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Sample records for gadolinium oxysulfide screen-film

  1. Gadolinium oxysulfide nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents for T2-weighted MR, X-ray tomography and photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osseni, Sèmiyou. A.; Lechevallier, Sévérine; Verelst, Marc; Perriat, Pascal; Dexpert-Ghys, Jeannette; Neumeyer, David; Garcia, Robin; Mayer, Florian; Djanashvili, Kristina; Peters, Joop A.; Magdeleine, Eddy; Gros-Dagnac, Hélène; Celsis, Pierre; Mauricot, Robert

    2013-12-01

    We have synthesized gadolinium oxysulfide nanoparticles (NPs) doped with other lanthanides (Eu3+, Er3+, Yb3+) via a hydroxycarbonate precursor precipitation route followed by a sulfuration process under a H2S-Ar atmosphere at 750 °C in order to propose new multimodal nanoplatforms for Magnetic Resonance (MR), X-ray and photoluminescence imaging. Gd2O2S:Eu3+ NPs strongly absorb near UV (~300-400 nm) and re-emit strong red light (624 nm). They can be easily internalized by cancer cells, and imaged by epifluorescence microscopy under excitation in the NUV (365 nm). They are not cytotoxic for living cells up to 100 μg mL-1. Consequently, they are well adapted for in vitro imaging on cell cultures. Gd2O2S:Eu3+ NPs also show strong transverse relaxivity and strong X-ray absorption allowing their use as contrast agents for T2-weighted MRI and X-ray tomography. Our study shows that Gd2O2S:Eu3+ NPs are considerably better than commercial Ferumoxtran-10 NPs as negative contrast agents for MRI. Upconversion emission of Gd2O2S:Er; Yb (1; 8%) NPs under infrared excitation (λex = 980 nm) shows mainly red emission (~650-680 nm). Consequently, they are more specifically designed for in vivo deep fluorescence imaging, because both excitation and emission are located inside the ``transparency window'' of biological tissues (650-1200 nm). Magnetic relaxivity and X-ray absorption behaviors of Gd2O2S:Er; Yb NPs are almost similar to Gd2O2S:Eu3+ NPs.We have synthesized gadolinium oxysulfide nanoparticles (NPs) doped with other lanthanides (Eu3+, Er3+, Yb3+) via a hydroxycarbonate precursor precipitation route followed by a sulfuration process under a H2S-Ar atmosphere at 750 °C in order to propose new multimodal nanoplatforms for Magnetic Resonance (MR), X-ray and photoluminescence imaging. Gd2O2S:Eu3+ NPs strongly absorb near UV (~300-400 nm) and re-emit strong red light (624 nm). They can be easily internalized by cancer cells, and imaged by epifluorescence microscopy under

  2. Geometric magnetic frustration in RE{sub 2}O{sub 2}S oxysulfides (RE = Sm, Eu and Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, V.; Sarvezuk, P.W.C.; Ivashita, F.F.; Silva, K.L.; Paesano, A.; Isnard, O.

    2014-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Stacked planes in the <001> direction of an oxysulfide structure, showing the triangular nets formed by rare earth cations, which moments present geometric magnetic frustration. - Highlights: • We prepared monophasic RE{sub 2}O{sub 2}S Oxysulfides (RE = Sm, Eu and Gd). • RE{sub 2}O{sub 2}S compounds were characterized regarding structural and magnetic properties. • Mössbauer spectra were obtained for Eu{sub 2}O{sub 2}S and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S at different temperatures. • Oxysulfides present geometric magnetic frustration of the rare-earth sublattice. - Abstract: RE{sub 2}O{sub 2}S oxysulfides (with RE = Sm, Eu and Gd) were prepared and characterized regarding their structural and magnetic properties. The compounds crystallized in the trigonal symmetry (space group P-3m/D{sub 3}{sup 3}d), with the lattice parameter varying linearly with the ionic radius of the RE cation. All these oxysulfides are magnetically frustrated and only the gadolinium sample showed magnetic order down to 3 K. The magnetic frustration is attributed to the spatial distribution of cations over the lattice, where the RE’s magnetic moments occupy the sites forming a triangular plane lattice, perpendicular to the direction. This geometric magnetic frustration was firstly recognized for these oxysulfides.

  3. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Nanosilver Oxysulfidation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Pennell, Kelly G.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Among the many new engineered nanomaterials, nanosilver is one of the highest priority cases for environmental risk assessment. Recent analysis of field samples from water treatment facilities suggests that silver is converted to silver sulfide, whose very low solubility may limit the bioavailability and adverse impact of silver in the environment. The present study demonstrates that silver nanoparticles react with dissolved sulfide species (HS−, S2−) under relevant but controlled laboratory conditions to produce silver sulfide nanostructures similar to those observed in the field. The reaction is tracked by time-resolved sulfide depletion measurements to yield quantitative reaction rates and stoichiometries. The reaction requires dissolved oxygen, and it is sensitive to pH and natural organic matter. Focusedion-beam analysis of surface films reveals an irregular coarse-grained sulfide phase that allows deep (> 1 μm) conversion of silver surfaces without passivation. At high sulfide concentrations, nanosilver oxysulfidation occurs by a direct particle-fluid reaction. At low sulfide concentration, quantitative kinetic analysis suggests a mechanistic switch to an oxidative dissolution/precipitation mechanism, in which the biologically active Ag+ ion is generated as an intermediate. The environmental transformation pathways for nanosilver will vary depending on the media-specific competing rates of oxidative dissolution and direct oxysulfidation. PMID:21770469

  4. Processing and characterization of new oxysulfide glasses in the Ge-Ga-As-S-O system

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, C.; Petit, L. Dussauze, M.; Kamitsos, E.I.; Couzi, M.; Cardinal, T.; Miller, A.C.; Jain, H.; Richardson, K.

    2008-10-15

    New oxysulfide glasses have been prepared in the Ge-Ga-As system employing a two-step melting process which involves the processing of the chalcogenide glass (ChG) and its subsequent melting with amorphous GeO{sub 2} powder. Optical characterization of the synthesized oxysulfide glasses has shown that the cut-off wavelength decreases with increasing oxygen content, and this has been correlated to results of Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopies which show the formation of new oxysulfide structural units. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis to probe the bonding environment of oxygen atoms in the oxysulfide glass network, has revealed the preferred formation of Ga-O and Ge-O bonds in comparison to As-O bonds. This work has demonstrated that melting a ChG glass with GeO{sub 2} leads to the formation of new oxysulfide glassy materials. - Graphical abstract: In this paper, we explain how new oxysulfide glasses are prepared in the Ge-Ga-As system employing a two-step process: (1) the processing of the chalcogenide glass (ChG) and (2) the re-melting of the ChG with GeO{sub 2} powder. Raman, infrared and XPS spectroscopies show the formation of new oxysulfide structural units.

  5. Zinc oxysulfide ternary alloy nanocrystals: A bandgap modulated photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shiv K.; Pandey, Shipra; Pandey, Avinash C.; Mehrotra, G. K.

    2013-06-10

    Herein, we report a green economic route for the synthesis of a series of Zinc Oxysulfide (ZOS) (ZnO{sub 1-x}S{sub x}; 0 {<=} x {>=} 1; x = Sulfur) alloys nanoparticles. The crystallographic features of ZnO, ZOS, and ZnS confirmed by X-Ray Diffraction and validated by Transmission Electron Microscopy reveal the variation of lattice spacing in binary and ternary compositions with homogenous elemental distribution. The photocatalytic analysis of ZOS (0.4) is performed and compared with Degussa P25 to ascertain its photocatalytic activity against methyl orange under irradiation of 365 nm UV-Vis light. A bandgap of 2.7 eV for ZOS (0.4) aptly establishes its prospects for sunlight driven photocatalysis.

  6. Molten iron oxysulfide as a superior sulfur sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1991-01-01

    Slagging combustors with injected lime or limestone are being considered as replacements for conventional coal burners. They have advantages in that they can be staged to reduce NO{sub x} and So{sub x} emissions. Iron oxide, as an alternative to lime or limestone may be effective not only as a desulfurizing agent, but under the right conditions of oxygen potential and after combination with sulfur, the reaction products of coal gases with iron oxide can act as a flux to produce a fluid phase. The thermodynamic conditions for optimum removal of sulfur from the first stage of a coal combustor are being determined by experiment and by use of existing data. Contour plots in which the pounds Of S0{sub 2} per million Btu of calorific power are plotted on isothermal ternary phase diagrams of the iron-oxygen-sulfur system. These contour plots determine the most favorable conditions for coal combustion in the presence of added iron oxide. Lowest S0{sub 2} pressures are close to the phase boundary limit between iron saturation and the oxysulfide liquid phase. Experimental studies in which ceramic containers (99% alumina) were used to contain the liquid were hampered by the tendency for the liquid to flow up and over the walls of containing vessels presumably as a result of surface tension effects. These effects, which make equilibration measurements difficult, may be favorable with respect to producing a high degree of reactivity of the oxysulfide with coal gases and resultant rapid reaction kinetics. As result of this problem, platinum containment vessels containers appear to avoid these surface tension effects. Thermodynamic and kinetic measurements are now being explored by thermogravimetric analysis.

  7. Quantitative study on the chemical solution deposition of zinc oxysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, Michael; Perkins, Craig L.; Steirer, K. Xerxes

    2015-11-21

    Zinc Oxysulfide (ZnOS) has demonstrated potential in the last decade to replace CdS as a buffer layer material since it is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with performance advantages over CdS (Eg = 2.4 eV) in the near UV-range for solar energy conversion. However, questions remain on the growth mechanisms of chemical bath deposited ZnOS. In this study, a detailed model is employed to calculate solubility diagrams that describe simple conditions for complex speciation control using only ammonium hydroxide without additional base. For these conditions, ZnOS is deposited via aqueous solution deposition on a quartz crystal microbalance in a continuous flow cell. Data is used to analyze the growth rate dependence on temperature and also to elucidate the effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) when used as a co-solvent. Activation energies (EA) of ZnOS are calculated for different flow rates and solution compositions. As a result, the measured EA relationships are affected by changes in the primary growth mechanism when DMSO is included.

  8. Quantitative study on the chemical solution deposition of zinc oxysulfide

    DOE PAGES

    Reinisch, Michael; Perkins, Craig L.; Steirer, K. Xerxes

    2015-11-21

    Zinc Oxysulfide (ZnOS) has demonstrated potential in the last decade to replace CdS as a buffer layer material since it is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with performance advantages over CdS (Eg = 2.4 eV) in the near UV-range for solar energy conversion. However, questions remain on the growth mechanisms of chemical bath deposited ZnOS. In this study, a detailed model is employed to calculate solubility diagrams that describe simple conditions for complex speciation control using only ammonium hydroxide without additional base. For these conditions, ZnOS is deposited via aqueous solution deposition on a quartz crystal microbalance in a continuous flow cell.more » Data is used to analyze the growth rate dependence on temperature and also to elucidate the effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) when used as a co-solvent. Activation energies (EA) of ZnOS are calculated for different flow rates and solution compositions. As a result, the measured EA relationships are affected by changes in the primary growth mechanism when DMSO is included.« less

  9. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  10. Gadolinium photoionization process

    DOEpatents

    Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Haynam, Christopher A.; Eggert, Jon H.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for selective photoionization of the odd-numbered atomic mass gadolinium isotopes 155 and 157. The selective photoionization is accomplished by circular or linear parallel polarized laser beam energy effecting a three-step photoionization pathway.

  11. Gadolinium photoionization process

    DOEpatents

    Paisner, J.A.; Comaskey, B.J.; Haynam, C.A.; Eggert, J.H.

    1993-04-13

    A method is provided for selective photoionization of the odd-numbered atomic mass gadolinium isotopes 155 and 157. The selective photoionization is accomplished by circular or linear parallel polarized laser beam energy effecting a three-step photoionization pathway.

  12. Molten iron oxysulfide as a superior sulfur sorbent. Final report, [September 1989--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-03-31

    The studies had as original objective the analysis of conditions for using liquid iron oxysulfide as a desulfuring agent during coal gasification. Ancillary was a comparison of iron oxysulfide with lime as sorbents under conditions where lime reacts with S-bearing gases to form Ca sulfate or sulfide. Primary thrust is to determine the thermodynamic requirements for desulfurization by iron additions (e.g., taconite concentrate) during combustion in gasifiers operating at high equivalence ratios. Thermodynamic analysis of lime-oxygen-sulfur system shows why lime is injected into burners under oxidizing conditions; reducing conditions forms CaS, requiring its removal, otherwise oxidation and release of S would occur. Iron as the oxysulfide liquid has a range of stability and can be used as a desulfurizing agent, if the burner/gasifier operates in a sufficiently reducing regime (high equivalence ratio); this operating range is given and is calculable for a coal composition, temperature, stoichiometry. High moisture or hydrogen contents of the coal yield a poorer degree of desulfurization. Kinetic tests on individual iron oxide particles on substrates or Pt cups with a TGA apparatus fail to predict reaction rates within a burner. Preliminary tests on the Dynamic Containment Burner with acetylene give some promise that this system can produce the proper conditions of coal gasification for use of added iron as a sulfur sorbent.

  13. Chemism and kinetics of the oxidation of zinc-calcium oxysulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, R. I.; Selivanov, E. N.; Mansurova, A. N.

    2013-05-01

    The sequence of phase transformations and the kinetics of the solid-phase (heating to 1273 K) oxidation of zinc-calcium oxysulfide CaZnSO with air are determined by thermodynamic, thermogravimetric, mass spectrometric, and X-ray diffraction analyses. The oxidation process is shown to be accompanied by the formation of the CaSO4 and ZnO phases depending on the heating conditions, as well as by the formation of CaO with SO2 evolution. The two-stage oxidation of CaZnSO is interpreted by the Avrami-Erofeev kinetic equations with activation energies of 190 and 422 kJ/mol.

  14. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF.

  15. Mammographic microcalcifications: detection with xerography, screen-film, and digitized film display.

    PubMed

    Smathers, R L; Bush, E; Drace, J; Stevens, M; Sommer, F G; Brown, B W; Karras, B

    1986-06-01

    Pulverized bone specks and aluminum oxide specks were measured by hand into sizes ranging from 0.2 mm to 1.0 mm and then arranged in clusters. These clusters were superimposed on a human breast tissue phantom, and xeromammograms and screen-film mammograms of the clusters were made. The screen-film mammograms were digitized using a high-resolution laser scanner and then displayed on cathode ray tube (CRT) monitors. Six radiologists independently counted the microcalcifications on the xeromammograms, the screen-film mammograms, and the digitized-film mammograms. The xeromammograms were examined with a magnifying glass; the screen-film images were examined with a magnifying glass and by hot light; and the digitized-film images were examined by electronic magnification and image processing. The bone speck size that corresponded to a mean 50% detectability level for each technique was as follows: xeromammography, 0.550 mm; digitized film, 0.573 mm; and screen-film, 0.661 mm. We postulate that electronic magnification and image processing with edge enhancement can improve the capability of screen-film mammography to enhance the detection of microcalcifications.

  16. Visibility of microcalcifications in computed and screen-film mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, Arnold R.; Launders, Jason H.; Jadav, Mark; Brettle, David S.

    1997-08-01

    Due to the clinically and technically demanding nature of breast x-ray imaging, mammography still remains one of the few essentially film-based radiological imaging techniques in modern medical imaging. There are a range of possible benefits available if a practical and economical direct digital imaging technique can be introduced to routine clinical practice. There has been much debate regarding the minimum specification required for direct digital acquisition. One such direct digital system available is computed radiography (CR), which has a modest specification when compared with modern screen-film mammography (SFM) systems. This paper details two psychophysical studies in which the detection of simulated microcalcifications with CR has been directly compared to that with SFM. The first study found that under scatter-free conditions the minimum detectable size of microcalcification was approximately for both SFM and CR. The second study found that SFM had a 4.6% higher probability of observers being able to correctly identify the shape of diameter test details; there was no significant difference for either larger or smaller test details. From the results of these studies it has been demonstrated that the modest specification of CR, in terms of limiting resolution, does not translate into a dramatic difference in the perception of details at the limit of detectability. When judging the imaging performance of a system it is more important to compare the signal-to-noise ratio transfer spectrum characteristics, rather than simply the modulation transfer function.

  17. A comparison of the performance of modern screen-film and digital mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, P.; Gutierrez, D.; Bulling, S.; Lepori, D.; Valley, J.-F.; Verdun, F. R.

    2005-06-01

    This work compares the detector performance and image quality of the new Kodak Min-R EV mammography screen-film system with the Fuji CR Profect detector and with other current mammography screen-film systems from Agfa, Fuji and Kodak. Basic image quality parameters (MTF, NPS, NEQ and DQE) were evaluated for a 28 kV Mo/Mo (HVL = 0.646 mm Al) beam using different mAs exposure settings. Compared with other screen-film systems, the new Kodak Min-R EV detector has the highest contrast and a low intrinsic noise level, giving better NEQ and DQE results, especially at high optical density. Thus, the properties of the new mammography film approach those of a fine mammography detector, especially at low frequency range. Screen-film systems provide the best resolution. The presampling MTF of the digital detector has a value of 15% at the Nyquist frequency and, due to the spread size of the laser beam, the use of a smaller pixel size would not permit a significant improvement of the detector resolution. The dual collection reading technology increases significantly the low frequency DQE of the Fuji CR system that can at present compete with the most efficient mammography screen-film systems.

  18. A comparison of the performance of modern screen-film and digital mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Gutierrez, D; Bulling, S; Lepori, D; Valley, J-F; Verdun, F R

    2005-06-07

    This work compares the detector performance and image quality of the new Kodak Min-R EV mammography screen-film system with the Fuji CR Profect detector and with other current mammography screen-film systems from Agfa, Fuji and Kodak. Basic image quality parameters (MTF, NPS, NEQ and DQE) were evaluated for a 28 kV Mo/Mo (HVL = 0.646 mm Al) beam using different mAs exposure settings. Compared with other screen-film systems, the new Kodak Min-R EV detector has the highest contrast and a low intrinsic noise level, giving better NEQ and DQE results, especially at high optical density. Thus, the properties of the new mammography film approach those of a fine mammography detector, especially at low frequency range. Screen-film systems provide the best resolution. The presampling MTF of the digital detector has a value of 15% at the Nyquist frequency and, due to the spread size of the laser beam, the use of a smaller pixel size would not permit a significant improvement of the detector resolution. The dual collection reading technology increases significantly the low frequency DQE of the Fuji CR system that can at present compete with the most efficient mammography screen-film systems.

  19. Quality Imaging — Comparison of CR Mammography with Screen-Film Mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, E.; Azorín Nieto, J.; Irán Díaz Góngora, J. A.; Arreola, M.; Casian Castellanos, G.; Perdigón Castañeda, G. M.; Franco Enríquez, J. G.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work is a quality imaging comparison of CR mammography images printed to film by a laser printer with screen-film mammography. A Giotto and Elscintec dedicated mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in screen-film mammography. Four CR mammography units from two different manufacturers and three dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in CR mammography. The tests quality image included an assessment of system resolution, scoring phantom images, Artifacts, mean optical density and density difference (contrast). In this study, screen-film mammography with a quality control program offers a significantly greater level of quality image relative to CR mammography images printed on film.

  20. Proximal surface caries detection with direct-exposure and rare earth screen/film imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeen, R.C.; McDavid, W.D.; Barnwell, G.M.

    1988-12-01

    This laboratory study compared five imaging systems for their diagnostic accuracy in detection of proximal surface dental caries. Ten viewers provided data on radiographic detectability of carious lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of each system was determined with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves by comparing viewer data with the true state of the teeth as determined microscopically. D-speed film marginally outperformed the other four systems, but the three screen/film systems matched the diagnostic accuracy of E-speed film. Radiation reductions between 62% and 92% were achieved with the screen/film systems when compared to the two conventional dental films. The feasibility of designing a screen/film bite-wing cassette was shown, but the poor diagnostic accuracy of the present bite-wing system indicated a need for a new technology in caries detection.

  1. Clinical comparison of CR and screen film for imaging the critically ill neonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Brasch, Robert C.; Gooding, Charles A.; Gould, Robert G.; Cohen, Pierre A.; Rencken, Ingo R.; Huang, H. K.

    1996-05-01

    A clinical comparison of computed radiography (CR) versus screen-film for imaging the critically-ill neonate is performed, utilizing a modified (hybrid) film cassette containing a CR (standard ST-V) imaging plate, a conventional screen and film, allowing simultaneous acquisition of perfectly matched CR and plain film images. For 100 portable neonatal chest and abdominal projection radiographs, plain film was subjectively compared to CR hardcopy. Three pediatric radiologists graded overall image quality on a scale of one (poor) to five (excellent), as well as visualization of various anatomic structures (i.e., lung parenchyma, pulmonary vasculature, tubes/lines) and pathological findings (i.e., pulmonary interstitial emphysema, pleural effusion, pneumothorax). Results analyzed using a combined kappa statistic of the differences between scores from each matched set, combined over the three readers showed no statistically significant difference in overall image quality between screen- film and CR (p equals 0.19). Similarly, no statistically significant difference was seen between screen-film and CR for anatomic structure visualization and for visualization of pathological findings. These results indicate that the image quality of CR is comparable to plain film, and that CR may be a suitable alternative to screen-film imaging for portable neonatal chest and abdominal examinations.

  2. Dose comparison between screen/film and full-field digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Gisella; di Maggio, Cosimo

    2006-11-01

    The study purpose was the comparison between doses delivered by a full-field digital mammography system and a screen/film mammography unit, both using the same type of X-ray tube. Exposure parameters and breast thickness were collected for 300 screen/film (GE Senographe DMR) and 296 digital mammograms (GE Senographe 2000D). The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was calculated from anode/filter combination, kV(p) and mAs values and breast thickness, by simulating spectra through a program based on a catalogue of experimental X-ray spectra. The average glandular dose (AGD) was also computed. Results showed an overall reduction of average glandular dose by 27% of digital over screen/film mammography. The dose saving was about 15% for thin and thick breasts, while it was between 30% and 40% for intermediate thicknesses. Full-field digital mammography dose reduction is allowed by wider dynamic range and higher efficiency of digital detector, which can be exposed at higher energy spectra than screen/film mammography, and by the separation between acquisition and displaying processes.

  3. Diagnostic quality versus patient exposure with five panoramic screen-film combinations

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, J.A.; Schiff, T.G.; McDavid, W.D.; Langland, O.E.

    1986-04-01

    Five film-screen combinations were used to make five density-matched panoramic radiographs of a tissue-equivalent phantom skull using the Midwest/Morita Panoral x-ray machine. The radiographs were evaluated as to their diagnostic quality by twenty dental radiologists. The results demonstrate that proper screen-film selection can significantly reduce patient exposure without compromising diagnostic quality.

  4. Structure and physical properties of the polar oxysulfide CaZnOS.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Timothy; Smura, Catherine F; Clarke, Simon J; Ok, Kang Min; Halasyamani, P Shiv

    2007-04-02

    The synthesis, structure, and electrical properties of the oxysulfide CaZnOS are reported. The white compound has a band gap of 3.7(1) eV and crystallizes in hexagonal space group P6(3)mc (No. 186) with a = 3.75726(3) A, c = 11.4013(1) A, and Z = 2. The noncentrosymmetric structure, which has few analogues, is composed of isotypic puckered hexagonal ZnS and CaO layers arranged so that ZnS3O tetrahedra are all aligned parallel, resulting in a polar structure. The compound shows type 1 non-phase-matchable second harmonic generation, determined using 1064 nm radiation, with an efficiency approximately 100 times that of alpha-SiO2 and a piezoelectric coefficient of 38 pm V-1. Although polar, CaZnOS is not ferroelectric and the pyroelectric coefficient is very small, approximately 0.0 microC m-2 K-1 between room temperature and 100 degrees C.

  5. Silicon Oxysulfide, OSiS: Rotational Spectrum, Quantum-Chemical Calculations, and Equilibrium Structure.

    PubMed

    Thorwirth, Sven; Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen; Tamassia, Filippo; Lattanzi, Valerio; McCarthy, Michael C

    2011-06-02

    Silicon oxysulfide, OSiS, and seven of its minor isotopic species have been characterized for the first time in the gas phase at high spectral resolution by means of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The equilibrium structure of OSiS has been determined from the experimental data using calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants. The structural parameters (rO-Si = 1.5064 Å and rSi-S = 1.9133 Å) are in very good agreement with values from high-level quantum chemical calculations using coupled-cluster techniques together with sophisticated additivity and extrapolation schemes. The bond distances in OSiS are very short in comparison with those in SiO and SiS. This unexpected finding is explained by the partial charges calculated for OSiS via a natural population analysis. The results suggest that electrostatic effects rather than multiple bonding are the key factors in determining bonding in this triatomic molecule. The data presented provide the spectroscopic information needed for radio astronomical searches for OSiS.

  6. Image quality and breast dose of 24 screen-film combinations for mammography.

    PubMed

    Dimakopoulou, A D; Tsalafoutas, I A; Georgiou, E K; Yakoumakis, E N

    2006-02-01

    In this study the effect of different mammographic screen-film combinations on image quality and breast dose, and the correlation between the various image quality parameters, breast dose and the sensitometric parameters of a film were investigated. Three Agfa (MR5-II, HDR, HT), two Kodak (Min-R M, Min-R 2000), one Fuji (AD-M), one Konica (CM-H) and one Ferrania (HM plus) single emulsion mammographic films were combined with three intensifying screens (Agfa HDS, Kodak Min-R 2190 and Fuji AD-MA). The film characteristics were determined by sensitometry, while the image quality and the dose to the breast of the resulting 24 screen-film combinations were assessed using a mammography quality control phantom. For each combination, three images of the phantom were acquired with optical density within three different ranges. Two observers assessed the quality of the 72 phantom images obtained, while the breast dose was calculated from the exposure data required for each image. Large differences among screen-film combinations in terms of image quality and breast dose were identified however, that, could not be correlated with the film's sensitometric characteristics. All films presented the best resolution when combined with the HDS screen at the expense of speed, and the largest speed when combined with the AD-MA screen, without degradation of the overall image quality. However, an ideal screen-film combination presenting the best image quality with the least dose was not identified. It is also worth mentioning that the best performance for a film was not necessarily obtained when this was combined with the screen provided by the same manufacturer. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that comparison of films based on their sensitometric characteristics are of limited value for clinical practice, as their performance is strongly affected by the screens with which they are combined.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of gadolinium disilicide

    SciTech Connect

    Lukashenko, G.M.; Polotskaya, R.I.

    1986-11-01

    The authors determine the Gibbs energy, enthalpy, formation heat, and other thermodynamic properties of gadolinium disilicide by measuring the electromotive force in the 830-960 K temperature range in electrolytes consisting of molten tin and various chlorides. The relationship of these properties to crystal structure is briefly discussed.

  8. Experience with gadolinium at yankee

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciapouti, R.J.; Sironen, M.A.; Kaptiz, D.M.; Potter, R.C.

    1985-11-01

    The Vermont Yankee nuclear power station, a boiling water reactor, has been operating with gadolinium in the fuel bundles since 1973. The gadolinium has ranged from 2.0 to 4.0 wt% in 7 x 7, 8 x 8, and retrofit 8 x 8 bundle designs. When Yankee Atomic Electric Company initiated its program in 1978 to perform reload licensing analysis, these bundles and the core designs had to be modeled accurately. The basic calculational model consists of the cross section generation code, CASMO, and the three-dimensional nodal code, SIMULATE. The gadolinium cross sections for use in CASMO were generated using MICBURN to model each gadolinium pin individually. This combination of codes has been used to calculate 11 cycles of operation at Vermont Yankee. The model has been depleted each cycle using explicit plant conditions at equilibrium xenon. At various state points, the eigenvalues, hot and cold, were calculated and tabulated for each cycle. Comparisons were made between plant-measured and SIMULATE-calculated TIP values and between process computer and SIMULATE thermal margins. The model is also used to predict future cycle operating conditions and thermal margins based on past comparisons.

  9. Comparative evaluation of the sensitometric properties of screen-film systems and conventional dental receptors for intraoral radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Staninec, M.; Chou, L.

    1989-12-01

    This investigation determined the sensitometric properties of 27 rare-earth screen-film combinations and compared them to E- and D-speed films and xeroradiography, the current standards for intraoral radiography. A series of exposures from base plus fog to film saturation were made to determine the Hurter and Driffield curve of each image receptor. The base plus fog, film saturation, speed, gamma, average gradient, and resolution were determined. When dental receptors and screen-film systems are compared on the basis of radiographic quality (contrast and resolution), many screen-film systems have similar resolution (greater than 10 line pairs/mm), significantly greater contrast (greater than 2.0), and a substantial speed advantage (greater than 10). Thus selected screen-film systems may be an alternative to conventional dental receptors for intraoral radiography.

  10. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT.

  11. Technology assessment: observer study directly compares screen/film to CR mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher-Heath, Lynn; Richards, Anne; Ryan-Kron, Susan

    2007-03-01

    A new study supports and expands upon a previous reporting that computed radiography (CR) mammography offers as good, or better, image quality than state-of-the-art screen/film mammography. The suitability of CR mammography is explored through qualitative and quantitative study components: feature comparison and cancer detection rates of each modality. Images were collected from 150 normal and 50 biopsy-confirmed subjects representing a range of breast and pathology types. Comparison views were collected without releasing compression, using automatic exposure control on Kodak MIN-R films, followed by CR. Digital images were displayed as both softcopy (S/C) and hardcopy (H/C) for the feature comparison, and S/C for the cancer detection task. The qualitative assessment used preference scores from five board-certified radiologists obtained while viewing 100 screen/film-CR pairs from the cancer subjects for S/C and H/C CR output. Fifteen general image-quality features were rated, and up to 12 additional features were rated for each pair, based on the pathology present. Results demonstrate that CR is equivalent or preferred to conventional mammography for overall image quality (89% S/C, 95% H/C), image contrast (95% S/C, 98% H/C), sharpness (86% S/C, 93% H/C), and noise (94% S/C, 91% H/C). The quantitative objective was satisfied by asking 10 board-certified radiologists to provide a BI-RADS TM score and probability of malignancy per breast for each modality of the 200 cases. At least 28 days passed between observations of the same case. Average sensitivity and specificity was 0.89 and 0.82 for CR and 0.91 and 0.82 for screen/film, respectively.

  12. GADOLINIUM SOLUBILITY AND VOLATILITY DURING DWPF PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S

    2008-01-30

    Understanding of gadolinium behavior, as it relates to potential neutron poisoning applications at the DWPF, has increased over the past several years as process specific data have been generated. Of primary importance are phenomena related to gadolinium solubility and volatility, which introduce the potential for gadolinium to be separated from fissile materials during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) and Melter operations. Existing data indicate that gadolinium solubilities under moderately low pH conditions can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on the quantities of other constituents that are present. With respect to sludge batching processes, the gadolinium solubility appears to be highly affected by iron. In cases where the mass ratio of Fe:Gd is 300 or more, the gadolinium solubility has been observed to be low, one milligram per liter or less. In contrast, when the ratio of Fe:Gd is 20 or less, the gadolinium solubility has been found to be relatively high, several thousands of milligrams per liter. For gadolinium to serve as an effective neutron poison in CPC operations, the solubility needs to be limited to approximately 100 mg/L. Unfortunately, the Fe:Gd ratio that corresponds to this solubility limit has not been identified. Existing data suggest gadolinium and plutonium are not volatile during melter operations. However, the data are subject to inherent uncertainties preventing definitive conclusions on this matter. In order to determine if gadolinium offers a practical means of poisoning waste in DWPF operations, generation of additional data is recommended. This includes: Gd solubility testing under conditions where the Fe:Gd ratio varies from 50 to 150; and Gd and Pu volatility studies tailored to quantifying high temperature partitioning. Additional tests focusing on crystal aging of Gd/Pu precipitates should be pursued if receipt of gadolinium-poisoned waste into the Tank Farm becomes routine.

  13. Gadolinium Deposition in Humans: When Did We Learn That Gadolinium Was Deposited In Vivo?

    PubMed

    Huckle, James E; Altun, Ersan; Jay, Michael; Semelka, Richard C

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there have been numerous major peer-reviewed publications reporting deposition of gadolinium in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus in subjects with normal renal function. This review takes a retrospective look back through the development of gadolinium-based contrast agents to describe the historical evidence of gadolinium deposition in vivo and shows that deposition in the basal ganglia should come as no surprise. Evidence for gadolinium deposition in both animal models and human patients is described. Stability differences among gadolinium contrast agents have long been recognized in vitro, and deposition of gadolinium in tissues has been described in animal models since at least 1984. The first major study that showed deposition in humans appeared in 1998 regarding patients with renal failure and in 2004 in patients with normal renal function. The historical literature indicates that gadolinium retention in healthy patients is occurring, although the clinical consequences of deposition remain unknown.

  14. Molten iron oxysulfide as a superior sulfur sorbent. Technical progress report, June 1, 1991--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1991-12-31

    Slagging combustors with injected lime or limestone are being considered as replacements for conventional coal burners. They have advantages in that they can be staged to reduce NO{sub x} and So{sub x} emissions. Iron oxide, as an alternative to lime or limestone may be effective not only as a desulfurizing agent, but under the right conditions of oxygen potential and after combination with sulfur, the reaction products of coal gases with iron oxide can act as a flux to produce a fluid phase. The thermodynamic conditions for optimum removal of sulfur from the first stage of a coal combustor are being determined by experiment and by use of existing data. Contour plots in which the pounds Of S0{sub 2} per million Btu of calorific power are plotted on isothermal ternary phase diagrams of the iron-oxygen-sulfur system. These contour plots determine the most favorable conditions for coal combustion in the presence of added iron oxide. Lowest S0{sub 2} pressures are close to the phase boundary limit between iron saturation and the oxysulfide liquid phase. Experimental studies in which ceramic containers (99% alumina) were used to contain the liquid were hampered by the tendency for the liquid to flow up and over the walls of containing vessels presumably as a result of surface tension effects. These effects, which make equilibration measurements difficult, may be favorable with respect to producing a high degree of reactivity of the oxysulfide with coal gases and resultant rapid reaction kinetics. As result of this problem, platinum containment vessels containers appear to avoid these surface tension effects. Thermodynamic and kinetic measurements are now being explored by thermogravimetric analysis.

  15. Gadolinium deposition in nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alan S; Zic, John A; Abraham, Jerrold L

    2007-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the association between the use of gadolinium-containing radiocontrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and the serious dermal and systemic disease nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy/nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NFD/NSF). The pathogenesis of this entity remains unclear; however, our recent observations suggest a likely mechanism for the initial dermal manifestations of this gadolinium toxicity.

  16. Metals Fact Sheet: Gadolinium GD

    SciTech Connect

    1992-10-01

    Gadolinium is a silvery-white, malleable, ductile metallic element used to improve the high-temperature characteristics of iron, chromium, and related metallic alloys. It was named after the French chemist, Gadolin, discoverer of yttrium. This article discusses sources of the element, the world supply and demand, and also a number of applications. With the largest thermal neutron absorption cross section of any element, one of these applications is as a burnable poison in reactors and as neutron absorbers in other nuclear devices.

  17. Investigation of diagnostic and image quality attributes: comparison of screen-film to CR mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher-Heath, Lynn; Richards, Anne; Ryan-Kron, Susan

    2006-03-01

    Digital mammography is advancing into an arena where analog has long been the gold standard. Direct digital systems may not be the favored solution for a particular site while computed radiography (CR) mammography, remains unproven worldwide. This pilot study responds to the growing desire to acquire and display digital mammographic images by exploring the acceptability of CR mammography. Images representing a range of breast tissue types were collected from 49 subjects (17 screening; 32 diagnostic) at four clinical sites. Comparison views were collected on the same breast, under the same compression, using automatic exposure control on state-of-the-art film systems followed by CR. CR images were processed and printed to a mammography printer for hard copy feature comparison. Each image pair in the study was evaluated according to 13 image quality attributes covering noise, contrast, sharpness, and image quality in the overall captured images as well as in each of several particular breast regions (periphery and skin-line, parenchyma and fatty tissue). A rating scale from 1 to 5 was used (strong preference for film=1, strong preference for CR=5). Twelve experienced mammographers at four clinical sites scored a subset of the 49 cases for a total of 64 image pair readings. There were 64 ratings for each of 13 image quality attributes for all cases and, an additional series of scores (four or five attribute ratings) for each abnormality in the category of mass, architectural distortion and microcalcification, for a total of 1069 scores. Based on the pilot study results, it was suggested that CR was equivalent or preferred to conventional screen-film for overall image quality (38% scored 3; 46% scored >3), image contrast (27% scored 3; 59% scored >3) and sharpness (28% scored 3; 50% scored >3). No preference was found when assessing noise. This pilot study also suggested that diagnostic quality was maintained in assessing abnormalities for attributes necessary to

  18. Status of gadolinium enrichment technology at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Haynam, C.; Comaskey, B.; Conway, J.; Eggert, J.; Glaser, J.; Ng, E.; Paisner, J.; Solarz, R.; Worden, E.

    1993-01-01

    A method based on,polarization selectivity and three step laser photoionization is presented for separation of the odd isotopes of gadolinium. Measurements of the spectroscopic parameters needed to quantify the excitation pathway are discussed. Model results are presented for the efficiency of photoionization. The vapor properties of electron beam vaporized gadolinium are presented which show dramatic cooling during the expansion of the hot dense vapor into a vacuum. This results in a significant increase in the efficiency of conversion of natural feed into enriched product in the AVLIS process. Production of enriched gadolinium for use in commercial power reactors appears to be economically viable using technology in use at LLNL.

  19. Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure: The Greatest Survival Story of All Time. Teacher's Guide To Accompany the Giant-Screen Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Reen

    This teacher's guide was developed to accompany the giant-screen film, "Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure". The activities featured use a multidisciplinary approach and target students ages 7 through 14. Teacher pages include background information and student pages include instructions and additional information for understanding the…

  20. Brain gadolinium deposition after administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Tomonori; Oba, Hiroshi; Toyoda, Keiko; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Furui, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) consist of gadolinium ions and a chelating agent that binds the gadolinium ion tightly so that its toxicity is not manifested. However, in 2013, an association between brain MRI abnormalities and a history of GBCA administration was first reported. Even in patients with normal renal function, increased signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted images showed a positive correlation with previous exposure to linear chelate type GBCAs, but not to macrocyclic chelate type ones. This difference of GBCAs is speculated to reflect the stability of GBCAs, and de-chelated gadolinium deposition has been strongly suspected. Using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, gadolinium was detected from patients' brains with a history of repeated GBCA administration. In some cases, the gadolinium concentration of a patient's brain with normal renal function exceeded the gadolinium concentration of the skin in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis patients, but without any histological change. The actual risk has not been documented yet, but it seems important to consider the potential unknown risks of residual gadolinium in our decisions regarding GBCA administration, and to make efforts to minimize any residual gadolinium in the patient's body.

  1. A new continuous two-step molecular precursor route to rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect

    De Crom, N.

    2012-07-15

    A continuous two-step molecular precursor pathway is designed for the preparation of rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Lu). This new route involves a first oxidation step leading to the rare-earth oxysulfate Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} which is subsequently reduced to the rare-earth oxysulfide Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S by switching to a H{sub 2}-Ar atmosphere. The whole process occurs at a temperature significantly lower than usual solid state synthesis (T{<=}650 Degree-Sign C) and avoids the use of dangerous sulfur-based gases, providing a convenient route to the synthesis of the entire series of Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S. The molecular precursors consist in heteroleptic dithiocarbamate complexes [Ln(Et{sub 2}dtc){sub 3}(phen)] and [Ln(Et{sub 2}dtc){sub 3}(bipy)] (Et{sub 2}dtc=N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate; phen=1,10-phenanthroline; bipy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine) and were synthesized by a new high yield and high purity synthesis route. The nature of the molecular precursor determines the minimum synthesis temperature and influences therefore the purity of the final Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S crystalline phase. - Graphical abstract: A continuous two-step molecular precursor pathway was designed for the preparation of rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Lu), starting from heteroleptic dithiocarbamate complexes. The influence of the nature of the molecular precursor on the minimum synthesis temperature and on the purity of the final Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S crystalline phase is discussed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new high yield and high purity synthesis route of rare earth dithiocarbamates is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds are used as precursors in a continuous process leading to rare-earth oxysulfides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxysulfides are obtained under much more moderate conditions than previously described.

  2. Digital versus screen-film mammography: impact of mammographic density and hormone therapy on breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Prummel, Maegan V; Muradali, Derek; Shumak, Rene S; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Done, Susan J; Yaffe, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Most studies that have examined the effects of mammographic density and hormone therapy use on breast cancer detection have included screen-film mammography. This study further examines this association in post-menopausal women screened by digital mammography. Approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board, this study identified 688,418 women of age 50-74 years screened with digital or screen-film mammography from 2008 to 2009 within the Ontario Breast Screening Program. Of 2993 eligible women with invasive breast cancer, 2450 were contacted and 1421 participated (847 screen-film mammography, 574 digital direct radiography). Mammographic density was measured by study radiologists using the standard BI-RADS classification system and by a computer-assisted method. Information on hormone therapy use was collected by a telephone-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression and two-tailed tests for significance evaluated associations between factors and detection method by mammography type. Women with >75 % radiologist-measured mammographic density compared to those with <25 % were more likely to be diagnosed with an interval than screen-detected cancer, with the difference being greater for those screened with screen-film (OR = 6.40, 95 % CI 2.30-17.85) than digital mammography (OR = 2.41, 95 % CI 0.67-8.58) and aged 50-64 years screened with screen-film mammography (OR = 10.86, 95 % CI 2.96-39.57). Recent former hormone therapy users were also at an increased risk of having an interval cancer with the association being significant for women screened with digital mammography (OR = 2.08, 95 % CI 1.17-3.71). Breast screening using digital mammography lowers the risk of having an interval cancer for post-menopausal women aged 50-64 with greater mammographic density.

  3. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  4. Interobserver agreement and performance score comparison in quality control using a breast phantom: screen-film mammography vs computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Satake, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Sawaki, Akiko; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2002-09-01

    Our objective was to evaluate interobserver agreement and to compare the performance score in quality control of screen-film mammography and computed radiography (CR) using a breast phantom. Eleven radiologists interpreted a breast phantom image (CIRS model X) by four viewing methods: (a) original screen-film; (b) soft-copy reading of the digitized film image; (c) hard-copy reading of CR using an imaging plate; and (d) soft-copy reading of CR. For the soft-copy reading, a 17-in. CRT monitor (1024x1536x8 bits) was used. The phantom image was evaluated using a scoring system outlined in the instruction manual, and observers judged each object using a three-point rating scale: (a) clearly seen; (b) barely seen; and (c) not seen. For statistical analysis, the kappa statistic was employed. For "mass" depiction, interobserver agreement using CR was significantly lower than when using screen-film ( p<0.05). There was no significant difference in the kappa value for detecting "microcalcification"; however, the performance score of "microcalcification" on CR hard-copy was significantly lower than on the other three viewing methods ( p<0.05). Viewing methods (film or CR, soft-copy or hard-copy) could affect how the phantom image is judged. Paying special attention to viewing conditions is recommended for quality control of CR mammograms.

  5. Structural, optical and magnetic properties of gadolinium sesquioxide nanobars synthesized via thermal decomposition of gadolinium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Manigandan, R.; Giribabu, K.; Suresh, R.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.; Narayanan, V.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobars are synthesized by decomposition of C{sub 6}H{sub 20}Gd{sub 2}O{sub 22}. • The nanoparticles are rectangular bar shape with high porous surface. • The combination of magnetic and optical properties within a single particle. • The Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobars have tailorable nanostructure, wide bandgap and are paramagnetic. - Abstract: Gadolinium oxide nanobars were obtained by thermal decomposition of gadolinium oxalate, which was synthesized by the chemical precipitation method along with glycerol. The functional group analysis and formation of gadolinium oxide from gadolinium oxalate were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analyzer. The crystal structure, average crystallite size, and lattice parameter were analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Moreover, Raman shifts, elemental composition and morphology of the gadolinium oxide was widely investigated by the laser Raman microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FE-SEM-EDAX and HR-TEM, respectively. Furthermore, the optical properties like band gap, absorbance measurement of the gadolinium oxide were extensively examined. In addition, the paramagnetic property of gadolinium oxide nanobars was explored by the vibrating sample magnetometer.

  6. Enhancement of the electron electric dipole moment in gadolinium garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhamedjanov, T.N.; Dzuba, V.A.; Sushkov, O.P.

    2003-10-01

    Effects caused by the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) in gadolinium garnets are considered. Experimental studies of these effects could improve the current upper limit on the electron EDM by several orders of magnitude. We suggest a consistent theoretical model and perform calculations of observable effects in gadolinium gallium garnet and gadolinium iron garnet. Our calculation accounts for both direct and exchange diagrams.

  7. Gadolinium: Central Metal of the Lanthanoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laing, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of gadolinium are compared with those of the other lanthanoids. Some properties are intermediate between those of lanthanum and lutetium; some between those of barium and hafnium; and others (unexpectedly) between those of ytterbium and lutetium. Both the remarkably high molar heat capacity of the metal and the…

  8. A toxicological study of gadolinium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show gadolinium nitrate to have potential sensitizing properties. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated that it was cutaneously a severe irritant. This material was considered an irritant in the rabbit eye application studies. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Structural Evolution from Tin Sulfide (Selenide) Layered Structures to Novel 3- and 4-Connected Tin Oxy-sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, John B.; Ko, Younghee; Tan, Kemin; Nellis, David M.; Koch, Stephen

    1995-07-01

    Addition of triethylenetetramine (TETN) and tetramethylammonium (TMA+) to SnS2 and SnSe2 slurries followed by heating at 150°C under autogenous hydrothermal conditions results in novel thio and thio-oxide phases. These materials crystallize in time sequence as the added amines decompose. Initially 2-D frameworks with composition (Sn3X7)2-, X = S or Se are produced. In the case of the sulfides these are shown to transform to 2-D and 3-D oxy-sulfides frameworks which incorporate the decomposed template. The structures of two materials in this sequence have been determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction. The first, Sn3Se7 · C6N4H16CO, designated TETN-SnSe-1, crystallizes after 1 day of digestion in space group Pbca, with a = 23.553(6), b = 14.004(6), and c = 13.967(4) Å. The structure contains SnSe5 coordination polyhedra which form Sn3Se4+4 semicubes; six such semicubes are linked via Se2 bridges to form apertures in the Sn3Se2-7 sheet in (010). Similar structures occur in the TETN-SnS and TMA-SnS systems. The second material, with a framework designated SnOS-SB3, is formed after 5 days of digestion in either the TMA-SnS or TETN-SnS systems and crystallizes in C2/c, with a = 35.62(1), b = 18.468(4), c = 21.858(6) Å, and β = 115.36(1)°. The structure consists of tetrahedral clusters of composition [Sn10S20O4]8-, which are linked via single S bridges at three corners to form a 2-D framework of composition [Sn20S37O8]10-. This is one member of a theoretical structural family with composition [Sn10S20-n/2O4](8-n)-, where 0 ≤ n ≤ 4 and represents the number of connections between clusters.

  10. Method of separating and purifying gadolinium-153

    DOEpatents

    Bray, Lane A [Richland, WA; Corneillie, Todd M [Davis, CA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement to the method of separating and purifying gadolinium from a mixture of gadolinium and europium having the steps of (a) dissolving the mixture in an acid; (b) reducing europium+3 to europium+2; and (c) precipitating the europium+2 with a sulfate ion in a superstoichiometric amount; wherein the improvement is achieved by using one or more of the following: (i) the acid is an anoic acid; (ii) the reducing is with zinc metal in the absence of a second metal or with an amount of the second metal that is ineffective in the reducing; (iii) adding a group IIA element after step (c) for precipitating the excess sulfate prior to repeating step (c); (iv) the sulfate is a sulfate salt with a monovalent cation; (v) adding cold europium+3 prior to repeating step (c).

  11. Cost and availability of gadolinium for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, O.H.

    1985-06-01

    Gadolinium is currently planned for use as a soluble neutron poison in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants to prevent criticality of solutions of spent fuel. Gadolinium is relatively rare and expensive. The present study was undertaken therefore to estimate whether this material is likely to be available in quantities sufficient for fuel reprocessing and at reasonable prices. It was found that gadolinium, one of 16 rare earth elements, appears in the marketplace as a by-product and that its present supply is a function of the production rate of other more prevalent rare earths. The potential demand for gadolinium in a fuel reprocessing facility serving a future fast reactor industry amounts to only a small fraction of the supply. At the present rate of consumption, domestic supplies of rare earths containing gadolinium are adequate to meet national needs (including fuel reprocessing) for over 100 years. With access to foreign sources, US demands can be met well beyond the 21st century. It is concluded therefore that the supply of gadolinium will quite likely be more than adequate for reprocessing spent fuel for the early generation of fast reactors. The current price of 99.99% pure gadolinium oxide lies in the range $50/lb to $65/lb (1984 dollars). By the year 2020, in time for reprocessing spent fuel from an early generation of large fast reactors, the corresponding values are expected to lie in the $60/lb to $75/lb (1984 dollars) price range. This increase is modest and its economic impact on nuclear fuel reprocessing would be minor. The economic potential for recovering gadolinium from the wastes of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants (which use gadolinium neutron poison) was also investigated. The cost of recycled gadolinium was estimated at over twelve times the cost of fresh gadolinium, and thus recycle using current recovery technology is not economical. 15 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Extraction-chromatographic affinage in gadolinium-153 preparation production technology

    SciTech Connect

    Melnik, M.I.; Karelin, E.A.; Kuznetsov, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    The gadolinium 153 preparation is used for production of medical gamma-sources which are applicable in bone densimeters for early diagnostics of osteoporosis. This preparation must meet strict requirements with respect to the content of europium radionuclides and specific activity. In The Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) the gadolinium 153 is produced by neutron irradiation of Europium 151. This process is described.

  13. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  14. Substitution of gadolinium ethylenediaminetetraacetate with phosphites: towards gadolinium deposit in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Chen, Mao-Long; Zhou, Zhao-Hui

    2014-01-14

    In neutral media, reactions of gadolinium ethylenediaminetetraacetates with phosphorous acid result in the formation of the mixed-ligand polymeric complex K3n[Gd(EDTA)(HPO3)]n·7nH2O () and dimeric complex Na6[Gd2(EDTA)2(HPO3)2]·2.5NaCl·21H2O () (H4EDTA = ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) in warm solution. Further substitution with citric acid gives the monomeric gadolinium citrate with EDTA (NH4)2Na[Gd(EDTA)(H2cit)]·4H2O (). The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, ESI-MS and thermogravimetric analysis. Structural analysis indicates that three coordinated water molecules in the gadolinium ethylenediaminetetraacetate trihydrates are replaced by phosphite ions (HPO3(2-)) in the compounds and . Gadolinium atoms are octa-coordinated by EDTA and the phosphite ion, the latter links adjacent Gd-EDTA units to generate an infinite one-dimensional chain in compound and a dimeric octatomic ring in . In complex , coordinated water molecules were substituted by the α-hydroxy, α-carboxy and β-carboxy groups of citrate. Citrate is favourable for inhibiting the formation of Gd-EDTA phosphite. All the complexes are very easily soluble in water. The solution behavior of the isostructural lanthanum complexes was probed with (13)C and (31)P NMR spectra in D2O for comparison. ESI-MS analysis and recrystallization proved that complexes and dissociate to the monomeric unit of Gd-EDTA and free HPO3(2-) in aqueous solution. Substitutions of gadolinium ethylenediaminetetraacetates to and are attributed to be the cause of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in some way.

  15. Towards modeling gadolinium-lead-borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rada, S.; Ristoiu, T.; Rada, M.; Coroiu, I.; Maties, V.; Culea, E.

    2010-01-15

    Infrared spectra of gadolinium-lead-borate glasses of the xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}.(100 - x)[3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO] system, where x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 35 and 50 mol.%, have been recorded to explore the role of content of gadolinium ions behaving as glass modifier. The FTIR spectroscopy data for the xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}.(1 - x)[3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO] glasses show the structural role of lead ions as a network-formers and of the gadolinium ions network modifiers. Adding of the rare earth ion up to 35 mol.% into the glass matrix, the IR bands characteristic to the studied glasses become sharper and more pronounced. Structural changes, as recognized by analyzing band shapes of IR spectra, revealed that Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} causes a change from the continuous borate network to the continuous lead-borate network interconnected through Pb-O-B and B-O-B bridges and the transformation of some tetrahedral [BO{sub 4}] units into trigonal [BO{sub 3}] units. Then, gadolinium ions have affinity towards [BO{sub 3}] structural units which contain non-bridging oxygens necessary for the charge compensation because the more electronegative [BO{sub 3}] structural units were implied in the formation of B-O-Gd bonds and the transformation of glass network into a glass ceramic. We propose a possible structural model of building blocks for the formation of continuous random 3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO network glass used by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations show that lead atoms occupy three different sites in the proposed model. The first is coordinated with six oxygen atoms forming distorted octahedral geometries. The second lead atom has an octahedral oxygen environment and the five longer Pb-O bonds are considered as participating in the metal coordination scheme. The third lead atom has ionic character. In agreement with the results offered by the experimental FTIR data, the theoretical IR data confirm that our proposed structure is highly possible.

  16. Light deflection in gadolinium molybdate ferroelastic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniorowski, Piotr; Bornarel, Jean

    2000-02-01

    The deflection of a He-Ne light beam by polydomain gadolinium molybdate (GMO) crystals has been studied with respect to incidence angle icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i on the sample at room temperature. The A and B deflected beams do not cross each other during the icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i variation, in contrast to results and calculations previously published. The model using the Fresnel equation confirms this result. The model presented is more accurate for numerical calculation than that using the Huygens construction.

  17. Performance comparison of an active matrix flat panel imager, computed radiography system, and a screen-film system at four standard radiation qualities.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Gutierrez, D; Bulling, S; Lepori, D; Valley, J F; Verdun, F R

    2005-02-01

    Four standard radiation qualities (from RQA 3 to RQA 9) were used to compare the imaging performance of a computed radiography (CR) system (general purpose and high resolution phosphor plates of a Kodak CR 9000 system), a selenium-based direct flat panel detector (Kodak Direct View DR 9000), and a conventional screen-film system (Kodak T-MAT L/RA film with a 3M Trimax Regular screen of speed 400) in conventional radiography. Reference exposure levels were chosen according to the manufacturer's recommendations to be representative of clinical practice (exposure index of 1700 for digital systems and a film optical density of 1.4). With the exception of the RQA 3 beam quality, the exposure levels needed to produce a mean digital signal of 1700 were higher than those needed to obtain a mean film optical density of 1.4. In spite of intense developments in the field of digital detectors, screen-film systems are still very efficient detectors for most of the beam qualities used in radiology. An important outcome of this study is the behavior of the detective quantum efficiency of the digital radiography (DR) system as a function of beam energy. The practice of users to increase beam energy when switching from a screen-film system to a CR system, in order to improve the compromise between patient dose and image quality, might not be appropriate when switching from screen-film to selenium-based DR systems.

  18. Performance of a new digital flat-panel detector system in the detection of simulated rheumatoid erosions: a comparison with a speed-class 200 screen-film system, a mammography screen-film system, and a storage-phosphor system at different levels of exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Karl; Henschel, Andreas; Bernhardt, Thomas; Lenzen, Horst; Wormanns, Dag; Diederich, Stefan; Heindel, Walter

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a large-area direct read-out flat-panel detector system with a speed class 200 screen-film system, a storage-phosphor system and a mammography screen-film system with regard to the detection of simulated rheumatoid erosions and to assess its diagnostic performance with decreasing exposure dose. The performance of a flat-panel system in such small lesions was considered especially interesting, as the spatial resolution of this system, limited by its pixel size, is considerably lower than that of conventional screen-film systems. An animal model with 160 joint specimens from 20 monkey paws was used. 640 regions were defined in these 160 meta- carpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joint specimens. Simulated rheumatoid erosions were created in 320 of these 640 regions. Specimens were enclosed in containers filed with water to obtain absorption and scatter radiation conditions similar to a human hand. Imaging was performed using a flat-panel system, a sped class 200 screen-film system, a mammography screen-film system and a storage- phosphor system under exactly matched conditions. Different exposure doses equivalent to speed classes of S equals 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600 and 3200 were used. Presence or absence of a lesion was assessed by three radiologists using a five level confidence scale. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed for a total of 21,120 observations and diagnostic performance estimated by the area under the ROC curve. The significance of differences between Az values was tested with analysis of variance. ROC-analysis showed Az values of 0.809, 0.768, 0.737, 0.710 and 0.685 for the flat-panel system, 0.770 for the screen-film system, 0.781, 0.739, 0.724 and 0.680 for the storage-phosphor system, and 0.798 for the mammography screen-film system. Analysis of variance showed significant differences for certain combinations of imaging modalities and exposure doses. The diagnostic performance of

  19. Comparison of full-field digital mammography to screen-film mammography with respect to contrast and spatial resolution in tissue equivalent breast phantoms.

    PubMed

    Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Pisano, Etta D; Cole, Elodia B; Zeng, Donglin; Burns, Charles B; Roberto, Craig; Pavic, Dag; Lee, Yeonhee; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Koomen, Marcia; Washburn, David

    2005-10-01

    To determine if the improved contrast resolution of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with reduced spatial resolution allows for superior or equal phantom object detection compared with screen-film mammography (SFM). Tissue equivalent breast phantoms simulating an adipose to glandular ratio of 50/50,30/70, and 20/80 were imaged according to each manufacturers' recommendation with four full-field digital mammography units (Fuji, Sectra, Fischer, and General Electric) and a screen-film mammography unit (MammoMatII 2000, Siemens, Munich, Germany). A total of 20 images were obtained in both hard- and soft-copy formats. For the purpose of soft-copy display, the screen-film hard-copy images were digitized with a 50 microm micron scanner. Six radiologists, experts in breast imaging, and three physicists, experts in scoring mammography phantoms, participated in a reader study where each reader scored each phantom for visibility of line-pairs and for 24 objects (fibers, clusters of specks, and masses). The data were recorded, entered into a database, and analyzed by a mixed-effect model. The limiting spatial resolution in line-pairs per millimeter visible with the digital units was less, regardless of display modality used, than that provided by the screen-film unit. The difference was statistically significant for the General Electric (p < 0.01) and Fuji digital mammography units (p = 0.03). With respect to the number of visible objects, a statistically significant higher number could be detected with the screen-film unit as compared to the Fischer (p < 0.01) and Sectra (p < 0.01) digital mammography units, but there was no significant difference between the other digital units and screen film. Overall, there was significantly better performance on the 50/50 phantom than with the 30/70 and 20/80 phantoms (p = 0.01, p < 0.01) for object visibility. For the digital mammography units, soft-copy display performed better than hard-copy display for the Fischer and Sectra

  20. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  1. Comparison of gadolinium depletion in CASMO-4 and CASMO-3

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.; Edenius, M.

    1995-12-31

    Since the mid-1980s, CASMO-3 has been used to generate two-group nodal data for SIMULATE-3. Development of CASMO-3 was based on the accuracy needed to analyze {approximately} 12-month cycle lengths. Fuel designs for these annual cycles contained low gadolinium loadings in only a few pins. As cycle lengths increased from 12 to 24 months, gadolinium loadings doubled and tripled, as did the number of pins containing gadolinium. The use of heavy burnable absorber loadings has been a driving force behind the development of CASMO-4.

  2. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  3. Effects of the Cu off-stoichiometry on transport properties of wide gap p-type semiconductor, layered oxysulfide LaCuSO

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Yosuke Tanaki, Mai; Okusa, Yuki; Matoba, Masanori; Kamihara, Yoichi; Shibuya, Taizo; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2014-07-14

    Layered oxysulfide LaCu{sub 1−x}SO (x = 0–0.03) was prepared to elucidate the effect of Cu off-stoichiometry on their electrical and thermal transport properties. Electrical resistivity drastically decreases down from ∼10{sup 5} Ω·cm to ∼10{sup −1} Ω·cm as a result of Cu deficiency (x = 0.01) at 300 K. Thermal conductivity of the samples at 300 K, which is dominated by lattice components, is estimated to be 2.3(3) Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1}. Stoichiometric LaCuSO has an optical band gap of 3.1 eV, while broad optical absorption at photon energies of approximately 2.1 eV was observed for Cu-deficient samples. Density functional theory calculation suggests that these broad absorption structures probably originate from the in-gap states generated by the sulfur vacancies created to compensate the charge imbalance due to Cu off-stoichiometry. These results clearly demonstrate that Cu deficiency plays a crucial role in determining the electrical transport properties of Cu-based p-type transparent semiconductors.

  4. Characterization of gadolinium and lanthanum oxide films on Si (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Landheer, D.; Sproule, G. I.; Quance, T.; Graham, M. J.; Botton, G. A.

    2002-05-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy, were used to study gadolinium and lanthanum oxide films deposited on Si (100) substrates using electron-beam evaporation from pressed-powder targets. As-deposited films consist of a crystalline oxide layer and an amorphous interfacial layer. A complicated distinct multilayer structure consisting of oxide layers, silicate layers, and SiO2-rich layers in thick (~30 nm) annealed films has been observed for both gadolinium and lanthanum films. For thinner annealed films (~8 nm), there is no longer a crystalline oxide layer but an amorphous gadolinium or lanthanum silicate layer and an interfacial SiO2-rich layer. The formation of the lanthanum silicate by annealing lanthanum oxide is found to be thermodynamically more favorable than the formation of gadolinium silicate.

  5. Gadolinium loaded plastic scintillators for high efficiency neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovechkina, Lena; Riley, Kent; Miller, Stuart; Bell, Zane; Nagarkar, Vivek

    2009-08-01

    Gadolinium has the highest thermal neutron absorption cross section of any naturally occurring element, and emits conversion electrons as well as atomic X-rays in over 50% of its neutron captures, which makes it a useful dopant in scintillators for detecting thermal neutrons. Gadolinium isopropoxide was studied as a possible dopant for styrene-based plastic scintillators as a convenient and inexpensive method to produce high-efficiency thermal neutron detectors. Plastic scintillators with gadolinium weight concentrations of up to 3% were transparent, uniform and defect-free and were characterized with spectral measurements performed under x-ray and neutron irradiation. The new material has the same characteristic emission of styrene with a maximum at approximately 425 nm, and a light output of 76% relative to the undoped plastic. A 13 mm thick sample containing 0.5% gadolinium by weight detected 46% of incident thermal neutrons, which makes this an attractive material for a variety of applications.

  6. Computer-aided detection of masses in full-field digital mammography using screen-film mammograms for training.

    PubMed

    Kallenberg, Michiel; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2008-12-07

    It would be of great value when available databases of screen-film mammography (SFM) images can be used to train full-field digital mammography (FFDM) computer-aided detection (CAD) systems, as compilation of new databases is costly. In this paper, we investigate this possibility. Firstly, we develop a method that converts an FFDM image into an SFM-like representation. In this conversion method, we establish a relation between exposure and optical density by simulation of an automatic exposure control unit. Secondly, we investigate the effects of using the SFM images as training samples compared to training with FFDM images. Our FFDM database consisted of 266 cases, of which 102 were biopsy-proven malignant masses and 164 normals. The images were acquired with systems of two different manufacturers. We found that, when we trained our FFDM CAD system with a small number of images, training with FFDM images, using a five-fold crossvalidation procedure, outperformed training with SFM images. However, when the full SFM database, consisting of 348 abnormal cases (including 204 priors) and 810 normal cases, was used for training, SFM training outperformed FFDMA training. These results show that an existing CAD system for detection of masses in SFM can be used for FFDM images without retraining.

  7. Design of linear anti-scatter grid geometry with optimum performance for screen-film and digital mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodajou-Chokami, H.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2015-08-01

    A detailed 3D Monte Carlo simulation of the grid geometrical parameters in screen-film mammography (SFM) and digital mammography (DM) systems has been performed. A combination of IEC 60627:2013 international standard conditions and other more clinically relevant parameters were used for this simulation. Accuracy of our results has been benchmarked with previously published data and good agreement has been obtained. Calculations in a wide range of linear anti-scatter grid geometries have been carried out. The evaluated parameters for the SFM system were the Bucky factor (BF) and contrast improvement factor (CIF) and for the DM system it was signal difference-to-noise ratio improvement factor (SIF). The CIF parameter was chosen to be nearly the same as the commercial grade, the BF and SIF were significantly improved compared to commercial grids in use today. Our optimized grid parameters for the SFM system were lead strip thickness d=12  µm, grid ratio r= 5 and strip density N=65 lines/cm. And for the DM system these parameters were d= 5  µm, r = 3 and N=100 lines/cm. Both optimized grid sets have thinner d and higher N compared to the commercial grids.

  8. Comparison of the imaging physics performance of a prototype flat-panel detector with a 400-speed screen-film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Rush, Charles

    2001-06-01

    The performance of a digital radiography system that included a prototype flat panel detector (StingRay) was compared with a 400 speed screen-film system. The flat panel detector consisted of a 500 micrometers thick CsI scintillator with an image matrix size of 3k2. The limiting spatial resolution of screen-film (approximately 4 line pairs/mm) was superior to that of the flat panel detector (approximately 2.5 line pairs/mm). The digital detector had an excellent linearity response (r2 equals 0.997), a dynamic range of 20,000:1, and saturated at a radiation exposure of 60 mR.

  9. Comparison of the image quality of a high-resolution screen-film system and a digital flat panel detector system in avian radiography.

    PubMed

    Bochmann, Monika; Ludewig, Eberhard; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Pees, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A conventional high-resolution screen-film system was compared with a digital detector system. A total of 20 birds (14 pigeons and six psittacine birds) with an average body mass of 533g were examined in dorsoventral as well as lateral projections. Digital radiographs were acquired with the same mAs as well as half the mAs used for the conventional radiographs. Three criteria and one overall assessment were defined for each of four anatomic regions and assessed by five veterinarians using a score system. Comparison of the ratings was done by visual grading analysis. For the majority of criteria, there was no significant difference regarding image quality between the digital and screen-film projections. However, for certain criteria the quality of the digital images was significantly superior. Using the same mAs as for the conventional radiographs, the humeral joint surfaces and the honeycomb structure of the lung were assessed as superior with the digital imaging system. The tracheal rings and the delineation of the trachea from the surrounding tissue were also superior with the digital system. Assessment of the trabecular structure of the humerus was superior when the full mAs was used compared with the reduced mAs. In conclusion the digital technique is equal or superior to the conventional screen-film high-resolution system for pet birds of a medium size. With some limitations, a dose reduction is possible with the digital system.

  10. Clinical evaluation of digital radiography based on a large-area cesium iodide-amorphous silicon flat-panel detector compared with screen-film radiography for skeletal system and abdomen.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Terue; Tanaka, Saori; Koyama, Koichi; Norihumi, Nishida; Daikokuya, Hideo; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Kishimoto, Kenji; Hatagawa, Masakatsu; Kudoh, Hiroaki; Yamada, Ryusaku

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to compare the image quality of digital radiography using the new digital Bucky system based on a flat-panel detector with that of a conventional screen-film system for the skeletal structure and the abdomen. Fifty patients were examined using digital radiography with a flat-panel detector and screen-film systems, 25 for the skeletal structures and 25 for the abdomen. Six radiologists judged each paired image acquired under the same exposure parameters concerning three observation items for the bone and six items for the abdomen. Digital radiographic images for the bone were evaluated to be similar to screen-film images at the mean of 42.2%, to be superior at 50.2%, and to be inferior at 7.6%. Digital radiographic images for the abdomen were judged to be similar to screen-film images at the mean of 43.4%, superior at 52.4%, and inferior at 4.2%; thus, digital radiographic images were estimated to be either similar as or superior to screen-film images at over 92% for the bone and abdomen. On the statistical analysis, digital radiographic images were also judged to be preferred significantly in the most items for the bone and abdomen. In conclusion, the image quality of digital radiography with a flat-panel detector was superior to that of a screen-film system under the same exposure parameters, suggesting that dose reduction is possible with digital radiography.

