalbumin- and somatostatin/metabotropic glutamate receptor 1(a) (mGlu(1a))-positive GABAergic interneurons express diacylglycerol lipase-α (DGL-α), a synthesizing enzyme of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), albeit at lower levels than principal cells. Moreover, this lipase accumulates postsynaptically around afferent excitatory synapses in all three cell types. To address the role of retrograde 2-AG signaling in LTD, we investigated two forms: (1) produced by postsynaptic spiking paired with subsequent presynaptic stimulation or (2) induced by group I mGlu activation by (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG). Neither form of LTD was evoked in the presence of the mGlu(5) antagonist MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine], the DGL inhibitor THL [N-formyl-l-leucine (1S)-1-[[(2S,3S)-3-hexyl-4-oxo-2-oxetanyl]methyl]dodecyl ester], or the intracellularly applied Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA in CA1 pyramidal cells, fast-spiking interneurons (representing parvalbumin-containing cells) and interneurons projecting to stratum lacunosum-moleculare (representing somatostatin/mGlu(1a)-expressing interneurons). Both forms of LTD were completely absent in CB(1) cannabinoid receptor knock-out mice, whereas pharmacological blockade of CB(1) led to inconsistent results. Notably, in accordance with their lower DGL-α level, a higher stimulation frequency or higher DHPG concentration was required for LTD induction in interneurons compared with pyramidal cells. These findings demonstrate that hippocampal principal cells and interneurons produce endocannabinoids to mediate LTD in a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different manner. The shifted induction threshold implies that

  19. Differential GABAergic and glycinergic inputs of inhibitory interneurons and Purkinje cells to principal cells of the cerebellar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Husson, Zoé; Rousseau, Charly V; Broll, Ilja; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    The principal neurons of the cerebellar nuclei (CN), the sole output of the olivo-cerebellar system, receive a massive inhibitory input from Purkinje cells (PCs) of the cerebellar cortex. Morphological evidence suggests that CN principal cells are also contacted by inhibitory interneurons, but the properties of this connection are unknown. Using transgenic, tracing, and immunohistochemical approaches in mice, we show that CN interneurons form a large heterogeneous population with GABA/glycinergic phenotypes, distinct from GABAergic olive-projecting neurons. CN interneurons are found to contact principal output neurons, via glycine receptor (GlyR)-enriched synapses, virtually devoid of the main GABA receptor (GABAR) subunits α1 and γ2. Those clusters account for 5% of the total number of inhibitory receptor clusters on principal neurons. Brief optogenetic stimulations of CN interneurons, through selective expression of channelrhodopsin 2 after viral-mediated transfection of the flexed gene in GlyT2-Cre transgenic mice, evoked fast IPSCs in principal cells. GlyR activation accounted for 15% of interneuron IPSC amplitude, while the remaining current was mediated by activation of GABAR. Surprisingly, small GlyR clusters were also found at PC synapses onto principal CN neurons in addition to α1 and γ2 GABAR subunits. However, GlyR activation was found to account for <3% of the PC inhibitory synaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation. This work establishes CN glycinergic neurons as a significant source of inhibition to CN principal cells, forming contacts molecularly distinct from, but functionally similar to, Purkinje cell synapses. Their impact on CN output, motor learning, and motor execution deserves further investigation.

  20. Environmental enrichment as a therapeutic avenue for anxiety in aged Wistar rats: Effect on cat odor exposition and GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sampedro-Piquero, P; Castilla-Ortega, E; Zancada-Menendez, C; Santín, L J; Begega, A

    2016-08-25

    The use of more ethological animal models to study the neurobiology of anxiety has increased in recent years. We assessed the effect of an environmental enrichment (EE) protocol (24h/day over a period of two months) on anxiety-related behaviors when aged Wistar rats (21months old) were confronted with cat odor stimuli. Owing to the relationship between GABAergic interneurons and the anxiety-related neuronal network, we examined changes in the expression of Parvalbumin (PV) and 67kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-67) immunoreactive cells in different brain regions involved in stress response. Behavioral results revealed that enriched rats traveled further and made more grooming behaviors during the habituation session. In the cat odor session, they traveled longer distances and they showed more active interaction with the odor stimuli and less time in freezing behavior. Zone analysis revealed that the enriched group spent more time in the intermediate zone according to the proximity of the predator odor. Regarding the neurobiological data, the EE increased the expression of PV-positive cells in some medial prefrontal regions (cingulate (Cg) and prelimbic (PL) cortices), whereas the GAD-67 expression in the basolateral amygdala was reduced in the enriched group. Our results suggest that EE is able to reduce anxiety-like behaviors in aged animals even when ethologically relevant stimuli are used. Moreover, GABAergic interneurons could be involved in mediating this resilient behavior. PMID:27235742

  1. Environmental enrichment as a therapeutic avenue for anxiety in aged Wistar rats: Effect on cat odor exposition and GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sampedro-Piquero, P; Castilla-Ortega, E; Zancada-Menendez, C; Santín, L J; Begega, A

    2016-08-25

    The use of more ethological animal models to study the neurobiology of anxiety has increased in recent years. We assessed the effect of an environmental enrichment (EE) protocol (24h/day over a period of two months) on anxiety-related behaviors when aged Wistar rats (21months old) were confronted with cat odor stimuli. Owing to the relationship between GABAergic interneurons and the anxiety-related neuronal network, we examined changes in the expression of Parvalbumin (PV) and 67kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-67) immunoreactive cells in different brain regions involved in stress response. Behavioral results revealed that enriched rats traveled further and made more grooming behaviors during the habituation session. In the cat odor session, they traveled longer distances and they showed more active interaction with the odor stimuli and less time in freezing behavior. Zone analysis revealed that the enriched group spent more time in the intermediate zone according to the proximity of the predator odor. Regarding the neurobiological data, the EE increased the expression of PV-positive cells in some medial prefrontal regions (cingulate (Cg) and prelimbic (PL) cortices), whereas the GAD-67 expression in the basolateral amygdala was reduced in the enriched group. Our results suggest that EE is able to reduce anxiety-like behaviors in aged animals even when ethologically relevant stimuli are used. Moreover, GABAergic interneurons could be involved in mediating this resilient behavior.

  2. Multi-dimensional classification of GABAergic interneurons with Bayesian network-modeled label uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Interneuron classification is an important and long-debated topic in neuroscience. A recent study provided a data set of digitally reconstructed interneurons classified by 42 leading neuroscientists according to a pragmatic classification scheme composed of five categorical variables, namely, of the interneuron type and four features of axonal morphology. From this data set we now learned a model which can classify interneurons, on the basis of their axonal morphometric parameters, into these five descriptive variables simultaneously. Because of differences in opinion among the neuroscientists, especially regarding neuronal type, for many interneurons we lacked a unique, agreed-upon classification, which we could use to guide model learning. Instead, we guided model learning with a probability distribution over the neuronal type and the axonal features, obtained, for each interneuron, from the neuroscientists' classification choices. We conveniently encoded such probability distributions with Bayesian networks, calling them label Bayesian networks (LBNs), and developed a method to predict them. This method predicts an LBN by forming a probabilistic consensus among the LBNs of the interneurons most similar to the one being classified. We used 18 axonal morphometric parameters as predictor variables, 13 of which we introduce in this paper as quantitative counterparts to the categorical axonal features. We were able to accurately predict interneuronal LBNs. Furthermore, when extracting crisp (i.e., non-probabilistic) predictions from the predicted LBNs, our method outperformed related work on interneuron classification. Our results indicate that our method is adequate for multi-dimensional classification of interneurons with probabilistic labels. Moreover, the introduced morphometric parameters are good predictors of interneuron type and the four features of axonal morphology and thus may serve as objective counterparts to the subjective, categorical axonal features.

  3. Multi-dimensional classification of GABAergic interneurons with Bayesian network-modeled label uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Interneuron classification is an important and long-debated topic in neuroscience. A recent study provided a data set of digitally reconstructed interneurons classified by 42 leading neuroscientists according to a pragmatic classification scheme composed of five categorical variables, namely, of the interneuron type and four features of axonal morphology. From this data set we now learned a model which can classify interneurons, on the basis of their axonal morphometric parameters, into these five descriptive variables simultaneously. Because of differences in opinion among the neuroscientists, especially regarding neuronal type, for many interneurons we lacked a unique, agreed-upon classification, which we could use to guide model learning. Instead, we guided model learning with a probability distribution over the neuronal type and the axonal features, obtained, for each interneuron, from the neuroscientists' classification choices. We conveniently encoded such probability distributions with Bayesian networks, calling them label Bayesian networks (LBNs), and developed a method to predict them. This method predicts an LBN by forming a probabilistic consensus among the LBNs of the interneurons most similar to the one being classified. We used 18 axonal morphometric parameters as predictor variables, 13 of which we introduce in this paper as quantitative counterparts to the categorical axonal features. We were able to accurately predict interneuronal LBNs. Furthermore, when extracting crisp (i.e., non-probabilistic) predictions from the predicted LBNs, our method outperformed related work on interneuron classification. Our results indicate that our method is adequate for multi-dimensional classification of interneurons with probabilistic labels. Moreover, the introduced morphometric parameters are good predictors of interneuron type and the four features of axonal morphology and thus may serve as objective counterparts to the subjective, categorical axonal features

  4. Multi-dimensional classification of GABAergic interneurons with Bayesian network-modeled label uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Interneuron classification is an important and long-debated topic in neuroscience. A recent study provided a data set of digitally reconstructed interneurons classified by 42 leading neuroscientists according to a pragmatic classification scheme composed of five categorical variables, namely, of the interneuron type and four features of axonal morphology. From this data set we now learned a model which can classify interneurons, on the basis of their axonal morphometric parameters, into these five descriptive variables simultaneously. Because of differences in opinion among the neuroscientists, especially regarding neuronal type, for many interneurons we lacked a unique, agreed-upon classification, which we could use to guide model learning. Instead, we guided model learning with a probability distribution over the neuronal type and the axonal features, obtained, for each interneuron, from the neuroscientists' classification choices. We conveniently encoded such probability distributions with Bayesian networks, calling them label Bayesian networks (LBNs), and developed a method to predict them. This method predicts an LBN by forming a probabilistic consensus among the LBNs of the interneurons most similar to the one being classified. We used 18 axonal morphometric parameters as predictor variables, 13 of which we introduce in this paper as quantitative counterparts to the categorical axonal features. We were able to accurately predict interneuronal LBNs. Furthermore, when extracting crisp (i.e., non-probabilistic) predictions from the predicted LBNs, our method outperformed related work on interneuron classification. Our results indicate that our method is adequate for multi-dimensional classification of interneurons with probabilistic labels. Moreover, the introduced morphometric parameters are good predictors of interneuron type and the four features of axonal morphology and thus may serve as objective counterparts to the subjective, categorical axonal features

  5. Apolipoprotein E4 causes age- and sex-dependent impairments of hilar GABAergic interneurons and learning and memory deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Leung, Laura; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Jain, Sachi; Ring, Karen; Dai, Jessica; Wang, Max Mu; Tong, Leslie; Walker, David; Huang, Yadong

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE4 has sex-dependent effects, whereby the risk of developing AD is higher in apoE4-expressing females than males. However, the mechanism underlying the sex difference, in relation to apoE4, is unknown. Previous findings indicate that apoE4 causes age-dependent impairments of hilar GABAergic interneurons in female mice, leading to learning and memory deficits. Here, we investigate whether the detrimental effects of apoE4 on hilar GABAergic interneurons are sex-dependent using apoE knock-in (KI) mice across different ages. We found that in female apoE-KI mice, there was an age-dependent depletion of hilar GABAergic interneurons, whereby GAD67- or somatostatin-positive--but not NPY- or parvalbumin-positive-interneuron loss was exacerbated by apoE4. Loss of these neuronal populations was correlated with the severity of spatial learning deficits at 16 months of age in female apoE4-KI mice; however, this effect was not observed in female apoE3-KI mice. In contrast, we found an increase in the numbers of hilar GABAergic interneurons with advancing age in male apoE-KI mice, regardless of apoE genotype. Moreover, male apoE-KI mice showed a consistent ratio of hilar inhibitory GABAergic interneurons to excitatory mossy cells approximating 1.5 that is independent of apoE genotype and age, whereas female apoE-KI mice exhibited an age-dependent decrease in this ratio, which was exacerbated by apoE4. Interestingly, there are no apoE genotype effects on GABAergic interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subregions of the hippocampus as well as the entorhinal and auditory cortexes. These findings suggest that the sex-dependent effects of apoE4 on developing AD is in part attributable to inherent sex-based differences in the numbers of hilar GABAergic interneurons, which is further modulated by apoE genotype.

  6. Somatostatin enhances tooth-pulp-evoked cervical dorsal horn neuronal activity in the rat via inhibition of GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Takeda, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Shigeji

    2014-01-01

    A recent in vitro electrophysiological analysis combined with anatomical approach suggests that a potential disinhibitory mechanism involving somatostatin (SST), which is released by interneurons in the superficial dorsal horn, contributes to nociceptive transmission (Yasaka et al., 2010); however, whether this mechanism occurs in vivo remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether iontophoretic application of SST facilitates the excitability of nociceptive upper cervical spinal dorsal horn (C1) neurons through GABAergic disinhibiton, using extracellular electrophysiological recording with multibarrel electrodes and immunohistochemical techniques. Immunoreactivity of SST2A receptors was found in layer II of the C1 dorsal horn in the rat and most of these neurons co-expressed the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase 67. Single-unit recordings were made from C1 neurons responding to tooth-pulp (TP) electrical stimulation in pentobarbital anesthestized rats. Iontophoretic application of SST significantly increased TP-evoked C1 neuronal discharges in layers I and II of the spinal dorsal horn and this effect occurred in a current-dependent manner. The facilitation of this discharge by SST application was abolished with co-application of the SST2 receptor antagonist, Cyanamid 154806. Iontophoretic application of GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, induced facilitation of TP-evoked C1 neuronal discharges. There was no significant difference in the relative number of spikes between SST and bicuculline applications. These results suggest that a local release of SST facilitates the excitability of trigeminal nocicepitve C1 neuronal activity via inhibition of GABAergic neurons. Therefore, SST2A receptors expressed in layer II GABAergic inhibitory interneurons play an important role in trigeminal nociceptive transmission and are a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of trigeminal pain, including hyperalgesia. PMID

  7. The amyloid precursor protein controls adult hippocampal neurogenesis through GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baiping; Wang, Zilai; Sun, Lu; Yang, Li; Li, Hongmei; Cole, Allysa L; Rodriguez-Rivera, Jennifer; Lu, Hui-Chen; Zheng, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Impaired neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has been implicated in AD pathogenesis. Here we reveal that the APP plays an important role in the neural progenitor proliferation and newborn neuron maturation in the mouse dentate gyrus. APP controls adult neurogenesis through a non cell-autonomous mechanism by GABAergic neurons, as selective deletion of GABAergic, but not glutamatergic, APP disrupts adult hippocampal neurogenesis. APP, highly expressed in the majority of GABAergic neurons in the dentate gyrus, enhances the inhibitory tone to granule cells. By regulating both tonic and phasic GABAergic inputs to dentate granule cells, APP maintains excitatory-inhibitory balance and preserves cognitive functions. Our studies uncover an indispensable role of APP in the GABAergic system for controlling adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and our findings indicate that APP dysfunction may contribute to impaired neurogenesis and cognitive decline associated with AD.

  8. Delays in GABAergic interneuron development and behavioral inhibition after prenatal stress.

    PubMed

    Lussier, Stephanie J; Stevens, Hanna E

    2016-10-01

    Prenatal stress is associated with altered behavioral, cognitive, and psychiatric outcomes in offspring. Due to the importance of GABAergic systems in normal development and in psychiatric disorders, prenatal stress effects on these neurons have been investigated in animal models. Prenatal stress delays GABAergic progenitor migration, but the significance of these early developmental disruptions for the continued development of GABAergic cells in the juvenile brain is unclear. Here, we examined effects of prenatal stress on populations of GABAergic neurons in juvenile and adult medial frontal cortex (mFC) and hippocampus through stereological counting, gene expression, and relevant anxiety-like and social behaviors. Postnatally, the total GABAergic cell number that peaks in adolescence showed altered trajectories in mFC and hippocampus. Parvalbumin neuron proportion in juvenile brain was altered by prenatal stress, but parvalbumin gene expression showed no differences. In adult brain, parvalbumin neuron proportions were altered by prenatal stress with opposite gene expression changes. Adult prenatally stressed offspring showed a lack of social preference on a three-chambered task, increased anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze, and reduced center time in an open field. Despite a lack of significant group differences in adult total GABAergic cell populations, performance of these tasks was correlated with GABAergic populations in mFC and hippocampus. In conclusion, prenatal stress resulted in a delay in GABAergic cell number and maturation of the parvalbumin subtype. Influences of prenatal stress on GABAergic populations during developmentally dynamic periods and during adulthood may be relevant to the anxiety-like behaviors that occur after prenatal stress. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 1078-1091, 2016. PMID:26724783

  9. Physiological impact of CB1 receptor expression by hippocampal GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Albayram, Önder; Passlick, Stefan; Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras; Zimmer, Andreas; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A subset of hippocampal GABAergic neurons, which are cholecystokinin-positive, highly express cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors. Activation of these receptors inhibits GABA release and thereby limits inhibitory control. While genetic deletion of CB1 receptors from GABAergic neurons led to behavioural alterations and neuroinflammatory reactions, it remained unclear whether these changes in the knockout animals were a direct consequence of the enhanced transmitter release or reflected developmental deficits. The hippocampus is vital for the generation of spatial, declarative and working memory. Here, we addressed the question how CB1 receptors in GABAergic neurons influence hippocampal function. Patch clamp and field potential recordings in mice devoid of CB1 receptors in GABAergic neurons revealed an enhanced frequency and faster kinetics of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons while tonic inhibition, paired-pulse facilitation and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus were not affected. Evaluation of cognitive functions demonstrated impaired acquisition of spatial memory and deficits in novel object recognition and partner recognition in the knockout mice, while working memory and spatial memory remained intact. The density of GABAergic neurons was also similar in knockout mice and their littermates, which argues against global deficits in hippocampal development. Together, these results suggest that CB1 receptors in GABAergic neurons influence specific aspects of neuronal excitability and hippocampal learning.

  10. Structural and functional characterization of dendritic arbors and GABAergic synaptic inputs on interneurons and principal cells in the rat basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Klenowski, Paul M.; Fogarty, Matthew J.; Belmer, Arnauld; Noakes, Peter G.; Bellingham, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is a complex brain region associated with processing emotional states, such as fear, anxiety, and stress. Some aspects of these emotional states are driven by the network activity of synaptic connections, derived from both local circuitry and projections to the BLA from other regions. Although the synaptic physiology and general morphological characteristics are known for many individual cell types within the BLA, the combination of morphological, electrophysiological, and distribution of neurochemical GABAergic synapses in a three-dimensional neuronal arbor has not been reported for single neurons from this region. The aim of this study was to assess differences in morphological characteristics of BLA principal cells and interneurons, quantify the distribution of GABAergic neurochemical synapses within the entire neuronal arbor of each cell type, and determine whether GABAergic synaptic density correlates with electrophysiological recordings of inhibitory postsynaptic currents. We show that BLA principal neurons form complex dendritic arborizations, with proximal dendrites having fewer spines but higher densities of neurochemical GABAergic synapses compared with distal dendrites. Furthermore, we found that BLA interneurons exhibited reduced dendritic arbor lengths and spine densities but had significantly higher densities of putative GABAergic synapses compared with principal cells, which was correlated with an increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents. The quantification of GABAergic connectivity, in combination with morphological and electrophysiological measurements of the BLA cell types, is the first step toward a greater understanding of how fear and stress lead to changes in morphology, local connectivity, and/or synaptic reorganization of the BLA. PMID:26041829

  11. Altered expression of KCC2 in GABAergic interneuron contributes prenatal stress-induced epileptic spasms in infant rat.

    PubMed

    Baek, Hyunjung; Yi, Min-Hee; Pandit, Sudip; Park, Jin Bong; Kwon, Hyeok Hee; Zhang, Enji; Kim, Sena; Shin, Nara; Kim, Eunjee; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Dong Woon; Kang, Joon Won

    2016-07-01

    Long-term stress during pregnancy causes neurologic deficits to offspring with altered gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system in the brain. However, it is not clear how prenatal stress affects the maturing GABAergic interneurons and the resulting abnormalities in infantile seizures. Here, we showed that prenatal stress alters the maturation of GABA inhibitory system using a seizure model induced by prenatal stress. Prenatal stress with betamethasone or acute immobilization stress (AIS) on gestational day 15 increased the seizure susceptibility to N-methyl-d-aspartate-triggered spasms on postnatal day 15. The expression of GABA was lower in the prenatally stressed group, which compromise the decrease of glutamate decarboxylase 67-immunopositive cells. Prenatal stress markedly decreased the expression of K(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter (KCC2) in the cortex. GABA induced membrane depolarization demonstrated prenatal stress models had significant higher membrane depolarization compared to control. GABA increased KCC2 expression in cultured cortex-containing slices. Taken together, our results showed that prenatal stress with betamethasone or AIS altered the maturation of GABAergic progenitors and resulted in the lack of GABA input, which in turn, decreased KCC2 expression and lowered seizure threshold. We conclude that delayed GABA excitatory/inhibitory shift would render the cortical neuronal circuit more susceptible to excitatory input in prenatal stress induced seizure. PMID:27180051

  12. Preserving GABAergic interneurons in acute brain slices of mice using the N-methyl-D-glucamine-based artificial cerebrospinal fluid method.

    PubMed

    Pan, Geng; Li, Yue; Geng, Hong-Yan; Yang, Jian-Ming; Li, Ke-Xin; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Defects in the function and development of GABAergic interneurons have been linked to psychiatric disorders, so preservation of these interneurons in brain slices is important for successful electrophysiological recording in various ex vivo methods. However, it is difficult to maintain the activity and morphology of neurons in slices from mice of >30 days old. Here we evaluated the N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG)-based artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) method for the preservation of interneurons in slices from mice of up to ∼6 months old and discussed the steps that may affect their quality during slicing. We found that the NMDG-aCSF method rescued more cells than sucrose-aCSF and successfully preserved different types of interneurons including parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons. In addition, both the chemical and electrical synaptic signaling of interneurons were maintained. These results demonstrate that the NMDG-aCSF method is suitable for the preservation of interneurons, especially in studies of gap junctions. PMID:25648546

  13. GABAergic interneuronal loss and reduced inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampal CA1 region after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Suhett, Camila P; Prager, Eric M; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Marini, Ann M; Li, Zheng; Eiden, Lee E; Braga, Maria F M

    2015-11-01

    Patients that suffer mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) often develop cognitive impairments, including memory and learning deficits. The hippocampus shows a high susceptibility to mTBI-induced damage due to its anatomical localization and has been implicated in cognitive and neurological impairments after mTBI. However, it remains unknown whether mTBI cognitive impairments are a result of morphological and pathophysiological alterations occurring in the CA1 hippocampal region. We investigated whether mTBI induces morphological and pathophysiological alterations in the CA1 using the controlled cortical impact (CCI) model. Seven days after CCI, animals subjected to mTBI showed cognitive impairment in the passive avoidance test and deficits to long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission. Deficiencies in inducing or maintaining LTP were likely due to an observed reduction in the activation of NMDA but not AMPA receptors. Significant reductions in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous and miniature GABAA-receptor mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were also observed 7 days after CCI. Design-based stereology revealed that although the total number of neurons was unaltered, the number of GABAergic interneurons is significantly reduced in the CA1 region 7 days after CCI. Additionally, the surface expression of α1, ß2/3, and γ2 subunits of the GABAA receptor were reduced, contributing to a reduced mIPSC frequency and amplitude, respectively. Together, these results suggest that mTBI causes a significant reduction in GABAergic inhibitory transmission and deficits to NMDA receptor mediated currents in the CA1, which may contribute to changes in hippocampal excitability and subsequent cognitive impairments after mTBI.

  14. Impact of single-site axonal GABAergic synaptic events on cerebellar interneuron activity.

    PubMed

    de San Martin, Javier Zorrilla; Jalil, Abdelali; Trigo, Federico F

    2015-12-01

    Axonal ionotropic receptors are present in a variety of neuronal types, and their function has largely been associated with the modulation of axonal activity and synaptic release. It is usually assumed that activation of axonal GABA(A)Rs comes from spillover, but in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) the GABA source is different: in these cells, GABA release activates presynaptic GABA(A) autoreceptors (autoRs) together with postsynaptic targets, producing an autoR-mediated synaptic event. The frequency of presynaptic, autoR-mediated miniature currents is twice that of their somatodendritic counterparts, suggesting that autoR-mediated responses have an important effect on interneuron activity. Here, we used local Ca(2+) photolysis in MLI axons of juvenile rats to evoke GABA release from individual varicosities to study the activation of axonal autoRs in single release sites. Our data show that single-site autoR conductances are similar to postsynaptic dendritic conductances. In conditions of high [Cl(-)](i), autoR-mediated conductances range from 1 to 5 nS; this corresponds to ∼30-150 GABA(A) channels per presynaptic varicosity, a value close to the number of channels in postsynaptic densities. Voltage responses produced by the activation of autoRs in single varicosities are amplified by a Na(v)-dependent mechanism and propagate along the axon with a length constant of 91 µm. Immunolabeling determination of synapse location shows that on average, one third of the synapses produce autoR-mediated signals that are large enough to reach the axon initial segment. Finally, we show that single-site activation of presynaptic GABA(A) autoRs leads to an increase in MLI excitability and thus conveys a strong feedback signal that contributes to spiking activity.

  15. Targeted Deletion of ERK5 MAP Kinase in the Developing Nervous System Impairs Development of GABAergic Interneurons in the Main Olfactory Bulb and Behavioral Discrimination between Structurally Similar Odorants

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Junhui; Pan, Yung-Wei; Wang, Zhenshan; Chang, Shih-Yu; Wang, Wenbin; Wang, Xin; Tournier, Cathy; Storm, Daniel R.; Xia, Zhengui

    2012-01-01

    ERK5 MAP kinase is highly expressed in the developing nervous system and has been implicated in promoting the survival of immature neurons in culture. However, its role in the development and function of the mammalian nervous system has not been established in vivo. Here, we report that conditional deletion of the erk5 gene in mouse neural stem cells during development reduces the number of GABAergic interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (OB). Our data suggest that this is due to a decrease in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and rostral migratory stream (RMS) of ERK5 mutant mice. Interestingly, ERK5 mutant mice have smaller OB and are impaired in odor discrimination between structurally similar odorants. We conclude that ERK5 is a novel signaling pathway regulating developmental OB neurogenesis and olfactory behavior. PMID:22442076

  16. Antiallodynic effect of tianeptine via modulation of the 5-HT7 receptor of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord of neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai; Heo, Bong Ha; Kim, Woong Mo; Kim, Yong Chul; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2015-06-26

    Although tianeptine, an atypical antidepressant has been reported to have antinociceptive effects, the mode of action is different from that of tricyclic antidepressants despite structural similarities. We examined the antiallodynic effect of intrathecal tianeptine in neuropathic pain rats and determined the involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 (5-HT7) receptor of the GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord. Neuropathic pain was induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL). After observation of the effect from intrathecal tianeptine, a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (SB-269970) was administered intrathecally 10 min before delivery of tianeptine, to determine the contribution of spinal 5-HT7 receptor on the activity of tianeptine. GAD expression and GABA concentrations were assessed. Intrathecal tianeptine dose-dependently attenuated mechanical allodynia in SNL rats. Pre-treatment with intrathecal SB-269970 reversed the antiallodynic effect of tianeptine. Both GAD65 expression and the GABA concentration in the spinal cord were decreased in neuropathic rats but were increased by tianeptine. Additionally, 5-HT7 receptor and GAD65 were co-localized in the spinal cord. Intrathecal tianeptine reduces neuropathic pain. 5-HT7 receptor of the GABAergic interneurons together with GAD65 plays a role in the activity of tianeptine at the spinal cord level.

  17. Antiallodynic effect of tianeptine via modulation of the 5-HT7 receptor of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord of neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai; Heo, Bong Ha; Kim, Woong Mo; Kim, Yong Chul; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2015-06-26

    Although tianeptine, an atypical antidepressant has been reported to have antinociceptive effects, the mode of action is different from that of tricyclic antidepressants despite structural similarities. We examined the antiallodynic effect of intrathecal tianeptine in neuropathic pain rats and determined the involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 (5-HT7) receptor of the GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord. Neuropathic pain was induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL). After observation of the effect from intrathecal tianeptine, a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (SB-269970) was administered intrathecally 10 min before delivery of tianeptine, to determine the contribution of spinal 5-HT7 receptor on the activity of tianeptine. GAD expression and GABA concentrations were assessed. Intrathecal tianeptine dose-dependently attenuated mechanical allodynia in SNL rats. Pre-treatment with intrathecal SB-269970 reversed the antiallodynic effect of tianeptine. Both GAD65 expression and the GABA concentration in the spinal cord were decreased in neuropathic rats but were increased by tianeptine. Additionally, 5-HT7 receptor and GAD65 were co-localized in the spinal cord. Intrathecal tianeptine reduces neuropathic pain. 5-HT7 receptor of the GABAergic interneurons together with GAD65 plays a role in the activity of tianeptine at the spinal cord level. PMID:25982324

  18. The ascl1a and dlx genes have a regulatory role in the development of GABAergic interneurons in the zebrafish diencephalon

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Ryan B.; Pollack, Jacob N.; Debiais-Thibaud, Mélanie; Heude, Eglantine; Talbot, Jared Coffin; Ekker, Marc

    2013-01-01

    During development of the mouse forebrain interneurons, the Dlx genes play a key role in a gene regulatory network (GRN) that leads to the GABAergic phenotype. Here, we have examined the regulatory relationships between the ascl1a, dlx, and gad1b genes in the zebrafish forebrain. Expression of ascl1a overlaps with dlx1a in the telencephalon and diencephalon during early forebrain development. The loss of Ascl1a function results in a loss of dlx expression, and subsequent losses of dlx5a and gad1b expression in the diencephalic prethalamus and hypothalamus. Loss of Dlx1a and Dlx2a function, and, to a lesser extent, of Dlx5a and Dlx6a, impairs gad1b expression in the prethalamus and hypothalamus. We conclude that dlx1a/2a act downstream of ascl1a but upstream of dlx5a/dlx6a and gad1b to activate GABAergic specification. This pathway is conserved in the diencephalon, but has diverged between mammals and teleosts in the telencephalon. PMID:23747543

  19. Enhanced GABAergic Inputs Contribute to Functional Alterations of Cholinergic Interneurons in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Sandra M.; Joshi, Prasad R.; Parievsky, Anna; Galvan, Laurie; Chen, Jane Y.; Fisher, Yvette E.; Huynh, My N.; Cepeda, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In Huntington’s disease (HD), a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, striatal medium-sized spiny neurons undergo degenerative changes. In contrast, large cholinergic interneurons (LCIs) are relatively spared. However, their ability to release acetylcholine (ACh) is impaired. The present experiments examined morphological and electrophysiological properties of LCIs in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. R6/2 mice show a severe, rapidly progressing phenotype. Immunocytochemical analysis of choline acetyltransferase-positive striatal neurons showed that, although the total number of cells was not changed, somatic areas were significantly smaller in symptomatic R6/2 mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermates, For electrophysiology, brain slices were obtained from presymptomatic (3-4 weeks) and symptomatic (>8 weeks) R6/2 mice and their WT littermates. Striatal LCIs were identified by somatic size and spontaneous action potential firing in the cell-attached mode. Passive and active membrane properties of LCIs were similar in presymptomatic R6/2 and WT mice. In contrast, LCIs from symptomatic R6/2 animals displayed smaller membrane capacitance and higher input resistance, consistent with reduced somatic size. In addition, more LCIs from symptomatic mice displayed irregular firing patterns and bursts of action potentials. They also displayed a higher frequency of spontaneous GABAergic IPSCs and larger amplitude of electrically evoked IPSCs. Selective optogenetic stimulation of somatostatin- but not parvalbumin-containing interneurons also evoked larger amplitude IPSCs in LCIs from R6/2 mice. In contrast, glutamatergic spontaneous or evoked postsynaptic currents were not affected. Morphological and electrophysiological alterations, in conjunction with the presence of mutant huntingtin in LCIs, could explain impaired ACh release in HD mouse models. PMID:26203463

  20. NMDA receptor blockade in the developing cortex induces autophagy-mediated death of immature cortical GABAergic interneurons: An ex vivo and in vivo study in Gad67-GFP mice.

    PubMed

    Roux, Christian; Aligny, Caroline; Lesueur, Céline; Girault, Virginie; Brunel, Valery; Ramdani, Yasmina; Genty, Damien; Driouich, Azeddine; Laquerrière, Annie; Marret, Stéphane; Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Bekri, Soumeya

    2015-05-01

    In neonates, excitotoxicity is a major process involved in hypoxic-ischemic brain lesions, and several research groups have suggested the use of NMDA antagonists for neuroprotection. However, despite their clinical interest, there is more and more evidence suggesting that, in the immature brain, these molecules exert deleterious actions on migrating GABAergic interneurons by suppressing glutamatergic trophic inputs. Consequently, preventing the side effects of NMDA antagonists would be therapeutically useful. Because macroautophagy is involved in the adaptive response to trophic deprivation, the aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of autophagy modulators on the MK801-induced death of immature GABAergic interneurons and to characterize the crosstalk between autophagic and apoptotic mechanisms in this cell type. Ex vivo, using cortical slices from NMRI and Gad67-GFP mice, we show that blockade of the NMDA receptor results in an accumulation of autophagosomes due to the disruption of the autophagic flux. This effect precedes the activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and the degeneration of immature GABAergic neurons present in developing cortical layers II-IV and is prevented by 3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor. In contrast, modulators of autophagy (3-MA, rapamycin) do not interfere with the anti-excitotoxic and neuroprotective effect of MK801 observed in deep layers V and VI. In vivo, 3-MA blocks the rapid increase in caspase-3 cleavage induced by the blockade of NMDA receptors and prevents the resulting long-term decrease in Gad67-GFP neurons in layers II-IV. Together, these data suggest that, in the developing cortex, the suppression of glutamatergic inputs through NMDA receptor inhibition results in the impairment of the autophagic flux and the subsequent switch to apoptotic death of immature GABAergic interneurons. The concomitant inhibition of autophagy prevents this pro-apoptotic action of the NMDA blocker and favors the long

  1. Proteomic pathway analysis of the hippocampus in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder implicates 14-3-3 signaling, aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling, and glucose metabolism: potential roles in GABAergic interneuron pathology.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Klaus Oliver; Föcking, Melanie; Cotter, David R

    2015-09-01

    Neuropathological changes of the hippocampus have been associated with psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Recent work has particularly implicated hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in the pathophysiology of these diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying structural and cellular hippocampal pathology remain poorly understood. We used data from comprehensive difference-in-gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) investigations of postmortem human hippocampus of people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, covering the acidic (isoelectric point (pI) between pH4 and 7) and, separately, the basic (pI between pH6 and 11) sub-proteome, for Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of implicated protein networks and pathways. Comparing disease and control cases, we identified 58 unique differentially expressed proteins in schizophrenia, and 70 differentially expressed proteins in bipolar disorder, using mass spectrometry. IPA implicated, most prominently, 14-3-3 and aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in schizophrenia, and gluconeogenesis/glycolysis in bipolar disorder. Both disorders were characterized by alterations of proteins involved in the oxidative stress response, mitochondrial function, and protein-endocytosis, -trafficking, -degradation, and -ubiquitination. These findings are interpreted with a focus on GABAergic interneuron pathology in the hippocampus.

  2. Impaired Action Potential Initiation in GABAergic Interneurons Causes Hyperexcitable Networks in an Epileptic Mouse Model Carrying a Human NaV1.1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hedrich, Ulrike B.S.; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na+ channels in interneurons and persistent Na+ currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca2+ imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. PMID:25378155

  3. Loss of Dopamine D2 Receptors Increases Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Disruption to dopamine homeostasis during brain development has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. Inappropriate expression or activity of GABAergic interneurons are common features of many of these disorders. We discovered a persistent upregulation of GAD67+ and parvalbumin+ neurons within the anterior cingulate cortex of dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice, while other GABAergic interneuron markers were unaffected. Interneuron distribution and number were not altered in the striatum or in the dopamine-poor somatosensory cortex. The changes were already present by postnatal day 14, indicating a developmental etiology. D2eGFP BAC transgenic mice demonstrated the presence of D2 receptor expression within a subset of parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons, suggesting the possibility of a direct cellular mechanism through which D2 receptor stimulation regulates interneuron differentiation or survival. D2 receptor knockout mice also exhibited decreased depressive-like behavior compared with wild-type controls in the tail suspension test. These data indicate that dopamine signaling modulates interneuron number and emotional behavior and that developmental D2 receptor loss or blockade could reveal a potential mechanism for the prodromal basis of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25393953

  4. Interneuron cell types are fit to function.

    PubMed

    Kepecs, Adam; Fishell, Gordon

    2014-01-16

    Understanding brain circuits begins with an appreciation of their component parts - the cells. Although GABAergic interneurons are a minority population within the brain, they are crucial for the control of inhibition. Determining the diversity of these interneurons has been a central goal of neurobiologists, but this amazing cell type has so far defied a generalized classification system. Interneuron complexity within the telencephalon could be simplified by viewing them as elaborations of a much more finite group of developmentally specified cardinal classes that become further specialized as they mature. Our perspective emphasizes that the ultimate goal is to dispense with classification criteria and directly define interneuron types by function. PMID:24429630

  5. Genetic dissection of GABAergic neural circuits in mouse neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Diverse and flexible cortical functions rely on the ability of neural circuits to perform multiple types of neuronal computations. GABAergic inhibitory interneurons significantly contribute to this task by regulating the balance of activity, synaptic integration, spiking, synchrony, and oscillation in a neural ensemble. GABAergic interneurons display a high degree of cellular diversity in morphology, physiology, connectivity, and gene expression. A considerable number of subtypes of GABAergic interneurons diversify modes of cortical inhibition, enabling various types of information processing in the cortex. Thus, comprehensively understanding fate specification, circuit assembly, and physiological function of GABAergic interneurons is a key to elucidate the principles of cortical wiring and function. Recent advances in genetically encoded molecular tools have made a breakthrough to systematically study cortical circuitry at the molecular, cellular, circuit, and whole animal levels. However, the biggest obstacle to fully applying the power of these to analysis of GABAergic circuits was that there were no efficient and reliable methods to express them in subtypes of GABAergic interneurons. Here, I first summarize cortical interneuron diversity and current understanding of mechanisms, by which distinct classes of GABAergic interneurons are generated. I then review recent development in genetically encoded molecular tools for neural circuit research, and genetic targeting of GABAergic interneuron subtypes, particularly focusing on our recent effort to develop and characterize Cre/CreER knockin lines. Finally, I highlight recent success in genetic targeting of chandelier cells, the most unique and distinct GABAergic interneuron subtype, and discuss what kind of questions need to be addressed to understand development and function of cortical inhibitory circuits. PMID:24478631

  6. Distribution of synapses on two ascending interneurones carrying frequency-specific information in the auditory system of the cricket: evidence for GABAergic inputs.

    PubMed

    Hardt, M; Watson, A H

    1994-07-22

    Two identified cricket auditory interneurones, AN1 and AN2, were intracellularly labelled with horseradish peroxidase following physiological characterisation. The neurones, which have some structural similarities, have their somata in the prothoracic ganglion and axons that project to the brain. Although both carry auditory information, they have different response properties and participate in different types of phonotactic behaviour. Ultrathin sections from selected regions of their prothoracic arborisations were examined in the electron microscope after postembedding immunostaining for the inhibitory transmitter GABA. In the prothoracic ganglion AN1 branches only in the medial ventral association centre (mVAC) contralateral to the soma, and receives only iput synapses. Twenty-seven percent of these were made by processes immunoreactive for GABA. AN2 branches not only in mVAC on both sides of the ganglion but also in several other areas. It makes output synapses from large diameter neurites in mVAC on both sides of the ganglion as well as from neurites in more posterior regions of the neuropile. Most input synapses are received onto branches in the contralateral mVAC where about 19% were made from GABA-immunoreactive processes.

  7. Initial loss but later excess of GABAergic synapses with dentate granule cells in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Thind, Khushdev K; Yamawaki, Ruth; Phanwar, Ibanri; Zhang, Guofeng; Wen, Xiling; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2010-03-01

    Many patients with temporal lobe epilepsy display neuron loss in the dentate gyrus. One potential epileptogenic mechanism is loss of GABAergic interneurons and inhibitory synapses with granule cells. Stereological techniques were used to estimate numbers of gephyrin-positive punctae in the dentate gyrus, which were reduced short-term (5 days after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus) but later rebounded beyond controls in epileptic rats. Stereological techniques were used to estimate numbers of synapses in electron micrographs of serial sections processed for postembedding GABA-immunoreactivity. Adjacent sections were used to estimate numbers of granule cells and glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive neurons per dentate gyrus. GABAergic neurons were reduced to 70% of control levels short-term, where they remained in epileptic rats. Integrating synapse and cell counts yielded average numbers of GABAergic synapses per granule cell, which decreased short-term and rebounded in epileptic animals beyond control levels. Axo-shaft and axo-spinous GABAergic synapse numbers in the outer molecular layer changed most. These findings suggest interneuron loss initially reduces numbers of GABAergic synapses with granule cells, but later, synaptogenesis by surviving interneurons overshoots control levels. In contrast, the average number of excitatory synapses per granule cell decreased short-term but recovered only toward control levels, although in epileptic rats excitatory synapses in the inner molecular layer were larger than in controls. These findings reveal a relative excess of GABAergic synapses and suggest that reports of reduced functional inhibitory synaptic input to granule cells in epilepsy might be attributable not to fewer but instead to abundant but dysfunctional GABAergic synapses.

  8. Laterodorsal tegmentum interneuron subtypes oppositely regulate olfactory cue-induced innate fear.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongbin; Yang, Junhua; Xi, Wang; Hao, Sijia; Luo, Benyan; He, Xiaobin; Zhu, Liya; Lou, Huifang; Yu, Yan-qin; Xu, Fuqiang; Duan, Shumin; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Innate fear has a critical role in survival of animals. Unlike conditioned fear, the neuronal circuitry underlying innate fear is largely unknown. We found that the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) and lateral habenula (LHb) are specifically activated by the mouse predator odorant trimethylthiazoline (TMT). Using optogenetics to selectively stimulate GABAergic neurons in the LDT immediately produced fear-like responses (freezing, accelerated heart rate and increased serum corticosterone), whereas prolonged stimulation caused anxiety-like behaviors. Notably, although selective stimulation of parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons similarly induced fear-like responses, stimulation of somatostatin-positive interneurons or inhibition of PV neurons in the LDT suppressed TMT-induced fear-like responses without affecting conditioned fear. Finally, activation of LHb glutamatergic inputs to LDT interneurons was sufficient to generate fear-like responses. Thus, the LHb-LDT pathway is important for regulating olfactory cue-induced innate fear. Our results provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for anxiety disorder.

  9. Survival of interneurons and parallel fiber synapses in a cerebellar cortex deprived of Purkinje cells: studies in the double mutant mouse Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-).

    PubMed

    Zanjani, S Hadi; Selimi, Fekrije; Vogel, Michael W; Haeberlé, Anne-Marie; Boeuf, Julien; Mariani, Jean; Bailly, Yannick J

    2006-08-01

    The Lurcher mutation in the Grid2 gene causes the cell autonomous death of virtually all cerebellar Purkinje cells and the target-related death of 90% of the granule cells and 60-75% of the olivary neurons. Inactivation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family, in heterozygous Lurcher mutants (Grid2Lc/+) rescues approximately 60% of the granule cells, but does not rescue Purkinje or olivary neurons. Given the larger size of the cerebellar molecular layer in Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) double mutants compared to Grid2Lc/+ mutants, we analyzed the survival of the stellate and basket interneurons as well as the synaptic connectivity of parallel fibers originating from the surviving granule cells in the absence of their Purkinje cell targets in the Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) cerebellum. Quantification showed a significantly higher density of interneurons ( approximately 60%) in the molecular layer of the Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) mice compared to Grid2Lc/+, suggesting that interneurons are subject to a BAX-dependent target-related death in the Lurcher mutants. Furthermore, electron microscopy showed the normal ultrastructural aspect of a number of parallel fibers in the molecular layer of the Grid2Lc/+; Bax(-/-) double mutant mice and preserved their numerous synaptic contacts on interneurons, suggesting that interneurons could play a trophic role for axon terminals of surviving granule cells. Finally, parallel fibers varicosities in the double mutant established "pseudo-synapses" on glia as well as displayed autophagic profiles, suggesting that the connections established by the parallel fibers in the absence of their Purkinje cell targets were subject to a high turnover involving autophagy.

  10. Fgfr1 Inactivation in the Mouse Telencephalon Results in Impaired Maturation of Interneurons Expressing Parvalbumin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Karen Müller; Maragnoli, Maria Elisabetta; Phull, Pooja M.; Tran, Kathy May; Choubey, Lisha; Vaccarino, Flora M.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) and their receptors (Fgfr) are expressed in the developing and adult CNS. Previous studies demonstrated a decrease in cortical interneurons and locomotor hyperactivity in mice with a conditional Fgfr1 deletion generated in radial glial cells during midneurogenesis (Fgfr1f/f;hGfapCre+). Here, we report earlier and more extensive inactivation of Fgfr1 in neuroepithelial cells of the CNS (Fgfr1f/f;NesCre+). Similar to findings in Fgfr1f/f;hGfapCre+ mice, parvalbumin positive (PV+) cortical interneurons are also decreased in the neocortex of Fgfr1f/f;NesCre+ mice when compared to control littermates (Fgfr1f/f). Fgfr1f/f;NesCre+ embryos do not differ from controls in the initial specification of GABAergic cells in the ganglionic eminence (GE) as assessed by in situ hybridization for Dlx2, Mash1 and Nkx2. Equal numbers of GABAergic neuron precursors genetically labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were observed at P0 in Fgfr1f/f;hGfapCre+;Gad1-GFP mutant mice. However, fewer GFP+ and GFP+/PV+ interneurons were observed in these mutants at adulthood, indicating that a decrease in cortical interneuron markers is occurring postnatally. Fgfr1 is expressed in cortical astrocytes in the postnatal brain. To test whether the astrocytes of mice lacking Fgfr1 are less capable of supporting interneurons, we co-cultured wild type Gad1-GFP+ interneuron precursors isolated from the medial GE (MGE) with astrocytes from Fgfr1f/f control or Fgfr1f/f;hGfapCre+ mice. Interneurons grown on Fgfr1 deficient astrocytes had small soma size and fewer neurites per cell, but no differences in cell survival. Decreased soma size of Gad67 immunopositive interneurons was also observed in the cortex of adult Fgfr1f/f;NesCre+ mice. Our data indicate that astrocytes from Fgfr1 mutants are impaired in supporting the maturation of cortical GABAergic neurons in the postnatal period. This model may elucidate potential mechanisms of impaired PV interneuron maturation

  11. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM REDUCES PARVALBUMIN EXPRESSION IN GABAERGIC NEURONS OF CORTEX AND HIPPOCAMPUS: IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL FINDINGS AND FUNCTIONAL CORRELATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    GABAergic interneurons comprise the bulk of local inhibitory neuronal circuitry in cortex and hippocampus and a subpopulation of these interneurons contain the calcium binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). A previous report indicated that severe hypothyroidism reduced PV immunoreact...

  12. Duration of culture and sonic hedgehog signaling differentially specify PV versus SST cortical interneuron fates from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Jennifer A; Goldberg, Ethan M; Maroof, Asif M; Xu, Qing; Petros, Timothy J; Anderson, Stewart A

    2015-04-01

    Medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-derived GABAergic cortical interneurons (cINs) consist of multiple subtypes that are involved in many cortical functions. They also have a remarkable capacity to migrate, survive and integrate into cortical circuitry after transplantation into postnatal cortex. These features have engendered considerable interest in generating distinct subgroups of interneurons from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) for the study of interneuron fate and function, and for the development of cell-based therapies. Although advances have been made, the capacity to generate highly enriched pools of subgroup fate-committed interneuron progenitors from PSCs has remained elusive. Previous studies have suggested that the two main MGE-derived interneuron subgroups--those expressing somatostatin (SST) and those expressing parvalbumin (PV)--are specified in the MGE from Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors at higher or lower levels of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, respectively. To further explore the role of Shh and other factors in cIN fate determination, we generated a reporter line such that Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors express mCherry and postmitotic Lhx6-expressing MGE-derived interneurons express GFP. Manipulations of Shh exposure and time in culture influenced the subgroup fates of ESC-derived interneurons. Exposure to higher Shh levels, and collecting GFP-expressing precursors at 12 days in culture, resulted in the strongest enrichment for SST interneurons over those expressing PV, whereas the strongest enrichment for PV interneurons was produced by lower Shh and by collecting mCherry-expressing cells after 17 days in culture. These findings confirm that fate determination of cIN subgroups is crucially influenced by Shh signaling, and provide a system for the further study of interneuron fate and function. PMID:25804737

  13. Are striatal tyrosine hydroxylase interneurons dopaminergic?

    PubMed

    Xenias, Harry S; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M

    2015-04-22

    Striatal GABAergic interneurons that express the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) have been identified previously by several methods. Although generally assumed to be dopaminergic, possibly serving as a compensatory source of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's disease, this assumption has never been tested directly. In TH-Cre mice whose nigrostriatal pathway had been eliminated unilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine, we injected a Cre-dependent virus coding for channelrhodopsin-2 and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein unilaterally into the unlesioned midbrain or bilaterally into the striatum. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slices revealed that both optical and electrical stimulation readily elicited DA release in control striata but not from contralateral striata when nigrostriatal neurons were transduced. In contrast, neither optical nor electrical stimulation could elicit striatal DA release in either the control or lesioned striata when the virus was injected directly into the striatum transducing only striatal TH interneurons. This demonstrates that striatal TH interneurons do not release DA. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-TH mice revealed colocalization of DA, l-amino acid decarboxylase, the DA transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 with EGFP in midbrain dopaminergic neurons but not in any of the striatal EGFP-TH interneurons. Optogenetic activation of striatal EGFP-TH interneurons produced strong GABAergic inhibition in all spiny neurons tested. These results indicate that striatal TH interneurons are not dopaminergic but rather are a type of GABAergic interneuron that expresses TH but none of the other enzymes or transporters necessary to operate as dopaminergic neurons and exert widespread GABAergic inhibition onto direct and indirect spiny neurons. PMID:25904808

  14. Are striatal tyrosine hydroxylase interneurons dopaminergic?

    PubMed

    Xenias, Harry S; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M

    2015-04-22

    Striatal GABAergic interneurons that express the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) have been identified previously by several methods. Although generally assumed to be dopaminergic, possibly serving as a compensatory source of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's disease, this assumption has never been tested directly. In TH-Cre mice whose nigrostriatal pathway had been eliminated unilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine, we injected a Cre-dependent virus coding for channelrhodopsin-2 and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein unilaterally into the unlesioned midbrain or bilaterally into the striatum. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slices revealed that both optical and electrical stimulation readily elicited DA release in control striata but not from contralateral striata when nigrostriatal neurons were transduced. In contrast, neither optical nor electrical stimulation could elicit striatal DA release in either the control or lesioned striata when the virus was injected directly into the striatum transducing only striatal TH interneurons. This demonstrates that striatal TH interneurons do not release DA. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-TH mice revealed colocalization of DA, l-amino acid decarboxylase, the DA transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 with EGFP in midbrain dopaminergic neurons but not in any of the striatal EGFP-TH interneurons. Optogenetic activation of striatal EGFP-TH interneurons produced strong GABAergic inhibition in all spiny neurons tested. These results indicate that striatal TH interneurons are not dopaminergic but rather are a type of GABAergic interneuron that expresses TH but none of the other enzymes or transporters necessary to operate as dopaminergic neurons and exert widespread GABAergic inhibition onto direct and indirect spiny neurons.

  15. Cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling the migration of neocortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Marín, Oscar

    2013-07-01

    The discovery, approximately 15 years ago, that cortical GABAergic interneurons originate outside the pallium has revolutionized our understanding of the development of the cerebral cortex. It is now clear that glutamatergic pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons follow largely distinct development programs, a notion that has challenged our views on how these neurons assemble to form precise neural circuits. In this review, I summarize our current knowledge of the mechanisms that control the migration of neocortical interneurons, a process that can be subdivided into three consecutive phases: migration to the cortex, intracortical dispersion, and layering.

  16. Electrical coupling regulates layer 1 interneuron microcircuit formation in the neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xing-Hua; Wang, Min; He, Xiang-Nan; He, Fei; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Lu, Wenlian; Qiu, Zi-Long; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of electrical and chemical synapses among interneurons is essential for interneuron function in the neocortex. However, it remains largely unclear whether electrical coupling between interneurons influences chemical synapse formation and microcircuit assembly during development. Here, we show that electrical and GABAergic chemical connections robustly develop between interneurons in neocortical layer 1 over a similar time course. Electrical coupling promotes action potential generation and synchronous firing between layer 1 interneurons. Furthermore, electrically coupled interneurons exhibit strong GABA-A receptor-mediated synchronous synaptic activity. Disruption of electrical coupling leads to a loss of bidirectional, but not unidirectional, GABAergic connections. Moreover, a reduction in electrical coupling induces an increase in excitatory synaptic inputs to layer 1 interneurons. Together, these findings strongly suggest that electrical coupling between neocortical interneurons plays a critical role in regulating chemical synapse development and precise formation of circuits. PMID:27510304

  17. Firing regulation of fast-spiking interneurons by autaptic inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daqing; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Wu, Shengdun; Xia, Chuan; Zhang, Yangsong; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    Fast-spiking (FS) interneurons in the brain are self-innervated by powerful inhibitory GABAergic autaptic connections. By computational modelling, we investigate how autaptic inhibition regulates the firing response of such interneurons. Our results indicate that autaptic inhibition both boosts the current threshold for action potential generation and modulates the input-output gain of FS interneurons. The autaptic transmission delay is identified as a key parameter that controls the firing patterns and determines multistability regions of FS interneurons. Furthermore, we observe that neuronal noise influences the firing regulation of FS interneurons by autaptic inhibition and extends their dynamic range for encoding inputs. Importantly, autaptic inhibition modulates noise-induced irregular firing of FS interneurons, such that coherent firing appears at an optimal autaptic inhibition level. Our results reveal the functional roles of autaptic inhibition in taming the firing dynamics of FS interneurons.

  18. Spinal interneuronal systems: identification, multifunctional character and reconfigurations in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska, E

    2001-01-01

    This review focuses on the flexibility of operation of spinal interneuronal networks and their multifunctional character in mammals. It concerns, in particular, two ways in which spinal interneuronal networks may be functionally reorganised, namely by modulating the synaptic actions of primary afferents by monoamines and by GABAergic presynaptic inhibition. The evidence will be reviewed for topographical and target-related differences in modulatory effects in various interneuronal networks and these will be related to differences in the intrinsic properties of different functional types of interneurones in these networks and to the role played by them. PMID:11351010

  19. Hippocampal gamma-frequency oscillations: from interneurones to pyramidal cells, and back.

    PubMed

    Mann, Edward O; Radcliffe, Catrin A; Paulsen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    GABAergic interneurones are necessary for the emergence of hippocampal gamma-frequency network oscillations, during which they play a key role in the synchronization of pyramidal cell firing. However, it remains to be resolved how distinct interneurone subtypes contribute to gamma-frequency oscillations, in what way the spatiotemporal pattern of interneuronal input affects principal cell activity, and by which mechanisms the interneurones themselves are synchronized. Here we summarize recent evidence from cholinergically induced gamma-frequency network oscillations in vitro, showing that perisomatic-targeting GABAergic interneurones provide prominent rhythmic inhibition in pyramidal cells, and that these interneurones are synchronized by recurrent excitation. We conclude by presenting a minimal integrate-and-fire network model which demonstrates that this excitatory-inhibitory feedback loop is sufficient to explain the generation of intrahippocampal gamma-frequency oscillations. PMID:15539391

  20. Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation to Treat CNS Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Muhammad O.; Moore, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field. PMID:27582692

  1. Identification and Characterization of GABAergic Projection Neurons from Ventral Hippocampus to Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Lübkemann, Robert; Eberhardt, Judith; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Janitzky, Kathrin; Nullmeier, Sven; Stork, Oliver; Schwegler, Herbert; Linke, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic local circuit neurons are critical for the network activity and functional interaction of the amygdala and hippocampus. Previously, we obtained evidence for a GABAergic contribution to the hippocampal projection into the basolateral amygdala. Using fluorogold retrograde labeling, we now demonstrate that this projection indeed has a prominent GABAergic component comprising 17% of the GABAergic neurons in the ventral hippocampus. A majority of the identified GABAergic projection neurons are located in the stratum oriens of area CA1, but cells are also found in the stratum pyramidale and stratum radiatum. We could detect the expression of different markers of interneuron subpopulations, including parvalbumin and calbindin, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, and cholecystokinin in such retrogradely labeled GABA neurons. Thus GABAergic projection neurons to the amygdala comprise a neurochemically heterogeneous group of cells from different interneuron populations, well situated to control network activity patterns in the amygdalo-hippocampal system. PMID:26264032

  2. Novel fast adapting interneurons mediate cholinergic-induced fast GABAA inhibitory postsynaptic currents in striatal spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Faust, Thomas W; Assous, Maxime; Shah, Fulva; Tepper, James M; Koós, Tibor

    2015-07-01

    Previous work suggests that neostriatal cholinergic interneurons control the activity of several classes of GABAergic interneurons through fast nicotinic receptor-mediated synaptic inputs. Although indirect evidence has suggested the existence of several classes of interneurons controlled by this mechanism, only one such cell type, the neuropeptide-Y-expressing neurogliaform neuron, has been identified to date. Here we tested the hypothesis that in addition to the neurogliaform neurons that elicit slow GABAergic inhibitory responses, another interneuron type exists in the striatum that receives strong nicotinic cholinergic input and elicits conventional fast GABAergic synaptic responses in projection neurons. We obtained in vitro slice recordings from double transgenic mice in which Channelrhodopsin-2 was natively expressed in cholinergic neurons and a population of serotonin receptor-3a-Cre-expressing GABAergic interneurons were visualized with tdTomato. We show that among the targeted GABAergic interneurons a novel type of interneuron, termed the fast-adapting interneuron, can be identified that is distinct from previously known interneurons based on immunocytochemical and electrophysiological criteria. We show using optogenetic activation of cholinergic inputs that fast-adapting interneurons receive a powerful supra-threshold nicotinic cholinergic input in vitro. Moreover, fast adapting neurons are densely connected to projection neurons and elicit fast, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic current responses. The nicotinic receptor-mediated activation of fast-adapting interneurons may constitute an important mechanism through which cholinergic interneurons control the activity of projection neurons and perhaps the plasticity of their synaptic inputs when animals encounter reinforcing or otherwise salient stimuli.

  3. Canonical Organization of Layer 1 Neuron-Led Cortical Inhibitory and Disinhibitory Interneuronal Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice J.; Wang, Guangfu; Jiang, Xiaolong; Johnson, Seraphina M.; Hoang, Elizabeth T.; Lanté, Fabien; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Beenhakker, Mark P.; Shen, Ying; Julius Zhu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Interneurons play a key role in cortical function and dysfunction, yet organization of cortical interneuronal circuitry remains poorly understood. Cortical Layer 1 (L1) contains 2 general GABAergic interneuron groups, namely single bouquet cells (SBCs) and elongated neurogliaform cells (ENGCs). SBCs predominantly make unidirectional inhibitory connections (SBC→) with L2/3 interneurons, whereas ENGCs frequently form reciprocal inhibitory and electric connections (ENGC↔) with L2/3 interneurons. Here, we describe a systematic investigation of the pyramidal neuron targets of L1 neuron-led interneuronal circuits in the rat barrel cortex with simultaneous octuple whole-cell recordings and report a simple organizational scheme of the interneuronal circuits. Both SBCs→ and ENGC ↔ L2/3 interneuronal circuits connect to L2/3 and L5, but not L6, pyramidal neurons. SBC → L2/3 interneuronal circuits primarily inhibit the entire dendritic–somato–axonal axis of a few L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons located within the same column. In contrast, ENGC ↔ L2/3 interneuronal circuits generally inhibit the distal apical dendrite of many L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons across multiple columns. Finally, L1 interneuron-led circuits target distinct subcellular compartments of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons in a L2/3 interneuron type-dependent manner. These results suggest that L1 neurons form canonical interneuronal circuits to control information processes in both supra- and infragranular cortical layers. PMID:24554728

  4. Laterodorsal tegmentum interneuron subtypes oppositely regulate olfactory cue-induced innate fear.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongbin; Yang, Junhua; Xi, Wang; Hao, Sijia; Luo, Benyan; He, Xiaobin; Zhu, Liya; Lou, Huifang; Yu, Yan-qin; Xu, Fuqiang; Duan, Shumin; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Innate fear has a critical role in survival of animals. Unlike conditioned fear, the neuronal circuitry underlying innate fear is largely unknown. We found that the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) and lateral habenula (LHb) are specifically activated by the mouse predator odorant trimethylthiazoline (TMT). Using optogenetics to selectively stimulate GABAergic neurons in the LDT immediately produced fear-like responses (freezing, accelerated heart rate and increased serum corticosterone), whereas prolonged stimulation caused anxiety-like behaviors. Notably, although selective stimulation of parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons similarly induced fear-like responses, stimulation of somatostatin-positive interneurons or inhibition of PV neurons in the LDT suppressed TMT-induced fear-like responses without affecting conditioned fear. Finally, activation of LHb glutamatergic inputs to LDT interneurons was sufficient to generate fear-like responses. Thus, the LHb-LDT pathway is important for regulating olfactory cue-induced innate fear. Our results provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for anxiety disorder. PMID:26727549

  5. Somatostatin-expressing interneurons provide subtractive inhibition and regulate sensory response fidelity in olfactory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sturgill, James F.; Isaacson, Jeffry S.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse types of local GABAergic interneurons shape the cortical representation of sensory information. Here we show how somatostatin-expressing interneurons (SOM cells) contribute to odor coding in mouse olfactory cortex. We find that odor-tuned SOM cells regulate principal cells through a purely subtractive operation that is independent of odor identity or intensity. This operation enhances the salience of odor-evoked activity without changing cortical odor tuning. SOM cells inhibit both principal cells and fast-spiking interneurons, indicating that subtractive inhibition reflects the interplay of multiple classes of interneurons. PMID:25751531

  6. Prenatal exposure to the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 alters migration of early-born glutamatergic neurons and GABAergic interneurons in the rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Saez, Trinidad M M; Aronne, María P; Caltana, Laura; Brusco, Alicia H

    2014-05-01

    The endocannabinoid system, composed of cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids, and synthesis and degradation enzymes, is present since early stages of brain development. During this period, the endocannabinoid system is involved in the regulation of neural progenitor proliferation and specification as well as the migration and differentiation of pyramidal neurons and interneurons. Marijuana consumption during pregnancy represents a serious risk in relation to the fetal brain development since Δ(9) -tetrahidrocannabinol, the main active compound of cannabis, can reach the fetus through placenta and hemato-encephalic barrier. Cohort studies performed on children and adolescents of mothers who consumed marijuana during pregnancy reported cognitive and comportamental abnormalities. In the present study, we examined the expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 R during corticogenesis in radially and tangentially migrating post-mitotic neurons. We found that prenatal exposure to WIN impaired tangential and radial migration of post-mitotic neurons in the dorsal pallium. In addition, we described alterations of two transcription factors associated with proliferating and newly post-mitotic glutamatergic cells in the dorsal pallium, Tbr1 and Tbr2, and disruption in the number of Cajal-Retzius cells. The present results contribute to the knowledge of neurobiological substrates that determine neuro-comportamental changes that will persist through post-natal life.

  7. Striatal cholinergic interneurons Drive GABA release from dopamine terminals.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Alexandra B; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F; Shah, Nirao M; Seal, Rebecca P; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2014-04-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons.

