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Sample records for gadolinium tungstates

  1. Optical properties of doped potassium gadolinium tungstate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, E.; Zmija, Jozef; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Majchrowski, Andrzej; Kopczynski, Krzysztof; Cichowski, S.; Wojtanowski, J.

    2001-08-01

    Single crystals of double tungstates find applications as laser materials having very good parameters. One of the intensively investigated material sis KGD(WO4)2 doped with rare earth elements. Single crystal of KGd(WO4)2 were grown with the use of Top Seeded Solution Growth technique from K2W2O7 solvent. The crystals have low absorption loses and show high lasing efficiency. Optical investigations of as grown KGW:Nd single crystal confirmed their good optical quality and high absorption coefficient near 810 nm, what in connection with strong luminescence near 1067 nm allows fabrication of diode pumped microchip lasers working both in CW and giant pulse regime. Absorption and luminescence spectra of Nd3+ doped KGW single crystals are presented. Laser action was obtained in form of 128.5 kHz train of 100 ns giant pluses due to YAG:Cr4+ passive Q-switch.

  2. Steady-state Raman gain coefficients of potassium-gadolinium tungstate at the wavelength of 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulkov, R.; Markevich, V.; Orlovich, V.; El-Desouki, M.

    2015-12-01

    Stokes generation has been considered under the Fourier-limited nanosecond pulse excitation to find Raman gain coefficients in potassium-gadolinium tungstate. Data of numerical simulation under spontaneous Stokes initiation, light diffraction, and optical feedback have been compared with experimental results to reveal coefficient values of 14 ± 3 and 11 ± 3 cm/GW for the p[mm]p and p[gg]p sample orientations, respectively, at 532 nm wavelength.

  3. Lasing properties of sodium-gadolinium tungstate NaGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals doped with Tm{sup 3+} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zharikov, Evgeny V; Lis, Denis A; Popov, A V; Subbotin, Kirill A; Ushakov, S N; Shestakov, A V; Razdobreev, I M

    2006-06-30

    Lasing is obtained in Tm{sup 3+}-doped sodium-gadolinium tungstate NaGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals longitudinally pumped by pulses from a laser diode bar. The slope lasing efficiency is 16%. Lasing was observed at wavelengths of 1957, 1944, 1936, and 1901 nm for the transmission coefficients of the output mirror T{sub out} = 0.3%, 1.4%, 3.3%, and 8.5%, respectively. (lasers)

  4. Random lasing in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate crystal powder

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, André L.; Fewo, Serge I.; Carvalho, Mariana T.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Araújo, Cid B. de; Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2015-02-28

    Random laser (RL) emission in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate—KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+}—crystal powder is demonstrated. The powder was excited at 813 nm in resonance with the Nd{sup 3+} transition {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}F{sub 5/2}. RL emission at 1067 nm due to the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} transition was observed and characterized. An intensity threshold dependent on the laser spot area and bandwidth narrowing from ≈2.20 nm to ≈0.40 nm were observed and measured. For a beam spot area of 0.4 mm{sup 2}, a RL threshold of 6.5 mJ/mm{sup 2} (90 MW/cm{sup 2}) was determined. For excitation intensity smaller than the RL threshold, only spontaneous emission from level {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} with decay time in the tens microsecond range was observed, but for excitation above the RL threshold, significant shortening of excited level lifetime, characteristic of a stimulated process was found. The overall characteristics measured show that KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+} is an efficient material for operation of solid state RLs in the near-infrared.

  5. Tunable quasi-cw two-micron lasing in diode-pumped crystals of mixed Tm{sup 3+}-doped sodium - lanthanum - gadolinium molybdates and tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shchikov, F A; Ryabochkina, P A; Zharikov, Evgeny V; Lis, Denis A; Subbotin, Kirill A; Zakharov, N G; Antipov, Oleg L

    2010-12-09

    Two-micron lasing is obtained for the first time on the {sup 3}F{sub 4} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 6} transition of Tm{sup 3+} ions in diode-pumped crystals of mixed sodium - lanthanum - gadolinium tungstate Tm:NaLa{sub 1/2}Gd{sub 1/2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (C{sub Tm} = 3.6 at %) (3.6Tm : NLGW) and molybdate Tm:NaLa{sub 1/3}Gd{sub 2/3}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} (C{sub Tm} = 4.8 at %) (4.8Tm : NLGM). For the 3.6Tm : NLGW crystal, the quasi-cw laser output power exceeded 200 mW and the slope efficiency (with respect to absorbed pump power) for the {pi}- and {sigma}-polarisations at wavelengths of 1908 and 1918 nm was 34% and 30%, respectively. The laser wavelength of this crystal was continuously tuned within the spectral range of 1860 - 1935 nm. For the 4.8Tm : NLGM crystal, the slope efficiency for the {pi}- and {sigma}-polarisations at wavelengths of 1910 and 1918 nm was 27% and 23%, respectively, and the laser wavelength was tunable within the spectral range of 1870 - 1950 nm. (lasers)

  6. Synthesis, structural and vibrational studies on mixed alkali metal gadolinium double tungstate, K1-xNaxGd(WO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durairajan, A.; Thangaraju, D.; Moorthy Babu, S.

    2013-02-01

    Mixed alkali double tungstates K1-xNaxGd(WO4)2 (KNGW) (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) were synthesized by solid state reaction using sodium doped monoclinic KGd(WO4)2 (KGW). Synthesized KNGW powders were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman analysis. DTA analysis confirms that the melting point of the KGW matrix increases from 1063 °C to 1255 °C with increasing sodium content. The Powder XRD analyses reveal that mixed phases were observed up to 40 wt.% of Na in the KGW matrix above that percentage there is domination of scheelite structure in the synthesized powder. Polyhedral type, bi-pyramidal shape and spheroid shape morphology was observed for KGW, NKGW and NGW powders respectively. The Raman analysis was carried out to understand the vibrational characteristic changes with mixing of sodium ions in the KGW matrix.

  7. Thulium channel waveguide laser in a monoclinic double tungstate with 70% slope efficiency.

    PubMed

    van Dalfsen, K; Aravazhi, S; Grivas, C; García-Blanco, S M; Pollnau, M

    2012-03-01

    Laser experiments were performed on buried, ridge-type channel waveguides in an 8 at. % thulium-doped, yttrium-gadolinium-lutetium codoped monoclinic double tungstate. A maximum slope efficiency of 70% and output powers up to 300 mW about 2.0 μm were obtained in a mirrorless laser resonator, by pumping with a Ti:sapphire laser near 800 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this result represents the most efficient 2 μm channel waveguide laser to date. Lasing is obtained at various wavelengths between 1810 nm and 2037 nm.

  8. Vanadate, molybdate and tungstate for orthomolecular medicine.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, J

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that oxyanions, such as vanadate (V) or vanadyl (IV), cause insulin-like effects on rats by stimulating the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Tungstate (VI) and molybdate (VI) show the same effects on rat adipocytes and hepatocytes. Results of uncontrolled trials on volunteers accumulated in Japan also suggest that tungstate effectively regulates diabetes mellitus without detectable side effects. Since these oxyanions naturally exist in organisms, oxyanion therapy, the oral administration of vanadate, vanadyl, molybdate, or tungstate, can be considered to be orthomolecular medicine. Therefore, these oxyanions may provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy. Many diseases in addition to diabetes mellitus might also be treated since the implication of these results is that tyrosine kinases are involved in a variety of diseases. PMID:7815975

  9. Morphology Tuning of Strontium Tungstate Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, S.; George, T.; George, K. C.; Sunny, A. T.; Mathew, S.

    2007-08-22

    Strontium tungstate nanocrystals in two different morphologies are successfully synthesized by controlled precipitation in aqueous and in poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) medium. Structural characterizations are carried out by XRD and SEM. The average particle size calculated for the SrWO4 prepared in the two different solvents ranges 20-24 nm. The SEM pictures show that the surface morphologies of the SrWO4 nanoparticles in aqueous medium resemble mushroom and the SrWO4 nanoparticles in PVA medium resemble cauliflower. Investigations on the room temperature luminescent properties of the strontium tungstate nanoparticles prepared in aqueous and PVA medium shows strong emissions around 425 nm.

  10. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Omrani, Ismail

    2012-12-01

    Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  11. Gadolinium photoionization process

    DOEpatents

    Paisner, J.A.; Comaskey, B.J.; Haynam, C.A.; Eggert, J.H.

    1993-04-13

    A method is provided for selective photoionization of the odd-numbered atomic mass gadolinium isotopes 155 and 157. The selective photoionization is accomplished by circular or linear parallel polarized laser beam energy effecting a three-step photoionization pathway.

  12. Gadolinium photoionization process

    DOEpatents

    Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Haynam, Christopher A.; Eggert, Jon H.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for selective photoionization of the odd-numbered atomic mass gadolinium isotopes 155 and 157. The selective photoionization is accomplished by circular or linear parallel polarized laser beam energy effecting a three-step photoionization pathway.

  13. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF.

  14. In situ growth of epitaxial cerium tungstate (100) thin films.

    PubMed

    Skála, Tomáš; Tsud, Nataliya; Orti, Miguel Ángel Niño; Menteş, Tevfik Onur; Locatelli, Andrea; Prince, Kevin Charles; Matolín, Vladimír

    2011-04-21

    The deposition of ceria on a preoxidized W(110) crystal at 870 K has been studied in situ by photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Formation of an epitaxial layer of crystalline cerium tungstate Ce(6)WO(12)(100), with the metals in the Ce(3+) and W(6+) chemical states, has been observed. The interface between the tungsten substrate and the tungstate film consists of WO suboxide. At thicknesses above 0.89 nm, cerium dioxide grows on the surface of Ce(6)WO(12), favoured by the limited diffusion of tungsten from the substrate. PMID:21399780

  15. Synchrotron-based far-infrared spectroscopy of nickel tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinko, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Roy, P.; Evarestov, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    Monoclinic antiferromagnetic NiWO4 was studied by far-infrared (30-600 cm-1) absorption spectroscopy in the temperature range of 5-300 K using the synchrotron radiation from SOLEIL source. Two isomorphous CoWO4 and ZnWO4 tungstates were investigated for comparison. The phonon contributions in the far-infrared range of tungstates were interpreted using the first-principles spin-polarized linear combination of atomic orbital calculations. No contributions from magnetic excitations were found in NiWO4 and CoWO4 below their Neel temperatures down to 5 K.

  16. Elasto-optic effect anisotropy in calcium tungstate crystals.

    PubMed

    Demyanyshyn, N M; Mytsyk, B G; Kost, Y P; Solskii, I M; Sakharuk, O M

    2015-03-20

    The anisotropy of piezo- and elasto-optic effects in calcium tungstate CaWO4 crystals was studied by the indicatory surfaces method. On the basis of the maximum surfaces of the elasto-optic effect, the geometry of acousto-optic interaction with maximum efficiency was found. PMID:25968520

  17. Growth of transition metals on cerium tungstate model catalyst layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, T.; Tsud, N.; Stetsovych, V.; Mysliveček, J.; Matolín, V.

    2016-10-01

    Two model catalytic metal/oxide systems were investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mixed-oxide support was a cerium tungstate epitaxial thin layer grown in situ on the W(1 1 0) single crystal. Active particles consisted of palladium and platinum 3D islands deposited on the tungstate surface at 300 K. Both metals were found to interact weakly with the oxide support and the original chemical state of both support and metals was mostly preserved. Electronic and morphological changes are discussed during the metal growth and after post-annealing at temperatures up to 700 K. Partial transition-metal coalescence and self-cleaning from the CO and carbon impurities were observed.

  18. Growth of transition metals on cerium tungstate model catalyst layers.

    PubMed

    Skála, T; Tsud, N; Stetsovych, V; Mysliveček, J; Matolín, V

    2016-10-01

    Two model catalytic metal/oxide systems were investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mixed-oxide support was a cerium tungstate epitaxial thin layer grown in situ on the W(1 1 0) single crystal. Active particles consisted of palladium and platinum 3D islands deposited on the tungstate surface at 300 K. Both metals were found to interact weakly with the oxide support and the original chemical state of both support and metals was mostly preserved. Electronic and morphological changes are discussed during the metal growth and after post-annealing at temperatures up to 700 K. Partial transition-metal coalescence and self-cleaning from the CO and carbon impurities were observed. PMID:27494195

  19. EFFECT OF TUNGSTATE ON THE UPTAKE AND FUNCTION OF MOLYBDATE IN AZOTOBACTER AGILIS

    PubMed Central

    Bulen, William A.

    1961-01-01

    Bulen, William A. (Charles F. Kettering Foundation, Yellow Springs, Ohio). Effect of tungstate on the uptake and function of molybdate in Azotobacter agilis. J. Bacteriol. 82:130–134. 1961.—The reported competitive inhibition of molybdate by tungstate was investigated in an effort to elucidate molybdenum functions associated with nitrogen fixation by Azotobacter agilis (A. vinelandii). Growth, respiration, and N215-incorporation experiments with normal and molybdenum-deficient cells indicated that tungstate inhibits the uptake of molybdate but does not compete with the metabolically functional molybdenum of cells metabolizing N2. Neither a molybdenum requirement nor a tungstate inhibition was observed with cells metabolizing urea. PMID:16561910

  20. Structure and thermal behavior of zirconium tungstate under heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedova, E. S.; Shutilova, E. S.; Geber, R.; Gomze, L. A.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    The morphology and properties of powders ZrW2O7(OH)2·2H2O and ZrW2O8, obtained under the conditions of hydrothermal synthesis was studied. Using the high-temperature X-ray analysis, the mechanism of formation of zirconium tungstate was established. The influence of temperature on the structure and properties of materials was studied using shadow-casting method.

  1. A functional leptin system is essential for sodium tungstate antiobesity action.

    PubMed

    Canals, Ignasi; Carmona, María C; Amigó, Marta; Barbera, Albert; Bortolozzi, Analía; Artigas, Francesc; Gomis, Ramon

    2009-02-01

    Sodium tungstate is a novel agent in the treatment of obesity. In diet-induced obese rats, it is able to reduce body weight gain by increasing energy expenditure. This study evaluated the role of leptin, a key regulator of energy homeostasis, in the tungstate antiobesity effect. Leptin receptor-deficient Zucker fa/fa rats and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice were treated with tungstate. In lean animals, tungstate administration reduced body weight gain and food intake and increased energy expenditure. However, in animals with deficiencies in the leptin system, treatment did not modify these parameters. In ob/ob mice in which leptin deficiency was restored through adipose tissue transplantation, treatment restored the tungstate-induced body weight gain and food intake reduction as well as energy expenditure increase. Furthermore, in animals in which tungstate administration increased energy expenditure, changes in the expression of key genes involved in brown adipose tissue thermogenesis were detected. Finally, the gene expression of the hypothalamic neuropeptides, Npy, Agrp, and Cart, involved in the leptin regulation of energy homeostasis, was also modified by tungstate in a leptin-dependent manner. In summary, the results indicate that the effectiveness of tungstate in reducing body weight gain is completely dependent on a functional leptin system.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of tungstate-induced pancreatic plasticity: a transcriptomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Altirriba, Jordi; Barbera, Albert; Del Zotto, Héctor; Nadal, Belen; Piquer, Sandra; Sánchez-Pla, Alex; Gagliardino, Juan J; Gomis, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    Background Sodium tungstate is known to be an effective anti-diabetic agent, able to increase beta cell mass in animal models of diabetes, although the molecular mechanisms of this treatment and the genes that control pancreas plasticity are yet to be identified. Using a transcriptomics approach, the aim of the study is to unravel the molecular mechanisms which participate in the recovery of exocrine and endocrine function of streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats treated with tungstate, determining the hyperglycemia contribution and the direct effect of tungstate. Results Streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats were treated orally with tungstate for five weeks. Treated (STZ)-diabetic rats showed a partial recovery of exocrine and endocrine function, with lower glycemia, increased insulinemia and amylasemia, and increased beta cell mass achieved by reducing beta cell apoptosis and raising beta cell proliferation. The microarray analysis of the pancreases led to the identification of three groups of differentially expressed genes: genes altered due to diabetes, genes restored by the treatment, and genes specifically induced by tungstate in the diabetic animals. The results were corroborated by quantitative PCR. A detailed description of the pathways involved in the pancreatic effects of tungstate is provided in this paper. Hyperglycemia contribution was studied in STZ-diabetic rats treated with phloridzin, and the direct effect of tungstate was determined in INS-1E cells treated with tungstate or serum from untreated or treated STZ-rats, observing that tungstate action in the pancreas takes places via hyperglycemia-independent pathways and via a combination of tungstate direct and indirect (through the serum profile modification) effects. Finally, the MAPK pathway was evaluated, observing that it has a key role in the tungstate-induced increase of beta cell proliferation as tungstate activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway directly by increasing p42/p44

  3. A study on the properties of lead tungstate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y. Zhu, R.; Ma, D. A.; Newman, H. B.; Woody, C. L.; Kierstead, J. A.; Stoll, S. P.; Levy, P. W.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study on the properties of five large and five small size lead tungstate (PbWO4) crystals. Data are presented on the longitudinal optical transmittance and light attenuation length, light yield and response uniformity, emission spectra and decay time. The radiation resistance of large crystals and possible curing with optical bleaching are discussed. The result of an in depth materials study, including trace impurities analysis, are also presented. The general conclusion from this investigation is that further research and development is needed to develop fast, radiation-hard PbWO4 crystals for the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC.

  4. The magnetic properties of potassium holmium double tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, M. T.; Dyakonov, V. P.; Khatsko, E. N.; Zayarnyuk, T.; Zubov, E. E.; Szewczyk, A.; Gutowska, M. U.; Rykova, A. I.; Pietosa, J.; Majchrowski, A.; Michalski, E.; Hoffmann, J.-U.; Prokes, K.; Woźniak, K.; Dobrzycki, Ł.; Barański, M.; Domukhovski, V.; Shtyrkhunova, V.; Żmija, J.; Szymczak, H.

    2011-08-01

    The magnetic investigations of potassium holmium double tungstate KHo(WO4)2 have been performed. The results of measurements of magnetic susceptibility and magnetization as a function of temperature (T from 0.3 K up to 100 K) and magnetic field (up to 1.5 T) are presented. A strong anisotropy of magnetic properties was found. The magnetic measurements data were used to calculate the interaction energy. It was shown that the interactions between nearest neighbors Ho3+ ions have antiferromagnetic character.

  5. Optical and dielectric studies on tin(iv) tungstate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B, Beena; S, Manoj

    2015-02-01

    Tin(IV) tungstate nanoparticles in the form of disc were synthesized by a novel chemical coprecipitation method. Surface morphology and particle size of the synthesized materials were analysed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). SEM image shows disc like appearance of the nanoparticles. The particle size obtained was found to be ~20nm. Optical absorption for this material arises due to O2p → W5d charge transfer in the tungstate structure. The energy band gap determined using optical absorption spectrum shows that it is a direct band gap semiconductor. The extent of disorder determined using Urbach plot was found to be 0.00176 meV. The material showed intrinsic Photoluminescence around 468nm when excited by UV light of 275nm. The variation of dielectric permittivity in the frequency range 316 Hz to 3.16 MHz was studied. The temperature dependence of dielectric permittivity was also studied in the frequency range 10Hz and 32 MHz. The compound exhibit a high dielectric constant at room temperature (ε1>103) for frequencies 10Hz and (ε1 > 105) for frequencies 3.2×107 Hz. It posses lower dielectric loss ie, ~0.1 at 10 Hz to ~3 at 3.2×107 Hz. The material is very attractive for potential application provides its losses can be minimized.

  6. Toxicity of sodium tungstate to earthworm, oat, radish, and lettuce.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Josie E; Butler, Alicia D; Heim, Katherine E; Pittinger, Charles A; Lemus, Ranulfo; Staveley, Jane P; Lee, K Brian; Venezia, Carmen; Pardus, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    Due to unknown effects of the potential exposure of the terrestrial environment to tungsten substances, a series of toxicity studies of sodium tungstate (Na(2) WO(4) ) was conducted. The effect on earthworm (Eisenia fetida) survival and reproduction was examined using Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guideline 222. No effect on either endpoint was seen at the highest concentration tested, resulting in a 56-d no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) of ≥586 mg tungsten/kg dry soil (nominal concentrations). The effect of sodium tungstate on emergence and growth of plant species was examined according to OECD Guideline 208: oat (Avena sativa), radish (Raphanus sativus), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa). No effects on emergence, shoot height, and dry shoot weight were observed in oats exposed to the highest concentration, resulting in a 21-d NOEC of ≥586 mg tungsten/kg dry soil. The NOECs for radish and lettuce were 65 and 21.7 mg tungsten/kg dry soil (nominal concentrations), respectively. Respective 21-d median effective concentration values (EC50) for radish and lettuce were >586 and 313 mg tungsten/kg dry soil (based on shoot height) (confidence level [CL] -8.5-615); EC25 values were 152 (CL 0-331) and 55 (CL 0-114) mg tungsten/kg dry soil. Results are consistent with the few other tungsten substance terrestrial toxicity studies in the literature.

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of cadmium tungstate for scintillator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, S.; Baker, M. A.; Wilson, M. D.; Lohstroh, A.; Seller, P.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafast pulsed laser ablation has been investigated as a technique to machine CdWO4 single crystal scintillator and segment it into small blocks with the aim of fabricating a 2D high energy X-ray imaging array. Cadmium tungstate (CdWO4) is a brittle transparent scintillator used for the detection of high energy X-rays and γ-rays. A 6 W Yb:KGW Pharos-SP pulsed laser of wavelength 1028 nm was used with a tuneable pulse duration of 10 ps to 190 fs, repetition rate of up to 600 kHz and pulse energies of up to 1 mJ was employed. The effect of varying the pulse duration, pulse energy, pulse overlap and scan pattern on the laser induced damage to the crystals was investigated. A pulse duration of ≥500 fs was found to induce substantial cracking in the material. The laser induced damage was minimised using the following operating parameters: a pulse duration of 190 fs, fluence of 15.3 J cm-2 and employing a serpentine scan pattern with a normalised pulse overlap of 0.8. The surface of the ablated surfaces was studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ablation products were found to contain cadmium tungstate together with different cadmium and tungsten oxides. These laser ablation products could be removed using an ammonium hydroxide treatment.

  8. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT.

  9. GADOLINIUM SOLUBILITY AND VOLATILITY DURING DWPF PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S

    2008-01-30

    Understanding of gadolinium behavior, as it relates to potential neutron poisoning applications at the DWPF, has increased over the past several years as process specific data have been generated. Of primary importance are phenomena related to gadolinium solubility and volatility, which introduce the potential for gadolinium to be separated from fissile materials during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) and Melter operations. Existing data indicate that gadolinium solubilities under moderately low pH conditions can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on the quantities of other constituents that are present. With respect to sludge batching processes, the gadolinium solubility appears to be highly affected by iron. In cases where the mass ratio of Fe:Gd is 300 or more, the gadolinium solubility has been observed to be low, one milligram per liter or less. In contrast, when the ratio of Fe:Gd is 20 or less, the gadolinium solubility has been found to be relatively high, several thousands of milligrams per liter. For gadolinium to serve as an effective neutron poison in CPC operations, the solubility needs to be limited to approximately 100 mg/L. Unfortunately, the Fe:Gd ratio that corresponds to this solubility limit has not been identified. Existing data suggest gadolinium and plutonium are not volatile during melter operations. However, the data are subject to inherent uncertainties preventing definitive conclusions on this matter. In order to determine if gadolinium offers a practical means of poisoning waste in DWPF operations, generation of additional data is recommended. This includes: Gd solubility testing under conditions where the Fe:Gd ratio varies from 50 to 150; and Gd and Pu volatility studies tailored to quantifying high temperature partitioning. Additional tests focusing on crystal aging of Gd/Pu precipitates should be pursued if receipt of gadolinium-poisoned waste into the Tank Farm becomes routine.

  10. Theoretical calculations of emission of wolframite and scheelite-type tungstate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaenko, T.; Hizhnyi, Y.; Nedilko, S.

    2009-01-21

    Tungstate crystals AWO{sub 4} (A = Zn,Cd,Pb) are well-known scintillation materials for various applications in science and technology. In recent years the optical properties of these crystals were intensively studied experimentally and theoretically. However, the origin of luminescence in lead, cadmium and zinc tungstates is still the subject of discussion. According to generally accepted view, the centers of luminescence in AWO{sub 4} crystals are in some or other way related to the tungstate anionic groups. We developed a cluster approach in theoretical investigation of the electronic structure of AWO{sub 4} tungstate crystals based on the configuration interaction (CI) computation in which the lattice vibrations were taken into account.

  11. Large-scale synthesis and photoluminescence of cobalt tungstate nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cuiling; Guo, Donglin; Hu, Chenguo; Chen, Yanxue; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Hulin; Wang, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Single-crystalline wolframite-type monoclinic structure cobalt tungstate (CoWO4) nanowires were obtained by a solvothermal method at 180 °C for 24 h with a width of 20 nm and length of 200 to 400 nm. Besides the strong blue-green light emission at 10-250 K, we found much stronger and broader near-infrared emission ranging from 700-1000 nm at about 300 K under the excitation wavelength of 325 nm. The emission and the dependence of emission intensity on temperature are discussed by introducing the effect of Co vacancies. This near-infrared emission material might have potential applications in infrared detection or stealth technology.

  12. The specific heat of potassium holmium double tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, M. T.; Dyakonov, V. P.; Szewczyk, A.; Gutowska, M. U.; Zayarnyuk, T.; Zubov, E. E.; Majchrowski, A.; Michalski, E.; Hoffmann, J.-U.; Prokes, K.; Woźniak, K.; Dobrzycki, Ł.; Khatsko, E. N.; Rykova, A. I.; Domukhovski, V.; Barański, M.; Shtyrkhunova, V.; Żmija, J.; Szymczak, H.

    2011-11-01

    The results of measurements of thermal properties (specific heat) of potassium holmium double tungstate KHo(WO4)2 as a function of temperature (from 0.5 to 300 K) and magnetic field (up to 2 T) are presented. The total specific heat without the phonon and Schottky contributions is found to have the anomaly with maximum at T SPT ∼ 5 K. This anomaly is likely related with the structural phase transition (SPT) caused by the cooperative Jahn-Teller effect. The increase of specific heat at very low temperatures and its shift towards high temperatures with increasing magnetic field are observed. The origin of this behaviour can be connected with possible magnetic phase transition induced by magnetic field.

  13. 40 CFR 721.9840 - Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI) (PMN P-96-1177; CAS No. 12141-67-2) is subject to reporting under this... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9840 Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI). (a) Chemical...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9840 - Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI) (PMN P-96-1177; CAS No. 12141-67-2) is subject to reporting under this... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9840 Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI). (a) Chemical...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9840 - Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI) (PMN P-96-1177; CAS No. 12141-67-2) is subject to reporting under this... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9840 Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI). (a) Chemical...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9840 - Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI) (PMN P-96-1177; CAS No. 12141-67-2) is subject to reporting under this... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9840 Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI). (a) Chemical...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9840 - Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI) (PMN P-96-1177; CAS No. 12141-67-2) is subject to reporting under this... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9840 Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI). (a) Chemical...

  18. Effect of sodium tungstate on visual evoked potentials in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Mehmet; Dönmez, Barış Özgür; Öztürk, Nihal; Başaranlar, Göksun; Kencebay Manas, Ceren; Derin, Narin; Özdemir, Semir

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of sodium tungstate on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in diabetic rats. METHODS Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups as normal control, diabetic control and diabetic rats treated with sodium tungstate. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Sodium tungstate [40 mg/(kg·d)] was administered for 12wk and then VEPs were recorded. Additionally, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels were measured in brain tissues. RESULTS The latencies of P1, N1, P2, N2 and P3 waves were significantly prolonged in diabetic rats compared with control group. Diabetes mellitus caused an increase in the lipid peroxidation process that was accompanied by changes in VEPs. However, prolonged latencies of VEPs for all components returned to control levels in sodium tungstate-treated group. The treatment of sodium tungstate significantly decreased brain TBARS levels and depleted the prolonged latencies of VEP components compared with diabetic control group. CONCLUSION Sodium tungstate shows protective effects on visual pathway in diabetic rats, and it can be worthy of further study for potential use. PMID:27275420

  19. Phosphorylation events implicating p38 and PI3K mediate tungstate-effects in MIN6 beta cells

    SciTech Connect

    Piquer, Sandra; Gomis, Ramon . E-mail: rgomis@clinic.ub.es

    2007-06-29

    Oral administration of sodium tungstate is an effective treatment for diabetes in animal models. Several lines of evidence indicate the pancreatic beta cell as one of the targets of tungstate action. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism by which this compound exerts its effects on the beta cell line MIN6. Tungstate treatment induced phosphorylation and subsequent activation of p38 and PI3K which in turn are implicated in tungstate PDX-1 nuclear localization and activation. Although no effect was observed in glucose-induced insulin secretion we found that tungstate activates basal insulin release, a process driven, at least in part, by activation of p38. These results show a direct involvement of p38 and PI3K phosphorylation in the mechanism of action of tungstate in the beta cell.

  20. Toxicity of Gadolinium to Some Aquatic Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2001-01-24

    The toxicity of gadolinium to algae and bacteria was determined as part of an effort to develop a biological process to purify drums containing spent nuclear reactor heavy water moderator (D2O). This water was contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Nuclear reactors were operated for approximately 30 years at the SRS to produce nuclear weapons materials for national defense. Throughout this period, a heavy water solution of gadolinium nitrate was utilized in a standby emergency shutdown system that could inject this chemical into the reactor moderator coolant water. The chemical was used for this purpose because the high neutron absorption cross sections of some gadolinium isotopes make gadolinium salts such as GdNO3 effective in controlling nuclear activity in aqueous systems (Gilbert et al. 1985; Rodenas et al. 1990). The use of this practice resulted in a large inventory of this degraded heavy water containing gadolinium nitrate. Microbiological and chemical studies were initiated to evaluate the potential use of bacteria and algae for water purification of the drums. Since metals are often toxic to microbes when present at concentrations substantially higher than natural environmental levels, it was hypothesized that Gd may be toxic to selected microorganisms (algae and bacteria) at the very high concentrations (average 80,000 mg/L, maximum 259,000 mg/L) present in most of the drums. Two principal components of the study included: (1) chemical and microbiological characterization of representative drums, and (2) an evaluation of the toxicity of gadolinium to selected species of algae. In addition to wastewater from nuclear production reactor operations, gadolinium waste is also generated from medical applications, especially MRI, and various electronic components including CD disks. Despite growing and widespread

  1. Tungstate-Targeting of BKαβ1 Channels Tunes ERK Phosphorylation and Cell Proliferation in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Mariño, Ana Isabel; Cidad, Pilar; Zafra, Delia; Nocito, Laura; Domínguez, Jorge; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Köhler, Ralf; López-López, José R.; Pérez-García, María Teresa; Valverde, Miguel Ángel; Guinovart, Joan J.; Fernández-Fernández, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the substantial knowledge on the antidiabetic, antiobesity and antihypertensive actions of tungstate, information on its primary target/s is scarce. Tungstate activates both the ERK1/2 pathway and the vascular voltage- and Ca2+-dependent large-conductance BKαβ1 potassium channel, which modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and function, respectively. Here, we have assessed the possible involvement of BKαβ1 channels in the tungstate-induced ERK phosphorylation and its relevance for VSMC proliferation. Western blot analysis in HEK cell lines showed that expression of vascular BKαβ1 channels potentiates the tungstate-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a Gi/o protein-dependent manner. Tungstate activated BKαβ1 channels upstream of G proteins as channel activation was not altered by the inhibition of G proteins with GDPβS or pertussis toxin. Moreover, analysis of Gi/o protein activation measuring the FRET among heterologously expressed Gi protein subunits suggested that tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels promotes G protein activation. Single channel recordings on VSMCs from wild-type and β1-knockout mice indicated that the presence of the regulatory β1 subunit was essential for the tungstate-mediated activation of BK channels in VSMCs. Moreover, the specific BK channel blocker iberiotoxin lowered tungstate-induced ERK phosphorylation by 55% and partially reverted (by 51%) the tungstate-produced reduction of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced proliferation in human VSMCs. Our observations indicate that tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels promotes activation of PTX-sensitive Gi proteins to enhance the tungstate-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and inhibits PDGF-stimulated cell proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle. PMID:25659150

  2. Amorphous tungstate precursor route to nanostructured tungsten oxide film with electrochromic property.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ie-Rang; Kang, Joo-Hee; Paek, Seung-Min; Hwang, Seong-Ju; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Electrochromic tungsten oxide (WO3) films on ITO glass were fabricated by spin-coating with a tungsten peroxy acid solution, which was prepared by adding an equivolume mixture of hydrogen peroxide and glacial acetic acid to tungsten metal powder. The structural evolution of the tungstate precursor upon heat treatment was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses, which indicated that the as-synthesized tungstate transformed into nanocrystalline WO3 upon heating. It is, therefore, quite clear that as-synthesized tungstate can be a good precursor for electrochromic WO3 films. A series of WO3 thin films were prepared on ITO glass by spin-coating with different concentrations of tungsten peroxy acid solution and then post-annealing at various temperatures. Depending on the concentration of the tungstate coating solution (200-500 mg mL(-1)) and the annealing temperature (100-300 degrees C), the thickness and WO3 content as well as the electrochromic properties of WO3 films can be controlled. As a result, the optimum fabrication conditions were determined to be a tungstate solution concentration of 300-400 mg mL(-1) and a post-annealing temperature of 200 degrees C. Finally, an inorganic-inorganic hybrid electrochromic device (ECD) composed of optimized WO3 and Prussian Blue (PB) with desirable coloration efficiency was successfully developed. PMID:22121748

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Zirconium Tungstate Ultra-Thin Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lifeng; Howe, Jane Y; Fong, Hao; Zhang, Yan

    2009-01-01

    This study reports an innovative method of electrospinning followed by pyrolysis to synthesize zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8), a material with negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), in ultra-thin fiber form. Morphologies and microstructures of the as-electrospun precursor fibers, the heat-treated intermediate fibers, and the final ZrW2O8 ultra-thin fibers were characterized by SEM, XRD, and TEM. The ZrW2O8 ultra-thin fibers had diameters in the sub-micrometer range with aspect ratios larger than 100; these fibers were polycrystalline, and consisted of single crystalline ZrW2O8 crystallites with sizes of 30-50 nm and surface roughness of several nanometers. The ZrW2O8 ultra-thin fibers are expected to outperform spherically, cylindrically, and/or irregularly shaped polycrystalline ZrW2O8 particles for the development of composites with precisely controlled CTEs. Additionally, this reported method could be utilized as a general approach to convert nano-scaled inorganic particles into fibers.

  4. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  5. Structural, optical and magnetic properties of gadolinium sesquioxide nanobars synthesized via thermal decomposition of gadolinium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Manigandan, R.; Giribabu, K.; Suresh, R.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.; Narayanan, V.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobars are synthesized by decomposition of C{sub 6}H{sub 20}Gd{sub 2}O{sub 22}. • The nanoparticles are rectangular bar shape with high porous surface. • The combination of magnetic and optical properties within a single particle. • The Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobars have tailorable nanostructure, wide bandgap and are paramagnetic. - Abstract: Gadolinium oxide nanobars were obtained by thermal decomposition of gadolinium oxalate, which was synthesized by the chemical precipitation method along with glycerol. The functional group analysis and formation of gadolinium oxide from gadolinium oxalate were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analyzer. The crystal structure, average crystallite size, and lattice parameter were analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Moreover, Raman shifts, elemental composition and morphology of the gadolinium oxide was widely investigated by the laser Raman microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FE-SEM-EDAX and HR-TEM, respectively. Furthermore, the optical properties like band gap, absorbance measurement of the gadolinium oxide were extensively examined. In addition, the paramagnetic property of gadolinium oxide nanobars was explored by the vibrating sample magnetometer.

  6. Enhancement of the electron electric dipole moment in gadolinium garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhamedjanov, T.N.; Dzuba, V.A.; Sushkov, O.P.

    2003-10-01

    Effects caused by the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) in gadolinium garnets are considered. Experimental studies of these effects could improve the current upper limit on the electron EDM by several orders of magnitude. We suggest a consistent theoretical model and perform calculations of observable effects in gadolinium gallium garnet and gadolinium iron garnet. Our calculation accounts for both direct and exchange diagrams.

  7. The effects of tungstate on skin lesions caused by PPD in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Cho, Hyun-Gug; Lee, Sang-Il

    2008-04-01

    P-phenylenediamine (PPD) has been used as one of the ingredients in hair dye. The purpose of this study is to investigate the skin toxicity of PPD application in a tungstate-induced xanthine oxidase (XO) deficient animal model. PPD (2.5% PPD in 2% NH4OH) was applied to rat skin (25 mg/16.5 cm2) five times every other day in rats fed a standard diet (SD) or a tungstate supplemented diet (TD). The skin structure in the SD and the TD group was intact, whereas XO activity was not detected in the TD group during experimental periods. Furthermore, there were no differences between the SD and the TD group in dermal reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes. In these experimental conditions, although XO activity was not detected in the applied PPD rats fed a tungstate supplemented diet (PTD) group, it showed more severe tissue damage compared with the applied PPD rats fed a standard diet (PSD) group. In addition, the PTD group showed higher increased rates of ROS scavenging enzyme activity and lipid peroxide (LPO) content, and decreased glutathione (GSH) content than in the PSD group. In conclusion, the increase of PPD dermal toxicity in tungstate-induced XO deficient animals may be due to excessive ROS via ROS imbalance during PPD skin application. PMID:18379062

  8. Zirconium tungstate hydroxide hydrate revisited: Crystallization dependence on halide and hydronium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Colin, Julie A. Camper, DeMarco V.; Gates, Stacy D.; Simon, Monty D. Witker, Karen L. Lind, Cora

    2007-12-15

    The formation of zirconium tungstate hydroxide hydrate, a precursor to the negative thermal expansion material cubic zirconium tungstate, shows a strong dependence on hydrothermal reaction conditions. It was found that not only the acid concentration, but also the acid counterion plays a significant role in the crystallization of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. High temperatures, high acid concentrations, and the presence of chloride or bromide ions promote the formation of well-crystallized ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. For low acid concentrations, a new zirconium tungstate hydrate polymorph is observed, which transforms to tetragonal ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O at longer reaction times. A study of crystallization kinetics in hydrochloric acid is presented. - Graphical abstract: The formation of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O shows a strong dependence on reaction conditions. Both acid concentration and acid counterion play a significant role in the crystallization. High temperatures, high acid concentrations, and the presence of chloride or bromide ions promote the formation of well-crystallized ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. For low acid concentrations, a new zirconium tungstate hydrate polymorph is observed.

  9. New family of tungstate-responsive transcriptional regulators in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Alexey E; Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Zane, Grant M; Siddartha, Kavya; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Dubchak, Inna; Arkin, Adam P; Wall, Judy D; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Novichkov, Pavel S

    2013-10-01

    The trace elements molybdenum and tungsten are essential components of cofactors of many metalloenzymes. However, in sulfate-reducing bacteria, high concentrations of molybdate and tungstate oxyanions inhibit growth, thus requiring the tight regulation of their homeostasis. By a combination of bioinformatic and experimental techniques, we identified a novel regulator family, tungstate-responsive regulator (TunR), controlling the homeostasis of tungstate and molybdate in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. The effector-sensing domains of these regulators are similar to those of the known molybdate-responsive regulator ModE, while their DNA-binding domains are homologous to XerC/XerD site-specific recombinases. Using a comparative genomics approach, we identified DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 40 TunR family members. Positional analysis of TunR sites and putative promoters allowed us to classify most TunR proteins into two groups: (i) activators of modABC genes encoding a high-affinity molybdenum and tungsten transporting system and (ii) repressors of genes for toluene sulfonate uptake (TSUP) family transporters. The activation of modA and modBC genes by TunR in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was confirmed in vivo, and we discovered that the activation was diminished in the presence of tungstate. A predicted 30-bp TunR-binding motif was confirmed by in vitro binding assays. A novel TunR family of bacterial transcriptional factors controls tungstate and molybdate homeostasis in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. We proposed that TunR proteins participate in protection of the cells from the inhibition by these oxyanions. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a family of bacterial transcriptional factors evolved from site-specific recombinases.

  10. Gadolinium: Central Metal of the Lanthanoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laing, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of gadolinium are compared with those of the other lanthanoids. Some properties are intermediate between those of lanthanum and lutetium; some between those of barium and hafnium; and others (unexpectedly) between those of ytterbium and lutetium. Both the remarkably high molar heat capacity of the metal and the…

  11. A toxicological study of gadolinium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show gadolinium nitrate to have potential sensitizing properties. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated that it was cutaneously a severe irritant. This material was considered an irritant in the rabbit eye application studies. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Time- and energy-efficient solution combustion synthesis of binary metal tungstate nanoparticles with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Abegayl; Janáky, Csaba; Samu, Gergely F; Huda, Muhammad N; Sarker, Pranab; Liu, J Ping; van Nguyen, Vuong; Wang, Evelyn H; Schug, Kevin A; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2015-05-22

    In the search for stable and efficient photocatalysts beyond TiO2 , the tungsten-based oxide semiconductors silver tungstate (Ag2 WO4 ), copper tungstate (CuWO4 ), and zinc tungstate (ZnWO4 ) were prepared using solution combustion synthesis (SCS). The tungsten precursor's influence on the product was of particular relevance to this study, and the most significant effects are highlighted. Each sample's photocatalytic activity towards methyl orange degradation was studied and benchmarked against their respective commercial oxide sample obtained by solid-state ceramic synthesis. Based on the results herein, we conclude that SCS is a time- and energy-efficient method to synthesize crystalline binary tungstate nanomaterials even without additional excessive heat treatment. As many of these photocatalysts possess excellent photocatalytic activity, the discussed synthetic strategy may open sustainable materials chemistry avenues to solar energy conversion and environmental remediation.

  13. Subcellular SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in human glioblastoma cells treated with a gadolinium containing MRI agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Duane R.; Lorey, Daniel R.; Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary radiotherapeutic modality for the treatment of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme. Recently, neutron capture therapy with gadolinium-157 has gained attention, and techniques for studying the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157 are needed. In this preliminary study, we have been able to image the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157, as well as the other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium, with SIMS ion microscopy. T98G human glioblastoma cells were treated for 24 h with 25 mg/ml of the metal ion complex diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid Gd(III) dihydrogen salt hydrate (Gd-DTPA). Gd-DTPA is a contrast enhancing agent used for MRI of brain tumors, blood-brain barrier impairment, diseases of the central nervous system, etc. A highly heterogeneous subcellular distribution was observed for gadolinium-157. The nuclei in each cell were distinctly lower in gadolinium-157 than in the cytoplasm. Even within the cytoplasm the gadolinium-157 was heterogeneously distributed. The other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium were imaged from the same cells and exhibited a subcellular distribution consistent with that observed for gadolinium-157. These observations indicate that SIMS ion microscopy may be a viable approach for subcellular studies of gadolinium containing neutron capture therapy drugs and may even play a major role in the development and validation of new gadolinium contrast enhancing agents for diagnostic MRI applications.

  14. Oral tungstate (Na2WO4) exposure reduces adaptive immune responses in mice after challenge.

    PubMed

    Osterburg, Andrew R; Robinson, Chad T; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Stockelman, Michael; Schwemberger, Sandy J; Chapman, Gail; Babcock, George F

    2014-01-01

    Tungstate (WO²⁻₄) has been identified as a ground water contaminant at military firing ranges and can be absorbed by ingestion. In this study, C57BL6 mice were exposed to sodium tungstate (Na2WO4·2H2O) (0, 2, 62.5, 125, and 200 mg/kg/day) in their drinking water for an initial 28-day screen and in a one-generation (one-gen) model. Twenty-four hours prior to euthanasia, mice were intraperitoneally injected with Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) (20 μg/mouse) or saline as controls. After euthanasia, splenocytes and blood were collected and stained with lymphocyte and/or myeloid immunophenotyping panels and analyzed by flow cytometry. In the 28-day and one-gen exposure, statistically significant reductions were observed in the quantities of activated cytotoxic T-cells (TCTL; CD3(+)CD8(+)CD71(+)) and helper T-cells (TH; CD3(+)CD4(+)CD71(+)) from spleens of SEB-treated mice. In the 28-day exposures, CD71(+) TCTL cells were 12.87 ± 2.05% (SE) in the 0 tungstate (control) group compared to 4.44 ± 1.42% in the 200 mg/kg/day (p < 0.001) group. TH cells were 4.85 ± 1.23% in controls and 2.76 ± 0.51% in the 200 mg/kg/day (p < 0.003) group. In the one-gen exposures, TCTL cells were 7.98 ± 0.49% and 6.33 ± 0.49% for P and F1 mice after 0 mg/kg/day tungstate vs 1.58 ± 0.23% and 2.52 ± 0.25% after 200 mg/kg/day of tungstate (p < 0.001). Similarly, TH cells were reduced to 6.21 ± 0.39% and 7.20 ± 0.76%, respectively, for the 0 mg/kg/day P and F1 mice, and 2.28 ± 0.41% and 2.85 ± 0.53%, respectively, for the 200 mg/kg/day tungstate P and F1 groups (p < 0.001). In delayed-type hypersensitivity Type IV experiments, tungstate exposure prior to primary and secondary antigen challenge significantly reduced footpad swelling at 20 and 200 mg/kg/day. These data indicate that exposure to tungstate can result in immune suppression that may, in turn, reduce host defense against

  15. MOF-Derived Tungstated Zirconia as Strong Solid Acids toward High Catalytic Performance for Acetalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Feng, Jian; Zhao, Yupei; Wang, Shaobin; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-14

    A strong solid acid, tungstated zirconia (WZ), has been prepared first using tungstate immobilized UiO-66 as precursors through a "double-solvent" impregnation method under mild calcination temperature. With moderate W contents, the as-synthesized WZ catalysts possess a high density of acid sites, and the proper heat treatment also has facilely led to a bunch of oligomeric tungsten clusters on stabilized tetragonal ZrO2. The resultant solid acids show an improved catalytic performance toward the benzaldehyde's acetalization in comparison with traditional zirconium hydroxide-prepared WZ. Notably, due to large surface area and additionally introduced strong acid sites, the MOF-derived WZ catalysts afforded conversion up to 86.0%. The facile method endows the WZ catalysts with superior catalytic activities and excellent recyclability, thus opening a new avenue for preparation of metal oxide-based solid superacids and superbases. PMID:27557351

  16. One-step synthesis and luminescence properties of tetragonal double tungstates nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J; Zhang, Y L; Zhong, J P; Yao, H H; Wang, J; Wu, M M; Meijerink, A

    2016-08-25

    A versatile one-step thermolysis protocol is demonstrated to produce a uniform dispersion of tetragonal double tungstates NaRE(WO4)2 (RE = rare earth) nanocrystals (NCs). Oriented attachment in the [001] direction occurred. Doping with luminescent RE(3+) ions resulted in highly luminescent NCs showing characteristic line emission of the dopant as well as a blue emission assigned to surface adsorbed organic species. PMID:27524472

  17. A photon calorimeter using lead tungstate crystals for the CEBAF HAll A Compton polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    D. Neyret; T. Pussieux; T. Auger; M. Baylac; E. Burtin; C. Cavata; R. Chipaux; S. Escoffier; N. Falletto; J. Jardillier; S. Kerhoas; D. Lhuillier; F. Marie; C. Veyssiere; J. Ahrens; R. Beck; M. Lang

    2000-05-01

    A new Compton polarimeter is built on the CEBAF Hall A electron beam line. Performances of 10% resolution and 1% calibration are required for the photon calorimeter of this polarimeter. This calorimeter is built with lead tungstate scintillators coming from the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter R&D. Beam tests of this detector have been made using the tagged photon beam line at MAMI, Mainz, and a resolution of 1.76%+2.75%/v+0.41%/E has been measured.

  18. Gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid-loaded chitosan microspheres for gadolinium neutron-capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tapan Kumar; Ichikawa, Hideki; Fukumori, Yoshinobu

    2006-12-11

    In order to provide a suitable device that would contain water-soluble drugs, highly water-soluble gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid-loaded chitosan microspheres (CMS-Gd-DTPA) were prepared by the emulsion method using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker and Span 80 as a surfactant for gadolinium neutron-capture therapy of cancer. The gadolinium content and the mass median diameter of CMS-Gd-DTPA were estimated. The size and morphology of the CMS-Gd-DTPA were strongly influenced by the initial applied weight ratio of Gd-DTPA:chitosan. FTIR spectra showed that the electrostatic interaction between chitosan and Gd-DTPA accelerated the formation of gadolinium-enriched chitosan microspheres. Sufficient amounts of glutaraldehyde and Span 80 were necessary for producing discrete CMS-Gd-DTPA. The CMS-Gd-DTPA having a mass median diameter 11.7microm and 11.6% of gadolinium could be used in Gd-NCT following intratumoral injection. PMID:17045253

  19. Method of separating and purifying gadolinium-153

    DOEpatents

    Bray, Lane A [Richland, WA; Corneillie, Todd M [Davis, CA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement to the method of separating and purifying gadolinium from a mixture of gadolinium and europium having the steps of (a) dissolving the mixture in an acid; (b) reducing europium+3 to europium+2; and (c) precipitating the europium+2 with a sulfate ion in a superstoichiometric amount; wherein the improvement is achieved by using one or more of the following: (i) the acid is an anoic acid; (ii) the reducing is with zinc metal in the absence of a second metal or with an amount of the second metal that is ineffective in the reducing; (iii) adding a group IIA element after step (c) for precipitating the excess sulfate prior to repeating step (c); (iv) the sulfate is a sulfate salt with a monovalent cation; (v) adding cold europium+3 prior to repeating step (c).

  20. Progress Towards Laser Cooling and Trapping Gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Upendra; Simien, Clayton

    2016-05-01

    Lanthanide elements are of interest because of their potential for investigating next generation optical clock transitions, novel non-S ground state ultracold collisions, and the physics of quantum degenerate dipolar gases. We present our progress towards laser cooling and trapping atomic Gadolinium (Gd). A magneto-optical trap is the first step towards precision measurements, ultracold collision studies, and for probing dipolar physics of Gd. The design, construction, and performance of the apparatus will be presented.

  1. Gadolinium and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Weller, Alex; Barber, Joy L; Olsen, Oystein E

    2014-10-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a multisystem disease seen exclusively in patients with renal impairment. It can be severely debilitating and sometimes fatal. There is a strong association with gadolinium-based contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Risk factors include renal impairment and proinflammatory conditions, e.g. major surgery and vascular events. Although there is no single effective treatment for NSF, the most successful outcomes are seen following restoration of renal function, either following recovery from acute kidney injury or following renal transplantation. There have been ten biopsy-proved pediatric cases of NSF, with no convincing evidence that children have a significantly altered risk compared with the adult population. After implementation of guidelines restricting the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in at-risk patients, there has been a sharp reduction in new cases and no new reports in children. Continued vigilance is recommended: screening for renal impairment, use of more stable gadolinium chelates, consideration of non-contrast-enhanced MRI or alternative imaging modalities where appropriate.

  2. Emerging concepts for myocardial late gadolinium enhancement MRI.

    PubMed

    Doltra, Adelina; Amundsen, Brage Hoyem; Gebker, Rolf; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement is a useful tool for scar detection, based on differences in the volume of distribution of gadolinium, an extracellular agent. The presence of fibrosis in the myocardium amenable to be detected with late gadolinium enhancement MRI is found not only in ischemic cardiomyopathy, in which it offers information regarding viability and prognosis, but also in a wide variety of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. In the following review we will discuss the methodological aspects of gadolinium-based imaging, as well as its applications and anticipated future developments.

  3. Tungstate-induced color-pattern modifications of butterfly wings are independent of stress response and ecdysteroid effect.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Joji M; Ogasawara, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Haruhiko

    2005-06-01

    Systemic injections of sodium tungstate, a protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) inhibitor, to pupae immediately after pupation have been shown to efficiently produce characteristic color-pattern modifications on the wings of many species of butterflies. Here we demonstrated that the tungstate-induced modification pattern was entirely different from other chemically-induced ones in a species of nymphalid butterfly Junonia (Precis) orithya. In this species, the systemic injections of tungstate produced characteristic expansion of black area and shrinkage of white area together with the move of parafocal elements toward the wing base. Overall, pattern boundaries became obscure. In contrast, an entirely different modification pattern, overall darkening of wings, was observed by the injections of stress-inducing chemicals, thapsigargin, ionomycin, or geldanamycin, to pupae under the rearing conditions for the adult summer form. On the ventral wings, this darkening was due to an increase of the proportion of peppered dark scales, which was reminiscent of the natural fall form of this species. Under the same rearing conditions, the injections of ecdysteroid, which is a well-known hormone being responsible for the seasonal polyphenism of nymphalid butterflies, yielded overall expansion of orange area especially around eyespots. Taken together, we conclude that the tungstate-induced modifications are clearly distinguishable from those of stress response and ecdysteroid effect. This conclusion then suggests that the putative PTPase signaling pathway that is sensitive to tungstate uniquely contributes to the wing-wide color-pattern development in butterflies. PMID:15988157

  4. Tungstate-induced color-pattern modifications of butterfly wings are independent of stress response and ecdysteroid effect.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Joji M; Ogasawara, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Haruhiko

    2005-06-01

    Systemic injections of sodium tungstate, a protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) inhibitor, to pupae immediately after pupation have been shown to efficiently produce characteristic color-pattern modifications on the wings of many species of butterflies. Here we demonstrated that the tungstate-induced modification pattern was entirely different from other chemically-induced ones in a species of nymphalid butterfly Junonia (Precis) orithya. In this species, the systemic injections of tungstate produced characteristic expansion of black area and shrinkage of white area together with the move of parafocal elements toward the wing base. Overall, pattern boundaries became obscure. In contrast, an entirely different modification pattern, overall darkening of wings, was observed by the injections of stress-inducing chemicals, thapsigargin, ionomycin, or geldanamycin, to pupae under the rearing conditions for the adult summer form. On the ventral wings, this darkening was due to an increase of the proportion of peppered dark scales, which was reminiscent of the natural fall form of this species. Under the same rearing conditions, the injections of ecdysteroid, which is a well-known hormone being responsible for the seasonal polyphenism of nymphalid butterflies, yielded overall expansion of orange area especially around eyespots. Taken together, we conclude that the tungstate-induced modifications are clearly distinguishable from those of stress response and ecdysteroid effect. This conclusion then suggests that the putative PTPase signaling pathway that is sensitive to tungstate uniquely contributes to the wing-wide color-pattern development in butterflies.

  5. Extraction-chromatographic affinage in gadolinium-153 preparation production technology

    SciTech Connect

    Melnik, M.I.; Karelin, E.A.; Kuznetsov, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    The gadolinium 153 preparation is used for production of medical gamma-sources which are applicable in bone densimeters for early diagnostics of osteoporosis. This preparation must meet strict requirements with respect to the content of europium radionuclides and specific activity. In The Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) the gadolinium 153 is produced by neutron irradiation of Europium 151. This process is described.

  6. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  7. Precision machining, polishing and measurement of mechanical and toxicological properties of lead tungstate crystals for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.; Fuchs, B.A.; Shi, X.

    1995-08-01

    We have developed new machining and polishing techniques that have previously been applied to large scintillating crystal arrays for high energy physics experiments such as the Barium Fluoride Electromagnetic Calorimeter for the GEM Detector at SSCL, the LCsI Electromagnetic Calorimeter for the BaBar Detector at PEP-II B Factory at SLAC and the 110,000 crystal CMS Lead Tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter at LHC at CERN. We discuss earlier results achieved with diamond machining and polishing methods and present new results on diamond machining of lead tungstate crystals. Additionally we present new results on mechanical properties of lead tungstate including toxicological data important for the safe handling and processing of this material.

  8. Substitution of gadolinium ethylenediaminetetraacetate with phosphites: towards gadolinium deposit in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Chen, Mao-Long; Zhou, Zhao-Hui

    2014-01-14

    In neutral media, reactions of gadolinium ethylenediaminetetraacetates with phosphorous acid result in the formation of the mixed-ligand polymeric complex K3n[Gd(EDTA)(HPO3)]n·7nH2O () and dimeric complex Na6[Gd2(EDTA)2(HPO3)2]·2.5NaCl·21H2O () (H4EDTA = ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) in warm solution. Further substitution with citric acid gives the monomeric gadolinium citrate with EDTA (NH4)2Na[Gd(EDTA)(H2cit)]·4H2O (). The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, ESI-MS and thermogravimetric analysis. Structural analysis indicates that three coordinated water molecules in the gadolinium ethylenediaminetetraacetate trihydrates are replaced by phosphite ions (HPO3(2-)) in the compounds and . Gadolinium atoms are octa-coordinated by EDTA and the phosphite ion, the latter links adjacent Gd-EDTA units to generate an infinite one-dimensional chain in compound and a dimeric octatomic ring in . In complex , coordinated water molecules were substituted by the α-hydroxy, α-carboxy and β-carboxy groups of citrate. Citrate is favourable for inhibiting the formation of Gd-EDTA phosphite. All the complexes are very easily soluble in water. The solution behavior of the isostructural lanthanum complexes was probed with (13)C and (31)P NMR spectra in D2O for comparison. ESI-MS analysis and recrystallization proved that complexes and dissociate to the monomeric unit of Gd-EDTA and free HPO3(2-) in aqueous solution. Substitutions of gadolinium ethylenediaminetetraacetates to and are attributed to be the cause of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in some way.

  9. Light deflection in gadolinium molybdate ferroelastic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniorowski, Piotr; Bornarel, Jean

    2000-02-01

    The deflection of a He-Ne light beam by polydomain gadolinium molybdate (GMO) crystals has been studied with respect to incidence angle icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i on the sample at room temperature. The A and B deflected beams do not cross each other during the icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i variation, in contrast to results and calculations previously published. The model using the Fresnel equation confirms this result. The model presented is more accurate for numerical calculation than that using the Huygens construction.

  10. Towards modeling gadolinium-lead-borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rada, S.; Ristoiu, T.; Rada, M.; Coroiu, I.; Maties, V.; Culea, E.

    2010-01-15

    Infrared spectra of gadolinium-lead-borate glasses of the xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}.(100 - x)[3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO] system, where x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 35 and 50 mol.%, have been recorded to explore the role of content of gadolinium ions behaving as glass modifier. The FTIR spectroscopy data for the xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}.(1 - x)[3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO] glasses show the structural role of lead ions as a network-formers and of the gadolinium ions network modifiers. Adding of the rare earth ion up to 35 mol.% into the glass matrix, the IR bands characteristic to the studied glasses become sharper and more pronounced. Structural changes, as recognized by analyzing band shapes of IR spectra, revealed that Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} causes a change from the continuous borate network to the continuous lead-borate network interconnected through Pb-O-B and B-O-B bridges and the transformation of some tetrahedral [BO{sub 4}] units into trigonal [BO{sub 3}] units. Then, gadolinium ions have affinity towards [BO{sub 3}] structural units which contain non-bridging oxygens necessary for the charge compensation because the more electronegative [BO{sub 3}] structural units were implied in the formation of B-O-Gd bonds and the transformation of glass network into a glass ceramic. We propose a possible structural model of building blocks for the formation of continuous random 3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO network glass used by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations show that lead atoms occupy three different sites in the proposed model. The first is coordinated with six oxygen atoms forming distorted octahedral geometries. The second lead atom has an octahedral oxygen environment and the five longer Pb-O bonds are considered as participating in the metal coordination scheme. The third lead atom has ionic character. In agreement with the results offered by the experimental FTIR data, the theoretical IR data confirm that our proposed structure is highly possible.

  11. Effect of thermal annealing on the phase evolution of silver tungstate in Ag/WO₃ films.

    PubMed

    Bose, R Jolly; Sreedharan, R Sreeja; Krishnan, R Resmi; Reddy, V R; Gupta, Mukul; Ganesan, V; Sudheer, S K; Pillai, V P Mahadevan

    2015-06-15

    Silver/tungsten oxide multi-layer films are deposited over quartz substrates by RF magnetron sputtering technique and the films are annealed at temperatures 200, 400 and 600°C. The effect of thermal annealing on the phase evolution of silver tungstate phase in Ag/WO3 films is studied extensively using techniques like X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman analysis, atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence studies. The XRD pattern of the as-deposited film shows only the peaks of cubic phase of silver. The film annealed at 200°C shows the presence of XRD peaks corresponding to orthorhombic phase of Ag2WO4 and peaks corresponding to cubic phase of silver with reduced intensity. It is found that, as annealing temperature increases, the volume fraction of Ag decreases and that of Ag2WO4 phase increases and becomes highest at a temperature of 400°C. When the temperature increases beyond 400°C, the volume fraction of Ag2WO4 decreases, due to its decomposition into silver and oxygen deficient phase Ag2W4O13. The micro-Raman spectra of the annealed films show the characteristic bands of tungstate phase which is in agreement with XRD analysis. The surface morphology of the films studied by atomic force microscopy reveals that the particle size and r.m.s roughness are highest for the sample annealed at 400°C. In the photoluminescence study, the films with silver tungstate phase show an emission peak in blue region centered around the wavelength 441 nm (excitation wavelength 256 nm).

  12. TupA: A Tungstate Binding Protein in the Periplasm of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Otrelo-Cardoso, Ana Rita; Nair, Rashmi R.; Correia, Márcia A. S.; Rivas, Maria G.; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The TupABC system is involved in the cellular uptake of tungsten and belongs to the ABC (ATP binding cassette)-type transporter systems. The TupA component is a periplasmic protein that binds tungstate anions, which are then transported through the membrane by the TupB component using ATP hydrolysis as the energy source (the reaction catalyzed by the ModC component). We report the heterologous expression, purification, determination of affinity binding constants and crystallization of the Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 TupA. The tupA gene (locus tag Dde_0234) was cloned in the pET46 Enterokinase/Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC) expression vector, and the construct was used to transform BL21 (DE3) cells. TupA expression and purification were optimized to a final yield of 10 mg of soluble pure protein per liter of culture medium. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out showing that TupA binds both tungstate and molybdate ions and has no significant interaction with sulfate, phosphate or perchlorate. Quantitative analysis of metal binding by isothermal titration calorimetry was in agreement with these results, but in addition, shows that TupA has higher affinity to tungstate than molybdate. The protein crystallizes in the presence of 30% (w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 using the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method. The crystals diffract X-rays beyond 1.4 Å resolution and belong to the P21 space group, with cell parameters a = 52.25 Å, b = 42.50 Å, c = 54.71 Å, β = 95.43°. A molecular replacement solution was found, and the structure is currently under refinement. PMID:24992597

  13. Analysis of solid solutions stability in scheelite-type molybdates and tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, V.D.; Reznitskikh, O.G.; Velikodnyi, Yu.A.; Patrusheva, T.A.; Sivtsova, O.V.