  11. High Performance Anion Chromatography of Gadolinium Chelates.

    PubMed

    Hajós, Peter; Lukács, Diana; Farsang, Evelin; Horváth, Krisztian

    2016-11-01

    High performance anion chromatography (HPIC) method to separate ionic Gd chelates, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and free matrix anions was developed. At alkaline pHs, polydentate complexing agents such as ethylene-diamine-tetraacetate, diethylene-triamine pentaacetate and trans-1,2-diamine-cyclohexane-tetraacetate tend to form stable Gd chelate anions and can be separated by anion exchange. Separations were studied in the simple isocratic chromatographic run over the wide range of pH and concentration of carbonate eluent using suppressed conductivity detection. The ion exchange and complex forming equilibria were quantitatively described and demonstrated in order to understand major factors in the control of selectivity of Gd chelates. Parameters of optimized resolution between concurrent ions were presented on a 3D resolution surface. The applicability of the developed method is represented by the simultaneous analysis of Gd chelates and organic/inorganic anions. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy  (ICP-AES) analysis was used for confirmation of HPIC results for Gd. Collection protocols for the heart-cutting procedure of chromatograms were applied. SPE procedures were also developed not only to extract traces of free gadolinium ions from samples, but also to remove the high level of interfering anions of the complex matrices. The limit of detection, the recoverability and the linearity of the method were also presented.

  12. Studies of narrow autoionizing resonances in gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, Bruce A.; Nortershauser, W.; Blaum, K.; Wendt, Klaus

    2003-06-30

    The autoionization (AI) spectrum of gadolinium between the first and second limits has been investigated by triple-resonance excitation with high-resolution cw lasers. A large number of narrow AI resonances have been observed and assigned total angular momentum J values. The resonances are further divided into members of AI Rydberg series converging to the second limit or other ''interloping'' levels. Fine structure in the Rydberg series has been identified and interpreted in terms of Jc j coupling. A number of detailed studies have been performed on the interloping resonances: These include lifetime determination by lineshape analysis, isotope shifts, hyperfine structure, and photoionization saturation parameters. The electronic structure of the interloping levels is discussed in terms of these studies. Linewidths generally decrease with increasing total angular momentum and the J = 7 resonances are extremely narrow with Lorentzian widths ranging from < 1 MHz up to 157 MHz. The strongest resonances are found to have cross-sections of {approx}10-12 cm{sup 2} and photoionization can be saturated with powers available from cw diode lasers.

  13. Distribution profile of gadolinium in gadolinium chelate-treated renally-impaired rats: role of pharmaceutical formulation.

    PubMed

    Fretellier, Nathalie; Salhi, Mariem; Schroeder, Josef; Siegmund, Heiko; Chevalier, Thibaut; Bruneval, Patrick; Jestin-Mayer, Gaëlle; Delaloge, Francette; Factor, Cécile; Mayer, Jean-François; Fabicki, Jean-Michel; Robic, Caroline; Bonnemain, Bruno; Idée, Jean-Marc; Corot, Claire

    2015-05-25

    While not acutely toxic, chronic hepatic effect of certain gadolinium chelates (GC), used as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, might represent a risk in renally-impaired patients due to free gadolinium accumulation in the liver. To answer this question, this study investigated the consequences of the presence of small amounts of either a soluble gadolinium salt ("free" Gd) or low-stability chelating impurity in the pharmaceutical solution of gadoteric acid, a macrocyclic GC with high thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities, were investigated in renally-impaired rats. Renal failure was induced by adding 0.75% adenine in the diet for three weeks. The pharmaceutical and commercial solution of gadoteric acid was administered (5 daily intravenous injections of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg) either alone or after being spiked with either "free" gadolinium (i.e., 0.04% w/v) or low-stability impurity (i.e., 0.06 w/v). Another GC, gadodiamide (low thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities) was given as its commercial solution at a similar dose. Non-chelated gadolinium was tested at two doses (0.005 and 0.01 mmol Gd/kg) as acetate salt. Gadodiamide induced systemic toxicity (mortality, severe epidermal and dermal lesions) and substantial tissue Gd retention. The addition of very low amounts of "free", non-chelated gadolinium or low thermodynamic stability impurity to the pharmaceutical solution of the thermodynamically stable GC gadoteric acid resulted in substantial capture of metal by the liver, similar to what was observed in "free" gadolinium salt-treated rats. Relaxometry studies strongly suggested the presence of free and soluble gadolinium in the liver. Electron microscopy examinations revealed the presence of free and insoluble gadolinium deposits in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells of rats treated with gadoteric acid solution spiked with low-stability impurity, free gadolinium and gadodiamide, but not in rats treated with the pharmaceutical solution of gadoteric acid. The

  14. Use of a Mixture of Gadolinium and Iodinated Contrast for Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Badiola, Carlos M.

    2004-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the image quality of gadolinium digital subtraction angiography (DSA) can be improved by the addition of small quantities of iodinated contrast to gadolinium. The optical density (OD) of a mixture of four parts gadolinium-based contrast to one part iodinated contrast was measured through a phantom study and compared to that of full-strength gadolinium, full strength iodinated contrast, and a 20% solution of iodinated contrast. We also compared the clinical image quality of the mixture of gadolinium-based contrast and iodinated contrast relative to full-strength gadolinium and full strength iodinated contrast during DSA. The DSA image quality of the gadolinium-iodinated contrast mixture was significantly improved relative to images obtained with full-strength gadolinium and compared favorably to that obtained with full-strength iodinated contrast. The phantom data showed that the OD of the gadolinium-iodinated contrast mixture was much greater than that of full strength gadolinium and the 20% iodinated contrast solution. The increase in OD was greater than that expected from a simple additive effect of the OD of the contrast agents. Adding a small amount of iodinated contrast to gadolinium results in a significant improvement in the radiographic density and DSA image quality of gadolinium. This simple technique appears to overcome one of the major limitations of gadolinium-based angiography-poor radiographic density-while continuing to minimize the volume of administered iodinated contrast.

  15. PARTITIONING OF GADOLINIUM IN THE CHEMICAL PROCESSING CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S.; Best, D.; Stone, M.; Click, D.

    2011-04-27

    A combination of short-term beaker tests and longer-duration Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) simulations were performed to investigate the relative partitioning behaviors of gadolinium and iron under conditions applicable to the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). The testing was performed utilizing non-radioactive simple Fe-Gd slurries, non-radioactive Sludge Batch 6 simulant slurries, and a radioactive real-waste slurry representative of Sludge Batch 7 material. The testing focused on the following range of conditions: (a) Fe:Gd ratios of 25-100; (b) pH values of 2-6; (c) acidification via addition of nitric, formic, and glycolic acids; (d) temperatures of {approx}93 C and {approx}22 C; and (e) oxalate concentrations of <100 mg/kg and {approx}10,000 mg/kg. The purpose of the testing was to provide data for assessing the potential use of gadolinium as a supplemental neutron poison when dispositioning excess plutonium. Understanding of the partitioning behavior of gadolinium in the CPC was the first step in assessing gadolinium's potential applicability. Significant fractions of gadolinium partitioned to the liquid-phase at pH values of 4.0 and below, regardless of the Fe:Gd ratio. In SRAT simulations targeting nitric and formic acid additions of 150% acid stoichiometry, the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.5-4.0, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were both {approx}20%. In contrast, in a SRAT simulation utilizing a nitric and formic acid addition under atypical conditions (due to an anomalously low insoluble solids content), the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.7, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were {approx}60% and {approx}70%, respectively. When glycolic acid was used in combination with nitric and formic acids at 100% acid stoichiometry, the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.6-4.0, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were 60-80% and 3-5%, respectively

  16. Gadolinium metallo nanocongregates as potential magnetosensors for detecting early stage cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2015-04-27

    Gadolinium chelates and gadolinium based inorganic nanoparticles have been extensively studied, because of the high magnetic moment of gadolinium. Here, metallic gadolinium nanocongregates have been developed. Upon injecting these nanoparticles in the mice, they initially circulate in the blood stream and are localized at the cancer site, which could be visualized upon application of magnetic field hence acting as small magnetic nanosensors searching for even small cancers, detecting cancers at a very early stage.

  17. Gadolinium accumulation in organs of Sprague-Dawley® rats after implantation of a biodegradable magnesium-gadolinium alloy.

    PubMed

    Myrissa, Anastasia; Braeuer, Simone; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Goessler, Walter; Weinberg, Annelie Martina

    2017-01-15

    Biodegradable magnesium implants are under investigation because of their promising properties as medical devices. For enhancing the mechanical properties and the degradation resistance, rare earth elements are often used as alloying elements. In this study Mg10Gd pins were implanted into Sprague-Dawley® rats. The pin volume loss and a possible accumulation of magnesium and gadolinium in the rats' organs and blood were investigated in a long-term study over 36weeks. The results showed that Mg10Gd is a fast disintegrating material. Already 12weeks after implantation the alloy is fragmented to smaller particles, which can be found within the intramedullary cavity and the cortical bones. They disturbed the bone remodeling until the end of the study. The results concerning the elements' distribution in the animals' bodies were even more striking, since an accumulation of gadolinium could be observed in the investigated organs over the whole time span. The most affected tissue was the spleen, with up to 3240μgGd/kg wet mass, followed by the lung, liver and kidney (up to 1040, 685 and 207μgGd/kg). In the brain, muscle and heart, the gadolinium concentrations were much smaller (less than 20μg/kg), but an accumulation could still be detected. Interestingly, blood serum samples showed no accumulation of magnesium and gadolinium. This is the first time that an accumulation of gadolinium in animal organs was observed after the application of a gadolinium-containing degradable magnesium implant. These findings demonstrate the importance of future investigations concerning the distribution of the constituents of new biodegradable materials in the body, to ensure the patients' safety.

  18. Discovery of samarium, europium, gadolinium, and terbium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    May, E.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-01-15

    Currently, thirty-four samarium, thirty-four europium, thirty-one gadolinium, and thirty-one terbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. Gadolinium chloride pretreatment ameliorates acute cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Loukas G; Tzirogiannis, Konstantinos N; Demonakou, Maria D; Kourentzi, Kalliopi T; Mykoniatis, Michael G; Panoutsopoulos, Georgios I

    2013-08-01

    Cadmium is a known industrial and environmental pollutant. It causes hepatotoxicity upon acute administration. Features of cadmium-induced acute hepatoxicity encompass necrosis, apoptosis, peliosis and inflammatory infiltration. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) may prevent cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity by suppressing Kupffer cells. The effect of GdCl3 pretreatment on a model of acute cadmium-induced liver injury was investigated. Male Wistar rats 4-5 months old were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline followed by cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 6.5 mg/kg) or GdCl3 (10 mg/kg) followed by CdCl2 (6.5 mg/kg; groups I and II, respectively). Rats of both the groups were killed at 9, 12, 16, 24, 48 and 60 h after cadmium intoxication. Liver sections were analyzed for necrosis, apoptosis, peliosis and mitoses. Liver regeneration was also evaluated by tritiated thymidine incorporation into hepatic DNA. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were also determined. Hepatic necrosis, hepatocyte and nonparenchymal cell apoptosis and macroscopic and microscopic types of peliosis hepatis were minimized by gadolinium pretreatment. Serum levels of AST and ALT were also greatly diminished in rats of group II. Tritiated thymidine incorporation into hepatic DNA was increased in gadolinium pretreatment rats. Kupffer cell activation was minimal in both the groups of rats. Gadolinium pretreatment attenuates acute cadmium-induced liver injury in young Wistar rats, with mechanisms other than Kupffer cell elimination.

  20. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, R. S.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search), 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β). The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides) was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  1. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-11-07

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Smtype→ dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GP and a temperature of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Furthermore, our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.

  2. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; ...

    2014-11-07

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Smtype→ dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GP and a temperaturemore » of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Furthermore, our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.« less

  3. Fabrication and evaluation of a Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor screen film for development of a CMOS-based X-ray imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Koon; Choi, Su Rim; Noh, Si Cheol; Jung, Bong Jae; Choi, Il Hong; Kang, Sang Sik

    2014-08-01

    In this study, Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor screen films were fabricated by using a special particle-inbinder sedimentation method. The phosphor particles used in this study were manufactured in two sizes, 2.5- μm and 5- μm. To evaluate luminescence efficiency and the spatial resolution according to the thickness, we fabricated screen films with thicknesses of 120, 150, 170, and 210- μm. The spatial resolution of the fabricated films was assessed by using an edge method to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF). From the experimental results, the spatial resolution of the mammography exposures (low-energy X-ray quality) was better than that of dental radiography (high-energy X-ray quality). Also, with the same film thickness, the screen with 2.5- μm particles had better resolution than the screen with 5.0- μm particles, but it showed about 20% lower resolution than a commercial Gd2O2S:Tb screen. In the evaluation of the results for the dependence of the spatial resolution on the film's thickness, the 120- μm-thick screen showed the highest resolution, which was similar to that of a commercial screen.

  4. About a Gadolinium-doped Water Cherenkov LAGUNA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Labarga, Luis

    2010-11-24

    Water Cherenkov (wC) detectors are extremely powerful apparatuses for scientific research. Nevertheless they lack of neutron tagging capabilities, which translates, mainly, into an inability to identify the anti-matter nature of the reacting incoming anti-neutrino particles. A solution was proposed by R. Beacon and M. Vagins back in 2004: by dissolving in the water a compound with nucleus with very large cross section for neutron capture like the Gadolinium, with a corresponding emission of photons of enough energy to be detected, they can tag thermal neutrons with an efficiency larger than 80%. In this talk we detail the technique and its implications in the measurement capabilities and, as well, the new backgrounds induced. We discuss the improvement on their physics program, also for the case of LAGUNA type detectors. We comment shortly the status of the pioneering R and D program of the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration towards dissolving a Gadolinium compound in its water.

  5. [Gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Muñoz, S; Calles Blanco, C; Marcin, Javier; Fernández Álvarez, C; Lafuente Martínez, J

    2014-06-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are increasingly being used in magnetic resonance imaging. These agents can improve the contrast in images and provide information about function and metabolism, increasing both sensitivity and specificity. We describe the gadolinium-based contrast agents that have been approved for clinical use, detailing their main characteristics based on their chemical structure, stability, and safety. In general terms, these compounds are safe. Nevertheless, adverse reactions, the possibility of nephrotoxicity from these compounds, and the possibility of developing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis will be covered in this article. Lastly, the article will discuss the current guidelines, recommendations, and contraindications for their clinical use, including the management of pregnant and breast-feeding patients.

  6. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  7. Dressler's syndrome demonstrated by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Steadman, Christopher D; Khoo, Jeffrey; Kovac, Jan; McCann, Gerry P

    2009-01-01

    A 49-year old patient presented late with an anterolateral ST-elevation myocardial infarction and was treated with rescue angioplasty to an occluded left anterior descending artery. Her recovery was complicated by low-grade pyrexia and raised inflammatory markers. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance 5 weeks after the acute presentation showed transmural infarction and global late gadolinium enhancement of the pericardium in keeping with Dressler's syndrome. PMID:19627595

  8. Magnons as a Bose-Einstein Condensate in Nanocrystalline Gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S. N.; Mathew, S. P.

    2011-06-17

    The recent observation [S. P. Mathew et al., J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 200, 072047 (2010)] of the anomalous softening of spin-wave modes at low temperatures in nanocrystalline gadolinium is interpreted as a Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of magnons. A self-consistent calculation, based on the BEC picture, is shown to closely reproduce the observed temperature variations of magnetization and specific heat at constant magnetic fields.

  9. Characteristics of Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles Using Terahertz Spectroscopy (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Maeng, Inhee; Oh, Seung Jae; Kim, Taekhoon; Cho, Byung Kyu; Lee, Kwangyeol; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2009-04-01

    The penetration property of the terahertz electromagnetic (THz) wave is relevant to its use. We used the THz wave spectroscopy system which easily penetrates some materials that do not contain water, e.g., plastic and ceramics. The system has been developed for several purposes, including measuring the properties of semiconductors and bio-materials, and detecting plastic bombs and ceramic knives at airports. It is also used for medical imaging systems, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), at some research institutes. It can show not only the difference in amplitude, but also the difference of the phase of each point of sample. MRI technology usually uses contrast agents to enhance the quality of the image. Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), made with a heavy metal ion, is commonly used as a clinical MRI contrast agent. Gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticle is a new contrast agent. It serves to equip the core of each particle with antibodies or ligands. It can freely circulate in blood vessels without amassing in the liver or lungs. This study shows the characteristics of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles to further advance terahertz medical imaging.

  10. Progress in the use of gadolinium for NCT.

    PubMed

    Cerullo, N; Bufalino, D; Daquino, G

    2009-07-01

    The evaluation of possible improvement in the use of Gd in cancer therapy, in reference to gadolinium in cancer therapy (GdNCT), has been analysed. At first the problem of the gadolinium compounds toxicity was reviewed identifying the Motexafin Gadolinium as the best. Afterwards, the spectrum of IC and Auger electrons was calculated using a special method. Afterwards, this electron source has been used as input of the PENELOPE code and the energy deposit in DNA was well defined. Taking into account that the electron yield and energy distribution are related to the neutron beam spectrum and intensity, the shaping assembly architecture was optimised through computational investigations. Finally the study of GdNCT was performed from two different points of view: macrodosimetry using MCNPX, with calculation of absorbed doses both in tumour and healthy tissues, and microdosimetry using PENELOPE, with the determination of electron RBE through the energy deposit. The equivalent doses were determined combining these two kinds of data, introducing specific figures of merit to be used in treatment planning system (TPS). According to these results, the GdNCT appears to be a fairly possible tumour therapy.

  11. Type of MRI contrast, tissue gadolinium, and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Do, Catherine; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Tan, Chunyan; Wagner, Brent

    2014-10-01

    It has been presupposed that the thermodynamic stability constant (K(therm)) of gadolinium-based MRI chelates relate to the risk of precipitating nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The present study compared low-K(therm) gadodiamide with high-K(therm) gadoteridol in cultured fibroblasts and rats with uninephrectomies. Gadolinium content was assessed using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in paraffin-embedded tissues. In vitro, fibroblasts demonstrated dose-dependent fibronectin generation, transforming growth factor-β production, and expression of activated myofibroblast stress fiber protein α-smooth muscle actin. There were negligible differences with respect to toxicity or proliferation between the two contrast agents. In the rodent model, gadodiamide treatment led to greater skin fibrosis and dermal cellularity than gadoteridol. In the kidney, both contrast agents led to proximal tubule vacuolization and increased fibronectin accumulation. Despite large detectable gadolinium signals in the spleen, skin, muscle, and liver from the gadodiamide-treated group, contrast-induced fibrosis appeared to be limited to the skin and kidney. These findings support the hypothesis that low-K(therm) chelates have a greater propensity to elicit nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and demonstrate that certain tissues are resistant to these effects.

  12. Magnetization of 2.6 T in gadolinium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheunert, G.; Hendren, W. R.; Ward, C.; Bowman, R. M.

    2012-10-01

    There is renewed interest in rare-earth elements and gadolinium in particular for a range of studies in coupling physics and applications. However, it is still apparent that synthesis impacts understanding of the intrinsic magnetic properties of thin gadolinium films, particularly for thicknesses of topicality. We report studies on 50 nm thick nanogranular polycrystalline gadolinium thin films on SiO2 wafers that demonstrate single-crystal like behavior. The maximum in-plane saturation magnetization at 4 K was found to be 4πMS4 K = (2.61 ± 0.26) T with a coercivity of HC4 K = (160 ± 5) Oe. A maximum Curie point of TC = (293 ± 2) K was measured via zero-field-cooled-field-cooled magnetization measurements in close agreement with values reported in bulk single crystals. Our measurements revealed magnetic transitions at T1 = (12 ± 2) K (as deposited samples) and T2 = (22 ± 2) K (depositions on heated substrates) possibly arising from the interaction of paramagnetic face-centred cubic grains with their ferromagnetic hexagonal close-packed counterparts.

  13. Characteristics of Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles Using Terahertz Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongkyu; Maeng, Inhee; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Oh, Seung Jae; Kim, Taekhoon; Cho, Byung Kyu; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2009-04-19

    The penetration property of the terahertz electromagnetic (THz) wave is relevant to its use. We used the THz wave spectroscopy system which easily penetrates some materials that do not contain water, e.g., plastic and ceramics. The system has been developed for several purposes, including measuring the properties of semiconductors and bio-materials, and detecting plastic bombs and ceramic knives at airports. It is also used for medical imaging systems, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), at some research institutes. It can show not only the difference in amplitude, but also the difference of the phase of each point of sample. MRI technology usually uses contrast agents to enhance the quality of the image. Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), made with a heavy metal ion, is commonly used as a clinical MRI contrast agent. Gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticle is a new contrast agent. It serves to equip the core of each particle with antibodies or ligands. It can freely circulate in blood vessels without amassing in the liver or lungs. This study shows the characteristics of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles to further advance terahertz medical imaging.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of gadolinium in Ga-Sn and Ga-Zn eutectic based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltsev, Dmitry S.; Volkovich, Vladimir A.; Yamshchikov, Leonid F.; Chukin, Andrey V.

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties of gadolinium in Ga-Sn and Ga-Zn eutectic based alloys were studied. Temperature dependences of gadolinium activity in the studied alloys were determined at 573-1073 K employing the EMF method. Solubility of gadolinium in the Ga-Sn and Ga-Zn alloys was measured at 462-1073 K using IMCs sedimentation method. Activity coefficients as well as partial and excess thermodynamic functions of gadolinium in the studied alloys were calculated on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  15. Gadolinium-based contrast agents: did we miss something in the last 25 years?

    PubMed

    Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Errante, Yuri; Grasso, Rosario Francesco

    2016-06-01

    In the last 24 months, several clinical and experimental studies, suggested first and demonstrated later, a progressive concentration of Gadolinium in the brain of normal renal function patients, following repeated injections of some of the commercially approved Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents. Although, till now, Gadolinium brain deposits have not been associated to any kind of neurological signs or symptoms, they oblige the radiology community to modify the actual approach in using Gadolinium contrast media in daily practice, to reduce unknown possible risks for patients.

  16. [CT contrast administration of iodine, gadolinium and ytterbium. In-vitro studies and animal experiments].

    PubMed

    Zwicker, C; Langer, M; Urich, V; Felix, R

    1993-03-01

    The absorption of the elements iodine, gadolinium and ytterbium in various dilutions was studied in relation to CT. Regression analysis and specific CT density measurements showed that absorption decreases from gadolinium to ytterbium and iodine. These results were confirmed by experiments using ten dogs. Boli of 0.5 molar gadolinium used for angio-CT without table movement showed the largest increase in density in the aorta and liver with an average of 190HU and 21HU respectively compared with iodine which gave 157HU and 12HU respectively. The animal experimental studies suggest that gadolinium and ytterbium are suitable contrast media for dynamic CT investigations.

  17. Combination of boron and gadolinium compounds for neutron capture therapy. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, A; Zhang, T; Nakai, K; Endo, K; Kumada, H; Yamamoto, T; Yoshida, F; Sakurai, Y; Yamamoto, K; Nose, T

    2005-03-01

    In neutron capture therapy, the therapeutic effect of the boron compound is based on alpha particles produced by the B(n, alpha) reaction while with the gadolinium compound the main radiation effect is from gamma rays derived from the Gd(n, gamma) reaction. The uptake and distribution within the tumor may be different among these compounds. Thus, the combination of the boron and gadolinium compounds may be beneficial for enhancing the radiation dose to the tumor. Chinese hamster fibroblast V79 cells were used. For the neutron targeting compounds, 10B (BSH) at 0, 5, 10, and 15 ppm, and 157Gd (Gd-BOPTA) at 0, 800, 1600, 2400, 3200, and 4800 ppm, were combined. The neutron irradiation was performed with thermal neutrons for 30 min. (neutron flux: 0.84 x 10(8) n/cm2/s in free air). The combination of the boron and gadolinium compounds showed an additive effect when the gadolinium concentration was lower than 1600 ppm. This additive effect decreased as a function of gadolinium concentration at 2400 ppm and resulted in no additive effect at more than 3200 ppm of gadolinium. In conclusion, the combination of the boron and gadolinium compounds can enhance the therapeutic effect with an optimum concentration ratio. When the gadolinium concentration is too high, it may weaken the boron neutron capture reaction due to the high cross-section of gadolinium compound against neutrons.

  18. Use of Gadolinium as a Primary Criticality Control in Disposing Waste Containing Plutonium at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Vincent

    2005-01-04

    Use of gadolinium as a neutron poison has been proposed for disposing of several metric tons of excess plutonium at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The plutonium will first be dissolved in nitric acid in small batches. Gadolinium nitrate will then be added to the plutonium nitrate solution. The Gd-poisoned plutonium solution will be neutralized and transferred to large under-ground tanks. The pH of small batches of neutralized plutonium solution will be adjusted prior to addition of the glass frit for eventual production as glass logs. The use of gadolinium as the neutron poison would minimize the number of glass logs generated from this disposition. The primary criticality safety concerns regarding the disposal process are: (1) maintaining neutron moderation under all processing conditions since gadolinium has a very large absorption cross section for thermal neutrons, (2) characteristics of plutonium and gadolinium precipitation during the neutralization process, (3) mixing characteristics of the precipitate to ensure that plutonium would remain homogeneously mixed with gadolinium, and (4) potential separation of plutonium and gadolinium during nitric and formic acids addition. A number of experiments were conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to study the behavior of plutonium and gadolinium at various stages of the disposition process.

  19. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A. Banerjee, M. Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  20. Dual-Energy X-Radiography With Gadolinium Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutt, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Image resolution increased, and cost reduced. Proposed dual-energy x-ray imaging system, continuous bremsstrahlung spectrum from x-ray tube filtered by foil of nonradioactive gadolinium or another rare-earth metal to form two-peaked energy spectrum. After passing through patient or object under examination, filtered radiation detected by array of energy-discriminating, photon-counting detectors. Detector outputs processed to form x-ray image for each peak and possibly enhanced image based on data taken at both peaks.

  1. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles for theranostic MRI-radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Lux, François; Sancey, Lucie; Bianchi, Andrea; Crémillieux, Yannick; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    A rapid development of gadolinium-based nanoparticles is observed due to their attractive properties as MRI-positive contrast agents. Indeed, they display high relaxivity, adapted biodistribution and passive uptake in the tumor thanks to enhanced permeability and retention effect. In addition to these imaging properties, it has been recently shown that they can act as effective radiosensitizers under different types of irradiation (radiotherapy, neutron therapy or hadron therapy). These new therapeutic modalities pave the way to therapy guided by imaging and to personalized medicine.

  2. Magnetoresistance of polycrystalline gadolinium with varying grain size

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravorty, Manotosh Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we report a study of evolution of low field magnetoresistance (MR) of Gadolinium as the grain size in the sample is changed from few microns (∼4 μm) to the nanoscopic regime (∼35 nm). The low field MR has a clear effect on varying grain size. In large grain sample (few μm), the magnetic domains are controlled by local anisotropy field determined mainly by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The low field MR clearly reflects the temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. For decreasing gain size, the contribution of spin disorder at the grain boundary increases and enhances the local anisotropy field.

  3. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, M.; Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-01

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  4. Sensitivity of alanine dosimeters with gadolinium exposed to 6 MV photons at clinical doses.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Longo, A; Spanò, M; Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Brai, M

    2011-12-01

    In this study we analyzed the ESR signal of alanine dosimeters with gadolinium exposed to 6 MV linear accelerator photons. We observed that the addition of gadolinium brings about an improvement in the sensitivity to photons because of its high atomic number. The experimental data indicated that the addition of gadolinium increases the sensitivity of the alanine to 6 MV photons. This enhancement was better observed at high gadolinium concentrations for which the tissue equivalence is heavily reduced. However, information about the irradiation setup and of the radiation beam features allows one to correct for this difference. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to obtain information on the expected effect of the addition of gadolinium on the dose absorbed by the alanine molecules inside the pellets. These results are compared with the experimental values, and the agreement is discussed.

  5. Gadolinium Thin Foils in a Plasma Panel Sensor as an Alternative to 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Varner Jr, Robert L; Beene, James R; Friedman, Dr. Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Gadolinium has long been investigated as a detector for neutrons. It has a thermal neutron capture cross-section that is unparalleled among stable elements, because of the isotopes $^{155,157}$Gd. As a replacement for $^3$He, gadolinium has a significant defect, it produces many gamma-rays with an energy sum of 8 MeV. It also produces conversion electrons, mostly 29 keV in energy. The key to replacing $^3$He with gadolinium is using a gamma-blind electron detector to detect the conversion electrons. We suggest that coupling a layer of gadolinium to a Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS) can provide highly efficient, nearly gamma-blind detection of the conversion. The PPS is a proposed detector under development as a dense array of avalanche counters based on plasma display technology. We will present simulations of the response of prototypes of this detector and considerations of the use of gadolinium in the PPS.

  6. Dielectric and magnetic properties of some gadolinium silica nanoceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Coroiu, I. Pascuta, P. Bosca, M. Culea, E.

    2013-11-13

    Some nanostructure gadolinium silica glass-ceramics were obtained undergoing a sol gel method and a heat-treatment at 1000°C about two hours. The magnetic and dielectric properties of these samples were studied. The magnetic properties were evidenced performing susceptibility measurements in the 80-300K temperature range. A Curie-Weiss behavior has acquired. The values estimated for paramagnetic Curie temperature being small and positive suggest the presence of weak ferromagnetic interactions between Gd{sup 3+} ions. The dielectric properties were evaluated from dielectric permittivity (ε{sub r}) and dielectric loss (tanδ) measurements at the frequency 1 kHz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz, in the 25-225°C temperature range and dielectric dispersion at room temperature for 79.5 kHz - 1GHz frequency area. The dielectric properties suggest that the main polarization mechanism corresponds to interfacial polarization, characteristic for polycrystalline-structured dielectrics. The polycrystalline structure of the samples is due to the polymorphous transformations of the nanostructure silica crystallites in the presence of gadolinium oxide. They were highlighted by SEM micrographs.

  7. Gadolinium-hydrogen ion exchange of zirconium phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, D. C.; Power, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The Gd(+3)/H(+) ion exchange on a commercial zirconium phosphate ion exchanger was investigated in chloride, sulfate, and phosphate solutions of Gd(+3) at gadolinium concentrations of 0.001 to 1 millimole per cc and in the pH range of 0 to 3.5. Relatively low Gd(+3) capacities, in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 millimole per g of ion exchanger were found at room temperature. A significant difference in Gd(+3) sorption was observed, depending on whether the ion exchanger was converted from initial conditions of greater or lesser Gd(+3) sorption than the specific final conditions. Correlations were found between decrease in Gd(+3) capacity and loss of exchanger phosphate groups due to hydrolysis during washing and between increase in capacity and treatment with H3PO4. Fitting of the experimental data to ideal ion exchange equilibrium expressions indicated that each Gd(+3) ion is sorbed on only one site of the ion exchanger. The selectivity quotient was determined to be 2.5 + or - 0.4 at room temperature on gadolinium desorption in chloride solutions.

  8. MRI gadolinium enhancement precedes neuroradiological findings in acute necrotizing encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Tamura, Takuya; Nagai, Yuhki; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Awaya, Tomonari; Shibata, Minoru; Kato, Takeo; Heike, Toshio

    2013-11-01

    We report a 2-year-old Japanese boy with acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) triggered by human herpes virus-6, who presented insightful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. He was admitted due to impaired consciousness and a convulsion, 2 days after the onset of an upper respiratory infection. At admission, cranial MRI showed marked gadolinium enhancement at the bilateral thalami, brainstem and periventricular white matter without abnormal findings in noncontrast MRI sequences. On the following day, noncontrast computed tomography demonstrated homogeneous low-density lesions in the bilateral thalami and severe diffuse brain edema. The patient progressively deteriorated and died on the 18th day of admission. The pathogenesis of ANE remains mostly unknown, but it has been suggested that hypercytokinemia may play a major role. Overproduced cytokines cause vascular endothelial damage and alter the permeability of the vessel wall in the multiple organs, including the brain. The MRI findings in our case demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeability was altered prior to the appearance of typical neuroradiological findings. This suggests that alteration of blood-brain barrier permeability is the first step in the development of the brain lesions in ANE, and supports the proposed mechanism whereby hypercytokinemia causes necrotic brain lesions. This is the first report demonstrating MRI gadolinium enhancement antecedent to typical neuroradiological findings in ANE.

  9. Establishing daily quality control (QC) in screen-film mammography using leeds tor (max) phantom at the breast imaging unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acaba, K. J. C.; Cinco, L. D.; Melchor, J. N.

    2016-03-01

    Daily QC tests performed on screen film mammography (SFM) equipment are essential to ensure that both SFM unit and film processor are working in a consistent manner. The Breast Imaging Unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute has been conducting QC following the test protocols in the IAEA Human Health Series No.2 manual. However, the availability of Leeds breast phantom (CRP E13039) in the facility made the task easier. Instead of carrying out separate tests on AEC constancy and light sensitometry, only one exposure of the phantom is done to accomplish the two tests. It was observed that measurements made on mAs output and optical densities (ODs) using the Leeds TOR (MAX) phantom are comparable with that obtained from the usual conduct of tests, taking into account the attenuation characteristic of the phantom. Image quality parameters such as low contrast and high contrast details were also evaluated from the phantom image. The authors recognize the usefulness of the phantom in determining technical factors that will help improve detection of smallest pathological details on breast images. The phantom is also convenient for daily QC monitoring and economical since less number of films is expended.

  10. Evaluation of Doses and Image Quality in Mammography with Screen-Film, CR, and DR Detectors – Application of the ACR Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarczyk-Kacprzyk, Wioletta; Skrzyński, Witold; Fabiszewska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Different methods of image quality evaluation are routinely used for analogue and digital mammography systems in Poland. In the present study, image quality for several screen-film (SF), computed radiography (CR), and fully digital (DR) mammography systems was compared directly with the use of the ACR mammography accreditation phantom. Material/Methods Image quality and mean glandular doses were measured and compared for 47 mammography systems in the Mazovia Voivodeship in Poland, including 26 SF systems, 12 CR systems, and 9 DR systems. The mean glandular dose for the breast simulated by 4.5 cm of PMMA was calculated with methods described in the “European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis”. Visibility of the structures in the image (fibers, microcalcifications, and masses) was evaluated with the mammographic accreditation ACR phantom. Results Image quality for DR systems was significantly higher than for SF and CR systems. Several SF systems failed to pass the image quality tests because of artifacts. The doses were within acceptable limits for all of the systems, but the doses for the CR systems were significantly higher than for the SF and DR systems. Conclusions The best image quality, at a reasonably low dose, was observed for the DR systems. The CR systems are capable of obtaining the same image quality as the SF systems, but only at a significantly higher dose. The ACR phantom can be routinely used to evaluate image quality for all types of mammographic systems. PMID:27617048

  11. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  12. New candidates for superconductors: A series of layered oxysulfides (Cu{sub 2}S{sub 2})(Sr{sub n+1}M{sub n}O{sub 3n{minus}1})

    SciTech Connect

    Otzschi, Kenji; Ogino, Hiraku; Shimoyama, Junichi; Kishio, Kohji

    1999-11-01

    The authors have discovered three new layered transition-metal oxysulfides; (Cu{sub 2}S{sub 2})(Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}), (Cu{sub 2}S{sub 2})(Sr{sub 2}NiO{sub 2}) and (Cu{sub 2}S{sub 2})(Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}), whose compositions are generally formulated as (Cu{sub 2}S{sub 2})(Sr{sub n+1}M{sub n}O{sub 3n{minus}1}). Their structures consist of alternate stackings of perovskite-based MO{sub 2} plane(s) and Cu{sub 2}S{sub 2} layers, showing great similarity to cuprate superconductors when the Cu{sub 2}S{sub 2} layer is considered as the blocking layer. The formation of these phases is limited by the ion size of M and elasticity of the Cu{sub 2}S{sub 2} layer. The newly found (Cu{sub 2}S{sub 2})(Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}) possesses the horizontally extended tetragonal CuO{sub 2} plane, making itself a possible candidate for a new superconductor.

  13. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-07

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist(®) in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL(-1)), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly 'energy dependent' for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs.

  14. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F.; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist® in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL-1), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly ‘energy dependent’ for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs.

  15. Epiphyseal and physeal cartilage: normal gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Renfa; Li, Yonggang; Tang, Lihua; Hu, Junwu; Xu, Anhui

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the normal appearance of epiphyseal and physeal cartilage on Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging. The appearance and enhancement ratios of 20 proximal and distal femoral epiphyses in 10 normal piglets were analyzed on Gd-enhanced MR images. The correlation of the MR imaging appearance with corresponding histological findings of immature epiphyses was examined. Our results showed that Gd-enhanced MRI could differentiate the differences in enhancement between physeal and epiphyseal cartilage and show vascular canals within the epiphyseal cartilage. Enhanced ratios in the physeal were greater than those in the epiphyseal cartilage (P < 0.005). It is concluded that Gd-enhanced MR imaging reveals epiphyseal vascular canals and shows difference in enhancement of physeal and epiphyseal cartilage.

  16. The structural response of gadolinium phosphate to pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Karina M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Spencer, Elinor C.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate elastic constants for gadolinium phosphate (GdPO4) have been measured by single-crystal high-pressure diffraction methods. The bulk modulus of GdPO4 determined under hydrostatic conditions, 128.1(8) GPa (Kʹ=5.8(2)), is markedly different from that obtained with GdPO4 under non-hydrostatic conditions (160(2) GPa), which indicates the importance of shear stresses on the elastic response of this phosphate. High pressure Raman and diffraction analysis indicate that the PO4 tetrahedra behave as rigid units in response to pressure and that contraction of the GdPO4 structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd-O-P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO9 polyhedra.

  17. Defect induced mobility enhancement: Gadolinium oxide (100) on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaputra, W.; Tsu, R.

    2012-11-26

    Growth of predominantly single crystal (100)-oriented gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on a p-type Si(100) and growth of a polycrystal with a predominant Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100) crystallite on a n-type Si(100) was performed using molecular beam epitaxy. Despite a poorer crystal structure than Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(110), an enhancement in carrier mobility can be found only from the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100)/n-type Si(100) interface. The mobility of 1715-1780 cm{sup 2}/V {center_dot} s was observed at room temperature, for carrier concentration >10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. This accumulation of the electrons and the mobility enhancement may arise from the two-dimensional confinement due to charge transfer across the interface similar to transfer doping.

  18. Mechanism of inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase with motexafin gadolinium (MGd)

    SciTech Connect

    Zahedi Avval, Farnaz; Berndt, Carsten; Pramanik, Aladdin; Holmgren, Arne

    2009-02-13

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is an expanded porphyrin anticancer agent which selectively targets tumor cells and works as a radiation enhancer, with promising results in clinical trials. Its mechanism of action is oxidation of intracellular reducing molecules and acting as a direct inhibitor of mammalian ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). This paper focuses on the mechanism of inhibition of RNR by MGd. Our experimental data present at least two pathways for inhibition of RNR; one precluding subunits oligomerization and the other direct inhibition of the large catalytic subunit of the enzyme. Co-localization of MGd and RNR in the cytoplasm particularly in the S-phase may account for its inhibitory properties. These data can elucidate an important effect of MGd on the cancer cells with overproduction of RNR and its efficacy as an anticancer agent and not only as a general radiosensitizer.

  19. The structural response of gadolinium phosphate to pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Heffernan, Karina M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Spencer, Elinor C.; ...

    2016-06-16

    In this study, accurate elastic constants for gadolinium phosphate (GdPO4) have been measured by single-crystal high-pressure diffraction methods. The bulk modulus of GdPO4 determined under hydrostatic conditions, 128.1(8) GPa (K'=5.8(2)), is markedly different from that obtained with GdPO4 under non-hydrostatic conditions (160(2) GPa), which indicates the importance of shear stresses on the elastic response of this phosphate. Finally, high pressure Raman and diffraction analysis indicate that the PO4 tetrahedra behave as rigid units in response to pressure and that contraction of the GdPO4 structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd–O–P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO9more » polyhedra.« less

  20. The structural response of gadolinium phosphate to pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Heffernan, Karina M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Spencer, Elinor C.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-06-16

    In this study, accurate elastic constants for gadolinium phosphate (GdPO4) have been measured by single-crystal high-pressure diffraction methods. The bulk modulus of GdPO4 determined under hydrostatic conditions, 128.1(8) GPa (K'=5.8(2)), is markedly different from that obtained with GdPO4 under non-hydrostatic conditions (160(2) GPa), which indicates the importance of shear stresses on the elastic response of this phosphate. Finally, high pressure Raman and diffraction analysis indicate that the PO4 tetrahedra behave as rigid units in response to pressure and that contraction of the GdPO4 structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd–O–P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO9 polyhedra.

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of Gadolinium Phosphate Neutron Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Lessing, Paul Alan; Erickson, Arnold Wendell

    2003-12-01

    Hydrated gadolinium phosphate (GdPO4·1H2O) was synthesized by reacting high purity dissolved salts (gadolinium nitrates or chlorides) with phosphoric acid. The hydrated powders were shown to be extremely insoluble in water with a Ksp measured to be between 2.07 E-14 and 4.76 E-13. Calcination to between 800 and 1000 °C resulted in the formation of GdPO4 in a monazite (monoclinic) crystal structure. This was correlated with the first exothermic differential thermal analysis (DTA) peak (864.9–883.4 °C). The DTA also showed small peaks in the 1200–1250 °C range, that could be associated with a change from the monazite (monoclinic) crystal structure to the xenotime (tetragonal) crystal structure. However, calcination of a sample to 1400 °C, followed by relatively rapid cooling and XRD, showed the structure was still monazite (monoclinic). DTA results showed a melting point at 1899–1920 °C (endothermic peak). It was therefore concluded that the melting point probably was the melting of the monazite (monoclinic) phase, but may have been xenotime if a phase change at 1200–1250 °C was reversible and very rapid. The higher part of the melting range was achieved with material derived using the slightly higher purity nitrate salt. The results show that GdPO4 is an excellent candidate for a chemically stable, water-insoluble neutron absorber for inclusion in spent nuclear fuel canisters.

  2. Theoretical study of structure and stability of small gadolinium carboxylate complexes in liquid scintillator solvents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-Wen

    2014-09-01

    The structural properties of three small gadolinium carboxylate complexes in three liquid scintillator solvents (pseudocumene, linear alkylbenzene, and phenyl xylylethane) were theoretically investigated using density functional theory (B3LYP/LC-RECP) and polarizable continuum model (PCM). The average interaction energy between gadolinium atom and carboxylate ligand (E(int)) and the energy difference of the highest singly occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (Δ(SL)) were calculated to evaluate and compare the relative stability of these complexes in solvents. The calculation results show that the larger (with a longer alkyl chain) gadolinium carboxylate complex has greater stability than the smaller one, while these gadolinium carboxylates in linear alkylbenzene were found to have greater stability than those in the other two solvents.

  3. Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen; Lee, Denise L

    2009-05-01

    In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of

  4. Gadolinium Use in Spine Pain Management Procedures for Patients with Contrast Allergies: Results in 527 Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Safriel, Yair Ang, Roberto; Ali, Muhammed

    2008-03-15

    Introduction. To review the safety and efficacy of gadolinium in spine pain management procedures in patients at high risk for a contrast reaction and who are not suitable candidates for the use of standard non-ionic contrast. Methods. We reviewed records over a 61-month period of all image-guided spinal pain management procedures where patients had allergies making them unsuitable candidates for standard non-ionic contrast and where gadolinium was used to confirm needle tip placement prior to injection of medication. Results. Three hundred and four outpatients underwent 527 procedures. A spinal needle was used in all but 41 procedures. Gadolinium was visualized using portable C-arm fluoroscopy in vivo allowing for confirmation of needle tip location. The gadolinium dose ranged from 0.2 to 10 ml per level. The highest dose received by one patient was 15.83 ml intradiscally during a three-level discogram. Three hundred and one patients were discharged without complication or known delayed complications. One patient had documented intrathecal injection but without sequelae and 2 patients who underwent cervical procedures experienced seizures requiring admission to the intensive care unit. Both the latter patients were discharged without any further complications. Conclusion. Based on our experience we recommend using gadolinium judiciously for needle tip confirmation. We feel more confident using gadolinium in the lumbar spine and in cervical nerve blocks. Gadolinium should probably not be used as an injectate volume expander. The indications for gadolinium use in cervical needle-guided spine procedures are less clear and use of a blunt-tipped needle should be considered.

  5. Application of extracellular gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents and the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Heverhagen, J T; Krombach, G A; Gizewski, E

    2014-07-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious, sometimes fatal disease. Findings in recent years have shown that a causal association between gadolinium containing contrast media and NSF is most likely. Therefore, the regulatory authorities have issued guidelines on the use of gadolinium-containing contrast media which have reduced the number of new cases of NSF to almost zero. However, it is for precisely this reason that the greatest care must still be taken to ensure that these guidelines are complied with. The most important factors are renal function, the quantity of gadolinium administered and coexisting diseases such as inflammation. All of these factors crucially influence the quantity of gadolinium released from the chelat in the body. This free gadolinium is thought to be the trigger for NSF. Other important factors are the stability of the gadolinium complex and furthermore the route of its elimination from the body. Partial elimination via the liver might be an additional protective mechanism. In conclusion, despite the NSF risk, contrast-enhanced MRI is a safe diagnostic procedure which can be used reliably and safely even in patients with severe renal failure, and does not necessarily have to be replaced by other methods.

  6. Gadolinium contrast agent-induced CD163+ ferroportin+ osteogenic cells in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Sundararaman; Bose, Chhanda; Shah, Sudhir V; Hall, Kimberly A; Hiatt, Kim M

    2013-09-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are linked to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal insufficiency. The pathology of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is characterized by abnormal tissue repair: fibrosis and ectopic ossification. The mechanisms by which gadolinium could induce fibrosis and ossification are not known. We examined in vitro the effect of a gadolinium-based contrast agent on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for phenotype and function relevant to the pathology of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, real-time PCR, and osteogenic assays. We also examined tissues from patients with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, using IHC to identify the presence of cells with phenotype induced by gadolinium. Gadolinium contrast induced differentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into a unique cellular phenotype--CD163(+) cells expressing proteins involved in fibrosis and bone formation. These cells express fibroblast growth factor (FGF)23, osteoblast transcription factors Runt-related transcription factor 2, and osterix, and show an osteogenic phenotype in in vitro assays. We show in vivo the presence of CD163(+)/procollagen-1(+)/osteocalcin(+) cells in the fibrotic and calcified tissues of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis patients. Gadolinium contrast-induced CD163(+)/ferroportin(+)/FGF23(+) cells with osteogenic potential may play a role in systemic fibrosis and ectopic ossification in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

  7. Chemical and mass spectrographic analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide (Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/) powder

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Analytical procedures to determine compliance of gadolinium oxide powders with specifications are presented. The following methods are described in detail: carbon by direct combustion - thermal conductivity method; total chlorine and fluorine by pyrohydrolysis ion-selective electrode method; loss of weight on ignition; sulfur by combustion - iodometric titration method; impurity elements by a spark-source mass spectrographic method; and gadolinium content in gadolinium oxide by impurity correction method. (JMT)

  8. X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis of Yttrium-Iron-Gadolinium Solutions Used to Prepare Spray Dried Powders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    IRON, * GADOLINIUM , *X RAY SPECTROSCOPY, *YTTRIUM, COMPUTER PROGRAMS, SOLUTIONS(MIXTURES), QUALITY CONTROL, NITRIC ACID, RARE EARTH ELEMENTS, CHEMICAL ANALYSIS, FERRITES , PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, YTTRIUM IRON GARNET.

  9. Impedance spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium substituted cobalt ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Md. T. Ramana, C. V.

    2014-10-28

    Gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFGO) with variable Gd content (x = 0.0–0.4) have been synthesized by solid state ceramic method. The crystal structure and impedance properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFGO crystallize in the inverse spinel phase. The CFGO compounds exhibit lattice expansion due to substitution of larger Gd ions into the crystal lattice. Impedance spectroscopy analysis was performed under a wide range of frequency (f = 20 Hz–1 MHz) and temperature (T = 303–573 K). Electrical properties of Gd incorporated Co ferrite ceramics are enhanced compared to pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to the lattice distortion. Impedance spectroscopic analysis illustrates the variation of bulk grain and grain-boundary contributions towards the electrical resistance and capacitance of CFGO materials with temperature. A two-layer heterogeneous model consisting of moderately conducting grain interior (ferrite-phase) regions separated by insulating grain boundaries (resistive-phase) accurately account for the observed temperature and frequency dependent electrical characteristic of CFGO ceramics.

  10. Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Patients with Nonischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Memon, Sarfaraz; Ganga, Harsha V; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    One-third of all patients with heart failure have nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDM). Five-year mortality from NIDM is as high as 20% with sudden cardiac death (SCD) as the cause in 30% of the deaths. Currently, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is used as the main criteria to risk stratify patients requiring an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to prevent SCD. However, LVEF does not necessarily reflect myocardial propensity for electrical instability leading to ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Due to the differential risk in various subgroups of patients for arrhythmic death, it is important to identify appropriate patients for ICD implantation so that we can optimize healthcare resources and avoid the complications of ICDs in individuals who are unlikely to benefit. We performed a systematic search and review of clinical trials of NIDM and the use of ICDs and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for risk stratification. LGE identifies patients with NIDM who are at high risk for SCD and enables optimized patient selection for ICD placement, while the absence of LGE may reduce the need for ICD implantation in patients with NIDM who are at low risk for future VF/VT or SCD.

  11. Gadolinium-loaded gel scintillators for neutron and antineutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Akers, Douglas William; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Paviet, Patricia Denise; Drigert, Mark William

    2016-11-29

    A gadolinium (Gd) loaded scintillation gel (Gd-ScintGel) compound allows for neutron and gamma-ray detection. The unique gel scintillator encompasses some of the best features of both liquid and solid scintillators, yet without many of the disadvantages associated therewith. Preferably, the gel scintillator is a water soluble Gd-DTPA compound and water soluble fluorophores such as: CdSe/ZnS (or ZnS) quantum dot (Q-dot) nanoparticles, coumarin derivatives 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid, 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid, and Alexa Fluor 350 as well as a carbostyril compound, carbostyril 124 in a stable water-based gel, such as methylcellulose or polyacrylamide polymers. The Gd-loaded ScintGel allows for a homogenious distribution of the Gd-DTPA and the fluorophores, and yields clean fluorescent emission peaks. A moderator, such as deuterium or a water-based clear polymer, can be incorporated in the Gd-ScintGel. The gel scintillators can be used in compact detectors, including neutron and antineutrino detectors.

  12. DNA surface modified gadolinium phosphate nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Matthieu F; Baligand, Celine; Li, Yichen; Knowles, Elisabeth S; Meisel, Mark W; Walter, Glenn A; Talham, Daniel R

    2012-05-16

    Oligonucleotide modified gadolinium phosphate nanoparticles have been prepared and their magnetic resonance relaxivity properties measured. Nanoparticles of GdPO4·H2O were synthesized in a water/oil microemulsion using IGEPAL CO-520 as surfactant, resulting in 50 to 100 nm particles that are highly dispersible and stable in water. Using surface modification chemistry previously established for zirconium phosphonate surfaces, the particles are directly modified with 5'-phosphate terminated oligonucleotides, and the specific interaction of the divalent phosphate with Gd(3+) sites at the surface is demonstrated. The ability of the modified nanoparticles to act as MRI contrast agents was determined by performing MR relaxivity measurements at 14.1 T. Solutions of nanopure water, Feridex, and Omniscan (FDA approved contrast agents) in 0.25% agarose were used for comparison and control purposes. MRI data confirm that GdPO4·H2O nanoparticles have relaxivities (r1, r2) comparable to those of commercially available contrast agents. In addition, the data suggest that biofunctionalization of the surface of the nanoparticles does not prevent their function as MRI contrast agents.

  13. Electronic transport in gadolinium atomic-size contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivera, B.; Salgado, C.; Lado, J. L.; Karimi, A.; Henkel, V.; Scheer, E.; Fernández-Rossier, J.; Palacios, J. J.; Untiedt, C.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the fabrication, transport measurements, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations of atomic-size contacts made of gadolinium (Gd). Gd is known to have local moments mainly associated with f electrons. These coexist with itinerant s and d bands that account for its metallic character. Here we explore whether and how the local moments influence electronic transport properties at the atomic scale. Using both scanning tunneling microscope and lithographic mechanically controllable break junction techniques under cryogenic conditions, we study the conductance of Gd when only few atoms form the junction between bulk electrodes made of the very same material. Thousands of measurements show that Gd has an average lowest conductance, attributed to single-atom contact, below 2/e2 h . Our DFT calculations for monostrand chains anticipate that the f bands are fully spin polarized and insulating and that the conduction may be dominated by s , p , and d bands. We also analyze the electronic transport for model nanocontacts using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism in combination with DFT. We obtain an overall good agreement with the experimental results for zero bias and show that the contribution to the electronic transport from the f channels is negligible and that from the d channels is marginal.

  14. Analytical Interference in Serum Iron Determination Reveals Iron Versus Gadolinium Transmetallation With Linear Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Fretellier, Nathalie; Poteau, Nathalie; Factor, Cécile; Mayer, Jean-François; Medina, Christelle; Port, Marc; Idée, Jean-Marc; Corot, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purposes of this study were to evaluate the risk for analytical interference with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) for the colorimetric measurement of serum iron (Fe3+) and to investigate the mechanisms involved. Materials and Methods Rat serum was spiked with several concentrations of all molecular categories of GBCAs, ligands, or “free” soluble gadolinium (Gd3+). Serum iron concentration was determined by 2 different colorimetric methods at pH 4.0 (with a Vitros DT60 analyzer or a Cobas Integra 400 analyzer). Secondly, the cause of interference was investigated by (a) adding free soluble Gd3+ or Mn2+ to serum in the presence of gadobenic acid or gadodiamide and (b) electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Results Spurious decrease in serum Fe3+ concentration was observed with all linear GBCAs (only with the Vitros DT60 technique occurring at pH 4.0) but not with macrocyclic GBCAs or with free soluble Gd3+. Spurious hyposideremia was also observed with the free ligands present in the pharmaceutical solutions of the linear GBCAs gadopentetic acid and gadodiamide (ie, diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid and calcium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid bismethylamide, respectively), suggesting the formation of Fe-ligand chelate. Gadobenic acid-induced interference was blocked in a concentration-dependent fashion by adding a free soluble Gd3+ salt. Conversely, Mn2+, which has a lower affinity than Gd3+ and Fe3+ for the ligand of gadobenic acid (ie, benzyloxypropionic diethylenetriamine tetraacetic acid), was less effective (interference was only partially blocked), suggesting an Fe3+ versus Gd3+ transmetallation phenomenon at pH 4.0. Similar results were observed with gadodiamide. Mass spectrometry detected the formation of Fe-ligand with all linear GBCAs tested in the presence of Fe3+ and the disappearance of Fe-ligand after the addition of free soluble Gd3+. No Fe-ligand chelate was found in the case of the macrocyclic GBCA gadoteric

  15. The presence of the gadolinium-based contrast agent depositions in the brain and symptoms of gadolinium neurotoxicity - A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Olchowy, Cyprian; Cebulski, Kamil; Łasecki, Mateusz; Chaber, Radosław; Olchowy, Anna; Kałwak, Krzysztof; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCAs) are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging, but recently, high signal intensity in the cerebellum structures was reported after repeated administrations of contrast- enhanced magnetic resonance images. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the association between increased signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus in the brain and repeated administrations of GBCAs. Additionally, we focused on possible short- and long-term consequences of gadolinium use in those patients. Methods Systematic review of retrospective investigations in PubMed and Medline was performed in July 2016. Primary outcomes included the presence of increased signal intensity within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images in patients following administrations of GBCAs. Two independent reviewers were responsible for search and data extraction. Results 25 publications satisfied inclusion criteria (19 magnetic resonance images analyses, 3 case reports; 3 autopsy studies). Magnetic resonance images of 1247 patients with increased signal intensity on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images were analyzed as well as tissue specimens from 27 patients. Signal intensity correlated positively with the exposure to GBCAs and was greater after serial administrations of linear nonionic than cyclic contrast agents. Gadolinium was detected in all tissue examinations. Conclusions High signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were associated with previous administration of GBCAs. Signal intensity correlated negatively with stability of contrast agents. Clinical significance of gadolinium deposition in the brain remains unclear. There is a strong need for further research to identify type of gadolinium deposited in the brain as well as to gather knowledge about long-term consequences. PMID:28187173

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ADVANCED GADOLINIUM NEUTRON ABSORBER ALLOY BY MEANS OF NEUTRON TRANSMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg W. Wachs

    2007-09-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the alloy at specific gadolinium dopant levels. The new alloy is to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched DOE SNF. For the transmission experiments, alloy test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using only radiative capture cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium poison and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the alloy test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the gadolinium was dispersed fairly uniformly in the alloy and the ENDF VII radiative capture cross section data were accurate.

  17. Tumor-induced lymph node alterations detected by MRI lymphography using gadolinium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Partridge, S C; Kurland, B F; Liu, C-L; Ho, R J Y; Ruddell, A

    2015-10-26

    Contrast-enhanced MRI lymphography shows potential to identify alterations in lymph drainage through lymph nodes (LNs) in cancer and other diseases. MRI studies have typically used low molecular weight gadolinium contrast agents, however larger gadolinium-loaded nanoparticles possess characteristics that could improve the specificity and sensitivity of lymphography. The performance of three gadolinium contrast agents with different sizes and properties was compared by 3T MRI after subcutaneous injection. Mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma footpad tumors were imaged to assess tumor-induced alterations in lymph drainage through tumor-draining popliteal and inguinal LNs versus contralateral uninvolved drainage. Gadolinium lipid nanoparticles were able to identify tumor-induced alterations in contrast agent drainage into the popliteal LN, while lower molecular weight or albumin-binding gadolinium agents were less effective. All of the contrast agents distributed in foci around the cortex and medulla of tumor-draining popliteal LNs, while they were restricted to the cortex of non-draining LNs. Surprisingly, second-tier tumor-draining inguinal LNs exhibited reduced uptake, indicating that tumors can also divert LN drainage. These characteristics of tumor-induced lymph drainage could be useful for diagnosis of LN pathology in cancer and other diseases. The preferential uptake of nanoparticle contrasts into tumor-draining LNs could also allow selective targeting of therapies to tumor-draining LNs.

  18. Compensated gadolinium-loaded plastic scintillators for thermal neutron detection (and counting)

    SciTech Connect

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Bertrand, Guillaume H. V.; Hamel, Matthieu; Sguerra, Fabien; Dehe-Pittance, Chrystele; Normand, Stephane; Mechin, Laurence

    2015-07-01

    Plastic scintillator loading with gadolinium-rich organometallic complexes shows a high potential for the deployment of efficient and cost-effective neutron detectors. Due to the low-energy photon and electron signature of thermal neutron capture by gadolinium-155 and gadolinium-157, alternative treatment to Pulse Shape Discrimination has to be proposed in order to display a trustable count rate. This paper discloses the principle of a compensation method applied to a two-scintillator system: a detection scintillator interacts with photon radiation and is loaded with gadolinium organometallic compound to become a thermal neutron absorber, while a non-gadolinium loaded compensation scintillator solely interacts with the photon part of the incident radiation. Posterior to the nonlinear smoothing of the counting signals, a hypothesis test determines whether the resulting count rate after photon response compensation falls into statistical fluctuations or provides a robust image of a neutron activity. A laboratory prototype is tested under both photon and neutron irradiations, allowing us to investigate the performance of the overall compensation system in terms of neutron detection, especially with regards to a commercial helium-3 counter. The study reveals satisfactory results in terms of sensitivity and orientates future investigation toward promising axes. (authors)

  19. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2012-03-12

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 °C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. At 25 °C, for 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 11 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2.5 g/L and 0.8 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd in 4 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate at 10 °C is about 1.5 g/L. For 6 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate, the solubility of Gd at 10

  20. Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Paul D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Goodman, Lawrence R.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A.; Hull, Russell D.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Leeper, Kenneth V.; Naidich, David P.; Sak, Daniel J.; Sostman, H. Dirk; Tapson, Victor F.; Weg, John G.; Woodard, Pamela K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography for diagnosing pulmonary embolism has not been determined conclusively. Objective To investigate performance characteristics of magnetic resonance angiography, with or without magnetic resonance venography, for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Design Prospective, multicenter study from 10 April 2006 to 30 September 2008. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00241826) Setting 7 hospitals and their emergency services. Patients 371 adults with diagnosed or excluded pulmonary embolism. Measurements Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were measured by comparing independently read magnetic resonance imaging with the reference standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Reference standard diagnosis or exclusion was made by using various tests, including computed tomographic angiography and venography, ventilation–perfusion lung scan, venous ultra-sonography, D-dimer assay, and clinical assessment. Results Magnetic resonance angiography, averaged across centers, was technically inadequate in 25% of patients (92 of 371). The proportion of technically inadequate images ranged from 11% to 52% at various centers. Including patients with technically inadequate images, magnetic resonance angiography identified 57% (59 of 104) with pulmonary embolism. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography had a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 99%. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography and venography had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 96%, but 52% of patients (194 of 370) had technically inadequate results. Limitation A high proportion of patients with suspected embolism was not eligible or declined to participate. Conclusion Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography should be considered only at centers that routinely perform it well and only for patients for whom standard tests are contraindicated. Magnetic

  1. Magnetization and coercivity of nanocrystalline gadolinium iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyet, Dao Thi Thuy; Duong, Nguyen Phuc; Satoh, Takuya; Anh, Luong Ngoc; Hien, Than Duc

    2013-04-01

    Gadolinium iron garnet (GdIG) nanoparticles with mean particle size of about 37 nm have been synthesized by citrate precursor gel formation followed by annealing at 800 °C for 2 hours. Magnetic behavior of clustered GdIG nanoparticles was studied in temperature range from 5 K to above Curie temperature. The sample shows a magnetization compensation temperature Tcomp˜286.5 K and a Curie temperature TC˜560 K. In comparison with the bulk saturation magnetization, the sample exhibits lower spontaneous magnetization in the temperature region from 5 K to Tcomp whereas higher spontaneous magnetization is observed at higher temperatures up to near the Curie point. The magnetization curves show a differential susceptibility in high fields which increases sharply below 50 K. At very low temperatures, irreversibility was observed in the magnetization loops, enduring in the fields up to ˜12.5 kOe. The spontaneous magnetization, high-field susceptibility and low-temperature irreversible effect were discussed based on a model for the interacting particles consisting of ferrimagnetically aligned core spins and disordered spins in surface layer which become frozen at low temperatures. We proposed a mechanism for the enhancement of the spontaneous magnetization above Tcomp in which the Gd and Fe spins in the surface layer are largely decoupled at high temperatures and the surface Fe spins realign to the magnetic moment of the core. The magnetic coercivity Hc at low temperatures is governed by the effective anisotropy whereas in the vicinity of the compensation point a peak in the coercive force shows up as a result of the so-called paraprocess with the maximum value of 1.2 kOe at Tcomp and by further increasing temperature the coercivity decreases and eventually vanishes at about 500 K. The interparticle interactions were found to play an important role in the hysteresis behavior of the sample.

  2. The structural response of gadolinium phosphate to pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Heffernan, Karina M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Spencer, Elinor C.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-09-15

    Accurate elastic constants for gadolinium phosphate (GdPO{sub 4}) have been measured by single-crystal high-pressure diffraction methods. The bulk modulus of GdPO{sub 4} determined under hydrostatic conditions, 128.1(8) GPa (K′=5.8(2)), is markedly different from that obtained with GdPO{sub 4} under non-hydrostatic conditions (160(2) GPa), which indicates the importance of shear stresses on the elastic response of this phosphate. High pressure Raman and diffraction analysis indicate that the PO{sub 4} tetrahedra behave as rigid units in response to pressure and that contraction of the GdPO{sub 4} structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd–O–P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO{sub 9} polyhedra. - Graphical abstract: A high-pressure single crystal diffraction study of GdPO{sub 4} with the monazite structure is presented. The elastic behaviour of rare-earth phosphates are believed to be sensitive to shear forces. The bulk modulus of GdPO{sub 4} measured under hydrostatic conditions is 128.1(8) GPa. Compression of the structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd−O−P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO{sub 9} polyhedra. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The elastic responses of rare-earth phosphates are sensitive to shear forces. • The bulk modulus of GdPO{sub 4} measured under hydrostatic conditions is 128.1(8) GPa. • Twisting of the inter-polyhedral links allows compression of the GdPO{sub 4} structure. • Changes to the GdO{sub 9} polyhedra occur in response to pressure (<7.0 GPa).

  3. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps.

  4. Modeling gadolinium-bearing fuel in Ringhals PWRs using CASMO/SIMULATE

    SciTech Connect

    Kurcyusz, E. )

    1993-01-01

    Ringhals units 2, 3, and 4 are Westinghouse three-loop, 157-assembly pressurized water reactors (PWRs) operated by Vattenfall. Originally, all three reactors were loaded in an out-in scheme using reload fuel without burnable poisons. In recent cycles, gadolinium-bearing fuel was introduced to enable a low-leakage loading pattern and minimize fuel cycle costs. This paper focuses on the Fragema 17 x 17 AFA design with peripheral gadolinium rods loaded in units 3 and 4. The Ringhals units are modeled using the Studsvik core management system, consisting of the CASMO-3 transport theory lattice physics code,and the SIMULATE-3 advanced nodal reactor analysis code. The results of the studies verifying the accuracy of CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 on the assemblies with peripheral gadolinium rods are presented in this paper. The verification was carried out against CASMO-3 color-set calculations and measured reactor data.

  5. Biodistribution of ultra small gadolinium-based nanoparticles as theranostic agent: application to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Miladi, Imen; Duc, Géraldine Le; Kryza, David; Berniard, Aurélie; Mowat, Pierre; Roux, Stéphane; Taleb, Jacqueline; Bonazza, Pauline; Perriat, Pascal; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Gadolinium-based nanoparticles are novel objects with interesting physical properties, allowing their use for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles were imaged following intravenous injection in healthy rats and rats grafted with 9L gliosarcoma tumors using magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphic imaging. Quantitative biodistribution using gamma-counting of each sampled organ confirmed that these nanoparticles were rapidly cleared essentially by renal excretion. Accumulation of these nanoparticles in 9L gliosarcoma tumors implanted in the rat brain was quantitated. This passive and long-duration accumulation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in tumor, which is related to disruption of the blood-brain barrier, is in good agreement with the use of these nanoparticles as radiosensitizers for brain tumors.

  6. Measurement of gamma-ray production from thermal neutron capture on gadolinium for neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Takatomi

    2017-02-01

    Recently, several scientific applications of gadolinium are found in neutrino physics experiments. Gadolinium-157 is the nucleus, which has the largest thermal neutron capture cross-section among all stable nuclei. Gadolinium-155 also has the large cross-section. These neutron capture reactions provide the gamma-ray cascade with the total energy of about 8 MeV. This reaction is applied for several neutrino experiments, e.g. reactor neutrino experiments and Gd doped large water Cherenkov detector experiments, to recognize inverse-beta-decay reaction. A good Gd(n,γ) simulation model is needed to evaluate the detection efficiency of the neutron capture reaction, i.e. the efficiency of IBD detection. In this presentation, we will report the development and study status of a Gd(n,γ) calculation model and comparison with our experimental data taken at ANNRI/MLF beam line, J-PARC.

  7. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps. PMID:27411781

  8. Gadolinium-Conjugated Gold Nanoshells for Multimodal Diagnostic Imaging and Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Andrew J.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Deng, Nanfu; Larina, Irina V.; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal imaging offers the potential to improve diagnosis and enhance the specificity of photothermal cancer therapy. Toward this goal, we have engineered gadolinium-conjugated gold nanoshells and demonstrated that they enhance contrast for magnetic resonance imaging, X-Ray, optical coherence tomography, reflectance confocal microscopy, and two-photon luminescence. Additionally, these particles effectively convert near-infrared light to heat, which can be used to ablate cancer cells. Ultimately, these studies demonstrate the potential of gadolinium-nanoshells for image-guided photothermal ablation. PMID:24115690

  9. Structural and optical properties of Nd{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide 1D nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathi, G. Mohan, R.; Raj, S. Gokul; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Neodymium doped gadolinium hydroxide [Nd:Gd(OH)3] nanorods were successfully synthesized at 60 °C through co-precipitation method. The dopant percentage was maintained at 5% and calcination was done at 750 °C temperature for 1 hour to form the respective neodymium doped gadolinium oxide [Nd:Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}] nanorods. The as-formed and annealed products were investigated in detail by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDX), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry.