  8. Diversity of Cortical Interneurons in Primates: The Role of the Dorsal Proliferative Niche

    PubMed Central

    Radonjić, Nevena V.; Ayoub, Albert E.; Memi, Fani; Yu, Xiaojing; Maroof, Asif; Jakovcevski, Igor; Anderson, Stewart A.; Rakic, Pasko; Zecevic, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Summary Evolutionary elaboration of tissues starts with changes in the genome and location of the stem cells. For example, GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian neocortex are generated in the ventral telencephalon and migrate tangentially to the neocortex, in contrast to the projection neurons originating in the ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ) of the dorsal telencephalon. In human and nonhuman primates, evidence suggests that an additional subset of neocortical GABAergic interneurons is generated in the cortical VZ and a proliferative niche, the outer SVZ. The origin, magnitude, and significance of this species-specific difference are not known. We use a battery of assays applicable to the human, monkey, and mouse organotypic cultures and supravital tissue to identify neuronal progenitors in the cortical VZ/SVZ niche that produce a subset of GABAergic interneurons. Our findings suggest that these progenitors constitute an evolutionary novelty contributing to the elaboration of higher cognitive functions in primates. PMID:25497090

  9. Excitatory Projection Neuron Subtypes Differentially Control the Distribution of Local Inhibitory Interneurons in the Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lodato, Simona; Rouaux, Caroline; Quast, Kathleen B.; Jantrachotechatchawan, Chanati; Studer, Michèle; Hensch, Takao K.; Arlotta, Paola

    2011-01-01

    In the mammalian cerebral cortex, the developmental events governing the integration of excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons into balanced local circuitry are poorly understood. We report that different subtypes of projection neurons uniquely and differentially determine the laminar distribution of cortical interneurons. We find that in Fezf2−/− cortex, the exclusive absence of subcerebral projection neurons and their replacement by callosal projection neurons cause distinctly abnormal lamination of interneurons and altered GABAergic inhibition. In addition, experimental generation of either corticofugal neurons or callosal neurons below the cortex is sufficient to recruit cortical interneurons to these ectopic locations. Strikingly, the identity of the projection neurons generated, rather than strictly their birthdate, determines the specific types of interneurons recruited. These data demonstrate that in the neocortex individual populations of projection neurons cell-extrinsically control the laminar fate of interneurons and the assembly of local inhibitory circuitry. PMID:21338885

  10. A Resource of Cre Driver Lines for Genetic Targeting of GABAergic Neurons in Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Hiroki; He, Miao; Wu, Priscilla; Kim, Sangyong; Paik, Raehum; Sugino, Ken; Kvitsani, Duda; Fu, Yu; Lu, Jiangteng; Lin, Ying; Miyoshi, Goichi; Shima, Yasuyuki; Fishell, Gord; Nelson, Sacha B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A key obstacle to understanding neural circuits in the cerebral cortex is that of unraveling the diversity of GABAergic interneurons. This diversity poses general questions for neural circuit analysis: how are these interneuron cell types generated and assembled into stereotyped local circuits and how do they differentially contribute to circuit operations that underlie cortical functions ranging from perception to cognition? Using genetic engineering in mice, we have generated and characterized ~20 Cre and inducible CreER knockin driver lines that reliably target major classes and lineages of GABAergic neurons. More select populations are captured by intersection of Cre and Flp drivers. Genetic targeting allows reliable identification, monitoring, and manipulation of cortical GABAergic neurons, thereby enabling a systematic and comprehensive analysis from cell fate specification, migration, and connectivity, to their functions in network dynamics and behavior. As such, this approach will accelerate the study of GABAergic circuits throughout the mammalian brain. PMID:21943598

  11. Distinct behavioral consequences of short-term and prolonged GABAergic depletion in prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Judith M.; Nissel, Sabine; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mederer, Anna; Käfer, Karola; Bedenk, Benedikt T.; Martens, Henrik; Anders, Rebecca; Grosche, Jens; Michalski, Dominik; Härtig, Wolfgang; Wotjak, Carsten T.

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons are essential for a functional equilibrium between excitatory and inhibitory impulses throughout the CNS. Disruption of this equilibrium can lead to various neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders such as epilepsy or schizophrenia. Schizophrenia itself is clinically defined by negative (e.g., depression) and positive (e.g., hallucinations) symptoms as well as cognitive dysfunction. GABAergic interneurons are proposed to play a central role in the etiology and progression of schizophrenia; however, the specific mechanisms and the time-line of symptom development as well as the distinct involvement of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in the etiology of schizophrenia-related symptoms are still not conclusively resolved. Previous work demonstrated that GABAergic interneurons can be selectively depleted in adult mice by means of saporin-conjugated anti-vesicular GABA transporter antibodies (SAVAs) in vitro and in vivo. Given their involvement in schizophrenia-related disease etiology, we ablated GABAergic interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) in adult male C57BL/6N mice. Subsequently we assessed alterations in anxiety, sensory processing, hyperactivity and cognition after long-term (>14 days) and short-term (<14 days) GABAergic depletion. Long-term GABAergic depletion in the mPFC resulted in a decrease in sensorimotor-gating and impairments in cognitive flexibility. Notably, the same treatment at the level of the dHPC completely abolished spatial learning capabilities. Short-term GABAergic depletion in the dHPC revealed a transient hyperactive phenotype as well as marked impairments regarding the acquisition of a spatial memory. In contrast, recall of a spatial memory was not affected by the same intervention. These findings emphasize the importance of functional local GABAergic networks for the encoding but not the recall of hippocampus-dependent spatial memories. PMID:25628548

  12. Mutual Control of Cholinergic and Low-Threshold Spike Interneurons in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Elghaba, Rasha; Vautrelle, Nicolas; Bracci, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is the largest nucleus of the basal ganglia and is crucially involved in action selection and reward processing. Cortical and thalamic inputs to the striatum are processed by local networks in which several classes of interneurons play an important, but still poorly understood role. Here we investigated the interactions between cholinergic and low-threshold spike (LTS) interneurons. LTS interneurons were hyperpolarized by co-application of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor antagonists (atropine and mecamylamine, respectively). Mecamylamine alone also caused hyperpolarizations, while atropine alone caused depolarizations and increased firing. LTS interneurons were also under control of tonic GABA, as application of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin caused depolarizations and increased firing. Frequency of spontaneous GABAergic events in LTS interneurons was increased by co-application of atropine and mecamylamine or by atropine alone, but reduced by mecamylamine alone. In the presence of picrotoxin and tetrodotoxin (TTX), atropine and mecamylamine depolarized the LTS interneurons. We concluded that part of the excitatory effects of tonic acetylcholine (ACh) on LTS interneurons were due to cholinergic modulation of tonic GABA. We then studied the influence of LTS interneurons on cholinergic interneurons. Application of antagonists of somatostatin or neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors or of an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME) did not cause detectable effects in cholinergic interneurons. However, prolonged synchronized depolarizations of LTS interneurons (elicited with optogenetics tools) caused slow-onset depolarizations in cholinergic interneurons, which were often accompanied by strong action potential firing and were fully abolished by L-NAME. Thus, a mutual excitatory influence exists between LTS and cholinergic interneurons in the striatum, providing an opportunity for sustained activation of the two cell types. This activation may

  13. GABA interneurons mediate the rapid antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine

    PubMed Central

    Wohleb, Eric S.; Wu, Min; Gerhard, Danielle M.; Taylor, Seth R.; Picciotto, Marina R.; Alreja, Meenakshi; Duman, Ronald S.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a recurring psychiatric illness that causes substantial health and socioeconomic burdens. Clinical reports have revealed that scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, produces rapid antidepressant effects in individuals with MDD. Preclinical models suggest that these rapid antidepressant effects can be recapitulated with blockade of M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M1-AChR); however, the cellular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent synaptic and behavioral responses to scopolamine have not been determined. Here, we demonstrate that the antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine are mediated by GABA interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Both GABAergic (GAD67+) interneurons and glutamatergic (CaMKII+) interneurons in the mPFC expressed M1-AChR. In mice, viral-mediated knockdown of M1-AChR specifically in GABAergic neurons, but not glutamatergic neurons, in the mPFC attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine. Immunohistology and electrophysiology showed that somatostatin (SST) interneurons in the mPFC express M1-AChR at higher levels than parvalbumin interneurons. Moreover, knockdown of M1-AChR in SST interneurons in the mPFC demonstrated that M1-AChR expression in these neurons is required for the rapid antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine. These data indicate that SST interneurons in the mPFC are a promising pharmacological target for developing rapid-acting antidepressant therapies. PMID:27270172

  14. GABAergic control of depression-related brain states

    PubMed Central

    Luscher, Bernhard; Fuchs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The GABAergic deficit hypothesis of major depressive disorders posits that reduced GABA concentration in brain, impaired function of GABAergic interneurons, altered expression and function of GABAA receptors, and changes in GABAergic transmission dictated by altered chloride homeostasis can contribute to the etiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Conversely, the hypothesis posits that the efficacy of currently used antidepressants is determined by their ability to enhance GABAergic neurotransmission. We here provide an update for corresponding evidence from studies of patients and preclinical animal models of depression. In addition, we propose an explanation for the continued lack of genetic evidence that explains the considerable heritability of MDD. Lastly, we discuss how alterations in GABAergic transmission are integral to other hypotheses of MDD that emphasize (i) the role of monoaminergic deficits, (ii) stress-based etiologies, (iii) neurotrophic deficits, and (iv) the neurotoxic and neural circuit-impairing consequences of chronic excesses of glutamate. We propose that altered GABAergic transmission serves as a common denominator of MDD that can account for all these other hypotheses and that plays a causal and common role in diverse mechanistic etiologies of depressive brain states and in the mechanism of action of current antidepressant drug therapies. PMID:25637439

  15. Modulation of behavioral networks by selective interneuronal inactivation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M J; Horvath, S; Ebert, P; Norris, J L; Seeley, E H; Brown, J; Gellert, L; Everheart, M; Garbett, K A; Grice, T W; Caprioli, R M; Mirnics, K

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic disturbances are hallmark features of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders and encompass multiple interneuronal cell types. Using bacterial artificial chromosome-driven, miRNA silencing technology we generated transgenic mouse lines that suppress glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) in either cholecystokinin (CCK)- or neuropeptide Y (NPY)-expressing interneurons. In situ lipidomic and proteomic analyses on brain tissue sections revealed distinct, brain region-specific profiles in each transgenic line. Behavioral analyses revealed that suppression of GAD1 in CCK+ interneurons resulted in locomotor and olfactory sensory changes, whereas suppression in NPY+ interneurons affected anxiety-related behaviors and social interaction. Both transgenic mouse lines had altered sensitivity to amphetamine albeit in opposite directions. Together, these data argue that reduced GAD1 expression leads to altered molecular and behavioral profiles in a cell type-dependent manner, and that these subpopulations of interneurons are strong and opposing modulators of dopamine system function. Furthermore, our findings also support the hypothesis that neuronal networks are differentially controlled by diverse inhibitory subnetworks.

  16. Behavior-dependent specialization of identified hippocampal interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Lapray, Damien; Lasztoczi, Balint; Lagler, Michael; Viney, Tim James; Katona, Linda; Valenti, Ornella; Hartwich, Katja; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A large variety of GABAergic interneurons control information processing in hippocampal circuits governing the formation of neuronal representations. Whether distinct hippocampal interneuron types contribute differentially to information-processing during behavior is not known. We employed a novel technique for recording and labeling interneurons and pyramidal cells in drug-free, freely-moving rats. Recorded parvalbumin-expressing basket interneurons innervate somata and proximal pyramidal cell dendrites, whereas nitric-oxide-synthase- and neuropeptide-Y-expressing ivy cells provide synaptic and extrasynaptic dendritic modulation. Basket and ivy cells showed distinct spike timing dynamics, firing at different rates and times during theta and ripple oscillations. Basket but not ivy cells changed their firing rates during movement, sleep and quiet wakefulness, suggesting that basket cells coordinate cell assemblies in a behavioral state-contingent manner, whereas persistently-firing ivy cells might control network excitability and homeostasis. Different interneuron types provide GABA to specific subcellular domains at defined times and rates, thus differentially controlling network activity during behavior. PMID:22864613

  17. Selective degeneration of septal and hippocampal GABAergic neurons in a mouse model of amyloidosis and tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Loreth, Desirée; Ozmen, Laurence; Revel, Florent G; Knoflach, Frédéric; Wetzel, Philine; Frotscher, Michael; Metzger, Friedrich; Kretz, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by brain accumulation of amyloid-β peptide and neurofibrillary tangles, which are believed to initiate a pathological cascade that results in progressive impairment of cognitive functions and eventual neuronal death. To obtain a mouse model displaying the typical AD histopathology of amyloidosis and tauopathy, we generated a triple-transgenic mouse line (TauPS2APP) by overexpressing human mutations of the amyloid precursor protein, presenilin2 and tau genes. Stereological analysis of TauPS2APP mice revealed significant neurodegeneration of GABAergic septo-hippocampal projection neurons as well as their target cells, the GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. In contrast, the cholinergic medial septum neurons remained unaffected. Moreover, the degeneration of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons was dependent on the hippocampal subfield and interneuronal subtype investigated, whereby the dentate gyrus and the NPY-positive interneurons, respectively, were most strongly affected. Neurodegeneration was also accompanied by a change in the mRNA expression of markers for inhibitory interneurons. In line with the loss of inhibitory neurons, we observed functional changes in TauPS2APP mice relative to WT mice, with strongly enhanced long-term potentiation in the medial-perforant pathway input to the dentate gyrus, and stereotypic hyperactivity. Our data indicate that inhibitory neurons are the targets of neurodegeneration in a mouse model of amyloidosis and tauopathy, thus pointing to a possible role of the inhibitory network in the pathophysiological and functional cascade of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. "Small axonless neurons": postnatally generated neocortical interneurons with delayed functional maturation.

    PubMed

    Le Magueresse, Corentin; Alfonso, Julieta; Khodosevich, Konstantin; Arroyo Martín, Angel A; Bark, Christine; Monyer, Hannah

    2011-11-16

    GABAergic interneurons of the mouse cortex are generated embryonically in the ventral telencephalon. Recent evidence, however, indicated that a subset of cortical cells expressing interneuronal markers originate in the neonatal subventricular zone. This has raised interest in the functional development and incorporation of these postnatally generated cells into cortical circuits. Here we demonstrate that these cells integrate in the cortex, and that they constitute two distinct GABAergic interneuronal classes. Whereas one class reflects the tail end of embryonic interneuron genesis, the other class comprises interneurons that are exclusively generated perinatally and postnatally. The latter constitute a novel subclass of interneurons. They are preferentially located in the deeper layers of the olfactory and orbital cortices, exhibit a unique firing pattern and slow functional maturation. Based on their distinct morphology we termed them "small axonless neurons" and indeed, unlike other cortical neurons, they communicate with their neuronal partners via dendrodendritic synapses. Finally, we provide evidence that the number of small axonless neurons is enhanced by odor enrichment, a further indication that they integrate into neural circuits and participate to olfactory processing.

  19. Maternal Immune Activation Leads to Selective Functional Deficits in Offspring Parvalbumin Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Canetta, Sarah; Bolkan, Scott; Padilla-Coreano, Nancy; Song, LouJin; Sahn, Ryan; Harrison, Neil; Gordon, Joshua A.; Brown, Alan; Kellendonk, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Summary Abnormalities in prefrontal GABAergic transmission, particularly in fast-spiking interneurons that express parvalbumin (PV), are hypothesized to contribute to the pathophysiology of multiple psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders and depression. While primarily histological abnormalities have been observed in patients and in animal models of psychiatric disease, evidence for abnormalities in functional neurotransmission at the level of specific interneuron populations has been lacking in animal models and is difficult to establish in human patients. Using an animal model of a psychiatric disease risk factor, prenatal maternal immune activation (MIA), we found reduced functional GABAergic transmission in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of adult MIA offspring. Decreased transmission was selective for interneurons expressing PV, and was not observed in calretinin-expressing neurons. This deficit in PV function in MIA offspring was associated with increased anxiety-like behavior and impairments in attentional set shifting, but did not affect working memory. Furthermore, cell-type specific optogenetic inhibition of mPFC PV interneurons was sufficient to impair attentional set shifting and enhance anxiety levels. Finally, we found that in vivo mPFC gamma oscillations, which are supported by PV interneuron function, were linearly correlated with the degree of anxiety displayed in adult mice, and that this correlation was disrupted in MIA offspring. These results demonstrate a selective functional vulnerability of PV interneurons to maternal immune activation, leading to affective and cognitive symptoms that have high relevance for schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:26830140

  20. Terminal Field and Firing Selectivity of Cholecystokinin-Expressing Interneurons in the Hippocampal CA3 Area

    PubMed Central

    Lasztóczi, Bálint; Tukker, John J.; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal oscillations reflect coordinated neuronal activity on many timescales. Distinct types of GABAergic interneuron participate in the coordination of pyramidal cells over different oscillatory cycle phases. In the CA3 area, which generates sharp waves and gamma oscillations, the contribution of identified GABAergic neurons remains to be defined. We have examined the firing of a family of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons during network oscillations in urethane-anesthetized rats and compared them with firing of CA3 pyramidal cells. The position of the terminals of individual visualized interneurons was highly diverse, selective, and often spatially coaligned with either the entorhinal or the associational inputs to area CA3. The spike timing in relation to theta and gamma oscillations and sharp waves was correlated with the innervated pyramidal cell domain. Basket and dendritic-layer-innervating interneurons receive entorhinal and associational inputs and preferentially fire on the ascending theta phase, when pyramidal cell assemblies emerge. Perforant-path-associated cells, driven by recurrent collaterals of pyramidal cells fire on theta troughs, when established pyramidal cell assemblies are most active. In the CA3 area, slow and fast gamma oscillations occurred on opposite theta oscillation phases. Perforant-path-associated and some COUP-TFII-positive interneurons are strongly coupled to both fast and slow gamma oscillations, but basket and dendritic-layer-innervating cells are weakly coupled to fast gamma oscillations only. During sharp waves, different interneuron types are activated, inhibited, or remain unaffected. We suggest that specialization in pyramidal cell domain and glutamatergic input-specific operations, reflected in the position of GABAergic terminals, is the evolutionary drive underlying the diversity of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. PMID:22159120

  1. PKC activators enhance GABAergic neurotransmission and paired-pulse facilitation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Liu, Q-Y; Alkon, D L

    2014-05-30

    Bryostatin-1, a potent agonist of protein kinase C (PKC), has recently been found to enhance spatial learning and long-term memory in rats, mice, rabbits and the nudibranch Hermissenda, and to exert profound neuroprotective effects on Alzheimer's disease (AD) in transgenic mice. However, details of the mechanistic effects of bryostatin on learning and memory remain unclear. To address this issue, whole-cell recording, a dual-recording approach and extracellular recording techniques were performed on young (2-4months) Brown-Norway rats. We found that bath-applied bryostatin-1 significantly increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). The firing rate of GABAergic interneurons significantly was also increased as recorded with a loosely-attached extracellular recording configuration. Simultaneous recordings from communicating cell pairs of interneuron and pyramidal neuron revealed unique activity-dependent properties of GABAergic synapses. Furthermore, the bryostatin-induced increase of the frequency and amplitude of IPSCs was blocked by methionine enkephalin which selectively suppressed the excitability of interneurons. Pretreatment with RO-32-0432, a relatively specific PKCα antagonist, blocked the effect of bryostatin on sIPSCs. Finally, bryostatin increased paired-pulse ratio of GABAergic synapses that lasted for at least 20min while pretreatment with RO-32-0432 significantly reduced the ratio. In addition, 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA), a selective PKCε activator, also increased the frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs. Taken together, these results suggest that bryostatin enhances GABAergic neurotransmission in pyramidal neurons by activating the PKCα & ε-dependent pathway and by a presynaptic mechanism with excitation of GABAergic interneurons. These effects of bryostatin on GABAergic transmissions and modifiability may contribute to the improvement of learning and memory

  2. Postnatal development of GABAergic signalling in the rat lateral geniculate nucleus: presynaptic dendritic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Marie-Claude; Qin, Yi; Heggelund, Paul; Zhu, J Julius

    2003-01-01

    Diverse forms of GABAergic inhibition are found in the mature brain. To understand how this diversity develops, we studied the changes in morphology of inhibitory interneurons and changes in interneuron-mediated synaptic transmission in the rat dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). We found a steady expansion of the dendritic tree of interneurons over the first three postnatal weeks. During this period, the area around a thalamocortical cell from which GABAA inhibition could be elicited also expanded. Dendritic branching and burst firing in interneurons evolved more slowly. The distal dendrites of interneurons began to branch extensively after the third week, and at the same time burst firing appeared. The appearance of burst firing and an elaborated dendritic tree were accompanied by a pronounced GABAB inhibition of thalamocortical cells. Thus, GABA inhibition of thalamocortical cells developed from one type of GABAA inhibition (spatially restricted) in the young animal into two distinct types of GABAA inhibition (short- and long-range) and GABAB inhibition in the adult animal. The close temporal relationships between the development of the diverse forms of inhibition and the postnatal changes in morphology of local GABAergic interneurons in the dLGN suggest that postnatal dendritic maturation is an important presynaptic factor for the developmental time course of the various types of feedforward inhibition in thalamus. PMID:12509484

  3. Bidirectional homeostatic plasticity induced by interneuron cell death and transplantation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Howard, MacKenzie Allen; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Baraban, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic changes in excitability and activity can induce homeostatic plasticity. These perturbations may be associated with neurological disorders, particularly those involving loss or dysfunction of GABA interneurons. In distal-less homeobox 1 (Dlx1−/−) mice with late-onset interneuron loss and reduced inhibition, we observed both excitatory synaptic silencing and decreased intrinsic neuronal excitability. These homeostatic changes do not fully restore normal circuit function, because synaptic silencing results in enhanced potential for long-term potentiation and abnormal gamma oscillations. Transplanting medial ganglionic eminence interneuron progenitors to introduce new GABAergic interneurons, we demonstrate restoration of hippocampal function. Specifically, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, input resistance, hippocampal long-term potentiation, and gamma oscillations are all normalized. Thus, in vivo homeostatic plasticity is a highly dynamic and bidirectional process that responds to changes in inhibition. PMID:24344303

  4. GABAergic inhibition regulates developmental synapse elimination in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hisako; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Kitamura, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu

    2012-04-26

    Functional neural circuit formation during development involves massive elimination of redundant synapses. In the cerebellum, one-to-one connection from excitatory climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell (PC) is established by elimination of early-formed surplus CFs. This process depends on glutamatergic excitatory inputs, but contribution of GABAergic transmission remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate impaired CF synapse elimination in mouse models with diminished GABAergic transmission by mutation of a single allele for the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, by conditional deletion of GAD67 from PCs and GABAergic interneurons or by pharmacological inhibition of cerebellar GAD activity. The impaired CF synapse elimination was rescued by enhancing GABA(A) receptor sensitivity in the cerebellum by locally applied diazepam. Our electrophysiological and Ca2+ imaging data suggest that GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition onto the PC soma from molecular layer interneurons influences CF-induced Ca2+ transients in the soma and regulates CF synapse elimination from postnatal day 10 (P10) to around P16. PMID:22542190

  5. Loss of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 from Parvalbumin Interneurons Leads to Hyperinhibition, Decreased Anxiety, and Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rudenko, Andrii; Seo, Jinsoo; Hu, Ji; Su, Susan C.; de Anda, Froylan Calderon; Durak, Omer; Ericsson, Maria; Carlén, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations in fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) interneurons are hypothesized to be a major component of various neuropsychiatric disorders; however, the mechanisms regulating PV interneurons remain mostly unknown. Recently, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been shown to function as a major regulator of synaptic plasticity. Here, we demonstrate that genetic ablation of Cdk5 in PV interneurons in mouse brain leads to an increase in GABAergic neurotransmission and impaired synaptic plasticity. PVCre;fCdk5 mice display a range of behavioral abnormalities, including decreased anxiety and memory impairment. Our results reveal a central role of Cdk5 expressed in PV interneurons in gating inhibitory neurotransmission and underscore the importance of such regulation during behavioral tasks. Our findings suggest that Cdk5 can be considered a promising therapeutic target in a variety of conditions attributed to inhibitory interneuronal dysfunction, such as epilepsy, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia. PMID:25673832

  6. GABAergic innervation organizes synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptor clustering in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Sean B; Miralles, Celia P; De Blas, Angel L

    2002-02-01

    We have studied the effects of GABAergic innervation on the clustering of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) in cultured hippocampal neurons. In the absence of GABAergic innervation, pyramidal cells form small (0.36 +/- 0.01 micrometer diameter) GABA(A)R clusters at their surface in the dendrites and soma. When receiving GABAergic innervation from glutamic acid decarboxylase-containing interneurons, pyramidal cells form large (1.62 +/- 0.08 micrometer breadth) GABA(A)R clusters at GABAergic synapses. This is accompanied by a disappearance of the small GABA(A)R clusters in the local area surrounding each GABAergic synapse. Although the large synaptic GABA(A)R clusters of any neuron contained all GABA(A)R subunits and isoforms expressed by that neuron, the small clusters not localized at GABAergic synapses showed significant heterogeneity in subunit and isoform composition. Another difference between large GABAergic and small non-GABAergic GABA(A)R clusters was that a significant proportion of the latter was juxtaposed to postsynaptic markers of glutamatergic synapses such as PSD-95 and AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit. The densities of both the glutamate receptor-associated and non-associated small GABA(A)R clusters were decreased in areas surrounding GABAergic synapses. However, no effect on the density or distribution of glutamate receptor clusters was observed. The results suggest that there are local signals generated at GABAergic synapses that induce both assembly of large synaptic GABA(A)R clusters at the synapse and disappearance of the small GABA(A)R clusters in the surrounding area. In the absence of GABAergic innervation, weaker GABA(A)R-clustering signals, generated at glutamatergic synapses, induce the formation of small postsynaptic GABA(A)R clusters that remain juxtaposed to glutamate receptors at glutamatergic synapses.

  7. VIP+ interneurons control neocortical activity across brain states.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jesse; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Karnani, Mahesh M; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    GABAergic interneurons are positioned to powerfully influence the dynamics of neural activity, yet the interneuron-mediated circuit mechanisms that control spontaneous and evoked neocortical activity remains elusive. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP+) interneurons are a specialized cell class which synapse specifically on other interneurons, potentially serving to facilitate increases in cortical activity. In this study, using in vivo Ca(2+) imaging, we describe the interaction between local network activity and VIP+ cells and determine their role in modulating neocortical activity in mouse visual cortex. VIP+ cells were active across brain states including locomotion, nonlocomotion, visual stimulation, and under anesthesia. VIP+ activity correlated most clearly with the mean level of population activity of nearby excitatory neurons during all brain states, suggesting VIP+ cells enable high-excitability states in the cortex. The pharmacogenetic blockade of VIP+ cell output reduced network activity during locomotion, nonlocomotion, anesthesia, and visual stimulation, suggesting VIP+ cells exert a state-independent facilitation of neural activity in the cortex. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that VIP+ neurons have a causal role in the generation of high-activity regimes during spontaneous and stimulus evoked neocortical activity. PMID:26961109

  8. Genetic disruption of Met signaling impairs GABAergic striatal development and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Gabriela J.; Shahrokh, Mondona; Powell, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    The largest structure of the basal ganglia, the striatum, modulates motor activity and cognitive function and is composed of GABAergic projection neurons and interneurons. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the development of the striatal neurons and their assembly into functional circuits, we used a mouse with a targeted conditional Met mutation in post-mitotic cells of the ventral telencephalon. Characterization of the ontogeny of the striatal neuronal populations demonstrated that disruption of Met signaling specifically altered the GABAergic interneurons. Medium spiny neurons and cholinergic interneurons were largely unaffected. Mice lacking Met signaling have increased numbers of striatal GABAergic interneurons in the lateral sensorimotor areas with distinct behavioral deficits. Motor function and memory formation and consolidation appeared intact, but procedural learning on the cued task of the Morris water maze was delayed. MET is a susceptibility gene in Tourette Syndrome and autism, which are human disorders with impaired procedural learning. This study reveals how a striatal targeted disruption in Met signaling after generation of striatal neurons produces behavioral phenotypes shared by Tourette Syndrome and autism, linking the human genetics with the mechanism underlying the disorders. PMID:21195751

  9. The role of cannabinoid 1 receptor expressing interneurons in behavior.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jacquelyn A; Horváth, Szatmár; Garbett, Krassimira A; Schmidt, Martin J; Everheart, Monika; Gellért, Levente; Ebert, Philip; Mirnics, Károly

    2014-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population. Reduced expression of the 67-kDa protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) is a hallmark of the disease and is encoded by the GAD1 gene. In schizophrenia, GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal subpopulations, including the cannabinoid receptor type 1 positive (CNR1+) cells, but the functional consequences of these disturbances are not well understood. To investigate the role of the CNR1-positive GABA-ergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we employed a novel, miRNA-mediated transgenic mouse approach. We silenced the Gad1 transcript using a miRNA engineered to specifically target Gad1 mRNA under the control of Cnr1 bacterial artificial chromosome. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic mice showed elevated and persistent conditioned fear associated with an auditory cue and a significantly altered response to an amphetamine challenge. These deficits could not be attributed to sensory deficits or changes in baseline learning and memory. Furthermore, HPLC analyses revealed that Cnr1/Gad1 mice have enhanced serotonin levels, but not dopamine levels in response to amphetamine. Our findings demonstrate that dysfunction of a small subset of interneurons can have a profound effect on behavior and that the GABA-ergic, monoamine, and cannabinoid systems are functionally interconnected. The results also suggest that understanding the function of various interneuronal subclasses might be essential to develop knowledge-based treatment strategies for various mental disorders including schizophrenia and substance abuse.

  10. The role of cannabinoid 1 receptor expressing interneurons in behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A.; Horváth, Szatmár; Garbett, Krassimira; Schmidt, Martin J.; Everheart, Monika; Gellért, Levente; Ebert, Philip; Mirnics, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population. Reduced expression of the 67-kD a protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), is a hallmark of the disease, and is encoded by the GAD1 gene. In schizophrenia, GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal subpopulations, including the cannabinoid receptor type 1 positive (CNR1+) cells, but the functional consequences of these disturbances are not well understood. To investigate the role of the CNR1-positive GABA-ergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we employed a novel, miRNA-mediated transgenic mouse approach. We silenced the Gad1 transcript using a miRNA engineered to specifically target Gad1 mRNA under the control of Cnr1 bacterial artificial chromosome. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic mice showed elevated and persistent conditioned fear associated with an auditory cue and a significantly altered response to an amphetamine challenge. These deficits could not be attributed to sensory deficits or changes in baseline learning and memory. Furthermore, HPLC analyses revealed that Cnr1/Gad1 mice have enhanced serotonin levels, but not dopamine levels in response to amphetamine. Our findings demonstrate that dysfunction of a small subset of interneurons can have a profound effect on behavior and that the GABA-ergic, monoamine, and cannabinoid systems are functionally interconnected. The results also suggest that understanding the function of various interneuronal subclasses might be essential to develop knowledge-based treatment strategies for various mental disorders including schizophrenia and substance abuse. PMID:24239560

  11. POSTNATAL PHENOTYPE AND LOCALIZATION OF SPINAL CORD V1 DERIVED INTERNEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Francisco J.; Jonas, Philip C.; Sapir, Tamar; Hartley, Robert; Berrocal, Maria C.; Geiman, Eric J.; Todd, Andrew J.; Goulding, Martyn

    2010-01-01

    Developmental studies identified four classes (V0, V1, V2, V3) of embryonic interneurons in the ventral spinal cord. Very little however is known about their adult phenotypes. In order to further characterize interneuron cell types in the adult, the location, neurotransmitter phenotype, calcium-buffering protein expression and axon distributions of V1-derived neurons in the mouse spinal cord was determined. In the mature (P20 and older) spinal cord, most V1-derived neurons are located in lateral LVII and in LIX, few in medial LVII and none in LVIII. Approximately 40% express calbindin and/or parvalbumin, while few express calretinin. Of seven groups of ventral interneurons identified according to calcium-buffering protein expression, two groups (1 and 4) correspond with V1-derived neurons. Group 1 are Renshaw cells and intensely express calbindin and coexpress parvalbumin and calretinin. They represent 9% of the V1 population. Group 4 express only parvalbumin and represent 27% of V1-derived neurons. V1-derived group 4 neurons receive contacts from primary sensory afferents and are therefore proprioceptive interneurons and the most ventral neurons in this group receive convergent calbindin-IR Renshaw cell inputs. This subgroup resembles Ia inhibitory interneurons (IaINs) and represents 13% of V1-derived neurons. Adult V1-interneuron axons target LIX and LVII and some enter the deep dorsal horn. V1-axons do not cross the midline. V1 derived axonal varicosities were mostly (>80%) glycinergic and a third were GABAergic. None were glutamatergic or cholinergic. In summary, V1 interneurons develop into ipsilaterally projecting, inhibitory interneurons that include Renshaw cells, Ia inhibitory interneurons and other unidentified proprioceptive interneurons. PMID:16255029

  12. Physiological Properties of Supragranular Cortical Inhibitory Interneurons Expressing Retrograde Persistent Firing

    PubMed Central

    Imbrosci, Barbara; Neitz, Angela; Mittmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are polarized functional units. The somatodendritic compartment receives and integrates synaptic inputs while the axon relays relevant synaptic information in form of action potentials (APs) across long distance. Despite this well accepted notion, recent research has shown that, under certain circumstances, the axon can also generate APs independent of synaptic inputs at axonal sites distal from the soma. These ectopic APs travel both toward synaptic terminals and antidromically toward the soma. This unusual form of neuronal communication seems to preferentially occur in cortical inhibitory interneurons following a period of intense neuronal activity and might have profound implications for neuronal information processing. Here we show that trains of ectopically generated APs can be induced in a large portion of neocortical layer 2/3 GABAergic interneurons following a somatic depolarization inducing hundreds of APs. Sparsely occurring ectopic spikes were also observed in a large portion of layer 1 interneurons even in absence of prior somatic depolarization. Remarkably, we found that interneurons which produce ectopic APs display specific membrane and morphological properties significantly different from the remaining GABAergic cells and may therefore represent a functionally unique interneuronal subpopulation. PMID:25763283

  13. Developmental downregulation of GABAergic drive parallels formation of functional synapses in cultured mouse neocortical networks.

    PubMed

    Klueva, Julia; Meis, Susanne; de Lima, Ana D; Voigt, Thomas; Munsch, Thomas

    2008-06-01

    Networks of cortical neurons in vitro spontaneously develop synchronous oscillatory electrical activity at around the second week in culture. However, the underlying mechanisms and in particular the role of GABAergic interneurons in initiation and synchronization of oscillatory activity in developing cortical networks remain elusive. Here, we examined the intrinsic properties and the development of GABAergic and glutamatergic input onto presumed projection neurons (PNs) and large interneurons (L-INs) in cortical cultures of GAD67-GFP mice. Cultures developed spontaneous synchronous activity already at 5-7 days in vitro (DIV), as revealed by imaging transient changes in Fluo-3 fluorescence. Concurrently, spontaneous glutamate-mediated and GABA(A)-mediated postsynaptic currents (sPSCs) occured at 5 DIV. For both types of neurons the frequency of glutamatergic and GABAergic sPSCs increased with DIV, whereas the charge transfer of glutamatergic sPSCs increased and the charge transfer of GABAergic sPSCs decreased with cultivation time. The ratio between GABAergic and the overall charge transfer was significantly reduced with DIV for L-INs and PNs, indicating an overall reduction in GABAergic synaptic drive with maturation of the network. In contrast, analysis of miniature PSCs (mPSCs) revealed no significant changes of charge transfer with DIV for both types of neurons, indicating that the reduction in GABAergic drive was not due to a decreased number of functional synapses. Our data suggest that the global reduction in GABAergic synaptic drive together with more synaptic input to PNs and L-INs during maturation may enhance rhythmogenesis of the network and increase the synchronization at the level of population bursts. PMID:18361402

  14. Taurine activates GABAergic networks in the neocortex of immature mice

    PubMed Central

    Sava, Bogdan A.; Chen, Rongqing; Sun, Haiyan; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Kilb, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that taurine is the main endogenous neurotransmitter acting on glycine receptors, the implications of glycine receptor-mediated taurine actions on immature neocortical networks have not been addressed yet. To investigate the influence of taurine on the excitability of neuronal networks in the immature neocortex, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified pyramidal neurons and interneurons in coronal slices from C57Bl/6 and GAD67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice (postnatal days 2–4). In 46% of the pyramidal neurons bath-application of taurine at concentrations ≥ 300 μM significantly enhanced the frequency of postsynaptic currents (PSCs) by 744.3 ± 93.8% (n = 120 cells). This taurine-induced increase of PSC frequency was abolished by 0.2 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX), 1 μM strychnine or 3 μM gabazine, but was unaffected by the glutamatergic antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and (±) R(-)-3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP), suggesting that taurine specifically activates GABAergic network activity projecting to pyramidal neurons. Cell-attached recordings revealed that taurine enhanced the frequency of action potentials (APs) in pyramidal neurons, indicating an excitatory action of the GABAergic PSCs. In order to identify the presynaptic targets of taurine we demonstrate that bath application of taurine induced in GAD67-GFP labeled interneurons an inward current that is mainly mediated by glycine receptors and can generate APs in these cells. We conclude from these results that taurine can enhance network excitability in the immature neocortex by selectively activating GABAergic interneurons via interactions with glycine receptors. PMID:24550782

  15. Localization of the GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons projecting to the sublaterodorsal nucleus and potentially gating paradoxical sleep onset.

    PubMed

    Boissard, Romuald; Fort, Patrice; Gervasoni, Damien; Barbagli, Bruno; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé

    2003-09-01

    We recently determined in rats that iontophoretic application of bicuculline or gabazine [two GABAa antagonists] and kainic acid (a glutamate agonist) in the sublaterodorsal nucleus (SLD) induces with a very short latency a paradoxical sleep-like state. From these results, we proposed that GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs to the SLD paradoxical sleep (PS)-executive neurons gate the onset of PS [R. Boissard et al. (2002) Eur. J. Neurosci., 16, 1959-1973]. We therefore decided to determine the origin of the GABAergic and non-GABAergic inputs to the SLD combining ejection of a retrograde tracer [cholera-toxin B subunit (CTb)] with glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) immunohistochemistry. The presence of GAD-immunoreactive neurons in the SLD was confirmed. Then, following CTb ejections centred on the SLD, combined with GAD and CTb immunohistochemistry, double-labelled cells were observed in the mesencephalic and pontine reticular nuclei and to a lesser extent the parvicellular reticular nucleus. A large number of GAD-negative retrogradely labelled cells was also seen in these structures as well as in the primary motor area of the frontal cortex, the central nucleus of the amygdala, the ventral and lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the lateral hypothalamic area, the lateral and ventrolateral periaqueductal grey and the lateral paragigantocellular reticular nucleus. From these results, we propose that the activation of PS-executive neurons from the SLD is due to the removal of a tonic inhibition from GABAergic neurons localized in the SLD, and the mesencephalic and pontine reticular nuclei. Strong non-GABAergic inputs to the SLD could be excitatory and responsible for the tonic glutamatergic input on the PS-on neurons we have previously described. They could also terminate on SLD GABAergic interneurons and be indirectly responsible for the inhibition of the PS-on neurons during waking and slow-wave sleep.

  16. Akting up in the GABA hypothesis of schizophrenia: Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic functions and hippocampus-dependent functions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implies that both AKT1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunit genes are involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. Activated Akt promotes GABAergic neuron differentiation and increases GABAAR expression on the plasma membrane. To elucidate the role of Akt1 in modulating GABAergic functions and schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits, a set of 6 in vitro and in vivo experiments was conducted. First, an Akt1/2 inhibitor was applied to evaluate its effect on GABAergic neuron-like cell formation from P19 cells. Inhibiting Akt resulted in a reduction in parvalbumin-positive neuron-like cells. In Akt1(-/-) and wild-type mice, seizures induced using pentylenetetrazol (a GABAAR antagonist) were measured, and GABAAR expression and GABAergic interneuron abundance in the brain were examined. Female Akt1(-/-) mice, but not male Akt1(-/-) mice, exhibited less pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsive activity than their corresponding wild-type controls. Reduced parvalbumin-positive interneuron abundance and GABAAR subunit expression, especially in the hippocampus, were also observed in female Akt1(-/-) mice compared to female wild-type mice. Neuromorphometric analyses revealed significantly reduced neurite complexity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Additionally, female Akt1(-/-) mice displayed increased hippocampal oscillation power and impaired spatial memory compared to female wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic interneurons and GABAAR expression, contributing to hippocampus-dependent cognitive functional impairment.

  17. Akting up in the GABA hypothesis of schizophrenia: Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic functions and hippocampus-dependent functions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implies that both AKT1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunit genes are involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. Activated Akt promotes GABAergic neuron differentiation and increases GABAAR expression on the plasma membrane. To elucidate the role of Akt1 in modulating GABAergic functions and schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits, a set of 6 in vitro and in vivo experiments was conducted. First, an Akt1/2 inhibitor was applied to evaluate its effect on GABAergic neuron-like cell formation from P19 cells. Inhibiting Akt resulted in a reduction in parvalbumin-positive neuron-like cells. In Akt1(-/-) and wild-type mice, seizures induced using pentylenetetrazol (a GABAAR antagonist) were measured, and GABAAR expression and GABAergic interneuron abundance in the brain were examined. Female Akt1(-/-) mice, but not male Akt1(-/-) mice, exhibited less pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsive activity than their corresponding wild-type controls. Reduced parvalbumin-positive interneuron abundance and GABAAR subunit expression, especially in the hippocampus, were also observed in female Akt1(-/-) mice compared to female wild-type mice. Neuromorphometric analyses revealed significantly reduced neurite complexity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Additionally, female Akt1(-/-) mice displayed increased hippocampal oscillation power and impaired spatial memory compared to female wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic interneurons and GABAAR expression, contributing to hippocampus-dependent cognitive functional impairment. PMID:27615800

  18. Akting up in the GABA hypothesis of schizophrenia: Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic functions and hippocampus-dependent functions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implies that both AKT1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunit genes are involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. Activated Akt promotes GABAergic neuron differentiation and increases GABAAR expression on the plasma membrane. To elucidate the role of Akt1 in modulating GABAergic functions and schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits, a set of 6 in vitro and in vivo experiments was conducted. First, an Akt1/2 inhibitor was applied to evaluate its effect on GABAergic neuron-like cell formation from P19 cells. Inhibiting Akt resulted in a reduction in parvalbumin-positive neuron-like cells. In Akt1−/− and wild-type mice, seizures induced using pentylenetetrazol (a GABAAR antagonist) were measured, and GABAAR expression and GABAergic interneuron abundance in the brain were examined. Female Akt1−/− mice, but not male Akt1−/− mice, exhibited less pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsive activity than their corresponding wild-type controls. Reduced parvalbumin-positive interneuron abundance and GABAAR subunit expression, especially in the hippocampus, were also observed in female Akt1−/− mice compared to female wild-type mice. Neuromorphometric analyses revealed significantly reduced neurite complexity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Additionally, female Akt1−/− mice displayed increased hippocampal oscillation power and impaired spatial memory compared to female wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic interneurons and GABAAR expression, contributing to hippocampus-dependent cognitive functional impairment. PMID:27615800

  19. Anxiety-like behavior is modulated by a discrete subpopulation of interneurons in the basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Truitt, William A.; Johnson, Philip L.; Dietrich, Amy D.; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Shekhar, Anantha

    2009-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala (BL) is a putative site for regulating anxiety, where inhibition and excitation respectively lead to decreases and increases in anxiety-like behaviors. The BL contains local networks of GABAergic interneurons that are subdivided into classes based on neurochemical content, and are hypothesized to regulate unique functional responses of local glutamatergic projection neurons. Recently it was demonstrated that lesioning a portion of the BL interneuronal population, those interneurons that express neurokinin1 receptors (NK1r), resulted in anxiety-like behavior. In the current study, these NK1r expressing cells of the BL are further phenotypically characterized, demonstrating approximately 80% co-expression with GABA thus confirming them as GABAergic interneurons. These NK1r interneurons also co localize with two distinct populations of BL interneurons as defined by the neuropeptide content. 41.8% of the NK1r positive cells are also positive for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and 39.7% of the NK1r positive cells are also positive for cholecystokinin (CCK). In addition to enhancing the phenotypic characterization, the extent to which the NK1r cells of amygdala nuclei contribute to anxiety-like responses was also investigated. Lesioning the NK1r expressing interneurons, with a stable form of substance P (SSP; the natural ligand for NK1r) coupled to the targeted toxin saporin (SAP), in the anterior and posterior divisions of the BL was correlated to increased anxiety-like behaviors compared to baseline and control treated rats. Furthermore the phenotypic and regional selectivity of the lesions was also confirmed. PMID:19258024

  20. Postnatal NMDA receptor ablation in corticolimbic interneurons confers schizophrenia-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Belforte, Juan E; Zsiros, Veronika; Sklar, Elyse R; Jiang, Zhihong; Yu, Gu; Li, Yuqing; Quinlan, Elizabeth M; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2010-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic dysfunction may underlie the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Here, we characterized a mouse strain in which the essential NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) was selectively eliminated in 40-50% of cortical and hippocampal interneurons in early postnatal development. Consistent with the NMDAR hypofunction theory of schizophrenia, distinct schizophrenia-related symptoms emerged after adolescence, including novelty-induced hyperlocomotion, mating and nest-building deficits, as well as anhedonia-like and anxiety-like behaviors. Many of these behaviors were exacerbated by social isolation stress. Social memory, spatial working memory and prepulse inhibition were also impaired. Reduced expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 and parvalbumin was accompanied by disinhibition of cortical excitatory neurons and reduced neuronal synchrony. Postadolescent deletion of NR1 did not result in such abnormalities. These findings suggest that early postnatal inhibition of NMDAR activity in corticolimbic GABAergic interneurons contributes to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia-related disorders.

  1. The vulnerability of calretinin-containing hippocampal interneurons to temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Kinga; Maglóczky, Zsófia

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the vulnerability of a special interneuron type—the calretinin (CR)-containing interneurons—in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). CR is a calcium-binding protein expressed mainly by GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus. Despite their morphological heterogeneity, CR-containing interneurons form a distinct subpopulation of inhibitory cells, innervating other interneurons in rodents and to some extent principal cells in the human. Their dendrites are strongly connected by zona adherentiae and presumably by gap junctions both in rats and humans. CR-containing interneurons are suggested to play a key role in the hippocampal inhibitory network, since they can effectively synchronize dendritic inhibitory interneurons. The sensitivity of CR-expressing interneurons to epilepsy was discussed in several reports, both in animal models and in humans. In the sclerotic hippocampus the density of CR-immunopositive cells is decreased significantly. In the non-sclerotic hippocampus, the CR-containing interneurons are preserved, but their dendritic tree is varicose, segmented, and zona-adherentia-type contacts can be less frequently observed among dendrites. Therefore, the dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells may be less effective in TLE. This can be partially explained by the impairment of the CR-containing interneuron ensemble in the epileptic hippocampus, which may result in an asynchronous and thus less effective dendritic inhibition of the principal cells. This phenomenon, together with the sprouting of excitatory pathway axons and enhanced innervation of principal cells, may be involved in seizure generation. Preventing the loss of CR-positive cells and preserving the integrity of CR-positive dendrite gap junctions may have antiepileptic effects, maintaining proper inhibitory function and helping to protect principal cells in epilepsy. PMID:25324731

  2. Forebrain GABAergic neuron precursors integrate into adult spinal cord and reduce injury-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, JM; Sharif-Naeini, R; Vogt, D; Kriegstein, A; Alvarez-Buylla, A; Rubenstein, JL; Basbaum, AI

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain. Because symptoms are often unresponsive to conventional methods of pain treatment, new therapeutic approaches are essential. Here, we describe a strategy that not only ameliorates symptoms of neuropathic pain, but is also potentially disease modifying. We show that transplantation of immature telencephalic GABAergic interneurons from the mouse medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) into the adult mouse spinal cord completely reverses the mechanical hypersensitivity produced by peripheral nerve injury. Underlying this improvement is a remarkable integration of the MGE transplants into the host spinal cord circuitry, in which the transplanted cells make functional connections with both primary afferent and spinal cord neurons. By contrast, MGE transplants were not effective against inflammatory pain. Our findings suggest that MGE-derived GABAergic interneurons overcome the spinal cord hyperexcitability that is a hallmark of nerve-injury induced neuropathic pain. PMID:22632725

  3. Whole-cell Patch-clamp Recordings from Morphologically- and Neurochemically-identified Hippocampal Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Sam A.; Song, Jie; Vida, Imre

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory interneurons play a central role within neuronal circuits of the brain. Interneurons comprise a small subset of the neuronal population (10-20%), but show a high level of physiological, morphological, and neurochemical heterogeneity, reflecting their diverse functions. Therefore, investigation of interneurons provides important insights into the organization principles and function of neuronal circuits. This, however, requires an integrated physiological and neuroanatomical approach for the selection and identification of individual interneuron types. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording from acute brain slices of transgenic animals, expressing fluorescent proteins under the promoters of interneuron-specific markers, provides an efficient method to target and electrophysiologically characterize intrinsic and synaptic properties of specific interneuron types. Combined with intracellular dye labeling, this approach can be extended with post-hoc morphological and immunocytochemical analysis, enabling systematic identification of recorded neurons. These methods can be tailored to suit a broad range of scientific questions regarding functional properties of diverse types of cortical neurons. PMID:25350149

  4. Interneurons and oligodendrocyte progenitors form a structured synaptic network in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Orduz, David; Maldonado, Paloma P; Balia, Maddalena; Vélez-Fort, Mateo; de Sars, Vincent; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Emiliani, Valentina; Angulo, Maria Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    NG2 cells, oligodendrocyte progenitors, receive a major synaptic input from interneurons in the developing neocortex. It is presumed that these precursors integrate cortical networks where they act as sensors of neuronal activity. We show that NG2 cells of the developing somatosensory cortex form a transient and structured synaptic network with interneurons that follows its own rules of connectivity. Fast-spiking interneurons, highly connected to NG2 cells, target proximal subcellular domains containing GABAA receptors with γ2 subunits. Conversely, non-fast-spiking interneurons, poorly connected with these progenitors, target distal sites lacking this subunit. In the network, interneuron-NG2 cell connectivity maps exhibit a local spatial arrangement reflecting innervation only by the nearest interneurons. This microcircuit architecture shows a connectivity peak at PN10, coinciding with a switch to massive oligodendrocyte differentiation. Hence, GABAergic innervation of NG2 cells is temporally and spatially regulated from the subcellular to the network level in coordination with the onset of oligodendrogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06953.001 PMID:25902404

  5. Quantitative study of NPY-expressing GABAergic neurons and axons in rat spinal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Polgár, Erika; Sardella, Thomas C P; Watanabe, Masahiko; Todd, Andrew J

    2011-04-15

    Between 25-40% of neurons in laminae I-III are GABAergic, and some of these express neuropeptide Y (NPY). We previously reported that NPY-immunoreactive axons form numerous synapses on lamina III projection neurons that possess the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1r). The aims of this study were to determine the proportion of neurons and GABAergic boutons in this region that contain NPY, and to look for evidence that they selectively innervate different neuronal populations. We found that 4-6% of neurons in laminae I-III were NPY-immunoreactive and based on the proportions of neurons that are GABAergic, we estimate that NPY is expressed by 18% of inhibitory interneurons in laminae I-II and 9% of those in lamina III. GABAergic boutons were identified by the presence of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) and NPY was found in 13-15% of VGAT-immunoreactive boutons in laminae I-II, and 5% of those in lamina III. For both the lamina III NK1r-immunoreactive projection neurons and protein kinase Cγ (PKCγ)-immunoreactive interneurons in lamina II, we found that around one-third of the VGAT boutons that contacted them were NPY-immunoreactive. However, based on differences in the sizes of these boutons and the strength of their NPY-immunoreactivity, we conclude that these originate from different populations of interneurons. Only 6% of VGAT boutons presynaptic to large lamina I projection neurons that lacked NK1rs contained NPY. These results show that NPY-containing neurons make up a considerable proportion of the inhibitory interneurons in laminae I-III, and that their axons preferentially target certain classes of dorsal horn neuron.

  6. GDNF-based therapies, GDNF-producing interneurons, and trophic support of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. Implications for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    d’Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Pascual, Alberto; López-Barneo, José

    2015-01-01

    The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a well-established trophic agent for dopaminergic (DA) neurons in vitro and in vivo. GDNF is necessary for maintenance of neuronal morphological and neurochemical phenotype and protects DA neurons from toxic damage. Numerous studies on animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) have reported beneficial effects of GDNF on nigrostriatal DA neuron survival. However, translation of these observations to the clinical setting has been hampered so far by side effects associated with the chronic continuous intra-striatal infusion of recombinant GDNF. In addition, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials have not reported any clinically relevant effect of GDNF on PD patients. In the past few years, experiments with conditional Gdnf knockout mice have suggested that GDNF is necessary for maintenance of DA neurons in adulthood. In parallel, new methodologies for exogenous GDNF delivery have been developed. Recently, it has been shown that a small population of scattered, electrically interconnected, parvalbumin positive (PV+) GABAergic interneurons is responsible for most of the GDNF produced in the rodent striatum. In addition, cholinergic striatal interneurons appear to be also involved in the modulation of striatal GDNF. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on brain GDNF delivery, homeostasis, and its effects on nigrostriatal DA neurons. Special attention is paid to the therapeutic potential of endogenous GDNF stimulation in PD. PMID:25762899

  7. Function and Circuitry of VIP+ Interneurons in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Park, Silvia J.H.; Borghuis, Bart G.; Rahmani, Pouyan; Zeng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Visual processing in the retina depends on coordinated signaling by interneurons. Photoreceptor signals are relayed to ∼20 ganglion cell types through a dozen excitatory bipolar interneurons, each responsive to light increments (ON) or decrements (OFF). ON and OFF bipolar cell pathways become tuned through specific connections with inhibitory interneurons: horizontal and amacrine cells. A major obstacle for understanding retinal circuitry is the unknown function of most of the ∼30–40 amacrine cell types, each of which synapses onto a subset of bipolar cell terminals, ganglion cell dendrites, and other amacrine cells. Here, we used a transgenic mouse line in which vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-expressing (VIP+) GABAergic interneurons express Cre recombinase. Targeted whole-cell recordings of fluorescently labeled VIP+ cells revealed three predominant types: wide-field bistratified and narrow-field monostratified cells with somas in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and medium-field monostratified cells with somas in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Bistratified INL cells integrated excitation and inhibition driven by both ON and OFF pathways with little spatial tuning. Narrow-field INL cells integrated excitation driven by the ON pathway and inhibition driven by both pathways, with pronounced hyperpolarizations at light offset. Monostratified GCL cells integrated excitation and inhibition driven by the ON pathway and showed center-surround spatial tuning. Optogenetic experiments showed that, collectively, VIP+ cells made strong connections with OFF δ, ON-OFF direction-selective, and W3 ganglion cells but weak, inconsistent connections with ON and OFF α cells. Revealing VIP+ cell morphologies, receptive fields and synaptic connections advances our understanding of their role in visual processing. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The retina is a model system for understanding nervous system function. At the first stage, rod and cone photoreceptors encode light and

  8. Caudal Ganglionic Eminence Precursor Transplants Disperse and Integrate as Lineage-Specific Interneurons but Do Not Induce Cortical Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Larimer, Phillip; Spatazza, Julien; Espinosa, Juan Sebastian; Tang, Yunshuo; Kaneko, Megumi; Hasenstaub, Andrea R; Stryker, Michael P; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    The maturation of inhibitory GABAergic cortical circuits regulates experience-dependent plasticity. We recently showed that the heterochronic transplantation of parvalbumin (PV) or somatostatin (SST) interneurons from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) reactivates ocular dominance plasticity (ODP) in the postnatal mouse visual cortex. Might other types of interneurons similarly induce cortical plasticity? Here, we establish that caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE)-derived interneurons, when transplanted into the visual cortex of neonatal mice, migrate extensively in the host brain and acquire laminar distribution, marker expression, electrophysiological properties, and visual response properties like those of host CGE interneurons. Although transplants from the anatomical CGE do induce ODP, we found that this plasticity reactivation is mediated by a small fraction of MGE-derived cells contained in the transplant. These findings demonstrate that transplanted CGE cells can successfully engraft into the postnatal mouse brain and confirm the unique role of MGE lineage neurons in the induction of ODP. PMID:27425623

  9. Dentate total molecular layer interneurons mediate cannabinoid-sensitive inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiandong; Swietek, Bogumila; Proddutur, Archana; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2015-08-01

    Activity of the dentate gyrus, which gates information flow to the hippocampus, is under tight inhibitory regulation by interneurons with distinctive axonal projections, intrinsic and synaptic characteristics and neurochemical identities. Total molecular layer cells (TML-Cs), a class of morphologically distinct GABAergic neurons with axonal projections across the molecular layer, are among the most frequent interneuronal type in the dentate subgranular region. However, little is known about their synaptic and neurochemical properties. We demonstrate that synapses from morphologically identified TML-Cs to dentate interneurons are characterized by low release probability, facilitating short-term dynamics and asynchronous release. TML-Cs consistently show somatic and axonal labeling for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 R) yet fail to express cholecystokinin (CCK) indicating their distinctive neurochemical identity. In paired recordings, the release probability at synapses between TML-Cs was increased by the CB1 R antagonist AM251, demonstrating baseline endocannabinoid regulation of TML-C synapses. Apart from defining the synaptic and neurochemical features of TML-Cs, our findings reveal the morphological identity of a class of dentate CB1 R-positive neurons that do not express CCK. Our findings indicate that TML-Cs can mediate cannabinoid sensitive feed-forward and feedback inhibition of dentate perforant path inputs.

  10. Interneuron epigenomes during the critical period of cortical plasticity: Implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Hirofumi; Kundakovic, Marija; Bicks, Lucy; Mitchell, Amanda; Akbarian, Schahram

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia, a major psychiatric disorder defined by delusions and hallucinations, among other symptoms, often with onset in early adulthood, is potentially associated with molecular and cellular alterations in parvalbumin-expressing fast spiking interneurons and other constituents of the cortical inhibitory GABAergic circuitry. The underlying mechanisms, including the role of disease-associated risk factors operating in adolescence such as drug abuse and social stressors, remain incompletely understood. Here, we summarize emerging findings from animal models, highlighting the ability of parvalbuminergic interneurons (PVI) to induce, during the juvenile period, long-term plastic changes in prefrontal and visual cortex, thereby altering perception, cognition and behavior in the adult. Of note, molecular alterations in PVI from subjects with schizophrenia, including downregulated expression of a subset of GABAergic genes, have also been found in juvenile stress models of the disorder. Some of the transcriptional alterations observed in schizophrenia postmortem brain could be linked to changes in the epigenetic architecture of GABAergic gene promoters, including dysregulated DNA methylation, histone modification patterns and disruption of promoter-enhancer interactions at site of chromosomal loop formations. Therefore, we predict that, in the not-to-distant future, PVI- and other cell-type specific epigenomic mappings in the animal model and human brain will provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related psychotic diseases, including the role of cortical GABAergic circuitry in shaping long-term plasticity and cognitive function of the cerebral cortex.

  11. Opposing Dopaminergic and GABAergic Neurons Control the Duration and Persistence of Copulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Crickmore, Michael A.; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Behavioral persistence is a major factor in determiningwhen and under which circumstances animals will terminate their current activity and transition into more profitable, appropriate, or urgent behavior. We show that, for the first 5 min of copulation in Drosophila, stressful stimuli do not interrupt mating, whereas 10 min later, even minor perturbations are sufficient to terminate copulation. This decline in persistence occurs as the probability of successful mating increases and is promoted by approximately eight sexually dimorphic, GABAergic interneurons of the male abdominal ganglion. When these interneurons were silenced, persistence increased and males copulated far longer than required for successful mating. When these interneurons were stimulated, persistence decreased and copulations were shortened. In contrast, dopaminergic neurons of the ventral nerve cord promote copulation persistence and extend copulation duration. Thus, copulation duration in Drosophila is a product of gradually declining persistence controlled by opposing neuronal populations using conserved neurotransmission systems. PMID:24209625

  12. Identification of a direct GABAergic pallidocortical pathway in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael C.; Ferrari, Loris; Sacchet, Matthew D.; Foland-Ross, Lara C.; Qiu, Mei-Hong; Gotlib, Ian H.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Arrigoni, Elda; Lu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The basal ganglia, interacting with the cortex, play a critical role in a range of behaviors. Output from the basal ganglia to the cortex is thought to relay through the thalamus, yet an intriguing alternative is that the basal ganglia may directly project to, and communicate with, the cortex. We explored an efferent projection from the globus pallidus externa (GPe), a key hub in the basal ganglia system, to the cortex of rats and mice. Anterograde and retrograde tracing revealed projections to the frontal premotor cortex, especially the deep projecting layers, originating from GPe neurons that receive axonal inputs from the dorsal striatum. Cre-dependent anterograde tracing in GPe Vgat-ires-cre mice confirmed that the pallidocortical projection is GABAergic, and in vitro optogenetic stimulation in the cortex of these projections produced a fast inhibitory postsynaptic current in targeted cells that was abolished by bicucculine. The pallidocortical projections targeted GABAergic interneurons and, to a lesser extent, pyramidal neurons. This GABAergic pallidocortical pathway directly links the basal ganglia and cortex and may play a key role in behavior and cognition in normal and disease states. PMID:25581560

  13. Physiological and morphological characterization of GABAergic neurons in the medial amygdala.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiling

    2013-05-01

    GABAergic neurons in the medial amygdala (MeA) have been indicated in information processing in reproductive behavior and fear/anxiety. However, basic knowledge of their physiological and morphological properties is still very limited, probably due to the technical challenge to selectively record the GABAergic neurons. In this study, I characterized properties of the MeA GABAergic neurons by performing whole-cell patch clamp recordings from brain slices of adult knock-in mice selectively expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) in GABAergic neurons. The majority (73%) of GABAergic neurons exhibiting low threshold calcium spike were classified as type I neurons, with morphological properties of being bitufted or stellate, and dendrites either aspiny or covered by various shapes of spines. Axonal collaterals of some neurons were observed near somata as well as in other amygdaloid nuclei. Neurons incapable of generate low threshold calcium spikes were divided into two types. Type II neurons (11%) exhibited hyperpolarization-activated sag and higher input resistance (>400 MΩ). Most Type II neurons exhibited asymmetric dendritic trees extending towards the superficial layer covered with long neck dendritic spines. The axons of type II neurons formed large collaterals and projected to other amygdaloid nuclei. Type III neurons (16%) lack prominent hyperpolarization-activated sag and possessed lower input resistance (<400 MΩ). These neurons were local interneurons with smooth multipolar dendritic trees. Since both MeA and nearby amygdaloid nuclei are involved in fear/anxiety processing, two types of MeA GABAergic projection neurons and a third type of interneurons that might participate in anxiety-related behavior were revealed by my present study.

  14. Revisiting the Lamotrigine-Mediated Effect on Hippocampal GABAergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Yin; Liu, Yu-Chao; Lee, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Yen-Chu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chang, Kaung-Yi; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Lamotrigine (LTG) is generally considered as a voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel blocker. However, recent studies suggest that LTG can also serve as a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel enhancer and can increase the excitability of GABAergic interneurons (INs). Perisomatic inhibitory INs, predominantly fast-spiking basket cells (BCs), powerfully inhibit granule cells (GCs) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Notably, BCs express abundant Nav channels and HCN channels, both of which are able to support sustained action potential generation. Using whole-cell recording in rat hippocampal slices, we investigated the net LTG effect on BC output. We showed that bath application of LTG significantly decreased the amplitude of evoked compound inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in GCs. In contrast, simultaneous paired recordings from BCs to GCs showed that LTG had no effect on both the amplitude and the paired-pulse ratio of the unitary IPSCs, suggesting that LTG did not affect GABA release, though it suppressed cell excitability. In line with this, LTG decreased spontaneous IPSC (sIPSC) frequency, but not miniature IPSC frequency. When re-examining the LTG effect on GABAergic transmission in the cornus ammonis region 1 (CA1) area, we found that LTG markedly inhibits both the excitability of dendrite-targeting INs in the stratum oriens and the concurrent sIPSCs recorded on their targeting pyramidal cells (PCs) without significant hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) enhancement. In summary, LTG has no effect on augmenting Ih in GABAergic INs and does not promote GABAergic inhibitory output. The antiepileptic effect of LTG is likely through Nav channel inhibition and the suppression of global neuronal network activity. PMID:27455251

  15. Anatomically heterogeneous populations of CB1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing interneurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus show homogeneous input-output characteristics.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Gergely G; Papp, Orsolya I; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Hájos, Norbert

    2014-12-01

    A subpopulation of GABAergic cells in cortical structures expresses CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 ) on their axon terminals. To understand the function of these interneurons in information processing, it is necessary to uncover how they are embedded into neuronal circuits. Therefore, the proportion of GABAergic terminals expressing CB1 and the morphological and electrophysiological properties of CB1 -immunoreactive interneurons should be revealed. We investigated the ratio and the origin of CB1 -expressing inhibitory boutons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we estimated that ∼40% of GABAergic axon terminals in different layers of CA3 also expressed CB1 . To identify the inhibitory cell types expressing CB1 in this region, we recorded and intracellularly labeled interneurons in hippocampal slices. CB1 -expressing interneurons showed distinct axonal arborization, and were classified as basket cells, mossy-fiber-associated cells, dendritic-layer-innervating cells or perforant-path-associated cells. In each morphological category, a substantial variability in axonal projection was observed. In contrast to the diverse morphology, the active and passive membrane properties were found to be rather similar. Using paired recordings, we found that pyramidal cells displayed large and fast unitary postsynaptic currents in response to activating basket and mossy-fiber-associated cells, while they showed slower and smaller synaptic events in pairs originating from interneurons that innervate the dendritic layer, which may be due to dendritic filtering. In addition, CB1 activation significantly reduced the amplitude of the postsynaptic currents in each cell pair tested. Our data suggest that CB1 -expressing interneurons with different axonal projections have comparable physiological characteristics, contributing to a similar proportion of GABAergic inputs along the somato-dendritic axis of CA3 pyramidal cells.