    2011-10-15

    Mutual solubility of bivalent metal molybdates and tungstates with scheelite structure was theoretically estimated by calculating formation enthalpies and the maximal decomposition temperatures of solid solutions at different temperatures. The theoretical stability of continuous solid solutions in binary systems of bivalent metal molybdates and tungstates was found to be higher than reported literature data. After cooling down continuous substitution solid solution should remain in following systems: CaMoO{sub 4}-CdMoO{sub 4}, SrMoO{sub 4}-MMoO{sub 4} (M=Ba, Pb), BaMoO{sub 4}-PbMoO{sub 4}, SrWO{sub 4}-MWO{sub 4} (M=Ca, Pb), and BaWO{sub 4}-PbWO{sub 4}. There is a probability that at room temperature in systems CaMoO{sub 4}-SrMoO{sub 4,} CaWO{sub 4}-PbWO{sub 4}, and BaWO{sub 4}-SrWO{sub 4} the single homogeneity region may decompose to limited solid solutions. It was shown experimentally that a continuous series of scheelite-structure solid solutions M{sub 1-x}M{sup I}{sub x}TO{sub 4} can be formed via citrate synthesis at temperatures below 500 deg. S. - Graphical abstract: Calculated boundaries of solid solutions in BaWO{sub 4}-CaWO{sub 4} (1) and PbMoO{sub 4}-CaMoO{sub 4} (2) systems. Highlights: > Stability of solid solutions molybdates and tungstates has been investigated. > The ionic model for isovalent substitutions was used. > In 'polyhedral substitution model' enthalphies of mixing were calculated. > Most of the examined series of solid solutions is stable at room temperatures. > Solid solutions M{sub 1-x}M{sup I}{sub x}Mo(W)O{sub 4} (x=0-1) were formed via citrate synthesis below 500 S.

  14. Comparison of radiation damage in lead tungstate crystals under pion and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Batarin, V.A.; Butler, J.; Davidenko, A.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Goncharenko, Y.M.; Grishin, V.N.; Kachanov, V.A.; Khodyrev, V.Y.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Lukanin, V.S.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Melnick, Y.M.; Meschanin, A.P.; Mikhalin, N.E.; Minaev, N.G.; Mochalov, V.V.; Morozov, D.A.; Nogach, L.V.; Ryazantsev, A.V.; /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab /Minnesota U. /Syracuse U. /Nanjing U.

    2003-12-01

    Studies of the radiation hardness of lead tungstate crystals produced by the Bogoroditsk Techno-Chemical Plant in Russia and the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics in China have been carried out at IHEP, Protvino. The crystals were irradiated by a 40 GeV pion beam. After full recovery, the same crystals were irradiated using a {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-ray source. The dose rate profiles along the crystal length were observed to be quite similar. We compare the effects of the two types of radiation on the crystals light output.

  15. Low Temperature Spin Structure of Gadolinium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanparast, Behnam; McClarty, Paul; Gingras, Michel

    2012-02-01

    Many rare earth pyrochlore oxides exhibit exotic spin configurations at low temperatures due to frustration. The nearest neighbor coupling between spins on the corner-sharing tetrahedral network generate geometrical magnetic frustration. Among these materials, gadolinium titanate (Gd2Ti2O7) is of particular interest. Its low temperature ordered phases are not yet understood theoretically. Bulk thermal measurements such as specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements find two phase transitions in zero external field, in agreement with simple mean field calculations. However, recent neutron scattering experiments suggest a so-called 4-k spin structure for intermediate phase and a so called canted 4-k structure for lower temperature phase that does not agree with either mean-field theory or Monte Carlo simulation which find the 1-k state and Palmer-Chalker state respectively as the lowest free energy configuration for those phases. In our work, we study the 4-k structure in detail and present a new phase diagram for dipolar Heisenberg spins on a pyrochlore lattice, certain portions of which describe gadolinium titanate.

  16. Deposition of Highly Luminescent Zinc Tungstate Thin Films on Various Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrakhan, Rashad

    Zinc tungstate films have promising applications in small form factor backscatter electron detectors. We are developing a multistep technology for synthesis of these films. Zinc and tungsten were co-sputtered onto substrates through the process of magnetron sputtering. The metallic films were oxidized in a vacuum sealed tube furnace in controlled flow of argon and oxygen at 800 °C. The chemical composition of the film was characterized by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The structure of the film was investigated by Raman Spectroscopy. The photoluminescence quantum efficiency of the films was found to be 60%. Process parameters for obtaining the desired 1-1 ratio of zinc to tungsten in the film is explored through varying factors such as: the composition of the target used in the sputtering, the power and or voltage used in the sputtering process. Our experiments show that zinc tungstate thin films can be deposited on various substrates with good adhesion and mechanical integrity, and still be efficient light emitters.

  17. Adsorptional removal of methylene blue by guar gum-cerium (IV) tungstate hybrid cationic exchanger.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K; Pathania, Deepak; Singh, Pardeep; Kumar, Amit; Rathore, B S

    2014-01-30

    Guar gum-cerium (IV) tungstate nanocomposite (GG/CTNC) cationic exchanger was synthesized using simple sol gel method. The GG/CTNC was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometer (EDX). The XRD studies confirmed amorphous and fibrous in nature of GG/CTNC. The high percentage of oxygen in the nanocomposite material confirmed the functionality tungstate (WO4(-)). The ion exchange capacity of GG/CTNC for Na(+) ion was observed to be 1.30 mequivg(-1). The hybrid exchanger was used as potential adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous system. The correlation coefficients value indicated a good fit of monolayer Langmuir model to the adsorption of methylene blue onto GG/CTNC. The adsorption kinetic study revealed that the adsorption process followed the pseudo second order kinetic. The Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values confirmed the spontaneous nature of adsorption process.

  18. Compton profiles and electronic structure of monoclinic zinc and cadmium tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, B. S.; Heda, N. L.; Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    We report the first ever Compton scattering study of ZnWO4 and CdWO4 using 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer at momentum resolution of 0.34 a.u. To compare the experimental Compton profiles, we have also deduced the momentum densities using density functional theory (DFT) within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) methods. It is seen that the experimental Compton profiles of both the tungstates give a better agreement with LCAO-DFT calculations within generalized gradient approximation (GGA) employing Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation energies than other approximations included in the present work. Further, energy bands, density of states (DOS) and band gaps have also been calculated using LCAO-DFT-GGA-PBE scheme and full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. Both the computational schemes show a semiconducting nature of both the tungstates, with a direct band gap at Y point of Brillouin zone. Further, a relative nature of bonding on equal-valence-electron-density scale shows more covalent character in ZnWO4 than CdWO4 which reconciles with the conclusions drawn using integrated DOS and Mulliken's population data.

  19. Metal tungstates at the ultimate two-dimensional limit: fabrication of a CuWO₄ nanophase.

    PubMed

    Denk, Martin; Kuhness, David; Wagner, Margareta; Surnev, Svetlozar; Negreiros, Fabio R; Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni; Vobornik, Ivana; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Netzer, Falko P

    2014-04-22

    Metal tungstates (with general formula MWO4) are functional materials with a high potential for a diverse set of applications ranging from low-dimensional magnetism to chemical sensing and photoelectrocatalytic water oxidation. For high level applications, nanoscale control of film growth is necessary, as well as a deeper understanding and characterization of materials properties at reduced dimensionality. We succeeded in fabricating and characterizing a two-dimensional (2-D) copper tungstate (CuWO4). For the first time, the atomic structure of an ultrathin ternary oxide is fully unveiled. It corresponds to a CuWO4 monolayer arranged in three sublayers with stacking O-W-O/Cu from the interface. The resulting bidimensional structure forms a robust framework with localized regions of anisotropic flexibility. Electronically it displays a reduced band gap and increased density of states close to the Fermi level with respect to the bulk compound. These unique features open a way for new applications in the field of photo- and electrocatalysis, while the proposed synthesis method represents a radically new and general approach toward the fabrication of 2-D ternary oxides.

  20. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of potassium erbium double tungstate KEr(WO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, M. T.; Dyakonov, V. P.; Wozniak, K.; Dobrzycki, L.; Berkowski, M.; Zubov, E. E.; Michalski, E.; Szewczyk, A.; Gutowska, M. U.; Zayarnyuk, T.; Szymczak, H.

    2007-02-01

    Results of structural, magnetic and specific heat investigations of the potassium erbium double tungstate, KEr(WO4)2, are presented. Potassium erbium double-tungstate KEr(WO4)2 single crystals have been grown by the top-seeded solution growth method (TSSG) and modified Czochralski techniques. It crystallizes in the monoclinic crystal structure (C 2/c space group). The unit cell contains four formula units and is described by parameters a = 10.615(2) Å, b = 10.316(2) Å, c = 7.534(2) Å, β = 130.73(3)°. From the x-ray diffraction measurements the fractional atomic coordinates, displacement parameters and interatomic distances have been determined. The specific heat C(T) of the KEr(WO4)2 crystal has been measured over a temperature range of 0.6-300 K. The susceptibility has been studied at T = 0.25-4.0 K. The magnetic phase transition was observed at a temperature of 0.48 K. The magnetization has been measured in the temperature region from 4.2 to 60 K and in magnetic field up to 1.6 T. A strong anisotropy of magnetic properties was found. The temperature and field dependences of susceptibility and magnetization data were used for both elucidation of character of the magnetic ordering and calculation of the exchange and dipole-dipole interaction energies as well as for determination of the possible magnetic structure of KEr(WO4)2.

  1. Two-Dimensional Iron Tungstate: A Ternary Oxide Layer With Honeycomb Geometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The exceptional physical properties of graphene have sparked tremendous interests toward two-dimensional (2D) materials with honeycomb structure. We report here the successful fabrication of 2D iron tungstate (FeWOx) layers with honeycomb geometry on a Pt(111) surface, using the solid-state reaction of (WO3)3 clusters with a FeO(111) monolayer on Pt(111). The formation process and the atomic structure of two commensurate FeWOx phases, with (2 × 2) and (6 × 6) periodicities, have been characterized experimentally by combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and understood theoretically by density functional theory (DFT) modeling. The thermodynamically most stable (2 × 2) phase has a formal FeWO3 stoichiometry and corresponds to a buckled Fe2+/W4+ layer arranged in a honeycomb lattice, terminated by oxygen atoms in Fe–W bridging positions. This 2D FeWO3 layer has a novel structure and stoichiometry and has no analogues to known bulk iron tungstate phases. It is theoretically predicted to exhibit a ferromagnetic electronic ground state with a Curie temperature of 95 K, as opposed to the antiferromagnetic behavior of bulk FeWO4 materials. PMID:27110319

  2. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging using gadolinium-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Lee M; Bhargava, Puneet; Essig, Marco; Maki, Jeffrey H

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the basic properties of available gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents, discuss their fundamental differences, and explore common and evolving applications of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast throughout the body excluding the central nervous system. A more specific aim of this article was to explore novel uses of these gadolinium-based contrast agents and applications where a particular agent has been demonstrated to behave differently or be better suited for certain applications than the other contrast agents in this class.

  4. Simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in welding fume alkaline extracts by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ščančar, Janez; Berlinger, Balázs; Thomassen, Yngvar; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    A novel analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Linear gradient elution from 100% water to 100% 0.7 M NaCl was applied for chromatographic separation of metal species. In standard aqueous solution at neutral pH molybdate, tungstate and vanadate exist in several aqueous species, while chromate is present as a single CrO4(2-) species. Consequently, only chromate can be separated from this solution in a sharp chromatographic peak. For obtaining sharp chromatographic peaks for molybdate, tungstate and vanadate, the pH of aqueous standard solutions was raised to 12. At highly alkaline conditions single CrO4(2-), MoO4(2-) and WO4(2-) are present and were eluted in sharp chromatographic peaks, while VO4(3-) species, which predominates at pH 12 was eluted in slightly broaden peak. In a mixture of aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate were eluted at retention times from 380 to 420 s, 320 to 370 s, 300 to 350 s and 240 to 360 s, respectively. Eluted species were simultaneously detected on-line by ICP-MS recording m/z 52, 95, 182 and 51. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of leachable concentrations of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in alkaline extracts (2% NaOH+3% Na2CO3) of manual metal arc (MMA) welding fumes loaded on filters. Good repeatability and reproducibility of measurement (RSD±3.0%) for the investigated species were obtained in both aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) and in alkaline extracts of welding fumes. Low limits of detection (LODs) were found for chromate (0.02 ng Cr mL(-1)), molybdate (0.1 ng Mo mL(-1)), tungstate (0.1 ng W mL(-1)) and vanadate (0.2 ng V mL(-1)). The accuracy of analytical procedure for the determination of chromate was checked by analysis of

  5. Simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in welding fume alkaline extracts by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ščančar, Janez; Berlinger, Balázs; Thomassen, Yngvar; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    A novel analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Linear gradient elution from 100% water to 100% 0.7 M NaCl was applied for chromatographic separation of metal species. In standard aqueous solution at neutral pH molybdate, tungstate and vanadate exist in several aqueous species, while chromate is present as a single CrO4(2-) species. Consequently, only chromate can be separated from this solution in a sharp chromatographic peak. For obtaining sharp chromatographic peaks for molybdate, tungstate and vanadate, the pH of aqueous standard solutions was raised to 12. At highly alkaline conditions single CrO4(2-), MoO4(2-) and WO4(2-) are present and were eluted in sharp chromatographic peaks, while VO4(3-) species, which predominates at pH 12 was eluted in slightly broaden peak. In a mixture of aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate were eluted at retention times from 380 to 420 s, 320 to 370 s, 300 to 350 s and 240 to 360 s, respectively. Eluted species were simultaneously detected on-line by ICP-MS recording m/z 52, 95, 182 and 51. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of leachable concentrations of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in alkaline extracts (2% NaOH+3% Na2CO3) of manual metal arc (MMA) welding fumes loaded on filters. Good repeatability and reproducibility of measurement (RSD±3.0%) for the investigated species were obtained in both aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) and in alkaline extracts of welding fumes. Low limits of detection (LODs) were found for chromate (0.02 ng Cr mL(-1)), molybdate (0.1 ng Mo mL(-1)), tungstate (0.1 ng W mL(-1)) and vanadate (0.2 ng V mL(-1)). The accuracy of analytical procedure for the determination of chromate was checked by analysis of

  6. Optical properties of gadolinium gallium garnet.

    PubMed

    Wood, D L; Nassau, K

    1990-09-01

    The refractive index, the temperature coefficient of the refractive index, and the optical transparency of gadolinium gallium garnet are reported as a function of wavelength from the near UV to the middle IR. The materialis transparent enough for good optical components between 0.36 and 6.0 microm, and the refractive index ranges from 2.0 at the UV end to 1.8 at the IR end of the spectrum. The wavelength dependence of index is expressed as a three-term Sellmeier formula with agreement better than two parts in the fourth decimal between calculated and experimental values. Variations in composition depending on growth from various melts (e.g., stoichiometric vs congruent) have no effect on the optical parameters at this level of precision.

  7. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  8. Synthesis of gadolinium oxide magnetoliposomes for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Danielle; Zhu, Weibe L.; Frommen, Christoph M.; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2000-05-01

    A method for the synthesis of gadolinium oxide magnetoliposomes, i.e., nanosized gadolinium oxide magnetic particles coated by a phospholipid membrane, is presented. Magnetoliposomes were prepared by reacting lauric acid coated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes prepared using a direct injection method. The gadolinium oxide magnetoliposomes were characterized using transmission electron microscopy imaging, x-ray diffraction, and fluorescence. The magnetic properties of the magnetoliposomes were investigated with a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Our results indicate that the magnetoliposomes contain approximately spherical nanoparticles averaging 20 nm in diameter. The occurrence of a phospholipid bilayer surrounding the magnetic particles is confirmed both by transmission electron micrographs of samples negatively stained with uranyl acetate and by digital fluorescence imaging microscopy measurements of magnetoliposomes labeled with fluorescein. The particles are paramagnetic at room temperature. NMR measurements show that the ratio between the relaxivities of the particles depends largely on their preparation.

  9. Gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of lung radiation fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Werthmuller, W.C.; Schiebler, M.L.; Whaley, R.A.; Mauro, M.A.; McCartney, W.H. )

    1989-11-01

    Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) enhancement of radiation-induced apical pulmonary fibrosis was observed in two patients previously treated for breast cancer. In one case the fibrosis was biopsied twice, with no change in its CT appearance over 3 years. Gadolinium-DTPA may enhance benign apical fibrosis after radiation therapy and should not, in and of itself, be used as evidence of recurrent malignancy.

  10. Fascinating and challenging role of tungstate promoted vanadium phosphate towards solvent free esterification of oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Behera, Gobinda Chandra; Parida, K M

    2012-01-28

    A novel solid acid catalyst has been extensively used for the esterification reaction. Herein, tungstate promoted vanadium phosphate material is fabricated from its precursor, VOHPO(4)·0.5H(2)O and its catalytic activities and structure are investigated in detail. This kind of catalyst is, for the first time, applied for the effective production of biodiesel from fatty acids. Although vanadium phosphate has been extensively used in gas phase oxidation reactions, it has not drawn much attention for its application in liquid phase reactions. Our recent results indicate that vanadium phosphate is an effective, minimally polluting and re-usable catalyst that is highly suited to the production of biodiesel from fatty acids. This work extends the possibility of using VPO in other liquid phase reactions.

  11. Synergistic inhibitive effect of tartarate and tungstate in preventing steel corrosion in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabeera, B.; Shibli, S. M. A.; Anirudhan, T. S.

    2006-03-01

    The inhibitive effect of tartarate was studied as a coinhibitor with tungstate in preventing carbon steel corrosion in aqueous solutions. Open circuit potential measurements, weight-loss measurements and polarization studies were conducted to understand the domains of corrosion and passivation. Tartarate ions, even at low concentration, showed excellent synergistic corrosion inhibition characteristics. A mixture of 500 ppm each of the inhibitors was found to be optimum inhibitor combination. This inhibitor combination showed inhibition efficiency as high as 98%. Tartarate in the synergistic inhibitor combination did not reveal any dominant role in shifting the surface potential, even though it showed substantial passivation effect. The present study explores and evaluates the synergistic combination as a potential inhibitor system in combating corrosion on carbon steel surface.

  12. Scintillation of lead tungstate crystal studied with single-electron beam from KUFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Rizwan, Mohamad Uozumi, Yusuke; Matsuo, Kazuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Kii, Toshiteru; Zen, Heishun; Tsamalaidze, Zviadi; Evtoukhovitch, Petr; Valentin, Samoilov

    2015-04-29

    Lead tungstate (PWO) crystal has a very fast response, high atomic density and high radiation hardness. Therefore, they are suitable to be used for high-energy nuclear data measurements under high-background circumstances. Although a good electron-ion separation with a pulse shape analysis technique is essential, scintillation pulse shapes have not been observed with electron beams of a wide energy range. A single-electron beam technique has been developed at Kyoto University Free Electron Laser (KUFEL), and electron beams of 4-38 MeV are available. During the experiments, single electron beams bombarded a PWO crystal. By using oscilloscope we observed scintillation pulses of a PWO crystal coupled with a photomultiplier tube. Measured spectra were compared with the simulation code of EGS5 to analyze scattering effects. As the result, the pulse amplitudes show good linearity and the pulse shapes are almost constant in the observed energy range.

  13. BK channel activation by tungstate requires the β1 subunit extracellular loop residues essential to modulate voltage sensor function and channel gating.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mariño, Ana I; Valverde, Miguel A; Fernández-Fernández, José M

    2014-07-01

    Tungstate, a compound with antidiabetic, antiobesity, and antihypertensive properties, activates the large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) (BK) channel containing either β1 or β4 subunits. The BK activation by tungstate is Mg(2+)-dependent and promotes arterial vasodilation, but only in precontracted mouse arteries expressing β1. In this study, we further explored how the β1 subunit participates in tungstate activation of BK channels. Activation of heterologously expressed human BKαβ1 channels in inside-out patches is fully dependent on the Mg(2+) sensitivity of the BK α channel subunit even at high (10 μM) cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Alanine mutagenesis of β1 extracellular residues Y74 or S104, which destabilize the active voltage sensor, greatly decreased the tungstate-induced left-shift of the BKαβ1 G-V curves in either the absence or presence of physiologically relevant cytosolic Ca(2+) levels (10 μM). The weakened tungstate activation of the BKαβ1Y74A and BKαβ1S104A mutant channels was not related to decreased Mg(2+) sensitivity. These results, together with previously published reports, support the idea that the putative binding site for tungstate-mediated BK channel activation is located in the pore-forming α channel subunit, around the Mg(2+) binding site. The role of β1 in tungstate-induced channel activation seems to rely on its interaction with the BK α subunit to modulate channel activity. Loop residues that are essential for the regulation of voltage sensor activation and gating of the BK channel are also relevant for BK activation by tungstate.

  14. Lasing properties of new Nd 3+-doped tungstate, molybdate, and fluoride materials under selective optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Jan; Jelínkova, Helena; Basiev, Tolstoban T.; Doroschenko, Maxim E.; Ivleva, Ludmila I.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Zverev, Peter G.

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative efficiencies of new Nd 3+-doped laser active/Raman - tungstate, molybdate, and fluoride - materials (SrWO 4, PbWO 4, BaWO 4, SrMoO 4, PbMoO 4, SrF II, and LaF 3) under selective longitudinal optical pumping by the alexandrite (~750nm), or diode (~800nm) laser. Crystals with various length, orientations and active ions concentrations were tested. To optimize the output of the tested lasers a set of input dichroic and output dielectric mirrors with different reflectivities were used. For realized lasers operating at pulsed free-running regime, threshold energy, slope efficiency, emission wavelength, and radiation polarization were determined. For each crystal, fluorescence lifetime and absorption coefficient under given pumping were established. The slope efficiency in case of Nd 3+:PbMoO 4 laser at wavelength 1054nm was measured to be 54.3% with total efficiency of 46% which is the best result obtained for all new tested crystals. For Nd 3+ doped SrWO 4, PbWO 4, and BaWO 4 crystals simultaneous laser and self-Raman emission were demonstrated in Q-switched regime. Thus newly proposed laser Raman crystals demonstrate high efficiency for Nd 3+ laser oscillations comparable with well known and widely used Nd:KGW crystal. Further improvement in the quality of tungstate and molybdate type crystals should result in further increase in lasing efficiency at 1.06μm wavelength. Self Raman frequency conversion of Nd 3+-laser oscillations in these crystals should result in high efficient pulse shortening, high peak power and new wavelengths in 1.2-1.5μm wavelength region.

  15. Distribution profile of gadolinium in gadolinium chelate-treated renally-impaired rats: role of pharmaceutical formulation.

    PubMed

    Fretellier, Nathalie; Salhi, Mariem; Schroeder, Josef; Siegmund, Heiko; Chevalier, Thibaut; Bruneval, Patrick; Jestin-Mayer, Gaëlle; Delaloge, Francette; Factor, Cécile; Mayer, Jean-François; Fabicki, Jean-Michel; Robic, Caroline; Bonnemain, Bruno; Idée, Jean-Marc; Corot, Claire

    2015-05-25

    While not acutely toxic, chronic hepatic effect of certain gadolinium chelates (GC), used as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, might represent a risk in renally-impaired patients due to free gadolinium accumulation in the liver. To answer this question, this study investigated the consequences of the presence of small amounts of either a soluble gadolinium salt ("free" Gd) or low-stability chelating impurity in the pharmaceutical solution of gadoteric acid, a macrocyclic GC with high thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities, were investigated in renally-impaired rats. Renal failure was induced by adding 0.75% adenine in the diet for three weeks. The pharmaceutical and commercial solution of gadoteric acid was administered (5 daily intravenous injections of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg) either alone or after being spiked with either "free" gadolinium (i.e., 0.04% w/v) or low-stability impurity (i.e., 0.06 w/v). Another GC, gadodiamide (low thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities) was given as its commercial solution at a similar dose. Non-chelated gadolinium was tested at two doses (0.005 and 0.01 mmol Gd/kg) as acetate salt. Gadodiamide induced systemic toxicity (mortality, severe epidermal and dermal lesions) and substantial tissue Gd retention. The addition of very low amounts of "free", non-chelated gadolinium or low thermodynamic stability impurity to the pharmaceutical solution of the thermodynamically stable GC gadoteric acid resulted in substantial capture of metal by the liver, similar to what was observed in "free" gadolinium salt-treated rats. Relaxometry studies strongly suggested the presence of free and soluble gadolinium in the liver. Electron microscopy examinations revealed the presence of free and insoluble gadolinium deposits in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells of rats treated with gadoteric acid solution spiked with low-stability impurity, free gadolinium and gadodiamide, but not in rats treated with the pharmaceutical solution of gadoteric acid. The

  16. Studies of narrow autoionizing resonances in gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, Bruce A.; Nortershauser, W.; Blaum, K.; Wendt, Klaus

    2003-06-30

    The autoionization (AI) spectrum of gadolinium between the first and second limits has been investigated by triple-resonance excitation with high-resolution cw lasers. A large number of narrow AI resonances have been observed and assigned total angular momentum J values. The resonances are further divided into members of AI Rydberg series converging to the second limit or other ''interloping'' levels. Fine structure in the Rydberg series has been identified and interpreted in terms of Jc j coupling. A number of detailed studies have been performed on the interloping resonances: These include lifetime determination by lineshape analysis, isotope shifts, hyperfine structure, and photoionization saturation parameters. The electronic structure of the interloping levels is discussed in terms of these studies. Linewidths generally decrease with increasing total angular momentum and the J = 7 resonances are extremely narrow with Lorentzian widths ranging from < 1 MHz up to 157 MHz. The strongest resonances are found to have cross-sections of {approx}10-12 cm{sup 2} and photoionization can be saturated with powers available from cw diode lasers.

  17. PARTITIONING OF GADOLINIUM IN THE CHEMICAL PROCESSING CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S.; Best, D.; Stone, M.; Click, D.

    2011-04-27

    A combination of short-term beaker tests and longer-duration Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) simulations were performed to investigate the relative partitioning behaviors of gadolinium and iron under conditions applicable to the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). The testing was performed utilizing non-radioactive simple Fe-Gd slurries, non-radioactive Sludge Batch 6 simulant slurries, and a radioactive real-waste slurry representative of Sludge Batch 7 material. The testing focused on the following range of conditions: (a) Fe:Gd ratios of 25-100; (b) pH values of 2-6; (c) acidification via addition of nitric, formic, and glycolic acids; (d) temperatures of {approx}93 C and {approx}22 C; and (e) oxalate concentrations of <100 mg/kg and {approx}10,000 mg/kg. The purpose of the testing was to provide data for assessing the potential use of gadolinium as a supplemental neutron poison when dispositioning excess plutonium. Understanding of the partitioning behavior of gadolinium in the CPC was the first step in assessing gadolinium's potential applicability. Significant fractions of gadolinium partitioned to the liquid-phase at pH values of 4.0 and below, regardless of the Fe:Gd ratio. In SRAT simulations targeting nitric and formic acid additions of 150% acid stoichiometry, the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.5-4.0, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were both {approx}20%. In contrast, in a SRAT simulation utilizing a nitric and formic acid addition under atypical conditions (due to an anomalously low insoluble solids content), the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.7, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were {approx}60% and {approx}70%, respectively. When glycolic acid was used in combination with nitric and formic acids at 100% acid stoichiometry, the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.6-4.0, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were 60-80% and 3-5%, respectively

  18. Toward a mid-infrared femtosecond laser system with suspended-core tungstate-tellurite glass fibers.

    PubMed

    Anashkina, E A; Andrianov, A V; Dorofeev, V V; Kim, A V

    2016-06-10

    A simple design of a fiber laser system for generating high-quality pulses with a duration of order 100 fs with ultrabroad wavelength tunability in the 2-5 μm range is discussed. This design incorporates conventional fs near-IR lasers and specially developed tungstate-tellurite fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDW) and relies on nonlinear wavelength conversion via either soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) or red-shifted dispersive wave (DW) generation. The fiber parameters needed for such optical conversion have been scanned numerically and showed a possibility of SSFS beyond 4 μm and of DW generation beyond 5 μm. We have also studied and prepared tungstate-tellurite glasses and preforms that are highly stable against crystallization, exhibit extremely low level of hydroxyl groups absorption, and from which the suspended-core two-ZDW fibers can be manufactured. PMID:27409007

  19. On the nature of defect states in tungstate nanoflake arrays as promising photoanodes in solar fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Aya M; Amer, Ahmad W; AlQaradawi, Siham Y; Allam, Nageh K

    2016-08-10

    An electrochemical method is presented to study the nature of the defect states in sub-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanoflake photoanodes used in water splitting. First, stoichiometric/sub-stoichiometric tungstate nanoflake arrays were deliberately developed via annealing under different atmospheres (air, O2, and H2) in different sequences. UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra and Tauc analysis indicated the presence of oxygen vacancies, which was also confirmed via XRD and Raman analysis, with samples annealed in an air/O2 sequence resulting in the most stoichiometric monoclinic structures. A defect sensitivity factor was proposed to explain the nature of defects whether they are deep or shallow. Mott-Schottky analysis was used to confirm the expected defect donor densities, as well as to confirm the nature of the developed oxygen vacancy defect states. The tungstate photoanodes were tested in photoelectrochemical water splitting cells and their photoconversion efficiency was demonstrated and discussed in detail. PMID:27453354

  20. Polyol-mediated low-temperature synthesis of crystalline tungstate nanoparticles MWO4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungelenk, Jan; Speldrich, Manfred; Dronskowski, Richard; Feldmann, Claus

    2014-05-01

    A polyol-mediated synthesis is presented as a general access to nanoscaled transition-metal tungstates MWO4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn). Using simple inorganic salts as starting materials, uniform and readily crystalline nanoparticles are prepared under mild conditions (T < 220 °C). The nanoparticles are of high quality in terms of small diameter (<20 nm), high surface area (up to 200 m2 g-1), phase purity and yield (>85%). Size, morphology and composition can be adjusted by precise variation of the reaction parameters, including type of starting material, duration and temperature of reaction. The transition-metal tungstate nanoparticles are fully functional, exhibiting typical properties of this class of materials, for instance, superparamagnetism (CoWO4), luminescence (ZnWO4) and photocatalytic activity (CuWO4).

  1. Assessing the performance under ionising radiation of lead tungstate scintillators for EM calorimetry in the CLAS12 Forward Tagger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegan, S.; Auffray, E.; Battaglieri, M.; Buchanan, E.; Caiffi, B.; Celentano, A.; Colaneri, L.; D`Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Dormenev, V.; Fanchini, E.; Lanza, L.; Novotny, R. W.; Parodi, F.; Rizzo, A.; Sokhan, D.; Tarasov, I.; Zonta, I.

    2015-07-01

    The well-established technology of electromagnetic calorimetry using Lead Tungstate crystals has recently seen an upheaval, with the closure of one of the most experienced large-scale suppliers of such crystals, the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP), which was instrumental in the development of mass production procedures for PWO-II, the current benchmark for this scintillator. Obtaining alternative supplies of Lead Tungstate crystals matching the demanding specifications of contemporary calorimeter devices now presents a significant challenge to detector research and development programmes. In this paper we describe a programme of assessment carried out for the selection, based upon the performance under irradiation, of Lead Tungstate crystals for use in the Forward Tagger device, part of the CLAS12 detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The crystals tested were acquired from SICCAS, the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tests performed are intended to maximise the performance of the detector within the practicalities of the crystal manufacturing process. Results of light transmission, before and after gamma ray irradiation, are presented and used to calculate dk, the induced radiation absorption coefficient, at 420 nm, the peak of the Lead Tungstate emission spectrum. Results for the SICCAS crystals are compared with identical measurements carried out on Bogoroditsk samples, which were acquired for the Forward Tagger development program before the closure of the facility. Also presented are a series of tests performed to determine the feasibility of recovering radiation damage to the crystals using illumination from an LED, with such illumination available in the Forward Tagger from a light monitoring system integral to the detector.

  2. Gadolinium metallo nanocongregates as potential magnetosensors for detecting early stage cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2015-04-27

    Gadolinium chelates and gadolinium based inorganic nanoparticles have been extensively studied, because of the high magnetic moment of gadolinium. Here, metallic gadolinium nanocongregates have been developed. Upon injecting these nanoparticles in the mice, they initially circulate in the blood stream and are localized at the cancer site, which could be visualized upon application of magnetic field hence acting as small magnetic nanosensors searching for even small cancers, detecting cancers at a very early stage.

  3. Growth of bulk gadolinium pyrosilicate single crystals for scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasymov, I.; Sidletskiy, O.; Neicheva, S.; Grinyov, B.; Baumer, V.; Galenin, E.; Katrunov, K.; Tkachenko, S.; Voloshina, O.; Zhukov, A.

    2011-03-01

    Ce, Pr, and La-doped gadolinium pyrosilicate Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) single crystals were grown by the Czochralski and Top Seeded Solution Growth (TSSG) techniques for the first time. Formation conditions of different pyrosilicate phases were determined. X-ray luminescence integral intensity of Ce-doped GPS is about one order of magnitude higher in comparison with gadolinium oxyorthosilicate Gd2SiO5:Ce (GSO:Ce). All samples demonstrate temperature stability of luminescence yield up to 400 K.

  4. Photocatalytic generation of syngas using combustion-synthesized silver bismuth tungstate.

    PubMed

    de Tacconi, Norma R; Timmaji, Hari Krishna; Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Huda, Muhammad N; Sarker, Pranab; Janáky, Csaba; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2012-08-27

    Silver bismuth tungstate (AgBiW(2)O(8)) nanoparticles were prepared for the first time by solution combustion synthesis by using the corresponding metal nitrates as the precursor and urea as the fuel. These nanoparticles were subsequently modified with Pt catalyst islands using a photocatalytic procedure and used for the photogeneration of syngas (CO+H(2)). Formic acid was used for this purpose for the in situ generation of CO(2) and its subsequent reduction to CO. In the absence of Pt modification, H(2) was not obtained in the gas products evolved. These results were compared with those obtained with acetic acid in place of formic acid. The combustion process was simulated by thermogravimetry and the synthesized powder was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance UV/Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface area measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Tauc plots derived from the diffuse reflectance data yielded an optical band gap of 2.74 eV. The photocatalytic activity of these nanoparticles was superior to a sample prepared by solid-state synthesis. Mechanistic aspects are finally presented, as are structural models and electronic calculations, using density functional theory (DFT).

  5. Studying radiation hardness of a cadmium tungstate crystal based radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtein, M. M.; Smekalin, L. F.; Stepanov, S. A.; Zatonov, I. A.; Tkacheva, T. V.; Usachev, E. Yu

    2016-06-01

    The given article considers radiation hardness of an X-ray detector used in production of non-destructive testing instruments and inspection systems. In the course of research, experiments were carried out to estimate radiation hardness of a detector based on cadmium tungstate crystal and its structural components individually. The article describes a layout of an experimental facility that was used for measurements of radiation hardness. The radiation dose dependence of the photodiode current is presented, when it is excited by a light flux of a scintillator or by an external light source. Experiments were carried out to estimate radiation hardness of two types of optical glue used in detector production; they are based on silicon rubber and epoxy. With the help of a spectrophotometer and cobalt gun, each of the glue samples was measured for a relative light transmission factor with different wavelengths, depending on the radiation dose. The obtained data are presented in a comprehensive analysis of the results. It was determined, which of the glue samples is most suitable for production of detectors working under exposure to strong radiation.

  6. Zirconium tungstate/epoxy nanocomposites: effect of nanoparticle morphology and negative thermal expansivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongchao; Rogalski, Mark; Kessler, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    The ability to tailor the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a polymer is essential for mitigating thermal residual stress and reducing microcracks caused by CTE mismatch of different components in electronic applications. This work studies the effect of morphology and thermal expansivity of zirconium tungstate nanoparticles on the rheological, thermo-mechanical, dynamic-mechanical, and dielectric properties of ZrW2O8/epoxy nanocomposites. Three types of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles were synthesized under different hydrothermal conditions and their distinct properties were characterized, including morphology, particle size, aspect ratio, surface area, and CTE. Nanoparticles with a smaller particle size and larger surface area led to a more significant reduction in gel-time and glass transition temperature of the epoxy nanocomposites, while a higher initial viscosity and significant shear thinning behavior was found in prepolymer suspensions containing ZrW2O8 with larger particle sizes and aspect ratios. The thermo- and dynamic-mechanical properties of epoxy-based nanocomposites improved with increasing loadings of the three types of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. In addition, the introduced ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not negatively affect the dielectric constant or the breakdown strength of the epoxy resin, suggesting potential applications of ZrW2O8/epoxy nanocomposites in the microelectronic insulation industry.

  7. Synthesis of bismuth tungstate (Bi2WO6) nanoflakes and their field emission investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolhe, P. S.; Bankar, P. K.; Gavhane, D. S.; Sonawane, K. M.; Maiti, N.; More, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The nanoflakes of Bismuth Tungstate (Bi2WO6) were successfully synthesized by a one-step facile hydrothermal route without using any templates or surfactants and field emission investigations of the Bi2WO6 nanoflakes emitter are reported. Structural and morphological analysis of as-synthesized Bi2WO6 nanoflakes has been carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Moreover, the field emission characteristics of the Bi2WO6 nanoflakes are found to be superior to the other semiconductor emitters. The synthesized Bi2WO6 nanoflakes emitter delivers current density of ~222.35 μA/cm2 at an applied electric field of ~7.2 V/μm. The emission current stability investigated at pre-set value of ~2 μA is observed to be fairly good. These observed results demonstrate potential candidate of the Bi2WO6 cathode as an electron source for practical applications in vacuum microelectronic device.

  8. ROLE OF TUNGSTEN IN THE AQUEOUS PHASE HYDRODEOXYGENATION OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL ON TUNGSTATED ZIRCONIA SUPPORTED PALLADIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Marin-Flores, Oscar G.; Karim, Ayman M.; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-15

    The focus of the present work was specifically on the elucidation of the role played by tungsten on the catalytic activity and selectivity of tungstated zirconia supported palladium (Pd-mWZ) for the aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation (APHDO) of ethylene glycol (EG). Zirconia supported palladium (Pd-mZ) was used as reference. The catalysts were prepared via incipient wet impregnation and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), CO pulse chemisorption, CO-DRIFTS, ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and pyridine adsorption. The presence of W results in larger Pd particles on supported Pd catalysts, i.e., 0.9 and 6.1 nm Pd particles are for Pd-mZ and Pd-mWZ, respectively. For comparison purposes, the activity of the catalytic materials used in this work was obtained using a well-defined set of operating conditions. The catalytic activity measurements show that the overall intrinsic activity of Pd particles on mWZ is 1.9 times higher than on mZ. APHDO process appears to be highly favored on Pd-mWZ whereas Pd-mZ exhibits a higher selectivity for reforming. This difference in terms of selectivity seems to be related to the high concentration of Brønsted acid sites and electron-deficient Pd species present on Pd-mWZ.

  9. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan N., Pethan; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V. R.

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol-gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO3) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH3 TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  10. Compton profiles and Mulliken's populations of cobalt, nickel and copper tungstates: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, B. S.; Heda, N. L.; Kumar, Kishor; Bhatt, Samir; Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first ever studies on Compton profiles of AWO4 (A=Co, Ni and Cu) using 661.65 keV γ-rays emitted by 137Cs source. The experimental momentum densities have been employed to validate exchange and correlation potentials within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. Density functional theory (DFT) with local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation and also the hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT (B3LYP and PBE0) have been considered under LCAO scheme. The LCAO-B3LYP scheme is found to be in better agreement with the experimental data than other approximations considered in this work, suggesting applicability of B3LYP approach in predicting the electronic properties of these tungstates. The Mulliken's population (MP) data show charge transfer from Co/Ni/Cu and W to O atoms. The experimental profiles when normalized to same area show almost similar localization of 3d electrons (in real space) of Ni and Cu which is lower than that of Co in their AWO4 environment.

  11. Numerical simulation of photonic-crystal tellurite-tungstate glass fibres used in parametric fibre devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G; Nazaryants, V O; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2006-01-31

    Using the MIT Photonic-Bands Package to calculate fully vectorial definite-mode eigenmodes of Maxwell's equations with periodic boundary conditions in a plane-wave basis, light propagation is simulated in fibres formed by point defects in two-dimensional periodic lattices of cylindrical holes in a glass or of glass tubes. The holes and gaps between tubes are assumed filled with air. Single-site hexagonal and square lattices are considered, which were most often studied both theoretically and experimentally and are used to fabricate silica photonic-crystal fibres. As a defect, a single vacancy is studied - the absent lattice site (one hole in a glass or one of the tubes are filled with the same glass) and a similar vacancy with nearest neighbours representing holes of a larger diameter. The obtained solutions are analysed by the method of effective mode area. The dependences of the effective refractive index and dispersion of the fundamental mode on the geometrical parameters of a fibre are found. The calculations are performed for tellurite-tungstate 80TeO{sub 2}-20WO{sub 3} glass fibres taking into account the frequency dispersion of the refractive index. (optical fibres)

  12. Investigation of oxygen vacancy and photoluminescence in calcium tungstate nanophosphors with different particle sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yezhou; Wang, Zhaofeng; Sun, Luyi; Wang, Zhilong; Wang, Shiqin; Liu, Xiong; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphors with different particle sizes were prepared by hydrothermal processes through controlling the concentration of surfactant. • Green emission band of oxygen vacancy in CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphor was clearly observed upon the irradiation of 350 nm excitation. • The concentration of oxygen vacancy in CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphor could be increased by reducing its size. - Abstract: Calcium tungstate (CaWO{sub 4}) nanophosphors with the particle sizes from 35 to 90 nm were synthesized by a hydrothermal process through exactly controlling the pre-treated conditions. The influence of particle size on oxygen vacancy and photoluminescence properties in CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphors was investigated and discussed. The crystal structure of the CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphors presented a certain level of distortion due to the high concentration of oxygen vacancy. Under 350 nm excitation, a clear green emission aroused by oxygen vacancy was observed. The possible luminescence processes for the matrix and oxygen vacancy were proposed. The luminescence spectra of the nanophosphors revealed that the emission and absorption intensity aroused by oxygen vacancy were both enhanced when the size is decreased. On the basis of the above results, the essential relationship between particle size and oxygen vacancy in CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphors was concluded that the concentration of oxygen vacancy could be increased by reducing its size, which was further confirmed by decay lifetimes.

  13. Photocatalytic generation of syngas using combustion-synthesized silver bismuth tungstate.

    PubMed

    de Tacconi, Norma R; Timmaji, Hari Krishna; Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Huda, Muhammad N; Sarker, Pranab; Janáky, Csaba; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2012-08-27

    Silver bismuth tungstate (AgBiW(2)O(8)) nanoparticles were prepared for the first time by solution combustion synthesis by using the corresponding metal nitrates as the precursor and urea as the fuel. These nanoparticles were subsequently modified with Pt catalyst islands using a photocatalytic procedure and used for the photogeneration of syngas (CO+H(2)). Formic acid was used for this purpose for the in situ generation of CO(2) and its subsequent reduction to CO. In the absence of Pt modification, H(2) was not obtained in the gas products evolved. These results were compared with those obtained with acetic acid in place of formic acid. The combustion process was simulated by thermogravimetry and the synthesized powder was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance UV/Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface area measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Tauc plots derived from the diffuse reflectance data yielded an optical band gap of 2.74 eV. The photocatalytic activity of these nanoparticles was superior to a sample prepared by solid-state synthesis. Mechanistic aspects are finally presented, as are structural models and electronic calculations, using density functional theory (DFT). PMID:22431409

  14. Characterization of CALET prototype TASC lead tungstate calorimeter using CERN beam test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaid, Amir

    2013-04-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a high-energy cosmic ray experiment that will be placed on the International Space Station in 2014. The primary goals of CALET are to measure the cosmic ray electron spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, gamma rays from 10 GeV to 10 TeV, and protons and nuclei from 10 GeV up to 1000 TeV. The detector consists of three main components: a Charge Detector (CHD), Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), and Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC). The TASC consists of 192 lead tungstate (PbWO4) logs arranged in 12 layers. An understanding of the major characteristics of the TASC is important for accurately determining the incident particle shower energy deposition. In September 2012, a prototype CALET detector was exposed to electron, muon, and proton beams from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. Muon beams can be used to determine the detector response to minimum ionizing particles (MIP). In the present paper, we discuss the response of the TASC logs to muon beams as a function of position, and signal attenuation during propagation. Included is a discussion of parameterizations of position-dependent muon energy deposition and signal attenuation functions for the TASC logs based on the CERN beam test data.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of bi-functional nanostructured manganese tungstate catalysts for selective oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Kröhnert, Jutta; Pfeifer, Verena; Girgsdies, Frank; Rosowski, Frank; Schlögl, Robert; Trunschke, Annette

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of C-H activation in selective oxidation reactions of short-chain alkane molecules over transition metal oxides is critically affected by the balance of acid-base and redox sites at the surface of the catalyst. Using the example of manganese tungstate we discuss how the relative abundance of these sites can be controlled via synthetic techniques. Phase-pure catalysts composed of the thermodynamic stable monoclinic MnWO4 phase have been prepared using hydrothermal synthesis. Variation of the initial pH value resulted in rod-shaped nano-crystalline MnWO4 catalysts composed of particles with varying aspect ratio. The synthesis products have been analysed using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared, and photoelectron spectroscopy. In situ Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the dissolution-re-crystallization processes occurring under hydrothermal conditions. Ethanol oxidation was applied to probe the surface functionalities in terms of acid-base and redox properties. Changes in the aspect ratio of the primary catalyst particles are reflected in the product distribution induced by altering the fraction of acid-base and redox sites exposed at the surface of the catalysts in agreement with the proposed mechanism of particle growth by re-crystallization during ageing under hydrothermal conditions. PMID:27076100

  16. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-11-07

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Smtype→ dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GP and a temperature of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Furthermore, our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.

  17. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-11-07

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Smtype→ dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GP and a temperaturemore » of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Furthermore, our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.« less

  18. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-10-01

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Sm-type → dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GPa and a temperature of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.

  19. Discovery of samarium, europium, gadolinium, and terbium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    May, E.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-01-15

    Currently, thirty-four samarium, thirty-four europium, thirty-one gadolinium, and thirty-one terbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  20. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, R. S.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search), 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β). The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides) was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  1. Toxic effects of mercury, lead and gadolinium on vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, D V; Simões, M R; Furieri, L B; Fioresi, M; Fiorim, J; Almeida, E A S; Angeli, J K; Wiggers, G A; Peçanha, F M; Salaices, M

    2011-09-01

    Heavy metals have been used in a wide variety of human activities that have significantly increased both professional and environmental exposure. Unfortunately, disasters have highlighted the toxic effects of metals on different organs and systems. Over the last 50 years, the adverse effects of chronic lead, mercury and gadolinium exposure have been underscored. Mercury and lead induce hypertension in humans and animals, affecting endothelial function in addition to their other effects. Increased cardiovascular risk after exposure to metals has been reported, but the underlying mechanisms, mainly for short periods of time and at low concentrations, have not been well explored. The presence of other metals such as gadolinium has raised concerns about contrast-induced nephropathy and, interestingly, despite this negative action, gadolinium has not been defined as a toxic agent. The main actions of these metals, demonstrated in animal and human studies, are an increase of free radical production and oxidative stress and stimulation of angiotensin I-converting enzyme activity, among others. Increased vascular reactivity, highlighted in the present review, resulting from these actions might be an important mechanism underlying increased cardiovascular risk. Finally, the results described in this review suggest that mercury, lead and gadolinium, even at low doses or concentrations, affect vascular reactivity. Acting via the endothelium, by continuous exposure followed by their absorption, they can increase the production of free radicals and of angiotensin II, representing a hazard for cardiovascular function. In addition, the actual reference values, considered to pose no risk, need to be reduced.

  2. Development of gadolinium based nanoparticles having an affinity towards melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlieras, Jessica; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Roux, Amandine; Heinrich-Balard, Laurence; Cohen, Richard; Tarrit, Sébastien; Truillet, Charles; Mignot, Anna; Hachani, Roxanne; Kryza, David; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Perriat, Pascal; Janier, Marc; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip.Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33457g

  3. Gadolinium chloride pretreatment ameliorates acute cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Loukas G; Tzirogiannis, Konstantinos N; Demonakou, Maria D; Kourentzi, Kalliopi T; Mykoniatis, Michael G; Panoutsopoulos, Georgios I

    2013-08-01

    Cadmium is a known industrial and environmental pollutant. It causes hepatotoxicity upon acute administration. Features of cadmium-induced acute hepatoxicity encompass necrosis, apoptosis, peliosis and inflammatory infiltration. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) may prevent cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity by suppressing Kupffer cells. The effect of GdCl3 pretreatment on a model of acute cadmium-induced liver injury was investigated. Male Wistar rats 4-5 months old were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline followed by cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 6.5 mg/kg) or GdCl3 (10 mg/kg) followed by CdCl2 (6.5 mg/kg; groups I and II, respectively). Rats of both the groups were killed at 9, 12, 16, 24, 48 and 60 h after cadmium intoxication. Liver sections were analyzed for necrosis, apoptosis, peliosis and mitoses. Liver regeneration was also evaluated by tritiated thymidine incorporation into hepatic DNA. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were also determined. Hepatic necrosis, hepatocyte and nonparenchymal cell apoptosis and macroscopic and microscopic types of peliosis hepatis were minimized by gadolinium pretreatment. Serum levels of AST and ALT were also greatly diminished in rats of group II. Tritiated thymidine incorporation into hepatic DNA was increased in gadolinium pretreatment rats. Kupffer cell activation was minimal in both the groups of rats. Gadolinium pretreatment attenuates acute cadmium-induced liver injury in young Wistar rats, with mechanisms other than Kupffer cell elimination.

  4. Linear Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Are Associated With Brain Gadolinium Retention in Healthy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Philippe; Violas, Xavier; Grand, Sylvie; Lehericy, Stéphane; Idée, Jean-Marc; Ballet, Sébastien; Corot, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate Gd retention in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) of linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) compared with a macrocyclic contrast agent. Materials and Methods The brain tissue retention of Gd of 3 linear GBCAs (gadobenate dimeglumine, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide) and a macrocyclic GBCA (gadoterate meglumine) was compared in healthy rats (n = 8 per group) that received 20 intravenous injections of 0.6 mmol Gd/kg (4 injections per week for 5 weeks). An additional control group with saline was included. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed before injection and once a week during the 5 weeks of injections and for another 4 additional weeks after contrast period. Total gadolinium concentration was measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Blinded qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the T1 signal intensity in DCN were performed, as well as a statistical analysis on quantitative data. Results At completion of the injection period, all the linear contrast agents (gadobenate dimeglumine, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide) induced a significant increase in signal intensity in DCN, unlike the macrocyclic GBCA (gadoterate meglumine) or saline. The T1 hypersignal enhancement kinetic was fast for gadodiamide. Total Gd concentrations for the 3 linear GBCAs groups at week 10 were significantly higher in the cerebellum (1.21 ± 0.48, 1.67 ± 0.17, and 3.75 ± 0.18 nmol/g for gadobenate dimeglumine, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide, respectively) than with the gadoterate meglumine (0.27 ± 0.16 nmol/g, P < 0.05) and saline (0.09 ± 0.12 nmol/g, P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the macrocyclic agent and saline. Conclusions Repeated administrations of the linear GBCAs gadodiamide, gadobenate dimeglumine, and gadopentetate dimeglumine to healthy rats were associated with progressive and significant T1 signal hyperintensity in the

  5. Structural and optical characterization of metal tungstates (MWO4; M=Ni, Ba, Bi) synthesized by a sucrose-templated method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metal tungstates have attracted much attention due to their interesting structural and photoluminescence properties. Depending on the size of the bivalent cation present, the metal tungstates will adopt structures with different phases. In this work, three different phases of metal tungstates MWO4 (M= Ba, Ni and Bi) were synthesized via the sucrose templated method. Results The powders of BaWO4 (tetragonal), NiWO4 (monoclinic) and Bi2WO6 (orthorhombic) formed after calcination temperatures of 750, 650 and 600°C for 4 h respectively are found to be crystalline and exist in their pure phase. Based on Scherrer estimation, their crystallite size are of nanosized. BET results showed NiWO4 has the highest surface area. BaWO4 exhibited less Raman vibrations than the NiWO4 because of the increased lattice symmetry but Bi2WO6 showed almost the same Raman vibrations as BaWO4. From the UV-vis spectra, the band gap transition of the metal tungstates are of the order of BaWO4 > Bi2WO6 > NiWO4. Broad blue-green emission peaks were detected in photoluminescence spectra and the results showed the great dependence on morphology, crystallinity and size of the metal tungstates. Conclusion Three different phases of metal tungstates of BaWO4 (scheelite), NiWO4 (wolframite) and Bi2WO6 (perovskite layer) in their pure phase were successfully prepared by the simple and economical sucrose-templated method. The highest surface area is exhibited by NiWO4 while largest band gap is shown by BaWO4. These materials showed promising optical properties. PMID:23634962

  6. Cation–cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    treatments. The framework of these compounds is robust to cation exchange and heat. (yellow polyhedra=uranium pentagonal bipyramids; blue polyhedra=tungsten octahedral, purple balls=K; yellow balls=Na; grey balls=Tl). - Highlights: • Five isostructural uranyl tungstates compounds were synthesized hydrothermally. • The structures consist of a chains of uranium and tungstate polyhedral. • Chains are connected into a framework by cation–cation interactions. • Cation exchange does not alter the structural integrity of the compounds. • Cation exchange was successful at room temperature and mild hydrothermal conditions.

  7. Monocrystal Elastic Constants of the Negative-Thermal-Expansion Compound Zirconium Tungstate (ZrW2O8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drymiotis, F. R.; Ledbetter, H.; Betts, J. B.; Kimura, T.; Lashley, J. C.; Migliori, A.; Ramirez, A. P.; Kowach, G. R.; van Duijn, J.

    2004-07-01

    We measured zirconium tungstate's elastic constants Cij. This compound shows relatively soft, nearly isotropic elastic constants with normal Poisson ratios and no approach to Born instability. ZrW2O8 shows normal ambient-temperature elastic constants Cij, but remarkable dCij/dT that show dominant low-frequency acoustic-vibration modes. From the bulk modulus, we estimated the total ambient-temperature thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter as γ=-1.2. The dB/dT slope gives a Grüneisen parameter γ=-7. The 300 0K bulk-modulus increase (40%) seems unprecedented and breaks Birch's law of corresponding states.

  8. Acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR)/manganous tungstate (MnWO4) nanocomposites: Characterization, mechanical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Abdu Raheem V., P.; Jayakrishnan, P.; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2014-10-01

    Nanocomposites of NBR with manganous-tungstate nanoparticles were prepared through vulcanization process. The extent of interaction of nanoparticles with the polymer was studied by FTIR, SEM, XRD, TGA and AC conductivity. FTIR and XRD ascertain the interaction of NBR with MnWO4 nanoparticles. SEM analysis established that the nanopartilces were well dispersed in the macromolecular chain of NBR. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were studied as a function of filler loading. The nanocomposites exhibited enhanced thermal stability as seen in TGA. Conductivity and dielectric properties of nanocomposites increase with increase in concentration of MnWO4 nanoparticles (7phr) and thereafter the value decreases.

  9. Surface Raman excitation and enhancement profiles for chromate, molybdate, and tungstate on colloidal silver

    SciTech Connect

    Feilchenfeld, H.; Siiman, O.

    1986-05-08

    The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) excitation profiles of chromate, molybdate, and tungstate ions on colloidal silver were obtained by using excitation wavelengths between 457.9 and 676.4 nm. The intensity of the strongest SERS band between 800 and 900 cm/sup -1/, assignable to nu/sub s/(M-O), was in each case referenced to the 1020-cm/sup -1/ band of the internal standard, methanol, in silver hydrosols. These relative SERS intensities were compared against similar intensity ratios for each oxo anion in solution and then appropriately scaled for the concentration of MO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ in solution and on the surface of the silver particles in the sols. Peak SERS enhancements occurred at 560 nm for CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and at 600 nm for both MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. The latter peak positions matched the secondary absorption band maxima that originate from aggregates of silver particles in the sols. The numerical values of the SERS enhancements were 5 x 10/sup 4/-l x 10/sup 5/ for CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, 9 x 10/sup 5/ for MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and about 2 x 10/sup 5/ for WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ on colloidal silver. The somewhat lower SERS enhancements for the chromophoric adsorbate, CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, which adsorbs maximally at 370 nm in aqueous solution, are attributed to a lower degree of aggregation for the sols with added CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, rather than to partial quenching of its resonant excited state on the heavy metal (silver) surface. 34 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Performance characterization of a MVCT scanner using multislice thick, segmented cadmium tungstate-photodiode detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kirvan, P. F.; Monajemi, T. T.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) and megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) can be used for visualizing anatomical structures prior to radiation therapy treatments to assist in patient setup and target localization. These systems are less susceptible to metal artifacts and provide better CT number linearity than conventional CT scanners. However, their contrast is limited by the properties of the megavoltage photons and the low detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of flat panel detector systems currently available. By using higher DQE, thick, segmented cadmium tungstate detectors, the authors can improve the low contrast detectability of a MVCT system. This in turn would permit greater soft tissue visualization for a given radiation dose, allowing MVCT to be used in more clinical situations. Methods: This article describes the evaluation of our prototype system that uses thick, segmented detectors. In order to create images using a dose that would be acceptable for day to day patient imaging, the authors evaluated their system using the low intensity bremsstrahlung component of a 6 MeV electron beam. The system was evaluated for its uniformity, high contrast resolution, low contrast detectability, signal to noise ratio, contrast to noise ratio, and CT number linearity. Results: The prototype system was found to have a high contrast spatial resolution of about 5 line pairs per cm, and to be able to visualize a 15 mm 1.5% contrast target with 2 cGy of radiation dose delivered. SNR{sup 2} vs radiation dose and mean pixel value vs electron density curves were linear. Conclusions: This prototype system shows a large improvement in low contrast detectability over current MVCBCT systems.

  11. In-situ growth of zinc tungstate nanorods on graphene for enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Lei; Xu, Junling; Ao, Yanhui; Wang, Peifang

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Graphene/ZnWO{sub 4} (G–ZnWO{sub 4}) nanorod composite photocatalysts were prepared by a simple one-step method. Namely, the reduction of graphene oxide and the growth of ZnWO{sub 4} nanorod occurred simultaneously in one single process. An enhancement in the photocatalytic activities were observed in G–ZnWO{sub 4} composites compared with pure ZnWO{sub 4} under UV light irradiation. - Highlights: • Graphene–ZnWO{sub 4} composite photocatalyst was prepared for the first time. • The as-prepared composite photocatalysts show high activity for dye degradation. • Effect of graphene amount on the photocatalytic activity was investigated. - Abstract: Graphene–zinc tungstate (G–ZnWO{sub 4}) hybrid photocatalysts were prepared by an in-situ growth method in which the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and the growth of ZnWO{sub 4} crystals occurred simultaneously. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was investigated by the degradation of dye methylene blue (MB). An enhancement in the photocatalytic activity was observed for G–ZnWO{sub 4} hybrids compared with pure ZnWO{sub 4} under UV light. This improvement was attributed to the following two reasons: increased migration efficiency of photo-induced electrons and increased adsorption activity for dye molecules. The effect of the amount of graphene on the photocatalytic activity was also investigated. Results showed that there was an optimum amount of 2%.

  12. Structural, microstructural and vibrational analyses of the monoclinic tungstate BiLuWO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Ahsaine, H.; Taoufyq, A.; Patout, L.; Ezahri, M.; Benlhachemi, A.; Bakiz, B.; Villain, S.; Guinneton, F.; Gavarri, J.-R.

    2014-10-15

    The bismuth lutetium tungstate phase BiLuWO{sub 6} has been prepared using a solid state route with stoichiometric mixtures of oxide precursors. The obtained polycrystalline phase has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. In the first step, the crystal structure has been refined using Rietveld method: the crystal cell was resolved using monoclinic system (parameters a, b, c, β) with space group A2/m. SEM images showed the presence of large crystallites with a constant local nominal composition (BiLuW). TEM analyses showed that the actual local structure could be better represented by a superlattice (a, 2b, c, β) associated with space groups P2 or P2/m. The Raman spectroscopy showed the presence of vibrational bands similar to those observed in the compounds BiREWO{sub 6} with RE=Y, Gd, Nd. However, these vibrational bands were characterized by large full width at half maximum, probably resulting from the long range Bi/Lu disorder and local WO{sub 6} octahedron distortions in the structure. - Graphical abstract: The average structure of BiLuWO{sub 6} determined from X-ray diffraction data can be represented by A2/m space group. Experimental Electron Diffraction patterns along the [0vw] zone axes of the monoclinic structure and associated simulated patterns show the existence of a monoclinic superstructure with space group P2 or P2/m. - Highlights: • A new monoclinic BiLuWO{sub 6} phase has been elaborated from solid-state reaction. • The space group of the monoclinic disordered average structure should be A2/m. • Transmission electron microscopy leads to a superlattice with P2/m space group. • Raman spectroscopy suggests existence of local disorder.