  10. Misconnections in the Critically Ill: Injection of High-Dose Gadolinium into an External Ventricular Drain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sumit; Rejai, Sepehr; Antongiorgi, Zarah; Gonzalez, Nestor; Stelzner, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    We report an unfortunate case of accidental administration of intrathecal gadolinium through an external ventricular drain in a postcraniotomy patient during magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. The incident occurred after the venous contrast line was connected mistakenly to the ventricular drainage catheter. The patient subsequently developed confusion, aphasia, and right facial droop with new computed tomography evidence of diffuse cerebral edema and stroke. Review of the magnetic resonance image revealed the inappropriate presence of subarachnoid gadolinium. Despite all interventions, the patient developed irreversible neurologic disability. We address the clinical sequelae, management strategies, and factors contributing to the catheter misconnection that led to this event.

  11. Structural, morphological and optical investigations on Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathi, G.; Mohan, R.; Raj, S. Gokul; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    One dimensional uniform Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium hydroxide nanorods have been prepared via simple co– precipitation technique at 60 °C temperature for 1 hour. The samples were calcinated at 750 °C to obtain Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide nanorods. The 1D nanorods were then subjected to different characterization techniques to ascertain its structural stability and its morphology were investigated using high–resolution transmission electron microscopy. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry was investigated and the obtained results were discussed in detail.

  12. Gadolinium-conjugated gold nanoshells for multimodal diagnostic imaging and photothermal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Andrew J; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Deng, Nanfu; Larina, Irina V; Decuzzi, Paolo; West, Jennifer L

    2014-02-12

    Multimodal imaging offers the potential to improve diagnosis and enhance the specificity of photothermal cancer therapy. Toward this goal, gadolinium-conjugated gold nanoshells are engineered and it is demonstrated that they enhance contrast for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray, optical coherence tomography, reflectance confocal microscopy, and two-photon luminescence. Additionally, these particles effectively convert near-infrared light to heat, which can be used to ablate cancer cells. Ultimately, these studies demonstrate the potential of gadolinium-nanoshells for image-guided photothermal ablation.

  13. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    2012-02-22

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

  14. Syntheses, structures, magnetism, and optical properties of gadolinium scandium chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Gengbang; Choi, Eun Sang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2009-05-15

    Three gadolinium scandium chalcogenides have been synthesized using Sb{sub 2}Q{sub 3} (Q=S, Se) fluxes at 975 deg. C. Gd{sub 3.04}Sc{sub 0.96}S{sub 6}, GdScS{sub 3}, and Gd{sub 1.05}Sc{sub 0.95}Se{sub 3} are crystallized in U{sub 3}ScS{sub 6} type, GdFeO{sub 3} type, and UFeS{sub 3} type structures, respectively. The magnetic susceptibilities for these compounds follow the Curie-Weiss law above their transition temperatures. The effective magnetic moments are close to calculated values for free Gd{sup 3+} ions. The Weiss constants for Gd{sub 3.04}Sc{sub 0.96}S{sub 6}, GdScS{sub 3}, and Gd{sub 1.05}Sc{sub 0.95}Se{sub 3} are determined to be -3.3(1), -4.5(4), and 1.5(1) K, respectively. Gd{sub 3.04}Sc{sub 0.96}S{sub 6} orders antiferromagnetically below 9 K. GdScS{sub 3} exhibits an antiferromagnetic ordering below 3 K with a weak ferromagnetism. Gd{sub 1.05}Sc{sub 0.95}Se{sub 3} undergoes a ferromagnetic transition around 5 K. The optical band gaps for Gd{sub 3.04}Sc{sub 0.96}S{sub 6}, GdScS{sub 3}, and Gd{sub 1.05}Sc{sub 0.95}Se{sub 3} are 1.5, 2.1, and 1.2 eV, respectively. - Graphical abstract: A view of the three-dimensional structure of Gd{sub 3.04}Sc{sub 0.96}S{sub 6} along the c axis.

  15. A Manganese Alternative to Gadolinium for MRI Contrast.

    PubMed

    Gale, Eric M; Atanasova, Iliyana P; Blasi, Francesco; Ay, Ilknur; Caravan, Peter

    2015-12-16

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used to diagnose soft tissue and vascular abnormalities. However, safety concerns limit the use of iodinated and gadolinium (Gd)-based CT and MRI contrast media in renally compromised patients. With an estimated 14% of the US population suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD), contrast media compatible with renal impairment is sorely needed. We present the new manganese(II) complex [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) as a Gd alternative. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) is among the most stable Mn(II) complexes at pH 7.4 (log KML = 11.40). In the presence of 25 mol equiv of Zn at pH 6.0, 37 °C, [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) is 20-fold more resistant to dissociation than [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)](2-). Relaxivity of [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) in blood plasma is comparable to commercial Gd contrast agents. Biodistribution analysis confirms that [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) clears via a mixed renal/hepatobiliary pathway with >99% elimination by 24 h. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) was modified to form a bifunctional chelator and 4 chelates were conjugated to a fibrin-specific peptide to give Mn-FBP. Mn-FBP binds the soluble fibrin fragment DD(E) with Kd = 110 nM. Per Mn relaxivity of Mn-FBP is 4-fold greater than [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) and increases 60% in the presence of fibrin, consistent with binding. Mn-FBP provided equivalent thrombus enhancement to the state of the art Gd analogue, EP-2104R, in a rat model of arterial thrombosis. Mn metabolite analysis reveals no evidence of dechelation and the probe was >99% eliminated after 24 h. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) is a lead development candidate for an imaging probe that is compatible with renally compromised patients.

  16. A Manganese Alternative to Gadolinium for MRI Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Eric M.; Atanasova, Iliyana P.; Blasi, Francesco; Ay, Ilknur; Caravan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used to diagnose soft tissue and vascular abnormalities. However safety concerns limit the use of iodinated and gadolinium- (Gd) based CT and MRI contrast media in renally compromised patients. With an estimated 14% of the US population suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD), contrast media compatible with renal impairment is sorely needed. We present the new manganese(II) complex [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- as a Gd alternative. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- is amongst the most stable Mn(II) complexes at pH 7.4 (log KML = 11.40). In the presence of 25 mol equiv. Zn at pH 6.0, 37 °C, [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- is 20-fold more resistant to dissociation than [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)]2-. Relaxivity of [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- in blood plasma is comparable to commercial Gd contrast agents. Biodistribution analysis confirms that [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- clears via a mixed renal/ hepatobiliary pathway with >99% elimination by 24h. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- was modified to form a bifunctional chelator and 4 chelates were conjugated to a fibrin-specific peptide to give Mn-FBP. Mn-FBP binds the soluble fibrin fragment DD(E) with Kd = 110 nM. Per Mn relaxivity of Mn-FBP is 4-fold greater than [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- and increases 60% in the presence of fibrin, consistent with binding. Mn-FBP provided equivalent thrombus enhancement to the state of the art Gd analog, EP-2104R, in a rat model of arterial thrombosis. Mn metabolite analysis reveals no evidence of dechelation and the probe was >99% eliminated after 24 hr. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- is a lead development candidate for an imaging probe that is compatible with renally compromised patients. PMID:26588204

  17. Tissue deposition of gadolinium and development of NSF: a convergence of factors.

    PubMed

    Perazella, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast (GBC) exposure has recently been linked to the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with underlying kidney disease and may in fact be the previously unrecognized trigger for the fibrosing process. As NSF is fairly rare in this patient population, a number of permissive factors are likely required for GBC exposure to initiate fibrosis. Advanced kidney disease is an absolute requirement whereas vascular injury and an inflammatory state, and a mix of co-factors including increased serum phosphate and calcium concentrations and iron overload further enhance risk. The combination of these events allows excess circulating gadolinium, which dissociates from its chelate to leak out of vessels and deposit in tissues. Free or bound tissue gadolinium, a rare earth metal of the lanthanoid series, promotes fibrosis via either direct binding to the collagen helix or, once the metal has been engulfed by macrophages, through the production of free oxygen radicals, cytokines, and other profibrotic factors that attract circulating fibrocytes to tissues. These fibrocytes then differentiate into fibroblast-like spindle cells that produce connective tissue matrix and other angiogenic and growth factors that further enhance tissue fibrosis. Direct gadolinium activation of transglutaminases on these tissue fibroblast-like cells may also promote fibrosis.

  18. [Physico-chemical and toxicological profile of gadolinium chelates as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Idée, J-M; Fretellier, N; Thurnher, M M; Bonnemain, B; Corot, C

    2015-07-01

    Gadolinium chelates (GC) are contrast agents widely used to facilitate or to enable diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). From a regulatory viewpoint, GC are drugs. GC have largely contributed to the success of MRI, which has become a major component of clinician's diagnostic armamentarium. GC are not metabolised and are excreted by the kidneys. They distribute into the extracellular compartment. Because of its high intrinsic toxicity, gadolinium must be administered as a chelate. GC can be classified according to two key molecular features: (a) nature of the chelating moiety: either macrocyclic molecules in which gadolinium is caged in the pre-organized cavity of the ligand, or linear, open-chain molecules, (b) ionicity: Gd chelates can be ionic (meglumine or sodium salts) or non-ionic. The thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of the various GCs differ according to these structural characteristics. The kinetic stability of macrocyclic GCs is much higher than that of linear GCs and the thermodynamic stability of ionic GCs is generally higher than that of non-ionic GC, thus leading to a lower risk of gadolinium dissociation. This class of drugs has enjoyed an excellent reputation in terms of safety for a long time, until a causal link with a recently-described serious disease, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), was evidenced. It is acknowledged that the vast majority of NSF cases are related to the administration of some linear CG in renally-impaired patients. Health authorities, worldwide, released recommendations which drastically reduced the occurrence of new cases.

  19. Preparation of 152Gd targets from a small quantity of gadolinium oxide in a pyrochemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipski, A. R.

    1995-02-01

    A simple method utilizing small amounts (< 5 mg) of isotopically enriched material for the production of gadolinium targets is discussed. An electrostatically focused e-gun is used in the procedure in which 152Gd 2O 3 powder undergoes reduction-distillation and deposition onto an Fe foil.

  20. A Polymeric Fastener can Easily Functionalize Liposome Surfaces with Gadolinium for Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Cartney E.; Shkumatov, Artem; Withers, Sarah G.; Glockner, James F.; Misra, Sanjay; Roy, Edward J.; Wong, Chun-Ho; Zimmerman, Steven C.; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2013-01-01

    Common methods of loading magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents into nanoparticles often suffer from challenges related to particle formation, complex chemical modification/purification steps, and reduced contrast efficiency. This study presents a simple, yet advanced process to address these issues by loading gadolinium, an MRI contrast agent, exclusively on a liposome surface using a polymeric fastener. The fastener, so named for its ability to physically link the two functional components together, consisted of chitosan substituted with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) to chelate gadolinium, as well as octadecyl chains to stabilize the modified chitosan on the liposome surface. The assembly strategy, mimicking the mechanisms by which viruses and proteins naturally anchor to a cell, provided greater T1 relaxivity than liposomes loaded with gadolinium in both the interior and outer leaflet. Gadolinium-coated liposomes were ultimately evaluated in vivo using murine ischemia models to highlight the diagnostic capability of the system. Taken together, this process decouples particle assembly and functionalization, and therefore has considerable potential to enhance imaging quality while alleviating many of the difficulties associated with multifunctional particle fabrication. PMID:24083377

  1. Gadolinium-enhanced computed tomography cystogram to diagnose bladder augment rupture in patients with iodine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Newport, John Paul; Dusseault, Beau N; Butler, Carina; Pais, Vernon M

    2008-05-01

    Anaphylactic reaction to iodinated contrast is a potentially life-threatening complication of diagnostic imaging studies. We report the successful use of gadolinium as an alternative contrast agent for computed tomography cystogram in a patient with a history of anaphylactic reaction to iodinated contrast. This technique allowed us rapidly to diagnose a rupture of her bladder augmentation and pursue operative repair.

  2. Lithium Gadolinium Borate in Plastic Scintillator as an Antineutrino Detection Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    techniques, such as tags, seals, and tamper proof video cameras , but no direct measurement of the fission process [7]. In smaller research...inverse beta interaction is captured by a gadolinium nucleus, producing multiple gamma rays. These gamma rays in turn generate fast Compton -scattered...electrons,2 which generate a second flash of Cerenkov light. This design has only been 2 Compton

  3. Myocardial late gadolinium enhancement in specific cardiomyopathies by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Silva, Caterina; Moon, James C; Elkington, Andrew G; John, Anna S; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Pennell, Dudley J

    2007-12-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can visualize myocardial interstitial abnormalities. The aim of this study was to assess whether regions of abnormal myocardium can also be visualized by late enhancement gadolinium CMR in the specific cardiomyopathies. A retrospective review of all referrals for gadolinium CMR with specific cardiomyopathy over 20 months. Nine patients with different specific cardiomyopathies were identified. Late enhancement was demonstrated in all patients, with a mean signal intensity of 390 +/- 220% compared with normal regions. The distribution pattern of late enhancement was unlike the subendocardial late enhancement related to coronary territories found in myocardial infarction. The affected areas included papillary muscles (sarcoid), the mid-myocardium (Anderson-Fabry disease, glycogen storage disease, myocarditis, Becker muscular dystrophy) and the global sub-endocardium (systemic sclerosis, Loeffler's endocarditis, amyloid, Churg-Strauss). Focal myocardial late gadolinium enhancement is found in the specific cardiomyopathies, and the pattern is distinct from that seen in infarction. Further systematic studies are warranted to assess whether the pattern and extent of late enhancement may aid diagnosis and prognostic assessment.

  4. Criticality experiments with low enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.; Murphy, E.S.; Clayton, E.D.; Keay, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The results obtained in a criticality experiments program performed for British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL) under contract with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved low enriched UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium, and are in direct support of BNFL plans to use soluble compounds of the neutron poison gadolinium as a primary criticality safeguard in the reprocessing of low enriched nuclear fuels. The experiments were designed primarily to provide data for validating a calculation method being developed for BNFL design and safety assessments, and to obtain data for the use of gadolinium as a neutron poison in nuclear chemical plant operations - particularly fuel dissolution. The experiments program covers a wide range of neutron moderation (near optimum to very under-moderated) and a wide range of gadolinium concentration (zero to about 2.5 g Gd/l). The measurements provide critical and subcritical k/sub eff/ data (1 greater than or equal to k/sub eff/ greater than or equal to 0.87) on fuel-water assemblies of UO/sub 2/ rods at two enrichments (2.35 wt % and 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U) and on mixed fuel-water assemblies of UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ rods containing 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U and 2 wt % PuO/sub 2/ in natural UO/sub 2/ respectively. Critical size of the lattices was determined with water containing no gadolinium and with water containing dissolved gadolinium nitrate. Pulsed neutron source measurements were performed to determine subcritical k/sub eff/ values as additional amounts of gadolinium were successively dissolved in the water of each critical assembly. Fission rate measurements in /sup 235/U using solid state track recorders were made in each of the three unpoisoned critical assemblies, and in the near-optimum moderated and the close-packed poisoned assemblies of this fuel.

  5. Impact of gadolinium-157 containing nanoscale magnetosensitive composites on morfofunctional properties of cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lavrenchuk, H Y; Shevchenko, Y B; Petranovska, A L; Asmolkova, V S; Oksamytnyi, V M; Kozlovska, I V; Yavorska, O H

    2014-09-01

    Objective - to investigate the morphofunctional cells properties under the action of magneticallybased nanocomposites containing gadolinium-157. Materials and methods. Experimental studies are performed in cell culture line L929 Nanocomposites based on magnetite modified by functional amino groups chemically fixed by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and gadolinium - (Fe3O4/γ-APS/DTPA-Gd) were studied (1), also by meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) - (Fe3O4/DMSA-Gd), which binds to the hydroxyl group of magnetite surface (2); gadolinium was adsorbed from a solution of gadolinium sulfate. Reagent 3 - magnetic substance Fe3O4 with sodium oleate. Morphofunctional characteristics of cell culture were evaluated in various terms by standard indicators of sustainability: proliferative and mitotic activity and the number of giant multinuclear cells, apoptosis. Results and conclusions. We established that magnetdriven nanocomposites with gadolinium modified by DTPA and DMSA, were more biocompatibile to cells: incubation of cells with neutron capture agents (NCA) in the studied range of concentrations showed no toxicity, except maximum concentration, while decreasing cells adhesive properties. For all nanocomposites we observed decrease in mitotic activity in the background of the control cell population density, which may indicate synchronization of cell division. We found that the stabilized by sodium oleate ferrite caused destructive changes in cell culture only at concentrations of 500 μg / ml, but reduced mitotic activity in cell culture in 3-5 times in the whole range of concentrations. It is shown that magnetdriven nanocomposites induce different levels of apoptosis in cultured cells depending on the concentration of the reactants.

  6. Nickel-based Gadolinium Alloy for Neutron Adsorption Application in Ram Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg Wachs; James Sterbentz; William Hurt; P. E. McConnell; C. V. Robino; F. Tovesson; T. S. Hill

    2007-10-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy and chromium-nickel (Cr-Ni) stainless steel, modified by the addition of boron. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the materials at specific gadolinium and boron dopant levels. The Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy is envisioned to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). For these transmission experiments, test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy and 1.16 wt% boron in stainless steel. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using total neutron cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium and boron elements and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy and borated stainless steel test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the size and distribution of the gadolinium in both the hot-top (as-cast) and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd converted to plate was not a discriminator related to neutron absorption. Moreover, the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF VII) total neutron cross section data were accurate.

  7. Comparison of an amorphous silicon/cesium iodide flat-panel digital chest radiography system with screen/film and computed radiography systems--a contrast-detail phantom study.

    PubMed

    Rong, X J; Shaw, C C; Liu, X; Lemacks, M R; Thompson, S K

    2001-11-01

    Flat-panel (FP) based digital radiography systems have recently been introduced as a new and improved digital radiography technology; it is important to evaluate and compare this new technology with currently widely used conventional screen/film (SF) and computed radiography (CR) techniques. In this study, the low-contrast performance of an amorphous silicon/cesium iodide (aSi/Csl)-based flat-panel digital chest radiography system is compared to those of a screen/film and a computed radiography system by measuring their contrast-detail curves. Also studied were the effects of image enhancement in printing the digital images and dependence on kVp and incident exposure. It was found that the FP system demonstrated significantly better low-contrast performance than the SF or CR systems. It was estimated that a dose savings of 70%-90% could be achieved to match the low-contrast performance of the FP images to that of the SF images. This dose saving was also found to increase with the object size. No significant difference was observed in low-contrast performances between the SF and CR systems. The use of clinical enhancement protocols for printing digital images was found to be essential and result in better low-contrast performance. No significant effects were observed for different kVps. From the results of this contrast-detail phantom study, the aSi/CsI-based flat-panel digital chest system should perform better under clinical situations for detection of low-contrast objects such as lung nodules. However, proper processing prior to printing would be essential to realizing this better performance.

  8. Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions In Gadolinium Iron Borate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamova, S. A.; Struzhkin, V. V.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Gavriliuk, A. G.; Brown, D.; Toellner, T.; Zhao, J.; Lerche, M.; Lyubutin, I. S.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.

    2007-12-01

    An understanding of spin crossover (SC) dynamics is relevant to understanding of a role or participation of SC in natural systems including lower Mantle minerals, heme proteins as well as from fundamental science of view. For example, pressure-induced electronic spin transitions of Fe2+ and Fe3+ iron occur in magnesiowustite, silicate perovskite and post-perovskite which are abundant minerals in the Earth's lower mantle [1-3]. Such a SC phenomenon has recently been observed in a number of magnetic minerals FeBO3 [4, 5], BiFeO3 [6], Fe2O3 [7], and Y3Fe5O12 [8], (La, Pr)FeO3 [9, 10]. In those cases, iron ions are in the trivalent state Fe3+ and the high-spin-low-spin (HS-LS) crossover is manifested as the collapse of the local magnetic moment and as the transition of the antiferromagnet to a paramagnetic state. For example, in FeBO3 at low temperatures a spin-crossover and some magnetic transitions with two triple points were found [4, 5]. Gadolinium iron borate, GdFe3(BO3)4 is also a system with SEC and recently, we have reported on phase transitions induced by high pressures in this material [11, 12]. We studied the structural and magnetic behavior of GdFe573(BO3)4 at high pressures and temperatures using a diamond anvil cell and a Synchrotron Mossbauer Spectroscopy technique. The hyperfine parameters and results obtained from the experiments are discussed. Based on our experimental data and theoretical calculation a tentative magnetic P-T phase diagram and an equation of states of GdFe573(BO3)4 are proposed. Important features of the phase diagram are a spin crossover, insulator-semiconductor transition and possible presence of two triple points where magnetic and paramagnetic phases of the high-spin and low-spin states coexist. 1. J. Badro, J.-P. Rueff, G. Vankó, et al., Science 305, 383 (2004). 2. J. M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, G. Shen, et al., American Mineralogist 90, 199 (2005). 3. J.Li, V.V. Struzhkin, H.-K. Mao, et al., PNAS 101, 14027 (2004). 4. I.A. Troyan

  9. Tracing gadolinium-based contrast agents from surface water to drinking water by means of speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Birka, Marvin; Wehe, Christoph A; Hachmöller, Oliver; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, a significant amount of anthropogenic gadolinium has been released into the environment as a result of the broad application of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Since this anthropogenic gadolinium anomaly has also been detected in drinking water, it has become necessary to investigate the possible effect of drinking water purification on these highly polar microcontaminats. Therefore, a novel highly sensitive method for speciation analysis of gadolinium is presented. For that purpose, the hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was employed. In order to enhance the detection power, sample introduction was carried out by ultrasonic nebulization. In combination with a novel HILIC method using a diol-based stationary phase, it was possible to achieve superior limits of detection for frequently applied gadolinium-based contrast agents below 20pmol/L. With this method, the contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A were determined in concentrations up to 159pmol/L in samples from several waterworks in a densely populated region of Germany alongside the river Ruhr as well as from a waterworks near a catchment lake. Thereby, the direct impact of anthropogenic gadolinium species being present in the surface water on the amount of anthropogenic gadolinium in drinking water was shown. There was no evidence for the degradation of contrast agents, the release of Gd(3+) or the presence of further Gd species.

  10. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Birch, J.; Etxegarai, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Oliveri, E.; Oksanen, E.; Robinson, L.; Ropelewski, L.; Schmidt, S.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.

    2016-05-01

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer (NMX) require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The μTPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of 10B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with a measured efficiency of 11.8% at a wavelength of 2 Åand a position resolution better than 250 μm.

  11. The statistical decay properties of Gadolinium isotopes using the DANCE array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.

    2008-10-01

    The gadolinium isotopes are interesting for reactor applications as well as for medicine and astrophysics. There are seven stable isotopes of gadolinium with varying deformation. Decay γ rays following neutron capture on Gd isotopes are detected by the DANCE array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation and close packing of the detector array enable γ-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric property of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a specific isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles γ-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. Various photon strength function models are used for comparison with experimentally measured DANCE data and provide insight for understanding the statistical decay properties of deformed nuclei.

  12. Regression of gadolinium-enhanced lesions in patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Lucchetta, Marta; Manara, Renzo; Perilongo, Giorgio; Clementi, Maurizio; Trevisson, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I is a genetic condition with an autosomal dominant transmission characterized by neurocutaneous involvement and a predisposition to tumor development. Central nervous system manifestations include benign areas of dysmyelination and possibly hazardous glial tumors whose clinical management may result challenging. Here, we report on three patients diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis type I whose brain MRI follow-up showed the presence of gadolinium-enhancing lesions which spontaneously regressed. In none of the three cases, the lesions showed any clinical correlate and eventually presented a striking reduction in size while gadolinium enhancement disappeared despite no specific therapy administration during the follow-up. Although their nature remains undetermined, these lesions presented a benign evolution. However, they might be misdiagnosed as potentially life-threatening tumors. Hitherto, a similar behavior has been described only in scattered cases and we believe these findings may be of particular interest for the clinical management of patients affected by neurofibromatosis type I.

  13. The role of gadolinium chelates in the mechanism of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: A critical update.

    PubMed

    Idée, Jean-Marc; Fretellier, Nathalie; Robic, Caroline; Corot, Claire

    2014-11-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is an iatrogenic scleroderma-like fibrosing systemic disorder occurring in patients with severe or end-stage renal disease. It was established as a new clinical entity in the year 2000. A causal role for gadolinium chelates (GC), widely used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, was suggested six years later. It rapidly appeared that the occurrence of NSF was associated with prior administration of GCs with lower thermodynamic stability, leading to warnings being published by health authorities and learned societies worldwide. Although a role for the chelated form of the less stable GCs has been proposed, the most commonly accepted hypothesis involves the gradual release of dissociated gadolinium in the body, leading to systemic fibrosis. However, the entire chain of events is still not fully understood in a causal way and many uncertainties remain.

  14. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications.

  15. Renal function, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and other adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast media.

    PubMed

    Canga, Ana; Kislikova, Maria; Martínez-Gálvez, María; Arias, Mercedes; Fraga-Rivas, Patricia; Poyatos, Cecilio; de Francisco, Angel L M

    2014-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder that affects patients with impaired renal function and is associated with the administration of gadolinium-based contrast media used in MRI. Despite being in a group of drugs that were considered safe, report about this potentially serious adverse reaction was a turning point in the administration guidelines of these contrast media. There has been an attempt to establish safety parameters to identify patients with risk factors of renal failure. The close pharmacovigilance and strict observation of current regulations, with special attention being paid to the value of glomerular filtration, have reduced the published cases involving the use of gadolinium-based contrast media. In a meeting between radiologists and nephrologists we reviewed the most relevant aspects currently and recommendations for its prevention.

  16. Thermodynamic property evaluation and magnetic refrigeration cycle analysis for gadolinium gallium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.W.

    1994-12-01

    Based on relevant material property data and previous model formulations, a magnetothermodynamic property map for gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}) was adapted for refrigeration cycle analysis in the temperature range 4-40 K and the magnetic field range 0-6 T. Employing methods similar to those previously developed for other materials and temperature ranges, assessments of limitations and relative performance were made for Carnot, ideal regenerative, and pseudo-constant field regenerative cycles. It was found that although Carnot cycle limitations on available temperature lift for gadolinium gallium garnet are not as severe as the limitations for materials previously examined, considerable improvement in cooling capacity and temperature lift combinations can be achieved by using regenerative cycles if serious loss mechanisms are avoided.

  17. A new gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator for reactor neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yayun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liu, Jinchang; Wang, Zhimin; Zhou, Pengju; Zhao, Yuliang

    2008-01-01

    A high flash point, low toxicity gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) has been developed for the detection of reactor neutrino. Carboxylic acid 3,5,5-trimethylhexanoic acid is used as complexing ligand to form organo-complex with gadolinium chloride, and 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO), and 1,4-bis[2-methylstyryl]benzene (bis-MSB) are used as primary fluor and wavelength shifter, respectively. The scintillator base is linear alkyl benzene (LAB). The Gd-LS prepared with such recipe has long attenuation length, high light yield and long-term stability. Eight hundred liters of Gd-LS (1 g/L Gd) was synthesized and tested in a prototype detector at Institute of High Energy Physics. Preliminary results of the obviously peaks corresponding to neutron captured by H and Gd give an additional evidence that such Gd-LS are very promising for anti-neutrino detection.

  18. Characterizing Prostiva RF treatments of the prostate for BPH with gadolinium-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Huidobro, Christian; Larson, Benjamin; Mynderse, Samuel; Myers, James J; Busel, David; Acevedo, Cristian; Larson, Thayne R; Mynderse, Lance A

    2009-01-18

    Transurethral needle ablation (TUNA) is an accepted and effective therapy for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Prostiva (Medtronic, Shoreview, MN) is the newest-generation device, which includes a new needle design and radio frequency (RF) generator. This device creates temperatures of 120 degrees C and necrotic lesions in less than 2.5 min. Using previously described techniques, we analyzed dynamic, gadolinium-enhanced MRIs to characterize the ablative properties of the new Prostiva RF device. Ten men with LUTS due to BPH were treated with the standard Prostiva manufacturer-recommended protocol. The bladder neck and lateral lobes received treatment based on prostate volume and prostatic urethral length. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI sequences were obtained prior to and 1 week post-treatment. Analyze software (Mayo Clinic Biomedical Imaging Resource, Rochester, MN) was used to evaluate MRIs. New gadolinium defects were seen in all patients following Prostiva treatments. All lesions coalesced within the prostate. No defects were seen beyond the prostate, and the urethra was spared in all patients. The mean volume of necrosis was 7.56 cc, representing a mean of 11.28% of total prostate volume. Dynamic, gadolinium-enhanced MRIs demonstrate new vascular defects representing necrosis caused by Prostiva RF therapy of the prostate. The standard Prostiva RF protocol produces lesions that coalesce to create larger lesions in the bladder neck and lateral lobes. Compared to the TUNA Precision Plus device, the ablative lesions appear comparable while produced with a shorter burn time.

  19. Sensitive and transportable gadolinium-core plastic scintillator sphere for neutron detection and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Carrel, Frédérick; Corre, Gwenolé; Normand, Stéphane; Méchin, Laurence; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Neutron detection forms a critical branch of nuclear-related issues, currently driven by the search for competitive alternative technologies to neutron counters based on the helium-3 isotope. The deployment of plastic scintillators shows a high potential for efficient detectors, safer and more reliable than liquids, more easily scalable and cost-effective than inorganic. In the meantime, natural gadolinium, through its 155 and mostly 157 isotopes, presents an exceptionally high interaction probability with thermal neutrons. This paper introduces a dual system including a metal gadolinium core inserted at the center of a high-scale plastic scintillator sphere. Incident fast neutrons are thermalized by the scintillator shell and then may be captured with a significant probability by gadolinium 155 and 157 nuclei in the core. The deposition of a sufficient fraction of the capture high-energy prompt gamma signature inside the scintillator shell will then allow discrimination from background radiations by energy threshold, and therefore neutron detection. The scaling of the system with the Monte Carlo MCNPX2.7 code was carried out according to a tradeoff between the moderation of incident fast neutrons and the probability of slow neutron capture by a moderate-cost metal gadolinium core. Based on the parameters extracted from simulation, a first laboratory prototype for the assessment of the detection method principle has been synthetized. The robustness and sensitivity of the neutron detection principle are then assessed by counting measurement experiments. Experimental results confirm the potential for a stable, highly sensitive, transportable and cost-efficient neutron detector and orientate future investigation toward promising axes.

  20. Highly absorbing gadolinium test device to characterize the performance of neutron imaging detector systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenzweig, C.; Frei, G.; Lehmann, E.; Kuehne, G.; David, C.

    2007-05-15

    We report on the fabrication and application of a novel neutron imaging test device made of gadolinium. It is designed for a real time evaluation of the spatial resolution, resolution direction, and distortions of a neutron imaging detector system. Measurements of the spatial resolution of {sup 6}LiF doped ZnS scintillator screens with different thicknesses and of imaging plates were performed. The obtained results are in good agreement with comparison measurements using the standard knife edge detection method.

  1. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; Rezaei, Arash; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-15

    Restenosis is a major problem after balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. The aim of this study is to introduce gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB) as a suitable modality for treatment of stenosis. The utility of GdNCB in intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) of stent stenosis is investigated by using the GEANT4 and MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. To study capture rate, Kerma, absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate around a Gd-containing stent activated with neutrons, a 30 mm long, 5 mm diameter gadolinium foil is chosen. The input data is a neutron spectrum used for clinical neutron capture therapy in Studsvik, Sweden. Thermal neutron capture in gadolinium yields a spectrum of high-energy gamma photons, which due to the build-up effect gives an almost flat dose delivery pattern to the first 4 mm around the stent. The absorbed dose rate is 1.33 Gy/min, 0.25 mm from the stent surface while the dose to normal tissue is in order of 0.22 Gy/min, i.e., a factor of 6 lower. To spare normal tissue further fractionation of the dose is also possible. The capture rate is relatively high at both ends of the foil. The dose distribution from gamma and charge particle radiation at the edges and inside the stent contributes to a nonuniform dose distribution. This will lead to higher doses to the surrounding tissue and may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. The position of the stent can be verified and corrected by the treatment plan prior to activation. Activation of the stent by an external neutron field can be performed days after catherization when the target cells start to proliferate and can be expected to be more radiation sensitive. Another advantage of the nonradioactive gadolinium stent is the possibility to avoid radiation hazard to personnel.

  2. Proposed experiment to measure {gamma}-rays from the thermal neutron capture of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Takatomi; Ou, I.; Izumi, T.; Yamaguchi, R.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.

    2012-11-12

    Gadolinium-157 ({sup 157}Gd) has the largest thermal neutron capture cross section among any stable nuclei. The thermal neutron capture yields {gamma}-ray cascade with total energy of about 8 MeV. Because of these characteristics, Gd is applied for the recent neutrino detectors. Here, we propose an experiment to measure the multiplicity and the angular correlation of {gamma}-rays from the Gd neutron capture. With these information, we expect the improved identification of the Gd neutron capture.

  3. Gadolinium Oxide / Silicon Thin Film Heterojunction Solid-State Neutron Detector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) and p-type silicon heterojunction diodes were produced using a supercritical water deposition process . Pulse height spectroscopy...possible to produce semi-conductor devices that have a high probability of neutron interaction. 1.2 Problem Statement Can a heterojunction diode...materials. The second area develops a method of depositing Gd on silicon with subsequent device fabrication. The third is a feasibility study that

  4. Nanoamplifiers synthesized from gadolinium and gold nanocomposites for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiumei; Shao, Yuanzhi; He, Haoqiang; Liu, Huan; Shen, Yingying; Huang, Wenlin; Li, Li

    2013-03-01

    We have synthesized an efficient and highly sensitive nanoamplifier composed of gadolinium-doped silica nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vitro and in vivo assays revealed enhancement of signal sensitivity, which may be explained by electron transfer between water and gadolinium-doped nanoparticles, apparent in the presence of gold. In vitro and in vivo evaluation demonstrated nanoamplifier incurred minimal cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity, increased stability, and gradual excretion patterns. Tumor targeted properties were preliminarily determined when the nanoamplifier was injected into mouse models of colon cancer liver metastasis. Furthermore, although AuNPs departed from the nanoamplifiers in specific mice tissues, optical and magnetic resonance imaging was efficient, especially in metastatic tumors. These assays validate our nanoamplifier as an effective MRI signal enhancer with sensitive cancer diagnosis potential.We have synthesized an efficient and highly sensitive nanoamplifier composed of gadolinium-doped silica nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vitro and in vivo assays revealed enhancement of signal sensitivity, which may be explained by electron transfer between water and gadolinium-doped nanoparticles, apparent in the presence of gold. In vitro and in vivo evaluation demonstrated nanoamplifier incurred minimal cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity, increased stability, and gradual excretion patterns. Tumor targeted properties were preliminarily determined when the nanoamplifier was injected into mouse models of colon cancer liver metastasis. Furthermore, although AuNPs departed from the nanoamplifiers in specific mice tissues, optical and magnetic resonance imaging was efficient, especially in metastatic tumors. These assays validate our nanoamplifier as an effective MRI signal enhancer with sensitive cancer diagnosis potential. Electronic supplementary information

  5. Thermal Excitation of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Using Spin Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Fridjhon, Peter; Rubin, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations into the thermal excitation of liquid paramagnetic contrast agents using the spin resonance relaxation mechanism are presented. The electronic spin-lattice relaxation time τ1e of gadolinium-based contrast agents, which is estimated at 0.1 ns, is ten orders of magnitude faster than the relaxation time of protons in water. The shorter relaxation time is found to significantly increase the rate of thermal energy deposition. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first study of gadolinium based contrast agents in a liquid state used as thermal agents. Analysis shows that when τ1e and other experimental parameters are optimally selected, a maximum theoretical heating rate of 29.4 °C.s−1 could be achieved which would suffice for clinical thermal ablation of neoplasms. The experimental results show a statistically significant thermal response for two out of the four contrast agents tested. The results are compared to the simulated estimates via analysis of a detailed model of the system. While these experimentally determined temperature rises are small and thus of no clinical utility, their presence supports the theoretical analysis and strongly suggests that the chemical structure of the selected compounds plays an important role in this mechanism of heat deposition. There exists an opportunity for the development of alternative gadolinium-based compounds with an order of magnitude longer τ1e in a diluted form to be used as an efficient hyperthermia agent for clinical use. PMID:27341338

  6. Selective Filtration of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water Cherenkov Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-04-10

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have been investigating the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This focused study of selective water filtration and GdCl{sub 3} extraction techniques, conducted at UC Irvine, followed up on highly promising benchtop-scale and kiloton-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of 2003 and 2005 Advanced Detector Research Program grants.

  7. Study of the Photon Strength Functions for Gadolinium Isotopes with the DANCE Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The gadolinium isotopes are interesting for reactor applications as well as for medicine and astrophysics. The gadolinium isotopes have some of the largest neutron capture cross sections. As a consequence they are used in the control rod in reactor fuel assembly. From the basic science point of view, there are seven stable isotopes of gadolinium with varying degrees of deformation. Therefore they provide a good testing ground for the study of deformation dependent structure such as the scissors mode. Decay gamma rays following neutron capture on Gd isotopes are detected by the DANCE array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation and close packing of the detector array enable gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric properties of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a specific isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles gamma-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. Various photon strength function models are used for comparison with experimentally measured DANCE data and provide insight for understanding the statistical decay properties of deformed nuclei.

  8. Specific lipase-responsive polymer-coated gadolinium nanoparticles for MR imaging of early acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Wu; Wang, Li-Qin; Xiang, Qing-Feng; Zhong, Qian; Chen, Lu-Ming; Xu, Cai-Xia; Xiang, Xian-Hong; Xu, Bo; Meng, Fei; Wan, Yi-Qian; Deng, David Y B

    2014-01-01

    Currently, available methods for diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) are mainly dependent on serum enzyme analysis and imaging techniques that are too low in sensitivity and specificity to accurately and promptly diagnose AP. The lack of early diagnostic tools highlights the need to search for a highly effective and specific diagnostic method. In this study, we synthesized a conditionally activated, gadolinium-containing, nanoparticle-based MRI nanoprobe as a diagnostic tool for the early identification of AP. Gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic fatty acid (Gd-DTPA-FA) nanoparticles were synthesized by conjugation of DTPA-FA ligand and gadolinium acetate. Gd-DTPA-FA exhibited low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility when characterized in vitro and in vivo studies. L-arginine induced a gradual increase in the intensity of the T1-weighted MRI signal from 1 h to 36 h in AP rat models. The increase in signal intensity was most significant at 1 h, 6 h and 12 h. These results suggest that the Gd-DTPA-FA as an MRI contrast agent is highly efficient and specific to detect early AP.

  9. Large Scale Testing and Development of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Vagine

    2007-09-18

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have begun to investigate the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This large-scale investigation, conducted in the one kiloton water Cherenkov detector built for the K2K long-baseline experiment, follows up on highly promising benchtop-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of a 2003 Advanced Detector Research Program grant.

  10. Study of the Photon Strength Functions for Gadolinium Isotopes with the DANCE Array

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.

    2009-03-10

    The gadolinium isotopes are interesting for reactor applications as well as for medicine and astrophysics. The gadolinium isotopes have some of the largest neutron capture cross sections. As a consequence they are used in the control rod in reactor fuel assembly. From the basic science point of view, there are seven stable isotopes of gadolinium with varying degrees of deformation. Therefore they provide a good testing ground for the study of deformation dependent structure such as the scissors mode. Decay gamma rays following neutron capture on Gd isotopes are detected by the DANCE array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation and close packing of the detector array enable gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric properties of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a specific isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles gamma-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. Various photon strength function models are used for comparison with experimentally measured DANCE data and provide insight for understanding the statistical decay properties of deformed nuclei.

  11. Gadolinium-148 and other spallation production cross section measurements for accelerator target facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Karen Corzine

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research facility and the 1L target at the Lujan Center. The Department of Energy requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on certain radionuclide inventories in the targets to avoid characterizing the facilities as "nuclear facilities." Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten. Allowed isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of Gadolinium-148 is low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total dose burden for the two tungsten targets based on present yield estimates. From a hazard classification standpoint, this severely limits the lifetime of these tungsten targets. The cross section is not well-established experimentally and this is the motivation for measuring the Gadolinium-148 production cross section from tungsten. In a series of experiments at the Weapons Neutron Research facility, Gadolinium-148 production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 mum thin tungsten, tantalum, and gold foils and 10 mum thin aluminum activation foils. In addition, spallation yields were determined for many short-lived and long-lived spallation products with these foils using gamma and alpha spectroscopy and compared with predictions of the Los Alamos National Laboratory codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. The cumulative Gadolinium-148 production cross section measured from tantalum, tungsten, and gold for incident 600-MeV protons were 15.2 +/- 4.0, 8.31 +/- 0.92, and 0.591 +/- 0.155, respectively. The average production cross sections measured at 800 MeV were 28.6 +/- 3.5, 19.4 +/- 1.8, and 3.69 +/- 0.50 for tantalum, tungsten, and gold, respectively. These cumulative

  12. Incorporation of Integral Fuel Burnable Absorbers Boron and Gadolinium into Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Clad Material

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, K.; Renk, T.J.; Lahoda, E.J.; Corradini, M.L

    2004-12-14

    Long-lived fuels require the use of higher enrichments of 235U or other fissile materials. Such high levels of fissile material lead to excessive fuel activity at the beginning of life. To counteract this excessive activity, integral fuel burnable absorbers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly. The two commonly used IFBA elements are gadolinium, which is added as gadolinium-oxide to the UO2 powder, and boron, which is applied as a zirconium-diboride coating on the UO2 pellets using plasma spraying or chemical vapor deposition techniques. The incorporation of IFBA into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be very costly because of their small volume and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. Other manufacturing issues that impact cost and performance are maintaining the correct levels of dosing, the reduction in fuel melting point due to gadolinium-oxide additions, and parasitic neutron absorption at fuel's end-of-life. The goal of the proposed research is to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of boron or gadolinium into the outer surface of the fuel cladding material rather than as an additive to the fuel pellets. This paradigm shift will allow for the introduction of the IFBA in a non-nuclear regulated environment and will obviate the necessity of additional handling and processing of the fuel pellets. This could represent significant cost savings and potentially lead to greater reproducibility and control of the burnable fuel in the early stages of the reactor operation. The surface alloying is being performed using the IBEST (Ion Beam Surface Treatment) process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. IBEST involves the delivery of energetic ion beam pulses onto the surface of a material, near-surface melting, and rapid solidification. The non-equilibrium nature of such processing allows for surface

  13. Does gadolinium-based contrast material improve diagnostic accuracy of local invasion in rectal cancer MRI? A multireader study.

    PubMed

    Gollub, Marc J; Lakhman, Yulia; McGinty, Katrina; Weiser, Martin R; Sohn, Michael; Zheng, Junting; Shia, Jinru

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to compare reader accuracy and agreement on rectal MRI with and without gadolinium administration in the detection of T4 rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS. In this study, two radiologists and one fellow independently interpreted all posttreatment MRI studies for patients with locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer using unenhanced images alone or combined with contrast-enhanced images, with a minimum interval of 4 weeks. Readers evaluated involvement of surrounding structures on a 5-point scale and were blinded to pathology and disease stage. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and AUC were calculated and kappa statistics were used to describe interreader agreement. RESULTS. Seventy-two patients (38 men and 34 women) with a mean age of 61 years (range, 32-86 years) were evaluated. Fifteen patients had 32 organs invaded. Global AUCs without and with gadolinium administration were 0.79 and 0.77, 0.91 and 0.86, and 0.83 and 0.78 for readers 1, 2, and 3, respectively. AUCs before and after gadolinium administration were similar. Kappa values before and after gadolinium administration for pairs of readers ranged from 0.5 to 0.7. CONCLUSION. On the basis of pathology as a reference standard, the use of gadolinium during rectal MRI did not significantly improve radiologists' agreement or ability to detect T4 disease.

  14. Positive gadolinium anomalies in wastewater treatment plant effluents and aquatic environment in the Hérault watershed (South France).

    PubMed

    Rabiet, M; Brissaud, F; Seidel, J L; Pistre, S; Elbaz-Poulichet, F

    2009-05-01

    Anthropogenic gadolinium (Gd), used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging, may enter rivers and groundwaters with the effluents of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Such contaminations, which are mainly found in densely populated areas with highly developed medical systems, induce positive gadolinium anomalies in waters. This study reports on the occurrence of positive Gd anomaly in wastewaters, surface and groundwaters in a slightly populated Mediterranean watershed. Water samples have been collected along the Hérault River, in its tributaries, in wells and springs supplying drinking water and in WWTP effluents during two sampling campaigns in February and July 2003. Systematically pronounced positive gadolinium anomalies (Gd/Gd( *)) were observed in WWTP effluents with values reaching 306. These observations have shown that Gd/Gd( *) can also be found in wastewater drained from rural communities, not equipped with MRI facilities. Positive gadolinium anomalies were detected in two tributaries of the Hérault River and in some wells supplying drinking water, corresponding to an excess of anthropogenic Gd in water up to 15.4pM. A monthly monitoring on one well has confirmed the persistence of gadolinium anomalies all along the year, suggesting a continual wastewater contamination on this site. A spatial monitoring on one tributary showed that wastewater contribution modifies completely the normalized REE pattern of river water, resulting in a decrease of REE amount correlated to the Gd anomaly appearance.

  15. A feasibility study to determine the potential of in vivo detection of gadolinium by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) following gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, F; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R; Noseworthy, M D

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using a (109)Cd γ-ray induced K x-ray fluorescence (K-XRF) system for the in vivo detection of gadolinium (Gd) in bone has been investigated. The K-XRF bone measurement system employs an array of four detectors, and is normally used for the non-invasive study of bone lead levels. The system was used to measure bone simulating phantoms doped with varying levels of gadolinium and fixed amounts of sodium (Na), chlorine (Cl) and calcium (Ca). The detection limits for bare bone phantoms, using a source of activity 0.17 GBq, were determined to be 3.9 ppm and 6.5 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom) for the Kα1 and Kα2 Gd x-ray peaks, respectively. This leads to an overall detection limit of 3.3 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom). Layers of plastic were used to simulate overlying soft tissue and this permitted prediction of a detection limit, using the current strength of our radioisotope source, of 6.1 ppm to 8.6 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom) for fingers with 2-4 mm of overlying tissue. With a new source of activity 5 GBq, we predict that this system could achieve a detection limit of 4-5.6 µg Gd g(-1) Ca. This is within the range of levels (2-30 µg Gd g(-1) Ca) previously found in the bone of patients receiving Gd based contrast imaging agents. The technique is promising and warrants further investigation.

  16. Quantitative assessment of the rheumatoid synovial microvascular bed by gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, K.; Cookson, J.; Blades, S.; Coumbe, A.; Blake, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the relation between rate of synovial membrane enhancement, intra-articular pressure (IAP), and histologically determined synovial vascularity in rheumatoid arthritis, using gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
METHODS—Dynamic gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI was performed in 31 patients with knee synovitis (10 patients IAP study, 21 patients vascular morphometry study). Rate of synovial membrane enhancement was quantified by line profile analysis using the image processing package ANALYZE. IAP was measured using an intra-compartmental pressure monitor system. Multiple synovial biopsy specimens were obtained by a blind biopsy technique. Blood vessels were identified immunohistochemically using the endothelial cell marker QBend30 and quantified (blood vessel numerical density and fractional area).
RESULTS—Median blood vessel numerical density and fractional area were 77.5/mm2 (IQR; 69.3-110.7) and 5.6% (IQR; 3.4-8.5) respectively. The rate of synovial membrane enhancement (median 2.74 signal intensity units/s, IQR 2.0-3.8) correlated with both blood vessel numerical density (r = 0.46, p < 0.05) and blood vessel fractional area (r = 0.55, p < 0.02). IAP did not influence the rate of enhancement.
CONCLUSIONS—Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI may prove to be a valuable technique for evaluating drugs that influence angiogenesis.

 Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging; rheumatoid arthritis; synovitis; vascularity PMID:9640130

  17. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  18. Relaxometric studies of gadolinium-functionalized perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for MR imaging.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Anke; Moonen, Rik; Yildirim, Muhammed; Langereis, Sander; Lamerichs, Rolf; Pikkemaat, Jeroen A; Baroni, Simona; Terreno, Enzo; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J; Grüll, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine MRI ((19) F MRI) is receiving an increasing attention as a viable alternative to proton-based MRI ((1) H MRI) for dedicated application in molecular imaging. The (19) F nucleus has a high gyromagnetic ratio, a 100% natural abundance and is furthermore hardly present in human tissues allowing for hot spot MR imaging. The applicability of (19) F MRI as a molecular and cellular imaging technique has been exploited, ranging from cell tracking to detection and imaging of tumors in preclinical studies. In addition to applications, developing new contrast materials with improved relaxation properties has also been a core research topic in the field, since the inherently low longitudinal relaxation rates of perfluorocarbon compounds result in relatively low imaging efficiency. Borrowed from (1) H MRI, the incorporation of lanthanides, specifically Gd(III) complexes, as signal modulating ingredients in the nanoparticle formulation has emerged as a promising approach to improvement of the fluorine signal. Three different perfluorocarbon emulsions were investigated at five different magnetic field strengths. Perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether was used as the core material and Gd(III)DOTA-DSPE, Gd(III)DOTA-C6-DSPE and Gd(III)DTPA-BSA as the relaxation altering components. While Gd(III)DOTA-DSPE and Gd(III)DOTA-C6-DSPE were favorable constructs for (1) H NMR, Gd(III)DTPA-BSA showed the strongest increase in (19F) R(1). These results show the potential of the use of paramagnetic lipids to increase (19F) R(1) at clinical field strengths (1.5-3 T). At higher field strengths (6.3-14 T), gadolinium does not lead to an increase in (19F) R(1) compared with emulsions without gadolinium, but leads to an significant increase in (19F) R(2). Our data therefore suggest that the most favorable situation for fluorine measurements is at high magnetic fields without the inclusion of gadolinium constructs.

  19. Geometrically confined ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles boost the T1 contrast ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kaiyuan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhou, Zijian; Yang, Li; Wang, Lirong; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-01

    High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM-1 s-1. Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy provides new guidance for developing various high-performance T1 contrast agents for sensitive imaging and disease diagnosis.High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM-1 s-1. Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy

  20. The developmental history of the gadolinium chelates as intravenous contrast media for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M; Ai, Tao; Hao, Dapeng; Hu, Xuemei

    2011-12-01

    The developmental history of the gadolinium chelates, which spans 30 years, is described, focusing, in part, on the seminal work with each of the major agents in use today. By examining this history, insight is gained into important issues of efficacy and safety, with valuable lessons to be learned from the mistakes made during this period. An overview of physicochemical characteristics and chemical structures is also provided. The review concludes with a discussion of current research directions involving this field, which is that of the intravenous contrast media for magnetic resonance, in the past 5 years.

  1. Caustic Precipitation of Plutonium Using Gadolinium as the Neutron Poison for Disposition to High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bronikowski, M.G.

    2002-06-24

    Nuclear Materials Management Division (NMMD) has proposed that up to 100 kg of the plutonium (Pu) solutions stored in H-Canyon be precipitated with a nuclear poison and dispositioned to H-Area Tank Farm. The use of gadolinium (Gd) as the poison would greatly reduce the number of additional glass logs resulting from this disposition. This report summarizes the characteristics of the precipitation process and addresses criticality concerns in the Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation. No problems were found with the nature of the precipitate or the neutralization process.

  2. Controlled manipulation of gadolinium-coordinated supramolecules by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Urgel, José I; Ecija, David; Auwärter, Willi; Barth, Johannes V

    2014-03-12

    Coordination bonding between para-quarterphenyl-dicarbonitrile linkers and gadolinium on Ag(111) has been exploited to construct pentameric mononuclear supramolecules, consisting of a rare-earth center surrounded by five molecular linkers. By employing a scanning tunneling microscope tip, a manipulation protocol was developed to position individual pentamers on the surface. In addition, the tip was used to extract and replace individual linkers yielding tetrameric, pentameric, nonameric, and dodecameric metallosupramolecular arrangements. These results open new avenues toward advanced nanofabrication methods and rare-earth nanochemistry by combining the versatility of metal-ligand interactions and atomistic manipulation capabilities.

  3. Modification of the crystal structure of gadolinium gallium garnet by helium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostafiychuk, B. K.; Yaremiy, I. P. Yaremiy, S. I.; Fedoriv, V. D.; Tomyn, U. O.; Umantsiv, M. M.; Fodchuk, I. M.; Kladko, V. P.

    2013-12-15

    The structure of gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) single crystals before and after implantation by He{sup +} ions has been investigated using high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods and the generalized dynamic theory of X-ray scattering. The main types of growth defects in GGG single crystals and radiation-induced defects in the ion-implanted layer have been determined. It is established that the concentration of dislocation loops in the GGG surface layer modified by ion implantation increases and their radius decreases with an increase in the implantation dose.

  4. Safety Evaluation and Imaging Properties of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Shady; Piraquive, Joao; Lamberton, Franck; Lux, François; Verset, Michael; Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Contamin, Hugues; Tillement, Olivier; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Sancey, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report the safety evaluation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in nonhuman primates (NHP) in the context of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in atherosclerosis bearing animals and healthy controls. In healthy NHP, the pharmacokinetics and toxicity profiles demonstrated the absence of dose, time, and sex-effects, as well as a suitable tolerance of intravenous administration of the nanoparticles. We investigated their imaging properties for arterial plaque imaging in a standard diet or a high cholesterol diet NHP, and compared their characteristics with clinically applied Gd-chelate. This preliminary investigation reports the efficient and safe imaging of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27725693

  5. Structural and chemical analysis of gadolinium halides encapsulated within WS2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anumol, E. A.; Enyashin, Andrey N.; Batra, Nitin M.; Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Deepak, Francis Leonard

    2016-06-01

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of WS2 nanotubes by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is non-trivial due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials.The hollow cavities of nanotubes serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of WS2 nanotubes by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is non-trivial due to the

  6. Active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent into the subdural space following lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Pranay D; Hanser, Evelyn M; Wang, Harrison; Farid, Nikdokht

    2016-01-01

    A 38year-old male presented with cauda equina syndrome following multiple lumbar puncture attempts. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a subdural hematoma and an area of apparent contrast enhancement in the spinal canal on sagittal post-contrast images. Axial post-contrast images obtained seven minutes later demonstrated an increase in size and change in shape of the region of apparent contrast enhancement, indicating active extravasation of the contrast agent. This is the first reported case of active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent in the spine.

  7. Gadolinium(III)-sensitized fluorescence of europium in its mixed-metal compounds with trifluroacetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinovskaya, I. V.; Zadorozhnaya, A. N.

    2017-04-01

    The fluorescence properties of mixed-metal compounds of Eu(III) and Gd(III) with trifluoroacetic acid, Eu1-xGdx(C2F3O2)3·yD·zH2O, where D - 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2-dipyridil, diphenylguanidine, x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, or 0.7, were studied. Luminescence spectroscopic evidence and the examination of excitation spectra indicate the occurrence of efficient energy transfer from the gadolinium to the europium ion. The greatest promotion of Eu3+ photoluminescence at 615 nm is observed when Eu:Gd = 1:1.

  8. Chest radiography with a large-area detector based on cesium-iodide/amorphous-silicon technology: image quality and dose requirement in comparison with an asymmetric screen-film system.

    PubMed

    Strotzer, M; Völk, M; Reiser, M; Lenhart, M; Manke, C; Gmeinwieser, J; Holzknecht, N; Link, J; Feuerbach, S

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a large-area, flat-panel X-ray detector, which uses cesium-iodide (CsI) and amorphous silicon (a-Si). Conventional images were compared with digital images acquired with equal dose (2.5 microGy) and with 50% dose reduction. Fifteen consecutive patients were studied prospectively using an asymmetric screen-film system (detector dose, 2.5 microGy). Digital images were taken from the same patients in a posteroanterior view with detector doses of 2.5 and 1.25 microGy, respectively. The CsI/a-Si active-matrix imager had a panel-size of 43 x 43 cm, a matrix of 3 x 3k, and a pixel-pitch of 143 microm. Hard copies were presented in a random order to eight independent observers, who rated image quality according to six subjective quality criteria. Statistical significance of differences was evaluated with Student's t test for paired samples (confidence level, 95%). Digital radiographs with 2.5 and 1.25 microGy were superior to conventional images regarding all quality criteria. Statistically significant differences were observed for five of six criteria at a detector dose of 2.5 microGy and for only one quality feature at 1.25 microGy. Flat-panel digital imagers based on CsI/a-Si technique have the potential to replace conventional systems and might allow a reduction of radiation dose by 50% without loss of image quality.

  9. Geometrical confinement of gadolinium-based contrast agents in nanoporous particles enhances T1 contrast

    PubMed Central

    Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Godin, Biana; Sethi, Richa; Moriggi, Loick; Liu, Xuewu; Serda, Rita E.; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Muthupillai, Raja; Bolskar, Robert D.; Helm, Lothar; Ferrari, Mauro; Wilson, Lon J.; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents are currently designed by modifying their structural and physiochemical properties in order to improve relaxivity and to enhance image contrast. Here we show a general method for increasing relaxivity by confining contrast agents inside the nanoporous structure of silicon particles. Magnevist, gadofullerenes and gadonanotubes were loaded inside the pores of quasi-hemispherical and discoidal particles. For all combinations of nanoconstructs, a boost in longitudinal proton relaxivity r1 was observed: for Magnevist, r1~14 mM-1s-1/Gd3+ion (~8.15×10+7 mM-1s-1/construct); for gadofullerenes, r1~200 mM-1s-1/Gd3+ion (~7×10+9 mM-1s-1/construct); for gadonanotubes, r1~150 mM-1s-1/Gd3+ion (~2×10+9 mM-1s-1/construct). These relaxivity values are about 4 to 50 times larger than that of clinically-available gadolinium-based agents (~4 mM-1s-1 /Gd3+ion). The enhancement in contrast is attributed to the geometrical confinement of the agents, which influences the paramagnetic behavior of the Gd3+ions. Thus, nanoscale confinement offers a new and general strategy for enhancing the contrast of gadolinium-based contrast agents. PMID:20972435

  10. Nanodiamond-Gadolinium(III) Aggregates for Tracking Cancer Growth In Vivo at High Field.

    PubMed

    Rammohan, Nikhil; MacRenaris, Keith W; Moore, Laura K; Parigi, Giacomo; Mastarone, Daniel J; Manus, Lisa M; Lilley, Laura M; Preslar, Adam T; Waters, Emily A; Filicko, Abigail; Luchinat, Claudio; Ho, Dean; Meade, Thomas J

    2016-12-14

    The ability to track labeled cancer cells in vivo would allow researchers to study their distribution, growth, and metastatic potential within the intact organism. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is invaluable for tracking cancer cells in vivo as it benefits from high spatial resolution and the absence of ionizing radiation. However, many MR contrast agents (CAs) required to label cells either do not significantly accumulate in cells or are not biologically compatible for translational studies. We have developed carbon-based nanodiamond-gadolinium(III) aggregates (NDG) for MR imaging that demonstrated remarkable properties for cell tracking in vivo. First, NDG had high relaxivity independent of field strength, a finding unprecedented for gadolinium(III) [Gd(III)]-nanoparticle conjugates. Second, NDG demonstrated a 300-fold increase in the cellular delivery of Gd(III) compared to that of clinical Gd(III) chelates without sacrificing biocompatibility. Further, we were able to monitor the tumor growth of NDG-labeled flank tumors by T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging for 26 days in vivo, longer than was reported for other MR CAs or nuclear agents. Finally, by utilizing quantitative maps of relaxation times, we were able to describe tumor morphology and heterogeneity (corroborated by histological analysis), which would not be possible with competing molecular imaging modalities.

  11. Effect of solid-phase amorphization on the spectral characteristics of europium-doped gadolinium molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmurak, S. Z.; Kiselev, A. P.; Kurmasheva, D. M.; Red'Kin, B. S.; Sinitsyn, V. V.

    2010-05-01

    A method is proposed for detecting spectral characteristics of optically inactive molybdates of rare-earth elements by their doping with rare-earth ions whose luminescence lies in the transparency region of all structural modifications of the sample. Gadolinium molybdate is chosen as the object of investigations, while europium ions are used as an optically active and structurally sensitive admixture. It is shown that after the action of a high pressure under which gadolinium molybdate passes to the amorphous state, the spectral characteristics of Gd1.99Eu0.01(MoO4)3 (GMO:Eu) change radically; namely, considerable line broadening is observed in the luminescence spectra and the luminescence excitation spectra, while the long-wave threshold of optical absorption is shifted considerably (by approximately 1.1 eV) towards lower energies. It is found that by changing the structural state of GMO:Eu by solid-state amorphization followed by annealing, the spectral characteristics of the sample can be purposefully changed. This is extremely important for solving the urgent problem of designing high-efficiency light-emitting diodes producing “white” light.

  12. Evaluation of gadolinium compounds potentially suitable for magnetic resonance using Gd-153 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Engelstad, B.; Huberty, J.; White, D.; Wynne, C.; Ramos, E.; Goldberg, H.

    1985-05-01

    Gd-153 is not customarily considered for scintigraphy, yet it: 1) is available at acceptable cost, 2) has a 242 day half-life suitable for prolonged animal studies and 3) has 97 keV (40%) and 103 keV (59%) photopeaks suitable for conventional scintigraphy. Gd-153 (10-15 ..mu..Ci; 370-555 kBq) was administered to normal rats in 5 forms: 1) carrier 0.1 mmole/kg Gd-EIDA (diethyl iminodiacetic acid), 2) tracer (<.1 umole/kg) Gd-EIDA, 3) tracer Gd-ISIDA (diisopropyl iminodiacetic acid), 4) tracer GdCl/sub 3/, and 5) tracer Gd-DTPA. Scintigraphy, performed continuously for 90 minutes following intravenous injection and at intervals at up to 2 weeks, depicted: 1) rapid, partial hepatobiliary and renal clearance of tracer Gd-EIDA and Gd-ISIDA; 2) slow blood clearance and partial hepatobiliary clearance of carrier Gd-EIDA; and 3) prolonged reticuloendothelial retention of all IDA complexes, similar to GdCl3. Whole body and tissue distribution data paralleled the scintigraphic findings. Gd-153 scintigraphy provides a simple method to assess balance, distribution, kinetics, and stability of new paramagnetic contrast agents, and bis-iminodiacetate gadolinium complexes, unlike technetium analogues, lack effective stability to prevent gadolinium hydrolysis or translocation.

  13. Disparate ultrafast dynamics of itinerant and localized magnetic moments in gadolinium metal

    PubMed Central

    Frietsch, B.; Bowlan, J.; Carley, R.; Teichmann, M.; Wienholdt, S.; Hinzke, D.; Nowak, U.; Carva, K.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Weinelt, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Heisenberg–Dirac intra-atomic exchange coupling is responsible for the formation of the atomic spin moment and thus the strongest interaction in magnetism. Therefore, it is generally assumed that intra-atomic exchange leads to a quasi-instantaneous aligning process in the magnetic moment dynamics of spins in separate, on-site atomic orbitals. Following ultrashort optical excitation of gadolinium metal, we concurrently record in photoemission the 4f magnetic linear dichroism and 5d exchange splitting. Their dynamics differ by one order of magnitude, with decay constants of 14 versus 0.8 ps, respectively. Spin dynamics simulations based on an orbital-resolved Heisenberg Hamiltonian combined with first-principles calculations explain the particular dynamics of 5d and 4f spin moments well, and corroborate that the 5d exchange splitting traces closely the 5d spin-moment dynamics. Thus gadolinium shows disparate dynamics of the localized 4f and the itinerant 5d spin moments, demonstrating a breakdown of their intra-atomic exchange alignment on a picosecond timescale. PMID:26355196

  14. Thermal neutron capture cross section of gadolinium by pile-oscillation measurements in MINERVE

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, P.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A.; Hentati, A.

    2012-07-01

    Natural gadolinium is used as a burnable poison in most LWR to account for the excess of reactivity of fresh fuels. For an accurate prediction of the cycle length, its nuclear data and especially its neutron capture cross section needs to be known with a high precision. Recent microscopic measurements at Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) suggest a 11% smaller value for the thermal capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd, compared with most of evaluated nuclear data libraries. To solve this inconsistency, we have analyzed several pile-oscillation experiments, performed in the MINERVE reactor. They consist in the measurement of the reactivity variation involved by the introduction in the reactor of small-samples, containing different mass amounts of natural gadolinium. The analysis of these experiments is done through the exact perturbation theory, using the PIMS calculation tool, in order to link the reactivity effect to the thermal capture cross section. The measurement of reactivity effects is used to deduce the 2200 m.s-1 capture cross section of {sup nat}Gd which is (49360 {+-} 790) b. This result is in good agreement with the JEFF3.1.1 value (48630 b), within 1.6% uncertainty at 1{sigma}, but is strongly inconsistent with the microscopic measurements at RPI which give (44200 {+-} 500) b. (authors)

  15. Geometrically confined ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles boost the T(1) contrast ability.

    PubMed

    Ni, Kaiyuan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhou, Zijian; Yang, Li; Wang, Lirong; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-14

    High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM(-1) s(-1). Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy provides new guidance for developing various high-performance T1 contrast agents for sensitive imaging and disease diagnosis.

  16. Microcalorimetric studies on the energy release of isolated rat mitochondria under different concentrations of gadolinium (III).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Ma, Long; Xiang, Xun; Guo, Qing-Lian; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Gadolinium-based compounds are most widely utilized for paramagnetic contrast agents, but, the toxicological mechanism of gadolinium (Gd) had not been fully elucidated since the first report about Gd anomaly. In this work, we analyzed the effect of Gd(3+) on mitochondria in vitro by microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetry can provide detailed kinetic and thermodynamic information from thermogenic curve. At the tested concentration, Gd(3+) induced the increase of growth rate constant (k1). At high concentration (100-500 μM), the maximum power output time (tm), the decline rate constant (-k2) and the time of activity recovery phase (tR) decreased with the addition of Gd(3+) and the maximum power output (Pm) increased. At low concentration (0-100 μM), the changes were different from high concentration. From the results we concluded that the effect of different concentrations of Gd(3+) had a relationship with time, high concentration of Gd(3+) induced mitochondrial energy metabolism disturb however low concentration may promote mitochondrial adaption to physiological stresses. The effect of low concentration of Gd(3+) need more work to elucidate the mechanism. The results of total heat output (Q) and mitochondrial respiratory activities suggested high concentrations of Gd(3+) could accelerate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption under respiratory system damaged.

  17. Density functional calculations for structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of gadolinium-oxide clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H. K.; Chen, H. Tian, C. L.; Kuang, A. L.; Wang, J. Z.

    2014-04-21

    Gadolinium-oxide clusters in various sizes and stoichiometries have been systematically studied by employing the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. The clusters in bulk stoichiometry are relatively more stable and their binding energies increase with the increasing size. Stoichiometric (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub n} clusters of n = 1–3 prefer cage-like structures, whereas the clusters of n = 4–30 prefer compact structures layered by wedge-like units and exhibit a rough feature toward the bulk-like arrangement with small disorders of atomic positions. The polyhedral-cages analogous to carbon-fullerenes are stable isomers yet not the minimum energy configurations. Their stabilities can be improved by embedding one oxygen atom or a suitable cage to form core-shell configurations. The mostly favored antiferromagnetic couplings between adjacent Gd atoms are nearly degenerated in energy with their ferromagnetic couplings, resulting in super-paramagnetic characters of gadolinium-oxide clusters. The Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY)-type mechanism together with the superexchange-type mechanism plays cooperation role for the magnetic interactions in clusters. We present, as a function of n, calculated binding energies, ionization potential, electron affinity, and electronic dipole moment.

  18. Order-disorder transitions in gadolinium zirconate: A potential electrolyte material in solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meilicke, S.; Haile, S.