  16. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord. PMID:27489533

  17. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord. PMID:27489533

  18. Hypoxia-Induced Developmental Delays of Inhibitory Interneurons Are Reversed by Environmental Enrichment in the Postnatal Mouse Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Komitova, Mila; Xenos, Dionysios; Salmaso, Natalina; May Tran, Kathy; Brand, Theresa; Schwartz, Michael L.; Ment, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Infants born premature experience hypoxic episodes due to immaturity of their respiratory and central nervous systems. This profoundly affects brain development and results in cognitive impairments. We used a mouse model to examine the impact of hypoxic rearing (9.5–10.5% O2) from postnatal day 3 to 11 (P3–P11) on GABAergic interneurons and the potential for environmental enrichment to ameliorate these developmental abnormalities. At P15 the numbers of cortical interneurons expressing immunohistochemically detectable levels of parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SST), and vasoactive intestinal peptide were decreased in hypoxic-reared mice by 59%, 32%, and 38%, respectively, compared with normoxic controls. Hypoxia also decreased total GABA content in frontal neocortex by 31%. However, GAD67-EGFP knock-in mice reared under hypoxic conditions showed no changes in total number of GAD67-EGFP+ cells and no evidence of increased interneuron death, suggesting that the total number of interneurons was not decreased, but rather, that hypoxic-rearing decreased interneuron marker expression in these cells. In adulthood, PV and SST expression levels were decreased in hypoxic-reared mice. In contrast, intensity of reelin (RLN) expression was significantly increased in adult hypoxic-reared mice compared with normoxic controls. Housing mice in an enriched environment from P21 until adulthood normalized phenotypic interneuron marker expression without affecting total interneuron numbers or leading to increased neurogenesis. Our data show that (1) hypoxia decreases PV and SST and increases RLN expression in cortical interneurons during postnatal cortical development and (2) enriched environment has the capacity to normalize the interneuron abnormalities in cortex. PMID:23946395

  19. Distinct and synergistic feedforward inhibition of pyramidal cells by basket and bistratified interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Michele; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2015-01-01

    Feedforward inhibition (FFI) enables pyramidal cells in area CA1 of the hippocampus (CA1PCs) to remain easily excitable while faithfully representing a broad range of excitatory inputs without quickly saturating. Despite the cortical ubiquity of FFI, its specific function is not completely understood. FFI in CA1PCs is mediated by two physiologically and morphologically distinct GABAergic interneurons: fast-spiking, perisomatic-targeting basket cells and regular-spiking, dendritic-targeting bistratified cells. These two FFI pathways might create layer-specific computational sub-domains within the same CA1PC, but teasing apart their specific contributions remains experimentally challenging. We implemented a biophysically realistic model of CA1PCs using 40 digitally reconstructed morphologies and constraining synaptic numbers, locations, amplitude, and kinetics with available experimental data. First, we validated the model by reproducing the known combined basket and bistratified FFI of CA1PCs at the population level. We then analyzed how the two interneuron types independently affected the CA1PC spike probability and timing as a function of inhibitory strength. Separate FFI by basket and bistratified respectively modulated CA1PC threshold and gain. Concomitant FFI by both interneuron types synergistically extended the dynamic range of CA1PCs by buffering their spiking response to excitatory stimulation. These results suggest testable hypotheses on the precise effects of GABAergic diversity on cortical computation. PMID:26594151

  20. Inhibition of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons results in complex behavioral changes.

    PubMed

    Brown, J A; Ramikie, T S; Schmidt, M J; Báldi, R; Garbett, K; Everheart, M G; Warren, L E; Gellért, L; Horváth, S; Patel, S; Mirnics, Károly

    2015-12-01

    Reduced expression of the Gad1 gene-encoded 67-kDa protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) is a hallmark of schizophrenia. GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal sub-populations, including the parvalbumin-positive (PVALB+) cells. To investigate the role of the PV-positive GABAergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we knocked down the Gad1 transcript using a microRNA engineered to target specifically Gad1 mRNA under the control of Pvalb bacterial artificial chromosome. Verification of construct expression was performed by immunohistochemistry. Follow-up electrophysiological studies revealed a significant reduction in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release probability without alterations in postsynaptic membrane properties or changes in glutamatergic release probability in the prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic (Tg) mice uncovered that the Pvalb/Gad1 Tg mice have pronounced sensorimotor gating deficits, increased novelty-seeking and reduced fear extinction. Furthermore, NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor antagonism by ketamine had an opposing dose-dependent effect, suggesting that the differential dosage of ketamine might have divergent effects on behavioral processes. All behavioral studies were validated using a second cohort of animals. Our results suggest that reduction of GABAergic transmission from PVALB+ interneurons primarily impacts behavioral domains related to fear and novelty seeking and that these alterations might be related to the behavioral phenotype observed in schizophrenia.

  1. Inhibition of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons results in complex behavioral changes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A.; Ramikie, Teniel S.; Schmidt, Martin J.; Báldi, Rita; Garbett, Krassimira; Everheart, Monika G.; Warren, Lambert E.; Gellért, Levente; Horváth, Szatmár; Patel, Sachin; Mirnics, Károly

    2014-01-01

    Reduced expression of the GAD1 gene-encoded 67-kD protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) is a hallmark of the schizophrenia. GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal subpopulations, including the parvalbumin positive (PVALB+) cells. To investigate the role of the PV-positive GABA-ergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we knocked down the Gad1 transcript using a miRNA engineered to specifically target Gad1 mRNA under the control of Pvalb bacterial artificial chromosome. Verification of construct expression was performed by immunohistochemistry. Follow-up electrophysiological studies revealed a significant reduction in GABA release probability without alterations in postsynaptic membrane properties or changes in glutamatergic release probability in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic mice uncovered that the Pvalb/Gad1 Tg mice have pronounced sensorimotor gating deficits, increased novelty seeking and reduced fear extinction. Furthermore, NMDA receptor antagonism by ketamine had an opposing dose-dependent effect, suggesting that the differential dosage of ketamine might have divergent effects on behavioral processes. All behavioral studies were validated using a second cohort of animals. Our results suggest that reduction of GABA-ergic transmission from PVALB+ interneurons primarily impacts behavioral domains related to fear and novelty seeking and that these alterations might be related to the behavioral phenotype observed in schizophrenia. PMID:25623945

  2. Distinct and synergistic feedforward inhibition of pyramidal cells by basket and bistratified interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Michele; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2015-01-01

    Feedforward inhibition (FFI) enables pyramidal cells in area CA1 of the hippocampus (CA1PCs) to remain easily excitable while faithfully representing a broad range of excitatory inputs without quickly saturating. Despite the cortical ubiquity of FFI, its specific function is not completely understood. FFI in CA1PCs is mediated by two physiologically and morphologically distinct GABAergic interneurons: fast-spiking, perisomatic-targeting basket cells and regular-spiking, dendritic-targeting bistratified cells. These two FFI pathways might create layer-specific computational sub-domains within the same CA1PC, but teasing apart their specific contributions remains experimentally challenging. We implemented a biophysically realistic model of CA1PCs using 40 digitally reconstructed morphologies and constraining synaptic numbers, locations, amplitude, and kinetics with available experimental data. First, we validated the model by reproducing the known combined basket and bistratified FFI of CA1PCs at the population level. We then analyzed how the two interneuron types independently affected the CA1PC spike probability and timing as a function of inhibitory strength. Separate FFI by basket and bistratified respectively modulated CA1PC threshold and gain. Concomitant FFI by both interneuron types synergistically extended the dynamic range of CA1PCs by buffering their spiking response to excitatory stimulation. These results suggest testable hypotheses on the precise effects of GABAergic diversity on cortical computation.

  3. Galanin-immunoreactivity identifies a distinct population of inhibitory interneurons in laminae I-III of the rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inhibitory interneurons constitute 30-40% of neurons in laminae I-III and have an important anti-nociceptive role. However, because of the difficulty in classifying them we know little about their organisation. Previous studies have identified 3 non-overlapping groups of inhibitory interneuron, which contain neuropeptide Y (NPY), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) or parvalbumin, and have shown that these differ in postsynaptic targets. Some inhibitory interneurons contain galanin and the first aim of this study was to determine whether these form a different population from those containing NPY, nNOS or parvalbumin. We also estimated the proportion of neurons and GABAergic axons that contain galanin in laminae I-III. Results Galanin cells were concentrated in laminae I-IIo, with few in laminae IIi-III. Galanin showed minimal co-localisation with NPY, nNOS or parvalbumin in laminae I-II, but most galanin-containing cells in lamina III were nNOS-positive. Galanin cells constituted ~7%, 3% and 2% of all neurons in laminae I, II and III, and we estimate that this corresponds to 26%, 10% and 5% of the GABAergic neurons in these laminae. However, galanin was only found in ~6% of GABAergic boutons in laminae I-IIo, and ~1% of those in laminae IIi-III. Conclusions These results show that galanin, NPY, nNOS and parvalbumin can be used to define four distinct neurochemical populations of inhibitory interneurons. Together with results of a recent study, they suggest that the galanin and NPY populations account for around half of the inhibitory interneurons in lamina I and a quarter of those in lamina II. PMID:21569622

  4. Nicotine increases GABAergic input on rat dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vázquez, F; Chavarría, K; Garduño, J; Hernández-López, S; Mihailescu, S P

    2014-12-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains large populations of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. This nucleus receives GABAergic inhibitory afferents from many brain areas and from DRN interneurons. Both GABAergic and 5-HT DRN neurons express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine increases 5-HT release and 5-HT DRN neuron discharge rate by stimulating postsynaptic nAChRs and by increasing glutamate and norepinephrine release inside DRN. However, the influence of nicotine on the GABAergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons was poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of nicotine on GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) of 5-HT DRN neurons and the subtype of nAChR(s) involved in this response. Experiments were performed in coronal slices obtained from young Wistar rats. GABAergic sIPSCs were recorded from post hoc-identified 5-HT DRN neurons with the whole cell voltage patch-clamp technique. Administration of nicotine (1 μM) increased sIPSC frequency in 72% of identified 5-HT DRN neurons. This effect was not reproduced by the α4β2 nAChR agonist RJR-2403 and was not influenced by TTX (1 μM). It was mimicked by the selective agonist for α7 nAChR, PNU-282987, and exacerbated by the positive allosteric modulator of the same receptor, PNU-120596. The nicotine-induced increase in sIPSC frequency was independent on voltage-gated calcium channels and dependent on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). These results demonstrate that nicotine increases the GABAergic input to most 5-HT DRN neurons, by activating α7 nAChRs and producing CICR in DRN GABAergic terminals.

  5. Nicotine increases GABAergic input on rat dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vázquez, F; Chavarría, K; Garduño, J; Hernández-López, S; Mihailescu, S P

    2014-12-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains large populations of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. This nucleus receives GABAergic inhibitory afferents from many brain areas and from DRN interneurons. Both GABAergic and 5-HT DRN neurons express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine increases 5-HT release and 5-HT DRN neuron discharge rate by stimulating postsynaptic nAChRs and by increasing glutamate and norepinephrine release inside DRN. However, the influence of nicotine on the GABAergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons was poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of nicotine on GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) of 5-HT DRN neurons and the subtype of nAChR(s) involved in this response. Experiments were performed in coronal slices obtained from young Wistar rats. GABAergic sIPSCs were recorded from post hoc-identified 5-HT DRN neurons with the whole cell voltage patch-clamp technique. Administration of nicotine (1 μM) increased sIPSC frequency in 72% of identified 5-HT DRN neurons. This effect was not reproduced by the α4β2 nAChR agonist RJR-2403 and was not influenced by TTX (1 μM). It was mimicked by the selective agonist for α7 nAChR, PNU-282987, and exacerbated by the positive allosteric modulator of the same receptor, PNU-120596. The nicotine-induced increase in sIPSC frequency was independent on voltage-gated calcium channels and dependent on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). These results demonstrate that nicotine increases the GABAergic input to most 5-HT DRN neurons, by activating α7 nAChRs and producing CICR in DRN GABAergic terminals. PMID:25231613

  6. Differential vulnerability of interneurons in the epileptic hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Marx, Markus; Haas, Carola A; Häussler, Ute

    2013-01-01

    The loss of hippocampal interneurons has been considered as one reason for the onset of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by shifting the excitation-inhibition balance. Yet, there are many different interneuron types which show differential vulnerability in the context of an epileptogenic insult. We used the intrahippocampal kainate (KA) mouse model for TLE in which a focal, unilateral KA injection induces status epilepticus (SE) followed by development of granule cell dispersion (GCD) and hippocampal sclerosis surrounding the injection site but not in the intermediate and temporal hippocampus. In this study, we characterized the loss of interneurons with respect to septotemporal position and to differential vulnerability of interneuron populations. To this end, we performed intrahippocampal recordings of the initial SE, in situ hybridization for glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) mRNA and immunohistochemistry for parvalbumin (PV) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the early phase of epileptogenesis at 2 days and at 21 days after KA injection, when recurrent epileptic activity and GCD have fully developed. We show that SE extended along the entire septotemporal axis of both hippocampi, but was stronger at distant sites than at the injection site. There was an almost complete loss of interneurons surrounding the injection site and expanding to the intermediate hippocampus already at 2 days but increasing until 21 days after KA. Furthermore, we observed differential vulnerability of PV- and NPY-expressing cells: while the latter were lost at the injection site but preserved at intermediate sites, PV-expressing cells were gone even at sites more temporal than GCD. In addition, we found upregulation of GAD67 mRNA expression in dispersed granule cells and of NPY staining in ipsilateral granule cells and ipsi- and contralateral mossy fibers. Our data thus indicate differential survival capacity of interneurons in the epileptic hippocampus and compensatory plasticity mechanisms

  7. Cooperative Subnetworks of Molecularly Similar Interneurons in Mouse Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Karnani, Mahesh M; Jackson, Jesse; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Tucciarone, Jason; Manoocheri, Kasra; Snider, William G; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Simultaneous co-activation of neocortical neurons is likely critical for brain computations ranging from perception and motor control to memory and cognition. While co-activation of excitatory principal cells (PCs) during ongoing activity has been extensively studied, that of inhibitory interneurons (INs) has received little attention. Here, we show in vivo and in vitro that members of two non-overlapping neocortical IN populations, expressing somatostatin (SOM) or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are active as populations rather than individually. We demonstrate a variety of synergistic mechanisms, involving population-specific local excitation, GABAergic disinhibition and excitation through electrical coupling, which likely underlie IN population co-activity. Firing of a few SOM or VIP INs recruits additional members within the cell type via GABAergic and cholinergic mechanisms, thereby amplifying the output of the population as a whole. Our data suggest that IN populations work as cooperative units, thus generating an amplifying nonlinearity in their circuit output. PMID:27021171

  8. Functional maturation of hPSC-derived forebrain interneurons requires an extended timeline and mimics human neural development

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Cory R.; Chen, Jiadong; Tang, Yunshuo; Southwell, Derek G.; Chalmers, Nadine; Vogt, Daniel; Arnold, Christine M.; Chen, Ying-Jiun J.; Stanley, Edouard G.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Sasai, Yoshiki; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Rubenstein, John L.R.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Directed differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has seen significant progress in recent years. Most differentiated populations, however, exhibit immature properties of an early embryonic stage, raising concerns about their ability to model and treat disease. Here, we report the directed differentiation of hPSCs into medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-like progenitors and their maturation into forebrain type interneurons. We find that early stage progenitors progress via a radial glial-like stem cell enriched in the human fetal brain. Both in vitro and post-transplantation into the rodent cortex, the MGE-like cells develop into GABAergic interneuron subtypes with mature physiological properties along a prolonged intrinsic timeline of up to seven months, mimicking endogenous human neural development. MGE-derived cortical interneuron deficiencies are implicated in a broad range of neurodevelopmental and degenerative disorders, highlighting the importance of these results for modeling human neural development and disease. PMID:23642366

  9. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for interneuron connectivity at specific subcellular compartments of granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Beuter, Simone; Ardi, Ziv; Horovitz, Omer; Wuchter, Jennifer; Keller, Stefanie; Saha, Rinki; Tripathi, Kuldeep; Anunu, Rachel; Kehat, Orli; Kriebel, Martin; Richter-Levin, Gal; Volkmer, Hansjürgen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal transmission is regulated by the local circuitry which is composed of principal neurons targeted at different subcellular compartments by a variety of interneurons. However, mechanisms that contribute to the subcellular localisation and maintenance of GABAergic interneuron terminals are poorly understood. Stabilization of GABAergic synapses depends on clustering of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein gephyrin and its interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin. Lentiviral knockdown experiments in adult rats indicated that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for the stabilisation of basket cell terminals on proximal dendritic and somatic compartments of granular cells of the dentate gyrus. EphA7 deficiency and concomitant destabilisation of GABAergic synapses correlated with impaired long-term potentiation and reduced hippocampal learning. Reduced GABAergic innervation may be explained by an impact of EphA7 on gephyrin clustering. Overexpression or ephrin stimulation of EphA7 induced gephyrin clustering dependent on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) which is an interaction partner of gephyrin. Gephyrin interactions with mTOR become released after mTOR activation while enhanced interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin was observed in parallel. In conclusion, EphA7 regulates gephyrin clustering and the maintenance of inhibitory synaptic connectivity via mTOR signalling. PMID:27405707

  10. Deletion of Selenoprotein P Results in Impaired Function of Parvalbumin Interneurons and Alterations in Fear Learning and Sensorimotor Gating

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, Matthew W.; Raman, Arjun V.; Hashimoto, Ann C.; Todorovic, Cedomir; Nichols, Robert A.; Berry, Marla J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the primary lines of defense against oxidative stress is the selenoprotein family, a class of proteins that contain selenium in the form of the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine. Within this class of proteins, Selenoprotein P (Sepp1) is unique, as it contains multiple selenocysteine residues and is postulated to act in selenium transport. Recent findings have demonstrated that neuronal selenoprotein synthesis is required for the development of parvalbumin (PV)-interneurons, a class of GABAergic neurons involved in the synchronization of neural activity. To investigate the potential influence of Sepp1 on PV-interneurons, we first mapped the distribution of the Sepp1 receptor, ApoER2, and parvalbumin in the mouse brain. Our results indicate that ApoER2 is highly expressed on PV-interneurons in multiple brain regions. Next, to determine whether PV-interneuron populations are affected by Sepp1 deletion, we performed stereology on several brain regions in which we observed ApoER2 expression on PV-interneurons, comparing WT and Sepp1−/− mice. We observed reduced numbers of PV-interneurons in the inferior colliculus of Sepp1−/− mice, which corresponded with a regional increase in oxidative stress. Finally, as impaired PV-interneuron function has been implicated in several neuropsychiatric conditions, we performed multiple behavioral tests on Sepp1−/− mice. Our behavioral results indicate that Sepp1−/− mice have impairments in contextual fear extinction, latent inhibition, and sensorimotor gating. In sum, these findings demonstrate the important supporting role of Sepp1 on ApoER2-expressing PV-interneurons. PMID:22640876

  11. Cholinergic and GABAergic pathways in fly motion vision

    PubMed Central

    Brotz, Tilmann M; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Borst, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Background The fly visual system is a highly ordered brain structure with well-established physiological and behavioral functions. A large number of interneurons in the posterior part of the third visual neuropil, the lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs), respond to visual motion stimuli. In these cells the mechanism of motion detection has been studied in great detail. Nevertheless, the cellular computations leading to their directionally selective responses are not yet fully understood. Earlier studies addressed the neuropharmacological basis of the motion response in lobula plate interneurons. In the present study we investigated the distribution of the respective neurotransmitter receptors in the fly visual system, namely nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and GABA receptors (GABARs) demonstrated by antibody labeling. Results The medulla shows a laminar distribution of both nAChRs and GABARs. Both receptor types are present in layers that participate in motion processing. The lobula also shows a characteristic layering of immunoreactivity for either receptor in its posterior portion. Furthermore, immunostaining for nAChRs and GABARs can be observed in close vicinity of lobula plate tangential cells. Immunostaining of GABAergic fibers suggests that inhibitory inputs from the medulla are relayed through the lobula to the lobula plate rather than through direct connections between medulla and lobula plate. Conclusions The interaction of excitatory and inhibitory pathways is essential for the computation of visual motion responses and discussed in the context of the Reichardt model for motion detection. PMID:11242563

  12. Sleep Impairment and Reduced Interneuron Excitability in a Mouse Model of Dravet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalume, Franck; Oakley, John C.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Gile, Jennifer; de la Iglesia, Horacio O.; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Dravet Syndrome (DS) is caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.1. Our genetic mouse model of DS recapitulates its severe seizures and premature death. Sleep disturbance is common in DS, but its mechanism is unknown. Electroencephalographic studies revealed abnormal sleep in DS mice, including reduced delta wave power, reduced sleep spindles, increased brief wakes, and numerous interictal spikes in Non-Rapid-Eye-Movement sleep. Theta power was reduced in Rapid-Eye-Movement sleep. Mice with NaV1.1 deleted specifically in forebrain interneurons exhibited similar sleep pathology to DS mice, but without changes in circadian rhythm. Sleep architecture depends on oscillatory activity in the thalamocortical network generated by excitatory neurons in the ventrobasal nucleus (VBN) of the thalamus and inhibitory GABAergic neurons in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus (RNT). Whole-cell NaV current was reduced in GABAergic RNT neurons but not in VBN neurons. Rebound firing of action potentials following hyperpolarization, the signature firing pattern of RNT neurons during sleep, was also reduced. These results demonstrate imbalance of excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in this circuit. As predicted from this functional impairment, we found substantial deficit in homeostatic rebound of slow wave activity following sleep deprivation. Although sleep disorders in epilepsies have been attributed to anti-epileptic drugs, our results show that sleep disorder in DS mice arises from loss of NaV1.1 channels in forebrain GABAergic interneurons without drug treatment. Impairment of NaV currents and excitability of GABAergic RNT neurons are correlated with impaired sleep quality and homeostasis in these mice. PMID:25766678

  13. Sleep impairment and reduced interneuron excitability in a mouse model of Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalume, Franck; Oakley, John C; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Gile, Jennifer; de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2015-05-01

    Dravet Syndrome (DS) is caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.1. Our mouse genetic model of DS recapitulates its severe seizures and premature death. Sleep disturbance is common in DS, but its mechanism is unknown. Electroencephalographic studies revealed abnormal sleep in DS mice, including reduced delta wave power, reduced sleep spindles, increased brief wakes, and numerous interictal spikes in Non-Rapid-Eye-Movement sleep. Theta power was reduced in Rapid-Eye-Movement sleep. Mice with NaV1.1 deleted specifically in forebrain interneurons exhibited similar sleep pathology to DS mice, but without changes in circadian rhythm. Sleep architecture depends on oscillatory activity in the thalamocortical network generated by excitatory neurons in the ventrobasal nucleus (VBN) of the thalamus and inhibitory GABAergic neurons in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus (RNT). Whole-cell NaV current was reduced in GABAergic RNT neurons but not in VBN neurons. Rebound firing of action potentials following hyperpolarization, the signature firing pattern of RNT neurons during sleep, was also reduced. These results demonstrate imbalance of excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in this circuit. As predicted from this functional impairment, we found substantial deficit in homeostatic rebound of slow wave activity following sleep deprivation. Although sleep disorders in epilepsies have been attributed to anti-epileptic drugs, our results show that sleep disorder in DS mice arises from loss of NaV1.1 channels in forebrain GABAergic interneurons without drug treatment. Impairment of NaV currents and excitability of GABAergic RNT neurons are correlated with impaired sleep quality and homeostasis in these mice. PMID:25766678

  14. Defined types of cortical interneurone structure space and spike timing in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The cerebral cortex encodes, stores and combines information about the internal and external environment in rhythmic activity of multiple frequency ranges. Neurones of the cortex can be defined, recognized and compared on the comprehensive application of the following measures: (i) brain area- and cell domain-specific distribution of input and output synapses, (ii) expression of molecules involved in cell signalling, (iii) membrane and synaptic properties reflecting the expression of membrane proteins, (iv) temporal structure of firing in vivo, resulting from (i)–(iii). Spatial and temporal measures of neurones in the network reflect an indivisible unity of evolutionary design, i.e. neurones do not have separate structure or function. The blueprint of this design is most easily accessible in the CA1 area of the hippocampus, where a relatively uniform population of pyramidal cells and their inputs follow an instantly recognizable laminated pattern and act within stereotyped network activity patterns. Reviewing the cell types and their spatio-temporal interactions, we suggest that CA1 pyramidal cells are supported by at least 16 distinct types of GABAergic neurone. During a given behaviour-contingent network oscillation, interneurones of a given type exhibit similar firing patterns. During different network oscillations representing two distinct brain states, interneurones of the same class show different firing patterns modulating their postsynaptic target-domain in a brain-state-dependent manner. These results suggest roles for specific interneurone types in structuring the activity of pyramidal cells via their respective target domains, and accurately timing and synchronizing pyramidal cell discharge, rather than providing generalized inhibition. Finally, interneurones belonging to different classes may fire preferentially at distinct time points during a given oscillation. As different interneurones innervate distinct domains of the pyramidal cells, the

  15. [Intern(euron)al affairs : The role of specific neocortical interneuron classes in the interaction between acetylcholine and GABAergic anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Liebig, L; Grasshoff, C; Hentschke, H

    2016-08-01

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulator which is released throughout the central nervous system and plays an essential role in consciousness and cognitive processes including attention and learning. Due to its 'activating' effect on the neuronal and behavioral level its interaction with anesthetics has long been of interest to anesthesiologists. It is widely held that a reduction of the release of acetylcholine by general anesthetics constitutes part of the anesthetic effect. This notion is backed by numerous human and animal studies, but is also in seeming contradiction to findings that acetylcholine activates specific classes of inhibitory neurons: if acetylcholine excites elements within the neuronal network responsible for the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), its withdrawal should diminish, not enhance, the effect of anesthetics.Focusing on cortical circuits, we present an overview of recent advances in cellular neurophysiology, particularly the interactions between inhibitory neuron classes, which provide insights on the interaction between acetylcholine and GABA.

  16. Role of Prelimbic GABAergic Circuits in Sensory and Emotional Aspects of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zizhen; Gadotti, Vinicius M; Chen, Lina; Souza, Ivana A; Stemkowski, Patrick L; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-08-01

    Noxious stimuli are detected by peripheral nociceptors and then transmitted to higher CNS centers, where they are perceived as an unpleasant sensation. The mechanisms that govern the emotional component associated with pain are still incompletely understood. Here, we used optogenetic approaches both in vitro and in vivo to address this issue. We found that peripheral nerve injury inhibits pyramidal cell firing in the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex as a result of feed-forward inhibition mediated by parvalbumin-expressing GABAergic interneurons. In addition, activation of inhibitory archaerhodopsin or excitatory channelrhodopsin-2 in these neurons decreased and increased pain responses, respectively, in freely moving mice and accordingly modulated conditioned place preference scores and place escape/avoidance behavior. Our findings thus demonstrate an important role of the prelimbic area in sensory and emotional aspects of pain and identify GABAergic circuits in this region as a potential target for pain therapeutics.

  17. Interplay of environmental signals and progenitor diversity on fate specification of cortical GABAergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Romcy-Pereira, Rodrigo N.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic interneurons constitute an extremely diverse population of cells organized in a well-defined topology of precisely interconnected cells. They play a crucial role regulating inhibitory-excitatory balance in brain circuits, gating sensory perception, and regulating spike timing to brain oscillations during distinct behaviors. Dysfunctions in the establishment of proper inhibitory circuits have been associated to several brain disorders such as autism, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. In the rodent adult cortex, inhibitory neurons are generated during the second gestational week from distinct progenitor lineages located in restricted domains of the ventral telencephalon. However, only recently, studies have revealed some of the mechanisms generating the heterogeneity of neuronal subtypes and their modes of integration in brain networks. Here we will discuss some the events involved in the production of cortical GABAergic neuron diversity with focus on the interaction between intrinsically driven genetic programs and environmental signals during development. PMID:25972784

  18. The role of spinal GABAergic circuits in the control of phrenic nerve motor output

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Michael G. Z.; Rogers, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    While supraspinal mechanisms underlying respiratory pattern formation are well characterized, the contribution of spinal circuitry to the same remains poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that intraspinal GABAergic circuits are involved in shaping phrenic motor output. To this end, we performed bilateral phrenic nerve recordings in anesthetized adult rats and observed neurogram changes in response to knocking down expression of both isoforms (65 and 67 kDa) of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65/67) using microinjections of anti-GAD65/67 short-interference RNA (siRNA) in the phrenic nucleus. The number of GAD65/67-positive cells was drastically reduced on the side of siRNA microinjections, especially in the lateral aspects of Rexed's laminae VII and IX in the ventral horn of cervical segment C4, but not contralateral to microinjections. We hypothesize that intraspinal GABAergic control of phrenic output is primarily phasic, but also plays an important role in tonic regulation of phrenic discharge. Also, we identified respiration-modulated GABAergic interneurons (both inspiratory and expiratory) located slightly dorsal to the phrenic nucleus. Our data provide the first direct evidence for the existence of intraspinal GABAergic circuits contributing to the formation of phrenic output. The physiological role of local intraspinal inhibition, independent of descending direct bulbospinal control, is discussed. PMID:25833937

  19. Heterosynaptic long-term potentiation at interneuron-principal neuron synapses in the amygdala requires nitric oxide signalling.

    PubMed

    Lange, M D; Doengi, M; Lesting, J; Pape, H C; Jüngling, K

    2012-01-01

    Long-lasting changes of synaptic efficacy are thought to be a prerequisite for memory formation and maintenance. In the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), one of the main regions for fear and extinction learning of the brain, various forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) have been described for excitatory glutamatergic synapses. In contrast, little is known about the mechanisms of LTP at inhibitory GABAergic synapses. Here we provide evidence that (1) LTP at inhibitory GABAergic synapses (LTP(i)) between inhibitory interneurons and principal neurons (PNs) can be induced by theta-burst stimulation (TBS), (2) this LTP(i) is prevented by AMPA- or NMDA-receptor antagonists, and (3) this LTP(i) is abolished by the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME or the NO scavenger PTIO, and thus is critically dependent on nitric oxide (NO) signalling. These findings are corroborated by immunocytochemical stainings for neuronal (n) NOS, which revealed the existence of nNOS-positive neurons and fibres in the BLA. We conclude that LTP of GABAergic synaptic transmission to PNs is induced by activation of AMPA and NMDA receptors at glutamatergic synapses and subsequent retrograde NO signalling to enhance GABAergic transmission. This form of LTP at GABAergic synapses comprises a novel form of heterosynaptic plasticity within the BLA, apt to shape conditioned fear responses. PMID:22041183

  20. Activity blockade and GABAA receptor blockade produce synaptic scaling through chloride accumulation in embryonic spinal motoneurons and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Lindsly, Casie; Gonzalez-Islas, Carlos; Wenner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic scaling represents a process whereby the distribution of a cell's synaptic strengths are altered by a multiplicative scaling factor. Scaling is thought to be a compensatory response that homeostatically controls spiking activity levels in the cell or network. Previously, we observed GABAergic synaptic scaling in embryonic spinal motoneurons following in vivo blockade of either spiking activity or GABAA receptors (GABAARs). We had determined that activity blockade triggered upward GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, thus increasing the driving force for these currents. To determine whether chloride accumulation also underlies GABAergic scaling following GABAAR blockade we have developed a new technique. We expressed a genetically encoded chloride-indicator, Clomeleon, in the embryonic chick spinal cord, which provides a non-invasive fast measure of intracellular chloride. Using this technique we now show that chloride accumulation underlies GABAergic scaling following blockade of either spiking activity or the GABAAR. The finding that GABAAR blockade and activity blockade trigger scaling via a common mechanism supports our hypothesis that activity blockade reduces GABAAR activation, which triggers synaptic scaling. In addition, Clomeleon imaging demonstrated the time course and widespread nature of GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, as it was also observed in spinal interneurons. This suggests that homeostatic scaling via chloride accumulation is a common feature in many neuronal classes within the embryonic spinal cord and opens the possibility that this process may occur throughout the nervous system at early stages of development.

  1. Network interneurons underlying ciliary locomotion in Hermissenda.

    PubMed

    Crow, Terry; Jin, Nan Ge; Tian, Lian-Ming

    2013-02-01

    In the nudibranch mollusk Hermissenda, ciliary locomotion contributes to the generation of two tactic behaviors. Light elicits a positive phototaxis, and graviceptive stimulation evokes a negative gravitaxis. Two classes of light-responsive premotor interneurons in the network contributing to ciliary locomotion have been recently identified in the cerebropleural ganglia. Aggregates of type I interneurons receive monosynaptic excitatory (I(e)) or inhibitory (I(i)) input from identified photoreceptors. Type II interneurons receive polysynaptic excitatory (II(e)) or inhibitory (II(i)) input from photoreceptors. The ciliary network also includes type III inhibitory (III(i)) interneurons, which form monosynaptic inhibitory connections with ciliary efferent neurons (CENs). Illumination of the eyes evokes a complex inhibitory postsynaptic potential, a decrease of I(i) spike activity, a complex excitatory postsynaptic potential, and an increase of I(e) spike activity. Here, we characterized the contribution of identified I, II, and III(i) interneurons to the neural network supporting visually guided locomotion. In dark-adapted preparations, light elicited an increase in the tonic spike activity of II(e) interneurons and a decrease in the tonic spike activity of II(i) interneurons. Fluorescent dye-labeled type II interneurons exhibited diverse projections within the circumesophageal nervous system. However, a subclass of type II interneurons, II(e(cp)) and II(i(cp)) interneurons, were shown to terminate within the ipsilateral cerebropleural ganglia and indirectly modulate the activity of CENs. Type II interneurons form monosynaptic or polysynaptic connections with previously identified components of the ciliary network. The identification of a monosynaptic connection between I(e) and III(i) interneurons shown here suggest that they provide a major role in the light-dependent modulation of CEN spike activity underlying ciliary locomotion. PMID:23155173

  2. Calretinin interneurons are early targets of extracellular amyloid-beta pathology in PS1/AbetaPP Alzheimer mice hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Baglietto-Vargas, David; Moreno-Gonzalez, Ines; Sanchez-Varo, Raquel; Jimenez, Sebastian; Trujillo-Estrada, Laura; Sanchez-Mejias, Elisabeth; Torres, Manuel; Romero-Acebal, Manuel; Ruano, Diego; Vizuete, Marisa; Vitorica, Javier; Gutierrez, Antonia

    2010-01-01

    Specific neuronal networks are preferentially affected in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The distinct subpopulations of hippocampal inhibitory GABAergic system have been shown to display differential vulnerability to neurodegeneration in AD. We have previously reported a substantial loss of SOM/NPY interneurons, whereas those expressing parvalbumin were unaltered, in the hippocampus of 6 month-old PS1/AbetaPP transgenic mice. In the present study, we now investigated the pathological changes of hippocampal calretinin (CR) interneurons in this PS1/AbetaPP model from 2 to 12 months of age. The total number of CR-immunoreactive inhibitory cells was determined by stereology in CA1 and CA2/3 subfields. Our findings show a substantial decrease (35%-45%) of CR-positive interneurons in both hippocampal subfields of PS1/AbetaPP mice at very early age (4 months) compared to age-matched control mice. This decrease was accompanied by a reduced CR mRNA content as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. However, the number of another hippocampal CR-positive population (belonging to Cajal-Retzius cells) was not affected. The selective early loss of CR-interneurons was parallel to the appearance of extracellular Abeta deposits, preferentially in CR-axonal fields, and the formation of dystrophic neurites. This specific GABAergic subpopulation plays a crucial role in the generation of synchronous rhythmic activity in hippocampus by controlling other interneurons. Therefore, early alterations of hippocampal inhibitory functionality in AD, caused by select CR-cells neurodegeneration, could result in cognitive impairments seen in initial stages of the disease.

  3. Disruption of mGluR5 in parvalbumin-positive interneurons induces core features of neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, SA; Pinto-Duarte, A; Kappe, A; Zembrzycki, A; Metzler, A; Mukamel, EA; Lucero, J; Wang, X; Sejnowski, TJ; Markou, A; Behrens, MM

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in glutamatergic transmission onto developing GABAergic systems, in particular onto parvalbumin-positive (Pv+) fast-spiking interneurons, have been proposed as underlying causes of several neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism. Excitatory glutamatergic transmission, through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, is necessary for the correct postnatal development of the Pv+ GABAergic network. We generated mutant mice in which the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) was specifically ablated from Pv+ interneurons postnatally, and investigated the consequences of such a manipulation at the cellular, network and systems levels. Deletion of mGluR5 from Pv+ interneurons resulted in reduced numbers of Pv+ neurons and decreased inhibitory currents, as well as alterations in event-related potentials and brain oscillatory activity. These cellular and sensory changes translated into domain-specific memory deficits and increased compulsive-like behaviors, abnormal sensorimotor gating and altered responsiveness to stimulant agents. Our findings suggest a fundamental role for mGluR5 in the development of Pv+ neurons and show that alterations in this system can produce broad-spectrum alterations in brain network activity and behavior that are relevant to neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26260494

  4. β1-adrenoceptor activation is required for ethanol enhancement of lateral paracapsular GABAergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Weiner, Jeff L

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) potentiation of GABAergic neurotransmission in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) may contribute to the acute anxiolytic effects of this drug. Previous studies have shown that BLA pyramidal neurons receive GABAergic input from two distinct sources: local interneurons and a cluster of GABAergic cells termed lateral paracapsular (LPCS) interneurons. It is noteworthy that whereas EtOH enhances local GABAergic synapses via a presynaptic increase in GABA release, EtOH potentiation of LPCS inhibition is mediated via a distinct mechanism that requires adrenoceptor (AR) activation. Here, we sought to further characterize the interaction between the AR system and EtOH enhancement of LPCS GABAergic synapses by using in vitro electrophysiology techniques in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Exogenous norepinephrine (NE) enhanced LPCS-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) via the activation of β-ARs, because this effect was blocked by propranolol. EtOH potentiation of LPCS eIPSCs was also blocked by propranolol and significantly reduced by NE pretreatment, suggesting that NE and EtOH may enhance LPCS inhibition via a common mechanism. EtOH enhancement of LPCS eIPSCs was significantly reduced by a selective β1-, but not β2- or β3-, AR antagonist, and both EtOH and NE potentiation of LPCS IPSCs was blocked by postsynaptic disruption of cAMP signaling. These data suggest that EtOH enhances LPCS synapses via a postsynaptic β1-AR, cAMP-dependent cascade. Because enhancement of LPCS inhibition can reduce anxiety-like behaviors, these findings shed light on a novel mechanism that may play a role in some of the anxiolytic effects of EtOH that are thought to contribute to the development and progression of alcoholism.

  5. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Large, Adam M.; Kunz, Nicholas A.; Mielo, Samantha L.; Oswald, Anne-Marie M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  6. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Large, Adam M; Kunz, Nicholas A; Mielo, Samantha L; Oswald, Anne-Marie M

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  7. Loss of Either Rac1 or Rac3 GTPase Differentially Affects the Behavior of Mutant Mice and the Development of Functional GABAergic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pennucci, Roberta; Talpo, Francesca; Astro, Veronica; Montinaro, Valentina; Morè, Lorenzo; Cursi, Marco; Castoldi, Valerio; Chiaretti, Sara; Bianchi, Veronica; Marenna, Silvia; Cambiaghi, Marco; Tonoli, Diletta; Leocani, Letizia; Biella, Gerardo; D'Adamo, Patrizia; de Curtis, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Rac GTPases regulate the development of cortical/hippocampal GABAergic interneurons by affecting the early development and migration of GABAergic precursors. We have addressed the function of Rac1 and Rac3 proteins during the late maturation of hippocampal interneurons. We observed specific phenotypic differences between conditional Rac1 and full Rac3 knockout mice. Rac1 deletion caused greater generalized hyperactivity and cognitive impairment compared with Rac3 deletion. This phenotype matched with a more evident functional impairment of the inhibitory circuits in Rac1 mutants, showing higher excitability and reduced spontaneous inhibitory currents in the CA hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Morphological analysis confirmed a differential modification of the inhibitory circuits: deletion of either Rac caused a similar reduction of parvalbumin-positive inhibitory terminals in the pyramidal layer. Intriguingly, cannabinoid receptor-1-positive terminals were strongly increased only in the CA1 of Rac1-depleted mice. This increase may underlie the stronger electrophysiological defects in this mutant. Accordingly, incubation with an antagonist for cannabinoid receptors partially rescued the reduction of spontaneous inhibitory currents in the pyramidal cells of Rac1 mutants. Our results show that Rac1 and Rac3 have independent roles in the formation of GABAergic circuits, as highlighted by the differential effects of their deletion on the late maturation of specific populations of interneurons. PMID:26582364

  8. Loss of Either Rac1 or Rac3 GTPase Differentially Affects the Behavior of Mutant Mice and the Development of Functional GABAergic Networks.

    PubMed

    Pennucci, Roberta; Talpo, Francesca; Astro, Veronica; Montinaro, Valentina; Morè, Lorenzo; Cursi, Marco; Castoldi, Valerio; Chiaretti, Sara; Bianchi, Veronica; Marenna, Silvia; Cambiaghi, Marco; Tonoli, Diletta; Leocani, Letizia; Biella, Gerardo; D'Adamo, Patrizia; de Curtis, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    Rac GTPases regulate the development of cortical/hippocampal GABAergic interneurons by affecting the early development and migration of GABAergic precursors. We have addressed the function of Rac1 and Rac3 proteins during the late maturation of hippocampal interneurons. We observed specific phenotypic differences between conditional Rac1 and full Rac3 knockout mice. Rac1 deletion caused greater generalized hyperactivity and cognitive impairment compared with Rac3 deletion. This phenotype matched with a more evident functional impairment of the inhibitory circuits in Rac1 mutants, showing higher excitability and reduced spontaneous inhibitory currents in the CA hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Morphological analysis confirmed a differential modification of the inhibitory circuits: deletion of either Rac caused a similar reduction of parvalbumin-positive inhibitory terminals in the pyramidal layer. Intriguingly, cannabinoid receptor-1-positive terminals were strongly increased only in the CA1 of Rac1-depleted mice. This increase may underlie the stronger electrophysiological defects in this mutant. Accordingly, incubation with an antagonist for cannabinoid receptors partially rescued the reduction of spontaneous inhibitory currents in the pyramidal cells of Rac1 mutants. Our results show that Rac1 and Rac3 have independent roles in the formation of GABAergic circuits, as highlighted by the differential effects of their deletion on the late maturation of specific populations of interneurons.

  9. Characterization and Distribution of Reelin-Positive Interneuron Subtypes in the Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Dávid, Csaba; Cauli, Bruno; Gallopin, Thierry; Bouché, Elisabeth; Karagiannis, Anastassios; May, Petra; Herz, Joachim; Frotscher, Michael; Staiger, Jochen F.; Bock, Hans H.

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory interneurons (IN) represent a heterogeneous population with different electrophysiological, morphological, and molecular properties. The correct balance between interneuronal subtypes is important for brain function and is impaired in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Here we show the data of 123 molecularly and electrophysiologically characterized neurons of juvenile rat barrel cortex acute slices, 48 of which expressed Reelin (Reln). Reln mRNA was exclusively detected in Gad65/67-positive cells but was found in interneuronal subtypes in different proportions: all cells of the adapting-Somatostatin (SST) cluster expressed Reln, whereas 63% of the adapting-neuropeptide Y (NPY, 50% of the fast-spiking Parvalbumin (PVALB), and 27% of the adapting/bursting-Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) cluster were Reln-positive. Silhouette analysis revealed a high impact of the parameter Reln on cluster quality. By analyzing the co-localization of RELN immunoreactivity with those of different IN-markers, we found that RELN is produced layer-independently in SST-, NPY-, and NOS1-expressing INs, whereas co-localization of RELN and VIP was mostly absent. Of note, RELN co-localized with PVALB, predominantly in INs of layers IV/V (>30%). Our findings emphasize RELN's role as an important IN-marker protein and provide a basis for the functional characterization of Reln-expressing INs and its role in the regulation of inhibitory IN networks. PMID:23803971

  10. Accumulation of GABAergic Neurons, Causing a Focal Ambient GABA Gradient, and Downregulation of KCC2 Are Induced During Microgyrus Formation in a Mouse Model of Polymicrogyria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianying; Kumada, Tatsuro; Morishima, Toshitaka; Iwata, Satomi; Kaneko, Takeshi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Yoshida, Sachiko; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    Although focal cortical malformations are considered neuronal migration disorders, their formation mechanisms remain unknown. We addressed how the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system affects the GABAergic and glutamatergic neuronal migration underlying such malformations. A focal freeze-lesion (FFL) of the postnatal day zero (P0) glutamic acid decarboxylase–green fluorescent protein knock-in mouse neocortex produced a 3- or 4-layered microgyrus at P7. GABAergic interneurons accumulated around the necrosis including the superficial region during microgyrus formation at P4, whereas E17.5-born, Cux1-positive pyramidal neurons outlined the GABAergic neurons and were absent from the superficial layer, forming cell-dense areas in layer 2 of the P7 microgyrus. GABA imaging showed that an extracellular GABA level temporally increased in the GABAergic neuron-positive area, including the necrotic center, at P4. The expression of the Cl– transporter KCC2 was downregulated in the microgyrus-forming GABAergic and E17.5-born glutamatergic neurons at P4; these cells may need a high intracellular Cl– concentration to induce depolarizing GABA effects. Bicuculline decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in these microgyrus-forming cells. Thus, neonatal FFL causes specific neuronal accumulation, preceded by an increase in ambient GABA during microgyrus formation. This GABA increase induces GABAA receptor-mediated Ca2+ oscillation in KCC2-downregulated microgyrus-forming cells, as seen in migrating cells during early neocortical development. PMID:23246779

  11. Synaptic Organization of Perisomatic GABAergic Inputs onto the Principal Cells of the Mouse Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Vereczki, Viktória K.; Veres, Judit M.; Müller, Kinga; Nagy, Gergö A.; Rácz, Bence; Barsy, Boglárka; Hájos, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Spike generation is most effectively controlled by inhibitory inputs that target the perisomatic region of neurons. Despite the critical importance of this functional domain, very little is known about the organization of the GABAergic inputs contacting the perisomatic region of principal cells (PCs) in the basolateral amygdala. Using immunocytochemistry combined with in vitro single-cell labeling we determined the number and sources of GABAergic inputs of PCs at light and electron microscopic levels in mice. We found that the soma and proximal dendrites of PCs were innervated primarily by two neurochemically distinct basket cell types expressing parvalbumin (PVBC) or cholecystokinin and CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CCK/CB1BC). The innervation of the initial segment of PC axons was found to be parceled out by PVBCs and axo-axonic cells (AAC), as the majority of GABAergic inputs onto the region nearest to the soma (between 0 and 10 μm) originated from PVBCs, while the largest portion of the axon initial segment was innervated by AACs. Detailed morphological investigations revealed that the three perisomatic region-targeting interneuron types significantly differed in dendritic and axonal arborization properties. We found that, although individual PVBCs targeted PCs via more terminals than CCK/CB1BCs, similar numbers (15–17) of the two BC types converge onto single PCs, whereas fewer (6–7) AACs innervate the axon initial segment of single PCs. Furthermore, we estimated that a PVBC and a CCK/CB1BC may target 800–900 and 700–800 PCs, respectively, while an AAC can innervate 600–650 PCs. Thus, BCs and AACs innervate ~10 and 20% of PC population, respectively, within their axonal cloud. Our results collectively suggest, that these interneuron types may be differently affiliated within the local amygdalar microcircuits in order to fulfill specific functions in network operation during various brain states. PMID:27013983

  12. Direct Induction and Functional Maturation of Forebrain GABAergic Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Alfred Xuyang; Yuan, Qiang; Tan, Shawn; Xiao, Yixin; Wang, Danlei; Khoo, Audrey Tze Ting; Sani, Levena; Tran, Hoang-Dai; Kim, Paul; Chiew, Yong Seng; Lee, Kea Joo; Yen, Yi-Chun; Ng, Huck Hui; Lim, Bing; Je, Hyunsoo Shawn

    2016-08-16

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-releasing interneurons play an important modulatory role in the cortex and have been implicated in multiple neurological disorders. Patient-derived interneurons could provide a foundation for studying the pathogenesis of these diseases as well as for identifying potential therapeutic targets. Here, we identified a set of genetic factors that could robustly induce human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into GABAergic neurons (iGNs) with high efficiency. We demonstrated that the human iGNs express neurochemical markers and exhibit mature electrophysiological properties within 6-8 weeks. Furthermore, in vitro, iGNs could form functional synapses with other iGNs or with human-induced glutamatergic neurons (iENs). Upon transplantation into immunodeficient mice, human iGNs underwent synaptic maturation and integration into host neural circuits. Taken together, our rapid and highly efficient single-step protocol to generate iGNs may be useful to both mechanistic and translational studies of human interneurons. PMID:27498872

  13. An enhanced role and expanded developmental origins for gamma-aminobutyric acidergic interneurons in the human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Clowry, Gavin J

    2015-10-01

    Human beings have considerably expanded cognitive abilities compared with all other species and they also have a relatively larger cerebral cortex compared with their body size. But is a bigger brain the only reason for higher cognition or have other features evolved in parallel? Humans have more and different types of GABAergic interneurons, found in different places, than our model species. Studies are beginning to show differences in function. Is this expanded repertoire of functional types matched by an evolution of their developmental origins? Recent studies support the idea that generation of interneurons in the ventral telencephalon may be more complicated in primates, which have evolved a large and complex outer subventricular zone in the ganglionic eminences. In addition, proportionally more interneurons appear to be produced in the caudal ganglionic eminence, the majority of which populate the superficial layers of the cortex. Whether or not the cortical proliferative zones are a source of interneurogenesis, and to what extent and of what significance, is a contentious issue. As there is growing evidence that conditions such as autism, schizophrenia and congenital epilepsy may have developmental origins in the failure of interneuron production and migration, it is important we understand fully the similarities and differences between human development and our animal models.

  14. A negative feedback loop controls NMDA receptor function in cortical interneurons via neuregulin 2/ErbB4 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Vullhorst, Detlef; Mitchell, Robert M.; Keating, Carolyn; Roychowdhury, Swagata; Karavanova, Irina; Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Buonanno, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The neuregulin receptor ErbB4 is an important modulator of GABAergic interneurons and neural network synchronization. However, little is known about the endogenous ligands that engage ErbB4, the neural processes that activate them or their direct downstream targets. Here we demonstrate, in cultured neurons and in acute slices, that the NMDA receptor is both effector and target of neuregulin 2 (NRG2)/ErbB4 signalling in cortical interneurons. Interneurons co-express ErbB4 and NRG2, and pro-NRG2 accumulates on cell bodies atop subsurface cisternae. NMDA receptor activation rapidly triggers shedding of the signalling-competent NRG2 extracellular domain. In turn, NRG2 promotes ErbB4 association with GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, followed by rapid internalization of surface receptors and potent downregulation of NMDA but not AMPA receptor currents. These effects occur selectively in ErbB4-positive interneurons and not in ErbB4-negative pyramidal neurons. Our findings reveal an intimate reciprocal relationship between ErbB4 and NMDA receptors with possible implications for the modulation of cortical microcircuits associated with cognitive deficits in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26027736

  15. General anesthesia as a possible GABAergic modulator affects visual processing in children

    PubMed Central

    Van den Boomen, C.; de Graaff, J. C.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.; Kalkman, C. J.; Kemner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) inhibitory interneurons play an important role in visual processing, as is revealed by studies administering drugs in human and monkey adults. Investigating this process in children requires different methodologies, due to ethical considerations. The current study aimed to investigate whether a new method, being general anesthesia using Sevoflurane, can be used to trace the effects of GABAergic modulation on visual brain functioning in children. To this aim, visual processing was investigated in children aged 4–12 years who were scheduled for minor urologic procedures under general anesthesia in day-care treatment. In a visual segmentation task, the difference in Event-Related Potential (ERP) response to homogeneous and textured stimuli was investigated. In addition, psychophysical performance on visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were measured. Results were compared between before and shortly after anesthesia. In two additional studies, effects at 1 day after anesthesia and possible effects of task-repetition were investigated. ERP results showed longer latency and lower amplitude of the Texture Negativity (TN) component shortly after compared to before anesthesia. No effects of anesthesia on psychophysical measurements were found. No effects at 1 day after anesthesia or of repetition were revealed either. These results show that GABAergic modulation through general anesthesia affects ERP reflections of visual segmentation in a similar way in children as benzodiazepine does in adults, but that effects are not permanent. This demonstrates that ERP measurement after anesthesia is a successful method to study effects of GABAergic modulation in children. PMID:23630461

  16. Early GABAergic circuitry in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Kirischuk, Sergei; Sinning, Anne; Kilb, Werner

    2014-06-01

    In the cerebral cortex GABAergic signaling plays an important role in regulating early developmental processes, for example, neurogenesis, migration and differentiation. Transient cell populations, namely Cajal-Retzius in the marginal zone and thalamic input receiving subplate neurons, are integrated as active elements in transitory GABAergic circuits. Although immature pyramidal neurons receive GABAergic synaptic inputs already at fetal stages, they are integrated into functional GABAergic circuits only several days later. In consequence, GABAergic synaptic transmission has only a minor influence on spontaneous network activity during early corticogenesis. Concurrent with the gradual developmental shift of GABA action from excitatory to inhibitory and the maturation of cortical synaptic connections, GABA becomes more important in synchronizing neuronal network activity.

  17. Differential effects of GABAB autoreceptor activation on ethanol potentiation of local and lateral paracapsular GABAergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Weiner, Jeff L

    2009-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that GABAergic inhibition within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays an integral role in the regulation of anxiety, an important behavioral component in the etiology of alcoholism. Although ethanol has recently been shown to enhance BLA GABAergic inhibition via two distinct populations of inhibitory cells, local and lateral paracapsular (lpcs) interneurons, little is known about the mechanisms underlying ethanol potentiation of these two inhibitory pathways. Ethanol is known to enhance GABAergic inhibition in many brain regions via a complex array of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. In addition, ethanol's presynaptic effects are often subject to GABA(B) autoreceptor (GABA(B)-R) modulation. Therefore, in this study, we characterized GABA(B)-R function and modulation of ethanol actions at local and lpcs GABAergic synapses. At local synapses, we found significant paired-pulse depression (PPD, 250 ms inter-pulse interval) which was abated by SCH-50911 (GABA(B)-R antagonist). No significant PPD was detected at lpcs synapses, but SCH-50911 significantly potentiated lpcs-evoked IPSCs. Baclofen (GABA(B)-R agonist) had similar depressant effects on local- and lpcs-evoked IPSCs, however baclofen pretreatment only reduced ethanol potentiation at local synapses. Ethanol also significantly enhanced the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs, and these effects were also sensitive to GABA(B)-R modulators. Collectively, these data suggest that stimulus-independent inhibitory responses recorded from BLA principal neurons primarily reflect the activity of local GABAergic interneurons and provide additional evidence that ethanol potentiates local BLA inhibitory synapses primarily via a presynaptic enhancement of GABA release that is tightly regulated by GABA(B)-Rs. In contrast, ethanol potentiation of lpcs GABAergic synapses is not sensitive to GABA(B)-R activation and does not appear to involve increased presynaptic GABA release.

  18. Differential Effects of GABAB Autoreceptor Activation on Ethanol Potentiation of Local and Lateral Paracapsular GABAergic Synapses in the Rat Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J.; Weiner, Jeff L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Many studies have demonstrated that GABAergic inhibition within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays an integral role in the regulation of anxiety, an important behavioral component in the etiology of alcoholism. Although ethanol has recently been shown to enhance BLA GABAergic inhibition via two distinct populations of inhibitory cells, local and lateral paracapsular (lpcs) interneurons, little is known about the mechanisms underlying ethanol potentiation of these two inhibitory pathways. Ethanol is known to enhance GABAergic inhibition in many brain regions via a complex array of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. In addition, ethanol’s presynaptic effects are often subject to GABAB autoreceptor (GABAB-R) modulation. Therefore, in this study, we characterized GABAB-R function and modulation of ethanol actions at local and lpcs GABAergic synapses. At local synapses, we found significant paired-pulse depression (PPD, 250 msec interpulse interval) which was abated by SCH-50911 (GABAB-R antagonist). No significant PPD was detected at lpcs synapses, but SCH-50911 significantly potentiated lpcs-evoked IPSCs. Baclofen (GABAB-R agonist) had similar depressant effects on local- and lpcs-evoked IPSCs, however baclofen pretreatment only reduced ethanol potentiation at local synapses. Ethanol also significantly enhanced the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs, and these effects were also sensitive to GABAB-R modulators. Collectively, these data suggest that stimulus-independent inhibitory responses recorded from BLA principal neurons primarily reflect the activity of local GABAergic interneurons and provide additional evidence that ethanol potentiates local BLA inhibitory synapses primarily via a presynaptic enhancement of GABA release that is tightly regulated by GABAB-R. In contrast, ethanol potentiation of lpcs GABAergic synapses is not sensitive to GABAB-R activation and does not appear to involve increased presynaptic GABA release. PMID:19371578

  19. Distinct local circuits between neocortical pyramidal cells and fast-spiking interneurons in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Angulo, María Cecilia; Staiger, Jochen F; Rossier, Jean; Audinat, Etienne

    2003-02-01

    Connections between layer V pyramidal cells and GABAergic fast-spiking interneurons (pyramidal-FS) were studied by paired recordings combined with morphological analyses in acute neocortical slices from 28- to 52-day-old rats. Pairs of spikes elicited in pyramidal cells at a stimulation rate of 0.2 Hz induced unitary excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in FS interneurons that displayed facilitation (48%), depression (38.5%), or neither depression nor facilitation (13.5%). Analyses of the EPSC amplitude distributions indicate that depressing connections always showed multiple functional release sites. On the contrary, facilitating connections consisted either of one or several release sites. At a holding potential of -72 mV, the quantal size (q) and the release probability (p) of facilitating connections with a single release site were -21.9 +/- 7.5 pA and 0.49 +/- 0.19 (SD), respectively. The mean q and the estimated number of release sites (n) at connections showing multiple sites were obtained by decreasing the release probability and did not differ between depressing and facilitating synapses (depressing connections: q = -15.3 +/- 2.5 pA, n = 5.1 +/- 3, facilitating connections: q = -23.9 +/- 9.8 pA, n = 7.8 +/- 5.4). However, the quantal content at facilitating synapses with multiple sites (1.9 +/- 1.5) was significantly different from that at depressing connections (4.1 +/- 3.9). Finally, quantitative morphological analyses revealed that most of the pyramidal cells displaying facilitation can be differentiated from those displaying depression by a more densely branched apical dendritic tree. Therefore two types of morphologically distinct pyramidal cells form excitatory connections with FS interneurons that differ in their short-term plasticity characteristics. Facilitating and depressing connections may provide a differential control of the temporal information processing of FS cells and thus finely regulate the inhibitory effect of these interneurons in

  20. Innervation by a GABAergic neuron depresses spontaneous release in glutamatergic neurons and unveils the clamping phenotype of synaptotagmin-1.

    PubMed

    Wierda, Keimpe D B; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2014-02-01

    The role of spontaneously occurring release events in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and their regulation is intensely debated. To study the interdependence of glutamatergic and GABAergic spontaneous release, we compared reciprocally connected "mixed" glutamatergic/GABAergic neuronal pairs from mice cultured on astrocyte islands with "homotypic" glutamatergic or GABAergic pairs and autaptic neurons. We measured mEPSC and mIPSC frequencies simultaneously from both neurons. Neuronal pairs formed both interneuronal synaptic and autaptic connections indiscriminately. We find that whereas mEPSC and mIPSC frequencies did not deviate between autaptic and synaptic connections, the frequency of mEPSCs in mixed pairs was strongly depressed compared with either autaptic neurons or glutamatergic pairs. Simultaneous imaging of synapses, or comparison to evoked release amplitudes, showed that this decrease was not caused by fewer active synapses. The mEPSC frequency was negatively correlated with the mIPSC frequency, indicating interdependence. Moreover, the reduction in mEPSC frequency was abolished when established pairs were exposed to bicuculline for 3 d, but not by long-term incubation with tetrodotoxin, indicating that spontaneous GABA release downregulates mEPSC frequency. Further investigations showed that knockout of synaptotagmin-1 did not affect mEPSC frequencies in either glutamatergic autaptic neurons or in glutamatergic pairs. However, in mixed glutamatergic/GABAergic pairs, mEPSC frequencies were increased by a factor of four in the synaptotagmin-1-null neurons, which is in line with data obtained from mixed cultures. The effect persisted after incubation with BAPTA-AM. We conclude that spontaneous GABA release exerts control over mEPSC release, and GABAergic innervation of glutamatergic neurons unveils the unclamping phenotype of the synaptotagmin-1-null neurons.

  1. Functions for interneuronal nets in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Buzsáki, G

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in the physiology of hippocampal interneurons are summarized in this article. These findings suggest that through their interconnectivity inhibitory interneurons can maintain large-scale oscillations at various frequency ranges (theta, gamma, and 200-Hz bands). We suggest that networks of inhibitory interneurons within the forebrain impose coordinated oscillatory "contexts" for the "content" carried by networks of principal cells. These oscillating inhibitory networks may provide the precise temporal structure necessary for ensembles of neurons to perform specific functions, such as memory trace formation and retrieval. In addition, synaptic inhibition is shown to reduce the somadendritic backpropagation of sodium spikes and to prevent the occurrence of calcium spikes in dendrites. These observations indicate that interneurons are in an excellent position to control neuronal plasticity and allow synaptic transmission either with or without long-term modification of synaptic strength.

  2. Neural circuits: Interacting interneurons regulate fear learning.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takaaki; Johansen, Joshua P

    2014-08-01

    A recent study has found that, during associative fear learning, different sensory stimuli activate subsets of inhibitory interneurons in distinct ways to dynamically regulate glutamatergic neural activity and behavioral memory formation. PMID:25093560

  3. Immunohistochemical localization of GABAergic key molecules in the main olfactory bulb of the Korean roe deer, Capreolus pygargus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongtae; Takayama, Chitoshi; Park, Changnam; Ahn, Meejung; Moon, Changjong; Shin, Taekyun

    2015-09-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) negatively regulates the excitatory activity of neurons and is a predominant neurotransmitter in the nervous system. The olfactory bulb, the main center in the olfactory system, is modulated by inhibitory interneurons that use GABA as their main neurotransmitter. The present study aimed to evaluate GABAergic transmission in the main olfactory bulb (MOB) of the Korean roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) by examining the immunohistochemical localization of GABAergic key molecules, including glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), GABA transporters (GATs; GAT-1 and GAT-3), and potassium sodium chloride co-transporter 2 (KCC2). GAD, VGAT, and KCC2 were expressed in the glomerular layer (GL), external plexiform layer (ePL), mitral cell layer (ML), and granule cell layer (GrL). Intense GAT-1 expression was observed in the GL; GAT-1 expression was discernible in the ePL, ML, and GrL. However, intense GAT-3 expression was extensively observed in all layers of the MOB. These results suggest that substantial GABAergic synapses are present in the GL, ePL, ML, and GrL. Furthermore, the released GABA may be removed by GAT-1 and GAT-3 in the GL, and the majority of GABA, which is present in the ePL to GrL, may undergo reuptake by GAT-3. This is the first morphological and descriptive study of GABAergic transmission in the MOB of Korean roe deer. PMID:26115600

  4. Transplant-mediated enhancement of spinal cord GABAergic inhibition reverses paclitaxel-induced mechanical and heat hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bráz, João M; Wang, Xidao; Guan, Zhonghui; Rubenstein, John L; Basbaum, Allan I

    2015-06-01

    Decreased spinal cord GABAergic inhibition is a major contributor to the persistent neuropathic pain that can follow peripheral nerve injury. Recently, we reported that restoring spinal cord GABAergic signaling by intraspinal transplantation of cortical precursors of GABAergic interneurons from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) can reverse the mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia) that characterizes a neuropathic pain model in the mouse. We show that MGE cell transplants are also effective against both the mechanical allodynia and the heat hyperalgesia produced in a paclitaxel-induced chemotherapy model of neuropathic pain. To test the necessity of GABA release by the transplants, we also studied the utility of transplanting MGE cells from mice with a deletion of VGAT, the vesicular GABA transporter. Transplants from these mice, in which GABA is synthesized but cannot be stored or released, had no effect on mechanical hypersensitivity or heat hyperalgesia in the paclitaxel model. Taken together, these results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of GABAergic precursor cell transplantation in diverse neuropathic pain models and support our contention that restoration of inhibitory controls through release of GABA from the transplants is their mode of action. PMID:25760475

  5. hVGAT-mCherry: a novel molecular tool for analysis of GABAergic neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    DeRosa, Brooke A.; Belle, Kinsley C.; Thomas, Blake J.; Cukier, Holly N.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.