  13. Gadolinium Endohedral Metallofullerene-Based MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolskar, Robert D.

    With the ability to encapsulate and carry the highly paramagnetic Gd3+ ion, gadolinium endohedral metallofullerenes or "gadofullerenes" are being explored as alternatives to the chelate complexes that are currently used for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Reviewed here are the various water-soluble derivatives of the gadofullerenes Gd@C82, Gd@C60, and Gd3N@C80 that have been investigated as MRI contrast agents. The water proton r1 relaxivities of gadofullerenes can be more than an order of magnitude higher than those of clinically used chelate agents. Gadofullerene relaxivity mechanisms have been studied, and multiple factors are found to contribute to their high relaxivities. In vitro and in vivoT1-weighted MRI tests of gadofullerene derivatives have shown their utility as bright image-enhancing agents. The gadofullerene MRI contrast agents are a promising new and unique style of gadolinium carrier for advanced imaging applications, including cellular and molecular imaging.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of praseodymium, gadolinium and ytterbium chlorides.

    PubMed

    Basile, A C; Hanada, S; Sertié, J A; Oga, S

    1984-02-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of chloride salts of praseodymium, gadolinium and ytterbium were investigated, using various experimental inflammatory models in rats. The lanthanide salts administered by oral route showed no significant effect, but when injected intraperitoneally they significantly inhibited the carrageenin-induced oedema, proportional to their doses ranging from 15 to 75 mg/kg. They also reduced nystatin-induced oedema and vascular permeability response to histamine and serotonin. Pronounced inhibitory effect of lanthanide salts at the dose of 50 mg/kg, i.p., was observed in histamine- and serotonin-induced changes in vascular permeability. Repeated administration of lanthanide salts in the dose of 20 mg/kg for 13 d significantly inhibited arthritis development. The same dose of these salts for a 6-d period similarly reduced granuloma formation. However, praseodymium, gadolinium and ytterbium chlorides showed no significant difference among themselves and their anti-inflammatory effects were smaller than those from phenylbutazone.

  15. About a Gadolinium-doped Water Cherenkov LAGUNA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Labarga, Luis

    2010-11-24

    Water Cherenkov (wC) detectors are extremely powerful apparatuses for scientific research. Nevertheless they lack of neutron tagging capabilities, which translates, mainly, into an inability to identify the anti-matter nature of the reacting incoming anti-neutrino particles. A solution was proposed by R. Beacon and M. Vagins back in 2004: by dissolving in the water a compound with nucleus with very large cross section for neutron capture like the Gadolinium, with a corresponding emission of photons of enough energy to be detected, they can tag thermal neutrons with an efficiency larger than 80%. In this talk we detail the technique and its implications in the measurement capabilities and, as well, the new backgrounds induced. We discuss the improvement on their physics program, also for the case of LAGUNA type detectors. We comment shortly the status of the pioneering R and D program of the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration towards dissolving a Gadolinium compound in its water.

  16. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  17. Solid-state gadolinium{endash}magnesium hydride optical switch

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, R.; Rubin, M.; Richardson, T.; OBrien, N.; Chen, Y.

    1999-09-01

    The optical switching properties of gadolinium{endash}magnesium hydride have been demonstrated in a solid-state electrochromic device. With positive polarization of the hydride electrode, the visible reflectance approaches 35{percent} with virtually zero transmission, while with negative polarization, the visible transmission exceeds 25{percent} at 650 nm. The switching is reversible, with intermediate optical properties between the transparent and reflecting states. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Magnons as a Bose-Einstein Condensate in Nanocrystalline Gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S. N.; Mathew, S. P.

    2011-06-17

    The recent observation [S. P. Mathew et al., J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 200, 072047 (2010)] of the anomalous softening of spin-wave modes at low temperatures in nanocrystalline gadolinium is interpreted as a Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of magnons. A self-consistent calculation, based on the BEC picture, is shown to closely reproduce the observed temperature variations of magnetization and specific heat at constant magnetic fields.

  19. Synthesis of nanocrystals of gadolinium carbonate by reaction crystallization.

    PubMed

    He, Xin-Kuai; Shin, Dongmin; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2012-03-01

    The formation of nano-sized crystals of gadolinium carbonate via reaction crystallization was studied in a semi-batch crystallizer using gadolinium chloride and ammonium hydrogen carbonate as the reactants. The gadolinium carbonate crystals were formed by the aggregation of primary particles sized about 5 nm. Thereby, the crystallization parameters acting directly on the aggregation of the primary particles, such as the reactant concentrations, non-stoichiometry of the reactants, solution pH, acoustic energy, and agitation speed, were mechanistically investigated. As such, increasing the reactant concentrations enhanced the crystal size due to higher nucleation of the primary particles for the aggregation. Non-stoichiometric reactant concentrations resulted in a significant reduction of the crystal size, due to the adsorption of the excess species on the primary particles. Similarly, the surface charge of the primary particles depended on the solution pH. Thus, the crystal size was reduced when the pH deviated from the neutral point. The acoustic cavitation of the ultrasound was much more effective than the turbulent fluid motion of the agitation in inhibiting the primary particle aggregation. Thus, the crystal size was remarkably reduced, even at a low acoustic energy of 6 watts.

  20. Characteristics of Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles Using Terahertz Spectroscopy (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Maeng, Inhee; Oh, Seung Jae; Kim, Taekhoon; Cho, Byung Kyu; Lee, Kwangyeol; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2009-04-01

    The penetration property of the terahertz electromagnetic (THz) wave is relevant to its use. We used the THz wave spectroscopy system which easily penetrates some materials that do not contain water, e.g., plastic and ceramics. The system has been developed for several purposes, including measuring the properties of semiconductors and bio-materials, and detecting plastic bombs and ceramic knives at airports. It is also used for medical imaging systems, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), at some research institutes. It can show not only the difference in amplitude, but also the difference of the phase of each point of sample. MRI technology usually uses contrast agents to enhance the quality of the image. Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), made with a heavy metal ion, is commonly used as a clinical MRI contrast agent. Gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticle is a new contrast agent. It serves to equip the core of each particle with antibodies or ligands. It can freely circulate in blood vessels without amassing in the liver or lungs. This study shows the characteristics of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles to further advance terahertz medical imaging.

  1. Characteristics of Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles Using Terahertz Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongkyu; Maeng, Inhee; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Oh, Seung Jae; Kim, Taekhoon; Cho, Byung Kyu; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2009-04-19

    The penetration property of the terahertz electromagnetic (THz) wave is relevant to its use. We used the THz wave spectroscopy system which easily penetrates some materials that do not contain water, e.g., plastic and ceramics. The system has been developed for several purposes, including measuring the properties of semiconductors and bio-materials, and detecting plastic bombs and ceramic knives at airports. It is also used for medical imaging systems, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), at some research institutes. It can show not only the difference in amplitude, but also the difference of the phase of each point of sample. MRI technology usually uses contrast agents to enhance the quality of the image. Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), made with a heavy metal ion, is commonly used as a clinical MRI contrast agent. Gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticle is a new contrast agent. It serves to equip the core of each particle with antibodies or ligands. It can freely circulate in blood vessels without amassing in the liver or lungs. This study shows the characteristics of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles to further advance terahertz medical imaging.

  2. Type of MRI contrast, tissue gadolinium, and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Do, Catherine; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Tan, Chunyan; Wagner, Brent

    2014-10-01

    It has been presupposed that the thermodynamic stability constant (K(therm)) of gadolinium-based MRI chelates relate to the risk of precipitating nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The present study compared low-K(therm) gadodiamide with high-K(therm) gadoteridol in cultured fibroblasts and rats with uninephrectomies. Gadolinium content was assessed using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in paraffin-embedded tissues. In vitro, fibroblasts demonstrated dose-dependent fibronectin generation, transforming growth factor-β production, and expression of activated myofibroblast stress fiber protein α-smooth muscle actin. There were negligible differences with respect to toxicity or proliferation between the two contrast agents. In the rodent model, gadodiamide treatment led to greater skin fibrosis and dermal cellularity than gadoteridol. In the kidney, both contrast agents led to proximal tubule vacuolization and increased fibronectin accumulation. Despite large detectable gadolinium signals in the spleen, skin, muscle, and liver from the gadodiamide-treated group, contrast-induced fibrosis appeared to be limited to the skin and kidney. These findings support the hypothesis that low-K(therm) chelates have a greater propensity to elicit nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and demonstrate that certain tissues are resistant to these effects.

  3. Air- and water-stable gold-coated gadolinium metal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chao; Wagner, Michael J

    2013-06-12

    Gold-coated gadolinium nanocrystals, with an average diameter of 3.20 ± 0.35 nm, have been synthesized at ambient temperature by alkalide reduction. Whereas uncoated gadolinium nanoparticles react violently with air and water, the gold-coated gadolinium nanocrystals reported here show no reaction even upon long-term exposure. This is the first example of air- and water-stable lanthanide metal nanocrystals, which may allow for the development of magnetic and biomedical applications of gadolinium and other lanthanide metal and alloy nanocrystals.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of gadolinium in Ga-Sn and Ga-Zn eutectic based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltsev, Dmitry S.; Volkovich, Vladimir A.; Yamshchikov, Leonid F.; Chukin, Andrey V.

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties of gadolinium in Ga-Sn and Ga-Zn eutectic based alloys were studied. Temperature dependences of gadolinium activity in the studied alloys were determined at 573-1073 K employing the EMF method. Solubility of gadolinium in the Ga-Sn and Ga-Zn alloys was measured at 462-1073 K using IMCs sedimentation method. Activity coefficients as well as partial and excess thermodynamic functions of gadolinium in the studied alloys were calculated on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  5. Selection and preliminary evaluation of three structures as potential solid conductors of alkali ions: Two hollandites, a titanate, and a tungstate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, J.; Kautz, H. E.; Fielder, W. L.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Utilization of crystal-chemical criteria has suggested three structure types in which alkali ions may be mobile: (1)hollandites K(x)Mg(x/2)Ti(8-x/2)O16 and K(x)Al(x)Ti(8-x)O16 for 1.6 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 2.0 tungstate K2W4013; and (3) sodium hexatitante Na2Ti6O13. Each is a tunnel structure. An electrical screening procedure, previously tested on beta-alumina, has indicated high K(+) ion mobility in the hollandites and in the tungstate, but not in the hexatitanate. Specimens were polycrystalline disks near 90 percent of theoretical density. The ac conductivity calculated from dielectric and capacitance measurements has been attributed to ion mobility. This ac conductivity was up to 0.01/ohm-cm for hollandites and about 0.0001/ohm-cm for the tungstate, with approximate activation energies of 21 to 25 and 16 kJ/mole (5 to 6 and 4 kcal/mole), respectively. Electronic conduction and chemical reactivity have eliminated the tungstate from further consideration. The hollandites have been considered worthy of further development and evaluation.

  6. A cationic gadolinium contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Jonathan D; Lusic, Hrvoje; Wiewiorski, Martin; Farley, Michelle; Snyder, Brian D; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-06-30

    A new cationic gadolinium contrast agent is reported for delayed gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC). The agent partitions into the glycosaminoglycan rich matrix of articular cartilage, based on Donnan equilibrium theory, and its use enables imaging of the human cadaveric metacarpal phalangeal joint.

  7. Use of Gadolinium as a Primary Criticality Control in Disposing Waste Containing Plutonium at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Vincent

    2005-01-04

    Use of gadolinium as a neutron poison has been proposed for disposing of several metric tons of excess plutonium at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The plutonium will first be dissolved in nitric acid in small batches. Gadolinium nitrate will then be added to the plutonium nitrate solution. The Gd-poisoned plutonium solution will be neutralized and transferred to large under-ground tanks. The pH of small batches of neutralized plutonium solution will be adjusted prior to addition of the glass frit for eventual production as glass logs. The use of gadolinium as the neutron poison would minimize the number of glass logs generated from this disposition. The primary criticality safety concerns regarding the disposal process are: (1) maintaining neutron moderation under all processing conditions since gadolinium has a very large absorption cross section for thermal neutrons, (2) characteristics of plutonium and gadolinium precipitation during the neutralization process, (3) mixing characteristics of the precipitate to ensure that plutonium would remain homogeneously mixed with gadolinium, and (4) potential separation of plutonium and gadolinium during nitric and formic acids addition. A number of experiments were conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to study the behavior of plutonium and gadolinium at various stages of the disposition process.

  8. Updates for Gadolinium neutron capture measurements at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, Dugersuren; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T.; Couture, A.; Haight, R.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Rundberg, R.; Wouters, J.; Ullmann, J.; Vieira, D.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.

    2007-10-01

    Neutron capture reactions for several isotopes of Gadolinium have been measured at DANCE array in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Progress on the analysis is discussed. The detector response function of DANCE array is presented in connection with the statistical gamma-ray decay cascade simulation. In the region of separated neutron resonances, the statistical gamma-ray decay cascade is simulated using the DICEBOX code. Various models for the photon strength function and level density are used as input. The output of simulations is compared with DANCE data.

  9. Magnetoresistance of polycrystalline gadolinium with varying grain size

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravorty, Manotosh Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we report a study of evolution of low field magnetoresistance (MR) of Gadolinium as the grain size in the sample is changed from few microns (∼4 μm) to the nanoscopic regime (∼35 nm). The low field MR has a clear effect on varying grain size. In large grain sample (few μm), the magnetic domains are controlled by local anisotropy field determined mainly by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The low field MR clearly reflects the temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. For decreasing gain size, the contribution of spin disorder at the grain boundary increases and enhances the local anisotropy field.

  10. Dual-Energy X-Radiography With Gadolinium Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutt, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Image resolution increased, and cost reduced. Proposed dual-energy x-ray imaging system, continuous bremsstrahlung spectrum from x-ray tube filtered by foil of nonradioactive gadolinium or another rare-earth metal to form two-peaked energy spectrum. After passing through patient or object under examination, filtered radiation detected by array of energy-discriminating, photon-counting detectors. Detector outputs processed to form x-ray image for each peak and possibly enhanced image based on data taken at both peaks.

  11. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A. Banerjee, M. Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  12. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles for theranostic MRI-radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Lux, François; Sancey, Lucie; Bianchi, Andrea; Crémillieux, Yannick; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    A rapid development of gadolinium-based nanoparticles is observed due to their attractive properties as MRI-positive contrast agents. Indeed, they display high relaxivity, adapted biodistribution and passive uptake in the tumor thanks to enhanced permeability and retention effect. In addition to these imaging properties, it has been recently shown that they can act as effective radiosensitizers under different types of irradiation (radiotherapy, neutron therapy or hadron therapy). These new therapeutic modalities pave the way to therapy guided by imaging and to personalized medicine.

  13. Studies of MRI relaxivities of gadolinium-labeled dendrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hongmu; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    In cancer detection, imaging techniques have a great importance in early diagnosis. The more sensitive the imaging technique and the earlier the tumor can be detected. Contrast agents have the capability to increase the sensitivity in imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Until now, gadolinium-based contrast agents are mainly used for MRI, and show good enhancement. But improvement is needed for detection of smaller tumors at the earliest stage possible. The dendrons complexed with Gd(DOTA) were synthesized and evaluated as a new MRI contrast agent. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation effects were tested and compared with commercial drug Magnevist, Gd(DTPA).

  14. Gadolinium Thin Foils in a Plasma Panel Sensor as an Alternative to 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Varner Jr, Robert L; Beene, James R; Friedman, Dr. Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Gadolinium has long been investigated as a detector for neutrons. It has a thermal neutron capture cross-section that is unparalleled among stable elements, because of the isotopes $^{155,157}$Gd. As a replacement for $^3$He, gadolinium has a significant defect, it produces many gamma-rays with an energy sum of 8 MeV. It also produces conversion electrons, mostly 29 keV in energy. The key to replacing $^3$He with gadolinium is using a gamma-blind electron detector to detect the conversion electrons. We suggest that coupling a layer of gadolinium to a Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS) can provide highly efficient, nearly gamma-blind detection of the conversion. The PPS is a proposed detector under development as a dense array of avalanche counters based on plasma display technology. We will present simulations of the response of prototypes of this detector and considerations of the use of gadolinium in the PPS.

  15. The preparation of organic infrared semiconductor phthalocyanine gadolinium (III) and its optical and structural characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Li-bin; Ji, Rong-bin; Song, Li-yuan; Chen, Xue-mei; Ma, Yu; Wang, Yi-feng; Qian, Ming; Song, Lei; Su, Hai-ying; Zhuang, Ji-sheng; Yang, Rui-yu

    2009-07-01

    In order to increase the species of organic infrared semiconductor, we synthesized organic infrared semiconductor phthalocyanine gadolinium by using o-phthalodinitrile and GdCl3 as reactants, ammonium molybdate as catalyzer. Under light and dark field modes of microscope, the translucency emerald-like powder of phthalocyanine gadolinium has been observed, the size of the small grain for the sample is around 5μm in diameter, the size of larger grain may reach to several tens of microns. The main vibrational peaks in FT-IR spectrum and Raman spectrum have been assigned. Elementary analysis shows that the experimental data of phthalocyanine gadolinium in the main agree with those of calculated data. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the sample indicates the sandwich-like structure of phthalocyanine gadolinium. The organic infrared semiconductor phthalocyanine gadolinium thin film on quartz substrate has been prepared with our synthesized powdered sample by using solution method. The characterizations of XRD and UV-Vis-NIR absorption have been carried out for the phthalocyanine gadolinium thin film on quartz substrate, XRD shows that phthalocyanine gadolinium diffractions occur at 2θ=6.851,8.290 and 8.820 degrees, the corresponding plane spacings (d) for the diffraction peaks are 12.8921, 10.6570, and 10.0176Å.The diffraction peaks locate at low diffraction angle, suggesting that the molecular size of the phthalocyanine gadolinium is big that causes the large spacing of crystal planes. The UV-Vis-NIR absorption of phthalocyanine gadolinium thin film on quartz substrate implies that within near infrared band there is a absorption in the 1.3~2.0μm wavelength range peaked at ca. 1.75μm, indicating the important potential application value of phthalocyanine gadolinium in the field of organic infrared optoelectronics.

  16. Magnetic Surfactants and Polymers with Gadolinium Counterions for Protein Separations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul; Bromberg, Lev; Rial-Hermida, M Isabel; Wasbrough, Matthew; Hatton, T Alan; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2016-01-26

    New magnetic surfactants, (cationic hexadecyltrimethlyammonium bromotrichlorogadolinate (CTAG), decyltrimethylammonium bromotrichlorogadolinate (DTAG), and a magnetic polymer (poly(3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium tetrachlorogadolinate (APTAG)) have been synthesized by the simple mixing of the corresponding surfactants and polymer with gadolinium metal ions. A magnetic anionic surfactant, gadolinium tri(1,4-bis(2-ethylhexoxy)-1,4-dioxobutane-2-sulfonate) (Gd(AOT)3), was synthesized via metathesis. Both routes enable facile preparation of magnetically responsive magnetic polymers and surfactants without the need to rely on nanocomposites or organic frameworks with polyradicals. Electrical conductivity, surface tensiometry, SQUID magnetometry, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) demonstrate surface activity and self-aggregation behavior of the magnetic surfactants similar to their magnetically inert parent analogues but with added magnetic properties. The binding of the magnetic surfactants to proteins enables efficient separations under low-strength (0.33 T) magnetic fields in a new, nanoparticle-free approach to magnetophoretic protein separations and extractions. Importantly, the toxicity of the magnetic surfactants and polymers is, in some cases, lower than that of their halide analogues.

  17. Hepatobiliary MR Imaging with Gadolinium Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Frydrychowicz, Alex; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brown, Jeffrey J.; Merkle, Elmar M.; Nagle, Scott K.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of gadolinium-based “hepatobiliary” contrast agents offers new opportunities for diagnostic MRI and has triggered a great interest for innovative imaging approaches to the liver and bile ducts. In this review article we will discuss the imaging properties of the two gadolinium-based hepatobiliary contrast agents currently available in the USA, gadobenate dimeglumine and gadoxetic acid, as well as important pharmacokinetic differences that affect their diagnostic performance. We will review potential applications, protocol optimization strategies, as well as diagnostic pitfalls. A variety of illustrative case examples will be used to demonstrate the role of these agents in detection and characterization of liver lesions as well as for imaging the biliary system. Changes in MR protocols geared towards optimizing workflow and imaging quality will also be discussed. It is our aim that the information provided in this article will facilitate the optimal utilization of these agents, and will stimulate the reader‘s pursuit of new applications for future benefit. PMID:22334493

  18. Dielectric and magnetic properties of some gadolinium silica nanoceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Coroiu, I. Pascuta, P. Bosca, M. Culea, E.

    2013-11-13

    Some nanostructure gadolinium silica glass-ceramics were obtained undergoing a sol gel method and a heat-treatment at 1000°C about two hours. The magnetic and dielectric properties of these samples were studied. The magnetic properties were evidenced performing susceptibility measurements in the 80-300K temperature range. A Curie-Weiss behavior has acquired. The values estimated for paramagnetic Curie temperature being small and positive suggest the presence of weak ferromagnetic interactions between Gd{sup 3+} ions. The dielectric properties were evaluated from dielectric permittivity (ε{sub r}) and dielectric loss (tanδ) measurements at the frequency 1 kHz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz, in the 25-225°C temperature range and dielectric dispersion at room temperature for 79.5 kHz - 1GHz frequency area. The dielectric properties suggest that the main polarization mechanism corresponds to interfacial polarization, characteristic for polycrystalline-structured dielectrics. The polycrystalline structure of the samples is due to the polymorphous transformations of the nanostructure silica crystallites in the presence of gadolinium oxide. They were highlighted by SEM micrographs.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by different concentrations of gadolinium ion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Jin, Jian-Cheng; Yuan, Lian; He, Huan; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Yang, Xiao-Gang; Dai, Jie; Liu, Yi

    2014-04-01

    Gadolinium-based compounds are the most widely used paramagnetic contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging on the world. But the tricationic gadolinium ion (Gd(3+)) could induce cell apoptosis probably because of its effects on mitochondria. Until now, the mechanism about how Gd(3+) interacts with mitochondria is not well elucidated. In this work, mitochondrial swelling, collapsed transmembrane potential and decreased membrane fluidity were observed to be important factors for mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) opening induced by Gd(3+). The protection effect of CsA (Cyclosporin A) could confirm high concentration of Gd(3+) (500 μM) would trigger mtPTP opening. Moreover, mitochondrial outer membrane breakdown and volume expansion observed clearly by transmission electron microscopy and the release of Cyt c (Cytochrome c) could explain the mtPTP opening from another aspect. In addition, MBM(+) (monobromobimane(+)) and DTT (dithiothreitol) could protect thiol (-SH) groups from oxidation so that the toxicity of Gd(3+) might be resulted from the chelation of -SH of membrane proteins by free Gd(3+). Gd(3+) could inhibit the initiation of mitochondrial membrane lipid peroxidation, so it might interact with anionic lipids too. These findings will highly contribute to the safe applications of Gd-based agents.

  20. Gadolinium-hydrogen ion exchange of zirconium phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, D. C.; Power, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The Gd(+3)/H(+) ion exchange on a commercial zirconium phosphate ion exchanger was investigated in chloride, sulfate, and phosphate solutions of Gd(+3) at gadolinium concentrations of 0.001 to 1 millimole per cc and in the pH range of 0 to 3.5. Relatively low Gd(+3) capacities, in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 millimole per g of ion exchanger were found at room temperature. A significant difference in Gd(+3) sorption was observed, depending on whether the ion exchanger was converted from initial conditions of greater or lesser Gd(+3) sorption than the specific final conditions. Correlations were found between decrease in Gd(+3) capacity and loss of exchanger phosphate groups due to hydrolysis during washing and between increase in capacity and treatment with H3PO4. Fitting of the experimental data to ideal ion exchange equilibrium expressions indicated that each Gd(+3) ion is sorbed on only one site of the ion exchanger. The selectivity quotient was determined to be 2.5 + or - 0.4 at room temperature on gadolinium desorption in chloride solutions.

  1. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  2. Local pharmacological effects of tungstate on the color-pattern determination of butterfly wings: a possible relationship between the eyespot and parafocal element.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Bidur; Otaki, Joji M

    2009-11-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns can be changed by the application of a temperature shock or pharmacological agents such as tungstate, producing a distinctive type of elemental modification called the TS (temperature shock) type. Heterochronic uncoupling between the signaling and reception steps during the color-pattern determination process has been proposed as a mechanism for TS-type changes. As an extension of this hypothesis, both the parafocal element (PFE) and the eyespot in the same wing compartment are considered to be determined by morphogenic signal(s) emitted from the same eyespot focus. However, these models need to be examined with additional experimental data. Furthermore, there is controversy as to whether the action of tungstate on wing color patterns is direct or Indirect. Using a species of nymphalid butterfly (Junonia orithya), we have devised a simple method for the local application of pharmacological agents directly on developing wings of pupae. Local tungstate application resulted in reduced eyespots and circular dislocated PFEs in the eyespot-less compartments only on the treated wing, demonstrating that tungstate directly induces color-pattern changes on wings. We further examined the eyespot-PFE relationship in normal and cold-shocked Individuals, showing that an eyespot can be superimposed on a PFE and vice versa, probably depending on the timing of their fate determination. Taken together, we propose a two-morphogen model for the normal color-pattern determination, in which the morphogenic signals for the eyespot and PFE are different from each other despite their Identical origin. This two-morphogen model is compatible with the heterochronic uncoupling model for TS-type changes. PMID:19877835

  3. Local pharmacological effects of tungstate on the color-pattern determination of butterfly wings: a possible relationship between the eyespot and parafocal element.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Bidur; Otaki, Joji M

    2009-11-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns can be changed by the application of a temperature shock or pharmacological agents such as tungstate, producing a distinctive type of elemental modification called the TS (temperature shock) type. Heterochronic uncoupling between the signaling and reception steps during the color-pattern determination process has been proposed as a mechanism for TS-type changes. As an extension of this hypothesis, both the parafocal element (PFE) and the eyespot in the same wing compartment are considered to be determined by morphogenic signal(s) emitted from the same eyespot focus. However, these models need to be examined with additional experimental data. Furthermore, there is controversy as to whether the action of tungstate on wing color patterns is direct or Indirect. Using a species of nymphalid butterfly (Junonia orithya), we have devised a simple method for the local application of pharmacological agents directly on developing wings of pupae. Local tungstate application resulted in reduced eyespots and circular dislocated PFEs in the eyespot-less compartments only on the treated wing, demonstrating that tungstate directly induces color-pattern changes on wings. We further examined the eyespot-PFE relationship in normal and cold-shocked Individuals, showing that an eyespot can be superimposed on a PFE and vice versa, probably depending on the timing of their fate determination. Taken together, we propose a two-morphogen model for the normal color-pattern determination, in which the morphogenic signals for the eyespot and PFE are different from each other despite their Identical origin. This two-morphogen model is compatible with the heterochronic uncoupling model for TS-type changes.

  4. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F.; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist® in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL-1), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly ‘energy dependent’ for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs.

  5. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist(®) in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL(-1)), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly 'energy dependent' for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs. PMID:25988839

  6. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist(®) in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL(-1)), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly 'energy dependent' for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs.

  7. The structural response of gadolinium phosphate to pressure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Heffernan, Karina M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Spencer, Elinor C.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-06-16

    In this study, accurate elastic constants for gadolinium phosphate (GdPO4) have been measured by single-crystal high-pressure diffraction methods. The bulk modulus of GdPO4 determined under hydrostatic conditions, 128.1(8) GPa (K'=5.8(2)), is markedly different from that obtained with GdPO4 under non-hydrostatic conditions (160(2) GPa), which indicates the importance of shear stresses on the elastic response of this phosphate. Finally, high pressure Raman and diffraction analysis indicate that the PO4 tetrahedra behave as rigid units in response to pressure and that contraction of the GdPO4 structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd–O–P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO9more » polyhedra.« less

  8. The structural response of gadolinium phosphate to pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Karina M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Spencer, Elinor C.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate elastic constants for gadolinium phosphate (GdPO4) have been measured by single-crystal high-pressure diffraction methods. The bulk modulus of GdPO4 determined under hydrostatic conditions, 128.1(8) GPa (Kʹ=5.8(2)), is markedly different from that obtained with GdPO4 under non-hydrostatic conditions (160(2) GPa), which indicates the importance of shear stresses on the elastic response of this phosphate. High pressure Raman and diffraction analysis indicate that the PO4 tetrahedra behave as rigid units in response to pressure and that contraction of the GdPO4 structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd-O-P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO9 polyhedra.

  9. Mechanism of inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase with motexafin gadolinium (MGd)

    SciTech Connect

    Zahedi Avval, Farnaz; Berndt, Carsten; Pramanik, Aladdin; Holmgren, Arne

    2009-02-13

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is an expanded porphyrin anticancer agent which selectively targets tumor cells and works as a radiation enhancer, with promising results in clinical trials. Its mechanism of action is oxidation of intracellular reducing molecules and acting as a direct inhibitor of mammalian ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). This paper focuses on the mechanism of inhibition of RNR by MGd. Our experimental data present at least two pathways for inhibition of RNR; one precluding subunits oligomerization and the other direct inhibition of the large catalytic subunit of the enzyme. Co-localization of MGd and RNR in the cytoplasm particularly in the S-phase may account for its inhibitory properties. These data can elucidate an important effect of MGd on the cancer cells with overproduction of RNR and its efficacy as an anticancer agent and not only as a general radiosensitizer.

  10. Defect induced mobility enhancement: Gadolinium oxide (100) on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaputra, W.; Tsu, R.

    2012-11-26

    Growth of predominantly single crystal (100)-oriented gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on a p-type Si(100) and growth of a polycrystal with a predominant Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100) crystallite on a n-type Si(100) was performed using molecular beam epitaxy. Despite a poorer crystal structure than Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(110), an enhancement in carrier mobility can be found only from the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100)/n-type Si(100) interface. The mobility of 1715-1780 cm{sup 2}/V {center_dot} s was observed at room temperature, for carrier concentration >10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. This accumulation of the electrons and the mobility enhancement may arise from the two-dimensional confinement due to charge transfer across the interface similar to transfer doping.

  11. Interplay of disorder and geometrical frustration in Gadolinium Gallium Garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Nayoon; Silevitch, D. M.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-03-01

    We study the effects of disorder on the geometrically frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet Gadolinium Gallium Garnet (GGG) using neodymium doping (0.1 to 1%) in combination with linear and nonlinear ac magnetic susceptibility. The Nd doping actually alleviates the effects of disorder due to excess Gd ions occupying Ga sites. The linear, frequency-dependent susceptibility reveals that 1% Nd doping suppresses the appearance of any long-range order from approximately 80mK to below 30mK. The dynamics of isolated, correlated spin clusters were studied as a function of doping level using nonlinear susceptometry. In this regime, both the aggregate moment of the clustered spins and the activation field required to excite a nonlinear response were inversely correlated with the dopant density.

  12. Magnetocaloric effect at cryogenic temperature in gadolinium oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Rima; Paramanik, Tapas; Das, Kalipada; Sen, Pintu; Satpati, B.; Das, I.

    2016-11-01

    We have synthesized fascinating nano-structure of Gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) using controlled template-assisted electrochemical deposition technique which showed interesting anisotropic magnetic behavior. The nanotubes of Gd2O3 with average diameter 200 nm, length 10 μm and wall thickness 20 nm are constituted of nanoclusters with average diameter 7.5 nm. The tubes are aligned and are almost uniform throughout their length. Detailed magnetic measurements of aligned Gd2O3 nanotubes have been performed for both parallel and perpendicular magnetic field orientations with respect to the axis of the Gd2O3 nanotube array. Significant differences in magnetization values have been observed between the parallel and perpendicular orientations. Experimental results indicate the superparamagnetic nature of the nanomaterial. Large magnetocaloric effect, associated with the sharp change in magnetization of the Gd2O3 nanotubes, has been observed in the cryogenic temperature regime that shows anisotropic behavior.

  13. Prognostic Value of Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gaztanaga, Juan; Paruchuri, Vijayapraveena; Elias, Elliott; Wilner, Jonathan; Islam, Shahidul; Sawit, Simonette; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Sanz, Javier; Garcia, Mario J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic value of late gadolinium enhancement seen on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICMP). Patients with NICMP are at increased risk for cardiovascular events and death. The presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in CMR may be associated with a poor prognosis, but its significance is still under investigation. We retrospectively studied 105 consecutive patients with NICMP and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤40% referred for CMR. The cohort was analyzed for the presence of LGE and left and right ventricular functional parameters. Patients were followed for the composite end point of hospitalization for congestive heart failure, appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy, or all-cause mortality. LGE was observed in 68% (n = 71) of the cohort. Both groups were similar in age, LVEF and LV end-diastolic volume. The LGE+ patients were more often men and had larger right ventricular volumes. At a mean follow-up of 806 ± 582 days, there were 26 patients (23 in the LGE+ group) who reached the primary end point. Event-free survival was significantly worse for the LGE+ patients. After adjusting for traditional risk factors (age, gender, and LVEF), patients with LGE had an increased risk of experiencing the primary end point (hazard ratio 4.47, 95% CIs 1.27 to 15.74, p = 0.02). The presence of LGE in patients with NICMP strongly predicts the occurrence of adverse events. In conclusion, this may be important in risk stratification and management. PMID:27614850

  14. Theoretical study of structure and stability of small gadolinium carboxylate complexes in liquid scintillator solvents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-Wen

    2014-09-01

    The structural properties of three small gadolinium carboxylate complexes in three liquid scintillator solvents (pseudocumene, linear alkylbenzene, and phenyl xylylethane) were theoretically investigated using density functional theory (B3LYP/LC-RECP) and polarizable continuum model (PCM). The average interaction energy between gadolinium atom and carboxylate ligand (E(int)) and the energy difference of the highest singly occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (Δ(SL)) were calculated to evaluate and compare the relative stability of these complexes in solvents. The calculation results show that the larger (with a longer alkyl chain) gadolinium carboxylate complex has greater stability than the smaller one, while these gadolinium carboxylates in linear alkylbenzene were found to have greater stability than those in the other two solvents.

  15. Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen; Lee, Denise L

    2009-05-01

    In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of

  16. Gadolinium Use in Spine Pain Management Procedures for Patients with Contrast Allergies: Results in 527 Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Safriel, Yair Ang, Roberto; Ali, Muhammed

    2008-03-15

    Introduction. To review the safety and efficacy of gadolinium in spine pain management procedures in patients at high risk for a contrast reaction and who are not suitable candidates for the use of standard non-ionic contrast. Methods. We reviewed records over a 61-month period of all image-guided spinal pain management procedures where patients had allergies making them unsuitable candidates for standard non-ionic contrast and where gadolinium was used to confirm needle tip placement prior to injection of medication. Results. Three hundred and four outpatients underwent 527 procedures. A spinal needle was used in all but 41 procedures. Gadolinium was visualized using portable C-arm fluoroscopy in vivo allowing for confirmation of needle tip location. The gadolinium dose ranged from 0.2 to 10 ml per level. The highest dose received by one patient was 15.83 ml intradiscally during a three-level discogram. Three hundred and one patients were discharged without complication or known delayed complications. One patient had documented intrathecal injection but without sequelae and 2 patients who underwent cervical procedures experienced seizures requiring admission to the intensive care unit. Both the latter patients were discharged without any further complications. Conclusion. Based on our experience we recommend using gadolinium judiciously for needle tip confirmation. We feel more confident using gadolinium in the lumbar spine and in cervical nerve blocks. Gadolinium should probably not be used as an injectate volume expander. The indications for gadolinium use in cervical needle-guided spine procedures are less clear and use of a blunt-tipped needle should be considered.

  17. Application of extracellular gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents and the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Heverhagen, J T; Krombach, G A; Gizewski, E

    2014-07-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious, sometimes fatal disease. Findings in recent years have shown that a causal association between gadolinium containing contrast media and NSF is most likely. Therefore, the regulatory authorities have issued guidelines on the use of gadolinium-containing contrast media which have reduced the number of new cases of NSF to almost zero. However, it is for precisely this reason that the greatest care must still be taken to ensure that these guidelines are complied with. The most important factors are renal function, the quantity of gadolinium administered and coexisting diseases such as inflammation. All of these factors crucially influence the quantity of gadolinium released from the chelat in the body. This free gadolinium is thought to be the trigger for NSF. Other important factors are the stability of the gadolinium complex and furthermore the route of its elimination from the body. Partial elimination via the liver might be an additional protective mechanism. In conclusion, despite the NSF risk, contrast-enhanced MRI is a safe diagnostic procedure which can be used reliably and safely even in patients with severe renal failure, and does not necessarily have to be replaced by other methods.

  18. Gadolinium contrast agent-induced CD163+ ferroportin+ osteogenic cells in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Sundararaman; Bose, Chhanda; Shah, Sudhir V; Hall, Kimberly A; Hiatt, Kim M

    2013-09-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are linked to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal insufficiency. The pathology of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is characterized by abnormal tissue repair: fibrosis and ectopic ossification. The mechanisms by which gadolinium could induce fibrosis and ossification are not known. We examined in vitro the effect of a gadolinium-based contrast agent on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for phenotype and function relevant to the pathology of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, real-time PCR, and osteogenic assays. We also examined tissues from patients with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, using IHC to identify the presence of cells with phenotype induced by gadolinium. Gadolinium contrast induced differentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into a unique cellular phenotype--CD163(+) cells expressing proteins involved in fibrosis and bone formation. These cells express fibroblast growth factor (FGF)23, osteoblast transcription factors Runt-related transcription factor 2, and osterix, and show an osteogenic phenotype in in vitro assays. We show in vivo the presence of CD163(+)/procollagen-1(+)/osteocalcin(+) cells in the fibrotic and calcified tissues of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis patients. Gadolinium contrast-induced CD163(+)/ferroportin(+)/FGF23(+) cells with osteogenic potential may play a role in systemic fibrosis and ectopic ossification in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

  19. [Subclavian artery stenting using gadolinium contrast medium in a case with iodine allergy].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Michiyuki; Asano, Takeshi; Osanai, Toshiya; Endo, Shogo; Nakayama, Naoki; Kuroda, Satoshi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2012-05-01

    The authors reported a subclavian artery stenting (SAS) using gadolinium contrast medium. The patient was a 65-year-old female who presented dizziness and right upper extremity pain with movement. Digital subtraction angiography revealed right subclavian artery occlusion with subclavian steal phenomenon. We tried to treat this lesion using SAS. However, iodinated contrast medium caused the allergy in this patient and the treatment was discontinued. Therefore, SAS was performed with gadolinium contrast medium. Using gadolinium contrast medium, it is possible to confirm large arteries like innominate artery and subclavian artery. The stenting procedure was performed without complication. The usage of gadolinium contrast medium has the limit and some strategies are important to reduce the usage of gadolinium contrast medium in SAS. First, PercuSurge GuardWire® was placed in the right internal carotid artery to confirm the anatomy, to decide working angle, and to treat the common carotid artery in case of dissection. Second, a "U" shaped guide wire was placed in the distal end from the brachial artery. Guide wire from femoral side was able to pass the lesion at midpoint of the "U" shaped one. SAS using gadolinium contrast medium may be an alternative treatment if a patient with subclavian artery stenosis or occlusion is allergic to iodinated contrast medium.

  20. Lasing properties of selectively pumped Raman-active Nd{sup 3+}-doped molybdate and tungstate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Doroshenko, Maxim E; Ivleva, Lyudmila I; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Kosmyna, M B; Komar', V K; Sulc, J; Jelinkova, H

    2006-08-31

    The lasing efficiency of Nd{sup 3+} ions is studied in laser materials capable of self-Raman frequency conversion. The lasing properties of tungstate and molybdate crystals with the scheelite structure (SrWO{sub 4}, BaWO{sub 4}, PbWO{sub 4}, SrMoO{sub 4}, PbMoO{sub 4}) activated with neodymium ions are investigated upon longitudinal pumping by a 750-nm alexandrite laser or a 800-nm diode laser. The slope lasing efficiency obtained for a Nd{sup 3+}:PbMoO{sub 4} laser emitting at 1054 nm is 54.3% for the total lasing efficiency of 46%, which is the best result for all the crystals with the scheelite structure studied so far. The simultaneous Q-switched lasing and self-Raman frequency conversion were demonstrated in neodymium-doped SrWO{sub 4}, PbWO{sub 4}, and BaWO{sub 4} crystals. (papers devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m.prokhorov)

  1. Effects of Molybdate, Tungstate, and Selenium Compounds on Formate Dehydrogenase and Other Enzyme Systems in Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    Enoch, Harry G.; Lester, Robert L.

    1972-01-01

    The role of selenium and molybdenum in the metabolism of Escherichia coli was explored by growing cells in a simple salts medium and examining the metabolic consequences of altering the concentration of molybdenum and selenium compounds in the medium. The addition of tungstate increased the molybdate deficiency of this medium, as reflected by lowered levels of enzyme systems previously recognized to require compounds of molybdenum and selenium for their formation [formate-dependent oxygen reduction, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) (EC 1.2.2.1), and nitrate reductase (EC 1.9.6.1)]. The requirement for selenium and molybdenum appears to be unique to the enzymes of formate and nitrate metabolism since molybdate- and selenite-deficient medium had no effect on the level of several dehydrogenase and oxidase systems, for which the electron donors were reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, succinate, d- or l-lactate, and glycerol. In addition, no effect was observed on the growth rate or cell yield with any carbon source tested (glucose, glycerol, dl-lactate, acetate, succinate, and l-malate) when the medium was deficient in molybdenum and selenium. dl-Selenocystine was about as effective as selenite in stimulating the formation of formate dehydrogenase, whereas dl-selenomethionine was only 1% as effective. In aerobic cells, an amount of FDH was formed such that 3,200 or 3,800 moles of formate were oxidized per min per mole of added selenium (added as dl-selenocystine or selenite, respectively). PMID:4555402

  2. Zirconium(IV) tungstate nanoparticles prepared through chemical co-precipitation method and its function as solid acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadanandan, Manoj; Bhaskaran, Beena

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of zirconium(IV) tungstate nanoparticles, a new and efficient catalyst for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and esterification of acetic acid with various alcohols. The nanoparticle catalyst was prepared using the room temperature chemical co-precipitation method. The catalyst was characterized with thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area. The crystallite size was found to be ~20 nm as revealed by XRD, HRTEM and AFM. The Na+ exchange capacity was found to be 2.76 meq g-1 and the surface area of the compound measured using BET method was found to be 250-265 m2 g-1. The high value of ion exchange capacity indicates the presence of surface hydroxyl groups. The prepared nanoparticles have proven to be excellent catalysts for both oxidation and ester synthesis under mild reaction conditions. The mechanism of the catalytic reaction was studied as well.

  3. Spectroscopy and structural characteristics of Eu3+-activated perovskite tungstate Ba2La2ZnW2O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Huang, Yanlin; Cheng, Han; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-11-01

    Eu3+-doped tungstate Ba2La2ZnW2O12 was prepared by the high-temperature solid-state reaction method. The x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns indicate that the matrix has a perovskite structure. The samples were characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM), by optical diffuse reflection, photoluminescence (PL) spectra and by their decay curves. Eu3+-activated Ba2La2ZnW2O12 shows red luminescence under the excitation of near-ultraviolet and blue light. Laser site-selective excitation and emission spectroscopy technology was applied to investigate the spectroscopic and microstructural properties. The excitation spectra were tested by monitoring the emission from 5D0  →  7F0-4 transitions. Accordingly the emission spectra and decay curves (lifetime) were measured by the excitation in the 5D0  →  7F0 wavelength region using a pulsed, tunable, and narrow-band dye laser. We have detected two Eu3+ sites in Ba2La2ZnW2O12 with the temperature region ranging from 10 K to below 300 K. On the spectra data of the site-selective emission and decay, the Stark energy levels of Eu3+ at two different sites were determined. The lifetimes of Eu3+ ions at the two sites were compared. The energy transfer and crystallographic assignments for the Eu3+ sites were discussed.

  4. Gadolinium Chelate Contrast Material in Pregnancy: Fetal Biodistribution in the Nonhuman Primate

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Victoria H. J.; Schabel, Matthias C.; Grove, Kevin L.; Woods, Mark; Frias, Antonio E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the extent to which gadolinium chelate is found in nonhuman primate fetal tissues and amniotic fluid at 19–45 hours after intravenous injection of a weight-appropriate maternal dose of the contrast agent gadoteridol. Materials and Methods Gravid Japanese macaques (n = 14) were maintained as approved by the institutional animal care and utilization committee. In the 3rd trimester of pregnancy, the macaques were injected with gadoteridol (0.1 mmol per kilogram of maternal weight). Fetuses were delivered by means of cesarean section within 24 hours of maternal injection (range, 19–21 hours; n = 11) or 45 hours after injection (n = 3). Gadolinium chelate levels in the placenta, fetal tissues, and amniotic fluid were obtained by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used for quantitative comparisons. Results Gadoteridol was present in the fetoplacental circulation at much lower quantities than in the mother. At both time points, the distribution of gadolinium chelate in the fetus was comparable to that expected in an adult. The highest concentration of the injected dose (ID) was found in the fetal kidney (0.0161% ID per gram in the 19–21-hour group). The majority of the in utero gadolinium chelate was found in the amniotic fluid and the placenta (mean, 0.1361% ID per organ ± 0.076 [standard deviation] and 0.0939% ID per organ ± 0.0494, respectively). Data acquired 45 hours after injection showed a significant decrease in the gadolinium chelate concentration in amniotic fluid compared with that in the 19–21-hour group (from 0.0017% to 0.0007% ID per gram; P = .01). Conclusion Amounts of gadolinium chelate in the fetal tissues and amniotic fluid were minimal compared with the maternal ID. This may impact future clinical studies on the safety of gadolinium contrast agent use in pregnancy. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:25763829

  5. Impedance spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium substituted cobalt ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Md. T. Ramana, C. V.

    2014-10-28

    Gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFGO) with variable Gd content (x = 0.0–0.4) have been synthesized by solid state ceramic method. The crystal structure and impedance properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFGO crystallize in the inverse spinel phase. The CFGO compounds exhibit lattice expansion due to substitution of larger Gd ions into the crystal lattice. Impedance spectroscopy analysis was performed under a wide range of frequency (f = 20 Hz–1 MHz) and temperature (T = 303–573 K). Electrical properties of Gd incorporated Co ferrite ceramics are enhanced compared to pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to the lattice distortion. Impedance spectroscopic analysis illustrates the variation of bulk grain and grain-boundary contributions towards the electrical resistance and capacitance of CFGO materials with temperature. A two-layer heterogeneous model consisting of moderately conducting grain interior (ferrite-phase) regions separated by insulating grain boundaries (resistive-phase) accurately account for the observed temperature and frequency dependent electrical characteristic of CFGO ceramics.

  6. Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as potential multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jeong; Chae, Kwon Seok; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Potentials of hydrophilic and biocompatible ligand coated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents, drug carriers, and therapeutic agents are reviewed. First of all, they can be used as advanced T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents because they have r1 larger than those of Gd(III)-chelates due to a high density of Gd(III) per nanoparticle. They can be further functionalized by conjugating other imaging agents such as fluorescent imaging (FI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) agents. They can be also useful for drug carriers through morphology modifications. They themselves are also potential CT and ultrasound imaging (USI) contrast and thermal neutron capture therapeutic (NCT) agents, which are superior to commercial iodine compounds, air-filled albumin microspheres, and boron ((10)B) compounds, respectively. They, when conjugated with targeting agents such as antibodies and peptides, will provide enhanced images and be also very useful for diagnosis and therapy of diseases (so called theragnosis).

  7. Susceptibility-Based Analysis Of Dynamic Gadolinium Bolus Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Barker, Peter B.; Leigh, Richard; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An algorithm is developed for the reconstruction of dynamic, gadolinium (Gd) bolus MR perfusion images of the human brain, based on quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Methods The method is evaluated in 5 perfusion scans obtained from 4 different patients scanned at 3T, and compared to the conventional analysis based on changes in the transverse relaxation rate ΔR2* and to theoretical predictions. QSM images were referenced to ventricular CSF for each dynamic of the perfusion sequence. Results Images of cerebral blood flow and blood volume were successfully reconstructed from the QSM-analysis, and were comparable to those reconstructed using ΔR2*. The magnitudes of the Gd-associated susceptibility effects in gray and white matter were consistent with theoretical predictions. Conclusion QSM-based analysis may have some theoretical advantages compared to ΔR2*, including a simpler relationship between signal change and Gd concentration. However, disadvantages are its much lower contrast-to-noise ratio, artifacts due to respiration and other effects, and more complicated reconstruction methods. More work is required to optimize data acquisition protocols for QSM-based perfusion imaging. PMID:24604343

  8. Magnetism of Gadolinium: A First-Principles Perspective.

    PubMed

    Oroszlány, L; Deák, A; Simon, E; Khmelevskyi, S; Szunyogh, L

    2015-08-28

    By calculating the spectral density of states in the ferromagnetic ground state and in the high temperature paramagnetic phase we provide the first concise study of finite temperature effects on the electronic structure of the bulk and the surface of gadolinium metal. The variation of calculated spectral properties of the Fermi surface and the density of states in the bulk and at the surface are in good agreement with recent photoemission experiments performed in both ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases. In the paramagnetic state we find vanishing spin splitting of the conduction band, but finite local spin moments both in bulk and at the surface. We clearly demonstrate that the formation of these local spin moments in the conduction band is due to the asymmetry of the density of states in the two spin channels, suggesting a complex, non-Stoner behavior. We, therefore, suggest that the vanishing or nearly vanishing spin splitting of spectral features cannot be used as an indicator for Stoner-like magnetism. PMID:26371666

  9. Cationic gadolinium chelate for magnetic resonance imaging of cartilaginous defects.

    PubMed

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Qu, Feini; Warden-Rothman, Robert; Zhang, Clare Y; Mauck, Robert L; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The ability to detect meniscus defects by magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) can be highly variable. To improve the delineation of fine tears, we synthesized a cationic gadolinium complex, (Gd-DOTA-AM4 )(2+) , that can electrostatically interact with Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The complex has a longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 4.2 mM(-1) s(-1) and is highly stable in serum. Its efficacy in highlighting soft tissue tears was evaluated in comparison to a clinically employed contrast agent (Magnevist) using explants obtained from adult bovine menisci. In all cases, Gd-DOTA-AM4 appeared to improve the ability to detect the soft tissue defect by providing increased signal intensity along the length of the tear. Magnevist shows a strong signal near the liquid-meniscus interface, but much less contrast is observed within the defect at greater depths. This provides initial evidence that cationic contrast agents can be used to improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Patients with Nonischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Memon, Sarfaraz; Ganga, Harsha V; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    One-third of all patients with heart failure have nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDM). Five-year mortality from NIDM is as high as 20% with sudden cardiac death (SCD) as the cause in 30% of the deaths. Currently, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is used as the main criteria to risk stratify patients requiring an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to prevent SCD. However, LVEF does not necessarily reflect myocardial propensity for electrical instability leading to ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Due to the differential risk in various subgroups of patients for arrhythmic death, it is important to identify appropriate patients for ICD implantation so that we can optimize healthcare resources and avoid the complications of ICDs in individuals who are unlikely to benefit. We performed a systematic search and review of clinical trials of NIDM and the use of ICDs and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for risk stratification. LGE identifies patients with NIDM who are at high risk for SCD and enables optimized patient selection for ICD placement, while the absence of LGE may reduce the need for ICD implantation in patients with NIDM who are at low risk for future VF/VT or SCD. PMID:27071516

  11. Cationic gadolinium chelate for magnetic resonance imaging of cartilaginous defects.

    PubMed

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Qu, Feini; Warden-Rothman, Robert; Zhang, Clare Y; Mauck, Robert L; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The ability to detect meniscus defects by magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) can be highly variable. To improve the delineation of fine tears, we synthesized a cationic gadolinium complex, (Gd-DOTA-AM4 )(2+) , that can electrostatically interact with Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The complex has a longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 4.2 mM(-1) s(-1) and is highly stable in serum. Its efficacy in highlighting soft tissue tears was evaluated in comparison to a clinically employed contrast agent (Magnevist) using explants obtained from adult bovine menisci. In all cases, Gd-DOTA-AM4 appeared to improve the ability to detect the soft tissue defect by providing increased signal intensity along the length of the tear. Magnevist shows a strong signal near the liquid-meniscus interface, but much less contrast is observed within the defect at greater depths. This provides initial evidence that cationic contrast agents can be used to improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26853708

  12. Immunotoxic effects of sodium tungstate dihydrate on female B6C3F1/N mice when administered in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Frawley, Rachel P; Smith, Matthew J; White, Kimber L; Elmore, Susan A; Herbert, Ron; Moore, Rebecca; Staska, Lauren M; Behl, Mamta; Hooth, Michelle J; Kissling, Grace E; Germolec, Dori R

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring, high-tensile strength element that has been used in a number of consumer products. Tungsten has been detected in soil, waterways, groundwater, and human tissue and body fluids. Elevated levels of tungsten in urine were reported for populations exposed to tungstate in drinking water in areas where natural tungsten formations were prevalent. Published reports indicated that sodium tungstate may modulate hematopoiesis, immune cell populations, and immune responses in rodent models. The objective of this study was to assess potential immunotoxicity of sodium tungstate dihydrate (STD), a drinking water contaminant. Female B6C3F1/N mice received 0-2000 mg STD/L in their drinking water for 28 d, and were evaluated for effects on immune cell populations in spleen and bone marrow, and humoral-mediated, cell-mediated, and innate immunity. Three different parameters of cell-mediated immunity were similarly affected at 1000 mg STD/L. T-cell proliferative responses against allogeneic leukocytes and anti-CD3 were decreased 32%, and 21%, respectively. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity was decreased at all effector:target cell ratios examined. At 2000 mg STD/L, the absolute numbers of CD3(+) T-cell progenitor cells in bone marrow were increased 86%, but the alterations in B-lymphocyte and other progenitor cells were not significant. There were no effects on bone marrow DNA synthesis or colony forming capabilities. STD-induced effects on humoral-mediated immunity, innate immunity, and splenocyte sub-populations were limited. Enhanced histopathology did not detect treatment-related lesions in any of the immune tissues. These data suggest exposure to STD in drinking water may adversely affect cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27223060

  13. Immunotoxic effects of sodium tungstate dihydrate on female B6C3F1/N mice when administered in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Frawley, Rachel P; Smith, Matthew J; White, Kimber L; Elmore, Susan A; Herbert, Ron; Moore, Rebecca; Staska, Lauren M; Behl, Mamta; Hooth, Michelle J; Kissling, Grace E; Germolec, Dori R

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring, high-tensile strength element that has been used in a number of consumer products. Tungsten has been detected in soil, waterways, groundwater, and human tissue and body fluids. Elevated levels of tungsten in urine were reported for populations exposed to tungstate in drinking water in areas where natural tungsten formations were prevalent. Published reports indicated that sodium tungstate may modulate hematopoiesis, immune cell populations, and immune responses in rodent models. The objective of this study was to assess potential immunotoxicity of sodium tungstate dihydrate (STD), a drinking water contaminant. Female B6C3F1/N mice received 0-2000 mg STD/L in their drinking water for 28 d, and were evaluated for effects on immune cell populations in spleen and bone marrow, and humoral-mediated, cell-mediated, and innate immunity. Three different parameters of cell-mediated immunity were similarly affected at 1000 mg STD/L. T-cell proliferative responses against allogeneic leukocytes and anti-CD3 were decreased 32%, and 21%, respectively. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity was decreased at all effector:target cell ratios examined. At 2000 mg STD/L, the absolute numbers of CD3(+) T-cell progenitor cells in bone marrow were increased 86%, but the alterations in B-lymphocyte and other progenitor cells were not significant. There were no effects on bone marrow DNA synthesis or colony forming capabilities. STD-induced effects on humoral-mediated immunity, innate immunity, and splenocyte sub-populations were limited. Enhanced histopathology did not detect treatment-related lesions in any of the immune tissues. These data suggest exposure to STD in drinking water may adversely affect cell-mediated immunity.

  14. Development of radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators from enriched {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd to search for double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Danevich, F. A.; Boiko, R. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Mokina, V. M.; Nikolaiko, A. S.; Poda, D. V.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Tretyak, V. I.; Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Umatov, V. I.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; D'Angelo, S.; Brudanin, V. B.; Cappella, F.; Incicchitti, A.; Caracciolo, V.; and others

    2013-08-08

    Cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators enriched in {sup 106}Cd up to 66% ({sup 106}CdWO{sub 4}) and in {sup 116}Cd up to 82% ({sup 116}CdWO{sub 4}) have been developed. The low radioactive contamination of the crystals measured on the level of ≤ 1.5 mBq/kg ({sup 40}K), ≤ 0.005 - 0.012 mBq/kg ({sup 226}Ra), 0.04 - 0.07 mBq/kg ({sup 228}Th) allows to carry out high sensitivity experiments to search for double beta processes in {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd.

  15. Kinetic approach to evaluate the energy and entropy of activation for the exchange of alkaline earth metal ions on tin(IV) tungstate cation exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Khan, A.A.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations has been applied to study the reaction kinetics on the surface of tin(IV) tungstate for the Mg(II)-H(I), Ca(II)-H(I), Sr(II)-H(I) and Ba(II)-H(I) exchanges under the conditions favouring a particle diffusion phenomenon. On the basis of these studies the various physical parameters such as the effective diffusion coefficients, activation energies and entropies of activation have been evaluated which give some informations regarding the mechanism of ion-exchange on the surface of inorganic materials. 25 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  16. The potential reproductive, neurobehavioral and systemic effects of soluble sodium tungstate exposure in Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    McInturf, S.M.; Bekkedal, M.Y.V.; Wilfong, E.; Arfsten, D.; Chapman, G.; Gunasekar, P.G.

    2011-07-15

    The debate on tungsten (W) is fostered by its continuous usage in military munitions. Reports demonstrate W solubilizes in soil and can migrate into drinking water supplies and, therefore, is a potential health risk to humans. This study evaluated the reproductive, systemic and neurobehavioral effects of sodium tungstate (NaW) in rats following 70 days of daily pre-and postnatal exposure via oral gavage to 5, 62.5 and 125 mg/kg/day of NaW through mating, gestation and weaning (PND 0-20). Daily administration of NaW produced no overt evidence of toxicity and had no apparent effect on mating success or offspring physical development. Distress vocalizations were elevated in F{sub 1} offspring from the high dose group, whereas righting reflex showed unexpected sex differences where males demonstrated faster righting than females; however, the effects were not dose-dependent. Locomotor activity was affected in both low and high-dose groups of F{sub 1} females. Low-dose group showed increased distance traveled, more time in ambulatory movements and less time in stereotypic behavior than controls or high dose animals. The high-dose group had more time in stereotypical movements than controls, and less time resting than controls and the lowest exposure group. Maternal retrieval was not affected by NaW exposure. Tungsten analysis showed a systemic distribution of NaW in both parents and offspring, with preferential uptake within the immune organs, including the femur, spleen and thymus. Histopathological evidence suggested no severe chronic injury or loss of function in these organs. However, the heart showed histological lesions, histiocytic inflammation from minimal to mild with cardiomyocyte degeneration and necrosis in several P{sub 0} animals of 125 mg NaW dose group. The result of this study suggests that pre and postnatal exposure to NaW may produce subtle neurobehavioral effects in offspring related to motor activity and emotionality.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ADVANCED GADOLINIUM NEUTRON ABSORBER ALLOY BY MEANS OF NEUTRON TRANSMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg W. Wachs

    2007-09-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the alloy at specific gadolinium dopant levels. The new alloy is to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched DOE SNF. For the transmission experiments, alloy test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using only radiative capture cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium poison and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the alloy test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the gadolinium was dispersed fairly uniformly in the alloy and the ENDF VII radiative capture cross section data were accurate.

  18. Extraction of gadolinium from high flux isotope reactor control plates. [Alternative method

    SciTech Connect

    Kohring, M.W.

    1987-04-01

    Gadolinium-153 is an important radioisotope used in the diagnosis of various bone disorders. Recent medical and technical developments in the detection and cure of osteoporosis, a bone disease affecting an estimated 50 million people, have greatly increased the demand for this isotope. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has produced /sup 153/Gd since 1980 primarily through the irradiation of a natural europium-oxide powder followed by the chemical separation of the gadolinium fraction from the europium material. Due to the higher demand for /sup 153/Gd, an alternative production method to supplement this process has been investigated. This process involves the extraction of gadolinium from the europium-bearing region of highly radioactive, spent control plates used at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) with a subsequent re-irradiation of the extracted material for the production of the /sup 153/Gd. Based on the results of experimental and calculational analyses, up to 25 grams of valuable gadolinium (greater than or equal to60% enriched in /sup 152/Gd) resides in the europium-bearing region of the HFIR control components of which 70% is recoverable. At a specific activity yield of 40 curies of /sup 153/Gd for each gram of gadolinium re-irradiated, 700 one-curie sources can be produced from each control plate assayed.

  19. Tumor-induced lymph node alterations detected by MRI lymphography using gadolinium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Partridge, S C; Kurland, B F; Liu, C-L; Ho, R J Y; Ruddell, A

    2015-10-26

    Contrast-enhanced MRI lymphography shows potential to identify alterations in lymph drainage through lymph nodes (LNs) in cancer and other diseases. MRI studies have typically used low molecular weight gadolinium contrast agents, however larger gadolinium-loaded nanoparticles possess characteristics that could improve the specificity and sensitivity of lymphography. The performance of three gadolinium contrast agents with different sizes and properties was compared by 3T MRI after subcutaneous injection. Mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma footpad tumors were imaged to assess tumor-induced alterations in lymph drainage through tumor-draining popliteal and inguinal LNs versus contralateral uninvolved drainage. Gadolinium lipid nanoparticles were able to identify tumor-induced alterations in contrast agent drainage into the popliteal LN, while lower molecular weight or albumin-binding gadolinium agents were less effective. All of the contrast agents distributed in foci around the cortex and medulla of tumor-draining popliteal LNs, while they were restricted to the cortex of non-draining LNs. Surprisingly, second-tier tumor-draining inguinal LNs exhibited reduced uptake, indicating that tumors can also divert LN drainage. These characteristics of tumor-induced lymph drainage could be useful for diagnosis of LN pathology in cancer and other diseases. The preferential uptake of nanoparticle contrasts into tumor-draining LNs could also allow selective targeting of therapies to tumor-draining LNs.