    1995-12-31

    Rare-earth, yttrium, and calcium doped zirconates are the materials of choice for electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells. The dopant in these materials serves not only to stabilized the cubic phase of zirconia, but also to introduce anion defects that presumably increase the ionic conductivity. In order to understand the relationships between anion defect distribution, thermal history and ionic conductivity, the structural properties of gadolinium zirconate, Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, have been examined via high-temperature x-ray powder diffraction. Gadolinium zirconate is an ideal material for such a structure-property-processing study: it shows ordering of defects at low temperatures, taking on a pyrochlore structure, and disordering at elevated temperature, taking on a defect fluorite structure. Diffraction experiments, performed as functions of time and temperature, confirmed the transition temperature to lie between 1,500 and 1,550 C. They also revealed that the transformation takes place most rapidly just below the transition temperature, indicating that the ordering process is kinetically constrained at low temperatures. Moreover, x-ray data collected at room temperature from quenched samples were found to be as useful, if not more so, than those collected in situ at high temperature. The latter are affected by thermal scattering, severely compromising data quality.

  19. Modulation of channel activity and gadolinium block of MscL by static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Evgeny; Martinac, Boris

    2007-02-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has for long been known to influence the behaviour and orientation of a variety of living organisms. Experimental studies of the magnetic sense have, however, been impaired by the lack of a plausible cellular and/or molecular mechanism providing meaningful explanation for detection of magnetic fields by these organisms. Recently, mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels have been implied to play a role in magnetoreception. In this study we have investigated the effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) of moderate intensity on the activity and gadolinium block of MscL, the bacterial MS channel of large conductance, which has served as a model channel to study the basic physical principles of mechanosensory transduction in living cells. In addition to showing that direct application of the magnetic field decreased the activity of the MscL channel, our study demonstrates for the first time that SMFs can reverse the effect of gadolinium, a well-known blocker of MS channels. The results of our study are consistent with a notion that (1) the effects of SMFs on the MscL channels may result from changes in physical properties of the lipid bilayer due to diamagnetic anisotropy of phospholipid molecules and consequently (2) cooperative superdiamagnetism of phospholipid molecules under influence of SMFs could cause displacement of Gd(3+) ions from the membrane bilayer and thus remove the MscL channel block.

  20. Effects of Polyethyleneimine on the Sonochemical Synthesis of Gadolinium Ion-Modified ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok Cheol; Yun, Won Suk; Sohn, Sang Ho

    2015-01-01

    We prepared gadolinium (Gd) ion-modified ZnO nanorods by a sonochemical decomposition of zinc acetate dehydrate and gadolinium acetate hydrate precursor solutions with and without polyethyleneimine (PEI). We investigated the effects of PEI on the sonochemical synthesis of ZnO nanorods with and without Gd ion modifications. In the case of nascent ZnO nanorods, PEI in the precursor solutions can prohibit radial growth but allow axial growth, resulting in changes in the degree of preferred crystal orientations, and in the PL properties of the resulting nanorods. In the case of Gd ion-modified ZnO nanorods, we observed that the ZnO nanorods, fabricated sonochemically in the precursor solutions with PEI, exhibited a peak broadening of the ZnO(002) crystal plane and decreasing crystal orientation with respect to the c plane. We note that PEI can negatively affect the crystal orientation and crystallinity of Gd ion-modified ZnO nanorods, even though it cannot affect the lattice constant.

  1. Bioconjugation of luminescent silicon quantum dots to gadolinium ions for bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Erogbogbo, Folarin; Chang, Ching-Wen; May, Jasmine L; Liu, Liwei; Kumar, Rajiv; Law, Wing-Cheung; Ding, Hong; Yong, Ken Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Sheshadri, Mukund; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N

    2012-09-07

    Luminescent imaging agents and MRI contrast agents are desirable components in the rational design of multifunctional nanoconstructs for biological imaging applications. Luminescent biocompatible silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) and gadolinium chelates can be applied for fluorescence microscopy and MRI, respectively. Here, we report the first synthesis of a nanocomplex incorporating SiQDs and gadolinium ions (Gd³⁺) for biological applications. The nanoconstruct is composed of a PEGylated micelle, with hydrophobic SiQDs in its core, covalently bound to DOTA-chelated Gd³⁺. Dynamic light scattering reveals a radius of 85 nm for these nanoconstructs, which is consistent with the electron microscopy results depicting radii ranging from 25 to 60 nm. Cellular uptake of the probes verified that they maintain their optical properties within the intracellular environment. The magnetic resonance relaxivity of the nanoconstruct was 2.4 mM⁻¹ s⁻¹ (in terms of Gd³⁺ concentration), calculated to be around 6000 mM⁻¹ s⁻¹ per nanoconstruct. These desirable optical and relaxivity properties of the newly developed probe open the door for use of SiQDs in future multimodal applications such as tumour imaging.

  2. Development of a gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator for the Hanaro short baseline prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, In Sung; Joo, Kyung Kwang; So, Sun Heang; Song, Sook Hyung; Kim, Hong Joo; So, Jung Ho; Park, Kang Soon; Ma, Kyung Ju; Jeon, Eun Ju; Kim, Jin Yu; Kim, Young Duk; Lee, Jason; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Sun, Gwang-Min

    2014-02-01

    We propose a new experiment on the site of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) located at Daejeon, Korea. The Hanaro short baseline (SBL) nuclear reactor with a thermal power output 30 MW is used to investigate a reactor neutrino anomaly. A Hanaro SBL prototype detector having a 60- l volume has been constructed ˜6 m away from the reactor core. A gadolinium (Gd)-loaded liquid scintillator (LS) is used as an active material to trigger events. The selection of the LS is guided by physical and technical requirements, as well as safety considerations. A linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is used as a base solvent of the Hanaro SBL prototype detector. Three g/ l of PPO and 30 mg/ l of bis-MSB are dissolved to formulate the LAB-based LS. Then, a 0.5% gadolinium (Gd) complex with carboxylic acid is loaded into the LAB-based LS by using the liquidliquid extraction method. In this paper, we will summarize all the characteristics of the Gd-loaded LAB-based LS for the Hanaro prototype detector.

  3. Chemical and magnetic structure of uranium/gadolinium multilayers studied by transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.B.; Springell, R.; Langridge, S.; Wildes, A.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Moore, K.T.; Butterfield, M.; Chivall, J.; Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R.; Lander, G.H.

    2010-04-29

    We present a multitechnique approach to study the detailed chemical and magnetic structure of uranium/gadolinium multilayers. At low temperature the saturation magnetization is found to be {approx}60% of that of bulk gadolinium. We address this problem, which is found in many other multilayers and suggest a model that may have wider applications. Transmission electron microscopy images indicate a microstructure, consistent with a columnar growth of Gd with crystallites of the order 20 {yields} 100{angstrom}. Off-specular neutron scattering is most strongly visible at saturation field, indicating that Gd moments are not aligned with the applied field. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering provides proof of coupled in-plane length scales for both the structural and the magnetic roughness. A detailed x-ray scattering study of both the specular and off-specular reflectivities has been used to investigate the in-plane structure of the multilayers. We calculate the roughness and transverse correlation cut-off length, {zeta}{sub x} = 120 {+-} 30{angstrom}, and present a simple model to determine an average column size of 27 {+-} 6{angstrom} and a reduction in the magnetic saturation of {approx}40%.

  4. High Relaxivity Gadolinium Hydroxypyridonate-Viral Capsid Conjugates: Nano-sized MRI Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Meux, Susan C.; Datta, Ankona; Hooker, Jacob M.; Botta, Mauro; Francis, Matthew B.; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-08-29

    High relaxivity macromolecular contrast agents based on the conjugation of gadolinium chelates to the interior and exterior surfaces of MS2 viral capsids are assessed. The proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of the conjugates show up to a five-fold increase in relaxivity, leading to a peak relaxivity (per Gd{sup 3+} ion) of 41.6 mM{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 30 MHz for the internally modified capsids. Modification of the exterior was achieved through conjugation to flexible lysines, while internal modification was accomplished by conjugation to relatively rigid tyrosines. Higher relaxivities were obtained for the internally modified capsids, showing that (1) there is facile diffusion of water to the interior of capsids and (2) the rigidity of the linker attaching the complex to the macromolecule is important for obtaining high relaxivity enhancements. The viral capsid conjugated gadolinium hydroxypyridonate complexes appear to possess two inner-sphere water molecules (q = 2) and the NMRD fittings highlight the differences in the local motion for the internal ({tau}{sub RI} = 440 ps) and external ({tau}{sub RI} = 310 ps) conjugates. These results indicate that there are significant advantages of using the internal surface of the capsids for contrast agent attachment, leaving the exterior surface available for the installation of tissue targeting groups.

  5. The determination of samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium in uranium products by direct-current plasma emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Flavelle, F; Westland, A D

    1986-05-01

    Samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium were separated from uranium-containing materials by means of solvent extraction with Alamine 336, followed by cation-exchange. The elements were determined in the sub-ppm range by means of direct-current plasma atomic-emission spectrometry.

  6. 77 FR 42317 - Establish a Patient-Based Registry To Evaluate the Association of Gadolinium Based Contrast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Establish a Patient-Based Registry To Evaluate the Association of Gadolinium Based Contrast Agents Exposure and Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is...

  7. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Samarium, Europium, and Gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of samarium, europium and gadolinium (62 {le} Z {le} 64, 82 {le} N {le} 96).

  8. The feasibility of in vivo quantification of bone-gadolinium in humans by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) following gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Noseworthy, M. D.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of using a 238Pu/Be-based in vivo prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) system, previously successfully used for measurements of muscle, for the detection of gadolinium (Gd) in bone was presented. Gd is extensively used in contrast agents in MR imaging. We present phantom measurement data for the measurement of Gd in the tibia. Gd has seven naturally occurring isotopes, of which two have extremely large neutron capture cross sections; 155Gd (14.8% natural abundance (NA), σ= 60,900 barns) and 157Gd (15.65% NA, σ= 254,000 barns). Our previous work focused on muscle but this only informs about the short term kinetics of Gd. We studied the possibility of measuring bone, as it may be a long term storage site for Gd. A human simulating bone phantom set was developed. The phantoms were doped with seven concentrations of Gd of concentrations 0.0, 25, 50, 75, 100, 120 and 150 ppm. Additional elements important for neutron activation analysis, Na, Cl and Ca, were also included to create an overall elemental composition consistent with Reference Man. The overall conclusion is that the potential application of this Pu-Be-based prompt in vivo NAA for the monitoring of the storage and retention of Gd in bone is not feasible.

  9. Hepatic Gadolinium Deposition and Reversibility after Contrast Agent-enhanced MR Imaging of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Maximova, Natalia; Gregori, Massimo; Zennaro, Floriana; Sonzogni, Aurelio; Simeone, Roberto; Zanon, Davide

    2016-11-01

    Purpose To determine if hepatic gadolinium deposition occurs in pediatric patients with iron overload but normal renal and hepatic function who undergo gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Design and execution of this study was approved by the Ethical Committee of Institute for Research in Maternal and Child Health Burlo Garofolo of Trieste (reference no. 1105/2015). Because of the retrospective nature of the study, the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Twenty-one recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants who underwent GBCA-enhanced MR imaging for suspected infection or relapse followed by liver biopsy comprised the study group. The number of GBCA-enhanced MR examinations and cumulative gadolinium dose for each patient was analyzed by comparing liver histologic analysis and iron and gadolinium liver concentration (GLC). Eight patients had siderosis and underwent chelation therapy. The study group was compared with four control patients who were never exposed to GBCA. Statistical analysis was performed with Spearman rank coefficient for correlation. Results All 21 patients had positive correlations between GLC and total GBCA dose (r = 0.4486; P < .05) and between GLC and liver iron concentration (r = 0.56; P < .05). Patients who underwent deferoxamine therapy had a significant reduction of GLC (from 0.64 μg/g ± 0.29 to 0.20 μg/g ± 0.17 [standard deviation]; P < .05). Conclusion In the presence of siderosis, a transmetallation mechanism may be set off between ferric ion and gadoterate meglumine. Deferoxamine appears capable of binding to gadolinium ion. Further studies of the safety of GBCAs in severe siderosis are needed. Chelation should be considered in patients with iron overload and a history of GBCA exposure. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  10. Tolerance and Long-Term MRI Imaging of Gadolinium-Modified Meshes Used in Soft Organ Repair

    PubMed Central

    Letouzey, Vincent; Huberlant, Stéphanie; Cornille, Arnaud; Blanquer, Sébastien; Guillaume, Olivier; Lemaire, Laurent; Garric, Xavier; de Tayrac, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    Background Synthetic meshes are frequently used to reinforce soft tissues. The aim of this translational study is to evaluate tolerance and long-term MRI visibility of two recently developed Gadolinium-modified meshes in a rat animal model. Materials and Methods Gadolinium-poly-ε-caprolactone (Gd-PCL) and Gadolinium-polymethylacrylate (Gd-PMA) modified meshes were implanted in Wistar rats and their tolerance was assessed daily. Inflammation and biocompatibility of the implants were assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry after 30 days post implantation. Implants were visualised by 7T and 3T MRI at day 30 and at day 90. Diffusion of Gadolinium in the tissues of the implanted animals was assessed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Results Overall Gd-PMA coated implants were better tolerated as compared to those coated with Gd-PCL. In fact, Gd-PMA implants were characterised by a high ratio collagen I/III and good vascularisation of the integration tissues. High resolution images of the coated mesh were obtained in vivo with experimental 7T as well as 3T clinical MRI. Mass spectrometry analyses showed that levels of Gadolinium in animals implanted with coated mesh were similar to those of the control group. Conclusions Meshes coated with Gd-PMA are better tolerated as compared to those coated with Gd-PCL as no signs of erosion or significant inflammation were detected at 30 days post implantation. Also, Gd-PMA coated meshes were clearly visualised with both 7T and 3T MRI devices. This new technique of mesh optimisation may represent a valuable tool in soft tissue repair and management. PMID:25811855

  11. Magnetic resonance knee arthrography. Enhanced contrast by gadolinium complex in the rabbit and in humans.

    PubMed

    Engel, A

    1990-01-01

    This study contains the fundamentals and the technique of the intraarticular application of an MRI contrast agent in connection with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI arthrography). It also presents the resulting clinical relevance for knee joint diagnostics. The significance of MRI arthrography is linked above all to the central question of whether or not it is possible to depict the hyaline cartilage, its surface and its thickness with the help of MRI arthrography. MRI arthrography was used for in vitro examinations of rabbit knee joint cartilage and human joint cartilage. The in vivo application was carried out in 73 patients. Apart from the metric evaluation and the assessment of the information content of the MRI image, the corresponding histologic sections were made in 20 knee joints in order to compare the cartilage surface and the thickness of the cartilage with the results in the MRI image. The optimum amount of contrast agent for visualization was determined, the uptake and clearance of the contrast agent from the cartilage were assessed, and trace elements from the cartilage were also analyzed. The examination showed that the molecular structure of the contrast agent (gadolinium-DTPA) does not prevent the uptake of the contrast agent into the matrix of the hyaline cartilage. But this process is reversible. Thus, 14 hours after the intraarticular application of the contrast agent no measurable traces of gadolinium-DTPA could be established. The intraarticular application of the contrast agent also made it possible to achieve a constant and reproducible visualization of all joint structures. This affected mainly the surface of the hyaline cartilage. The best imaging quality was achieved with intraarticular application of 30 to 40 mL of a 2 mmolar solution of gadolinium-DTPA. The technique used for the intraarticular application is the same as for the common procedures of knee joint aspiration. The clinical importance of MRI arthrography lies in the fact that

  12. Effect of gadolinium on the ryanodine receptor/sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sárközi, Sándor; Szegedi, Csaba; Lukács, Balázs; Ronjat, Michel; Jóna, István

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gadolinium ions on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR1) was studied using heavy SR (HSR) vesicles and RyR1 isolated from rabbit fast twitch muscle. In the [(3)H]ryanodine binding assay, 5 microM Gd(3+) increased the K(d) of the [(3)H]ryanodine binding of the vesicles from 33.8 nM to 45.6 nM while B(max), referring to the binding capacity, was not affected significantly. In the presence of 18 nM[(3)H]ryanodine and 100 microM free Ca(2+), Gd(3+) inhibited the binding of the radiolabeled ryanodine with an apparent K(d) value of 14.7 microM and a Hill coefficient of 3.17. In (45)Ca(2+) experiments the time constant of (45)Ca(2+) efflux from HSR vesicles increased from 90.9 (+/- 11.1) ms to 187.7 (+/- 24.9) ms in the presence of 20 microM gadolinium. In single channel experiments gadolinium inhibited the channel activity from both the cytoplasmic (cis) (IC(50) = 5.65 +/- 0.33 microM, n(Hill) = 4.71) and the luminal (trans) side (IC(50) = 5.47 +/- 0.24 microM, n(Hill) = 4.31). The degree of inhibition on the cis side didn't show calcium dependency in the 100 microM to 1 mM Ca(2+) concentration range which indicates no competition with calcium on its regulatory binding sites. When Gd(3+) was applied at the trans side, EGTA was present at the cis side to prevent the binding of Gd(+3) to the cytoplasmic calcium binding regulatory sites of the RyR1 if Gd(3+) accidentally passed through the channel. The inhibition of the channel did not show any voltage dependence, which would be the case if Gd(3+) exerted its effect after getting to the cis side. Our results suggest the presence of inhibitory binding sites for Gd(3+) on both sides of the RyR1 with similar Hill coefficients and IC(50) values.

  13. Analysis of Blood Gadolinium in an Isotope Geochemist Following Contrast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasylenki, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Normal brain tissue does not have blood flowing throughout it; instead oxygen diffuses across a blood-brain barrier in order to oxygenate brain cells. Brain tumors, however, do grow blood supplies, so an abnormal distribution of blood in the brain is a key indicator of abnormal cell growth. But how is the distribution of blood in inside the brain observed? The lanthanide ion gadolinium(III) has unpaired 5f-shell electrons and is thus paramagnetic. As such, the presence of Gd causes the nuclei of nearby atoms to relax more quickly when excited to high-energy spin states by pulses of radio-frequency energy than they would without Gd nearby. The signal in magnetic resonance imaging correlates with this nuclear spin relaxation time, so gadolinium's presence in certain body tissues makes those tissues appear as bright areas on MRI images. Gadolinium is therefore commonly injected intravenously just prior to MRI imaging, so that the distribution of blood in and around the brain can be mapped. Gadolinium as a free ion is toxic, so it is injected in a relatively inert form, often as gadoversetamide, in which Gd is tightly bound in nine-fold coordination with N, C, and O. This compound is removed from the blood by the kidneys at a rate that is fast compared to the rate of breakdown of this compound in the blood, thus preventing release of toxic Gd in the bloodstream. But how quickly can the kidneys of an isotope geochemist remove Gd from blood? In this experiment, a single isotope geochemist's wristwatch was synchronized with that of the MRI technician and then left in a dressing room with all other magnetically susceptible objects until after the MRI. The time of intravenous injection of gadoversetamide into the isotopist was recorded by the technician and later transmitted verbally to the isotopist. Following the MRI session, blood samples were collected by self-fingerprick, in a Class 100 trace metal clean lab, from 47 to 281 minutes after intravenous injection. For each

  14. Controllable Fabrication and Optical Properties of Uniform Gadolinium Oxysulfate Hollow Spheres

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fashen; Chen, Gen; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Xiaohe; Luo, Hongmei; Li, Junhui; Chen, Limiao; Ma, Renzhi; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2015-01-01

    Uniform gadolinium oxysulfate (Gd2O2SO4) hollow spheres were successfully fabricated by calcination of corresponding Gd-organic precursor obtained via a facile hydrothermal process. The Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres have a mean diameter of approximately 550 nm and shell thickness in the range of 30–70 nm. The sizes and morphologies of as-prepared Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres could be deliberately controlled by adjusting the experimental parameters. Eu-doped Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres have also been prepared for the property modification and practical applications. The structure, morphology, and properties of as-prepared products were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, SEM and fluorescence spectrophotometer. Excited with ultraviolet (UV) pump laser, successful downconversion (DC) could be achieved for Eu-doped Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres. PMID:26671661

  15. Synthesis of bulk-size transparent gadolinium oxide–polymer nanocomposites for gamma ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wen; Chen, Qi; Cherepy, Nerine; Dooraghi, Alex; Kishpaugh, David; Chatziioannou, Arion; Payne, Stephen; Xiang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Heavy element loaded polymer composites have long been proposed to detect high energy X- and γ-rays upon scintillation. The previously reported bulk composite scintillators have achieved limited success because of the diminished light output resulting from fluorescence quenching and opacity. We demonstrate the synthesis of a transparent nanocomposite comprising gadolinium oxide nanocrystals uniformly dispersed in bulk-size samples at a high loading content. The strategy to avoid luminescence quenching and opacity in the nanocomposite was successfully deployed, which led to the radioluminescence light yield of up to 27 000/MeV, about twice as much as standard commercial plastic scintillators. Nanocomposites monoliths (14 mm diameter by 3 mm thickness) with 31 wt% loading of nanocrystals generated a photoelectric peak for Cs-137 gamma (662 keV) with 11.4% energy resolution. PMID:26478816

  16. Effects of exposure to gadolinium on the development of geographically and phylogenetically distant sea urchins species.

    PubMed

    Martino, Chiara; Bonaventura, Rosa; Byrne, Maria; Roccheri, Maria; Matranga, Valeria

    2016-06-02

    Gadolinium (Gd), a metal of the lanthanide series used as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, is released into the aquatic environment. We investigated the effects of Gd on the development of four sea urchin species: two from Europe, Paracentrotus lividus and Arbacia lixula, and two from Australia, Heliocidaris tuberculata and Centrostephanus rodgersii. Exposure to Gd from fertilization resulted in inhibition or alteration of skeleton growth in the plutei. The similar morphological response to Gd in the four species indicates a similar mechanism underlying abnormal skeletogenesis. Sensitivity to Gd greatly varied, with the EC50 ranging from 56 nM to 132 μM across the four species. These different sensitivities highlight the importance of testing toxicity in several species for risk assessment. The strong negative effects of Gd on calcification in plutei, together with the plethora of marine species that have calcifying larvae, indicates that Gd pollution is urgent issue that needs to be addressed.

  17. Transient band structures in the ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnetic gadolinium and terbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichmann, Martin; Frietsch, Björn; Döbrich, Kristian; Carley, Robert; Weinelt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We compare the laser-driven demagnetization dynamics of the rare earths gadolinium and terbium by mapping their transient valance band structures with time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. In both metals, the minority and majority spin valence bands evolve independently with different time constants after optical excitation. The ultrafast shift of the partially unoccupied minority spin bulk band to higher binding energy and of the majority spin surface state to lower binding energy suggests spin transport between surface and bulk. The slower response of the fully occupied majority spin band follows the lattice temperature and is attributed to Elliott-Yafet type spin-flip scattering. Terbium shows a stronger and faster decay of the exchange splitting, pointing to ultrafast magnon emission via 4 f spin-to-lattice coupling.

  18. Obtaining gadolinium nanoparticles and studying their properties in a helium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petinov, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    A method for obtaining Gd nanoparticles with diameters of 89 to 18 nm upon metal evaporation both in a flow of pure helium and with the addition of 0.5% of oxygen is described. It is found that the addition of O2 does not affect the size of the particles, their structure, or the Curie temperature, though the magnetization is reduced. Particles with sizes of 18 nm have cubic lattice symmetry (fcc) and remain paramagnetic below T c; with an increase in the size of nanoparticles, the proportion of the hexagonal (hcp) phase, which coincides with the gadolinium structure, also grows, and below T c such particles become ferromagnetic. Oxygen impurities seem to have no effect on magnetic and structural transitions in nanoparticles.

  19. X-ray Absorption Improvement of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube through Gadolinium Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimin; Narsito, I.; Kartini; Santosa, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray absorption improvement of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) through gadolinium (Gd) encapsulation has been studied. The liquid phase adsorption using ethanol has been performed for the doping treatment. The Gd-doped SWCNT (Gd@SWCNT) was characterized by nitrogen adsorption isotherms, Raman spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. A relatively high residual weight of Gd@SWCNT compared to non-doped SWCNT (n-SWCNT) indicated that Gd has been doped in the nanotube. Even though Gd nanoparticles could not be observed clearly by TEM image, however, a significant decrease of nitrogen uptakes at low pressure and RBM (Radial Breathing Mode) upshift of Raman spectra of Gd@SWCNT specimen suggest that the metal nanoparticles might be encapsulated in the internal tube spaces of the nanotube. It was found that Gd-doped in the SWCNT increased significantly mass attenuation coefficient of the nanotube.

  20. Effect of Gadolinium Doping on the Air Oxidation of Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, Randall D.; Hanson, Brady D.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2004-12-04

    Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigated the effects of gadolinia concentration on the air oxidization of gadolinia-doped uranium dioxide using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry to determine if such doping could improve uranium dioxide's stability as a nuclear fuel during potential accident scenarios in a nuclear reactor or during long-term disposal. We undertook this study to determine whether the resistance of the uranium dioxide to oxidation to the orthorhombic U3O8 with its attendant crystal expansion could be prevented by addition of gadolinia. Our studies found that gadolinium has little effect on the thermal initiation of the first step of the reported two-step air oxidation of UO2; however, increasing gadolinia content does stabilize the initial tetragonal or cubic product allowing significant oxidation before the second expansive step to U3O8 begins.

  1. Dielectric and conducting behavior of gadolinium-terbium fumarate heptahydrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, M. D.; Want, B.

    2015-07-01

    Gadolinium-terbium fumarate heptahydrate crystals were grown in silica gel by using single gel diffusion technique. The crystals were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques of characterization. Powder X-ray diffraction results showed that the grown material is purely crystalline in nature. Elemental analyses suggested the chemical formula of the compound to be Gd Tb (C4H2O4)3ṡ7H2O. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the presence of Gd and Tb in the title compound. The dielectric and conductivity studies of the grown compound were carried as function of frequency of applied field and the temperature. The grown material showed a dielectric anomaly which was correlated with its thermal behavior. The ac conductivity of the material showed Jonscher's power law behavior: σ(ω)=σo+Aωs, with a temperature-dependent power exponent s(<1). The conductivity was found to be a function of temperature and frequency.

  2. Feasibility study of a gadolinium-loaded DIN-based liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sook Hyung; Joo, Kyung Kwang; So, Sun Heang; Yeo, In Sung

    2013-09-01

    DIN (di-isopropylnaphthalene) has a high flashpoint and can be used as a base solvent in liquid scintillators. It reduces safety concerns to humans and the environment. (PPO, 3 g/ ℓ) and (bis-MSB, 30 mg/ ℓ) were dissolved to formulate a DIN-based liquid scintillator (LS). A gadolinium (Gd) complex with carboxylic acid was synthesized using a neutralized chemical reaction. Then, 0.1% Gd was loaded into the LS. This Gd-loaded DIN-based LS using a solvent-solvent extraction method is the first attempt at a LS. In this study, we investigated the physical and the optical properties of this LS, and we will summarize all the characteristics of the Gd-loaded DIN-based LS.

  3. Coherent spin dynamics in a gadolinium-doped CaW O4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibekov, E. I.; Gafurov, M. R.; Zverev, D. G.; Kurkin, I. N.; Rodionov, A. A.; Malkin, B. Z.; Barbara, B.

    2017-02-01

    We report the first observation of Rabi oscillations in the spin-7/2 ensemble of trivalent gadolinium ions hosted in CaW O4 single crystal. A number of transitions within the lowest electronic multiplet 8S7 /7 2 2 of G d3 + ion are studied using a combination of continuous-wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The corresponding Rabi damping curves and the spin coherence times are detected at varying strengths of the microwave field. These data are well reproduced by a theoretical model which accounts for the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the microwave field within the microwave resonator and the magnetic dipole interactions in the diluted spin ensemble. The results indicate that the studied 8-level ground manifold of G d3 + ion can represent an effective three-qubit quantum system.

  4. Characterization of PAH matrix with monazite stream containing uranium, gadolinium and iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sangita; Meena, Sher Singh; Goswami, D.

    2016-05-01

    Uranium (U) gadolinium(Gd) and iron (Fe) containing alkaline waste simulated effluent (relevant to alkaline effluent of monazite ore) has been treated with a novel amphoteric resin viz, Polyamidehydroxamate (PAH) containing amide and hydroxamic acid groups. The resin has been synthesized in an eco-friendly manner by polymerization nad conversion to functional groups characterized by FT-IR spectra and architectural overview by SEM. Coloration of the loaded matrix and de-coloration after extraction of uranium is the special characteristic of the matrix. Effluent streams have been analyzed by ICP-AES, U loaded PAH has been characterized by FT-IR, EXAFS, Gd and Fe by X-ray energy values of EDXRF at 6.053 Kev and 6.405 Kev respectively. The remarkable change has been observed in Mössbauer spectrum of Fe-loaded PAH samples.

  5. Nanosystem composed with MSNs, gadolinium, liposome and cytotoxic peptides for tumor theranostics.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yaqing; Zhang, Nengpan; Li, Chunlin; Pu, Kefeng; Ding, Chen; Zhu, Yimin

    2017-03-01

    A dual-functional delivery system, based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with the integration of Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and therapeutic peptide delivery, is reported in this paper. A lipid bilayer is attached onto the surface of the nanoparticles, following the doping of Gadolinium (Gd), a paramagnetic lanthanide ion. The liposome-coated GdMSNs exhibit improved colloidal stability, better biocompatibility and more efficient cellular uptake. The Gd renders the nano carrier a potential T1 contrast agent, confirmed by the MR imaging. A pro-apoptotic peptide, KLA (HGGKLAKLAKKLAKLAK), is encapsulated into the GdMSNs-LP and enters into the cells successfully to induce mitochondrial swelling and apoptosis, while it is nontoxic outside the cells. The synthesis procedure is convenient and free of toxic organic reagents. The nanosystem we construct may contribute to a promising theranostic platform for therapeutic peptide delivery in cancer treatment.

  6. Gadolinium(III) complexes as MRI contrast agents: ligand design and properties of the complexes.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Petr; Kotek, Jan; Kubícek, Vojtech; Lukes, Ivan

    2008-06-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a commonly used diagnostic method in medicinal practice as well as in biological and preclinical research. Contrast agents (CAs), which are often applied are mostly based on Gd(III) complexes. In this paper, the ligand types and structures of their complexes on one side and a set of the physico-chemical parameters governing properties of the CAs on the other side are discussed. The solid-state structures of lanthanide(III) complexes of open-chain and macrocyclic ligands and their structural features are compared. Examples of tuning of ligand structures to alter the relaxometric properties of gadolinium(III) complexes as a number of coordinated water molecules, their residence time (exchange rate) or reorientation time of the complexes are given. Influence of the structural changes of the ligands on thermodynamic stability and kinetic inertness/lability of their lanthanide(III) complexes is discussed.

  7. Redox-Triggered Self-Assembly of Gadolinium-Based MRI Probes for Sensing Reducing Environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Controlled self-assembly of small molecule gadolinium (Gd) complexes into nanoparticles (GdNPs) is emerging as an effective approach to design activatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes and amplify the r1 relaxivity. Herein, we employ a reduction-controlled macrocyclization reaction and self-assembly to develop a redox activated Gd-based MRI probe for sensing a reducing environment. Upon disulfide reduction at physiological conditions, an acyclic contrast agent 1 containing dual Gd-chelates undergoes intramolecular macrocyclization to form rigid and hydrophobic macrocycles, which subsequently self-assemble into GdNPs, resulting in a ∼60% increase in r1 relaxivity at 0.5 T. Probe 1 has high r1 relaxivity (up to 34.2 mM–1 s–1 per molecule at 0.5 T) upon activation, and also shows a high sensitivity and specificity for MR detection of thiol-containing biomolecules. PMID:24992373

  8. Biocompatible nanotemplate-engineered nanoparticles containing gadolinium: stability and relaxivity of a potential MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donghua; White, R D; Hardy, Peter A; Weerapreeyakul, Natthida; Sutthanut, Khaetthareeya; Jay, Michael

    2006-04-01

    In this article, we use a nanotemplate engineering approach to prepare biodegradable nanoparticles composed of FDA-approved materials and possessing accessible gadolinium (Gd) atoms and demonstrate their potential as a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Nanoparticles containing dimyristoyl phosphoethanolamine diethylene triamine penta acetate (PE-DTPA) were prepared using 3.5 mg of Brij 78, 2.0 mg of emulsifying wax and 0.5 mg of PE-DTPA/ml from a microemulsion precursor. After the addition of GdCl3, the presence of Gd on the surface of nanoparticles was characterized using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). The in vitro relaxivities of the PE-DTPA-Gd nanoparticles in different media were assessed at different field strengths. The conditional stability constant of Gd binding to the nanoparticles was determined using competitive spectrophotometric titration. Transmetallation kinetics of the gadolinium ion from PE-DTPA-Gd nanoparticles with zinc as the competing ionic was measured using the relaxivity evolution method. Nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 130 nm possessing surface chelating functions were made from GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) materials. STEM demonstrated the uniform distribution of Gd3+ on the surface of the nanoparticles. The thermodynamic binding constant for Gd3+ to the nanoparticles was approximately 10(18) M(-1) and transmetallation studies with Zn2+ yielded kinetic constants K1 and K(-1) of 0.033 and 0.022 1/h, respectively, with an equilibrium constant of 1.5. A payload of approximately 10(5) Gd/nanoparticle was achieved; enhanced relaxivities were observed, including a pH dependence of the transverse relaxivity (r2). Nanoparticles composed of materials that have been demonstrated to be hemocompatible and enzymatically metabolized and possessing accessible Gd ions on their surface induce relaxivities in the bulk water signal that make them

  9. The use of theranostic gadolinium-based nanoprobes to improve radiotherapy efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sancey, L; Kotb, S; Roux, S; Dufort, S; Bianchi, A; Crémillieux, Y; Fries, P; Coll, J-L; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Janier, M; Dutreix, M; Barberi-Heyob, M; Boschetti, F; Denat, F; Louis, C; Porcel, E; Lacombe, S; Le Duc, G; Deutsch, E; Perfettini, J-L; Detappe, A; Verry, C; Berbeco, R; Butterworth, K T; McMahon, S J; Prise, K M; Perriat, P; Tillement, O

    2014-01-01

    A new efficient type of gadolinium-based theranostic agent (AGuIX®) has recently been developed for MRI-guided radiotherapy (RT). These new particles consist of a polysiloxane network surrounded by a number of gadolinium chelates, usually 10. Owing to their small size (<5 nm), AGuIX typically exhibit biodistributions that are almost ideal for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For example, although a significant proportion of these particles accumulate in tumours, the remainder is rapidly eliminated by the renal route. In addition, in the absence of irradiation, the nanoparticles are well tolerated even at very high dose (10 times more than the dose used for mouse treatment). AGuIX particles have been proven to act as efficient radiosensitizers in a large variety of experimental in vitro scenarios, including different radioresistant cell lines, irradiation energies and radiation sources (sensitizing enhancement ratio ranging from 1.1 to 2.5). Pre-clinical studies have also demonstrated the impact of these particles on different heterotopic and orthotopic tumours, with both intratumoural or intravenous injection routes. A significant therapeutical effect has been observed in all contexts. Furthermore, MRI monitoring was proven to efficiently aid in determining a RT protocol and assessing tumour evolution following treatment. The usual theoretical models, based on energy attenuation and macroscopic dose enhancement, cannot account for all the results that have been obtained. Only theoretical models, which take into account the Auger electron cascades that occur between the different atoms constituting the particle and the related high radical concentrations in the vicinity of the particle, provide an explanation for the complex cell damage and death observed. PMID:24990037

  10. Aqueous stability of gadolinium in surface waters receiving sewage treatment plant effluent Boulder Creek, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Taylor, H.E.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Barber, L.B.

    2005-01-01

    In many surface waters, sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent is a substantial source of both regulated and unregulated contaminants, including a suite of complex organic compounds derived from household chemicals, pharmaceutical, and industrial and medical byproducts. In addition, STP effluents in some urban areas have also been shown to have a positive gadolinium (Gd) anomaly in the rare earth element (REE) pattern, with the Gd derived from its use in medical facilities. REE concentrations are relatively easy to measure compared to many organic wastewater compounds and may provide a more widely utilized tracer of STP effluents. To evaluate whether sewage treatment plant-associated Gd is a useful tracer of treatment plant effluent, an investigation of the occurrence, fate, and transport of rare earth elements was undertaken. The rare earth element patterns of four of five STP effluents sampled display positive Gd anomalies. The one site that did not have a Gd anomaly serves a small community, population 1200, with no medical facilities. Biosolids from a large metropolitan STP are not enriched in Gd even though the effluent is, suggesting that a substantial fraction of Gd remains in the aqueous phase through routine treatment plant operation. To evaluate whether STP-derived Gd persists in the fluvial environment, a 14-km study reach downstream of an STP was sampled. Gadolinium anomalies were present at all five downstream sites, but the magnitude of the anomaly decreased. Effluent from STPs is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic constituents, and to better understand the chemical interactions and their effect on REEs, the aqueous speciation was modeled using comprehensive chemical analyses of water samples collected downstream of STP input. These calculations suggest that the REEs will likely remain dissolved because phosphate and carbonate complexes dominate over free REE ions. This study supports the application of Gd anomalies as a useful tracer of urban

  11. Gadolinium Enhanced MR Coronary Vessel Wall Imaging at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Kelle, Sebastian; Schlendorf, Kelly; Hirsch, Glenn A; Gerstenblith, Gary; Fleck, Eckart; Weiss, Robert G; Stuber, Matthias

    2010-10-11

    Purpose. We evaluated the influence of the time between low-dose gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration and coronary vessel wall enhancement (LGE) detected by 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and Methods. Four healthy subjects (4 men, mean age 29 ± 3 years and eleven CAD patients (6 women, mean age 61 ± 10 years) were studied on a commercial 3.0 Tesla (T) whole-body MR imaging system (Achieva 3.0 T; Philips, Best, The Netherlands). T1-weighted inversion-recovery coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was repeated up to 75 minutes after administration of low-dose Gadolinium (Gd) (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA). Results. LGE was seen in none of the healthy subjects, however in all of the CAD patients. In CAD patients, fifty-six of 62 (90.3%) segments showed LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall at time-interval 1 after contrast. At time-interval 2, 34 of 42 (81.0%) and at time-interval 3, 29 of 39 evaluable segments (74.4%) were enhanced. Conclusion. In this work, we demonstrate LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall using 3.0 T MRI after a single, low-dose Gd contrast injection in CAD patients but not in healthy subjects. In the majority of the evaluated coronary segments in CAD patients, LGE of the coronary vessel wall was already detectable 30-45 minutes after administration of the contrast agent.

  12. Gadolinium-based Compounds Induce NLRP3-dependent IL-1β Production and Peritoneal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Lauber, Christian; Bossaller, Lukas; Abujudeh, Hani H.; Vladimer, Gregory I.; Christ, Anette; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Latz, Eicke; Gravallese, Ellen M.; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Kay, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a progressive fibrosing disorder that may develop in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) after administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). In the setting of impaired renal clearance of GBCAs, gadolinium (Gd) deposits in various tissues and fibrosis subsequently develops. However, the precise mechanism by which fibrosis occurs in NSF is incompletely understood. Because other profibrotic agents, such silica or asbestos, activate the NOD-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome and initiate IL-1β release with the subsequent development of fibrosis, we evaluated the effects of GBCAs on inflammasome activation. Methods Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) from C57BL/6, Nlrp3−/− and Asc−/− mice were incubated with three Gd-containing compounds and IL-1β activation and secretion was detected by ELISA and Western blot analysis. Inflammasome activation and regulation was investigated in IL-4- and IFNγ-polarized macrophages by ELISA, qRT-PCR and NanoString nCounter analysis. Furthermore, C57BL/6 and Nlrp3−/− mice were injected i.p. with GBCA and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the peritoneum was analyzed by FACS. Results Both free Gd and GBCAs activate the NLRP3 inflammasome and induce IL-1β secretion in vitro. Gd-DTPA also induces the recruitment of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes to the peritoneum in vivo. Gd activated IL-4-polarized macrophages more effectively than IFNγ-polarized macrophages, which preferentially expressed genes known to downregulate inflammasome activity. Conclusion These data suggest that Gd released from GBCAs triggers a NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent inflammatory response that leads to fibrosis in an appropriate clinical setting. The preferential activation of IL-4-differentiated macrophages is consistent with the predominantly fibrotic presentation of NSF. PMID:24914072

  13. Effects of rare-earth filters on patient exposure and image contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Mauriello, S.M.; Washburn, D.B.; Matteson, S.R.

    1987-08-01

    Minimizing patient exposure while maintaining a diagnostically acceptable radiograph is a major goal in diagnostic radiography. Rare-earth filters may be the means to achieve this goal due to their band-pass effect. The purpose of this study was to examine the image contrast effects and exposure reductions for various thicknesses of aluminum, samarium, gadolinium, gadolinium oxysulfide, and gadolinium oxysulfide added to 2.5 mm of aluminum. Trials were conducted on an intra-oral dental x-ray unit (range, 65 to 90 kVp). When compared with conventional aluminum, all of the rare-earth filters provided lower radiation exposures, with gadolinium in the metallic or oxysulfide form providing the lowest exposures. Samarium, at a thickness of 0.127 mm, yielded the highest image contrast. Gadolinium or gadolinium oxysulfide added to 2.5 mm of aluminum resulted in a slight loss of contrast when compared with conventional aluminum filtration. This loss may not be clinically significant, and when coupled with the reduced exposure afforded by these filters, they become viable as acceptable alternatives to aluminum filtration.

  14. Helium defectoscopy of cerium gadolinium ceramics Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 with a submicrocrystalline structure in the impurity disorder region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koromyslov, A. V.; Zhiganov, A. N.; Kovalenko, M. A.; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya.

    2013-12-01

    The concentration of impurity anion vacancies formed upon the dissociation of gadolinium-vacancy complexes has been determined using helium defectoscopy of the cerium gadolinium ceramics Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 with a submicrocrystalline structure in the temperature range T = 740-1123 K and at saturation pressures ranging from 0.05 to 15 MPa. It has been found that the energy of dissociation of gadoliniumvacancy complexes is E {eff/ D }= 0.26 ± 0.06 eV, and the energy of dissolution of helium in anion vacancies in the impurity disorder region is E P = -0.31 ± 0.09 eV. The proposed mechanism of dissolution has been confirmed by the investigation of the electrical conductivity of the cerium gadolinium ceramics, as well as by the high-speed molecular dynamics simulation of the dissociation of gadolinium-vacancy complexes. It has been assumed that a decrease in the effective dissolution energy in comparison with the results of the previously performed low-temperature investigations is caused by the mutual repulsion of vacancies formed upon the dissociation of gadolinium-vacancy complexes in highly concentrated solutions of gadolinium in CeO2 with increasing temperature.

  15. Properties of high k gate dielectric gadolinium oxide deposited on Si (1 0 0) by dual ion beam deposition (DIBD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Ping; Chai, Chun-Lin; Yang, Shao-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Kai; Song, Shu-Lin; Li, Yan-Li; Chen, Nuo-Fu

    2004-09-01

    Gadolinium oxide thin films have been prepared on silicon (1 0 0) substrates with a low-energy dual ion-beam epitaxial technique. Substrate temperature was an important factor to affect the crystal structures and textures in an ion energy range of 100-500 eV. The films had a monoclinic Gd2O3 structure with preferred orientation (4 bar 0 2) at low substrate temperatures. When the substrate temperature was increased, the orientation turned to (2 0 2), and finally, the cubic structure appeared at the substrate temperature of 700 °C, which disagreed with the previous report because of the ion energy. The AES studies found that Gadolinium oxide shared Gd2O3 structures, although there were a lot of oxygen deficiencies in the films, and the XPS results confirmed this. AFM was also used to investigate the surface images of the samples. Finally, the electrical properties were presented.

  16. Dramatic impact of the giant local magnetic fields on spin-dependent recombination processes in gadolinium based garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, N. G. Tolmachev, D. O.; Gurin, A. S.; Uspenskaya, Yu. A.; Asatryan, H. R.; Badalyan, A. G.; Baranov, P. G.; Wieczorek, H.; Ronda, C.

    2015-06-29

    A giant magnetic field effect on spin-dependent recombination of the radiation-induced defects has been found in cerium doped gadolinium based garnet crystals and ceramics, promising materials for scintillator applications. A sharp and strong increase in the afterglow intensity stimulated by external magnetic field and an evidence of the magnetic field memory have been discovered. The effect was ascribed to huge Gd-induced internal magnetic fields, which suppress the recombination, and cross-relaxation with Gd{sup 3+} ions leading to reorientation of the spins of the electron and hole centers. Thus, the spin system of radiation-induced defects in gadolinium garnet based scintillator materials was shown to accumulate significant energy which can be released in external magnetic fields.

  17. Gadolinium(III) Complexes with N-Alkyl-N-methylglucamine Surfactants Incorporated into Liposomes as Potential MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Simone Rodrigues; Duarte, Érica Correia; Ramos, Guilherme Santos; Kock, Flávio Vinícius Crizóstomo; Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Frézard, Frédéric; Colnago, Luiz Alberto; Demicheli, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Complexes of gadolinium(III) with N-octanoyl-N-methylglucamine (L8) and N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (L10) with 1 : 2 stoichiometry were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and molar conductivity measurements. The transverse (r2) and longitudinal (r1) relaxivity protons were measured at 20 MHz and compared with those of the commercial contrasts. These complexes were incorporated in liposomes, resulting in the increase of the vesicle zeta potential. Both the free and liposome-incorporated gadolinium complexes showed high relaxation effectiveness, compared to commercial contrast agent gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist). The high relaxivity of these complexes was attributed to the molecular rotation that occurs more slowly, because of the elevated molecular weight and incorporation in liposomes. The results establish that these paramagnetic complexes are highly potent contrast agents, making them excellent candidates for various applications in molecular MR imaging. PMID:26347596

  18. The use of innovative gadolinium-based contrast agent for MR-diagnosis of cancer in the experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Zelchan, R.; Grigorev, E.; Frolova, I.; Nam, I.

    2016-02-01

    The present study of the functional suitability and specific activity of the contrast agent gadolinium-based for magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that the investigated contrast agent intensively accumulates in organs and anatomical structures of the experimental animals. In the model of tumor lesions in animals, study have shown that investigational contrast agent accumulates in the tumor tissue and retained there in for a long enough time.

  19. Gadolinium oxide nanoplates with high longitudinal relaxivity for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjung; Sethi, Richa; Ananta Narayanan, Jeyarama Subramanian; Lee, Seung Soo; Benoit, Denise N.; Taheri, Nasim; Decuzzi, Paolo; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values moderately reduce as the size of the Gd2O3 nanoplates increases, and are always larger for the PAA-OA coating. Cytotoxicity studies on human dermal fibroblast cells documented no significant toxicity, with 100% cell viability preserved up to 250 μM for the PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates. Given the 10 times increase in longitudinal relaxivity over the commercially available Gd-based molecular agents and the favorable toxicity profile, the 2 nm PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates could represent a new class of highly effective T1 MRI contrast agents.Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values

  20. Nanoparticles for multi-modality cancer diagnosis: Simple protocol for self-assembly of gold nanoclusters mediated by gadolinium ions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenxiu; Xia, Fangfang; Alfranca, Gabriel; Yan, Hao; Zhi, Xiao; Liu, Yanlei; Peng, Chen; Zhang, Chunlei; de la Fuente, Jesus Martinez; Cui, Daxiang

    2017-03-01

    It is essential to develop a simple synthetic strategy to improve the quality of multifunctional contrast agents for cancer diagnosis. Herein, we report a time-saving method for gadolinium (Gd(3+)) ions-mediated self-assembly of gold nanoclusters (GNCs) into monodisperse spherical nanoparticles (GNCNs) under mild conditions. The monodisperse, regular and colloidal stable GNCNs were formed via selectively inducing electrostatic interactions between negatively-charged carboxylic groups of gold nanoclusters and trivalent cations of gadolinium in aqueous solution. In this way, the Gd(3+) ions were chelated into GNCNs without the use of molecular gadolinium chelates. With the co-existence of GNCs and Gd(3+) ions, the formed GNCNs exhibit significant luminescence intensity enhancement for near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, high X-ray attenuation for computed tomography (CT) imaging and reasonable r1 relaxivity for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The excellent biocompatibility of the GNCNs was proved both in vitro and in vivo. Meanwhile, the GNCNs also possess unique NIRF/CT/MR imaging ability in A549 tumor-bearing mice. In a nutshell, the simple and safe GNCNs hold great potential for tumor multi-modality clinical diagnosis.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis: an evaluation of the cardiac segments and layers that exhibit late gadolinium enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Komada, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Kojiro; Ishiguchi, Hiroaki; Kawai, Hisashi; Okumura, Takahiro; Hirashiki, Akihiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) can cause sudden death, which is the leading cause of mortality in patients with sarcoidosis in Japan. However, it is difficult to diagnose CS because of the lack of a sensitive diagnostic method for the condition. Late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrates improved sensitivity for diagnosing CS. Therefore, it is important to know the late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) characteristics of CS on cardiac MR images in order to diagnose CS accurately. In this study, we investigated the most common sites of LGE on cardiac MR images in CS. Late gadolinium-enhanced MR images of 9 consecutive patients with CS (obtained between August 2009 and July 2015) were reviewed by two radiologists. The distribution of LGE was evaluated using the American Heart Association 17-segment model of the left ventricle. The LGE in each segment was also classified into 4 patterns according to the myocardial layer in which it occurred (the subepicardial, subendocardial, intramural, and transmural layer patterns). All 9 patients exhibited LGE in their left ventricle, and 70 of 153 (46%) myocardial segments were enhanced. All of the patients displayed LGE in the basal septal wall. The patients' LGE layer patterns were as follows: subepicardial: 40% (28/70), intramural: 30% (21/70), subendocardial: 16% (11/70), and transmural: 14% (10/70). The basal septum wall and subepicardial layer often exhibit LGE on cardiac MR images in CS patients. LGE can be observed in other segments and layers in some cases. PMID:28008199

  2. Neuroprotective effect of gadolinium: a stretch-activated calcium channel blocker in mouse model of ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Puja; Muthuraman, Arunachalam; Jaggi, Amteshwar S; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the potential of gadolinium, a stretch-activated calcium channel blocker in ischemic reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain injury in mice. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion of 12 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h was given to induce cerebral injury in male Swiss mice. Cerebral infarct size was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Memory was assessed using Morris water maze test and motor incoordination was evaluated using rota-rod, lateral push, and inclined beam walking tests. In addition, total calcium, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were also estimated in brain tissue. I/R injury produced a significant increase in cerebral infarct size. A significant loss of memory along with impairment of motor performance was also noted. Furthermore, I/R injury also produced a significant increase in levels of TBARS, total calcium, AChE activity, and a decrease in GSH levels. Pretreatment of gadolinium significantly attenuated I/R-induced infarct size, behavioral and biochemical changes. On the basis of the present findings, we can suggest that opening of stretch-activated calcium channel may play a critical role in ischemic reperfusion-induced brain injury and that gadolinium has neuroprotective potential in I/R-induced injury.

  3. Relaxivity enhancement of aquated Tris(β-diketonate)gadolinium(III) chelates by confinement within ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Law, Justin J; Guven, Adem; Wilson, Lon J

    2014-01-01

    Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes loaded with gadolinium ions (gadonanotubes) have been previously shown to exhibit extremely high T1 -weighted relaxivities (>100 mm(-1) s(-1) ). To further examine the effect of nanoconfinement on the relaxivity of gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, a series of ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotube (US-tube) materials internally loaded with gadolinium chelates have been prepared and studied. US-tubes were loaded with Gd(acac)3  · 2H2 O, Gd(hfac)3  · 2H2 O, and Gd(thd)3 (acac = acetylacetone, hfac = hexafluoroacetylacetone, thd = tetramethylheptanedione). The longitudinal relaxivities of the prepared materials determined at 25°C in a 1.5 T field were 103 mm(-1) s(-1) for Gd(acac)3  · 2H2 O@US-tubes, 105 mm(-1) s(-1) for Gd(hfac)3  · 2H2 O@US-tubes and 26 mm(-1) s(-1) for Gd(thd)3 @US-tubes. Compared with the relaxivities obtained for the unloaded chelates (<10 mm(-1) s(-1) ) as well as accounting for the T1 reduction observed for the empty US-tubes, the boost in relaxivity for chelate-loaded US-tubes is attributed to confinement within the nanotube and depends on the number of coordinated water molecules.

  4. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    DOE PAGES

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; ...

    2016-04-07

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8GPa and 600K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high-pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scan the phasemore » diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in this experiment, the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp → αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0–10GPa and 300–650K« less

  5. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2016-04-07

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8GPa and 600K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high-pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scan the phase diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in this experiment, the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp → αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0–10GPa and 300–650K

  6. Monte Carlo Study of Radiation Dose Enhancement by Gadolinium in Megavoltage and High Dose Rate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daniel G.; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G.; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed. PMID:25275550

  7. Luminescence properties and electronic structure of Ce{sup 3+}-doped gadolinium aluminum garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Dotsenko, V.P.; Berezovskaya, I.V.; Voloshinovskii, A.S.; Zadneprovski, B.I.; Efryushina, N.P.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The luminescence properties of Ce{sup 3+} ions in (Y, Gd){sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} are analyzed. • The Gd{sup 3+} → Y{sup 3+} substitution leads to increasing of Ce{sup 3+} noncubic crystal field splitting parameter. • The excitation spectra for the Ce{sup 3+} emission in GdAG contain bands at 6.67, 7.75, and 9.76 eV. • These features are due to the Ce{sup 3+}-bound exciton formation and O 2p → Al 3s, 3p transitions. • Contributions from Al atoms to the conduction-band density of states are quite essential. - Abstract: Yttrium-gadolinium aluminum garnets (YGdAG) doped with Ce{sup 3+} ions have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The luminescent properties of Ce{sup 3+} ions in Gd{sub 3(1−x)}Ce{sub 3x}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (x = 0.01) have been studied upon excitation in the 2–20 eV region. The substitution of Gd{sup 3+} for Y{sup 3+} in the garnet structure results in broadening the emission band and shifting its maximum towards the longer wavelengths. It was found that in addition to the 4f → 5d excitation bands of Ce{sup 3+} ions, the excitation spectra for the Ce{sup 3+} emission contain bands at 6.67, 7.75, and 9.76 eV. These bands are attributed to the Ce{sup 3+}-bound exciton formation and O 2p → Al 3s, 3p transitions, respectively. Although gadolinium states dominate near the bottom of the conduction band of Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}, contributions from Al{sub tetr} and Al{sub oct} atoms to the conduction-band density of states are evaluated as quite essential.

  8. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, Xinglu; Qian, Chunqi; Zhu, Lei; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MR contrast agents exert influence on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2} relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T{sub 1}) or transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T{sub 2} weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T{sub 2} relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to -4.12 {+-} 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the

  9. Gadolinium-148 production cross section measurements for 600-and 800-MEV protons.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, K. C.; Devlin, M. J.; Pitcher, E. J.; Mashnik, S. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2004-01-01

    In a series of experiments at LANSCE's WNR facility, {sup 148}Gd production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 {mu}m thin W, Ta, and Au foils and 10 {mu}m thin Al activation foils. Gadolinium spallation yields were determined from these foils using alpha spectroscopy and compared with the LANL codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. When heavy metal targets, such as tungsten, are bombarded with protons greater than a few hundred MeV many different nuclides are produced. These nuclides are both stable and radioactive and are created by spallation, proton activation, or secondary reactions with neutrons and other nuclear particles made in the target. These products are distributed somewhat heterogeneously throughout a thick target because of the energy dependence of the cross sections and energy loss of the proton beam within the target. From this standpoint, it is difficult to measure nuclide production cross sections for a given energy proton in a thick target. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility and 1L target at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. DOE requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on radionuclide inventories in the target as a means of determining the 'nuclear facility' category level. Presently, WNR's Target 4 is a non-nuclear facility while the Lujan 1L target is classified as a Category 3 nuclear facility. Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten and other heavy elements. Allowable isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of {sup 148}Gd is generally low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total inhalation dose burden in an accident

  10. Clearance of Gadolinium from the Brain with No Pathologic Effect after Repeated Administration of Gadodiamide in Healthy Rats: An Analytical and Histologic Study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adrian P L; Marino, Michael; Roberts, Jeanette; Crowder, Janell M; Castle, Jason; Lowery, Lisa; Morton, Christine; Hibberd, Mark G; Evans, Paul M

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To measure the levels of gadolinium present in the rat brain 1 and 20 weeks after dosing with contrast agent and to determine if there are any histopathologic sequelae. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the GE Global Research Center Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Absolute gadolinium levels were quantified in the blood and brains of rats 1 week after dosing and 20 weeks after dosing with up to 20 repeat doses of gadodiamide (cumulative dose, 12 mmol per kilogram of body weight) by using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Treatment groups (n = 6 rats per group) included low-dosage and high-dosage gadodiamide and osmolality-matched saline controls. Brain sections were submitted (blinded) for standard toxicology assessment per Registry of Industrial Toxicology Animal data guidelines. Analysis of variance and Mann-Whitney U tests with post hoc correction were used to assess differences in absolute gadolinium levels and percentage of injected dose, respectively. Results Dose-dependent low levels of gadolinium were detected in the brain, a mean ± standard deviation of 2.49 nmol per gram of brain tissue ± 0.30 or 0.00019% of the injected dose 1 week after dosing. This diminished by approximately 50% (to 1.38 nmol per gram of brain tissue ± 0.10 or 0.00011% of the injected dose) 20 weeks after dosing. As a percentage of injected dose, the levels of gadolinium measured were comparable between different doses, indicating that mechanisms of uptake and elimination were not saturated at the tested doses. There were no histopathologic findings associated with the levels of gadolinium measured. Conclusion Low levels of gadolinium are present in the brain after repeat dosing with gadodiamide, which is partially cleared over 20 weeks with no detectable neurotoxicity.

  11. Late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify early features of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). We characterise myocardial and functional findings in carriers of lamin A/C mutation to facilitate the recognition of these patients using this method. We also investigated the connection between myocardial fibrosis and conduction abnormalities. Methods Seventeen lamin A/C mutation carriers underwent CMR. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and cine images were performed to evaluate myocardial fibrosis, regional wall motion, longitudinal myocardial function, global function and volumetry of both ventricles. The location, pattern and extent of enhancement in the left ventricle (LV) myocardium were visually estimated. Results Patients had LV myocardial fibrosis in 88% of cases. Segmental wall motion abnormalities correlated strongly with the degree of enhancement. Myocardial enhancement was associated with conduction abnormalities. Sixty-nine percent of our asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients showed mild ventricular dilatation, systolic failure or both in global ventricular analysis. Decreased longitudinal systolic LV function was observed in 53% of patients. Conclusions Cardiac conduction abnormalities, mildly dilated LV and depressed systolic dysfunction are common in DCM caused by a lamin A/C gene mutation. However, other cardiac diseases may produce similar symptoms. CMR is an accurate tool to determine the typical cardiac involvement in lamin A/C cardiomyopathy and may help to initiate early treatment in this malignant familiar form of DCM. PMID:21689390

  12. A complement to the modern crystallographer's toolbox: caged gadolinium complexes with versatile binding modes.

    PubMed

    Stelter, Meike; Molina, Rafael; Jeudy, Sandra; Kahn, Richard; Abergel, Chantal; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-06-01

    A set of seven caged gadolinium complexes were used as vectors for introducing the chelated Gd(3+) ion into protein crystals in order to provide strong anomalous scattering for de novo phasing. The complexes contained multidentate ligand molecules with different functional groups to provide a panel of possible interactions with the protein. An exhaustive crystallographic analysis showed them to be nondisruptive to the diffraction quality of the prepared derivative crystals, and as many as 50% of the derivatives allowed the determination of accurate phases, leading to high-quality experimental electron-density maps. At least two successful derivatives were identified for all tested proteins. Structure refinement showed that the complexes bind to the protein surface or solvent-accessible cavities, involving hydrogen bonds, electrostatic and CH-π interactions, explaining their versatile binding modes. Their high phasing power, complementary binding modes and ease of use make them highly suitable as a heavy-atom screen for high-throughput de novo structure determination, in combination with the SAD method. They can also provide a reliable tool for the development of new methods such as serial femtosecond crystallography.

  13. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  14. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of epiphyseal and metaphyseal marrow in normal piglets.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Renfa; Qi, Jianpin; Tang, Lihua

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the appearance of normal epiphyseal and metaphyseal marrow and normal changes of marrow due to fatty conversion on Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR Imaging. Unenhanced and enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging were performed in proximal and distal femoral ends of 8 healthy piglets at the ages of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks, respectively. The changes with age in signal intensity and enhancement ratio of the epiphyseal and metaphyseal marrow with age were examined. The correlation of MRI characteristics with histological findings was studied. Our study showed that marrow of the metaphysis and of periphery of the 2nd ossification center were well vascularized hematopoietic marrow and had great enhancements. The enhancement ratio of metaphysis was greater than that of epiphyseal marrow and both enhancement ratios degraded gradually with age. The central regions of the epiphyseal ossification center and of the diaphysis were of fatty marrow and had little enhancement. It is concluded that on Gd-enhanced MR imaging the hematopoietic marrow of metaphysis and of periphery of the 2nd ossification center had greater enhancement than that of fatty marrow of central region of the 2nd ossification center. All of their enhancements decreased gradually with age.

  15. Layered gadolinium-based nanoparticle as a novel delivery platform for microRNA therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Shannon S.; Razzak, Rene; Bédard, Eric; Guo, Linghong; Shaw, Andrew R.; Moore, Ronald B.; Roa, Wilson H.

    2014-10-01

    Specific expression patterns of microRNA (miRNA) molecules have been linked to cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. The accumulating evidence for the role of oncogenic or tumor-suppressing miRNAs identified the need for nano-scaled platform that can help deliver nucleotides to modulate miRNAs. Here we report the synthesis of novel layered gadolinium hydroxychloride (LGdH) nanoparticles, a member of the layered double hydroxide (LDH) family, with physiochemical properties suitable for cell uptake and tracing via magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the inhibition of mature miRNA-10b in metastatic breast cancer cell line using LGdH nanoparticle as a delivery platform. Through characterization analysis, we show that nanoparticles are easily and stably loaded with anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMO) and efficiently penetrate cell membranes. We demonstrate that AMOs delivered by LGdH nanoparticles remain functional by inducing changes in the expression of its downstream effector and by curbing the invasive properties. Furthermore, we demonstrate the traceability of LGdH nanoparticles via T1 weighted MR imaging. LGdH nanoparticles, which are biocompatible with cells in vitro, provide a promising multifunctional platform for microRNA therapeutics through their diagnostic, imaging, and therapeutic potentials.

  16. Caustic Precipitation of Plutonium and Uranium with Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    SciTech Connect

    ANN, VISSER

    2005-04-14

    The caustic precipitation of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) from Pu and U containing waste solutions has been investigated to determine whether gadolinium (Gd) could be used as a neutron poison for precipitation with greater than a fissile mass containing both Pu and enriched U. Precipitation experiments were performed using both actual samples and simulant solutions with a range of 2.6-5.16 g/L U and 0-4.3 to 1 U to Pu. Analyses were performed on solutions at intermediate pH to determine the partitioning of elements for accident scenarios. When both Pu and U were present in the solution, precipitation began at pH 4.5 and by pH 7, 99 percent of Pu and U had precipitated. When complete neutralization was achieved at pH greater than 14 with 1.2 M excess OH-, greater than 99 percent of Pu, U, and Gd had precipitated. At pH greater than 14, the particles sizes were larger and the distribution was a single mode. The ratio of hydrogen to fissile atoms in the precipitate was determined after both settling and centrifuging and indicates that sufficient water was associated with the precipitates to provide the needed neutron moderation for Gd to prevent a criticality in solutions containing up to 4.3 to 1 U to Pu and up to 5.16 g/L U.

  17. Caustic Precipitation of Plutonium and Uranium with Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    SciTech Connect

    VISSER, ANN E.; BRONIKOWSKI, MICHAEL G.; RUDISILL, TRACY S.

    2005-10-18

    The caustic precipitation of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) from Pu and U-containing waste solutions has been investigated to determine whether gadolinium (Gd) could be used as a neutron poison for precipitation with greater than a fissile mass containing both Pu and enriched U. Precipitation experiments were performed using both process solution samples and simulant solutions with a range of 2.6-5.16 g/L U and 0-4.3:1 U:Pu. Analyses were performed on solutions at intermediate pH to determine the partitioning of elements for accident scenarios. When both Pu and U were present in the solution, precipitation began at pH 4.5 and by pH 7, 99% of Pu and U had precipitated. When complete neutralization was achieved at pH > 14 with 1.2 M excess OH{sup -}, greater than 99% of Pu, U, and Gd had precipitated. At pH > 14, the particles sizes were larger and the distribution was a single mode. The ratio of hydrogen:fissile atoms in the precipitate was determined after both settling and centrifuging and indicates that sufficient water was associated with the precipitates to provide the needed neutron moderation for Gd to prevent a criticality in solutions containing up to 4.3:1 U:Pu and up to 5.16 g/L U.

  18. MR of intracranial tumors: Combined use of gadolinium and magnetization transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kurki, T.; Niemi, P.; Valtonen, S.

    1994-10-01

    To study the potential combined application of gadolinium and magnetization transfer in the MR imaging of intracranial tumors. Twenty-two patients were imaged at low field strength (0.1 T). Corresponding gradient-echo partial saturation images without and with magnetization transfer pulse were produced. Images with intermediate repetition times were obtained in 18 cases; five different sequences were produced in 4 cases. Gadopentetate dimeglumine was used at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg. Magnetization transfer effect increased the contrast between enhancing lesion and normal brain and the contrast between edema and normal brain; the contrast between enhancing lesion and edema was not significantly changed. On intermediate-repetition-time magnetization transfer images the contrast between enhancing tumor and normal brain and the contrast between edema and normal brain were superior to short-repetition-time magnetization transfer images, but the differentiation between enhancing tumor and edema was poorer. Magnetization transfer can be used to improve contrast in Gd-enhanced MR imaging. Combining magnetization transfer with an intermediate-repetition-time image provides the possibility for displaying both enhancing and nonehancing lesions on a single MR image. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) encapsulated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles for MRI-based cell tracking.

    PubMed

    Bennewitz, Margaret F; Williams, Simone S; Nkansah, Michael K; Shapiro, Erik M

    2013-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles have proven useful for cell tracking applications by monitoring cell transplantation and migration in living organisms. However, one perceived drawback is that these particles cause dark contrast in MRI, sometimes yielding confusion with other biological phenomena, which also yield dark contrast. To that end, researchers have investigated the use of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) based contrast agents for MRI-based cell tracking, as Gd2O3 has favorable r1 molar relaxivity. We synthesized Gd2O3 nanocrystals and encapsulated them within PLGA matrices to form approximatley to 150 nm nanoparticles. r1 was 1.9 mM(-1) sec(-1) and r2 was 8.4 mM(-1) sec(-1). Cell labeling with particles was well tolerated by cells except at very high doses. MRI of labeled cells showed that labeled cells could achieve both R1 and R2 enhancements due to the internalized particles. R2 enhancements were approximately to twice that of R1 enhancements suggesting the use of very short echo times when using Gd2O3 based contrast agents for MRI-based cell tracking.