    2015-01-01

    Background GABAergic synaptic transmission is known to play a critical role in the assembly of neuronal circuits during development and is responsible for maintaining the balance between excitatory and inhibitory signaling in the brain during maturation into adulthood. Importantly, defects in GABAergic neuronal function and signaling have been linked to a number of neurological diseases, including autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and epilepsy. With patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based models of neurological disease, it is now possible to investigate the disease mechanisms that underlie deficits in GABAergic function in affected human neurons. To that end, tools that enable the labeling and purification of viable GABAergic neurons from human pluripotent stem cells would be of great value. Results To address the need for tools that facilitate the identification and isolation of viable GABAergic neurons from the in vitro differentiation of iPSC lines, a cell type-specific promoter-driven fluorescent reporter construct was developed that utilizes the human vesicular GABA transporter (hVGAT) promoter to drive the expression of mCherry specifically in VGAT-expressing neurons. The transduction of iPSC-derived forebrain neuronal cultures with the hVGAT promoter-mCherry lentiviral reporter construct specifically labeled GABAergic neurons. Immunocytochemical analysis of hVGAT-mCherry expression cells showed significant co-labelling with the GABAergic neuronal markers for endogenous VGAT, GABA, and GAD67. Expression of mCherry from the VGAT promoter showed expression in several cortical interneuron subtypes to similar levels. In addition, an effective and reproducible protocol was developed to facilitate the fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS)-mediated purification of high yields of viable VGAT-positive cells. Conclusions These studies demonstrate the utility of the hVGAT-mCherry reporter construct as an effective tool for studying

  6. Lateral paracapsular GABAergic synapses in the basolateral amygdala contribute to the anxiolytic effects of beta 3 adrenoceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Chappell, Ann M; Yorgason, Jordan T; Weiner, Jeff L

    2010-08-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is known to play an integral role in the neurobiological response to stress. Exposure to stressful stimuli increases NE levels in brain regions that regulate stress and anxiety, like the basolateral amygdala (BLA). NE is thought to increase excitability in these areas through alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors (ARs), leading to increased anxiety. Surprisingly, recent studies have shown that systemic beta 3-AR agonist administration decreases anxiety-like behaviors, suggesting that beta 3-ARs may inhibit excitability in anxiety-related brain regions. Therefore, in this study we integrated electrophysiological and behavioral approaches to test the hypothesis that the anxiolytic effects of beta 3-AR agonists may be mediated by an increase in BLA GABAergic inhibition. We examined the effect of a selective beta 3-AR agonist, BRL37344 (BRL), on GABAergic synapses arising from local circuit interneurons and inhibitory synapses originating from a recently described population of cells called lateral paracapsular (LPCS) interneurons. Surprisingly, BRL selectively enhanced LPCS-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) with no effect on local GABAergic inhibition. BRL also had no effect on glutamatergic synaptic excitation within the BLA. BRL potentiation of LPCS eIPSCs was blocked by the selective beta 3-AR antagonist, SR59230A, or by intracellular dialysis of Rp-CAMPS (cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor), and this enhancement was not associated with any changes in spontaneous IPSCs or LPCS paired-pulse ratio. BRL also increased the amplitude of unitary LPCS IPSCs (uIPSCs) with no effect on uIPSC failure rate. Finally, bilateral BLA microinjection of BRL reduced anxiety-like behaviors in an open-field assay and the elevated plus-maze. Collectively, these data suggest that beta 3-AR activation selectively enhances LPCS, but not local, BLA GABAergic synapses, and that increases in LPCS-mediated inhibition may contribute to the anxiolytic profile of

  7. Prenatal betamethasone does not affect glutamatergic or GABAergic neurogenesis in preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Vose, L R; Vinukonda, G; Diamond, D; Korumilli, R; Hu, F; Zia, M T K; Hevner, R; Ballabh, P

    2014-06-13

    Prenatal glucocorticoids (GCs) are routinely used for pregnant women in preterm labor to prevent respiratory distress syndrome and intraventricular hemorrhage in premature infants. However, the effect of antenatal GCs on neurogenesis in preterm neonates remains elusive. Herein, we hypothesized that prenatal GCs might suppress both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurogenesis in preterm rabbits and that this treatment would induce distinct changes in the expression of transcription factors regulating these developmental events. To test our hypotheses, we treated pregnant rabbits with betamethasone at E27 and E28, delivered the pups at E29 (term=32d), and assessed neurogenesis at birth and postnatal day 3. We quantified radial glia (Sox2(+)) and intermediate progenitor cells (Tbr2(+)) in the dorsal cortical subventricular zone to assess glutamatergic neuronal progenitors, and counted Nkx2.1(+) and Dlx2(+) cells in the ganglionic eminence to evaluate GABAergic neurogenesis. In addition, we assayed transcription factors regulating neurogenesis. We found that prenatal GCs did not affect the densities of radial glia and intermediate progenitors of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. The number of GABA(+) interneurons in the ganglionic eminence was similar between the prenatal GC-treated pups compared to untreated controls. Moreover, the mRNA expression of transcription factors, including Pax6, Ngn1/2, Emx1/2, Insm1, Dlx1, Nkx2.1, and Gsh2, were comparable between the two groups. However, there was a transient elevation in Mash1 protein in betamethasone-treated pups relative to controls at birth. These data suggest that prenatal GC treatment does not significantly impact the balance of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurogenesis in premature infants.

  8. Distribution and Intrinsic Membrane Properties of Basal Forebrain GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, James T.; Yang, Chun; Franciosi, Serena; Winston, Stuart; Abarr, Kathleen K.; Rigby, Matthew S.; Yanagawa, Yuchio; McCarley, Robert W.; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2013-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) strongly regulates cortical activation, sleep homeostasis, and attention. Many BF neurons involved in these processes are GABAergic, including a subpopulation of projection neurons containing the calcium-binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). However, technical difficulties in identification have prevented a precise mapping of the distribution of GABAergic and GABA/PV+ neurons in the mouse or a determination of their intrinsic membrane properties. Here we used mice expressing fluorescent proteins in GABAergic (GAD67-GFP knock-in mice) or PV+ neurons (PV-Tomato mice) to study these neurons. Immunohistochemical staining for GABA in GAD67-GFP mice confirmed that GFP selectively labeled BF GABAergic neurons. GFP+ neurons and fibers were distributed throughout the BF, with the highest density in the magnocellular preoptic area (MCPO). Immunohistochemistry for PV indicated that the majority of PV+ neurons in the BF were large (>20 μm) or medium-sized (15–20 μm) GFP+ neurons. Most medium and large-sized BF GFP+ neurons, including those retrogradely labeled from the neocortex, were fast-firing and spontaneously active in vitro. They exhibited prominent hyperpolarization-activated inward currents and subthreshold “spikelets,” suggestive of electrical coupling. PV+ neurons recorded in PV-Tomato mice had similar properties but had significantly narrower action potentials and a higher maximal firing frequency. Another population of smaller GFP+ neurons had properties similar to striatal projection neurons. The fast firing and electrical coupling of BF GABA/PV+ neurons, together with their projections to cortical interneurons and the thalamic reticular nucleus, suggest a strong and synchronous control of the neocortical fast rhythms typical of wakefulness and REM sleep. PMID:23254904

  9. Prenatal betamethasone does not affect glutamatergic or GABAergic neurogenesis in preterm newborns

    PubMed Central

    Vose, Linnea R.; Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Diamond, Daniel; Korumilli, Ritesh; Hu, Furong; Zia, Muhammad TK; Hevner, Robert; Ballabh, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal glucocorticoids (GCs) are routinely used for pregnant women in preterm labor to prevent respiratory distress syndrome and intraventricular hemorrhage in premature infants. However, the effect of antenatal GCs on neurogenesis in preterm neonates remains elusive. Herein, we hypothesized that prenatal GCs might suppress both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurogenesis in preterm rabbits and that this treatment would induce distinct changes in the expression of transcription factors regulating these developmental events. To test our hypotheses, we treated pregnant rabbits with betamethasone at E27 and E28, delivered the pups at E29 (term=32d), and assessed neurogenesis at birth and postnatal day 3. We quantified radial glia (Sox2+) and intermediate progenitor cells (Tbr2+) in the dorsal cortical subventricular zone to assess glutamatergic neuronal progenitors, and counted Nkx2.1+ and Dlx2+ cells in the ganglionic eminence to evaluate GABAergic neurogenesis. In addition, we assayed transcription factors regulating neurogenesis. We found that prenatal GCs did not affect the densities of radial glia and intermediate progenitors of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. The number of GABA+ interneurons in the ganglionic eminence was similar between the prenatal GC treated pups compared to untreated controls. Moreover, the mRNA expression of transcription factors, including Pax6, Ngn1/2, Emx1/2, Insm1, Dlx1, Nkx2.1, and Gsh2, were comparable between the two groups. However, there was a transient elevation in Mash1 protein in betamethasone treated pups relative to controls at birth. This data suggests that prenatal GC treatment does not significantly impact the balance of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurogenesis in premature infants. PMID:24735821

  10. EXPRESSION AND DISTRIBUTION OF Kv4 POTASSIUM CHANNEL SUBUNITS AND POTASSIUM CHANNEL INTERACTING PROTEINS IN SUBPOPULATIONS OF INTERNEURONS IN THE BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA

    PubMed Central

    DABROWSKA, J.; RAINNIE, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Kv4 potassium channel α subunits, Kv4.1, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3, determine some of the fundamental physiological properties of neurons in the CNS. Kv4 subunits are associated with auxiliary β-subunits, such as the potassium channel interacting proteins (KChIP1 – 4), which are thought to regulate the trafficking and gating of native Kv4 potassium channels. Intriguingly, KChIP1 is thought to show cell type-selective expression in GABA-ergic inhibitory interneurons, while other β-subunits (KChIP2–4) are associated with principal glutamatergic neurons. However, nothing is known about the expression of Kv4 family α- and β-subunits in specific interneurons populations in the BLA. Here, we have used immunofluorescence, co-immunoprecipitation, and Western Blotting to determine the relative expression of KChIP1 in the different interneuron subtypes within the BLA, and its co-localization with one or more of the Kv4 α subunits. We show that all three α-subunits of Kv4 potassium channel are found in rat BLA neurons, and that the immuno-reactivity of KChIP1 closely resembles that of Kv4.3. Indeed, Kv4.3 showed almost complete co-localization with KChIP1 in the soma and dendrites of a distinct subpopulation of BLA neurons. Dual-immunofluorescence studies revealed this to be in BLA interneurons immunoreactive for parvalbumin, cholecystokin-8, and somatostatin. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that KChIP1 was associated with all three Kv4 α subunits. Together our results suggest that KChIP1 is selectively expressed in BLA interneurons where it may function to regulate the activity of A-type potassium channels. Hence, KChIP1 might be considered as a cell type-specific regulator of GABAergic inhibitory circuits in the BLA. PMID:20849929

  11. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons of the prefrontal cortex support working memory and cognitive flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Andrew J.; Woloszynowska-Fraser, Marta U.; Ansel-Bollepalli, Laura; Cole, Katy L. H.; Foggetti, Angelica; Crouch, Barry; Riedel, Gernot; Wulff, Peer

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons (PVIs) within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been implicated in schizophrenia pathology. It is however unclear, how impaired signaling of these neurons may contribute to PFC dysfunction. To identify how PVIs contribute to PFC-dependent behaviors we inactivated PVIs in the PFC in mice using region- and cell-type-selective expression of tetanus toxin light chain (TeLC) and compared the functional consequences of this manipulation with non-cell-type-selective perturbations of the same circuitry. By sampling for behavioral alterations that map onto distinct symptom categories in schizophrenia, we show that dysfunction of PVI signaling in the PFC specifically produces deficits in the cognitive domain, but does not give rise to PFC-dependent correlates of negative or positive symptoms. Our results suggest that distinct aspects of the complex symptomatology of PFC dysfunction in schizophrenia can be attributed to specific prefrontal circuit elements. PMID:26608841

  12. Temporal lobe cortical pathology and inhibitory GABA interneuron cell loss are associated with seizures in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Richard; Magliozzi, Roberta; Campbell, Graham; Mahad, Don; Reynolds, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Seizures are recognised in multiple sclerosis (MS), but their true incidence and the mechanism by which they are associated with MS is unclear. Objective: The objective of this paper is to determine the lifetime frequency of seizures in the United Kingdom MS Tissue Bank (UKMSTB) population and any pathological features associated with seizures. Methods: We evaluated 255 individuals from the UKMSTB. A subset underwent analysis of cortical thickness, grey matter lesion (GML) (type and number) and cortical neuronal numbers (total and GABAergic). Results: A total of 37/255 patients had seizures (14.5% lifetime incidence); in 47% they were associated with concurrent infection. In those with seizures, death and wheelchair use occurred earlier and in 59% seizures developed after 15 years of disease. Seizures were associated with Type 1 GMLs and reduced cortical thickness in the middle temporal gyrus. Localised selective GABAergic interneuron loss in layers IV and VI was related to GMLs but was not explained by the presence of inflammation or by mitochondrial dysfunction within Type I GMLs. Conclusion: We confirm that seizure frequency rises in MS. Type I GMLs in the temporal lobe underlie a loss of inhibitory interneurons in cortical layers IV and VI and these changes could together with concurrent infection enhance susceptibility to seizures. PMID:25921040

  13. Production and organization of neocortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Khadeejah T.; Brown, Keith N.; Shi, Song-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitory GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic interneurons are a vital component of the neocortex responsible for shaping its output through a variety of inhibitions. Consisting of many flavors, interneuron subtypes are predominantly defined by their morphological, physiological, and neurochemical properties that help to determine their functional role within the neocortex. During development, these cells are born in the subpallium where they then tangentially migrate over long distances before being radially positioned to their final location in the cortical laminae. As development progresses into adolescence, these cells mature and form chemical and electrical connections with both glutamatergic excitatory neurons and other interneurons ultimately establishing the cortical network. The production, migration, and organization of these cells are determined by vast array of extrinsic and intrinsic factors that work in concert in order to assemble a proper functioning cortical inhibitory network. Failure of these cells to undergo these processes results in abnormal positioning and cortical function. In humans, this can bring about several neurological disorders including schizophrenia, epilepsy, and autism spectrum disorders. In this article, we will review previous literature that has revealed the framework for interneuron neurogenesis and migratory behavior as well as discuss recent findings that aim to elucidate the spatial and functional organization of interneurons within the neocortex. PMID:24312011

  14. Comparison of spike parameters from optically identified GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in sparse cortical cultures

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Keiko; Blanquie, Oriane; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Sinning, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Primary neuronal cultures share many typical features with the in vivo situation, including similarities in distinct electrical activity patterns and synaptic network interactions. Here, we use multi-electrode array (MEA) recordings from spontaneously active cultures of wildtype and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice to evaluate which spike parameters differ between GABAergic interneurons and principal, putatively glutamatergic neurons. To analyze this question we combine MEA recordings with optical imaging in sparse cortical cultures to assign individual spikes to visually-identified single neurons. In our culture system, excitatory and inhibitory neurons are present at a similar ratio as described in vivo, and spike waveform characteristics and firing patterns are fully developed after 2 weeks in vitro. Spike amplitude, but not other spike waveform parameters, correlated with the distance between the recording electrode and the location of the assigned neuron’s soma. Cluster analysis of spike waveform properties revealed no particular cell population that may be assigned to putative inhibitory or excitatory neurons. Moreover, experiments in primary cultures from transgenic GAD67-GFP mice, which allow optical identification of GABAergic interneurons and thus unambiguous assignment of extracellular signals, did not reveal any significant difference in spike timing and spike waveform parameters between inhibitory and excitatory neurons. Despite of our detailed characterization of spike waveform and temporal spiking properties we could not identify an unequivocal electrical parameter to discriminate between individual excitatory and inhibitory neurons in vitro. Our data suggest that under in vitro conditions cellular classifications of single neurons on the basis of their extracellular firing properties should be treated with caution. PMID:25642167

  15. Status Epilepticus-Induced Somatostatinergic Hilar Interneuron Degeneration Is Regulated by Striatal Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sik; Lin, Stanley L.; Lee, Boyoung; Kurup, Pradeep; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Naegele, Janice R.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Obrietan, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Excitotoxic cell death is one of the precipitating events in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. Of particular prominence is the loss of GABAergic hilar neurons. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of these cells are not well understood, activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway has been implicated in neuroprotective responses to excitotoxicity in other neuronal populations. Here, we report that high levels of the striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), a key regulator of ERK/MAPK signaling, are found in vulnerable somatostatin-immunoreactive hilar interneurons. Under both control conditions and after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), ERK/MAPK activation was repressed in STEP-immunoreactive hilar neurons. This contrasts with robust SE-induced ERK/MAPK activation in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, a cell region that does not express STEP. During pilocarpine-induced SE, in vivo disruption of STEP activity allowed activation of the MAPK pathway, leading to immediate-early gene expression and significant rescue from cell death. Thus, STEP increases the sensitivity of neurons to SE-induced excitotoxicity by specifically blocking a latent neuroprotective response initiated by the MAPK pathway. These findings identify a key set of signaling events that render somatostatinergic hilar interneurons vulnerable to SE-induced cell death. PMID:17360923

  16. Chronic stress, hippocampus and parvalbumin-positive interneurons: what do we know so far?

    PubMed

    Zaletel, Ivan; Filipović, Dragana; Puškaš, Nela

    2016-06-01

    The hippocampus is a brain structure involved in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and stress response. It plays an important role in the formation of declarative, spatial and contextual memory, as well as in the processing of emotional information. As a part of the limbic system, it is a very susceptible structure towards the effects of various stressors. The molecular mechanisms of structural and functional alternations that occur in the hippocampus under chronic stress imply an increased level of circulating glucocorticoids (GCs), which is an HPA axis response to stress. Certain data show that changes induced by chronic stress may be independent from the GCs levels, opening the possibility of existence of other poorly explored mechanisms and pathways through which stressors act. The hippocampal GABAergic parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons represent an especially vulnerable population of neurons in chronic stress, which may be of key importance in the development of mood disorders. However, cellular and molecular hippocampal changes that arise as a consequence of chronic stress still represent a large and unexplored area. This review discusses the current knowledge about the PV+ interneurons of the hippocampus and the influence of chronic stress on this intriguing population of neurons.

  17. Augmented Inhibition from Cannabinoid-Sensitive Interneurons Diminishes CA1 Output after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brian N.; Palmer, Chris P.; Bourgeois, Elliot B.; Elkind, Jaclynn A.; Putnam, Brendan J.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2014-01-01

    The neurological impairments associated with traumatic brain injury include learning and memory deficits and increased risk of seizures. The hippocampus is critically involved in both of these phenomena and highly susceptible to damage by traumatic brain injury. To examine network activity in the hippocampal CA1 region after lateral fluid percussion injury, we used a combination of voltage-sensitive dye, field potential, and patch clamp recording in mouse hippocampal brain slices. When the stratum radiatum (SR) was stimulated in slices from injured mice, we found decreased depolarization in SR and increased hyperpolarization in stratum oriens (SO), together with a decrease in the percentage of pyramidal neurons firing stimulus-evoked action potentials. Increased hyperpolarization in SO persisted when glutamatergic transmission was blocked. However, we found no changes in SO responses when the alveus was stimulated to directly activate SO. These results suggest that the increased SO hyperpolarization evoked by SR stimulation was mediated by interneurons that have cell bodies and/or axons in SR, and form synapses in stratum pyramidale and SO. A low concentration (100 nM) of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2, restored CA1 output in slices from injured animals. These findings support the hypothesis that increased GABAergic signaling by cannabinoid-sensitive interneurons contributes to the reduced CA1 output following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25565968

  18. N-Cadherin Sustains Motility and Polarity of Future Cortical Interneurons during Tangential Migration

    PubMed Central

    Luccardini, Camilla; Hennekinne, Laetitia; Viou, Lucie; Yanagida, Mitsutoshi; Murakami, Fujio; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Ma, Xufei; Adelstein, Robert S.; Mège, René-Marc

    2013-01-01

    In the developing brain, cortical GABAergic interneurons migrate long distances from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) in which they are generated, to the cortex in which they settle. MGE cells express the cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin, a homophilic cell–cell adhesion molecule that regulates numerous steps of brain development, from neuroepithelium morphogenesis to synapse formation. N-cadherin is also expressed in embryonic territories crossed by MGE cells during their migration. In this study, we demonstrate that N-cadherin is a key player in the long-distance migration of future cortical interneurons. Using N-cadherin-coated substrate, we show that N-cadherin-dependent adhesion promotes the migration of mouse MGE cells in vitro. Conversely, mouse MGE cells electroporated with a construct interfering with cadherin function show reduced cell motility, leading process instability, and impaired polarization associated with abnormal myosin IIB dynamics. In vivo, the capability of electroporated MGE cells to invade the developing cortical plate is altered. Using genetic ablation of N-cadherin in mouse embryos, we show that N-cadherin-depleted MGEs are severely disorganized. MGE cells hardly exit the disorganized proliferative area. N-cadherin ablation at the postmitotic stage, which does not affect MGE morphogenesis, alters MGE cell motility and directionality. The tangential migration to the cortex of N-cadherin ablated MGE cells is delayed, and their radial migration within the cortical plate is perturbed. Altogether, these results identify N-cadherin as a pivotal adhesion substrate that activates cell motility in future cortical interneurons and maintains cell polarity over their long-distance migration to the developing cortex. PMID:24227724

  19. The GABAergic System and the Gastrointestinal Physiopathology.

    PubMed

    Auteri, Michelangelo; Zizzo, Maria Grazia; Serio, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report about the presence of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, accumulating evidence strongly supports the widespread representation of the GABAergic system in the enteric milieu, underlining its potential multifunctional role in the regulation of GI functions in health and disease. GABA and GABA receptors are widely distributed throughout the GI tract, constituting a complex network likely regulating the diverse GI behaviour patterns, cooperating with other major neurotransmitters and mediators for maintaining GI homeostasis in physiologic and pathologic conditions. GABA is involved in the circuitry of the enteric nervous system, controlling GI secretion and motility, as well as in the GI endocrine system, possibly acting as a autocrine/paracrine or hormonal agent. Furthermore, a series of investigations addresses the GABAergic system as a potential powerful modulator of GI visceral pain processing, enteric immune system and carcinogenesis. Although overall such actions may imply the consideration of the GABAergic system as a novel therapeutic target in different GI pathologic states, including GI motor and secretory diseases and different enteric inflammatory- and pain-related pathologies, current clinical applications of GABAergic drugs are scarce. Thus, in an attempt to propel novel scientific efforts addressing the detailed characterization of the GABAergic signaling in the GI tract, and consequently the development of novel strategies for the treatment of different GI disorders, we reviewed and discussed the current evidence about GABA actions in the enteric environment, with a particular focus on their possible therapeutic implications. PMID:26365138

  20. Expression of COUP-TFII Nuclear Receptor in Restricted GABAergic Neuronal Populations in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Klausberger, Thomas; Karayannis, Theofanis; Suen, Wai Yee; Huck, Jojanneke; Tomioka, Ryohei; Rockland, Kathleen; Capogna, Marco; Studer, Michèle; Morales, Marisela; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The COUP-TFII nuclear receptor, also known as NR2F2, is expressed in the developing ventral telencephalon and modulates the tangential migration of a set of subpallial neuronal progenitors during forebrain development. Little information is available about its expression patterns in the adult brain. We have identified the cell populations expressing COUP-TFII and the contribution of some of them to network activity in vivo. Expression of COUP-TFII by hippocampal pyramidal and dentate granule cells, as well as neurons in the neocortex, formed a gradient increasing from undetectable in the dorsal to very strong in the ventral sectors. In the dorsal hippocampal CA1 area, COUP-TFII was restricted to GABAergic interneurons and expressed in several, largely nonoverlapping neuronal populations. Immunoreactivity was present in calretinin-, neuronal nitric oxide synthase-, and reelin-expressing cells, as well as in subsets of cholecystokinin- or calbindin-expressing or radiatum-retrohippocampally projecting GABAergic cells, but not in parvalbumin-and/or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In vivo recording and juxtacellular labeling of COUP-TFII-expressing cells revealed neurogliaform cells, basket cells in stratum radiatum and tachykinin-expressing radiatum dentate innervating interneurons, identified by their axodendritic distributions. They showed cell type-selective phase-locked firing to the theta rhythm but no activation during sharp wave/ripple oscillations. These basket cells in stratum radiatum and neurogliaform cells fired at the peak of theta oscillations detected extracellularly in stratum pyramidale, unlike previously reported ivy cells, which fired at the trough. The characterization of COUP-TFII-expressing neurons suggests that this developmentally important transcription factor plays cell type-specific role(s)in the adult hippocampus. PMID:20130170

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, David; Walker, Kendall; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Hampton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Dulla, Chris G.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for developing pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Although disruptions in brain circuitry are associated with TBI, the precise mechanisms by which brain injury leads to epileptiform network activity is unknown. Using controlled cortical impact (CCI) as a model of TBI, we examined how cortical excitability and glutamatergic signaling was altered following injury. We optically mapped cortical glutamate signaling using FRET-based glutamate biosensors, while simultaneously recording cortical field potentials in acute brain slices 2–4 weeks following CCI. Cortical electrical stimulation evoked polyphasic, epileptiform field potentials and disrupted the input–output relationship in deep layers of CCI-injured cortex. High-speed glutamate biosensor imaging showed that glutamate signaling was significantly increased in the injured cortex. Elevated glutamate responses correlated with epileptiform activity, were highest directly adjacent to the injury, and spread via deep cortical layers. Immunoreactivity for markers of GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased throughout CCI cortex. Lastly, spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency decreased and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current increased after CCI injury. Our results suggest that specific cortical neuronal microcircuits may initiate and facilitate the spread of epileptiform activity following TBI. Increased glutamatergic signaling due to loss of GABAergic control may provide a mechanism by which TBI can give rise to post-traumatic epilepsy. PMID:24610117

  2. Co-localization of glycine and gaba immunoreactivity in interneurons in Macaca monkey cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Crook, J; Hendrickson, A; Robinson, F R

    2006-09-15

    Previous work demonstrates that the cerebellum uses glycine as a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter [Ottersen OP, Davanger S, Storm-Mathisen J (1987) Glycine-like immunoreactivity in the cerebellum of rat and Senegalese baboon, Papio papio: a comparison with the distribution of GABA-like immunoreactivity and with [3H]glycine and [3H]GABA uptake. Exp Brain Res 66(1):211-221; Ottersen OP, Storm-Mathisen J, Somogyi P (1988) Colocalization of glycine-like and GABA-like immunoreactivities in Golgi cell terminals in the rat cerebellum: a postembedding light and electron microscopic study. Brain Res 450(1-2):342-353; Dieudonne S (1995) Glycinergic synaptic currents in Golgi cells of the rat cerebellum. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 92:1441-1445; Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2001) IPSC kinetics at identified GABAergic and mixed GABAergic and glycinergic synapses onto cerebellar Golgi cells. J Neurosci 21(16):6045-6057; Dugue GP, Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2005) Target-dependent use of coreleased inhibitory transmitters at central synapses. J Neurosci 25(28):6490-6498; Zeilhofer HU, Studler B, Arabadzisz D, Schweizer C, Ahmadi S, Layh B, Bosl MR, Fritschy JM (2005) Glycinergic neurons expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice. J Comp Neurol 482(2):123-141]. In the rat cerebellum glycine is not released by itself but is released together with GABA by Lugaro cells onto Golgi cells [Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2001) IPSC kinetics at identified GABAergic and mixed GABAergic and glycinergic synapses onto cerebellar Golgi cells. J Neurosci 21(16):6045-6057] and by Golgi cells onto unipolar brush and granule cells [Dugue GP, Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2005) Target-dependent use of coreleased inhibitory transmitters at central synapses. J Neurosci 25(28):6490-6498]. Here we report, from immunolabeling evidence in Macaca cerebellum, that interneurons in the granular cell layer are glycine+ at a density

  3. Opposing Actions of Sevoflurane on GABAergic and Glycinergic Synaptic Inhibition in the Spinal Ventral Horn

    PubMed Central

    Eckle, Veit-Simon; Hauser, Sabrina; Drexler, Berthold; Antkowiak, Bernd; Grasshoff, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background The ventral horn is a major substrate in mediating the immobilizing properties of the volatile anesthetic sevoflurane in the spinal cord. In this neuronal network, action potential firing is controlled by GABAA and glycine receptors. Both types of ion channels are sensitive to volatile anesthetics, but their role in mediating anesthetic-induced inhibition of spinal locomotor networks is not fully understood. Methodology/Principal Findings To compare the effects of sevoflurane on GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from ventral horn interneurons were carried out in organotypic spinal cultures. At concentrations close to MAC (minimum alveolar concentration), decay times of both types of IPSCs were significantly prolonged. However, at 1.5 MAC equivalents, GABAergic IPSCs were decreased in amplitude and reduced in frequency. These effects counteracted the prolongation of the decay time, thereby decreasing the time-averaged GABAergic inhibition. In contrast, amplitudes and frequency of glycinergic IPSCs were not significantly altered by sevoflurane. Furthermore, selective GABAA and glycine receptor antagonists were tested for their potency to reverse sevoflurane-induced inhibition of spontaneous action potential firing in the ventral horn. These experiments confirmed a weak impact of GABAA receptors and a prominent role of glycine receptors at a high sevoflurane concentration. Conclusions At high concentrations, sevoflurane mediates neuronal inhibition in the spinal ventral horn primarily via glycine receptors, and less via GABAA receptors. Our results support the hypothesis that the impact of GABAA receptors in mediating the immobilizing properties of volatile anesthetics is less essential in comparison to glycine receptors. PMID:23565218

  4. GABAergic neurons immunoreactive for calcium binding proteins are reduced in the prefrontal cortex in major depression.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Grazyna; O'Dwyer, Gillian; Teleki, Zsofia; Stockmeier, Craig A; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier

    2007-02-01

    Post-mortem morphometric studies report reductions in the average density and size of cortical neurons in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (ORB) in major depressive disorder (MDD). The contribution of specific neuronal phenotypes to this general pathology in depression is still unclear. Post-mortem sections from the dlPFC and ORB regions of 14 subjects with MDD and 11 controls were immunostained to visualize calbindin-immunoreactive (CB-IR) and parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) presumptive GABAergic neurons. A three-dimensional cell counting probe was used to assess the cell packing density and size of CB-IR neurons in layers II+IIIa and PV-IR neurons in layers III-VI. The density of CB-IR neurons was significantly reduced by 50% in depression in the dlPFC and there was a trend toward reduction in the ORB. The size of CB-IR somata was significantly decreased (18%) in depression in the dlPFC with a trend toward reduction in the ORB. In contrast, there was no difference in the density of PV-IR neurons between the depressed and control groups in the dlPFC. The size of PV-IR neuronal soma was unchanged in depressed compared to control subjects in either dlPFC or ORB. In depression, subpopulations of GABAergic neurons may be affected differently in dlPFC and ORB. A significant reduction in the density and size of GABAergic interneurons immunoreactive for calcium binding proteins was found predominantly in the dlPFC region. These cellular changes are consistent with recent neuroimaging studies revealing a reduction in the cortical levels of GABA in depression. PMID:17063153

  5. ZC4H2, an XLID gene, is required for the generation of a specific subset of CNS interneurons

    PubMed Central

    May, Melanie; Hwang, Kyu-Seok; Miles, Judith; Williams, Charlie; Niranjan, Tejasvi; Kahler, Stephen G.; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Steindl, Katharina; Van Der Spek, Peter J.; Swagemakers, Sigrid; Mueller, Jennifer; Stefl, Shannon; Alexov, Emil; Ryu, Jeong-Im; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Tarpey, Patrick; Neri, Giovanni; Holloway, Lynda; Skinner, Cindy; Stevenson, Roger E.; Dorsky, Richard I.; Wang, Tao; Schwartz, Charles E.; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Miles–Carpenter syndrome (MCS) was described in 1991 as an XLID syndrome with fingertip arches and contractures and mapped to proximal Xq. Patients had microcephaly, short stature, mild spasticity, thoracic scoliosis, hyperextendable MCP joints, rocker-bottom feet, hyperextended elbows and knees. A mutation, p.L66H, in ZC4H2, was identified in a XLID re-sequencing project. Additional screening of linked families and next generation sequencing of XLID families identified three ZC4H2 mutations: p.R18K, p.R213W and p.V75in15aa. The families shared some relevant clinical features. In silico modeling of the mutant proteins indicated all alterations would destabilize the protein. Knockout mutations in zc4h2 were created in zebrafish and homozygous mutant larvae exhibited abnormal swimming, increased twitching, defective eye movement and pectoral fin contractures. Because several of the behavioral defects were consistent with hyperactivity, we examined the underlying neuronal defects and found that sensory neurons and motoneurons appeared normal. However, we observed a striking reduction in GABAergic interneurons. Analysis of cell-type-specific markers showed a specific loss of V2 interneurons in the brain and spinal cord, likely arising from mis-specification of neural progenitors. Injected human wt ZC4H2 rescued the mutant phenotype. Mutant zebrafish injected with human p.L66H or p.R213W mRNA failed to be rescued, while the p.R18K mRNA was able to rescue the interneuron defect. Our findings clearly support ZC4H2 as a novel XLID gene with a required function in interneuron development. Loss of function of ZC4H2 thus likely results in altered connectivity of many brain and spinal circuits. PMID:26056227

  6. Specification of spatial identities of cerebellar neuron progenitors by ptf1a and atoh1 for proper production of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mayumi; Seto, Yusuke; Taya, Shinichiro; Owa, Tomoo; Inoue, Yukiko U; Inoue, Takayoshi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Nabeshima, Yo-Ichi; Hoshino, Mikio

    2014-04-01

    In the cerebellum, the bHLH transcription factors Ptf1a and Atoh1 are expressed in distinct neuroepithelial regions, the ventricular zone (VZ) and the rhombic lip (RL), and are required for producing GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively. However, it is unclear whether Ptf1a or Atoh1 is sufficient for specifying GABAergic or glutamatergic neuronal fates. To test this, we generated two novel knock-in mouse lines, Ptf1a(Atoh1) and Atoh1(Ptf1a), that are designed to express Atoh1 and Ptf1a ectopically in the VZ and RL, respectively. In Ptf1a(Atoh1) embryos, ectopically Atoh1-expressing VZ cells produced glutamatergic neurons, including granule cells and deep cerebellar nuclei neurons. Correspondingly, in Atoh1(Ptf1a) animals, ectopically Ptf1a-expressing RL cells produced GABAergic populations, such as Purkinje cells and GABAergic interneurons. Consistent results were also obtained from in utero electroporation of Ptf1a or Atoh1 into embryonic cerebella, suggesting that Ptf1a and Atoh1 are essential and sufficient for GABAergic versus glutamatergic specification in the neuroepithelium. Furthermore, birthdating analyses with BrdU in the knock-in mice or with electroporation studies showed that ectopically produced fate-changed neuronal types were generated at temporal schedules closely simulating those of the wild-type RL and VZ, suggesting that the VZ and RL share common temporal information. Observations of knock-in brains as well as electroporated brains revealed that Ptf1a and Atoh1 mutually negatively regulate their expression, probably contributing to formation of non-overlapping neuroepithelial domains. These findings suggest that Ptf1a and Atoh1 specify spatial identities of cerebellar neuron progenitors in the neuroepithelium, leading to appropriate production of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively.

  7. Inhibitory interneurons in visual cortical plasticity.

    PubMed

    van Versendaal, Daniëlle; Levelt, Christiaan N

    2016-10-01

    For proper maturation of the neocortex and acquisition of specific functions and skills, exposure to sensory stimuli is vital during critical periods of development when synaptic connectivity is highly malleable. To preserve reliable cortical processing, it is essential that these critical periods end after which learning becomes more conditional and active interaction with the environment becomes more important. How these age-dependent forms of plasticity are regulated has been studied extensively in the primary visual cortex. This has revealed that inhibitory innervation plays a crucial role and that a temporary decrease in inhibition is essential for plasticity to take place. Here, we discuss how different interneuron subsets regulate plasticity during different stages of cortical maturation. We propose a theory in which different interneuron subsets select the sources of neuronal input that undergo plasticity.

  8. Cadherin-13, a risk gene for ADHD and comorbid disorders, impacts GABAergic function in hippocampus and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, O; Selten, M M; Sich, S; Popp, S; Bacmeister, L; Amendola, E; Negwer, M; Schubert, D; Proft, F; Kiser, D; Schmitt, A G; Gross, C; Kolk, S M; Strekalova, T; van den Hove, D; Resink, T J; Nadif Kasri, N; Lesch, K P

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin-13 (CDH13), a unique glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored member of the cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules, has been identified as a risk gene for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and various comorbid neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, including depression, substance abuse, autism spectrum disorder and violent behavior, while the mechanism whereby CDH13 dysfunction influences pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders remains elusive. Here we explored the potential role of CDH13 in the inhibitory modulation of brain activity by investigating synaptic function of GABAergic interneurons. Cellular and subcellular distribution of CDH13 was analyzed in the murine hippocampus and a mouse model with a targeted inactivation of Cdh13 was generated to evaluate how CDH13 modulates synaptic activity of hippocampal interneurons and behavioral domains related to psychopathologic (endo)phenotypes. We show that CDH13 expression in the cornu ammonis (CA) region of the hippocampus is confined to distinct classes of interneurons. Specifically, CDH13 is expressed by numerous parvalbumin and somatostatin-expressing interneurons located in the stratum oriens, where it localizes to both the soma and the presynaptic compartment. Cdh13−/− mice show an increase in basal inhibitory, but not excitatory, synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Associated with these alterations in hippocampal function, Cdh13−/− mice display deficits in learning and memory. Taken together, our results indicate that CDH13 is a negative regulator of inhibitory synapses in the hippocampus, and provide insights into how CDH13 dysfunction may contribute to the excitatory/inhibitory imbalance observed in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as ADHD and autism. PMID:26460479

  9. Nitric oxide synthesis in locust olfactory interneurones

    PubMed

    Elphick; Rayne; Riveros-Moreno; Moncada; Shea

    1995-01-01

    The brain of the locust Schistocerca gregaria contains a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) that has similar properties to mammalian neuronal NOS. It catalyses the production of equimolar quantities of nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline from l-arginine in a Ca2+/calmodulin- and NADPH-dependent manner and is inhibited by the Nomega-nitro and Nomega-monomethyl analogues of l-arginine. In Western blots, an antiserum to the 160 kDa rat cerebellar NOS subunit recognises a locust brain protein with a molecular mass of approximately 135 kDa. NOS is located in several parts of the locust brain, including the mushroom bodies, but it is particularly abundant in the olfactory processing centres, the antennal lobes. Here it is present in two groups of local interneurones (a pair and a cluster of about 50) that project into the neuropile of the antennal lobes. The processes of these neurones terminate in numerous glomerulus-like structures where the synapses between primary olfactory receptor neurones and central interneurones are formed. NOS-containing local interneurones have also been identified in the mammalian olfactory bulb, suggesting that NO performs analogous functions in locust and mammalian olfactory systems. As yet, nothing is known about the role of NO in olfaction, but it seems likely that it is involved in the processing of chemosensory input to the brain. The locust antennal lobe may be an ideal 'simple' system in which this aspect of NO function can be examined.

  10. Corticofugal GABAergic projection neurons in the mouse frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Ryohei; Sakimura, Kenji; Yanagawa, Yuchio

    2015-01-01

    Cortical projection neurons are classified by hodology in corticocortical, commissural and corticofugal subtypes. Although cortical projection neurons had been regarded as only glutamatergic neurons, recently corticocortical GABAergic projection neurons has been also reported in several species. Here, we demonstrate corticofugal GABAergic projection neurons in the mouse frontal cortex. We employed viral-vector-mediated anterograde tracing, classical retrograde tracing, and immunohistochemistry to characterize neocortical GABAergic projection neurons. Injections of the Cre-dependent adeno-associated virus into glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67)-Cre knock-in mice revealed neocortical GABAergic projections widely to the forebrain, including the cerebral cortices, caudate putamen (CPu), ventral pallidum (VP), lateral globus pallidus (LGP), nucleus accumbens, and olfactory tubercle (Tu). Minor GABAergic projections were also found in the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, diagonal band of Broca, medial globus pallidus, substantial nigra, and dorsal raphe nucleus. Retrograde tracing studies also demonstrated corticofugal GABAergic projection neurons in the mouse frontal cortex. Further immunohistochemical screening with neurochemical markers revealed the majority of corticostriatal GABAergic projection neurons were positive for somatostatin (SS)-immunoreactivity. In contrast, corticothalamic GABAergic projection neurons were not identified by representative neurochemical markers for GABAergic neurons. These findings suggest that corticofugal GABAergic projection neurons are heterogeneous in terms of their neurochemical properties and target nuclei, and provide axonal innervations mainly to the nuclei in the basal ganglia. PMID:26578895

  11. Direct excitation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons by M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: roles in cellular excitability, inhibitory transmission and cognition.

    PubMed

    Yi, Feng; Ball, Jackson; Stoll, Kurt E; Satpute, Vaishali C; Mitchell, Samantha M; Pauli, Jordan L; Holloway, Benjamin B; Johnston, April D; Nathanson, Neil M; Deisseroth, Karl; Gerber, David J; Tonegawa, Susumu; Lawrence, J Josh

    2014-08-15

    Parvalbumin-containing (PV) neurons, a major class of GABAergic interneurons, are essential circuit elements of learning networks. As levels of acetylcholine rise during active learning tasks, PV neurons become increasingly engaged in network dynamics. Conversely, impairment of either cholinergic or PV interneuron function induces learning deficits. Here, we examined PV interneurons in hippocampus (HC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and their modulation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). HC PV cells, visualized by crossing PV-CRE mice with Rosa26YFP mice, were anatomically identified as basket cells and PV bistratified cells in the stratum pyramidale; in stratum oriens, HC PV cells were electrophysiologically distinct from somatostatin-containing cells. With glutamatergic transmission pharmacologically blocked, mAChR activation enhanced PV cell excitability in both CA1 HC and PFC; however, CA1 HC PV cells exhibited a stronger postsynaptic depolarization than PFC PV cells. To delete M1 mAChRs genetically from PV interneurons, we created PV-M1 knockout mice by crossing PV-CRE and floxed M1 mice. The elimination of M1 mAChRs from PV cells diminished M1 mAChR immunoreactivity and muscarinic excitation of HC PV cells. Selective cholinergic activation of HC PV interneurons using Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs technology enhanced the frequency and amplitude of inhibitory synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal cells. Finally, relative to wild-type controls, PV-M1 knockout mice exhibited impaired novel object recognition and, to a lesser extent, impaired spatial working memory, but reference memory remained intact. Therefore, the direct activation of M1 mAChRs on PV cells contributes to some forms of learning and memory.

  12. Direct excitation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons by M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: roles in cellular excitability, inhibitory transmission and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Feng; Ball, Jackson; Stoll, Kurt E; Satpute, Vaishali C; Mitchell, Samantha M; Pauli, Jordan L; Holloway, Benjamin B; Johnston, April D; Nathanson, Neil M; Deisseroth, Karl; Gerber, David J; Tonegawa, Susumu; Lawrence, J Josh

    2014-01-01

    Parvalbumin-containing (PV) neurons, a major class of GABAergic interneurons, are essential circuit elements of learning networks. As levels of acetylcholine rise during active learning tasks, PV neurons become increasingly engaged in network dynamics. Conversely, impairment of either cholinergic or PV interneuron function induces learning deficits. Here, we examined PV interneurons in hippocampus (HC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and their modulation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). HC PV cells, visualized by crossing PV-CRE mice with Rosa26YFP mice, were anatomically identified as basket cells and PV bistratified cells in the stratum pyramidale; in stratum oriens, HC PV cells were electrophysiologically distinct from somatostatin-containing cells. With glutamatergic transmission pharmacologically blocked, mAChR activation enhanced PV cell excitability in both CA1 HC and PFC; however, CA1 HC PV cells exhibited a stronger postsynaptic depolarization than PFC PV cells. To delete M1 mAChRs genetically from PV interneurons, we created PV-M1 knockout mice by crossing PV-CRE and floxed M1 mice. The elimination of M1 mAChRs from PV cells diminished M1 mAChR immunoreactivity and muscarinic excitation of HC PV cells. Selective cholinergic activation of HC PV interneurons using Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs technology enhanced the frequency and amplitude of inhibitory synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal cells. Finally, relative to wild-type controls, PV-M1 knockout mice exhibited impaired novel object recognition and, to a lesser extent, impaired spatial working memory, but reference memory remained intact. Therefore, the direct activation of M1 mAChRs on PV cells contributes to some forms of learning and memory. PMID:24879872

  13. A dopamine-acetylcholine cascade: simulating learned and lesion-induced behavior of striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tan, Can Ozan; Bullock, Daniel

    2008-10-01

    The giant cholinergic interneurons of the striatum are tonically active neurons (TANs) that respond with pauses to appetitive and aversive cues and to novel events. Whereas tonic activity emerges from intrinsic properties of these neurons, glutamatergic inputs from intralaminar thalamic nuclei and dopaminergic inputs from midbrain are required for genesis of pause responses. No prior computational models encompass both intrinsic and synaptically gated dynamics. We present a mathematical model that robustly accounts for behavior-related electrophysiological properties of TANs in terms of their intrinsic physiological properties and known afferents. In the model, balanced intrinsic hyperpolarizing and depolarizing currents engender tonic firing and glutamatergic inputs from thalamus (and cortex) both directly excite and indirectly inhibit TANs. If this inhibition, probably mediated by GABAergic nitric oxide synthase interneurons, exceeds a threshold, a persistent K+ conductance current amplifies its effect to generate a prolonged pause. Dopamine (DA) signals modulate both the intrinsic mechanisms and the external inputs of TANs. Simulations revealed that many learning-dependent behaviors of TANs, including acquired pauses to task-relevant cues, are explicable without recourse to learning-dependent changes in synapses onto TANs, due to a tight coupling between DA bursts and TAN pauses. These interactions imply that reward-predicting cues often cause striatal projection neurons to receive a cascade of signals: an adaptively scaled DA burst, a brief acetylcholine (ACh) burst, and an ACh pause. A sensitivity analysis revealed a unique TAN response surface, which shows that DA inputs robustly cooperate with thalamic inputs to control cue-dependent pauses of ACh release, which strongly affects performance- and learning-related dynamics in the striatum.

  14. Ivy and neurogliaform interneurons are a major target of μ-opioid receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Luu, Lillian; Lee, Sang-Hun; Varga, Csaba; Soltesz, Ivan

    2011-10-19

    μ-Opioid receptors (μORs) are selectively expressed on interneurons in area CA1 of the hippocampus. Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing, basket cells express μORs, but circumstantial evidence suggests that another major, unidentified, GABAergic cell class must also be modulated by μORs. Here we report that the abundant, dendritically targeting, neurogliaform family of cells (Ivy and neurogliaform cells) is a previously unrecognized target of direct modulation by μORs. Ivy and neurogliaform cells are not only numerous but also have unique properties, including promiscuous gap junctions formed with various interneuronal subtypes, volume transmission, and the ability to produce a postsynaptic GABA(B) response after a single presynaptic spike. Using a mouse line expressing green fluorescent protein under the neuropeptide Y promoter, we find that, across all layers of CA1, activation of μORs hyperpolarizes Ivy and neurogliaform cells. Furthermore, paired recordings between synaptically coupled Ivy and pyramidal cells show that Ivy cell terminals are dramatically inhibited by μOR activation. Effects in Ivy and neurogliaform cells are seen at similar concentrations of agonist as those producing inhibition in fast-spiking parvalbumin basket cells. We also report that Ivy cells display the recently described phenomenon of persistent firing, a state of continued firing in the absence of continued input, and that induction of persistent firing is inhibited by μOR activation. Together, these findings identify a major, previously unrecognized, target of μOR modulation. Given the prominence of this cell type in and beyond CA1, as well as its unique role in microcircuitry, opioid modulation of neurogliaform cells has wide implications. PMID:22016519

  15. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling at inhibitory interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Younts, Thomas J.; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in our understanding of how endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) signal at excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). This review discusses how eCBs regulate inhibitory interneurons, their synapses, and the networks in which they are embedded. eCB signaling plays a pivotal role in brain physiology by means of their synaptic signal transduction, spatiotemporal signaling profile, routing of information through inhibitory microcircuits, and experience-dependent plasticity. Understanding the normal processes underlying eCB signaling is beginning to shed light on how their dysregulation contributes to disease. PMID:24650503

  16. LOSING THE SUGAR COATING: POTENTIAL IMPACT OF PERINEURONAL NET ABNORMALITIES ON INTERNEURONS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Sabina; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Markota, Matej; Brown, Christopher; Batzianouli, Eleni T.

    2015-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) were shown to be markedly altered in subjects with schizophrenia. In particular, decreases of PNNs have been detected in the amygdala, entorhinal cortex and prefrontal cortex. The formation of these specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) aggregates during postnatal development, their functions and association with distinct populations of GABAergic interneurons, bear great relevance to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PNNs gradually mature in an experience-dependent manner during late stages of postnatal development, overlapping with the prodromal period/age of onset of schizophrenia. Throughout adulthood, PNNs regulate neuronal properties, including synaptic remodeling, cell membrane compartmentalization and subsequent regulation of glutamate receptors and calcium channels, and susceptibility to oxidative stress. With the present paper, we discuss evidence for PNN abnormalities in schizophrenia, the potential functional impact of such abnormalities on inhibitory circuits and, in turn, cognitive and emotion processing. We integrate these considerations with results from recent genetic studies showing genetic susceptibility for schizophrenia associated with genes encoding for PNN components, matrix-regulating molecules and immune system factors. Notably, the composition of PNNs is regulated dynamically in response to factors such as fear, reward, stress, and immune response. This regulation occurs through families of matrix metalloproteinases that cleave ECM components, altering their functions and affecting plasticity. Several metalloproteinases have been proposed as vulnerability factors for schizophrenia. We speculate that the physiological process of PNN remodeling may be disrupted in schizophrenia as a result of interactions between matrix remodeling processes and immune system dysregulation. In turn, these mechanisms may contribute to dysfunction of GABAergic neurons. PMID:25601362

  17. Losing the sugar coating: potential impact of perineuronal net abnormalities on interneurons in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Sabina; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Markota, Matej; Brown, Christopher; Batzianouli, Eleni T

    2015-09-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) were shown to be markedly altered in subjects with schizophrenia. In particular, decreases of PNNs have been detected in the amygdala, entorhinal cortex and prefrontal cortex. The formation of these specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) aggregates during postnatal development, their functions, and association with distinct populations of GABAergic interneurons, bear great relevance to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PNNs gradually mature in an experience-dependent manner during late stages of postnatal development, overlapping with the prodromal period/age of onset of schizophrenia. Throughout adulthood, PNNs regulate neuronal properties, including synaptic remodeling, cell membrane compartmentalization and subsequent regulation of glutamate receptors and calcium channels, and susceptibility to oxidative stress. With the present paper, we discuss evidence for PNN abnormalities in schizophrenia, the potential functional impact of such abnormalities on inhibitory circuits and, in turn, cognitive and emotion processing. We integrate these considerations with results from recent genetic studies showing genetic susceptibility for schizophrenia associated with genes encoding for PNN components, matrix-regulating molecules and immune system factors. Notably, the composition of PNNs is regulated dynamically in response to factors such as fear, reward, stress, and immune response. This regulation occurs through families of matrix metalloproteinases that cleave ECM components, altering their functions and affecting plasticity. Several metalloproteinases have been proposed as vulnerability factors for schizophrenia. We speculate that the physiological process of PNN remodeling may be disrupted in schizophrenia as a result of interactions between matrix remodeling processes and immune system dysregulation. In turn, these mechanisms may contribute to the dysfunction of GABAergic neurons.

  18. GABAergic mediation of indirect transsynaptic control over basal and spatial memory testing-induced activation of septo-hippocampal cholinergic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Durkin, T P

    1992-09-28

    A neurochemical study of the transsynaptic interactions established between septal GABAergic interneurones and cholinergic septo-hippocampal neurones was conducted using mice. The effects of acute in vivo injections of either muscimol (20-500 ng/0.2 microliter), bicuculline (100 ng-1 micrograms/0.2 microliter) or saline vehicle (0.2 microliter) into the medial septum on septo-hippocampal cholinergic activity were evaluated using measures of hippocampal high affinity choline uptake at 30 min post-injection in two main groups of mice. The first (quiet control) remained in their home cages during the post-injection period whereas the second (active) were submitted, 10 min following injection to a 20-min period of spatial working memory testing in an 8-arm radial maze. Intraseptal injections of either muscimol or bicuculline produced significant (25-50%) inhibition of hippocampal cholinergic activity in quiet conditions (basal) as compared to intact or saline-injected mice. In the active groups, whereas memory testing induced significant cholinergic activation (+15-20%) in intact and saline injected mice at 30 s post-test no significant memory testing-induced activation was observed in either muscimol or bicuculline-injected mice at any dose. The role of septal GABAergic interneurones in the indirect transsynaptic control over the basal and activated states of septo-hippocampal cholinergic activity is discussed with respect to the concept that these complex neuronal interactions contribute to the physiological mechanisms involved in the modulation of working memory performance.

  19. Repeated potentiation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulates behavioural and GABAergic deficits induced by early postnatal phencyclidine (PCP) treatment.

    PubMed

    Kjaerby, Celia; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Fejgin, Kim; Kristiansen, Uffe; Dalby, Nils Ole

    2013-09-01

    The underlying mechanism of the GABAergic deficits observed in schizophrenia has been proposed to involve NMDA receptor hypofunction. An emerging treatment strategy therefore aims at enhancing GABAergic signalling by increasing the excitatory transmission onto interneurons. We wanted to determine whether behavioural and GABAergic functional deficits induced by the NMDA receptor channel blocker, phencyclidine (PCP), could be reversed by repeated administration of two drugs known to enhance GABAergic transmission: the positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), ADX47273, and the partial agonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR), SSR180711. Adolescent rats (4-5 weeks) subjected to PCP treatment during the second postnatal week displayed a consistent deficit in prepulse inhibition (PPI), which was reversed by a one-week treatment with ADX47273 or SSR180711. We examined GABAergic transmission by whole cell patch-clamp recordings of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) in pyramidal neurons in layer II/III of prefrontal cortex (PFC) and by activation of extrasynaptic δ-containing GABAA receptors by THIP. Following PCP treatment, pyramidal neurons displayed a reduced mIPSC frequency and up-regulation of extrasynaptic THIP-induced current. ADX47273 treatment restored this up-regulation of THIP-induced current. Reduced receptor function seems to be the underlying cause of the reported changes, since repeated treatment with ADX47273 and SSR180711 decreased the induction of spontaneous inhibitory current caused by acute and direct agonism of mGluR5s and α7 nAChRs in slices. These results show that repeated administration of ADX47273 or SSR180711 reverses certain behavioural and functional deficits induced by PCP, likely through down-regulation or desensitisation of mGluR5s and α7 nAChRs, respectively. PMID:23643744

  20. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Choudhury, Mayukh; Stoica, Ana; Di Cristo, Graziella; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X) that were found in a cohort of French Canadian families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1−/− GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D) induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  1. Minimal Change in the Cytoplasmic Calcium Dynamics in Striatal GABAergic Neurons of a DYT1 Dystonia Knock-In Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Iwabuchi, Sadahiro; Koh, Jin-Young; Wang, Kai; Ho, K. W. David; Harata, N. Charles

    2013-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is the most common hereditary form of primary torsion dystonia. This autosomal-dominant disorder is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that cause sustained twisting and repetitive movements. It is caused by an in-frame deletion in the TOR1A gene, leading to the deletion of a glutamic acid residue in the torsinA protein. Heterozygous knock-in mice, which reproduce the genetic mutation in human patients, have abnormalities in synaptic transmission at the principal GABAergic neurons in the striatum, a brain structure that is involved in the execution and modulation of motor activity. However, whether this mutation affects the excitability of striatal GABAergic neurons has not been investigated in this animal model. Here, we examined the excitability of cultured striatal neurons obtained from heterozygous knock-in mice, using calcium imaging as indirect readout. Immunofluorescence revealed that more than 97% of these neurons are positive for a marker of GABAergic neurons, and that more than 92% are also positive for a marker of medium spiny neurons, indicating that these are mixed cultures of mostly medium spiny neurons and a few (~5%) GABAergic interneurons. When these neurons were depolarized by field stimulation, the calcium concentration in the dendrites increased rapidly and then decayed slowly. The amplitudes of calcium transients were larger in heterozygous neurons than in wild-type neurons, resulting in ~15% increase in cumulative calcium transients during a train of stimuli. However, there was no change in other parameters of calcium dynamics. Given that calcium dynamics reflect neuronal excitability, these results suggest that the mutation only slightly increases the excitability of striatal GABAergic neurons in DYT1 dystonia. PMID:24260480

  2. GABAergic synapses: their plasticity and role in sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Griffen, Trevor C.; Maffei, Arianna

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of a variety of cell types organized in a highly interconnected circuit. GABAergic neurons account for only about 20% of cortical neurons. However, they show widespread connectivity and a high degree of diversity in morphology, location, electrophysiological properties and gene expression. In addition, distinct populations of inhibitory neurons have different sensory response properties, capacities for plasticity and sensitivities to changes in sensory experience. In this review we summarize experimental evidence regarding the properties of GABAergic neurons in primary sensory cortex. We will discuss how distinct GABAergic neurons and different forms of GABAergic inhibitory plasticity may contribute to shaping sensory cortical circuit activity and function. PMID:24723851

  3. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca2+-activated K+ channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons

  4. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Harwell, Corey C.; Fuentealba, Luis C.; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R.L.; Gertz, Caitlyn C.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Turrero Garcia, Miguel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L.; Kriegstein, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin. PMID:26299474

  5. Cell type-specific, presynaptic LTP of inhibitory synapses on fast-spiking GABAergic neurons in the mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Sarihi, Abdolrahman; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Jiang, Bin; Sohya, Kazuhiro; Safari, Mir-Shahram; Arami, Masoumeh Kourosh; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Tsumoto, Tadaharu

    2012-09-19

    Properties and plasticity of inhibitory synapses on fast-spiking (FS) GABAergic (FS-GABA) interneurons in layer II/III of the mouse visual cortex were examined in cortical slices by whole-cell recordings of IPSCs or IPSPs evoked by activation of presynaptic FS or non-FS GABAergic interneurons. Unitary IPSCs (uIPSCs) evoked by action potentials of FS-GABA neurons have shorter onset latency, faster rising slope, higher peak amplitude, and faster decay time than those evoked by action potentials of non-FS-GABA neurons. Tetanic activation of presynaptic FS-GABA neurons induced long-term potentiation (LTP) of uIPSCs, whereas that of presynaptic non-FS-GABA neurons did not induce LTP, indicating that long-term plasticity of inhibitory synapses on FS-GABA neurons is pathway specific. For further analysis of inhibitory synaptic plasticity, IPSPs evoked by electrical stimulation of an adjacent site in the cortex were recorded from FS-GABA neurons. Theta burst stimulation induced LTP of IPSPs in 12 of 14 FS-GABA neurons. The paired-pulse stimulation protocol and coefficient of variation analysis indicated that this form of LTP may be presynaptic in origin. Filling postsynaptic cells with a Ca(2+) chelator did not block the induction of LTP, suggesting no involvement of postsynaptic Ca(2+) rise. Also, this form of LTP was dependent neither on metabotropic glutamate receptors nor voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels of the L and T types. Further pharmacological analysis indicated that voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels other than the P/Q type, such as N and R types, were not involved in LTP, suggesting that P/Q-type channels are a candidate for factors inducing LTP of inhibitory synapses between FS-GABA neurons. PMID:22993435

  6. GABA concentration and GABAergic neuron populations in limbic areas are differentially altered by brain serotonin deficiency in Tph2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Waider, Jonas; Proft, Florian; Langlhofer, Georg; Asan, Esther; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Gutknecht, Lise

    2013-02-01

    While tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2) null mutant (Tph2(-/-)) mice are completely deficient in brain serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, the formation of serotonergic neurons and pathfinding of their projections are not impaired. However, 5-HT deficiency, during development and in the adult, might affect morphological and functional parameters of other neural systems. To assess the influence of 5-HT deficiency on γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) systems, we carried out measurements of GABA concentrations in limbic brain regions of adult male wildtype (wt), heterozygous (Tph2(+/-)) and Tph2(-/-) mice. In addition, unbiased stereological estimation of GABAergic interneuron numbers and density was performed in subregions of amygdala and hippocampus. Amygdala and prefrontal cortex displayed significantly increased and decreased GABA concentrations, respectively, exclusively in Tph2(+/-) mice while no changes were detected between Tph2(-/-) and wt mice. In contrast, in the hippocampus, increased GABA concentrations were found in Tph2(-/-) mice. While total cell density in the anterior basolateral amygdala did not differ between genotypes, the number and density of the GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased in Tph2(-/-) mice, with the group of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive (ir) interneurons contributing somewhat less to the decrease than that of non-PV-ir GABAergic interneurons. Major morphological changes were also absent in the dorsal hippocampus, and only a trend toward reduced density of PV-ir cells was observed in the CA3 region of Tph2(-/-) mice. Our findings are the first to document that life-long reduction or complete lack of brain 5-HT transmission causes differential changes of GABA systems in limbic regions which are key players in emotional learning and memory processes. The changes likely reflect a combination of developmental alterations and functional adaptations of emotion circuits to balance the lack of 5-HT, and may underlie altered emotional

  7. α7-Containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on interneurons of the basolateral amygdala and their role in the regulation of the network excitability.

    PubMed

    Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I; Prager, Eric M; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Braga, Maria F M

    2013-11-01

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a key role in fear-related learning and memory, in the modulation of cognitive functions, and in the overall regulation of emotional behavior. Pathophysiological alterations involving hyperexcitability in this brain region underlie anxiety and other emotional disorders as well as some forms of epilepsy. GABAergic interneurons exert a tight inhibitory control over the BLA network; understanding the mechanisms that regulate their activity is necessary for understanding physiological and disordered BLA functions. The BLA receives dense cholinergic input from the basal forebrain, affecting both normal functions and dysfunctions of the amygdala, but the mechanisms involved in the cholinergic regulation of inhibitory activity in the BLA are unclear. Using whole cell recordings in rat amygdala slices, here we demonstrate that the α(7)-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α(7)-nAChRs) are present on somatic or somatodendritic regions of BLA interneurons. These receptors are active in the basal state enhancing GABAergic inhibition, and their further, exogenous activation produces a transient but dramatic increase of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in principal BLA neurons. In the absence of AMPA/kainate receptor antagonists, activation of α(7)-nAChRs in the BLA network increases both GABAergic and glutamatergic spontaneous currents in BLA principal cells, but the inhibitory currents are enhanced significantly more than the excitatory currents, reducing overall excitability. The anxiolytic effects of nicotine as well as the role of the α(7)-nAChRs in seizure activity involving the amygdala and in mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, may be better understood in light of the present findings.