  20. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2012-03-12

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 °C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. At 25 °C, for 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 11 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2.5 g/L and 0.8 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd in 4 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate at 10 °C is about 1.5 g/L. For 6 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate, the solubility of Gd at 10

  1. Gadolinium-loaded nanoparticles engineered from microemulsion templates.

    PubMed

    Oyewumi, Moses O; Mumper, Russell J

    2002-03-01

    Microemulsions (oil-in-water) have been used as templates to engineer stable emulsifying wax and Brij 72 (polyoxyl 2 stearyl ether) nanoparticles. The technique is simple, reproducible, and amenable to large-scale production of stable nanoparticles having diameters below 100 nm. Investigation of the process variables showed that the amount of surfactant used in the preparation of microemulsion templates had the greatest influence on the microemulsion window, as well as the properties and stability of the cured nanoparticles. Emulsifying wax and Brij 72 nanoparticles (2 mg/mL) made with 3 mM polyoxyl 20 stearyl ether and 2.3mM polysorbate 80, respectively, were the most stable based on retention of nanoparticle size over time. Gadolinium acetylacetonate (GdAcAc), a potential anticancer agent for neutron capture therapy (NCT), was entrapped in stable nanoparticles. The apparent water solubility of GdAcAc was increased more than 2000-fold by entrapment into nanoparticles. The entrapment efficiency of GdAcAc was about 100% for emulsifying wax nanoparticles and 86% for Brij 72 nanoparticles, as determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Elution profiles were obtained with light scattering (counts per second) to detect nanoparticles and ultraviolet (UV) absorption of GdAcAc at 288 nm. Challenges of these cured nanoparticles in biologically relevant media such as 10% fetal bovine serum, 10 mM phosphate-buffered saline, 150 mM NaCl, and 10% lactose at 37 degrees C for 60 min demonstrated that these nanoparticles are stable. The ease of preparation of these very small and stable nanoparticles, and the ability to entrap lipophilic drugs such as GdAcAc with high efficiency, suggested that these systems may have potential in cell targeting, especially for specific delivery to tumor cells for NCT. PMID:12026224

  2. Gadolinium-loaded nanoparticles engineered from microemulsion templates.

    PubMed

    Oyewumi, Moses O; Mumper, Russell J

    2002-03-01

    Microemulsions (oil-in-water) have been used as templates to engineer stable emulsifying wax and Brij 72 (polyoxyl 2 stearyl ether) nanoparticles. The technique is simple, reproducible, and amenable to large-scale production of stable nanoparticles having diameters below 100 nm. Investigation of the process variables showed that the amount of surfactant used in the preparation of microemulsion templates had the greatest influence on the microemulsion window, as well as the properties and stability of the cured nanoparticles. Emulsifying wax and Brij 72 nanoparticles (2 mg/mL) made with 3 mM polyoxyl 20 stearyl ether and 2.3mM polysorbate 80, respectively, were the most stable based on retention of nanoparticle size over time. Gadolinium acetylacetonate (GdAcAc), a potential anticancer agent for neutron capture therapy (NCT), was entrapped in stable nanoparticles. The apparent water solubility of GdAcAc was increased more than 2000-fold by entrapment into nanoparticles. The entrapment efficiency of GdAcAc was about 100% for emulsifying wax nanoparticles and 86% for Brij 72 nanoparticles, as determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Elution profiles were obtained with light scattering (counts per second) to detect nanoparticles and ultraviolet (UV) absorption of GdAcAc at 288 nm. Challenges of these cured nanoparticles in biologically relevant media such as 10% fetal bovine serum, 10 mM phosphate-buffered saline, 150 mM NaCl, and 10% lactose at 37 degrees C for 60 min demonstrated that these nanoparticles are stable. The ease of preparation of these very small and stable nanoparticles, and the ability to entrap lipophilic drugs such as GdAcAc with high efficiency, suggested that these systems may have potential in cell targeting, especially for specific delivery to tumor cells for NCT.

  3. Patterns of late gadolinium enhancement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to assess whether cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers (DMDc) may index any cell milieu elements of LV dysfunction and whether this cardiac phenotype may be related to genotype. The null hypothesis was that myocardial fibrosis, assessed by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), might be similarly accounted for in DMDc and gender and age-matched controls. Methods Thirty DMDc patients had CMR and genotyping with 37 gender and age-matched controls. Systolic and diastolic LV function was assessed by 2D-echocardiography. Results Absolute and percent LGE were higher in muscular symptomatic (sym) than asymptomatic (asy) DMDc (1.77 ± 0.27 vs 0.76 ± 0.17 ml; F = 19.6, p < 0.0001 and 1.86 ± 0.26% vs 0.68 ± 0.17%, F = 22.1, p < 0.0001, respectively). There was no correlation between LGE and age. LGE was seen most frequently in segments 5 and 6; segment 5 was involved in all asy-DMDc. Subepicardial LGE predominated, compared to the mid-myocardial one (11 out of 14 DMDc). LGE was absent in the subendocardium. No correlations were seen between genotyping (type of mutation, gene region and protein domain), confined to the exon’s study, and cardiac phenotype. Conclusions A typical myocardial LGE-pattern location (LV segments 5 and 6) was a common finding in DMDc. LGE was more frequently subepicardial plus midmyocardial in sym-DMDc, with normal LV systolic and diastolic function. No genotype-phenothype correlation was found. PMID:25008475

  4. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps. PMID:27411781

  5. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps.

  6. Biodistribution of ultra small gadolinium-based nanoparticles as theranostic agent: application to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Miladi, Imen; Duc, Géraldine Le; Kryza, David; Berniard, Aurélie; Mowat, Pierre; Roux, Stéphane; Taleb, Jacqueline; Bonazza, Pauline; Perriat, Pascal; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Gadolinium-based nanoparticles are novel objects with interesting physical properties, allowing their use for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles were imaged following intravenous injection in healthy rats and rats grafted with 9L gliosarcoma tumors using magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphic imaging. Quantitative biodistribution using gamma-counting of each sampled organ confirmed that these nanoparticles were rapidly cleared essentially by renal excretion. Accumulation of these nanoparticles in 9L gliosarcoma tumors implanted in the rat brain was quantitated. This passive and long-duration accumulation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in tumor, which is related to disruption of the blood-brain barrier, is in good agreement with the use of these nanoparticles as radiosensitizers for brain tumors.

  7. [Causal relationship between the use of gadolinium based contrast media and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Varela, Cristian U; Prieto-Rayo, Juan Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a severe iatrogenic disease that affect patients with impaired renal function exposed to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Clinically, symptoms develop within days or weeks after the exposure and mimic a scleromyxedema. The causal relationship between use of gadolinium-based contrast agents and NSF led to develop clinical guidelines aiming to limit the use of this contrast medium in high risk patients. These guidelines decreased the incidence of NSF in the last years. Unfortunately there is no specific treatment for NSF yet. Thus, strict adherence to current guidelines is key to prevent new cases. Renal dysfunction is increasingly common in our population. Therefore, practicing physicians should be aware of this potential complication of the use of gadolinium based contrast media.

  8. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps. PMID:27411781

  9. Structural and optical properties of Nd{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide 1D nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathi, G. Mohan, R.; Raj, S. Gokul; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Neodymium doped gadolinium hydroxide [Nd:Gd(OH)3] nanorods were successfully synthesized at 60 °C through co-precipitation method. The dopant percentage was maintained at 5% and calcination was done at 750 °C temperature for 1 hour to form the respective neodymium doped gadolinium oxide [Nd:Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}] nanorods. The as-formed and annealed products were investigated in detail by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDX), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry.

  10. Structural, morphological and optical investigations on Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathi, G.; Mohan, R.; Raj, S. Gokul; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    One dimensional uniform Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium hydroxide nanorods have been prepared via simple co– precipitation technique at 60 °C temperature for 1 hour. The samples were calcinated at 750 °C to obtain Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide nanorods. The 1D nanorods were then subjected to different characterization techniques to ascertain its structural stability and its morphology were investigated using high–resolution transmission electron microscopy. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry was investigated and the obtained results were discussed in detail.

  11. Syntheses, structures, magnetism, and optical properties of gadolinium scandium chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Gengbang; Choi, Eun Sang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2009-05-15

    Three gadolinium scandium chalcogenides have been synthesized using Sb{sub 2}Q{sub 3} (Q=S, Se) fluxes at 975 deg. C. Gd{sub 3.04}Sc{sub 0.96}S{sub 6}, GdScS{sub 3}, and Gd{sub 1.05}Sc{sub 0.95}Se{sub 3} are crystallized in U{sub 3}ScS{sub 6} type, GdFeO{sub 3} type, and UFeS{sub 3} type structures, respectively. The magnetic susceptibilities for these compounds follow the Curie-Weiss law above their transition temperatures. The effective magnetic moments are close to calculated values for free Gd{sup 3+} ions. The Weiss constants for Gd{sub 3.04}Sc{sub 0.96}S{sub 6}, GdScS{sub 3}, and Gd{sub 1.05}Sc{sub 0.95}Se{sub 3} are determined to be -3.3(1), -4.5(4), and 1.5(1) K, respectively. Gd{sub 3.04}Sc{sub 0.96}S{sub 6} orders antiferromagnetically below 9 K. GdScS{sub 3} exhibits an antiferromagnetic ordering below 3 K with a weak ferromagnetism. Gd{sub 1.05}Sc{sub 0.95}Se{sub 3} undergoes a ferromagnetic transition around 5 K. The optical band gaps for Gd{sub 3.04}Sc{sub 0.96}S{sub 6}, GdScS{sub 3}, and Gd{sub 1.05}Sc{sub 0.95}Se{sub 3} are 1.5, 2.1, and 1.2 eV, respectively. - Graphical abstract: A view of the three-dimensional structure of Gd{sub 3.04}Sc{sub 0.96}S{sub 6} along the c axis.

  12. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Among Survivors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Neilan, Tomas G.; Farhad, Hoshang; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Shah, Ravi V.; Dodson, John A.; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Danik, Stephan B.; Verdini, Daniel J.; Tokuda, Michifumi; Tedrow, Usha B.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Hoffmann, Udo; Ghoshhajra, Brian B.; Stevenson, William G.; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to describe the role of contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in the workup of patients with aborted sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and in the prediction of long-term outcomes. BACKGROUND Myocardial fibrosis is a key substrate for SCA, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on a CMR study is a robust technique for imaging of myocardial fibrosis. METHODS We performed a retrospective review of all survivors of SCA who were referred for CMR studies and performed follow-up for the subsequent occurrence of an adverse event (death and appropriate defibrillator therapy). RESULTS After a workup that included a clinical history, electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and coronary angiogram, 137 patients underwent CMR for workup of aborted SCA (66% male; mean age 56 ± 11 years; left ventricular ejection fraction 43 ± 12%). The presenting arrhythmias were ventricular fibrillation (n = 105 [77%]) and ventricular tachycardia (n = 32 [23%]). Overall, LGE was found in 98 patients (71%), with an average extent of 9.9 ± 5% of the left ventricular myocardium. CMR imaging provided a diagnosis or an arrhythmic substrate in 104 patients (76%), including the presence of an infarct-pattern LGE in 60 patients (44%), noninfarct LGE in 21 (15%), active myocarditis in 14 (10%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 3 (2%), sarcoidosis in 3, and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in 3. In a median follow-up of 29 months (range 18 to 43 months), there were 63 events. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest predictors of recurrent events were the presence of LGE (adjusted hazard ratio: 6.7; 95% CI: 2.38 to 18.85; p < 0.001) and the extent of LGE (hazard ratio: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.19; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with SCA, CMR with contrast identified LGE in 71% and provided a potential arrhythmic substrate in 76%. In follow-up, both the presence and extent of LGE identified a group at markedly increased risk of future adverse events. PMID

  13. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    2012-02-22

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

  14. A new biodegradable and biocompatible gadolinium (III) -polymer for liver magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Xue, Rong; You, Tianyan; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui

    2015-07-01

    A new biodegradable and biocompatible gadolinium (III) -copolymer (ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd) has been developed as a potential liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd consisted of a poly (aspartic acid-co-leucine) unit bound with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (Gd-DOTA) via the linkage of ethylenediamine. In vitro, the biodegradable experiment and cytotoxicity assay showed the biodegradability and biocompatibility of this gadolinium-polymer. ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd presented an increase in relaxivity of 2.4 times than the clinical Gd-DOTA. In vivo, gadolinium (III)-copolymer was mainly accumulated in the liver, and it could be excreted via the renal and hepatobiliary mechanism. The average enhancement of ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd (60.71±5.93%, 50-80 min) in liver was 2.62-fold greater than that of Gd-DOTA (23.16±3.55%, 10-30 min). ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd could be as a potential liver MRI contrast agent with a long time-window.

  15. [Physico-chemical and toxicological profile of gadolinium chelates as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Idée, J-M; Fretellier, N; Thurnher, M M; Bonnemain, B; Corot, C

    2015-07-01

    Gadolinium chelates (GC) are contrast agents widely used to facilitate or to enable diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). From a regulatory viewpoint, GC are drugs. GC have largely contributed to the success of MRI, which has become a major component of clinician's diagnostic armamentarium. GC are not metabolised and are excreted by the kidneys. They distribute into the extracellular compartment. Because of its high intrinsic toxicity, gadolinium must be administered as a chelate. GC can be classified according to two key molecular features: (a) nature of the chelating moiety: either macrocyclic molecules in which gadolinium is caged in the pre-organized cavity of the ligand, or linear, open-chain molecules, (b) ionicity: Gd chelates can be ionic (meglumine or sodium salts) or non-ionic. The thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of the various GCs differ according to these structural characteristics. The kinetic stability of macrocyclic GCs is much higher than that of linear GCs and the thermodynamic stability of ionic GCs is generally higher than that of non-ionic GC, thus leading to a lower risk of gadolinium dissociation. This class of drugs has enjoyed an excellent reputation in terms of safety for a long time, until a causal link with a recently-described serious disease, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), was evidenced. It is acknowledged that the vast majority of NSF cases are related to the administration of some linear CG in renally-impaired patients. Health authorities, worldwide, released recommendations which drastically reduced the occurrence of new cases. PMID:25731664

  16. In vitro radiosensitizing effects of ultrasmall gadolinium based particles on tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mowat, P; Mignot, A; Rima, W; Lux, F; Tillement, O; Roulin, C; Dutreix, M; Bechet, D; Huger, S; Humbert, L; Barberi-Heyob, M; Aloy, M T; Armandy, E; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Le Duc, G; Roux, S; Perriat, P

    2011-09-01

    Since radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment, it is essential to develop strategies which lower the irradiation burden while increasing efficacy and become efficient even in radio resistant tumors. Our new strategy is relying on the development of solid hybrid nanoparticles based on rare-earth such as gadolinium. In this paper, we then evidenced that gadolinium-based particles can be designed to enter efficiently into the human glioblastoma cell line U87 in quantities that can be tuned by modifying the incubation conditions. These sub-5 nm particles consist in a core of gadolinium oxide, a shell of polysiloxane and are functionalized by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Although photoelectric effect is maximal in the [10-100 keV] range, such particles were found to possess efficient in-vitro radiosensitizing properties at an energy of 660 keV by using the "single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay," an assay that measures the number of DNA damage that occurs during irradiation. Even more interesting, the particles have been evidenced by MTT assays to be also efficient radiosensitizers at an energy of 6 MeV for doses comprised between 2 and 8 Gy. The properties of the gadolinium-based particles give promising opening to a particle-assisted radio-therapy by using irradiation systems already installed in the majority of hospitals.

  17. A polymeric fastener can easily functionalize liposome surfaces with gadolinium for enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cartney E; Shkumatov, Artem; Withers, Sarah G; Yang, Binxia; Glockner, James F; Misra, Sanjay; Roy, Edward J; Wong, Chun-Ho; Zimmerman, Steven C; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2013-11-26

    Common methods of loading magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents into nanoparticles often suffer from challenges related to particle formation, complex chemical modification/purification steps, and reduced contrast efficiency. This study presents a simple, yet advanced process to address these issues by loading gadolinium, an MRI contrast agent, exclusively on a liposome surface using a polymeric fastener. The fastener, so named for its ability to physically link the two functional components together, consisted of chitosan substituted with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) to chelate gadolinium, as well as octadecyl chains to stabilize the modified chitosan on the liposome surface. The assembly strategy, mimicking the mechanisms by which viruses and proteins naturally anchor to a cell, provided greater T1 relaxivity than liposomes loaded with gadolinium in both the interior and outer leaflet. Gadolinium-coated liposomes were ultimately evaluated in vivo using murine ischemia models to highlight the diagnostic capability of the system. Taken together, this process decouples particle assembly and functionalization and, therefore, has considerable potential to enhance imaging quality while alleviating many of the difficulties associated with multifunctional particle fabrication.

  18. Criticality experiments with low enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.; Murphy, E.S.; Clayton, E.D.; Keay, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The results obtained in a criticality experiments program performed for British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL) under contract with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved low enriched UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium, and are in direct support of BNFL plans to use soluble compounds of the neutron poison gadolinium as a primary criticality safeguard in the reprocessing of low enriched nuclear fuels. The experiments were designed primarily to provide data for validating a calculation method being developed for BNFL design and safety assessments, and to obtain data for the use of gadolinium as a neutron poison in nuclear chemical plant operations - particularly fuel dissolution. The experiments program covers a wide range of neutron moderation (near optimum to very under-moderated) and a wide range of gadolinium concentration (zero to about 2.5 g Gd/l). The measurements provide critical and subcritical k/sub eff/ data (1 greater than or equal to k/sub eff/ greater than or equal to 0.87) on fuel-water assemblies of UO/sub 2/ rods at two enrichments (2.35 wt % and 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U) and on mixed fuel-water assemblies of UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ rods containing 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U and 2 wt % PuO/sub 2/ in natural UO/sub 2/ respectively. Critical size of the lattices was determined with water containing no gadolinium and with water containing dissolved gadolinium nitrate. Pulsed neutron source measurements were performed to determine subcritical k/sub eff/ values as additional amounts of gadolinium were successively dissolved in the water of each critical assembly. Fission rate measurements in /sup 235/U using solid state track recorders were made in each of the three unpoisoned critical assemblies, and in the near-optimum moderated and the close-packed poisoned assemblies of this fuel.

  19. Acute and chronic effects of sodium tungstate on an aquatic invertebrate (Daphnia magna), green alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Clements, Leslie N; Lemus, Ranulfo; Butler, Alicia D; Heim, Kate; Rebstock, Matthew R; Venezia, Carmen; Pardus, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Although aquatic toxicity data exists for tungstate substances, insufficient data of high quality and relevancy are available for conducting an adequate risk assessment. Therefore, a series of acute and chronic toxicity tests with sodium tungstate (Na(2)WO(4)) were conducted on an aquatic invertebrate (Daphnia magna), green alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and zebrafish (Danio rerio). Collectively, the data from these studies suggest that sodium tungstate exhibits a relatively low toxicity to these taxa under these test conditions. All studies were conducted in the same laboratory under good laboratory practice standards using Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines with the same stock of test material and the same analytical methods. All results are reported as mg W/L. The following toxicity values were based on mean measured concentrations. For D. magna, the 21 day test no-observable effect concentration (NOEC) was 25.9 mg W/L, and the 48-h median effective concentration (EC(50)) from the acute test was >95.5 mg W/L (the highest concentration tested). The P. subcapitata test yielded an ErC(50) of 31 mg W/L. A 38-day test with zebrafish resulted in an NOEC ≥5.74 mg W/L with no effects at any concentration. The 96-h LC(50) from the acute test with zebrafish was >106 mg W/L. The results of the current acute study for daphnids and fish are consistent with published literature, whereas the algae results are different from previously reported values. Transformation/dissolution (T/D) studies, which were conducted according to United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals protocol, confirmed that the WO (4) (-2) anion accounted for most of the tungsten in solution. For classification purposes, the algae ecotoxity reference value was then compared with T/D data and would not classify Na(2)WO(4) as an aquatic toxicant under the European Union Classification, Labelling and Packaging scheme. PMID

  20. Acute and chronic effects of sodium tungstate on an aquatic invertebrate (Daphnia magna), green alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Clements, Leslie N; Lemus, Ranulfo; Butler, Alicia D; Heim, Kate; Rebstock, Matthew R; Venezia, Carmen; Pardus, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Although aquatic toxicity data exists for tungstate substances, insufficient data of high quality and relevancy are available for conducting an adequate risk assessment. Therefore, a series of acute and chronic toxicity tests with sodium tungstate (Na(2)WO(4)) were conducted on an aquatic invertebrate (Daphnia magna), green alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and zebrafish (Danio rerio). Collectively, the data from these studies suggest that sodium tungstate exhibits a relatively low toxicity to these taxa under these test conditions. All studies were conducted in the same laboratory under good laboratory practice standards using Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines with the same stock of test material and the same analytical methods. All results are reported as mg W/L. The following toxicity values were based on mean measured concentrations. For D. magna, the 21 day test no-observable effect concentration (NOEC) was 25.9 mg W/L, and the 48-h median effective concentration (EC(50)) from the acute test was >95.5 mg W/L (the highest concentration tested). The P. subcapitata test yielded an ErC(50) of 31 mg W/L. A 38-day test with zebrafish resulted in an NOEC ≥5.74 mg W/L with no effects at any concentration. The 96-h LC(50) from the acute test with zebrafish was >106 mg W/L. The results of the current acute study for daphnids and fish are consistent with published literature, whereas the algae results are different from previously reported values. Transformation/dissolution (T/D) studies, which were conducted according to United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals protocol, confirmed that the WO (4) (-2) anion accounted for most of the tungsten in solution. For classification purposes, the algae ecotoxity reference value was then compared with T/D data and would not classify Na(2)WO(4) as an aquatic toxicant under the European Union Classification, Labelling and Packaging scheme.

  1. Nickel-based Gadolinium Alloy for Neutron Adsorption Application in Ram Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg Wachs; James Sterbentz; William Hurt; P. E. McConnell; C. V. Robino; F. Tovesson; T. S. Hill

    2007-10-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy and chromium-nickel (Cr-Ni) stainless steel, modified by the addition of boron. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the materials at specific gadolinium and boron dopant levels. The Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy is envisioned to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). For these transmission experiments, test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy and 1.16 wt% boron in stainless steel. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using total neutron cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium and boron elements and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy and borated stainless steel test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the size and distribution of the gadolinium in both the hot-top (as-cast) and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd converted to plate was not a discriminator related to neutron absorption. Moreover, the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF VII) total neutron cross section data were accurate.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of a novel hybrid nano composite cation exchanger poly-o-toluidine Sn(IV) tungstate: Its analytical applications as ion-selective electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif Ali; Shaheen, Shakeeba

    2013-02-01

    A novel organic-inorganic nano composite cation exchanger poly-o-toluidine Sn(IV) tungstate has been synthesized by incorporation of a polymer material into inorganic precipitate. The material is a class of hybrid ion-exchanger with good ion-exchange properties, reproducibility, stability and good selectivity for heavy metals. The physico-chemical properties of this nano composite material were characterized by using XRD, TGA, FTIR, SEM and TEM. The ion-exchange capacity, pH titrations, elution behavior and chemical stability were also carried out to study ion-exchange properties of the material. Distribution studies for various metal ions revealed that the nano composite is highly selective for Cd(II). An ion-selective membrane electrode was fabricated using this material for the determination of Cd(II) ions in solutions. The analytical utility of this electrode was established by employing it as an indicator electrode in electrometric titrations.

  3. Morphological evolution and visible light-induced degradation of Rhodamine 6G by nanocrystalline bismuth tungstate prepared using a template-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Raissa Mendes; Batista Barbosa, Diego Augusto; de Jesus Silva Mendonça, Caritas; de Oliveira Lima, José Renato; Silva, Fernando Carvalho; Longo, Elson; Maciel, Adeilton Pereira; de Araujo Paschoal, Carlos William; Almeida, Marcio Aurélio Pinheiro

    2016-09-01

    The cleaning of water contaminated with organic dyes is a crucial problem nowadays. The search for good catalysts is intense, and bismuth tungstates have attracted a lot of attention because of their catalytic properties which are related to their crystal structure and morphology. In this study, we show that Bi2WO6 (BWO) crystals synthesized by the surfactant-assisted hydrothermal method create a different morphology than non-assisted crystals. With the assistance of the PVP surfactant, even the BWO crystalline structure could change, crystallizing into a high-symmetry metastable phase. These changes in morphology imply a decrease in BWO catalytic activity, which shows that insightful control of BWO synthesis is necessary to improve the BWO properties.

  4. PAPERS DEVOTED TO THE 90TH ANNIVERSARY OF A.M.PROKHOROV: Lasing properties of selectively pumped Raman-active Nd3+-doped molybdate and tungstate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Doroshenko, Maxim E.; Ivleva, Lyudmila I.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Kosmyna, M. B.; Komar', V. K.; Sulc, J.; Jelinkova, H.

    2006-08-01

    The lasing efficiency of Nd3+ ions is studied in laser materials capable of self-Raman frequency conversion. The lasing properties of tungstate and molybdate crystals with the scheelite structure (SrWO4, BaWO4, PbWO4, SrMoO4, PbMoO4) activated with neodymium ions are investigated upon longitudinal pumping by a 750-nm alexandrite laser or a 800-nm diode laser. The slope lasing efficiency obtained for a Nd3+:PbMoO4 laser emitting at 1054 nm is 54.3% for the total lasing efficiency of 46%, which is the best result for all the crystals with the scheelite structure studied so far. The simultaneous Q-switched lasing and self-Raman frequency conversion were demonstrated in neodymium-doped SrWO4, PbWO4, and BaWO4 crystals.

  5. Tungsten bronze-based nuclear waste form ceramics. Part 2: Conversion of granular microporous tungstate polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite adsorbents to leach resistant ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher S.; Sebesta, Ferdinand; Hanna, John V.; Yee, Patrick; Drabarek, Elizabeth; Smith, Mark E.; Luca, Vittorio

    2006-11-01

    Conversion of a granular molybdenum-doped, hexagonal tungsten bronze (MoW-HTB)-polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite adsorbent to a leach resistant ceramic waste form capable of immobilizing adsorbed Cs + and Sr 2+ has been achieved by heating in air at temperatures in the range 600-1200 °C. Thermal treatment of the Cs- and Sr-loaded composite material at 1000 °C was sufficient to invoke a 60% reduction in volume of the composite while still retaining its spherical morphology. Cs-133 MAS NMR studies of this sample suite at 9.4 T and 14.1 T showed that multiple Cs sites are present throughout the entire thermal treatment range. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of the phase assemblages resulting from thermal treatment demonstrated that the full complement of Cs, and the majority of Sr, partitions into HTB phases (A 0.16-0.3MO 3; A = Cs +, Sr 2+ and Na +; M = Mo, W). The potentially reducing conditions resulting from the removal of the PAN matrix or the presence of high concentrations of Na + relative to either Cs + or Sr 2+ does not retard the formation of the high temperature HTB phases. The fraction of Cs + and Sr 2+ leached from the tungstate phase assemblages was superior or comparable with cesium hollandite (Cs 0.8Ba 0.4Ti 8O 18; f = ≈8 × 10 -5; rate = <1.2 × 10 -4 g/m 2/day) and strontium titanate (SrTiO 3; f = 3.1 × 10 -3; rate = 2.63 × 10 -4 g/m 2/day), respectively, using a modified PCT test in Millipore water at 90 °C. Furthermore, where aggressive leaching conditions were employed (0.1 M HNO 3; 150 °C; 4 days), the tungstate phase assemblages displayed leach resistance almost two orders of magnitude greater than the reference phases.

  6. The investigation of gadolinium oxide porous structure and refinement of the pore size distribution based on the NLDFT-models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashkovtsev, Maxim A.; Botalov, Maxim S.; Smyshlyaev, Denis V.; Kasimova, Renata E.; Bereskina, Polina A.; Vereshchagin, Artem O.

    2016-09-01

    The study focuses on the characterization of gadolinium oxide surface by the method of low-temperature adsorption/desorption of nitrogen. The specific surface area of gadolinium oxide, the average pore diameter and fractal dimensions were determined. The refinement of the pore distribution was performed on the basis of the NLDFT model. It was shown that there were three kinds of pores with average sizes of 150, 300 and 600 Å.

  7. Tracing gadolinium-based contrast agents from surface water to drinking water by means of speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Birka, Marvin; Wehe, Christoph A; Hachmöller, Oliver; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, a significant amount of anthropogenic gadolinium has been released into the environment as a result of the broad application of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Since this anthropogenic gadolinium anomaly has also been detected in drinking water, it has become necessary to investigate the possible effect of drinking water purification on these highly polar microcontaminats. Therefore, a novel highly sensitive method for speciation analysis of gadolinium is presented. For that purpose, the hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was employed. In order to enhance the detection power, sample introduction was carried out by ultrasonic nebulization. In combination with a novel HILIC method using a diol-based stationary phase, it was possible to achieve superior limits of detection for frequently applied gadolinium-based contrast agents below 20pmol/L. With this method, the contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A were determined in concentrations up to 159pmol/L in samples from several waterworks in a densely populated region of Germany alongside the river Ruhr as well as from a waterworks near a catchment lake. Thereby, the direct impact of anthropogenic gadolinium species being present in the surface water on the amount of anthropogenic gadolinium in drinking water was shown. There was no evidence for the degradation of contrast agents, the release of Gd(3+) or the presence of further Gd species. PMID:26931429

  8. Tracing gadolinium-based contrast agents from surface water to drinking water by means of speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Birka, Marvin; Wehe, Christoph A; Hachmöller, Oliver; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, a significant amount of anthropogenic gadolinium has been released into the environment as a result of the broad application of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Since this anthropogenic gadolinium anomaly has also been detected in drinking water, it has become necessary to investigate the possible effect of drinking water purification on these highly polar microcontaminats. Therefore, a novel highly sensitive method for speciation analysis of gadolinium is presented. For that purpose, the hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was employed. In order to enhance the detection power, sample introduction was carried out by ultrasonic nebulization. In combination with a novel HILIC method using a diol-based stationary phase, it was possible to achieve superior limits of detection for frequently applied gadolinium-based contrast agents below 20pmol/L. With this method, the contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A were determined in concentrations up to 159pmol/L in samples from several waterworks in a densely populated region of Germany alongside the river Ruhr as well as from a waterworks near a catchment lake. Thereby, the direct impact of anthropogenic gadolinium species being present in the surface water on the amount of anthropogenic gadolinium in drinking water was shown. There was no evidence for the degradation of contrast agents, the release of Gd(3+) or the presence of further Gd species.

  9. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2016-05-19

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications. PMID:27159645

  10. Gadolinium-modulated 19F signals from Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles as a New Strategy for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Anne M.; Myerson, Jacob; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Hockett, Franklin D.; Winter, Patrick M.; Chen, Junjie; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Robertson, J. David; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in the design of fluorinated nanoparticles for magnetic resonance molecular imaging have enabled specific detection of 19F nuclei, providing unique and quantifiable spectral signatures. However, a pressing need for signal enhancement exists because the total 19F in imaging voxels is often limited. By directly incorporating a relaxation agent (gadolinium) into the lipid monolayer that surrounds the perfluorocarbon, a marked augmentation of the 19F signal from 200nm nanoparticles was achieved. This design increases the magnetic relaxation rate of the 19F nuclei 4-fold at 1.5 T and effects a 125% increase in signal, an effect which is maintained when they are targeted to human plasma clots. By varying the surface concentration of gadolinium, the relaxation effect can be quantitatively modulated to tailor particle properties. This novel strategy dramatically improves the sensitivity and range of 19F MRI/MRS and forms the basis for designing contrast agents capable of sensing their surface chemistry. PMID:18956457

  11. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles for highly efficient T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Kang, Byunghoon; Choi, Yuna; Jang, Eunji; Han, Seungmin; Lee, Kwangyeol; Suh, Jin-Suck; Haam, Seungjoo; Huh, Yong-Min

    2014-06-01

    We developed Pyrene-Gadolinium (Py-Gd) nanoparticles as pH-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents capable of showing a high-Mr signal in cancer-specific environments, such as acidic conditions. Py-Gd nanoparticles were prepared by coating Py-Gd, which is a complex of gadolinium with pyrenyl molecules, with pyrenyl polyethyleneglycol PEG using a nano-emulsion method. These particles show better longitudinal relaxation time (T1) MR signals in acidic conditions than they do in neutral conditions. Furthermore, the particles exhibit biocompatibility and MR contrast effects in both in vitro and in vivo studies. From these results, we confirm that Py-Gd nanoparticles have the potential to be applied for accurate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  12. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Birch, J.; Etxegarai, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Oliveri, E.; Oksanen, E.; Robinson, L.; Ropelewski, L.; Schmidt, S.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.

    2016-05-01

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer (NMX) require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The μTPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of 10B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with a measured efficiency of 11.8% at a wavelength of 2 Åand a position resolution better than 250 μm.

  13. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications.

  14. Frontiers of X-ray spectromicroscopy in biology and medicine: Gadolinium in brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Gilbert, B.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Mercanti, D.; Ciotti, M. T.; Casalbore, P.; Larocca, L. M.; Rinelli, A.; Pallini, R.

    2000-02-01

    We present the first feasibility test of spectromicroscopy on the microlocalization of gadolinium in brain cancer tissue. A gadolinium compound was injected to the patients before the brain tumor was extracted with surgery, and we looked for Gd in the tumor tissue. The goal of the experiment was to understand if Gd Neutron Capture Therapy (GdNCT) is viable for clinical tests, i.e. if there is enough Gd, and it is localized near the nuclei of tumor cells. The experiments were performed using the MEPHISTO X-ray PhotoElectron Emission Microscope (X-PEEM) at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center. The present results demonstrate the feasibility of the experiment, and suggest how to improve the sample preparation and data acquisition to achieve the goal.

  15. Regression of gadolinium-enhanced lesions in patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Lucchetta, Marta; Manara, Renzo; Perilongo, Giorgio; Clementi, Maurizio; Trevisson, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I is a genetic condition with an autosomal dominant transmission characterized by neurocutaneous involvement and a predisposition to tumor development. Central nervous system manifestations include benign areas of dysmyelination and possibly hazardous glial tumors whose clinical management may result challenging. Here, we report on three patients diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis type I whose brain MRI follow-up showed the presence of gadolinium-enhancing lesions which spontaneously regressed. In none of the three cases, the lesions showed any clinical correlate and eventually presented a striking reduction in size while gadolinium enhancement disappeared despite no specific therapy administration during the follow-up. Although their nature remains undetermined, these lesions presented a benign evolution. However, they might be misdiagnosed as potentially life-threatening tumors. Hitherto, a similar behavior has been described only in scattered cases and we believe these findings may be of particular interest for the clinical management of patients affected by neurofibromatosis type I.

  16. The role of gadolinium chelates in the mechanism of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: A critical update.

    PubMed

    Idée, Jean-Marc; Fretellier, Nathalie; Robic, Caroline; Corot, Claire

    2014-11-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is an iatrogenic scleroderma-like fibrosing systemic disorder occurring in patients with severe or end-stage renal disease. It was established as a new clinical entity in the year 2000. A causal role for gadolinium chelates (GC), widely used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, was suggested six years later. It rapidly appeared that the occurrence of NSF was associated with prior administration of GCs with lower thermodynamic stability, leading to warnings being published by health authorities and learned societies worldwide. Although a role for the chelated form of the less stable GCs has been proposed, the most commonly accepted hypothesis involves the gradual release of dissociated gadolinium in the body, leading to systemic fibrosis. However, the entire chain of events is still not fully understood in a causal way and many uncertainties remain.

  17. Renal function, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and other adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast media.

    PubMed

    Canga, Ana; Kislikova, Maria; Martínez-Gálvez, María; Arias, Mercedes; Fraga-Rivas, Patricia; Poyatos, Cecilio; de Francisco, Angel L M

    2014-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder that affects patients with impaired renal function and is associated with the administration of gadolinium-based contrast media used in MRI. Despite being in a group of drugs that were considered safe, report about this potentially serious adverse reaction was a turning point in the administration guidelines of these contrast media. There has been an attempt to establish safety parameters to identify patients with risk factors of renal failure. The close pharmacovigilance and strict observation of current regulations, with special attention being paid to the value of glomerular filtration, have reduced the published cases involving the use of gadolinium-based contrast media. In a meeting between radiologists and nephrologists we reviewed the most relevant aspects currently and recommendations for its prevention.

  18. Interplay of disorder and geometrical frustration in doped gadolinium gallium garnet.

    PubMed

    Woo, N; Silevitch, D M; Ferri, C; Ghosh, S; Rosenbaum, T F

    2015-07-29

    The geometrically frustrated triangular antiferromagnet Gadolinium Gallium Garnet (Gd3Ga5O12 or GGG) exhibits a rich mix of short-range order and isolated quantum states. We investigate the effects of up to 1% neodymium substitution for gallium on the ac magnetic response at temperatures below 1 K in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. Substitutional disorder actually drives the system toward a more perfectly frustrated state, apparently compensating for the effects of imperfect gadolinium/gallium stoichiometry, while at the same time more closely demarcating the boundaries of isolated, coherent clusters composed of hundreds of spins. Optical measurements of the local Nd environment substantiate the picture of an increased frustration index with doping. PMID:26154501

  19. Interplay of disorder and geometrical frustration in doped gadolinium gallium garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, N.; Silevitch, D. M.; Ferri, C.; Ghosh, S.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-07-01

    The geometrically frustrated triangular antiferromagnet Gadolinium Gallium Garnet (Gd3Ga5O12 or GGG) exhibits a rich mix of short-range order and isolated quantum states. We investigate the effects of up to 1% neodymium substitution for gallium on the ac magnetic response at temperatures below 1 K in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. Substitutional disorder actually drives the system toward a more perfectly frustrated state, apparently compensating for the effects of imperfect gadolinium/gallium stoichiometry, while at the same time more closely demarcating the boundaries of isolated, coherent clusters composed of hundreds of spins. Optical measurements of the local Nd environment substantiate the picture of an increased frustration index with doping.

  20. Biocompatible Polyhydroxyethylaspartamide-based Micelles with Gadolinium for MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sang Young; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ha-Young; Seong, Hasoo; Shin, Byung Cheol; Yuk, Soon Hong; Hwang, Sung-Joo; Cho, Sun Hang

    2010-12-01

    Biocompatible poly-[ N-(2-hydroxyethyl)- d, l-aspartamide]-methoxypoly(ethyleneglycol)-hexadecylamine (PHEA-mPEG-C16) conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (DOTA-Gd) via ethylenediamine (ED) was synthesized as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Amphiphilic PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd forms micelle in aqueous solution. All the synthesized materials were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Micelle size and shape were examined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Micelles with PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd showed higher relaxivities than the commercially available gadolinium contrast agent. Moreover, the signal intensity of a rabbit liver was effectively increased after intravenous injection of PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd.

  1. Thermal Magnetic Hysteresis in a Copper-Gadolinium-Radical Chain Compound.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mei; Li, Cun; Wang, Xiufeng; Li, Licun; Sutter, Jean-Pascal

    2016-03-21

    Magnetic bistability spanning over a temperature domain of 40 K can result from a small structural deformation of the gadolinium aminoxyl coordination. This is illustrated for a nitronyl nitroxide 3d-4f chain, [Ln(hfac)3Cu(hfac)2(NIT-Pyrim)2] (Ln(III) = Gd, Dy), which is the first example of a bistable lanthanide-based complex. PMID:26915061

  2. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; Rezaei, Arash; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-15

    Restenosis is a major problem after balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. The aim of this study is to introduce gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB) as a suitable modality for treatment of stenosis. The utility of GdNCB in intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) of stent stenosis is investigated by using the GEANT4 and MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. To study capture rate, Kerma, absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate around a Gd-containing stent activated with neutrons, a 30 mm long, 5 mm diameter gadolinium foil is chosen. The input data is a neutron spectrum used for clinical neutron capture therapy in Studsvik, Sweden. Thermal neutron capture in gadolinium yields a spectrum of high-energy gamma photons, which due to the build-up effect gives an almost flat dose delivery pattern to the first 4 mm around the stent. The absorbed dose rate is 1.33 Gy/min, 0.25 mm from the stent surface while the dose to normal tissue is in order of 0.22 Gy/min, i.e., a factor of 6 lower. To spare normal tissue further fractionation of the dose is also possible. The capture rate is relatively high at both ends of the foil. The dose distribution from gamma and charge particle radiation at the edges and inside the stent contributes to a nonuniform dose distribution. This will lead to higher doses to the surrounding tissue and may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. The position of the stent can be verified and corrected by the treatment plan prior to activation. Activation of the stent by an external neutron field can be performed days after catherization when the target cells start to proliferate and can be expected to be more radiation sensitive. Another advantage of the nonradioactive gadolinium stent is the possibility to avoid radiation hazard to personnel.

  3. Gadolinium uptake by brain cancer cells: Quantitative analysis with X-PEEM spectromicroscopy for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Gilbert, B.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Mercanti, D.; Ciotti, M. T.; Casalbore, P.; Larocca, L. M.; Rinelli, A.; Pallini, R.

    2000-05-01

    We present the first X-PEEM spectromicroscopy semi-quantitative data, acquired on Gd in glioblastoma cell cultures from human brain cancer. The cells were treated with a Gd compound for the optimization of GdNCT (Gadolinium Neutron Capture Therapy). We analyzed the kinetics of Gd uptake as a function of exposure time, and verified that a quantitative analytical technique gives the same results as our MEPHISTO X-PEEM, demonstrating the feasibility of semi-quantitative spectromicroscopy.

  4. Proposed experiment to measure {gamma}-rays from the thermal neutron capture of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Takatomi; Ou, I.; Izumi, T.; Yamaguchi, R.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.

    2012-11-12

    Gadolinium-157 ({sup 157}Gd) has the largest thermal neutron capture cross section among any stable nuclei. The thermal neutron capture yields {gamma}-ray cascade with total energy of about 8 MeV. Because of these characteristics, Gd is applied for the recent neutrino detectors. Here, we propose an experiment to measure the multiplicity and the angular correlation of {gamma}-rays from the Gd neutron capture. With these information, we expect the improved identification of the Gd neutron capture.

  5. Sensitive and transportable gadolinium-core plastic scintillator sphere for neutron detection and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Carrel, Frédérick; Corre, Gwenolé; Normand, Stéphane; Méchin, Laurence; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Neutron detection forms a critical branch of nuclear-related issues, currently driven by the search for competitive alternative technologies to neutron counters based on the helium-3 isotope. The deployment of plastic scintillators shows a high potential for efficient detectors, safer and more reliable than liquids, more easily scalable and cost-effective than inorganic. In the meantime, natural gadolinium, through its 155 and mostly 157 isotopes, presents an exceptionally high interaction probability with thermal neutrons. This paper introduces a dual system including a metal gadolinium core inserted at the center of a high-scale plastic scintillator sphere. Incident fast neutrons are thermalized by the scintillator shell and then may be captured with a significant probability by gadolinium 155 and 157 nuclei in the core. The deposition of a sufficient fraction of the capture high-energy prompt gamma signature inside the scintillator shell will then allow discrimination from background radiations by energy threshold, and therefore neutron detection. The scaling of the system with the Monte Carlo MCNPX2.7 code was carried out according to a tradeoff between the moderation of incident fast neutrons and the probability of slow neutron capture by a moderate-cost metal gadolinium core. Based on the parameters extracted from simulation, a first laboratory prototype for the assessment of the detection method principle has been synthetized. The robustness and sensitivity of the neutron detection principle are then assessed by counting measurement experiments. Experimental results confirm the potential for a stable, highly sensitive, transportable and cost-efficient neutron detector and orientate future investigation toward promising axes.

  6. Hyperintense Dentate Nuclei on T1-Weighted MRI: Relation to Repeat Gadolinium Administration

    PubMed Central

    Adin, M.E.; Kleinberg, L.; Vaidya, D.; Zan, E.; Mirbagheri, S.; Yousem, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE A hyperintense appearance of the dentate nucleus on T1-weighted MR images has been related to various clinical conditions, but the etiology remains indeterminate. We aimed to investigate the possible associations between a hyperintense appearance of the dentate nucleus on T1-weighted MR images in patients exposed to radiation and factors including, but not limited to, the cumulative number of contrast-enhanced MR images, amount of gadolinium administration, dosage of ionizing radiation, and patient demographics. MATERIALS AND METHODS The medical records of 706 consecutive patients who were treated with brain irradiation at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions between 1995 and 2010 were blindly reviewed by 2 readers. RESULTS One hundred eighty-four subjects were included for dentate nuclei analysis. Among the 184 subjects who cumulatively underwent 2677 MR imaging studies following intravenous gadolinium administration, 103 patients had hyperintense dentate nuclei on precontrast T1-weighted MR images. The average number of gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging studies performed in the group with normal dentate nuclei was significantly lower than that of the group with hyperintense dentate nuclei. The average follow-up time was 62.5 months. No significant difference was observed between hyperintense and normal dentate nuclei groups in terms of exposed radiation dose, serum creatinine and calcium/phosphate levels, patient demographics, history of chemotherapy, and strength of the scanner. No dentate nuclei abnormalities were found on the corresponding CT scans of patients with hyperintense dentate nuclei (n = 44). No dentate nuclei abnormalities were found in 53 healthy volunteers. CONCLUSIONS Repeat performance of gadolinium-enhanced studies likely contributes to a long-standing hyperintense appearance of dentate nuclei on precontrast T1-weighted-MR images. PMID:26294649

  7. Optical absorption of Ni2+ and Ni3+ ions in gadolinium gallium garnet epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileva, N. V.; Gerus, P. A.; Sokolov, V. O.; Plotnichenko, V. G.

    2012-12-01

    Single-crystal Ni-doped gadolinium gallium garnet films were grown for the first time from supercooled Bi2O3-B2O3-based melt solutions by liquid-phase epitaxy. Optical absorption bands due to Ni2+, Ni3+ and Bi3+ ions were observed in those films. Interpretation and tabulation of all absorption bands of nickel ions occupying octahedral and tetrahedral sites in the garnet lattice are presented.

  8. Gadolinium Chloride Inhibits the Spontaneous Resolution of Fibrosis in CCL(4)-Induced Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Enrique; Alcantar, Lidia K; Moreno, Mario G; Muriel, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that liver fibrosis is dynamic and can be bidirectional, involving phases of progression and regression, and that in addition to increased matrix synthesis, this pathological process involves major changes in the regulation of matrix degradation. There is also evidence that Kupffer cells participate in both fibrogenesis and fibrolysis. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to study the participation of Kupffer cells on the spontaneous resolution of hepatic fibrosis. Cirrhosis was produced by 3 months of chronic CCl(4) intoxication in male Wistar rats, and then CCl(4) was discontinued and two groups were formed: One group received gadolinium chloride (10 mg/kg, IP, daily) and the other received the vehicle (water) only for 2 months. Serum enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase and liver lipid peroxidation increased by CCl(4) treatment but returned to normal by discontinuation of CCl(4). GSH, GSH/GSSG, and GSH+GSSG decreased significantly by CCl(4), but withdrawal of CCl(4) restored normal glutathione parameters. Fibrosis increased five-fold and glycogen decreased significantly by CCl(4) treatment, while discontinuation of CCl(4) reversed completely glycogen depletion and partially fibrosis. Gadolinium chloride showed effects only in the content of glycogen and collagen; the former was decreased further and the latter remained elevated despite discontinuation of the toxic agent. Persistent fibrosis induced by gadolinium chloride, a selective inhibitor of Kupffer cells, indicates that these cells play a pivotal role in fibrolysis. PMID:20020993

  9. Thermal Excitation of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Using Spin Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Fridjhon, Peter; Rubin, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations into the thermal excitation of liquid paramagnetic contrast agents using the spin resonance relaxation mechanism are presented. The electronic spin-lattice relaxation time τ1e of gadolinium-based contrast agents, which is estimated at 0.1 ns, is ten orders of magnitude faster than the relaxation time of protons in water. The shorter relaxation time is found to significantly increase the rate of thermal energy deposition. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first study of gadolinium based contrast agents in a liquid state used as thermal agents. Analysis shows that when τ1e and other experimental parameters are optimally selected, a maximum theoretical heating rate of 29.4 °C.s−1 could be achieved which would suffice for clinical thermal ablation of neoplasms. The experimental results show a statistically significant thermal response for two out of the four contrast agents tested. The results are compared to the simulated estimates via analysis of a detailed model of the system. While these experimentally determined temperature rises are small and thus of no clinical utility, their presence supports the theoretical analysis and strongly suggests that the chemical structure of the selected compounds plays an important role in this mechanism of heat deposition. There exists an opportunity for the development of alternative gadolinium-based compounds with an order of magnitude longer τ1e in a diluted form to be used as an efficient hyperthermia agent for clinical use. PMID:27341338

  10. Large Scale Testing and Development of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Vagine

    2007-09-18

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have begun to investigate the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This large-scale investigation, conducted in the one kiloton water Cherenkov detector built for the K2K long-baseline experiment, follows up on highly promising benchtop-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of a 2003 Advanced Detector Research Program grant.

  11. Physico-chemical and NMR relaxometric characterization of gadolinium hydroxide and dysprosium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossuin, Yves; Hocq, Aline; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Disch, Sabrina; Hermann, Raphaël P.; Gillis, Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Gadolinium hydroxide and dysprosium oxide nanoparticles, which constitute a new interesting class of magnetic nanoparticles, are characterized by different methods, using x-ray diffraction, magnetometry and NMR relaxometry at multiple fields. The rod-like particles are first shown to have a simple paramagnetic behavior, like the bulk compound, without any influence of the nanometric size of the particles. Because of their paramagnetic moment, these particles considerably shorten water relaxation times, especially the transverse relaxation time at high fields. The relaxation induced by gadolinium hydroxide particles is due to a proton exchange between the particle surface and bulk water, while the transverse relaxation caused by dysprosium oxide particles is governed by the diffusion of water protons around the magnetized particles. 1/T2 increases linearly with the magnetic field for gadolinium hydroxide particles while a quadratic increase is observed for dysprosium oxide nanoparticles. The relaxation results are compared with those from previous studies and interpreted using different theories for the relaxation induced by magnetic particles.

  12. Ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles to image brain cancer cells in vivo with MRI.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Luc; Guay-Bégin, Andrée-Anne; Lagueux, Jean; Côté, Marie-France; Petitclerc, Eric; Fortin, Marc-André

    2011-01-01

    The majority of contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is based on the rare-earth element gadolinium. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles could find promising applications in pre-clinical diagnostic procedures of certain types of cancer, such as glioblastoma multiforme. This is one of the most malignant, lethal and poorly accessible forms of cancer. Recent advances in colloidal nanocrystal synthesis have led to the development of ultra-small crystals of gadolinium oxide (US-Gd(2)O(3), 2-3 nm diameter). As of today, this is the smallest and the densest of all Gd-containing nanoparticles. Cancer cells labeled with a sufficient quantity of this compound appear bright in T(1)-weighted MRI images. Here we demonstrate that US-Gd(2)O(3) can be used to label GL-261 glioblastoma multiforme cells, followed by localization and visualization in vivo using MRI. Very high amounts of Gd are efficiently internalized and retained in cells, as confirmed with TEM and ICP-MS. Labeled cells were visualized in vivo at 1.5 T using the chicken embryo model. This is one more step toward the development of "positively contrasted" cell tracking procedures with MRI.

  13. Gadolinium-chelate nanoparticle entrapped human mesenchymal stem cell via photochemical internalization for cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Sub; Park, Wooram; Na, Kun

    2015-01-01

    To improve the gadolinium (Gd) internalization efficiency in stem cells, gadolinium-chelate nanoparticles were prepared from a pullulan derivative (pullulan-deoxycholic acid (DOCA)-diethylene triamine pentaacetic (DTPA)-Gd conjugate; PDDG) and then the PDDG was entrapped into human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by the photochemical-internalization (PCI) method for cancer diagnosis via the cancer homing property of hMSCs. The internalization efficiency of Gd in hMSCs was significantly increased to 98 ± 4 pg Gd/cell from 32 ± 2 pg Gd/cell via the PCI method. Moreover, the Gd-entrapped hMSCs revealed a low exocytosis ratio of gadolinium-chelate nanoparticles during cell division in vitro and a high cellular labeling efficiency for at least 21 days in vivo. The cancer-targeting and diagnosis effect of the Gd-entrapped hMSCs were confirmed in a small CT26 tumor-bearing mice model. The stem cells detected an early tumor (∼3 mm(3)) within 2 h using 4.7-T MR and optical imaging. The results demonstrated that the PCI-mediated internalization of Gd-incorporated nanoparticles into hMSCs is a promising protocol for efficient cell labeling and tracking.

  14. Thermal Excitation of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Using Spin Resonance.

    PubMed

    Dinger, Steven C; Fridjhon, Peter; Rubin, David M

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations into the thermal excitation of liquid paramagnetic contrast agents using the spin resonance relaxation mechanism are presented. The electronic spin-lattice relaxation time τ1e of gadolinium-based contrast agents, which is estimated at 0.1 ns, is ten orders of magnitude faster than the relaxation time of protons in water. The shorter relaxation time is found to significantly increase the rate of thermal energy deposition. To the authors' knowledge this is the first study of gadolinium based contrast agents in a liquid state used as thermal agents. Analysis shows that when τ1e and other experimental parameters are optimally selected, a maximum theoretical heating rate of 29.4 °C.s-1 could be achieved which would suffice for clinical thermal ablation of neoplasms. The experimental results show a statistically significant thermal response for two out of the four contrast agents tested. The results are compared to the simulated estimates via analysis of a detailed model of the system. While these experimentally determined temperature rises are small and thus of no clinical utility, their presence supports the theoretical analysis and strongly suggests that the chemical structure of the selected compounds plays an important role in this mechanism of heat deposition. There exists an opportunity for the development of alternative gadolinium-based compounds with an order of magnitude longer τ1e in a diluted form to be used as an efficient hyperthermia agent for clinical use. PMID:27341338

  15. Study of the Photon Strength Functions for Gadolinium Isotopes with the DANCE Array

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.

    2009-03-10

    The gadolinium isotopes are interesting for reactor applications as well as for medicine and astrophysics. The gadolinium isotopes have some of the largest neutron capture cross sections. As a consequence they are used in the control rod in reactor fuel assembly. From the basic science point of view, there are seven stable isotopes of gadolinium with varying degrees of deformation. Therefore they provide a good testing ground for the study of deformation dependent structure such as the scissors mode. Decay gamma rays following neutron capture on Gd isotopes are detected by the DANCE array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation and close packing of the detector array enable gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric properties of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a specific isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles gamma-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. Various photon strength function models are used for comparison with experimentally measured DANCE data and provide insight for understanding the statistical decay properties of deformed nuclei.

  16. Gadolinium enhancement patterns of tumefactive demyelinating lesions: correlations with brain biopsy findings and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Shimizu, Yuko; Shibata, Noriyuki; Uchiyama, Shinichiro

    2014-10-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs) can mimic brain tumors on radiological images. TDLs are often referred to as tumefactive multiple sclerosis (TMS), but the heterogeneous nature and monophasic course of TDLs do not fulfill clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria for multiple sclerosis. Redefining TDLs, TMS and other inflammatory brain lesions is essential for the accurate clinical diagnosis of extensive demyelinating brain lesions. We retrospectively analyzed MRI from nine TDL cases that underwent brain biopsy. Patterns of gadolinium enhancement on MRI were categorized as homogenous, inhomogeneous, patchy and diffuse, open ring or irregular rim, and were compared with pathological hallmarks including demyelination, central necrosis, macrophage infiltration, angiogenesis and perivascular lymphocytic cuffing. All cases had coexistence of demyelinating features and axonal loss. Open-ring and irregular rim patterns of gadolinium enhancement were associated with macrophage infiltrations and angiogenesis at the inflammatory border. An inhomogeneous pattern of gadolinium enhancement was associated with perivascular lymphocytic cuffing. Central necrosis was seen in cases of severe multiple sclerosis and hemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy. These results suggest that the radiological features of TDLs may be related to different pathological processes, and indicate that MRI may be useful in understanding their pathophysiology. Further investigation is needed to determine the precise disease entity of these inflammatory demyelinating brain lesions.

  17. Specific lipase-responsive polymer-coated gadolinium nanoparticles for MR imaging of early acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Wu; Wang, Li-Qin; Xiang, Qing-Feng; Zhong, Qian; Chen, Lu-Ming; Xu, Cai-Xia; Xiang, Xian-Hong; Xu, Bo; Meng, Fei; Wan, Yi-Qian; Deng, David Y B

    2014-01-01

    Currently, available methods for diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) are mainly dependent on serum enzyme analysis and imaging techniques that are too low in sensitivity and specificity to accurately and promptly diagnose AP. The lack of early diagnostic tools highlights the need to search for a highly effective and specific diagnostic method. In this study, we synthesized a conditionally activated, gadolinium-containing, nanoparticle-based MRI nanoprobe as a diagnostic tool for the early identification of AP. Gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic fatty acid (Gd-DTPA-FA) nanoparticles were synthesized by conjugation of DTPA-FA ligand and gadolinium acetate. Gd-DTPA-FA exhibited low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility when characterized in vitro and in vivo studies. L-arginine induced a gradual increase in the intensity of the T1-weighted MRI signal from 1 h to 36 h in AP rat models. The increase in signal intensity was most significant at 1 h, 6 h and 12 h. These results suggest that the Gd-DTPA-FA as an MRI contrast agent is highly efficient and specific to detect early AP.

  18. Breakthrough reactions of iodinated and gadolinium contrast media after oral steroid premedication protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse reactions to iodinated and gadolinium contrast media are an important clinical issue. Although some guidelines have proposed oral steroid premedication protocols to prevent adverse reactions, some patients may have reactions to contrast media in spite of premedication (breakthrough reaction; BTR). The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency, type and severity of BTR when following an oral steroid premedication protocol. Methods All iodinated and gadolinium contrast-enhanced radiologic examinations between August 2011 and February 2013 for which the premedication protocol was applied in our institution were assessed for BTRs. Results The protocol was applied to a total of 252 examinations (153 patients, ages 15–87 years; 63 males, 90 females). Of these, 152 were for prior acute adverse reactions to contrast media, 85 were for a history of bronchial asthma, and 15 were for other reasons. There were 198 contrast enhanced CTs and 54 contrast enhanced MRIs. There were nine BTR (4.5%) for iodinated contrast media, and only one BTR (1.9%) for gadolinium contrast media: eight were mild and one was moderate. No patient who had a mild index reaction (IR) had a severe BTR. Conclusion Incidence of BTRs when following the premedication protocol was low. This study by no means proves the efficacy of premedication, but provides some support for following a premedication protocol to improve safety of contrast-enhanced examinations when prior adverse reactions are mild, or when there is a history of asthma. PMID:25287952

  19. Selective Filtration of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water Cherenkov Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-04-10

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have been investigating the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This focused study of selective water filtration and GdCl{sub 3} extraction techniques, conducted at UC Irvine, followed up on highly promising benchtop-scale and kiloton-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of 2003 and 2005 Advanced Detector Research Program grants.

  20. Incorporation of Integral Fuel Burnable Absorbers Boron and Gadolinium into Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Clad Material

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, K.; Renk, T.J.; Lahoda, E.J.; Corradini, M.L

    2004-12-14

    Long-lived fuels require the use of higher enrichments of 235U or other fissile materials. Such high levels of fissile material lead to excessive fuel activity at the beginning of life. To counteract this excessive activity, integral fuel burnable absorbers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly. The two commonly used IFBA elements are gadolinium, which is added as gadolinium-oxide to the UO2 powder, and boron, which is applied as a zirconium-diboride coating on the UO2 pellets using plasma spraying or chemical vapor deposition techniques. The incorporation of IFBA into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be very costly because of their small volume and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. Other manufacturing issues that impact cost and performance are maintaining the correct levels of dosing, the reduction in fuel melting point due to gadolinium-oxide additions, and parasitic neutron absorption at fuel's end-of-life. The goal of the proposed research is to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of boron or gadolinium into the outer surface of the fuel cladding material rather than as an additive to the fuel pellets. This paradigm shift will allow for the introduction of the IFBA in a non-nuclear regulated environment and will obviate the necessity of additional handling and processing of the fuel pellets. This could represent significant cost savings and potentially lead to greater reproducibility and control of the burnable fuel in the early stages of the reactor operation. The surface alloying is being performed using the IBEST (Ion Beam Surface Treatment) process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. IBEST involves the delivery of energetic ion beam pulses onto the surface of a material, near-surface melting, and rapid solidification. The non-equilibrium nature of such processing allows for surface

  1. Does gadolinium-based contrast material improve diagnostic accuracy of local invasion in rectal cancer MRI? A multireader study.

    PubMed

    Gollub, Marc J; Lakhman, Yulia; McGinty, Katrina; Weiser, Martin R; Sohn, Michael; Zheng, Junting; Shia, Jinru

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to compare reader accuracy and agreement on rectal MRI with and without gadolinium administration in the detection of T4 rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS. In this study, two radiologists and one fellow independently interpreted all posttreatment MRI studies for patients with locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer using unenhanced images alone or combined with contrast-enhanced images, with a minimum interval of 4 weeks. Readers evaluated involvement of surrounding structures on a 5-point scale and were blinded to pathology and disease stage. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and AUC were calculated and kappa statistics were used to describe interreader agreement. RESULTS. Seventy-two patients (38 men and 34 women) with a mean age of 61 years (range, 32-86 years) were evaluated. Fifteen patients had 32 organs invaded. Global AUCs without and with gadolinium administration were 0.79 and 0.77, 0.91 and 0.86, and 0.83 and 0.78 for readers 1, 2, and 3, respectively. AUCs before and after gadolinium administration were similar. Kappa values before and after gadolinium administration for pairs of readers ranged from 0.5 to 0.7. CONCLUSION. On the basis of pathology as a reference standard, the use of gadolinium during rectal MRI did not significantly improve radiologists' agreement or ability to detect T4 disease.