  20. Synthesis, Characterization, and Thermal Kinetics of Mixed Gadolinium: Calcium Heptamolybdate System

    PubMed Central

    Koul, R. K.; Suri, Shivani; Singh, Vishal; Bamzai, K. K.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of mixed gadolinium calcium heptamolybdate (GdCaHM) system in silica gel medium using single gel single tube technique has been successfully achieved. The grown crystal exhibits various morphologies, which includes spherulites, multifaceted, and square platelets. The nature of the grown material was established by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study signifies the presence of heptamolybdate (Mo7O24) and water symmetry structure, whereas energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) establishes the stoichiometric of the grown crystal as GdCaMo7O24·8H2O. The thermal behaviour was studied using the thermoanalytical techniques, which include thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results obtained on the application of TG based models, namely, Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern, and Piloyan-Novikova, suggest the contracting cylindrical model as the relevant model for the thermal decomposition of the material. The kinetic parameters, namely, the order of reaction (n), activation energy (Ea), frequency factor (Z), and entropy (ΔS∗), were also calculated using these three models. PMID:27350973

  1. High performance magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles assembled from terbium and gadolinium 1,3-diketones

    PubMed Central

    Zairov, Rustem; Mustafina, Asiya; Shamsutdinova, Nataliya; Nizameev, Irek; Moreira, Beatriz; Sudakova, Svetlana; Podyachev, Sergey; Fattakhova, Alfia; Safina, Gulnara; Lundstrom, Ingemar; Gubaidullin, Aidar; Vomiero, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte-coated nanoparticles consisting of terbium and gadolinium complexes with calix[4]arene tetra-diketone ligand were first synthesized. The antenna effect of the ligand on Tb(III) green luminescence and the presence of water molecules in the coordination sphere of Gd(III) bring strong luminescent and magnetic performance to the core-shell nanoparticles. The size and the core-shell morphology of the colloids were studied using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The correlation between photophysical and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles and their core composition was highlighted. The core composition was optimized for the longitudinal relaxivity to be greater than that of the commercial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents together with high level of Tb(III)-centered luminescence. The tuning of both magnetic and luminescent output of nanoparticles is obtained via the simple variation of lanthanide chelates concentrations in the initial synthetic solution. The exposure of the pheochromocytoma 12 (PC 12) tumor cells and periphery human blood lymphocytes to nanoparticles results in negligible effect on cell viability, decreased platelet aggregation and bright coloring, indicating the nanoparticles as promising candidates for dual magneto-fluorescent bioimaging. PMID:28091590

  2. Metabolomic profiles delineate potential roles for gadolinium chloride in the proliferation or inhibition of Hela cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiao-Hui; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Qiong; Yao, Jun; Wang, Yi; He, Guo-Hua; Hong, Guang-Yan; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2011-08-01

    Lanthanides (Lns) compounds have been reported to possess contrary effects on cell activity, i.e., promoting cell cycle progression and cell growth by lower concentration treatment, but suppressing cell proliferation and inducing cell apoptosis at higher dosing. However, the cellular processes during the intervention and the possible underlying mechanisms are still not well clarified. Using a combination of high-throughput liquid chromatography (LC) with mass spectrometry (MS), we have investigated the metabolomic profiles of Hela cells following gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)) treatment in time- and concentration- dependent manners. A total of 48 metabolites released by Hela cells are identified to be differentially expressed (P < 0.05) in different states. Metabolic pathways analyses reveal that the differential metabolites are mainly characterized by increased lipid and amino acid metabolisms and by decreased lipid, amino acid, and carbohydrate metabolisms for cells treated with GdCl(3) at lower and higher concentrations, respectively. Notably, in the higher level GdCl(3) case, the down-expressions of metabolites are predominantly in the glycolytic and the redox pathways. The above results, obtained by using a metabolomic strategy for the first time, disclose that different cell signaling pathways are activated by GdCl(3) treatment with different concentrations, leading to inhibitory or promotional effect on Hela cells.

  3. Optical properties of color centers in calcium-stabilized gadolinium gallium garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Pogatshnik, G.J. ); Cain, L.S. ); Chen, Y. ); Evans, B.D. )

    1991-01-15

    The addition of small amounts of calcium during the crystal growth of large-diameter, gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) crystals creates color centers that absorb in the near-uv region of the spectrum. Ultraviolet and {gamma}-ray irradiation of the crystals produced changes in the intensities of the uv color-center bands along with a broad absorption throughout the visible spectrum. The color center that gives rise to an absorption band at 350 nm serves as a photoionizable donor center so that uv excitation results in a visible coloration of the crystals. The effects of oxidation and reduction treatments on the strength of the color-center bands and on the radiation response of the material were examined. Photoluminescence bands were observed in both reduced GGG crystals as well as crystals that were irradiated with neutrons. Visible coloration is likely to occur during flashlamp pumping of laser rods that utilize large-diameter GGG crystals as the laser host. The changes in the optical properties of the material under uv excitation indicate that the addition of small amounts of calcium to assist in the growth of large-diameter crystals is likely to result in the degradation of laser performance.

  4. Thermal-Diffusivity Dependence on Temperature of Gadolinium Calcium Oxoborate Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefon-Radziejewska, D.; Bodzenta, J.; Łukasiewicz, T.

    2013-05-01

    Thermal diffusivities of pure and doped gadolinium calcium oxoborate (GdCOB) single crystals were measured as a function of the temperature along optical indicatrix axes X, Y, and Z. Three GdCOB samples were investigated, chemically pure single crystal, the one doped with 4 at% of Nd and the next one doped with 7 at% of Yb. Measurements were carried out for temperature range 40 °C to 300 °C. Determination of the thermal diffusivity based on an analysis of thermal wave propagation in the sample. For a detection of temperature disturbance propagating in the sample the mirage effect was used. Obtained results show that the thermal diffusivity decreases with the increase of sample temperature for all investigated crystals. The GdCOB single crystals reveal a strong anisotropy. The thermal diffusivity along Y direction has the highest value while values obtained in X and Z axes are much lower. Dopants cause decrease in the thermal diffusivity for all investigated directions.

  5. Gadolinium dosimetry, a problematic issue in the neutron capture therapy. Comparison between experiments and computational simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalino, D.; Cerullo, N.; Colli, V.; Gambarini, G.; Rosi, G.

    2006-05-01

    In GdNCT the interested isotope is 157Gd that captures neutrons with (n, ) reaction and also emits internal conversion and Auger electrons. These electrons have an important effect on DNA strands, mainly due to the property of gadolinium to link to DNA. The emitted gamma rays partially interacts with tumours but mainly diffuse in the body damaging healthy tissues. Therefore in the study of Gd therapeutical effect both dosimetric and microdosimetric analyses must be performed. At Pisa University, in the last years some works were performed by NCT group. At the present these researches are continued on these topics carrying out also a PhD thesis. In this frame some simulations, using MC code, were performed in order to evaluate the dose distribution due to Gd reactions. It is however necessary to calibrate the calculations on experimental results, though they are scarce in GdNCT. Some experiments with 157Gd were performed by Milan group using gel dosimetry [1, 2, 3]. Therefore some computational comparisons were done. In these article the results of this comparisons are shown and discussed.

  6. Random lasing in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate crystal powder

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, André L.; Fewo, Serge I.; Carvalho, Mariana T.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Araújo, Cid B. de; Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2015-02-28

    Random laser (RL) emission in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate—KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+}—crystal powder is demonstrated. The powder was excited at 813 nm in resonance with the Nd{sup 3+} transition {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}F{sub 5/2}. RL emission at 1067 nm due to the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} transition was observed and characterized. An intensity threshold dependent on the laser spot area and bandwidth narrowing from ≈2.20 nm to ≈0.40 nm were observed and measured. For a beam spot area of 0.4 mm{sup 2}, a RL threshold of 6.5 mJ/mm{sup 2} (90 MW/cm{sup 2}) was determined. For excitation intensity smaller than the RL threshold, only spontaneous emission from level {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} with decay time in the tens microsecond range was observed, but for excitation above the RL threshold, significant shortening of excited level lifetime, characteristic of a stimulated process was found. The overall characteristics measured show that KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+} is an efficient material for operation of solid state RLs in the near-infrared.

  7. Influence of gadolinium doping on the structure and defects of ceria under fuel cell operating temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, S. A. Gaikwad, V. M.; Sathe, V.; Kulkarni, S. K.

    2014-03-17

    Correlation between atomic positional shift, oxygen vacancy defects, and oxide ion conductivity in doped ceria system has been established in the gadolinium doped ceria system from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy study at operating temperature (300–600 °C) of Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (IT-SOFC). High temperature XRD data are used to quantify atomic positional shift from mean position with temperature. The Raman spectroscopy study shows additional vibration modes related to ordering of defect spaces (Gd{sub Ce}{sup ′}−V{sub o}{sup ••}){sup *} and (2Gd{sub Ce}{sup ′}−V{sub o}{sup ••}){sup x} generated due to association of oxygen vacancies and reduced cerium or dopant cations site (Gd{sup 3+}), which disappear at 450 °C; indicating oxygen vacancies dissociation from the defect complex. The experimental evidences of cation-anion positional shifting and oxygen vacancies dissociation from defect complex in the IT-SOFC operating temperature are discussed to correlate with activation energy for ionic conductivity.

  8. Performance improvement of gadolinium oxide resistive random access memory treated by hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jer-Chyi Hsu, Chih-Hsien; Ye, Yu-Ren; Ai, Chi-Fong; Tsai, Wen-Fa

    2014-03-15

    Characteristics improvement of gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub x}O{sub y}) resistive random access memories (RRAMs) treated by hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was investigated. With the hydrogen PIII treatment, the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs exhibited low set/reset voltages and a high resistance ratio, which were attributed to the enhanced movement of oxygen ions within the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} films and the increased Schottky barrier height at Pt/Gd{sub x}O{sub y} interface, respectively. The resistive switching mechanism of Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs was dominated by Schottky emission, as proved by the area dependence of the resistance in the low resistance state. After the hydrogen PIII treatment, a retention time of more than 10{sup 4} s was achieved at an elevated measurement temperature. In addition, a stable cycling endurance with the resistance ratio of more than three orders of magnitude of the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs can be obtained.

  9. Sorafenib and gadolinium co-loaded liposomes for drug delivery and MRI-guided HCC treatment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanan; Liu, Yongjun; Yang, Shaomei; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Tianqi; Jiang, Dandan; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Dexin; Zhang, Na

    2016-05-01

    To improve the poor water solubility of sorafenib and to monitor its distribution and the early feedback effects on its in vivo treatment efficacy in a precise manner, sorafenib (SF) and gadolinium (Gd) co-loaded liposomes (SF/Gd-liposomes) were prepared. The simultaneous imaging and therapy efficacies of the SF/Gd-liposomes were tested. The solubility of SF in SF/Gd-liposomes was significantly increased from 0.21 μg/mL to 250 μg/mL. The imaging capability of SF/Gd-liposomes were tested by in-vitro and the in-vivo imaging ability tests and the results confirmed that SF/Gd-liposomes could be served as an effective contrast agent. The design of SF/Gd-liposomes allowed the MRI-guided in vivo visualization of the delivery and biodistribution of liposome. In the in vivo antitumor studies, SF/Gd-liposomes had better antitumor effects in H22 tumor-bearing mice than SF solution (oral or i.v. administration) (P<0.05). These findings indicated that the SF/Gd-liposomes could be used as the promising nano-carriers for the MRI-guided in vivo visualization of the delivery and HCC treatment.

  10. Preparation and initial characterization of biodegradable particles containing gadolinium-DTPA contrast agent for enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Amber L; Chu, Kevin; Ali, Adeel; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2008-11-11

    Accurate imaging of atherosclerosis is a growing necessity for timely treatment of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique for plaque imaging. The goal of this study was to create polymeric particles of a small size with high loading of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium (III) (Gd-DTPA) and demonstrate their usefulness for MRI. A water-in-oil-in-oil double emulsion solvent evaporation technique was used to encapsulate the MRI agent in a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or polylactide-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) particle for the purpose of concentrating the agent at an imaging site. PLGA particles with two separate average sizes of 1.83 microm and 920 nm, and PLA-PEG particles with a mean diameter of 952 nm were created. Loading of up to 30 wt % Gd-DTPA was achieved, and in vitro release occurred over 5 h. PLGA particles had highly negative zeta potentials, whereas the particles incorporating PEG had zeta potentials closer to neutral. Cytotoxicity of the particles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was shown to be minimal. The ability of the polymeric contrast agent formulation to create contrast was similar to that of Gd-DTPA alone. These results demonstrate the possible utility of the contrast agent-loaded polymeric particles for plaque detection with MRI.

  11. Modelling of the Gadolinium Fuel Test IFA-681 using the BISON Code

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, Giovanni; Hales, Jason Dean; Novascone, Stephen Rhead; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting; Williamson, Richard L

    2016-05-01

    In this work, application of Idaho National Laboratory’s fuel performance code BISON to modelling of fuel rods from the Halden IFA-681 gadolinium fuel test is presented. First, an overview is given of BISON models, focusing on UO2/UO2-Gd2O3 fuel and Zircaloy cladding. Then, BISON analyses of selected fuel rods from the IFA-681 test are performed. For the first time in a BISON application to integral fuel rod simulations, the analysis is informed by detailed neutronics calculations in order to accurately capture the radial power profile throughout the fuel, which is strongly affected by the complex evolution of absorber Gd isotopes. In particular, radial power profiles calculated at IFE–Halden Reactor Project with the HELIOS code are used. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project. Some slide have been added as an Appendix to present the newly developed PolyPole-1 algorithm for modeling of intra-granular fission gas release.

  12. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after the Use of Gadolinium Contrast Media.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Byun, Il Hwan; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Jung-Won

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a medical emergency that threatens life. To this day, ARDS is very rarely reported by iodine contrast media, and there is no reported case of ARDS induced by gadolinium contrast media. Here, we present a case with ARDS after the use of gadobutrol (Gadovist) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast medium. A 26 years old female without any medical history, including allergic diseases and without current use of drugs, visited the emergency room for abdominal pain. Her abdominopelvic computed tomography with iodine contrast media showed a right ovarian cyst and possible infective colitis. Eighty-three hours later, she underwent pelvis MRI after injection of 7.5 mL (0.1 mL/kg body weight) of gadobutrol (Gadovist) to evaluate the ovarian cyst. She soon presented respiratory difficulty, edema of the lips, nausea, and vomiting, and we could hear wheezing upon auscultation. She was treated with dexamethasone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Her chest X-ray showed bilateral central bat-wing consolidative appearance. Managed with mechanical ventilation, she was extubated 3 days later and discharged without complications.

  13. Phase-Sensitive Inversion Recovery for Detecting Myocardial Infarction Using Gadolinium-Delayed Hyperenhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; Arai, Andrew E.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Aletras, Anthony H.

    2007-01-01

    After administration of gadolinium, infarcted myocardium exhibits delayed hyperenhancement and can be imaged using an inversion recovery (IR) sequence. The performance of such a method when using magnitude-reconstructed images is highly sensitive to the inversion recovery time (TI) selected. Using phase-sensitive reconstruction, it is possible to use a nominal value of TI, eliminate several breath-holds otherwise needed to find the precise null time for normal myocardium, and achieve a consistent contrast. Phase-sensitive detection is used to remove the background phase while preserving the sign of the desired magnetization during IR. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the benefits of both phase-sensitive IR image reconstruction and surface coil intensity normalization for detecting myocardial infarction (MI). The phase-sensitive reconstruction method reduces the variation in apparent infarct size that is observed in the magnitude images as TI is changed. Phase-sensitive detection also has the advantage of decreasing the sensitivity to changes in tissue T1 with increasing delay from contrast agent injection. PMID:11810682

  14. Internalization pathways into cancer cells of gadolinium-based radiosensitizing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rima, Wael; Sancey, Lucie; Aloy, Marie-Thérèse; Armandy, Emma; Alcantara, Gustavo B; Epicier, Thierry; Malchère, Annie; Joly-Pottuz, Lucile; Mowat, Pierre; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Burdin, Béatrice; Rivoire, Annie; Boulé, Christelle; Anselme-Bertrand, Isabelle; Pourchez, Jérémie; Cottier, Michèle; Roux, Stéphane; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Perriat, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, nanoparticles have been studied in theranostic field with the objective of exhibiting a long circulation time through the body coupled to major accumulation in tumor tissues, rapid elimination, therapeutic potential and contrast properties. In this context, we developed sub-5 nm gadolinium-based nanoparticles that possess in vitro efficient radiosensitizing effects at moderate concentration when incubated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells (SQ20B). Two main cellular internalization mechanisms were evidenced and quantified: passive diffusion and macropinocytosis. Whereas the amount of particles internalized by passive diffusion is not sufficient to induce in vitro a significant radiosensitizing effect, the cellular uptake by macropinocytosis leads to a successful radiotherapy in a limited range of particles incubation concentration. Macropinocytosis processes in two steps: formation of agglomerates at vicinity of the cell followed by their collect via the lamellipodia (i.e. the "arms") of the cell. The first step is strongly dependent on the physicochemical characteristics of the particles, especially their zeta potential that determines the size of the agglomerates and their distance from the cell. These results should permit to control the quantity of particles internalized in the cell cytoplasm, promising ambitious opportunities towards a particle-assisted radiotherapy using lower radiation doses.

  15. Purificaiton of Lanthanides for Large Neutrino Detectors: Thorium Removal from Gadolinium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, M.; Cumming, J.B.; Hans, S.; Hahn, R.L.

    2010-06-01

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillators are the detectors of choice for various neutrino experiments. Procedures have been developed to transfer metals into organic liquids by solvent extraction or direct dissolution of a metallic compound. Traces of natural radioactivity introduced into the scintillator with the metal may produce undesirable backgrounds. Measurements using a {sup 229}Th tracer indicate that the inclusion of a pH-controlled partial hydrolysis and filtration prior to the preparation of a gadolinium-loading compound can reduce thorium by a factor of {approx}100. This 'self-scavenging' procedure has the advantage that it uses only reagents encountered in the production process. Addition of non-elemental scavengers such as iron, or the use of solvent extraction or ion exchange procedures can be avoided. It also improves the optical transmission in the blue region by removing traces of iron. This purification method has potential applications to the large-scale production of other metal-loaded liquid scintillators and for the removal of traces of thorium in the industrial production of lanthanides.

  16. Hybrid mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/): gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) detector for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlbom, M.; Barton, J.B.; Hoffman, E.J.; Mandelkern, M.; Ricci, A.R.

    1985-02-01

    Gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO), a high density (6.71 g/cm/sup 3/), high effective Z (59) scintillation detector with faster decay time (60 ns) and higher light yield than bismuth germanate (BGO), was evaluated as a replacement for BGO for a hybrid detection system for high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The detection system consists of multiple GSO detectors attached to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a HgI/sub 2/ photodetector attached to each GSO crystal. The PMT signal provides coincidence timing and energy discrimination and the photodetector signal identifies the crystal of interaction. GSO light yield was 1.7 times that of BGO with energy resolution consistent with improved photon statistics (17.8 to 13.8% FWHM). Resolution of GSO coupled to a HgI/sub 2/ photodetector was 13.6% FWHM. Coincidence timing was 2.3 ns FWHM. Timing between PMT and HgI/sub 2/ was 136 ns FWHM.

  17. Optical constants determination of neodymium and gadolinium in the 3-nm to 100-nm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjornrattanawanich, B.; Windt, D. L.; Uspenskii, Y. A.; Seely, J. F.

    2006-08-01

    The optical constants (n, k) of the wavelength-dependent index of refraction N = n+ik = 1-δ+ik of Nd (Neodymium) and Gd (Gadolinium) are determined in the wavelength range of 3 nm to 100 nm by the transmittance method using synchrotron radiation. Nd and Gd films with thicknesses ranging from 5 nm to 180 nm were fabricated on Si photodiodes (which served as the coating substrates as well as the detectors) and capped with Si layers to protect these reactive rare earth elements from oxidation. The imaginary part (k) obtained directly from the transmittance measurement is used in the derivation of the real part (δ) of the complex index of refraction N through the Kramers- Kronig integral. The measured optical constants are used in the design of currently developed Nd- and Gd-based multilayers for solar imaging applications. Our results on Nd and Gd optical constants and the reflectance of some Nd- and Gd-based multilayers are presented.

  18. Whole-core comet solutions to a 3-dimensional PWR benchmark problem with gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F.

    2012-07-01

    A pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem with gadolinium was used to determine the accuracy and computational efficiency of the coarse mesh radiation transport method COMET. The benchmark problem contains 193 square fuel assemblies. The COMET solution (eigenvalue, assembly averaged and fuel pin averaged fission density distributions) was compared with those obtained from the corresponding Monte Carlo reference solution using the same 2-group material cross section library. The comparison showed that both the core eigenvalue and fission density distribution averaged over each assembly and fuel pin predicated by COMET agree very well with the corresponding MCNP reference solution if the incident flux response expansion used in COMET is truncated at 2nd order in the two spatial and the two angular variables. The benchmark calculations indicate that COMET has Monte Carlo accuracy. In, particular, the eigenvalue difference between the codes ranged from 17 pcm to 35 pcm, being within 2 standard deviations of the calculational uncertainty. The mean flux weighted relative differences in the assembly and fuel pin fission densities were 0.47% and 0.65%, respectively. It was also found that COMET's full (whole) core computational speed is 30,000 times faster than MCNP in which only 1/8 of the core is modeled. It is estimated that COMET would have been about over 6 orders of magnitude faster than MCNP if the full core were also modeled in MCNP. (authors)

  19. Lunar prospector measurements of the distribution of incompatible elements gadolinium, samarium and thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Elphic, R.C.; Lawrence, D.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Barraclough, B.L.; Maurice, S.; Binder, A.B.; Lucey, P.G.

    1999-04-01

    Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer (NS) and gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) observations have been used to map out the distribution of incompatible elements on the lunar surface. Specifically, the GRS data provide maps of the distribution of thorium and potassium while the NS data provide information on the distribution of iron and titanium, and the rare earth elements gadolinium and samarium. Using results of analysis of Celementine spectral reflectance (CSR) data, the Fe- and Ti-contributions to the NS data can be removed, leaving primarily rare earth element contributions from Gd and Sm. The Th and K maps correlate with the inferred Gd and Sm maps (r {approximately} 0.93), but there are regions of significant disagreement. One of these is in the KREEP-rich circum-Imbrium ring. No clear explanation has emerged for this disagreement, though Th, K, Gd and Sm have differing degrees of incompatibility. These results clearly are important to discussions of the geochemistry of the Procellarum-Imbrium Th-rich Terrane and the South-Pole-Aitken Terrane.

  20. High performance magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles assembled from terbium and gadolinium 1,3-diketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zairov, Rustem; Mustafina, Asiya; Shamsutdinova, Nataliya; Nizameev, Irek; Moreira, Beatriz; Sudakova, Svetlana; Podyachev, Sergey; Fattakhova, Alfia; Safina, Gulnara; Lundstrom, Ingemar; Gubaidullin, Aidar; Vomiero, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte-coated nanoparticles consisting of terbium and gadolinium complexes with calix[4]arene tetra-diketone ligand were first synthesized. The antenna effect of the ligand on Tb(III) green luminescence and the presence of water molecules in the coordination sphere of Gd(III) bring strong luminescent and magnetic performance to the core-shell nanoparticles. The size and the core-shell morphology of the colloids were studied using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The correlation between photophysical and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles and their core composition was highlighted. The core composition was optimized for the longitudinal relaxivity to be greater than that of the commercial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents together with high level of Tb(III)-centered luminescence. The tuning of both magnetic and luminescent output of nanoparticles is obtained via the simple variation of lanthanide chelates concentrations in the initial synthetic solution. The exposure of the pheochromocytoma 12 (PC 12) tumor cells and periphery human blood lymphocytes to nanoparticles results in negligible effect on cell viability, decreased platelet aggregation and bright coloring, indicating the nanoparticles as promising candidates for dual magneto-fluorescent bioimaging.

  1. [Studies of three-dimensional cardiac late gadolinium enhancement MRI at 3.0 Tesla].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masaru; Ikeda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Momoe

    2008-12-20

    Cardiac late Gadolinium enhancement MR imaging has been shown to allow assessment of myocardial viability in patients with ischemic heart disease. The current standard approach is a 3D inversion recovery sequence at 1.5 Tesla. The aims of this study were to evaluate the technique feasibility and clinical utility of MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy. In phantom and volunteer studies, the inversion time required to suppress the signal of interests and tissues was prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. In the clinical study, the average inversion time to suppress the signal of myocardium at 3.0 Tesla with respect to MR viability imaging at 1.5 Tesla was at 15 min after the administration of contrast agent (304.0+/-29.2 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 283.9+/-20.9 at 1.5 Tesla). The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium was equal at both field strengths (4.06+/-1.30 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 4.42+/-1.85 at 1.5 Tesla). Even at this early stage, MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla provides high quality images in patients with myocardial infarction. The inversion time is significantly prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium at 3.0 Tesla are equal to 1.5 Tesla. Further investigation is needed for this technical improvement, for clinical evaluation, and for limitations.

  2. Dual photon absorptiometry using a gadolinium-153 source applied to measure equine bone mineral content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moure, Alessandro; Reichmann, Peter; Remigio Gamba, Humberto

    2003-12-01

    The application of the dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) technique, using gadolinium-153 as the photon source, to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) of the third metacarpal bone of horses is presented. The radiation detector was implemented with a NaI(TI) scintillator coupled to a 14 stage photomultiplier. A modular mechanical system allows the position of the prototype to be adjusted in relation to the animal. A moveable carrier makes it possible to scan the third metacarpal with a velocity adjustable between 1 and 12 mm s-1, in steps of 1 mm s-1, for a total distance of 250 mm. The prototype was evaluated with a phantom of the third metacarpal bone made of perspex and aluminium, and in vitro with a transverse slice of the third metacarpal bone of a horse. The tests showed that the prototype has an accuracy and precision of, approximately, 10% and 6%, respectively, for a 6 s acquisition time. Preliminary studies carried out in three foals from birth to one year of age indicated that the prototype is well suited to in vivo and in situ analysis of the BMD of the third metacarpal bones of horses, making it possible to evaluate the changes of BMD levels on a monthly basis. Also, results indicated an exponential behaviour of the BMD curve during the first year of life of the studied horses.

  3. The influence of gadolinium and yttrium on biomass production and nutrient balance of maize plants.

    PubMed

    Saatz, Jessica; Vetterlein, Doris; Mattusch, Jürgen; Otto, Matthias; Daus, Birgit

    2015-09-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are expected to become pollutants by enriching in the environment due to their wide applications nowadays. The uptake and distribution of gadolinium and yttrium and its influence on biomass production and nutrient balance was investigated in hydroponic solution experiments with maize plants using increasing application doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg L(-1). It could be shown that concentrations of up to 1 mg L(-1) of Gd and Y did not reduce or enhance the plant growth or alter the nutrient balance. 10 mg L(-1) Gd or Y resulted in REE concentrations of up to 1.2 weight-% in the roots and severe phosphate deficiency symptoms. Transfer rates showed that there was only little transport of Gd and Y from roots to shoots. Significant correlations were found between the concentration of Gd and Y in the nutrient solution and the root tissue concentration of Ca, Mg and P.

  4. Response of a lithium gadolinium borate scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Williams, A M; Beeley, P A; Spyrou, N M

    2004-01-01

    Accurate estimation of neutron dose requires knowledge of the neutron energy distribution in the working environment. Existing neutron spectrometry systems, Bonner spheres for example, are large and bulky, and require long data acquisition times. A portable system that could indicate the approximate neutron energy spectrum in a short time would be extremely useful in radiation protection. A composite scintillator, consisting of lithium gadolinium borate crystals in a plastic scintillator matrix, produced by Photogenics is being tested for this purpose. A prototype device based on this scintillator and digital pulse processing electronics has been calibrated using quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields at the low-scatter facility of the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). Energies selected were 144, 250, 565, 1400, 2500 and 5000 keV, with correction for scattered neutrons being made using the shadow cone technique. Measurements were also made in the NPL thermal neutron field. Pulse distributions collected with the digitiser in capture-gated mode are presented, and detection efficiency and energy resolution derived. For comparison, neutron spectra were also collected using the commercially available Microspec N-Probe from Bubble Technology Industries, which consists of an NE213 scintillator and a 3He proportional counter.

  5. Removal of gadolinium-based contrast agents: adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Elizalde-González, María P; García-Díaz, Esmeralda; González-Perea, Mario; Mattusch, Jürgen

    2017-01-31

    Three carbon samples were employed in this work, including commercial (1690 m(2) g(-1)), activated carbon prepared from guava seeds (637 m(2) g(-1)), and activated carbon prepared from avocado kernel (1068 m(2) g(-1)), to study the adsorption of the following gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs): gadoterate meglumine Dotarem®, gadopentetate dimeglumine Magnevist®, and gadoxetate disodium Primovist®. The activation conditions with H3PO4 were optimized using a Taguchi methodology to obtain mesoporous materials. The best removal efficiency by square meter in a batch system in aqueous solution and model urine was achieved by avocado kernel carbon, in which mesoporosity prevails over microporosity. The kinetic adsorption curves were described by a pseudo-second-order equation, and the adsorption isotherms in the concentration range 0.5-6 mM fit the Freundlich equation. The chemical characterization of the surfaces shows that materials with a greater amount of phenolic functional groups adsorb the GBCA better. Adsorption strongly depends on the pH due to the combination of the following factors: contrast agent protonated forms and carbon surface charge. The tested carbon samples were able to adsorb 70-90% of GBCA in aqueous solution and less in model urine. This research proposes a method for the elimination of GBCA from patient urine before its discharge into wastewater.

  6. Magnetic properties of gadolinium and carbon co-doped gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed Kaleemullah, N.; Ramsubramanian, S.; Mohankumar, R.; Munawar Basha, S.; Rajagopalan, M.; Kumar, J.

    2017-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out to study the ferromagnetic properties of Gadolinium (Gd) Carbon (C) co-doped wurtzite Gallium Nitride (GaN) using full-potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within the density functional theory. The system shows half-metallic nature when single Gd is substituted in Ga36N36 supercell. The presence of carbon in GaN supercell is found to generate weak magnetic moment (Ms) in the neighbouring atoms. When Carbon is codoped in the Gd-GaN, it increased the total magnetic moment of the system (Mtot). The cause of ferromagnetism in the Gd and C co-doped GaN has been explained by Zener's p-d exchange mechanism. The role of defects in the magnetic property of this system is also investigated. The results indicate the gallium vacancy influences the magnetic moment of the Gd and C codoped GaN more than the nitrogen vacancy. The presence of holes is effective than electrons in achieving the ferromagnetism in the considered system.

  7. Design of a novel optical sensor for determination of trace gadolinium.

    PubMed

    Zare-Dorabei, R; Norouzi, P; Ganjali, M R

    2009-11-15

    In this work, a highly selective and sensitive gadolinium (Gd) optical sensor based on immobilization of bis(thiophenal) pyridine-2,6-diamine (BPD), on a triacetylcellulose membrane has been reported. This optode exhibits a linear range of the Gd(III) ion concentration of 2.5 x 10(-6)M with a detection limit of 0.93 x 10(-8) M. Response time of the newly designed optode was within 1-2 min, depending on the Gd(III) ion concentration. Response of the sensor is independent of solution pH in the range of 2.0-9.0. It manifests advantages of: low detection limit, fast response time, and most significantly, very good selectivity with respect to a number of lanthanide ions (La, Ce, Sm, Tm, Ho, and Eu ions). The sensor was successfully regenerated with thiourea solutions and its response was reversible and reproducible (R.S.D. less than 1.4%). This optode was applied to determine Gd(III) in synthetic and water samples, and validated with certified reference materials (CRMs).

  8. In vitro study of novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer for promising tumor targeting and tumor diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gu, Meng-Jie; Li, Kun-Feng; Zhang, Lan-Xin; Wang, Huan; Liu, Li-Si; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Han, Nan-Yin; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Fan, Tian-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer were developed and evaluated in vitro to enhance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis of tumor. Nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes were achieved by incorporating amphipathic material, Gd (III) [N,N-bis-stearylamidomethyl-N'-amidomethyl] diethylenetriamine tetraacetic acid, into the liposome membrane using lipid film hydration method. GBI-10, as the targeting ligand, was then conjugated onto the liposome surface to get GBI-10-targeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes (GTLs). Both nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes and GTLs displayed good dispersion stability, optimal size, and zeta potential for tumor targeting, as well as favorable imaging properties with enhanced relaxivity compared with a commercial MRI contrast agent (CA), gadopentetate dimeglumine. The use of GBI-10 aptamer in this liposomal system was intended to result in increased accumulation of gadolinium at the periphery of C6 glioma cells, where the targeting extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C is overexpressed. Increased cellular binding of GTLs to C6 cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and MRI, demonstrating the promise of this novel delivery system as a carrier of MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of tumor. These studies provide a new strategy furthering the development of nanomedicine for both diagnosis and therapy of tumor.

  9. Gadolinium, a mechano-sensitive channel blocker, inhibits osmosis-initiated motility of sea- and freshwater fish sperm, but does not affect human or ascidian sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Krasznai, Zoltán; Morisawa, Masaaki; Krasznai, Zoárd Tibor; Morisawa, Sachiko; Inaba, Kazuo; Bazsáné, Zsuzsa Kassai; Rubovszky, Bálint; Bodnár, Béla; Borsos, Antal; Márián, Teréz

    2003-08-01

    Exposure to hypo-osmotic or hyperosmotic environment triggers the initiation of fish sperm motility. In this article, we report that calcium and potassium channel blockers do not influence motility of puffer fish sperm but calmodulin antagonists reversibly decrease it, suggesting that calmodulin-Ca(2+) interactions are prerequisite for the initiation of sperm motility in this species. Gadolinium (a stretch activated ion channel blocker) decreased the motility of puffer fish sperm from 92 +/- 3% to 6 +/- 3% and that of carp sperm from 91 +/- 7% to 3.5 +/- 4.3% in a dose-dependent manner (10-40 micro M). The effect of gadolinium was reversible, suggesting that stretch activated ion channels participate in the initiation of sperm motility of the two species. Gadolinium inhibits changes in the isoelectric point of certain proteins of puffer fish sperm, which occur when sperm motility is initiated in a hypertonic solution. Anisotropy measurements showed that hypo-osmotic treatment, which initiates carp sperm motility, increased membrane fluidity. When hypo-osmotic treatment was given in the presence of gadolinium, the sperm membrane remained as rigid as in quiescent cells, while motility was blocked. By contrast, gadolinium did not influence the motility parameters of Ciona or human sperm. Based on these lines of evidence, we suggest that conformational changes of mechanosensitive membrane proteins are involved in osmolality-dependent but not osmolality-independent sperm.

  10. Gadolinium Enhanced MRI Assessment of Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Graft Harvest on Patellar Vascularity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kristofer J.; Lazaro, Lionel E.; Taylor, Samuel; Pardee, Nadine C.; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Warren, Russell F.; Lorich, Dean G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft remains a favored graft source for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction despite problems related to donor-site morbidity. Patellar devascularization has been proposed as a source of anterior knee pain following vascular disruption from traumatic injury (fracture) or surgical procedures involving the patella (total knee arthroplasty); however, no study has investigated the effect of BPTB harvest on patellar vascularity. Recent anatomic studies have suggested that the dominant arterial supply enters the patella through the inferior pole. We hypothesized that BPTB harvest can significantly diminish patellar vascularity following graft harvest. Methods: Nine matched pair cadaveric knee specimens (mean age 47.4 years) were dissected and cannulated at the superficial femoral, anterior tibialis, and posterior tibialis arteries. A single knee was randomly selected to undergo bone graft harvest. The contralateral knee was left intact to serve as a control. Gadolinium (Gd-DPTA) was injected into each knee and MRI signal enhancement was quantified to determine differences in osseous uptake between the two knees. Following MRI assessment, each matched pair was injected with a urethane polymer compound and dissected to correlate vessel disruption with MRI findings. Results: Graft harvest resulted in a mean 31% (range, 7.1-69.5%) decrease in signal enhancement when compared to the matched control. MRI assessment revealed two predominant patterns of vessel entry for the dominant inferior arterial supply. In one pattern, the vessel entered the inferomedial aspect (∼7 o’clock) of the distal patellar pole and was disrupted by bone graft harvest in two matched pairs (2/9, 22%). In the second pattern, the predominant vessel entered further medial (∼8 o’clock) and was not disrupted in 7 matched pairs. The mean decrease in gadolinium uptake following disruption of the predominant vessel measured 56% (range, 42

  11. Enhanced electron mobility at gadolinium oxide(100)/silicon(100) interface: Origin and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaputra, Wattaka

    A growth of a gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) layer with (100) orientation on a Si(100) substrate was obtained for the first time using molecular beam epitaxy deposition (MBE) with the growth temperature in the range of 150-200°C and the oxygen partial pressure in the range of 10 -7-10-6 Torr. The growth was performed on three type of Si(100) substrate; n-type, p-type, and intrinsic. Among the three major orientations, i.e. (111), (110) and (100), the Gd2O3(100) is known from energetic point of view to be least favorable. Nonetheless, an enhancement in electron mobility can only be found from the interface between Gd2O3(100) and Si(100). Although p-type Si(100) results in the best structural considerations from x-ray diffraction among the three types of substrate, the best feature was observed in the Gd2O 3(100)/n-type Si(100) because of its highest mobility enhancement and satisfactory structural stability. The mobility of 1670-1780 cm2/V˙s was observed at room temperature, for carrier concentration > 1018 cm-3. This amounts to a factor of four higher in electron mobility compared to a heavily doped n-type substrate with similar carrier concentration. This accumulation of electrons and mobility enhancement are attributed to two-dimensional confinement from charges transfer across the interface quite similar to modulation doping. Owing to these properties, the Gd2O3(100) becomes a promising candidate in promoting the scaling of logic devices.

  12. Erosion Performance of Gadolinium Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Processed by Suspension Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahade, Satyapal; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    7-8 wt.% Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the standard thermal barrier coating (TBC) material used by the gas turbines industry due to its excellent thermal and thermo-mechanical properties up to 1200 °C. The need for improvement in gas turbine efficiency has led to an increase in the turbine inlet gas temperature. However, above 1200 °C, YSZ has issues such as poor sintering resistance, poor phase stability and susceptibility to calcium magnesium alumino silicates (CMAS) degradation. Gadolinium zirconate (GZ) is considered as one of the promising top coat candidates for TBC applications at high temperatures (>1200 °C) due to its low thermal conductivity, good sintering resistance and CMAS attack resistance. Single-layer 8YSZ, double-layer GZ/YSZ and triple-layer GZdense/GZ/YSZ TBCs were deposited by suspension plasma spray (SPS) process. Microstructural analysis was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A columnar microstructure was observed in the single-, double- and triple-layer TBCs. Phase analysis of the as-sprayed TBCs was carried out using XRD (x-ray diffraction) where a tetragonal prime phase of zirconia in the single-layer YSZ TBC and a cubic defect fluorite phase of GZ in the double and triple-layer TBCs was observed. Porosity measurements of the as-sprayed TBCs were made by water intrusion method and image analysis method. The as-sprayed GZ-based multi-layered TBCs were subjected to erosion test at room temperature, and their erosion resistance was compared with single-layer 8YSZ. It was shown that the erosion resistance of 8YSZ single-layer TBC was higher than GZ-based multi-layered TBCs. Among the multi-layered TBCs, triple-layer TBC was slightly better than double layer in terms of erosion resistance. The eroded TBCs were cold-mounted and analyzed by SEM.

  13. Neutralization of Plutonium and Enriched Uranium Solutions Containing Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    SciTech Connect

    BRONIKOWSKI, MG.

    2004-04-01

    Materials currently being dissolved in the HB-Line Facility will result in an accumulated solution containing an estimated uranium:plutonium (U:Pu) ratio of 4.3:1 and an 235U enrichment estimated at 30 per cent The U:Pu ratio and the enrichment are outside the evaluated concentration range for disposition to high level waste (HLW) using gadolinium (Gd) as a neutron poison. To confirm that the solution generated during the current HB-Line dissolving campaign can be poisoned with Gd, neutralized and discarded to the Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW) system without undue nuclear safety concerns the caustic precipitation of surrogate solutions was examined. Experiments were performed with a U/Pu/Gd solution representative of the HB-Line estimated concentration ratio and also a U/Gd solution. Depleted U was used in the experiments as the enrichment of the U will not affect the chemical behavior during neutralization, but will affect the amount of Gd added to the solution. Settling behavior of the neutralized solutions was found to be comparable to previous studies. The neutralized solutions mixed easily and had expected densities of typical neutralized waste. The neutralized solids were found to be homogeneous and less than 20 microns in size. Partially neutralized solids were more amorphous than the fully neutralized solids. Based on the results of these experiments, Gd was found to be a viable poison for neutralizing a U/Pu/Gd solution with a U:Pu mass ratio of 4.3:1 thus extending the U:Pu mass ratio from the previously investigated 0-3:1 to 4.3:1. However, further work is needed to allow higher U concentrations or U:Pu ratios greater than investigated in this work.

  14. Convection enhanced delivery of different molecular weight tracers of gadolinium-tagged polylysine.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Peter A; Keeley, Dan; Schorn, Greg; Forman, Eric; Ai, Yi; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Zhang, Zhiming; Bradley, Luke H

    2013-09-30

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) is a powerful method of circumventing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to deliver therapeutic compounds directly to the CNS. While inferring the CED distribution of a therapeutic compound by imaging a magnetic resonance (MR)-sensitive tracer has many advantages, however how the compound distribution is affected by the features of the delivery system, its target tissue, and its molecular properties, such as its binding characteristics, charge, and molecular weight (MW) are not fully understood. We used MR imaging of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-tagged polylysine compounds of various MW, in vitro and in vivo, to measure the dependence of compounds MW on CED distribution. For the in vitro studies, the correlation between volume of distribution (Vd) as a function of MW was determined by measuring the T1 of the infused tracers, into 0.6% agarose gels through a multiport catheter. The compounds distributed in the gels inversely proportional to their MW, consistent with convection and unobstructed diffusion through a porous media. For the in vivo studies, Gd-DTPA tagged compounds were infused into the non-human primate putamen, via an implanted multiport catheter connected to a MedStream™ pump, programmed to deliver a predetermined volume with alternating on-off periods to take advantage of the convective and diffusive contributions to Vd. Unlike the gel studies, the higher MW polylysine-tracer infusions did not freely distribute from the multiport catheter in the putamen, suggesting that distribution was impeded by other properties that should also be considered in future tracer design and CED infusion protocols.

  15. Speciation and isotope dilution analysis of gadolinium-based contrast agents in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Telgmann, Lena; Wehe, Christoph A; Birka, Marvin; Künnemeyer, Jens; Nowak, Sascha; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2012-11-06

    The fate of Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during sewage treatment was investigated. The total concentration of Gd in influent and effluent 2 and 24 h composite samples was determined by means of isotope dilution analysis. The balancing of Gd input and output of a sewage plant over seven days indicated that approximately 10% of the Gd is removed during treatment. Batch experiments simulating the aeration tank of a sewage treatment plant confirmed the Gd complex removal during activated sludge treatment. For speciation analysis of the Gd complexes in wastewater samples, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS). Separation of the five predominantly used contrast agents was carried out on a new hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography stationary phase in less than 15 min. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.13 μg/L and a limit of quantification of 0.43 μg/L could be achieved for the Gd chelates without having to apply enrichment techniques. Speciation analysis of the 24 h composite samples revealed that 80% of the Gd complexes are present as Gd-BT-DO3A in the sampled treatment plant. The day-of-week dependent variation of the complex load followed the variation of the total Gd load, indicating a similar behavior. The analysis of sewage sludge did not prove the presence of anthropogenic Gd. However, in the effluent of the chamber filter press, which was used for sludge dewatering, two of the contrast agents and three other unknown Gd species were observed. This indicates that species transformation took place during anaerobic sludge treatment.

  16. Strength and structural phase transitions of gadolinium at high pressure from radial X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Lun Liu, Jing; Bai, Ligang; Li, Xiaodong; Lin, Chuanlong; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2014-12-28

    Lattice strength and structural phase transitions of gadolinium (Gd) were determined under nonhydrostatic compression up to 55 GPa using an angle-dispersive radial x-ray diffraction technique in a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature. Three new phases of fcc structure, dfcc structure, and new monoclinic structure were observed at 25 GPa, 34 GPa, and 53 GPa, respectively. The radial x-ray diffraction data yield a bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 36(1) GPa with its pressure derivate K{sub 0}′ = 3.8(1) at the azimuthal angle between the diamond cell loading axis and the diffraction plane normal and diffraction plane ψ = 54.7°. With K{sub 0}′ fixed at 4, the derived K{sub 0} is 34(1) GPa. In addition, analysis of diffraction data with lattice strain theory indicates that the ratio of differential stress to shear modulus (t/G) ranges from 0.011 to 0.014 at pressures of 12–55 GPa. Together with estimated high-pressure shear moduli, our results show that Gd can support a maximum differential stress of 0.41 GPa, while it starts to yield to plastic deformation at 16 GPa under uniaxial compression. The yield strength of Gd remains approximately a constant with increasing pressure, and reaches 0.46 GPa at 55 GPa.

  17. Investigating the stability of gadolinium based contrast agents towards UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Birka, Marvin; Roscher, Jörg; Holtkamp, Michael; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-03-15

    Since the 1980s, the broad application of gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has led to significantly increased concentrations of Gd in the aqueous environment. Little is known about the stability of these highly polar xenobiotics under environmental conditions, in wastewater and in drinking water treatment. Therefore, the stability of frequently applied Gd-based MRI contrast agents towards UV radiation was investigated. The hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and of HILIC with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) provided quantitative elemental information as well as structural information. The contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A showed a high stability in irradiation experiments applying a wavelength range from 220 nm to 500 nm. Nevertheless, the degradation of Gd-BOPTA as well as the formation of Gd-containing transformation products was observed by means of HILIC-ICP-MS. Matrix-dependent irradiation experiments showed a degradation of Gd-BOPTA down to 3% of the initial amount in purified water after 300 min, whereas the degradation was slowed down in drinking water and surface water. Furthermore, it was observed that the sum of species continuously decreased with proceeding irradiation in all matrices. After irradiation in purified water for 300 min only 16% of the sum of species was left. This indicates a release of Gd(III) ions from the complex in course of irradiation. HILIC-ESI-MS measurements revealed that the transformation products mostly resulted from O-dealkylation and N-dealkylation reactions. In good correlation with retention times, the majority of transformation products were found to be more polar than Gd-BOPTA itself. Based on accurate masses, sum formulas were obtained and structures could be proposed.

  18. Modification of Mg{sub 2}Si in Mg–Si alloys with gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lingying; Hu, Jilong Tang, Changping; Zhang, Xinming; Deng, Yunlai; Liu, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Zhile

    2013-05-15

    The modification effect of gadolinium (Gd) on Mg{sub 2}Si in the hypereutectic Mg–3 wt.% Si alloy has been investigated using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and hardness measurements. The results indicate that the morphology of the primary Mg{sub 2}Si is changed from coarse dendrite into fine polygon with the increasing Gd content. The average size of the primary Mg{sub 2}Si significantly decreases with increasing Gd content up to 1.0 wt.%, and then slowly increases. Interestingly, when the Gd content is increased to 4.0 and 8.0 wt.%, the primary and eutectic Mg{sub 2}Si evidently decrease and even disappear. The modification and refinement of the primary Mg{sub 2}Si is mainly attributed to the poisoning effect. The GdMg{sub 2} phase in the primary Mg{sub 2}Si is obviously coarsened as the Gd content exceeds 2.0 wt.%. While the decrease and disappearance of the primary and eutectic Mg{sub 2}Si are ascribed to the formation of vast GdSi compound. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that proper Gd (1.0 wt.%) addition can effectively modify and refine the primary Mg{sub 2}Si. - Highlights: ► Proper Gd (1.0 wt.%) addition can effectively modify and refine the primary Mg{sub 2}Si. ► We studied the reaction feasibility between Mg and Si, Gd and Si in Mg–Gd–Si system. ► We explored the modification mechanism of Gd modifier on Mg{sub 2}Si.

  19. Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for tumor cell imaging based on gadolinium oxide and iron oxide nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Wang, Shan; Wu, Chen; Dai, Yue; Hou, Pingfu; Han, Cuiping; Xu, Kai

    2016-12-15

    Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for intracellular GSH sensing was designed. As an alternative to "always on" nanoprobe, activatable imaging nanoprobes which are designed to amplify or boost imaging signals only in response to the targets have attracted more and more attention. In this paper, we designed a novel activatable molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nanoprobe for tumor cell recognization based on a MRI signal variation induced by the distance change between T1 and T2 contrast agents (CAs) in the presence of glutathione (GSH). To achieve this aim, carboxyl group functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) and polyethylene glycol-coated gadolinium oxide (PEG-Gd2O3) NPs as T2 and T1 MRI CA were connected by cystamine which contains a disulfide linkage. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), mass spectra and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) were introduced for their characterizations. The formation of Fe3O4-cystamine-Gd2O3 (Fe3O4-SS-Gd2O3) nanocomplex resulted in a quenched T1 signal due to the near proximity of PEG-Gd2O3 NPs to Fe3O4 NPs and a "light-up" T1 signal with the cleavage of disulfide bond in the presence of GSH. These results provide not only an easy way to realize MRI of tumor cells based on the overexpressed intracellular GSH level, but also a new insight for the design of activatable MRI nanoprobe.

  20. Synchrotron X-ray Analyses Demonstrate Phosphate-Bound Gadolinium in Skin in Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    George, Simon J.; Webb, Samuel M.; Abraham, Jerrold L.; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is an incurable, debilitating disease found exclusively in patients with decreased kidney function and comprises a fibrosing disorder of the skin and systemic tissues. The disease is associated with exposure to Gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCA) used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tissue samples from many NSF patients contain micron-sized insoluble Gd-containing deposits. However, the precise composition and chemical nature of these particles is unclear. Objectives To clarify the precise chemical structure of the Gd-containing deposits in NSF tissues. Methods Autopsy skin tissues from a NSF patient are examined in situ using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microscopy and extended absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and in correlation with light microscopy and the results of SEM/EDS analyses. Results The insoluble Gd deposits are shown to contain Gd no longer coordinated by GBCA chelator molecules but rather in a sodium calcium phosphate material. SXRF microscopy shows a clear correlation between Gd, Ca and P. EXAFS spectroscopy shows a very different spectrum from the GBCAs, with Gd-P distances at 3.11 Å and 3.72 Å as well as Gd-Gd distances at an average of 4.05 Å, consistent with a GdPO4 structure. Conclusions This is the first direct evidence for the chemical release of Gd from GBCA in human tissue. This supports the physical-chemical, clinical, and epidemiological data indicating a link between stability and dose of GBCA to the development of NSF. PMID:20560953

  1. Regional Convection-Enhanced Delivery of Gadolinium-labeled Albumin in the Rat Hippocampus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Astary, Garrett W.; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Carney, Paul R.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa

    2010-01-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) has emerged as a promising method of targeted drug-delivery for treating central nervous system (CNS) disorders, but the influence of brain structure on infusate distribution is unclear. We have utilized this approach to study extracellular transport and distribution of a contrast agent in the hippocampus, a complex structure susceptible to CNS disorders. The magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent diethylene triamene penta-acetic acid chelated gadolinium-labeled albumin (Gd-albumin), tagged with Evans blue dye, was directly infused into the dorsal and ventral hippocampus of seven male Sprague-Dawley rats. The final distribution profile of the contrast agent, a product of CED and limited diffusion, was observed in vivo using high-resolution T1-weighted MR imaging at 11.1 Tesla. Dense cell layers, such as the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and the pyramidal cell layer of CA1, appeared to be barriers to transport of the tracer. Three-dimensional distribution shape and volume (Vd) differences, between the dorsal and ventral hippocampus infusions, were determined from the MR images using a semi-automatic segmentation routine (Dorsal Vd = 23.4 ± 1.8 μl, Ventral Vd = 36.4 ± 5.1 μl). Finer structural detail of the hippocampus was obtained using a combination of histological analysis and fluorescence imaging. This study demonstrates that CED has the potential to target all regions of the hippocampus and that tracer distribution is influenced by infusion site, underlying structure and circuitry, and extent of backflow. Therefore, CED, combined with high-resolution MR imaging, may be a useful strategy for delivering therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders affecting the hippocampus. PMID:20067808

  2. Mannose-coated gadolinium liposomes for improved magnetic resonance imaging in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bing; Liu, Ri; Chen, Shiyue; Chen, Luguang; Liu, Fang; Jia, Guorong; Dong, Yinmei; Li, Jing; Chen, Huaiwen; Lu, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory condition of the pancreas. The symptoms, treatment, and prognosis of mild and severe AP are different, and severe AP is a potentially life-threatening disease with a high incidence of complications and high mortality rate. Thus, it is urgent to develop an effective approach to reliably discriminate between mild and severe AP. Methods We have developed novel gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (Gd-DTPA)-loaded mannosylated liposomes (named thereafter M-Gd-NL) that preferably target macrophages in AP. The targeting ability of M-Gd-NL toward macrophages in AP and its ability to discriminate between mild and severe AP were evaluated. Results The liposomes were of desired particle size (~100 nm), Gd-DTPA encapsulation efficiency (~85%), and stability. M-Gd-NL and non-targeted Gd-DTPA-loaded liposomes (Gd-NL) exhibited increased relaxivity compared with Gd-DTPA. Compared with Gd-NL and Gd-DTPA, M-Gd-NL showed increased uptake in macrophages, resulting in increased T1 imaging ability both in vitro (macrophage cell line) and in vivo (severe AP model). Importantly, M-Gd-NL had the ability to discriminate between mild and severe AP, as reflected by a significantly higher T1 magnetic resonance imaging signal in severe AP than in mild AP. M-Gd-NL did not show severe organ toxicity in rats. Conclusion Our data suggest that M-Gd-NL had enhanced magnetic resonance imaging ability by targeting macrophages in AP and good ability to discriminate between mild and severe AP. We believe that M-Gd-NL could shed new light on the diagnosis of AP in the near future. PMID:28260882

  3. Influence of geochemical parameters on the sorption and desorption behaviour of europium and gadolinium onto kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Kautenburger, Ralf; Beck, Horst P

    2010-06-01

    In this study we investigated the sorption and desorption behaviour of europium and gadolinium (homologues of the actinides americium and curium) onto the clay mineral kaolinite KGa-1b. In the model system metal/kaolinite, sorption isotherms and pH-edges were determined in different batch experiments. Calcium and magnesium as competing cations were used to simulate the influence of water hardness on the sorption and desorption processes. After centrifugation, the free metal ions in the supernatant solution were analysed by ICP-MS. With increasing lanthanide concentration, especially the relative desorption of these metals from kaolinite rises significantly before the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of 0.94 meq per 100 g is reached. This indicates that low lanthanide concentrations will result in a relatively lower metal migration due to sorption reactions at higher active sites in comparison with higher lanthanide concentrations. The K(d)-values and sorption isotherms of Eu(iii) and Gd(iii) were determined at pH 5.0 (+/-0.02) and analysed with Freundlich and Langmuir sorption models. The experimental data can best be fitted by Langmuir sorption isotherm. The pH-value has only a minor influence on the sorption onto kaolinite. Only at low pH-values (

  4. Enhanced Quantum Cutting via Li(+) Doping from a Bi(3+)/Yb(3+)-Codoped Gadolinium Tungstate Phosphor.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ran Vijay; Yadav, Ram Sagar; Bahadur, Amresh; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Rai, Shyam Bahadur

    2016-11-07

    The Bi(3+)/Yb(3+)-codoped gadolinium tungstate phosphor has been synthesized through a solid-state reaction method. The structural characterization reveals the crystalline nature of the phosphor. The Bi(3+)-doped phosphor emits visible radiation from the blue to red regions upon excitation with 330 and 355 nm. The addition of Yb(3+) to the Bi(3+)-doped phosphor reduces the emission intensity in the visible region and emits an intense near-infrared (NIR) photon centered at 976 nm through a quantum-cutting (QC) phenomenon. This is due to cooperative energy transfer (CET) from the (3)P1 level of Bi(3+) to the (2)F5/2 level of Yb(3+). The presence of Li(+) ions in the Bi(3+)/Yb(3+)-codoped phosphor enhances the emission intensity in the NIR region up to by 3 times, whereas the emission intensity in the visible region is significantly reduced. The energy transfer (ET) from the Bi(3+) ions to the Yb(3+) ions is confirmed by lifetime measurements, and the lifetime for the (3)P1 level of Bi(3+) decreases continuously with increasing Yb(3+) concentration. The ET efficiency (ηETE) and corresponding QC efficiency (ηQE) are calculated and found to be 29% and 129%, respectively. The presence of Li(+) enhances the QC efficiency of the phosphor up to 43%. Thus, the Bi(3+)/Yb(3+)/Li(+)-codoped phosphor is a promising candidate to enhance the efficiency of a crystalline-silicon-based solar cell through spectral conversion.

  5. Evaluation of apical subtype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kebed, Kalie Y; Al Adham, Raed I; Bishu, Kalkidan; Askew, J Wells; Klarich, Kyle W; Araoz, Philip A; Foley, Thomas A; Glockner, James F; Nishimura, Rick A; Anavekar, Nandan S

    2014-09-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is an uncommon variant of HC. We sought to characterize cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among apical HC patients. This was a retrospective review of consecutive patients with a diagnosis of apical HC who underwent cardiac MRI examinations at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) from August 1999 to October 2011. Clinical and demographic data at the time of cardiac MRI study were abstracted. Cardiac MRI study and 2-dimensional echocardiograms performed within 6 months of the cardiac MRI were reviewed; 96 patients with apical HC underwent cardiac MRI examinations. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 130.7 ± 39.1 ml and 44.2 ± 20.9 ml, respectively. Maximum LV thickness was 19 ± 5 mm. Hypertrophy extended beyond the apex into other segments in 57 (59.4%) patients. Obstructive physiology was seen in 12 (12.5%) and was more common in the mixed apical phenotype than the pure apical (19.3 vs 2.6%, p = 0.02). Apical pouches were noted in 39 (40.6%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 70 (74.5%) patients. LGE was associated with severe symptoms and increased maximal LV wall thickness. In conclusion, cardiac MRI is well suited for studying the apical form of HC because of difficulty imaging the cardiac apex with standard echocardiography. Cardiac MRI is uniquely suited to delineate the presence or absence of an apical pouch and abnormal myocardial LGE that may have implications in the natural history of apical HM. In particular, the presence of abnormal LGE is associated with clinical symptoms and increased wall thickness.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of novel boron and gadolinium rich power generation and real-time neutron detection materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, Marcus L.

    In this work, the neutron capture capabilities of two naturally occurring isotopes, gadolinium-157 (157Gd) and boron-10 (10B), were investigated for use as neutron detecting diodes. The appeal of using 157Gd and 10B is due to their large thermal neutron absorption cross sections: gadolinium (on average ˜46,000 barns) and boron-10 (˜3800 barns). Boron carbide (B4C) films were grown on nickel, copper, silver, and aluminum substrates using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques forming p-n junctions using various configurations of two isomers: closo-1,7-dicarbadodecaborane (metacarborane) or closo-1,7-phosphacaborane (phosphacarborane) for the n-type layers and closo-1,2-dicarbadodecaborane (orthocarborane) for the p-type layer. These all-boron carbide heterojunction diodes were investigated experimentally, with highly sensitive current voltage measurements in light and dark and under alpha, beta, and neutron irradiation. The heteroisomeric diodes exhibited photovoltaic and alphavoltaic behavior and successfully functioned as neutron detectors. Preliminary results of beta radiation response of these heteroisomeric diodes is also presented. The high-kappa dielectric oxide, hafnium oxide (HfO2), was doped with gadolinium and grown on silicon using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to form a novel semiconducting diode. Three levels of Gd-doping (3%, 10%, and 15%) were explored. A shift from the unstable monoclinic phase to the stable cubic phase is seen with increased Gd-doping concentrations, which may possibly serve as a better semiconductor. The detection of charge pulses created by neutron capture was explored using neutron sources from Nebraska Wesleyan University and The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) neutron sources. The 10% and 15% doped diodes exhibited pulse height spectra in the presence of neutrons. Electronic signal processing remains the most significant challenge for these latter detectors.

  7. Arterial double-contrast dual-energy MDCT: in-vivo rabbit atherosclerosis with iodinated nanoparticles and gadolinium agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Raz; Kafri, Galit; Altman, Ami; Goshen, Liran; Planer, David; Sosna, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    An in-vivo feasibility study of potentially improved atherosclerosis CT imaging is presented. By administration of two different contrast agents to rabbits with induced atherosclerotic plaques we aim at identifying both soft plaque and vessel lumen simultaneously. Initial injection of iodinated nanoparticle (INP) contrast agent (N1177 - Nanoscan Imaging), two to four hours before scan, leads to its later accumulation in macrophage-rich soft plaque, while a second gadolinium contrast agent (Magnevist) injected immediately prior to the scan blends with the aortic blood. The distinction between the two agents in a single scan is achieved with a double-layer dual-energy MDCT (Philips Healthcare) following material separation analysis using the reconstructed images of the different x-ray spectra. A single contrast agent injection scan, where only INP was injected two hours prior to the scan, was compared to a double-contrast scan taken four hours after INP injection and immediately after gadolinium injection. On the single contrast agent scan we observed along the aorta walls, localized iodine accumulation which can point on INP uptake by atherosclerotic plaque. In the double-contrast scan the gadolinium contributes a clearer depiction of the vessel lumen in addition to the lasting INP presence. The material separation shows a good correlation to the pathologies inferred from the conventional CT images of the two different scans while performing only a single scan prevents miss-registration problems and reduces radiation dose. These results suggest that a double-contrast dual-energy CT may be used for advanced clinical diagnostic applications.

  8. Speciation of gadolinium in surface water samples and plants by hydrophilic interaction chromatography hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Uwe; Lingott, Jana; Richter, Silke; Jakubowski, Norbert; Panne, Ulrich

    2013-02-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was optimized for speciation analysis of gadolinium-based contrast agents in environmental samples, in particular surface river waters and plants. Surface water samples from the Teltow channel, near Berlin, were investigated over a distance of 5 km downstream from the influx of a wastewater treatment plant. The total concentration of gadolinium increased significantly from 50 to 990 ng L(-1) due to the influx of the contrast agents. After complete mixing with the river water, the concentration remained constant over a distance of at least 4 km. Two main substances [Dotarem(®) (Gd-DOTA) and Gadovist(®) (Gd-BT-DO3A)] have been identified in the river water using standards. A gadolinium-based contrast agent, possibly Gd-DOTA (Dotarem(®)), was also detected in water plant samples taken from the Teltow channel. Therefore, uptake of contrast agents [Gadovist(®) (Gd-BTDO3A), Magnevist(®) (Gd-DTPA), Omniscan(®) (Gd-DTPA-BMA), Dotarem(®) (Gd-DOTA), and Multihance(®) (Gd-BOPTA)] by plants was investigated in a model experiment using Lepidium sativum (cress plants). HILIC-ICP-MS was used for identification of different contrast agents, and a first approach for quantification using aqueous standard solutions was tested. For speciation analysis, all investigated contrast agents could be extracted from the plant tissues with a recovery of about 54 % for Multihance(®) (Gd-BOPTA) up to 106 % for Gadovist(®) (Gd-BT-DO3A). These experiments demonstrate that all contrast agents investigated are transported from the roots to the leaves where the highest content was measured.

  9. Stimuli-Responsive Biodegradable Hyperbranched Polymer-Gadolinium Conjugates as Efficient and Biocompatible Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ling; Li, Xue; Wei, Xiaoli; Luo, Qiang; Guan, Pujun; Wu, Min; Zhu, Hongyan; Luo, Kui; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-04-27

    The efficacy and biocompatibility of nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents depend on optimal molecular structures and compositions. Gadolinium [Gd(III)] based dendritic macromolecules with well-defined and tunable nanoscale sizes are excellent candidates as multivalent MRI contrast agents. Here, we propose a novel alternate preparation of biodegradable hyperbranched polymer-gadolinium conjugates via a simple strategy and report potentially efficient and biocompatible nanoscale MRI contrast agents for cancer diagnosis. The enzyme-responsive hyperbranched poly(oligo-(ethylene glycol) methacrylate)-gadolinium conjugate (HB-POEGMA-Gd) was prepared via one-step reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and Gd(III) chelating, and the cRGDyK functionalized polymer (HB-POEGMA-cRGD-Gd) was obtained via click chemistry. By using an enzyme similar to lysosomal cathepsin B, hyperbranched conjugates of high molecular weights (MW) (180 and 210 kDa) and nanoscale sizes (38 and 42 nm) were degraded into low MW (25 and 30 kDa) and smaller products (4.8 and 5.2 nm) below the renal threshold. Conjugate-based nanoscale systems had three-fold more T1 relaxivity compared to clinical agent diethylenediaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-Gd. Animal studies with the nanoscale system offered greater tumor accumulation and enhanced signal intensity (SI) in mouse U87 tumors of which the greatest activity was conferred by the cRGDyK moiety functionalized hyperbranched conjugate. In vitro cytotoxicity, hemocompatibility and in vivo toxicity studies confirmed no adverse events. This design strategy for multifunctional Gd(III)-labeled biodegradable dendritic macromolecules may have significant potential as future efficient, biocompatible polymeric nanoscale MRI diagnostic contrast agents for cancer.

  10. Spatially resolved quantification of gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance agents in tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry after in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Huber, Katharina; Schilling, Franz; Lohöfer, Fabian; Kosanke, Katja; Meier, Reinhard; Rummeny, Ernst J; Walch, Axel; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2015-03-27

    Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents improve the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially when targeted contrast agents are applied. Because of nonlinear correlation between the contrast agent concentration in tissue and the MRI signal obtained in vivo, quantification of certain biological or pathophysiological processes by MRI remains a challenge. Up to now, no technology has been able to provide a spatially resolved quantification of MRI agents directly within the tissue, which would allow a more precise verification of in vivo imaging results. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for spatially resolved in situ quantification of gadolinium(III) agents, in correlation to in vivo MRI, were evaluated. Enhanced kinetics of Gadofluorine M were determined dynamically over time in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. MALDI imaging was able to corroborate the in vivo imaging MRI signals and enabled in situ quantification of the gadolinium probe with high spatial resolution.

  11. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YING-QIN; TANG, YING; FU, RAO; MENG, QIU-HUA; ZHOU, XUE; LING, ZE-MIN; CHENG, XIAO; TIAN, SU-WEI; WANG, GUO-JIE; LIU, XUE-GUO; ZHOU, LI-HUA

    2015-01-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats. PMID:25816076

  12. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World

    PubMed Central

    Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). PMID:27660737

  13. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Edgar; Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-08-15

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF).

  14. Vibrational dynamics of zero-field-splitting hamiltonian in gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lasoroski, Aurélie; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Pollet, Rodolphe

    2014-07-07

    The electronic relaxation of gadolinium complexes used as MRI contrast agents was studied theoretically by following the short time evolution of zero-field-splitting parameters. The statistical analysis of ab initio molecular dynamics trajectories provided a clear separation between static and transient contributions to the zero-field-splitting. For the latter, the correlation time was estimated at approximately 0.1 ps. The influence of the ligand was also probed by replacing one pendant arm of our reference macrocyclic complex by a bulkier phosphonate arm. In contrast to the transient contribution, the static zero-field-splitting was significantly influenced by this substitution.

  15. Band-gap modulation via gallium substitution in cerium doped gadolinium aluminum garnet using a mixed fuel combustion approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Mohit; Pitale, Shreyas S.; Ghosh, Manoranjan; Shinde, Seema

    2014-04-24

    Cerium doped Gadolinium garnets (Gd{sub 3}Al{sub x}Ga{sub 5−x}O{sub 12} where 0≤x≤5) are synthesized via combustion synthesis using mixture of urea and glycine fuels. A 4h Post annealing at 1400 oC is found to be necessary for pure phase formation. Lattice spacing variation as a result of partial or total Ga substitution at Al site was mapped by X-ray diffraction. Photoluminescence emission of Ce shifts as a consequence of Ga substitution and therefore suggests a local re-adjustment of crystal field around activator site.

  16. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  17. Study of iodine, gadolinium and bismuth quantification possibility with micro-CT IVIS spectrumct in vivo imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervova, V. V.; Lipengolts, A. A.; Cherepanov, A. A.; Abakumov, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    The main task of radiotherapy is to create prescribed absorbed dose of irradiation in a tumor with minimal damage of healthy tissues. Contrast Enhanced Radiotherapy allows to achieve that by administration of a special drug into the tumor before irradiation, that increases the absorbed dose within the tumor volume. The concentration of the drug determines the value of the absorbed dose, therefore one of the major tasks in CERT is quantification of the drug concentration in the tumor during irradiation procedure. The present work deals with quantitative determination of iodine, gadolinium and bismuth water solutions by use of micro-CT IVIS Spectrum In Vivo Imaging System.