  8. Complementary control of sensory adaptation by two types of cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Natan, Ryan G; Briguglio, John J; Mwilambwe-Tshilobo, Laetitia; Jones, Sara I; Aizenberg, Mark; Goldberg, Ethan M; Geffen, Maria Neimark

    2015-01-01

    Reliably detecting unexpected sounds is important for environmental awareness and survival. By selectively reducing responses to frequently, but not rarely, occurring sounds, auditory cortical neurons are thought to enhance the brain's ability to detect unexpected events through stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). The majority of neurons in the primary auditory cortex exhibit SSA, yet little is known about the underlying cortical circuits. We found that two types of cortical interneurons differentially amplify SSA in putative excitatory neurons. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PVs) amplify SSA by providing non-specific inhibition: optogenetic suppression of PVs led to an equal increase in responses to frequent and rare tones. In contrast, somatostatin-positive interneurons (SOMs) selectively reduce excitatory responses to frequent tones: suppression of SOMs led to an increase in responses to frequent, but not to rare tones. A mutually coupled excitatory-inhibitory network model accounts for distinct mechanisms by which cortical inhibitory neurons enhance the brain's sensitivity to unexpected sounds. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09868.001 PMID:26460542

  9. Estrogen administration modulates hippocampal GABAergic subpopulations in the hippocampus of trimethyltin-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Corvino, Valentina; Di Maria, Valentina; Marchese, Elisa; Lattanzi, Wanda; Biamonte, Filippo; Michetti, Fabrizio; Geloso, Maria Concetta

    2015-01-01

    Given the well-documented involvement of estrogens in the modulation of hippocampal functions in both physiological and pathological conditions, the present study investigates the effects of 17-beta estradiol (E2) administration in the rat model of hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by trimethyltin (TMT) administration (8 mg/kg), characterized by loss of pyramidal neurons in CA1, CA3/hilus hippocampal subfields, associated with astroglial and microglial activation, seizures and cognitive impairment. After TMT/saline treatment, ovariectomized animals received two doses of E2 (0.2 mg/kg intra-peritoneal) or vehicle, and were sacrificed 48 h or 7 days after TMT-treatment. Our results indicate that in TMT-treated animals E2 administration induces the early (48 h) upregulation of genes involved in neuroprotection and synaptogenesis, namely Bcl2, trkB, cadherin 2 and cyclin-dependent-kinase-5. Increased expression levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (gad) 67, neuropeptide Y (Npy), parvalbumin, Pgc-1α and Sirtuin 1 genes, the latter involved in parvalbumin (PV) synthesis, were also evident. Unbiased stereology performed on rats sacrificed 7 days after TMT treatment showed that although E2 does not significantly influence the extent of TMT-induced neuronal death, significantly enhances the TMT-induced modulation of GABAergic interneuron population size in selected hippocampal subfields. In particular, E2 administration causes, in TMT-treated rats, a significant increase in the number of GAD67-expressing interneurons in CA1 stratum oriens, CA3 pyramidal layer, hilus and dentate gyrus, accompanied by a parallel increase in NPY-expressing cells, essentially in the same regions, and of PV-positive cells in CA1 pyramidal layer. The present results add information concerning the role of in vivo E2 administration on mechanisms involved in cellular plasticity in the adult brain. PMID:26594149

  10. Enhanced GABAergic network and receptor function in pediatric cortical dysplasia Type IIB compared with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Carlos; André, Véronique M; Hauptman, Jason S; Yamazaki, Irene; Huynh, My N; Chang, Julia W; Chen, Jane Y; Fisher, Robin S; Vinters, Harry V; Levine, Michael S; Mathern, Gary W

    2012-01-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) and cortical dysplasia Type IIB (CDIIB) share histopathologic features that suggest similar epileptogenic mechanisms. This study compared the morphological and electrophysiological properties of cortical cells in tissue from pediatric TSC (n=20) and CDIIB (n=20) patients using whole-cell patch clamp recordings and biocytin staining. Cell types were normal-appearing and dysmorphic-cytomegalic pyramidal neurons, interneurons, and giant/balloon cells, including intermediate neuronal-glial cells. In the cortical mantle, giant/balloon cells occurred more frequently in TSC than in CDIIB cases, whereas cytomegalic pyramidal neurons were found more frequently in CDIIB. Cell morphology and membrane properties were similar in TSC and CDIIB cases. Except for giant/balloon and intermediate cells, all neuronal cell types fired action potentials and displayed spontaneous postsynaptic currents. However, the frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic postsynaptic currents in normal pyramidal neurons and interneurons was significantly lower in CDIIB compared with TSC cases and the GABAergic activity was higher in all neuronal cell types in CDIIB. Further, acutely dissociated pyramidal neurons displayed higher sensitivity to exogenous application of GABA in CDIIB compared with TSC cases. These results indicate that, in spite of similar histopathologic features and basic cell membrane properties, TSC and CDIIB display differences in the topography of abnormal cells, excitatory and inhibitory synaptic network properties, and GABA(A) receptor sensitivity. These differences support the notion that the mechanisms of epileptogenesis could differ in patients with TSC and CDIIB. Consequently, pharmacologic therapies should take these findings into consideration. PMID:21889982

  11. Parvalbumin-Expressing GABAergic Neurons in Mouse Barrel Cortex Contribute to Gating a Goal-Directed Sensorimotor Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sachidhanandam, Shankar; Sermet, B. Semihcan; Petersen, Carl C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sensory processing in neocortex is primarily driven by glutamatergic excitation, which is counterbalanced by GABAergic inhibition, mediated by a diversity of largely local inhibitory interneurons. Here, we trained mice to lick a reward spout in response to whisker deflection, and we recorded from genetically defined GABAergic inhibitory neurons in layer 2/3 of the primary somatosensory barrel cortex. Parvalbumin-expressing (PV), vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing (VIP), and somatostatin-expressing (SST) neurons displayed distinct action potential firing dynamics during task performance. Whereas SST neurons fired at low rates, both PV and VIP neurons fired at high rates both spontaneously and in response to whisker stimulation. After an initial outcome-invariant early sensory response, PV neurons had lower firing rates in hit trials compared to miss trials. Optogenetic inhibition of PV neurons during this time period enhanced behavioral performance. Hence, PV neuron activity might contribute causally to gating the sensorimotor transformation of a whisker sensory stimulus into licking motor output. PMID:27149853

  12. TrkB (Tropomyosin-Related Kinase B) Controls the Assembly and Maintenance of GABAergic Synapses in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Albert I.; Nguyen, Cindy N.; Copenhagen, David R.; Badurek, Sylvia; Minichiello, Liliana; Ranscht, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons play a critical role in coordinating the activity of neural circuits. To explore the mechanisms that direct the organization of inhibitory circuits, we analyzed the involvement of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in the assembly and maintenance of GABAergic inhibitory synapses between Golgi and granule cells in the mouse cerebellar cortex. We show that TrkB acts directly within each cell-type to regulate synaptic differentiation. TrkB is required not only for assembly, but also maintenance of these synapses and acts, primarily, by regulating the localization of synaptic constituents. Postsynaptically, TrkB controls the localization of a scaffolding protein, gephyrin, but acts at a step subsequent to the localization of a cell adhesion molecule, Neuroligin-2. Importantly, TrkB is required for the localization of an Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecule, Contactin-1, in Golgi and granule cells and the absence of Contactin-1 also results in deficits in inhibitory synaptic development. Thus, our findings demonstrate that TrkB controls the assembly and maintenance of GABAergic synapses and suggest that TrkB functions, in part, through promoting synaptic adhesion. PMID:21414899

  13. Metaplastic Regulation of CA1 Schaffer Collateral Pathway Plasticity by Hebbian MGluR1a-Mediated Plasticity at Excitatory Synapses onto Somatostatin-Expressing Interneurons(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Vasuta, Cristina; Artinian, Julien; Laplante, Isabel; Hébert-Seropian, Sarah; Elayoubi, Karim; Lacaille, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic interneurons represent a highly diverse neuronal type that regulates neural network activity. In particular, interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 oriens/alveus (O/A-INs) area provide feedback dendritic inhibition to local pyramidal cells and express somatostatin (SOM). Under relevant afferent stimulation patterns, they undergo long-term potentiation (LTP) of their excitatory synaptic inputs through multiple induction and expression mechanisms. However, the cell-type specificity of these different forms of LTP and their specific contribution to the dynamic regulation of the CA1 network remain unclear. Here we recorded from SOM-expressing interneurons (SOM-INs) in the O/A region from SOM-Cre-Ai3 transgenic mice in whole-cell patch-clamp. Results indicate that, like in anatomically identified O/A-INs, theta-burst stimulation (TBS) induced a Hebbian form of LTP dependent on metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1a (mGluR1a) in SOM-INs, but not in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, another mainly nonoverlapping interneuron subtype in CA1. In addition, we demonstrated using field recordings from transgenic mice expressing archaerhodopsin 3 selectively in SOM-INs, that a prior conditioning TBS in O/A, to induce mGluR1a-dependent LTP in SOM-INs, upregulated LTP in the Schaffer collateral pathway of pyramidal cells. This effect was prevented by light-induced hyperpolarization of SOM-INs during TBS, or by application of the mGluR1a antagonist LY367385, indicating a necessity for mGluR1a and SOM-INs activation. These results uncover that SOM-INs perform an activity-dependent metaplastic control on hippocampal CA1 microcircuits in a cell-specific fashion. Our findings provide new insights on the contribution of interneuron synaptic plasticity in the regulation of the hippocampal network activity and mnemonic processes. PMID:26464997

  14. The GABAergic Deficit Hypothesis of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Luscher, Bernhard; Shen, Qiuying; Sahir, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to an association between major depressive disorders (MDDs) and diverse types of GABAergic deficits. Here we summarize clinical and preclinical evidence supporting a central and causal role of GABAergic deficits in the etiology of depressive disorders. Studies of depressed patients indicate that MDDs are accompanied by reduced brain concentration of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as well as alterations in the subunit composition of the principal receptors (GABAA receptors) mediating GABAergic inhibition. In addition, there is abundant evidence that GABA plays a prominent role in the brain control of stress, the most important vulnerability factor in mood disorders. Furthermore, preclinical evidence suggests that currently used antidepressant drugs designed to alter monoaminergic transmission as well as non-pharmacologic therapies may ultimately act to counteract GABAergic deficits. In particular, GABAergic transmission plays an important role in the control of hippocampal neurogenesis and neural maturation, which are now established as cellular substrates of most if not all antidepressant therapies. Lastly, comparatively modest deficits in GABAergic transmission in GABAA-receptor-deficient mice are sufficient to cause behavioral, cognitive, neuroanatomical, and neuroendocrine phenotypes as well as antidepressant drug response characteristics expected of an animal model of MDD. The GABAergic hypothesis of MDD suggests that alterations in GABAergic transmission represent fundamentally important aspects of the etiological sequelae of major depressive disorders that are reversed by monoaminergic antidepressant drug action. PMID:21079608

  15. Dynamics of action potential firing in electrically connected striatal fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giovanni; Nieus, Thierry R.; Maggi, Silvia; Taverna, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) play a central role in organizing the output of striatal neural circuits, yet functional interactions between these cells are still largely unknown. Here we investigated the interplay of action potential (AP) firing between electrically connected pairs of identified FSIs in mouse striatal slices. In addition to a loose coordination of firing activity mediated by membrane potential coupling, gap junctions (GJ) induced a frequency-dependent inhibition of spike discharge in coupled cells. At relatively low firing rates (2–20 Hz), some APs were tightly synchronized whereas others were inhibited. However, burst firing at intermediate frequencies (25–60 Hz) mostly induced spike inhibition, while at frequencies >50–60 Hz FSI pairs tended to synchronize. Spike silencing occurred even in the absence of GABAergic synapses or persisted after a complete block of GABAA receptors. Pharmacological suppression of presynaptic spike afterhyperpolarization (AHP) caused postsynaptic spikelets to become more prone to trigger spikes at near-threshold potentials, leading to a mostly synchronous firing activity. The complex pattern of functional coordination mediated by GJ endows FSIs with peculiar dynamic properties that may be critical in controlling striatal-dependent behavior. PMID:24294191

  16. Only a Minority of the Inhibitory Inputs to Cerebellar Golgi Cells Originates from Local GABAergic Cells123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebellar Golgi cells (GoCs) efficiently control the spiking activity of granule cells through GABAA receptor-mediated tonic and phasic inhibition. Recent experiments provided compelling evidence for the extensive interconnection of GoCs through electrical synapses, but their chemical inhibitory synaptic inputs are debated. Here, we investigated the GABAergic synaptic inputs of GoCs using in vitro electrophysiology and quantitative light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). We characterized GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs in GoCs and Lugaro cells (LuCs), and found that IPSCs in GoCs have lower frequencies, smaller amplitudes, and much slower decay kinetics. Pharmacological and LM immunolocalization experiments revealed that GoCs express α3, whereas LuCs express α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors. The selective expression and clustered distribution of the α3 subunit in GoCs allowed the quantitative analysis of GABAergic synapses on their dendrites in the molecular layer (ML). EM and LM experiments in rats, and wild-type and GlyT2-GFP transgenic mice revealed that only one third of axon terminals establishing GABAergic synapses on GoC dendrites contain GlyT2, ruling out LuCs, globular cells, and any noncortical glycinergic inputs as major inhibitory sources. We also show that axon terminals of stellate/basket cells very rarely innervate GlyT2-GFP-expressing GoCs, indicating that only a minority of the inhibitory inputs to GoCs in the ML originates from local interneurons, and the majority of their inhibitory inputs exclusively releases GABA. PMID:27257627

  17. Populations of inhibitory and excitatory interneurons in lamina II of the adult rat spinal dorsal horn revealed by a combined electrophysiological and anatomical approach

    PubMed Central

    Yasaka, Toshiharu; Tiong, Sheena Y.X.; Hughes, David I.; Riddell, John S.; Todd, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Lamina II contains a large number of interneurons involved in modulation and transmission of somatosensory (including nociceptive) information. However, its neuronal circuitry is poorly understood due to the difficulty of identifying functional populations of interneurons. This information is important for understanding nociceptive processing and for identifying changes that underlie chronic pain. In this study, we compared morphology, neurotransmitter content, electrophysiological and pharmacological properties for 61 lamina II neurons recorded in slices from adult rat spinal cord. Morphology was related to transmitter content, since islet cells were GABAergic, while radial and most vertical cells were glutamatergic. However, there was considerable diversity among the remaining cells, some of which could not be classified morphologically. Transmitter phenotype was related to firing pattern, since most (18/22) excitatory cells, but few (2/23) inhibitory cells had delayed, gap or reluctant patterns, which are associated with A-type potassium (IA) currents. Somatostatin was identified in axons of 14/24 excitatory neurons. These had variable morphology, but most of those tested showed delayed-firing. Excitatory interneurons are therefore likely to contribute to pain states associated with synaptic plasticity involving IA currents. Although noradrenaline and serotonin evoked outward currents in both inhibitory and excitatory cells, somatostatin produced these currents only in inhibitory neurons, suggesting that its pro-nociceptive effects are mediated by disinhibition. Our results demonstrate that certain distinctive populations of inhibitory and excitatory interneuron can be recognised in lamina II. Combining this approach with identification of other neurochemical markers should allow further clarification of neuronal circuitry in the superficial dorsal horn. PMID:20817353

  18. Tasks for inhibitory interneurons in intact brain circuits

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Lisa; Buzsáki, György

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition, brought about by a rich variety of interneuron types that target different domains of principal cells and other interneurons, counters excitation, modulates the gain, timing, tuning, bursting properties of principal cell firing, and exerts selective filtering of synaptic excitation. At the network level, it allows for coordinating transient interactions among the principal cells to form cooperative assemblies for efficient transmission of information and routing of excitatory activity across networks, typically in the form of brain oscillations. Targeted expression of neuronal activity modulators, such as optogenetics, allow physiological identification and perturbation of specific interneuron subtypes. Combined with large-scale recordings or imaging techniques, these approaches facilitate our understanding of the multiple roles of inhibitory interneurons in shaping circuit functions. PMID:25239808

  19. Enriched expression of GluD1 in higher brain regions and its involvement in parallel fiber-interneuron synapse formation in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Konno, Kohtarou; Matsuda, Keiko; Nakamoto, Chihiro; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Yamasaki, Miwako; Sakimura, Kenji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2014-05-28

    Of the two members of the δ subfamily of ionotropic glutamate receptors, GluD2 is exclusively expressed at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC) synapses in the cerebellum and regulates their structural and functional connectivity. However, little is known to date regarding cellular and synaptic expression of GluD1 and its role in synaptic circuit formation. In the present study, we investigated this issue by producing specific and sensitive histochemical probes for GluD1 and analyzing cerebellar synaptic circuits in GluD1-knock-out mice. GluD1 was widely expressed in the adult mouse brain, with high levels in higher brain regions, including the cerebral cortex, striatum, limbic regions (hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, lateral septum, bed nucleus stria terminalis, lateral habenula, and central nucleus of the amygdala), and cerebellar cortex. In the cerebellar cortex, GluD1 mRNA was expressed at the highest level in molecular layer interneurons and its immunoreactivity was concentrated at PF synapses on interneuron somata. In GluD1-knock-out mice, the density of PF synapses on interneuron somata was significantly reduced and the size and number of interneurons were significantly diminished. Therefore, GluD1 is common to GluD2 in expression at PF synapses, but distinct from GluD2 in neuronal expression in the cerebellar cortex; that is, GluD1 in interneurons and GluD2 in PCs. Furthermore, GluD1 regulates the connectivity of PF-interneuron synapses and promotes the differentiation and/or survival of molecular layer interneurons. These results suggest that GluD1 works in concert with GluD2 for the construction of cerebellar synaptic wiring through distinct neuronal and synaptic expressions and also their shared synapse-connecting function.

  20. Hyperactive Somatostatin Interneurons Contribute to Excitotoxicity in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bo; Schroeder, David; Zhang, Zhong-wei; Cox, Gregory A.; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are overlapping neurodegenerative disorders whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Here using TDP-43A315T mice, an ALS and FTD model with profound cortical pathology, we demonstrated that hyperactive somatostatin interneurons disinhibited layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5-PN) and contributed to their excitotoxicity. Focal ablation of somatostatin interneurons efficiently restored normal excitability of L5-PN and alleviated neurodegeneration, suggesting a novel therapeutic target for ALS and FTD. PMID:26900927

  1. Functional diversity of excitatory commissural interneurons in adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Björnfors, E Rebecka; El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility in the bilateral coordination of muscle contraction underpins variable locomotor movements or gaits. While the locomotor rhythm is generated by ipsilateral excitatory interneurons, less is known about the commissural excitatory interneurons. Here we examined how the activity of the V0v interneurons – an important commissural neuronal class – varies with the locomotor speed in adult zebrafish. Although V0v interneurons are molecularly homogenous, their activity pattern during locomotion is not uniform. They consist of two distinct types dependent on whether they display rhythmicity or not during locomotion. The rhythmic V0v interneurons were further subdivided into three sub-classes engaged sequentially, first at slow then intermediate and finally fast locomotor speeds. Their order of recruitment is defined by scaling their synaptic current with their input resistance. Thus we uncover, in an adult vertebrate, a novel organizational principle for a key class of commissural interneurons and their recruitment pattern as a function of locomotor speed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18579.001 PMID:27559611

  2. A novel GABAergic afferent input to the pontine reticular formation: the mesopontine GABAergic column.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2009-11-10

    Pharmacological manipulations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of the rat brainstem produce alterations in sleep/wake behavior. Local applications of GABA(A) receptor antagonists and agonists increase REM sleep and wake, respectively. These findings support a role for GABAergic mechanisms of the PnO in the control of arousal state. We have been investigating sources of GABA innervation of the PnO that may interact with local GABA(A) receptors in the control of state. Utilizing a retrograde tracer, cholera toxin-B subunit (CTb), injected into the PnO and dual-label immunohistochemistry with an antibody against glutamic acid decarboxalase-67 (GAD67), we report on a previously unidentified GABAergic neuronal population projecting to the contralateral PnO appearing as a column of cells, with long-axis in the sagittal plane, extending through the midbrain and pons. We refer to these neurons as the mesopontine GABAergic column (MPGC). The contiguous, columnar, anatomical distribution suggests operation as a functional neural system, which may influence expression of REM sleep, wake and other behaviors subserved by the PnO.

  3. GABAergic signaling in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijie; Benitez, Sergio G; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Farias Altamirano, Luz E; Kruse, Martin; Seo, Jong Bae; Koh, Duk-Su; Muñoz, Estela M; Hille, Bertil

    2016-08-01

    Pinealocytes secrete melatonin at night in response to norepinephrine released from sympathetic nerve terminals in the pineal gland. The gland also contains many other neurotransmitters whose cellular disposition, activity, and relevance to pineal function are not understood. Here, we clarify sources and demonstrate cellular actions of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry of the gland and electrical recording from pinealocytes. GABAergic cells and nerve fibers, defined as containing GABA and the synthetic GAD67, were identified. The cells represent a subset of interstitial cells while the nerve fibers were distinct from the sympathetic innervation. The GABAA receptor subunit α1 was visualized in close proximity of both GABAergic and sympathetic nerve fibers as well as fine extensions among pinealocytes and blood vessels. The GABAB 1 receptor subunit was localized in the interstitial compartment but not in pinealocytes. Electrophysiology of isolated pinealocytes revealed that GABA and muscimol elicit strong inward chloride currents sensitive to bicuculline and picrotoxin, clear evidence for functional GABAA receptors on the surface membrane. Applications of elevated potassium solution or the neurotransmitter acetylcholine depolarized the pinealocyte membrane potential enough to open voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels leading to intracellular calcium elevations. GABA repolarized the membrane and shut off such calcium rises. In 48-72-h cultured intact glands, GABA application neither triggered melatonin secretion by itself nor affected norepinephrine-induced secretion. Thus, strong elements of GABA signaling are present in pineal glands that make large electrical responses in pinealocytes, but physiological roles need to be found.

  4. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sean Austin O.; Kang, Un Jung; McGehee, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh). Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI), which comprises only about 1–2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction. PMID:25374536

  5. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  6. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  7. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  8. Cholinergic Interneurons Are Differentially Distributed in the Human Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Bernácer, Javier; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Background The striatum (caudate nucleus, CN, and putamen, Put) is a group of subcortical nuclei involved in planning and executing voluntary movements as well as in cognitive processes. Its neuronal composition includes projection neurons, which connect the striatum with other structures, and interneurons, whose main roles are maintaining the striatal organization and the regulation of the projection neurons. The unique electrophysiological and functional properties of the cholinergic interneurons give them a crucial modulating function on the overall striatal response. Methodology/Principle Findings This study was carried out using stereological methods to examine the volume and density (cells/mm3) of these interneurons, as visualized by choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity, in the following territories of the CN and Put of nine normal human brains: 1) precommissural head; 2) postcommissural head; 3) body; 4) gyrus and 5) tail of the CN; 6) precommissural and 7) postcommissural Put. The distribution of ChAT interneurons was analyzed with respect to the topographical, functional and chemical territories of the dorsal striatum. The CN was more densely populated by cholinergic neurons than the Put, and their density increased along the anteroposterior axis of the striatum with the CN body having the highest neuronal density. The associative territory of the dorsal striatum was by far the most densely populated. The striosomes of the CN precommissural head and the postcommissural Put contained the greatest number of ChAT-ir interneurons. The intrastriosomal ChAT-ir neurons were abundant on the periphery of the striosomes throughout the striatum. Conclusions/Significance All these data reveal that cholinergic interneurons are differentially distributed in the distinct topographical and functional territories of the human dorsal striatum, as well as in its chemical compartments. This heterogeneity may indicate that the posterior aspects of the CN require a

  9. GABAergic circuit dysfunction in the Drosophila Fragile X syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Cheryl L; Pereira, Daniel; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of FMR1 gene function, is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. The FMR1 protein (FMRP) translational regulator mediates activity-dependent control of synapses. In addition to the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) hyperexcitation FXS theory, the GABA theory postulates that hypoinhibition is causative for disease state symptoms. Here, we use the Drosophila FXS model to assay central brain GABAergic circuitry, especially within the Mushroom Body (MB) learning center. All 3 GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunits are reportedly downregulated in dfmr1 null brains. We demonstrate parallel downregulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting GABA synthesis enzyme, although GABAergic cell numbers appear unaffected. Mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker (MARCM) single-cell clonal studies show that dfmr1 null GABAergic neurons innervating the MB calyx display altered architectural development, with early underdevelopment followed by later overelaboration. In addition, a new class of extra-calyx terminating GABAergic neurons is shown to include MB intrinsic α/β Kenyon Cells (KCs), revealing a novel level of MB inhibitory regulation. Functionally, dfmr1 null GABAergic neurons exhibit elevated calcium signaling and altered kinetics in response to acute depolarization. To test the role of these GABAergic changes, we attempted to pharmacologically restore GABAergic signaling and assay effects on the compromised MB-dependent olfactory learning in dfmr1 mutants, but found no improvement. Our results show that GABAergic circuit structure and function are impaired in the FXS disease state, but that correction of hypoinhibition alone is not sufficient to rescue a behavioral learning impairment.

  10. Proportional inhibition in the cricket medial giant interneuron.

    PubMed

    Baba, Y; Masuda, H; Shimozawa, T

    2001-02-01

    Inhibitory effects on the number of wind-evoked impulses were studied in the medial giant interneuron of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. The interneuron receives an inhibitory input from wind receptors on cercus ipsilateral to its soma. Using a dual channel wind stimulator, the intensity of inhibitory input was changed over 1,000-fold and effects on the number of spikes were observed. The ipsilateral inhibition reduced the number of outgoing spikes from a level elicited by excitation alone and it did so in proportion to the level of wind responsiveness displayed by each cell. A proportional coefficient of inhibition was derived and its value depended on the level of total excitation of the medial giant interneuron. The medial giant interneurons with high excitation showed a smaller value of the coefficient than those with low excitation. The proportional inhibition of the medial giant interneuron by the ipsilateral cercus suppresses the number of its spikes to a reasonable level for a wide range of stimulus intensities under natural conditions.

  11. Targeted deletion of Secisbp2 reduces, but does not abrogate, selenoprotein expression and leads to striatal interneuron loss.

    PubMed

    Seeher, Sandra; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2014-10-01

    Selenoproteins contain the amino acid selenocysteine (Sec). The Sec insertion sequence (SECIS)-binding protein 2 (Secisbp2) binds to SECIS elements in the 3'-UTR of eukaryotic selenoprotein mRNAs. Mutations in SECISBP2 in humans lead to reduced selenoprotein expression thereby affecting thyroid hormone-dependent growth and differentiation processes. The most severe cases also display mental retardation and ataxia. Mouse models are needed to understand selenoprotein-dependent processes underlying the patients' pleiotropic phenotypes. Homozygous Secisbp2 deletion is embryonic lethal. Conditional deletion of Secisbp2 in hepatocytes significantly decreased selenoprotein expression and reduced the abundance of many, but not all, selenoprotein mRNAs. Regarding selenoprotein expression, compensatory Nrf2-dependent gene expression, or embryonic development, phenotypes were always milder in Secisbp2- than in tRNA(Sec)-deficient mice. Neuron-specific inactivation of Secisbp2 reduced cerebral expression of selenoproteins, but allowed to study the development of cortical PVpos interneurons, which are known to depend on selenoproteins. Cre expression spares the cerebellum of these mice, why we suspected that basal ganglia dysfunction may cause the obvious movement phenotype. We observed for the first time that the number of PVpos neurons was reduced by 50% in the caudate putamen of a selenoprotein-deficient mouse model. In situ hybridization for Gad67 showed that selenoprotein deficiency selectively reduced the number of PVpos GABAergic interneurons. We propose that the striatal neuron loss likely causes the movement disorder. The most striking novel finding of this work is the selective damage of PVpos/Gad67pos neurons in the striatum. The second key finding is that selenoprotein expression in hepatocytes and neurons is less dependent on Secisbp2 than on tRNA(Sec). This implies the possibility of Secisbp2-independent selenoprotein expression, albeit on a reduced level. PMID

  12. Pyramidal cell-interneuron interactions underlie hippocampal ripple oscillations.

    PubMed

    Stark, Eran; Roux, Lisa; Eichler, Ronny; Senzai, Yuta; Royer, Sebastien; Buzsáki, György

    2014-07-16

    High-frequency ripple oscillations, observed most prominently in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal layer, are associated with memory consolidation. The cellular and network mechanisms underlying the generation, frequency control, and spatial coherence of the rhythm are poorly understood. Using multisite optogenetic manipulations in freely behaving rodents, we found that depolarization of a small group of nearby pyramidal cells was sufficient to induce high-frequency oscillations, whereas closed-loop silencing of pyramidal cells or activation of parvalbumin- (PV) or somatostatin-immunoreactive interneurons aborted spontaneously occurring ripples. Focal pharmacological blockade of GABAA receptors abolished ripples. Localized PV interneuron activation paced ensemble spiking, and simultaneous induction of high-frequency oscillations at multiple locations resulted in a temporally coherent pattern mediated by phase-locked interneuron spiking. These results constrain competing models of ripple generation and indicate that temporally precise local interactions between excitatory and inhibitory neurons support ripple generation in the intact hippocampus.

  13. Reduced GABAergic Action in the Autistic Brain.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Caroline E; Ratai, Eva-Maria; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2016-01-11

    An imbalance between excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission has been posited as a central characteristic of the neurobiology of autism [1], inspired in part by the striking prevalence of seizures among individuals with the disorder [2]. Evidence supporting this hypothesis has specifically implicated the signaling pathway of the inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), in this putative imbalance: GABA receptor genes have been associated with autism in linkage and copy number variation studies [3-7], fewer GABA receptor subunits have been observed in the post-mortem tissue of autistic individuals [8, 9], and GABAergic signaling is disrupted across heterogeneous mouse models of autism [10]. Yet, empirical evidence supporting this hypothesis in humans is lacking, leaving a gulf between animal and human studies of the condition. Here, we present a direct link between GABA signaling and autistic perceptual symptomatology. We first demonstrate a robust, replicated autistic deficit in binocular rivalry [11], a basic visual function that is thought to rely on the balance of excitation/inhibition in visual cortex [12-15]. Then, using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we demonstrate a tight linkage between binocular rivalry dynamics in typical participants and both GABA and glutamate levels in the visual cortex. Finally, we show that the link between GABA and binocular rivalry dynamics is completely and specifically absent in autism. These results suggest a disruption in inhibitory signaling in the autistic brain and forge a translational path between animal and human models of the condition.

  14. A Multi-Compartment Model for Interneurons in the Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Halnes, Geir; Augustinaite, Sigita; Heggelund, Paul; Einevoll, Gaute T.; Migliore, Michele

    2011-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons (INs) in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) shape the information flow from retina to cortex, presumably by controlling the number of visually evoked spikes in geniculate thalamocortical (TC) neurons, and refining their receptive field. The INs exhibit a rich variety of firing patterns: Depolarizing current injections to the soma may induce tonic firing, periodic bursting or an initial burst followed by tonic spiking, sometimes with prominent spike-time adaptation. When released from hyperpolarization, some INs elicit rebound bursts, while others return more passively to the resting potential. A full mechanistic understanding that explains the function of the dLGN on the basis of neuronal morphology, physiology and circuitry is currently lacking. One way to approach such an understanding is by developing a detailed mathematical model of the involved cells and their interactions. Limitations of the previous models for the INs of the dLGN region prevent an accurate representation of the conceptual framework needed to understand the computational properties of this region. We here present a detailed compartmental model of INs using, for the first time, a morphological reconstruction and a set of active dendritic conductances constrained by experimental somatic recordings from INs under several different current-clamp conditions. The model makes a number of experimentally testable predictions about the role of specific mechanisms for the firing properties observed in these neurons. In addition to accounting for the significant features of all experimental traces, it quantitatively reproduces the experimental recordings of the action-potential- firing frequency as a function of injected current. We show how and why relative differences in conductance values, rather than differences in ion channel composition, could account for the distinct differences between the responses observed in two different neurons, suggesting that INs may be

  15. Interneurons in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-02-01

    The principal olfactory structures display Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology at early stages of the disease. Consequently, olfactory deficits are among the earliest symptoms. Reliable olfactory tests for accurate clinical diagnosis are rarely made. In addition, neuropathological analysis postmortem of olfactory structures is often not made. Therefore, the relationship between the clinical features and the underlying pathology is poorly defined. Traditionally, research into Alzheimer's disease has focused on the degeneration of cortical temporal projection neurons and cholinergic neurons. Recent evidence has demonstrated the neurodegeneration of interneuron populations in AD. This review provides an updated overview of the pathological involvement of interneuron populations in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Medial Habenula Output Circuit Mediated by α5 Nicotinic Receptor-Expressing GABAergic Neurons in the Interpeduncular Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yun-Wei A.; Tempest, Lynne; Quina, Lely A.; Wei, Aguan D.; Zeng, Hongkui

    2013-01-01

    The Chrna5 gene encodes the α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit, an “accessory” subunit of pentameric nicotinic receptors, that has been shown to play a role in nicotine-related behaviors in rodents and is genetically linked to smoking behavior in humans. Here we have used a BAC transgenic mouse line, α5GFP, to examine the cellular phenotype, connectivity, and function of α5-expressing neurons. Although the medial habenula (MHb) has been proposed as a site of α5 function, α5GFP is not detectable in the MHb, and α5 mRNA is expressed there only at very low levels. However, α5GFP is strongly expressed in a subset of neurons in the interpeduncular nucleus (IP), median raphe/paramedian raphe (MnR/PMnR), and dorsal tegmental area (DTg). Double-label fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals that these neurons are exclusively GABAergic. Transgenic and conventional tract tracing show that α5GFP neurons in the IP project principally to the MnR/PMnR and DTg/interfascicular dorsal raphe, both areas rich in serotonergic neurons. The α5GFP neurons in the IP are located in a region that receives cholinergic fiber inputs from the ventral MHb, and optogenetically assisted circuit mapping demonstrates a monosynaptic connection between these cholinergic neurons and α5GFP IP neurons. Selective inhibitors of both α4β2- and α3β4-containing nicotinic receptors were able to reduce nicotine-evoked inward currents in α5GFP neurons in the IP, suggesting a mixed nicotinic receptor profile in these cells. Together, these findings show that the α5-GABAergic interneurons form a link from the MHb to serotonergic brain centers, which is likely to mediate some of the behavioral effects of nicotine. PMID:24227714

  17. Medial habenula output circuit mediated by α5 nicotinic receptor-expressing GABAergic neurons in the interpeduncular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yun-Wei A; Tempest, Lynne; Quina, Lely A; Wei, Aguan D; Zeng, Hongkui; Turner, Eric E

    2013-11-13

    The Chrna5 gene encodes the α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit, an "accessory" subunit of pentameric nicotinic receptors, that has been shown to play a role in nicotine-related behaviors in rodents and is genetically linked to smoking behavior in humans. Here we have used a BAC transgenic mouse line, α5(GFP), to examine the cellular phenotype, connectivity, and function of α5-expressing neurons. Although the medial habenula (MHb) has been proposed as a site of α5 function, α5(GFP) is not detectable in the MHb, and α5 mRNA is expressed there only at very low levels. However, α5(GFP) is strongly expressed in a subset of neurons in the interpeduncular nucleus (IP), median raphe/paramedian raphe (MnR/PMnR), and dorsal tegmental area (DTg). Double-label fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals that these neurons are exclusively GABAergic. Transgenic and conventional tract tracing show that α5(GFP) neurons in the IP project principally to the MnR/PMnR and DTg/interfascicular dorsal raphe, both areas rich in serotonergic neurons. The α5(GFP) neurons in the IP are located in a region that receives cholinergic fiber inputs from the ventral MHb, and optogenetically assisted circuit mapping demonstrates a monosynaptic connection between these cholinergic neurons and α5(GFP) IP neurons. Selective inhibitors of both α4β2- and α3β4-containing nicotinic receptors were able to reduce nicotine-evoked inward currents in α5(GFP) neurons in the IP, suggesting a mixed nicotinic receptor profile in these cells. Together, these findings show that the α5-GABAergic interneurons form a link from the MHb to serotonergic brain centers, which is likely to mediate some of the behavioral effects of nicotine. PMID:24227714

  18. Distinct firing patterns of identified basket and dendrite-targeting interneurons in the prefrontal cortex during hippocampal theta and local spindle oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hartwich, Katja; Pollak, Thomas; Klausberger, Thomas

    2009-07-29

    The medial prefrontal cortex is involved in working memory and executive control. However, the collective spatiotemporal organization of the cellular network has not been possible to explain during different brain states. We show that pyramidal cells in the prelimbic cortex fire synchronized to hippocampal theta and local spindle oscillations in anesthetized rats. To identify which types of interneurons contribute to the synchronized activity, we recorded and juxtacellularly labeled parvalbumin- and calbindin-expressing (PV+/CB+) basket cells and CB-expressing, PV-negative (CB+/PV-) dendrite-targeting interneurons during both network oscillations. All CB+/PV- dendrite-targeting cells strongly decreased their firing rate during hippocampal theta oscillations. Most PV+/CB+ basket cells fired at the peak of dorsal CA1 theta cycles, similar to prefrontal pyramidal cells. We show that pyramidal cells in the ventral hippocampus also fire around the peak of dorsal CA1 theta cycles, in contrast to previously reported dorsal hippocampal pyramidal cells. Therefore, prefrontal neurons might be driven by monosynaptic connections from the ventral hippocampus during theta oscillations. During prefrontal spindle oscillations, the majority of pyramidal cells and PV+/CB+ basket cells fired preferentially at the trough and early ascending phase, but CB+/PV- dendrite-targeting cells fired uniformly at all phases. We conclude that PV+/CB+ basket cells contribute to rhythmic responses of prefrontal pyramidal cells in relation to hippocampal and thalamic inputs and CB+/PV- dendrite-targeting cells modulate the excitability of dendrites and spines regardless of these field rhythms. Distinct classes of GABAergic interneuron in the prefrontal cortex contribute differentially to the synchronization of pyramidal cells during network oscillations. PMID:19641119

  19. The heterogeneity in GABAA receptor-mediated IPSC kinetics reflects heterogeneity of subunit composition among inhibitory and excitatory interneurons in spinal lamina II

    PubMed Central

    Labrakakis, Charalampos; Rudolph, Uwe; De Koninck, Yves

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition displays rich functional diversity throughout the CNS, which arises from variations in the nature of inputs, subunit composition, subcellular localization of receptors and synapse geometry, or reuptake mechanisms. In the spinal dorsal horn (SDH), GABAA and glycine receptors play a major role in the control of excitability and accuracy of nociceptive processing. Identifying which components shape the properties of the inhibitory synapses in different cell types is necessary to understand how nociceptive information is integrated. To address this, we used transgenic mice where inhibitory interneurons express GAD65-EGFP. We found that GABAA, but not glycine receptor-mediated evoked IPSCs displayed slower kinetics in EGFP+ vs. EGFP− interneurons. GABAA miniature IPSC decay kinetics showed a large variability in both populations, however the distribution of decays differed between EGFP+ and EGFP− interneurons. The range of mIPSC decay kinetics observed was replicated in experiments using rapid application of GABA on outside-out patches taken from SDH neurons in slices. Furthermore, GABAA decay kinetics were not affected by uptake blockers and were not different in mice lacking δ or α5 subunits, indicating that intrinsic channel properties likely underlie the heterogeneity. To identify whether other α subunits shape the various kinetic properties observed we took advantage of knock-in mice carrying point mutations in either the α1, α2, or α3 subunits rendering Ro 15-4513 a selective agonist at the benzodiazepine modulatory site. We found that α1 and α2 subunit underlie the fast decaying component of IPSCs while the slow component is determined by the α3 subunit. The differential distribution of GABAA subunits at inhibitory synapses thus sculpts the heterogeneity of the SDH inhibitory circuitry. This diversity of inhibitory elements can be harnessed to selectively modulate different components of the spinal nociceptive circuitry for

  20. Control of REM sleep by ventral medulla GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Weber, Franz; Chung, Shinjae; Beier, Kevin T; Xu, Min; Luo, Liqun; Dan, Yang

    2015-10-15

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a distinct brain state characterized by activated electroencephalogram and complete skeletal muscle paralysis, and is associated with vivid dreams. Transection studies by Jouvet first demonstrated that the brainstem is both necessary and sufficient for REM sleep generation, and the neural circuits in the pons have since been studied extensively. The medulla also contains neurons that are active during REM sleep, but whether they play a causal role in REM sleep generation remains unclear. Here we show that a GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric-acid-releasing) pathway originating from the ventral medulla powerfully promotes REM sleep in mice. Optogenetic activation of ventral medulla GABAergic neurons rapidly and reliably initiated REM sleep episodes and prolonged their durations, whereas inactivating these neurons had the opposite effects. Optrode recordings from channelrhodopsin-2-tagged ventral medulla GABAergic neurons showed that they were most active during REM sleep (REMmax), and during wakefulness they were preferentially active during eating and grooming. Furthermore, dual retrograde tracing showed that the rostral projections to the pons and midbrain and caudal projections to the spinal cord originate from separate ventral medulla neuron populations. Activating the rostral GABAergic projections was sufficient for both the induction and maintenance of REM sleep, which are probably mediated in part by inhibition of REM-suppressing GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey. These results identify a key component of the pontomedullary network controlling REM sleep. The capability to induce REM sleep on command may offer a powerful tool for investigating its functions. PMID:26444238

  1. Control of REM sleep by ventral medulla GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Weber, Franz; Chung, Shinjae; Beier, Kevin T; Xu, Min; Luo, Liqun; Dan, Yang

    2015-10-15

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a distinct brain state characterized by activated electroencephalogram and complete skeletal muscle paralysis, and is associated with vivid dreams. Transection studies by Jouvet first demonstrated that the brainstem is both necessary and sufficient for REM sleep generation, and the neural circuits in the pons have since been studied extensively. The medulla also contains neurons that are active during REM sleep, but whether they play a causal role in REM sleep generation remains unclear. Here we show that a GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric-acid-releasing) pathway originating from the ventral medulla powerfully promotes REM sleep in mice. Optogenetic activation of ventral medulla GABAergic neurons rapidly and reliably initiated REM sleep episodes and prolonged their durations, whereas inactivating these neurons had the opposite effects. Optrode recordings from channelrhodopsin-2-tagged ventral medulla GABAergic neurons showed that they were most active during REM sleep (REMmax), and during wakefulness they were preferentially active during eating and grooming. Furthermore, dual retrograde tracing showed that the rostral projections to the pons and midbrain and caudal projections to the spinal cord originate from separate ventral medulla neuron populations. Activating the rostral GABAergic projections was sufficient for both the induction and maintenance of REM sleep, which are probably mediated in part by inhibition of REM-suppressing GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey. These results identify a key component of the pontomedullary network controlling REM sleep. The capability to induce REM sleep on command may offer a powerful tool for investigating its functions.

  2. Pathophysiological mechanisms underlying increased anxiety after soman exposure: reduced GABAergic inhibition in the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Prager, Eric M; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Apland, James P; Braga, Maria F M

    2014-09-01

    The recent sarin attack in Syria killed 1429 people, including 426 children, and left countless more to deal with the health consequences of the exposure. Prior to the Syrian chemical assault, nerve agent attacks in Japan left many victims suffering from neuropsychiatric illnesses, particularly anxiety disorders, more than a decade later. Uncovering the neuro-pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of anxiety after nerve agent exposure is necessary for successful treatment. Anxiety is associated with hyperexcitability of the basolateral amygdala (BLA). The present study sought to determine the nature of the nerve agent-induced alterations in the BLA, which could explain the development of anxiety. Rats were exposed to soman, at a dose that induced prolonged status epilepticus. Twenty-four hours and 14-days after exposure, neurons from the BLA were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. At both the 24h and 14-day post-exposure time-points, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in the BLA were reduced, along with reduction in the frequency but not amplitude of miniature IPSCs. In addition, activation of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, a cholinergic receptor that participates in the regulation of BLA excitability and is involved in anxiety, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in both soman-exposed rats and controls, but was less effective in increasing sIPSCs in soman-exposed rats. Despite the loss of both interneurons and principal cells after soman-induced status epilepticus, the frequency of sEPSCs was increased in the soman-exposed rats. Impaired function and cholinergic modulation of GABAergic inhibition in the BLA may underlie anxiety disorders that develop after nerve agent exposure.

  3. Differential presynaptic actions of pyrethroid insecticides on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad Mubarak; Suzuki, Tadahiko; Unno, Toshihiro; Komori, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Haruo

    2008-01-14

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of several pyrethroids on the extracellular level of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the hippocampus of rats measured using microdialysis following systemic (i.p.) administration. Pyrethroids, allethrin (type I), cyhalothrin (type II) and deltamethrin (type II), were found to have differential effects on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus. Allethrin had an interesting dual effect, increasing glutamate release with low doses (10 and 20mg/kg) to about 175-150% and decreasing glutamate release with high dose (60 mg/kg) to about 50% of baseline. Cyhalothrin (10, 20 and 60 mg/kg) inhibited the release of glutamate dose-dependently to about 60-30% of baseline. The extracellular level of GABA was decreased to about 50% of baseline by 10 and 20mg/kg allethrin. The high dose of allethrin (60 mg/kg) and all doses of cyhalothrin (10, 20 and 60 mg/kg) increased the extracellular level of GABA while decreasing the level of glutamate. Deltamethrin dose-dependently increased extracellular glutamate levels to about 190-275% of baseline while decreasing the level of GABA. Local infusion of TTX (1 microM), a Na(+) channel blocker, completely prevented the effect of allethrin (10, 20 and 60 mg/kg), cyhalothrin (20 and 60 mg/kg) and deltamethrin (20mg/kg) on glutamate and GABA release, but only partially blocked the effects of 60 mg/kg deltamethrin. The effect of deltamethrin (60 mg/kg) on glutamate release was completely prevented by local infusion of nimodipine (10 microM), an L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker. Collectively, results from this study suggest that the excitatory glutamatergic neurons in the hippocampus are modulated by inhibitory GABA-releasing interneurons and that other mechanisms, beside sodium channels, may be involved with the neurotoxic action of pyrethroids.

  4. Diversity among principal and GABAergic neurons of the anterior olfactory nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Rachel B.; Brunjes, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular components of neural circuits is an essential step in discerning regional function. The anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) is reciprocally connected to both the ipsi- and contralateral olfactory bulb (OB) and piriform cortex (PC), and, as a result, can broadly influence the central processing of odor information. While both the AON and PC are simple cortical structures, the regions differ in many ways including their general organization, internal wiring and synaptic connections with other brain areas. The present work used targeted whole-cell patch clamping to investigate the morphological and electrophysiological properties of the AON's two main neuronal populations: excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Retrograde fluorescent tracers placed into either the OB or PC identified projection neurons. Two classes were observed with different physiological signatures and locations (superficial and deep pyramidal neurons), suggesting the AON contains independent efferent channels. Transgenic mice in which GABA-containing cells expressed green fluorescent protein were used to assess inhibitory neurons. These cells were further identified as containing one or more of seven molecular markers including three calcium-binding proteins (calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin) or four neuropeptides (somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin). The proportion of GABAergic cells containing these markers varied across subregions reinforcing notions that the AON has local functional subunits. At least five classes of inhibitory cells were observed: fast-spiking multipolar, regular-spiking multipolar, superficial neurogliaform, deep neurogliaform, and horizontal neurons. While some of these cell types are similar to those reported in the PC and other cortical regions, the AON also has unique populations. These studies provide the first examination of the cellular components of this simple cortical system

  5. GABAergic inhibition and modifications of taste responses in the cortical taste area in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, H; Hasegawa, K; Otawa, S; Ikeda, I

    1998-09-01

    Using multibarrel electrodes, recordings were made in the cortical taste area (CTA), specifically in the granular and dysgranular parts of the insular cortex (areas GI and DI), of urethane-anesthetized rats. The effects of an iontophoretic application of gamma-aminobutylic acid (GABA) and bicuculline methiodide (BMI), a specific antagonist to the GABA(A) receptor, were tested. GABA decreased background discharges in ca. 69% of 509 neurons in both areas, and in ca. 58% of 64 taste neurons. BMI antagonized the inhibitory action of GABA in CTA neurons and facilitated background discharges in ca. 51% of the 390 neurons tested, including ca. 69% of the 52 taste neurons, which indicates that CTA neurons have GABA(A) receptors to receive inhibitory inputs from interneurons. In both areas, the effects of BMI (6-20 nA) on taste responses of the 85 CTA neurons (49 and 36 in areas GI and DI, respectively) to the four basic taste stimuli were examined: 65 neurons were recognized in the absence of BMI, whereas 20 only in the presence of the drug. BMI increased taste responses in 25 of the former group and changed the type of their response profiles in 25 including 12 neurons whose responses were increased. It also changed the best stimulus in 34 neurons. The drug affected the receptive fields in almost all cases examined (n = 23) and increased the size in 78.2% when the value for all four basic taste stimuli were totaled. New receptive fields were uncovered by BMI in varying regions of the oral cavity depending on the taste stimulus. But the drug decreased taste responses in several neurons (n = 8). These findings indicate that the GABAergic inhibitory system apparently contributes to modifying or selecting taste information in both areas of the CTA. PMID:9831255

  6. Pathophysiological Mechanisms Underlying Increased Anxiety after Soman Exposure: Reduced GABAergic Inhibition in the Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Prager, Eric M.; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Apland, James P.; Braga, Maria F.M.

    2014-01-01

    The recent sarin attack in Syria killed 1,429 people, including 426 children, and left countless more to deal with the health consequences of the exposure. Prior to the Syrian chemical assault, nerve agent attacks in Japan left many victims suffering from neuropsychiatric illnesses, particularly anxiety disorders, more than a decade later. Uncovering the neuro-pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of anxiety after nerve agent exposure is necessary for successful treatment. Anxiety is associated with hyperexcitability of the basolateral amygdala (BLA). The present study sought to determine the nature of the nerve agent-induced alterations in the BLA, which could explain the development of anxiety. Rats were exposed to soman, at a dose that induced prolonged status epilepticus. Twenty-four hours and 14-days after exposure, neurons from the BLA were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. At both the 24 h and 14-day post-exposure time-points, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in the BLA were reduced, along with reduction in the frequency but not amplitude of miniature IPSCs. In addition, activation of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, a cholinergic receptor that participates in the regulation of BLA excitability and is involved in anxiety, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in both soman-exposed rats and controls, but was less effective in increasing sIPSCs in soman-exposed rats. Despite the loss of both interneurons and principal cells after soman-induced status epilepticus, the frequency of sEPSCs was increased in the soman-exposed rats. Impaired function and cholinergic modulation of GABAergic inhibition in the BLA may underlie anxiety disorders that develop after nerve agent exposure. PMID:25150775

  7. During postnatal development endogenous neurosteroids influence GABA-ergic neurotransmission of mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adam R.; Mitchell, Scott J.; Peden, Dianne R.; Herd, Murray B.; Seifi, Mohsen; Swinny, Jerome D.; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    As neuronal development progresses, GABAergic synaptic transmission undergoes a defined program of reconfiguration. For example, GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated synaptic currents, (miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents; mIPSCs), which initially exhibit a relatively slow decay phase, become progressively reduced in duration, thereby supporting the temporal resolution required for mature network activity. Here we report that during postnatal development of cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, GABAAR-mediated phasic inhibition is influenced by a resident neurosteroid tone, which wanes in the second postnatal week, resulting in the brief phasic events characteristic of mature neuronal signalling. Treatment of cortical slices with the immediate precursor of 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (5α3α), the GABAAR-inactive 5α-dihydroprogesterone, (5α-DHP), greatly prolonged the mIPSCs of P20 pyramidal neurons, demonstrating these more mature neurons retain the capacity to synthesize GABAAR-active neurosteroids, but now lack the endogenous steroid substrate. Previously, such developmental plasticity of phasic inhibition was ascribed to the expression of synaptic GABAARs incorporating the α1 subunit. However, the duration of mIPSCs recorded from L2/3 cortical neurons derived from α1 subunit deleted mice, were similarly under the developmental influence of a neurosteroid tone. In addition to principal cells, synaptic GABAARs of L2/3 interneurons were modulated by native neurosteroids in a development-dependent manner. In summary, local neurosteroids influence synaptic transmission during a crucial period of cortical neurodevelopment, findings which may be of importance for establishing normal network connectivity. PMID:26626485

  8. Diversity among principal and GABAergic neurons of the anterior olfactory nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kay, Rachel B; Brunjes, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular components of neural circuits is an essential step in discerning regional function. The anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) is reciprocally connected to both the ipsi- and contralateral olfactory bulb (OB) and piriform cortex (PC), and, as a result, can broadly influence the central processing of odor information. While both the AON and PC are simple cortical structures, the regions differ in many ways including their general organization, internal wiring and synaptic connections with other brain areas. The present work used targeted whole-cell patch clamping to investigate the morphological and electrophysiological properties of the AON's two main neuronal populations: excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Retrograde fluorescent tracers placed into either the OB or PC identified projection neurons. Two classes were observed with different physiological signatures and locations (superficial and deep pyramidal neurons), suggesting the AON contains independent efferent channels. Transgenic mice in which GABA-containing cells expressed green fluorescent protein were used to assess inhibitory neurons. These cells were further identified as containing one or more of seven molecular markers including three calcium-binding proteins (calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin) or four neuropeptides (somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin). The proportion of GABAergic cells containing these markers varied across subregions reinforcing notions that the AON has local functional subunits. At least five classes of inhibitory cells were observed: fast-spiking multipolar, regular-spiking multipolar, superficial neurogliaform, deep neurogliaform, and horizontal neurons. While some of these cell types are similar to those reported in the PC and other cortical regions, the AON also has unique populations. These studies provide the first examination of the cellular components of this simple cortical system.

  9. Subtype-specific reduction of olfactory bulb interneurons in Pax6 heterozygous mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Haba, Hasumi; Nomura, Tadashi; Suto, Fumikazu; Osumi, Noriko

    2009-09-01

    Interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) play essential roles in the processing of olfactory information. They are classified into several subpopulations by the expression of different neurochemical markers. Here we focused on a transcription factor Pax6, and examined its expression and function in distinct subtypes of OB interneurons. We identified Pax6 expression in specific subtypes of interneurons in the external plexiform layer (EPL). The number of these interneuron subtypes was dramatically decreased in Pax6 heterozygous mutant mice. These results indicate that Pax6 is required for differentiation and/or maintenance of EPL interneurons in the adult mouse OB.

  10. A GABAergic nigrotectal pathway for coordination of drinking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Mark A.; Li, Haofang E.; Lu, Dongye; Kim, Il Hwan; Bartholomew, Ryan A.; Gaidis, Erin; Barter, Joseph W.; Kim, Namsoo; Cai, Min Tong; Soderling, Scott H.; Yin, Henry H.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of basal ganglia outputs to consummatory behavior remains poorly understood. We recorded from the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNR), the major basal ganglia output nucleus, during self-initiated drinking. The firing rates of many lateral SNR neurons were time-locked to individual licks. These neurons send GABAergic projections to the deep layers of the orofacial region of the lateral tectum (superior colliculus, SC). Many tectal neurons are also time-locked to licking, but their activity is usually antiphase to that of SNR neurons, suggesting inhibitory nigrotectal projections. We used optogenetics to selectively activate the GABAergic nigrotectal afferents in the deep layers of the SC. Photo-stimulation of the nigrotectal projections transiently inhibited the activity of the lick-related tectal neurons, disrupted their licking-related oscillatory pattern, and suppressed self-initiated drinking. These results demonstrate that GABAergic nigrotectal projections play a crucial role in coordinating drinking behavior. PMID:27043290

  11. Leptin potentiates GABAergic synaptic transmission in the developing rodent hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Damien; Diabira, Diabe; Porcher, Christophe; Bader, Francesca; Ferrand, Nadine; Zhu, Mingyan; Appleyard, Suzanne M.; Wayman, Gary A.; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that leptin is not only a hormone regulating energy homeostasis but also a neurotrophic factor impacting a number of brain regions, including the hippocampus. Although leptin promotes the development of GABAergic transmission in the hypothalamus, little is known about its action on the GABAergic system in the hippocampus. Here we show that leptin modulates GABAergic transmission onto developing CA3 pyramidal cells of newborn rats. Specifically, leptin induces a long-lasting potentiation (LLP-GABAA) of miniature GABAA receptor-mediated postsynaptic current (GABAA-PSC) frequency. Leptin also increases the amplitude of evoked GABAA-PSCs in a subset of neurons along with a decrease in the coefficient of variation and no change in the paired-pulse ratio, pointing to an increased recruitment of functional synapses. Adding pharmacological blockers to the recording pipette showed that the leptin-induced LLP-GABAA requires postsynaptic calcium released from internal stores, as well as postsynaptic MAPK/ERK kinases 1 and/or 2 (MEK1/2), phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and calcium-calmodulin kinase kinase (CaMKK). Finally, study of CA3 pyramidal cells in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice revealed a reduction in the basal frequency of miniature GABAA-PSCs compared to wild type littermates. In addition, presynaptic GAD65 immunostaining was reduced in the CA3 stratum pyramidale of mutant animals, both results converging to suggest a decreased number of functional GABAergic synapses in ob/ob mice. Overall, these results show that leptin potentiates and promotes the development of GABAergic synaptic transmission in the developing hippocampus likely via an increase in the number of functional synapses, and provide insights into the intracellular pathways mediating this effect. This study further extends the scope of leptin's neurotrophic action to a key regulator of hippocampal development and function, namely GABAergic transmission. PMID:25177272

  12. Epigenetic GABAergic targets in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, A; Auta, J; Chen, Y; Davis, J M; Dong, E; Gavin, D P; Grayson, D R; Matrisciano, F; Pinna, G; Satta, R; Sharma, R P; Tremolizzo, L; Tueting, P

    2011-06-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that a dysfunction of the GABAergic/glutamatergic network in telencephalic brain structures may be the pathogenetic mechanism underlying psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP) disorder patients. Data obtained in Costa's laboratory (1996-2009) suggest that this dysfunction may be mediated primarily by a downregulation in the expression of GABAergic genes (e.g., glutamic acid decarboxylase₆₇[GAD₆₇] and reelin) associated with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)-dependent hypermethylation of their promoters. A pharmacological strategy to reduce the hypermethylation of GABAergic promoters is to administer drugs, such as the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproate (VPA), that induce DNA-demethylation when administered at doses that facilitate chromatin remodeling. The benefits elicited by combining VPA with antipsychotics in the treatment of BP disorder suggest that an investigation of the epigenetic interaction of these drugs is warranted. Our studies in mice suggest that when associated with VPA, clinically relevant doses of clozapine elicit a synergistic potentiation of VPA-induced GABAergic promoter demethylation. Olanzapine and quetiapine (two clozapine congeners) also facilitate chromatin remodeling but at doses higher than used clinically, whereas haloperidol and risperidone are inactive. Hence, the synergistic potentiation of VPA's action on chromatin remodeling by clozapine appears to be a unique property of the dibenzepines and is independent of their action on catecholamine or serotonin receptors. By activating DNA-demethylation, the association of clozapine or its derivatives with VPA or other more potent and selective HDAC inhibitors may be considered a promising treatment strategy for normalizing GABAergic promoter hypermethylation and the GABAergic gene expression downregulation detected in the postmortem brain of SZ and BP disorder patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  13. Epigenetic GABAergic Targets in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, A.; Auta, J.; Chen, Y.; Davis, J.M.; Dong, E.; Gavin, D.P.; Grayson, D.R.; Matrisciano, F.; Pinna, G.; Satta, R.; Sharma, R.P.; Tremolizzo, L.; Tueting, P.

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that a dysfunction of the GABAergic/glutamatergic network in telencephalic brain structures may be the pathogenetic mechanism underlying psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP) disorder patients. Data obtained in Costa’s laboratory (1996–2009) suggest that this dysfunction may be mediated primarily by a downregulation in the expression of GABAergic genes (e.g., glutamic acid decarboxylase67 [GAD67] and reelin) associated with DNA-methyltransferase (DNMT)-dependent hypermethylation of their promoters. A pharmacological strategy to reduce the hypermethylation of GABAergic promoters is to administer drugs, such as the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproate (VPA), that induce DNA-demethylation when administered at doses that facilitate chromatin remodeling. The benefits elicited by combining VPA with antipsychotics in the treatment of BP disorder suggest that an investigation of the epigenetic interaction of these drugs is warranted. Our studies in mice suggest that when associated with VPA, clinically relevant doses of clozapine elicit a synergistic potentiation of VPA-induced GABAergic promoter demethylation. Olanzapine and quetiapine (two clozapine congeners) also facilitate chromatin remodeling but at doses higher than used clinically, whereas haloperidol and risperidone are inactive. Hence, the synergistic potentiation of VPA’s action on chromatin remodeling by clozapine appears to be a unique property of the dibenzepines and is independent of their action on catecholamine or serotonin receptors. By activating DNA-demethylation, the association of clozapine or its derivatives with VPA or other more potent and selective HDAC inhibitors may be considered a promising treatment strategy for normalizing GABAergic promoter hypermethylation and the GABAergic gene expression downregulation detected in the postmortem brain of SZ and BP disorder patients. PMID:21074545

  14. Evx1 is a postmitotic determinant of v0 interneuron identity in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Moran-Rivard, L; Kagawa, T; Saueressig, H; Gross, M K; Burrill, J; Goulding, M

    2001-02-01

    Interneurons in the ventral spinal cord are essential for coordinated locomotion in vertebrates. During embryogenesis, the V0 and V1 classes of ventral interneurons are defined by expression of the homeodomain transcription factors Evx1/2 and En1, respectively. In this study, we show that Evx1 V0 interneurons are locally projecting intersegmental commissural neurons. In Evx1 mutant embryos, the majority of V0 interneurons fail to extend commissural axons. Instead, they adopt an En1-like ipsilateral axonal projection and ectopically express En1, indicating that V0 interneurons are transfated to a V1 identity. Conversely, misexpression of Evx1 represses En1, suggesting that Evx1 may suppress the V1 interneuron differentiation program. Our findings demonstrate that Evx1 is a postmitotic determinant of V0 interneuron identity and reveal a critical postmitotic phase for neuronal determination in the developing spinal cord.

  15. Evx1 is a postmitotic determinant of v0 interneuron identity in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Moran-Rivard, L; Kagawa, T; Saueressig, H; Gross, M K; Burrill, J; Goulding, M

    2001-02-01

    Interneurons in the ventral spinal cord are essential for coordinated locomotion in vertebrates. During embryogenesis, the V0 and V1 classes of ventral interneurons are defined by expression of the homeodomain transcription factors Evx1/2 and En1, respectively. In this study, we show that Evx1 V0 interneurons are locally projecting intersegmental commissural neurons. In Evx1 mutant embryos, the majority of V0 interneurons fail to extend commissural axons. Instead, they adopt an En1-like ipsilateral axonal projection and ectopically express En1, indicating that V0 interneurons are transfated to a V1 identity. Conversely, misexpression of Evx1 represses En1, suggesting that Evx1 may suppress the V1 interneuron differentiation program. Our findings demonstrate that Evx1 is a postmitotic determinant of V0 interneuron identity and reveal a critical postmitotic phase for neuronal determination in the developing spinal cord. PMID:11239430

  16. Vibration-Processing Interneurons in the Honeybee Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    The afferents of the Johnston's organ (JO) in the honeybee brain send their axons to three distinct areas, the dorsal lobe, the dorsal subesophageal ganglion (DL-dSEG), and the posterior protocerebral lobe (PPL), suggesting that vibratory signals detected by the JO are processed differentially in these primary sensory centers. The morphological and physiological characteristics of interneurons arborizing in these areas were studied by intracellular recording and staining. DL-Int-1 and DL-Int-2 have dense arborizations in the DL-dSEG and respond to vibratory stimulation applied to the JO in either tonic excitatory, on-off-phasic excitatory, or tonic inhibitory patterns. PPL-D-1 has dense arborizations in the PPL, sends axons into the ventral nerve cord (VNC), and responds to vibratory stimulation and olfactory stimulation simultaneously applied to the antennae in long-lasting excitatory pattern. These results show that there are at least two parallel pathways for vibration processing through the DL-dSEG and the PPL. In this study, Honeybee Standard Brain was used as the common reference, and the morphology of two types of interneurons (DL-Int-1 and DL-Int-2) and JO afferents was merged into the standard brain based on the boundary of several neuropiles, greatly supporting the understanding of the spatial relationship between these identified neurons and JO afferents. The visualization of the region where the JO afferents are closely appositioned to these DL interneurons demonstrated the difference in putative synaptic regions between the JO afferents and these DL interneurons (DL-Int-1 and DL-Int-2) in the DL. The neural circuits related to the vibration-processing interneurons are discussed. PMID:20130757

  17. Optogenetic stimulation reveals distinct modulatory properties of thalamostriatal vs corticostriatal glutamatergic inputs to fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Ponterio, Giulia; Mandolesi, Georgia; Bonsi, Paola; Pisani, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Parvalbumin-containing fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) exert a powerful feed-forward GABAergic inhibition on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), playing a critical role in timing striatal output. However, how glutamatergic inputs modulate their firing activity is still unexplored. Here, by means of a combined optogenetic and electrophysiological approach, we provide evidence for a differential modulation of cortico- vs thalamo-striatal synaptic inputs to FSIs in transgenic mice carrying light-gated ion channels channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in glutamatergic fibers. Corticostriatal synapses show a postsynaptic facilitation, whereas thalamostriatal synapses present a postsynaptic depression. Moreover, thalamostriatal synapses exhibit more prominent AMPA-mediated currents than corticostriatal synapses, and an increased release probability. Furthermore, during current-evoked firing activity, simultaneous corticostriatal stimulation increases bursting activity. Conversely, thalamostriatal fiber activation shifts the canonical burst-pause activity to a more prolonged, regular firing pattern. However, this change in firing pattern was accompanied by a significant rise in the frequency of membrane potential oscillations. Notably, the responses to thalamic stimulation were fully abolished by blocking metabotropic glutamate 1 (mGlu1) receptor subtype, whereas both acetylcholine and dopamine receptor antagonists were ineffective. Our findings demonstrate that cortical and thalamic glutamatergic input differently modulate FSIs firing activity through specific intrinsic and synaptic properties, exerting a powerful influence on striatal outputs. PMID:26572101

  18. Two types of interneurons in the mouse lateral geniculate nucleus are characterized by different h-current density

    PubMed Central

    Leist, Michael; Datunashvilli, Maia; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Zobeiri, Mehrnoush; Aissaoui, Ania; Cerina, Manuela; Romanelli, Maria Novella; Pape, Hans-Christian; Budde, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Although hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels and the corresponding h-current (Ih) have been shown to fundamentally shape the activity pattern in the thalamocortical network, little is known about their function in local circuit GABAergic interneurons (IN) of the dorsal part of the lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). By combining electrophysiological, molecular biological, immunohistochemical and cluster analysis, we characterized the properties of Ih and the expression profile of HCN channels in IN. Passive and active electrophysiological properties of IN differed. Two subclasses of IN were resolved by unsupervised cluster analysis. Small cells were characterized by depolarized resting membrane potentials (RMP), stronger anomalous rectification, higher firing frequency of faster action potentials (APs), appearance of rebound bursting, and higher Ih current density compared to the large IN. The depolarization exerted by sustained HCN channel activity facilitated neuronal firing. In addition to cyclic nucleotides, Ih in IN was modulated by PIP2 probably based on the abundant expression of the HCN3 isoform. Furthermore, only IN with larger cell diameters expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). It is discussed that Ih in IN is modulated by neurotransmitters present in the thalamus and that the specific properties of Ih in these cells closely reflect their modulatory options. PMID:27121468

  19. Amelioration of oxidative stress-induced phenotype loss of parvalbumin interneurons might contribute to the beneficial effects of environmental enrichment in a rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao R; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Hong T; Ji, Mu H; Li, Hui H; Wu, Jing; Li, Kuan Y; Yang, Jian J

    2016-10-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common psychiatric disease following exposure to a severe traumatic event or physiological stress, which is characterized by anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and cognitive impairment. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Parvalbumin (PV) interneurons that are susceptible to oxidative stress are a subset of inhibitory GABAergic neurons regulating the excitability of pyramidal neurons, while dysfunction of PV interneurons is casually linked to many mental disorders including PTSD. We therefore hypothesized that environmental enrichment (EE), a method of enhanced cognitive, sensory and motor stimulation, can reverse the behavioral impairments by normalizing PV interneurons in a rat model of PTSD induced by inescapable foot shocks (IFS). Behavioral changes were determined by the open field, elevated plus maze, fear conditioning, and Morris water maze tests. The levels of nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 2 (NOX2), NOX4, PV, glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD-67), and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were determined. Our results showed that in this PTSD model, rats displayed the anxiety-like behavior, enhanced fear learning behavior, and hippocampus- dependent spatial memory deficit, which were accompanied by the up-regulation of NOX2, 8-OH-dG, and down-regulation of PV and GAD-67. Notably, EE reversed all these abnormalities. These results suggest that restoration of PV interneurons by inhibiting oxidative stress in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex might represent a mechanism through which EE reverses the behavioral impairments in a rat model of PTSD induced by IFS.

  20. Ethanol exposure during development reduces GABAergic/glycinergic neuron numbers and lobule volumes in the mouse cerebellar vermis.

    PubMed

    Nirgudkar, Pranita; Taylor, Devin H; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Cerebellar alterations are a hallmark of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and are thought to be responsible for deficits in fine motor control, motor learning, balance, and higher cognitive functions. These deficits are, in part, a consequence of dysfunction of cerebellar circuits. Although the effect of developmental ethanol exposure on Purkinje and granule cells has been previously characterized, its actions on other cerebellar neuronal populations are not fully understood. Here, we assessed the impact of repeated ethanol exposure on the number of inhibitory neurons in the cerebellar vermis. We exposed pregnant mice to ethanol in vapor inhalation chambers during gestational days 12-19 and offspring during postnatal days 2-9. We used transgenic mice expressing the fluorescent protein, Venus, in GABAergic/glycinergic neurons. Using unbiased stereology techniques, we detected a reduction in Venus positive neurons in the molecular and granule cell layers of lobule II in the ethanol exposed group at postnatal day 16. In contrast, ethanol produced a more widespread reduction in Purkinje cell numbers that involved lobules II, IV-V and IX. We also found a reduction in the volume of lobules II, IV-V, VI-VII, IX and X in ethanol-exposed pups. These findings indicate that second and third trimester-equivalent ethanol exposure has a greater impact on Purkinje cells than interneurons in the developing cerebellar vermis. The decrease in the volume of most lobules could be a consequence of a reduction in cell numbers, dendritic arborizations, or axonal projections.