  2. A feasibility study to determine the potential of in vivo detection of gadolinium by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) following gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, F; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R; Noseworthy, M D

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using a (109)Cd γ-ray induced K x-ray fluorescence (K-XRF) system for the in vivo detection of gadolinium (Gd) in bone has been investigated. The K-XRF bone measurement system employs an array of four detectors, and is normally used for the non-invasive study of bone lead levels. The system was used to measure bone simulating phantoms doped with varying levels of gadolinium and fixed amounts of sodium (Na), chlorine (Cl) and calcium (Ca). The detection limits for bare bone phantoms, using a source of activity 0.17 GBq, were determined to be 3.9 ppm and 6.5 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom) for the Kα1 and Kα2 Gd x-ray peaks, respectively. This leads to an overall detection limit of 3.3 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom). Layers of plastic were used to simulate overlying soft tissue and this permitted prediction of a detection limit, using the current strength of our radioisotope source, of 6.1 ppm to 8.6 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom) for fingers with 2-4 mm of overlying tissue. With a new source of activity 5 GBq, we predict that this system could achieve a detection limit of 4-5.6 µg Gd g(-1) Ca. This is within the range of levels (2-30 µg Gd g(-1) Ca) previously found in the bone of patients receiving Gd based contrast imaging agents. The technique is promising and warrants further investigation.

  3. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-11

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd(2)O(3)) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  4. Multi-luminescent hybrid gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as potential cell labeling.

    PubMed

    Fizet, J; Rivière, C; Bridot, J L; Charvet, N; Louis, C; Billotey, C; Raccurt, M; Morel, G; Roux, S; Perriat, P; Tillement, O

    2009-10-01

    This manuscript analyses the use of newly developed hybrid gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as cell-labeling tracers. The nanoparticles are core-shell particles composed of a core of gadolinium oxide of [2-4] nm and a protecting shell of polysiloxane [1-3 nm] where different organic dyes (fluoresceine isothiocyanate (FITC) or rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC)) are embedded. They are functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol)bis(carboxymethyl) to ensure their colloidal stability in biological buffers. These particles are potential multi-labeling tracers (magnetic and optical). In this paper, we show by optical imaging that they can be efficiently internalized in cells without cell alteration. The in-vitro uptake of the nanoparticles was followed in two cell lines (human fibroblasts and a human adenocarnima cell lines MCF7 cells). Nanoparticles distribution within cells was analysed by confocal analysis, and gadolinium concentration within cells was quantified by mass spectrometry (ICP-MS analysis). Nanoparticles uptake is found to be fast and efficient for both cell lines, with fluorescent labeling visible after 10 min of incubation whatever the nature of the fluorophore. The fluorescent intensity is mainly found as concentrated dots in the perinuclear region of the cells and decreases with the number of days in culture, but is still easily detectable after 3 days in culture. No significant effect on cell growth was detected. Finally, we show in this study the protective effect of the polysiloxane layer: encapsulation of RBITC within the polysiloxane shell, leads to a better photostability of this low cost dye than Cy3 and even reach a level comparable to Alexa 595. With their high photostability and long-lasting contrast properties, these hybrid luminescent nanoparticles appears thus as a versatile solution to assess multiple cell fate both in in-vitro cell model as well as in-vivo.

  5. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  6. Relaxometric studies of gadolinium-functionalized perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for MR imaging.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Anke; Moonen, Rik; Yildirim, Muhammed; Langereis, Sander; Lamerichs, Rolf; Pikkemaat, Jeroen A; Baroni, Simona; Terreno, Enzo; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J; Grüll, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine MRI ((19) F MRI) is receiving an increasing attention as a viable alternative to proton-based MRI ((1) H MRI) for dedicated application in molecular imaging. The (19) F nucleus has a high gyromagnetic ratio, a 100% natural abundance and is furthermore hardly present in human tissues allowing for hot spot MR imaging. The applicability of (19) F MRI as a molecular and cellular imaging technique has been exploited, ranging from cell tracking to detection and imaging of tumors in preclinical studies. In addition to applications, developing new contrast materials with improved relaxation properties has also been a core research topic in the field, since the inherently low longitudinal relaxation rates of perfluorocarbon compounds result in relatively low imaging efficiency. Borrowed from (1) H MRI, the incorporation of lanthanides, specifically Gd(III) complexes, as signal modulating ingredients in the nanoparticle formulation has emerged as a promising approach to improvement of the fluorine signal. Three different perfluorocarbon emulsions were investigated at five different magnetic field strengths. Perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether was used as the core material and Gd(III)DOTA-DSPE, Gd(III)DOTA-C6-DSPE and Gd(III)DTPA-BSA as the relaxation altering components. While Gd(III)DOTA-DSPE and Gd(III)DOTA-C6-DSPE were favorable constructs for (1) H NMR, Gd(III)DTPA-BSA showed the strongest increase in (19F) R(1). These results show the potential of the use of paramagnetic lipids to increase (19F) R(1) at clinical field strengths (1.5-3 T). At higher field strengths (6.3-14 T), gadolinium does not lead to an increase in (19F) R(1) compared with emulsions without gadolinium, but leads to an significant increase in (19F) R(2). Our data therefore suggest that the most favorable situation for fluorine measurements is at high magnetic fields without the inclusion of gadolinium constructs.

  7. Gadolinium-complexed Aβ-binding contrast agents for MRI diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Balpreet; Spencer, Nick; Howe, Franklyn; Austen, Brian

    2015-10-01

    MRI contrast agents, containing peptide sequences that bind β-amyloid and gadolinium ions ligated to DOTA have been synthesized for evaluation in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease in transgenic mice models. A number of brain penetration modifications were incorporated and sufficient amounts of contrast agent in the brain were achieved only by addition of a cationic cell penetration sequence along with the use of microparticle assisted ultrasound activation. In the T1 mode of a MRI scan, the peptide (R2) illuminated areas of brain rich in amyloid plaques.

  8. Safety Evaluation and Imaging Properties of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Shady; Piraquive, Joao; Lamberton, Franck; Lux, François; Verset, Michael; Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Contamin, Hugues; Tillement, Olivier; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Sancey, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report the safety evaluation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in nonhuman primates (NHP) in the context of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in atherosclerosis bearing animals and healthy controls. In healthy NHP, the pharmacokinetics and toxicity profiles demonstrated the absence of dose, time, and sex-effects, as well as a suitable tolerance of intravenous administration of the nanoparticles. We investigated their imaging properties for arterial plaque imaging in a standard diet or a high cholesterol diet NHP, and compared their characteristics with clinically applied Gd-chelate. This preliminary investigation reports the efficient and safe imaging of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27725693

  9. Bioconjugation of luminescent silicon quantum dots to gadolinium ions for bioimaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erogbogbo, Folarin; Chang, Ching-Wen; May, Jasmine L.; Liu, Liwei; Kumar, Rajiv; Law, Wing-Cheung; Ding, Hong; Yong, Ken Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Sheshadri, Mukund; Swihart, Mark T.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2012-08-01

    Luminescent imaging agents and MRI contrast agents are desirable components in the rational design of multifunctional nanoconstructs for biological imaging applications. Luminescent biocompatible silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) and gadolinium chelates can be applied for fluorescence microscopy and MRI, respectively. Here, we report the first synthesis of a nanocomplex incorporating SiQDs and gadolinium ions (Gd3+) for biological applications. The nanoconstruct is composed of a PEGylated micelle, with hydrophobic SiQDs in its core, covalently bound to DOTA-chelated Gd3+. Dynamic light scattering reveals a radius of 85 nm for these nanoconstructs, which is consistent with the electron microscopy results depicting radii ranging from 25 to 60 nm. Cellular uptake of the probes verified that they maintain their optical properties within the intracellular environment. The magnetic resonance relaxivity of the nanoconstruct was 2.4 mM-1 s-1 (in terms of Gd3+ concentration), calculated to be around 6000 mM-1 s-1 per nanoconstruct. These desirable optical and relaxivity properties of the newly developed probe open the door for use of SiQDs in future multimodal applications such as tumour imaging.Luminescent imaging agents and MRI contrast agents are desirable components in the rational design of multifunctional nanoconstructs for biological imaging applications. Luminescent biocompatible silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) and gadolinium chelates can be applied for fluorescence microscopy and MRI, respectively. Here, we report the first synthesis of a nanocomplex incorporating SiQDs and gadolinium ions (Gd3+) for biological applications. The nanoconstruct is composed of a PEGylated micelle, with hydrophobic SiQDs in its core, covalently bound to DOTA-chelated Gd3+. Dynamic light scattering reveals a radius of 85 nm for these nanoconstructs, which is consistent with the electron microscopy results depicting radii ranging from 25 to 60 nm. Cellular uptake of the probes verified that they

  10. Combustion synthesis and optical properties of ceria doped gadolinium-oxide nanopowder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar; Bisen, D. P.

    2013-06-01

    The Ceria doped Gadolinium (Gd2O3) nanopowder was synthesized by combustion synthesis by using urea as a fuel. The combustion synthesis method which is reported here is advantageous from the perspectives of small size of the nanoparticle. The structural and photoluminescence (PL) property of sample was studies. Gd2O3:Ce3+ nanoparticles exhibit green emission around 543 nm. The result of XRD show that synthesized sample has cubic structure. The average size of particle is found to be 45 nm. The surface morphology of the films is also presented.

  11. Structural and chemical analysis of gadolinium halides encapsulated within WS2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anumol, E. A.; Enyashin, Andrey N.; Batra, Nitin M.; Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Deepak, Francis Leonard

    2016-06-01

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of WS2 nanotubes by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is non-trivial due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials.The hollow cavities of nanotubes serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of WS2 nanotubes by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is non-trivial due to the

  12. Geometrically confined ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles boost the T1 contrast ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kaiyuan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhou, Zijian; Yang, Li; Wang, Lirong; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-01

    High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM-1 s-1. Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy provides new guidance for developing various high-performance T1 contrast agents for sensitive imaging and disease diagnosis.High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM-1 s-1. Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy

  13. A case of delayed onset nephrogenic systemic fibrosis after gadolinium based contrast injection.

    PubMed

    Do, Jong Geol; Kim, Young Bum; Lee, Dae Gu; Hwang, Ji Hye

    2012-12-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin and joints that occurs in patients with advanced renal insufficiency. This condition is progressive and can be seriously disabling. Gadolinium based contrast agent (GBCA) has been identified as a potential cause of this condition. A 56-years-old man in hemodialysis developed stiffness and contracture of the whole limbs eight years after frequent GBCA exposure for cervical magnetic resonance imaging. For the first time in Korea, we report late-onset nephrogenic systemic fibrosis after GBCA exposure and performed an electrophysiologic study of this condition. PMID:23342325

  14. Caustic Precipitation of Plutonium Using Gadolinium as the Neutron Poison for Disposition to High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bronikowski, M.G.

    2002-06-24

    Nuclear Materials Management Division (NMMD) has proposed that up to 100 kg of the plutonium (Pu) solutions stored in H-Canyon be precipitated with a nuclear poison and dispositioned to H-Area Tank Farm. The use of gadolinium (Gd) as the poison would greatly reduce the number of additional glass logs resulting from this disposition. This report summarizes the characteristics of the precipitation process and addresses criticality concerns in the Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation. No problems were found with the nature of the precipitate or the neutralization process.

  15. Size-dependent Strain in Epitaxial (001)Gadolinium-doped Ceria Nanoislands

    SciTech Connect

    V Solovyov; M Gibert; T Puig; X Obradors

    2011-12-31

    We report size-dependent strain in epitaxial gadolinium doped ceria nanoislands, which was determined by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Reciprocal space sections of symmetric, (004) and asymmetric, (224) reflections are approximated by a model assuming size-dependent strain of the islands using real-space size distribution obtained by atomic force microscopy. We show that the islands smaller than 40 nm are subjected to a high level of lateral tensile strain and normal compression. The lateral to normal strain ratio determined from the reciprocal map analysis suggests that lateral tension is the primary stress generator, possibly due to oxygen vacancy ordering on the island-substrate interface.

  16. Modification of the crystal structure of gadolinium gallium garnet by helium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostafiychuk, B. K.; Yaremiy, I. P. Yaremiy, S. I.; Fedoriv, V. D.; Tomyn, U. O.; Umantsiv, M. M.; Fodchuk, I. M.; Kladko, V. P.

    2013-12-15

    The structure of gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) single crystals before and after implantation by He{sup +} ions has been investigated using high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods and the generalized dynamic theory of X-ray scattering. The main types of growth defects in GGG single crystals and radiation-induced defects in the ion-implanted layer have been determined. It is established that the concentration of dislocation loops in the GGG surface layer modified by ion implantation increases and their radius decreases with an increase in the implantation dose.

  17. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging in assessment of myocardial viability: techniques and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Juan, Laura; Crean, Andrew M; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of myocardial viability is of ever-evolving interest in cardiovascular imaging, with major societies having incorporated viability imaging as class I or class IIa indications in their guidelines to better guide patient management. As with late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (MR), assessment of residual myocardial viability or the extent of myocardial infarction is straightforward and this technique may easily be combined with other cardiac MR modules. In clinical routine functional assessment and myocardial perfusion imaging if often used in conjunction allowing for a comprehensive assessment of ischemic heart disease.

  18. Gadolinium contrast agent selection and optimal use for body MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G; Gupta, Shiva

    2014-07-01

    Proper selection of a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) for body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cases requires understanding the indication for the MRI exam, the key features of the different GBCAs, and the effect that the GBCA has on the selected imaging protocol. The different categories of GBCAs require timing optimization on postcontrast sequences and adjusting imaging parameters to obtain the highest T1 contrast. Gadoxetate disodium has many advantages when evaluating liver lesions, although there are caveats and limitations that need to be understood. Gadobenate dimeglumine, a high-relaxivity GBCA, can be used for indications when stronger T1 relaxivity is needed.

  19. Modification of the crystal structure of gadolinium gallium garnet by helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostafiychuk, B. K.; Yaremiy, I. P.; Yaremiy, S. I.; Fedoriv, V. D.; Tomyn, U. O.; Umantsiv, M. M.; Fodchuk, I. M.; Kladko, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    The structure of gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) single crystals before and after implantation by He+ ions has been investigated using high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods and the generalized dynamic theory of X-ray scattering. The main types of growth defects in GGG single crystals and radiation-induced defects in the ion-implanted layer have been determined. It is established that the concentration of dislocation loops in the GGG surface layer modified by ion implantation increases and their radius decreases with an increase in the implantation dose.

  20. Electromagnetic excitation of ultrasonic oscillations by yttrium iron garnet films on gallium gadolinium garnet substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnatskii, V. M.; Mavlonazarov, I. O.; Lutsev, L. V.

    2014-07-01

    We have studied the phenomenon of contactless excitation of ultrasonic oscillations by thin yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films on gallium gadolinium garnet (GGG) substrates upon application of the superposition of a constant magnetic bias field and alternating magnetic field. Dimensional resonance effects that cannot be explained in the framework of existing theoretical notions have been discovered, in particular, in dependences of the amplitude of excited longitudinal oscillations on the YIG film thickness, frequency of ultrasound, and degree of homogeneity and strength of the magnetic bias field. It is suggested that the observed phenomenon is caused by resonant participation of the intrinsic oscillations of domain walls in the excitation of ultrasound.

  1. Controlled manipulation of gadolinium-coordinated supramolecules by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Urgel, José I; Ecija, David; Auwärter, Willi; Barth, Johannes V

    2014-03-12

    Coordination bonding between para-quarterphenyl-dicarbonitrile linkers and gadolinium on Ag(111) has been exploited to construct pentameric mononuclear supramolecules, consisting of a rare-earth center surrounded by five molecular linkers. By employing a scanning tunneling microscope tip, a manipulation protocol was developed to position individual pentamers on the surface. In addition, the tip was used to extract and replace individual linkers yielding tetrameric, pentameric, nonameric, and dodecameric metallosupramolecular arrangements. These results open new avenues toward advanced nanofabrication methods and rare-earth nanochemistry by combining the versatility of metal-ligand interactions and atomistic manipulation capabilities.

  2. Quantitative assessment of synovitis in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease using gadolinium-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Neal, David C; O'Brien, Jack C; Burgess, Jamie; Jo, Chanhee; Kim, Harry K W

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative method to assess hip synovitis in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) is not currently available. To develop this method, the areas of synovial enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced MRI (Gd-MRI) were measured by two independent observers. The volume of synovial enhancement was significantly increased in the initial and the fragmentation stages of LCPD (Waldenström stages I and II), with a persistence of synovitis into the reossification stage (stage III). The Gd-MRI method had high interobserver and intraobserver agreements and may serve as a useful method to monitor the effect of various treatments on hip synovitis in LCPD. PMID:25305048

  3. Gadolinium-Enhanced Angiography for Diagnosis and Interventional Treatment of Subclavian Artery Stenosis Prior to Fistula Creation

    SciTech Connect

    Termote, Bruno; Maleux, Geert Heye, Sam; Fourneau, Inge; Claes, Kathleen

    2008-07-15

    We report the use of gadolinium-based contrast agent for both diagnostic and interventional subclavian angiography in two azotemic patients, presenting with an asymptomatic, high-grade stenosis of the left subclavian artery, ipsilateral to the site of choice for native fistula creation. Angiographic imaging performed with diluted gadolinium-based contrast material was clear enough to perform successful subclavian artery stenting, resulting in normalization of the arterial blood pressure in the afferent artery of the dialysis fistula. Clinically, no decrease in residual renal function and no other complication were noted immediately or a longer period after the interventional treatment.

  4. Density functional calculations for structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of gadolinium-oxide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H. K.; Chen, H.; Tian, C. L.; Kuang, A. L.; Wang, J. Z.

    2014-04-01

    Gadolinium-oxide clusters in various sizes and stoichiometries have been systematically studied by employing the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. The clusters in bulk stoichiometry are relatively more stable and their binding energies increase with the increasing size. Stoichiometric (Gd2O3)n clusters of n = 1-3 prefer cage-like structures, whereas the clusters of n = 4-30 prefer compact structures layered by wedge-like units and exhibit a rough feature toward the bulk-like arrangement with small disorders of atomic positions. The polyhedral-cages analogous to carbon-fullerenes are stable isomers yet not the minimum energy configurations. Their stabilities can be improved by embedding one oxygen atom or a suitable cage to form core-shell configurations. The mostly favored antiferromagnetic couplings between adjacent Gd atoms are nearly degenerated in energy with their ferromagnetic couplings, resulting in super-paramagnetic characters of gadolinium-oxide clusters. The Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY)-type mechanism together with the superexchange-type mechanism plays cooperation role for the magnetic interactions in clusters. We present, as a function of n, calculated binding energies, ionization potential, electron affinity, and electronic dipole moment.

  5. Ligand-free gadolinium oxide for in vivo T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ningqi; Tian, Xiumei; Yang, Chuan; Xiao, Jun; Hu, Wenyong; Chen, Dihu; Li, Li

    2013-08-01

    Gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3), which can be used as a T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, has attracted intense attention in recent years. In this paper, ligand-free monoclinic Gd2O3 nanocrystals of 7.1 nm in diameter are synthesized by a simple and green approach, namely microsecond laser ablation of a gadolinium (Gd) target in deionized water. These nanocrystals obtain high r1 relaxivity of 5.53 s(-1) mM(-1), and their low toxicity was demonstrated by the cell viability of S18 cells and apoptosis in RAW264.7 cells. In vitro and in vivo MR images show these particles to be good T1-weighted MRI contrast agents. Base on the experimental results and theoretical analysis, we suggest that the purity of the Gd2O3 contributes to its high r1 relaxivity value, while the low toxicity is due to its good crystallinity. These findings show that laser ablation in liquid (LAL) is a promising strategy to synthesize ligand-free monoclinic Gd2O3 nanocrystals for use as high efficient T1-weighted MRI contrast agents.

  6. Geometrically confined ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles boost the T(1) contrast ability.

    PubMed

    Ni, Kaiyuan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhou, Zijian; Yang, Li; Wang, Lirong; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-14

    High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM(-1) s(-1). Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy provides new guidance for developing various high-performance T1 contrast agents for sensitive imaging and disease diagnosis.

  7. Silica nanoparticles coencapsulating gadolinium oxide and horseradish peroxidase for imaging and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nikesh; Shrivastava, Anju; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles coencapsulating gadolinium oxide and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) have been synthesized in the aqueous core of sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)-hexane-water reverse micelle. The average diameter of these silica particles is around 25 nm and the particles are spherical and highly monodispersed as depicted using transmission electron microscopy. The entrapment efficiency of HRP was found to be as high as 95%. Practically, the entrapped enzyme shows zero leachability up to 90 days. The enzyme entrapped in these silica nanoparticles follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Peroxidase entrapped in silica nanoparticles shows higher stability towards temperature and pH change as compared to free enzymes. The gadolinium oxide-doped silica nanoparticles are paramagnetic as observed from the nuclear magnetic resonance line-broadening effect on the proton spectrum of the surrounding water molecule. The entrapped enzyme, HRP, has been used to convert a benign prodrug, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), to a toxic oxidized product and its toxic effect has been tested on cancerous cell lines through thiazolyl blue tetrazolium blue (MTT) assay. In vitro studies on different cancerous cell lines show that the enzyme has been entrapped and retains its activity inside the silica nanoparticles. IAA alone has no cytotoxic effect and it becomes active only after oxidative decarboxylation by HRP.

  8. Disparate ultrafast dynamics of itinerant and localized magnetic moments in gadolinium metal

    PubMed Central

    Frietsch, B.; Bowlan, J.; Carley, R.; Teichmann, M.; Wienholdt, S.; Hinzke, D.; Nowak, U.; Carva, K.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Weinelt, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Heisenberg–Dirac intra-atomic exchange coupling is responsible for the formation of the atomic spin moment and thus the strongest interaction in magnetism. Therefore, it is generally assumed that intra-atomic exchange leads to a quasi-instantaneous aligning process in the magnetic moment dynamics of spins in separate, on-site atomic orbitals. Following ultrashort optical excitation of gadolinium metal, we concurrently record in photoemission the 4f magnetic linear dichroism and 5d exchange splitting. Their dynamics differ by one order of magnitude, with decay constants of 14 versus 0.8 ps, respectively. Spin dynamics simulations based on an orbital-resolved Heisenberg Hamiltonian combined with first-principles calculations explain the particular dynamics of 5d and 4f spin moments well, and corroborate that the 5d exchange splitting traces closely the 5d spin-moment dynamics. Thus gadolinium shows disparate dynamics of the localized 4f and the itinerant 5d spin moments, demonstrating a breakdown of their intra-atomic exchange alignment on a picosecond timescale. PMID:26355196

  9. Thermal neutron capture cross section of gadolinium by pile-oscillation measurements in MINERVE

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, P.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A.; Hentati, A.

    2012-07-01

    Natural gadolinium is used as a burnable poison in most LWR to account for the excess of reactivity of fresh fuels. For an accurate prediction of the cycle length, its nuclear data and especially its neutron capture cross section needs to be known with a high precision. Recent microscopic measurements at Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) suggest a 11% smaller value for the thermal capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd, compared with most of evaluated nuclear data libraries. To solve this inconsistency, we have analyzed several pile-oscillation experiments, performed in the MINERVE reactor. They consist in the measurement of the reactivity variation involved by the introduction in the reactor of small-samples, containing different mass amounts of natural gadolinium. The analysis of these experiments is done through the exact perturbation theory, using the PIMS calculation tool, in order to link the reactivity effect to the thermal capture cross section. The measurement of reactivity effects is used to deduce the 2200 m.s-1 capture cross section of {sup nat}Gd which is (49360 {+-} 790) b. This result is in good agreement with the JEFF3.1.1 value (48630 b), within 1.6% uncertainty at 1{sigma}, but is strongly inconsistent with the microscopic measurements at RPI which give (44200 {+-} 500) b. (authors)

  10. Density functional calculations for structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of gadolinium-oxide clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H. K.; Chen, H. Tian, C. L.; Kuang, A. L.; Wang, J. Z.

    2014-04-21

    Gadolinium-oxide clusters in various sizes and stoichiometries have been systematically studied by employing the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. The clusters in bulk stoichiometry are relatively more stable and their binding energies increase with the increasing size. Stoichiometric (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub n} clusters of n = 1–3 prefer cage-like structures, whereas the clusters of n = 4–30 prefer compact structures layered by wedge-like units and exhibit a rough feature toward the bulk-like arrangement with small disorders of atomic positions. The polyhedral-cages analogous to carbon-fullerenes are stable isomers yet not the minimum energy configurations. Their stabilities can be improved by embedding one oxygen atom or a suitable cage to form core-shell configurations. The mostly favored antiferromagnetic couplings between adjacent Gd atoms are nearly degenerated in energy with their ferromagnetic couplings, resulting in super-paramagnetic characters of gadolinium-oxide clusters. The Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY)-type mechanism together with the superexchange-type mechanism plays cooperation role for the magnetic interactions in clusters. We present, as a function of n, calculated binding energies, ionization potential, electron affinity, and electronic dipole moment.

  11. High Relaxivity Gadolinium Hydroxypyridonate-Viral Capsid Conjugates: Nano-sized MRI Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Meux, Susan C.; Datta, Ankona; Hooker, Jacob M.; Botta, Mauro; Francis, Matthew B.; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-08-29

    High relaxivity macromolecular contrast agents based on the conjugation of gadolinium chelates to the interior and exterior surfaces of MS2 viral capsids are assessed. The proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of the conjugates show up to a five-fold increase in relaxivity, leading to a peak relaxivity (per Gd{sup 3+} ion) of 41.6 mM{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 30 MHz for the internally modified capsids. Modification of the exterior was achieved through conjugation to flexible lysines, while internal modification was accomplished by conjugation to relatively rigid tyrosines. Higher relaxivities were obtained for the internally modified capsids, showing that (1) there is facile diffusion of water to the interior of capsids and (2) the rigidity of the linker attaching the complex to the macromolecule is important for obtaining high relaxivity enhancements. The viral capsid conjugated gadolinium hydroxypyridonate complexes appear to possess two inner-sphere water molecules (q = 2) and the NMRD fittings highlight the differences in the local motion for the internal ({tau}{sub RI} = 440 ps) and external ({tau}{sub RI} = 310 ps) conjugates. These results indicate that there are significant advantages of using the internal surface of the capsids for contrast agent attachment, leaving the exterior surface available for the installation of tissue targeting groups.

  12. Effect of solid-phase amorphization on the spectral characteristics of europium-doped gadolinium molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmurak, S. Z.; Kiselev, A. P.; Kurmasheva, D. M.; Red'Kin, B. S.; Sinitsyn, V. V.

    2010-05-01

    A method is proposed for detecting spectral characteristics of optically inactive molybdates of rare-earth elements by their doping with rare-earth ions whose luminescence lies in the transparency region of all structural modifications of the sample. Gadolinium molybdate is chosen as the object of investigations, while europium ions are used as an optically active and structurally sensitive admixture. It is shown that after the action of a high pressure under which gadolinium molybdate passes to the amorphous state, the spectral characteristics of Gd1.99Eu0.01(MoO4)3 (GMO:Eu) change radically; namely, considerable line broadening is observed in the luminescence spectra and the luminescence excitation spectra, while the long-wave threshold of optical absorption is shifted considerably (by approximately 1.1 eV) towards lower energies. It is found that by changing the structural state of GMO:Eu by solid-state amorphization followed by annealing, the spectral characteristics of the sample can be purposefully changed. This is extremely important for solving the urgent problem of designing high-efficiency light-emitting diodes producing “white” light.

  13. Chemical and magnetic structure of uranium/gadolinium multilayers studied by transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.B.; Springell, R.; Langridge, S.; Wildes, A.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Moore, K.T.; Butterfield, M.; Chivall, J.; Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R.; Lander, G.H.

    2010-04-29

    We present a multitechnique approach to study the detailed chemical and magnetic structure of uranium/gadolinium multilayers. At low temperature the saturation magnetization is found to be {approx}60% of that of bulk gadolinium. We address this problem, which is found in many other multilayers and suggest a model that may have wider applications. Transmission electron microscopy images indicate a microstructure, consistent with a columnar growth of Gd with crystallites of the order 20 {yields} 100{angstrom}. Off-specular neutron scattering is most strongly visible at saturation field, indicating that Gd moments are not aligned with the applied field. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering provides proof of coupled in-plane length scales for both the structural and the magnetic roughness. A detailed x-ray scattering study of both the specular and off-specular reflectivities has been used to investigate the in-plane structure of the multilayers. We calculate the roughness and transverse correlation cut-off length, {zeta}{sub x} = 120 {+-} 30{angstrom}, and present a simple model to determine an average column size of 27 {+-} 6{angstrom} and a reduction in the magnetic saturation of {approx}40%.

  14. Development of a gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator for the Hanaro short baseline prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, In Sung; Joo, Kyung Kwang; So, Sun Heang; Song, Sook Hyung; Kim, Hong Joo; So, Jung Ho; Park, Kang Soon; Ma, Kyung Ju; Jeon, Eun Ju; Kim, Jin Yu; Kim, Young Duk; Lee, Jason; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Sun, Gwang-Min

    2014-02-01

    We propose a new experiment on the site of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) located at Daejeon, Korea. The Hanaro short baseline (SBL) nuclear reactor with a thermal power output 30 MW is used to investigate a reactor neutrino anomaly. A Hanaro SBL prototype detector having a 60- l volume has been constructed ˜6 m away from the reactor core. A gadolinium (Gd)-loaded liquid scintillator (LS) is used as an active material to trigger events. The selection of the LS is guided by physical and technical requirements, as well as safety considerations. A linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is used as a base solvent of the Hanaro SBL prototype detector. Three g/ l of PPO and 30 mg/ l of bis-MSB are dissolved to formulate the LAB-based LS. Then, a 0.5% gadolinium (Gd) complex with carboxylic acid is loaded into the LAB-based LS by using the liquidliquid extraction method. In this paper, we will summarize all the characteristics of the Gd-loaded LAB-based LS for the Hanaro prototype detector.

  15. Ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions of sodium molybdate and sodium tungstate in mixtures of acetonitrile and water at 298.15, 308.15, and 318.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, B. K.; Sinha, B.; Roy, M. N.

    2008-06-01

    The apparent molar volumes ( V ϕ) and viscosity B-coefficients of sodium molybdate and sodium tungstate in aqueous binary mixtures of acetonitrile were determined from solution density and viscosity measurements at 298.15, 308.15 and 318.15 K and various electrolyte concentrations. The experimental density and viscosity data were evaluated by the Masson and Jones-Dole equations, respectively, and the parameters derived were interpreted in terms of ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions. The activation parameters of viscous flow were also determined and discussed using transition state theory.

  16. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of phonon spectra, and simulations of pressure-induced amorphization in tungstates A W O4 (A =Ba ,Sr ,Ca , and Pb )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Prabhatasree; Gupta, M. K.; Mittal, R.; Rols, S.; Achary, S. N.; Tyagi, A. K.; Chaplot, S. L.

    2015-03-01

    Lattice dynamics and high-pressure phase transitions in A W O4 (A =Ba ,Sr ,Ca , and Pb ) have been investigated using inelastic neutron scattering experiments, ab initio density functional theory calculations, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational modes that are internal to W O4 tetrahedra occur at the highest energies consistent with the relative stability of W O4 tetrahedra. The neutron data and the ab initio calculations are found to be in excellent agreement. The neutron and structural data are used to develop and validate an interatomic potential model. The model is used for classical molecular dynamics simulations to study their response to high pressure. We have calculated the enthalpies of the scheelite and fergusonite phases as a function of pressure, which confirms that the scheelite to fergusonite transition is second order in nature. With increase in pressure, there is a gradual change in the A O8 polyhedra, while there is no apparent change in the W O4 tetrahedra. We found that all the four tungstates amorphize at high pressure. This is in good agreement with available experimental observations which show amorphization at around 45 GPa in BaW O4 and 40 GPa in CaW O4 . Further molecular dynamics simulations at high pressure and high temperature indicate that application of pressure at higher temperature hastens the process of amorphization. On amorphization, there is an abrupt increase in the coordination of the W atom while the bisdisphenoids around the A atom are considerably distorted. The pair-correlation functions of the various atom pairs corroborate these observations. Our observations aid in predicting the pressure of amorphization in SrW O4 and PbW O4 .

  17. Fabrication of a silica sphere with fluorescent and MR contrasting GdPO4 nanoparticles from layered gadolinium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-su; Lee, Byung-Il; Lee, Kyung Sig; Heo, Hyejung; Lee, Jung Hee; Byeon, Song-Ho; Lee, In Su

    2010-06-01

    The delaminated gadolinium hydroxide layers doped with Eu(3+) ions were assembled on the surface of silica spheres and annealed at high temperatures, resulting in the formation of fluorescent and MR active GdPO(4) : Eu nanoparticles at the surface.

  18. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Samarium, Europium, and Gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of samarium, europium and gadolinium (62 {le} Z {le} 64, 82 {le} N {le} 96).

  19. Feasibility of synchrotron radiation computed tomography on rats bearing glioma after iodine or gadolinium injection. Jeune Equipe RSRM-UJF.

    PubMed

    Le Duc, G; Corde, S; Elleaume, H; Estève, F; Charvet, A M; Brochard, T; Fiedler, S; Collomb, A; Le Bas, J F

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new imaging technique called synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT). This technique leads to a direct assessment of the in vivo concentration of an iodine- or gadolinium-labeled compound. Rats bearing C6 glioma were imaged by MRI prior to the SRCT experiment. The SRCT experiments were performed after a 1.3 g I/kg (n = 5) or a 0.4 g Gd/kg (n = 5) injection. Finally, brains were sampled for histology. The SRCT images exhibited contrast enhancement at the tumor location. Ten minutes after injection, iodine and gadolinium tissular concentrations were equal to 0.80 ( +/- 0.40) mg/cm3 and 0.50 ( +/- 0.10) mg/cm3, respectively in the peripheral area of the tumor (respective background value: 0.20 +/- 0.02 to 0.10 +/- 0.01). Correlation to MRI and histology revealed that the contrast uptake occurred in the most vascularized area of the tumor. The present study summarizes the feasibility of in vivo SRCT to obtain quantitative information about iodine and gadolinium-labeled compounds. Beyond brain tumor pathology, the SRCT appears as a complementary approach to MRI and CT, for studying iodine- and gadolinium-labeled compounds by the direct achievement of the tissular concentration value in the tissue.

  20. Hybrid gold-gadolinium nanoclusters for tumor-targeted NIRF/CT/MRI triple-modal imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, De-Hong; Sheng, Zong-Hai; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Yang, Da-Zhi; Liu, Shu-Hui; Gong, Ping; Gao, Du-Yang; Fang, Sheng-Tao; Ma, Yi-Fan; Cai, Lin-Tao

    2013-01-01

    Multimodal imaging is highly desirable for accurate diagnosis because it can provide complementary information from each imaging modality. In this study, we prepared hybrid gold-gadolinium nanoclusters (NCs), which are ultrasmall, stable, biocompatible, and suitable for triple-modal NIRF/CT/MRI imaging. Upon intravenously injected, the hybrid NCs are effectively accumulated in tumor tissues and quickly clear by renal excretion, indicating their capacity of tumor targeting and low body residues. Notably, the ultrasmall hybrid NCs would penetrate into the solid tumor for capturing its heterostructure and do not induce potential toxicity in vivo. Hence, the well-defined hybrid gold-gadolinium NCs provide a versatile nanoprobe for cancer targeted imaging and diagnosis in vivo.Multimodal imaging is highly desirable for accurate diagnosis because it can provide complementary information from each imaging modality. In this study, we prepared hybrid gold-gadolinium nanoclusters (NCs), which are ultrasmall, stable, biocompatible, and suitable for triple-modal NIRF/CT/MRI imaging. Upon intravenously injected, the hybrid NCs are effectively accumulated in tumor tissues and quickly clear by renal excretion, indicating their capacity of tumor targeting and low body residues. Notably, the ultrasmall hybrid NCs would penetrate into the solid tumor for capturing its heterostructure and do not induce potential toxicity in vivo. Hence, the well-defined hybrid gold-gadolinium NCs provide a versatile nanoprobe for cancer targeted imaging and diagnosis in vivo. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33543c

  1. The feasibility of in vivo quantification of bone-gadolinium in humans by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) following gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Noseworthy, M. D.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of using a 238Pu/Be-based in vivo prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) system, previously successfully used for measurements of muscle, for the detection of gadolinium (Gd) in bone was presented. Gd is extensively used in contrast agents in MR imaging. We present phantom measurement data for the measurement of Gd in the tibia. Gd has seven naturally occurring isotopes, of which two have extremely large neutron capture cross sections; 155Gd (14.8% natural abundance (NA), σ= 60,900 barns) and 157Gd (15.65% NA, σ= 254,000 barns). Our previous work focused on muscle but this only informs about the short term kinetics of Gd. We studied the possibility of measuring bone, as it may be a long term storage site for Gd. A human simulating bone phantom set was developed. The phantoms were doped with seven concentrations of Gd of concentrations 0.0, 25, 50, 75, 100, 120 and 150 ppm. Additional elements important for neutron activation analysis, Na, Cl and Ca, were also included to create an overall elemental composition consistent with Reference Man. The overall conclusion is that the potential application of this Pu-Be-based prompt in vivo NAA for the monitoring of the storage and retention of Gd in bone is not feasible.

  2. Detection of small hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison of conventional gadolinium-enhanced MRI with gadolinium-enhanced MRI after the administration of ferucarbotran.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y K; Kim, C S; Han, Y M

    2009-06-01

    We compared the diagnostic efficacy of gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MRI with that of Gd-enhanced MRI after administration of ferucarbotran for revealing small hypervascular hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). 24 patients with 34 HCCs (ranging in size from 0.6-2.0 cm) underwent Gd-enhanced three-dimensional dynamic MRI followed, after an interval of 5-11 days (mean, 7 days), by Gd-enhanced three-dimensional dynamic MRI after administration of ferucarbotran. The two Gd-enhanced arterial-phase MRI scans were compared quantitatively by measuring the tumour-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and qualitatively by evaluating the tumour-liver contrast using matched-pairs analysis. The tumour-liver CNR with Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging after ferucarbotran (250.3 +/- 103.7) was higher than that with Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging (221.1 +/- 96.1) (p < 0.001). Matched-pairs analysis indicated that, for three lesions, the relative tumour-liver contrast was slightly better with Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging after ferucarbotran than with conventional Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging; however, in the case of the remaining 31 lesions, the two images were equivalent. We concluded that, although Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging after ferucarbotran results in better tumour-liver CNR than Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging, the ability of the two techniques to reveal small hypervascular HCCs is the same.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and effect of low energy Ar ion irradiation on gadolinium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, N.; Devi, M.; Mohanta, D.

    2011-08-15

    Graphical abstract: . The figure depicts Raman spectra of (A) unirradiated and (B) 80 keV Ar ion irradiated nanoscale gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) systems. Intense Raman signals corresponding to two B{sub g} modes at 288 and 384 cm{sup -1} are observed for irradiated sample along with the evolution of a new peak at 202 cm{sup -1} due to surface defects. Highlights: {yields} Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles are synthesized via a selective reduction route. {yields} 80 keV Ar ion-irradiated specimen showed better symmetric emission than pristine. {yields} Irradiation led point defect contribution was studied through spectroscopic means. -- Abstract: In this work, we report on the surfactant assisted synthesis of gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles and their characterization through various microscopic and spectroscopic tools. Exhibiting a monoclinic phase, the nanoscale Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles are believed to be comprising of crystallites with an average size of {approx}3.2 nm, as revealed from the X-ray diffraction analysis. The transmission electron microscopy has predicted a particle size of {approx}9 nm and an interplanar spacing of {approx}0.28 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies show that Gd-O inplane vibrations at 536.8 and 413.3 cm{sup -1} were more prominent for 80-keV Ar-ion irradiated Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanosystem than unirradiated system. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of irradiated specimen have revealed an improvement in the symmetry factor owing to significant enhancement of surface-trap emission, compared to the band-edge counterpart. Irradiation induced creation of point defects (oxygen vacancies) were predicted both from PL and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies. Further, the Raman spectra of the irradiated sample have exhibited notable vibrational features along with the evolution of a new peak at {approx}202 cm{sup -1}. This can be ascribed to an additional Raman active vibrational response

  4. Investigation of Plutonium and Uranium Precipitation Behavior with Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A.E.

    2003-10-17

    The caustic precipitation of plutonium (Pu)-containing solutions has been investigated to determine whether the presence of 3:1 uranium (U):Pu in solutions stored in the H-Canyon Facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) would adversely impact the use of gadolinium nitrate (Gd(NO3)3) as a neutron poison. In the past, this disposition strategy has been successfully used to discard solutions containing approximately 100 kg of Pu to the SRS high level waste (HLW) system. In the current experiments, gadolinium (as Gd(NO3)3) was added to samples of a 3:1 U:Pu solution, a surrogate 3 g/L U solution, and a surrogate 3 g/L U with 1 g/L Pu solution. A series of experiments was then performed to observe and characterize the precipitate at selected pH values. Solids formed at pH 4.5 and were found to contain at least 50 percent of the U and 94 percent of the Pu, but only 6 percent of the Gd. As the pH of the solution increased (e.g., pH greater than 14 with 1.2 or 3.6 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) excess), the precipitate contained greater than 99 percent of the Pu, U, and Gd. After the pH greater than 14 systems were undisturbed for one week, no significant changes were found in the composition of the solid or supernate for each sample. The solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) which found sodium diuranate (Na2U2O7) and gadolinium hydroxide (Gd(OH)3) at pH 14. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated sufficient water molecules were present in the solids to thermalize the neutrons, a requirement for the use of Gd as a neutron poison. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also performed and the accompanying back-scattering electron analysis (BSE) found Pu, U, and Gd compounds in all pH greater than 14 precipitate samples. The rheological properties of the slurries at pH greater than 14 were also investigated by performing precipitate settling rate studies and measuring the viscosity and density of the materials. Based on the

  5. X-ray Absorption Improvement of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube through Gadolinium Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimin; Narsito, I.; Kartini; Santosa, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray absorption improvement of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) through gadolinium (Gd) encapsulation has been studied. The liquid phase adsorption using ethanol has been performed for the doping treatment. The Gd-doped SWCNT (Gd@SWCNT) was characterized by nitrogen adsorption isotherms, Raman spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. A relatively high residual weight of Gd@SWCNT compared to non-doped SWCNT (n-SWCNT) indicated that Gd has been doped in the nanotube. Even though Gd nanoparticles could not be observed clearly by TEM image, however, a significant decrease of nitrogen uptakes at low pressure and RBM (Radial Breathing Mode) upshift of Raman spectra of Gd@SWCNT specimen suggest that the metal nanoparticles might be encapsulated in the internal tube spaces of the nanotube. It was found that Gd-doped in the SWCNT increased significantly mass attenuation coefficient of the nanotube.

  6. In vivo selective cancer-tracking gadolinium eradicator as new-generation photodynamic therapy agent

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Lan, Rongfeng; Chan, Chi-Fai; Law, Ga-Lai; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a modality of photodynamic therapy (PDT) through the design of our truly dual-functional—PDT and imaging—gadolinium complex (Gd-N), which can target cancer cells specifically. In the light of our design, the PDT drug can specifically localize on the anionic cell membrane of cancer cells in which its laser-excited photoemission signal can be monitored without triggering the phototoxic generation of reactive oxygen species—singlet oxygen—before due excitation. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies had been conducted for the substantiation of the effectiveness of Gd-N as such a tumor-selective PDT photosensitizer. This treatment modality does initiate a new direction in the development of “precision medicine” in line with stem cell and gene therapies as tools in cancer therapy. PMID:25453097

  7. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of pure and mixed gadolinium-terbium fumarate heptahydrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, B.; Shah, M. D.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic moment and susceptibility measurements of single crystals of pure and mixed rare earth fumarates of gadolinium and terbium were carried out at room temperature. The experimental values of molar susceptibilities for Gd2 (C4H2O4)3·7H2O, Tb2(C4H2O4)3·7H2O and GdTb (C4H2O4)3·7H2O are 2.68×10-2, 3.89×10-2, and 3.18×10-2 (in emu mol-1 Oe-1), respectively. The calculated effective magnetic moments are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions on rare earth ions.

  8. General synthesis route to fabricate uniform upconversion luminescent gadolinium oxide hollow spheres.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guang; Zhang, Cuimiao; Ding, Shiwen; Wang, Liyong

    2011-08-01

    Uniform upconversion luminescent gadolinium oxide hollow spheres were successfully synthesized via a homogeneous precipitation method with carbon spheres as template followed by a calcination process. During the annealing process, the carbon spheres template can be effectively removed and the amorphous precursor has converted to crystalline Gd2O3, which can be confirmed by the XRD and TG-DSC analysis. SEM and TEM images indicate that the Gd2O3 hollow spheres with diameters of 300-400 nm are uniform in size and distribution. The rare earth activator ions Ln3+-doped Gd2O3 hollow spheres exhibit intense upconversion luminescence with different colors under 980 nm light excitation, which may find potential applications in the fields such as drug delivery or biological labeling. Moreover, the upconversion luminescent mechanisms of the hollow spherical phosphors were investigated in detail.

  9. Characteristics of Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents for Terahertz Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Hyeongmun; Kim, Taekhoon; Cho, Byungkyu; Lee, Kwangyeol; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2011-04-01

    For the application of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles as terahertz contrast agents, their optical properties in a solvent were studied using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The power absorption and refractive index of the samples were measured with various concentrations of nanoparticles. The power absorption was extremely large, as much as three orders of magnitude higher than that of water, so that a few ppms of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were distinguished in terms of their power absorption capacity. The results show that the interaction between the terahertz electromagnetic waves and the Gd2O3 nanoparticles is strong enough to allow their exploitation as contrast agents for terahertz medical imaging.

  10. Influence of morphological transformation on luminescence properties of europium-doped gadolinium oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Dondapati, Hareesh; Holloway, Terence; Cao, Wei; Kar, Arik; Patra, Amitava; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2010-09-01

    Low dimensional europium (Eu3+)-doped gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) lanthanide nanostructures are synthesized by an effective and simple coprecipitation process followed by subsequent heat treatments. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images indicate Eu3+-doped Gd2O3 nanostructures undergo significant morphological changes from nanorods to nanoparticles during thermal treatments. Nanostructures with different morphology, including nanotubes, strongly influence the photoluminescence properties. The dependence of luminescence lifetime on morphological nature of the nanostructures demonstrates that the one dimensional nanostructures such as nanorods and nanotubes have higher emission intensity with shorter lifetime. Our analysis suggests that the morphological transformation of the nanostructures plays the most important role in the behavior of radiative and nonradiative relaxation mechanisms, resulting in the overall photoluminescence properties.

  11. Magnetically induced optical activity and dichroism of gadolinium oxide nanoparticle-based ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Nibedita; Devi, Manasi; Mohanta, Dambarudhar; Saha, Abhijit

    2012-02-01

    The present work reports on magnetically induced optical activity (such as Faraday rotation and linear dichroism) of pristine and gamma-irradiated gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticle-based ferrofluids. The ferrofluids were produced by dispersing N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-coated ˜9-nm-sized Gd2O3 particles in a carrier fluid of ethanol. The ferrofluids were then irradiated with 1.25 MeV energetic gamma rays (dose: 868 Gy and 2.635 kGy). Irradiation-led formation of a number of point defects was revealed through high resolution electron microscopy. The interaction of light with the ionized point defects is believed to have caused substantial improvement in the magneto-optic response of irradiated magnetic fluids.

  12. Obtaining gadolinium nanoparticles and studying their properties in a helium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petinov, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    A method for obtaining Gd nanoparticles with diameters of 89 to 18 nm upon metal evaporation both in a flow of pure helium and with the addition of 0.5% of oxygen is described. It is found that the addition of O2 does not affect the size of the particles, their structure, or the Curie temperature, though the magnetization is reduced. Particles with sizes of 18 nm have cubic lattice symmetry (fcc) and remain paramagnetic below T c; with an increase in the size of nanoparticles, the proportion of the hexagonal (hcp) phase, which coincides with the gadolinium structure, also grows, and below T c such particles become ferromagnetic. Oxygen impurities seem to have no effect on magnetic and structural transitions in nanoparticles.

  13. MRI relaxation properties of water-soluble apoferritin-encapsulated gadolinium oxide-hydroxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Purificación; Valero, Elsa; Gálvez, Natividad; Domínguez-Vera, José M; Marinone, Massimo; Poletti, Giulio; Corti, Maurizio; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2009-02-01

    We have prepared water-soluble gadolinium oxide nanoparticles that show potential as MRI contrast agents. The particles were built into the apoferritin cavity and have an average size of 5 nm. After seven days a loss of 5% of Gd was detected compared with the as-prepared samples; after that the Gd remained constant and stabilized inside the apoferritin, indicating that the apoferritin capsid acts as a Gd store, avoiding metal delivery and consequent toxicity. The NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxivities resulted about 10 and 70 times higher than the ones of clinically approved paramagnetic Gd-chelates, thus indicating the possible route for synthesizing a novel class of MRI contrast agents.

  14. Temperature dependence of the magnetic and electrical properties of Permalloy/gadolinium/Permalloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranchal, R.; Aroca, C.; Maicas, M.; López, E.

    2007-09-01

    The magnetic and electrical properties of Permalloy/gadolinium/Permalloy (Py/Gd/Py) trilayers have been studied as a function of temperature by using vibrating sample magnetometer and transport measurements with current in plane configuration. The observed dependence of the magnetic moment with temperature can be explained by a paramagnetic contribution. Electrical measurements show that this contribution is originated by the formation of Gd1-xNix alloys at the Py/Gd interfaces because of the Ni diffusion. Despite the Ni diffusion, we find no evidence of amorphization from either the Py layer or the Py/Gd interfaces. We also obtain the Curie temperature of the Gd1-xNix alloys by the position of inflexion points in the resistance versus temperature curve.

  15. Synthesis of bulk-size transparent gadolinium oxide–polymer nanocomposites for gamma ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wen; Chen, Qi; Cherepy, Nerine; Dooraghi, Alex; Kishpaugh, David; Chatziioannou, Arion; Payne, Stephen; Xiang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Heavy element loaded polymer composites have long been proposed to detect high energy X- and γ-rays upon scintillation. The previously reported bulk composite scintillators have achieved limited success because of the diminished light output resulting from fluorescence quenching and opacity. We demonstrate the synthesis of a transparent nanocomposite comprising gadolinium oxide nanocrystals uniformly dispersed in bulk-size samples at a high loading content. The strategy to avoid luminescence quenching and opacity in the nanocomposite was successfully deployed, which led to the radioluminescence light yield of up to 27 000/MeV, about twice as much as standard commercial plastic scintillators. Nanocomposites monoliths (14 mm diameter by 3 mm thickness) with 31 wt% loading of nanocrystals generated a photoelectric peak for Cs-137 gamma (662 keV) with 11.4% energy resolution. PMID:26478816

  16. Analysis of Blood Gadolinium in an Isotope Geochemist Following Contrast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasylenki, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Normal brain tissue does not have blood flowing throughout it; instead oxygen diffuses across a blood-brain barrier in order to oxygenate brain cells. Brain tumors, however, do grow blood supplies, so an abnormal distribution of blood in the brain is a key indicator of abnormal cell growth. But how is the distribution of blood in inside the brain observed? The lanthanide ion gadolinium(III) has unpaired 5f-shell electrons and is thus paramagnetic. As such, the presence of Gd causes the nuclei of nearby atoms to relax more quickly when excited to high-energy spin states by pulses of radio-frequency energy than they would without Gd nearby. The signal in magnetic resonance imaging correlates with this nuclear spin relaxation time, so gadolinium's presence in certain body tissues makes those tissues appear as bright areas on MRI images. Gadolinium is therefore commonly injected intravenously just prior to MRI imaging, so that the distribution of blood in and around the brain can be mapped. Gadolinium as a free ion is toxic, so it is injected in a relatively inert form, often as gadoversetamide, in which Gd is tightly bound in nine-fold coordination with N, C, and O. This compound is removed from the blood by the kidneys at a rate that is fast compared to the rate of breakdown of this compound in the blood, thus preventing release of toxic Gd in the bloodstream. But how quickly can the kidneys of an isotope geochemist remove Gd from blood? In this experiment, a single isotope geochemist's wristwatch was synchronized with that of the MRI technician and then left in a dressing room with all other magnetically susceptible objects until after the MRI. The time of intravenous injection of gadoversetamide into the isotopist was recorded by the technician and later transmitted verbally to the isotopist. Following the MRI session, blood samples were collected by self-fingerprick, in a Class 100 trace metal clean lab, from 47 to 281 minutes after intravenous injection. For each

  17. Magnetically induced optical activity and dichroism of gadolinium oxide nanoparticle-based ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Nibedita; Devi, Manasi; Mohanta, Dambarudhar; Saha, Abhijit

    2012-02-15

    The present work reports on magnetically induced optical activity (such as Faraday rotation and linear dichroism) of pristine and gamma-irradiated gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticle-based ferrofluids. The ferrofluids were produced by dispersing N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-coated {approx}9-nm-sized Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in a carrier fluid of ethanol. The ferrofluids were then irradiated with 1.25 MeV energetic gamma rays (dose: 868 Gy and 2.635 kGy). Irradiation-led formation of a number of point defects was revealed through high resolution electron microscopy. The interaction of light with the ionized point defects is believed to have caused substantial improvement in the magneto-optic response of irradiated magnetic fluids.

  18. Site selectivity in praseodymium- and bismuth-substituted gadolinium gallium garnet epilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Klages, C.P.

    1984-05-01

    Praseodymium- and bismuth-substituted gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) layers have been prepared by liquid-phase epitaxy on (111)- and (110)-oriented GGG substrates. By an investigation of linear dichroism of Pr/sup 3 +/ -transitions, the supercooling dependence of dodecahedral site selectivity in Pr-substituted GGG can be shown to differ considerably for (110)- and (111)-epitaxial layers. An increase insite selectivity with supercooling is found in (111) layers while it is constant in (110) layers. The long-wavelength /sup 1/S /sub 0/ ..-->.. /sup 3/ P/sub 1/-transition of the B/sub 1/ /sup 3 +/ ion has been utilized to detect site selectivity in (110)oriented Bi-substituted GGG layers.

  19. Corrosion of 304L and 316 in gadolinium nitrate neutron poison solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.T.; Anderson, M.H.

    1991-12-31

    Pitting corrosion has occurred on AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) conductivity probes used to monitor liquid levels of gadolinium nitrate neutron poison solutions (GPS). An electrochemical and immersion test program has led to a better understanding of the cause of corrosion of 304L probes. Results indicate that the alternating voltage applied to the probes to monitor contact with solution is the primary factor in the corrosion of the probes. A chloride-containing dye and low pH also contribute to the corrosion process, but appear to play a secondary role. AISI Type 316 stainless steel (316) was found to behave similarly to 304L in GPS, while nickel-based alloys such as Hastelloy G30, Hastelloy C22, and Inconel 625 were found to be more susceptible to corrosion as compared to 304L.

  20. Corrosion of 304L and 316 in gadolinium nitrate neutron poison solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.T.; Anderson, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Pitting corrosion has occurred on AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) conductivity probes used to monitor liquid levels of gadolinium nitrate neutron poison solutions (GPS). An electrochemical and immersion test program has led to a better understanding of the cause of corrosion of 304L probes. Results indicate that the alternating voltage applied to the probes to monitor contact with solution is the primary factor in the corrosion of the probes. A chloride-containing dye and low pH also contribute to the corrosion process, but appear to play a secondary role. AISI Type 316 stainless steel (316) was found to behave similarly to 304L in GPS, while nickel-based alloys such as Hastelloy G30, Hastelloy C22, and Inconel 625 were found to be more susceptible to corrosion as compared to 304L.

  1. Controllable Fabrication and Optical Properties of Uniform Gadolinium Oxysulfate Hollow Spheres

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fashen; Chen, Gen; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Xiaohe; Luo, Hongmei; Li, Junhui; Chen, Limiao; Ma, Renzhi; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2015-01-01

    Uniform gadolinium oxysulfate (Gd2O2SO4) hollow spheres were successfully fabricated by calcination of corresponding Gd-organic precursor obtained via a facile hydrothermal process. The Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres have a mean diameter of approximately 550 nm and shell thickness in the range of 30–70 nm. The sizes and morphologies of as-prepared Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres could be deliberately controlled by adjusting the experimental parameters. Eu-doped Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres have also been prepared for the property modification and practical applications. The structure, morphology, and properties of as-prepared products were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, SEM and fluorescence spectrophotometer. Excited with ultraviolet (UV) pump laser, successful downconversion (DC) could be achieved for Eu-doped Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres. PMID:26671661

  2. Characterization of PAH matrix with monazite stream containing uranium, gadolinium and iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sangita; Meena, Sher Singh; Goswami, D.

    2016-05-01

    Uranium (U) gadolinium(Gd) and iron (Fe) containing alkaline waste simulated effluent (relevant to alkaline effluent of monazite ore) has been treated with a novel amphoteric resin viz, Polyamidehydroxamate (PAH) containing amide and hydroxamic acid groups. The resin has been synthesized in an eco-friendly manner by polymerization nad conversion to functional groups characterized by FT-IR spectra and architectural overview by SEM. Coloration of the loaded matrix and de-coloration after extraction of uranium is the special characteristic of the matrix. Effluent streams have been analyzed by ICP-AES, U loaded PAH has been characterized by FT-IR, EXAFS, Gd and Fe by X-ray energy values of EDXRF at 6.053 Kev and 6.405 Kev respectively. The remarkable change has been observed in Mössbauer spectrum of Fe-loaded PAH samples.

  3. Strongest Ferromagnetic Coupling in Designed Gadolinium(III)-Nitroxide Coordination Compounds.

    PubMed

    Kanetomo, Takuya; Yoshitake, Toru; Ishida, Takayuki

    2016-08-15

    Three novel gadolinium(III)-radical complexes [Gd(III)(hfac)3(H2O)(L)] [Gd-L; L = tert-butyl phenyl nitroxide (phNO) and its derivatives (tert-butyl 3-tolyl nitroxide and tert-butyl 4-tert-butylphenyl nitroxide)] were synthesized, and all compounds showed ferromagnetic coupling, obeying the empirical relation: out-of-plane coordination of the Gd ion from the radical π system favors ferromagnetic coupling. In particular, Gd-phNO has a considerably large torsion angle around Gd-O-N-Csp(2) (69.8(9)° on average) and the largest ferromagnetic coupling parameter (2J/kB = +18.0(4) K) in Gd-nitroxide compounds ever known. The validity of our molecular design was assessed on the basis of the magneto-structure relation analysis with many literature data including various paramagnetic ligating groups. PMID:27482940

  4. Effect of a magnetic field on the resonant multistep selective photoionization of gadolinium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guyadec, E.; Ravoire, J.; Botter, R.; Lambert, F.; Petit, A.

    1990-04-01

    A multistep photoionization with three resonant polarized photons has been used to separate the odd and even isotopes of gadolinium. Due to their hyperfine structure ( I= {3}/{2}), the 155,157Gd isotopes can be photoionized via a J=2→2→1→0 scheme with three п photons whereas the even isotopes cannot. If a time delay is introduced between the three laser pulses we show that the presence of a low intensity dc magnetic field affects the selectivity. The effect of this weak field on the 156Gd photoionization rate has been calculated independently of the optical pumping and the result is in good agreement with the experiment.

  5. Aqueous stability of gadolinium in surface waters receiving sewage treatment plant effluent Boulder Creek, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Taylor, H.E.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Barber, L.B.

    2005-01-01

    In many surface waters, sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent is a substantial source of both regulated and unregulated contaminants, including a suite of complex organic compounds derived from household chemicals, pharmaceutical, and industrial and medical byproducts. In addition, STP effluents in some urban areas have also been shown to have a positive gadolinium (Gd) anomaly in the rare earth element (REE) pattern, with the Gd derived from its use in medical facilities. REE concentrations are relatively easy to measure compared to many organic wastewater compounds and may provide a more widely utilized tracer of STP effluents. To evaluate whether sewage treatment plant-associated Gd is a useful tracer of treatment plant effluent, an investigation of the occurrence, fate, and transport of rare earth elements was undertaken. The rare earth element patterns of four of five STP effluents sampled display positive Gd anomalies. The one site that did not have a Gd anomaly serves a small community, population 1200, with no medical facilities. Biosolids from a large metropolitan STP are not enriched in Gd even though the effluent is, suggesting that a substantial fraction of Gd remains in the aqueous phase through routine treatment plant operation. To evaluate whether STP-derived Gd persists in the fluvial environment, a 14-km study reach downstream of an STP was sampled. Gadolinium anomalies were present at all five downstream sites, but the magnitude of the anomaly decreased. Effluent from STPs is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic constituents, and to better understand the chemical interactions and their effect on REEs, the aqueous speciation was modeled using comprehensive chemical analyses of water samples collected downstream of STP input. These calculations suggest that the REEs will likely remain dissolved because phosphate and carbonate complexes dominate over free REE ions. This study supports the application of Gd anomalies as a useful tracer of urban

  6. Engineering tumor-targeted gadolinium hexanedione nanoparticles for potential application in neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Oyewumi, Moses O; Mumper, Russell J

    2002-01-01

    Microemulsions (oil-in-water) have been employed as templates to engineer nanoparticles containing high concentrations of gadolinium for potential application in neutron capture therapy of tumors. Gadolinium hexanedione (GdH), synthesized by complexation of Gd(3+) with 2,4-hexanedione, was used as the nanoparticle matrix alone or in combination with either emulsifying wax or PEG-400 monostearate. Solid nanoparticles (<125 nm size) were obtained by simple cooling of the microemulsions prepared at 60 degrees C to room temperature in one vessel. The feasibility of tumor targeting via folate receptors was studied. A folate ligand was synthesized by chemically linking folic acid to distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) via a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG; MW 3350) spacer. To obtain folate-coated nanoparticles, the folate ligand (0.75% w/w to 15% w/w) was added to either the microemulsion templates at 60 degrees C or nanoparticle suspensions at 25 degrees C. Efficiencies of folate ligand attachment/adsorption to nanoparticle formulations were monitored by gel permeation chromatography. Cell uptake studies were carried out in KB cells (human nasopharyngeal epidermal carcinoma cell line), known to overexpress folate receptors. The uptake of folate-coated nanoparticles was about 10-fold higher than uncoated nanoparticles after 30 min at 37 degrees C. The uptake of folate-coated nanoparticles at 4 degrees C was 20-fold lower than the uptake at 37 degrees C and comparable to the uptake of uncoated nanoparticles at 37 degrees C. Folate-mediated endocytosis was further verified by the inhibition of folate-coated nanoparticles uptake by free folic acid. It was observed that folate-coated nanoparticles uptake decreased to approximately 2% of its initial value with the coincubation of 0.001 mM of free folic acid. The results suggested that these tumor-targeted nanoparticles containing high concentrations of Gd may have potential for neutron capture therapy. PMID:12440870

  7. Engineering tumor-targeted gadolinium hexanedione nanoparticles for potential application in neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Oyewumi, Moses O; Mumper, Russell J

    2002-01-01

    Microemulsions (oil-in-water) have been employed as templates to engineer nanoparticles containing high concentrations of gadolinium for potential application in neutron capture therapy of tumors. Gadolinium hexanedione (GdH), synthesized by complexation of Gd(3+) with 2,4-hexanedione, was used as the nanoparticle matrix alone or in combination with either emulsifying wax or PEG-400 monostearate. Solid nanoparticles (<125 nm size) were obtained by simple cooling of the microemulsions prepared at 60 degrees C to room temperature in one vessel. The feasibility of tumor targeting via folate receptors was studied. A folate ligand was synthesized by chemically linking folic acid to distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) via a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG; MW 3350) spacer. To obtain folate-coated nanoparticles, the folate ligand (0.75% w/w to 15% w/w) was added to either the microemulsion templates at 60 degrees C or nanoparticle suspensions at 25 degrees C. Efficiencies of folate ligand attachment/adsorption to nanoparticle formulations were monitored by gel permeation chromatography. Cell uptake studies were carried out in KB cells (human nasopharyngeal epidermal carcinoma cell line), known to overexpress folate receptors. The uptake of folate-coated nanoparticles was about 10-fold higher than uncoated nanoparticles after 30 min at 37 degrees C. The uptake of folate-coated nanoparticles at 4 degrees C was 20-fold lower than the uptake at 37 degrees C and comparable to the uptake of uncoated nanoparticles at 37 degrees C. Folate-mediated endocytosis was further verified by the inhibition of folate-coated nanoparticles uptake by free folic acid. It was observed that folate-coated nanoparticles uptake decreased to approximately 2% of its initial value with the coincubation of 0.001 mM of free folic acid. The results suggested that these tumor-targeted nanoparticles containing high concentrations of Gd may have potential for neutron capture therapy.