  18. Intraindividual comparison of gadolinium- and iodine-enhanced 64-slice multidetector CT pulmonary angiography for the detection of pulmonary embolism in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Henes, Frank Oliver Gerhard; Groth, Michael; Begemann, Philipp G C; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2011-06-01

    This study is an evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for the detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) in comparison with iodine-enhanced CTPA. PE was induced in five anesthetized pigs by administration of blood clots through an 11-F catheter inside the jugular vein. Animals underwent CTPA in breathhold with i.v. bolus injection of 50 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine (0.4 mmol/kg, 4 ml/s). Subsequently, CTPA was performed using the same imaging parameters but under administration of 70 ml nonionic iodinated contrast material (400 mg/ml, 4 ml/s). All images were reconstructed with 1 mm slice thickness. A consensus readout of the iodium-enhanced CTPAs by both radiologists served as reference standard. Gadolinium-enhanced CTPAs were evaluated independently by two experienced radiologists, and differences in detection rate between both contrast agents were assessed on a per embolus basis using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Interobserver agreement was determined by calculation of қ values. PE was diagnosed independently by both readers in all five pigs by the use of gadolinium-enhanced CTPA. Out of 60 pulmonary emboli detected in the iodine-enhanced scans, 47 (78.3%; reader 1) and 44 (62.8%; reader 2) emboli were detected by the use of gadolinium. All 13 (100%) emboli in lobar arteries (by both readers) and 26 (reader 1) and 25 (reader 2) out of 27 emboli (96.3% and 92.6%) in segmental arteries were detected by the use of the gadolinium-enhanced CTPA. In subsegmental arteries, only 8 (40%; reader 1) and 6 (30%; reader 2) out of 20 emboli were detected by the gadolinium-enhanced CTPA. By comparing both scans on a per vessel basis (Wilcoxon test), Gd-enhanced CTPA was significantly inferior in emboli detection on subsegmental level (P < 0.0001). The interobserver agreement was excellent on lobar and segmental level (қ = 1.0 and 0.93, respectively), whereas readers only reached moderate

  19. Reversible low-light induced photoswitching of crowned spiropyran-DO3A complexed with gadolinium(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Kruttwig, Klaus; Yankelevich, Diego R; Brueggemann, Chantal; Tu, Chuqiao; L'etoile, Noelle; Knoesen, André; Louie, Angelique Y

    2012-05-31

    Photoswitchable spiropyran has been conjugated to the crowned ring system DO3A, which improves its solubility in dipolar and polar media and stabilizes the merocyanine isomer. Adding the lanthanide ion gadolinium(III) to the macrocyclic ring system leads to a photoresponsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent that displays an increased spin-lattice relaxation time (T₁) upon visible light stimulation. In this work, the photoresponse of this photochromic molecule to weak light illumination using blue and green light emitting diodes was investigated, simulating the emission spectra from bioluminescent enzymes. Photon emission rate of the light emitting diodes was changed, from 1.75 × 10¹⁶ photons·s⁻¹ to 2.37 × 10¹² photons·s⁻¹. We observed a consistent visible light-induced isomerization of the merocyanine to the spiropyran form with photon fluxes as low as 2.37 × 10¹² photons·s⁻¹ resulting in a relaxivity change of the compound. This demonstrates the potential for use of the described imaging probes in low light level applications such as sensing bioluminescence enzyme activity. The isomerization behavior of gadolinium(III)-ion complexed and non-complexed spiropyran-DO3A was analyzed in water and ethanol solution in response to low light illumination and compared to the emitted photon emission rate from over-expressed Gaussia princeps luciferase.

  20. Correlation of histological findings with gadolinium enhanced MRI scans during healing of a PHEMA orbital implant in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, C.; Morris, I.; Vijayasekaran, S.; Fallon, M.; McAllister, J.; Clayton, A.; Chirila, T.; Crawford, G.; Constable, I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—To investigate a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) orbital implant with a spongy anterior hemisphere and a smooth gel posterior hemisphere, by histology correlated with magnetic resonance images.
METHODS—Following enucleation, eight rabbits received PHEMA implants to which the muscles were directly sutured, and underwent gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from 3 to 52 weeks. After the rabbits were killed, the implants were removed, cut in a plane corresponding to the scan, and processed for light and electron microscopy.
RESULTS—All eight rabbits retained their implant to the end of the study period without complications. The scans demonstrated muscle attachment to the anterior half of the implant, and enhancement was seen on injection of gadolinium chelate. Histology confirmed muscle attachment, and cellular and vascular ingrowth. Over time, a transformation from reactive inflammatory to relatively non-vascular scar tissue was seen within the implant. Calcium deposits in one implant were detected by imaging and histology.
CONCLUSION—The implants are readily visualised on MRI. Muscle attachment and fibrovascular ingrowth into the anterior hemisphere are seen, while encapsulation of the posterior hemisphere is minimal. Histological findings confirm the progress of the healing response, with initial inflammation and marked vascularisation, developing later into quiescent scar tissue predominantly of fibroblasts.

 PMID:10216066

  1. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Yvana Lopes Pinheiro; Costa, Rita Zanlorensi Visneck; Pinho, Kátia Elisa Prus; Ferreira, Ricardo Rabello; Schuindt, Sueliton Miyamoto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography. PMID:25987746

  2. Comparative theoretical study of the structures and stabilities of four typical gadolinium carboxylates in different scintillator solvents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-Wen

    2016-03-01

    The structural properties and stabilities of four typical gadolinium carboxylates (Gd-CBX) in toluene, linear alkyl benzene (LAB), and phenyl xylyl ethane (PXE) solvents were theoretically studied using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP with the basis sets 6-311G(d) and MWB54) and the polarizable continuum model (PCM). The average Gd-ligand interaction energies (E int, corrected for dispersion) and the values of the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ΔHL) for the gadolinium complexes were calculated to compare the relative stabilities of the four Gd-CBX molecules in the three liquid scintillator solvents. According to the calculations, the values of E int and ΔHL for Gd-CBX in LAB are larger than the corresponding values in PXE and toluene. Gd-CBX may therefore be more compatible with LAB than with PXE and toluene. It was also found that, in the three scintillator solvents, the stabilities of the four Gd-CBX molecules increase in the order Gd-2EHA < Gd-2MVA < Gd-pivalate < Gd-TMHA.

  3. Gadolinium-functionalized aggregation-induced emission dots as dual-modality probes for cancer metastasis study.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Ding, Dan; Prashant, Chandrasekharan; Qin, Wei; Yang, Chang-Tong; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the localization and engraftment of tumor cells at postintravasation stage of metastasis is of high importance in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Advanced fluorescent probes and facile methodologies for cell tracing play a key role in metastasis studies. In this work, we design and synthesize a dual-modality imaging dots with both optical and magnetic contrast through integration of a magnetic resonance imaging reagent, gadolinium(III), into a novel long-term cell tracing probe with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) in far-red/near-infrared region. The obtained fluorescent-magnetic AIE dots have both high fluorescence quantum yield (25%) and T1 relaxivity (7.91 mM(-1) s(-1) ) in aqueous suspension. After further conjugation with a cell membrane penetrating peptide, the dual-modality dots can be efficiently internalized into living cells. The gadolinium(III) allows accurate quantification of biodistribution of cancer cells via intraveneous injection, while the high fluorescence provides engraftment information of cells at single cellular level. The dual-modality AIE dots show obvious synergistic advantages over either single imaging modality and hold great promises in advanced biomedical studies.

  4. Two-dimensional nanoscale imaging of gadolinium spins via scanning probe relaxometry with a single spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Myers, Bryan; Pascal, Laetitia; Das, Anand; Jayich, Ania

    2015-03-01

    Spin-labeling of molecules with paramagnetic ions is an important approach for determining molecular structure, however current ensemble techniques lack the sensitivity to detect few isolated spins. In this talk, we demonstrate two-dimensional nanoscale imaging of paramagnetic gadolinium compounds using scanning relaxometry of a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond. Gadopentetate dimeglumine attached to an atomic force microscope tip is controllably interacted with and detected by the NV center, by virtue of the fact that the NV exhibits fast relaxation in the fluctuating magnetic field generated by electron spin flips in the gadolinium. We demonstrate a reduction in the T1 relaxation time of the NV center by over two orders of magnitude, probed with a spatial resolution of 20 nm, limited by thermal drift in ambient conditions. We discuss the importance of mitigating drift to reach truly nanoscale imaging and present progress towards cryogenic scanning magnetometry, along with utilizing chemically functionalized tips to gain greater control over the Gd distribution on the tip. Our result exhibits the viability of the technique for imaging individual spins attached to complex nanostructures or biomolecules, along with studying the magnetic dynamics of isolated spins.

  5. Effect of particle size on gamma radiation shielding property of gadolinium oxide dispersed epoxy resin matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Gu, Yizhuo; Wang, Yidong; Yang, Zhongjia; Li, Min; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-03-01

    Epoxy resin matrix composites filled with dispersed micro and nano gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) particles of different contents were fabricated in this study. The γ radiation shielding and mechanical properties of these micro and nano composites were evaluated by measuring mass attenuation coefficients at photon energies from 31 keV to 356 keV and flexural performances. Adding Gd2O3 obviously increases mass attenuation coefficients of composites, and the enhancement is stronger at low photon energy because of dominating photoelectric effect and k-edge of element gadolinium. Effect of Gd2O3 particle size on shielding property of composite was also discussed. The results show that nano-Gd2O3 composites have better ability to shield X and γ ray than micro-Gd2O3 composites, and an enhanced effect of ~28% is obtained with Gd2O3 content of around 5 wt.% at 59.5 keV. The reason is attributed to higher probability of interaction between γ-ray and nano particles. Especially, this effect is prominent in low particle concentration. For flexural property, nano-Gd2O3/epoxy composite show equivalent flexural strength and up to15% higher flexural modulus compared with micro-Gd2O3/epoxy composite. Based on these experimental results, nano-Gd2O3 reinforced epoxy composite is believed to be a promising novel radiation shielding material.

  6. Monte Carlo calculations of thermal neutron capture in gadolinium: a comparison of GEANT4 and MCNP with measurements.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Rezaei, Arash; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-02-01

    GEANT4 is a Monte Carlo code originally implemented for high-energy physics applications and is well known for particle transport at high energies. The capacity of GEANT4 to simulate neutron transport in the thermal energy region is not equally well known. The aim of this article is to compare MCNP, a code commonly used in low energy neutron transport calculations and GEANT4 with experimental results and select the suitable code for gadolinium neutron capture applications. To account for the thermal neutron scattering from chemically bound atoms [S(alpha,beta)] in biological materials a comparison of thermal neutron fluence in tissue-like poly(methylmethacrylate) phantom is made with MCNP4B, GEANT4 6.0 patch1, and measurements from the neutron capture therapy (NCT) facility at the Studsvik, Sweden. The fluence measurements agreed with MCNP calculated results considering S(alpha,beta). The location of the thermal neutron peak calculated with MCNP without S(alpha,beta) and GEANT4 is shifted by about 0.5 cm towards a shallower depth and is 25%-30% lower in amplitude. Dose distribution from the gadolinium neutron capture reaction is then simulated by MCNP and compared with measured data. The simulations made by MCNP agree well with experimental results. As long as thermal neutron scattering from chemically bound atoms are not included in GEANT4 it is not suitable for NCT applications.

  7. Biologically-compatible gadolinium(at)(carbon nanostructures) as advanced contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitharaman, Balaji

    2005-11-01

    Paramagnetic gadolinium-based carbon nanostructures are introduced as a new paradigm in high-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent (CA) design. Two Gd C60-based nanomaterials, Gd C60 [C(COOH)2]10 and Gd C60(OH)x are shown to have MRI efficacies (relaxivities) 5 to 20 times larger than any current Gd3+-based CA in clinical use. The first detailed and systematic physicochemical characterization was performed on these materials using the same experimental techniques usually applied to traditional Gd 3+-based CAs. Water-proton relaxivities were measured for the first time on these materials, as a function of magnetic field (5 x 10-4--9.4 T) to elucidate the different interaction mechanisms and dynamic processes influencing the relaxation behavior. These studies attribute the observed enhanced relaxivities completely to the "outer sphere" proton relaxation mechanism. These "outer sphere" relaxation effects are the largest reported for any Gd3+-based agent without inner-sphere water molecules. The proton relaxivities displayed a remarkable pH-dependency, increasing dramatically with decreasing pH (pH: 3--12). The increase in relaxivity resulted mainly from aggregation and subsequent three-order-of-magnitude increase in tauR, the rotational correlation time. Water-soluble fullerene materials (such as the neuroprotective fullerene drug, C3) readily cross cell membranes, suggesting an application for these gadofullerenes as the first intracellular, as well as pH-responsive MRI CAs. Studies performed at 60 MHz in the presence of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, mice serum pH: 7.4) to mimic physiological conditions demonstrated that the aggregates can be disrupted by addition of salts, leading to a decrease in relaxivity. Biological fluids present a high salt concentration and should strongly modify the behavior of any fullerenes/metallofullerene-based drug in vivo. Gd C60[C(COOH)2]10 also showed enhanced relaxivity (23% increase) in the presence of the

  8. Gadoxate disodium: gadolinium EOB DTPA, gadoxetic acid, Gd-EOB-DTPA.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Gadoxate disodium [gadolinium EOB DTPA, Gd-EOB-DTPA, gadoxetic acid, Eovist injection, Primovist] is a hydrophilic paramagnetic contrast agent being developed by Schering AG for hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging. In April 2004, gadoxate disodium (Primovist) was approved in Sweden, the reference member state for the EU registration. Following the Swedish approval, Schering will initiate a mutual recognition procedure for the EU with approvals expected in most countries during 2004. Gadoxate disodium is in phase III clinical trials in the US and has completed phase III studies in Japan. Submissions for approval in Japan and other Asian countries are planned for 2004. Schering AG plans to launch Eovist in Japan in 2005. Schering AG acquired a worldwide, royalty-bearing licence to EPIX Medical's patents covering liver-enhancing agents such as Eovist injection. These included a European patent (222886) and the US patents (4,899,755 and 4,888,008) that EPIX Medical exclusively licensed from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). The MGH patents, a part of EPIX's extensive intellectual property, also covered albumin-targeted agents such as MS 325 (AngioMARK). Schering AG formally withdrew from the opposition proceedings against EPIX's EU patent 222886 following its acquisition of EPIX's intellectual property. These EU and US patents were also non-exclusively licensed by EPIX Medical to Bracco in September 2001. Apart from covering Eovist (Schering AG), the EU patent also covered gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance Bracco). Following the licensing agreement, Bracco withdrew its opposition to the patents in Europe and Japan, and both EPIX Medical and Bracco settled their European patent dispute. In its 2002 Annual Report, Schering predicted that Eovist has the potential to reach peak sales of euro50 million, three years after launch--at the time, launch in Europe was anticipated in 2004, followed by launch in Japan in 2005. This is down from earlier predictions

  9. A new method for the determination of Gadolinium in ppq levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünjes, Robert; Bichler, Andrea; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    The use of Gadolinium (Gd) complexes as a contrast agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results in an enhanced Gd input in the aquatic environment. Gd-complexes are excreted by humans unmetabolized within 12h after application. Passing the sewage systems with almost no degradation taking place, they successively reach surface waters, which make Gd a capable tracer for surface water/groundwater (SW/GW) interactions. The natural background concentration of Gd and other rare earth elements (REE) occur at ultratrace levels [low ng/L]. Crust-normalized REE patterns show positive Gd-anomalies in surface water, groundwater, and recently also in tap water. The difference between the total concentration and its natural background concentration estimated by the REE pattern is the anthropogenic Gd. Not only densely populated areas are affected by the presence of anthropogenic Gd. Studies have shown that even in rural areas without MRI facilities, anthropogenic Gd can be detected, since people are sent home after treatment. However, low input concentrations and mixing with natural waters lead to a decrease of Gd concentration below the current limit of quantification (LOQ) [1-5ng/L]. Often anthropogenic Gd cannot be calculated, although it is present, because natural background concentration cannot be determined with current methods, in particular in areas with low waste water load (e.g. headwater catchments). A new method using an on-line preconcentration system "SeaFAST" (Elemental Scientific Inc., USA), in combination with a desolvation system "Apex Q" (Elemental Scientific Inc., USA) and a QQQ-ICP-MS instrument (Agilent Technologies, Japan) does lower the LOQ for REE by a factor of 10 to 20. The SeaFAST-system uses a resin with ethylenediaminetriacetic acid and iminodiacetic acid functional groups to preconcentrate specifically REE as they are exclusively trivalent while anions, alkali and alkaline earth cations are washed out. The Apex Q interface is also supposed to

  10. Low Temperature Constrained Sintering of Cerium Gadolinium OxideFilms for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Jason Dale

    2007-01-01

    Cerium gadolinium oxide (CGO) has been identified as an acceptable solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrolyte at temperatures (500-700 C) where cheap, rigid, stainless steel interconnect substrates can be used. Unfortunately, both the high sintering temperature of pure CGO, >1200 C, and the fact that constraint during sintering often results in cracked, low density ceramic films, have complicated development of metal supported CGO SOFCs. The aim of this work was to find new sintering aids for Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95, and to evaluate whether they could be used to produce dense, constrained Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 films at temperatures below 1000 C. To find the optimal sintering aid, Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 was doped with a variety of elements, of which lithium was found to be the most effective. Dilatometric studies indicated that by doping CGO with 3mol% lithium nitrate, it was possible to sinter pellets to a relative density of 98.5% at 800 C--a full one hundred degrees below the previous low temperature sintering record for CGO. Further, it was also found that a sintering aid's effectiveness could be explained in terms of its size, charge and high temperature mobility. A closer examination of lithium doped Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 indicated that lithium affects sintering by producing a Li2O-Gd2O3-CeO2 liquid at the CGO grain boundaries. Due to this liquid phase sintering, it was possible to produce dense, crack-free constrained films of CGO at the record low temperature of 950 C using cheap, colloidal spray deposition processes. This is the first time dense constrained CGO films have been produced below 1000 C and could help commercialize metal supported ceria based solid oxide fuel cells.

  11. Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition and etching of high-k gadolinium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, Steven A.; Wyatt, Peter W.; Hodson, Chris J.

    2012-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-quality gadolinium oxide thin films is achieved using Gd(iPrCp){sub 3} and O{sub 2} plasma. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth is observed from 150 to 350 deg. C, though the optical properties of the film improve at higher temperature. True layer-by-layer ALD growth of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurred in a relatively narrow window of temperature and precursor dose. A saturated growth rate of 1.4 A/cycle was observed at 250 deg. C. As the temperature increases, high-quality films are deposited, but the growth mechanism appears to become CVD-like, indicating the onset of precursor decomposition. At 250 deg. C, the refractive index of the film is stable at {approx}1.80 regardless of other deposition conditions, and the measured dispersion characteristics are comparable to those of bulk Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. XPS data show that the O/Gd ratio is oxygen deficient at 1.3, and that it is also very hygroscopic. The plasma etching rate of the ALD Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} film in a high-density helicon reactor is very low. Little difference is observed in etching rate between Cl{sub 2} and pure Ar plasmas, suggesting that physical sputtering dominates the etching. A threshold bias power exists below which etching does not occur; thus it may be possible to etch a metal gate material and stop easily on the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate dielectric. The Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} film has a dielectric constant of about 16, exhibits low C-V hysteresis, and allows a 50 x reduction in gate leakage compared to SiO{sub 2}. However, the plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) process causes formation of an {approx}1.8 nm SiO{sub 2} interfacial layer, and generates a fixed charge of -1.21 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, both of which may limit use of PE-ALD Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a gate dielectric.

  12. Highly-crystalline ultrathin gadolinium doped and carbon-coated Li4Ti5O12 nanosheets for enhanced lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G. B.; Yang, L. W.; Wei, X. L.; Ding, J. W.; Zhong, J. X.; Chu, P. K.

    2015-11-01

    Highly-crystalline gadolinium doped and carbon-coated ultrathin Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) nanosheets (denoted as LTO-Gd-C) as an anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs) are synthesized on large scale by controlling the amount of carbon precursor in the topotactic transformation of layered ultrathin Li1.81H0.19Ti2O5·xH2O (H-LTO) nanosheets at 700 °C. The characterizations of structure and morphology reveal that the gadolinium doped and carbon-coated ultrathin LTO nanosheets have high crystallinity with a thickness of about 10 nm. Gadolinium doping allows the spinel LTO products to be stabilized, thereby preserving the precursor's sheet morphology and single crystal structure. Carbon encapsulation serves dual functions by restraining crystal growth of the LTO primary nanoparticles in the LTO-Gd-C nanosheets and decreasing the external electron transport resistance. Owing to the synergistic effects rendered by ultrathin nanosheets with high crystallinity, gadolinium doping and carbon coating, the developed ultrathin LTO nanosheets possess excellent specific capacity, cycling performance, and rate capability compared with reference materials, when evaluated as an anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The simple and effective strategy encompassing nanoscale morphological engineering, surface modification, and doping improves the performance of LTO-based anode materials for high energy density and high power LIBs applied in large scale energy storage.

  13. Synergy Between Surface and Core Entrapped Metals in a Mixed Manganese-Gadolinium Nanocolloid Affords Safer MR Imaging of Sparse Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kezheng; Pan, Dipanjan; Schmieder, Anne H.; Senpan, Angana; Hourcade, Dennis E.; Pham, Christine TN; Mitchel, Lynne M.; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Cui, Grace; Wickline, Samuel A.; Shen, Baozhong; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    High-relaxivity T1-weighted (T1w) MR molecular imaging nanoparticles typically present high surface gadolinium payloads that can elicit significant acute complement activation (CA). The objective of this research was to develop a high T1 contrast nanoparticle, which reduced gadolinium exposure, minimized gadolinium transmetallation risk, and elicited negligible acute complement activation. We report the development, optimization, and characterization of a gadolinium-manganese hybrid nanocolloid (MnOL-Gd NC; 138±10 (Dav)/nm; PDI: 0.06; zeta: −27±2 mV). High r1 particulate relaxivity with minute additions of Gd-DOTA-lipid conjugate to the MnOL nanocolloid surface achieved an unexpected paramagnetic synergism. This hybrid MnOL-Gd NC provided optimal MR TSE signal intensity at 5nM/voxel and lower levels, consistent with the level expression anticipated for sparse biomarkers such as neovascular integrins. MnOL NC produced optimal MR TSE signal intensity at 10nM/voxel concentrations and above. Importantly, MnOL-Gd NC avoided acute CA in vitro and in vivo, while retaining minimal transmetallation risk. PMID:25652900

  14. Gadolinium nanoparticle-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube/titania nanocomposites for degradation of methylene blue in water under simulated solar light.

    PubMed

    Mamba, G; Mbianda, X Y; Mishra, A K

    2014-04-01

    Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles of diameters <5 nm were uniformly decorated on the surfaces of multiwalled carbon nanotubes which were subsequently used as templates to fabricate gadolinium oxide nanoparticle-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube/titania nanocomposites. The prepared nanocomposites were evaluated for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under simulated solar light irradiation. Higher photocatalytic activity was observed for the gadolinium oxide-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites compared to the neat multiwalled carbon nanotube/titania nanocomposite and commercial titania. This improvement in photocatalytic activity was ascribed to the gadolinium oxide nanoparticles supported at the interface of the carbon nanotubes and titania resulting in efficient electron transfer between the two components of the composite. Total organic carbon (TOC) analysis revealed a higher degree of complete mineralisation of methylene blue (80.0 % TOC removal) which minimise the possible formation of toxic by-products. The photocatalyst could be re-used for five times, reaching a maximum degradation efficiency of 85.9 % after the five cycles. The proposed photocatalytic degradation mechanism is outlined herein.

  15. Molten iron oxysulfide as a superior sulfur sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Slagging combustors with injected lime or limestone are being considered as replacements for conventional coal burners. They have advantages in that they can be staged to reduce NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. Iron oxide, as an alternative to lime or limestone may be effective not only as a desulfurizing agent, but, under the right conditions of oxygen potential, it can act as a flux to produce a glassy slag. This glassy slag should be dense and environmentally inert. In this reporting period, the thermodynamic conditions are determined for the operation of the first stage of a combustor which would have as its feed six types of coals. The calculations are made for the four phase equilibrium: FeO(wustite)/Fe/Liquid/Gas over the temperature range 950{degrees} to 1300{degrees}C. The minimum dosage of iron oxide required at equilibrium an the calculated maximum percent sulfur removal are reported. Also given are the expected pounds of S0{sub 2} per million Btu of heat evolution calculated for complete combustion. These preliminary results indicate in the Fe-O-S system that higher temperatures give better results approaching 96 percent sulfur removal from a coal containing (on a dry basis) 3.29% by weight sulfur. In the prior reporting period, a comparison is made between iron oxide and lime as a desulfurizing agent. With lime, the thermodynamic conditions were chosen: a set of conditions where the compound calcium sulfide is the product and a set of conditions where calcium sulfate is the product. The temperature limits of the sulfate forming and sulfide forming reactions were defined.

  16. Comparison of Ventricular Inducibility with Late Gadolinium Enhancement and Myocardial Inflammation in Endomyocardial Biopsy in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Karin A. L.; Heck, Christian; Heinzmann, David; Schwille, Johannes; Klingel, Karin; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kramer, Ulrich; Gramlich, Michael; Geisler, Tobias; Gawaz, Meinrad P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk stratification of patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy remains a matter of debate in the era of device implantation. Objective We investigated associations between histopathological findings, contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI and the inducibility of ventricular tachycardia (VT) or fibrillation (VF) in programmed ventricular stimulation. Methods 56 patients with impaired left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF≤50%, mean 36.6±10.5%) due to non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy underwent cardiac MRI, programmed ventricular stimulation, and endomyocardial biopsy and were retrospectively investigated. Inducibility was defined as sustained mono- or polymorphic VT or unstable VT/VF requiring cardioversion/defibrillation. Primary study endpoint was defined as the occurrence of hemodynamically relevant VT/VF and/or adequate ICD-therapy during follow-up. Results Endomyocardial biopsy detected cardiac fibrosis in 18 (32.1%) patients. Cardiac MRI revealed 35 (62.5%) patients with positive late gadolinium enhancement. VT/VF was induced in ten (17.9%) patients during programmed ventricular stimulation. Monomorphic VT was inducible in 70%, while 20% of patients showed polymorphic VT. One patient (10%) presented with VF. Inducibility correlated significantly with the presence of positive late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac MRI (p<0.01). We could not find a significant association between inducibility and the degree of cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in non-site directed routine right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. During a mean follow-up of 2.6 years, nine (16.1%) patients reached the primary endpoint. Monomorphic VTs were found in 66.7% patients and were terminated by antitachycardia pacing therapy. One patient with polymorphic VT and two patients with VF received adequate therapy by an ICD-shock. However, inducibility did not correlate with the occurrence of endpoints. Conclusion Inducibilty during programmed ventricular stimulation is

  17. NEUTRALIZATIONS OF HIGH ALUMINUM LOW URANIUM USED NUCLEAR FUEL SOLUTIONS CONTAINING GADOLINIUM AS A NEUTRON POISON

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2011-06-08

    H-Canyon will begin dissolving High Aluminum - Low Uranium (High Al/Low U) Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) following approval by DOE which is anticipated in CY2011. High Al/Low U is an aluminum/enriched uranium UNF with small quantities of uranium relative to aluminum. The maximum enrichment level expected is 93% {sup 235}U. The High Al/Low U UNF will be dissolved in H-Canyon in a nitric acid/mercury/gadolinium solution. The resulting solution will be neutralized and transferred to Tank 39H in the Tank Farm. To confirm that the solution generated could be poisoned with Gd, neutralized, and discarded to the Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW) system without undue nuclear safety concerns the caustic precipitation of simulant solutions was examined. Experiments were performed with three simulant solutions representative of the H-Canyon estimated concentrations in the final solutions after dissolution. The maximum U, Gd, and Al concentration were selected for testing from the range of solution compositions provided. Simulants were prepared in three different nitric acid concentrations, ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 M. The simulant solutions were neutralized to four different endpoints: (1) just before a solid phase was formed (pH 3.5-4), (2) the point where a solid phase was obtained, (3) 0.8 M free hydroxide, and (4) 1.2 M free hydroxide, using 50 wt % sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The settling behavior of the neutralized solutions was found to be slower compared to previous studies, with settling continuing over a one week period. Due to the high concentration of Al in these solutions, precipitation of solids was observed immediately upon addition of NaOH. Precipitation continued as additional NaOH was added, reaching a point where the mixture becomes almost completely solid due to the large amount of precipitate. As additional NaOH was added, some of the precipitate began to redissolve, and the solutions neutralized to the final two endpoints mixed easily and had expected

  18. Performance of Large Neutron Detectors Containing Lithium-Gadolinium-Borate Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, David M.; Stuart, Cory R.; Klaass, R. Fred; Merrill, David B.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a neutron counter, spectrometer, and dosimeter that is compact, efficient, and accurate. A self-contained neutron detection instrument has wide applications in health physics, scientific research, and programs to detect, monitor, and control strategic nuclear materials (SNM). The 1.3 liter detector head for this instrument is a composite detector with an organic scintillator containing uniformly distributed {sup 6}Li{sub 6}{sup nat}Gd{sup 10}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}:Ce (LGB:Ce) microcrystals. The plastic scintillator acts to slow impinging neutrons and emits light proportional to the energy lost by the neutrons as they moderate in the detector body. Moderating neutrons that have slowed sufficiently capture in one of the Lithium-6, Boron-10, or Gadolinium-157 atoms in the LGB:Ce scintillator, which then releases the capture energy in a characteristic cerium emission pulse. The measured captured pulses indicate the presence of neutrons. When a scintillating fluor is present in the plastic, the light pulse resulting from the neutron moderating in the plastic is paired with the LGB:Ce capture pulse to identify the energy of the neutron. About 2% of the impinging neutrons lose all of their energy in a single collision with the detector. There is a linear relationship between the pulse areas of this group of neutrons and energy. The other 98% of neutrons have a wide range of collision histories within the detector body. When these neutrons are 'binned' into energy groups, each group contains a distribution of pulse areas. This data was used to assist in the unfolding of the neutron spectra. The unfolded spectra were then validated with known spectra, at both neutron emitting isotopes and fission/accelerator facilities. Having validated spectra, the dose equivalent and dose rate are determined by applying standard, regulatory damage coefficients to the measured neutron counts for each energy bin of the spectra. Testing at the

  19. Investigating the effects of laser intensity and pulse duration on 6.7-nm BEUV emission from Gadolinium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Thomas; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Yugami, Noboru; Jiang, Weihua; Endo, Akira; Li, Bowen; O'Gorman, Colm; Dunne, Padraig; Sokell, Emma; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present results on the influence of laser pulse duration and irradiating power density on the conversion efficiency (CE) and the ion energy of gadolinium (Gd) laser produced plasmas. Three lasers were used with 10 ns, 150 ps and 140 fs pulse durations. By varying the lasers output energies, experiments could be carried out for a power density range of 1011 - 1015 W/cm2. A maximum CE of 0.4% was achieved within a 0.6% bandwidth in 2π steradians using the picosecond laser. A faraday cup was used to calculate ion yield and time of flight measurements of each laser. The picosecond laser also showed a reduction in the ion time of flight measurements compared with the nanosecond pulse.

  20. Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles and Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Melanoma Metastases: Proof of Concept before Phase I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Shady; Detappe, Alexandre; Lux, François; Appaix, Florence; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Tran, Vu-Long; Plissonneau, Marie; Gehan, Hélène; Lefranc, Florence; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Verry, Camille; Berbeco, Ross; Tillement, Olivier; Sancey, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles containing high-Z elements are known to boost the efficacy of radiation therapy. Gadolinium (Gd) is particularly attractive because this element is also a positive contrast agent for MRI, which allows for the simultaneous use of imaging to guide the irradiation and to delineate the tumor. In this study, we used the Gd-based nanoparticles, AGuIX®. After intravenous injection into animals bearing B16F10 tumors, some nanoparticles remained inside the tumor cells for more than 24 hours, indicating that a single administration of nanoparticles might be sufficient for several irradiations. Combining AGuIX® with radiation therapy increases tumor cell death, and improves the life spans of animals bearing multiple brain melanoma metastases. These results provide preclinical proof-of-concept for a phase I clinical trial. PMID:26909115

  1. Induction of sister chromatid exchange in the presence of gadolinium-DTPA and its reduction by dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Etsuo; Fukuda, Hozumi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Matsubara, Sho

    1996-05-01

    The authors investigate the frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) after the addition of gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA to venous blood samples. Venous blood was obtained from nonsmokers. Samples were incubated with Gd-DTPA alone or in combination with mitomycin C, cytarabine, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and then evaluated for SCEs. The frequency of SCE increased with the concentration of Gd-DTPA and as each chemotherapeutic agent was added. Sister chromatid exchange frequencies were lower when the blood was treated with a combination of Gd-DTPA and DMSO compared with Gd-DTPA alone. The increase in frequency of SCE seen after the addition of Gd-DTPA was decreased by the addition of DMSO, indicating the production of hydroxyl radicals. The effect likely is dissociation-related. 14 refs., 6 tabs.

  2. Gadolinium-Activated CaZr4O9 Ultraviolet-B-Emitting Phosphor: A Luminescence and EPR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay; Singh, N.; Watanabe, S.; Gundu Rao, T. K.; Pathak, M. S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Singh, P. K.; Dhoble, S. J.

    2017-04-01

    Gadolinium-activated CaZr4O9 ultraviolet-B-emitting phosphor has been prepared by a solution combustion method and characterized using powder x-ray diffraction analysis, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic techniques. Upon excitation at 274 nm, the emission spectrum exhibits a well-defined ultraviolet B emission band with maximum at 313 nm, corresponding to 6P7/2 → 8S7/2 transition. A characteristic "U"-type EPR spectrum is observed for the powder samples. Doped Gd3+ ion appears to occupy calcium sites in the phosphor lattice. EPR and PL analyses of the sample confirm presence of Gd3+ in the CaZr4O9 host.

  3. A novel cryogenic magnetic refrigerant metal-organic framework based on 1D gadolinium(III) chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qun; Li, Peng-Fei; Zou, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Shu-Xia

    2017-02-01

    A metal-organic framework (MOF) based on gadolinium ion (Gd3+) and tricarboxylate ligand, [Gd(BTPCA)(H2O)]·2DMF·3H2O (Gd-BTPCA) (H3BTPCA =1,1‧,1‧-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl)tripiperidine-4-carboxylic acid; DMF=dimethylformamide), was synthesized and structurally characterized. The adjacent Gd3+ ions are intraconnected by the carboxylate groups of the BTPCA3- ligands to form a 1D Gd3+ ion chain. The 1D Gd3+ ion chains are interconnected by the BTPCA3- ligands, giving rise to a 3D framework with 1D open channel. The magnetic studies indicate that Gd-BTPCA exhibits weak ferromagnetic interactions, and acts as a cryogenic magnetic refrigerant having the magnetic entropy change (-ΔSm) of 20.40 J kg-1 K-1 for ΔH =7 T at 3 K.

  4. Magnetic Circular Dichroism of X-Ray Emission for Gadolinium in 4d-4f Excitation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Yasuhiro; Shinoda, Motoki; Obu, Kenji; Lee, Chol; Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Hirose, Masaaki; Ishii, Hiroyoshi; Miyahara, Tsuneaki; Okamoto, Jun

    2002-01-01

    We have measured magnetic circular dichroism of x-ray emission spectra (XES) for gadolinium in the 4d-4f excitation region. At a pre-threshold excitation energy, a large magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) signal appeared in a Raman scattering and the dramatic dependence of the MCD spectra on the excitation energy was observed. Theoretical calculation shows that the magnetic moment estimated with total photoelectron yield (TEY) spectra was much smaller than that with the emission spectra. This indicates that the MCD for the TEY reflects the magnetic state on the surface whereas the MCD for the XES reflects that in the bulk. We also observed the MCD spectra for total photon yield (TPY) and found the great difference of the MCD spectra for the TEY and TPY.

  5. Recent progress in advanced optical materials based on gadolinium aluminate garnet (Gd3Al5O12)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji-Guang; Sakka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    This review article summarizes the recent achievements in stabilization of the metastable lattice of gadolinium aluminate garnet (Gd3Al5O12, GAG) and the related developments of advanced optical materials, including down-conversion phosphors, up-conversion phosphors, transparent ceramics, and single crystals. Whenever possible, the materials are compared with their better known YAG and LuAG counterparts to demonstrate the merits of the GAG host. It is shown that novel emission features and significantly improved luminescence can be attained for a number of phosphor systems with the more covalent GAG lattice and the efficient energy transfer from Gd3+ to the activator. Ce3+ doped GAG-based single crystals and transparent ceramics are also shown to simultaneously possess the advantages of high theoretical density, fast scintillation decay, and high light yields, and hold great potential as scintillators for a wide range of applications. The unresolved issues are also pointed out. PMID:27877750

  6. Evidence of multicenter structure of cerium ions in gadolinium gallium garnet crystals studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybylińska, H.; Ma, Chong-Geng; Brik, M. G.; Kamińska, A.; Szczepkowski, J.; Sybilski, P.; Wittlin, A.; Berkowski, M.; Jastrzębski, W.; Suchocki, A.

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature, infrared absorption spectra of gadolinium gallium garnet crystals doped with Ce are presented. In the region of intraconfigurational 4f-4f transitions the spectra exhibit existence of at least two different, major Ce3+ related centers in the GGG crystals and also some other centers at lower concentration. The spectrum of 4f-4f intrashell transitions of Ce3+ ions extends up to about 3700 cm-1 due to the large splitting of the 2F7/2 excited state. In the visible region the absorption spectrum shows influence of symmetry-related selection rules. The absorption coefficient changes in the region of 4f1-5d1 transitions due to thermal population of the second level, belonging to the 2F5/2 ground state. This suggests that the symmetry of the site occupied by Ce3+ ions, which substitute Gd3+, is higher than D2 expected for garnet hosts.

  7. Reply to ``Comment on `Unusual magnetic transitions and nature of magnetic resonance spectra in oxide glasses containing gadolinium' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliava, Janis; Malakhovskii, Alexander; Edelman, Irina; Potseluyko, Anatoly; Melnikova, Svetlana; Petrakovskaja, Eleonora; Zarubina, Tat'Jana; Petrovskii, Gurii; Bruckental, I.; Yeshurun, Y.

    2006-07-01

    In this Reply we show that, contrary to the suggestion of Dubroca, Hack, and Hummel (DHH), the feature observed at ca. 55K in the magnetic susceptibility of gadolinium-containing oxide glasses [as in our earlier paper, Kliava Phys. Rev. B 71, 104406 (2005)] cannot be due to a magnetic transition in oxygen contaminant. In support of this statement, we supply transformed data at low Gd content as well as magnetization curves for a series of glasses containing dysprosium oxide measured with the same superconducting quantum interference device as in our earlier paper. In all these cases the feature in question is absent. Thus, our previous assignment of the 55K feature to a paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic transition in Gd clusters in the glass remains the only one consistent with the experimental results.

  8. Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect in Bi-substituted Neodymium Iron Garnet on Gadolinium Gallium Garnet Substrate Prepared by MOD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H.; Kuwahara, A.; Sueyasu, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Liu, Q.; Lou, G.; Kishimoto, K.; Koyanagi, T.

    Bi-substituted Neodymium Iron Garnet (Nd3-xBixFe5O12, Bi:NIG) thin films with the Bi composition x=0-1.0 are prepared on both the (001) and (111) oriented gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates by a metal organic decomposition method. Crystalline qualities and magnetic properties of these films are examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effects (LSSEs) are investigated by means of the inverse spin Hall effect in a Pt film. The increase of LSSE voltage in Bi:NIG(x=0-1.0)/Pt bilayers on GGG(001) is observed with the increase of Bi composition. In the case of GGG(111), the LSSE voltage for Bi:NIG(x=1.0) is also larger than that for NIG.

  9. Slurry sampling ETAAS determination of sodium impurities in optical crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate and potassium gadolinium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Detcheva, Albena; Gentscheva, Galia; Havezov, Ivan; Ivanova, Elisaveta

    2002-09-12

    Slurry sampling ETAAS was successfully applied to the determination of sodium impurities in single crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) and potassium gadolinium tungstate (KGW). Platform atomizers coated with titanium carbide or tungsten carbide, respectively, were used in order to avoid sensitivity drift due to the changes in the composition and the structure of the platform surface. Calibration curves with aqueous standards could be used for the KGW slurry (no matrix effects); analysis of KTP slurry required the standard additions method. The precision of the proposed method was better than 3% R.S.D. The results obtained by the present method showed a good agreement with those obtained by an independent method-flame AAS after sample digestion, which is an evidence for the good accuracy of the proposed method.

  10. Recent progress in advanced optical materials based on gadolinium aluminate garnet (Gd3Al5O12).

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Guang; Sakka, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    This review article summarizes the recent achievements in stabilization of the metastable lattice of gadolinium aluminate garnet (Gd3Al5O12, GAG) and the related developments of advanced optical materials, including down-conversion phosphors, up-conversion phosphors, transparent ceramics, and single crystals. Whenever possible, the materials are compared with their better known YAG and LuAG counterparts to demonstrate the merits of the GAG host. It is shown that novel emission features and significantly improved luminescence can be attained for a number of phosphor systems with the more covalent GAG lattice and the efficient energy transfer from Gd(3+) to the activator. Ce(3+) doped GAG-based single crystals and transparent ceramics are also shown to simultaneously possess the advantages of high theoretical density, fast scintillation decay, and high light yields, and hold great potential as scintillators for a wide range of applications. The unresolved issues are also pointed out.

  11. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber epoxy composite hybridized with Gadolinium and Boron nanoparticles for radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Venkat; Prasad, Narasimha S.; Kelkar, Ajit

    2016-09-01

    Deep space radiations pose a major threat to the astronauts and their spacecraft during long duration space exploration missions. The two sources of radiation that are of concern are the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and the short lived secondary neutron radiations that are generated as a result of fragmentation that occurs when GCR strikes target nuclei in a spacecraft. Energy loss, during the interaction of GCR and the shielding material, increases with the charge to mass ratio of the shielding material. Hydrogen with no neutron in its nucleus has the highest charge to mass ratio and is the element which is the most effective shield against GCR. Some of the polymers because of their higher hydrogen content also serve as radiation shield materials. Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers, apart from possessing radiation shielding properties by the virtue of the high hydrogen content, are known for extraordinary properties. An effective radiation shielding material is the one that will offer protection from GCR and impede the secondary neutron radiations resulting from the fragmentation process. Neutrons, which result from fragmentation, do not respond to the Coulombic interaction that shield against GCR. To prevent the deleterious effects of secondary neutrons, targets such as Gadolinium are required. In this paper, the radiation shielding studies that were carried out on the fabricated sandwich panels by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process are presented. VARTM is a manufacturing process used for making large composite structures by infusing resin into base materials formed with woven fabric or fiber using vacuum pressure. Using the VARTM process, the hybridization of Epoxy/UHMWPE composites with Gadolinium nanoparticles, Boron, and Boron carbide nanoparticles in the form of sandwich panels were successfully carried out. The preliminary results from neutron radiation tests show that greater than 99% shielding performance was

  12. Gadolinium Deposition in Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis: An Examination of Tissue using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    High, W.; Ranville, J; Brown, M; Punshon, T; Lanzirotti, A; Jackson, B

    2010-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder associated with gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents dosed during renal insufficiency. In two patients, Gd deposition in tissue affected by nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The presence of Gd was confirmed and mapped using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Affected skin and soft tissue from the lower extremity demonstrated 89 and 209 ppm ({micro}g/g, dry weight, formalin fixed) in cases 1 and 2, respectively. In case 2, the same skin and soft tissue was retested after paraffin embedding, with the fat content removed by xylene washes, and this resulted in a measured value of 189 ppm ({micro}g/g, dry weight, paraffin embedded). Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed Gd in the affected tissue of both cases, and provided high-sensitivity and high-resolution spatial mapping of Gd deposition. A gradient of Gd deposition in tissue correlated with fibrosis and cellularity. Gd deposited in periadnexal locations within the skin, including hair and eccrine ducts, where it colocalized to areas of high calcium and zinc content. Because of the difficulty in obtaining synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy scans, tissue from only two patients were mapped. A single control with kidney disease and gadolinium-based contrast agent exposure did not contain Gd. Gd content on a gravimetric basis was impacted by processing that removed fat and altered the dry weight of the specimens. Gradients of Gd deposition in tissue corresponded to fibrosis and cellularity. Adnexal deposition of Gd correlated with areas of high calcium and zinc content.

  13. MO-FG-BRA-07: Theranostic Gadolinium-Based AGuIX Nanoparticles for MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Detappe, A; Rottmann, J; Kunjachan, S; Berbeco, R; Tillement, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: AGuIX are gadolinium-based nanoparticles, initially developed for MRI, that have a potential role in radiation therapy as a radiosensitizer. Our goal is to demonstrate that these nanoparticles can both be used as an MRI contrast agent, as well as to obtain local dose enhancement in a pancreatic tumor when delivered in combination with an external beam irradiation. Methods: We performed in vitro cell uptake and radiosensitization studies of a pancreatic cancer cell line in a low energy (220kVp) beam, a standard clinical 6MV beam (STD) and a flattening filter free clinical 6MV beam (FFF). After injection of 40mM of nanoparticles, a biodistribution study was performed in vivo on mice with subcutaneous xenograft pancreatic tumors. In vivo radiation therapy studies were performed at the time point of maximum tumor uptake. Results: The concentration of AGuIX nanoparticles in Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells, determined in vitro by MRI and ICPMS, peaks after 30 minutes with 0.3% of the initial concentration (5mg/g). Clonogenic assays show a significant effect (p<0.05) when the AGuIX are coupled with MV photon irradiation (DEF20%=1.31). Similar AGuIX tumor uptake is found in vivo by both MRI and ICPMS 30 minutes after intravenous injection. For long term survival studies, the choice of the radiation dose is determined with 5 control groups (3mice/group) irradiated with 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20Gy. Afterwards, 4 groups (8mice/group) are used to evaluate the effect of the nanoparticles. A Logrank test is performed as a statistical test to evaluate the effect of the nanoparticles. Conclusion: The combination of the MRI contrast and radiosensitization properties of gadolinium nanoparticles reveals a strong potential for usage with MRI-guided radiation therapy.

  14. Gadolinium oxide decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube/tridoped titania nanocomposites for improved dye degradation under simulated solar light irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mamba, Gcina; Mbianda, Xavier Yangkou; Mishra, Ajay Kumar

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Illustration of the collaborative effect between MWCNT-Gd and Gd,N,S-TiO{sub 2} towards degradation of AB 74. - Highlights: • MWCNT-Gd/tridoped titania was successfully prepared via a sol-gel method. • XPS revealed the presence of Ti, C, O, S, N and Gd in MWCNT-Gd/Gd,N,S-TiO{sub 2}. • MWCNT-Gd/Gd,N,S-TiO{sub 2} displayed 100% degradation of acid blue 74 in 150 min. • Over 60% TOC removal by MWCNT-Gd/Gd,N,S-TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Neodymium/gadolinium/europium, nitrogen and sulphur tridoped titania (Nd/Gd/Eu, N,S-TiO{sub 2}) was hybridised with pre-synthesised gadolinium oxide decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Gd) using a sol–gel method. Subsequent to drying and calcination, composite photocatalysts: MWCNT-Gd/Nd,N,S-TiO{sub 2}, MWCNT-Gd/Gd,N,S-TiO{sub 2} and MWCNT-Gd/Eu,N,S-TiO{sub 2}, were obtained and characterised using TEM, SEM-EDX, UV–vis, XPS, XRD and FT-IR. Acid blue 74 (AB74) was used as a model dye to investigate the photocatalytic degradation properties of the prepared materials under simulated solar light irradiation. Coupling the different tridoped titania with MWCNT-Gd enhanced their activity compared to MWCNT/TiO{sub 2}, MWCNT-Gd/TiO{sub 2} and MWCNT/Gd,N,S-TiO{sub 2}. MWCNT-Gd/Gd,N,S-TiO{sub 2} showed the highest activity towards AB74 degradation reaching 100% decolourisation after 150 min of irradiation. Total organic carbon analysis revealed that over 50% of the AB74 molecules were completely mineralised after 180 min of irradiation in the presence of MWCNT-Gd/Gd,N,S-TiO{sub 2}.

  15. High longitudinal relaxivity of ultra-small gadolinium oxide prepared by microsecond laser ablation in diethylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Ningqi; Xiao Jun; Hu Wenyong; Chen Dihu; Tian Xiumei; Yang Chuan; Li Li

    2013-04-28

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can be used as T{sub 1}-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent own to its high longitudinal relaxivity (r{sub 1}) and has attracted intensive attention in these years. In this paper, ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles of 3.8 nm in diameter have been successfully synthesized by a microsecond laser ablating a gadolinium (Gd) target in diethylene glycol (DEG). The growth inhibition effect induced by the large viscosity of DEG makes it possible to synthesize ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by laser ablation in DEG. The r{sub 1} value and T{sub 1}-weighted MR images are measured by a 3.0 T MRI spectroscope. The results show these nanoparticles with a high r{sub 1} value of 9.76 s{sup -1} mM{sup -1} to be good MRI contrast agents. We propose an explanation for the high r{sub 1} value of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by considering the decreasing factor (surface to volume ratio of the nanoparticles, S/V) and the increasing factor (water hydration number of the Gd{sup 3+} on Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, q), which offer a new look into the relaxivity studies of MRI contrast agents. Our research provides a new approach to preparing ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} of high r{sub 1} value by laser ablation in DEG and develops the understanding of high relaxivity of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} MRI contrast agents.

  16. Gadolinium chloride elicits apoptosis in human osteosarcoma U-2 OS cells through extrinsic signaling, intrinsic pathway and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yuh-Feng; Huang, Ching-Wen; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Hsiao, Chen-Yu; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2016-12-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) compounds are important as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and are potential anticancer agents. However, no report has shown the effect of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) on osteosarcoma in vitro. The present study investigated the apoptotic mechanism of GdCl3 on human osteosarcoma U-2 OS cells. Our results indicated that GdCl3 significantly reduced cell viability of U-2 OS cells in a concentration-dependent manner. GdCl3 led to apoptotic cell shrinkage and DNA fragmentation in U-2 OS cells as revealed by morphologic changes and TUNEL staining. Colorimetric assay analyses also showed that activities of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9 and caspase-4 occurred in GdCl3-treated U-2 OS cells. Pretreatment of cells with pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and specific inhibitors of caspase-3/-8/-9 significantly reduced cell death caused by GdCl3. The increase of cytoplasmic Ca2+ level, ROS production and the decrease of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) were observed by flow cytometric analysis in U-2 OS cells after GdCl3 exposure. Western blot analyses demonstrated that the levels of Fas, FasL, cytochrome c, Apaf-1, GADD153 and GRP78 were upregulated in GdCl3-treated U-2 OS cells. In conclusion, death receptor, mitochondria-dependent and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways contribute to GdCl3-induced apoptosis in U-2 OS cells. GdCl3 might have potential to be used in treatment of osteosarcoma patients.

  17. K-edge angiography utilizing a tungsten plasma X-ray generator in conjunction with gadolinium-based contrast media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Onagawa, Jun; Ido, Hideaki

    2006-11-01

    The tungsten plasma flash X-ray generator is useful in order to perform high-speed enhanced K-edge angiography using cone beams because K-series characteristic X-rays from the tungsten target are absorbed effectively by gadolinium-based contrast media. In the flash X-ray generator, a 150 nF condenser is charged up to 80 kV by a power supply, and flash X-rays are produced by the discharging. The X-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Since the electric circuit of the high-voltage pulse generator employs a cable transmission line, the high-voltage pulse generator produces twice the potential of the condenser charging voltage. At a charging voltage of 80 kV, the estimated maximum tube voltage and current were approximately 160 kV and 40 kA, respectively. When the charging voltage was increased, the characteristic X-ray intensities of tungsten K α lines increased. The K α lines were clean, and hardly any bremsstrahlung rays were detected. The X-ray pulse widths were approximately 110 ns, and the time-integrated X-ray intensity had a value of approximately 0.35 mGy at 1.0 m from the X-ray source with a charging voltage of 80 kV. Angiography was performed using a film-less computed radiography (CR) system and gadolinium-based contrast media. In angiography of non-living animals, we observed fine blood vessels of approximately 100 μm with high contrasts.

  18. Effects of motexafin gadolinium on DNA damage and X-ray-induced DNA damage repair, as assessed by the Comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Erling T.; Liu Yanfeng; Paul, Tracy K.; Rockwell, Sara . E-mail: sara.rockwell@yale.edu

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and DNA damage in EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma cells. The ability of MGd to alter radiosensitivity and to inhibit DNA damage repair after X-ray irradiation was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: Reactive oxygen species and GSH levels were assessed by 2,7-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence flow cytometry and the Tietze method, respectively. Cellular radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic assays. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage and DNA damage repair were assessed in plateau-phase EMT6 cells by the Comet assay and clonogenic assays. Results: Cells treated with 100 {mu}mol/L MGd plus equimolar ascorbic acid (AA) had significantly increased levels of ROS and a 58.9% {+-} 3.4% decrease in GSH levels, relative to controls. Motexafin gadolinium plus AA treatment increased the hypoxic, but not the aerobic, radiosensitivity of EMT6 cells. There were increased levels of single-strand breaks in cells treated with 100 {mu}mol/L MGd plus equimolar AA, as evidenced by changes in the alkaline tail moment (MGd + AA, 6 h: 14.7 {+-} 1.8; control: 2.8 {+-} 0.9). The level of single-strand breaks was dependent on the length of treatment. Motexafin gadolinium plus AA did not increase double-strand breaks. The repair of single-strand breaks at 2 h, but not at 4 h and 6 h, after irradiation was altered significantly in cells treated with MGd plus AA (MGd + AA, 2 h: 15.8 {+-} 3.4; control: 5.8 {+-} 0.6). Motexafin gadolinium did not alter the repair of double-strand breaks at any time after irradiation with 10 Gy. Conclusions: Motexafin gadolinium plus AA generated ROS, which in turn altered GSH homeostasis and induced DNA strand breaks. The MGd plus AA-mediated alteration of GSH levels increased the hypoxic, but not aerobic, radiosensitivity of EMT6 cells. Motexafin gadolinium altered the kinetics of single-strand break repair soon after irradiation but

  19. Assessment of Degree of Applicability of Benchmarks for Gadolinium Using KENO V.a and the 238-Group SCALE Cross-Section Library

    SciTech Connect

    Goluoglu, S.

    2003-12-01

    A review of the degree of applicability of benchmarks containing gadolinium using the computer code KENO V.a and the gadolinium cross sections from the 238-group SCALE cross-section library has been performed for a system that contains {sup 239}Pu, H{sub 2}O, and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The system (practical problem) is a water-reflected spherical mixture that represents a dry-out condition on the bottom of a sludge receipt and adjustment tank around steam coils. Due to variability of the mixture volume and the H/{sup 239}Pu ratio, approximations to the practical problem, referred to as applications, have been made to envelop possible ranges of mixture volumes and H/{sup 239}Pu ratios. A newly developed methodology has been applied to determine the degree of applicability of benchmarks as well as the penalty that should be added to the safety margin due to insufficient benchmarks.

  20. Novel 15-crown-5 ether or beta-diketone incorporated gadolinium complexes for the detection of potassium ions or magnesium and calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Hifumi, Hiroki; Tanimoto, Akihiro; Citterio, Daniel; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Koji

    2007-11-01

    Novel gadolinium complexes (KMR-series: KMR-K and KMR-Mg), which have a bis-15-crown-5 ether or a charged beta-diketone structure as a recognition site, have been designed, synthesized and applied for the detection of K(+) or of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) using MRI or NMR techniques. The measurements are based on the modulation of the longitudinal relaxation time (T(1)) of water protons in proximity of the gadolinium complexes. Relaxivity measurements of KMR-K1 in aqueous solution showed that the initial longitudinal relaxivity value (r(1)) of 5.05 mM(-1) s(-1) is monotonously decreasing with increasing K(+) concentrations, reaching a final value of 4.78 mM(-1) s(-1). This decrease is attributed to a change in the second sphere of hydration of the gadolinium (Gd(3+)) complex (KMR-K), resulting in a K(+) concentration-dependent contrast in MR images. From stoichiometric analysis using mass spectrometry and UV/VIS spectrometry, a 1 : 1 complex formation between KMR-K1 and K(+) in a sandwich-type manner with a log K of 3.20 was confirmed. In the case of KMR-Mg, the initial r(1) value of 4.98 mM(-1) s(-1) is monotonously decreasing with increasing Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) concentrations, reaching a final value of 3.95 or 4.16 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively, resulting in Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) concentration-dependent contrast in MR images. The formation of a 1:1 complex with a log K of 2.33 for Mg(2+) and 1.91 for Ca(2+) was confirmed. KMR-K1 and KMR-Mg are the first ion-selective or ion-sensitive gadolinium complexes for K(+) or Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), respectively.

  1. Application of the model-free approach to the study of non-isothermal decomposition of un-irradiated and γ-irradiated hydrated gadolinium acetylacetonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouz, R. M.; Ahmed, G. A.-W.; Alshammari, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    The non-isothermal decomposition of unirradiated and γ-irradiated hydrated gadolinium acetylacetone with 102 kGy γ-ray absorbed dose was carried out in air and in nitrogen atmospheres and in the temperature range of 25-1000°C. The results indicate that gadolinium acetylacetonate decomposes through four main decomposition steps leading to the formation of intermediate products whose chemical structure is independent of the gas atmosphere applied and on the investigated absorbed dose. The final product at 820°C was found to be Gd2O3 irrespective of the gas atmosphere and the irradiation conditions. The non-isothermal data were analyzed using linear Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and non-linear Vyazovkin (VYZ) iso-conversional methods. The results of the application of these free models on the present kinetic data showed that the activation energy, Ea is independent of α in a very wide conversion range (0.1-0.9) indicating that the decomposition process is controlled by a unique kinetic model. The results of the model-fitting analysis showed that the decomposition course of the four decomposition steps of hydrated gadolinium acetylacetone was controlled by the D3 Jander diffusion model. Pure phase of Gd2O3 nanoparticles was obtained by thermal oxidation of γ-irradiated GdAcAc.3 H2O at 800°C for 6 h. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were employed for characterization of the as-synthesized nanoparticles. This is the first attempt to prepare Gd2O3 nanoparticles by solid-state thermal decomposition of γ-irradiated hydrated gadolinium acetylacetone.

  2. Synergy between surface and core entrapped metals in a mixed manganese-gadolinium nanocolloid affords safer MR imaging of sparse biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kezheng; Pan, Dipanjan; Schmieder, Anne H; Senpan, Angana; Hourcade, Dennis E; Pham, Christine T N; Mitchell, Lynne M; Caruthers, Shelton D; Cui, Grace; Wickline, Samuel A; Shen, Baozhong; Lanza, Gregory M

    2015-04-01

    High-relaxivity T1-weighted (T1w) MR molecular imaging nanoparticles typically present high surface gadolinium payloads that can elicit significant acute complement activation (CA). The objective of this research was to develop a high T1w contrast nanoparticle with improved safety. We report the development, optimization, and characterization of a gadolinium-manganese hybrid nanocolloid (MnOL-Gd NC; 138±10 (Dav)/nm; PDI: 0.06; zeta: -27±2 mV). High r1 particulate relaxivity with minute additions of Gd-DOTA-lipid conjugate to the MnOL nanocolloid surface achieved an unexpected paramagnetic synergism. This hybrid MnOL-Gd NC provided optimal MR TSE signal intensity at 5 nM/voxel and lower levels consistent with the level expression anticipated for sparse biomarkers, such as neovascular integrins. MnOL NC produced optimal MR TSE signal intensity at 10 nM/voxel concentrations and above. Importantly, MnOL-Gd NC avoided acute CA in vitro and in vivo while retaining minimal transmetallation risk. From the clinical editor: The authors developed a gadolinium-manganese hybrid nanocolloid (MnOL-Gd NC) in this study. These were used as a high-relaxivity paramagnetic MR molecular imaging agent in experimental models. It was shown that MnOL-Gd NC could provide high T1w MR contrast for targeted imaging. As the level of gadolinium used was reduced, there was also reduced risk of systemic side effects from complement activation.

  3. Lasing properties of sodium-gadolinium tungstate NaGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals doped with Tm{sup 3+} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zharikov, Evgeny V; Lis, Denis A; Popov, A V; Subbotin, Kirill A; Ushakov, S N; Shestakov, A V; Razdobreev, I M

    2006-06-30

    Lasing is obtained in Tm{sup 3+}-doped sodium-gadolinium tungstate NaGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals longitudinally pumped by pulses from a laser diode bar. The slope lasing efficiency is 16%. Lasing was observed at wavelengths of 1957, 1944, 1936, and 1901 nm for the transmission coefficients of the output mirror T{sub out} = 0.3%, 1.4%, 3.3%, and 8.5%, respectively. (lasers)

  4. Three-dimensional gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography used as a "one-stop shop'' imaging procedure for venous thromboembolism: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Obernosterer, Andrea; Aschauer, Manuela; Portugaller, Horst; Köppel, Herwig; Lipp, Rainer W

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis are individual manifestations of a single entity, venous thromboembolic disease. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of 3-dimensional gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography used as an "one-stop shop'' imaging procedure visualizing both the pulmonary arteries and the deep lower venous system within a single investigation. The inclusion criterion was a proven or excluded venous thromboembolism. Diagnosis was based on an imaging work-up for pulmonary embolism including either perfusion lung scan or contrast-enhanced spiral computed tomography, or both, and an imaging work-up for deep venous thrombosis including either venous color-coded duplex sonography or ascending phlebography, or both. A gadolinium-enhanced "one-stop shop'' magnetic resonance angiography was performed within 24 hours of completed diagnostic imaging work-up for pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis in 20 patients. Results of pulmonary magnetic resonance angiography were concordant with perfusion lung scan and/or computed tomography in 90% of patients. Magnetic resonance angiography results of the deep lower venous system were concordant with venous duplex sonography and/or phlebography in 75% of patients and seemed to be more precise in 25% of patients. The "one-stop shop'' imaging procedure using gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography was feasible and proved to offer a reliable and rapid diagnostic approach in thromboembolic disease, sparing patients' exposure to ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast media.

  5. Safety of the Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Focusing in Part on Their Accumulation in the Brain and Especially the Dentate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2016-05-01

    The established class of intravenous contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging is the gadolinium chelates, more generally referred to as the gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). These can be differentiated on the basis of stability in vivo, with safety and tolerability of the GBCAs dependent upon chemical and biologic inertness. This review discusses first the background in terms of development of these agents and safety discussions therein, and second their relative stability based both on in vitro studies and clinical observations before and including the advent of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This sets the stage for the subsequent focus of the review, the current knowledge regarding accumulation of gadolinium in the brain and specifically the dentate nucleus after intravenous administration of the GBCAs and differentiation among agents on this basis. The information available to date, from the initial conception of these agents in 1981 to the latest reports concerning safety, demonstrates a significant difference between the macrocyclic and linear chelates. The review concludes with a discussion of the predictable future, which includes, importantly, a reassessment of the use of the linear GBCAs or a subset thereof.

  6. Ferromagnetic coupling in the three-dimensional malonato-bridged gadoliniumIII complex [Gd2(mal)3(H2O)6] (H2mal = malonic acid).

    PubMed

    Hernández-Molina, María; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina; López, Trinidad; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2003-09-08

    The novel gadolinium(III) complex of formula [Gd(2)(mal)(3)(H(2)O)(6)] (1) (H(2)mal = 1,3-propanedioic acid) has been prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystal data for 1: monoclinic, space group I2/a, a = 11.1064(10) A, b = 12.2524(10) A, c =13.6098(2) A, beta = 92.925(10) degrees, U = 1849.5(3) A(3), Z = 4. Compound 1 is a three-dimensional network made up of malonate-bridged gadolinium(III) ions where the malonate exhibits two bridging modes, eta(5)-bidentate + unidentate and eta(3):eta(3) + bis(unidentate). The gadolinium atom is nine-coordinate with three water molecules and six malonate oxygen atoms from three malonate ligands forming a distorted monocapped square antiprism. The shortest metal-metal separations are 4.2763(3) A [through the oxo-carboxylate bridge] and 6.541(3) A [through the carboxylate in the anti-syn coordination mode]. The value of the angle at the oxo-carboxylate atom is 116.8(2) degrees. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal the occurrence of a significant ferromagnetic interaction through the oxo-carboxylate pathway (J = +0.048(1) cm(-1), H = -JS(Gd(1)) x S(Gd(1a))).

  7. Gadolinium-uptake by aquatic and terrestrial organisms-distribution determined by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lingott, Jana; Lindner, Uwe; Telgmann, Lena; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Jakubowski, Norbert; Panne, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) based contrast agents (CA) are used to enhance magnetic resonance imaging. As a consequence of excretion by patients and insufficient elimination in wastewater treatment plants they are detected in high concentrations in surface water. At present, little is known about the uptake of these species by living organisms in aquatic systems. Therefore the uptake of gadolinium containing chelates by plants and animals grown in exposed water or on soil irrigated with exposed water was investigated. For this purpose two types of plants were treated with two different contrast agents. The uptake of the Gd contrast agents was studied by monitoring the elemental distribution with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique allows the multi-elemental analysis of solid samples with high resolution and little sample preparation. The analysis of L. minor showed that the uptake of Gd correlated with the concentration of gadodiamide in the water. The higher the concentration in the exposed water, the larger the Gd signal in the LA-ICP-MS acquired image. Exposure time experiments showed saturation within one day. The L. minor had contact with the CAs through roots and fronds, whereas the L. sativum only showed uptake through the roots. These results show that an external absorption of the CA through the leaves of L. sativum was impossible. All the analyzed parts of the plant showed Gd signal from the CA; the highest being at the main vein of the leaf. It is shown that the CAs can be taken up from plants. Furthermore, the uptake and distribution of Gd in Daphnia magna were shown. The exposure via cultivation medium is followed by Gd signals on the skin and in the area of the intestine, while the uptake via exposed nutrition algae causes the significantly highest Gd intensities in the area of the intestine. Because there are hints of negative effects for human organism these findings are important as they show that Gd based

  8. Enhancement of lindane-induced liver oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity by thyroid hormone is reduced by gadolinium chloride.

    PubMed

    Simon-Giavarotti, Karin A; Giavarotti, Leandro; Gomes, Ligia F; Lima, Alessandra F; Veridiano, Adriano M; Garcia, Eduardo A; Mora, Oswaldo A; Fernández, Virginia; Videla, Luis A; Junqueira, Virginia B C

    2002-10-01

    The role of Kupffer cells in the hepatocellular injury and oxidative stress induced by lindane (20 mg/kg; 24h) in hyperthyroid rats (daily doses of 0.1 mg L-3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3)/kg for three consecutive days) was assessed by the simultaneous administration of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 2 doses of 10mg/kg on alternate days). Hyperthyroid animals treated with lindane exhibit enhanced liver microsomal superoxide radical (O2.-) production and NADPH cytochrome c reductase activity, with lower levels of cytochrome P450, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activity, and glutathione (GSH) content over control values. These changes are paralleled by a substantial increase in the lipid peroxidation potential of the liver and in the O2.- generation/ SOD activity ratio, thus evidencing a higher oxidative stress status that correlates with the development of liver injury characterized by neutrophil infiltration and necrosis. Kupffer cell inactivation by GdCl3 suppresses liver injury in lindane/T3-treated rats with normalization of altered oxidative stress-related parameters, excepting the reduction in the content of GSH and in catalase activity. It is concluded that lindane hepatotoxicity in hyperthyroid state, that comprises an enhancement in the oxidative stress status of the liver, is largely dependent on Kupffer cell function, which may involve generation of mediators leading to pro-oxidant and inflammatory processes.