  1. Ethanol exposure during development reduces GABAergic/glycinergic neuron numbers and lobule volumes in the mouse cerebellar vermis.

    PubMed

    Nirgudkar, Pranita; Taylor, Devin H; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Cerebellar alterations are a hallmark of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and are thought to be responsible for deficits in fine motor control, motor learning, balance, and higher cognitive functions. These deficits are, in part, a consequence of dysfunction of cerebellar circuits. Although the effect of developmental ethanol exposure on Purkinje and granule cells has been previously characterized, its actions on other cerebellar neuronal populations are not fully understood. Here, we assessed the impact of repeated ethanol exposure on the number of inhibitory neurons in the cerebellar vermis. We exposed pregnant mice to ethanol in vapor inhalation chambers during gestational days 12-19 and offspring during postnatal days 2-9. We used transgenic mice expressing the fluorescent protein, Venus, in GABAergic/glycinergic neurons. Using unbiased stereology techniques, we detected a reduction in Venus positive neurons in the molecular and granule cell layers of lobule II in the ethanol exposed group at postnatal day 16. In contrast, ethanol produced a more widespread reduction in Purkinje cell numbers that involved lobules II, IV-V and IX. We also found a reduction in the volume of lobules II, IV-V, VI-VII, IX and X in ethanol-exposed pups. These findings indicate that second and third trimester-equivalent ethanol exposure has a greater impact on Purkinje cells than interneurons in the developing cerebellar vermis. The decrease in the volume of most lobules could be a consequence of a reduction in cell numbers, dendritic arborizations, or axonal projections. PMID:27565053

  2. Altered posterior cingulate cortical cyctoarchitecture, but normal density of neurons and interneurons in the posterior cingulate cortex and fusiform gyrus in autism

    PubMed Central

    Rosene, Douglas L.; Kemper, Thomas L.; Bauman, Margaret L.; Blatt, Gene J.

    2011-01-01

    Lay Abstract Autism is a behaviorally defined disorder with increasing prevalence rates globally. The disorder is characterized by deficits in several domains including social behaviors, restricted and repetitive behaviors, and deficits in communication. Two regions thought to contribute to deficits in social behavior are the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and fusiform gyrus (FFG). The PCC is involved in processing emotionally salient stimuli, and also has a role in processing faces. The FFG is the area responsible for object and face recognition. A potential imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory processing in the brain may contribute to some of the abnormal social behaviors observed in autism. This is supported by previous work suggesting reduced GABA receptors in the autistic brain. The present study used thionin stained section to qualitatively assess cortical patterning and quantitatively assess the density of neurons. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry was used to determine the density of a subset of GABAergic interneurons. In the autistic brain, the PCC displayed several abnormal cortical patterns including irregularly distributed neurons in specific cortical layers, and the presence of increased white matter neurons. In marked contrast, the FFG appeared normal and there were no significant differences in the density of neurons or interneurons in either region. The present study highlights the presence of abnormal findings in the PCC, which appear to have developmental origins and could affect local processing of social-emotional behaviors as well as the function of interrelated cortical areas. Scientific Abstract Autism is a developmental disorder with prenatal origins, currently estimated to affect 1 in 91 children in the United States. Social-emotional deficits are a hallmark of autism and early neuropathology studies have indicated involvement of the limbic system. Imaging studies demonstrate abnormal activation of the posterior cingulate cortex

  3. Resonant Interneurons Can Increase Robustness of Gamma Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Tikidji-Hamburyan, Ruben A.; Martínez, Joan José; White, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are believed to play a critical role in in information processing, encoding, and retrieval. Inhibitory interneuronal network gamma (ING) oscillations may arise from a coupled oscillator mechanism in which individual neurons oscillate or from a population oscillator in which individual neurons fire sparsely and stochastically. All ING mechanisms, including the one proposed herein, rely on alternating waves of inhibition and windows of opportunity for spiking. The coupled oscillator model implemented with Wang–Buzsáki model neurons is not sufficiently robust to heterogeneity in excitatory drive, and therefore intrinsic frequency, to account for in vitro models of ING. Similarly, in a tightly synchronized regime, the stochastic population oscillator model is often characterized by sparse firing, whereas interneurons both in vivo and in vitro do not fire sparsely during gamma, but rather on average every other cycle. We substituted so-called resonator neural models, which exhibit class 2 excitability and postinhibitory rebound (PIR), for the integrators that are typically used. This results in much greater robustness to heterogeneity that actually increases as the average participation in spikes per cycle approximates physiological levels. Moreover, dynamic clamp experiments that show autapse-induced firing in entorhinal cortical interneurons support the idea that PIR can serve as a network gamma mechanism. Furthermore, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) cells were much more likely to display both PIR and autapse-induced firing than GAD2+ cells, supporting the view that PV+ fast-firing basket cells are more likely to exhibit class 2 excitability than other types of inhibitory interneurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Gamma oscillations are believed to play a critical role in information processing, encoding, and retrieval. Networks of inhibitory interneurons are thought to be essential for these oscillations. We show that one class of interneurons with an

  4. GABAergic processes within the median preoptic nucleus promote NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Luciana; Chase, Michael H; Torterolo, Pablo

    2012-06-15

    GABAergic mechanisms in the preoptic region of the hypothalamus (POA) have been implicated in the generation and maintenance of NREM (quiet) sleep. We recently reported that neurons in the median peptic nucleus (MnPN) in the POA of the cat are selectively activated during NREM sleep. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that NREM sleep is controlled by GABAergic mechanisms within the MnPN. Consequently, adult cats were utilized to determine GABA immunorreactivity within the MnPN and to examine the effects on sleep of the microinjection of a GABA(A) agonist (muscimol) and a GABA(A) antagonist (bicuculline) into this area. GABAergic neurons were present throughout the MnPN. Compared with control microinjections, after the application of muscimol, the time spent in NREM sleep (59.8±7.5 min) and REM sleep (6.9±4.7 min) decreased compared with control microinjections (103.8±5.2 and 20.2±4.3 min, respectively; P<0.005). In contrast, bicuculline microinjections increased only NREM sleep time (103.0±23.0 vs 77.7±23.7 min; P<0.05). These results demonstrate that GABAergic processes within the MnPN are involved in the generation and maintenance of sleep, especially NREM sleep. PMID:22483998

  5. Implications of GABAergic Neurotransmission in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfang; Sun, Hao; Chen, Zhicai; Xu, Huaxi; Bu, Guojun; Zheng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized pathologically by the deposition of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) composed of hyper-phosphorylated tau. Regardless of the pathological hallmarks, synaptic dysfunction is widely accepted as a causal event in AD. Of the two major types of synapses in the central nervous system (CNS): glutamatergic and GABAergic, which provide excitatory and inhibitory outputs respectively, abundant data implicate an impaired glutamatergic system during disease progression. However, emerging evidence supports the notion that disrupted default neuronal network underlies impaired memory, and that alterations of GABAergic circuits, either plays a primary role or as a compensatory response to excitotoxicity, may also contribute to AD by disrupting the overall network function. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the involvement of Aβ, tau and apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), the major genetic risk factor in late-onset AD (LOAD), in GABAergic neurotransmission and the potential of modulating the GABAergic function as AD therapy. PMID:26941642

  6. GABAergic processes within the median preoptic nucleus promote NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Luciana; Chase, Michael H; Torterolo, Pablo

    2012-06-15

    GABAergic mechanisms in the preoptic region of the hypothalamus (POA) have been implicated in the generation and maintenance of NREM (quiet) sleep. We recently reported that neurons in the median peptic nucleus (MnPN) in the POA of the cat are selectively activated during NREM sleep. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that NREM sleep is controlled by GABAergic mechanisms within the MnPN. Consequently, adult cats were utilized to determine GABA immunorreactivity within the MnPN and to examine the effects on sleep of the microinjection of a GABA(A) agonist (muscimol) and a GABA(A) antagonist (bicuculline) into this area. GABAergic neurons were present throughout the MnPN. Compared with control microinjections, after the application of muscimol, the time spent in NREM sleep (59.8±7.5 min) and REM sleep (6.9±4.7 min) decreased compared with control microinjections (103.8±5.2 and 20.2±4.3 min, respectively; P<0.005). In contrast, bicuculline microinjections increased only NREM sleep time (103.0±23.0 vs 77.7±23.7 min; P<0.05). These results demonstrate that GABAergic processes within the MnPN are involved in the generation and maintenance of sleep, especially NREM sleep.

  7. Target-Specific Effects of Somatostatin-Expressing Interneurons on Neocortical Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Cottam, James C. H.

    2013-01-01

    A diverse array of interneuron types regulates activity in the mammalian neocortex. Two of the most abundant are the fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons, which target the axosomatic region of pyramidal cells, and the somatostatin-positive (SOM+) interneurons, which target the dendrites. Recent work has focused on the influence of PV+ and SOM+ interneurons on pyramidal cells. However, the connections among PV+ and SOM+ interneurons are poorly understood and could play an important role in cortical circuitry, since their interactions may alter the net influence on pyramidal cell output. We used an optogenetic approach to investigate the effect of SOM+ interneurons on pyramidal cells and PV+ interneurons during visual stimulation in mouse primary visual cortex. We find that SOM+ interneuron activation suppresses PV+ cell spiking at least twice as potently as pyramidal cell spiking during visual stimulation. This differential effect of SOM+ cell stimulation is detectable even when only two to three SOM+ cells are activated. Importantly, the remaining responses to oriented gratings in PV+ cells are more orientation tuned and temporally modulated, suggesting that SOM+ activity unmasks this tuning by suppressing untuned input. Our results highlight the importance of SOM+ inhibition of PV+ interneurons during sensory processing. This prominent competitive inhibition between interneuron types leads to a reconfiguration of inhibition along the somatodendritic axis of pyramidal cells, and enhances the orientation selectivity of PV+ cells. PMID:24336721

  8. Control of REM Sleep by Ventral Medulla GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Franz; Chung, Shinjae; Beier, Kevin T.; Luo, Liqun; Dan, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a distinct brain state characterized by activated electroencephalogram (EEG) and complete skeletal muscle paralysis, and it is associated with vivid dreams1-3. Transection studies by Jouvet first demonstrated that the brainstem is both necessary and sufficient for REM sleep generation2, and the neural circuits in the pons have since been studied extensively4-8. The medulla also contains neurons that are active during REM sleep9-13, but whether they play a causal role in REM sleep generation remains unclear. Here we show that a GABAergic pathway originating from the ventral medulla (vM) powerfully promotes REM sleep. Optogenetic activation of vM GABAergic neurons rapidly and reliably initiated REM sleep episodes and prolonged their durations, whereas inactivating these neurons had the opposite effects. Optrode recordings from channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2)-tagged vM GABAergic neurons showed that they were most active during REM sleep (REM-max), and during wakefulness they were preferentially active during eating and grooming. Furthermore, dual retrograde tracing showed that the rostral projections to the pons and midbrain and caudal projections to the spinal cord originate from separate vM neuron populations. Activating the rostral GABAergic projections was sufficient for both the induction and maintenance of REM sleep, which are likely mediated in part by inhibition of REM-suppressing GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). These results identify a key component of the pontomedullary network controlling REM sleep. The capability to induce REM sleep on command may offer a powerful tool for investigating its functions. PMID:26444238

  9. Fluoxetine disrupts motivation and GABAergic signaling in adolescent female hamsters.

    PubMed

    Shannonhouse, John L; DuBois, Dustin W; Fincher, Annette S; Vela, Alejandra M; Henry, Morgan M; Wellman, Paul J; Frye, Gerald D; Morgan, Caurnel

    2016-08-01

    Initial antidepressant treatment can paradoxically worsen symptoms in depressed adolescents by undetermined mechanisms. Interestingly, antidepressants modulate GABAA receptors, which mediate paradoxical effects of other therapeutic drugs, particularly in females. Although the neuroanatomic site of action for this paradox is unknown, elevated GABAA receptor signaling in the nucleus accumbens can disrupt motivation. We assessed fluoxetine's effects on motivated behaviors in pubescent female hamsters - anhedonia in the reward investigational preference (RIP) test as well as anxiety in the anxiety-related feeding/exploration conflict (AFEC) test. We also assessed accumbal signaling by RT-PCR and electrophysiology. Fluoxetine initially worsened motivated behaviors at puberty, relative to adulthood. It also failed to improve these behaviors as pubescent hamsters transitioned into adulthood. Low accumbal mRNA levels of multiple GABAA receptor subunits and GABA-synthesizing enzyme, GAD67, assessed by RT-PCR, suggested low GABAergic tone at puberty. Nonetheless, rapid fluoxetine-induced reductions of α5GABAA receptor and BDNF mRNA levels at puberty were consistent with age-related differences in GABAergic responses to fluoxetine and disruption of the motivational state. Whole-cell patch clamping of accumbal slices also suggested low GABAergic tone by the low amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) at puberty. It also confirmed age-related differences in GABAergic responses to fluoxetine. Specifically, fluoxetine potentiated mIPSC amplitude and frequency at puberty, but attenuated the amplitude during adulthood. These results implicate GABAergic tone and GABAA receptor plasticity in adverse motivational responses and resistance to fluoxetine during adolescence. PMID:27068049

  10. Excitatory Local Interneurons Enhance Tuning of Sensory Information

    PubMed Central

    Assisi, Collins; Stopfer, Mark; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Neurons in the insect antennal lobe represent odors as spatiotemporal patterns of activity that unfold over multiple time scales. As these patterns unspool they decrease the overlap between odor representations and thereby increase the ability of the olfactory system to discriminate odors. Using a realistic model of the insect antennal lobe we examined two competing components of this process –lateral excitation from local excitatory interneurons, and slow inhibition from local inhibitory interneurons. We found that lateral excitation amplified differences between representations of similar odors by recruiting projection neurons that did not receive direct input from olfactory receptors. However, this increased sensitivity also amplified noisy variations in input and compromised the ability of the system to respond reliably to multiple presentations of the same odor. Slow inhibition curtailed the spread of projection neuron activity and increased response reliability. These competing influences must be finely balanced in order to decorrelate odor representations. PMID:22807661

  11. Cholinergic interneurons control local circuit activity and cocaine conditioning.

    PubMed

    Witten, Ilana B; Lin, Shih-Chun; Brodsky, Matthew; Prakash, Rohit; Diester, Ilka; Anikeeva, Polina; Gradinaru, Viviana; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-12-17

    Cholinergic neurons are widespread, and pharmacological modulation of acetylcholine receptors affects numerous brain processes, but such modulation entails side effects due to limitations in specificity for receptor type and target cell. As a result, causal roles of cholinergic neurons in circuits have been unclear. We integrated optogenetics, freely moving mammalian behavior, in vivo electrophysiology, and slice physiology to probe the cholinergic interneurons of the nucleus accumbens by direct excitation or inhibition. Despite representing less than 1% of local neurons, these cholinergic cells have dominant control roles, exerting powerful modulation of circuit activity. Furthermore, these neurons could be activated by cocaine, and silencing this drug-induced activity during cocaine exposure (despite the fact that the manipulation of the cholinergic interneurons was not aversive by itself) blocked cocaine conditioning in freely moving mammals.

  12. Controlling interneuron activity in Caenorhabditis elegans to evoke chemotactic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Askin; Shen, Ching-Han; Guo, Zengcai V; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2012-10-11

    Animals locate and track chemoattractive gradients in the environment to find food. With its small nervous system, Caenorhabditis elegans is a good model system in which to understand how the dynamics of neural activity control this search behaviour. Extensive work on the nematode has identified the neurons that are necessary for the different locomotory behaviours underlying chemotaxis through the use of laser ablation, activity recording in immobilized animals and the study of mutants. However, we do not know the neural activity patterns in C. elegans that are sufficient to control its complex chemotactic behaviour. To understand how the activity in its interneurons coordinate different motor programs to lead the animal to food, here we used optogenetics and new optical tools to manipulate neural activity directly in freely moving animals to evoke chemotactic behaviour. By deducing the classes of activity patterns triggered during chemotaxis and exciting individual neurons with these patterns, we identified interneurons that control the essential locomotory programs for this behaviour. Notably, we discovered that controlling the dynamics of activity in just one interneuron pair (AIY) was sufficient to force the animal to locate, turn towards and track virtual light gradients. Two distinct activity patterns triggered in AIY as the animal moved through the gradient controlled reversals and gradual turns to drive chemotactic behaviour. Because AIY neurons are post-synaptic to most chemosensory and thermosensory neurons, it is probable that these activity patterns in AIY have an important role in controlling and coordinating different taxis behaviours of the animal. PMID:23000898

  13. Hierarchical spike clustering analysis for investigation of interneuron heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Boehlen, Anne; Heinemann, Uwe; Henneberger, Christian

    2016-04-21

    Action potentials represent the output of a neuron. Especially interneurons display a variety of discharge patterns ranging from regular action potential firing to prominent spike clustering or stuttering. The mechanisms underlying this heterogeneity remain incompletely understood. We established hierarchical cluster analysis of spike trains as a measure of spike clustering. A clustering index was calculated from action potential trains recorded in the whole-cell patch clamp configuration from hippocampal (CA1, stratum radiatum) and entorhinal (medial entorhinal cortex, layer 2) interneurons in acute slices and simulated data. Prominent, region-dependent, but also variable spike clustering was detected using this measure. Further analysis revealed a strong positive correlation between spike clustering and membrane potentials oscillations but an inverse correlation with neuronal resonance. Furthermore, clustering was more pronounced when the balance between fast-activating K(+) currents, assessed by the spike repolarisation time, and hyperpolarization-activated currents, gauged by the size of the sag potential, was shifted in favour of fast K(+) currents. Simulations of spike clustering confirmed that variable ratios of fast K(+) and hyperpolarization-activated currents could underlie different degrees of spike clustering and could thus be crucial for temporally structuring interneuron spike output. PMID:26987719

  14. Clonally related forebrain interneurons disperse broadly across both, functional areas and structural boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christian; Jaglin, Xavier H.; Cobbs, Lucy V.; Bandler, Rachel C.; Streicher, Carmen; Cepko, Constance L.; Hippenmeyer, Simon; Fishell, Gord

    2015-01-01

    The medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) gives rise to the majority of mouse forebrain interneurons. Here, we examine the lineage relationship among MGE-derived interneurons using a replication-defective retroviral library containing a highly diverse set of DNA barcodes. Recovering the barcodes from the mature progeny of infected progenitor cells enabled us to unambiguously determine their respective lineal relationship. We found that clonal dispersion occurs across large areas of the brain and is not restricted by anatomical divisions. As such, sibling interneurons can populate the cortex, hippocampus striatum and globus pallidus. The majority of interneurons appeared to be generated from asymmetric divisions of MGE progenitor cells, followed by symmetric divisions within the subventricular zone. Altogether, our findings uncover that lineage relationships do not appear to determine interneuron allocation to particular regions. As such, it is likely that clonally-related interneurons have considerable flexibility as to the particular forebrain circuits to which they can contribute. PMID:26299473

  15. Theta phase classification of interneurons in the hippocampal formation of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Czurkó, András; Huxter, John; Li, Yu; Hangya, Balázs; Muller, Robert U

    2011-02-23

    Earlier work on freely moving rats classified neurons in Ammon's horn as pyramidal cells (including place cells) or interneurons (previously called "theta cells") based on temporal discharge correlates and waveform configurations, but the anatomical and biochemical diversity of interneurons suggests they may have other distinguishing characteristics. To explore this possibility, we made extracellular recordings as rats foraged for food in an open space, used accepted criteria to identify interneurons, and found two additional categorization methods. First, interneurons were separated into theta-modulated and theta-independent groups using spike autocorrelograms. Second, theta-modulated interneurons were further separated into four groups by the phase of the ∼8 Hz theta rhythm at which firing was most rapid. These phase groups resemble the four phase peak groups of five anatomically identified interneuron types (two with the same preferred phase) recorded during the slow (∼4 Hz) theta rhythm in urethane-anesthetized rats. We suggest that the similar number of peak phase groups in walking rats and urethane-anesthetized rats and the partial agreement between peak phase values reflect a similar organization of theta rhythm in both states, so that the discharge properties of anatomically identified interneurons can be described in freely moving rats. Interestingly, the average spatial firing precision of the interneuron classes does not differ significantly, suggesting that the strong location-specific firing of place cells may be due to segregated high- and low-precision interneuron ensembles rather than to one or more dedicated high-precision classes.

  16. Postnatal maternal separation enhances tonic GABA current of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons in juvenile rats and promotes genesis of GABAergic neurons in neocortical molecular layer and subventricular zone in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mei; Sheng, Guoxia; Li, Zhongxia; Wang, Jiangping; Ren, Keming; Jin, Xiaoming; Jiang, Kewen

    2014-03-01

    Postnatal maternal separation (PMS) has been shown to be associated with an increased vulnerability to psychiatric illnesses in adulthood. However, the underlying neurological mechanisms are not well understood. Here we evaluated its effects on neurogenesis and tonic GABA currents of cortical layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons. PMS not only increased cell proliferation in the subventricular zone, cortical layer 1 and hippocampal dentate gyrus in the adult brain, but also promoted the newly generated cells to differentiate into GABAergic neurons, and PMS adult brain maintained higher ratios of GABAergic neurons in the survival of newly generated cells within 5 days immediately post PMS. Additionally, PMS increased the tonic currents at P7-10 and P30-35 in cortical L5 pyramidal cells. Our results suggest that the newly generated GABAergic neurons and the low GABA concentration-activated tonic currents may be involved in the development of psychiatric disorders after PMS.

  17. Seasonal induction of GABAergic excitation in the central mammalian clock

    PubMed Central

    Farajnia, Sahar; van Westering, Tirsa L. E.; Meijer, Johanna H.; Michel, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The balance between excitation and inhibition is essential for the proper function of neuronal networks in the brain. The inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributes to the network dynamics within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which is involved in seasonal encoding. We investigated GABAergic activity and observed mainly inhibitory action in SCN neurons of mice exposed to a short-day photoperiod. Remarkably, the GABAergic activity in a long-day photoperiod shifts from inhibition toward excitation. The mechanistic basis for this appears to be a change in the equilibrium potential of GABA-evoked current. These results emphasize that environmental conditions can have substantial effects on the function of a key neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. PMID:24979761

  18. A differential, developmental pattern of spinal interneuron apoptosis during synaptogenesis: Insights from genetic analyses of the protocadherin-γ gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Tuhina; Wang, Xiaozhong; Gray, Paul A.; Weiner, Joshua A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY While the role of developmental apoptosis in shaping the complement and connectivity of sensory and motor neurons is well documented, the extent to which cell death affects the 13 cardinal classes of spinal interneurons has been unclear. Using a series of genetic manipulations in vivo, we demonstrate for the first time a differential pattern of developmental apoptosis in molecularly-identified spinal interneuron populations, and implicate the adhesion molecule family encoded by the 22-member Protocadherin-γ (Pcdh-γ) gene cluster in its control. In constitutive Pcdh-γ null mutant mouse embryos, many interneuron populations undergo increased apoptosis, but to differing extents: For example, over 80% of En1-positive V1 neurons are lost, while only 30% of Chx10-positive V2a neurons are lost and there is no reduction in the number of V1-derived Renshaw cells. Using two complementary methods, we show that this represents an exacerbation of a normal, underlying developmental pattern: The extent of each population’s decrease in Pcdh-γ mutants is precisely commensurate both with the extent of its loss during normal embryogenesis and with the extent of its increase in Bax−/− mice, in which apoptosis is genetically blocked. Interneuron apoptosis begins during the first wave of synaptogenesisis in the spinal cord, occuring first among ventral populations (primarily between E14 and E17), and only later among dorsal populations (primarily after P0). Utilizing a new, conditional Pcdh-γ mutant allele, we show that the γ-Pcdhs can promote survival non-cell autonomously: mutant neurons can survive if they are surrounded by normal neurons, while normal neurons can undergo apoptosis if they are surrounded by mutant neurons. PMID:19029045

  19. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Carmen E.; Méndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25386117

  20. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Carmen E; Méndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25386117

  1. GABAergic Control of Critical Developmental Periods for Anxiety- and Depression-Related Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiuying; Fuchs, Thomas; Sahir, Nadia; Luscher, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Vulnerability for anxiety and depressive disorders is thought to have origins in early life and is increasingly recognized to involve deficits in GABAergic neurotransmission. Mice that were rendered heterozygous for the γ2 subunit gene of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) show behavioral, cognitive, neuroendocrine and pharmacologic features expected of a mouse model of melancholic anxious depression, including reduced survival of adult-born hippocampal neurons. Here we embarked on elucidating the developmental substrate underlying this phenotype, focusing on the Elevated Plus Maze and Forced Swim Test as relevant behavioral paradigms. In a first series of experiments using hemizygous tamoxifen-induced genetic inactivation of a floxed γ2 genomic locus we show that reducing the gene dosage at postnatal days (P)13/14 but not P27/28 results in altered behavior in both of these tests in adulthood, reminiscent of the anxious-depressive phenotype previously described for global heterozygous mice. However, in contrast to global heterozygous mice, the behavioral changes induced by γ2 subunit knockdown at P13/14 occurred without changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, indicating that altered neurogenesis is not an absolute prerequisite for anxiety- and depression-related behavior in this model. In a separate series of experiments using a pharmacological approach, acute but transient potentiation of GABAARs with diazepam uncovered distinct developmental vulnerabilities for altered behavior in the Elevated Plus Maze and Forced Swim Test, respectively. Specifically, diazepam given during P10-16 but not during later weeks resulted in increased anxiety-like behavior in adulthood, while diazepam administered during P29-35 but not earlier nor later resulted in increased immobility behavior in adulthood. We conclude that anxiety-like behavior in the Elevated Plus Maze and behavioral despair-like immobility in the Forced Swim Test are controlled by separate postnatal critical periods

  2. Turning a Negative into a Positive: Ascending GABAergic Control of Cortical Activation and Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ritchie E.; McKenna, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Recent technological advances have illuminated the role of GABAergic neurons in control of cortical arousal and sleep. Sleep-promoting GABAergic neurons in the preoptic hypothalamus are well-known. Less well-appreciated are GABAergic projection neurons in the brainstem, midbrain, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain, which paradoxically promote arousal and fast electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms. Thus, GABA is not purely a sleep-promoting neurotransmitter. GABAergic projection neurons in the brainstem nucleus incertus and ventral tegmental nucleus of Gudden promote theta (4–8 Hz) rhythms. Ventral tegmental area GABAergic neurons, neighboring midbrain dopamine neurons, project to the frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. They discharge faster during cortical arousal and regulate reward. Thalamic reticular nucleus GABAergic neurons initiate sleep spindles in non-REM sleep. In addition, however, during wakefulness, they tonically regulate the activity of thalamocortical neurons. Other GABAergic inputs to the thalamus arising in the globus pallidus pars interna, substantia nigra pars reticulata, zona incerta, and basal forebrain regulate motor activity, arousal, attention, and sensory transmission. Several subpopulations of cortically projecting GABAergic neurons in the basal forebrain project to the thalamus and neocortex and preferentially promote cortical gamma-band (30–80 Hz) activity and wakefulness. Unlike sleep-active GABAergic neurons, these ascending GABAergic neurons are fast-firing neurons which disinhibit and synchronize the activity of their forebrain targets, promoting the fast EEG rhythms typical of conscious states. They are prominent targets of GABAergic hypnotic agents. Understanding the properties of ascending GABAergic neurons may lead to novel treatments for diseases involving disorders of cortical activation and wakefulness. PMID:26124745

  3. Stress differentially alters mu opioid receptor density and trafficking in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the female and male rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Teresa A.; Burstein, Suzanne R.; Marrone, Gina F.; Khalid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D.; Williams, Tanya J.; Schierberl, Kathryn C.; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Gonzales, Keith L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Waters, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Stress differentially affects hippocampal dependent learning relevant to addiction and morphology in male and female rats. Mu opioid receptors (MORs), which are located in parvalbumin (PARV)-containing GABAergic interneurons and are trafficked in response to changes in the hormonal environment, play a critical role in promoting principal cell excitability and long-term potentiation. Here, we compared the effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress (AIS and CIS) on MOR trafficking in PARV-containing neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus in female and male rats using dual label immuno-electron microscopy. Following AIS, the density of MOR silver-intensified gold particles (SIGs) in the cytoplasm of PARV-labeled dendrites was significantly reduced in females (estrus stage). Conversely, AIS significantly increased the proportion of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs in PARV-labeled dendrites in male rats. CIS significantly reduced the number of PARV-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus of males but not females. However, MOR/PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals were significantly smaller in CIS females, but not males, compared to controls. Following CIS, the density of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs increased in PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals in females. Moreover, the proportion of near-plasmalemmal MOR SIGs relative to total decreased in large PARV-labeled dendrites in females. After CIS, no changes in the density or trafficking of MOR SIGs were seen in PARV-labeled dendrites or terminals in males. These data show that AIS and CIS differentially affect available MOR pools in PARV-containing interneurons in female and male rats. Furthermore, they suggest that CIS could affect principal cell excitability in a manner that maintains learning processes in females but not males. PMID:23720407

  4. Using a Semi-Automated Strategy to Develop Multi-Compartment Models That Predict Biophysical Properties of Interneuron-Specific 3 (IS3) Cells in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Camiré, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining how intrinsic cellular properties govern and modulate neuronal input–output processing is a critical endeavor for understanding microcircuit functions in the brain. However, lack of cellular specifics and nonlinear interactions prevent experiments alone from achieving this. Building and using cellular models is essential in these efforts. We focus on uncovering the intrinsic properties of mus musculus hippocampal type 3 interneuron-specific (IS3) cells, a cell type that makes GABAergic synapses onto specific interneuron types, but not pyramidal cells. While IS3 cell morphology and synaptic output have been examined, their voltage-gated ion channel profile and distribution remain unknown. We combined whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and two-photon dendritic calcium imaging to examine IS3 cell membrane and dendritic properties. Using these data as a target reference, we developed a semi-automated strategy to obtain multi-compartment models for a cell type with unknown intrinsic properties. Our approach is based on generating populations of models to capture determined features of the experimental data, each of which possesses unique combinations of channel types and conductance values. From these populations, we chose models that most closely resembled the experimental data. We used these models to examine the impact of specific ion channel combinations on spike generation. Our models predict that fast delayed rectifier currents should be present in soma and proximal dendrites, and this is confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Further, without A-type potassium currents in the dendrites, spike generation is facilitated at more distal synaptic input locations. Our models will help to determine the functional role of IS3 cells in hippocampal microcircuits. PMID:27679813

  5. Interactions between Inhibitory Interneurons and Excitatory Associational Circuitry in Determining Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Hippocampal Dentate Granule Cells: A Large-Scale Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Phillip J.; Yu, Gene J.; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from a million-cell granule cell model of the rat dentate gyrus that was used to explore the contributions of local interneuronal and associational circuits to network-level activity. The model contains experimentally derived morphological parameters for granule cells, which each contain approximately 200 compartments, and biophysical parameters for granule cells, basket cells, and mossy cells that were based both on electrophysiological data and previously published models. Synaptic input to cells in the model consisted of glutamatergic AMPA-like EPSPs and GABAergic-like IPSPs from excitatory and inhibitory neurons, respectively. The main source of input to the model was from layer II entorhinal cortical neurons. Network connectivity was constrained by the topography of the system, and was derived from axonal transport studies, which provided details about the spatial spread of axonal terminal fields, as well as how subregions of the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices project to subregions of the dentate gyrus. Results of this study show that strong feedback inhibition from the basket cell population can cause high-frequency rhythmicity in granule cells, while the strength of feedforward inhibition serves to scale the total amount of granule cell activity. Results furthermore show that the topography of local interneuronal circuits can have just as strong an impact on the development of spatio-temporal clusters in the granule cell population as the perforant path topography does, both sharpening existing clusters and introducing new ones with a greater spatial extent. Finally, results show that the interactions between the inhibitory and associational loops can cause high frequency oscillations that are modulated by a low-frequency oscillatory signal. These results serve to further illustrate the importance of topographical constraints on a global signal processing feature of a neural network, while also illustrating how rich

  6. Stress differentially alters mu opioid receptor density and trafficking in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the female and male rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Milner, Teresa A; Burstein, Suzanne R; Marrone, Gina F; Khalid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Williams, Tanya J; Schierberl, Kathryn C; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Gonzales, Keith L; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Stress differentially affects hippocampal-dependent learning relevant to addiction and morphology in male and female rats. Mu opioid receptors (MORs), which are located in parvalbumin (PARV)-containing GABAergic interneurons and are trafficked in response to changes in the hormonal environment, play a critical role in promoting principal cell excitability and long-term potentiation. Here, we compared the effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress (AIS and CIS) on MOR trafficking in PARV-containing neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus in female and male rats using dual label immunoelectron microscopy. Following AIS, the density of MOR silver-intensified gold particles (SIGs) in the cytoplasm of PARV-labeled dendrites was significantly reduced in females (estrus stage). Conversely, AIS significantly increased the proportion of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs in PARV-labeled dendrites in male rats. CIS significantly reduced the number of PARV-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus of males but not females. However, MOR/PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals were significantly smaller in CIS females, but not males, compared with controls. Following CIS, the density of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs increased in PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals in females. Moreover, the proportion of near-plasmalemmal MOR SIGs relative to total decreased in large PARV-labeled dendrites in females. After CIS, no changes in the density or trafficking of MOR SIGs were seen in PARV-labeled dendrites or terminals in males. These data show that AIS and CIS differentially affect available MOR pools in PARV-containing interneurons in female and male rats. Furthermore, they suggest that CIS could affect principal cell excitability in a manner that maintains learning processes in females but not males. PMID:23720407

  7. Using a Semi-Automated Strategy to Develop Multi-Compartment Models That Predict Biophysical Properties of Interneuron-Specific 3 (IS3) Cells in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Camiré, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining how intrinsic cellular properties govern and modulate neuronal input–output processing is a critical endeavor for understanding microcircuit functions in the brain. However, lack of cellular specifics and nonlinear interactions prevent experiments alone from achieving this. Building and using cellular models is essential in these efforts. We focus on uncovering the intrinsic properties of mus musculus hippocampal type 3 interneuron-specific (IS3) cells, a cell type that makes GABAergic synapses onto specific interneuron types, but not pyramidal cells. While IS3 cell morphology and synaptic output have been examined, their voltage-gated ion channel profile and distribution remain unknown. We combined whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and two-photon dendritic calcium imaging to examine IS3 cell membrane and dendritic properties. Using these data as a target reference, we developed a semi-automated strategy to obtain multi-compartment models for a cell type with unknown intrinsic properties. Our approach is based on generating populations of models to capture determined features of the experimental data, each of which possesses unique combinations of channel types and conductance values. From these populations, we chose models that most closely resembled the experimental data. We used these models to examine the impact of specific ion channel combinations on spike generation. Our models predict that fast delayed rectifier currents should be present in soma and proximal dendrites, and this is confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Further, without A-type potassium currents in the dendrites, spike generation is facilitated at more distal synaptic input locations. Our models will help to determine the functional role of IS3 cells in hippocampal microcircuits.

  8. Postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of somatostatin interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex of mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Geng; Yang, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xing-Yue; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST)-positive interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) play important roles in neuronal diseases, memory and cognitive functions. However, their development in the ACC remains unclear. Using postnatal day 3 (P3) to P45 GIN mice, we found that most of the intrinsic membrane properties of SST interneurons in the ACC were developmentally mature after the second postnatal week and that the development of these neurons differed from that of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, electrical coupling between SST interneurons appeared primarily between P12–14. The coupling probability plateaued at approximately P21–30, with a non-age-dependent development of coupling strength. The development of excitatory chemical afferents to SST interneurons occurred earlier than the development of inhibitory chemical afferents. Furthermore, eye closure attenuated the development of electrical coupling probability at P21–30 but had no effect on coupling strength. Eye closure also delayed the development of inhibitory chemical afferent frequency but had no effect on the excitatory chemical afferent amplitude, frequency or rise time. Our data suggest that SST interneurons in the ACC exhibit inherent developmental characteristics distinct from other interneuron subtypes, such as PV interneurons, and that some of these characteristics are subject to environmental regulation. PMID:27319800

  9. PAX2 is expressed in multiple spinal cord interneurons, including a population of EN1+ interneurons that require PAX6 for their development.

    PubMed

    Burrill, J D; Moran, L; Goulding, M D; Saueressig, H

    1997-11-01

    Members of the PAX family of transcription factors are candidates for controlling cell identity in the spinal cord. We have morphologically analyzed cells that express one of these transcription factors, PAX2, demonstrating multiple interneuron cell types express PAX2. Two ventral populations of PAX2-expressing interneurons in the spinal cord are marked by coexpression of the transcription factors, EN1 and EVX1. Interestingly, the expression domains of PAX2, EN1 and EVX1 in postmitotic neurons correlate closely with those of Pax6 and Pax7 in the ventricular zone, implicating these patterning genes in the regulation of PAX2, EN1 and EVX1. We show that one of these patterning genes, Pax6, is required for the correct specification of ventral PAX2+ interneurons that coexpress EN1. These results demonstrate that the early activity of patterning genes in the ventricular zone determines interneuron identity in the spinal cord.

  10. PAX2 is expressed in multiple spinal cord interneurons, including a population of EN1+ interneurons that require PAX6 for their development.

    PubMed

    Burrill, J D; Moran, L; Goulding, M D; Saueressig, H

    1997-11-01

    Members of the PAX family of transcription factors are candidates for controlling cell identity in the spinal cord. We have morphologically analyzed cells that express one of these transcription factors, PAX2, demonstrating multiple interneuron cell types express PAX2. Two ventral populations of PAX2-expressing interneurons in the spinal cord are marked by coexpression of the transcription factors, EN1 and EVX1. Interestingly, the expression domains of PAX2, EN1 and EVX1 in postmitotic neurons correlate closely with those of Pax6 and Pax7 in the ventricular zone, implicating these patterning genes in the regulation of PAX2, EN1 and EVX1. We show that one of these patterning genes, Pax6, is required for the correct specification of ventral PAX2+ interneurons that coexpress EN1. These results demonstrate that the early activity of patterning genes in the ventricular zone determines interneuron identity in the spinal cord. PMID:9409667

  11. Live-Cell, Label-Free Identification of GABAergic and Non-GABAergic Neurons in Primary Cortical Cultures Using Micropatterned Surface

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Sho; Kushida, Takatoshi; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Niwano, Michio; Tanii, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Excitatory and inhibitory neurons have distinct roles in cortical dynamics. Here we present a novel method for identifying inhibitory GABAergic neurons from non-GABAergic neurons, which are mostly excitatory glutamatergic neurons, in primary cortical cultures. This was achieved using an asymmetrically designed micropattern that directs an axonal process to the longest pathway. In the current work, we first modified the micropattern geometry to improve cell viability and then studied the axon length from 2 to 7 days in vitro (DIV). The cell types of neurons were evaluated retrospectively based on immunoreactivity against GAD67, a marker for inhibitory GABAergic neurons. We found that axons of non-GABAergic neurons grow significantly longer than those of GABAergic neurons in the early stages of development. The optimal threshold for identifying GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons was evaluated to be 110 μm at 6 DIV. The method does not require any fluorescence labelling and can be carried out on live cells. The accuracy of identification was 98.2%. We confirmed that the high accuracy was due to the use of a micropattern, which standardized the development of cultured neurons. The method promises to be beneficial both for engineering neuronal networks in vitro and for basic cellular neuroscience research. PMID:27513933

  12. A crucial role for polysialic acid in developmental interneuron migration and the establishment of interneuron densities in the mouse prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kröcher, Tim; Röckle, Iris; Diederichs, Ute; Weinhold, Birgit; Burkhardt, Hannelore; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Hildebrandt, Herbert

    2014-08-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) is a unique glycan modification of the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM and a major determinant of brain development. Polysialylation of NCAM is implemented by the two polysialyltransferases (polySTs) ST8SIA2 and ST8SIA4. Dysregulation of the polySia-NCAM system and variation in ST8SIA2 has been linked to schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Here, we show reduced interneuron densities in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of mice with either partial or complete loss of polySia synthesizing capacity by ablation of St8sia2, St8sia4, or both. Cells positive for parvalbumin and perineuronal nets as well as somatostatin-positive cells were reduced in the mPFC of all polyST-deficient lines, whereas calretinin-positive cells and the parvalbumin-negative fraction of calbindin-positive cells were unaffected. Reduced interneuron numbers were corroborated by analyzing polyST-deficient GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. The accumulation of precursors in the ganglionic eminences and reduced numbers of tangentially migrating interneurons in the pallium were observed in polyST-deficient embryos. Removal of polySia by endosialidase treatment of organotypic slice cultures led to decreased entry of GAD67-GFP-positive interneurons from the ganglionic eminences into the pallium. Moreover, the acute loss of polySia caused significant reductions in interneuron velocity and leading process length. Thus, attenuation of polySia interferes with the developmental migration of cortical interneurons and causes pathological changes in specific interneuron subtypes. This provides a possible link between genetic variation in polyST genes, neurodevelopmental alterations and interneuron dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disease.

  13. Linking Cholinergic Interneurons, Synaptic Plasticity, and Behavior during the Extinction of a Cocaine-Context Association.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junuk; Finkelstein, Joel; Choi, Jung Yoon; Witten, Ilana B

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that cholinergic interneurons are a key cell type within the nucleus accumbens, a relationship between synaptic plasticity and the in vivo activity of cholinergic interneurons remains to be established. Here, we identify a three-way link between the activity of cholinergic interneurons, synaptic plasticity, and learning in mice undergoing the extinction of a cocaine-context association. We found that activity of cholinergic interneurons regulates extinction learning for a cocaine-context association and generates a sustained reduction in glutamatergic presynaptic strength onto medium spiny neurons. Interestingly, activation of cholinergic interneurons does not support reinforcement learning or plasticity by itself, suggesting that these neurons have a modulatory rather than a reinforcing function. PMID:27210555

  14. Opening Holes in the Blanket of Inhibition: Localized Lateral Disinhibition by VIP Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Jesse; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Hamzehei Sichani, Azadeh; Manoocheri, Kasra; Kim, Samuel; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons in the neocortex often connect in a promiscuous and extensive fashion, extending a “blanket of inhibition” on the circuit. This raises the problem of how can excitatory activity propagate in the midst of this widespread inhibition. One solution to this problem could be the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) interneurons, which disinhibit other interneurons. To explore how VIP interneurons affect the local circuits, we use two-photon optogenetics to activate them individually in mouse visual cortex in vivo while measuring their output with two-photon calcium imaging. We find that VIP interneurons have narrow axons and inhibit nearby somatostatin interneurons, which themselves inhibit pyramidal cells. Moreover, via this lateral disinhibition, VIP cells in vivo make local and transient “holes” in the inhibitory blanket extended by SOM cells. VIP interneurons, themselves regulated by neuromodulators, may therefore enable selective patterns of activity to propagate through the cortex, by generating a “spotlight of attention”. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Most inhibitory interneurons have axons restricted to a nearby area and target excitatory neighbors indiscriminately, raising the issue of how neuronal activity can propagate through cortical circuits. Vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing interneurons (VIPs) disinhibit cortical pyramidal cells through inhibition of other inhibitory interneurons, and they have very focused, “narrow” axons. By optogenetically activating single VIPs in live mice while recording the activity of nearby neurons, we find that VIPs break open a hole in blanket inhibition with an effective range of ∼120 μm in lateral cortical space where excitatory activity can propagate. PMID:27013676

  15. Molecular layer interneurons of the cerebellum: developmental and morphological aspects.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Constantino

    2015-10-01

    During the past 25 years, our knowledge on the development of basket and stellate cells (molecular layer interneurons [MLIs]) has completely changed, not only regarding their origin from the ventricular zone, corresponding to the primitive cerebellar neuroepithelium, instead of the external granular layer, but above all by providing an almost complete account of the genetic regulations (transcription factors and other genes) involved in their differentiation and synaptogenesis. Moreover, it has been shown that MLIs' precursors (dividing neuroblasts) and not young postmitotic neurons, as in other germinal neuroepithelia, leave the germinative zone and migrate all along a complex and lengthy path throughout the presumptive cerebellar white matter, which provides suitable niches exerting epigenetic influences on their ultimate neuronal identities. Recent studies carried out on the anatomical-functional properties of adult MLIs emphasize the importance of these interneurons in regulating PC inhibition, and point out the crucial role played by electrical synaptic transmission between MLIs as well as ephaptic interactions between them and Purkinje cells at the pinceaux level, in the regulation of this inhibition.

  16. Somatostatin-Expressing Inhibitory Interneurons in Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Yavorska, Iryna; Wehr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM) inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical layers. Through these disinhibitory circuits, SOM cells help encode the behavioral relevance of sensory stimuli by regulating the activity of cortical neurons based on subcortical and intracortical modulatory input. Associative learning leads to long-term changes in the strength of connectivity of SOM cells with other neurons, often influencing the strength of inhibitory input they receive. Thus despite their heterogeneity and variability across cortical areas, current evidence shows that SOM neurons perform unique neural computations, forming not only distinct molecular but also functional subclasses of cortical inhibitory interneurons. PMID:27746722

  17. Effects of GABAergic and noradrenergic injections into the cerebellar flocculus on vestibulo-ocular reflexes in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    van Neerven, J; Pompeiano, O; Collewijn, H

    1991-01-01

    The role of the vesitibulo-cerebellum of the rabbit in the control of the vestibulo-ocular response (VOR) and optokinetic response (OKR) reflexes was investigated by bilateral microinjections, into the flocculus, of substances affecting GABAergic or noradrenergic neurotransmission. GABA, the main transmitter through which cerebellar interneurons inhibit Purkinje cells directly or indirectly, acts normally through GABAA receptors (mainly located in the granular layer) and GABAB receptors (predominantly located in the molecular layer). Despite this different distribution, floccular injections of the GABAA agonist muscimol and of the GABAB agonist baclofen had a similar effect, presumably by profound inhibition of Purkinje cells. This effect consisted of a reduction in the gain of the VOR (in darkness and in light) as well as of the OKR by at least 50%. This provides firm evidence that the net effect of normal Purkinje-cell activity in the flocculus is to enhance the VOR and OKR, rather than to inhibit these responses, as is sometimes supposed. Intrafloccular injections of the beta-noradrenergic agonist isoproterenol or the beta-noradrenergic antagonist sotalol did not affect the basic magnitude of the VOR and OKR. However, these substances markedly affected the adaptive processes, which cause the VOR and OKR to change its magnitude when this is no longer adequate in stabilizing the retinal image. By a suitable combination of vestibular and optokinetic stimuli, consistent upward changes in the gain of these reflexes could be reliably and reproducibly induced in uninjected animals. Floccular injections of sotalol impaired these adaptive changes markedly, whereas injections of isoproterenol enhanced the adaptation, particularly of the VOR measured in darkness. These findings strongly suggest that the effectuation of adaptive changes of vestibular, and possibly other, motor control systems is strongly facilitated by the noradrenergic innervation of the flocculus, which

  18. GABAergic Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cellot, Giada; Cherubini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, early in postnatal life exerts a depolarizing and excitatory action. This depends on accumulation of chloride inside the cell via the cation–chloride importer NKCC1, being the expression of the chloride exporter KCC2 very low at birth. The developmentally regulated expression of KCC2 results in extrusion of chloride with age and a shift of GABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction. The depolarizing action of GABA leads to intracellular calcium rise through voltage-dependent calcium channels and/or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. GABA-mediated calcium signals regulate a variety of developmental processes from cell proliferation migration, differentiation, synapse maturation, and neuronal wiring. Therefore, it is not surprising that some forms of neuro-developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are associated with alterations of GABAergic signaling and impairment of the excitatory/inhibitory balance in selective neuronal circuits. In this review, we will discuss how changes of GABAA-mediated neurotransmission affect several forms of ASDs including the Fragile X, the Angelman, and Rett syndromes. Then, we will describe various animal models of ASDs with GABAergic dysfunctions, highlighting their behavioral deficits and the possibility to rescue them by targeting selective components of the GABAergic synapse. In particular, we will discuss how in some cases, reverting the polarity of GABA responses from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with the diuretic bumetanide, a selective blocker of NKCC1, may have beneficial effects on ASDs, thus opening new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of these devastating disorders. PMID:25072038

  19. GABAergic signaling as therapeutic target for autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Cellot, Giada; Cherubini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, early in postnatal life exerts a depolarizing and excitatory action. This depends on accumulation of chloride inside the cell via the cation-chloride importer NKCC1, being the expression of the chloride exporter KCC2 very low at birth. The developmentally regulated expression of KCC2 results in extrusion of chloride with age and a shift of GABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction. The depolarizing action of GABA leads to intracellular calcium rise through voltage-dependent calcium channels and/or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. GABA-mediated calcium signals regulate a variety of developmental processes from cell proliferation migration, differentiation, synapse maturation, and neuronal wiring. Therefore, it is not surprising that some forms of neuro-developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are associated with alterations of GABAergic signaling and impairment of the excitatory/inhibitory balance in selective neuronal circuits. In this review, we will discuss how changes of GABAA-mediated neurotransmission affect several forms of ASDs including the Fragile X, the Angelman, and Rett syndromes. Then, we will describe various animal models of ASDs with GABAergic dysfunctions, highlighting their behavioral deficits and the possibility to rescue them by targeting selective components of the GABAergic synapse. In particular, we will discuss how in some cases, reverting the polarity of GABA responses from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with the diuretic bumetanide, a selective blocker of NKCC1, may have beneficial effects on ASDs, thus opening new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of these devastating disorders. PMID:25072038

  20. Differential regulation of neurexin at glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Pregno, Giulia; Frola, Elena; Graziano, Stefania; Patrizi, Annarita; Bussolino, Federico; Arese, Marco; Sassoè-Pognetto, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Neurexins (Nrxs) have emerged as potential determinants of synaptic specificity, but little is known about their localization at central synapses. Here we show that Nrxs have a remarkably selective localization at distinct types of glutamatergic synapses and we reveal an unexpected ontogenetic regulation of Nrx expression at GABAergic synapses. Our data indicate that synapses are specified by molecular interactions that involve both Nrx-dependent and Nrx-independent mechanisms. We propose that differences in the spatio-temporal profile of Nrx expression may contribute to specify the molecular identity of synapses.

  1. Investigation of synapse formation and function in a glutamatergic-GABAergic two-neuron microcircuit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ling; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Chao, Hsiao-Tuan; Jordan, Julia-Christine; Herman, Melissa A; Rosenmund, Christian

    2014-01-15

    Neural circuits are composed of mainly glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, which communicate through synaptic connections. Many factors instruct the formation and function of these synapses; however, it is difficult to dissect the contribution of intrinsic cell programs from that of extrinsic environmental effects in an intact network. Here, we perform paired recordings from two-neuron microculture preparations of mouse hippocampal glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons to investigate how synaptic input and output of these two principal cells develop. In our reduced preparation, we found that glutamatergic neurons showed no change in synaptic output or input regardless of partner neuron cell type or neuronal activity level. In contrast, we found that glutamatergic input caused the GABAergic neuron to modify its output by way of an increase in synapse formation and a decrease in synaptic release efficiency. These findings are consistent with aspects of GABAergic synapse maturation observed in many brain regions. In addition, changes in GABAergic output are cell wide and not target-cell specific. We also found that glutamatergic neuronal activity determined the AMPA receptor properties of synapses on the partner GABAergic neuron. All modifications of GABAergic input and output required activity of the glutamatergic neuron. Because our system has reduced extrinsic factors, the changes we saw in the GABAergic neuron due to glutamatergic input may reflect initiation of maturation programs that underlie the formation and function of in vivo neural circuits. PMID:24431444

  2. Immunohistochemical study on the distribution and origin of GABAergic nerve terminals in the superior salivatory nucleus.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ayumi; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Masako; Mitoh, Yoshihiro; Kobashi, Motoi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Matsuo, Ryuji

    2009-01-01

    The superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) is the primary parasympathetic center controlling submandibular salivatory secretion. Our previous electrophysiological study revealed that many SSN neurons receive GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic inputs. In the present study, we examined the distribution of GABAergic and glycinergic nerve terminals, GABA(A) receptors in the SSN, and the origin of GABAergic nerve terminals innervating the SSN. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and glycine transporter 2 (GLYT2) were used as markers of GABAergic and glycinergic nerve terminals, respectively. GAD- and GLYT2-positive nerve terminals and GABA(A) receptors were examined immunohistochemically in SSN neurons labeled by the retrograde axonal transport of FastBlue (FB) injected into the chorda-lingual nerve. The SSN neurons abundantly contained GAD-positive nerve terminals and GABA(A) receptors, suggesting that SSN neurons undergo strong GABAergic inhibition. The origin of GABAergic terminals was examined in neurons labeled by the retrograde transport of FluoroGold (FG) injected into the SSN. GAD was used as a marker of GABAergic neurons. Numerous FG-labeled neurons were found in the forebrain and brainstem. However, in FG-labeled neurons, GAD-positive neurons were occasionally observed in the reticular formation of the brainstem. These findings suggest that SSN neurons mainly receive GABAergic projections from the reticular formation.

  3. Investigation of synapse formation and function in a glutamatergic-GABAergic two-neuron microcircuit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ling; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Chao, Hsiao-Tuan; Jordan, Julia-Christine; Herman, Melissa A; Rosenmund, Christian

    2014-01-15

    Neural circuits are composed of mainly glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, which communicate through synaptic connections. Many factors instruct the formation and function of these synapses; however, it is difficult to dissect the contribution of intrinsic cell programs from that of extrinsic environmental effects in an intact network. Here, we perform paired recordings from two-neuron microculture preparations of mouse hippocampal glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons to investigate how synaptic input and output of these two principal cells develop. In our reduced preparation, we found that glutamatergic neurons showed no change in synaptic output or input regardless of partner neuron cell type or neuronal activity level. In contrast, we found that glutamatergic input caused the GABAergic neuron to modify its output by way of an increase in synapse formation and a decrease in synaptic release efficiency. These findings are consistent with aspects of GABAergic synapse maturation observed in many brain regions. In addition, changes in GABAergic output are cell wide and not target-cell specific. We also found that glutamatergic neuronal activity determined the AMPA receptor properties of synapses on the partner GABAergic neuron. All modifications of GABAergic input and output required activity of the glutamatergic neuron. Because our system has reduced extrinsic factors, the changes we saw in the GABAergic neuron due to glutamatergic input may reflect initiation of maturation programs that underlie the formation and function of in vivo neural circuits.

  4. Engrailed-1 and netrin-1 regulate axon pathfinding by association interneurons that project to motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Saueressig, H; Burrill, J; Goulding, M

    1999-10-01

    During early development, multiple classes of interneurons are generated in the spinal cord including association interneurons that synapse with motor neurons and regulate their activity. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that generate these interneuron cell types, nor is it known how axons from association interneurons are guided toward somatic motor neurons. By targeting the axonal reporter gene &tgr;-lacZ to the En1 locus, we show the cell-type-specific transcription factor Engrailed-1 (EN1) defines a population of association neurons that project locally to somatic motor neurons. These EN1 interneurons are born early and their axons pioneer an ipsilateral longitudinal projection in the ventral spinal cord. The EN1 interneurons extend axons in a stereotypic manner, first ventrally, then rostrally for one to two segments where their axons terminate close to motor neurons. We show that the growth of EN1 axons along a ventrolateral pathway toward motor neurons is dependent on netrin-1 signaling. In addition, we demonstrate that En1 regulates pathfinding and fasciculation during the second phase of EN1 axon growth in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF); however, En1 is not required for the early specification of ventral interneuron cell types in the embryonic spinal cord.

  5. Secretagogin expression delineates functionally-specialized populations of striatal parvalbumin-containing interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Garas, Farid N; Shah, Rahul S; Kormann, Eszter; Doig, Natalie M; Vinciati, Federica; Nakamura, Kouichi C; Dorst, Matthijs C; Smith, Yoland; Magill, Peter J; Sharott, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Corticostriatal afferents can engage parvalbumin-expressing (PV+) interneurons to rapidly curtail the activity of striatal projection neurons (SPNs), thus shaping striatal output. Schemes of basal ganglia circuit dynamics generally consider striatal PV+ interneurons to be homogenous, despite considerable heterogeneity in both form and function. We demonstrate that the selective co-expression of another calcium-binding protein, secretagogin (Scgn), separates PV+ interneurons in rat and primate striatum into two topographically-, physiologically- and structurally-distinct cell populations. In rats, these two interneuron populations differed in their firing rates, patterns and relationships with cortical oscillations in vivo. Moreover, the axons of identified PV+/Scgn+ interneurons preferentially targeted the somata of SPNs of the so-called ‘direct pathway’, whereas PV+/Scgn- interneurons preferentially targeted ‘indirect pathway’ SPNs. These two populations of interneurons could therefore provide a substrate through which either of the striatal output pathways can be rapidly and selectively inhibited to subsequently mediate the expression of behavioral routines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16088.001 PMID:27669410

  6. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Scheyltjens, Isabelle; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  7. Cxcr4 regulation of interneuron migration is disrupted in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Tucker, Eric S.; Maynard, Thomas M.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Interneurons are thought to be a primary pathogenic target for several behavioral disorders that arise during development, including schizophrenia and autism. It is not known, however, whether genetic lesions associated with these diseases disrupt established molecular mechanisms of interneuron development. We found that diminished 22q11.2 gene dosage—the primary genetic lesion in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS)—specifically compromises the distribution of early-generated parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the Large Deletion (LgDel) 22q11.2DS mouse model. This change reflects cell-autonomous disruption of interneuron migration caused by altered expression of the cytokine C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (Cxcr4), an established regulator of this process. Cxcr4 is specifically reduced in LgDel migrating interneurons, and genetic analysis confirms that diminished Cxcr4 alters interneuron migration in LgDel mice. Thus, diminished 22q11.2 gene dosage disrupts cortical circuit development by modifying a critical molecular signaling pathway via Cxcr4 that regulates cortical interneuron migration and placement. PMID:23091025

  8. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  9. Engrailed-1 and netrin-1 regulate axon pathfinding by association interneurons that project to motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Saueressig, H; Burrill, J; Goulding, M

    1999-10-01

    During early development, multiple classes of interneurons are generated in the spinal cord including association interneurons that synapse with motor neurons and regulate their activity. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that generate these interneuron cell types, nor is it known how axons from association interneurons are guided toward somatic motor neurons. By targeting the axonal reporter gene &tgr;-lacZ to the En1 locus, we show the cell-type-specific transcription factor Engrailed-1 (EN1) defines a population of association neurons that project locally to somatic motor neurons. These EN1 interneurons are born early and their axons pioneer an ipsilateral longitudinal projection in the ventral spinal cord. The EN1 interneurons extend axons in a stereotypic manner, first ventrally, then rostrally for one to two segments where their axons terminate close to motor neurons. We show that the growth of EN1 axons along a ventrolateral pathway toward motor neurons is dependent on netrin-1 signaling. In addition, we demonstrate that En1 regulates pathfinding and fasciculation during the second phase of EN1 axon growth in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF); however, En1 is not required for the early specification of ventral interneuron cell types in the embryonic spinal cord. PMID:10477289

  10. Crosstalk between intracellular and extracellular signals regulating interneuron production, migration and integration into the cortex

    PubMed Central

    Peyre, Elise; Silva, Carla G.; Nguyen, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    During embryogenesis, cortical interneurons are generated by ventral progenitors located in the ganglionic eminences of the telencephalon. They travel along multiple tangential paths to populate the cortical wall. As they reach this structure they undergo intracortical dispersion to settle in their final destination. At the cellular level, migrating interneurons are highly polarized cells that extend and retract processes using dynamic remodeling of microtubule and actin cytoskeleton. Different levels of molecular regulation contribute to interneuron migration. These include: (1) Extrinsic guidance cues distributed along migratory streams that are sensed and integrated by migrating interneurons; (2) Intrinsic genetic programs driven by specific transcription factors that grant specification and set the timing of migration for different subtypes of interneurons; (3) Adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal elements/regulators that transduce molecular signalings into coherent movement. These levels of molecular regulation must be properly integrated by interneurons to allow their migration in the cortex. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the interplay between microenvironmental signals and cell autonomous programs that drive cortical interneuron porduction, tangential migration, and intergration in the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:25926769

  11. Secretagogin expression delineates functionally-specialized populations of striatal parvalbumin-containing interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Garas, Farid N; Shah, Rahul S; Kormann, Eszter; Doig, Natalie M; Vinciati, Federica; Nakamura, Kouichi C; Dorst, Matthijs C; Smith, Yoland; Magill, Peter J; Sharott, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Corticostriatal afferents can engage parvalbumin-expressing (PV+) interneurons to rapidly curtail the activity of striatal projection neurons (SPNs), thus shaping striatal output. Schemes of basal ganglia circuit dynamics generally consider striatal PV+ interneurons to be homogenous, despite considerable heterogeneity in both form and function. We demonstrate that the selective co-expression of another calcium-binding protein, secretagogin (Scgn), separates PV+ interneurons in rat and primate striatum into two topographically-, physiologically- and structurally-distinct cell populations. In rats, these two interneuron populations differed in their firing rates, patterns and relationships with cortical oscillations in vivo. Moreover, the axons of identified PV+/Scgn+ interneurons preferentially targeted the somata of SPNs of the so-called ‘direct pathway’, whereas PV+/Scgn- interneurons preferentially targeted ‘indirect pathway’ SPNs. These two populations of interneurons could therefore provide a substrate through which either of the striatal output pathways can be rapidly and selectively inhibited to subsequently mediate the expression of behavioral routines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16088.001

  12. In vivo properties of cerebellar interneurons in the macaque caudal vestibular vermis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Laurens, Jean; Blázquez, Pablo M; Angelaki, Dora E

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is among the brain’s most well-studied circuits and includes distinct classes of excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. Several studies have attempted to characterize the in vivo properties of cerebellar interneurons, yet little is currently known about their stimulus-driven properties. Here we quantify both spontaneous and stimulus-driven responses of interneurons in lobules X (nodulus) and IXc,d (ventral uvula) of the macaque caudal vermis during vestibular stimulation. Interneurons were identified as cells located >100 μm from the Purkinje cell layer that did not exhibit complex spikes. Based on baseline firing, three types of interneurons could be distinguished. First, there was a group of very regular firing interneurons with high mean discharge rates, which consistently encoded tilt, rather than translational head movements. Second, there was a group of low firing interneurons with a range of discharge regularity. This group had more diverse vestibular properties, where most were translation-selective and a few tilt- or gravitoinertial acceleration-selective. Third, we also encountered interneurons that were similar to Purkinje cells in terms of discharge regularity and mean firing rate. This group also encoded mixtures of tilt and translation signals. A few mossy fibres showed unprocessed, otolith afferent-like properties, encoding the gravitoinertial acceleration. We conclude that tilt- and translation-selective signals, which reflect neural computations transforming vestibular afferent information, are not only encountered in Purkinje cell responses. Instead, upstream interneurons within the cerebellar cortex are also characterized by similar properties, thus implying a widespread network computation. PMID:25556803

  13. DREADD in Parvalbumin Interneurons of the Dentate Gyrus Modulates Anxiety, Social Interaction and Memory Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Zou, D.; Chen, L.; Deng, D.; Jiang, D.; Dong, F.; McSweeney, C.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, L.; Chen, G.; Wu, Y.; Mao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in the hippocampus play a critical role in animal memory, such as spatial working memory. However, how PV-positive interneurons in the subregions of the hippocampus affect animal behaviors remains poorly defined. Here, we achieved specific and reversible activation of PV-positive interneurons using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) technology. Inducible DREADD expression was demonstrated in vitro in cultured neurons, in which co-transfection of the hM3D-Gq-mCherry vector with a Cre plasmid resulted in a cellular response to hM3Dq ligand clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) stimulation. In addition, the dentate gyrus (DG) of PV-Cre mice received bilateral injection of control lentivirus or lentivirus expressing double floxed hM3D-Gq-mCherry. Selective activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG did not affect locomotor activity or depression-related behavior in mice. Interestingly, stimulation of PV-positive interneurons induced an anxiolytic effect. Activation of PV-positive interneurons appears to impair social interaction to novelty, but has no effect on social motivation. However, this defect is likely due to the anxiolytic effect as the exploratory behavior of mice expressing hM3D-Gq is significantly increased. Mice expressing hM3D-Gq did not affect novel object recognition. Activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG maintains intact cued and contextual fear memory but facilitates fear extinction. Collectively, our results demonstrated that proper control of PV interneurons activity in the DG is critical for regulation of the anxiety, social interaction and fear extinction. These results improve our fundamental understanding of the physiological role of PV-positive interneurons in the hippocampus.