  8. The use of theranostic gadolinium-based nanoprobes to improve radiotherapy efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sancey, L; Kotb, S; Roux, S; Dufort, S; Bianchi, A; Crémillieux, Y; Fries, P; Coll, J-L; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Janier, M; Dutreix, M; Barberi-Heyob, M; Boschetti, F; Denat, F; Louis, C; Porcel, E; Lacombe, S; Le Duc, G; Deutsch, E; Perfettini, J-L; Detappe, A; Verry, C; Berbeco, R; Butterworth, K T; McMahon, S J; Prise, K M; Perriat, P; Tillement, O

    2014-01-01

    A new efficient type of gadolinium-based theranostic agent (AGuIX®) has recently been developed for MRI-guided radiotherapy (RT). These new particles consist of a polysiloxane network surrounded by a number of gadolinium chelates, usually 10. Owing to their small size (<5 nm), AGuIX typically exhibit biodistributions that are almost ideal for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For example, although a significant proportion of these particles accumulate in tumours, the remainder is rapidly eliminated by the renal route. In addition, in the absence of irradiation, the nanoparticles are well tolerated even at very high dose (10 times more than the dose used for mouse treatment). AGuIX particles have been proven to act as efficient radiosensitizers in a large variety of experimental in vitro scenarios, including different radioresistant cell lines, irradiation energies and radiation sources (sensitizing enhancement ratio ranging from 1.1 to 2.5). Pre-clinical studies have also demonstrated the impact of these particles on different heterotopic and orthotopic tumours, with both intratumoural or intravenous injection routes. A significant therapeutical effect has been observed in all contexts. Furthermore, MRI monitoring was proven to efficiently aid in determining a RT protocol and assessing tumour evolution following treatment. The usual theoretical models, based on energy attenuation and macroscopic dose enhancement, cannot account for all the results that have been obtained. Only theoretical models, which take into account the Auger electron cascades that occur between the different atoms constituting the particle and the related high radical concentrations in the vicinity of the particle, provide an explanation for the complex cell damage and death observed. PMID:24990037

  9. Gadolinium chloride reduces cytochrome P450: relevance to chemical-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Badger, D A; Kuester, R K; Sauer, J M; Sipes, I G

    1997-08-15

    The Kupffer cell inhibitor, gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), protects the liver from a number of toxicants that require biotransformation to elicit toxicity (i.e. 1,2-dichlorobenzene and CCl4), as well as compounds that do not (i.e. cadmium chloride and beryllium sulfate). The mechanism of this protection is thought to result from reduced secretion of inflammatory and cytotoxic products from Kupffer cells (KC). However, since other lanthanides have been shown to decrease cytochrome P450 (P450) activity, the following studies were designed to determine if GdCl3 pretreatment alters hepatic P450 levels or activity. The toxicological relevance of GdCl3-mediated alterations in P450 activity was also estimated by determining the effect of GdCl3 pretreatment on the susceptibility of primary cultured hepatocytes to CCl4 and cadmium chloride (CdCl2). Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were given GdCl3 (i.v., 10 mg/kg). Twenty-four hours later, livers were either processed for preparation of microsomes or for primary cultures of hepatocytes. Gadolinium chloride treatment reduced total hepatic microsomal P450 as well as aniline hydroxylase activity by approximately 30% in males and 20% in females. In hepatocytes isolated from rats pretreated with GdCl3, the toxicity caused by CCl4, but not CdCl2 was reduced. Interestingly, when GdCl3 was administered in vitro to microsomes, there was no effect on either the microsomal P450 difference spectra or p-hydroxylation of aniline. However, when GdCl3 was incubated with isolated hepatocytes, the cytotoxicity of CCl4 (but not CdCl2) was partially attenuated. These results suggest that, in addition to its inhibitory effects on KC, GdCl3 produces other effects which may alter the susceptibility of hepatocytes to toxicity caused by certain chemicals.

  10. Renal safety of intravenous gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients awaiting liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Katherine M; Parikh, Mehul R; Runge, Thomas M; Perez, Sebastian D; Sakaria, Sonali S; Subramanian, Ram M

    2015-11-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis carries a high morbidity and mortality. Given the potential risk of contrast-induced nephropathy associated with iodinated intravenous contrast used in computed tomography (CT), alternate contrast modalities for abdominal imaging in liver transplant candidates need to be examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the renal safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium in patients awaiting liver transplantation. The study involved a retrospective analysis of 352 patients of abdominal MRI with low-dose gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) (0.05 mmol/kg) in patients with cirrhosis and without renal replacement therapy at a single center during the period from 2007 to 2013. For each case, serum creatinine before and within a few days after the MRI were compared. In addition, the patients were analyzed for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a reported complication of gadolinium in chronic kidney disease. The pre-MRI serum creatinine values ranged from 0.36 to 4.86 mg/dL, with 70 patients (20%) having values ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. A comparison of the pre- and post-MRI serum creatinine values did not demonstrate a clinically significant difference (mean change = 0.017 mg/dL; P = 0.38), including those patients with a pre-MRI serum creatinine ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. In addition, no cases of NSF were noted. In conclusion, our findings suggest that MRI with low-dose gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) is a nonnephrotoxic imaging modality in liver transplant candidates, and its use can be cautiously expanded to liver transplant candidates with concomitant renal insufficiency.

  11. Atherosclerotic neovasculature MR imaging with mixed manganese-gadolinium nanocolloids in hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kezheng; Pan, Dipanjan; Schmieder, Anne H; Senpan, Angana; Caruthers, Shelton D; Cui, Grace; Allen, John S; Zhang, Huiying; Shen, Baozhong; Lanza, Gregory M

    2015-04-01

    A high r1 relaxivity manganese-gadolinium nanocolloid (αvβ3-MnOL-Gd NC) was developed and effectively detected atherosclerotic angiogenesis in rabbits fed cholesterol-rich diets for 12 months using a clinical MRI scanner (3T). 3D mapping of neovasculature signal intensity revealed the spatial coherence and intensity of plaque angiogenic expansion, which may, with other high risk MR bioindicators, help identify high-risk patients with moderate (40% to 60%) vascular stenosis. Microscopy confirmed the predominant media and plaque distribution of fluorescent αvβ3-MnOL-Gd NC, mirroring the MR data. An expected close spatial association of αvβ3-integrin neovasculature and macrophages was noted, particularly within plaque shoulder regions. Manganese oleate bioelimination occurred via the biliary system into feces. Gd-DOTA was eliminated through the bile-fecal and renal excretion routes. αvβ3-MnOL-Gd NC offers an effective vehicle for T1w neovascular imaging in atherosclerosis. From the clinical editor: Cerebrovascular accidents are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The acute formation of thrombus following atherosclerotic plaque rupture has been well recognized as the etiology of stroke. The authors studied microanatomical features of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in this article, in an attempt to identify those with high risk of rupture. Gadolinium-manganese hybrid nanocolloid (MnOL-Gd NC) was developed as a novel contrast agent for MRI. They show that this agent is effective in providing neovascular imaging.

  12. Bioinspired synthesis and characterization of gadolinium-labeled magnetite nanoparticles for dual contrast t1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ki Hyun; Kim, Young Beom; Lee, Yuhan; Hwang, Jinyoung; Park, Hyunwook; Park, Tae Gwan

    2010-03-17

    Gadolinium-labeled magnetite nanoparticles (GMNPs) were synthesized via a bioinspired manner to use as dual contrast agents for T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. A mussel-derived adhesive moiety, 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), was utilized as a robust anchor to form a mixed layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains and dopamine molecules on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. Gadolinium ions were subsequently complexed at the distal end of the dopamine molecules that were prefunctionalized with a chelating ligand for gadolinium. The resultant GMNPs exhibited high dispersion stability in aqueous solution. Crystal structure and superparamagnetic properties of magnetite nanocrystals were also maintained after the complexation of gadolinium. The potential of GMNPs as dual contrast agents for T1 and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was demonstrated by conducting in vitro and in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements.

  13. Gadolinium(III) Complexes with N-Alkyl-N-methylglucamine Surfactants Incorporated into Liposomes as Potential MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Simone Rodrigues; Duarte, Érica Correia; Ramos, Guilherme Santos; Kock, Flávio Vinícius Crizóstomo; Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Frézard, Frédéric; Colnago, Luiz Alberto; Demicheli, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Complexes of gadolinium(III) with N-octanoyl-N-methylglucamine (L8) and N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (L10) with 1 : 2 stoichiometry were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and molar conductivity measurements. The transverse (r2) and longitudinal (r1) relaxivity protons were measured at 20 MHz and compared with those of the commercial contrasts. These complexes were incorporated in liposomes, resulting in the increase of the vesicle zeta potential. Both the free and liposome-incorporated gadolinium complexes showed high relaxation effectiveness, compared to commercial contrast agent gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist). The high relaxivity of these complexes was attributed to the molecular rotation that occurs more slowly, because of the elevated molecular weight and incorporation in liposomes. The results establish that these paramagnetic complexes are highly potent contrast agents, making them excellent candidates for various applications in molecular MR imaging. PMID:26347596

  14. Dramatic impact of the giant local magnetic fields on spin-dependent recombination processes in gadolinium based garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, N. G. Tolmachev, D. O.; Gurin, A. S.; Uspenskaya, Yu. A.; Asatryan, H. R.; Badalyan, A. G.; Baranov, P. G.; Wieczorek, H.; Ronda, C.

    2015-06-29

    A giant magnetic field effect on spin-dependent recombination of the radiation-induced defects has been found in cerium doped gadolinium based garnet crystals and ceramics, promising materials for scintillator applications. A sharp and strong increase in the afterglow intensity stimulated by external magnetic field and an evidence of the magnetic field memory have been discovered. The effect was ascribed to huge Gd-induced internal magnetic fields, which suppress the recombination, and cross-relaxation with Gd{sup 3+} ions leading to reorientation of the spins of the electron and hole centers. Thus, the spin system of radiation-induced defects in gadolinium garnet based scintillator materials was shown to accumulate significant energy which can be released in external magnetic fields.

  15. The use of innovative gadolinium-based contrast agent for MR-diagnosis of cancer in the experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Zelchan, R.; Grigorev, E.; Frolova, I.; Nam, I.

    2016-02-01

    The present study of the functional suitability and specific activity of the contrast agent gadolinium-based for magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that the investigated contrast agent intensively accumulates in organs and anatomical structures of the experimental animals. In the model of tumor lesions in animals, study have shown that investigational contrast agent accumulates in the tumor tissue and retained there in for a long enough time.

  16. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2016-04-07

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8GPa and 600K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high-pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scan the phasemore » diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in this experiment, the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp → αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0–10GPa and 300–650K« less

  17. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2016-04-01

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8 GPa and 600 K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high-pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scan the phase diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in this experiment, the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp → αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0-10 GPa and 300-650 K.

  18. Neuroprotective effect of gadolinium: a stretch-activated calcium channel blocker in mouse model of ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Puja; Muthuraman, Arunachalam; Jaggi, Amteshwar S; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the potential of gadolinium, a stretch-activated calcium channel blocker in ischemic reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain injury in mice. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion of 12 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h was given to induce cerebral injury in male Swiss mice. Cerebral infarct size was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Memory was assessed using Morris water maze test and motor incoordination was evaluated using rota-rod, lateral push, and inclined beam walking tests. In addition, total calcium, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were also estimated in brain tissue. I/R injury produced a significant increase in cerebral infarct size. A significant loss of memory along with impairment of motor performance was also noted. Furthermore, I/R injury also produced a significant increase in levels of TBARS, total calcium, AChE activity, and a decrease in GSH levels. Pretreatment of gadolinium significantly attenuated I/R-induced infarct size, behavioral and biochemical changes. On the basis of the present findings, we can suggest that opening of stretch-activated calcium channel may play a critical role in ischemic reperfusion-induced brain injury and that gadolinium has neuroprotective potential in I/R-induced injury.

  19. Relaxivity enhancement of aquated Tris(β-diketonate)gadolinium(III) chelates by confinement within ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Law, Justin J; Guven, Adem; Wilson, Lon J

    2014-01-01

    Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes loaded with gadolinium ions (gadonanotubes) have been previously shown to exhibit extremely high T1 -weighted relaxivities (>100 mm(-1) s(-1) ). To further examine the effect of nanoconfinement on the relaxivity of gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, a series of ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotube (US-tube) materials internally loaded with gadolinium chelates have been prepared and studied. US-tubes were loaded with Gd(acac)3  · 2H2 O, Gd(hfac)3  · 2H2 O, and Gd(thd)3 (acac = acetylacetone, hfac = hexafluoroacetylacetone, thd = tetramethylheptanedione). The longitudinal relaxivities of the prepared materials determined at 25°C in a 1.5 T field were 103 mm(-1) s(-1) for Gd(acac)3  · 2H2 O@US-tubes, 105 mm(-1) s(-1) for Gd(hfac)3  · 2H2 O@US-tubes and 26 mm(-1) s(-1) for Gd(thd)3 @US-tubes. Compared with the relaxivities obtained for the unloaded chelates (<10 mm(-1) s(-1) ) as well as accounting for the T1 reduction observed for the empty US-tubes, the boost in relaxivity for chelate-loaded US-tubes is attributed to confinement within the nanotube and depends on the number of coordinated water molecules.

  20. Changes in Urinary and Serum Levels of Novel Biomarkers after Administration of Gadolinium-based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mawad, Habib; Laurin, Louis-Philippe; Naud, Jean-François; Leblond, François A.; Henley, Nathalie; Vallée, Michel; Pichette, Vincent; Leblanc, Martine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of our study is to describe the changes in urinary and serum levels of novel biomarkers after gadolinium contrast administration in patients with normal renal function. METHODS We measured four biomarkers in 28 volunteers: interleukin-18 (IL-18), N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, and cystatin C. Urinary and serum samples were collected at 0, 3, and 24 hours following gadolinium administration. RESULTS Baseline serum creatinine was 57.8 ± 34.5 µmol/L and remained stable. Urinary IL-18 levels increased significantly at three hours (10.7 vs. 7.3 ng/mg creatinine; P < 0.05). Similarly, urinary NAG levels increased significantly at three hours (3.9 vs. 2.2 IU/mg creatinine; P < 0.001). For both these markers, the difference was no longer significant at 24 hours. No statistically significant differences were observed for urinary and serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels and for serum cystatin C levels. CONCLUSIONS Urinary IL-18 and NAG levels increased transiently after administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with normal renal function. PMID:27398022

  1. Gadolinium oxide nanoplates with high longitudinal relaxivity for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjung; Sethi, Richa; Ananta Narayanan, Jeyarama Subramanian; Lee, Seung Soo; Benoit, Denise N.; Taheri, Nasim; Decuzzi, Paolo; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values moderately reduce as the size of the Gd2O3 nanoplates increases, and are always larger for the PAA-OA coating. Cytotoxicity studies on human dermal fibroblast cells documented no significant toxicity, with 100% cell viability preserved up to 250 μM for the PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates. Given the 10 times increase in longitudinal relaxivity over the commercially available Gd-based molecular agents and the favorable toxicity profile, the 2 nm PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates could represent a new class of highly effective T1 MRI contrast agents.Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values

  2. Comparison of gadolinium Cy{sub 2}DOTA, a new hepatobiliary agent, and gadolinium HP-DO3A, an extracellular agent, in healthy liver and metastatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Wells, J.W.; Williams, N.M.

    1995-02-01

    A new gadolinium (Gd) chelate with preferential hepatobiliary uptake, Gd Cy{sub 2}DOTA, was compared in two animal species with Gd HP-DO3A (gadoteridol), a clinically approved contrast agent with extracellular distribution. Liver enhancement was evaluated for these two contrast agents using magnetic resonance imaging, whereas an experimental model of metastatic disease was used to evaluate the agents` efficacy for liver-lesion delineation. The two agents were compared in four healthy Rhesus monkeys (eight studies) and five New Zealand White rabbits with implanted VX-2 liver tumors (ten studies). The contrast dose was 0.1 mmol/kg, with the agents given in random order and at least 72 hours between contrast injections. Breathhold T1-weighted spin echo scans were obtained at 1.5 tesla (T) before and after contrast was administered. Postcontrast scans were obtained 1 to 90 minutes after injection in the monkeys and 1 to 240 minutes after injection in the rabbits. Prolonged hepatic enhancement, superior in degree to that with Gd HP-DO3A, was noted to both monkeys and rabbits after injection of Gd Cy{sub 2}DOTA. Two minutes after contrast, liver SI was 1.94 {+-} 0.05 with Gd Cy{sub 2}DOTA compared with 1.5 {+-} 0.05 with Gd HP-DO3A in monkeys. Sixty minutes after contrast, liver SI was 1.60 {+-} 0.09 compared with 1.20 {+-} 0.02. The difference between agents was significant at all times from 2 to 60 minutes after contrast injection (P < 0.01). Excretion of contrast into the gall bladder was observed in both animal species with Gd Cy{sub 2}DOTA but not with Gd HP-DO3A. The maximum improvement in lesion conspicuity (rabbit) occurred 45 minutes after injection of Gd Cy{sub 2}DOTA and 5 minutes after injection of Gd HP-DO3A. 22 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Luminescence properties and electronic structure of Ce{sup 3+}-doped gadolinium aluminum garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Dotsenko, V.P.; Berezovskaya, I.V.; Voloshinovskii, A.S.; Zadneprovski, B.I.; Efryushina, N.P.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The luminescence properties of Ce{sup 3+} ions in (Y, Gd){sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} are analyzed. • The Gd{sup 3+} → Y{sup 3+} substitution leads to increasing of Ce{sup 3+} noncubic crystal field splitting parameter. • The excitation spectra for the Ce{sup 3+} emission in GdAG contain bands at 6.67, 7.75, and 9.76 eV. • These features are due to the Ce{sup 3+}-bound exciton formation and O 2p → Al 3s, 3p transitions. • Contributions from Al atoms to the conduction-band density of states are quite essential. - Abstract: Yttrium-gadolinium aluminum garnets (YGdAG) doped with Ce{sup 3+} ions have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The luminescent properties of Ce{sup 3+} ions in Gd{sub 3(1−x)}Ce{sub 3x}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (x = 0.01) have been studied upon excitation in the 2–20 eV region. The substitution of Gd{sup 3+} for Y{sup 3+} in the garnet structure results in broadening the emission band and shifting its maximum towards the longer wavelengths. It was found that in addition to the 4f → 5d excitation bands of Ce{sup 3+} ions, the excitation spectra for the Ce{sup 3+} emission contain bands at 6.67, 7.75, and 9.76 eV. These bands are attributed to the Ce{sup 3+}-bound exciton formation and O 2p → Al 3s, 3p transitions, respectively. Although gadolinium states dominate near the bottom of the conduction band of Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}, contributions from Al{sub tetr} and Al{sub oct} atoms to the conduction-band density of states are evaluated as quite essential.

  4. Monte Carlo Study of Radiation Dose Enhancement by Gadolinium in Megavoltage and High Dose Rate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daniel G.; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G.; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed. PMID:25275550

  5. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daniel G; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed.

  6. Design and development of a Gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudyal, Nabin

    This thesis describes a research and development project for neutron capture and detection in Gadolinium doped water. The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is exploring rare event physics, such as neutrinoless double beta decay (MAJORANA Project) and dark-matter detection (LUX experiment). The success of these experiments requires a careful study and understanding of background radiation, including flux and energy spectrum. The background radiation from surface contamination, radioactive decays of U-238, Th-232, Rn-222 in the surrounding rocks and muon induced neutrons have a large impact on the success of rare-event physics. The main objective of this R&D project is to measure the neutron flux contributing to ongoing experiments at SURF and suppress it by identification and capture method. For this purpose, we first modeled and designed a detector with Geant4 software. The approximate dimension of the detector is determined. The neutron capture percentage of the detector is estimated using Monte Carlo. The energy response of the detector is simulated. Next, we constructed the experimental detector, an acrylic rectangular tank (60cm x 30cm x 30cm), filled with Gadolinium-doped deionized water. The tank is coated with high efficient reflector and then taped with black electrical tape to make it opaque. The voltage dividers attached to PMTs are covered with mu-metal. Two 5-inch Hamamatsu Photomultiplier tubes were attached on both sides facing the tank to collect the Cherenkov light produced in the water. The detector utilizes the principle of Cherenkov light emission by a charged particle moving through a water at a speed higher than the speed of light in the water, hence it has an inherent energy threshold of Cherenkov photon production. This property reduces the lower energy backgrounds. Event data are obtained using the Data Acquisition hardware, Flash Analog to digital converter, along with Multi Instance Data Acquisition software. Post

  7. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, Xinglu; Qian, Chunqi; Zhu, Lei; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MR contrast agents exert influence on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2} relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T{sub 1}) or transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T{sub 2} weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T{sub 2} relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to -4.12 {+-} 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the

  8. Prognostic Value of Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Cardiac Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Marianna; Pica, Silvia; Reant, Patricia; Abdel-Gadir, Amna; Treibel, Thomas A.; Banypersad, Sanjay M.; Maestrini, Viviana; Barcella, William; Rosmini, Stefania; Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Sayed, Rabya H.; Patel, Ketna; Mamhood, Shameem; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Whelan, Carol J.; Herrey, Anna S.; Lachmann, Helen J.; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D.; Manisty, Charlotte H.; Schelbert, Eric B.; Kellman, Peter; Gillmore, Julian D.; Hawkins, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    Background— The prognosis and treatment of the 2 main types of cardiac amyloidosis, immunoglobulin light chain (AL) and transthyretin (ATTR) amyloidosis, are substantially influenced by cardiac involvement. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) is a reference standard for the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis, but its potential for stratifying risk is unknown. Methods and Results— Two hundred fifty prospectively recruited subjects, 122 patients with ATTR amyloid, 9 asymptomatic mutation carriers, and 119 patients with AL amyloidosis, underwent LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Subjects were followed up for a mean of 24±13 months. LGE was performed with phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) and without (magnitude only). These were compared with extracellular volume measured with T1 mapping. PSIR was superior to magnitude-only inversion recovery LGE because PSIR always nulled the tissue (blood or myocardium) with the longest T1 (least gadolinium). LGE was classified into 3 patterns: none, subendocardial, and transmural, which were associated with increasing amyloid burden as defined by extracellular volume (P<0.0001), with transitions from none to subendocardial LGE at an extracellular volume of 0.40 to 0.43 (AL) and 0.39 to 0.40 (ATTR) and to transmural at 0.48 to 0.55 (AL) and 0.47 to 0.59 (ATTR). Sixty-seven patients (27%) died. Transmural LGE predicted death (hazard ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.1–13.7; P<0.0001) and remained independent after adjustment for N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, ejection fraction, stroke volume index, E/E′, and left ventricular mass index (hazard ratio, 4.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3–13.1; P<0.05). Conclusions— There is a continuum of cardiac involvement in systemic AL and ATTR amyloidosis. Transmural LGE is determined reliably by PSIR and represents advanced cardiac amyloidosis. The PSIR technique provides incremental information on outcome even after

  9. Scintillation properties of cerium-doped gadolinium-scandium-aluminum garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, A.; Kollewe, D.; Mateika, D.

    1994-07-01

    Optical properties and scintillation responses of cerium doped gadolinium-scandium-aluminum garnets (GSAG), pulled by the Czochralski method, were studied with regard to applications in scintillation counters. Scintillation responses were investigated for irradiation with charged particles, γ-rays and neutrons. The observed decay constant ( τ = 120 ns) is shorter than in common inorganic scintillators like NaI(T1) and bismuth germanate (BGO). The attenuation coefficient exceeds the value reported for Nal(T1). GSAG(Ce) shows a higher light yield (30% when compared with NaI(T1)) and better energy resolution (12.5% for 662 keV γ-rays from 137Cs) than BGO. To demonstrate the feasibility for neutron detection, crystals were irradiated with slow neutrons (from 14.7 meV to 120 meV) from a neutron diffraction spectrometer at the Grenoble pile Melusine and fast neutrons (≥ 7.9 MeV) from the Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator using the 9Be(α, n) 12C reaction.

  10. Thermal-Diffusivity Dependence on Temperature of Gadolinium Calcium Oxoborate Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefon-Radziejewska, D.; Bodzenta, J.; Łukasiewicz, T.

    2013-05-01

    Thermal diffusivities of pure and doped gadolinium calcium oxoborate (GdCOB) single crystals were measured as a function of the temperature along optical indicatrix axes X, Y, and Z. Three GdCOB samples were investigated, chemically pure single crystal, the one doped with 4 at% of Nd and the next one doped with 7 at% of Yb. Measurements were carried out for temperature range 40 °C to 300 °C. Determination of the thermal diffusivity based on an analysis of thermal wave propagation in the sample. For a detection of temperature disturbance propagating in the sample the mirage effect was used. Obtained results show that the thermal diffusivity decreases with the increase of sample temperature for all investigated crystals. The GdCOB single crystals reveal a strong anisotropy. The thermal diffusivity along Y direction has the highest value while values obtained in X and Z axes are much lower. Dopants cause decrease in the thermal diffusivity for all investigated directions.

  11. Gadolinium metallofullerenol nanoparticles inhibit cancer metastasis through matrix metalloproteinase inhibition: imprisoning instead of poisoning cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Huan; Xing, Gengmei; Blanco, Elvin; Song, Yan; Zhao, Lina; Sun, Baoyun; Li, Xiaoda; Wang, Paul C.; Korotcov, Alexandru; Li, Wei; Liang, Xing-Jie; Chen, Chunying; Yuan, Hui; Zhao, Feng; Chen, Zhen; Sun, Tong; Chai, Zhifang; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhao, Yuliang

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the antimetastasis activity of gadolinium metallofullerenol nanoparticles (f-NPs) in malignant and invasive human breast cancer models. We demonstrated that f-NPs inhibited the production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzymes and further interfered with the invasiveness of cancer cells in tissue culture condition. In the tissue invasion animal model, the invasive primary tumor treated with f-NPs showed significantly less metastasis to the ectopic site along with the decreased MMP expression. In the same animal model, we observed the formation of a fibrous cage that may serve as a physical barrier capable of cancer tissue encapsulation that cuts the communication between cancer- and tumor-associated macrophages, which produce MMP enzymes. In another animal model, the blood transfer model, f-NPs potently suppressed the establishment of tumor foci in lung. Based on these data, we conclude that f-NPs have antimetastasis effects and speculate that utilization of f-NPs may provide a new strategy for the treatment of tumor metastasis. PMID:21930111

  12. The influence of gadolinium and yttrium on biomass production and nutrient balance of maize plants.

    PubMed

    Saatz, Jessica; Vetterlein, Doris; Mattusch, Jürgen; Otto, Matthias; Daus, Birgit

    2015-09-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are expected to become pollutants by enriching in the environment due to their wide applications nowadays. The uptake and distribution of gadolinium and yttrium and its influence on biomass production and nutrient balance was investigated in hydroponic solution experiments with maize plants using increasing application doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg L(-1). It could be shown that concentrations of up to 1 mg L(-1) of Gd and Y did not reduce or enhance the plant growth or alter the nutrient balance. 10 mg L(-1) Gd or Y resulted in REE concentrations of up to 1.2 weight-% in the roots and severe phosphate deficiency symptoms. Transfer rates showed that there was only little transport of Gd and Y from roots to shoots. Significant correlations were found between the concentration of Gd and Y in the nutrient solution and the root tissue concentration of Ca, Mg and P.

  13. Lunar prospector measurements of the distribution of incompatible elements gadolinium, samarium and thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Elphic, R.C.; Lawrence, D.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Barraclough, B.L.; Maurice, S.; Binder, A.B.; Lucey, P.G.

    1999-04-01

    Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer (NS) and gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) observations have been used to map out the distribution of incompatible elements on the lunar surface. Specifically, the GRS data provide maps of the distribution of thorium and potassium while the NS data provide information on the distribution of iron and titanium, and the rare earth elements gadolinium and samarium. Using results of analysis of Celementine spectral reflectance (CSR) data, the Fe- and Ti-contributions to the NS data can be removed, leaving primarily rare earth element contributions from Gd and Sm. The Th and K maps correlate with the inferred Gd and Sm maps (r {approximately} 0.93), but there are regions of significant disagreement. One of these is in the KREEP-rich circum-Imbrium ring. No clear explanation has emerged for this disagreement, though Th, K, Gd and Sm have differing degrees of incompatibility. These results clearly are important to discussions of the geochemistry of the Procellarum-Imbrium Th-rich Terrane and the South-Pole-Aitken Terrane.

  14. Influence of gadolinium doping on the structure and defects of ceria under fuel cell operating temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, S. A. Gaikwad, V. M.; Sathe, V.; Kulkarni, S. K.

    2014-03-17

    Correlation between atomic positional shift, oxygen vacancy defects, and oxide ion conductivity in doped ceria system has been established in the gadolinium doped ceria system from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy study at operating temperature (300–600 °C) of Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (IT-SOFC). High temperature XRD data are used to quantify atomic positional shift from mean position with temperature. The Raman spectroscopy study shows additional vibration modes related to ordering of defect spaces (Gd{sub Ce}{sup ′}−V{sub o}{sup ••}){sup *} and (2Gd{sub Ce}{sup ′}−V{sub o}{sup ••}){sup x} generated due to association of oxygen vacancies and reduced cerium or dopant cations site (Gd{sup 3+}), which disappear at 450 °C; indicating oxygen vacancies dissociation from the defect complex. The experimental evidences of cation-anion positional shifting and oxygen vacancies dissociation from defect complex in the IT-SOFC operating temperature are discussed to correlate with activation energy for ionic conductivity.

  15. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  16. Late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify early features of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). We characterise myocardial and functional findings in carriers of lamin A/C mutation to facilitate the recognition of these patients using this method. We also investigated the connection between myocardial fibrosis and conduction abnormalities. Methods Seventeen lamin A/C mutation carriers underwent CMR. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and cine images were performed to evaluate myocardial fibrosis, regional wall motion, longitudinal myocardial function, global function and volumetry of both ventricles. The location, pattern and extent of enhancement in the left ventricle (LV) myocardium were visually estimated. Results Patients had LV myocardial fibrosis in 88% of cases. Segmental wall motion abnormalities correlated strongly with the degree of enhancement. Myocardial enhancement was associated with conduction abnormalities. Sixty-nine percent of our asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients showed mild ventricular dilatation, systolic failure or both in global ventricular analysis. Decreased longitudinal systolic LV function was observed in 53% of patients. Conclusions Cardiac conduction abnormalities, mildly dilated LV and depressed systolic dysfunction are common in DCM caused by a lamin A/C gene mutation. However, other cardiac diseases may produce similar symptoms. CMR is an accurate tool to determine the typical cardiac involvement in lamin A/C cardiomyopathy and may help to initiate early treatment in this malignant familiar form of DCM. PMID:21689390

  17. Long-circulating gadolinium-encapsulated liposomes for potential application in tumor neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Le, Uyen M; Cui, Zhengrong

    2006-04-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality. One of the key factors for a successful Gd-NCT is to deliver and maintain a sufficient amount of Gd in tumor tissues during neutron irradiation. We proposed to prepare a Gd delivery system by complexing a Gd-containing compound, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), with a polycationic peptide, poly-L-lysine (pLL), and then encapsulate the complexed Gd-DTPA into PEGylated liposomes. Complexation of Gd-DTPA with pLL not only enhanced the encapsulation efficiency of Gd-DTPA in liposomes, but also significantly limited the release of Gd-DTPA from the liposomes. A Gd-DTPA-encapsulated liposome formulation that contained 6.8+/-0.3 mg/mL of pure encapsulated Gd was prepared. The blood half-life of the Gd encapsulated into the liposome formulation was estimated to be about 24 h in healthy tumor-free mice. About 12 h after the Gd-encapsulated liposomes were intravenously injected into mice with pre-established model tumors, the Gd content in the tumors reached an average of 159 microg/g of wet tumor tissue. This Gd-DTPA encapsulated liposome may be used to deliver Gd into solid tumors for NCT and tumor imaging. PMID:16457973

  18. Acute myocardial ischemia: magnetic resonance contrast enhancement with gadolinium-DTPA. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, M.T.; Higgins, C.B.; Ehman, R.L.; Revel, D.; Sievers, R.; Brasch, R.C.

    1984-10-01

    Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) was used to improve the diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in detecting early ischemia, before the onset of infarction. Following one minute of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion, 9 dogs were intraveneously injected with either 0.5 mM/kg of Gd-DTPA (6 dogs) or normal saline (3 dogs). There was no visible difference in intensity or alterations in magnetic relaxation times between normal and ischemic myocardium in the control (saline-injected) animals. The Gd-DTPA-injected dogs had a well-defined segment of high intensity representing the ischemic myocardium in the anterior wall of the left ventricle. Both T1 and T2 were significantly shortened in the normal myocardium of the Gd-DTPA animals, but relatively greater T2 relaxation rate enhancement resulted in reduced intensity of normal myocardium, thus increasing contrast with ischemic myocardium. It is concluded that Gd-DTPA has the potential to expand the sensitivity and diagnostic utility of MR in the study of occlusive coronary artery disease.

  19. Cytotoxic aspects of gadolinium oxide nanostructures for up-conversion and NIR bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Hemmer, Eva; Yamano, Tomoyoshi; Kishimoto, Hidehiro; Venkatachalam, Nallusamy; Hyodo, Hiroshi; Soga, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    Bioimaging is an important diagnostic tool in the investigation and visualization of biological phenomena in cells and in medicine. In this context, up-converting Gd(2)O(3):Er(3+),Yb(3+) nanostructures (nanoparticles, nanorods) have been synthesized by precipitation methods and hydrothermal synthesis. Independent of size and morphology, Gd(2)O(3):Er(3+),Yb(3+) powders show up-conversion (550 nm, 670 nm) and near-infrared emission (1.5 μm) upon 980 nm excitation, which makes these structures interesting for application as biomarkers. With regard to their potential application in bioimaging, cytotoxicity is an important aspect and is strongly affected by the physico-chemical properties of the investigated nanostructures. Therefore, the cytotoxic effect of bare and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(acrylic acid) block co-polymer-modified nanostructures on non-phagocytic and phagocytic cells (B-cell hybridoma cells and macrophages) was investigated. The observed cytotoxic behavior in the case of macrophages incubated with bare nanostructures was assigned to the poor chemical durability of gadolinium oxide, but could be overcome by surface modification.

  20. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) encapsulated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles for MRI-based cell tracking.

    PubMed

    Bennewitz, Margaret F; Williams, Simone S; Nkansah, Michael K; Shapiro, Erik M

    2013-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles have proven useful for cell tracking applications by monitoring cell transplantation and migration in living organisms. However, one perceived drawback is that these particles cause dark contrast in MRI, sometimes yielding confusion with other biological phenomena, which also yield dark contrast. To that end, researchers have investigated the use of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) based contrast agents for MRI-based cell tracking, as Gd2O3 has favorable r1 molar relaxivity. We synthesized Gd2O3 nanocrystals and encapsulated them within PLGA matrices to form approximatley to 150 nm nanoparticles. r1 was 1.9 mM(-1) sec(-1) and r2 was 8.4 mM(-1) sec(-1). Cell labeling with particles was well tolerated by cells except at very high doses. MRI of labeled cells showed that labeled cells could achieve both R1 and R2 enhancements due to the internalized particles. R2 enhancements were approximately to twice that of R1 enhancements suggesting the use of very short echo times when using Gd2O3 based contrast agents for MRI-based cell tracking.

  1. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a delivery system of gadolinium for effective human stem cell tracking.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Tsai, Chih-Pin; Chung, Tsai-Hua; Hung, Yann; Yao, Ming; Liu, Hon-Man; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Yang, Chung-Shi; Chen, Yao-Chang; Huang, Dong-Ming

    2008-09-01

    The progress of using gadolinium (Gd)-based nanoparticles in cellular tracking lags behind that of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, dual functional Gd-fluorescein isothiocyanate mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Gd-Dye@MSN) that possess green fluorescence and paramagnetism are developed in order to evaluate their potential as effective T1-enhancing trackers for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs are labeled efficiently with Gd-Dye@MSN via endocytosis. Labeled hMSCs are unaffected in their viability, proliferation, and differentiation capacities into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes, which can still be readily MRI detected. Imaging, with a clinical 1.5-T MRI system and a low incubation dosage of Gd, low detection cell numbers, and short incubation times is demonstrated on both loaded cells and hMSC-injected mouse brains. This study shows that the advantages of biocompatibility, durability, high internalizing efficiency, and pore architecture make MSNs an ideal vector of T1-agent for stem-cell tracking with MRI.

  2. Concurrent dual contrast for cellular magnetic resonance imaging using gadolinium oxide and iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Loai, Yasir; Ganesh, Tameshwar; Cheng, Hai-Ling Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives. Concurrent visualization of differential targets in cellular and molecular imaging is valuable for resolving processes spatially and temporally, as in monitoring different cell subtypes. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate concurrent, dual (positive and negative) contrast visualization on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of two colocalized cell populations labeled with Gadolinium "Gd" oxide and iron "Fe" oxide nanoparticles. Materials and Methods. Human aortic endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) were labeled with various concentrations of Gd oxide and Fe oxide, respectively. MRI on single- or mixed-cell samples was performed at 7 tesla. Proper cell phenotype expressions, cell uptake of contrast agents, and the effect of labeling on cell viability and proliferation were also determined. Results. Both contrast agents were efficiently taken up by cells, with viability and proliferation largely unaffected. On MRI, the positive contrast associated with Gd oxide-labeled EC and negative contrast associated with Fe oxide-labeled SMC discriminated the presence of each cell type, whether it existed alone or colocalized in a mixed-cell sample. Conclusion. It is feasible to use Gd oxide and Fe oxide for dual contrast and concurrent discrimination of two colocalized cell populations on MRI at 7 tesla.

  3. Impact of agglomeration on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Luc; Gossuin, Yves; Hocq, Aline; Fortin, Marc-André

    2011-07-22

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (US-Gd(2)O(3)) are used to provide 'positive' contrast effects in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and are being considered for molecular and cellular imaging applications. However, these nanoparticles can aggregate over time in aqueous medium, as well as when internalized into cells. This study is aimed at measuring in vitro, in aqueous medium, the impact of aggregation on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic US-Gd(2)O(3) particles. First, the nanoparticle core size as well as aggregation behaviour was assessed by HRTEM. DLS (hydrodynamic diameter) was used to measure the hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles and nanoaggregates. The relaxometric properties were measured by NMRD profiling, as well as with (1)H NMR relaxometers. Then, the positive contrast enhancement effect was assessed by using magnetic resonance scanners (at 1.5 and 7 T). At every magnetic field, the longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) decreased upon agglomeration, while remaining high enough to provide positive contrast. On the other hand, the transverse relaxivity (r(2)) slightly decreased at 0.47 and 1.41 T, but it was enhanced at higher fields (7 and 11.7 T) upon agglomeration. All NMRD profiles revealed a characteristic relaxivity peak in the range 60-100 MHz, suggesting the possibility to use US-Gd(2)O(3) as an efficient 'positive-T(1)' contrast agent at clinical magnetic fields (1-3 T), in spite of aggregation.

  4. Impact of agglomeration on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, Luc; Gossuin, Yves; Hocq, Aline; Fortin, Marc-André

    2011-07-01

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (US-Gd2O3) are used to provide 'positive' contrast effects in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and are being considered for molecular and cellular imaging applications. However, these nanoparticles can aggregate over time in aqueous medium, as well as when internalized into cells. This study is aimed at measuring in vitro, in aqueous medium, the impact of aggregation on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic US-Gd2O3 particles. First, the nanoparticle core size as well as aggregation behaviour was assessed by HRTEM. DLS (hydrodynamic diameter) was used to measure the hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles and nanoaggregates. The relaxometric properties were measured by NMRD profiling, as well as with 1H NMR relaxometers. Then, the positive contrast enhancement effect was assessed by using magnetic resonance scanners (at 1.5 and 7 T). At every magnetic field, the longitudinal relaxivity (r1) decreased upon agglomeration, while remaining high enough to provide positive contrast. On the other hand, the transverse relaxivity (r2) slightly decreased at 0.47 and 1.41 T, but it was enhanced at higher fields (7 and 11.7 T) upon agglomeration. All NMRD profiles revealed a characteristic relaxivity peak in the range 60-100 MHz, suggesting the possibility to use US-Gd2O3 as an efficient 'positive-T1' contrast agent at clinical magnetic fields (1-3 T), in spite of aggregation.

  5. Visible upconversion emission of Pr3+ doped gadolinium gallium garnet nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Naccache, R; Vetrone, F; Boyer, J C; Capobianco, J A; Speghini, A; Bettinelli, M

    2004-11-01

    The luminescence properties of a Pr3+-doped gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG, Gd3Ga5O12) nanocrystalline host were investigated. Dominant blue/green emission was observed emanating from the 3P0 --> 3H4 transition after excitation using a wavelength of 457.9 nm. Continuous wave excitation into the 1D2 level of the Pr3+ ion at 606.9 nm transition produced blue upconversion luminescence spectra, ascribed to emission from the 3P1 --> 3H4 and 3P0 --> 3H4 transitions. The increase in the decay times of the observed transitions following excitation with 606.9 nm is indicative of the dominance of an energy transfer upconversion (ETU) mechanism relative to excited state absorption (ESA). Furthermore, blue, green and red upconversion emission was observed from the 3P0, 3P1 and 1D2 states following excitation into the 1G4 energy level with 980 nm. No change in the decay times of the emitting states was observed following excitation with a wavelength of 980 or 457.9 nm; hence, upconversion was determined to primarily occur through ESA. The luminescence properties of the nanocrystals are compared to a single crystal of GGG:Pr3+ (bulk) with an identical Pr3+ concentration (1%).

  6. Performance improvement of gadolinium oxide resistive random access memory treated by hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jer-Chyi Hsu, Chih-Hsien; Ye, Yu-Ren; Ai, Chi-Fong; Tsai, Wen-Fa

    2014-03-15

    Characteristics improvement of gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub x}O{sub y}) resistive random access memories (RRAMs) treated by hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was investigated. With the hydrogen PIII treatment, the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs exhibited low set/reset voltages and a high resistance ratio, which were attributed to the enhanced movement of oxygen ions within the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} films and the increased Schottky barrier height at Pt/Gd{sub x}O{sub y} interface, respectively. The resistive switching mechanism of Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs was dominated by Schottky emission, as proved by the area dependence of the resistance in the low resistance state. After the hydrogen PIII treatment, a retention time of more than 10{sup 4} s was achieved at an elevated measurement temperature. In addition, a stable cycling endurance with the resistance ratio of more than three orders of magnitude of the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs can be obtained.

  7. MR of intracranial tumors: Combined use of gadolinium and magnetization transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kurki, T.; Niemi, P.; Valtonen, S.

    1994-10-01

    To study the potential combined application of gadolinium and magnetization transfer in the MR imaging of intracranial tumors. Twenty-two patients were imaged at low field strength (0.1 T). Corresponding gradient-echo partial saturation images without and with magnetization transfer pulse were produced. Images with intermediate repetition times were obtained in 18 cases; five different sequences were produced in 4 cases. Gadopentetate dimeglumine was used at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg. Magnetization transfer effect increased the contrast between enhancing lesion and normal brain and the contrast between edema and normal brain; the contrast between enhancing lesion and edema was not significantly changed. On intermediate-repetition-time magnetization transfer images the contrast between enhancing tumor and normal brain and the contrast between edema and normal brain were superior to short-repetition-time magnetization transfer images, but the differentiation between enhancing tumor and edema was poorer. Magnetization transfer can be used to improve contrast in Gd-enhanced MR imaging. Combining magnetization transfer with an intermediate-repetition-time image provides the possibility for displaying both enhancing and nonehancing lesions on a single MR image. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Comparative study of the physicochemical properties of six clinical low molecular weight gadolinium contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Sophie; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the physicochemical properties of six low molecular weight clinical complexes of gadolinium studied under identical experimental conditions. Magnevist, Dotarem, Omniscan, ProHance, MultiHance and Gadovist were investigated by oxygen-17 relaxometry at different temperatures and by proton relaxometry at various magnetic fields, temperatures and media [pure water, zinc(II)-containing aqueous solutions and HSA-containing solutions]. Osmolality, viscosity and stability versus transmetallation by zinc(II) ions were added for a more comprehensive description. The relaxivities of the clinical formulations as measured in water are similar in the imaging magnetic field region, with a slightly better performance for MultiHance. This can be explained by a shorter distance between the hydrogen nuclei of the water molecule bound to the Gd(3+) ion and this paramagnetic centre. In contrast to the open-chain complexes, all macrocyclic systems (Dotarem, ProHance and Gadovist) are insensitive to transmetallation by zinc ions. The stability of the open-chain complexes with respect to transmetallation depends on the chemical structure of the ligand, with a better stability for MultiHance. The presence of human serum albumin has no significant effect on the proton relaxivity of Magnevist, Dotarem, Omniscan, ProHance and Gadovist but markedly increases the relaxivity of MultiHance because of a non-covalent interaction with the protein. As a result, the relaxivity of MultiHance in HSA-containing media of fixed concentration decreases with increasing concentration of the contrast agent.

  9. Dual photon absorptiometry using a gadolinium-153 source applied to measure equine bone mineral content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moure, Alessandro; Reichmann, Peter; Remigio Gamba, Humberto

    2003-12-01

    The application of the dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) technique, using gadolinium-153 as the photon source, to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) of the third metacarpal bone of horses is presented. The radiation detector was implemented with a NaI(TI) scintillator coupled to a 14 stage photomultiplier. A modular mechanical system allows the position of the prototype to be adjusted in relation to the animal. A moveable carrier makes it possible to scan the third metacarpal with a velocity adjustable between 1 and 12 mm s-1, in steps of 1 mm s-1, for a total distance of 250 mm. The prototype was evaluated with a phantom of the third metacarpal bone made of perspex and aluminium, and in vitro with a transverse slice of the third metacarpal bone of a horse. The tests showed that the prototype has an accuracy and precision of, approximately, 10% and 6%, respectively, for a 6 s acquisition time. Preliminary studies carried out in three foals from birth to one year of age indicated that the prototype is well suited to in vivo and in situ analysis of the BMD of the third metacarpal bones of horses, making it possible to evaluate the changes of BMD levels on a monthly basis. Also, results indicated an exponential behaviour of the BMD curve during the first year of life of the studied horses.

  10. Gas-Phase Photoluminescence Characterization of Stoichiometrically Pure Nonanuclear Lanthanoid Hydroxo Complexes Comprising Europium or Gadolinium.

    PubMed

    Greisch, Jean-François; Chmela, Jiří; Harding, Michael E; Klopper, Wim; Kappes, Manfred M; Schooss, Detlef

    2016-04-01

    Gas-phase photoluminescence measurements involving mass-spectrometric techniques enable determination of the properties of selected molecular systems with knowledge of their exact composition and unaffected by matrix effects such as solvent interactions or crystal packing. The resulting reduced complexity facilitates a comparison with theory. Herein, we provide a detailed report of the intrinsic luminescence properties of nonanuclear europium(III) and gadolinium(III) 9-hydroxyphenalen-1-one (HPLN) hydroxo complexes. Luminescence spectra of [Eu9(PLN)16(OH)10](+) ions reveal an europium-centered emission dominated by a 4-fold split Eu(III) hypersensitive transition, while photoluminescence lifetime measurements for both complexes support an efficient europium sensitization via a PLN-centered triplet-state manifold. The combination of gas-phase measurements with density functional theory computations and ligand-field theory is used to discuss the antiprismatic core structure of the complexes and to shed light on the energy-transfer mechanism. This methodology is also employed to fit a new set of parameters, which improves the accuracy of ligand-field computations of Eu(III) electronic transitions for gas-phase species. PMID:26974169

  11. [Studies of three-dimensional cardiac late gadolinium enhancement MRI at 3.0 Tesla].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masaru; Ikeda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Momoe

    2008-12-20

    Cardiac late Gadolinium enhancement MR imaging has been shown to allow assessment of myocardial viability in patients with ischemic heart disease. The current standard approach is a 3D inversion recovery sequence at 1.5 Tesla. The aims of this study were to evaluate the technique feasibility and clinical utility of MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy. In phantom and volunteer studies, the inversion time required to suppress the signal of interests and tissues was prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. In the clinical study, the average inversion time to suppress the signal of myocardium at 3.0 Tesla with respect to MR viability imaging at 1.5 Tesla was at 15 min after the administration of contrast agent (304.0+/-29.2 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 283.9+/-20.9 at 1.5 Tesla). The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium was equal at both field strengths (4.06+/-1.30 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 4.42+/-1.85 at 1.5 Tesla). Even at this early stage, MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla provides high quality images in patients with myocardial infarction. The inversion time is significantly prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium at 3.0 Tesla are equal to 1.5 Tesla. Further investigation is needed for this technical improvement, for clinical evaluation, and for limitations.

  12. Layered gadolinium-based nanoparticle as a novel delivery platform for microRNA therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Shannon S.; Razzak, Rene; Bédard, Eric; Guo, Linghong; Shaw, Andrew R.; Moore, Ronald B.; Roa, Wilson H.

    2014-10-01

    Specific expression patterns of microRNA (miRNA) molecules have been linked to cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. The accumulating evidence for the role of oncogenic or tumor-suppressing miRNAs identified the need for nano-scaled platform that can help deliver nucleotides to modulate miRNAs. Here we report the synthesis of novel layered gadolinium hydroxychloride (LGdH) nanoparticles, a member of the layered double hydroxide (LDH) family, with physiochemical properties suitable for cell uptake and tracing via magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the inhibition of mature miRNA-10b in metastatic breast cancer cell line using LGdH nanoparticle as a delivery platform. Through characterization analysis, we show that nanoparticles are easily and stably loaded with anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMO) and efficiently penetrate cell membranes. We demonstrate that AMOs delivered by LGdH nanoparticles remain functional by inducing changes in the expression of its downstream effector and by curbing the invasive properties. Furthermore, we demonstrate the traceability of LGdH nanoparticles via T1 weighted MR imaging. LGdH nanoparticles, which are biocompatible with cells in vitro, provide a promising multifunctional platform for microRNA therapeutics through their diagnostic, imaging, and therapeutic potentials.

  13. Layered gadolinium-based nanoparticle as a novel delivery platform for microRNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Shannon S; Razzak, Rene; Bédard, Eric; Guo, Linghong; Shaw, Andrew R; Moore, Ronald B; Roa, Wilson H

    2014-10-24

    Specific expression patterns of microRNA (miRNA) molecules have been linked to cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. The accumulating evidence for the role of oncogenic or tumor-suppressing miRNAs identified the need for nano-scaled platform that can help deliver nucleotides to modulate miRNAs. Here we report the synthesis of novel layered gadolinium hydroxychloride (LGdH) nanoparticles, a member of the layered double hydroxide (LDH) family, with physiochemical properties suitable for cell uptake and tracing via magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the inhibition of mature miRNA-10b in metastatic breast cancer cell line using LGdH nanoparticle as a delivery platform. Through characterization analysis, we show that nanoparticles are easily and stably loaded with anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMO) and efficiently penetrate cell membranes. We demonstrate that AMOs delivered by LGdH nanoparticles remain functional by inducing changes in the expression of its downstream effector and by curbing the invasive properties. Furthermore, we demonstrate the traceability of LGdH nanoparticles via T1 weighted MR imaging. LGdH nanoparticles, which are biocompatible with cells in vitro, provide a promising multifunctional platform for microRNA therapeutics through their diagnostic, imaging, and therapeutic potentials. PMID:25277286

  14. Synthesis, Characterization, and Thermal Kinetics of Mixed Gadolinium: Calcium Heptamolybdate System

    PubMed Central

    Koul, R. K.; Suri, Shivani; Singh, Vishal; Bamzai, K. K.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of mixed gadolinium calcium heptamolybdate (GdCaHM) system in silica gel medium using single gel single tube technique has been successfully achieved. The grown crystal exhibits various morphologies, which includes spherulites, multifaceted, and square platelets. The nature of the grown material was established by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study signifies the presence of heptamolybdate (Mo7O24) and water symmetry structure, whereas energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) establishes the stoichiometric of the grown crystal as GdCaMo7O24·8H2O. The thermal behaviour was studied using the thermoanalytical techniques, which include thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results obtained on the application of TG based models, namely, Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern, and Piloyan-Novikova, suggest the contracting cylindrical model as the relevant model for the thermal decomposition of the material. The kinetic parameters, namely, the order of reaction (n), activation energy (Ea), frequency factor (Z), and entropy (ΔS∗), were also calculated using these three models. PMID:27350973

  15. Caustic Precipitation of Plutonium and Uranium with Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    SciTech Connect

    VISSER, ANN E.; BRONIKOWSKI, MICHAEL G.; RUDISILL, TRACY S.

    2005-10-18

    The caustic precipitation of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) from Pu and U-containing waste solutions has been investigated to determine whether gadolinium (Gd) could be used as a neutron poison for precipitation with greater than a fissile mass containing both Pu and enriched U. Precipitation experiments were performed using both process solution samples and simulant solutions with a range of 2.6-5.16 g/L U and 0-4.3:1 U:Pu. Analyses were performed on solutions at intermediate pH to determine the partitioning of elements for accident scenarios. When both Pu and U were present in the solution, precipitation began at pH 4.5 and by pH 7, 99% of Pu and U had precipitated. When complete neutralization was achieved at pH > 14 with 1.2 M excess OH{sup -}, greater than 99% of Pu, U, and Gd had precipitated. At pH > 14, the particles sizes were larger and the distribution was a single mode. The ratio of hydrogen:fissile atoms in the precipitate was determined after both settling and centrifuging and indicates that sufficient water was associated with the precipitates to provide the needed neutron moderation for Gd to prevent a criticality in solutions containing up to 4.3:1 U:Pu and up to 5.16 g/L U.

  16. Caustic Precipitation of Plutonium and Uranium with Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    SciTech Connect

    ANN, VISSER

    2005-04-14

    The caustic precipitation of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) from Pu and U containing waste solutions has been investigated to determine whether gadolinium (Gd) could be used as a neutron poison for precipitation with greater than a fissile mass containing both Pu and enriched U. Precipitation experiments were performed using both actual samples and simulant solutions with a range of 2.6-5.16 g/L U and 0-4.3 to 1 U to Pu. Analyses were performed on solutions at intermediate pH to determine the partitioning of elements for accident scenarios. When both Pu and U were present in the solution, precipitation began at pH 4.5 and by pH 7, 99 percent of Pu and U had precipitated. When complete neutralization was achieved at pH greater than 14 with 1.2 M excess OH-, greater than 99 percent of Pu, U, and Gd had precipitated. At pH greater than 14, the particles sizes were larger and the distribution was a single mode. The ratio of hydrogen to fissile atoms in the precipitate was determined after both settling and centrifuging and indicates that sufficient water was associated with the precipitates to provide the needed neutron moderation for Gd to prevent a criticality in solutions containing up to 4.3 to 1 U to Pu and up to 5.16 g/L U.

  17. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after the Use of Gadolinium Contrast Media.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Byun, Il Hwan; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Jung-Won

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a medical emergency that threatens life. To this day, ARDS is very rarely reported by iodine contrast media, and there is no reported case of ARDS induced by gadolinium contrast media. Here, we present a case with ARDS after the use of gadobutrol (Gadovist) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast medium. A 26 years old female without any medical history, including allergic diseases and without current use of drugs, visited the emergency room for abdominal pain. Her abdominopelvic computed tomography with iodine contrast media showed a right ovarian cyst and possible infective colitis. Eighty-three hours later, she underwent pelvis MRI after injection of 7.5 mL (0.1 mL/kg body weight) of gadobutrol (Gadovist) to evaluate the ovarian cyst. She soon presented respiratory difficulty, edema of the lips, nausea, and vomiting, and we could hear wheezing upon auscultation. She was treated with dexamethasone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Her chest X-ray showed bilateral central bat-wing consolidative appearance. Managed with mechanical ventilation, she was extubated 3 days later and discharged without complications.

  18. Multifunctional layered gadolinium hydroxide nanoplates for ultrahigh field magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Li, Lei; Yu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Daquan; Sun, Tianying; Li, Xue; Sun, Ling; Lui, Su; Huang, Xiaoqi; Bi, Feng; Wang, Huaiyu; Zhu, Hongyan; Gong, Qiyong

    2014-12-01

    The commonly used clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are generally suitable for MR systems with a magnetic field less than 3.0 T. However, these agents show low contrast efficacy for MR systems with ultrahigh fields ≥ 7.0 T, which is the direction that next-generation MRI scanners are heading. A new contrast agent consisting of layered gadolinium hydroxide nanoplates doped with Ce and Tb (LGdH:Ce,Tb NPs) is presented herein. This material exhibits excellent negative (T2) contrast agent efficacy for 7.0 T MRI with a high r2/r1 ratio of 48.80, whereas it exhibits a lower r2/r1 ratio of 30.60 for 3.0 T MRI. Its performance as a T2 contrast agent in ultrahigh field MRI of subcutaneous liver tumor-bearing nude mice is investigated, demonstrating its ability to be used as a negative target T2 contrast agent to distinguish hepatic carcinoma from healthy tissues. Furthermore, the multifunctionality of the LGdH:Ce,Tb NPs as a contrast agent in X-ray computed tomography (CT) and fluorescence bioimaging is also presented, suggesting the possibility of integrating these imaging technologies for in-depth exploration of bioimaging. PMID:26000375

  19. Gadolinium oxide nanoplates with high longitudinal relaxivity for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Minjung; Sethi, Richa; Narayanan, Jeyarama Subramanian Ananta; Lee, Seung Soo; Benoit, Denise N; Taheri, Nasim; Decuzzi, Paolo; Colvin, Vicki L

    2014-11-21

    Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)(-1) were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values moderately reduce as the size of the Gd2O3 nanoplates increases, and are always larger for the PAA-OA coating. Cytotoxicity studies on human dermal fibroblast cells documented no significant toxicity, with 100% cell viability preserved up to 250 μM for the PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates. Given the 10 times increase in longitudinal relaxivity over the commercially available Gd-based molecular agents and the favorable toxicity profile, the 2 nm PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates could represent a new class of highly effective T1 MRI contrast agents.

  20. Optical properties of color centers in calcium-stabilized gadolinium gallium garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Pogatshnik, G.J. ); Cain, L.S. ); Chen, Y. ); Evans, B.D. )

    1991-01-15

    The addition of small amounts of calcium during the crystal growth of large-diameter, gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) crystals creates color centers that absorb in the near-uv region of the spectrum. Ultraviolet and {gamma}-ray irradiation of the crystals produced changes in the intensities of the uv color-center bands along with a broad absorption throughout the visible spectrum. The color center that gives rise to an absorption band at 350 nm serves as a photoionizable donor center so that uv excitation results in a visible coloration of the crystals. The effects of oxidation and reduction treatments on the strength of the color-center bands and on the radiation response of the material were examined. Photoluminescence bands were observed in both reduced GGG crystals as well as crystals that were irradiated with neutrons. Visible coloration is likely to occur during flashlamp pumping of laser rods that utilize large-diameter GGG crystals as the laser host. The changes in the optical properties of the material under uv excitation indicate that the addition of small amounts of calcium to assist in the growth of large-diameter crystals is likely to result in the degradation of laser performance.