  9. Parallel Comparative Studies on Mouse Toxicity of Oxide Nanoparticle- and Gadolinium-Based T1 MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Ling, Daishun; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shuaifei; Liu, Ying; Bai, Ru; Baik, Seungmin; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-12-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with high relaxivity are highly desirable because they can significantly increase the accuracy of diagnosis. However, they can be potentially toxic to the patients. In this study, using a mouse model, we investigate the toxic effects and subsequent tissue damage induced by three T1 MRI contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine injection (GDI), a clinically used gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent (GBCAs), and oxide nanoparticle (NP)-based contrast agents, extremely small-sized iron oxide NPs (ESIONs) and manganese oxide (MnO) NPs. Biodistribution, hematological and histopathological changes, inflammation, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses are evaluated for 24 h after intravenous injection. These thorough assessments of the toxic and stress responses of these agents provide a panoramic description of safety concerns and underlying mechanisms of the toxicity of contrast agents in the body. We demonstrate that ESIONs exhibit fewer adverse effects than the MnO NPs and the clinically used GDI GBCAs, providing useful information on future applications of ESIONs as potentially safe MRI contrast agents.

  10. Indirect MR lymphangiography of the head and neck using conventional gadolinium contrast: A pilot study in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Billy W. . E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu; Draney, Mary T.; Sivanandan, Ranjiv; Ruehm, Stefan G.; Pawlicki, Todd; Xing Lei; Herfkens, Robert J.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MR-LAG) using interstitial injection of conventional gadolinium contrast (gadoteridol and gadopentetate dimeglumine) for delineating the primary lymphatic drainage of head-and-neck sites. Methods and Materials: We performed head-and-neck MR-LAG in 5 healthy volunteers, with injection of dermal and mucosal sites. We evaluated the safety of the procedure, the patterns of enhancement categorized by injection site and nodal level, the time course of enhancement, the optimal concentration and volume of contrast, and the optimal imaging sequence. Results: The worst side effects of interstitial contrast injection were brief, mild pain and swelling at the injected sites that were self-limited. MR-LAG resulted in consistent visualization of the primary lymphatic drainage pattern specific to each injected site, which was reproducible on repeated examinations. The best enhancement was obtained with injection of small volumes (0.3-0.5 mL) of either agent diluted, imaging within 5-15 min of injection, and a three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo sequence with magnetization transfer. Conclusions: We found head-and-neck MR-LAG to be a safe, convenient imaging method that provides functional information about the lymphatic drainage of injected sites. Applied to head-and-neck cancer, it has the potential to identify sites at highest risk of occult metastatic spread for radiotherapy or surgical planning, and possibly to visualize micrometastases.

  11. [Amyloid beta-related angiitis: brain lesions showing leptomeningeal gadolinium enhancement on MRI and characteristic surgical pathologic features].

    PubMed

    Koike, Yuka; Ouchi, Haruka; Sato, Tomoe; Shimbo, Junsuke; Sato, Aki; Sasaki, Osamu; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Igarashi, Shuichi

    2013-06-01

    Amyloid-β-related angiitis (ABRA) of the CNS occurs in association with vasculitis of small-and medium-sized leptomeningeal arteries. Here, we describe the clinicopathological features of a 76-year-old man with ABRA. The patient suffered progressive truncal oscillation, aphasia, and recent memory disturbance with a subacute disease onset. His cerebrospinal fluid showed a mild increase in protein levels (101 mg/dL) and pleocytosis (8/mm(3)). High-intensity brain lesion were detected on T(2)-weighted and FLAIR MRI scans, and prominent spread of gadolinium enhancement spreading was observed through the sulci of the left occipital and temporal lobes and left cerebellar hemisphere. A biopsy of the left temporal lesion showed a granulomatous and angiodestructive inflammation with infiltration of many CD4(+) T-lymphocytes and multinucleated giant cells and with fibrinoid necrosis of the arterial walls in the subarachnoid space. Immunolabeling for Aβ(1-40) revealed the abundant deposition of this protein in the affected arteries. On the basic of the diagnosis of ABRA, immunosuppressive therapy was conducted, and it ameliorated the clinical course.

  12. Luminescence properties of barium--gadolinium-titanate ceramics doped with rare-earth ions (Eu3+ and Tb3+).

    PubMed

    Hemasundara Raju, S; Muni Sudhakar, B; Sudhakar Reddy, B; Dhoble, S J; Thyagarajan, K; Nageswara Raju, C

    2014-11-01

    Barium-gadolinium-titanate (BaGd2 Ti4 O12) powder ceramics doped with rare-earth ions (Eu(3+) and Tb(3+)) were synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. From the X-ray diffraction spectrum, it was observed that Eu(3+) and Tb(3+):BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics are crystallized in the form of an orthorhombic structure. Scanning electron microscopy image shows that the particles are agglomerated and the particle size is about 200 nm. Eu(3+) - and Tb(3+) -doped BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics were examined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra. Emission spectra of Eu(3+)-doped BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics showed bright red emission at 613 nm ((5)D0 →(7)F2) with an excitation wavelength λ(exci)  = 408 nm ((7)F0 → (5)D3) and Tb(3+):BaGd2 Ti4 O12 ceramic powder has shown green emission at 534 nm ((5)D4 → (7)F5) with an excitation wavelength λ(exci)  = 331 nm (((7)F6 → (5)D1). TL spectra show that Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions affect TL sensitivity.

  13. Gadolinium-Loaded Poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) Nanogels: Synthesis, Characterization, and Application for Enhanced Tumor MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Thies, Sabrina; Zhang, Jiulong; Peng, Chen; Tang, Guangyu; Shen, Mingwu; Pich, Andrij; Shi, Xiangyang

    2017-02-01

    We report the synthesis of poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) nanogels (PVCL NGs) loaded with gadolinium (Gd) for tumor MR imaging applications. The PVCL NGs were synthesized via precipitation polymerization using the monomer N-vinylcaprolactam (VCL), the comonomer acrylic acid (AAc), and the degradable cross-linker 3,9-divinyl-2,4,8,10-tetraoxaspiro-[5,5]-undecane (VOU) in aqueous solution, followed by covalently binding with 2,2',2″-(10-(4-((2-aminoethyl)amino)-1-carboxy-4-oxobutyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triyl) triacetic acid (NH2-DOTA-GA)/Gd complexes. We show that the formed Gd-loaded PVCL NGs (PVCL-Gd NGs) having a size of 180.67 ± 11.04 nm are water dispersible, colloidally stable, uniform in size distribution, and noncytotoxic in a range of the studied concentrations. The PVCL-Gd NGs also display a r1 relaxivity (6.38-7.10 mM(-1) s(-1)), which is much higher than the clinically used Gd chelates. These properties afforded the use of the PVCL-Gd NGs as an effective positive contrast agent for enhanced MR imaging of cancer cells in vitro as well as a subcutaneous tumor model in vivo. Our study suggests that the developed PVCL-Gd NGs could be applied as a promising contrast agent for T1-weighted MR imaging of diverse biosystems.

  14. Exceptional Oxygen Sensing Properties of New Blue Light-Excitable Highly Luminescent Europium(III) and Gadolinium(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Sergey M.; Fischer, Roland; Saf, Robert; Klimant, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    New europium(III) and gadolinium(III) complexes bearing 8-hydroxyphenalenone antenna combine efficient absorption in the blue part of the spectrum and strong emission in polymers at room temperature. The Eu(III) complexes show characteristic red luminescence whereas the Gd(III) dyes are strongly phosphorescent. The luminescence quantum yields are about 20% for the Eu(III) complexes and 50% for the Gd(III) dyes. In contrast to most state-of-the-art Eu(III) complexes the new dyes are quenched very efficiently by molecular oxygen. The luminescence decay times of the Gd(III) complexes exceed 1 ms which ensures exceptional sensitivity even in polymers of moderate oxygen permeability. These sensors are particularly suitable for trace oxygen sensing and may be good substitutes for Pd(II) porphyrins. The photophysical and sensing properties can be tuned by varying the nature of the fourth ligand. The narrow-band emission of the Eu(III) allows efficient elimination of the background light and autofluorescence and is also very attractive for use e.g. in multi-analyte sensors. The highly photostable indicators incorporated in nanoparticles are promising for imaging applications. Due to the straightforward preparation and low cost of starting materials the new dyes represent a promising alternative to the state-of-the-art oxygen indicators particularly for such applications as e.g. food packaging. PMID:27158252

  15. Anthropogenic gadolinium anomalies and rare earth elements in the water of Atibaia River and Anhumas Creek, Southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Francisco Ferreira; Enzweiler, Jacinta

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), measured in water samples from Atibaia River and its tributary Anhumas Creek, Brazil, present excess of dissolved gadolinium. Such anthropogenic anomalies of Gd in water, already described in other parts of the world, result from the use of stable and soluble Gd chelates as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Atibaia River constitutes the main water supply of Campinas Metropolitan area, and its basin receives wastewater effluents. The REE concentrations in water samples were determined in 0.22-μm pore size filtered samples, without and after preconcentration by solid-phase extraction with bis-(2-ethyl-hexyl)-phosphate. This preconcentration method was unable to retain the anthropogenic Gd quantitatively. The probable reason is that the Gd chelates dissociate slowly in acidic media to produce the free ion that is retained by the phosphate ester. Strong correlations between Gd and constituents or parameters associated with effluents confirmed the source of most Gd in water samples as anthropogenic. The shale-normalized REE patterns of Atibaia River and Anhumas Creek water samples showed light and heavy REE enrichment trends, respectively. Also, positive Ce anomalies in many Atibaia River samples, as well as the strong correlations of the REE (except Gd) with terrigenous elements, imply that inorganic colloidal particles contributed to the REE measured values.

  16. Influence of gadolinium content on the tetragonal to cubic phase transition in zirconia-silica binary oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Behera, Pallavi Suhasinee; Vasanthavel, S.; Ponnilavan, V.; Kannan, S.

    2015-05-15

    The present study reports the effect of gadolinium (Gd{sup 3+}) in zirconia-silica (ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2}) binary oxides. The pure ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} synthesized at 1100 °C was tetragonal. The addition of Gd{sup 3+} in the concentration range of 5%–10% resulted in the formation of t-ZrO{sub 2}, whereas higher contents of Gd{sup 3+} led to the formation of cubic ZrO{sub 2} (c-ZrO{sub 2}). The presence of Gd{sup 3+} also affected the lattice parameters of both t-ZrO{sub 2} and c-ZrO{sub 2}. Magnetic studies confirmed a steady increase in the paramagnetic behaviour with increasing content of Gd{sup 3+}. - Graphical abstract: t-ZrO{sub 2} to c-ZrO{sub 2} phase transition influenced by Gd{sup 3+} content. - Highlights: • Sol-gel synthesis of Gd{sup 3+} added SiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} binary oxides. • Significant role of Gd{sup 3+} content in the tetragonal and cubic stabilization of ZrO{sub 2}. • Phase stability of either tetragonal or cubic stabilization till 1100 °C. • Gd{sup 3+} additions ensured additional paramagnetic behaviour in SiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} binary oxide.

  17. Long-term in vivo clearance of gadolinium-based AGuIX nanoparticles and their biocompatibility after systemic injection.

    PubMed

    Sancey, Lucie; Kotb, Shady; Truillet, Charles; Appaix, Florence; Marais, Arthur; Thomas, Eloïse; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Klein, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Blandine; Cottier, Michèle; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Panczer, Gérard; Lux, François; Perriat, Pascal; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Tillement, Olivier

    2015-03-24

    We previously reported the synthesis of gadolinium-based nanoparticles (NPs) denoted AGuIX (activation and guiding of irradiation by X-ray) NPs and demonstrated their potential as an MRI contrast agent and their efficacy as radiosensitizing particles during X-ray cancer treatment. Here we focus on the elimination kinetics of AGuIX NPs from the subcellular to whole-organ scale using original and complementary methods such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), intravital two-photon microscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). This combination of techniques allows the exact mechanism of AGuIX NPs elimination to be elucidated, including their retention in proximal tubules and their excretion as degraded or native NPs. Finally, we demonstrated that systemic AGuIX NP administration induced moderate and transient effects on renal function. These results provide useful and promising preclinical information concerning the safety of theranostic AGuIX NPs.

  18. A benchmarked MCNP model of the in vivo detection of gadolinium by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, J. L.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Chettle, D. R.; Noseworthy, M. D.

    2010-08-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents are a valuable diagnostic aid for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The amount of free Gd deposited in tissues following contrast enhanced MRI is of toxicological concern. The McMaster University in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility has been adapted for the detection of Gd in the kidney, liver, and the leg muscle. A simple model of the HPGe detector used for detection of the prompt γ-rays following Gd neutron capture has been created using Monte Carlo simulation. A separate simulation describing the neutron collimation and shielding apparatus has been modified to determine the neutron capture rate in the Gd phantoms. The MCNP simulation results have been confirmed by experimental measurement. The deviations between MCNP and the experiment were between 1% and 18%, with an average deviation of 3.8 ± 6.7%. The validated MCNP model is to be used to improve the Gd in vivo measurement sensitivity by determining the best neutron moderator/reflector arrangement.

  19. Thermal, spectroscopic and laser properties of Nd3+ in gadolinium scandium gallium garnet crystal produced by optical floating zone method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Li; Wang, Shuxian; Wu, Kui; Wang, Baolin; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Cai, Huaqiang; Huang, Hui

    2013-12-01

    A neodymium-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nd:GSGG) single crystal with dimensions of Φ 5 × 20 mm2 has been grown by means of optical floating zone (OFZ). X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) result shows that the as-grown Nd:GSGG crystal possesses a cubic structure with space group Ia3d and a cell parameter of a = 1.2561 nm. Effective elemental segregation coefficients of the Nd:GSGG as-grown crystal were calculated by using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The thermal properties of the Nd:GSGG crystal were systematically studied by measuring the specific heat, thermal expansion and thermal diffusion coefficient, and the thermal conductivity of this crystal was calculated. The absorption and luminescence spectra of Nd:GSGG were measured at room temperature (RT). By using the Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory, the theoretical radiative lifetime was calculated and compared with the experimental result. Continuous wave (CW) laser performance was achieved with the Nd:GSGG at the wavelength of 1062 nm when it was pumped by a laser diode (LD). A maximum output power of 0.792 W at 1062 nm was obtained with a slope efficiency of 11.89% under a pump power of 7.36 W, and an optical-optical conversion efficiency of 11.72%.

  20. Automated scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis for in situ quantification of gadolinium deposits in skin.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Charu; Abraham, Jerrold L

    2007-10-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) has been identified as a possible causative agent of an emerging cutaneous and systemic fibrosing disorder, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), which can cause serious disability and even death. To date, there are only two known associations with this disorder--renal insufficiency and Gd enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We developed an automated quantitative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) method for Gd in tissue of NSF patients. Freshly cut paraffin block surfaces examined using the variable pressure mode under standardized conditions and random search of the tissue area allow in situ detection and semiquantitative morphometric (volumetric) analysis of insoluble higher atomic number features using backscattered electron imaging. We detected Gd ranging from 1 to 2270 cps/mm2 in 57 cutaneous biopsies of NSF. Gd was associated with P, Ca, and usually Na in tissue deposits. Our method reproducibly determines the elemental composition, relative concentration, and spatial distribution of detected features within the tissue. However, we cannot detect features below our spatial resolution, nor concentrations below the detection limit of our SEM/EDS system. The findings confirm transmetallation and release of toxic Gd ions in NSF and allow dose-response analysis at the histologic level.

  1. The Complex Fate in Plasma of Gadolinium Incorporated into High-Density Lipoproteins Used for Magnetic Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Barazza, Alessandra; Blachford, Courtney; Even-Or, Orli; Joaquin, Victor A.; Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Chen, Wei; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Cormode, David P.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported enhancing the imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in mice using reconstituted high density lipoproteins (HDL) as nanocarriers for the MRI contrast agent gadolinium (Gd). This study focuses on the underlying mechanisms of Gd delivery to atherosclerotic plaques. HDL, LDL, and VLDL particles containing Gd chelated to phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DTPA-DMPE) and a lipidic fluorophore were used to demonstrate the transfer of Gd-phospholipids among plasma lipoproteins in vitro and in vivo. To determine the basis of this transfer, the roles of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lipoprotein lipase (LpL) in mediating the migration of Gd-DTPA-DMPE among lipoproteins were investigated. The results indicated that neither was an important factor, suggesting that spontaneous transfer of Gd-DTPA-DMPE was the most probable mechanism. Finally, two independent mouse models were used to quantify the relative contributions of HDL and LDL reconstituted with Gd-DTPA-DMPE to plaque imaging enhancement by MR. Both sets of results suggested that Gd-DTPA-DMPE originally associated with LDL was about twice as effective as that injected in the form of Gd-HDL, and that some of Gd-HDL’s effectiveness in vivo is indirect through transfer of the imaging agent to LDL. In conclusion, the fate of Gd-DTPA-DMPE associated with a particular type of lipoprotein is complex, and includes its transfer to other lipoprotein species that are then cleared from the plasma into tissues. PMID:23617731

  2. Immediate Adverse Reactions to Gadolinium-Based MR Contrast Media: A Retrospective Analysis on 10,608 Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; dell'Aprovitola, Nicoletta; Catalano, Orlando; Filice, Salvatore; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Contrast media (CM) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may determine the development of acute adverse reactions. Objective was to retrospectively assess the frequency and severity of adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) injection in patients who underwent MRI. Material and Methods. At our center 10608 MRI examinations with CM were performed using five different GBCAs: Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance), Gd-DTPA (Magnevist), Gd-EOBDTPA (Primovist), Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), and Gd-BTDO3A (Gadovist). Results. 32 acute adverse reactions occurred, accounting for 0.3% of all administration. Twelve reactions were associated with Gd-DOTA injection (0.11%), 9 with Gd-BOPTA injection (0.08%), 6 with Gd-BTDO3A (0.056%), 3 with Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.028%), and 2 with Gd-DTPA (0.018%). Twenty-four reactions (75.0%) were mild, four (12.5%) moderate, and four (12.5%) severe. The most severe reactions were seen associated with use of Gd-BOPTA, with 3 severe reactions in 32 total reactions. Conclusion. Acute adverse reactions are generally rare with the overall adverse reaction rate of 0.3%. The most common adverse reactions were not severe, consisting in skin rash and hives. PMID:27652261

  3. Long-circulating iodinated albumin-gadolinium nanoparticles as enhanced magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging probes for osteosarcoma visualization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianliang; Lv, Ling; Ling, Zhuoyan; Wang, Yangyun; Liu, Yujing; Li, Liubing; Liu, Guodong; Shen, Liqin; Yan, Jun; Wang, Yong

    2015-04-21

    Multimodal imaging probes represent an extraordinary tool for accurate diagnosis of diseases due to the complementary advantages of multiple imaging modalities. The purpose of the work was to fabricate a simple dual-modality MR/CT probe for osteosarcoma visualization in vivo. Protein-directed synthesis methods offer a suitable alternative to MR/CT probe produced by synthetic chemistry. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) bound to gadolinium nanoparticles (GdNPs) was first prepared via a biomimetic synthesis method and was subsequently iodinated by chloramine-T method. The final iodinated BSA-GdNPs (I-BSA-GdNPs) showed excellent chemical stability and biocompatibility, intense X-ray attenuation coefficient, and good MR imaging ability. However, an iodinated protein nanoparticles synthesis for MR/CT imaging, as well as its useful application, has not been reported yet. Intravenous injection of I-BSA-GdNPs into orthotopic osteosarcoma-bearing rats led to its accumulation and retention by the tumor, allowing for a noninvasive tumor dual-modality imaging through the intact thigh. The long-circulating dual-model I-BSA-GdNPs probes possess potential application for image-guided drug delivery and image-guided surgery. Our study is therefore highlighting the properties of albumin in this field combined with its useful use in dual-model MR/CT osteosarcoma visualization, underlining its potential use as a drug carrier for a future therapy on cancer.

  4. Gadolinium(III)-Chelated Silica Nanospheres Integrating Chemotherapy and Photothermal Therapy for Cancer Treatment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mingjing; Wang, Pengyang; Kou, Yu; Wang, Jing; Liu, Jing; Li, Yanhui; Li, Jiayang; Wang, Liming; Chen, Chunying

    2015-11-18

    The combination of therapy and diagnosis has been emerging as a promising strategy for cancer treatment. To realize chemotherapy, photothermal therapy, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in one system, we have synthesized a new magnetic nanoparticle (Gd@SiO2-DOX/ICG-PDC) integrating doxorubicin (DOX), indocyanine green (ICG), and gadolinium(III)-chelated silica nanospheres (Gd@SiO2) with a poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDC) coating. PDC coating serves as a polymer layer to protect from quick release of drugs from the nanocarriers and increase cellular uptake. The DOX release from Gd@SiO2-DOX/ICG-PDC depends on pH and temperature. The process will be accelerated in the acidic condition than in a neutral pH 7.4. Meanwhile, upon laser irradiation, the photothermal effects promote DOX release and improve the therapeutic efficacy compared to either DOX-loaded Gd@SiO2 or ICG-loaded Gd@SiO2. Moreover, MRI results show that the Gd@SiO2-PDC nanoparticles are safe T1-type MRI contrast agents for imaging. The Gd@SiO2-PDC nanoparticles loaded with DOX and ICG can thus act as a promising theranostic platform for multimodal cancer treatment.

  5. Immobilized contrast-enhanced MRI: Gadolinium-based long-term MR contrast enhancement of the vein graft vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Yu, Peng; Tao, Ming; Nguyen, Binh T; Campagna, Christina M; Karp, Jeffrey M; Mulkern, Robert V; Ozaki, C Keith; Rybicki, Frank J

    2011-01-01

    An implantable MR contrast agent that can be covalently immobilized on tissue during surgery has been developed. The rationale is that a durable increase in tissue contrast using an implantable contrast agent can enhance postsurgical tissue differentiation using MRI. For small-vessel (e.g., vein graft) MRI, the direct benefit of such permanent "labeling" of the vessel wall by modification of its relaxation properties is to achieve more efficient imaging. This efficiency can be realized as either increased contrast leading to more accurate delineation of vessel wall and lesion tissue boundaries, or, faster imaging without penalizing contrast-to-noise ratio, or a combination thereof. We demonstrate, for the first time, stable long-term MRI enhancement using such an exogenous contrast mechanism based on immobilizing a modified diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium(3+) dihydrogen complex on a human vein using a covalent amide bond. Signal enhancement due to the covalently immobilized contrast agent is demonstrated for excised human vein specimens imaged at 3 T, and its long-term stability is demonstrated during a 4-month incubation period.

  6. Gd(DOTAlaP): Exploring the Boundaries of Fast Water Exchange in Gadolinium-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis of the single amino acid chelator DOTAlaP and four of its derivatives. The corresponding gadolinium(III) complexes were investigated for their kinetic inertness, relaxometric properties at a range of fields and temperatures, water exchange rate, and interaction with human serum albumin (HSA). Derivatives with one inner-sphere water (q = 1) were determined to have a mean water residency time between 8 and 6 ns in phoshate-buffered saline at 37 °C. The corresponding europium complexes were also formed and used to obtain information on the hydration number of the corresponding coordination complexes. Two complexes capable of binding HSA were also synthesized, of which one, Gd(5b), contains no inner-sphere water, while the other derivative, Gd(4b), is a mixture of ca. 15% q =1 and 85% q = 0. In the presence of HSA, the latter displayed a very short mean water residency time (τM310 = 2.4 ns) and enhanced relaxivity at intermediate and high fields. The kinetic inertness of Gd(4b) with respect to complex dissociation was decreased compared to its DOTAla analogue but still 100-fold more inert than [Gd(BOPTA)(H2O)]2–. Magnetic resonance imaging in mice showed that Gd(4b) was able to provide 38% better vessel to muscle contrast compared to the clinically used HSA binding agent MS-325. PMID:24922178

  7. Analysis of the refractive index and film thickness of Eu doped gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) planar waveguides fabricated by the sol-gel and dip coating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Quianna S.; Edwards, Matthew; Curley, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The present research focused on the systematic study of the fabrication of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) and gadolinium oxide:europium (Gd2O3:Eu3+) thin films via the sol-gel and dip coating methods under normal laboratory conditions in a methanol solvent medium to determine if thin films of comparable quality could be produced. The thin films were synthesized via the sol-gel method by the hydrolysis of gadolinium acetylacetate in two different solvent mediums, absolute ethanol and methanol. The europium doped gadolinium oxide sol-­-gels were prepared to have a final concentration of 0.01 M europium nitrate. Ordinary microscope glass slides (borosilicate glass or BSG) were used as the substrate. The substrates were cleaned and coated using the dip coating apparatus to prepare thin films that consisted of 5, 10, 30 and 50 layers. The cast films were annealed at 300°C and 500°C by direct insertion in a furnace operated under atmospheric conditions. The resulting film thickness and effective refractive indices were determined and compared. Finally, we present the introductory results of gadolinium oxide thin films as a waveguide.

  8. Progressive increase of T1 signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images in the pediatric brain exposed to multiple doses of gadolinium contrast.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Donna R; Holden, Kenton R

    2016-03-01

    Recently, there have been reports of gadolinium accumulation in the brain and bone of adult patients with normal renal function who have undergone multiple gadolinium contrast administrations. This case report gives the first description of a pediatric patient who, following multiple contrasted MRI exams, demonstrated abnormal signal on unenhanced T1-weighted imaging involving the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus, a finding which has previously been shown to represent gadolinium deposition in adults. The patient presented here had no history of intracranial pathology which would alter the blood brain barrier or abnormal renal function. The clinical significance of gadolinium accumulation in the human body is currently unknown but is of concern, particularly in pediatric patients who have a lifetime to manifest any potential adverse consequences. Therefore, research is needed to address the clinical significance, if any, of gadolinium deposition in the developing pediatric brain. Given these current uncertainties, clinicians should continue to use prudence in selecting pediatric patients to undergo contrasted MRI and in selecting the appropriate contrast agents to use.

  9. Extended electron energy loss fine structure simulation of the local boron environment in sodium aluminoborosilicate glasses containing gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Morris; Li, Hong; Li, Liyu ); Strachan, Denis M. )

    2003-12-01

    Phase separation in sodium-aluminoborosilicate glasses was systematically studied as a function of Gd2O3 concentration with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) methods. Gadolinium-induced phase separation in the three systems can be consistently explained by proposing that Gd cations partition to the borate-rich environments and subsequent agglomeration of the Gd-borate moieties, or short-range ordered structural groups, in the glass. Agglomeration of the Gd-borate rich environments is further discussed within the context of excess metal oxides,[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex=|Na2O - Al2O3|, and excess B2O3,[B2O3]ex, available for incorporating Gd cations. Results showed that agglomeration of the Gd-borate rich environments occurred at a much lower Gd2O3 concentration in the glass without[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex and at a significantly higher Gd2O3 concentration in the glass with either[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex. Assuming 1BO4 : 1Gd : 2BO3 (based on literature-reported Gd-metaborate structure) as a local Gd-borate environment in glass, we introduced the saturation index of boron, SI[B]= Gd2O3/(1/3[B2O3]ex), to examine the glass susceptibility to Gd-induced phase separation for all three alkali-aluminoborosilicate systems. While our results have provided some insight to the glass structure, they also provide insight to the mechanism by which the metal oxide is dissolved into the melt. This appears to occur predominantly through boron complexation of the metal oxide.

  10. Preparation and characterization of gadolinium-loaded PLGA particles surface modified with RGDS for the detection of thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Dajing; Ao, Meng; Zheng, Yuanyi; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic disease is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The development of magnetic resonance molecular imaging provides potential promise for early disease diagnosis. In this study, we explore the preparation and characterization of gadolinium (Gd)-loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles surface modified with the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) peptide for the detection of thrombus. PLGA was employed as the carrier-delivery system, and a double emulsion solvent-evaporation method (water in oil in water) was used to prepare PLGA particles encapsulating the magnetic resonance contrast agent Gd diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). To synthesize the Gd-PLGA/chitosan (CS)-RGDS particles, carbodiimide-mediated amide bond formation was used to graft the RGDS peptide to CS to form a CS-RGDS film that coated the surface of the PLGA particles. Blank PLGA, Gd-PLGA, and Gd-PLGA/CS particles were fabricated using the same water in oil in water method. Our results indicated that the RGDS peptide successfully coated the surface of the Gd-PLGA/CS-RGDS particles. The particles had a regular shape, smooth surface, relatively uniform size, and did not aggregate. The high electron density of the Gd-loaded particles and a translucent film around the particles coated with the CS and CS-RGDS films could be observed by transmission electron microscopy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the Gd-PLGA/CS-RGDS particles could target thrombi and could be imaged using a clinical magnetic resonance scanner. Compared with the Gd-DTPA solution, the longitudinal relaxation time of the Gd-loaded particles was slightly longer, and as the Gd-load concentration increased, the longitudinal relaxation time values decreased. These results suggest the potential of the Gd-PLGA/CS-RGDS particles for the sensitive and specific detection of thrombus at the molecular level. PMID:24124363

  11. Gadolinium-functionalized nanographene oxide for combined drug and microRNA delivery and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Lin, Chih-Wen; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chia-Wen; Liao, Shih-Sheng; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Lu, Yu-Jen; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Ma, Chen-Chi M

    2014-08-01

    The delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics to tumors at clinically effective concentrations, while avoiding nonspecific toxicity, remains a major challenge for cancer treatment. Here we present nanoparticles of poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-grafted gadolinium-functionalized nanographene oxide (Gd-NGO) as effective carriers to deliver both chemotherapeutic drugs and highly specific gene-targeting agents such as microRNAs (miRNAs) to cancer cells. The positively charged surface of Gd-NGO was capable of simultaneous adsorption of the anti-cancer drug epirubicin (EPI) and interaction with negatively charged Let-7g miRNA. Using human glioblastoma (U87) cells as a model, we found that this conjugate of Let-7g and EPI (Gd-NGO/Let-7g/EPI) not only exhibited considerably higher transfection efficiency, but also induced better inhibition of cancer cell growth than Gd-NGO/Let-7g or Gd-NGO/EPI. The concentration of Gd-NGO/Let-7g/EPI required for 50% inhibition of cellular growth (IC50) was significantly reduced (to the equivalent of 1.3 μg/mL EPI) compared to Gd-NGO/EPI (3.4 μg/mL EPI). In addition, Gd-NGO/Let-7g/EPI could be used as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging to identify the location and extent of blood-brain barrier opening and quantitate drug delivery to tumor tissues. These results suggest that Gd-NGO/Let-7g/EPI may be a promising non-viral vector for chemogene therapy and molecular imaging diagnosis in future clinical applications.

  12. Determination of trace rare earth elements in gadolinium aluminate by inductively coupled plasma time of flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhijit; Deb, S. B.; Nagar, B. K.; Saxena, M. K.

    An analytical methodology was developed for the precise quantification of ten trace rare earth elements (REEs), namely, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Tm, in gadolinium aluminate (GdAlO3) employing an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN)-desolvating device based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A microwave digestion procedure was optimized for digesting 100 mg of the refractory oxide using a mixture of sulphuric acid (H2SO4), phosphoric acid (H3PO4) and water (H2O) with 1400 W power, 10 min ramp and 60 min hold time. An USN-desolvating sample introduction system was employed to enhance analyte sensitivities by minimizing their oxide ion formation in the plasma. Studies on the effect of various matrix concentrations on the analyte intensities revealed that precise quantification of the analytes was possible with matrix level of 250 mg L- 1. The possibility of using indium as an internal standard was explored and applied to correct for matrix effect and variation in analyte sensitivity under plasma operating conditions. Individual oxide ion formation yields were determined in matrix matched solution and employed for correcting polyatomic interferences of light REE (LREE) oxide ions on the intensities of middle and heavy rare earth elements (MREEs and HREEs). Recoveries of ≥ 90% were achieved for the analytes employing standard addition technique. Three real samples were analyzed for traces of REEs by the proposed method and cross validated for Eu and Nd by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). The results show no significant difference in the values at 95% confidence level. The expanded uncertainty (coverage factor 1σ) in the determination of trace REEs in the samples were found to be between 3 and 8%. The instrument detection limits (IDLs) and the method detection limits (MDLs) for the ten REEs lie in the ranges 1-5 ng L- 1 and 7-64 μg kg- 1 respectively.

  13. Registration of dynamic multiview 2D ultrasound and late gadolinium enhanced images of the heart: Application to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterization.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Julián; Simon, Antoine; Halbert, Edgar; Tavard, François; Carré, François; Hernández, Alfredo; Donal, Erwan; Schnell, Frédéric; Garreau, Mireille

    2016-02-01

    Describing and analyzing heart multiphysics requires the acquisition and fusion of multisensor cardiac images. Multisensor image fusion enables a combined analysis of these heterogeneous modalities. We propose to register intra-patient multiview 2D+t ultrasound (US) images with multiview late gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images acquired during cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in order to fuse mechanical and tissue state information. The proposed procedure registers both US and LGE to cine MRI. The correction of slice misalignment and the rigid registration of multiview LGE and cine MRI are studied, to select the most appropriate similarity measure. It showed that mutual information performs the best for LGE slice misalignment correction and for LGE and cine registration. Concerning US registration, dynamic endocardial contours resulting from speckle tracking echocardiography were exploited in a geometry-based dynamic registration. We propose the use of an adapted dynamic time warping procedure to synchronize cardiac dynamics in multiview US and cine MRI. The registration of US and LGE MRI was evaluated on a dataset of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A visual assessment of 330 left ventricular regions from US images of 28 patients resulted in 92.7% of regions successfully aligned with cardiac structures in LGE. Successfully-aligned regions were then used to evaluate the abilities of strain indicators to predict the presence of fibrosis. Longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay of aligned left ventricular regions were computed from corresponding regional strain curves from US. The Mann-Withney test proved that the expected values of these indicators change between the populations of regions with and without fibrosis (p < 0.01). ROC curves otherwise proved that the presence of fibrosis is one factor amongst others which modifies longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay.

  14. Review of Source Images is Necessary for the Evaluation of Gadolinium-Enhanced MR Angiography for Renal Artery Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrschuetz, M. Aschauer, M.; Portugaller, H.; Stix, A.; Wehrschuetz-Sigl, E.; Hausegger, K.; Ebner, F.

    2004-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess interobserver variability and accuracy in the evaluation of renal artery stenosis (RAS) with gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with hypertension. The authors found that source images are more accurate than maximum intensity projection (MIP) for depicting renal artery stenosis. Two independent radiologists reviewed MRA and DSA from 38 patients with hypertension. Studies were postprocessed to display images in MIP and source images. DSA was the standard for comparison in each patient. For each main renal artery, percentage stenosis was estimated for any stenosis detected by the two radiologists. To calculate sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, MRA studies and stenoses were categorized as normal, mild (1-39%), moderate (40-69%) or severe ({>=}70%), or occluded. DSA stenosis estimates of 70% or greater were considered hemodynamically significant. Analysis of variance demonstrated that MIP estimates of stenosis were greater than source image estimates for both readers. Differences in estimates for MIP versus DSA reached significance in one reader. The interobserver variance for MIP, source images and DSA was excellent (0.80< {kappa}{<=} 0.90). The specificity of source images was high (97%) but less for MIP (87%); average accuracy was 92% for MIP and 98% for source images. In this study, source images are significantly more accurate than MIP images in one reader with a similar trend was observed in the second reader. The interobserver variability was excellent. When renal artery stenosis is a consideration, high accuracy can only be obtained when source images are examined.

  15. Effect of hepatocyte-specific gadolinium-based contrast agents on hepatic fat-fraction and R2(⁎).

    PubMed

    Hernando, Diego; Wells, Shane A; Vigen, Karl K; Reeder, Scott B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of a hepatocyte-specific gadolinium based contrast agent (GBCA) on quantitative hepatic fat-fraction (FF) and R2* measurements. Fifty patients were imaged at 1.5T, using chemical-shift encoded water-fat MRI with low (5°) and high (15°) flip angles (FA), both before and after administration of a hepatocyte-specific GBCA (gadoxetic acid). Low and high FA, pre- and post-contrast FF and R2* values were measured for each subject. Available serum laboratory studies related to liver disease were also recorded. Linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis were performed to compare measurements. Hepatic FF was unaffected by GBCA at low FA (slope=1.02±0.02, p=0.32). FF was overestimated at high FA pre-contrast (slope=1.33±0.03, p<10(-10)), but underestimated post-contrast (slope=0.81±0.02, p<10(-10)). Hepatic R2* was unaffected by FA (mean difference±95% CI pre-contrast:2.2±4.9s(-1), post-contrast:2.8±3.6s(-1)), but increased post-contrast in patients with total bilirubin <2.5mg/dL (ΔR2*=13.4±12.7s(-1)). Regression analysis of serum values demonstrated a correlation of post-contrast change in R2* with total bilirubin (p<0.01) and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score (p≈0.01). In conclusion, GBCA has no effect on hepatic FF at low FA due to a lack of T1-weighting, potentially allowing flexibility for FF imaging with hepatobiliary imaging protocols. Hepatic R2* increased significantly after GBCA administration, particularly in the biliary tree. Therefore, R2* maps should be obtained prior to contrast administration.

  16. Eu{sup 3+} luminescence enhancement by intercalation of benzenepolycarboxylic guests into Eu{sup 3+}-doped layered gadolinium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Qingyang; Pan, Guohua; Ma, Teng; Huang, Gailing; Sun, Genban; Ma, Shulan; Yang, Xiaojing

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: Two benzenepolycarboxylic sensitizers, 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (BTA) and 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid (BA), were intercalated into NO{sub 3}–LGdH:Eu, in which different structures of the compounds resulted in varied arrangement in the gallery. The two organic compounds especially BA markedly enhanced the red luminescence of Eu{sup 3+} due to efficient energy transfer between the organic guests and Eu{sup 3+} centers. - Highlights: • We report the intercalation of benzenepolycarboxylic organic sensitizers into LRH. • We study the intercalation structure and the arrangement of the interlayer guests. • The two organic compounds can markedly enhance the luminescence of Eu{sup 3+}. • There exists efficient energy transfer between organic guests and Eu{sup 3+} centers. • This material opens a route for fabricating new multifunctional luminescent materials. - Abstract: Two benzenepolycarboxylic organic sensitizers, 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (BTA) and 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid (BA), were intercalated into the gallery of NO{sub 3}{sup −} type Eu{sup 3+}-doped layered gadolinium hydroxide (NO{sub 3}–LGdH:Eu). CHN analysis, FTIR, and SEM were employed to characterize the intercalation structures of the as-prepared organic/inorganic hybrids. The area per unit charge (S{sub charge}) was used to explain the intercalation structure and the arrangement of the interlayer guests. Different structures of the two organic compounds resulted in varied arrangement of guests. Photoluminescence studies indicated that both of the two organic compounds especially BA markedly enhanced the red luminescence of Eu{sup 3+} due to efficient energy transfer between the organic guests and Eu{sup 3+} centers.

  17. The study of in vivo x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique for gadolinium (Gd) measurements in human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; Nie, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    An in vivo K x-ray fluorescence system, based on 109Cd source, for the detection of gadolinium has been investigated. Gd is of interest because of the extensive use of Gd-based contrast agents in MR imaging. A human simulating bone phantom set has been developed. The phantoms were doped with seven concentrations of Gd. Additional elements important for in vivo x-ray fluorescence, Na, Cl and Ca, were also included to create an overall elemental composition consistent with the Reference Man. A new 5 GBq 109Cd source was purchased to improve the source activity in comparison to the previous study (0.17 GBq). The previously published minimum detection limit (MDL) for Gd phantom measurements using KXRF system was 3.3 ppm. In this study the minimum detection limit for bare bone phantoms was found to reduce the MDL to 0.8, a factor of 4.1. The previous published data used only three layers of plastic as soft tissue equivalent materials and found the MDL of 4-4.8 ppm. In this study we have used the plastic with more realistic thicknesses to simulate a soft tissue at tibia. The detection limits for phantoms with Lucite as a tissue equivalent, using a new source, was determined to be 1.81 to 3.47 ppm (μg Gd per gram phantom). Our next study would be testing an in vivo K x-ray fluorescence system, based on 109Cd source on human volunteers who went through MR imaging and were injected by Gd.

  18. Free breathing three-dimensional late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance using outer volume suppressed projection navigators

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rajiv G.; Miller, G.W.; Jeudy, Jean; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Shin, Taehoon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop a free-breathing, 3D late gadolinium enhancement (3D FB-LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) technique and to compare it with clinically used 2D breath-hold LGE (2D BH-LGE). Methods The proposed 3D FB-LGE method consisted of inversion preparation, inversion delay, fat saturation, outer volume suppression, 1D-projection navigators, and a segmented stack of spirals acquisition. The 3D FB-LGE and 2D BH-LGE scans were performed on 29 cardiac patients. Qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis (in patients with scar) were performed. Results No significant differences were noted between the 3D FB-LGE and 2D BH-LGE datasets in terms of overall image quality score (2D: 4.69 ± 0.60 versus 3D: 4.55 ± 0.51, P = 0.46) and image artifact score (2D: 1.10 ± 0.31 versus 3D: 1.17 ± 0.38; P = 0.63). The average difference in fractional scar volume between the 3D and 2D methods was 1.9 % (n = 5). Acquisition time was significantly shorter for the 3D FB-LGE over 2D BH-LGE by a factor of 2.83 ± 0.77 (P < 0.0001). Conclusions The 3D FB-LGE is a viable option for patients, particularly in acute settings or in patients who are unable to comply with breath-hold instructions. PMID:27122450

  19. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of acute gouty arthritis on top of chronic gouty involvement in different joints.

    PubMed

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El-Naggar, Ahmed; El-Shaarawy, Nashwa; Abd-Allah, Mayada A; Gamal, Rania M; Fathy, Ahmed; Hawass, Mona; Rasker, Johannes J

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the current study are to describe gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of an acute flare of established gouty arthritis in different joints and to examine a possible association between serum uric acid and MRI signs indicative of ongoing inflammation and/or structural joint damage as well as association with disease characteristics and laboratory findings. Twenty-seven male patients with established chronic gout agreed to participate, mean age 47.6 years, and mean disease duration in months 43.2 (±31.8). For all patients, detailed demographic, disease characteristics, and laboratory findings were obtained and correlated with MRI findings. In 27 patients with established gout, a total of 50 MRI studies were performed of the following joints: feet joints (n = 23), ankles (n = 18), knees (n = 5), and hand and wrist joints (n = 4). MRI revealed capsular thickening in 19 patients, bone marrow edema (BME) in 15, soft tissue edema (STE) in 20, joint effusion in 21, bone erosions in 17, cartilaginous erosions in 4, and tenosynovitis in 9 cases. In 17 cases, tophaceous lesions were found. Post contrast MRI showed synovial thickening in seven cases. Positive correlations were observed between serum uric acid levels and the following MRI findings: capsular thickening (r = 0.552, p = 0.003), BME (r = 0.668, p ≤ 0.0001), STE (r = 0.559, p = 0.002), and tenosynovitis (r = 0.513, p = 0.006). Using MRI in chronic gout, important features can be detected like BME, minute cartilaginous erosions, and hypertrophic synovial inflammation in post contrast MR images. Serum uric acid (SUA) was positively correlated with capsular thickening, BME, STE, and tenosynovitis.

  20. Evaluation of state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms for left ventricle infarct from late Gadolinium enhancement MR images.

    PubMed

    Karim, Rashed; Bhagirath, Pranav; Claus, Piet; Housden, R James; Chen, Zhong; Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Sohn, Hyon-Mok; Lara Rodríguez, Laura; Vera, Sergio; Albà, Xènia; Hennemuth, Anja; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto; Arbel, Tal; Gonzàlez Ballester, Miguel A; Frangi, Alejandro F; Götte, Marco; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias; Rhode, Kawal

    2016-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated the feasibility of late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging for guiding the management of patients with sequelae to myocardial infarction, such as ventricular tachycardia and heart failure. Clinical implementation of these developments necessitates a reproducible and reliable segmentation of the infarcted regions. It is challenging to compare new algorithms for infarct segmentation in the left ventricle (LV) with existing algorithms. Benchmarking datasets with evaluation strategies are much needed to facilitate comparison. This manuscript presents a benchmarking evaluation framework for future algorithms that segment infarct from LGE CMR of the LV. The image database consists of 30 LGE CMR images of both humans and pigs that were acquired from two separate imaging centres. A consensus ground truth was obtained for all data using maximum likelihood estimation. Six widely-used fixed-thresholding methods and five recently developed algorithms are tested on the benchmarking framework. Results demonstrate that the algorithms have better overlap with the consensus ground truth than most of the n-SD fixed-thresholding methods, with the exception of the Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) fixed-thresholding method. Some of the pitfalls of fixed thresholding methods are demonstrated in this work. The benchmarking evaluation framework, which is a contribution of this work, can be used to test and benchmark future algorithms that detect and quantify infarct in LGE CMR images of the LV. The datasets, ground truth and evaluation code have been made publicly available through the website: https://www.cardiacatlas.org/web/guest/challenges.

  1. Fabrication and in vitro characterization of gadolinium-based nanoclusters for simultaneous drug delivery and radiation enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Shannon S.; Guo, Linghong; Sun, Xuejun; Shaw, Andrew R.; Yuan, Zhipeng; Löbenberg, Raimar; Roa, Wilson H.

    2016-09-01

    We report the synthesis of a gadolinium hydroxide (Gd(OH)3) nanorod based doxorubicin (Dox) delivery system that can enhance both magnetic resonance imaging contrast and radiation sensitivity. A simple and cost effective wet-chemical method was utilized in the presence of manganese (Mn) ions and Dox to produce the Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster structure. The Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster was composed of Mn-doped Gd(OH)3 nanorods arranged in parallel with Dox as a linker molecule between the adjacent nanorods. No other studies have utilized Dox as both the linker and therapeutic molecule in a nanostructure to date. The Gd(OH)3 nanorod is reported to have no significant cellular or in vivo toxicity, which makes it an ideal base material for this biomedical application. The Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster exhibited paramagnetic behavior and was stable in a colloidal solution. The nanocluster also enabled high Dox loading capacity and specifically released Dox in a sustained and pH-dependent manner. The positively charged Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanoclusters were readily internalized into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via endocytosis, which resulted in intracellular release of Dox. The released Dox in cells was effective in conferring cytotoxicity and inhibiting proliferation of cancer cells. Furthermore, a synergistic anticancer effect could be observed with radiation treatment. Overall, the Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster drug delivery system described herein may have potential utility in clinics as a multifunctional theranostic nanoparticle with combined benefits in both diagnosis and therapy in the management of cancer.

  2. 3D Late Gadolinium Enhancement in a Single Prolonged Breath-hold using Supplemental Oxygenation and Hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Roujol, Sébastien; Basha, Tamer A.; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Foppa, Murilo; Chan, Raymond H.; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Manning, Warren J.; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of 3D single breath-hold late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the left ventricle (LV) using supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation and compressed-sensing acceleration. Methods: Breath-hold metrics (breath-hold duration, diaphragmatic/LV position drift, and maximum variation of RR interval) without and with supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation were assessed in healthy adult subjects using a real time single shot acquisition. Ten healthy subjects and 13 patients then underwent assessment of the proposed 3D breath-hold LGE acquisition (FOV=320×320×100 mm3, resolution=1.6×1.6×5.0 mm3, acceleration rate of 4) and a free breathing acquisition with right hemidiaphragm navigator (NAV) respiratory gating. Semi-quantitative grading of overall image quality, motion artifact, myocardial nulling, and diagnostic value was performed by consensus of two blinded observers. Results: Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation increased the breath-hold duration (35±11 s to 58±21 s, p<0.0125) without significant impact on diaphragmatic/LV position drift or maximum variation of RR interval (both p>0.01). LGE images were of similar quality when compared to free breathing acquisitions but with reduced total scan time (85±22 s to 35±6 s, p<0.001). Conclusions: Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation allow for prolonged breath-holding and enable single breath-hold 3D accelerated LGE with similar image quality as free breathing with NAV. PMID:24186772

  3. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Judith M. Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.

  4. Three-dimensional speckle tracking longitudinal strain is related to myocardial fibrosis determined by late-gadolinium enhancement.

    PubMed

    Spartera, Marco; Damascelli, Anna; Mozes, Ferenc; De Cobelli, Francesco; La Canna, Giovanni

    2017-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is a reliable clinical tool for accurate measurements of left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (EF). In this prospective study, we sought to identify an association between 3DSTE longitudinal strain abnormalities and areas of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). In 50 patients (52 ± 18.5 years old) referred to our hospital for clinically indicated CMR, 3D full-volume trans-thoracic acquisitions on apical views were performed within 1 h of CMR, in order to obtain LV volumes and ejection fraction as well as global and segmental peak systolic longitudinal strain. Relative amount of fibrosis was defined based on LGE CMR with grey-scale threshold of 5 standard deviations above the mean signal intensity of the normal remote myocardium. We found a moderate positive correlation between global longitudinal strain (GLS) by 3DSTE and LGE proportion (r = 0.465, p = 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.79. In addition, abnormal GLS could detect LGE-determined myocardial fibrosis with a sensitivity of 84.6%, a specificity of 84.8%, a positive predictive value of 69% and negative predictive value of 93%, considering an optimal GLS cut-off value of - 15.25%. Regarding 3DSTE capacity of localizing segmental LGE involvement, about 70% of LGE-positive segments presented a concomitant longitudinal strain reduction. This prospective study shows that 3DSTE longitudinal deformation is moderately associated with the extent of myocardial fibrosis, with a promising potential role in ruling out prognostically relevant fibrosis as detected by LGE.

  5. Remnants of spherical shell structures in deformed nuclei: The impact of an N=64 neutron subshell closure on the structure of N~90 gadolinium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, T.J.; Hughes, R.O.; Beausang, C.W.; Allmond, James M; Angell, C.T.; Basunia, M.S.; Bleuel, D.L.; Burke, J.T.; Casperson, R.J.; Escher, J.E.; Fallon, P.; Hatarik, R.; Munson, J.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L.; Ressler, J.J.; Scielzo, N.D.

    2013-01-01

    Odd-mass gadolinium isotopes around N = 90 were populated by the (p,d ) reaction, utilizing 25-MeV protons, resulting in population of low-spin quasineutron states at energies near and below the Fermi surface. Systematics of the single quasineutron levels populated are presented. A large excitation energy gap is observed between levels originating from the 2d3/2 , 1h11/2 , and 3s1/2 spherical parents (above the N = 64 gap), and the 2d5/2 (below the gap), indicating that the spherical shell model level spacing is maintained at least to moderate deformations.

  6. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J. )

    1990-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography.

  7. [Comparing the activity of multiple sclerosis (MS) at the minute and at 20 minutes of gadolinium application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain?

    PubMed

    Saldívar-Uribe, Christina; de la Portilla-Villanueva, Mario Alberto; Esau-Mendoza-García, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to compare active disease in patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, brain by MRI after gadolinium application at one minute and 20 minutes. A longitudinal, prospective, observational, analytical and comparative study was conducted in 18 patients over 18 years of age diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). An analysis was made for each patient, watching for inflammatory activity in MS lesions, comparing the results to one minute and 20 minutes after the application of gadolinium. For the descriptive analysis, absolute frequencies and percentages were used, as well as means and standard deviations or medians with ranges for the inferential analysis comparing the presence or absence of enhancement in lesions at one minute and 20 minutes; the exact probability test used was Fisher. Finally, the results were analyzed, looking at the gender distribution: 14 (77.8%) were female. The average age was 36.2 ± 9.5 years, with a minimum age of 18 years and a maximum of 55 years; four patients (22.2%) presented further highlight active lesions at 20 minutes, and two patients (11.1%) presented enhancement at one minute. Concluding that MRI in the diagnosis of MS is very important for the detection of activity in lesions caused by the disease, it is evident that the optimum time for evaluation of postcontrast sequences is 20 minutes.

  8. Terbium-doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in liquid for use as a fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging dual-modal contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Chen, Min; Yang, Chuan; Liu, Jun; Luo, Ningqi; Yang, Guowei; Chen, Dihu; Li, Li

    2015-01-14

    Dual-modal lanthanide-doped gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs), which exhibit an excellent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spatial resolution and high fluorescence imaging (FI) sensitivity, have attracted tremendous attention in biotechnology and nanomedicine applications. In this paper, terbium (Tb) ion doped gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3:Tb) NPs with varied Tb concentrations were synthesized by a laser ablation in liquid (LAL) method. The characterization of the structure, morphology, and composition shows that these NPs are spherical with excellent crystallinity. The effects of Tb ion concentration on the visible green fluorescence and longitudinal relaxivity were investigated, indicating that the fluorescence properties were significantly influenced by the Tb ion concentration, but all samples were still efficient T1-weighted contrast agents. Furthermore, the optimum Tb doping concentration was determined to be 1%. The cell viability, cellular fluorescence imaging and in vivo MRI of this dual-modal nano-probe were studied, with the results revealing that the Gd2O3:Tb NPs did not have a significant cytotoxic effect, making them good candidates for use as a dual-modal contrast agent for MRI and fluorescence imaging.

  9. Stimuli-responsive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-co-tyrosine@gadolinium: Iron oxide nanoparticle-based nanotheranostic for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ekta; Patra, Santanu; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we have prepared a stimuli-responsive polymer modified gadolinium doped iron oxide nanoparticle (poly@Gd-MNPs) as cancer theranostic agent. The responsive polymer is composed of the poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-co-tyrosine unit, which shows excellent loading for the anti-cancer drug (methotrexate) and stimuli dependent release (change in pH and temperature). The in vitro experiment revealed that the poly@Gd-MNPs exhibited T1-weighted MRI capability (r1=11.314mM(-1)s(-1)) with good in-vitro hyperthermia response. The prepared poly@Gd-MNPs has generated quick heating (45°C in 2min) upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field and able to travel a distance of 35cm in 1min in the presence of an external magnet. The poly@Gd-MNPs shows 86% of drug loading capacity with 70% drug release in first 2h. The cytotoxic assay (MTT) demonstrated that the nanoparticle did not affect the viability of normal human fibroblast and efficiently kill the MCF7 cancer cells in the presence of an external magnetic field. To explore the uptake of poly@Gd-MNPs in the cells, bright field cell imaging study was also performed. This study provides a valuable approach for the design of highly sensitive polymer modified gadolinium doped iron oxide-based T1 contrast agents for cancer theranostics.

  10. Gadolinium- and manganite-based contrast agents with fluorescent probes for both magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging of pancreatic islets: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Berkova, Zuzana; Jirak, Daniel; Zacharovova, Klara; Lukes, Ivan; Kotkova, Zuzana; Kotek, Jan; Kacenka, Michal; Kaman, Ondrej; Rehor, Ivan; Hajek, Milan; Saudek, Frantisek

    2013-04-01

    Three magnetic resonance (MR)/fluorescence imaging probes were tested for visualization, cellular distribution, and survival of labeled pancreatic islets in vitro and following transplantation. As T(1) contrast agents (CAs), gadolinium(III) complexes linked to β-cyclodextrin (Gd-F-βCD) or bound to titanium dioxide (TiO2 @RhdGd) were tested. As a T(2) CA, perovskite manganite nanoparticles (LSMO@siF@si) were examined. Fluorescein or rhodamine was incorporated as a fluorescent marker in all probes. Islets labeled with gadolinium(III) CAs were visible as hyperintense spots on MR in vitro, but detection in vivo was inconclusive. Islets labeled with LSMO@siF@si CA were clearly visible as hypointense spots or areas on MR scans in vitro as well as in vivo. All CAs were detected inside the islet cells by fluorescence. Although the vitality and function of the labeled islets was not impaired by any of the tested CAs, results indicate that LSMO@siF@si CA is a superior marker for islet labeling, as it provides better contrast enhancement within a shorter scan time.

  11. [Optic nerve swelling and gadolinium contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging in the subacute stage of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Furuki, Misako; Ohkubo, Takuya; Ota, Kiyobumi; Ishikawa, Kinya; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old man with subacute onset of bilateral visual field loss and visual acuity loss. His visual acuity was 0.07 OD/0.09 OS and Goldmann perimetry showed central scotomas. The optic fundi were normal bilaterally. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintensity in the right optic nerve on T(2) weighted imaging and swelling of the optic chiasm with slight enhancement of the bilateral optic nerves and the optic chiasm on gadolinium-enhanced imaging. Since sensory disturbance in the left hand and leg was noted in addition to the visual problem, multiple sclerosis (MS) was suspected initially. The patient was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone (1,000 mg/day), plasma exchange therapy, and immunosuppressant therapy. However, his visual disturbance did not improve. He had a history of deafness and family history of visual disturbance, because of which we performed an analysis of mitochondrial DNA. G11778A point mutation was found, and a diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was made. Although gadolinium contrast enhancement and swelling of the optic nerve are rare, this case shows that these findings are not in conflict with LHON. The present case also suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction may trigger the onset of MS-like extraocular symptoms in patients with LHON.

  12. Eu(3+) doped α-sodium gadolinium fluoride luminomagnetic nanophosphor as a bimodal nanoprobe for high-contrast in vitro bioimaging and external magnetic field tracking applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satbir; Kumar, Pawan; Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    Herein, we introduce a novel strategy for the synthesis of Eu(3+) doped α-sodium gadolinium fluoride (α-NaGd0.88F4:Eu0.12(3+)) based luminomagnetic nanophosphors using hydrothermal route. The synthesized nanophosphor has exceptional luminescent and paramagnetic properties in a single host lattice, which is highly desirable for biomedical applications. This highly luminescent nanophosphor with an average particle size ∼ 5±3 nm enables high-contrast fluorescent imaging with decreased light scattering. In vitro cellular uptake is shown by fluorescent microscopy that envisages the characteristic hypersensitive red emission of Eu(3+) doped α-sodium gadolinium fluoride centered at 608 nm ((5)D0-(7)F2) upon 465 nm excitation wavelength. No apparent cytotoxicity is observed. Furthermore, time- resolved emission spectroscopy and SQUID magnetic measurements successfully demonstrate a photoluminescence decay time in microseconds and enhanced paramagnetic behavior respectively, which promises the applications of nanophosphors in biomedical studies. Hence, the obtained results strongly suggest that this nanophosphor could be potentially used as a bimodal nanoprobe for high-contrast in vitro bio-imaging of HeLa cells and external magnetic field tracking applications of luminomagnetic nanophosphors using permanent magnet.

  13. T1-T2 Dual-modal MRI contrast agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with surface attached gadolinium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szpak, Agnieszka; Fiejdasz, Sylwia; Prendota, Witold; Strączek, Tomasz; Kapusta, Czesław; Szmyd, Janusz; Nowakowska, Maria; Zapotoczny, Szczepan

    2014-11-01

    Dual-mode MRI contrast agents consisting of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) cores and gadolinium ions associated with the ionic chitosan protecting layer were synthesized and studied. Gadolinium ions were introduced into the coating layer via direct complex formation on the nanoparticles surface, covalent attachment or electrostatically driven deposition of the preformed Gd complex. The modified SPIONs having hydrodynamic diameters ca. 100 nm form stable, well-defined dispersions in water and have excellent magnetic properties. Physiochemical properties of those new materials were characterized using e.g., FTIR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray fluorescence, TEM, and vibrating sample magnetometry. They behave as superparamagnetics and shorten both T1 and T2 proton relaxation times, thus influencing both r1 and r2 relaxivity values that reach 53.7 and 375.5 mM-1 s-1, respectively, at 15 MHz. The obtained materials can be considered as highly effective contrast agents for low-field MRI, particularly useful at permanent magnet-based scanners.

  14. Extended electron energy loss fine structure simulation of the local boron environment in sodium aluminoborosilicate glasses containing gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Morris; Li, Hong; Li, Liyu ); Strachan, Denis M. )

    2003-10-15

    Gadolinium can be dissolved in sodium-alumino-borosilicate glasses up to 47 wt% in a baseline borosilicate glass (mol%) 20 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 60 SiO2,and 20 Na2O. Understanding of Gd dissolution in borosilicate melts is important in glass formulation optimization. Electron energy loss fine structure (ELFS) spectroscopy is chosen, which provides well resolved local atomic structure information for both amorphous and crystalline materials with high sensitivity to low Z elements such as Al, B, Na, O, and Si where the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique faces experimental difficulty. In this study, we report our results of boron K-edge ELFS study. Two borosilicate glass samples with 30 and 47 mass% Gd2O3, B20Gd30 and B20Gd47were chosen for B K-edge ELFS study. EEL spectra were acquired on a Philips 430 TEM equipped with Gatan PEELS system 666 and EL/P 2.1 software with Custom function AcqLong. The ELFS data analysis was performed using UWELFS, UWXAFS and FEFF software. From our Gd solubility study, the local structure of Gd in the borate environment possibly resembles double chain structure found in crystalline Gd(BO2)3 as proposed by Chakraborty et al. The B/Gd ratio's in both glasses are smaller then 3, which means the excess Gd atoms in the Si-sites would be 17 and 60 mol% of the total Gd atoms, respectively according to the model, yet the local environment of borate sites saturated with Gd should be remained. To verity above hypothesis, the double chain structure model was applied to fit boron K-edge. The model was shown to well fit experimental boron K-edge EELS spectra for both glasses with some degree of distance distortion which is understandable in amorphous structure. Therefore, it is very likely that Gd stabilized in borate sites has a local structure resembling the double chain Gd(BO2)3 structure as proposed by our solubility study and literature.

  15. Preliminary Microstructural Characterization of Gadolinium-Enriched Stainless Steels for Spent Nuclear Fuel Baskets (title change from A)

    SciTech Connect

    DUPONT,J.N.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; STEPHENS JR.,JOHN J.; MCCONNELL,PAUL E.; MIZIA,R.; BRANAGAN,D.

    2000-07-24

    Gadolinium (Gd) is a very potent neutron absorber that can potentially provide the nuclear criticality safety required for interim storage, transport, and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Gd could be incorporated into an alloy that can be fabricated into baskets to provide structural support, corrosion resistance, and nuclear criticality control. In particular, Gd alloyed with stainless steel has been identified as a material that may fulfill these functional requirements. However, no information is available in the open literature that describes the influence of Gd on the microstructure and resultant mechanical properties of stainless steels alloyed with Gd. Such information is vital for determination of the suitability of these types of alloys for the intended application. Characterization of Gd-stainless steel (Gd-SS) alloys is also necessary for an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) material specification, subsequent code approval by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), and regulatory approval by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for subsequent use by the nuclear industry. The Department of Energy National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has commissioned Lehigh University and Sandia National Laboratories to characterize the properties of a series of Gd-SS alloys to assess their suitability for the spent fuel basket application. Preliminary microstructural characterization results are presented on Gd stainless steels. Small gas tungsten arc buttons were prepared by melting 316L stainless steel with 0.1 to 10 wt.% Gd. These samples were characterized by light optical and electron optical microscopy to determine the distribution of alloying elements and volume fraction of Gd-rich phase. The results acquired to date indicate that no Gd is dissolved in the austenite matrix. Instead, the Gd was present as an interdendritic constituent, and the amount of the Gd-rich constituent

  16. Effects of gadolinium chloride on basal flow and compression-induced rapid hyperemia in the rabbit masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Turturici, M; Roatta, S

    2014-06-01

    Aim of the present study is to investigate the role of mechano-sensitive channels on basal muscle blood flow and on the compression-induced rapid hyperaemia. To this aim, the mechano-sensitive channel blocker Gadolinium (Gd(3+)) is employed, which already proved to reduce the myogenic response in isolated vessels. Muscle blood flow (MaBF) was recorded from the masseteric artery in 8 urethane-anesthetized rabbits. Rapid hyperemic responses were evoked by 1-s lasting compressions of the masseter muscle (MC) delivered before and after close arterial infusion of Gd(3+) in the masseteric artery. Three infusions were performed at 1-h interval, producing estimated plasma concentration (EPC) of 0.045, 0.45 and 4.5 mM, in the masseteric artery. The amplitude of the hyperaemic response to MC, equal to 195±77% of basal flow in control condition, was reduced by 9.5±19.4% (p=0.18) and 45±28% (p<0.01) while basal MaBf increased by 10±3% (p=0.90) and by 68±30% (p<0.01) at EPC of 0.045 and 0.45 mM, respectively. At EPC of 4.5 mM a strong reduction in both MaBF (by 54±13%, p<0.01) and MC response (75±12%, p<0.01) was instead observed. These effects did not depend on time from infusion. At all doses employed Gd(3+) never affected arterial blood pressure, heart rate and contralateral MaBF. While the effects observed at the highest EPC likely result from blood vessel occlusion due to Gd(3+) precipitation, the effects observed at lower concentrations demonstrate that Gd(3+) affects musculo-vascular function by decreasing both resting vascular tone and responsiveness to mechanical stimuli. The results are compatible with a Gd(3+)-induced blockade of vascular mechano-sensitive channels.

  17. Quantification of fibrosis in infarcted swine hearts by ex vivo late gadolinium-enhancement and diffusion-weighted MRI methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Mihaela; Ghugre, Nilesh R.; Ramanan, Venkat; Morikawa, Lily; Stanisz, Greg; Dick, Alexander J.; Wright, Graham A.

    2013-08-01

    Many have speculated that MRI signal characteristics can be used to identify regions of heterogeneous infarct associated with an arrhythmogenic substrate; however, direct evidence of this relationship is limited. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the remodelling characteristics of fibrosis by means of histology and high-resolution MR imaging. For this purpose, we performed whole-mount histology in heart samples (n = 9) collected from five swine at six weeks post-infarction and compared the extent of fibrosis in the infarcted areas delineated in these histological images with that obtained ex vivo by MRI using late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) methods. All MR images were obtained at a submillimetre resolution (i.e., voxel size of 0.6×0.6×1.2 mm3). Specifically, in the histology images, we differentiated moderate fibrosis (consisting of a mixture of viable and non-viable myocytes, known as border zone, BZ) from severe fibrosis (i.e., the dense scar). Correspondingly, tissue heterogeneities in the MR images were categorized by a Gaussian mixture model into healthy, BZ and scar. Our results showed that (a) both MRI methods were capable of qualitatively distinguishing sharp edges between dense scar and healthy tissue from regions of heterogeneous BZ; (b) the BZ and dense scar areas had intermediate-to-high increased values of signal intensity in the LGE images and of apparent diffusion coefficient in the DWI, respectively. In addition, as demonstrated by the Picrosirius Red and immunohistochemistry stains, the viable bundles in the BZ were clearly separated by thin collagen strands and had reduced expression of Cx43, whereas the core scar was composed of dense fibrosis. A quantitative analysis demonstrated that the comparison between BZ/scar extent in LGE and DWI to the corresponding areas identified in histology yielded very good correlations (i.e., for the scar identified by LGE, R2 was 0.96 compared to R2 = 0.93 for the

  18. Two- and three-dimensional networks of gadolinium(III) with dicarboxylate ligands: synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Pasan, Jorge; Fabelo, Oscar; Hernandez-Molina, María; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina

    2006-12-25

    Four gadolinium(III) complexes with dicarboxylate ligands of formulas [Gd2(mal)3(H2O)5]n.2nH2O (1), [Gd2(mal)3(H2O)6]n (2), [NaGd(mal)(ox)(H2O)3]n (3), and [Gd2(ox)3(H2O)6]n.2.5nH2O (4) (mal = malonate; ox = oxalate) have been prepared, and their magnetic properties have been investigated as a function of the temperature. The structures of 1-3 have been determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The crystal structure of 4 was already known, and it is made of hexagonal layers of Gd atoms that are bridged by bis-bidentate oxalate. Compound 1 is isostructural with the europium(III) malonate complex [Eu2(mal)3(H2O)5]n.2nH2O,1 whose structure was reported elsewhere. The Gd atoms in 1 define a two-dimensional network where a terminal bidentate and bridging bidentate/bis-monodentate and tris-bidentate coordination modes of malonate occur. Compound 2 has a three-dimensional structure with a structural phase transition at 226 K, which involves a change of the space group from I2/a to Ia. Although its structure at room temperature was already known, that below 226 K was not. Pairs of Gd atoms with a double oxo-carboxylate bridge occur in both phases, and the main differences between both structures deal with the Gd environment and the H-bond pattern. 3 is also a three-dimensional compound, and it was obtained by reacting Gd(III) ions with malonic acid in a silica gel medium. Oxalic acid results as an oxidized product of the malonic acid, and single crystals of the heteroleptic complex were produced. The Gd atoms in 3 are connected through bis-bidentate oxalate and carboxylate-malonate bridges in the anti-anti and anti-syn coordination modes. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibit weak but significant ferromagnetic couplings between the Gd(III) ions through the single (1) and double (2) oxo-carboxylate bridges, whereas antiferromagnetic interactions across the bis-bidentate oxalate account for the overall antiferromagnetic behavior observed in 3 and 4.