  14. DREADD in parvalbumin interneurons of the dentate gyrus modulates anxiety, social interaction and memory extinction.

    PubMed

    Zou, D; Chen, L; Deng, D; Jiang, D; Dong, F; McSweeney, C; Zhou, Y; Liu, L; Chen, G; Wu, Y; Mao, Y

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in the hippocampus play a critical role in animal memory, such as spatial working memory. However, how PV-positive interneurons in the subregions of the hippocampus affect animal behaviors remains poorly defined. Here, we achieved specific and reversible activation of PV-positive interneurons using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) technology. Inducible DREADD expression was demonstrated in vitro in cultured neurons, in which co-transfection of the hM3D-Gq-mCherry vector with a Cre plasmid resulted in a cellular response to hM3Dq ligand clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) stimulation. In addition, the dentate gyrus (DG) of PV-Cre mice received bilateral injection of control lentivirus or lentivirus expressing double floxed hM3D-Gq-mCherry. Selective activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG did not affect locomotor activity or depression-related behavior in mice. Interestingly, stimulation of PV-positive interneurons induced an anxiolytic effect. Activation of PVpositive interneurons appears to impair social interaction to novelty, but has no effect on social motivation. However, this defect is likely due to the anxiolytic effect as the exploratory behavior of mice expressing hM3DGq is significantly increased. Mice expressing hM3D-Gq did not affect novel object recognition. Activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG maintains intact cued and contextual fear memory but facilitates fear extinction. Collectively, our results demonstrated that proper control of PV interneurons activity in the DG is critical for regulation of the anxiety, social interaction and fear extinction. These results improve our fundamental understanding of the physiological role of PV-positive interneurons in the hippocampus.

  15. DREADD in Parvalbumin Interneurons of the Dentate Gyrus Modulates Anxiety, Social Interaction and Memory Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Zou, D.; Chen, L.; Deng, D.; Jiang, D.; Dong, F.; McSweeney, C.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, L.; Chen, G.; Wu, Y.; Mao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in the hippocampus play a critical role in animal memory, such as spatial working memory. However, how PV-positive interneurons in the subregions of the hippocampus affect animal behaviors remains poorly defined. Here, we achieved specific and reversible activation of PV-positive interneurons using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) technology. Inducible DREADD expression was demonstrated in vitro in cultured neurons, in which co-transfection of the hM3D-Gq-mCherry vector with a Cre plasmid resulted in a cellular response to hM3Dq ligand clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) stimulation. In addition, the dentate gyrus (DG) of PV-Cre mice received bilateral injection of control lentivirus or lentivirus expressing double floxed hM3D-Gq-mCherry. Selective activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG did not affect locomotor activity or depression-related behavior in mice. Interestingly, stimulation of PV-positive interneurons induced an anxiolytic effect. Activation of PV-positive interneurons appears to impair social interaction to novelty, but has no effect on social motivation. However, this defect is likely due to the anxiolytic effect as the exploratory behavior of mice expressing hM3D-Gq is significantly increased. Mice expressing hM3D-Gq did not affect novel object recognition. Activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG maintains intact cued and contextual fear memory but facilitates fear extinction. Collectively, our results demonstrated that proper control of PV interneurons activity in the DG is critical for regulation of the anxiety, social interaction and fear extinction. These results improve our fundamental understanding of the physiological role of PV-positive interneurons in the hippocampus. PMID:26733123

  16. Hypocretin (orexin) regulates glutamate input to fast-spiking interneurons in layer V of the Fr2 region of the murine prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Aracri, Patrizia; Banfi, Daniele; Pasini, Maria Enrica; Amadeo, Alida; Becchetti, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    We studied the effect of hypocretin 1 (orexin A) in the frontal area 2 (Fr2) of the murine neocortex, implicated in the motivation-dependent goal-directed tasks. In layer V, hypocretin stimulated the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) on fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. The effect was accompanied by increased frequency of miniature EPSCs, indicating that hypocretin can target the glutamatergic terminals. Moreover, hypocretin stimulated the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) on pyramidal neurons, with no effect on miniature IPSCs. This action was prevented by blocking 1) the ionotropic glutamatergic receptors; 2) the hypocretin receptor type 1 (HCRTR-1), with SB-334867. Finally, hypocretin increased the firing frequency in FS cells, and the effect was blocked when the ionotropic glutamate transmission was inhibited. Immunolocalization confirmed that HCRTR-1 is highly expressed in Fr2, particularly in layer V-VI. Conspicuous labeling was observed in pyramidal neuron somata and in VGLUT1+ glutamatergic terminals, but not in VGLUT2+ fibers (mainly thalamocortical afferents). The expression of HCRTR-1 in GABAergic structures was scarce. We conclude that 1) hypocretin regulates glutamate release in Fr2; 2) the effect presents a presynaptic component; 3) the peptide control of FS cells is indirect, and probably mediated by the regulation of glutamatergic input onto these cells.

  17. AMPA receptor channels with long-lasting desensitization in bipolar interneurons contribute to synaptic depression in a novel feedback circuit in layer 2/3 of rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    Rozov, A; Jerecic, J; Sakmann, B; Burnashev, N

    2001-10-15

    A novel, local inhibitory circuit in layer 2/3 of rat somatosensory cortex is described that connects pyramidal cells reciprocally with GABAergic vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-immunoreactive bipolar interneurons. In paired whole-cell recordings, the glutamatergic unitary responses (EPSPs or EPSCs) in bipolar cells evoked by repetitive (10 Hz) stimulation of a pyramidal cell show strong frequency-dependent depression. Unitary IPSPs evoked in pyramidal cells by repetitive stimulation of bipolar cells, on average, maintained their amplitude. This suggests that the excitatory synapses on bipolar cells act as a low-pass filter in the reciprocal pyramid-to-bipolar circuit. The EPSCs in bipolar cells are mediated predominantly by AMPA receptor (AMPAR) channels. AMPARs desensitize rapidly and recover slowly from desensitization evoked by a brief pulse of glutamate. In slices, reduction of AMPAR desensitization by cyclothiazide (50-100 microm) or conditioning steady-state desensitization induced by application of extracellular AMPA (50 nm) or glutamate (50 microm) strongly reduced synaptic depression. It is concluded that in the local circuits between pyramidal and bipolar cells the desensitization of AMPARs in bipolar cells contributes to low-pass feedback inhibition of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons by bipolar cells.

  18. Perineuronal nets of extracellular matrix around hippocampal interneurons resist destruction by activated microglia in trimethyltin-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Schüppel, Karin; Brauer, Kurt; Härtig, Wolfgang; Grosche, Jens; Earley, Bernadette; Leonard, Brian E; Brückner, Gert

    2002-12-27

    The destruction of the extracellular matrix by inflammatory processes may induce neuronal dysfunction and accelerate neurodegeneration. We describe that chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan-immunoreactive perineuronal nets and the enwrapped interneurons persisted 2 weeks after trimethyltin intoxication of rats (TMT, 8 mg/kg, i.p.) in all regions of the severely affected hippocampus and dentate gyrus, whereas the diffuse immunoreactivity around the CA2 pyramidal cells was reduced. Fluoro-Jade staining of degenerating neurons and staining of microglia by Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin showed that net-associated neurons survived in the vicinity of damaged pyramidal cells and that perineuronal nets were not removed by activated microglia. We conclude that the extracellular matrix of perineuronal nets resists destruction after TMT treatment in the inflamed neural tissue. A permanent reconstitution of matrix components may be one of the factors that may support the viability of distinct types of neurons during neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. GABAergic Projections to the Oculomotor Nucleus in the Goldfish (carassius Auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Luque, M. Angeles; Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Carrascal, Livia; Torres, Blas; Herrero, Luis

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian oculomotor nucleus receives a strong γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic synaptic input, whereas such projections have rarely been reported in fish. In order to determine whether this synaptic organization is preserved across vertebrates, we investigated the GABAergic projections to the oculomotor nucleus in the goldfish by combining retrograde transport of biotin dextran amine, injected into the antidromically identified oculomotor nucleus, and GABA immunohistochemistry. The main source of GABAergic afferents to the oculomotor nucleus was the ipsilateral anterior octaval nucleus, with only a few, if any, GABAergic neurons being located in the contralateral tangential and descending nuclei of the octaval column. In mammals there is a nearly GABAergic inhibitory inputs; thus, the vestibulooculomotor GABAergic circuitry follows a plan that appears to be shared throughout the vertebrate phylogeny. The second major source of GABAergic projections was the rhombencephalic reticular formation, primarily from the medial area but, to a lesser extent, from the inferior area. A few GABAergic oculomotor projecting neurons were also observed in the ipsilateral nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. The GABAergic projections from neurons located in both the reticular formation surrounding the abducens nucleus and the nucleus of the medial reticular formation have primarily been related to the control of saccadic eye movements. Finally, all retrogradely labeled internuclear neurons of the abducens nucleus, and neurons in the cerebellum (close to the caudal lobe), were negative for GABA. These data suggest that the vestibuloocular and saccadic inhibitory GABAergic systems appear early in vertebrate phylogeny to modulate the firing properties of the oculomotor nucleus motoneurons. PMID:21331170

  20. Distribution of GABAergic neurons and terminals in the auditory system of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Carr, C E; Fujita, I; Konishi, M

    1989-08-01

    Antisera to GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase) and GABA were used to determine the distribution of GABAergic cells and terminals in the brainstem and midbrain auditory nuclei of the barn owl. The owl processes time and intensity components of the auditory signal in separate pathways, and each pathway has a distinctive pattern of GAD- and GABA-like immunoreactivity. In the time pathway, all the cells of the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis and nucleus laminaris receive perisomatic GABAergic terminals, and small numbers of GABAergic neurons surround both nuclei. The ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (anterior division) contains both immunoreactive terminals and some GABAergic neurons. In the intensity pathway, dense immunoreactive terminals are distributed throughout the cochlear nucleus angularis, which also contains a small number of GABAergic neurons. The superior olive contains two GABAergic cell types and immunoreactive terminals distributed throughout the neuropil. All the neurons of the nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (ventral part) appear to be GABAergic, and this nucleus also contains a moderate number of immunoreactive terminals. Immunoreactive terminals are distributed throughout the neuropil of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (posterior division), whereas multipolar and small fusiform GABAergic neurons predominate in the dorsal regions of the nucleus. The time and intensity pathways combine in the inferior colliculus. The central nucleus of the inferior colliculus contains a larger number of fusiform and stellate GABAergic neurons and a dense plexus of immunoreactive terminals, whereas the external nucleus contains slightly fewer immunoreactive cells and terminals. The superficial nucleus contains dense, fine immunoreactive terminals and a small number of GABAergic neurons. PMID:2794115

  1. Sex differences in GABAergic gene expression occur in the anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Greg C; Bostrom, John A; Haroutunian, Vahram; Sodhi, Monsheel S

    2015-09-01

    GABAergic dysfunction has been strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In this study, we analyzed the expression levels of several GABAergic genes in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of postmortem subjects with schizophrenia (n=21) and a comparison group of individuals without a history of psychiatric illness (n=18). Our analyses revealed a significant sex by diagnosis effect, along with significant differences in GABAergic gene expression based on medication status. Analyses revealed that in male groups, the expression of GABAergic genes was generally lower in schizophrenia cases compared to the controls, with significantly lower expression levels of GABA-Aα5, GABA-Aβ1, and GABA-Aε. In females, the expression of GABAergic genes was higher in the schizophrenia cases, with significantly higher expression of the GABA-Aβ1 and GAD67 genes. Analysis of the effect of medication in the schizophrenia subjects revealed significantly higher expression of GABA-Aα1-3, GABA-Aβ2, GABA-Aγ2, and GAD67 in the medicated group compared to the unmedicated group. These data show that sex differences in the expression of GABAergic genes occur in the ACC in schizophrenia. Therefore, our data support previous findings of GABAergic dysfunction in schizophrenia and emphasize the importance of considering sex in analyses of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Sex differences in the GABAergic regulation of ACC function may contribute to the differences observed in the symptoms of male and female patients with schizophrenia. In addition, our findings indicate that antipsychotic medications may alter GABAergic signaling in the ACC, supporting the potential of GABAergic targets for the development of novel antipsychotic medication.

  2. Interneurons Differentially Contribute to Spontaneous Network Activity in the Developing Hippocampus Dependent on Their Embryonic Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Wester, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneously generated network activity is a hallmark of developing neural circuits, and plays an important role in the formation of synaptic connections. In the rodent hippocampus, this activity is observed in vitro as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) during the first postnatal week. Interneurons importantly contribute to GDPs, due to the depolarizing actions of GABA early in development. While they are highly diverse, cortical interneurons can be segregated into two distinct groups based on their embryonic lineage from either the medial or caudal ganglionic eminences (MGE and CGE). There is evidence suggesting CGE-derived interneurons are important for GDP generation; however, their contribution relative to those from the MGE has never been directly tested. Here, we optogenetically inhibited either MGE- or CGE-derived interneurons in a region-specific manner in mouse neonatal hippocampus in vitro. In CA1, where interneurons are the primary source of recurrent excitation, we found that those from the MGE strongly and preferentially contributed to GDP generation. Furthermore, in dual whole-cell patch recordings in neonatal CA1, MGE interneurons formed synaptic connections to and from neighboring pyramidal cells at a much higher rate than those from the CGE. These MGE interneurons were commonly perisomatic targeting, in contrast to those from the CGE, which were dendrite targeting. Finally, inhibiting MGE interneurons in CA1 suppressed GDPs in CA3 and vice versa; conversely, they could also trigger GDPs in CA1 that propagated to CA3 and vice versa. Our data demonstrate a key role for MGE-derived interneurons in both generating and coordinating GDPs across the hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT During nervous system development, immature circuits internally generate rhythmic patterns of electrical activity that promote the establishment of synaptic connections. Immature interneurons are excitatory rather than inhibitory and actively contribute to the generation

  3. Selective Activation of Striatal Fast Spiking Interneurons during Choice Execution

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Gregory J.; Stoetzner, Colin R.; Wiltschko, Alexander B.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2010-01-01

    Basal ganglia circuits are essential for the organization and execution of voluntary actions. Within the striatum, fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) are thought to tightly regulate the activity of medium-spiny projection neurons (MSNs) through feed-forward inhibition, yet few studies have investigated the functional contributions of FSIs in behaving animals. We recorded presumed MSNs and FSIs together with motor cortex and globus pallidus (GP) neurons, in rats performing a simple choice task. MSN activity was widely distributed across the task sequence, especially near reward receipt. By contrast, FSIs showed a coordinated pulse of increased activity as chosen actions were initiated, in conjunction with a sharp decrease in GP activity. Both MSNs and FSIs were direction-selective, but neighboring MSNs and FSIs showed opposite selectivity. Our findings suggest that individual FSIs participate in local striatal information processing, but more global disinhibition of FSIs by GP is important for initiating chosen actions while suppressing unwanted alternatives. PMID:20696383

  4. Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons linearly control olfactory bulb output

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki K.; Gillet, Shea N.; Peters, Andrew J.; Isaacson, Jeffry S.; Komiyama, Takaki

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In the olfactory bulb, odor representations by principal mitral cells are modulated by local inhibitory circuits. While dendrodendritic synapses between mitral and granule cells are typically thought to be a major source of this modulation, the contributions of other inhibitory neurons remain unclear. Here we demonstrate the functional properties of olfactory bulb parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV cells) and identify their important role in odor coding. Using paired recordings, we find that PV cells form reciprocal connections with the majority of nearby mitral cells, in contrast to the sparse connectivity between mitral and granule cells. In vivo calcium imaging in awake mice reveals that PV cells are broadly tuned to odors. Furthermore, selective PV cell inactivation enhances mitral cell responses in a linear fashion while maintaining mitral cell odor preferences. Thus, dense connections between mitral and PV cells underlie an inhibitory circuit poised to modulate the gain of olfactory bulb output. PMID:24239124

  5. Carrier-dependent temporal processing in an auditory interneuron.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Patrick; Gottlieb, Heather; Pollack, Gerald S

    2008-05-01

    Signal processing in the auditory interneuron Omega Neuron 1 (ON1) of the cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus was compared at high- and low-carrier frequencies in three different experimental paradigms. First, integration time, which corresponds to the time it takes for a neuron to reach threshold when stimulated at the minimum effective intensity, was found to be significantly shorter at high-carrier frequency than at low-carrier frequency. Second, phase locking to sinusoidally amplitude modulated signals was more efficient at high frequency, especially at high modulation rates and low modulation depths. Finally, we examined the efficiency with which ON1 detects gaps in a constant tone. As reflected by the decrease in firing rate in the vicinity of the gap, ON1 is better at detecting gaps at low-carrier frequency. Following a gap, firing rate increases beyond the pre-gap level. This "rebound" phenomenon is similar for low- and high-carrier frequencies.

  6. Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons linearly control olfactory bulb output.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki K; Gillet, Shea N; Peters, Andrew J; Isaacson, Jeffry S; Komiyama, Takaki

    2013-12-01

    In the olfactory bulb, odor representations by principal mitral cells are modulated by local inhibitory circuits. While dendrodendritic synapses between mitral and granule cells are typically thought to be a major source of this modulation, the contributions of other inhibitory neurons remain unclear. Here we demonstrate the functional properties of olfactory bulb parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV cells) and identify their important role in odor coding. Using paired recordings, we find that PV cells form reciprocal connections with the majority of nearby mitral cells, in contrast to the sparse connectivity between mitral and granule cells. In vivo calcium imaging in awake mice reveals that PV cells are broadly tuned to odors. Furthermore, selective PV cell inactivation enhances mitral cell responses in a linear fashion while maintaining mitral cell odor preferences. Thus, dense connections between mitral and PV cells underlie an inhibitory circuit poised to modulate the gain of olfactory bulb output. PMID:24239124

  7. GABAergic and Glutamatergic Efferents of the Mouse Ventral Tegmental Area

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Seth R; Badurek, Sylvia; DiLeone, Ralph J; Nashmi, Raad; Minichiello, Liliana; Picciotto, Marina R

    2014-01-01

    The role of dopaminergic (DA) projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in appetitive and rewarding behavior has been widely studied, but the VTA also has documented DA-independent functions. Several drugs of abuse, including nicotine, act on VTA GABAergic neurons, and most studies have focused on local inhibitory connections. Relatively little is known about VTA GABA projection neurons and their connections to brain sites outside the VTA. In this study, we employed viral-vector mediated cell-type specific anterograde tracing, classical retrograde tracing and immunohistochemistry to characterize VTA GABA efferents throughout the brain. We found that VTA GABA neurons project widely to forebrain and brainstem targets, including the ventral pallidum, lateral and magnocellular preoptic nuclei, lateral hypothalamus and lateral habenula. Minor projections also go to central amygdala, mediodorsal thalamus, dorsal raphe and deep mesencephalic nuclei, and sparse projections go to prefrontal cortical regions and to nucleus accumbens shell and core. Importantly, these projections differ from the major VTA DA target regions. Retrograde tracing studies confirmed results from the anterograde experiments and differences in projections from VTA subnuclei. Retrogradely-labeled GABA neurons were not numerous and most non-TH/retrogradely labeled cells lacked GABAergic markers. Many non-DA/retrogradely labeled cells projecting to several areas express VGluT2. VTA GABA and glutamate neurons project throughout the brain, most prominently to regions with reciprocal connections to the VTA. These data indicate that VTA GABA and glutamate neurons may have more dopamine-independent functions than previously recognized. PMID:24715505

  8. New Role of ATM in Controlling GABAergic Tone During Development.

    PubMed

    Pizzamiglio, Lara; Focchi, Elisa; Murru, Luca; Tamborini, Matteo; Passafaro, Maria; Menna, Elisabetta; Matteoli, Michela; Antonucci, Flavia

    2016-10-01

    The capacity to guarantee the proper excitatory/inhibitory balance is one of the most critical steps during early development responsible for the correct brain organization, function, and plasticity. GABAergic neurons guide this process leading to the right structural organization, brain circuitry, and neuronal firing. Here, we identified the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a serine/threonine protein kinase linked to DNA damage response, as crucial in regulating neurotransmission. We found that reduced levels of ATM in the hippocampal neuronal cultures produce an excitatory/inhibitory unbalance toward inhibition as indicated by the higher frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current events and an increased number of GABAergic synapses. In vivo, the increased inhibition still persists and, even if a higher excitation is also present, a reduced neuronal excitability is found as indicated by the lower action potential frequency generated in response to high-current intensity stimuli. Finally, we found an elevated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in heterozygous hippocampi associated with lower expression levels of the ERK1/2 phosphatase PP1. Given that the neurodegenerative condition associated with genetic mutations in the Atm gene, ataxia telangiectasia, presents a variable phenotype with impairment in cognition, our molecular findings provide a logical frame for a more clear comprehension of cognitive defects in the pathology, opening to novel therapeutic strategies.

  9. A postnatal switch in GABAergic control of spinal cutaneous reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Hathway, Gareth; Harrop, Emily; Baccei, Mark; Walker, Suellen; Moss, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2007-01-01

    GABAergic signalling exerts powerful inhibitory control over spinal tactile and nociceptive processing but during development GABA can be depolarizing and the functional consequences of this upon neonatal pain processing is unknown. Here we show a postnatal switch in tonic GABAA receptor (GABAAR) modulation of cutaneous tactile and nociceptive reflexes from excitation to inhibition, but only in the intact spinal cord. Neonatal and 21-day old (P21) rats were intrathecally treated with one of the GABAAR antagonists bicuculline and gabazine with both compounds dose-dependently decreasing hindpaw mechanical and thermal withdrawal thresholds in P21 rats but increasing them in P3 neonates. Intrathecal gabazine also produced an increase in the cutaneous evoked EMG response of the biceps femoris in P21 rates while lowering the response in neonates. Injections of 3H-gabazine in the L4-L5 region at P3 confirmed that gabazine binding was restricted to the lumbar spinal cord. Spinalisation of P3 neonates at the upper thoracic level prior to drug application reversed the behavioural and EMG responses to GABA antagonists so that they resembled those of P21 rats. The effects of spinalisation were consistent with gabazine facilitation of ventral root potentials observed in isolated neonatal spinal cord. These data show a marked postnatal developmental switch in GABAergic control of neonatal nociception that is mediated by supraspinal structures and illustrate the importance of studying developmental circuits in the intact nervous system. PMID:16420421

  10. New Role of ATM in Controlling GABAergic Tone During Development.

    PubMed

    Pizzamiglio, Lara; Focchi, Elisa; Murru, Luca; Tamborini, Matteo; Passafaro, Maria; Menna, Elisabetta; Matteoli, Michela; Antonucci, Flavia

    2016-10-01

    The capacity to guarantee the proper excitatory/inhibitory balance is one of the most critical steps during early development responsible for the correct brain organization, function, and plasticity. GABAergic neurons guide this process leading to the right structural organization, brain circuitry, and neuronal firing. Here, we identified the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a serine/threonine protein kinase linked to DNA damage response, as crucial in regulating neurotransmission. We found that reduced levels of ATM in the hippocampal neuronal cultures produce an excitatory/inhibitory unbalance toward inhibition as indicated by the higher frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current events and an increased number of GABAergic synapses. In vivo, the increased inhibition still persists and, even if a higher excitation is also present, a reduced neuronal excitability is found as indicated by the lower action potential frequency generated in response to high-current intensity stimuli. Finally, we found an elevated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in heterozygous hippocampi associated with lower expression levels of the ERK1/2 phosphatase PP1. Given that the neurodegenerative condition associated with genetic mutations in the Atm gene, ataxia telangiectasia, presents a variable phenotype with impairment in cognition, our molecular findings provide a logical frame for a more clear comprehension of cognitive defects in the pathology, opening to novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27166172

  11. Cortical interneuron dysfunction in epilepsy associated with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Jacob, John

    2016-02-01

    Autism and epilepsy are two associated disorders that are highly prevalent, share common developmental origins, and demonstrate substantial heritability. In this review, cross-disciplinary data in a rapidly evolving field that bridges neurology and psychiatry are synthesized to identify shared biologic mechanisms. The relationship between these debilitating, lifelong conditions is examined at the clinical, genetic, and neurophysiologic levels in humans and in animal models. Scopus and PubMed searches were used to identify relevant literature. Clinical observations have prompted speculation about the interdependence of autism and epilepsy, but causal relationships have proved difficult to determine. Despite their heritability, the genetic basis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and epilepsy has remained largely elusive until the advent of next-generation sequencing. This approach has revealed that mutations that are either causal or confer an increased disease risk are found in numerous different genes, any one of which accounts for only a small percentage of cases. Conversely, even cases with identical clinical phenotypes can be genetically heterogeneous. Candidate gene identification has facilitated the development of mouse genetic models, which in parallel with human studies have implicated shared brain regions and circuits that mediate disease expression. Diverse genetic causes of ASD and epilepsy converge on cortical interneuron circuits as one important mediator of both disorders. Cortical interneurons are among the most diverse cell types in the brain and their unique chemical and electrical coupling exert a powerful inhibitory influence on excitatory neurons via the release of the neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). These multifaceted approaches have validated theories derived from the field of developmental neurobiology, which propose that the neurologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations are caused by an altered ratio of excitation to

  12. Cortical interneuron dysfunction in epilepsy associated with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Jacob, John

    2016-02-01

    Autism and epilepsy are two associated disorders that are highly prevalent, share common developmental origins, and demonstrate substantial heritability. In this review, cross-disciplinary data in a rapidly evolving field that bridges neurology and psychiatry are synthesized to identify shared biologic mechanisms. The relationship between these debilitating, lifelong conditions is examined at the clinical, genetic, and neurophysiologic levels in humans and in animal models. Scopus and PubMed searches were used to identify relevant literature. Clinical observations have prompted speculation about the interdependence of autism and epilepsy, but causal relationships have proved difficult to determine. Despite their heritability, the genetic basis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and epilepsy has remained largely elusive until the advent of next-generation sequencing. This approach has revealed that mutations that are either causal or confer an increased disease risk are found in numerous different genes, any one of which accounts for only a small percentage of cases. Conversely, even cases with identical clinical phenotypes can be genetically heterogeneous. Candidate gene identification has facilitated the development of mouse genetic models, which in parallel with human studies have implicated shared brain regions and circuits that mediate disease expression. Diverse genetic causes of ASD and epilepsy converge on cortical interneuron circuits as one important mediator of both disorders. Cortical interneurons are among the most diverse cell types in the brain and their unique chemical and electrical coupling exert a powerful inhibitory influence on excitatory neurons via the release of the neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). These multifaceted approaches have validated theories derived from the field of developmental neurobiology, which propose that the neurologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations are caused by an altered ratio of excitation to

  13. Early neuropathology of somatostatin/NPY GABAergic cells in the hippocampus of a PS1xAPP transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Blanca; Baglietto-Vargas, David; del Rio, Juan Carlos; Moreno-Gonzalez, Ines; Santa-Maria, Consuelo; Jimenez, Sebastian; Caballero, Cristina; Lopez-Tellez, Juan Felix; Khan, Zafar U; Ruano, Diego; Gutierrez, Antonia; Vitorica, Javier

    2006-11-01

    At advanced stages, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by an extensive neuronal loss. However, the early neurodegenerative deficiencies have not been yet identified. Here we report an extensive, selective and early neurodegeneration of the dendritic inhibitory interneurons (oriens-lacunosum moleculare, O-LM, and hilar perforant path-associated, HIPP, cells) in the hippocampus of a transgenic PS1xAPP AD model. At 6 months of age, from 22 different pre- and postsynaptic mRNA markers tested (including GABAergic, glutamatergic and cholinergic markers), only the expression of somatostatin (SOM) and NPY neuropeptides (O-LM and HIPP markers) displayed a significant decrease. Stereological cell counting demonstrated a profound diminution (50-60%) of SOM-immunopositive neurons, preceding the pyramidal cell loss in this AD model. SOM population co-expressing NPY was the most damaged cell subset. Furthermore, a linear correlation between SOM and/or NPY deficiency and Abeta content was also observed. Though the molecular mechanism of SOM neuronal loss remains to be determined, these findings might represent an early hippocampal neuropathology. Therefore, SOM and NPY neuropeptides could constitute important biomarkers to assess the efficacy of potential early AD treatments.

  14. Cdk5 phosphorylation of ErbB4 is required for tangential migration of cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Rakić, Sonja; Kanatani, Shigeaki; Hunt, David; Faux, Clare; Cariboni, Anna; Chiara, Francesca; Khan, Shabana; Wansbury, Olivia; Howard, Beatrice; Nakajima, Kazunori; Nikolić, Margareta; Parnavelas, John G

    2015-04-01

    Interneuron dysfunction in humans is often associated with neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism. Some of these disorders are believed to emerge during brain formation, at the time of interneuron specification, migration, and synapse formation. Here, using a mouse model and a host of histological and molecular biological techniques, we report that the signaling molecule cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), and its activator p35, control the tangential migration of interneurons toward and within the cerebral cortex by modulating the critical neurodevelopmental signaling pathway, ErbB4/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, that has been repeatedly linked to schizophrenia. This finding identifies Cdk5 as a crucial signaling factor in cortical interneuron development in mammals. PMID:24142862

  15. Transient Suppression of Dbx1 PreBötzinger Interneurons Disrupts Breathing in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vann, Nikolas C.; Pham, Francis D.; Hayes, John A.; Kottick, Andrew; Del Negro, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Interneurons derived from Dbx1-expressing precursors located in the brainstem preBötzinger complex (preBötC) putatively form the core oscillator for inspiratory breathing movements. We tested this Dbx1 core hypothesis by expressing archaerhodopsin in Dbx1-derived interneurons and then transiently hyperpolarizing these neurons while measuring respiratory rhythm in vitro or breathing in vagus-intact adult mice. Transient illumination of the preBötC interrupted inspiratory rhythm in both slice preparations and sedated mice. In awake mice, light application reduced breathing frequency and prolonged the inspiratory duration. Support for the Dbx1 core hypothesis previously came from embryonic and perinatal mouse experiments, but these data suggest that Dbx1-derived preBötC interneurons are rhythmogenic in adult mice too. The neural origins of breathing behavior can be attributed to a localized and genetically well-defined interneuron population. PMID:27611210

  16. Transient Suppression of Dbx1 PreBötzinger Interneurons Disrupts Breathing in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Vann, Nikolas C; Pham, Francis D; Hayes, John A; Kottick, Andrew; Del Negro, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    Interneurons derived from Dbx1-expressing precursors located in the brainstem preBötzinger complex (preBötC) putatively form the core oscillator for inspiratory breathing movements. We tested this Dbx1 core hypothesis by expressing archaerhodopsin in Dbx1-derived interneurons and then transiently hyperpolarizing these neurons while measuring respiratory rhythm in vitro or breathing in vagus-intact adult mice. Transient illumination of the preBötC interrupted inspiratory rhythm in both slice preparations and sedated mice. In awake mice, light application reduced breathing frequency and prolonged the inspiratory duration. Support for the Dbx1 core hypothesis previously came from embryonic and perinatal mouse experiments, but these data suggest that Dbx1-derived preBötC interneurons are rhythmogenic in adult mice too. The neural origins of breathing behavior can be attributed to a localized and genetically well-defined interneuron population. PMID:27611210

  17. Adult Born Olfactory Bulb Dopaminergic Interneurons: Molecular Determinants and Experience-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Gendusa, Claudio; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is a highly plastic brain region involved in the early processing of olfactory information. A remarkably feature of the OB circuits in rodents is the constitutive integration of new neurons that takes place during adulthood. Newborn cells in the adult OB are mostly inhibitory interneurons belonging to chemically, morphologically and functionally heterogeneous types. Although there is general agreement that adult neurogenesis in the OB plays a key role in sensory information processing and olfaction-related plasticity, the contribution of each interneuron subtype to such functions is far to be elucidated. Here, we focus on the dopaminergic (DA) interneurons: we highlight recent findings about their morphological features and then describe the molecular factors required for the specification/differentiation and maintenance of the DA phenotype in adult born neurons. We also discuss dynamic changes of the DA interneuron population related to age, environmental stimuli and lesions, and their possible functional implications. PMID:27199651

  18. Role of tonic GABAergic currents during pre- and early postnatal rodent development.

    PubMed

    Kilb, Werner; Kirischuk, Sergei; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-01-01

    In the last three decades it became evident that the GABAergic system plays an essential role for the development of the central nervous system, by influencing the proliferation of neuronal precursors, neuronal migration and differentiation, as well as by controlling early activity patterns and thus formation of neuronal networks. GABA controls neuronal development via depolarizing membrane responses upon activation of ionotropic GABA receptors. However, many of these effects occur before the onset of synaptic GABAergic activity and thus require the presence of extrasynaptic tonic currents in neuronal precursors and immature neurons. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the role of tonic GABAergic currents during early brain development. In this review we compare the temporal sequence of the expression and functional relevance of different GABA receptor subunits, GABA synthesizing enzymes and GABA transporters. We also refer to other possible endogenous agonists of GABAA receptors. In addition, we describe functional consequences mediated by the GABAergic system during early developmental periods and discuss current models about the origin of extrasynaptic GABA and/or other endogenous GABAergic agonists during early developmental states. Finally, we present evidence that tonic GABAergic activity is also critically involved in the generation of physiological as well as pathophysiological activity patterns before and after the establishment of functional GABAergic synaptic connections.

  19. Friedreich ataxia: failure of GABA-ergic and glycinergic synaptic transmission in the dentate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, Arnulf H; Ramirez, R Liane; Becker, Alyssa B; Feustel, Paul J; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E

    2015-02-01

    Atrophy of large neurons in the dentate nucleus (DN) is an important pathologic correlate of neurologic disability in patients with Friedreich ataxia (FA). Thinning of the DN was quantified in 29 autopsy cases of FA and 2 carriers by measuring the thickness of the gray matter ribbon on stains with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA). The DN was thinner than normal in all cases of FA, and atrophy correlated inversely with disease duration but not with age at onset or length of the homozygous guanine-adenine-adenine trinucleotide expansions. In 13 of the FA cases, frozen DN tissue was available for assay of frataxin. Dentate nucleus atrophy was more severe when frataxin was very low. Immunohistochemical staining for glutamic acid decarboxylase revealed grumose reaction and preservation of small GABA-ergic neurons in the DN of FA patients. Residual small DN neurons and varicose axons also contained the glycine transporter 2, identifying them as glycinergic. Immunohistochemistry also confirmed severe loss of GABA-A and glycine receptors in the DN with comparable depletion of the receptor-anchoring protein gephyrin. Thus, loss of gephyrin and failure to position GABA-A and glycine receptors correctly may reduce trophic support of large DN neurons and contribute to their atrophy. By contrast, Purkinje cells may escape retrograde atrophy in FA by issuing new axonal sprouts to small surviving DN neurons where they form reparative grumose clusters.

  20. Cortical and Thalamic Excitation Mediate the Multiphasic Responses of Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons to Motivationally Salient Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Doig, Natalie M.; Magill, Peter J.; Apicella, Paul; Bolam, J. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic interneurons are key components of striatal microcircuits. In primates, tonically active neurons (putative cholinergic interneurons) exhibit multiphasic responses to motivationally salient stimuli that mirror those of midbrain dopamine neurons and together these two systems mediate reward-related learning in basal ganglia circuits. Here, we addressed the potential contribution of cortical and thalamic excitatory inputs to the characteristic multiphasic responses of cholinergic interneurons in vivo. We first recorded and labeled individual cholinergic interneurons in anesthetized rats. Electron microscopic analyses of these labeled neurons demonstrated that an individual interneuron could form synapses with cortical and, more commonly, thalamic afferents. Single-pulse electrical stimulation of ipsilateral frontal cortex led to robust short-latency (<20 ms) interneuron spiking, indicating monosynaptic connectivity, but firing probability progressively decreased during high-frequency pulse trains. In contrast, single-pulse thalamic stimulation led to weak short-latency spiking, but firing probability increased during pulse trains. After initial excitation from cortex or thalamus, interneurons displayed a “pause” in firing, followed by a “rebound” increase in firing rate. Across all stimulation protocols, the number of spikes in the initial excitation correlated positively with pause duration and negatively with rebound magnitude. The magnitude of the initial excitation, therefore, partly determined the profile of later components of multiphasic responses. Upon examining the responses of tonically active neurons in behaving primates, we found that these correlations held true for unit responses to a reward-predicting stimulus, but not to the reward alone, delivered outside of any task. We conclude that excitatory inputs determine, at least in part, the multiphasic responses of cholinergic interneurons under specific behavioral conditions. PMID

  1. Transient epileptiform signaling during neuronal network development: regulation by external stimulation and bimodal GABAergic activity.

    PubMed

    Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham M; Lee, Sangmook; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2013-04-01

    A predominance of excitatory activity, with protracted appearance of inhibitory activity, accompanies cortical neuronal development. It is unclear whether or not inhibitory neuronal activity is solicited exclusively by excitatory neurons or whether the transient excitatory activity displayed by developing GABAergic neurons contributes to an excitatory threshold that fosters their conversion to inhibitory activity. We addressed this possibility by culturing murine embryonic neurons on multi-electrode arrays. A wave of individual 0.2-0.4 mV signals ("spikes") appeared between approx. 20-30 days in culture, then declined. A transient wave of high amplitude (>0.5 mV) epileptiform activity coincided with the developmental decline in spikes. Bursts (clusters of ≥3 low-amplitude spikes within 0.7s prior to returning to baseline) persisted following this decline. Addition of the GABAergic antagonist bicuculline initially had no effect on signaling, consistent with delayed development of GABAergic synapses. This was followed by a period in which bicuculline inhibited overall signaling, confirming that GABAergic neurons initially display excitatory activity in ex vivo networks. Following the transient developmental wave of epileptiform signaling, bicuculline induced a resurgence of epileptiform signaling, indicating that GABAergic neurons at this point displayed inhibitory activity. The appearance of transition after the developmental and decline of epileptiform activity, rather than immediately after the developmental decline in lower-amplitude spikes, suggests that the initial excitatory activity of GABAergic neurons contributes to their transition into inhibitory neurons, and that inhibitory GABAergic activity is essential for network development. Prior studies indicate that a minority (25%) of neurons in these cultures were GABAergic, suggesting that inhibitory neurons regulate multiple excitatory neurons. A similar robust increase in signaling following cessation of

  2. Multiple forms of long-term synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses onto interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Emilio J.; Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) pathway originates from the dentate gyrus granule cells and provides a powerful excitatory synaptic drive to neurons in the dentate gyrus hilus and area CA3. Much of the early work on the MF pathway focused on its electrophysiological properties, and ability to drive CA3 pyramidal cell activity. Over the last ten years, however, a new focus on the synaptic interaction between granule cells with inhibitory interneurons has emerged. These data have revealed an immense heterogeneity of long-term plasticity at MF synapses on various interneuron targets. Interestingly, these studies also indicate that the mechanisms of MF long-term plasticity in some interneuron subtypes may be more similar to pyramidal cells than previously appreciated. In this review, we first define the synapse types at each of the interneuron targets based on the receptors present. We then describe the different forms of long-term plasticity observed, and the mechanisms underlying each form as they are currently understood. Finally we highlight various open questions surrounding MF long-term plasticity in interneurons, focusing specifically on the induction and maintenance of LTP, and what the functional impact of persistent changes in efficacy at MF – interneuron synapses might be on the emergent properties of the inhibitory network dynamics in area CA3. PMID:21093459

  3. Tonic GABAA conductance bidirectionally controls interneuron firing pattern and synchronization in the CA3 hippocampal network

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Ivan; Savtchenko, Leonid P.; Song, Inseon; Koo, Jaeyeon; Pimashkin, Alexey; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Semyanov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    The spiking output of interneurons is key for rhythm generation in the brain. However, what controls interneuronal firing remains incompletely understood. Here we combine dynamic clamp experiments with neural network simulations to understand how tonic GABAA conductance regulates the firing pattern of CA3 interneurons. In baseline conditions, tonic GABAA depolarizes these cells, thus exerting an excitatory action while also reducing the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) amplitude through shunting. As a result, the emergence of weak tonic GABAA conductance transforms the interneuron firing pattern driven by individual EPSPs into a more regular spiking mode determined by the cell intrinsic properties. The increased regularity of spiking parallels stronger synchronization of the local network. With further increases in tonic GABAA conductance the shunting inhibition starts to dominate over excitatory actions and thus moderates interneuronal firing. The remaining spikes tend to follow the timing of suprathreshold EPSPs and thus become less regular again. The latter parallels a weakening in network synchronization. Thus, our observations suggest that tonic GABAA conductance can bidirectionally control brain rhythms through changes in the excitability of interneurons and in the temporal structure of their firing patterns. PMID:24344272

  4. Distinct Roles of SOM and VIP Interneurons during Cortical Up States

    PubMed Central

    Neske, Garrett T.; Connors, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    During cortical network activity, recurrent synaptic excitation among pyramidal neurons is approximately balanced by synaptic inhibition, which is provided by a vast diversity of inhibitory interneurons. The relative contributions of different interneuron subtypes to inhibitory tone during cortical network activity is not well-understood. We previously showed that many of the major interneuron subtypes in mouse barrel cortex are highly active during Up states (Neske et al., 2015); while fast-spiking (FS), parvalbumin (PV)-positive cells were the most active interneuron subtype, many non-fast-spiking (NFS), PV-negative interneurons were as active or more active than neighboring pyramidal cells. This suggests that the NFS cells could play a role in maintaining or modulating Up states. Here, using optogenetic techniques, we further dissected the functional roles during Up states of two major NFS, PV-negative interneuron subtypes: somatostatin (SOM)-positive cells and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-positive cells. We found that while pyramidal cell excitability during Up states significantly increased when SOM cells were optogenetically silenced, VIP cells did not influence pyramidal cell excitability either upon optogenetic silencing or activation. VIP cells failed to contribute to Up states despite their ability to inhibit SOM cells strongly. We suggest that the contribution of VIP cells to the excitability of pyramidal cells may vary with cortical state. PMID:27507936

  5. Motor command for precision grip in the macaque monkey can be mediated by spinal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Alstermark, B; Pettersson, L G; Nishimura, Y; Yoshino-Saito, K; Tsuboi, F; Takahashi, M; Isa, T

    2011-07-01

    In motor control, the general view is still that spinal interneurons mainly contribute to reflexes and automatic movements. The question raised here is whether spinal interneurons can mediate the cortical command for independent finger movements, like a precision grip between the thumb and index finger in the macaque monkey, or if this function depends exclusively on a direct corticomotoneuronal pathway. This study is a followup of a previous report (Sasaki et al. J Neurophysiol 92: 3142-3147, 2004) in which we trained macaque monkeys to pick a small piece of sweet potato from a cylinder by a precision grip between the index finger and thumb. We have now isolated one spinal interneuronal system, the C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons with projection to hand and arm motoneurons. In the previous study, the lateral corticospinal tract (CST) was interrupted in C4/C5 (input intact to the C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons), and in this study, the CST was interrupted in C2 (input abolished). The precision grip could be performed within the first 15 days after a CST lesion in C4/C5 but not in C2. We conclude that C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons also can carry the command for precision grip. PMID:21511706

  6. GABAergic and glycinergic pathways to goldfish retinal ganglion cells: an ultrastructural double label study

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An ultrastructural double label has been employed to compare GABAergic and glycinergic systems in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the goldfish retina. Electron microscope autoradiography of /sup 3/H-GABA and /sup 3/H-glycine uptake was combined with retrograde HRP-labeling of ganglion cells. When surveyed for distribution, GABAergic and glycinergic synapses were found onto labeled ganglion cells throughout the IPL. This reinforces previous physiological work that described GABAergic and glycinergic influences on a variety of ganglion cells in goldfish and carp; These physiological effects often reflect direct inputs.

  7. Lineage origins of GABAergic versus glutamatergic neurons in the neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Oscar; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neocortical circuits are assembled from subtypes of glutamatergic excitatory and GABAergic inhibitory neurons with divergent anatomical and molecular signatures and unique physiological properties. Excitatory neurons derive from progenitors in the pallium, whereas inhibitory neurons originate from progenitors in the subpallium. Both classes of neurons subsequently migrate along well-defined routes to their final target area, where they integrate into common neuronal circuits. Recent findings show that neuronal diversity within the lineages of excitatory and inhibitory neurons is in part already established at the level of progenitor cells prior to migration. This poses challenges for our understanding of how radial units of interconnected excitatory and inhibitory neurons are assembled from progenitors that are spatially segregated and diverse in nature. PMID:24549207

  8. Steroid influences on GABAergic neurotransmission: A behavioral and biochemical approach

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Steroid influences on GABAergic neurotransmission are varied and complex. However, there has been little investigation into the behavioral relevance of steroid effects on GABA. GABA had been implicated in the control of lordosis, a steroid dependent posture exhibited by sexually receptive female rats, but with conflicting results. This data demonstrated that GABA plays a dual role in the regulation of lordosis; stimulation of GABAergic transmission in the medial hypothalamus enhances lordosis whereas stimulation of GABA in the preoptic area inhibits lordosis. In separate experiments it was determined that progesterone enhances binding of the GABA{sub A} agonist, muscimol, in an in vitro exchange assay utilizing synaptic membranes prepared from the hypothalamus of ovariectomized rats. Scatchard analysis revealed a difference in affinity of the GABA{sub A} receptor between ovariectomized, receptive and post receptive females. In the preoptic area there was a significant decrease in the binding of {sup 3}H-muscimol in receptive females versus post-receptive and ovariectomized rats. In other behavioral experiments, the influence of estrogen and progesterone on GABA-induced analgesia was assessed. Intrathecal infusion of a low dose of muscimol at the lumbar level of the spinal cord did not alter nociceptive thresholds in ovariectomized rats. However, when intact females were administered the same dose of muscimol, they exhibited differential responses over the estrous cycle. Females in estrus were analgesic after muscimol, whereas diestrus females did not differ from ovariectomized controls. Ovariectomized rats injected s.c. with progesterone (2mg) exhibited a pronounced analgesia after intrathecal muscimol beginning 15 minutes after steroid treatment, whereas similar treatment with estrogen (10ug) was without effect.

  9. Changes in GABAergic and non-GABAergic synapses during chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal in the dentate fascia of LS and SS mice.

    PubMed

    Fifková, E; Eason, H; Bueltmann, K; Lanman, J

    1994-08-01

    Ethanol-sensitive LSIBG and ethanol-insensitive SSIBG mice were exposed to ethanol (23.5% ethanol-derived calories) for 4 months. Half of the animals was sacrificed at this time and the other half was withdrawn from the ethanol diet for 1 month. GABA immunoelectron microscopy was used to study the impact of the treatments on synaptic contacts in the dentate molecular layer. In the LS mice a significant loss of non-GABAergic axospinous synapses (26.7%; p < 0.05) was observed during ethanol exposure which was followed by a loss of GABAergic synapses on dendritic shafts (54.7%; p < 0.01) during withdrawal. In the SS mice there was a significant decrease in the non-GABAergic axospinous synapses (23.5%; p < 0.05) and a significant increase in axodendritic synapses (63.3%; p < 0.05) during ethanol exposure. The observed changes in the GABAergic and non-GABAergic innervation of the dentate fascia induced by ethanol were observed in the projection zone of the perforant path. They could adversely affect the hippocampal physiology with a consequent impairment of mnemonic functions.

  10. Genetic ablation of V2a ipsilateral interneurons disrupts left-right locomotor coordination in mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Crone, Steven A; Quinlan, Katharina A; Zagoraiou, Laskaro; Droho, Steven; Restrepo, Carlos Ernesto; Lundfald, Line; Endo, Toshiaki; Setlak, Jennifer; Jessell, Thomas M; Kiehn, Ole; Sharma, Kamal

    2008-10-01

    The initiation and coordination of activity in limb muscles are the main functions of neural circuits that control locomotion. Commissural neurons connect locomotor circuits on the two sides of the spinal cord, and represent the known neural substrate for left-right coordination. Here we demonstrate that a group of ipsilateral interneurons, V2a interneurons, plays an essential role in the control of left-right alternation. In the absence of V2a interneurons, the spinal cord fails to exhibit consistent left-right alternation. Locomotor burst activity shows increased variability, but flexor-extensor coordination is unaffected. Anatomical tracing studies reveal a direct excitatory input of V2a interneurons onto commissural interneurons, including a set of molecularly defined V0 neurons that drive left-right alternation. Our findings imply that the neural substrate for left-right coordination consists of at least two components; commissural neurons and a class of ipsilateral interneurons that activate commissural pathways. PMID:18940589

  11. Presynaptic Kainate Receptor Activation Preserves Asynchronous GABA Release Despite the Reduction in Synchronous Release from Hippocampal CCK Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Michael I.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Chittajallu, Ramesh; McBain, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus in mediated by a wide variety of different interneuron classes which are assumed to play different roles in network activity. Activation of presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) has been shown to reduce inhibitory transmission but the interneuron class(es) at which they act is only recently beginning to emerge. Using paired recordings we show that KAR activation causes a decrease in presynaptic release from CCK- but not PV-containing interneurons and that this decrease is observed when pyramidal cells, but not interneurons, are the postsynaptic target. We also show that although the synchronous release component is reduced, the barrage of asynchronous GABA release from CCK interneurons during sustained firing is unaffected by KAR activation. This indicates that presynaptic KARs preserve and act in concert with asynchronous release to switch CCK interneurons from a phasic inhibition mode to produce prolonged inhibition during periods of intense activity. PMID:20720128

  12. Strategies and Tools for Combinatorial Targeting of GABAergic Neurons in Mouse Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Tucciarone, Jason; Lee, SooHyun; Nigro, Maximiliano José; Kim, Yongsoo; Levine, Jesse Maurica; Kelly, Sean Michael; Krugikov, Illya; Wu, Priscilla; Chen, Yang; Gong, Lin; Hou, Yongjie; Osten, Pavel; Rudy, Bernardo; Huang, Z Josh

    2016-09-21

    Systematic genetic access to GABAergic cell types will facilitate studying the function and development of inhibitory circuitry. However, single gene-driven recombinase lines mark relatively broad and heterogeneous cell populations. Although intersectional approaches improve precision, it remains unclear whether they can capture cell types defined by multiple features. Here we demonstrate that combinatorial genetic and viral approaches target restricted GABAergic subpopulations and cell types characterized by distinct laminar location, morphology, axonal projection, and electrophysiological properties. Intersectional embryonic transcription factor drivers allow finer fate mapping of progenitor pools that give rise to distinct GABAergic populations, including laminar cohorts. Conversion of progenitor fate restriction signals to constitutive recombinase expression enables viral targeting of cell types based on their lineage and birth time. Properly designed intersection, subtraction, conversion, and multi-color reporters enhance the precision and versatility of drivers and viral vectors. These strategies and tools will facilitate studying GABAergic neurons throughout the mouse brain. PMID:27618674

  13. Cortical Control of Striatal Dopamine Transmission via Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Kosillo, Polina; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Corticostriatal regulation of striatal dopamine (DA) transmission has long been postulated, but ionotropic glutamate receptors have not been localized directly to DA axons. Striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) are emerging as major players in striatal function, and can govern DA transmission by activating nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) on DA axons. Cortical inputs to ChIs have historically been perceived as sparse, but recent evidence indicates that they strongly activate ChIs. We explored whether activation of M1/M2 corticostriatal inputs can consequently gate DA transmission, via ChIs. We reveal that optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-expressing corticostriatal axons can drive striatal DA release detected with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and requires activation of nAChRs on DA axons and AMPA receptors on ChIs that promote short-latency action potentials. By contrast, DA release driven by optogenetic activation of intralaminar thalamostriatal inputs involves additional activation of NMDA receptors on ChIs and action potential generation over longer timescales. Therefore, cortical and thalamic glutamate inputs can modulate DA transmission by regulating ChIs as gatekeepers, through ionotropic glutamate receptors. The different use of AMPA and NMDA receptors by cortical versus thalamic inputs might lead to distinct input integration strategies by ChIs and distinct modulation of the function of DA and striatum. PMID:27566978

  14. Properties of precise firing synchrony between synaptically coupled cortical interneurons depend on their mode of coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Precise spike synchrony has been widely reported in the central nervous system, but its functional role in encoding, processing, and transmitting information is yet unresolved. Of particular interest is firing synchrony between inhibitory cortical interneurons, thought to drive various cortical rhythms such as gamma oscillations, the hallmark of cognitive states. Precise synchrony can arise between two interneurons connected electrically, through gap junctions, chemically, through fast inhibitory synapses, or dually, through both types of connections, but the properties of synchrony generated by these different modes of connectivity have never been compared in the same data set. In the present study we recorded in vitro from 152 homotypic pairs of two major subtypes of mouse neocortical interneurons: parvalbumin-containing, fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and somatostatin-containing (SOM) interneurons. We tested firing synchrony when the two neurons were driven to fire by long, depolarizing current steps and used a novel synchrony index to quantify the strength of synchrony, its temporal precision, and its dependence on firing rate. We found that SOM-SOM synchrony, driven solely by electrical coupling, was less precise than FS-FS synchrony, driven by inhibitory or dual coupling. Unlike SOM-SOM synchrony, FS-FS synchrony was strongly firing rate dependent and was not evident at the prototypical 40-Hz gamma frequency. Computer simulations reproduced these differences in synchrony without assuming any differences in intrinsic properties, suggesting that the mode of coupling is more important than the interneuron subtype. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms and properties of interneuron synchrony and point out important caveats in current models of cortical oscillations. PMID:25972585

  15. Preferred locomotor phase of activity of lumbar interneurons during air-stepping in subchronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    AuYong, Nicholas; Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Lemay, Michel A

    2011-03-01

    Spinal locomotor circuits are intrinsically capable of driving a variety of behaviors such as stepping, scratching, and swimming. Based on an observed rostrocaudal wave of activity in the motoneuronal firing during locomotor tasks, the traveling-wave hypothesis proposes that spinal interneuronal firing follows a similar rostrocaudal pattern of activation, suggesting the presence of spatially organized interneuronal modules within the spinal motor system. In this study, we examined if the spatial organization of the lumbar interneuronal activity patterns during locomotor activity in the adult mammalian spinal cord was consistent with a traveling-wave organizational scheme. The activity of spinal interneurons within the lumbar intermediate zone was examined during air-stepping in subchronic spinal cats. The preferred phase of interneuronal activity during a step cycle was determined using circular statistics. We found that the preferred phases of lumbar interneurons from both sides of the cord were evenly distributed over the entire step cycle with no indication of functional groupings. However, when units were subcategorized according to spinal hemicords, the preferred phases of units on each side largely fell around the period of extensor muscle activity on each side. In addition, there was no correlation between the preferred phases of units and their rostrocaudal locations along the spinal cord with preferred phases corresponding to both flexion and extension phases of the step cycle found at every rostrocaudal level of the cord. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that interneurons operate as part of a longitudinally distributed network rather than a rostrocaudally organized traveling-wave network.

  16. [Ammonia and GABA-ergic neurotransmission in pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Helewski, Krzysztof; Kowalczyk-Ziomek, Grazyna; Konecki, Janusz

    2003-01-01

    Pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has not been fully revealed and there are many factors which may affect its development. Ammonia and changes in GABA-ergic neurotransmission seem to be the most essential of these factors. Hepatic encephalopathy is frequently, though not always, accompanied by elevated blood ammonia level. Due to the changes in permeability of blood-brain barrier the ammonia level in the brain also increases which results in both stimulating and inhibitory neurotransmission disturbances. Ammonia also affects abnormal interaction of metabolic neurones and astrocytes as well as glutamine-serotonin balance. Another essential factor affecting hepatic encephalopathy development are disturbances in GABA-ergic neurotransmission connected with GABAA receptor complex. When the liver is damaged GABA-ergic neurotransmission increases due to a higher GABA level, natural benzodiazepine receptor agonists as well as neurosteroids synthesised in astrocytes. Many studies point to the fact that ammonia and GABA-ergic neurotransmission disturbances interrelate with each other. There is a concept saying that both these factors cause hepatic encephalopathy. Ammonia may indirectly increase GABA-ergic neurotransmission and also inhibit the function of the central nervous system by synergistic activity with benzodiazepine receptor ligands. So far it is not known whether GABA-ergic neurotransmission is affected by ammonia only or by other factors as well. PMID:15058165

  17. Response dynamics and directional properties of nonspiking local interneurons in the cockroach cercal system.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Y; Arima, T; Okuma, J; Hasegawa, Y

    1993-06-01

    The response properties and directional receptive fields of nonspiking local interneurons in the cercal system of the cockroach are described. Wind-evoked responses were recorded intracellularly, and then analyzed by means of the Wiener kernel method in which a Gaussian white noise signal was used as a stimulus. Cross-correlation between the response and the white noise signal produced first- (linear) and second-order (nonlinear) kernels that were used to define input-output characteristics of the interneurons. Three sets of interneurons were distinguished on the basis of kernel analysis. First, responses in interneurons 101, 107, 111, and 203 were characterized predominantly by a differentiating first-order kernel, which suggests a linear relationship to the stimulus. The amplitude and waveform of the kernel changed with the change in stimulus angle, indicating that these four cells are directionally sensitive. Second, responses in interneurons 102 and 103 were also directionally sensitive but highly nonlinear. The first-order kernel was biphasic, whereas the second-order kernel had an elongated depolarizing peak on the diagonal. The response dynamics were accounted for by a cascade of two filters, a linear band-pass filter and a static nonlinear filter, in which the nonlinearity is a signal compression (or a rectification). Third, responses in interneurons 104 and 201 consist largely of the second-order nonlinear component. The second-order kernel, which had an elongated depolarizing peak or a hyperpolarizing valley on the diagonal, did not show any directional preference. The second-order nonlinearity was dynamic, and could be modeled by a band-pass linear filter-static nonlinearity-low-pass linear filter cascade, where the static nonlinearity is a full-wave rectification. The band-pass filter would simply reflect the mechanical property of cercal hair sensilla, whereas the low-pass filter represents the transfer at synapses between the cercal afferents and the

  18. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  19. Spatiotemporal dynamics of rhythmic spinal interneurons measured with two-photon calcium imaging and coherence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Alex C; Dietz, Shelby B; Zhong, Guisheng; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M; Webb, Watt W

    2010-12-01

    In rhythmic neural circuits, a neuron often fires action potentials with a constant phase to the rhythm, a timing relationship that can be functionally significant. To characterize these phase preferences in a large-scale, cell type-specific manner, we adapted multitaper coherence analysis for two-photon calcium imaging. Analysis of simulated data showed that coherence is a simple and robust measure of rhythmicity for calcium imaging data. When applied to the neonatal mouse hindlimb spinal locomotor network, the phase relationships between peak activity of >1,000 ventral spinal interneurons and motor output were characterized. Most interneurons showed rhythmic activity that was coherent and in phase with the ipsilateral motor output during fictive locomotion. The phase distributions of two genetically identified classes of interneurons were distinct from the ensemble population and from each other. There was no obvious spatial clustering of interneurons with similar phase preferences. Together, these results suggest that cell type, not neighboring neuron activity, is a better indicator of an interneuron's response during fictive locomotion. The ability to measure the phase preferences of many neurons with cell type and spatial information should be widely applicable for studying other rhythmic neural circuits. PMID:20861442

  20. Chronic fluoxetine treatment alters the structure, connectivity and plasticity of cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Guirado, Ramon; Perez-Rando, Marta; Sanchez-Matarredona, David; Castrén, Eero; Nacher, Juan

    2014-10-01

    Novel hypotheses suggest that antidepressants, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, induce neuronal structural plasticity, resembling that of the juvenile brain, although the underlying mechanisms of this reopening of the critical periods still remain unclear. However, recent studies suggest that inhibitory networks play an important role in this structural plasticity induced by fluoxetine. For this reason we have analysed the effects of a chronic fluoxetine treatment in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of transgenic mice displaying eGFP labelled interneurons. We have found an increase in the expression of molecules related to critical period plasticity, such as the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), GAD67/65 and synaptophysin, as well as a reduction in the number of parvalbumin expressing interneurons surrounded by perineuronal nets. We have also described a trend towards decrease in the perisomatic inhibitory puncta on pyramidal neurons in the mPFC and an increase in the density of inhibitory puncta on eGFP interneurons. Finally, we have found that chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the structure of interneurons in the mPFC, increasing their dendritic spine density. The present study provides evidence indicating that fluoxetine promotes structural changes in the inhibitory neurons of the adult cerebral cortex, probably through alterations in plasticity-related molecules of neurons or the extracellular matrix surrounding them, which are present in interneurons and are known to be crucial for the development of the critical periods of plasticity in the juvenile brain.

  1. Roller Coaster Scanning reveals spontaneous triggering of dendritic spikes in CA1 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Katona, Gergely; Kaszás, Attila; Turi, Gergely F; Hájos, Norbert; Tamás, Gábor; Vizi, E Sylvester; Rózsa, Balázs

    2011-02-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are considered to be the controlling units of neural networks, despite their sparse number and unique morphological characteristics compared with excitatory pyramidal cells. Although pyramidal cell dendrites have been shown to display local regenerative events--dendritic spikes (dSpikes)--evoked by artificially patterned stimulation of synaptic inputs, no such studies exist for interneurons or for spontaneous events. In addition, imaging techniques have yet to attain the required spatial and temporal resolution for the detection of spontaneously occurring events that trigger dSpikes. Here we describe a high-resolution 3D two-photon laser scanning method (Roller Coaster Scanning) capable of imaging long dendritic segments resolving individual spines and inputs with a temporal resolution of a few milliseconds. By using this technique, we found that local, NMDA receptor-dependent dSpikes can be observed in hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons during spontaneous network activities in vitro. These NMDA spikes appear when approximately 10 spatially clustered inputs arrive synchronously and trigger supralinear integration in dynamic interaction zones. In contrast to the one-to-one relationship between computational subunits and dendritic branches described in pyramidal cells, here we show that interneurons have relatively small (∼14 μm) sliding interaction zones. Our data suggest a unique principle as to how interneurons integrate synaptic information by local dSpikes. PMID:21224413

  2. Identification of excitatory premotor interneurons which regulate local muscle contraction during Drosophila larval locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Eri; Truman, James W.; Nose, Akinao

    2016-01-01

    We use Drosophila larval locomotion as a model to elucidate the working principles of motor circuits. Larval locomotion is generated by rhythmic and sequential contractions of body-wall muscles from the posterior to anterior segments, which in turn are regulated by motor neurons present in the corresponding neuromeres. Motor neurons are known to receive both excitatory and inhibitory inputs, combined action of which likely regulates patterned motor activity during locomotion. Although recent studies identified candidate inhibitory premotor interneurons, the identity of premotor interneurons that provide excitatory drive to motor neurons during locomotion remains unknown. In this study, we searched for and identified two putative excitatory premotor interneurons in this system, termed CLI1 and CLI2 (cholinergic lateral interneuron 1 and 2). These neurons were segmentally arrayed and activated sequentially from the posterior to anterior segments during peristalsis. Consistent with their being excitatory premotor interneurons, the CLIs formed GRASP- and ChAT-positive putative synapses with motoneurons and were active just prior to motoneuronal firing in each segment. Moreover, local activation of CLI1s induced contraction of muscles in the corresponding body segments. Taken together, our results suggest that the CLIs directly activate motoneurons sequentially along the segments during larval locomotion. PMID:27470675

  3. Seizure Reduction through Interneuron-mediated Entrainment using Low Frequency Optical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ladas, Thomas P.; Chiang, Chia-Chu; Gonzalez-Reyes, Luis E.; Nowak, Theodore; Durand, Dominique M.

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency electrical stimulation (LFS) can reduce neural excitability and suppress seizures in animals and patients with epilepsy. However the therapeutic outcome could benefit from the determination of the cell types involved in seizure suppression. We used optogenetic techniques to investigate the role of interneurons in LFS (1Hz) in the epileptogenic hippocampus. Optical low frequency stimulation (oLFS) was first used to activate the cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in the Thy1-ChR2 transgenic mouse that expresses ChR2 in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We found that oLFS could effectively reduce epileptiform activity in the hippocampus through the activation of GAD-expressing hippocampal interneurons. This was confirmed using the VGAT-ChR2 transgenic mouse, allowing for selective optical activation of only GABA interneurons. Activating hippocampal interneurons through oLFS was found to cause entrainment of neural activity similar to electrical stimulation, but through a GABAA-mediated mechanism. These results confirm the robustness of the LFS paradigm and indicate that GABA interneurons play an unexpected role of shaping inter-ictal activity to decrease neural excitability in the hippocampus. PMID:25863022

  4. Ascending auditory interneurons in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus (Walker): comparative physiology and direct connections with afferents.

    PubMed

    Hennig, R M

    1988-05-01

    Ascending auditory interneurons of the cricket, Teleogryllus commodus (Walker), were investigated using simultaneous intracellular and extracellular recording in order to identify units which had previously been characterized only by extracellular recording. The morphology and physiology of the large adapting unit (LAU: Fig. 1) and of the small tonic unit (STU: Fig. 2) of Teleogryllus correspond well to those of the ascending neuron 2 (AN2) and the ascending neuron 1 (AN1) of Gryllus (Figs. 1, 2), respectively. A summary of the ascending auditory interneurons described by various authors in 5 species of crickets is presented in order to establish common identities. Physiological evidence for direct connections between auditory afferents and the ascending auditory interneurons AN1 (STU) and AN2 (LAU) is presented. Simultaneous intracellular recordings from receptors and interneurons in response to sound as well as the activity of auditory interneurons upon electrical stimulation of the tympanal nerve reveal short and constant latencies of receptor-evoked synaptic activity in AN1 (STU) and AN2 (LAU).