  1. Regulation of Collagen Turnover in Human Skin Fibroblasts Exposed to a Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; DaSilva, Marissa; Aslam, Muhammad N.; Dame, Michael K.; Warner, Roscoe L.; Xu, Yiru; Fisher, Gary J.; Johnson, Kent J.; Swartz, Richard; Varani, James

    2010-01-01

    Objective Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a clinical syndrome linked with exposure in renal failure patients to gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) during magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, we demonstrated that GBCA exposure led to increased matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) levels in human skin fibroblasts. The goals of the present work were to assess the relationship between altered MMP-1 / TIMP-1 expression and collagen production / deposition, and the intracellular signaling events that lead from GBCA stimulation to altered MMP-1 and TIMP-1 production. Materials and Methods Human dermal fibroblasts were treated with one of the currently used GBCAs (Omniscan). Proliferation was quantified as were levels of MMP-1, TIMP-1, procollagen type I and collagen type I. Signaling events were concomitantly assessed, and signaling inhibitors were used. Results Fibroblasts exposed to Omniscan had increases in both MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels. Omniscan treatment interfered with collagen turnover, leading to increased type I collagen deposition without an increase in type I procollagen production. U0126, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitor, reduced MMP-1 levels. U0126 also reduced TIMP-1 levels, but LY294002 increased TIMP-1. Conclusion These data provide evidence for complex regulation of collagen deposition in Omniscan-treated skin. They suggest that the major effect of Omniscan exposure is on an enzyme / inhibitor system that regulates collagen breakdown rather than on collagen production, per se. PMID:19561517

  2. Purificaiton of Lanthanides for Large Neutrino Detectors: Thorium Removal from Gadolinium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, M.; Cumming, J.B.; Hans, S.; Hahn, R.L.

    2010-06-01

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillators are the detectors of choice for various neutrino experiments. Procedures have been developed to transfer metals into organic liquids by solvent extraction or direct dissolution of a metallic compound. Traces of natural radioactivity introduced into the scintillator with the metal may produce undesirable backgrounds. Measurements using a {sup 229}Th tracer indicate that the inclusion of a pH-controlled partial hydrolysis and filtration prior to the preparation of a gadolinium-loading compound can reduce thorium by a factor of {approx}100. This 'self-scavenging' procedure has the advantage that it uses only reagents encountered in the production process. Addition of non-elemental scavengers such as iron, or the use of solvent extraction or ion exchange procedures can be avoided. It also improves the optical transmission in the blue region by removing traces of iron. This purification method has potential applications to the large-scale production of other metal-loaded liquid scintillators and for the removal of traces of thorium in the industrial production of lanthanides.

  3. Process-Property Relationship for Air Plasma-Sprayed Gadolinium Zirconate Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Tan, Yang; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    The continuous need of elevating operating temperature of gas turbine engines has introduced several challenges with the current state-of-the-art yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), requiring examination of new TBC material with high temperature phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and resistance to environmental ash particles. Gadolinium zirconate (Gd2Zr2O7) (GDZ) has been shown to meet many of these requirements, and has, in fact, been successfully implemented in to engine components. However, several fundamental issues related to the process-ability, toughness, and microstructural differences for GDZ when compared to equivalent YSZ coating. This study seeks to critically address the process-structure-property correlations for plasma-sprayed GDZ coating subjected to controlled parametric exploration. Use of in-flight diagnostics coupled with in situ and ex situ coating property monitoring allows examination and comparison of the process-property interplay and the resultant differences between the two TBC compositions. The results indicate that it is feasible to retain material chemistry and fabricate relevant microstructures of interest with GDZ with concomitant performance advantages such as low conductivity, mechanical compliance, sintering resistance, and suppression of environmentally induced damage from ash particles. This study provides a framework for optimal design and manufacturing of emergent multi-layer and multi-material TBCs.

  4. Whole-core comet solutions to a 3-dimensional PWR benchmark problem with gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F.

    2012-07-01

    A pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem with gadolinium was used to determine the accuracy and computational efficiency of the coarse mesh radiation transport method COMET. The benchmark problem contains 193 square fuel assemblies. The COMET solution (eigenvalue, assembly averaged and fuel pin averaged fission density distributions) was compared with those obtained from the corresponding Monte Carlo reference solution using the same 2-group material cross section library. The comparison showed that both the core eigenvalue and fission density distribution averaged over each assembly and fuel pin predicated by COMET agree very well with the corresponding MCNP reference solution if the incident flux response expansion used in COMET is truncated at 2nd order in the two spatial and the two angular variables. The benchmark calculations indicate that COMET has Monte Carlo accuracy. In, particular, the eigenvalue difference between the codes ranged from 17 pcm to 35 pcm, being within 2 standard deviations of the calculational uncertainty. The mean flux weighted relative differences in the assembly and fuel pin fission densities were 0.47% and 0.65%, respectively. It was also found that COMET's full (whole) core computational speed is 30,000 times faster than MCNP in which only 1/8 of the core is modeled. It is estimated that COMET would have been about over 6 orders of magnitude faster than MCNP if the full core were also modeled in MCNP. (authors)

  5. Response of a lithium gadolinium borate scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Williams, A M; Beeley, P A; Spyrou, N M

    2004-01-01

    Accurate estimation of neutron dose requires knowledge of the neutron energy distribution in the working environment. Existing neutron spectrometry systems, Bonner spheres for example, are large and bulky, and require long data acquisition times. A portable system that could indicate the approximate neutron energy spectrum in a short time would be extremely useful in radiation protection. A composite scintillator, consisting of lithium gadolinium borate crystals in a plastic scintillator matrix, produced by Photogenics is being tested for this purpose. A prototype device based on this scintillator and digital pulse processing electronics has been calibrated using quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields at the low-scatter facility of the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). Energies selected were 144, 250, 565, 1400, 2500 and 5000 keV, with correction for scattered neutrons being made using the shadow cone technique. Measurements were also made in the NPL thermal neutron field. Pulse distributions collected with the digitiser in capture-gated mode are presented, and detection efficiency and energy resolution derived. For comparison, neutron spectra were also collected using the commercially available Microspec N-Probe from Bubble Technology Industries, which consists of an NE213 scintillator and a 3He proportional counter.

  6. Coadsorption of lanthanum with boron and gadolinium with boron on Mo(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, Tamerlan T.; Vladimirov, Georgij G.; Rump, Gennadij A.

    2008-05-01

    Submonolayer to multilayer coadsorption of lanthanum (La) with boron (B) and gadolinium (Gd) with boron on the surface of Mo(1 1 0) has been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and work function ( ϕ) measurements. The equilibrium state of double adsorbate systems achieved either by adsorption of rare-earth metal (REM) on boron precovered Mo(1 1 0) surface held at room temperature or after moderate annealing of the system with opposite order of adsorption (B on REM films) is the layer which is the inhomogeneous mixture of boron and REM atoms with preferential concentration of boron in the surface area of the mixed film. The work function of such films even at REM to boron concentration ratio much higher than 1/6 are very close to the values of corresponding bulk LaB 6 and GdB 6, favoring assumption of surface rearrangement as the dominant reason of high electron emission efficiency of hexaborides. Almost total similarity of the results for La-B and Gd-B systems can be viewed as the consequence of weak participation of Gd f-electrons in determining the thermionic properties of corresponding double layers.

  7. Intra-cardiac distribution of late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac sarcoidosis and dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Makoto; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saotome, Masao; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Hayashi, Hideharu; Saitoh, Takeji

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac involvement of sarcoid lesions is diagnosed by myocardial biopsy which is frequently false-negative, and patients with cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) who have impaired left ventricular (LV) systolic function are sometimes diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Late gadolinium enhancement (LE) in magnetic resonance imaging is now a critical finding in diagnosing CS, and the novel Japanese guideline considers myocardial LE to be a major criterion of CS. This article describes the value of LE in patients with CS who have impaired LV systolic function, particularly the diagnostic and clinical significance of LE distribution in comparison with DCM. LE existed at all LV segments and myocardial layers in patients with CS, whereas it was localized predominantly in the midwall of basal to mid septum in those with DCM. Transmural (nodular), circumferential, and subepicardial and subendocardial LE distribution were highly specific in patients with CS, whereas the prevalence of striated midwall LE were high both in patients with CS and with DCM. Since sarcoidosis patients with LE have higher incidences of heart failure symptoms, ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden cardiac death, the analyses of extent and distribution of LE are crucial in early diagnosis and therapeutic approach for patients with CS. PMID:27721933

  8. The influence of gadolinium and yttrium on biomass production and nutrient balance of maize plants.

    PubMed

    Saatz, Jessica; Vetterlein, Doris; Mattusch, Jürgen; Otto, Matthias; Daus, Birgit

    2015-09-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are expected to become pollutants by enriching in the environment due to their wide applications nowadays. The uptake and distribution of gadolinium and yttrium and its influence on biomass production and nutrient balance was investigated in hydroponic solution experiments with maize plants using increasing application doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg L(-1). It could be shown that concentrations of up to 1 mg L(-1) of Gd and Y did not reduce or enhance the plant growth or alter the nutrient balance. 10 mg L(-1) Gd or Y resulted in REE concentrations of up to 1.2 weight-% in the roots and severe phosphate deficiency symptoms. Transfer rates showed that there was only little transport of Gd and Y from roots to shoots. Significant correlations were found between the concentration of Gd and Y in the nutrient solution and the root tissue concentration of Ca, Mg and P. PMID:25898235

  9. In vitro study of novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer for promising tumor targeting and tumor diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Meng-Jie; Li, Kun-Feng; Zhang, Lan-Xin; Wang, Huan; Liu, Li-Si; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Han, Nan-Yin; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Fan, Tian-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer were developed and evaluated in vitro to enhance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis of tumor. Nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes were achieved by incorporating amphipathic material, Gd (III) [N,N-bis-stearylamidomethyl-N′-amidomethyl] diethylenetriamine tetraacetic acid, into the liposome membrane using lipid film hydration method. GBI-10, as the targeting ligand, was then conjugated onto the liposome surface to get GBI-10-targeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes (GTLs). Both nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes and GTLs displayed good dispersion stability, optimal size, and zeta potential for tumor targeting, as well as favorable imaging properties with enhanced relaxivity compared with a commercial MRI contrast agent (CA), gadopentetate dimeglumine. The use of GBI-10 aptamer in this liposomal system was intended to result in increased accumulation of gadolinium at the periphery of C6 glioma cells, where the targeting extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C is overexpressed. Increased cellular binding of GTLs to C6 cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and MRI, demonstrating the promise of this novel delivery system as a carrier of MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of tumor. These studies provide a new strategy furthering the development of nanomedicine for both diagnosis and therapy of tumor. PMID:26316749

  10. In vitro study of novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer for promising tumor targeting and tumor diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gu, Meng-Jie; Li, Kun-Feng; Zhang, Lan-Xin; Wang, Huan; Liu, Li-Si; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Han, Nan-Yin; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Fan, Tian-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer were developed and evaluated in vitro to enhance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis of tumor. Nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes were achieved by incorporating amphipathic material, Gd (III) [N,N-bis-stearylamidomethyl-N'-amidomethyl] diethylenetriamine tetraacetic acid, into the liposome membrane using lipid film hydration method. GBI-10, as the targeting ligand, was then conjugated onto the liposome surface to get GBI-10-targeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes (GTLs). Both nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes and GTLs displayed good dispersion stability, optimal size, and zeta potential for tumor targeting, as well as favorable imaging properties with enhanced relaxivity compared with a commercial MRI contrast agent (CA), gadopentetate dimeglumine. The use of GBI-10 aptamer in this liposomal system was intended to result in increased accumulation of gadolinium at the periphery of C6 glioma cells, where the targeting extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C is overexpressed. Increased cellular binding of GTLs to C6 cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and MRI, demonstrating the promise of this novel delivery system as a carrier of MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of tumor. These studies provide a new strategy furthering the development of nanomedicine for both diagnosis and therapy of tumor.

  11. Motexafin gadolinium modulates levels of phosphorylated Akt and synergizes with inhibitors of Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jason; Sirisawad, Mint; Miller, Richard; Naumovski, Louie

    2006-05-01

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd, Xcytrin) is a tumor-selective expanded porphyrin that targets oxidative stress-related proteins. MGd treatment of the follicular lymphoma-derived cell line HF-1 resulted in growth suppression and apoptosis whereas MGd treatment of the Burkitt's lymphoma-derived cell line Ramos resulted in growth suppression but not apoptosis. Because phosphorylation status of Akt/protein kinase B is regulated by oxidative stress, we monitored total and phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) in MGd-treated HF-1 and Ramos cells. Levels of pAkt increased within 30 minutes after MGd treatment of HF-1 but after 4 hours began to show a progressive decline to below baseline levels before cells underwent apoptosis. In MGd-treated Ramos cells, pAkt increased approximately 2-fold within 4 hours and remained persistently elevated. Because pAkt activates survival pathways, we determined if MGd-induced cell death could be enhanced by inhibiting phosphorylation of Akt. The addition of specific inhibitors of Akt phosphorylation (Akt inhibitor 1 or SH-5) reduced pAkt levels in MGd-treated HF-1 and Ramos cells and synergistically enhanced MGd-induced cell death. MGd was also evaluated in combination with celecoxib, an inhibitor of Akt phosphorylation, or docetaxel, a microtubule inhibitor that can decrease Akt phosphorylation. The combination of MGd/celecoxib or MGd/docetaxel resulted in decreased Akt phosphorylation and in synergistic cytotoxicity compared with either agent alone. These data point to a potential protective role for pAkt in MGd-induced apoptosis and suggest that MGd activity may be enhanced by combining it with agents that inhibit Akt phosphorylation.

  12. Investigating the stability of gadolinium based contrast agents towards UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Birka, Marvin; Roscher, Jörg; Holtkamp, Michael; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-03-15

    Since the 1980s, the broad application of gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has led to significantly increased concentrations of Gd in the aqueous environment. Little is known about the stability of these highly polar xenobiotics under environmental conditions, in wastewater and in drinking water treatment. Therefore, the stability of frequently applied Gd-based MRI contrast agents towards UV radiation was investigated. The hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and of HILIC with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) provided quantitative elemental information as well as structural information. The contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A showed a high stability in irradiation experiments applying a wavelength range from 220 nm to 500 nm. Nevertheless, the degradation of Gd-BOPTA as well as the formation of Gd-containing transformation products was observed by means of HILIC-ICP-MS. Matrix-dependent irradiation experiments showed a degradation of Gd-BOPTA down to 3% of the initial amount in purified water after 300 min, whereas the degradation was slowed down in drinking water and surface water. Furthermore, it was observed that the sum of species continuously decreased with proceeding irradiation in all matrices. After irradiation in purified water for 300 min only 16% of the sum of species was left. This indicates a release of Gd(III) ions from the complex in course of irradiation. HILIC-ESI-MS measurements revealed that the transformation products mostly resulted from O-dealkylation and N-dealkylation reactions. In good correlation with retention times, the majority of transformation products were found to be more polar than Gd-BOPTA itself. Based on accurate masses, sum formulas were obtained and structures could be proposed.

  13. Gadolinium-Encapsulating Iron Oxide Nanoprobe as Activatable NMR/MRI Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Santimukul; Jativa, Samuel D.; Kaittanis, Charalambos; Normand, Guillaume; Grimm, Jan; Perez, J. Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report a novel gadolinium-encapsulating iron oxide nanoparticle-based activatable NMR/MRI nanoprobe. In our design, Gd-DTPA is encapsulated within the polyacrylic acid (PAA) polymer coating of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (IO-PAA) yielding a composite magnetic nanoprobe (IO-PAA-Gd-DTPA) with quenched longitudinal spin-lattice magnetic relaxation (T1). Upon release of the Gd-DTPA complex from the nanoprobe's polymeric coating in acidic media, an increase in the T1 relaxation rate (1/T1) of the composite magnetic nanoprobe was observed, indicating a dequenching of the nanoprobe with a corresponding increase in the T1-weighted MRI signal. When a folate-conjugated nanoprobe was incubated in HeLa cells, a cancer cell line overexpressing folate receptors, an increase in the 1/T1 signal was observed. This result suggests that upon receptor-mediated internalization, the composite magnetic nanoprobe degraded within the cell's lysosome acidic (pH = 5.0) environment, resulting in an intracellular release of Gd-DTPA complex with subsequent T1 activation. No change in T1 was observed when the Gd-DTPA complex was chemically conjugated on the surface of the nanoparticle's polymeric coating or when encapsulated in the polymeric coating of a non-magnetic nanoparticle. These results confirmed that the observed (T1) quenching of the composite magnetic nanoprobe is due to the encapsulation and close proximity of the Gd ion to the nanoparticles superparamagnetic iron oxide (IO) core. In addition, when an anticancer drug (Taxol) was co-encapsulated with the Gd-DTPA within the folate receptor targeting composite magnetic nanoprobe, the T1 activation of the probe coincide with the rate of drug release and corresponding cytotoxic effect in cell culture studies. Taken together, these results suggest that our activatable T1 nanoagent could be of great importance for the detection of acidic tumors and assessment of drug targeting and release by MRI. PMID:22809405

  14. Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for tumor cell imaging based on gadolinium oxide and iron oxide nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Wang, Shan; Wu, Chen; Dai, Yue; Hou, Pingfu; Han, Cuiping; Xu, Kai

    2016-12-15

    Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for intracellular GSH sensing was designed. As an alternative to "always on" nanoprobe, activatable imaging nanoprobes which are designed to amplify or boost imaging signals only in response to the targets have attracted more and more attention. In this paper, we designed a novel activatable molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nanoprobe for tumor cell recognization based on a MRI signal variation induced by the distance change between T1 and T2 contrast agents (CAs) in the presence of glutathione (GSH). To achieve this aim, carboxyl group functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) and polyethylene glycol-coated gadolinium oxide (PEG-Gd2O3) NPs as T2 and T1 MRI CA were connected by cystamine which contains a disulfide linkage. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), mass spectra and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) were introduced for their characterizations. The formation of Fe3O4-cystamine-Gd2O3 (Fe3O4-SS-Gd2O3) nanocomplex resulted in a quenched T1 signal due to the near proximity of PEG-Gd2O3 NPs to Fe3O4 NPs and a "light-up" T1 signal with the cleavage of disulfide bond in the presence of GSH. These results provide not only an easy way to realize MRI of tumor cells based on the overexpressed intracellular GSH level, but also a new insight for the design of activatable MRI nanoprobe. PMID:27501342

  15. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of gadolinium as functions of pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsson, P.; Sundqvist, B.

    1989-11-01

    The electrical resistivity ρ and the thermal diffusivity a of gadolinium have been measured as functions of T in the range 45-400 K. The thermal conductivity λ has been calculated from a and experimental data for the specific-heat capacity, cp. λ can be analyzed in terms of simple models for the lattice and electronic components above the Curie temperature TC~=291.4 K. Below TC an additional term, identified as a magnon (spin-wave) thermal conductivity λm, is found. ρ and λ have also been studied as functions of T and P in the range 150-400 K and 0-2.5 GPa. The Lorenz function L=ρλ/T increases by about 20%/GPa under pressure due to a very strong pressure dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity. The pressure coefficients of ρ and λ are -5.1×10-2 and 0.22 GPa-1, respectively, at 300 K (above TC), and 0 and 0.16 GPa-1 at 200 K (below TC). TC and the spin-reorganization temperature Tr~=219 K both decrease under pressure, at the rates -14.0 and -22.0 K/GPa, respectively. Although the magnitude of λm cannot be accurately calculated from the zero-pressure data for λ, the temperature dependence of dλ/dP allows us to distinguish between several models and assign a value of λm~=1.5 W m-1 K-1, or 16.0% of λ, at 200 K.

  16. Functionalization of gadolinium metallofullerenes for detecting atherosclerotic plaque lesions by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The hallmark of atherosclerosis is the accumulation of plaque in vessel walls. This process is initiated when monocytic cells differentiate into macrophage foam cells under conditions with high levels of atherogenic lipoproteins. Vulnerable plaque can dislodge, enter the blood stream, and result in acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Imaging techniques such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides one strategy to identify patients with plaque accumulation. Methods We synthesized an atherosclerotic-targeting contrast agent (ATCA) in which gadolinium (Gd)-containing endohedrals were functionalized and formulated into liposomes with CD36 ligands intercalated into the lipid bilayer. In vitro assays were used to assess the specificity of the ATCA for foam cells. The ability of ATCA to detect atherosclerotic plaque lesions in vivo was assessed using CMR. Results The ATCA was able to detect scavenger receptor (CD36)-expressing foam cells in vitro and were specifically internalized via the CD36 receptor as determined by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and Western blotting analysis of CD36 receptor-specific signaling pathways. The ATCA exhibited time-dependent accumulation in atherosclerotic plaque lesions of ApoE −/− mice as determined using CMR. No ATCA accumulation was observed in vessels of wild type (C57/b6) controls. Non-targeted control compounds, without the plaque-targeting moieties, were not taken up by foam cells in vitro and did not bind plaque in vivo. Importantly, the ATCA injection was well tolerated, did not demonstrate toxicity in vitro or in vivo, and no accumulation was observed in the major organs. Conclusions The ATCA is specifically internalized by CD36 receptors on atherosclerotic plaque providing enhanced visualization of lesions under physiological conditions. These ATCA may provide new tools for physicians to non-invasively detect atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23324435

  17. Reproducibility of Gadolinium Enhancement Patterns and Wall Thickness in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Granillo, Gaston A.; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Capunay, Carlos; Zan, Macarena C. De; Carrascosa, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Background Reproducibility data of the extent and patterns of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is limited. Objective To explore the reproducibility of regional wall thickness (WT), LGE extent, and LGE patterns in patients with HCM assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods The extent of LGE was assessed by the number of segments with LGE, and by the total LV mass with LGE (% LGE); and the pattern of LGE-CMR was defined for each segment. Results A total of 42 patients (672 segments) with HCM constituted the study population. The mean WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.62 ± 1.0 mm (6.1%), with limits of agreement of 1.36 mm; -2.60 mm and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93-0.96). Maximum WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.19 ± 0.8 mm (0.9%), with limits of agreement of 1.32 mm; -1.70 mm, and an ICC of 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98). The % LGE showed a mean difference between observers of -1.17 ± 1.2 % (21%), with limits of agreement of 1.16%; -3.49%, and an ICC of 0.94 (95% CI 0.88-0.97). The mean difference between observers regarding the number of segments with LGE was -0.40 ± 0.45 segments (11%), with limits of agreement of 0.50 segments; -1.31 segments, and an ICC of 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-0.99). Conclusions The number of segments with LGE might be more reproducible than the percent of the LV mass with LGE. PMID:27305110

  18. Enhancement of the normal pancreas: comparison of manganese-DPDP and gadolinium chelate.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, U; Warshauer, D M; Brown, E D; Schlund, J F; Eisenberg, L B; Semelka, R C

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare manganese-DPDP (Mn-DPDP) and gadolinium chelate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agents for enhancement of the normal pancreas. A total of 14 patients with focal liver disease underwent Mn-DPDP- and Gd-DTPA-enhanced 1.5 T MR examinations using spoiled gradient-echo (FLASH) technique at two separate times. Contrast agents were injected according to the currently recommended practices; Gd-DTPA was injected as a rapid bolus injection in a dosage of 0.1 mmol/kg, and Mn-DPDP was injected as a slow IV injection in a dosage of 5 mumol/kg. Quantitative region of interest measurements were made in 11 patients, and percent contrast enhancement of the pancreas and pancreas-fat signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were determined for each agent. Images were also evaluated qualitatively by consensus reading of two investigators and overall scan quality was rated on a scale from 1 (poor) to 4 (very good). Enhancement of the pancreas immediately post Gd-DTPA was significantly higher than 15 min post Mn-DPDP (73.3 vs 36.3%; p = 0.003). On postcontrast images the pancreas-fat SNR measurements were 7.7 (i.e., pancreas higher in signal than fat) and -6.1 for Gd-DTPA and Mn-DPDP, respectively, which was significantly different (p < 0.001). Image quality was rated as 3.1 and 2.5 for Gd-DTPA- and Mn-DPDP-enhanced images, respectively. The normal pancreas enhances significantly more with Gd-DTPA than with Mn-DPDP administered under the conditions of this study. Overall image quality is also greater on the Gd-DTPA-enhanced images.

  19. Gadolinium-encapsulating iron oxide nanoprobe as activatable NMR/MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Santra, Santimukul; Jativa, Samuel D; Kaittanis, Charalambos; Normand, Guillaume; Grimm, Jan; Perez, J Manuel

    2012-08-28

    Herein we report a novel gadolinium-encapsulating iron oxide nanoparticle-based activatable NMR/MRI nanoprobe. In our design, Gd-DTPA is encapsulated within the poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer coating of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (IO-PAA), yielding a composite magnetic nanoprobe (IO-PAA-Gd-DTPA) with quenched longitudinal spin-lattice magnetic relaxation (T(1)). Upon release of the Gd-DTPA complex from the nanoprobe's polymeric coating in acidic media, an increase in the T(1) relaxation rate (1/T(1)) of the composite magnetic nanoprobe was observed, indicating a dequenching of the nanoprobe with a corresponding increase in the T(1)-weighted MRI signal. When a folate-conjugated nanoprobe was incubated in HeLa cells, a cancer cell line overexpressing folate receptors, an increase in the 1/T(1) signal was observed. This result suggests that, upon receptor-mediated internalization, the composite magnetic nanoprobe degraded within the cell's lysosome acidic (pH 5.0) environment, resulting in an intracellular release of Gd-DTPA complex with subsequent T(1) activation. In addition, when an anticancer drug (Taxol) was coencapsulated with the Gd-DTPA within the folate receptor targeting composite magnetic nanoprobe, the T(1) activation of the probe coincided with the rate of drug release and corresponding cytotoxic effect in cell culture studies. Taken together, these results suggest that our activatable T(1) nanoagent could be of great importance for the detection of acidic tumors and assessment of drug targeting and release by MRI.

  20. Surface modification of gadolinium oxide thin films and nanoparticles using poly(ethylene glycol)-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Guay-Bégin, Andrée-Anne; Chevallier, Pascale; Faucher, Luc; Turgeon, Stéphane; Fortin, Marc-André

    2012-01-10

    The performance of nanomaterials for biomedical applications is highly dependent on the nature and the quality of surface coatings. In particular, the development of functionalized nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires the grafting of hydrophilic, nonimmunogenic, and biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Attached at the surface of nanoparticles, this polymer enhances the steric repulsion and therefore the stability of the colloids. In this study, phosphate molecules were used as an alternative to silanes or carboxylic acids, to graft PEG at the surface of ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (US-Gd(2)O(3), 2-3 nm diameter). This emerging, high-sensitivity "positive" contrast agent is used for signal enhancement in T(1)-weighted molecular and cellular MRI. Comparative grafting assays were performed on Gd(2)O(3) thin films, which demonstrated the strong reaction of phosphate with Gd(2)O(3) compared to silane and carboxyl groups. Therefore, PEG-phosphate was preferentially used to coat US-Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles. The grafting of this polymer on the particles was confirmed by XPS and FTIR. These analyses also demonstrated the strong attachment of PEG-phosphate at the surface of Gd(2)O(3), forming a protective layer on the nanoparticles. The stability in aqueous solution, the relaxometric properties, and the MRI signal of PEG-phosphate-covered Gd(2)O(3) particles were also better than those from non-PEGylated nanoparticles. As a result, reacting PEG-phosphate with Gd(2)O(3) particles is a promising, rapid, one-step procedure to PEGylate US-Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles, an emerging "positive" contrast agent for preclinical molecular and cellular applications.

  1. Novel method of producing nanoparticles for gadolinium-scintillator-based digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Kyu; Park, Sung Kwang; Shin, Jung Wook; Oh, Kyung Min; Heo, Seung Uk; Cho, Gyu Seok; Kim, Jin Young; Nam, Sang Hee

    2013-10-01

    Radiation image sensor properties affect the dose of radiation that patients are exposed to in a clinical setting. Numerous radiation imaging systems use scintillators as materials that absorb radiation. Rare-earth scintillators produced from elements such as gadolinium, yttrium, lutetium, and lanthanum have been investigated to improve the properties of radiation imaging systems. Although such rare-earth scintillators are manufactured with a bulk structure, they exhibit low resolution and low efficiency when they are used as conversion devices. Nanoscintillators have been proposed and researched as a possible solution to these problems. According to the research, the optical properties and size of fine scintillators are affected by the sintering temperature used to produce nanoscintillators instead of the existing bulk-structured scintillators. Therefore, the main purpose of this research is to develop radiation-imaging sensors based on nanoscintillators in order to evaluate the quantitative properties of various scintillators produced under various conditions such as sintering temperature. This is accomplished by measuring acquired phantom images, and modulation transfer functions (MTFs) for complementary-symmetry metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors under the same X-ray conditions. Low-temperature solution combustion was used to produce fine scintillators consisting of 5 wt% of europium as an activator dopant in a Gd2O3 scintillator host. Variations in the characteristics of the fine scintillators were investigated. The characteristics of fine scintillators produced at various sintering temperatures (i.e., 600, 800, or 1000 degrees C) and with a europium concentration of 0.5 wt% were also analyzed to determine the optimal conditions for synthesizing the fine scintillators.

  2. Field strength and dose dependence of contrast enhancement by gadolinium-based MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rinck, P A; Muller, R N

    1999-01-01

    The relaxivities r1 and r2 of magnetic resonance contrast agents and the T1 relaxation time values of tissues are strongly field dependent. We present quantitative data and simulations of different gadolinium-based extracellular fluid contrast agents and the modulation of their contrast enhancement by the magnetic field to be able to answer the following questions: How are the dose and field dependences of their contrast enhancement? Is there an interrelationship between dose and field dependence? Should one increase or decrease doses at specific fields? Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion data were acquired for the following contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadoterate meglumine, gadodiamide injection, and gadoteridol injection, as well as for several normal and pathological human tissue samples. The magnetic field range stretched from 0.0002 to 4.7 T, including the entire clinical imaging range. The data acquired were then fitted with the appropriate theoretical models. The combination of the diamagnetic relaxation rates (R1 = 1/T1 and R2 = 1/T2) of tissues with the respective paramagnetic contributions of the contrast agents allowed the prediction of image contrast at any magnetic field. The results revealed a nearly identical field and dose-dependent increase of contrast enhancement induced by these contrast agents within a certain dose range. The target tissue concentration (TTC) was an important though nonlinear factor for enhancement. The currently recommended dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight seems to be a compromise close to the lower limits of diagnostically sufficient contrast enhancement for clinical imaging at all field strengths. At low field contrast enhancement might be insufficient. Adjustment of dose or concentration, or a new class of contrast agents with optimized relaxivity, would be a valuable contribution to a better diagnostic yield of contrast enhancement at all fields.

  3. The magnetic, relaxometric, and optical properties of gadolinium-catalyzed single walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Sitharaman, Balaji; Jacobson, Barry D.; Wadghiri, Youssef Z.; Bryant, Henry; Frank, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We report the magnetic behavior, relaxometry, phantom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and near-infrared (NIR) photoluminescence spectroscopy of gadolinium (Gd) catalyzed single-walled carbon nanotubes (Gd-SWCNTs). Gd-SWCNTs are paramagnetic with an effective magnetic moment of 7.29 μB. Gd-SWCNT solutions show high r1 and r2 relaxivities at very low (0.01 MHz) to clinically relevant (61 MHz) magnetic fields (r1 ≥ 130 mM−1 s−1, r2 ≥ 160 mM−1 s−1). Analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion profiles using Solomon, Bloembergen, and Morgan equations suggests that multiple structural and dynamic parameters such as rotational correlation time τR, rate of water exchange τM, and the number of fast-exchanging water molecules within the inner sphere q may be responsible for the increase in r1 and r2 relaxivity. The T1 weighted MRI signal intensity (gradient echo sequence; repetition time (TR) = 66 ms, echo time (TE) = 3 ms, flop angle = 108°) of Gd-SWCNT phantom solution is 14 times greater than the Gd-based clinical MRI contrast agent Magnevist. Additionally, these nanotubes exhibit near infrared fluorescence with distinct E11 transitions of several semiconducting SWCNTs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Gd-SWCNTs have potential as a novel, highly efficacious, multimodal MRI-NIR optical imaging contrast agent. PMID:23653487

  4. Convection-enhanced Delivery of Free Gadolinium with the Recombinant Immunotoxin MR1-1

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dale; Kanaly, Charles W; Bigner, Darrell D; Cummings, Thomas J; Herndon, James E; Pastan, Ira; Raghavan, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A major obstacle in glioblastoma (GBM) therapy is the restrictive nature of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a novel method of drug administration which allows direct parenchymal infusion of therapeutics, bypassing the BBB. MR1-1 is a novel recombinant immunotoxin that targets the GBM tumor-specific antigen EGFRvIII and can be delivered via CED infusion. However, drug distribution via CED varies dramatically, which necessitates active monitoring. Gadolinium conjugated to diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) is a commonly used MRI contrast agent which can be co-infused with therapies using CED and may be useful in monitoring infusion leak and early distribution. Experimental design Forty immunocompetent rats were implanted with intracerebral cannulas that were connected to osmotic pumps and subsequently randomized into four groups that each received 0.2% human serum albumin (HSA) mixed with a different experimental infusion: 1) 25 ng/mL MR1-1; 2) 7 μmol/mL Gd-DTPA; 3) 25 ng/mL MR1-1 and 7 μmol/mL Gd-DTPA; 4) 250 ng/mL MR1-1 and 7μmol/mL Gd-DTPA. The rats were monitored clinically for six weeks then necropsied and histologically assessed for CNS toxicity. Results All rats survived the entirety of the study without clinical or histological toxicity attributable to the study drugs. There was no statistically significant difference in weight change over time among groups (p>0.999). Conclusion MR1-1 co-infused with Gd-DTPA via CED is safe in the long-term setting in a pre-clinical animal model. Our data supports the use of Gd-DTPA, as a surrogate tracer, co-infused with MR1-1 for drug distribution monitoring in patients with GBM. PMID:19898744

  5. Modification of Mg{sub 2}Si in Mg–Si alloys with gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lingying; Hu, Jilong Tang, Changping; Zhang, Xinming; Deng, Yunlai; Liu, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Zhile

    2013-05-15

    The modification effect of gadolinium (Gd) on Mg{sub 2}Si in the hypereutectic Mg–3 wt.% Si alloy has been investigated using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and hardness measurements. The results indicate that the morphology of the primary Mg{sub 2}Si is changed from coarse dendrite into fine polygon with the increasing Gd content. The average size of the primary Mg{sub 2}Si significantly decreases with increasing Gd content up to 1.0 wt.%, and then slowly increases. Interestingly, when the Gd content is increased to 4.0 and 8.0 wt.%, the primary and eutectic Mg{sub 2}Si evidently decrease and even disappear. The modification and refinement of the primary Mg{sub 2}Si is mainly attributed to the poisoning effect. The GdMg{sub 2} phase in the primary Mg{sub 2}Si is obviously coarsened as the Gd content exceeds 2.0 wt.%. While the decrease and disappearance of the primary and eutectic Mg{sub 2}Si are ascribed to the formation of vast GdSi compound. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that proper Gd (1.0 wt.%) addition can effectively modify and refine the primary Mg{sub 2}Si. - Highlights: ► Proper Gd (1.0 wt.%) addition can effectively modify and refine the primary Mg{sub 2}Si. ► We studied the reaction feasibility between Mg and Si, Gd and Si in Mg–Gd–Si system. ► We explored the modification mechanism of Gd modifier on Mg{sub 2}Si.

  6. The effect of motexafin gadolinium on ALA photodynamic therapy in glioma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Marlon S.; Sanchez, Rogelio; Sun, Chung-Ho; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2008-02-01

    Following surgical removal of malignant brain tumors 80% of all cases develop tumor recurrence within 2 cm of the resected margin. The aim of postoperative therapy is therefore elimination of nests of tumor cells remaining in the margins of the resection cavity. Light attenuation in tissue makes it difficult for adequate light fluences to reach depths of 1-2 cm in the resection margin making it difficult for standard intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) to accomplish this goal. Thus additional agents are required that either increase the efficacy of low fluence PDT or inhibit cellular repair, to enhance effectiveness of PDT in the tumor resection cavity. Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is one such agent previously reported to enhance the cytotoxic potential of radiation therapy, as well as several chemotherapeutic agents by causing redox stress to cancerous cells. MGd is well tolerated with tumor specific uptake in clinical studies. The authors evaluated MGd as a potential PDT enhancing agent at low light fluences using an in vitro model. Multicellular Glioma spheroids (MGS) of approximately 300 micron diameter, obtained from ACBT cell lines were subjected to acute PDT treatments at 6J, 12J, and 18J light fluences. Growth was determined by measuring diameters in two axes. At four weeks a dose dependent inhibition of spheroid growth was seen in 33%, 55%, and 83% of the MGS at 6J, 12J, and 18J respectively, while inhibition followed by a partial reversal of growth was seen in 17%, 33%, and 17% respectively. This study provides a rationale for the use of this drug as a PDT enhancer in the management of brain tumors.

  7. Evaluation of a novel gadolinium-based contrast agent for intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Wu, Genevieve N.; Chow, Rayland; Kim, Sung-Yop; Hirschberg, Henry

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether Motexafin Gadolinium (MGd) could serve as an efficient intraoperative contrast agent avoiding problems that arise with surgically-induced intracranial enhancement. F98 orthotopic brain tumors or surgical lesions were induced in Fisher rats. T1-weighted MRI studies were performed with either a single or multiple daily doses of MGd. The last contrast dose was administered either 7 or 24 h prior to scanning in both tumor-bearing and surgically treated animals. Animals receiving either 30 or 60 mg/kg MGd i.v. developed clinical signs of impaired motor activity, and increasing lethargy. MGd given i.p. was tolerated up to a dose of 140 mg/kg. Despite multiple dosages, and several administration modes (i.p. and i.v.), no significant enhancement was observed if the scans were performed 7 or 24 h following the last MGd dose. Clear enhancement was observed if the scans were performed 30 min. following MGd administration. Scans of necrotic lesions were positive 7 h post MGd injection. MGd scans showed no significant enhancement following surgically-induced lesions while scans with conventional contrast agents showed both meningeal and intraparenchymal enhancement. This study suggests that MGd is not sequestered in viable tumor for the necessary time interval required to allow delayed imaging in this model. The agent does seem to remain in necrotic tissue for longer time intervals. MGd therefore would not be suitable as a contrast agent in iMRI for the detection of residual tumor tissue during surgery.

  8. Convection enhanced delivery of different molecular weight tracers of gadolinium-tagged polylysine.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Peter A; Keeley, Dan; Schorn, Greg; Forman, Eric; Ai, Yi; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Zhang, Zhiming; Bradley, Luke H

    2013-09-30

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) is a powerful method of circumventing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to deliver therapeutic compounds directly to the CNS. While inferring the CED distribution of a therapeutic compound by imaging a magnetic resonance (MR)-sensitive tracer has many advantages, however how the compound distribution is affected by the features of the delivery system, its target tissue, and its molecular properties, such as its binding characteristics, charge, and molecular weight (MW) are not fully understood. We used MR imaging of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-tagged polylysine compounds of various MW, in vitro and in vivo, to measure the dependence of compounds MW on CED distribution. For the in vitro studies, the correlation between volume of distribution (Vd) as a function of MW was determined by measuring the T1 of the infused tracers, into 0.6% agarose gels through a multiport catheter. The compounds distributed in the gels inversely proportional to their MW, consistent with convection and unobstructed diffusion through a porous media. For the in vivo studies, Gd-DTPA tagged compounds were infused into the non-human primate putamen, via an implanted multiport catheter connected to a MedStream™ pump, programmed to deliver a predetermined volume with alternating on-off periods to take advantage of the convective and diffusive contributions to Vd. Unlike the gel studies, the higher MW polylysine-tracer infusions did not freely distribute from the multiport catheter in the putamen, suggesting that distribution was impeded by other properties that should also be considered in future tracer design and CED infusion protocols.

  9. Neutralization of Plutonium and Enriched Uranium Solutions Containing Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    SciTech Connect

    BRONIKOWSKI, MG.

    2004-04-01

    Materials currently being dissolved in the HB-Line Facility will result in an accumulated solution containing an estimated uranium:plutonium (U:Pu) ratio of 4.3:1 and an 235U enrichment estimated at 30 per cent The U:Pu ratio and the enrichment are outside the evaluated concentration range for disposition to high level waste (HLW) using gadolinium (Gd) as a neutron poison. To confirm that the solution generated during the current HB-Line dissolving campaign can be poisoned with Gd, neutralized and discarded to the Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW) system without undue nuclear safety concerns the caustic precipitation of surrogate solutions was examined. Experiments were performed with a U/Pu/Gd solution representative of the HB-Line estimated concentration ratio and also a U/Gd solution. Depleted U was used in the experiments as the enrichment of the U will not affect the chemical behavior during neutralization, but will affect the amount of Gd added to the solution. Settling behavior of the neutralized solutions was found to be comparable to previous studies. The neutralized solutions mixed easily and had expected densities of typical neutralized waste. The neutralized solids were found to be homogeneous and less than 20 microns in size. Partially neutralized solids were more amorphous than the fully neutralized solids. Based on the results of these experiments, Gd was found to be a viable poison for neutralizing a U/Pu/Gd solution with a U:Pu mass ratio of 4.3:1 thus extending the U:Pu mass ratio from the previously investigated 0-3:1 to 4.3:1. However, further work is needed to allow higher U concentrations or U:Pu ratios greater than investigated in this work.

  10. Strength and structural phase transitions of gadolinium at high pressure from radial X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Lun Liu, Jing; Bai, Ligang; Li, Xiaodong; Lin, Chuanlong; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2014-12-28

    Lattice strength and structural phase transitions of gadolinium (Gd) were determined under nonhydrostatic compression up to 55 GPa using an angle-dispersive radial x-ray diffraction technique in a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature. Three new phases of fcc structure, dfcc structure, and new monoclinic structure were observed at 25 GPa, 34 GPa, and 53 GPa, respectively. The radial x-ray diffraction data yield a bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 36(1) GPa with its pressure derivate K{sub 0}′ = 3.8(1) at the azimuthal angle between the diamond cell loading axis and the diffraction plane normal and diffraction plane ψ = 54.7°. With K{sub 0}′ fixed at 4, the derived K{sub 0} is 34(1) GPa. In addition, analysis of diffraction data with lattice strain theory indicates that the ratio of differential stress to shear modulus (t/G) ranges from 0.011 to 0.014 at pressures of 12–55 GPa. Together with estimated high-pressure shear moduli, our results show that Gd can support a maximum differential stress of 0.41 GPa, while it starts to yield to plastic deformation at 16 GPa under uniaxial compression. The yield strength of Gd remains approximately a constant with increasing pressure, and reaches 0.46 GPa at 55 GPa.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Therapy-Induced Necrosis Using Gadolinium-Chelated Polyglutamic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Edward F.; Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Wen Xiaoxia; Ng, Chaan S.; Daniel, Sherita L.; Price, Roger E.; Rivera, Belinda; Charnsangavej, Chusilp; Gelovani, Juri G.; Li Chun . E-mail: cli@di.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Necrosis is the most common morphologic alteration found in tumors and surrounding normal tissues after radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Accurate measurement of necrosis may provide an early indication of treatment efficacy or associated toxicity. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the selective accumulation of polymeric paramagnetic magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents-gadolinium p-aminobenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-poly(glutamic acid) (L-PG-DTPA-Gd and D-PG-DTPA-Gd)-in necrotic tissue. Methods and Materials: Two different solid tumor models, human Colo-205 xenograft and syngeneic murine OCA-1 ovarian tumors, were used in this study. Necrotic response was induced by treatment with poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PG-TXL). T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo images were obtained immediately and up to 4 days after contrast injection and compared with corresponding histologic specimens. Two low-molecular-weight contrast agents, DTPA-Gd and oligomeric(L-glutamic acid)-DTPA-Gd, were used as nonspecific controls. Results: Initially, there was minimal tumor enhancement after injection of either L-PG-DTPA-Gd or D-PG-DTPA-Gd, but rapid enhancement after injection of low-molecular-weight agents. However, polymeric contrast agents, but not low-molecular-weight contrast agents, caused sustained enhancement in regions of tumor necrosis in both tumors treated with PG-TXL and untreated tumors. These data indicate that high molecular weight, rather than in vivo biodegradation, is necessary for the specific localization of polymeric MR contrast agents to necrotic tissue. Moreover, biotinylated L-PG-DTPA-Gd colocalized with macrophages in the tumor necrotic areas, suggesting that selective accumulation of L- and D-PG-DTPA-Gd in necrotic tissue was mediated through residing macrophages. Conclusions: Our data suggest that MR imaging with PG-DTPA-Gd may be a useful technique for noninvasive characterization of treatment-induced necrosis.

  12. Enhanced electron mobility at gadolinium oxide(100)/silicon(100) interface: Origin and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaputra, Wattaka

    A growth of a gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) layer with (100) orientation on a Si(100) substrate was obtained for the first time using molecular beam epitaxy deposition (MBE) with the growth temperature in the range of 150-200°C and the oxygen partial pressure in the range of 10 -7-10-6 Torr. The growth was performed on three type of Si(100) substrate; n-type, p-type, and intrinsic. Among the three major orientations, i.e. (111), (110) and (100), the Gd2O3(100) is known from energetic point of view to be least favorable. Nonetheless, an enhancement in electron mobility can only be found from the interface between Gd2O3(100) and Si(100). Although p-type Si(100) results in the best structural considerations from x-ray diffraction among the three types of substrate, the best feature was observed in the Gd2O 3(100)/n-type Si(100) because of its highest mobility enhancement and satisfactory structural stability. The mobility of 1670-1780 cm2/V˙s was observed at room temperature, for carrier concentration > 1018 cm-3. This amounts to a factor of four higher in electron mobility compared to a heavily doped n-type substrate with similar carrier concentration. This accumulation of electrons and mobility enhancement are attributed to two-dimensional confinement from charges transfer across the interface quite similar to modulation doping. Owing to these properties, the Gd2O3(100) becomes a promising candidate in promoting the scaling of logic devices.

  13. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Qin; Tang, Ying; Fu, Rao; Meng, Qiu-Hua; Zhou, Xue; Ling, Ze-Min; Cheng, Xiao; Tian, Su-Wei; Wang, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xue-Guo; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats.

  14. Spatially resolved quantification of gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance agents in tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry after in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Huber, Katharina; Schilling, Franz; Lohöfer, Fabian; Kosanke, Katja; Meier, Reinhard; Rummeny, Ernst J; Walch, Axel; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2015-03-27

    Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents improve the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially when targeted contrast agents are applied. Because of nonlinear correlation between the contrast agent concentration in tissue and the MRI signal obtained in vivo, quantification of certain biological or pathophysiological processes by MRI remains a challenge. Up to now, no technology has been able to provide a spatially resolved quantification of MRI agents directly within the tissue, which would allow a more precise verification of in vivo imaging results. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for spatially resolved in situ quantification of gadolinium(III) agents, in correlation to in vivo MRI, were evaluated. Enhanced kinetics of Gadofluorine M were determined dynamically over time in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. MALDI imaging was able to corroborate the in vivo imaging MRI signals and enabled in situ quantification of the gadolinium probe with high spatial resolution.

  15. Speciation of gadolinium in surface water samples and plants by hydrophilic interaction chromatography hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Uwe; Lingott, Jana; Richter, Silke; Jakubowski, Norbert; Panne, Ulrich

    2013-02-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was optimized for speciation analysis of gadolinium-based contrast agents in environmental samples, in particular surface river waters and plants. Surface water samples from the Teltow channel, near Berlin, were investigated over a distance of 5 km downstream from the influx of a wastewater treatment plant. The total concentration of gadolinium increased significantly from 50 to 990 ng L(-1) due to the influx of the contrast agents. After complete mixing with the river water, the concentration remained constant over a distance of at least 4 km. Two main substances [Dotarem(®) (Gd-DOTA) and Gadovist(®) (Gd-BT-DO3A)] have been identified in the river water using standards. A gadolinium-based contrast agent, possibly Gd-DOTA (Dotarem(®)), was also detected in water plant samples taken from the Teltow channel. Therefore, uptake of contrast agents [Gadovist(®) (Gd-BTDO3A), Magnevist(®) (Gd-DTPA), Omniscan(®) (Gd-DTPA-BMA), Dotarem(®) (Gd-DOTA), and Multihance(®) (Gd-BOPTA)] by plants was investigated in a model experiment using Lepidium sativum (cress plants). HILIC-ICP-MS was used for identification of different contrast agents, and a first approach for quantification using aqueous standard solutions was tested. For speciation analysis, all investigated contrast agents could be extracted from the plant tissues with a recovery of about 54 % for Multihance(®) (Gd-BOPTA) up to 106 % for Gadovist(®) (Gd-BT-DO3A). These experiments demonstrate that all contrast agents investigated are transported from the roots to the leaves where the highest content was measured.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of novel boron and gadolinium rich power generation and real-time neutron detection materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, Marcus L.

    In this work, the neutron capture capabilities of two naturally occurring isotopes, gadolinium-157 (157Gd) and boron-10 (10B), were investigated for use as neutron detecting diodes. The appeal of using 157Gd and 10B is due to their large thermal neutron absorption cross sections: gadolinium (on average ˜46,000 barns) and boron-10 (˜3800 barns). Boron carbide (B4C) films were grown on nickel, copper, silver, and aluminum substrates using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques forming p-n junctions using various configurations of two isomers: closo-1,7-dicarbadodecaborane (metacarborane) or closo-1,7-phosphacaborane (phosphacarborane) for the n-type layers and closo-1,2-dicarbadodecaborane (orthocarborane) for the p-type layer. These all-boron carbide heterojunction diodes were investigated experimentally, with highly sensitive current voltage measurements in light and dark and under alpha, beta, and neutron irradiation. The heteroisomeric diodes exhibited photovoltaic and alphavoltaic behavior and successfully functioned as neutron detectors. Preliminary results of beta radiation response of these heteroisomeric diodes is also presented. The high-kappa dielectric oxide, hafnium oxide (HfO2), was doped with gadolinium and grown on silicon using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to form a novel semiconducting diode. Three levels of Gd-doping (3%, 10%, and 15%) were explored. A shift from the unstable monoclinic phase to the stable cubic phase is seen with increased Gd-doping concentrations, which may possibly serve as a better semiconductor. The detection of charge pulses created by neutron capture was explored using neutron sources from Nebraska Wesleyan University and The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) neutron sources. The 10% and 15% doped diodes exhibited pulse height spectra in the presence of neutrons. Electronic signal processing remains the most significant challenge for these latter detectors.

  17. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  18. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World

    PubMed Central

    Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). PMID:27660737

  19. Enhancements in hepatobiliary imaging: the spectrum of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid usages in hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Channual, Stephanie; Pahwa, Anokh; Lu, David S; Raman, Steven S

    2016-09-01

    Gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) is a unique hepatocyte-specific contrast agent approved for clinical use in the United States in 2008. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR has shown to improve detection and characterization of hepatic lesions. Gd-EOB-DTPA is now being routinely used in daily clinical practice worldwide. Therefore, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with the potential uses and pitfalls of Gd-EOB-DTPA, which extends beyond the assessment of focal hepatic lesions. The purpose of this article is to review the various usages of Gd-EOB-DTPA in hepatobiliary MR imaging. PMID:27225503

  20. Colloids containing gadolinium-capped gold nanoparticles as high relaxivity dual-modality contrast agents for CT and MRI.

    PubMed

    Zeng, ChengCai; Shi, XiaoNi; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, WeiLu

    2014-11-01

    A type of novel macromolecular colloid was prepared from gadolinium-based poly(l-succinimide) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with Au-S covalent bonds. The colloid displayed improved stability in aqueous media and regular arrays in partial region. Moreover, these materials enhanced the contrast 9 times more than that of the corresponding uncoated Au compound when the Au mass content was only 0.15%. Therefore, these materials might have potential as dual-modality contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT).

  1. Coupling of HPLC with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for studying the aging of ultrasmall multifunctional gadolinium-based silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Truillet, Charles; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Dugourd, Philippe; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2013-11-01

    Sub-5 nm multimodal nanoparticles have great potential for theranostic applications due to their easy renal elimination combined with complementary imaging properties and therapeutic facilities. Their potential clinical use requires the full characterization of not only the nanoparticle but also all its possible degradation products. We have recently proposed new ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles for multimodal imaging and radiosensitization. The aim of this article is to describe an analytical tool to characterize degradation products in a highly diluted medium. We demonstrate that HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) can be used in order to determine precisely the composition of nanoparticles and their degradation fragments during aging.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet spectra from highly charged gadolinium and neodymium ions in the Large Helical Device and laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, C.; Koike, F.; Murakami, I.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; O'Gorman, C.; Li, B.; Harte, C. S.; Donnelly, T.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2013-09-01

    We have observed extreme ultraviolet spectra from highly charged gadolinium (Gd) and neodymium (Nd) ions produced in two different types of light sources for comparative studies. Only broad quasicontinuum feature arising from unresolved transition array was observed in high-density laser produced plasmas of pure/diluted Gd and Nd targets at the University College Dublin, and the spectral feature largely depends on electron temperature in optically thin plasmas produced in the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science. The difference in spectral feature among a number of spectra can be qualitatively interpreted by considering dominant ion stages and opacity effects in the plasmas.

  3. Vibrational dynamics of zero-field-splitting hamiltonian in gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lasoroski, Aurélie; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Pollet, Rodolphe

    2014-07-07

    The electronic relaxation of gadolinium complexes used as MRI contrast agents was studied theoretically by following the short time evolution of zero-field-splitting parameters. The statistical analysis of ab initio molecular dynamics trajectories provided a clear separation between static and transient contributions to the zero-field-splitting. For the latter, the correlation time was estimated at approximately 0.1 ps. The influence of the ligand was also probed by replacing one pendant arm of our reference macrocyclic complex by a bulkier phosphonate arm. In contrast to the transient contribution, the static zero-field-splitting was significantly influenced by this substitution.

  4. Band-gap modulation via gallium substitution in cerium doped gadolinium aluminum garnet using a mixed fuel combustion approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Mohit; Pitale, Shreyas S.; Ghosh, Manoranjan; Shinde, Seema

    2014-04-24

    Cerium doped Gadolinium garnets (Gd{sub 3}Al{sub x}Ga{sub 5−x}O{sub 12} where 0≤x≤5) are synthesized via combustion synthesis using mixture of urea and glycine fuels. A 4h Post annealing at 1400 oC is found to be necessary for pure phase formation. Lattice spacing variation as a result of partial or total Ga substitution at Al site was mapped by X-ray diffraction. Photoluminescence emission of Ce shifts as a consequence of Ga substitution and therefore suggests a local re-adjustment of crystal field around activator site.

  5. A diode-pumped Nd3+-doped gadolinium gallium garnet quasi-three-level laser at 933 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. H.; Han, Y. H.; Zhao, Y. D.

    2013-11-01

    We report for the first time a Nd3+-doped gadolinium gallium garnet (Nd:GGG) laser operating on a quasi-three-level laser at 933 nm, based on the 4F3/2-4I9/2 transition. Continuous wave 691 mW output power at 933 nm is obtained under 10.2 W of incident pump power. Moreover, intracavity second-harmonic generation has also been achieved with a blue power of 89 mW by using a LiB3O5 (LBO) nonlinear crystal.

  6. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Edgar; Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). PMID:27660737

  7. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World

    PubMed Central

    Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF).

  8. Folate-targeted gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as a bimodal contrast agent for tumor fluorescent and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Kawano, Kumi; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Maitani, Yoshie

    2014-01-01

    To enhance tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals via the selective accumulation of contrast agents, we prepared folate-modified gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents. Folate-modified nanoparticles were comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid lipid, cationic cholesterol derivatives, folate-conjugated PEG-lipid, and Cy7-PEG-lipid. Folate receptor-mediated cellular nanoparticle association was examined in KB cells, which overexpress the folate receptor. The biodistribution of nanoparticles after their intravenous injection into KB tumor-bearing mice was measured. Mice were imaged through in vivo fluorescence imaging and MRI 24 h after nanoparticle injection, and the intensity enhancement of the tumor MRI signal was evaluated. Increased cellular association of folate-modified nanoparticles was inhibited by excess free folic acid, indicating that nanoparticle association was folate receptor-mediated. Irrespective of folate modification, the amount of nanoparticles in blood 24 h after injection was ca. 10% of the injected dose. Compared with non-modified nanoparticles, folate-modified nanoparticles exhibited significant accumulation in tumor tissues without altering other biodistribution, as well as enhanced tumor fluorescence and MRI signal intensity. The results support the feasibility of MRI- and in vivo fluorescence imaging-based tumor visualization using folate-modified nanoparticles and provide opportunities to develop folate targeting-based imaging applications.

  9. High longitudinal relaxivity of ultra-small gadolinium oxide prepared by microsecond laser ablation in diethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ningqi; Tian, Xiumei; Xiao, Jun; Hu, Wenyong; Yang, Chuan; Li, Li; Chen, Dihu

    2013-04-01

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) can be used as T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent own to its high longitudinal relaxivity (r1) and has attracted intensive attention in these years. In this paper, ultra-small Gd2O3 nanoparticles of 3.8 nm in diameter have been successfully synthesized by a microsecond laser ablating a gadolinium (Gd) target in diethylene glycol (DEG). The growth inhibition effect induced by the large viscosity of DEG makes it possible to synthesize ultra-small Gd2O3 by laser ablation in DEG. The r1 value and T1-weighted MR images are measured by a 3.0 T MRI spectroscope. The results show these nanoparticles with a high r1 value of 9.76 s-1 mM-1 to be good MRI contrast agents. We propose an explanation for the high r1 value of ultra-small Gd2O3 by considering the decreasing factor (surface to volume ratio of the nanoparticles, S/V) and the increasing factor (water hydration number of the Gd3+ on Gd2O3 surface, q), which offer a new look into the relaxivity studies of MRI contrast agents. Our research provides a new approach to preparing ultra-small Gd2O3 of high r1 value by laser ablation in DEG and develops the understanding of high relaxivity of ultra-small Gd2O3 MRI contrast agents.

  10. Human aortic endothelial cell labeling with positive contrast gadolinium oxide nanoparticles for cellular magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Loai, Yasir; Sakib, Nurus; Janik, Rafal; Foltz, Warren D; Cheng, Hai-Ling Margaret

    2012-04-01

    Positive T₁ contrast using gadolinium (Gd) contrast agents can potentially improve detection of labeled cells on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, gadolinium oxide (Gd₂O₃) nanoparticles have shown promise as a sensitive T₁ agent for cell labeling at clinical field strengths compared to conventional Gd chelates. The objective of this study was to investigate Gado CELLTrack, a commercially available Gd₂O₃ nanoparticle, for cell labeling and MRI at 7 T. Relaxivity measurements yielded r1  =  4.7 s⁻¹ mM⁻¹ and r₂/r₁  =  6.2. Human aortic endothelial cells were labeled with Gd₂O₃ at various concentrations and underwent MRI from 1 to 7 days postlabeling. The magnetic resonance relaxation times T₁ and T₂ of labeled cell pellets were measured. Cellular contrast agent uptake was quantified by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, which showed very high uptake compared to conventional Gd compounds. MRI demonstrated significant positive T₁ contrast and stable labeling on cells. Enhancement was optimal at low Gd concentrations, attained in the 0.02 to 0.1 mM incubation concentration range (corresponding cell uptake was 7.26 to 34.1 pg Gd/cell). Cell viability and proliferation were unaffected at the concentrations tested and up to at least 3 days postlabeling. Gd₂O₃ is a promising sensitive and stable positive contrast agent for cellular MRI at 7 T.

  11. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Yvana Lopes Pinheiro; Costa, Rita Zanlorensi Visneck; Pinho, Kátia Elisa Prus; Ferreira, Ricardo Rabello; Schuindt, Sueliton Miyamoto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography. PMID:25987746

  12. In vivo measurement of gadolinium diffusivity by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: a preclinical study of human xenografts.

    PubMed

    Koh, T S; Hartono, S; Thng, C H; Lim, T K H; Martarello, L; Ng, Q S

    2013-01-01

    Compartmental tracer kinetic models currently used for analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data yield poor fittings or parameter values that are unphysiological in necrotic regions of the tumor, as these models only describe microcirculation in perfused tissue. In this study, we explore the use of Fick's law of diffusion as an alternative method for analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in the necrotic regions. Xenografts of various human cancer cell lines were implanted in 14 mice that were subjected to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI performed using a spoiled gradient recalled sequence. Tracer concentration was estimated using the variable flip angle technique. Poorly perfused and necrotic tumor regions exhibiting delayed and slow enhancement were identified using a k-means clustering algorithm. Tracer behavior in necrotic regions was shown to be consistent with Fick's diffusion equation and the in vivo gadolinium diffusivity was estimated to be 2.08 (±0.88) × 10(-4) mm(2)/s. This study proposes the use of gadolinium diffusivity as an alternative parameter for quantifying tracer transport within necrotic tumor regions.

  13. Fluorescent single-stranded DNA-based assay for detecting unchelated Gadolinium(III) ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Edogun, Osafanmwen; Nguyen, Nghia Huu; Halim, Marlin

    2016-06-01

    The main concern pertaining to the safety of Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) is the toxicity caused by the unchelated ion, which may be inadvertently present in the solution due most commonly to excess unreacted starting material or dissociation of the complexes. Detecting the aqueous free ion during the synthesis and preparation of GBCA solutions is therefore instrumental in ensuring the safety of the agents. This paper reports the development of a sensitive fluorogenic sensor for aqueous unchelated Gadolinium(III) (Gd(III)). Our design utilizes single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides with a specific sequence of 44 bases as the targeting moiety. The fluorescence-based assay may be run at ambient pH with very small amounts of samples in 384-well plates. The sensor is able to detect nanomolar concentration of Gd(III), and is relatively unresponsive toward a range of biologically relevant ions and the chelated Gd(III). Although some cross-reactivity with other trivalent lanthanide ions, such as Europium(III) and Terbium(III), is observed, these are not commonly found in biological systems and contrast agents. This convenient and rapid method may be useful in ascertaining a high purity of GBCA solutions. Graphical abstract Fluorescent aptamer-based assay for detecting unchelated Ln(III) ions in aqueous solution. PMID:27071762

  14. Growth, structural, IR and magnetic studies of a new gadolinium metaphosphate, Gd(PO{sub 3}){sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Naili, H. . E-mail: houcine_naili@yahoo.com; Ettis, H.; Yahyaoui, S.; Mhiri, T.