  19. Myocardial extravascular extracellular volume fraction measurement by gadolinium cardiovascular magnetic resonance in humans: slow infusion versus bolus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Myocardial extravascular extracellular volume fraction (Ve) measures quantify diffuse fibrosis not readily detectable by conventional late gadolinium (Gd) enhancement (LGE). Ve measurement requires steady state equilibrium between plasma and interstitial Gd contrast. While a constant infusion produces steady state, it is unclear whether a simple bolus can do the same. Given the relatively slow clearance of Gd, we hypothesized that a bolus technique accurately measures Ve, thus facilitating integration of myocardial fibrosis quantification into cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) workflow routines. Assuming equivalence between techniques, we further hypothesized that Ve measures would be reproducible across scans. Methods In 10 volunteers (ages 20-81, median 33 yr, 3 females), we compared serial Ve measures from a single short axis slice from two scans: first, during a constant infusion, and second, 12-50 min after a bolus (0.2 mmol/kg gadoteridol) on another day. Steady state during infusion was defined when serial blood and myocardial T1 data varied <5%. We measured T1 on a 1.5 T Siemens scanner using a single-shot modified Look Locker inversion recovery sequence (MOLLI) with balanced SSFP. To shorten breath hold times, T1 values were measured with a shorter sampling scheme that was validated with spin echo relaxometry (TR = 15 sec) in CuSO4-Agar phantoms. Serial infusion vs. bolus Ve measures (n = 205) from the 10 subjects were compared with generalized estimating equations (GEE) with exchangeable correlation matrices. LGE images were also acquired 12-30 minutes after the bolus. Results No subject exhibited LGE near the short axis slices where Ve was measured. The Ve range was 19.3-29.2% and 18.4-29.1% by constant infusion and bolus, respectively. In GEE models, serial Ve measures by constant infusion and bolus did not differ significantly (difference = 0.1%, p = 0.38). For both techniques, Ve was strongly related to age (p < 0.01 for both) in GEE

  20. The application of Anthropogenic Gadolinium as a tracer in ground and surface water: examples from France and the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, G.; Verheul, M.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Negrel, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Gadolinium chelates have been used since 1988 as contrasts agents in medical imaging (MRI) and produce positive anthropogenic Gd anomalies in rare element shale normalized patterns (REEnasc) of river and lake waters. Both in the Netherlands and France the presence of a positive Gd anomaly in surface and groundwater is used as a common tool in complex surface-surface and surface-groundwater studies. In this poster 3 examples of this common practice are given. The "Ile du Chambon" catchment (100 ha) is located in the Allier Valley, within Oligocene alluvial formations (sand and gravel). The nitrate content in the wells of the drinking water supply is ≥ 50 mg/l and two sources for the origin of the nitrates are hypothesized: agriculture or wastewater from a waste water treatment plant. Widory et al. (2005), using a coupled chemical (Cl and NO3) and isotopic (nitrogen and boron) approach, could show that the wastewater was the main source of the nitrate pollution. The presence of a Gd anomaly in the shale normalized rare earth patterns of wells contaminated by the waste water confirms the findings of Widory et al. (2005). In the second case the Gd anomaly is used to follow the infiltration of river water into a small lake in the Netherlands. During dry periods in this small river, Meuse water with a distinct Gd anomaly is fed into this river. The REE were monitored in the river, in a piezometer installed in the dike between the river and the lake and in the lake before, during and after the Meuse water was fed into this river. With the time series analyses the infiltration of the Meuse water into the dike and the small lake could be clearly followed. In a third case, in the center of the Netherlands, the flow of inlet Meuse water with a distinct Gd anomaly into a polder and subsequently from the larger into the smaller ditches of this polder were followed by analyzing the REEs. In such dry periods the ditches in the polder are also fed by groundwater that does not

  1. Nanostructured gadolinium-doped ceria microsphere synthesis from ion exchange resin: Multi-scale in-situ studies of solid solution formation

    SciTech Connect

    Caisso, Marie; Lebreton, Florent; Horlait, Denis; Neuville, Daniel R.; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg; Delahaye, Thibaud

    2014-10-15

    In the current nano-sized material revolution, the main limitations to a large-scale deployment of nanomaterials involve health concerns related to nano-dissemination via air. Developing new chemical routes benefiting from nano-size advantages while avoiding their hazards could overcome these limitations. Addressing this need, a chemical route leading to soft nano-particle agglomerates, i.e., macroscopic precursors presenting the ability to be decomposed into nano-sized materials, was developed and applied to Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ}. Using cerium/gadolinium-loaded ion exchange resin, the Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ} solid solution formation as a function of temperature was studied in-situ through X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Temperatures corresponding to the organic skeleton decomposition and to the mixed oxide crystallization were identified. An optimal heat treatment, leading to nanostructured soft agglomerates, was established. Microsphere processing capabilities were evaluated and particle size distribution measurements were recorded. A very low fracture strength was calculated, and a nanometric particle size distribution (170 nm) was determined. - Graphical abstract: The elaboration of micro-spherical precursors leading to the formation of nano-oxide soft agglomerates was studied and approved through the use of ion exchange resin loaded with cerium and gadolinium. The formation of the solid solution was followed through in-situ measurements such as XAS, XRD, Raman, TGA and DSC. Key temperatures were identified for the formation of the mixed-oxide. Following this study, the microstructure and particle size of oxide microspheres formed highlight the formation of soft nano-arrangments. - Highlights: • Soft microspherical agglomerates able to be decomposed into nano-sized materials. • In situ study of cerium/gadolinium-loaded ion exchange resin conversion in oxide. • In situ multi-scale study

  2. Do Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Affect (18)F-FDG PET/CT Uptake in the Dentate Nucleus and the Globus Pallidus? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Kyle; Lathrum, Alaina; Raslan, Osama; Kelly, Patrick V; Zhou, Yihua; Hewing, Debra; Botkin, Crystal; Turner, James A; Osman, Medhat

    2017-03-01

    Gadolinium is toxic and to avoid its deposition in tissues, it must be chemically bonded with nonmetal ions to facilitate its excretion by the kidneys. High signal intensity in the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP) on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images has been both morphologically and pathologically linked to gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) retention in the brain. The purpose of this study was to determine whether repeated administrations of GBCA would affect the uptake of (18)F-FDG in the DN and GP on PET/CT. Methods: Three hundred seventy-six patients who underwent both contrast-enhanced MR (CE MR) of the brain and PET/CT from January 2004 to October 2015 were identified. Patients with a history of brain irradiation or hepatic or renal disease were excluded. The SUVmax was measured in the DN and GP on the PET/CT scan in patients who had 3-6 successive CE MR brain studies. The SUVmax of the corresponding areas in the control group of patients who had not undergone previous CE MR and who had a normal, unenhanced MR finding of the brain was also measured. A Wilcoxon 2-sample test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Fifteen of 376 (4%) patients (mean age ± SD, 54 ± 18 y; 10 men and 5 women) were included in the subject group, and 15 patients (mean age ± SD, 36 ± 9 y; 11 men and 4 women) were included in the control group. The median DN SUVmax was significantly lower in the subject group than in the control group (5.4 vs. 6.4, respectively; P = 0.021). Similarly, the median GP SUVmax was significantly lower in the subject group than in the control group (8.8 vs. 12.1, respectively; P = 0.003). Conclusion: The median SUVmax in the DN and GP was 16% and 27% lower, respectively, in patients who received GBCAs than in those who had not received GBCAs, possibly related to gadolinium deposition in these areas.

  3. Graphene Oxide and Gadolinium-Chelate Functionalized Poly(lactic acid) Nanocapsules Encapsulating Perfluorooctylbromide for Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Bimodal Imaging Guided Photothermal Ablation of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenglin; Ke, Hengte; Wang, Jinrui; Miao, Zhaohua; Yue, Xiuli

    2016-03-01

    This paper successfully fabricated a novel multifunctional theranostic agent (PFOB@PLA/GO/Gd-DTPA NCs) by loading perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) into poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanocapsules (NCs) followed by surface functionalization with graphene oxide (GO) and gadolinium-chelate (Gd-DTPA). It was found that the resulting nanoagent could serve as a contrast agent simultaneously to enhance ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Benefiting from the strong absorption in the near infrared (NIR) region, the nanocapsules could efficiently kill cancer cells under NIR laser irradiation. Thus, such a single theranostic agent with the combination of realtime US imaging and high-resolution MR imaging could achieve great therapeutic effectiveness without systemic damage to the body. In addition, the cytotoxicity assay on HUVEC cells revealed a good biocompatibility of PFOB@PLA/GO/Gd-DTPA NCs, showing that the versatile nanocapsule system may hold great potential as an effective nanoplatform for contrast enhanced imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  4. Extracellular biosynthesis of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles, their biodistribution and bioconjugation with the chemically modified anticancer drug taxol.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shadab Ali; Gambhir, Sanjay; Ahmad, Absar

    2014-01-01

    As a part of our programme to develop nanobioconjugates for the treatment of cancer, we first synthesized extracellular, protein-capped, highly stable and well-dispersed gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles by using thermophilic fungus Humicola sp. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles in rats was checked by radiolabelling with Tc-99m. Finally, these nanoparticles were bioconjugated with the chemically modified anticancer drug taxol with the aim of characterizing the role of this bioconjugate in the treatment of cancer. The biosynthesized Gd2O3 nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The Gd2O3-taxol bioconjugate was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy and was purified by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  5. Extracellular biosynthesis of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles, their biodistribution and bioconjugation with the chemically modified anticancer drug taxol

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shadab Ali; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Summary As a part of our programme to develop nanobioconjugates for the treatment of cancer, we first synthesized extracellular, protein-capped, highly stable and well-dispersed gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles by using thermophilic fungus Humicola sp. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles in rats was checked by radiolabelling with Tc-99m. Finally, these nanoparticles were bioconjugated with the chemically modified anticancer drug taxol with the aim of characterizing the role of this bioconjugate in the treatment of cancer. The biosynthesized Gd2O3 nanoparticles were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The Gd2O3–taxol bioconjugate was confirmed by UV–vis spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy and was purified by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). PMID:24778946

  6. Effect of ionic interaction between a hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probe and a gadolinium contrast agent for the hyperpolarized lifetime after dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Inoue, Kaori; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In hyperpolarization of 13C-enriched magnetic resonance chemical probes in the solid-state, a trace amount of gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent can be used to maximize polarization of the 13C nuclear spins. Here, we report systematic measurement of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and enhancement level of 13C-enriched chemical probes in the presence of various Gd contrast agents in the liquid-state after dissolution. Using two different 13C probes having opposite electric charges at neutral pH, we clearly show the T1 of hyperpolarized 13C was barely affected by the use of a Gd complex that displays repulsive interaction with the 13C probe in solution, whilst T1 was drastically shortened when there was ionic attraction between probe and complex.

  7. Gadolinium(3+)-doped mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a potential magnetic resonance tracer for monitoring the migration of stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yingying; Shao, Yuanzhi; He, Haoqiang; Tan, Yunpu; Tian, Xiumei; Xie, Fukang; Li, Li

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the tracking potential of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probe made of gadolinium-doped mesoporous silica MCM-41 (Gd(2)O(3)@MCM-41) nanoparticles for transplanted bone mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs) in vivo. The nanoparticles, synthesized using a one-step synthetic method, possess hexagonal mesoporous structures with appropriate assembly of nanoscale Gd(2)O(3) clusters. They show little cytotoxicity against proliferation and have a lower effect on the inherent differentiation potential of these labeled stem cells. The tracking of labeled NSCs in murine brains was dynamically determined with a clinical 3T MRI system for at least 14 days. The migration of labeled NSCs identified by MRI corresponded to the results of immunofluorescence imaging. Our study confirms that Gd(2)O(3)@MCM-41 particles can serve as an ideal vector for long-term MRI tracking of MSCs and NSCs in vivo.

  8. A novel method for evaluating enhancement using gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid in the hepatobiliary phase of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Miyati, Tosiaki; Shiozaki, Toshiki

    To investigate whether quantitative liver-portal vein contrast ratio (Q-LPC) can be used as a substitute for quantitative liver-spleen contrast ratio (Q-LSC) in the hepatobiliary phase (HBP) contrasting degree. Q-LSC and Q-LPC were calculated in HBP images that were obtained approximately 20 min after gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid injection, and relationship between them was evaluated. A very strong correlation was observed between Q-LSC and Q-LPC with respect to Child-Pugh class. Furthermore, Q-LPC values were not significantly different between patients with splenectomy or Gamna-Gandy bodies and those without. Therefore, Q-LPC can be useful instead of Q-LSC in patients with splenectomy or Gamna-Gandy bodies.

  9. Global and Regional Brain Assessment with Quantitative MR Imaging in Patients with Prior Exposure to Linear Gadolinium-based Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Hirofumi; Jara, Hernán; Buch, Karen; Qureshi, Muhammad Mustafa; Chapman, Margaret N; Sakai, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To assess the association of global and regional brain relaxation times in patients with prior exposure to linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this cross-sectional study. Thirty-five patients (nine who had received GBCA gadopentetate dimeglumine injections previously [one to eight times] and 26 patients who did not) who underwent brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a mixed fast spin-echo pulse sequence were assessed. The whole brain was segmented according to white and gray matter by using a dual-clustering algorithm. In addition, regions of interest were measured in the globus pallidus, dentate nucleus, thalamus, and pons. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to assess the difference between groups. Multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the association of T1 and T2 with prior GBCA exposure. Results T1 values of gray matter were significantly shorter for patients with than for patients without prior GBCA exposure (P = .022). T1 of the gray matter of the whole brain (P < .001), globus pallidus (P = .002), dentate nucleus (P = .046), and thalamus (P = .026) and T2 of the whole brain (P = .004), dentate nucleus (P = .023), and thalamus (P = .002) showed a significant correlation with the accumulated dose of previous GBCA administration. There was no significant correlation between T1 and the accumulated dose of previous GBCA injections in the white matter (P = .187). Conclusion Global and regional quantitative assessments of T1 and T2 demonstrated an association with prior GBCA exposure, especially for gray matter structures. The results of this study confirm previous research findings that there is gadolinium deposition in wider distribution throughout the brain. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  10. Molecular MRI of Acute Necrosis with a Novel DNA-Binding Gadolinium Chelate: Kinetics of Cell Death and Clearance in Infarcted Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuning; Chen, Howard H.; Yuan, Hushan; Dai, Guangping; Schuhle, Daniel T.; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Ngoy, Soeun; Liao, Ronglih; Caravan, Peter; Josephson, Lee; Sosnovik, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Current techniques to image cell death in the myocardium are largely non-specific. Here we report the use of a novel DNA-binding gadolinium chelate (Gd-TO) to specifically detect the exposed DNA in acutely necrotic (ruptured) cells in vivo. Methods and Results In vivo MRI was performed in 20 mice with myocardial infarction (MI). The mice were injected with Gd-TO or Gd-DTPA at varying time points post-MI. MRI was performed 2 hours after probe injection, to avoid nonspecific signal from the late gadolinium enhancement effect. Cell rupture (Gd-TO uptake) was present within 2 hours of infarction, but peaked 9–18 hours after the onset of injury. A significant increase in the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) in the infarct was seen in mice injected with Gd-TO within 48 hours of MI, but not in those injected more than 72 hours post MI (R1 = 1.24 ± 0.08 and 0.92 ± 0.03 s−1, respectively, p < 0.001). Gd-DTPA, unlike Gd-TO, washed completely out of acute infarcts within 2 hours of injection (p < 0.001). The binding of Gd-TO to exposed DNA in acute infarcts was confirmed with fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions Gd-TO specifically binds to acutely necrotic cells and can be used to image the mechanism and chronicity of cell death in injured myocardium. Cell rupture in acute MI begins early but peaks many hours after the onset of injury. The ruptured cells are efficiently cleared by the immune system and are no longer present in the myocardium 72 hours after injury. PMID:21836081

  11. Evaluation of EDXRF configurations to improve the limit of detection and exposure for in vivo quantification of gadolinium in tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santibáñez, M.; Vásquez, M.; Figueroa, R. G.; Valente, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the configuration of an Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) system optimized for in vivo quantification of gadolinium in tumor tissue was studied. The system was configured using XMI-MSIM software designed to predict the XRF spectral response using Monte Carlo simulations. The studied setup is comprised of an X-ray tube, tuned to different voltages, and a copper filter system configured with variable thickness, which emits a spectrally narrow beam centered on the specific excitation energy. The values for the central energy excitation and the spectral width were adjusted to optimize the system, using like figures of merit: minimization of the limit of detection, measurement uncertainty and radiation exposure. These values were obtained in two stages. The first was successive simulations of incident spectra with central energy in the range of 50-70 keV. The second was comprised of simulations with incident spectra of different widths (8-29 keV), all with the same determined central energy, evaluating the limit of detection depending on the exposure. This made it possible to find the best balance between system sensitivity and the delivered dose. The obtained results were compared with those produced by radioactive sources of 241Am whose activity was set to produce the same exposure as the proposed setup. To evaluate the feasibility of in vivo quantification, a set of tumor phantoms of 1-6 cm3 at different depths and labeled with a gadolinium concentration of 250 ppm was evaluated. From the resulting spectrum, calibration curves were obtained in function of the size and depth of the tumor, allowing for the evaluation of the potential of the methodology.

  12. Importance of timing of post-contrast MRI in rheumatoid arthritis: what happens during the first 60 minutes after IV gadolinium-DTPA?

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, M; Klarlund, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Volumes of inflamed synovial membrane determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are closely related to histopathological synovitis and may predict erosive progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, after IV injection, leakage of MRI contrast from the synovium gradually compromises the differentiation of synovium from joint fluid.
OBJECTIVE—To determine the time period after IV MRI contrast (gadolinium-DTPA (Gd)) injection in which synovial membrane volume determination is reliable.
METHODS—MRI of five RA knees with clinical synovitis was carried out, with axial, T1 weighted, spin echo images before IV Gd injection and every 1.75 minutes for 60 minutes post-Gd. By a semiautomated "signal enhancement threshold" method, including voxels with >35% or >45% relative post-Gd enhancement, synovial membrane volumes were estimated at each time point. At 4.25 minutes post-Gd, volumes were also determined by a more accurate but time consuming "manual method".
RESULTS—The initially observed synovium-effusion borderline remained clearly visible, and on the same location, within at least the initial 11 minutes post-Gd (that is, within the normal time frame of post-Gd imaging in RA) but started blurring and moving centripetally thereafter. Compared with volumes at all other time points, synovial membrane volumes at 0.75 and 2.50 minutes post-Gd were significantly lower (Wilcoxon-Pratt), suggesting that some synovial membrane areas had not yet exceeded the enhancement threshold. Thereafter, the measured volumes remained practically unchanged.
CONCLUSION—This study suggests that MR image acquisition in arthritic knee joints should be performed within the initial approximately 10 minutes after gadolinium contrast injection to achieve the most accurate distinction between synovium and joint fluid but that small time variations are not of major importance to the measured synovial membrane volumes.

 PMID:11602477

  13. Time-Resolved MR Angiography of the Legs at 3 T Using a Low Dose of Gadolinium: Initial Experience and Contrast Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Gurpreet Singh; Rezaee, Rod P.; Jesberger, John; Wright, Katherine; Griswold, Mark A.; Gulani, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This article describes our initial clinical experience with time-resolved MR angiography (MRA) of the legs using the time-resolved imaging with stochastic trajectories (TWIST) technique with a half dose of gadolinium. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-four patients underwent a TWIST examination of the legs at 3 T. Thirty-three patients also underwent a bolus-chase MRA examination in the same setting. Times elapsed between the start of contrast injection and the appearance of contrast material (tA) and peak enhancement of the arteries in the legs (tB) were analyzed. The number of patients with examinations affected by venous contamination was determined. The differences in tA and tB between cases in which venous contamination was present or absent were evaluated using a two-tailed Student t test. RESULTS The TWIST technique using a half dose of gadolinium provided diagnostic-quality images of all patients. The mean tA was 35.5 ± 8.8 (SD) seconds (range, 17.8–60.4 seconds), and the mean tB was 59.1 ± 15.1 seconds (range, 31–98.8 seconds). Venous contamination was observed in bolus-chase MRA images of 52.9% of patients. The relationship between venous contamination and tA was not statistically significant (p = 0.13). The incidence of venous contamination was higher in patients with lower values of tB (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION The described low-dose clinical experience with TWIST and the contrast dynamics information gained from this study could aid radiologists in planning protocols for leg MRA examinations. PMID:22358010

  14. Pediatric Brain: Repeated Exposure to Linear Gadolinium-based Contrast Material Is Associated with Increased Signal Intensity at Unenhanced T1-weighted MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Flood, Thomas F; Stence, Nicholas V; Maloney, John A; Mirsky, David M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether repeated exposure of the pediatric brain to a linear gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) is associated with an increase in signal intensity (SI) relative to that in GBCA-naive control subjects at unenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This single-center, retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. The authors evaluated 46 pediatric patients who had undergone at least three GBCA-enhanced MR examinations (30 patients for two-group analysis and 16 for pre- and post-GBCA exposure comparisons) and 57 age-matched GBCA-naive control subjects. The SI in the globus pallidus, thalamus, dentate nucleus, and pons was measured at unenhanced T1-weighted MR imaging. Globus pallidus-thalamus and dentate nucleus-pons SI ratios were calculated and compared between groups and relative to total cumulative gadolinium dose, age, sex, and number of and mean time between GBCA-enhanced examinations. Analysis included the Wilcoxon signed rank test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Patients who underwent multiple GBCA-enhanced examinations had increased SI ratios within the dentate nucleus (mean SI ratio ± standard error of the mean for two-group comparison: 1.007 ± 0.0058 for GBCA-naive group and 1.046 ± 0.0060 for GBCA-exposed group [P < .001]; mean SI ratio for pre- and post-GBCA comparison: 0.995 ± 0.0062 for pre-GBCA group and 1.035 ± 0.0063 for post-GBCA group [P < .001]) but not the globus pallidus (mean SI ratio for two-group comparison: 1.131 ± 0.0070 for GBCA-naive group and 1.014 ± 0.0091 for GBCA-exposed group [P = .21]; mean SI ratio for pre- and post-GBCA comparison: 1.068 ± 0.0094 for pre-GBCA group and 1.093 ± 0.0134 for post-GBCA group [P = .12]). There was a significant correlation between dentate nucleus SI and total cumulative gadolinium dose (r = 0.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03, 0.67; P = .03), but

  15. Albumin binding, relaxivity, and water exchange kinetics of the diastereoisomers of MS-325, a gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance angiography contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Caravan, Peter; Parigi, Giacomo; Chasse, Jaclyn M; Cloutier, Normand J; Ellison, Jeffrey J; Lauffer, Randall B; Luchinat, Claudio; McDermid, Sarah A; Spiller, Marga; McMurry, Thomas J

    2007-08-06

    The amphiphilic gadolinium complex MS-325 ((trisodium-{(2-(R)-[(4,4-diphenylcyclohexyl) phosphonooxymethyl] diethylenetriaminepentaacetato) (aquo)gadolinium(III)}) is a contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). MS-325 consists of two slowly interconverting diastereoisomers, A and B (65:35 ratio), which can be isolated at pH > 8.5 (TyeklAr, Z.; Dunham, S. U.; Midelfort, K.; Scott, D. M.; Sajiki, H.; Ong, K.; Lauffer, R. B.; Caravan, P.; McMurry, T. J. Inorg. Chem. 2007, 46, 6621-6631). MS-325 binds to human serum albumin (HSA) in plasma resulting in an extended plasma half-life, retention of the agent within the blood compartment, and an increased relaxation rate of water protons in plasma. Under physiological conditions (37 degrees C, pH 7.4, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), 4.5% HSA, 0.05 mM complex), there is no statistical difference in HSA affinity or relaxivity between the two isomers (A 88.6 +/- 0.6% bound, r1 = 42.0 +/- 1.0 mM(-1) s(-1) at 20 MHz; B 90.2 +/- 0.6% bound, r1 = 38.3 +/- 1.0 mM(-1) s(-1) at 20 MHz; errors represent 1 standard deviation). At lower temperatures, isomer A has a higher relaxivity than isomer B. The water exchange rates in the absence of HSA at 298 K, kA298 = 5.9 +/- 2.8 x 10(6) s(-1), kB298 = 3.2 +/- 1.8 x 10(6) s(-1), and heats of activation, DeltaHA = 56 +/- 8 kJ/mol, DeltaHB = 59 +/- 11 kJ/mol, were determined by variable-temperature 17O NMR at 7.05 T. Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles were recorded over the frequency range of 0.01-50 MHz at 5, 15, 25, and 35 degrees C in a 4.5% HSA in PBS solution for each isomer (0.1 mM). Differences in the relaxivity in HSA between the two isomers could be attributed to the differing water exchange rates.

  16. Immobilization of gadolinium in iron borophosphate glasses and iron borophosphate based glass-ceramics: Implications for the immobilization of plutonium(Ⅲ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Liao, Qilong; Dai, Yunya; Zhu, Hanzhen

    2016-08-01

    Immobilization of gadolinium (Gd), a nonradioactive surrogate for Pu3+, in iron borophosphate glasses/glass-ceramics (IBP glasses/glass-ceramics) has been investigated. The IBP glass containing 4 mol% Gd2O3 is homogeneously amorphous. At higher Gd2O3 concentrations, additional Gd is retained in the glasses as crystalline inclusions of monazite GdPO4 crystalline phase detected with X-ray diffraction. Moreover, Gd2O3 addition increases the Tg of the IBP glasses in glass formation range, which is consistent with the structural modification of the glasses. The structure of the Gd2O3-loaded IBP glasses/glass-ceramics is mainly based on pyrophosphate units. The chemical durability of Gd2O3-loaded IBP glasses/glass-ceramics is comparable to widely used borosilicate glass waste forms and the existence of monazite GdPO4 crystalline phase does not degrade the aqueous chemical durability of the IBP glasses/glass-ceramics. The Gd-loading results imply that the solubility should not be a limiting factor in processing nuclide Pu3+ if the formed crystalline phase(s) have high chemical durability.

  17. Encapsulated gadolinium and dysprosium ions within ultra-short carbon nanotubes for MR microscopy at 11.75 and 21.1 T.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jens T; Cisneros, Brandon T; Matson, Michael; Sokoll, Michelle; Sachi-Kocher, Afi; Bejarano, Fabian Calixto; Wilson, Lon J; Grant, Samuel C

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have gained interest for their biocompatibility and multifunctional properties. Ultra-short SWNTs (US-tubes) have demonstrated high proton relaxivity when encapsulating gadolinium ions (Gd(3+)) at clinical field strengths. At higher field strengths, however, Gd(3+) ions demonstrate decreased proton relaxation properties while chemically similar dysprosium ions (Dy(3+)) improve relaxation properties. This report investigates the first use of Gd(3+) and Dy(3+) ions within US-tubes (GNTs and DNTs, respectively) at ultra-high magnetic field (21.1 T). Both agents are compared in solution and as an intracellular contrast agent labeling a murine microglia cell line (Bv2) immobilized in a tissue-mimicking agarose phantom using two high magnetic fields: 21.1 and 11.75 T. In solution at 21.1 T, results show excellent transverse relaxation; DNTs outperformed GNTs as a T(2) agent with measured r(2)/r(1) ratios of 247 and 47, respectively. Additionally, intracellular DNTs were shown to be a better T(2) agent than GNTs with higher contrast percentages and contrast-to-noise ratios. As such, this study demonstrates the potential of DNTs at high magnetic fields for cellular labeling and future in vivo, MRI-based cell tracking.

  18. Characterization of tumor angiogenesis in rat brain using iron-based vessel size index MRI in combination with gadolinium-based dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Marine; Lemasson, Benjamin; Farion, Régine; Segebarth, Christoph; Rémy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L

    2009-10-01

    This study aimed at combining an iron-based, steady-state, vessel size index magnetic resonance imaging (VSI MRI) approach, and a gadolinium (Gd)-based, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI approach (DCE MRI) to characterize tumoral microvasculature. Rats bearing an orthotopic glioma (C6, n=14 and RG2, n=6) underwent DCE MRI and combined VSI and DCE MRI 4 h later, at 2.35 T. Gd-DOTA (200 mumol of Gd per kg) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) (200 micromol of iron per kg) were used for DCE and VSI MRI, respectively. C6 and RG2 gliomas were equally permeable to Gd-DOTA but presented different blood volume fractions and VSI, in good agreement with histologic data. The presence of USPIO yielded reduced K(trans) values. The K(trans) values obtained with Gd-DOTA in the absence and in the presence of USPIO were well correlated for the C6 glioma but not for the RG2 glioma. It was also observed that, within the time frame of DCE MRI, USPIO remained intravascular in the C6 glioma whereas it extravasated in the RG2 glioma. In conclusion, VSI and DCE MRI can be combined provided that USPIO does not extravasate with the time frame of the DCE MRI experiment. The mechanisms at the origin of USPIO extravasation remain to be elucidated.

  19. GADOLINIUM(Gd)-BASED and Ion Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Pre-Clinical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mri) Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Thian C.

    2012-06-01

    It is known that one strength of MRI is its excellent soft tissue discrimination. It naturally provides sufficient contrast between the structural differences of normal and pathological tissues, their spatial extent and progression. However, to further extend its applications and enhance even more contrast for clinical studies, various Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents have been developed for different organs (brain strokes, cancer, cardio-MRI, etc). These Gd-based contrast agents are paramagnetic compounds that have strong T1-effect for enhancing the contrast between tissue types. Gd-contrast can also enhance magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for studying stenosis and for measuring perfusion, vascular susceptibility, interstitial space, etc. Another class of contrast agents makes use of ferrite iron oxide nanoparticles (including Superparamagnetic Ion Oxide (SPIO) and Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO)). These nanoparticles have superior magnetic susceptibility effect and produce a drop in signal, namely in T2*-weighted images, useful for the determination of lymph nodes metastases, angiogenesis and arteriosclerosis plaques.

  20. Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles and aptamer-functionalized silver nanoclusters-based multimodal molecular imaging nanoprobe for optical/magnetic resonance cancer cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; You, Jia; Dai, Yue; Shi, Meilin; Han, Cuiping; Xu, Kai

    2014-11-18

    Multimodal molecular imaging has attracted more and more interest from researchers due to its combination of the strengths of each imaging modality. The development of specific and multifunctional molecular imaging probes is the key for this method. In this study, we fabricated an optical/magnetic resonance (MR) dual-modality molecular imaging nanoprobe, polyethylene glycol-coated ultrasmall gadolinium oxide (PEG-Gd2O3)/aptamer-Ag nanoclusters (NCs), for tracking cancer cells. To achieve this aim, PEG-Gd2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent and aptamer functionalized silver nanoclusters (aptamer-Ag NCs) as fluorescence reporter were first synthesized by a one-pot approach, respectively. They were then conjugated by the covalent coupling reaction between the carboxyl group on the surface of PEG-Gd2O3 NPs and amino group modified on the 5'-end of AS1411 aptamer. With a suitable ratio, the fluorescence intensity of aptamer-Ag NCs and MR signal of PEG-Gd2O3 nanoparticles could both be enhanced after the formation of PEG-Gd2O3/aptamer-Ag NCs nanoprobe, which favored their application for multimodal molecular imaging. With this nanoprobe, MCF-7 tumor cells could be specifically tracked by both fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in vitro.

  1. Quantitative measurement of regional blood flow with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate bolus track NMR imaging in cerebral infarcts in rats: validation with the iodo[14C]antipyrine technique.

    PubMed Central

    Wittlich, F; Kohno, K; Mies, G; Norris, D G; Hoehn-Berlage, M

    1995-01-01

    NMR bolus track measurements were correlated with autoradiographically determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The NMR method is based on bolus infusion of the contrast agent gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate and high-speed T*2-sensitive NMR imaging. The first pass of the contrast agent through the image plane causes a transient decrease of the signal intensity. This time course of the signal intensity is transformed into relative concentrations of the contrast agent in each pixel. The mean transit time and relative blood flow and volume are calculated from such indicator dilution curves. We investigated whether this NMR technique correctly expresses the relative rCBF. The relative blood flow data, calculated from NMR bolus track experiments, and the absolute values of iodo[14C]antipyrine autoradiography were compared. A linear relationship was observed, indicating the proportionality of the transient NMR signal change with CBF. Excellent interindividual reproducibility of calibration constants is observed (r = 0.963). For a given NMR protocol, bolus track measurements calibrated with autoradiography after the experiment allow determination of absolute values for rCBF and regional blood volume. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7892189

  2. The double role played by the Gd 2O 3 in the gadolinium-aluminum-borate-bismuthate quaternary glass forming tendency. GdBO 3 crystalline phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rada, S.; Culea, M.; Rada, M.; Pascuta, P.; Maties, V.; Culea, E.

    2009-11-01

    Glasses and glass-ceramics in the xGd 2O 3·(100 - x)[2Bi 2O 3·B 2O 3·Al 2O 3] system with x = 0, 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 50 mol% Gd 2O 3 have been prepared by the melt quenching method. The changes of the IR spectral features suggest that the formation of [BO 4] tetrahedra is reduced because the modified [BO 3] units containing one or more B-O-Gd bonds are unable to accept the fourth oxygen. Based on our results, we conclude that the accommodation of the networks with the excess of oxygen is possible by the deformation of Bi-O-Bi linkages, the participation of aluminum atoms as network formers and the intercalation of [BiO 6] and [AlO 4] entities in the [BO 4] chain network. When high Gd 2O 3 content is introduced, more [BO 3] structural units are coupled with gadolinium ions and the accumulation of oxygen can be supported by the formation of new [BO 3] -3 structural units as ortho-borate units. These yield the formation of GdBO 3 crystalline phase which has been confirmed by XRD investigations. Comparing the theoretical and experimental IR spectral characteristic features, we conclude that the prediction of the structural data is good.

  3. In Vivo Detection of Amyloid Plaques by Gadolinium-Stained MRI Can Be Used to Demonstrate the Efficacy of an Anti-amyloid Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Santin, Mathieu D.; Vandenberghe, Michel E.; Herard, Anne-Sophie; Pradier, Laurent; Cohen, Caroline; Debeir, Thomas; Delzescaux, Thierry; Rooney, Thomas; Dhenain, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular deposition of β amyloid plaques is an early event associated to Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we have used in vivo gadolinium-stained high resolution (29∗29∗117 μm3) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to follow-up in a longitudinal way individual amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice and evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy (SAR255952) directed against protofibrillar and fibrillary forms of Aβ. APP/PS1 mice were treated for 5 months between the age of 3.5 and 8.5 months. SAR255952 reduced amyloid load in 8.5-months-old animals, but not in 5.5-months animals compared to mice treated with a control antibody (DM4). Histological evaluation confirmed the reduction of amyloid load and revealed a lower density of amyloid plaques in 8.5-months SAR255952-treated animals. The longitudinal follow-up of individual amyloid plaques by MRI revealed that plaques that were visible at 5.5 months were still visible at 8.5 months in both SAR255952 and DM4-treated mice. This suggests that the amyloid load reduction induced by SAR255952 is related to a slowing down in the formation of new plaques rather than to the clearance of already formed plaques. PMID:27047372

  4. 15Mcps photon-counting X-ray computed tomography system using a ZnO-MPPC detector and its application to gadolinium imaging.

    PubMed

    Sato, Eiichi; Sugimura, Shigeaki; Endo, Haruyuki; Oda, Yasuyuki; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Osawa, Akihiro; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2012-01-01

    15Mcps photon-counting X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is a first-generation type and consists of an X-ray generator, a turntable, a translation stage, a two-stage controller, a detector consisting of a 2mm-thick zinc-oxide (ZnO) single-crystal scintillator and an MPPC (multipixel photon counter) module, a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). High-speed photon counting was carried out using the detector in the X-ray CT system. The maximum count rate was 15Mcps (mega counts per second) at a tube voltage of 100kV and a tube current of 1.95mA. Tomography is accomplished by repeated translations and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the translation. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The minimum exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 15min, and photon-counting CT was accomplished using gadolinium-based contrast media.

  5. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; MacLeod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  6. Synthesis of gadolinium carbonate-conjugated-poly(ethylene)glycol (Gd{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}@PEG) particles via a modified solvothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Nasution, Erika L. Y.; Ahab, Atika; Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam; Iskandar, Ferry

    2016-02-08

    PEGylated gadolinium carbonate ((Gd{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3})@PEG) powder was successfully synthesized by a modified solvothermal method. The synthesized products were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). A systematic change in the chemical surface composition, crystallinity and size properties of the Gd{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}@PEG particles was observed by increasing the reaction time at 5 hours, 7 hours, and 8 hours. The corresponding XRD patterns showed that the Gd{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} particles had hexagonal symmetry (JCPDS No. 37-0559) with a crystallite size of 3.5, 2.9, and 4.6 nm. FTIR spectra showed that the Gd{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3})@PEG particles were formed with the PEG as carbonyl and hydroxyl group attached to the surface. SEM analysis showed that the Gd{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3})@PEG particles had a flake-like morphology of homogeneous sized particles and agglomerates. EDS analysis confirmed the presence of constituent Gd{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} elements.

  7. Interplay between gadolinium dopants and oxygen vacancies in HfO{sub 2}: A density functional theory plus Hubbard U investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Hou, Z. F.

    2014-03-28

    The influence of gadolinium (Gd) doping on the oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}) in monoclinic HfO{sub 2} have been studied by the first-principles calculations within the spin-polarized generalized gradient approximation plus Hubbard U approach. It is found that the Gd dopant and V{sub O} show strong attractive interaction, resulting in a cooperative effect that the substitution of Gd for Hf (Gd{sub Hf}) would increase the probability of oxygen vacancies generation and vice versa. The Gd{sub Hf} is more energetically favorable to be next to the vacancy site of a three-coordinated oxygen (O3), forming a complex defect Gd{sub Hf} + V{sub O}. A single Gd{sub Hf} acts a hole donor and passivates the defect states of V{sub O}. Our results suggest that the decrease of the V{sub O}-related defect states observed in the photoluminescence spectra of Gd-HfO{sub 2} is because Gd doping passivates the defect states of V{sub O}, rather than caused by decrease of V{sub O} concentration. Our findings would clarify the debate about the influence of Gd doping on the oxygen vacancies in HfO{sub 2}.

  8. A Theranostic Agent Combining a Two-Photon-Absorbing Photosensitizer for Photodynamic Therapy and a Gadolinium(III) Complex for MRI Detection.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Julie; Heitz, Valérie; Sour, Angélique; Bolze, Frédéric; Kessler, Pascal; Flamigni, Lucia; Ventura, Barbara; Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Éva

    2016-02-18

    The convergent synthesis and characterization of a potential theranostic agent, [DPP-ZnP-GdDOTA](-), which combines a diketopyrrolopyrrole-porphyrin component DPP-ZnP as a two-photon photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT) with a gadolinium(III) DOTA complex as a magnetic resonance imaging probe, is presented. [DPP-ZnP-GdDOTA](-) has a remarkably high longitudinal water proton relaxivity (19.94 mm(-1)  s(-1) at 20 MHz and 25 °C) for a monohydrated molecular system of this size. The Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) profile is characteristic of slow rotation, related to the extended and rigid aromatic units integrated in the molecule and to self-aggregation occurring in aqueous solution. The two-photon properties were examined and large two-photon absorption cross-sections around 1000 GM were determined between 910 and 940 nm in DCM with 1 % pyridine and in DMSO. Furthermore, the new conjugate was able to generate singlet oxygen, with quantum yield of 0.42 and 0.68 in DCM with 1 % pyridine and DMSO, respectively. Cellular studies were also performed. The [DPP-ZnP-GdDOTA](-) conjugate demonstrated low dark toxicity and was able to induce high one-photon and moderate two-photon phototoxicity on cancer cells.

  9. Gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted versus T2-weighted imaging of scrotal disorders: is there an indication for MR imaging?

    PubMed

    Müller-Leisse, C; Bohndorf, K; Stargardt, A; Sohn, M; Neuerburg, J; Adam, G; Wein, B; Urhahn, R; Günther, R W

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the use of gadopentetate dimeglumine in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of scrotal disorders, the clinical, ultrasound, and MR imaging data of 29 patients (age range, 19-75 years) with various intra- and extratesticular disorders were retrospectively analyzed. T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images (T1-T2 group) were compared with T1-weighted spin-echo images before and after intravenous administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine (T1-Gd group). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the findings was undertaken. Better contrast between tumor and parenchyma and a clearer demonstration of the tunica albuginea were noted in the T1-T2 group (although not of diagnostic relevance). ROC analysis revealed no differences between the two imaging groups in the diagnosis of tumor, trauma, hydrocele, or hemorrhage; however, epididymitis was diagnosed more easily with contrast enhancement (0.8834 vs 0.7759, P = .04) and the diagnosis of orchitis was expressed more strongly (0.8221 vs 0.7184, P = .17). Four of the five observers were more confident in making the diagnosis with contrast enhancement. With MR imaging, the diagnosis was correctly suggested in three patients in whom clinical and ultrasound data were inconclusive. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging gives additional information in scrotal disorders and facilitates diagnosis. It may be helpful when findings at physical examination and ultrasound differ and when plain T1- and T2-weighted images are equivocal.

  10. Poly(acrylic acid) Bridged Gadolinium Metal-Organic Framework-Gold Nanoparticle Composites as Contrast Agents for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Bimodal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chixia; Zhu, Liping; Lin, Feng; Boyes, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) have received significant attention in the development of techniques for early-stage cancer diagnosis. Gadolinium (Gd) (III), which has seven unpaired electrons and a large magnetic moment, can dramatically influence the water proton relaxation and hence exhibits excellent MRI contrast. On the other hand, gold (Au), which has a high atomic number and high x-ray attenuation coefficient, is an ideal contrast agent candidate for x-ray based CT imaging. Gd metal organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles with tunable size, high Gd (III) loading and multivalency can potentially overcome the limitations of clinically utilized Gd chelate contrast agents. In this work, we report for the first time the integration of GdMOF nanoparticles with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the preparation of a MRI/CT bimodal imaging agent. Highly stable hybrid GdMOF/AuNPs composites have been prepared by using poly(acrylic acid) as a bridge between the GdMOF nanoparticles and AuNPs. The hybrid nanocomposites were then evaluated in MRI and CT imaging. The results revealed high longitudinal relaxivity in MRI and excellent CT imaging performance. Therefore, these GdMOF/AuNPs hybrid nanocomposites potentially provide a new platform for the development of multi-modal imaging probes. PMID:26147906

  11. Severe Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Small Pericardial Effusion, and Diffuse Late Gadolinium Enhancement by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Suspecting Cardiac Amyloidosis: Endomyocardial Biopsy Reveals an Unexpected Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Nina P.; Giusca, Sorin; Klingel, Karin; Nunninger, Peter; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy can be related to a multitude of cardiac disorders, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac amyloidosis, and hypertensive heart disease. Although the presence of LV hypertrophy is generally associated with poorer cardiac outcomes, the early differentiation between these pathologies is crucial due to the presence of specific treatment options. The diagnostic process with LV hypertrophy requires the integration of clinical evaluation, electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography, biochemical markers, and if required CMR and endomyocardial biopsy in order to reach the correct diagnosis. Here, we present a case of a patient with severe LV hypertrophy (septal wall thickness of 23 mm, LV mass of 264 g, and LV mass index of 147 g/m2), severely impaired longitudinal function, and preserved radial contractility (ejection fraction = 55%), accompanied by small pericardial effusion and diffuse late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Due to the imaging findings, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy, such as cardiac amyloidosis, was suspected. However, amyloid accumulation was excluded by endomyocardial biopsy, which revealed the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in an advanced hypertensive heart disease. PMID:27247807

  12. Motexafin-Gadolinium and Involved Field Radiation Therapy for Intrinsic Pontine Glioma of Childhood: A Children's Oncology Group Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Kristin A.; Zhou Tianni; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Jakacki, Regina I.; Pollack, Ian F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects on 1-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) of combining motexafin and gadolinium (MGd), a potent radiosensitizer, with daily fractionated radiation therapy in children with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine glioma were treated with MGd daily for 5 consecutive days each week, for a total of 30 doses. Patients received a 5- to 10-min intravenous bolus of MGd, 4.4 mg/kg/day, given 2 to 5 h prior to standard dose irradiation. Radiation therapy was administered at a daily dose of 1.8 Gy for 30 treatments over 6 weeks. The total dose was 54 Gy. Results: Sixty eligible children received MGd daily, concurrent with 6 weeks of radiation therapy. The estimated 1-year EFS was 18% {+-} 5%, and the estimated 1-year OS was 53% {+-} 6.5%. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities were lymphopenia, transient elevation of liver transaminases, and hypertension. Conclusions: Compared to historical controls, the addition of MGd to a standard 6-week course of radiation did not improve the survival of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas.

  13. Effect of tar fractions from coal gasification on nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia and nickel-gadolinium doped ceria solid oxide fuel cell anode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, E.; Berrueco, C.; Millan, M.; Brandon, N. P.

    2013-11-01

    The allowable tar content in gasification syngas is one of the key questions for the exploitation of the full potential of fuel cell concepts with integrated gasification systems. A better understanding of the interaction between tars and the SOFC anodes which leads to carbon formation and deposition is needed in order to design systems where the extent of gas cleaning operations is minimized. Model tar compounds (toluene, benzene, naphthalene) have been used in experimental studies to represent those arising from biomass/coal gasification. However, the use of toluene as a model tar overestimates the negative impact of a real gasification tar on SOFC anode degradation associated with carbon formation. In the present work, the effect of a gasification tar and its distillation fractions on two commercially available fuel cell anodes, Ni/YSZ (yttria stabilized zirconia) and Ni/CGO (gadolinium doped ceria), is reported. A higher impact of the lighter tar fractions was observed, in terms of more carbon formation on the anodes, in comparison with the whole tar sample. The characterization of the recovered tars after contact with the anode materials revealed a shift towards a heavier molecular weight distribution, reinforcing the view that these fractions have reacted on the anode.

  14. Gadolinium Texaphyrin (Gd-Tex)-Malonato-Platinum Conjugates: Synthesis and Comparison with Carboplatin in Normal and Pt-Resistant Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Arambula, Jonathan F.; Fountain, Mark; Wei, Wen-hao

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of a new PEG3-solubilized gadolinium texaphyrin (Gd-Tex) conjugate containing a malonate-Pt(NH3)2 moiety is described. The effect of the tumor localizing Gd-Tex macrocycle on platinum activity was evaluated in cell culture. The malonate moiety, analogous to that present in carboplatin, is expected to release Pt(NH3)2 under physiological conditions. The half-life in phosphate-buffered saline was found to be ca. 3 days at room temperature, and the hydrolytic product released from the conjugate was collected and confirmed as Pt-based by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Anti-proliferative activity was tested using A549 human lung cancer and A2780 human ovarian cancer cell lines. In both cell lines, the activity of the Gd-Tex conjugate was found to be similar to that of carboplatin. Efficacy against a Pt-resistant ovarian cell line greater than that displayed by carboplatin was also observed. PMID:20023913

  15. Proton-conducting Micro-solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Improved Cathode Reactions by a Nanoscale Thin Film Gadolinium-doped Ceria Interlayer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Wang, Shijie; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    An 8 nm-thick gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) layer was inserted as a cathodic interlayer between the nanoscale proton-conducting yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY) electrolyte and the porous platinum cathode of a micro-solid oxide fuel cell (μ-SOFC), which has effectively improved the cathode reaction kinetics and rendered high cell power density. The addition of the GDC interlayer significantly reduced the cathodic activation loss and increased the peak power density of the μ-SOFC by 33% at 400 °C. The peak power density reached 445 mW/cm2 at 425 °C, which is the highest among the reported μ-SOFCs using proton-conducting electrolytes. The impressive performance was attributed to the mixed protonic and oxygen ionic conducting properties of the nano-granular GDC, and also to the high densities of grain boundaries and lattice defects in GDC interlayer that favored the oxygen incorporation and transportation during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the water evolution reaction at cathode. PMID:26928192

  16. In Vivo Tracking of Phagocytic Immune Cells Using a Dual Imaging Probe with Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI and Near-Infrared Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Joong; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Hyun Min; Shin, Weon Sup; Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-04-27

    A novel dual imaging probe for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging was developed by combining gadolinium (Gd)-chelating MR probe and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore, aza-BODIPY (AB; BODIPY = boron-dipyrromethene). This aza-BODIPY-based bimodal contrast agent (AB-BCA) showed a significant fluorescence emission around the NIR range and an enhanced longitudinal relaxivity in MR modality. The probe was easily delivered to phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, together with macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), and presented high-performance fluorescence and MR imaging without obvious cytotoxicity. For in vivo visualization of AB-BCA using MRI and optical imaging, bone marrow-derived DCs were labeled and injected into the footpad of mice, and labeled DCs were tracked in vivo. We observed the migration of AB-BCA-labeled DCs into the lymph nodes via lymphatic vessels using NIR fluorescence and T1-weighted MR images. This dual-modality imaging probe was used for noninvasive monitoring of DC migration into lymph nodes and could be useful for investigating advanced cellular immunotherapy.

  17. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in Nd2BiFe5-xGaxO12 prepared on gadolinium gallium garnet (001) by metal organic decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H.; Kuwahara, A.; Sakata, N.; Ono, T.; Ishibashi, T.; Meguro, A.; Hashinaka, T.; Kishimoto, K.; Koyanagi, T.

    2015-05-01

    Nd2BiFe5-xGaxO12 thin films with the Ga composition x = 0, 0.5, and 1.0 are prepared on (001) oriented gadolinium gallium garnet substrates by a metal organic decomposition method. Only (001) peaks are observed in x-ray diffraction patterns for all the films, suggesting that the highly oriented Nd2BiFe5-xGaxO12 thin films were formed. Increasing Ga composition, the saturation magnetization decreases, and the perpendicular easy axis is enhanced due to the decrease of the shape anisotropy. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effects (LSSEs) in Nd2BiFe5-xGaxO12 thin films with a Pt layer of 10 nm in thickness were investigated. Magnetic field dependence of the thermoelectric voltage caused by the LSSE in Nd2BiFe5-xGaxO12 films indicates the hysteresis loop with the small coercivity reflecting the magnetization curve. The decrease of LSSE voltage in Nd2BiFe5-xGaxO12 is clearly observed with the decrease of Fe composition.

  18. Effects of gadolinium and tetrodotoxin on the response of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptors to mechanical stimulation in frog dorsal skin.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mamoru; Nishikawa, Toshimi; Sato, Sumie; Aiyama, Shigeo; Matsumoto, Shigeji

    2003-12-01

    To elucidate the excitatory mechanism of mechanoreceptors innervating the frog skin, we examined the effects of gadolinium (Gd3+) and tetrodotoxin (TTX) on the response of single-unit activity of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptors to mechanical stimulation topically applied to the receptive field (RF). Recordings were made from 46 fibers responding to mechanical stimulation with von Frey hairs, which caused an irregular firing pattern with slow adaptation. Application of a mechanically gated channel blocker, Gd3+ (30 microM), and a Na+ channel blocker, TTX (3 microM), caused the suppression of discharge rates, which was characterized by the conversion of a slowly adapting to a rapidly adapting discharge pattern. The administration of a high-voltage-activated (HVA) Ca2+ channel blocker, Cd2+ (100 microm), inhibited the unit discharge and caused the conversion of a slowly adapting to a rapidly adapting discharge pattern. Tonic discharges evoked by anodal electrical stimulation were inhibited by the application of Gd3+ or TTX. Electron microscopic examination showed that the cytoplasm of Merkel cells seen in the RF contained numerous Merkel granules. These results suggest that the excitatory mechanism of frog cutaneous mechanoreceptors may be mediated by the activation of Gd(3+)-sensitive stretch-activated channels in the Merkel cell-neurite complex, which are related to the Na+ influx via voltage-gated Na+ channels and/or the Ca2+ influx through HVA Ca2+ channels.

  19. Europium-doped gadolinium sulfide nanoparticles as a dual-mode imaging agent for T1-weighted MR and photoluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jongjin; Kim, Mi Ae; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Lee, Seung Jae; Yang, Ilseung; Cho, Janggeun; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Chulhyun; Park, Joung Kyu

    2012-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of europium-doped gadolinium sulfide (GdS:Eu(3+)) opto-magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) via sonochemistry. Their photoluminescence and strong paramagnetic properties enable these NPs to be utilized as an in vitro cell imaging and in vivo T(1)-weighted MR imaging probe. The GdS:Eu(3+) NPs have a prominent longitudinal (r(1)) relaxivity value, which is a critical parameter for T(1)-weighted MR imaging. Here, we showed not only their strong positive contrast effect to blood vessels and organs of mice, but also blood half-life and biodistribution including clearance from organs, in order to assess the GdS:Eu(3+) NPs as a competent nanocrystal-based T(1) contrast agent. We further showed confocal images of breast cancer cells containing GdS:Eu(3+) NPs to evaluate as a photoluminescence probe. Dual-mode imaging capability obtained from the GdS:Eu(3+) NPs will allow target-oriented cellular imaging as well as the resulting disease-specific MR imaging.

  20. Multimodal Magnetic Resonance and Near-Infrared-Fluorescent Imaging of Intraperitoneal Ovarian Cancer Using a Dual-Mode-Dual-Gadolinium Liposomal Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Ravoori, M. K.; Singh, S.; Bhavane, R.; Sood, A. K.; Anvari, B.; Bankson, J.; Annapragada, A.; Kundra, V.

    2016-01-01

    The degree of tumor removal at surgery is a major factor in predicting outcome for ovarian cancer. A single multimodality agent that can be used with magnetic resonance (MR) for staging and pre-surgical planning, and with optical imaging to aid surgical removal of tumors, would present a new paradigm for ovarian cancer. We assessed whether a dual-mode, dual-Gadolinium (DM-Dual-Gd-ICG) contrast agent can be used to visualize ovarian tumors in the peritoneal cavity by multimodal MR and near infra-red imaging (NIR). Intraperitoneal ovarian tumors (Hey-A8 or OVCAR3) in mice enhanced on MR two days after intravenous DM-Dual Gd-ICG injection compared to controls (SNR, CNR, p < 0.05, n = 6). As seen on open abdomen and excised tumors views and confirmed by optical radiant efficiency measurement, Hey-A8 or OVCAR3 tumors from animals injected with DM-Dual Gd-ICG had increased fluorescence (p < 0.05, n = 6). This suggests clinical potential to localize ovarian tumors by MR for staging and surgical planning, and, by NIR at surgery for resection. PMID:28004770

  1. Visualization of Fluoride Ions In Vivo Using a Gadolinium(III)-Coumarin Complex-Based Fluorescence/MRI Dual-Modal Probe

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Song, Renfeng; Feng, Huan; Guo, Ke; Meng, Qingtao; Chi, Haijun; Zhang, Run; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    A new Gadolinium(III)–coumarin complex, DO3A-Gd-CA, was designed and prepared as a dual-modal probe for simultaneous fluorescence and relaxivity responses to fluoride ions (F−) in aqueous media and mice. DO3A-Gd-CA was designed by using Gd(III) center as an MRI signal output unit and fluoride binding site, and the 4-(diethylamino)-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (CA) as a fluorescence reporter. Upon the addition of fluoride ions to the solution of DO3A-Gd-CA, the liberation of the coordinated CA ligand led to a 5.7-fold fluorescence enhancement and a 75% increase in the longitudinal relaxivity (r1). The fluorescent detection limit for fluoride ions was determined to be 8 μM based on a 3σ/slope. The desirable features of the proposed DO3A-Gd-CA, such as high sensitivity and specificity, reliability at physiological pH and low cytotoxicity enable its application in visualization of fluoride ion in mice. The successful in vivo imaging indicates that DO3A-Gd-CA could be potentially used in biomedical diagnosis fields. PMID:27999298

  2. Antenna Effect on the Organic Spacer-Modified Eu-Doped Layered Gadolinium Hydroxide for the Detection of Vanadate Ions over a Wide pH Range.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heejin; Lee, Byung-Il; Byeon, Song-Ho

    2016-05-04

    The excitation of the adsorbed vanadate group led to the red emission arising from the efficient energy transfer to Eu-doped layered gadolinium hydroxide (LGdH:Eu). This light-harvesting antenna effect allowed LGdH:Eu to detect selectively a vanadate in aqueous solution at different pHs. Because vanadate exists in various forms by extensive oligomerization and protonation reactions in aqueous solution depending on pH, it is important to detect a vanadate regardless of its form over a wide pH range. In particular, spacer molecules with long alkyl chains greatly facilitated access of a vanadate antenna into the interlayer surface of LGdH:Eu. The concomitant increase in adsorption capacity of LGdH:Eu achieved a strong antenna effect of vanadate on the red emission from Eu(3+). When a suspension containing LGdH:Eu nanosheets (1.0 g/L) was used, the vanadate concentration down to 1 × 10(-5) M could even be visually monitored, and the detection limit based on the (5)D0 → (7)F2 emission intensity could reach 4.5 × 10(-8) M.

  3. Proton-conducting Micro-solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Improved Cathode Reactions by a Nanoscale Thin Film Gadolinium-doped Ceria Interlayer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Wang, Shijie; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-02-29

    An 8 nm-thick gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) layer was inserted as a cathodic interlayer between the nanoscale proton-conducting yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY) electrolyte and the porous platinum cathode of a micro-solid oxide fuel cell (μ-SOFC), which has effectively improved the cathode reaction kinetics and rendered high cell power density. The addition of the GDC interlayer significantly reduced the cathodic activation loss and increased the peak power density of the μ-SOFC by 33% at 400 °C. The peak power density reached 445 mW/cm(2) at 425 °C, which is the highest among the reported μ-SOFCs using proton-conducting electrolytes. The impressive performance was attributed to the mixed protonic and oxygen ionic conducting properties of the nano-granular GDC, and also to the high densities of grain boundaries and lattice defects in GDC interlayer that favored the oxygen incorporation and transportation during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the water evolution reaction at cathode.

  4. Pulse electrosynthesis of novel wormlike gadolinium oxide nanostructure and its nanocomposite with conjugated electroactive polymer as a hybrid and high efficient electrode material for energy storage device.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Hamid Mohammad; Ehsani, Ali

    2016-12-15

    An effective approach for increasing the life cycle of pure p-type conductive polymers is combining conventional conductive polymers and nanomaterials to fabricate hybrid electrodes. In this paper, Gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) has first been synthesized using pulse electrochemical approach. Hybrid POAP/Gd2O3 films have then been fabricated by POAP electropolymerization in the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles as active electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors. Surface and electrochemical analyses have been used for characterization of Gd2O3 and POAP/Gd2O3 composite films. Different electrochemical methods including galvanostatic charge discharge experiments, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been applied to study the system performance. Specific capacitance, specific energy and specific power of the composite film are calculated 300F·g(-1), 41.66Wh·kg(-1) and 833.22W·kg(-1) respectively. This work introduces new nanocomposite materials for electrochemical redox capacitors with such advantages as the ease of synthesis, high active surface area and stability in an aqueous electrolyte.

  5. Exclusive photothermal heat generation by a gadolinium bis(naphthalocyanine) complex and inclusion into modified high-density lipoprotein nanocarriers for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Simon; Murakami, Tatsuya; Nakatsuji, Hirotaka; Okamoto, Haruki; Morone, Nobuhiro; Heuser, John E; Hashida, Mitsuru; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2013-10-22

    A hydrophobic gadolinium bis(naphthalocyanine) sandwich complex (GdSand) possessing several absorbances across visible and infrared wavelengths (up to 2500 nm) was solubilized in aqueous solution by uptake into a nascent mutant high-density lipoprotein (HDL) nanocarrier. The HDL nanocarrier was additionally functionalized with a trans-activator of transcription peptide sequence to promote efficient cell penetration of the drug delivery system (cpHDL). The dye-loaded nanocarrier (GdSand@cpHDL) exhibited photothermal heat generation properties upon irradiation with near-infrared (NIR) laser light, with controllable heat generation abilities as a function of the incident laser light power. Comparison of the photothermal behavior of the dyes GdSand and the well-explored molecular photothermal agent indocyanine green (ICG) in the cpHDL nanocarrier (i.e., ICG@cpHDL) revealed two significant advantages of GdSand@cpHDL: (1) the ability to maintain elevated temperatures upon light absorption for extended periods of time, with a reduced degree of self-destruction of the dye, and (2) exclusive photothermal heat generation with no detectable singlet oxygen production leading to improved integrity of the cpHDL nanocarrier after irradiation. Finally, GdSand@cpHDL was successfully subjected to an in vitro study against NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells, demonstrating the proof-of-principle utility of lanthanide sandwich complexes in photothermal therapeutic applications.

  6. Tunable quasi-cw two-micron lasing in diode-pumped crystals of mixed Tm{sup 3+}-doped sodium - lanthanum - gadolinium molybdates and tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shchikov, F A; Ryabochkina, P A; Zharikov, Evgeny V; Lis, Denis A; Subbotin, Kirill A; Zakharov, N G; Antipov, Oleg L

    2010-12-09

    Two-micron lasing is obtained for the first time on the {sup 3}F{sub 4} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 6} transition of Tm{sup 3+} ions in diode-pumped crystals of mixed sodium - lanthanum - gadolinium tungstate Tm:NaLa{sub 1/2}Gd{sub 1/2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (C{sub Tm} = 3.6 at %) (3.6Tm : NLGW) and molybdate Tm:NaLa{sub 1/3}Gd{sub 2/3}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} (C{sub Tm} = 4.8 at %) (4.8Tm : NLGM). For the 3.6Tm : NLGW crystal, the quasi-cw laser output power exceeded 200 mW and the slope efficiency (with respect to absorbed pump power) for the {pi}- and {sigma}-polarisations at wavelengths of 1908 and 1918 nm was 34% and 30%, respectively. The laser wavelength of this crystal was continuously tuned within the spectral range of 1860 - 1935 nm. For the 4.8Tm : NLGM crystal, the slope efficiency for the {pi}- and {sigma}-polarisations at wavelengths of 1910 and 1918 nm was 27% and 23%, respectively, and the laser wavelength was tunable within the spectral range of 1870 - 1950 nm. (lasers)

  7. Location and speciation of gadolinium and yttrium in roots of Zea mays by LA-ICP-MS and ToF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Saatz, Jessica; Stryhanyuk, Hryhoriy; Vetterlein, Doris; Musat, Niculina; Otto, Matthias; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Richnow, Hans H; Daus, Birgit

    2016-09-01

    Increasing production of rare earth elements (REE) might lead to future contamination of the environment. REE have been shown to accumulate in high concentrations in roots of plants. Plant experiments with Zea mays exposed to a nutrient solution containing gadolinium (Gd) or yttrium (Y) with 10 mg L(-1) Gd or Y were carried out to investigate this accumulation behaviour. Total concentrations of 3.17 g kg(-1) and 8.43 g kg(-1) of Gd and Y were measured in treated plant roots. Using a novel combination of laser ablation mass spectrometry and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, imaging of location and concentration of Gd and Y was carried out in root thin sections of treated roots. Single spots of elevated REE concentration were found at the epidermis, while inside the cortex, weak signals of Gd(+) and Y(+) were aligning with the root cell structures. The composition of Gd-containing secondary ions proves an REE-oxide phase accumulated at the epidermis, limiting REE availability for further uptake.

  8. A novel skeleton based quantification and 3-D volumetric visualization of left atrium fibrosis using late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravanelli, Daniele; dal Piaz, Elena Costanza; Centonze, Maurizio; Casagranda, Giulia; Marini, Massimiliano; Del Greco, Maurizio; Karim, Rashed; Rhode, Kawal; Valentini, Aldo

    2014-02-01

    This work presents the results of a new tool for 3-D segmentation, quantification and visualization of cardiac left atrium fibrosis, based on late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI), for stratifying patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) that are candidates for radio-frequency catheter ablation. In this study 10 consecutive patients suffering AF with different grades of atrial fibrosis were considered. LGE-MRI and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images were used to detect and quantify fibrosis of the left atrium using a threshold and 2-D skeleton based approach. Quantification and 3-D volumetric views of atrial fibrosis were compared with quantification and 3-D bipolar voltage maps measured with an electro-anatomical mapping (EAM) system, the clinical reference standard technique for atrial substrate characterization. Segmentation and quantification of fibrosis areas proved to be clinically reliable among all different fibrosis stages. The proposed tool obtains discrepancies in fibrosis quantification less than 4% from EAM results and yields accurate 3-D volumetric views of fibrosis of left atrium. The novel 3-D visualization and quantification tool based on LGE-MRI allows detection of cardiac left atrium fibrosis areas. This noninvasive method provides a clinical alternative to EAM systems for quantification and localization of atrial fibrosis.

  9. Synthesis of gadolinium carbonate-conjugated-poly(ethylene)glycol (Gd2(CO3)3@PEG) particles via a modified solvothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasution, Erika L. Y.; Ahab, Atika; Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam; Iskandar, Ferry

    2016-02-01

    PEGylated gadolinium carbonate ((Gd2(CO3)3)@PEG) powder was successfully synthesized by a modified solvothermal method. The synthesized products were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). A systematic change in the chemical surface composition, crystallinity and size properties of the Gd2(CO3)3@PEG particles was observed by increasing the reaction time at 5 hours, 7 hours, and 8 hours. The corresponding XRD patterns showed that the Gd2(CO3)3 particles had hexagonal symmetry (JCPDS No. 37-0559) with a crystallite size of 3.5, 2.9, and 4.6 nm. FTIR spectra showed that the Gd2(CO3)3)@PEG particles were formed with the PEG as carbonyl and hydroxyl group attached to the surface. SEM analysis showed that the Gd2(CO3)3)@PEG particles had a flake-like morphology of homogeneous sized particles and agglomerates. EDS analysis confirmed the presence of constituent Gd2(CO3)3 elements.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system in children with a new nonionic gadolinium contrast agent--gadoteridol injection (ProHance).

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, S. E.; Darling, C. F.; Wilczynski, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    This article reports the results of clinical testing in pediatric patients of a new contrast agent, gadoteridol injection (ProHance), developed by Squibb Diagnostic as a nonionic gadolinium agent for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirteen children (four girls and nine boys) ranging in age from 10 to 18 years were enrolled in the study. The children had MR studies of the brain and/or spine with T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and postgadoteridol injection T1-weighted sequences. Five children had primary brain or spine neoplasms, three children had metastatic disease to the central nervous system, one child had a recurrent brain neoplasm and spinal canal metastasis, one child had an arteriovenous malformation, and two children were normal on the MRI studies. No minor or major reactions to gadoteridol injection developed in the 13 patients. Gadoteridol injection provided excellent delineation and enhancement of the arteriovenous malformation and all of the primary and secondary neoplasms of the central nervous system except for one case of a grade 1 glioma of the midbrain. Gadoteridol injection is a safe and excellent contrast agent for use in MRI. Images Figures 1-5 Figures 6-10 PMID:8496990

  11. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; Macleod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-02-23

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  12. Solution and solid-state characterization of europium and gadolinium Schiff base complexes and assessment of their potential as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Morris, D.E.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R. )

    1989-09-13

    Two lanthanide Schiff base macrocyclic complexes, LnAM(OAc){sub 2}Cl{center dot}4H{sub 2}O (Ln = Eu, Gd; HAM - HexaAzaMacrocycle = C{sub 22}H{sub 26}N{sub 6}), have been characterized in view of the potential of the Gd complex as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The relaxivity of GdHAM(OAc){sub 2}Cl was measured at 300 and 20 MHz and is as high as that for the gadolinium aquo ion. The number of coordinated waters, q, was measured by comparison of the luminescent lifetimes of EuHAM(OAc){sub 2}Cl in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O and found to be between three and four. The complex GdHAM(OAc){sub 2}Cl{center dot}4H{sub 2}O was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in space group P{bar 1} with Z = 2, a = 10.032 (2) {angstrom}, b = 12.765 (2) {angstrom}, c = 13.668 (3) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 69.190{degree} (9){degree}, {beta} = 72.405{degree} (9){degree}, and {gamma} = 74.07{degree} (1){degree}.

  13. Proton-conducting Micro-solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Improved Cathode Reactions by a Nanoscale Thin Film Gadolinium-doped Ceria Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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