  5. Maturation-Promoting Activity of SATB1 in MGE-Derived Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Denaxa, Myrto; Kalaitzidou, Melanie; Garefalaki, Anna; Achimastou, Angeliki; Lasrado, Reena; Maes, Tamara; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Summary The generation of cortical interneuron subtypes is controlled by genetic programs that are activated in the ventral forebrain and unfold during the prolonged period of inhibitory neuron development. The LIM-homeodomain protein LHX6 is critical for the development of all cortical interneurons originating in the medial ganglionic eminence, but the molecular mechanisms that operate downstream of LHX6 to control the terminal differentiation of somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons within the cortex remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the nuclear matrix and genome organizer protein SATB1 is induced by neuronal activity and functions downstream of Lhx6 to control the transition of tangentially migrating immature interneurons into the terminally differentiated Somatostatin (SST)-expressing subtype. Our experiments provide a molecular framework for understanding the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms by which specified but immature cortical interneurons acquire the subtype-defining molecular and morphophysiological characteristics that allow them to integrate and function within cortical circuits. PMID:23142661

  6. GABAergic mechanisms contributing to categorical amygdala responses to chemosensory signals.

    PubMed

    Westberry, Jenne M; Meredith, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Chemosensory stimuli from conspecific and heterospecific animals, elicit categorically different immediate-early gene response-patterns in medial amygdala in male hamsters and mice. We previously showed that conspecific signals activate posterior (MeP) as well as anterior medial amygdala (MeA), and especially relevant heterospecific signals such as chemosensory stimuli from potential predators also activate MeP in mice. Other heterospecific chemosignals activate MeA, but not MeP. Here we show that male hamster amygdala responds significantly differentially to different conspecific signals, by activating different proportions of cells of different phenotype, possibly leading to differential activation of downstream circuits. Heterospecific signals that fail to activate MeP do activate GABA-immunoreactive cells in the adjacent caudal main intercalated nucleus (mICNc) and elicit selective suppression of MeP cells bearing GABA-Receptors, suggesting GABA inhibition in MeP by GABAergic cells in mICNc. Overall, work presented here suggests that medial amygdala may discriminate between important conspecific social signals, distinguish them from the social signals of other species and convey that information to brain circuits eliciting appropriate social behavior. PMID:27329335

  7. Muscarinic presynaptic modulation in GABAergic pallidal synapses of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Ricardo; Aceves, José J; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E; Hernández-Flores, Teresa; Hernández-González, Omar; Tapia, Dagoberto; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2015-02-01

    The external globus pallidus (GPe) is central for basal ganglia processing. It expresses muscarinic cholinergic receptors and receives cholinergic afferents from the pedunculopontine nuclei (PPN) and other regions. The role of these receptors and afferents is unknown. Muscarinic M1-type receptors are expressed by synapses from striatal projection neurons (SPNs). Because axons from SPNs project to the GPe, one hypothesis is that striatopallidal GABAergic terminals may be modulated by M1 receptors. Alternatively, some M1 receptors may be postsynaptic in some pallidal neurons. Evidence of muscarinic modulation in any of these elements would suggest that cholinergic afferents from the PPN, or other sources, could modulate the function of the GPe. In this study, we show this evidence using striatopallidal slice preparations: after field stimulation in the striatum, the cholinergic muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine significantly reduced the amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) from synapses that exhibited short-term synaptic facilitation. This inhibition was associated with significant increases in paired-pulse facilitation, and quantal content was proportional to IPSC amplitude. These actions were blocked by atropine, pirenzepine, and mamba toxin-7, suggesting that receptors involved were M1. In addition, we found that some pallidal neurons have functional postsynaptic M1 receptors. Moreover, some evoked IPSCs exhibited short-term depression and a different kind of modulation: they were indirectly modulated by muscarine via the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Thus pallidal synapses presenting distinct forms of short-term plasticity were modulated differently. PMID:25392165

  8. Local Optogenetic Induction of Fast (20–40 Hz) Pyramidal-Interneuron Network Oscillations in the In Vitro and In Vivo CA1 Hippocampus: Modulation by CRF and Enforcement of Perirhinal Theta Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dine, Julien; Genewsky, Andreas; Hladky, Florian; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Deussing, Jan M.; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Chen, Alon; Eder, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiological processes that can cause theta-to-gamma frequency range (4–80 Hz) network oscillations in the rhinal cortical-hippocampal system and the potential connectivity-based interactions of such forebrain rhythms are a topic of intensive investigation. Here, using selective Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expression in mouse forebrain glutamatergic cells, we were able to locally, temporally precisely, and reliably induce fast (20–40 Hz) field potential oscillations in hippocampal area CA1 in vitro (at 25°C) and in vivo (i.e., slightly anesthetized NEX-Cre-ChR2 mice). As revealed by pharmacological analyses and patch-clamp recordings from pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons in vitro, these light-triggered oscillations can exclusively arise from sustained suprathreshold depolarization (~200 ms or longer) and feedback inhibition of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as being mandatory for prototypic pyramidal-interneuron network (P-I) oscillations. Consistently, the oscillations comprised rhythmically occurring population spikes (generated by pyramidal cells) and their frequency increased with increasing spectral power. We further demonstrate that the optogenetically driven CA1 oscillations, which remain stable over repeated evocations, are impaired by the stress hormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, 125 nM) in vitro and, even more remarkably, found that they are accompanied by concurrent states of enforced theta activity in the memory-associated perirhinal cortex (PrC) in vivo. The latter phenomenon most likely derives from neurotransmission via a known, but poorly studied excitatory CA1→PrC pathway. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the existence of a prototypic (CRF-sensitive) P-I gamma rhythm generator in area CA1 and suggest that CA1 P-I oscillations can rapidly up-regulate theta activity strength in hippocampus-innervated rhinal networks, at least in the PrC. PMID:27199662

  9. Local Optogenetic Induction of Fast (20-40 Hz) Pyramidal-Interneuron Network Oscillations in the In Vitro and In Vivo CA1 Hippocampus: Modulation by CRF and Enforcement of Perirhinal Theta Activity.

    PubMed

    Dine, Julien; Genewsky, Andreas; Hladky, Florian; Wotjak, Carsten T; Deussing, Jan M; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Chen, Alon; Eder, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiological processes that can cause theta-to-gamma frequency range (4-80 Hz) network oscillations in the rhinal cortical-hippocampal system and the potential connectivity-based interactions of such forebrain rhythms are a topic of intensive investigation. Here, using selective Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expression in mouse forebrain glutamatergic cells, we were able to locally, temporally precisely, and reliably induce fast (20-40 Hz) field potential oscillations in hippocampal area CA1 in vitro (at 25°C) and in vivo (i.e., slightly anesthetized NEX-Cre-ChR2 mice). As revealed by pharmacological analyses and patch-clamp recordings from pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons in vitro, these light-triggered oscillations can exclusively arise from sustained suprathreshold depolarization (~200 ms or longer) and feedback inhibition of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as being mandatory for prototypic pyramidal-interneuron network (P-I) oscillations. Consistently, the oscillations comprised rhythmically occurring population spikes (generated by pyramidal cells) and their frequency increased with increasing spectral power. We further demonstrate that the optogenetically driven CA1 oscillations, which remain stable over repeated evocations, are impaired by the stress hormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, 125 nM) in vitro and, even more remarkably, found that they are accompanied by concurrent states of enforced theta activity in the memory-associated perirhinal cortex (PrC) in vivo. The latter phenomenon most likely derives from neurotransmission via a known, but poorly studied excitatory CA1→PrC pathway. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the existence of a prototypic (CRF-sensitive) P-I gamma rhythm generator in area CA1 and suggest that CA1 P-I oscillations can rapidly up-regulate theta activity strength in hippocampus-innervated rhinal networks, at least in the PrC.

  10. Local integration accounts for weak selectivity of mouse neocortical parvalbumin interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Benjamin; Pattadkal, Jagruti J.; Dilly, Geoffrey A.; Priebe, Nicholas J.; Zemelman, Boris V.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Dissecting the functional roles of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in cortical circuits is a fundamental goal in neuroscience. Of particular interest are their roles in emergent cortical computations such as binocular integration in primary visual cortex (V1). We measured the binocular response selectivity of genetically-defined subpopulations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Parvalbumin (PV+) interneurons received strong inputs from both eyes, but lacked selectivity for binocular disparity. Because broad selectivity could result from heterogeneous synaptic input from neighboring neurons, we examined how individual PV+ interneuron selectivity compared to that of the local neuronal network, which is primarily composed of excitatory neurons. PV+ neurons showed functional similarity to neighboring neuronal populations over spatial distances resembling measurements of synaptic connectivity. On the other hand, excitatory neurons expressing CaMKIIα displayed no such functional similarity with the neighboring population. Our findings suggest that broad selectivity of PV+ interneurons results from nonspecific integration within local networks. PMID:26182423

  11. Interneurons of the subesophageal ganglion of Sarcophaga bullata responding to gustatory and mechanosensory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B K; Itagaki, H

    1992-09-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from interneurons in the subesophageal ganglion (SEG) of Sarcophaga bullata while stimulating the labellar lobes with solutions of sucrose, NaCl and with distilled water. Neurons that responded to sucrose did not respond to NaCl and vice versa, while sucrose-sensitive neurons often responded weakly to water. Several of the recorded neurons were filled with Lucifer Yellow, and their morphology was reconstructed. Most showed extensive arborizations within the SEG, suggesting that they were local interneurons involved in the early stages of gustatory processing. Some of the filled neurons had extensive projections to the brain, in addition to arborizations in the SEG. This is the first published record of gustatory interneurons in the higher flies.

  12. Endogenous acetylcholine and nicotine activation enhances GABAergic and glycinergic inputs to cardiac vagal neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jijiang; Wang, Xin; Irnaten, Mustapha; Venkatesan, Priya; Evans, Cory; Baxi, Sunit; Mendelowitz, David

    2003-05-01

    The heart slows during expiration and heart rate increases during inspiration. This cardiorespiratory interaction is thought to occur by increased inhibitory synaptic events to cardiac vagal neurons during inspiration. Since cholinergic receptors have been suggested to be involved in this cardiorespiratory interaction, we tested whether endogenous cholinergic activity modulates GABAergic and glycinergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons in the nucleus ambiguus, whether nicotine can mimic this facilitation, and we examined the nicotinic receptors involved. Cardiac vagal neurons in the rat were labeled with a retrograde fluorescent tracer and studied in an in vitro slice using patch-clamp techniques. Application of neostigmine (10 microM), an acetylcholinerase inhibitor, significantly increased the frequency of both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in cardiac vagal neurons. Exogenous application of nicotine increased the frequency and amplitude of both GABAergic and glycinergic IPSCs. The nicotinic facilitation of both GABAergic and glycinergic IPSCs were insensitive to 100 nM alpha-bungarotoxin but were abolished by dihydro-beta-erythrodine (DHbetaE) at a concentration (3 microM) specific for alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors. In the presence of TTX, nicotine increased the frequency of GABAergic and glycinergic miniature synaptic events, which were also abolished by DHbetaE (3 microM). This work demonstrates that there is endogenous cholinergic facilitation of GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic inputs to cardiac vagal neurons, and activation of alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors at presynaptic terminals facilitates GABAergic and glycinergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons. Nicotinic facilitation of inhibitory neurotransmission to premotor cardiac parasympathetic neurons may be involved in generating respiratory sinus arrhythmia.

  13. Age-Related Uptake of Heavy Metals in Human Spinal Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Kum Jew, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals have been implicated in the loss of spinal motoneurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND). Motoneuron loss in the spinal anterior horn is severe in ALS/MND at the time of death, making this tissue unsuitable for examination. We therefore examined spinal cords of people without muscle weakness to look for any presence of heavy metals that could make these neurons susceptible to damage. Spinal cord samples from 50 individuals aged 1–95 y who had no clinical or histopathological evidence of spinal motoneuron loss were studied. Seven μm formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained for heavy metals with silver nitrate autometallography (AMGHM) which detects intracellular mercury, silver or bismuth. Neurons in the spinal cord were classified as interneurons or α-motoneurons based on their site and cell body diameter. Spinal interneurons containing heavy metals were present in 8 of 24 people (33%) aged 61–95 y, but not at younger ages. These AMGHM interneurons were most numerous in the lumbar spinal cord, with moderate numbers in the caudal cervical cord, few in the rostral cervical cord, and almost none in the thoracic cord. All people with AMGHM interneurons had occasional AMGHM staining in α-motoneurons as well. In one man AMGHM staining was present in addition in dorsomedial nucleus and sensory neurons. In conclusion, heavy metals are present in many spinal interneurons, and in a few α-motoneurons, in a large proportion of older people. Damage to inhibitory interneurons from toxic metals in later life could result in excitotoxic injury to motoneurons and may underlie motoneuron injury or loss in conditions such as ALS/MND, multiple sclerosis, sarcopenia and calf fasciculations. PMID:27611334

  14. Age-Related Uptake of Heavy Metals in Human Spinal Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals have been implicated in the loss of spinal motoneurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND). Motoneuron loss in the spinal anterior horn is severe in ALS/MND at the time of death, making this tissue unsuitable for examination. We therefore examined spinal cords of people without muscle weakness to look for any presence of heavy metals that could make these neurons susceptible to damage. Spinal cord samples from 50 individuals aged 1-95 y who had no clinical or histopathological evidence of spinal motoneuron loss were studied. Seven μm formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained for heavy metals with silver nitrate autometallography (AMGHM) which detects intracellular mercury, silver or bismuth. Neurons in the spinal cord were classified as interneurons or α-motoneurons based on their site and cell body diameter. Spinal interneurons containing heavy metals were present in 8 of 24 people (33%) aged 61-95 y, but not at younger ages. These AMGHM interneurons were most numerous in the lumbar spinal cord, with moderate numbers in the caudal cervical cord, few in the rostral cervical cord, and almost none in the thoracic cord. All people with AMGHM interneurons had occasional AMGHM staining in α-motoneurons as well. In one man AMGHM staining was present in addition in dorsomedial nucleus and sensory neurons. In conclusion, heavy metals are present in many spinal interneurons, and in a few α-motoneurons, in a large proportion of older people. Damage to inhibitory interneurons from toxic metals in later life could result in excitotoxic injury to motoneurons and may underlie motoneuron injury or loss in conditions such as ALS/MND, multiple sclerosis, sarcopenia and calf fasciculations. PMID:27611334

  15. Age-Related Uptake of Heavy Metals in Human Spinal Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals have been implicated in the loss of spinal motoneurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND). Motoneuron loss in the spinal anterior horn is severe in ALS/MND at the time of death, making this tissue unsuitable for examination. We therefore examined spinal cords of people without muscle weakness to look for any presence of heavy metals that could make these neurons susceptible to damage. Spinal cord samples from 50 individuals aged 1-95 y who had no clinical or histopathological evidence of spinal motoneuron loss were studied. Seven μm formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained for heavy metals with silver nitrate autometallography (AMGHM) which detects intracellular mercury, silver or bismuth. Neurons in the spinal cord were classified as interneurons or α-motoneurons based on their site and cell body diameter. Spinal interneurons containing heavy metals were present in 8 of 24 people (33%) aged 61-95 y, but not at younger ages. These AMGHM interneurons were most numerous in the lumbar spinal cord, with moderate numbers in the caudal cervical cord, few in the rostral cervical cord, and almost none in the thoracic cord. All people with AMGHM interneurons had occasional AMGHM staining in α-motoneurons as well. In one man AMGHM staining was present in addition in dorsomedial nucleus and sensory neurons. In conclusion, heavy metals are present in many spinal interneurons, and in a few α-motoneurons, in a large proportion of older people. Damage to inhibitory interneurons from toxic metals in later life could result in excitotoxic injury to motoneurons and may underlie motoneuron injury or loss in conditions such as ALS/MND, multiple sclerosis, sarcopenia and calf fasciculations.

  16. Axonal patterns and targets of dA1 interneurons in the chick hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Ayelet; Hadas, Yoav; Klar, Avihu; Sela-Donenfeld, Dalit

    2012-04-25

    Hindbrain dorsal interneurons that comprise the rhombic lip relay sensory information and coordinate motor outputs. The progenitor dA1 subgroup of interneurons, which is formed along the dorsal-most region of the caudal rhombic lip, gives rise to the cochlear and precerebellar nuclei. These centers project sensory inputs toward upper-brain regions. The fundamental role of dA1 interneurons in the assembly and function of these brainstem nuclei is well characterized. However, the precise en route axonal patterns and synaptic targets of dA1 interneurons are not clear as of yet. Novel genetic tools were used to label dA1 neurons and trace their axonal trajectories and synaptic connections at various stages of chick embryos. Using dA1-specific enhancers, two contralateral ascending axonal projection patterns were identified; one derived from rhombomeres 6-7 that elongated in the dorsal funiculus, while the other originated from rhombomeres 2-5 and extended in the lateral funiculus. Targets of dA1 axons were followed at later stages using PiggyBac-mediated DNA transposition. dA1 axons were found to project and form synapses in the auditory nuclei and cerebellum. Investigation of mechanisms that regulate the patterns of dA1 axons revealed a fundamental role of Lim-homeodomain (HD) proteins. Switch in the expression of the specific dA1 Lim-HD proteins Lhx2/9 into Lhx1, which is typically expressed in dB1 interneurons, modified dA1 axonal patterns to project along the routes of dB1 subgroup. Together, the results of this research provided new tools and knowledge to the assembly of trajectories and connectivity of hindbrain dA1 interneurons and of molecular mechanisms that control these patterns.

  17. Resistance of a crayfish sensory interneurone to hyperinnervation by acceptable afferents.

    PubMed Central

    Krasne, F B; Lee, S H

    1982-01-01

    1. Intact normal innervation of muscle fibres and other peripheral targets usually prevents regenerating nerves from forming synapses with the targets. Whether intact innervation similarly prevents synapse formation on central target neurones has rarely been tested. This question was examined here for interneurone A of the crayfish last abdominal ganglion. 2. Interneurone A normally receives synaptic input from mechanoreceptor neurones distributed over the side of the tailfan ipsilateral to interneurone A's axon and unilateral dendrites. When the five nerve roots carrying mechanoreceptor axons of one side are cut and central and peripheral ends of one or more are sutured together, regeneration and reinnervation of interneurone A occurs over some two to six weeks. If peripheral ends of roots from the 'wrong' (contralateral) side of the body are sutured to ipsilateral central stumps, they also form connexions with interneurone A. When roots from the two sides of the body are simultaneously tied to a central stump, functional connexion formation occurs equally well for afferents from both sides. Therefore, roots of the two sides seem to be equivalent in their ability to reinnervate interneurone A. 3. If peripheral ends of roots from one side of the tailfan are tied to roots on the intact opposite side of the body, the cut axons appear to grow into the last ganglion but usually do not form functional synapses there. The intact innervation therefore seems to exclude further innervation by other acceptable afferents. 4. It is known that mechanoreceptors are added to the tailfan at moult. Exclusion of extra innervation often broke down partially in animals that moulted during the present experiments. This suggests the possibility that synapse formation or exchange may be controlled by moult-inducing hormones. PMID:7153906

  18. Spike-dependent calcium influx in dendrites of the cricket giant interneuron.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, H; Baba, Y; Oka, K

    2000-07-01

    Identified wind-sensitive giant interneurons in the cricket's cercal sensory system integrate cercal afferent signals and release an avoidance behavior. A calcium-imaging technique was applied to the giant interneurons to examine the presence of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) in their dendrites. We found that presynaptic stimuli to the cercal sensory nerve cords elevated the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in the dendrites of the giant interneurons. The dendritic Ca(2+) rise coincided with the spike burst of the giant interneurons, and the rate of Ca(2+) rise depended on the frequency of the action potentials. These results suggest that the action potentials directly caused [Ca(2+)](i) increase. Observation of the [Ca(2+)](i) elevation induced by depolarizing current injection demonstrates the presence of the VDCCs in the dendrites. Although hyperpolarizing current injection into the giant interneuron suppressed action potential generation, EPSPs could induce no [Ca(2+)](i) increase. This result means that ligand-gated channels do not contribute to the synaptically stimulated Ca(2+) elevation. On the other hand, antidromically stimulated spikes also increased [Ca(2+)](i) in all cellular regions including the dendrites. And bath application of a mixture of Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Cd(2+) or tetrodotoxin inhibited the [Ca(2+)](i) elevation induced by the antidromic stimulation. From these findings, we suppose that the axonal spikes antidromically propagate and induce the Ca(2+) influx via VDCCs in the dendrites. The spike-dependent Ca(2+) elevation may regulate the sensory signals processing via second-messenger cascades in the giant interneurons.

  19. Ephrin-A5 acts as a repulsive cue for migrating cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Geraldine; Garcez, Patricia; Rudolph, Judith; Niehage, Ronny; Weth, Franco; Lent, Roberto; Bolz, Jürgen

    2008-07-01

    Cortical interneurons are born in the germinative zones of the ganglionic eminences in the subpallium, and migrate tangentially in spatially and temporally well-defined corridors into the neocortex. Because ephrin-A5 is expressed in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the ganglionic eminences at these developmental stages, we examined the possible effects of this molecule on interneuron migration. Double-immunocytochemistry of dissociated neurons from the medial ganglionic eminences (MGE) revealed that calbindin-positive cells express the EphA4-receptor. In situ, EphA4 is strongly expressed in the subventricular zone of the ganglionic eminences. Using different in vitro assays, we found that ephrin-A5 acts as a repellent cue for MGE neurons. We then examined interneuron migration in slice overlay experiments, where MGE-derived explants from enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic mice were homotopically grafted into host slices from wild-type littermate embryos. In these in vitro preparations, interneurons recapitulated in vivo cell migration in several respects. However, interneurons in brain slices also migrated in the VZ of the ganglionic eminences, a region that is strictly avoided in vivo. In situ hybridizations revealed that ephrin-A5 became downregulated in the VZ in vitro. When recombinant ephrin-A5-Fc was added to the slices, it preferentially bound to the VZ, and migrating MGE neurons avoided the VZ as in vivo. The restoration of the normal migration pathway in slices required ephrin-A5 clustering and signalling of Src family kinases. Together, these experiments suggest that ephrin-A5 acts as an inhibitory flank that contributes to define the pathway of migrating interneurons. PMID:18662335

  20. Maternal immune activation by LPS selectively alters specific gene expression profiles of interneuron migration and oxidative stress in the fetus without triggering a fetal immune response

    PubMed Central

    Oskvig, Devon B.; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Johnson, Kory R.; Phillips, Terry M.; Herkenham, Miles

    2012-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and autism. Infections during pregnancy activate the mother’s immune system and alter the fetal environment, with consequential effects on CNS function and behavior in the offspring, but the cellular and molecular links between infection-induced altered fetal development and risk for neuropsychiatric disorders are unknown. We investigated the immunological, molecular, and behavioral effects of MIA in the offspring of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats given an intraperitoneal (0.25 mg/kg) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on gestational day 15. LPS significantly elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in maternal serum, amniotic fluid, and fetal brain at 4 h, and levels decreased but remained elevated at 24 h. Offspring born to LPS-treated dams exhibited reduced social preference and exploration behaviors as juveniles and young adults. Whole genome microarray analysis of the fetal brain at 4 h post maternal LPS was performed to elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms by which MIA affects the fetal brain. We observed dysregulation of 3,285 genes in restricted functional categories, with increased mRNA expression of cellular stress and cell death genes and reduced expression of developmentally-regulated and brain-specific genes, specifically those that regulate neuronal migration of GABAergic interneurons, including the Distal-less (Dlx) family of transcription factors required for tangential migration from progenitor pools within the ganglionic eminences into the cerebral cortex. Our results provide a novel mechanism by which MIA induces the widespread down-regulation of critical neurodevelopmental genes, including those previously associated with autism. PMID:22310921

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating the Dendritic Development of Newborn Olfactory Bulb Interneurons in a Sensory Experience-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Sei-ichi; Takahashi, Hiroo; Tsuboi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb are generated continuously throughout life in the subventricular zone and differentiate into periglomerular and granule cells. Neural circuits that undergo reorganization by newborn olfactory bulb interneurons are necessary for odor detection, odor discrimination, olfactory memory, and innate olfactory responses. Although sensory experience has been shown to regulate development in a variety of species and in various structures, including the retina, cortex, and hippocampus, little is known about how sensory experience regulates the dendritic development of newborn olfactory bulb interneurons. Recent studies revealed that the 5T4 oncofetal trophoblast glycoprotein and the neuronal Per/Arnt/Sim domain protein 4 (Npas4) transcription factor regulate dendritic branching and dendritic spine formation, respectively, in olfactory bulb interneurons. Here, we summarize the molecular mechanisms that underlie the sensory input-dependent development of newborn interneurons and the formation of functional neural circuitry in the olfactory bulb. PMID:26793053

  2. Interactions between pathways controlling posture and gait at the level of spinal interneurones in the cat.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, E; Edgley, S

    1993-01-01

    The properties of three interneuronal populations controlling posture and locomotion are briefly reviewed. These are interneurones mediating reciprocal inhibition of antagonistic muscles and interneurones in pathways from secondary muscle spindle afferents to ipsilateral and contralateral motoneurones, respectively. It will be shown that these interneurones subserve a variety of movements, with functionally specialized subpopulations being selected under different conditions. Mechanisms for gating the activity of these neurones appear to be specific for each of them but to act in concert. Interneurones which are active during locomotion and postural reactions are distributed over many segments of the spinal cord and over several of Rexed's laminae, both in the intermediate zone and in the ventral horn (Berkinblit et al., 1978; Bayev et al., 1979; Schor et al., 1986; Yates et al., 1989). The location of neurones discharging during neck and labyrinthine reflexes is illustrated in Fig. 1A and B but indications that neurones with an even wider distribution contribute to locomotion, scratching and the related postural reactions have been provided by neuronal markers which preferentially label active neurones (WGA-HRP; see Noga et al., 1987) or neurones with active genetic transcription (c-fos; I. Barajon, personal communication; Dai et al., 1991). Such a wide distribution indicates a high degree of non-homogeneity, since neurones of different functional types are usually located in different laminae. It has been demonstrated that some of these neurones may be particularly important for setting up the rhythm of muscle contractions specific for different gaits or scratching, as part of their "pattern generators" (see, e.g., Grillner, 1981). Other neurones may be primarily involved in initiation of these movements or in postural adjustments combined with them. A considerable proportion of neurones mediating these movements are nevertheless likely to be used not in one

  3. Target Selection of Proprioceptive and Motor Axon Synapses on Neonatal V1-Derived Ia Inhibitory Interneurons and Renshaw Cells

    PubMed Central

    Siembab, Valerie C.; Smith, Courtney A.; Zagoraiou, Laskaro; Berrocal, Maria C.; Mentis, George Z.; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of premotor interneurons in the mammalian spinal cord is generated from a few phylogenetically conserved embryonic classes of interneurons (V0, V1, V2, V3). Their mechanisms of diversification remain unresolved, although these are clearly important to understand motor circuit assembly in the spinal cord. Some Ia inhibitory interneurons (IaINs) and all Renshaw cells (RCs) derive from embryonic V1 interneurons; however, in adult they display distinct functional properties and synaptic inputs, for example proprioceptive inputs preferentially target IaINs, while motor axons target RCs. Previously, we found that both inputs converge on RCs in neonates, raising the possibility that proprioceptive (VGLUT1-positive) and motor axon synapses (VAChT-positive) initially target several different V1 interneurons populations and then become selected or deselected postnatally. Alternatively, specific inputs might precisely connect only with predefined groups of V1 interneurons. To test these hypotheses we analyzed synaptic development on V1-derived IaINs and compared them to RCs of the same age and spinal cord levels. V1-interneurons were labeled using genetically encoded lineage markers in mice. The results show that although neonatal V1-derived IaINs and RCs are competent to receive proprioceptive synapses, these synapses preferentially target the proximal somato-dendritic regions of IaINs and postnatally proliferate on IaINs, but not on RCs. In contrast, cholinergic synapses on RCs are specifically derived from motor axons, while on IaINs they originate from Pitx2 V0c interneurons. Thus, motor, proprioceptive, and even some interneuron inputs are biased toward specific subtypes of V1-interneurons. Postnatal strengthening of these inputs is later superimposed on this initial preferential targeting. PMID:20963823

  4. Synapse-Associated Protein 97 Regulates the Membrane Properties of Fast-Spiking Parvalbumin Interneurons in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Gulcan

    2013-01-01

    Fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in layers 2/3 of the visual cortex regulate gain control and tuning of visual processing. Synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97) belongs to a family of proteins that have been implicated in regulating glutamatergic synaptic transmission at pyramidal-to-pyramidal connections in the nervous system. For PV interneurons in mouse visual cortex, the expression of SAP97 is developmentally regulated, being expressed in almost all juvenile but only a fraction, ∼40%, of adult PV interneurons. Using whole-cell patch-clamping, single-cell RT-PCR to assay endogenous expression of SAP97 and exogenous expression of SAP97, we investigated the functional significance of SAP97 in PV interneurons in layers 2/3 of the visual cortex. PV interneurons expressing SAP97, either endogenously or via exogenous expression, showed distinct membrane properties from those not expressing SAP97. This included an overall decrease in membrane excitability, as indexed by a decrease in membrane resistance and an increase in the stimulus threshold for the first action potential firing. Additionally, SAP97-expressing PV interneurons fired action potentials more frequently and, at moderate stimulus intensities, showed irregular or stuttering firing patterns. Furthermore, SAP97-expressing PV interneurons showed increased glutamatergic input and more extensive dendritic branching when compared with non-expressing PV interneurons. These differences in membrane and synaptic properties would significantly alter how PV interneurons expressing SAP97 compared with those not expressing SAP97 would function in local networks. Thus, our results indicate that the scaffolding protein SAP97 is a critical molecular factor regulating the input–output relationships of cortical PV interneurons. PMID:23904610

  5. GABAergic regulation of the HPA and HPG axes and the impact of stress on reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Camille Melón, Laverne; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes are regulated by GABAergic signaling at the level of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, respectively. Under basal conditions, activity of CRH and GnRH neurons are controlled in part by both phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition, mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs), respectively. For CRH neurons, this tonic GABAergic inhibition is mediated by extrasynaptic, δ subunit-containing GABAARs. Similarly, a THIP-sensitive tonic GABAergic current has been shown to regulate GnRH neurons, suggesting a role for δ subunit-containing GABAARs; however, this remains to be explicitly demonstrated. GABAARs incorporating the δ subunit confer neurosteroid sensitivity, suggesting a potential role for neurosteroid modulation in the regulation of the HPA and HPG axes. Thus, stress-derived neurosteroids may contribute to the impact of stress on reproductive function. Interestingly, excitatory actions of GABA have been demonstrated in both CRH neurons at the apex of control of the HPA axis and in GnRH neurons which mediate the HPG axis, adding to the complexity for the role of GABAergic signaling in the regulation of these systems. Here we review the effects that stress has on GnRH neurons and HPG axis function alongside evidence supporting GABAARs as a major interface between the stress and reproductive axes.

  6. GABAergic regulation of the HPA and HPG axes and the impact of stress on reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Camille Melón, Laverne; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes are regulated by GABAergic signaling at the level of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, respectively. Under basal conditions, activity of CRH and GnRH neurons are controlled in part by both phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition, mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs), respectively. For CRH neurons, this tonic GABAergic inhibition is mediated by extrasynaptic, δ subunit-containing GABAARs. Similarly, a THIP-sensitive tonic GABAergic current has been shown to regulate GnRH neurons, suggesting a role for δ subunit-containing GABAARs; however, this remains to be explicitly demonstrated. GABAARs incorporating the δ subunit confer neurosteroid sensitivity, suggesting a potential role for neurosteroid modulation in the regulation of the HPA and HPG axes. Thus, stress-derived neurosteroids may contribute to the impact of stress on reproductive function. Interestingly, excitatory actions of GABA have been demonstrated in both CRH neurons at the apex of control of the HPA axis and in GnRH neurons which mediate the HPG axis, adding to the complexity for the role of GABAergic signaling in the regulation of these systems. Here we review the effects that stress has on GnRH neurons and HPG axis function alongside evidence supporting GABAARs as a major interface between the stress and reproductive axes. PMID:26690789

  7. Shift from phasic to tonic GABAergic transmission following laser-lesions in the rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Imbrosci, Barbara; Neubacher, Ute; White, Robin; Eysel, Ulf T; Mittmann, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Reduction in the strength of GABAergic neurotransmission has often been reported following brain lesions. This weakened inhibition is believed to influence neurological deficits, neuronal hyperexcitability and functional recovery after brain injuries. Uncovering the mechanisms underlying the altered inhibition is therefore crucial. In the present study we used an ex vivo-in vitro model of laser lesions in the rat visual cortex to characterize the cellular correlates of changes in GABAergic transmission in the tissue adjacent to the injury. In the first week post-injury the number of VGAT positive GABAergic terminals as well as the expression level of the GABA synthesizing enzymes GAD67 and GAD65 remained unaltered. However, a reduced frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) together with an increased paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of evoked IPSCs suggested a functional reduction of phasic GABA release. In parallel, we found an enhancement in the GABAA receptor-mediated tonic inhibition. On the basis of these findings, we propose that cortical lesions provoke a shift in GABAergic transmission, decreasing the phasic and reinforcing the tonic component. We therefore suggest that it is not, as traditionally assumed, the overall inhibitory strength to be primarily compromised by a cortical lesion but rather the temporal accuracy of the GABAergic synaptic signaling. PMID:23224682

  8. Pin1-dependent signalling negatively affects GABAergic transmission by modulating neuroligin2/gephyrin interaction

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Roberta; Pizzarelli, Rocco; Pedroni, Andrea; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Del Sal, Giannino; Cherubini, Enrico; Zacchi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The cell adhesion molecule Neuroligin2 (NL2) is localized selectively at GABAergic synapses, where it interacts with the scaffolding protein gephyrin in the post-synaptic density. However, the role of this interaction for formation and plasticity of GABAergic synapses is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous NL2 undergoes proline-directed phosphorylation at its unique S714-P consensus site, leading to the recruitment of the peptidyl-prolyl cis–trans isomerase Pin1. This signalling cascade negatively regulates NL2’s ability to interact with gephyrin at GABAergic post-synaptic sites. As a consequence, enhanced accumulation of NL2, gephyrin and GABAA receptors was detected at GABAergic synapses in the hippocampus of Pin1-knockout mice (Pin1−/−) associated with an increase in amplitude of spontaneous GABAA-mediated post-synaptic currents. Our results suggest that Pin1-dependent signalling represents a mechanism to modulate GABAergic transmission by regulating NL2/gephyrin interaction. PMID:25297980

  9. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2-mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures.

    PubMed

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  10. NMDA-Dependent Switch of proBDNF Actions on Developing GABAergic Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Anais; Diabira, Diabe; Ferrand, Nadine; Porcher, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has emerged as an important messenger for activity-dependent development of neuronal network. Recent findings have suggested that a significant proportion of BDNF can be secreted as a precursor (proBDNF) and cleaved by extracellular proteases to yield the mature form. While the actions of proBDNF on maturation and plasticity of excitatory synapses have been studied, the effect of the precursor on developing GABAergic synapses remains largely unknown. Here, we show that regulated secretion of proBDNF exerts a bidirectional control of GABAergic synaptic activity with NMDA receptors driving the polarity of the plasticity. When NMDA receptors are activated during ongoing synaptic activity, regulated Ca2+-dependent secretion of proBDNF signals via p75NTR to depress GABAergic synaptic activity, while in the absence of NMDA receptors activation, secreted proBDNF induces a p75NTR-dependent potentiation of GABAergic synaptic activity. These results revealed a new function for proBDNF-p75NTR signaling in synaptic plasticity and a novel mechanism by which synaptic activity can modulate the development of GABAergic synaptic connections. PMID:22510533

  11. Compromised GABAergic inhibition contributes to tumor-associated epilepsy.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Georgina; O'Toole, Kate K; Moss, Stephen J; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of primary brain tumor with 30-50% of patients presenting with epilepsy. These tumor-associated seizures are often resistant to traditional antiepileptic drug treatment and persist after tumor resection. This suggests that changes in the peritumoral tissue underpin epileptogenesis. It is known that glioma cells extrude pathological concentrations of glutamate which is thought to play a role in tumor progression and the development of epilepsy. Given that pathological concentrations of glutamate have been shown to dephosphorylate and downregulate the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, we hypothesized that glioma-induced alterations in KCC2 in the peritumoral region may play a role in tumor-associated epilepsy. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observe a decrease in total KCC2 expression and a dephosphorylation of KCC2 at residue Ser940 in a glioma model which exhibits hyperexcitability and the development of spontaneous seizures. To determine whether the reduction of KCC2 could potentially contribute to tumor-associated epilepsy, we generated mice with a focal knockdown of KCC2 by injecting AAV2-Cre-GFP into the cortex of floxed KCC2 mice. The AAV2-Cre-mediated knockdown of KCC2 was sufficient to induce the development of spontaneous seizures. Further, blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide to offset the loss of KCC2 reduced the seizure susceptibility in glioma-implanted mice. These findings support a mechanism of tumor-associated epilepsy involving downregulation of KCC2 in the peritumoral region leading to compromised GABAergic inhibition and suggest that modulating chloride homeostasis may be useful for seizure control. PMID:27513374

  12. GABAergic mechanisms of the lateral parabrachial nucleus on sodium appetite.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lisandra B; Callera, João C; De Luca, Laurival A; Colombari, Débora S A; Menani, José V

    2007-07-12

    GABAergic activation in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) induces sodium and water intake in satiated and normovolemic rats. In the present study we investigated the effects of GABAA receptor activation in the LPBN on 0.3M NaCl, water, 2% sucrose and food intake in rats submitted to sodium depletion (treatment with the diuretic furosemide subcutaneously+sodium deficient food for 24h), 24h food deprivation or 24 h water deprivation. Male Holtzman rats with bilateral stainless steel cannulas implanted into the LPBN were used. In sodium depleted rats, muscimol (GABAA receptor agonist, 0.5 nmol/0.2 microl), bilaterally injected into the LPBN, produced an inconsistent increase of water intake and two opposite effects on 0.3M NaCl intake: an early inhibition (4.3+/-2.7 versus saline: 14.4+/-1.0 ml/15 min) and a late facilitation (37.6+/-2.7 versus saline: 21.1+/-0.9 ml/180 min). The pretreatment of the LPBN with bicuculline (GABAA receptor antagonist, 1.6 nmol) abolished these effects of muscimol. Muscimol into the LPBN also reduced food deprivation-induced food intake in the first 30 min of test (1.7+/-0.6g versus saline: 4.1+/-0.6g), without changing water deprivation-induced water intake or 2% sucrose intake in sodium depleted rats. Therefore, although GABAA receptors in the LPBN are not tonically involved in the control of sodium depletion-induced sodium intake, GABAA receptor activation in the LPBN produces an early inhibition and a late facilitation of sodium depletion-induced sodium intake. GABAA activation in the LPBN also inhibits food intake, while it consistently increases only sodium intake and not water, food or sucrose intake.

  13. Effects of the Concomitant Activation of ON and OFF Retinal Ganglion Cells on the Visual Thalamus: Evidence for an Enhanced Recruitment of GABAergic Cells.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Giovanni; Belfiore, Marcello; Ripamonti, Maddalena; Arena, Alessandro; Lamanna, Jacopo; Ferro, Mattia; Zimarino, Vincenzo; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Malgaroli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in vision neuroscience is how parallel processing of Retinal Ganglion Cell (RGC) signals is integrated at the level of the visual thalamus. It is well-known that parallel ON-OFF pathways generate output signals from the retina that are conveyed to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). However, it is unclear how these signals distribute onto thalamic cells and how these two pathways interact. Here, by electrophysiological recordings and c-Fos expression analysis, we characterized the effects of pharmacological manipulations of the retinal circuit aimed at inducing either a selective activation of a single pathway, OFF RGCs [intravitreal L-(+)-2-Amino-4-phosphonobutyric, L-AP4] or an unregulated activity of all classes of RGCs (intravitreal 4-Aminopyridine, 4-AP). In in vivo experiments, the analysis of c-Fos expression in the dLGN showed that these two manipulations recruited active cells from the same area, the lateral edge of the dLGN. Despite this similarity, the unregulated co-activation of both ON and OFF pathways by 4-AP yielded a much stronger recruitment of GABAergic interneurons in the dLGN when compared to L-AP4 pure OFF activation. The increased activation of an inhibitory thalamic network by a high level of unregulated discharge of ON and OFF RGCs might suggest that cross-inhibitory pathways between opposing visual channels are presumably replicated at multiple levels in the visual pathway, thus increasing the filtering ability for non-informative or noisy visual signals. PMID:26635537

  14. Effects of the Concomitant Activation of ON and OFF Retinal Ganglion Cells on the Visual Thalamus: Evidence for an Enhanced Recruitment of GABAergic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Montesano, Giovanni; Belfiore, Marcello; Ripamonti, Maddalena; Arena, Alessandro; Lamanna, Jacopo; Ferro, Mattia; Zimarino, Vincenzo; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Malgaroli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in vision neuroscience is how parallel processing of Retinal Ganglion Cell (RGC) signals is integrated at the level of the visual thalamus. It is well-known that parallel ON-OFF pathways generate output signals from the retina that are conveyed to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). However, it is unclear how these signals distribute onto thalamic cells and how these two pathways interact. Here, by electrophysiological recordings and c-Fos expression analysis, we characterized the effects of pharmacological manipulations of the retinal circuit aimed at inducing either a selective activation of a single pathway, OFF RGCs [intravitreal L-(+)-2-Amino-4-phosphonobutyric, L-AP4] or an unregulated activity of all classes of RGCs (intravitreal 4-Aminopyridine, 4-AP). In in vivo experiments, the analysis of c-Fos expression in the dLGN showed that these two manipulations recruited active cells from the same area, the lateral edge of the dLGN. Despite this similarity, the unregulated co-activation of both ON and OFF pathways by 4-AP yielded a much stronger recruitment of GABAergic interneurons in the dLGN when compared to L-AP4 pure OFF activation. The increased activation of an inhibitory thalamic network by a high level of unregulated discharge of ON and OFF RGCs might suggest that cross-inhibitory pathways between opposing visual channels are presumably replicated at multiple levels in the visual pathway, thus increasing the filtering ability for non-informative or noisy visual signals. PMID:26635537

  15. An extrasynaptic GABAergic signal modulates a pattern of forward movement in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu; Wen, Quan; Liu, He; Zhong, Connie; Qin, Yuqi; Harris, Gareth; Kawano, Taizo; Wu, Min; Xu, Tianqi; Samuel, Aravinthan DT; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    As a common neurotransmitter in the nervous system, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) modulates locomotory patterns in both vertebrates and invertebrates. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying the behavioral effects of GABAergic modulation are not completely understood. Here, we demonstrate that a GABAergic signal in C. elegans modulates the amplitude of undulatory head bending through extrasynaptic neurotransmission and conserved metabotropic receptors. We show that the GABAergic RME head motor neurons generate undulatory activity patterns that correlate with head bending and the activity of RME causally links with head bending amplitude. The undulatory activity of RME is regulated by a pair of cholinergic head motor neurons SMD, which facilitate head bending, and inhibits SMD to limit head bending. The extrasynaptic neurotransmission between SMD and RME provides a gain control system to set head bending amplitude to a value correlated with optimal efficiency of forward movement. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14197.001 PMID:27138642

  16. CO2-inhibited neurons in the medullary raphé are GABAergic

    PubMed Central

    Iceman, Kimberly E.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Taylor, Barbara E.; Harris, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported subsets of medullary raphé neurons that are either stimulated or inhibited by CO2/pH in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé CO2-inhibited neurons are GABAergic. Extracellular recordings in unanesthetized juvenile in situ rat preparations showed reversible hypercapnia-induced suppression of 19% (63/323) of medullary raphé neurons, and this suppression persisted after antagonism of NMDA, AMPA/kainate, and GABAA receptors. We stained a subset of CO2-inhibited cells and found that most (11/12) had glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactivity (GAD67-ir). These data indicate that the majority of acidosis-inhibited medullary raphé neurons are GABAergic, and that their chemosensitivity is independent of major fast synaptic inputs. Thus, CO2-sensitive GABAergic neurons may play a role in central CO2/pH chemoreception. PMID:25087734

  17. CO2-inhibited neurons in the medullary raphé are GABAergic.

    PubMed

    Iceman, Kimberly E; Corcoran, Andrea E; Taylor, Barbara E; Harris, Michael B

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have reported subsets of medullary raphé neurons that are either stimulated or inhibited by CO2/pH in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé CO2-inhibited neurons are GABAergic. Extracellular recordings in unanesthetized juvenile in situ rat preparations showed reversible hypercapnia-induced suppression of 19% (63/323) of medullary raphé neurons, and this suppression persisted after antagonism of NMDA, AMPA/kainate, and GABAA receptors. We stained a subset of CO2-inhibited cells and found that most (11/12) had glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactivity (GAD67-ir). These data indicate that the majority of acidosis-inhibited medullary raphé neurons are GABAergic, and that their chemosensitivity is independent of major fast synaptic inputs. Thus, CO2-sensitive GABAergic neurons may play a role in central CO2/pH chemoreception.

  18. The Memory-Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation Involve GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Projection Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Wheeler, Marina G.; Parent, Marise B.

    2007-01-01

    Septal infusions of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)[subscript A] agonist muscimol impair memory, and the effect likely involves the hippocampus. GABA[subscript A] receptors are present on the perikarya of cholinergic and GABAergic septo-hippocampal (SH) projections. The current experiments determined whether GABAergic SH projections are…

  19. Exposure to Sevoflurane Affects the Development of Parvalbumin Interneurons in the Main Olfactory Bulb in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Chen, Jing; Cai, Guohong; Lu, Rui; Sun, Tingting; Luo, Tingting; Wu, Shengxi; Ling, Shucai

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane is widely used in adult and pediatric patients during clinical surgeries. Although studies have shown that exposure to sevoflurane impairs solfactory memory after an operation, the neuropathological changes underlying this effect are not clear. This study detected the effect of sevoflurane exposure on the development of calcium-binding proteins-expressing interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB). We exposed neonatal mice to 2% sevoflurane at two different developmental time points and found that exposing mice to sevoflurane at postnatal day (PD) 7 significantly decreased the expression of GAD67 and parvalbumin (PV) in the olfactory bulb (OB) but did not alter the expression of calretinin (CR) or calbindin D28k (CB). The number and dendritic morphology of PV-expressing interneurons in the MOB were impaired by exposure to sevoflurane at PD7. However, exposure to sevoflurane at PD10 had no effect on calcium-binding protein expression or the number and dendritic morphology of PV-expressing interneurons in the MOB. These results suggest that exposing neonatal mice to sevoflurane during a critical period of olfactory development affects the development of PV-expressing interneurons in the MOB. PMID:27445710

  20. A Comparative Study of Three Interneuron Types in the Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yaxi; Liu, Zongwei; Wang, Weiping; Wei, Jiayou; Li, Keyi; Wu, Jiajia; Chen, Zhi; Li, Youlan; Mu, Shuhua; OuYang, Lisi; Lei, Wanlong

    2016-01-01

    Interneurons are involved in the physiological function and the pathomechanism of the spinal cord. Present study aimed to examine and compare the characteristics of Cr+, Calb+ and Parv+ interneurons in morphology and distribution by using immunhistochemical and Western blot techniques. Results showed that 1) Cr-Calb presented a higher co-existence rate than that of Cr-Parv, and both of them were higher in the ventral horn than in the dosal horn; 2) Cr+, Calb+ and Parv+ neurons distributing zonally in the superficial dosal horn were small-sized. Parv+ neuronswere the largest, and Cr+ and Calb+ neurons were higher density among them. In the deep dorsal horn, Parv+ neurons were mainly located in nucleus thoracicus and the remaining scatteredly distributed. Cr+ neuronal size was the largest, and Calb+ neurons were the least among three interneuron types; 3) Cr+, Calb+ and Parv+ neurons of ventral horns displayed polygonal, round and fusiform, and Cr+ and Parv+ neurons were mainly distributed in the deep layer, but Calb+ neurons mainly in the superficial layer. Cr+ neurons were the largest, and distributed more in ventral horns than in dorsal horns; 4) in the dorsal horn of lumbar cords, Calb protein levels was the highest, but Parv protein level in ventral horns was the highest among the three protein types. Present results suggested that the morphological characteristics of three interneuron types imply their physiological function and pathomechanism relevance. PMID:27658248

  1. Interneuron firing precedes sequential activation of neuronal ensembles in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takuya; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2014-06-01

    Neuronal firing sequences that occur during behavioral tasks are precisely reactivated in the neocortex and the hippocampus during rest and sleep. These precise firing sequences are likely to reflect latent memory traces, and their reactivation is believed to be essential for memory consolidation and working memory maintenance. However, how the organized repeating patterns emerge through the coordinated interplay of distinct types of neurons remains unclear. In this study, we monitored ongoing spatiotemporal firing patterns using a multi-neuron calcium imaging technique and examined how the activity of individual neurons is associated with repeated ensembles in hippocampal slice cultures. To determine the cell types of the imaged neurons, we applied an optical synapse mapping method that identifies network connectivity among dozens of neurons. We observed that inhibitory interneurons exhibited an increase in their firing rates prior to the onset of repeating sequences, while the overall activity level of excitatory neurons remained unchanged. A specific repeating sequence emerged preferentially after the firing of a specific interneuron that was located close to the neuron first activated in the sequence. The times of repeating sequences could be more precisely predicted based on the activity patterns of inhibitory cells than excitatory cells. In line with these observations, stimulation of a single interneuron could trigger the emergence of repeating sequences. These findings provide a conceptual framework that interneurons serve as a key regulator of initiating sequential spike activity.

  2. Functional Organization of Locomotor Interneurons in the Ventral Lumbar Spinal Cord of the Newborn Rat

    PubMed Central

    Antri, Myriam; Mellen, Nicholas; Cazalets, Jean-René

    2011-01-01

    Although the mammalian locomotor CPG has been localized to the lumbar spinal cord, the functional-anatomical organization of flexor and extensor interneurons has not been characterized. Here, we tested the hypothesis that flexor and extensor interneuronal networks for walking are physically segregated in the lumbar spinal cord. For this purpose, we performed optical recordings and lesion experiments from a horizontally sectioned lumbar spinal cord isolated from neonate rats. This ventral hemi spinal cord preparation produces well-organized fictive locomotion when superfused with 5-HT/NMDA. The dorsal surface of the preparation was visualized using the Ca2+ indicator fluo-4 AM, while simultaneously monitoring motor output at ventral roots L2 and L5. Using calcium imaging, we provided a general mapping view of the interneurons that maintained a stable phase relationship with motor output. We showed that the dorsal surface of L1 segment contains a higher density of locomotor rhythmic cells than the other segments. Moreover, L1 segment lesioning induced the most important changes in the locomotor activity in comparison with lesions at the T13 or L2 segments. However, no lesions led to selective disruption of either flexor or extensor output. In addition, this study found no evidence of functional parcellation of locomotor interneurons into flexor and extensor pools at the dorsal-ventral midline of the lumbar spinal cord of the rat. PMID:21698092

  3. Adult Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Phenotypes Identified by Targeting Embryonic and Postnatal Neural Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Figueres-Oñate, Maria; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are generated during embryonic development and in adulthood, although adult neurogenesis is restricted to two main brain regions, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles generates neural stem/progenitor cells that continually provide the olfactory bulb (OB) with new granule or periglomerular neurons, cells that arrive from the SVZ via the rostral migratory stream. The continued neurogenesis and the adequate integration of these newly generated interneurons is essential to maintain homeostasis in the olfactory bulb, where the differentiation of these cells into specific neural cell types is strongly influenced by temporal cues. Therefore, identifying the critical features that control the generation of adult OB interneurons at either pre- or post-natal stages is important to understand the dynamic contribution of neural stem cells. Here, we used in utero and neonatal SVZ electroporation along with a transposase-mediated stable integration plasmid, in order to track interneurons and glial lineages in the OB. These plasmids are valuable tools to study the development of OB interneurons from embryonic and post-natal SVZ progenitors. Accordingly, we examined the location and identity of the adult progeny of embryonic and post-natally transfected progenitors by examining neurochemical markers in the adult OB. These data reveal the different cell types in the olfactory bulb that are generated in function of age and different electroporation conditions. PMID:27242400

  4. A Computational Model of How Cholinergic Interneurons Protect Striatal-Dependent Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, F. Gregory; Crossley, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    An essential component of skill acquisition is learning the environmental conditions in which that skill is relevant. This article proposes and tests a neurobiologically detailed theory of how such learning is mediated. The theory assumes that a key component of this learning is provided by the cholinergic interneurons in the striatum known as…

  5. Spike timing-dependent plasticity at GABAergic synapses in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Kodangattil, Jayaraj N; Dacher, Matthieu; Authement, Michael E; Nugent, Fereshteh S

    2013-10-01

    Persistent changes in excitatory and inhibitory synaptic strengths to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons in response to addictive drugs may underlie the transition from casual to compulsive drug use. While an enormous amount of work has been done in the area of glutamatergic plasticity of the VTA, little is known regarding the learning rules governing GABAergic plasticity in the VTA. Spike timing-dependent plasticity, STDP, has attracted considerable attention primarily due to its potential roles in processing and storage of information in the brain and there is emerging evidence for the existence of STDP at inhibitory synapses. We therefore used whole-cell recordings in rat midbrain slices to investigate whether near-coincident pre- and postsynaptic firing induces a lasting change in synaptic efficacy of VTA GABAergic synapses. We found that a Hebbian form of STDP including long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) can be induced at GABAergic synapses onto VTA DA neurons and relies on the precise temporal order of pre- and postsynaptic spiking. Importantly, GABAergic STDP is heterosynaptic (NMDA receptor dependent): triggered by correlated activities of the presynaptic glutamatergic input and postsynaptic DA cells. GABAergic STDP is postsynaptic and has an associative component since pre- or postsynaptic spiking per se did not induce STDP. STDP of GABAergic synapses in the VTA provides physiologically relevant forms of inhibitory plasticity that may underlie natural reinforcement of reward-related behaviours. Moreover, this form of inhibitory plasticity may mediate some of the reinforcing, aversive and addictive properties of drugs of abuse.

  6. Modulation of the GABAergic pathway for the treatment of fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Reymundo; Hare, Emma B; Hagerman, Randi J

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and the most common single-gene cause of autism. It is caused by mutations on the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR1) and lack of fragile X mental retardation protein, which in turn, leads to decreased inhibition of translation of many synaptic proteins. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) hypothesis states that the neurological deficits in individuals with FXS are due mainly to downstream consequences of overstimulation of the mGluR pathway. The main efforts have focused on mGluR5 targeted treatments; however, investigation on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system and its potential as a targeted treatment is less emphasized. The fragile X mouse models (Fmr1-knock out) show decreased GABA subunit receptors, decreased synthesis of GABA, increased catabolism of GABA, and overall decreased GABAergic input in many regions of the brain. Consequences of the reduced GABAergic input in FXS include oversensitivity to sensory stimuli, seizures, and anxiety. Deficits in the GABA receptors in different regions of the brain are associated with behavioral and attentional processing deficits linked to anxiety and autistic behaviors. The understanding of the neurobiology of FXS has led to the development of targeted treatments for the core behavioral features of FXS, which include social deficits, inattention, and anxiety. These symptoms are also observed in individuals with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, therefore the targeted treatments for FXS are leading the way in the treatment of other neurodevelopmental syndromes and autism. The GABAergic system in FXS represents a target for new treatments. Herein, we discuss the animal and human trials of GABAergic treatment in FXS. Arbaclofen and ganaxolone have been used in individuals with FXS. Other potential GABAergic treatments, such as riluzole, gaboxadol, tiagabine, and vigabatrin, will be also discussed. Further

  7. GABAergic Somatostatin-immunoreactive Neurons in the Amygdala Project to the Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Alexander J.; Zaric, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex and other hippocampal and parahippocampal cortices are interconnected by a small number of GABAergic nonpyramidal neurons in addition to glutamatergic pyramidal cells. Since the cortical and basolateral amygdalar nuclei have cortex-like cell types and have robust projections to the entorhinal cortex, we hypothesized that a small number of amygdalar GABAergic nonpyramidal neurons might participate in amygdalo-entorhinal projections. To test this hypothesis we combined Fluorogold (FG) retrograde tract tracing with immunohistochemistry for the amygdalar nonpyramidal cell markers glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and the m2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2R). Injections of FG into the rat entorhinal cortex labeled numerous neurons that were mainly located in the cortical and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala. Although most of these amygdalar FG+ neurons labeled by entorhinal injections were large pyramidal cells, 1–5% were smaller long-range nonpyramidal neurons (LRNP neurons) that expressed SOM, or both SOM and NPY. No amygdalar FG+ neurons in these cases were PV+ or VIP+. Cell counts revealed that LRNP neurons labeled by injections into the entorhinal cortex constituted about 10–20% of the total SOM+ population, and 20–40% of the total NPY population in portions of the lateral amygdalar nucleus that exhibited a high density of FG+ neurons. Sixty-two percent of amygdalar FG+/SOM+ neurons were GAD+, and 51% were M2R+. Since GABAergic projection neurons typically have low perikaryal levels of GABAergic markers, it is actually possible that most or all of the amygdalar LRNP neurons are GABAergic. Like GABAergic LRNP neurons in hippocampal/parahippocampal regions, amygdalar LRNP neurons that project to the entorhinal cortex are most likely involved in synchronizing oscillatory activity between the two regions. These oscillations could entrain

  8. Differential expression of Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunits in mouse hippocampal interneurones and pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kathryn S; Bommert, Kurt; Szabo, Gabor; Miles, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The sodium pump (Na+/K+-ATPase), maintains intracellular and extracellular concentrations of sodium and potassium by catalysing ATP. Three sodium pump α subunits, ATP1A1, ATP1A2 and ATP1A3, are expressed in brain. We compared their role in pyramidal cells and a subset of interneurones in the subiculum. Interneurones were identified by their expression of GFP under the GAD-65 promoter. We used the sensitivity to the cardiac glycoside, ouabain, to discriminate between different α subunit isoforms. GFP-positive interneurones were depolarized by nanomolar doses of ouabain, but higher concentrations were needed to depolarize pyramidal cells. Comparison of pump currents in these cells revealed a current sensitive to low doses of ouabain in interneurones, while micromolar doses of ouabain were needed to suppress the pump current in subicular pyramidal cells. As predicted, nanomolar doses of ouabain increased the frequency but not the amplitudes of IPSPs in pyramidal cells. Immunostaining confirmed a differential distribution of α-subunits of the Na+/K+-ATPase in subicular interneurones and pyramidal cells. In conclusion, these data suggest that while ATP1A3-isoforms regulate sodium and potassium homeostasis in subicular interneurones, ATP1A1-isoforms assume this function in pyramidal cells. This differential expression of sodium pump isoforms may contribute to differences in resting membrane potential of subicular interneurones and pyramidal cells. PMID:17947306

  9. Oscillation-Driven Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity Allows Multiple Overlapping Pattern Recognition in Inhibitory Interneuron Networks.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Jesús A; Luque, Niceto R; Tolu, Silvia; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2016-08-01

    The majority of operations carried out by the brain require learning complex signal patterns for future recognition, retrieval and reuse. Although learning is thought to depend on multiple forms of long-term synaptic plasticity, the way this latter contributes to pattern recognition is still poorly understood. Here, we have used a simple model of afferent excitatory neurons and interneurons with lateral inhibition, reproducing a network topology found in many brain areas from the cerebellum to cortical columns. When endowed with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at the excitatory input synapses and at the inhibitory interneuron-interneuron synapses, the interneurons rapidly learned complex input patterns. Interestingly, induction of plasticity required that the network be entrained into theta-frequency band oscillations, setting the internal phase-reference required to drive STDP. Inhibitory plasticity effectively distributed multiple patterns among available interneurons, thus allowing the simultaneous detection of multiple overlapping patterns. The addition of plasticity in intrinsic excitability made the system more robust allowing self-adjustment and rescaling in response to a broad range of input patterns. The combination of plasticity in lateral inhibitory connections and homeostatic mechanisms in the inhibitory interneurons optimized mutual information (MI) transfer. The storage of multiple complex patterns in plastic interneuron networks could be critical for the generation of sparse representations of information in excitatory neuron populations falling under their control. PMID:27079422

  10. Transformation of signals by interneurones in the barnacle's visual pathway

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Donata; Stuart, Ann E.

    1981-01-01

    1. The photoreceptors of the median eye of the giant barnacle drive decrementally-conducting neurones in the supraoesophageal ganglion termed `inverting cells' (I-cells) which in turn drive impulse-producing neurones termed `amplifying cells' (A-cells). Using intracellular recording techniques we have studied the role of I-cells in visual processing. 2. Horseradish peroxidase injections show that I-cells are interneurones whose processes are confined to the regions of the photoreceptor terminals on both sides of the bilaterally symmetrical ganglion. 3. In the dark, I-cell membrane potentials (-45 mV) are considerably less negative than those of other ganglion cells (-60 to -70 mV). At the onset of a maintained light, I-cells undergo a transient peak hyperpolarization which declines to a steady-state response. Both response components are graded with light intensity. 4. The reversal potential of the peak of the I-cell light response depends on the external K+ concentration more strongly than does the dark resting potential (3-30 mm-K+). This evidence indicates that the hyperpolarization results from an increase in the cell's permeability to K+ ions. 5. At the offset of light an I-cell undergoes a transient depolarization that overshoots the dark membrane potential. Dimming of a background light can also cause the I-cell membrane potential to overshoot its dark resting value. This overshoot is associated with a large depolarizing synaptic potential in A-cells. 6. An overshoot of the dark resting potential can also be elicited by the break of a hyperpolarizing pulse of current injected into an I-cell. The amplitude of this overshoot increases with pulse duration over a time course of seconds. 7. In the presence of external tetraethylammonium ion (TEA) and tetrodotoxin, (TTX), the break of a hyperpolarizing pulse or the onset of a depolarizing pulse can evoke in an I-cell an action potential whose rate of rise and amplitude depend on the external Ca concentration. This

  11. Differential involvement of oriens/pyramidale interneurones in hippocampal network oscillations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gloveli, Tengis; Dugladze, Tamar; Saha, Sikha; Monyer, Hannah; Heinemann, Uwe; Traub, Roger D; Whittington, Miles A; Buhl, Eberhard H

    2005-01-01

    Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in conjunction with post hoc anatomy we investigated the physiological properties of hippocampal stratum oriens and stratum pyramidale inhibitory interneurones, before and following the induction of pharmacologically evoked gamma frequency network oscillations. Prior to kainate-induced transient epochs of gamma activity, two distinct classes of oriens interneurones, oriens lacunosum-moleculare (O-LM) and trilaminar cells, showed prominent differences in their membrane and firing properties, as well as in the amplitude and kinetics of their excitatory postsynaptic events. In the active network both types of neurone received a phasic barrage of gamma frequency excitatory inputs but, due to their differential functional integration, showed clear differences in their output patterns. While O-LM cells fired intermittently at theta frequency, trilaminar interneurones discharged on every gamma cycle and showed a propensity to fire spike doublets. Two other classes of fast spiking interneurones, perisomatic targeting basket and bistratified cells, in the active network discharged predominantly single action potentials on every gamma cycle. Thus, within a locally excited network, O-LM cells are likely to provide a theta-frequency patterned output to distal dendritic segments, whereas basket and bistratified cells are involved in the generation of locally synchronous gamma band oscillations. The anatomy and output profile of trilaminar cells suggest they are involved in the projection of locally generated gamma rhythms to distal sites. Therefore a division of labour appears to exist whereby different frequencies and spatiotemporal properties of hippocampal rhythms are mediated by different interneurone subtypes. PMID:15486016

  12. Multiple types of control by identified interneurons in a sensory-activated rhythmic motor pattern.

    PubMed

    Kemenes, G; Staras, K; Benjamin, P R

    2001-04-15

    Modulatory interneurons that can drive central pattern generators (CPGs) are considered as good candidates for decision-making roles in rhythmic behaviors. Although the mechanisms by which such neurons activate their target CPGs are known in detail in many systems, their role in the sensory activation of CPG-driven behaviors is poorly understood. In the feeding system of the mollusc Lymnaea, one of the best-studied rhythmical networks, intracellular stimulation of either of two types of neuron, the cerebral ventral 1a (CV1a) and the slow oscillator (SO) cells, leads to robust CPG-driven fictive feeding patterns, suggesting that they might make an important contribution to natural food-activated behavior. In this paper we investigated this contribution using a lip-CNS preparation in which feeding was elicited with a natural chemostimulant rather than intracellular stimulation. We found that despite their CPG-driving capabilities, neither CV1a nor SO were involved in the initial activation of sucrose-evoked fictive feeding, whereas a CPG interneuron, N1M, was active first in almost all preparations. Instead, the two interneurons play important and distinct roles in determining the characteristics of the rhythmic motor output; CV1a by modulating motoneuron burst duration and SO by setting the frequency of the ongoing rhythm. This is an example of a distributed system in which (1) interneurons that drive similar motor patterns when activated artificially contribute differently to the shaping of the motor output when it is evoked by the relevant sensory input, and (2) a CPG rather than a modulatory interneuron type plays the most critical role in initiation of sensory-evoked rhythmic activity.

  13. Firing and Cellular Properties of V2a Interneurons in the Rodent Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Kimberly J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a group of ventrally located neurons, designated V2a interneurons, play a key role in maintaining locomotor rhythmicity and in ensuring appropriate left–right alternation during locomotion (Crone et al., 2008, 2009). These V2a interneurons express the transcription factor Chx10. The aim of the present study was to characterize the locomotor-related activity of individual V2a interneurons, their cellular properties, and their detailed anatomical attributes in Chx10-GFP mice. A dorsal horn-removed preparation was developed to allow for visual whole-cell patch recordings from V2a interneurons along the entire lumbar spinal cord while at the same time leaving enough of the spinal cord intact to generate fictive locomotion. During drug-evoked locomotor-like activity, a large proportion of Chx10 cells showed rhythmic firing or membrane potential fluctuations related to either flexor or extensor activity in every lumbar segment. Chx10 cells received predominantly rhythmic excitatory input. Chx10 neurons displayed a wide variety of firing and potential rhythmogenic properties. However, none of these properties was obviously related to the observed rhythmicity during locomotor-like activity. In dual recordings, we found no evidence of Chx10 neuron interconnectivity. Intracellular fills revealed diverse projection patterns with most Chx10 interneurons being local with projections to the central pattern generator and motor neuron regions of the spinal cord and others with long ascending and/or descending branches. These data are compatible with V2a neurons having a role in regulating segmental left–right alternation and ipsilateral motor neuron firing with little effect on rhythm generation. PMID:20053884

  14. Distribution of interneurons in the CA2 region of the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Botcher, Nicola A.; Falck, Joanne