    2006-11-09

    The crystal structure of gadolinium metaphosphate Gd(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} has been established by X-ray diffraction. This compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system (space group C222{sub 1}, Z=4) with cell parameters: a=8.4530 (3), b=11.0576 (4) and c=7.1952 (2)A. The structure was refined to R{sub 1}=0.0234 and wR{sub 2}=0.0502 using 2180 independent reflections (I>2{sigma}(I)). Phosphorus atoms are in slightly irregular tetrahedral oxygen coordination, gadolinium atoms are in considerably distorted dodecahedral oxygen coordination. Formally, the 3D framework in the structure can be described by the PO{sub 4} tetrahedra sharing corners to form helical chains and the GdO{sub 8} polyhedra sharing edges in a zigzag fashion. The shortest Gd-Gd distance is 4.174 (2)A. The infrared spectrum of the title compound recorded at room temperature in the frequency range of 400-4000cm{sup -1}, confirm the atomic arrangement within the structure. Below T{sub C}=25K, the magnetic susceptibility evolution is characteristic of a ferromagnetic order. In the high-temperature region above 100K, the susceptibility follows a Curie-Weiss law with C=7.91cm{sup 3}Kmol{sup -1} and {theta}=9.96K.

  15. Gadolinium-functionalized aggregation-induced emission dots as dual-modality probes for cancer metastasis study.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Ding, Dan; Prashant, Chandrasekharan; Qin, Wei; Yang, Chang-Tong; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the localization and engraftment of tumor cells at postintravasation stage of metastasis is of high importance in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Advanced fluorescent probes and facile methodologies for cell tracing play a key role in metastasis studies. In this work, we design and synthesize a dual-modality imaging dots with both optical and magnetic contrast through integration of a magnetic resonance imaging reagent, gadolinium(III), into a novel long-term cell tracing probe with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) in far-red/near-infrared region. The obtained fluorescent-magnetic AIE dots have both high fluorescence quantum yield (25%) and T1 relaxivity (7.91 mM(-1) s(-1) ) in aqueous suspension. After further conjugation with a cell membrane penetrating peptide, the dual-modality dots can be efficiently internalized into living cells. The gadolinium(III) allows accurate quantification of biodistribution of cancer cells via intraveneous injection, while the high fluorescence provides engraftment information of cells at single cellular level. The dual-modality AIE dots show obvious synergistic advantages over either single imaging modality and hold great promises in advanced biomedical studies.

  16. Reversible Low-Light Induced Photoswitching of Crowned Spiropyran-DO3A Complexed with Gadolinium(III) Ions

    PubMed Central

    Kruttwig, Klaus; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Brueggemann, Chantal; Tu, Chuqiao; L’Etoile, Noelle; Knoesen, André; Louie, Angelique Y.

    2016-01-01

    Photoswitchable spiropyran has been conjugated to the crowned ring system DO3A, which improves its solubility in dipolar and polar media and stabilizes the merocyanine isomer. Adding the lanthanide ion gadolinium(III) to the macrocyclic ring system leads to a photoresponsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent that displays an increased spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) upon visible light stimulation. In this work, the photoresponse of this photochromic molecule to weak light illumination using blue and green light emitting diodes was investigated, simulating the emission spectra from bioluminescent enzymes. Photon emission rate of the light emitting diodes was changed, from 1.75 × 1016 photons·s−1 to 2.37 × 1012 photons·s−1. We observed a consistent visible light-induced isomerization of the merocyanine to the spiropyran form with photon fluxes as low as 2.37 × 1012 photons·s−1 resulting in a relaxivity change of the compound. This demonstrates the potential for use of the described imaging probes in low light level applications such as sensing bioluminescence enzyme activity. The isomerization behavior of gadolinium(III)-ion complexed and non-complexed spiropyran-DO3A was analyzed in water and ethanol solution in response to low light illumination and compared to the emitted photon emission rate from over-expressed Gaussia princeps luciferase. PMID:22728357

  17. Pretreatment with low-dose gadolinium chloride attenuates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Zheng, Yuan-yuan; Song, Yun-tao; Xue, Jing-yi; Liang, Zheng-yang; Yan, Xin-xin; Luo, Da-li

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We have shown that low-dose gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) abolishes arachidonic acid (AA)-induced increase of cytoplasmic Ca2+, which is known to play a crucial role in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The present study sought to determine whether low-dose GdCl3 pretreatment protected rat myocardium against I/R injury in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) were treated with GdCl3 or nifedipine, followed by exposure to anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R). Cell apoptosis was detected; the levels of related signaling molecules were assessed. SD rats were intravenously injected with GdCl3 or nifedipine. Thirty min after the administration the rats were subjected to LAD coronary artery ligation followed by reperfusion. Infarction size, the release of serum myocardial injury markers and AA were measured; cell apoptosis and related molecules were assessed. Results: In A/R-treated NRVMs, pretreatment with GdCl3 (2.5, 5, 10 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited caspase-3 activation, death receptor-related molecules DR5/Fas/FADD/caspase-8 expression, cytochrome c release, AA release and sustained cytoplasmic Ca2+ increases induced by exogenous AA. In I/R-treated rats, pre-administration of GdCl3 (10 mg/kg) significantly reduced the infarct size, and the serum levels of CK-MB, cardiac troponin-I, LDH and AA. Pre-administration of GdCl3 also significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells, caspase-3 activity, death receptor-related molecules (DR5/Fas/FADD) expression and cytochrome c release in heart tissues. The positive control drug nifedipine produced comparable cardioprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: Pretreatment with low-dose GdCl3 significantly attenuates I/R-induced myocardial apoptosis in rats by suppressing activation of both death receptor and mitochondria-mediated pathways. PMID:26948086

  18. A new method for the determination of Gadolinium in ppq levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünjes, Robert; Bichler, Andrea; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    The use of Gadolinium (Gd) complexes as a contrast agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results in an enhanced Gd input in the aquatic environment. Gd-complexes are excreted by humans unmetabolized within 12h after application. Passing the sewage systems with almost no degradation taking place, they successively reach surface waters, which make Gd a capable tracer for surface water/groundwater (SW/GW) interactions. The natural background concentration of Gd and other rare earth elements (REE) occur at ultratrace levels [low ng/L]. Crust-normalized REE patterns show positive Gd-anomalies in surface water, groundwater, and recently also in tap water. The difference between the total concentration and its natural background concentration estimated by the REE pattern is the anthropogenic Gd. Not only densely populated areas are affected by the presence of anthropogenic Gd. Studies have shown that even in rural areas without MRI facilities, anthropogenic Gd can be detected, since people are sent home after treatment. However, low input concentrations and mixing with natural waters lead to a decrease of Gd concentration below the current limit of quantification (LOQ) [1-5ng/L]. Often anthropogenic Gd cannot be calculated, although it is present, because natural background concentration cannot be determined with current methods, in particular in areas with low waste water load (e.g. headwater catchments). A new method using an on-line preconcentration system "SeaFAST" (Elemental Scientific Inc., USA), in combination with a desolvation system "Apex Q" (Elemental Scientific Inc., USA) and a QQQ-ICP-MS instrument (Agilent Technologies, Japan) does lower the LOQ for REE by a factor of 10 to 20. The SeaFAST-system uses a resin with ethylenediaminetriacetic acid and iminodiacetic acid functional groups to preconcentrate specifically REE as they are exclusively trivalent while anions, alkali and alkaline earth cations are washed out. The Apex Q interface is also supposed to

  19. Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition and etching of high-k gadolinium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, Steven A.; Wyatt, Peter W.; Hodson, Chris J.

    2012-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-quality gadolinium oxide thin films is achieved using Gd(iPrCp){sub 3} and O{sub 2} plasma. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth is observed from 150 to 350 deg. C, though the optical properties of the film improve at higher temperature. True layer-by-layer ALD growth of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurred in a relatively narrow window of temperature and precursor dose. A saturated growth rate of 1.4 A/cycle was observed at 250 deg. C. As the temperature increases, high-quality films are deposited, but the growth mechanism appears to become CVD-like, indicating the onset of precursor decomposition. At 250 deg. C, the refractive index of the film is stable at {approx}1.80 regardless of other deposition conditions, and the measured dispersion characteristics are comparable to those of bulk Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. XPS data show that the O/Gd ratio is oxygen deficient at 1.3, and that it is also very hygroscopic. The plasma etching rate of the ALD Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} film in a high-density helicon reactor is very low. Little difference is observed in etching rate between Cl{sub 2} and pure Ar plasmas, suggesting that physical sputtering dominates the etching. A threshold bias power exists below which etching does not occur; thus it may be possible to etch a metal gate material and stop easily on the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate dielectric. The Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} film has a dielectric constant of about 16, exhibits low C-V hysteresis, and allows a 50 x reduction in gate leakage compared to SiO{sub 2}. However, the plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) process causes formation of an {approx}1.8 nm SiO{sub 2} interfacial layer, and generates a fixed charge of -1.21 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, both of which may limit use of PE-ALD Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a gate dielectric.

  20. Low Temperature Constrained Sintering of Cerium Gadolinium OxideFilms for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Jason Dale

    2007-01-01

    Cerium gadolinium oxide (CGO) has been identified as an acceptable solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrolyte at temperatures (500-700 C) where cheap, rigid, stainless steel interconnect substrates can be used. Unfortunately, both the high sintering temperature of pure CGO, >1200 C, and the fact that constraint during sintering often results in cracked, low density ceramic films, have complicated development of metal supported CGO SOFCs. The aim of this work was to find new sintering aids for Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95, and to evaluate whether they could be used to produce dense, constrained Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 films at temperatures below 1000 C. To find the optimal sintering aid, Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 was doped with a variety of elements, of which lithium was found to be the most effective. Dilatometric studies indicated that by doping CGO with 3mol% lithium nitrate, it was possible to sinter pellets to a relative density of 98.5% at 800 C--a full one hundred degrees below the previous low temperature sintering record for CGO. Further, it was also found that a sintering aid's effectiveness could be explained in terms of its size, charge and high temperature mobility. A closer examination of lithium doped Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 indicated that lithium affects sintering by producing a Li2O-Gd2O3-CeO2 liquid at the CGO grain boundaries. Due to this liquid phase sintering, it was possible to produce dense, crack-free constrained films of CGO at the record low temperature of 950 C using cheap, colloidal spray deposition processes. This is the first time dense constrained CGO films have been produced below 1000 C and could help commercialize metal supported ceria based solid oxide fuel cells.

  1. Gadolinium-induced nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: the rise and fall of an iatrogenic disease

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Zaina P.; Sartor, A. Oliver; Norris, LeAnn B.; Murday, Alanna; Xirasagar, Sudha; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. In 2006, nephrologists in Denmark unexpectedly identified chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with a new syndrome, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Subsequently, 1603 NSF patients were reported to the Food and Drug Administration. Sixty hospitals in the USA account for 93% of these cases, and two hospitals in Denmark account for 4% of these reports. We review Denmark’s identification and subsequent rapid eradication of NSF. Methods. NSF reports from clinicians, the Danish Medicines Agency (DMA) and gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) manufacturers were reviewed (2002–11). Results. In 1994, the DMA approved a non-ionic linear GBCA, gadodiamide (0.1 mmol/kg), for magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs), with a renal insufficiency contraindication. In 1996, 0.3 mmol/kg dosing received DMA approval. In 1998, the DMA removed renal contraindications. In 1997 and 2002, radiologists at Skejby Hospital and Herlev Hospital, respectively, began performing gadodiamide-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography scans (0.3 mmol/kg) of CKD patients. In 2005, Herlev clinicians requested assistance in evaluating etiological causes of NSF occurring among 10 CKD patients who had developed NSF. This investigation, focusing on infectious agents, was inconclusive. In 2006, Herlev clinicians reported that of 108 CKD patients who had received gadodiamide-enhanced MRI, 20 had developed probable NSF. Herlev radiologists voluntarily discontinued administering gadodiamide to all patients and no new NSF cases at Herlev Hospital developed subsequently. After meeting with Herlev radiologists, Skejby radiologists also discontinued administering gadodiamide to all patients. In 2007, the European Medicines Agency and the DMA contraindicated gadodiamide administration to CKD patients. In 2008, in response to these advisories, radiologists at the other 36 Danish hospitals discontinued administering gadodiamide to all patients, following on practices adopted at Skejby and Herlev

  2. Volumetric Late Gadolinium-Enhanced Myocardial Imaging with Retrospective Inversion Time Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kecskemeti, Steve; Johnson, Kevin; François, Christopher J.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Unal, Orhan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a novel free-breathing three-dimensional radial late Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique (3D LGE-MRI) with isotropic resolution and retrospective inversion time (TI) selection for myocardial viability imaging. Materials and Methods The 3D LGE-MRI featuring an interleaved and bit-reversed radial k-space trajectory was evaluated in twelve subjects that also had clinical breathhold Cartesian 2D LGE-MRI. The 3D LGE-MRI acquisition requires a predicted TI and a user controlled data acquisition window that determines the sampling width around the predicted TI. Sliding window reconstructions with update rates of 1x the repetition time (TR) allow for a user selectable TI to obtain the maximum nulling of the myocardium. The retrospective nature of the acquisition allows the user to choose from a range of possible TI times centered on the expected TI. Those projections most corrupted by respiratory motion, as determined by a respiratory bellows signal, were re-sampled according to the diminishing variance algorithm. The quality of the left ventricular myocardial nulling on the 3D LGE-MRI and 2D LGE-MRI was assessed using a 4-point Likert scale by two experienced radiologists. Comparison of image quality scores for the two methods was performed using generalized estimating equations. Results All 3D LGE-MRI cases produced similar nulling of myocardial signal as the 2D LGE-MRI. The image quality of myocardial nulling was not significantly different between the two acquisitions (mean nulling of 3.4 for 2D vs. 3.1 for 3D, and p=0.0645). The average absolute deviation from mean scores was also not determined to be statistically significant (1.8 for 2D and 0.4 for 3D and p = 0.1673). Total acquisition time was approximately 9 minutes for 3D LGE-MRI with voxel sizes ranging from 1.63 to 2.03 mm3. Conversely, the total imaging time was twice as long for the 2D DCE-MRI (>17 minutes) with an eight times larger voxel size of 1.4 mm

  3. Two tri-spin complexes based on gadolinium and nitronyl nitroxide radicals: Structure and ferromagnetic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Na; Ma Yue; Wang Chao; Xu Gongfeng; Tang Jinkui; Yan Shiping; Liao Daizheng

    2010-04-15

    Three Radical-Ln(III)-Radical complexes based on nitronyl nitroxide radicals have been synthesized, structurally and magnetically characterized: [Gd(hfac){sub 3}(NITPhOEt){sub 2}] (1) (hfac=hexafluoroacetylacetonate, and NITPhOEt=4'-ethoxy-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), [Gd(hfac){sub 3}(NITPhOCH{sub 2}Ph){sub 2}] (2) (NITPhOCH{sub 2}Ph=4'-benzyloxy-phenyl-4,4,5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) and [Lu(hfac){sub 3}(NITPhOCH{sub 2}Ph){sub 2}] (3). The X-ray crystal structure analyses show that the structures of the three compounds are similar and all consist of the isolated molecules, in which central ions Gd{sup III} or Lu{sup III} are coordinated by six oxygen atoms from three hfac and two oxygen atoms from nitronyl radicals. The magnetic studies show that in both of the two Gd{sup III} complexes, there are ferromagnetic Gd{sup III}-Rad interactions and antiferro-magnetic Rad-Rad interactions in the molecules (with J{sub Rad-Gd}=0.27 cm{sup -1}, j{sub Rad-Rad}=-2.97 cm{sup -1} for 1: and J{sub Rad-Gd}=0.62 cm{sup -1}, j{sub Rad-Rad}=-7.01 cm{sup -1} for 2). An analogous complex of [Lu(hfac){sub 3} (NITPhOCH{sub 2}Ph){sub 2}] (3) containing diamagnetic Lu{sup III} ions has also been introduced for further demonstrating the nature of magnetic coupling between radicals. - Graphical abstract: Two tri-spin complexes based on gadolinium-radical have been synthesized and characterized, the magnetic studies show that in the two complexes the Gd-radical interaction is ferromagnetic and the radical-radical interaction is antiferromagnetic. An analogous complex containing the diamagnetic Lu{sup III} ions has also been synthesized to further demonstrate the nature of the magnetic coupling between radicals.

  4. Diagnosis of symptomatic disc by magnetic resonance imaging: T2-weighted and gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Tamai, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Naoki; Saiki, Kazuhiko; Saotome, Koichi

    2002-06-01

    Although radial tear of the annulus fibrosus can be detected on T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images, the association between the annular tear on MR images and the symptomatic discs is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between T2-weighted, gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MR images and pain response through discography in patients with chronic low back pain. A total of 56 lumbar discs from 23 patients with chronic low back pain (13 to 47 years old) underwent MR imaging (T2-weighted, gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MR images) followed by provocative discography. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of T2-weighted and gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MR images in detecting the symptomatic discs were calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of T2-weighted images in detecting the symptomatic disc were 94%, 71%, 59%, and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced images were 71%, 75%, 56%, and 86%, respectively. The high sensitivity and the high negative predictive value of T2-weighted MR imaging in detecting the symptomatic disc indicated that MR imaging can be a useful screening tool in avoiding unnecessary discography in patients with chronic low back pain.

  5. Left Ventricular Function Evaluation on a 3T MR Scanner with Parallel RF Transmission Technique: Prospective Comparison of Cine Sequences Acquired before and after Gadolinium Injection

    PubMed Central

    Caspar, Thibault; Schultz, Anthony; Schaeffer, Mickaël; Labani, Aïssam; Jeung, Mi-Young; Jurgens, Paul Thomas; El Ghannudi, Soraya; Roy, Catherine; Ohana, Mickaël

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare cine MR b-TFE sequences acquired before and after gadolinium injection, on a 3T scanner with a parallel RF transmission technique in order to potentially improve scanning time efficiency when evaluating LV function. Methods 25 consecutive patients scheduled for a cardiac MRI were prospectively included and had their b-TFE cine sequences acquired before and right after gadobutrol injection. Images were assessed qualitatively (overall image quality, LV edge sharpness, artifacts and LV wall motion) and quantitatively with measurement of LVEF, LV mass, and telediastolic volume and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the myocardium and the cardiac chamber. Statistical analysis was conducted using a Bayesian paradigm. Results No difference was found before or after injection for the LVEF, LV mass and telediastolic volume evaluations. Overall image quality and CNR were significantly lower after injection (estimated coefficient cine after > cine before gadolinium: -1.75 CI = [-3.78;-0.0305], prob(coef>0) = 0% and -0.23 CI = [-0.49;0.04], prob(coef>0) = 4%) respectively), but this decrease did not affect the visual assessment of LV wall motion (cine after > cine before gadolinium: -1.46 CI = [-4.72;1.13], prob(coef>0) = 15%). Conclusions In 3T cardiac MRI acquired with parallel RF transmission technique, qualitative and quantitative assessment of LV function can reliably be performed with cine sequences acquired after gadolinium injection, despite a significant decrease in the CNR and the overall image quality. PMID:27669571

  6. Highly-crystalline ultrathin gadolinium doped and carbon-coated Li4Ti5O12 nanosheets for enhanced lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G. B.; Yang, L. W.; Wei, X. L.; Ding, J. W.; Zhong, J. X.; Chu, P. K.

    2015-11-01

    Highly-crystalline gadolinium doped and carbon-coated ultrathin Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) nanosheets (denoted as LTO-Gd-C) as an anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs) are synthesized on large scale by controlling the amount of carbon precursor in the topotactic transformation of layered ultrathin Li1.81H0.19Ti2O5·xH2O (H-LTO) nanosheets at 700 °C. The characterizations of structure and morphology reveal that the gadolinium doped and carbon-coated ultrathin LTO nanosheets have high crystallinity with a thickness of about 10 nm. Gadolinium doping allows the spinel LTO products to be stabilized, thereby preserving the precursor's sheet morphology and single crystal structure. Carbon encapsulation serves dual functions by restraining crystal growth of the LTO primary nanoparticles in the LTO-Gd-C nanosheets and decreasing the external electron transport resistance. Owing to the synergistic effects rendered by ultrathin nanosheets with high crystallinity, gadolinium doping and carbon coating, the developed ultrathin LTO nanosheets possess excellent specific capacity, cycling performance, and rate capability compared with reference materials, when evaluated as an anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The simple and effective strategy encompassing nanoscale morphological engineering, surface modification, and doping improves the performance of LTO-based anode materials for high energy density and high power LIBs applied in large scale energy storage.

  7. Gadolinium nanoparticle-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube/titania nanocomposites for degradation of methylene blue in water under simulated solar light.

    PubMed

    Mamba, G; Mbianda, X Y; Mishra, A K

    2014-04-01

    Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles of diameters <5 nm were uniformly decorated on the surfaces of multiwalled carbon nanotubes which were subsequently used as templates to fabricate gadolinium oxide nanoparticle-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube/titania nanocomposites. The prepared nanocomposites were evaluated for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under simulated solar light irradiation. Higher photocatalytic activity was observed for the gadolinium oxide-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites compared to the neat multiwalled carbon nanotube/titania nanocomposite and commercial titania. This improvement in photocatalytic activity was ascribed to the gadolinium oxide nanoparticles supported at the interface of the carbon nanotubes and titania resulting in efficient electron transfer between the two components of the composite. Total organic carbon (TOC) analysis revealed a higher degree of complete mineralisation of methylene blue (80.0 % TOC removal) which minimise the possible formation of toxic by-products. The photocatalyst could be re-used for five times, reaching a maximum degradation efficiency of 85.9 % after the five cycles. The proposed photocatalytic degradation mechanism is outlined herein.

  8. Diagnosis of Vascular Compression at the Thoracic Outlet Using Gadolinium-Enhanced High-Resolution Ultrafast MR Angiography in Abduction and Adduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Spinosa, David J.; Angle, J. Fritz; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2000-03-15

    Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography allows rapid evaluation of the vascular structures of the thoracic outlet both in the neutral position and in abduction during one examination within FDA-approved dose limitations for contrast agents. The technique appears to be a good screening one for patients suspected of having vascular thoracic outlet syndrome.

  9. Late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of myocardial infarction: comparison of image quality between single and double doses of contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeo Koon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Kim, Sang Yoon; Chung, Jin Wook

    2014-12-01

    To compare the image quality of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) using a single dose of gadolinium contrast agent versus the conventional double dose for assessing myocardial infarction. This retrospective study examined 37 patients with chronic myocardial infarction who underwent LGE CMR using both inversion recovery (IR)-turbo fast low-angle shot magnitude-reconstructed and phase-sensitive images with two different dosages of gadolinium contrast agent: a single dose of 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium-DTPA in 17 patients and a double dose of 0.2 mmol/kg in 20 patients. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and visual conspicuity between infarct and normal myocardium (CNRinfarct-normal, conspicuityinfarct-normal) and between infarct and left ventricular cavity (CNRinfarct-LVC, conspicuityinfarct-LVC) were compared. Interobserver agreement for the maximal transmural extent of infarction was also evaluated. CNRinfarct-normal was significantly higher with double-dose gadolinium contrast agent (15.5 ± 20.7 vs. 40.4 ± 16.1 in magnitude images and 9.5 ± 2.8 vs. 11.2 ± 2.7 in phase-sensitive images, P < 0.001) while conspicuityinfarct-normal showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Both CNRinfarct-LVC (7.7 ± 10.7 vs. -6.6 ± 19.0 in magnitude images and 4.1 ± 2.3 vs. -0.4 ± 4.1 in phase-sensitive images, P < 0.05) and conspicuityinfarct-LVC were significantly better with single-dose gadolinium contrast. Interobserver agreement for assessing the transmural extent of infarction was moderate in both groups: 0.591 for single-dose and 0.472 for double-dose. LGE CMR using a single dose of gadolinium contrast agent showed significantly better contrast between infarcted myocardium and left ventricular cavity lumen without a significant decrease in visual contrast between infarcted myocardium and normal myocardium, compared to a double dose.

  10. Local Structure of Proton-Conducting Lanthanum Tungstate La28-xW4+xO54+δ: a Combined Density Functional Theory and Pair Distribution Function Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalland, Liv-Elisif; Magrasó, Anna; Mancini, Alessandro; Tealdi, Cristina; Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2013-10-02

    Lanthanum tungstate (La28–xW4+xO54+δ) is a good proton conductor and exhibits a complex fluorite-type structure. To gain further understanding of the short-range order in the structure we correlate the optimized configurations obtained by density functional theory (DFT) with the experimental atomic pair distribution function analysis (PDF) of time-of-flight neutron and synchrotron X-ray data, collected at room temperature. The local atomic arrangements cannot be described by means of any average symmetric structure. Tungsten forms WO6 octahedra in alternating directions, La1 is mainly 8-fold coordinated in relatively symmetric cubes, and La2 is coordinated with 6 or 7 oxygens in heavily distorted cubes. Both DFT and PDF confirm that the excess tungsten (x) is incorporated in La2 (1/4, 1/4, 1/4) sites in the La27W5O55.5 composition. This additional tungsten can be considered as a donor self-dopant in the material and has implications to the conducting properties and the defect structure.

  11. NEUTRALIZATIONS OF HIGH ALUMINUM LOW URANIUM USED NUCLEAR FUEL SOLUTIONS CONTAINING GADOLINIUM AS A NEUTRON POISON

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2011-06-08

    H-Canyon will begin dissolving High Aluminum - Low Uranium (High Al/Low U) Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) following approval by DOE which is anticipated in CY2011. High Al/Low U is an aluminum/enriched uranium UNF with small quantities of uranium relative to aluminum. The maximum enrichment level expected is 93% {sup 235}U. The High Al/Low U UNF will be dissolved in H-Canyon in a nitric acid/mercury/gadolinium solution. The resulting solution will be neutralized and transferred to Tank 39H in the Tank Farm. To confirm that the solution generated could be poisoned with Gd, neutralized, and discarded to the Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW) system without undue nuclear safety concerns the caustic precipitation of simulant solutions was examined. Experiments were performed with three simulant solutions representative of the H-Canyon estimated concentrations in the final solutions after dissolution. The maximum U, Gd, and Al concentration were selected for testing from the range of solution compositions provided. Simulants were prepared in three different nitric acid concentrations, ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 M. The simulant solutions were neutralized to four different endpoints: (1) just before a solid phase was formed (pH 3.5-4), (2) the point where a solid phase was obtained, (3) 0.8 M free hydroxide, and (4) 1.2 M free hydroxide, using 50 wt % sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The settling behavior of the neutralized solutions was found to be slower compared to previous studies, with settling continuing over a one week period. Due to the high concentration of Al in these solutions, precipitation of solids was observed immediately upon addition of NaOH. Precipitation continued as additional NaOH was added, reaching a point where the mixture becomes almost completely solid due to the large amount of precipitate. As additional NaOH was added, some of the precipitate began to redissolve, and the solutions neutralized to the final two endpoints mixed easily and had expected

  12. Microwave-assisted polyol synthesis of gadolinium-doped green luminescent carbon dots as a bimodal nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ningqiang; Wang, Hao; Li, Shuai; Deng, Yunlong; Chen, Xiao'ai; Ye, Ling; Gu, Wei

    2014-09-16

    The development of multimodal nanoprobes is highly desired in medical imaging because it integrates the advantages of multiple imaging modes. In this study, the gadolinium-doped green luminescent carbon dots (Gd-CDs) were prepared by the simple one-step microwave-assisted polyol method. The obtained Gd-CDs emitted a unique green photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 5.4%. The Gd-CDs exhibited a low cytotoxicity and could optically label the C6 glioma cells. Meanwhile, the r1 relaxivity of Gd-CDs was measured to be 11.356 mM(-1) s(-1). This high r1 value together with the r2/r1 ratio close to 1 nominates Gd-CDs as an excellent T1 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. These Gd-CDs combining two complementary imaging modalities are therefore a promising bimodal nanoprobe in medical imaging for a better diagnosis. PMID:25157595

  13. High-spin multiplicities in ferromagnetic ground states of supramolecular halide complexes based on the gadolinium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduani, C.

    2016-03-01

    Calculations using density functional theory are performed to study supramolecular assemblage of high spin halide complexes based on the gadolinium chloride. With the addition of Cl atoms to both Gd and B in number that exceeds their formal valence by 1 the calculated vertical detachment energy increases to 6.08 and 5.57 eV in GdCl4 and BCl4, respectively, indicating superhalogen behavior. By using BCl4 and GdCl4 clusters as building blocks to decorate the Gd atom the vertical detachment energy increases to 7.12 and 7.70 eV in the anionic clusters Gd(BCl4)4- and Gd(GdCl4)4-, respectively, which is indicative of hyperhalogen behavior. High spin multiplicities in the ferromagnetic state are observed for these clusters indicating therein outstanding paramagnetic response.

  14. Hepatic arterial-phase dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging: optimization with a test examination and a power injector.

    PubMed

    Earls, J P; Rofsky, N M; DeCorato, D R; Krinsky, G A; Weinreb, J C

    1997-01-01

    To optimize findings at dynamic gadolinium-enhanced hepatic magnetic resonance imaging in the hepatic arterial phase, a timing examination was performed after injection of a 0.5-mL timing bolus of gadopentetate dimeglumine. In the experimental group (n = 28), power injection was used and the imaging delay was determined in each patient on the basis of the results of the timing examination. In the control group (n = 28), hand injection and a fixed 20-second imaging delay were used. Arterial-phase examinations (defined as relative liver enhancement of not more than 30% of peak parenchymal enhancement) were successful in 26 (93%) experimental group patients and in 17 (61%) control group patients.

  15. Various ligand-coated ultrasmall gadolinium-oxide nanoparticles: Water proton relaxivity and in-vivo T1 MR image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ja Young; Kim, Sung June; Lee, Gang Ho; Jin, Seonguk; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok

    2015-04-01

    Surface coating of nanoparticles with ligands is essential in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of solubility in water and biocompatibility. In this study, five organic molecules were used for surface coating of ultrasmall gadolinium-oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles (d avg = 2.0 nm). All of the samples showed large longitudinal (r1) and transverse (r2) water proton relaxivities with r2/r1 ratios that were close to one, corresponding to ideal conditions for T1 MRI contrast agents. Finally, in-vivo T1 MR images were acquired to prove the effectiveness of the surface-coated ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles as a T1 MRI contrast agent.

  16. Rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of PVP-coated ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahdatkhah, Parisa; Madaah Hosseini, Hamid Reza; Khodaei, Azin; Montazerabadi, Ali Reza; Irajirad, Rasoul; Oghabian, Mohamad Ali; Delavari H., Hamid

    2015-05-01

    Synthesis of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) coated ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) with enhanced T1-weighted signal intensity and r2/r1 ratio close to unity is performed by a microwave-assisted polyol process. PVP coated Gd2O3NPs with spherical shape and uniform size of 2.5 ± 0.5 nm have been synthesized below 5 min and structure and morphology confirmed by HRTEM, XRD and FTIR. The longitudinal (r1) and transversal relaxation (r2) of Gd2O3NPs is measured by a 3 T MRI scanner. The results showed considerable increasing of relaxivity for Gd2O3NPs in comparison to gadolinium chelates which are commonly used for clinical magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, a mechanism for Gd2O3NPs formation and in situ surface modification of PVP-grafted Gd2O3NPs is proposed.

  17. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and class labeling of gadolinium-based contrast agents by the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lucie; Krefting, Ira; Gorovets, Alex; Marzella, Louis; Kaiser, James; Boucher, Robert; Rieves, Dwaine

    2012-10-01

    In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration requested that manufacturers of all approved gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), drugs widely used in magnetic resonance imaging, use nearly identical text in their product labeling to describe the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Accumulating information about NSF risks led to revision of the labeling text for all of these drugs in 2010. The present report summarizes the basis and purpose of this class-labeling approach and describes some of the related challenges, given the evolutionary nature of the NSF risk evidence. The class-labeling approach for presentation of product risk is designed to decrease the occurrence of NSF and to enhance the safe use of GBCAs in radiologic practice.

  18. Non-Specific Zn2+ Ion Sensing Using Ultrasmall Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticle as a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Bony, Badrul Alam; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2016-03-01

    The gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are well-known potential candidates for a positive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent owing to their large longitudinal water proton relaxivity (r1) value with r2/r1 ratio close to one (r2 = transverse water proton relaxivity). In addition they may be used to sense metal ions because their r1 and r2 values can be altered in the presence of metal ions. This may allow us to study metabolic processes involving metal ions and to diagnose disease related to abnormal concentrations of metal ions in the body in a non-invasive way. In this study ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles were for the first time applied to non-specifically sense Zn2+ ions in aqueous solution. We explored this by measuring r1 and r2 values in the presence of Zn2+ ions in solution.

  19. Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect in Bi-substituted Neodymium Iron Garnet on Gadolinium Gallium Garnet Substrate Prepared by MOD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H.; Kuwahara, A.; Sueyasu, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Liu, Q.; Lou, G.; Kishimoto, K.; Koyanagi, T.

    Bi-substituted Neodymium Iron Garnet (Nd3-xBixFe5O12, Bi:NIG) thin films with the Bi composition x=0-1.0 are prepared on both the (001) and (111) oriented gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates by a metal organic decomposition method. Crystalline qualities and magnetic properties of these films are examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effects (LSSEs) are investigated by means of the inverse spin Hall effect in a Pt film. The increase of LSSE voltage in Bi:NIG(x=0-1.0)/Pt bilayers on GGG(001) is observed with the increase of Bi composition. In the case of GGG(111), the LSSE voltage for Bi:NIG(x=1.0) is also larger than that for NIG.

  20. Consensus Report of the 4th International Forum for Gadolinium-Ethoxybenzyl-Diethylenetriamine Pentaacetic Acid Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Christoph J; Bolondi, Luigi; Jonas, Eduard; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Matsui, Osamu; Merkle, Elmar M.; Sakamoto, Michiie; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on issues relating to the optimal use of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-EOB-DTPA MR imaging) together with the generation of consensus statements from a working group meeting, which was held in Seoul, Korea (2010). Gd-EOB-DTPA has been shown to improve the detection and characterization of liver lesions, and the information provided by the hepatobiliary phase is proving particularly useful in differential diagnoses and in the characterization of small lesions (around 1-1.5 cm). Discussion also focused on advances in the role of organic anion-transporting polypeptide 8 (OATP8) transporters. Gd-EOB-DTPA is also emerging as a promising tool for functional analysis, enabling the calculation of post-surgical liver function in the remaining segments. Updates to current algorithms were also discussed. PMID:21852900

  1. Microwave-assisted polyol synthesis of gadolinium-doped green luminescent carbon dots as a bimodal nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ningqiang; Wang, Hao; Li, Shuai; Deng, Yunlong; Chen, Xiao'ai; Ye, Ling; Gu, Wei

    2014-09-16

    The development of multimodal nanoprobes is highly desired in medical imaging because it integrates the advantages of multiple imaging modes. In this study, the gadolinium-doped green luminescent carbon dots (Gd-CDs) were prepared by the simple one-step microwave-assisted polyol method. The obtained Gd-CDs emitted a unique green photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 5.4%. The Gd-CDs exhibited a low cytotoxicity and could optically label the C6 glioma cells. Meanwhile, the r1 relaxivity of Gd-CDs was measured to be 11.356 mM(-1) s(-1). This high r1 value together with the r2/r1 ratio close to 1 nominates Gd-CDs as an excellent T1 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. These Gd-CDs combining two complementary imaging modalities are therefore a promising bimodal nanoprobe in medical imaging for a better diagnosis.

  2. Formation and characterization of porous silicon-samarium/gadolinium nanocomposites: effect of substrate oxidation and biosynthesis process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigon-Lagunes, P.; Ascencio, J. A.; Agarwal, V.

    2014-12-01

    Samarium and gadolinium nanoparticles synthesized by bioreduction process have been incorporated into nanostructured porous silicon template to form a nanocomposite. The structural and optical properties of PS-Gd and PS-Sm nanocomposites have been studied through TEM, SEM and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Extent of infiltration has been verified through reflectance interference Fourier transform spectroscopy as a function of substrate oxidation conditions. The substrates oxidized at 600 °C showed the maximum infiltration and the corresponding change of optical thickness due to nanoparticles. Such biodegradable nanocomposites in the form of particles can have potential applications in localized drug delivery and enhancement of the image contrast and optoelectronic devices. The results here reported open an energy-cheap procedure to take advantages of small rare earth nanoparticles and produced nanocomposites with their immersion in SiO2 substrates, with the perspective to be replied in other similar substrates under controlled conditions.

  3. High longitudinal relaxivity of ultra-small gadolinium oxide prepared by microsecond laser ablation in diethylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Ningqi; Xiao Jun; Hu Wenyong; Chen Dihu; Tian Xiumei; Yang Chuan; Li Li

    2013-04-28

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can be used as T{sub 1}-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent own to its high longitudinal relaxivity (r{sub 1}) and has attracted intensive attention in these years. In this paper, ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles of 3.8 nm in diameter have been successfully synthesized by a microsecond laser ablating a gadolinium (Gd) target in diethylene glycol (DEG). The growth inhibition effect induced by the large viscosity of DEG makes it possible to synthesize ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by laser ablation in DEG. The r{sub 1} value and T{sub 1}-weighted MR images are measured by a 3.0 T MRI spectroscope. The results show these nanoparticles with a high r{sub 1} value of 9.76 s{sup -1} mM{sup -1} to be good MRI contrast agents. We propose an explanation for the high r{sub 1} value of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by considering the decreasing factor (surface to volume ratio of the nanoparticles, S/V) and the increasing factor (water hydration number of the Gd{sup 3+} on Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, q), which offer a new look into the relaxivity studies of MRI contrast agents. Our research provides a new approach to preparing ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} of high r{sub 1} value by laser ablation in DEG and develops the understanding of high relaxivity of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} MRI contrast agents.

  4. Gadolinium Deposition in Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis: An Examination of Tissue using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    High, W.; Ranville, J; Brown, M; Punshon, T; Lanzirotti, A; Jackson, B

    2010-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder associated with gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents dosed during renal insufficiency. In two patients, Gd deposition in tissue affected by nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The presence of Gd was confirmed and mapped using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Affected skin and soft tissue from the lower extremity demonstrated 89 and 209 ppm ({micro}g/g, dry weight, formalin fixed) in cases 1 and 2, respectively. In case 2, the same skin and soft tissue was retested after paraffin embedding, with the fat content removed by xylene washes, and this resulted in a measured value of 189 ppm ({micro}g/g, dry weight, paraffin embedded). Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed Gd in the affected tissue of both cases, and provided high-sensitivity and high-resolution spatial mapping of Gd deposition. A gradient of Gd deposition in tissue correlated with fibrosis and cellularity. Gd deposited in periadnexal locations within the skin, including hair and eccrine ducts, where it colocalized to areas of high calcium and zinc content. Because of the difficulty in obtaining synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy scans, tissue from only two patients were mapped. A single control with kidney disease and gadolinium-based contrast agent exposure did not contain Gd. Gd content on a gravimetric basis was impacted by processing that removed fat and altered the dry weight of the specimens. Gradients of Gd deposition in tissue corresponded to fibrosis and cellularity. Adnexal deposition of Gd correlated with areas of high calcium and zinc content.

  5. Significance of Late Gadolinium Enhancement at Right Ventricular Attachment to Ventricular Septum in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Raymond H; Maron, Barry J; Olivotto, Iacopo; Assenza, Gabriele E; Haas, Tammy S; Lesser, John R; Gruner, Christiane; Crean, Andrew M; Rakowski, Harry; Rowin, Ethan; Udelson, James; Lombardi, Massimo; Tomberli, Benedetta; Spirito, Paolo; Formisano, Francesco; Marra, Martina P; Biagini, Elena; Autore, Camillo; Manning, Warren J; Appelbaum, Evan; Roberts, William C; Basso, Cristina; Maron, Martin S

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) with extensive late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) is a novel marker for increased risk for sudden death (SD) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Small focal areas of LGE confined to the region of right ventricular (RV) insertion to ventricular septum (VS) have emerged as a frequent and highly visible CMR imaging pattern of uncertain significance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of LGE confined to the RV insertion area in patients with HC. CMR was performed in 1,293 consecutive patients with HC from 7 HC centers, followed for 3.4 ± 1.7 years. Of 1,293 patients (47 ± 14 years), 134 (10%) had LGE present only in the anterior and/or inferior areas of the RV insertion to VS, occupying 3.7 ± 2.9% of left ventricular myocardium. Neither the presence nor extent of LGE in these isolated areas was a predictor of adverse HC-related risk, including SD (adjusted hazard ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 1.50, p = 0.53; adjusted hazard ratio 1.16/10% increase in LGE, 95% confidence interval 0.29 to 4.65, p = 0.83, respectively). Histopathology in 20 HC hearts show the insertion areas of RV attachment to be composed of a greatly expanded extracellular space characterized predominantly by interstitial-type fibrosis and interspersed disorganized myocyte patterns and architecture. In conclusion, LGE confined to the insertion areas of RV to VS was associated with low risk of adverse events (including SD). Gadolinium pooling in this region of the left ventricle does not reflect myocyte death and repair with replacement fibrosis or scarring.

  6. Effects of gadolinium and silicon substitution on magnetic properties and microstructure of Nd-Fe-B-Nb bulk nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Zubair; Yan, Mi; Tao, Shan; Husain, S. Wilayat; Liu, Zhongwu

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic properties, phase evolution and microstructure of Fe70-xMxB19Nd7Nb4 (M=Si, Gd, Si+Gd; x=0-2.5 at%) bulk nanocomposite permanent magnets in the form of rods produced by annealing the amorphous precursor have been investigated systematically. Microstructural examination, three-dimensional atom probe microanalysis, δM-plots, X-ray diffraction analysis and magnetometer studies deduced that good magnetic properties in the magnets originate from the homogenous microstructure consisting of exchange coupled, soft magnetic (α-Fe, Fe3B) and hard magnetic (Nd,Gd)2Fe14B nanophases. Optimally annealed Fe70B19Nd7Nb4 rod magnets exhibit magnetic properties of Br=0.61 T, iHc=876 kA/m and (BH)max=50.2 kJ/m3. Gadolinium and silicon addition to quaternary Fe70B19Nd7Nb4 alloy increased the mass fraction of hard magnetic phase, strengthened the exchange coupling interactions and enhanced the magnetic properties. Gadolinium and silicon segregated into hard magnetic phase which led to enhance coercivity up to 1115 kA/m. Enhancement in the coercivity is mainly resulted by hard phase increment as well as domain wall pinning, while strengthening of exchange coupling is caused by grain size refinement and increase in Curie temperature of the magnetic phases. The Fe67B19Nd7Gd2Nb4Si1 magnetic rods of 1.2 mm in diameter demonstrated the best magnetic properties such as intrinsic coercivity, iHc of 1115 kA/m, remanence, Br of 0.57 T and maximum energy product, (BH)max of 65.7 kJ/m3.

  7. Effects of motexafin gadolinium on DNA damage and X-ray-induced DNA damage repair, as assessed by the Comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Erling T.; Liu Yanfeng; Paul, Tracy K.; Rockwell, Sara . E-mail: sara.rockwell@yale.edu

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and DNA damage in EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma cells. The ability of MGd to alter radiosensitivity and to inhibit DNA damage repair after X-ray irradiation was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: Reactive oxygen species and GSH levels were assessed by 2,7-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence flow cytometry and the Tietze method, respectively. Cellular radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic assays. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage and DNA damage repair were assessed in plateau-phase EMT6 cells by the Comet assay and clonogenic assays. Results: Cells treated with 100 {mu}mol/L MGd plus equimolar ascorbic acid (AA) had significantly increased levels of ROS and a 58.9% {+-} 3.4% decrease in GSH levels, relative to controls. Motexafin gadolinium plus AA treatment increased the hypoxic, but not the aerobic, radiosensitivity of EMT6 cells. There were increased levels of single-strand breaks in cells treated with 100 {mu}mol/L MGd plus equimolar AA, as evidenced by changes in the alkaline tail moment (MGd + AA, 6 h: 14.7 {+-} 1.8; control: 2.8 {+-} 0.9). The level of single-strand breaks was dependent on the length of treatment. Motexafin gadolinium plus AA did not increase double-strand breaks. The repair of single-strand breaks at 2 h, but not at 4 h and 6 h, after irradiation was altered significantly in cells treated with MGd plus AA (MGd + AA, 2 h: 15.8 {+-} 3.4; control: 5.8 {+-} 0.6). Motexafin gadolinium did not alter the repair of double-strand breaks at any time after irradiation with 10 Gy. Conclusions: Motexafin gadolinium plus AA generated ROS, which in turn altered GSH homeostasis and induced DNA strand breaks. The MGd plus AA-mediated alteration of GSH levels increased the hypoxic, but not aerobic, radiosensitivity of EMT6 cells. Motexafin gadolinium altered the kinetics of single-strand break repair soon after irradiation but

  8. Investigation of the variations in the crystallization front shape during growth of gadolinium gallium and terbium gallium crystals by the Czochralski method

    SciTech Connect

    Budenkova, O. N. Vasiliev, M. G.; Yuferev, V. S.; Ivanov, I. A.; Bul'kanov, A. M.; Kalaev, V. V.

    2008-12-15

    Numerical investigation of the variations in the crystallization front shape during growth of gadolinium gallium and terbium gallium garnet crystals in the same thermal zone and comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data have been performed. It is shown that the difference in the behavior of the crystallization front during growth of the crystals is related to their different transparency in the IR region. In gadolinium gallium garnet crystals, which are transparent to thermal radiation, a crystallization front, strongly convex toward the melt, is formed in the growth stage, which extremely rapidly melts under forced convection. Numerical analysis of this process has been performed within the quasistationary and nonstationary models. At the same time, in terbium gallium garnet crystals, which are characterized by strong absorption of thermal radiation, the phase boundary shape changes fairly smoothly and with a small amplitude. In this case, as the crystal is pulled, the crystallization front tends to become convex toward the crystal bulk.

  9. Gadolinium embedded iron oxide nanoclusters as T1-T2 dual-modal MRI-visible vectors for safe and efficient siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Zhou, Zijian; Wang, Zhiyong; Xue, Yunxin; Zeng, Yun; Gao, Jinhao; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Xianzhong; Liu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-09-01

    This report illustrates a new strategy of designing a T1-T2 dual-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible vector for siRNA delivery and MRI. Hydrophobic gadolinium embedded iron oxide (GdIO) nanocrystals are self-assembled into nanoclusters in the water phase with the help of stearic acid modified low molecular weight polyethylenimine (stPEI). The resulting water-dispersible GdIO-stPEI nanoclusters possess good stability, monodispersity with narrow size distribution and competitive T1-T2 dual-modal MR imaging properties. The nanocomposite system is capable of binding and delivering siRNA for knockdown of a gene of interest while maintaining its magnetic properties and biocompatibility. This new gadolinium embedded iron oxide nanocluster provides an important platform for safe and efficient gene delivery with non-invasive T1-T2 dual-modal MRI monitoring capability.

  10. [Gadolinium as an alternative radiocontrast agent in patients with allergy to iodine-based contrast provide for useful diagnostic imagings and safely treatment of biliary tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Natsume, Makoto; Sano, Hitoshi; Fukusada, Shigeki; Kachi, Kenta; Inoue, Tadahisa; Anbe, Kaiki; Nishie, Hirotada; Nishi, Yuji; Yoshimura, Norihiro; Mizushima, Takashi; Okumura, Fumihiro; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Hayashi, Kazuki; Nakazawa, Takahiro

    2013-05-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of biliary tract disease requires an intraductal radiocontrast agent. Although iodine-based contrast medium is commonly used, some patients show severe allergy to iodinated contrast agent. We have retrospectively reviewed the usefulness and safety of gadolinium as an alternative radiocontrast agent in 3 patients with allergy to iodine-based contrast medium in the diagnosis and treatment of biliary tract diseases. In case 1, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage and cholangiography were performed successfully and it was possible to visualize an intrahepatic bile duct stone. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopic lithotomy was performed and the intrahepatic bile duct stone was removed. In case 2, endoscopic biliary lithotripsy was performed. In case 3, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and cholangioscopy provided a diagnosis of moderately differentiated carcinoma. He underwent pancreatoduodenectomy. Postoperative cholangiograms were also obtained successfully. Gadolinium contrast agent is an alternative to iodine-based cholangiography for the patients with allergy to iodine.

  11. Assessment of Degree of Applicability of Benchmarks for Gadolinium Using KENO V.a and the 238-Group SCALE Cross-Section Library

    SciTech Connect

    Goluoglu, S.

    2003-12-01

    A review of the degree of applicability of benchmarks containing gadolinium using the computer code KENO V.a and the gadolinium cross sections from the 238-group SCALE cross-section library has been performed for a system that contains {sup 239}Pu, H{sub 2}O, and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The system (practical problem) is a water-reflected spherical mixture that represents a dry-out condition on the bottom of a sludge receipt and adjustment tank around steam coils. Due to variability of the mixture volume and the H/{sup 239}Pu ratio, approximations to the practical problem, referred to as applications, have been made to envelop possible ranges of mixture volumes and H/{sup 239}Pu ratios. A newly developed methodology has been applied to determine the degree of applicability of benchmarks as well as the penalty that should be added to the safety margin due to insufficient benchmarks.

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance and photoluminescence investigation on ultraviolet-emitting gadolinium-ion-doped CaAl₁₂O₁₉ phosphors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Borkotoky, S; Murali, A; Rao, J L; Rao, T K Gundu; Dhoble, S J

    2015-03-15

    The gadolinium doped CaAl12O19 phosphor has been prepared by a low temperature solution combustion method in a short time and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive analysis of X-ray mapping, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and photoluminescence spectroscopic techniques. EPR and optical analysis of the sample confirm the presence of Gd(3+) in the CaAl12O19 matrix. PMID:25546490

  13. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF INTRACRANIAL INFLAMMATORY CONDITIONS IN DOGS: SENSITIVITY OF SUBTRACTION IMAGES VERSUS PRE- AND POST-GADOLINIUM T1-WEIGHTED IMAGE PAIRS.

    PubMed

    Dirrig, Helen; Lamb, Christopher R

    2016-07-01

    Ante mortem diagnosis of canine meningoencephalitis is usually based on the results of neurologic examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. It has been hypothesized that subtraction MR imaging may increase the sensitivity of MR for intracranial inflammatory lesions compared to conventional post-gadolinium T1-weighted imaging. Sensitivity of pre- and post-gadolinium (C-/C+) image pairs and dynamic subtraction (DS) images was compared in a retrospective diagnostic accuracy study of 52 dogs with inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid and 67 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Series of transverse C-/C+ and DS images were reviewed independently for signs of abnormal enhancement affecting the pachymeninges, leptomeninges or intra-axial structures. Sensitivity of C-/C+ image pairs and DS images was 48% (95% CI: 35-61%) and 65% (95% CI: 52-77%), respectively (P = 0.01). Intra-axial lesions were observed more frequently than meningeal lesions in both C-/C+ (43% vs. 31%) and DS images (61% vs. 22%). The difference in sensitivities of C-/C+ and DS series was entirely due to increased sensitivity of DS images for intra-axial lesions. Eight (12%) dogs with epilepsy had evidence of intra-axial gadolinium accumulation affecting the cerebral cortex in DS images. This finding may represent a false-positive result or a true sign of pathology, possibly associated with a leaky blood-brain barrier in areas of the brain affected by neovascularization secondary to repeated seizures. Results suggest that DS imaging has higher sensitivity than comparison of pre- and post-gadolinium image pairs for inflammatory intra-axial lesions.

  14. Gadolinium embedded iron oxide nanoclusters as T1-T2 dual-modal MRI-visible vectors for safe and efficient siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Zhou, Zijian; Wang, Zhiyong; Xue, Yunxin; Zeng, Yun; Gao, Jinhao; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Xianzhong; Liu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-08-01

    This report illustrates a new strategy of designing a T1-T2 dual-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible vector for siRNA delivery and MRI. Hydrophobic gadolinium embedded iron oxide (GdIO) nanocrystals are self-assembled into nanoclusters in the water phase with the help of stearic acid modified low molecular weight polyethylenimine (stPEI). The resulting water-dispersible GdIO-stPEI nanoclusters possess good stability, monodispersity with narrow size distribution and competitive T1-T2 dual-modal MR imaging properties. The nanocomposite system is capable of binding and delivering siRNA for knockdown of a gene of interest while maintaining its magnetic properties and biocompatibility. This new gadolinium embedded iron oxide nanocluster provides an important platform for safe and efficient gene delivery with non-invasive T1-T2 dual-modal MRI monitoring capability.This report illustrates a new strategy of designing a T1-T2 dual-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible vector for siRNA delivery and MRI. Hydrophobic gadolinium embedded iron oxide (GdIO) nanocrystals are self-assembled into nanoclusters in the water phase with the help of stearic acid modified low molecular weight polyethylenimine (stPEI). The resulting water-dispersible GdIO-stPEI nanoclusters possess good stability, monodispersity with narrow size distribution and competitive T1-T2 dual-modal MR imaging properties. The nanocomposite system is capable of binding and delivering siRNA for knockdown of a gene of interest while maintaining its magnetic properties and biocompatibility. This new gadolinium embedded iron oxide nanocluster provides an important platform for safe and efficient gene delivery with non-invasive T1-T2 dual-modal MRI monitoring capability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02797j

  15. Application of the model-free approach to the study of non-isothermal decomposition of un-irradiated and γ-irradiated hydrated gadolinium acetylacetonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouz, R. M.; Ahmed, G. A.-W.; Alshammari, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    The non-isothermal decomposition of unirradiated and γ-irradiated hydrated gadolinium acetylacetone with 102 kGy γ-ray absorbed dose was carried out in air and in nitrogen atmospheres and in the temperature range of 25-1000°C. The results indicate that gadolinium acetylacetonate decomposes through four main decomposition steps leading to the formation of intermediate products whose chemical structure is independent of the gas atmosphere applied and on the investigated absorbed dose. The final product at 820°C was found to be Gd2O3 irrespective of the gas atmosphere and the irradiation conditions. The non-isothermal data were analyzed using linear Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and non-linear Vyazovkin (VYZ) iso-conversional methods. The results of the application of these free models on the present kinetic data showed that the activation energy, Ea is independent of α in a very wide conversion range (0.1-0.9) indicating that the decomposition process is controlled by a unique kinetic model. The results of the model-fitting analysis showed that the decomposition course of the four decomposition steps of hydrated gadolinium acetylacetone was controlled by the D3 Jander diffusion model. Pure phase of Gd2O3 nanoparticles was obtained by thermal oxidation of γ-irradiated GdAcAc.3 H2O at 800°C for 6 h. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were employed for characterization of the as-synthesized nanoparticles. This is the first attempt to prepare Gd2O3 nanoparticles by solid-state thermal decomposition of γ-irradiated hydrated gadolinium acetylacetone.

  16. Synergy between surface and core entrapped metals in a mixed manganese-gadolinium nanocolloid affords safer MR imaging of sparse biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kezheng; Pan, Dipanjan; Schmieder, Anne H; Senpan, Angana; Hourcade, Dennis E; Pham, Christine T N; Mitchell, Lynne M; Caruthers, Shelton D; Cui, Grace; Wickline, Samuel A; Shen, Baozhong; Lanza, Gregory M

    2015-04-01

    High-relaxivity T1-weighted (T1w) MR molecular imaging nanoparticles typically present high surface gadolinium payloads that can elicit significant acute complement activation (CA). The objective of this research was to develop a high T1w contrast nanoparticle with improved safety. We report the development, optimization, and characterization of a gadolinium-manganese hybrid nanocolloid (MnOL-Gd NC; 138±10 (Dav)/nm; PDI: 0.06; zeta: -27±2 mV). High r1 particulate relaxivity with minute additions of Gd-DOTA-lipid conjugate to the MnOL nanocolloid surface achieved an unexpected paramagnetic synergism. This hybrid MnOL-Gd NC provided optimal MR TSE signal intensity at 5 nM/voxel and lower levels consistent with the level expression anticipated for sparse biomarkers, such as neovascular integrins. MnOL NC produced optimal MR TSE signal intensity at 10 nM/voxel concentrations and above. Importantly, MnOL-Gd NC avoided acute CA in vitro and in vivo while retaining minimal transmetallation risk. From the clinical editor: The authors developed a gadolinium-manganese hybrid nanocolloid (MnOL-Gd NC) in this study. These were used as a high-relaxivity paramagnetic MR molecular imaging agent in experimental models. It was shown that MnOL-Gd NC could provide high T1w MR contrast for targeted imaging. As the level of gadolinium used was reduced, there was also reduced risk of systemic side effects from complement activation.

  17. Ferromagnetic coupling in the three-dimensional malonato-bridged gadoliniumIII complex [Gd2(mal)3(H2O)6] (H2mal = malonic acid).

    PubMed

    Hernández-Molina, María; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina; López, Trinidad; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2003-09-01

    The novel gadolinium(III) complex of formula [Gd(2)(mal)(3)(H(2)O)(6)] (1) (H(2)mal = 1,3-propanedioic acid) has been prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystal data for 1: monoclinic, space group I2/a, a = 11.1064(10) A, b = 12.2524(10) A, c =13.6098(2) A, beta = 92.925(10) degrees, U = 1849.5(3) A(3), Z = 4. Compound 1 is a three-dimensional network made up of malonate-bridged gadolinium(III) ions where the malonate exhibits two bridging modes, eta(5)-bidentate + unidentate and eta(3):eta(3) + bis(unidentate). The gadolinium atom is nine-coordinate with three water molecules and six malonate oxygen atoms from three malonate ligands forming a distorted monocapped square antiprism. The shortest metal-metal separations are 4.2763(3) A [through the oxo-carboxylate bridge] and 6.541(3) A [through the carboxylate in the anti-syn coordination mode]. The value of the angle at the oxo-carboxylate atom is 116.8(2) degrees. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal the occurrence of a significant ferromagnetic interaction through the oxo-carboxylate pathway (J = +0.048(1) cm(-1), H = -JS(Gd(1)) x S(Gd(1a))).

  18. Native T1-mapping detects the location, extent and patterns of acute myocarditis without the need for gadolinium contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute myocarditis can be diagnosed on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) using multiple techniques, including late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging, which requires contrast administration. Native T1-mapping is significantly more sensitive than LGE and conventional T2-weighted (T2W) imaging in detecting myocarditis. The aims of this study were to demonstrate how to display the non-ischemic patterns of injury and to quantify myocardial involvement in acute myocarditis without the need for contrast agents, using topographic T1-maps and incremental T1 thresholds. Methods We studied 60 patients with suspected acute myocarditis (median 3 days from presentation) and 50 controls using CMR (1.5 T), including: (1) dark-blood T2W imaging; >(2) native T1-mapping (ShMOLLI); (3) LGE. Analysis included: (1) global myocardial T2 signal intensity (SI) ratio compared to skeletal muscle; (2) myocardial T1 times; (3) areas of injury by T2W, T1-mapping and LGE. Results Compared to controls, patients had more edema (global myocardial T2 SI ratio 1.71 ± 0.27 vs.1.56 ± 0.15), higher mean myocardial T1 (1011 ± 64 ms vs. 946 ± 23 ms) and more areas of injury as detected by T2W (median 5% vs. 0%), T1 (median 32% vs. 0.7%) and LGE (median 11% vs. 0%); all p < 0.001. A threshold of T1 > 990 ms (sensitivity 90%, specificity 88%) detected significantly larger areas of involvement than T2W and LGE imaging in patients, and additional areas of injury when T2W and LGE were negative. T1-mapping significantly improved the diagnostic confidence in an additional 30% of cases when at least one of the conventional methods (T2W, LGE) failed to identify any areas of abnormality. Using incremental thresholds, T1-mapping can display the non-ischemic patterns of injury typical of myocarditis. Conclusion Native T1-mapping can display the typical non-ischemic patterns in acute myocarditis, similar to LGE imaging but without the need for contrast agents. In

  19. Protein-targeted gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents: design and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Caravan, Peter

    2009-07-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful medical diagnostic technique: it can penetrate deep into tissue, provide excellent soft tissue contrast with sub-millimeter resolution, and does not employ ionizing radiation. Targeted contrast agents provide an additional layer of molecular specificity to the wealth of anatomical and functional information already attainable by MRI. However, the major challenge for molecular MR imaging is sensitivity: micromolar concentrations of Gd(III) are required to cause a detectable signal change, which makes detecting proteins by MRI a challenge. Protein-targeted MRI contrast agents are bifunctional molecules comprising a protein-targeting moiety and typically one or more gadolinium chelates for detection by MRI. The ability of the contrast agent to enhance the MR image is termed relaxivity, and it depends upon many molecular factors, including protein binding itself. As in other imaging modalities, protein binding provides the pharmacokinetic effect of concentrating the agent at the region of interest. Unique to MRI, protein binding provides the pharmacodynamic effect of increasing the relaxivity of the contrast agent, thereby increasing the MR signal. In designing new agents, optimization of both the targeting function and the relaxivity is critical. In this Account, we focus on optimization of the relaxivity of targeted agents. Relaxivity depends upon speciation, chemical structure, and dynamic processes, such as water exchange kinetics and rotational tumbling rates. We describe mechanistic studies that relate these factors to the observed relaxivities and use these findings as the basis of rational design of improved agents. In addition to traditional biochemical methods to characterize ligand-protein interactions, the presence of the metal ion enables more obscure biophysical techniques, such as relaxometry and electron nuclear double resonance, to be used to elucidate the mechanism of relaxivity differences. As a case

  20. Gadolinium-uptake by aquatic and terrestrial organisms-distribution determined by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lingott, Jana; Lindner, Uwe; Telgmann, Lena; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Jakubowski, Norbert; Panne, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) based contrast agents (CA) are used to enhance magnetic resonance imaging. As a consequence of excretion by patients and insufficient elimination in wastewater treatment plants they are detected in high concentrations in surface water. At present, little is known about the uptake of these species by living organisms in aquatic systems. Therefore the uptake of gadolinium containing chelates by plants and animals grown in exposed water or on soil irrigated with exposed water was investigated. For this purpose two types of plants were treated with two different contrast agents. The uptake of the Gd contrast agents was studied by monitoring the elemental distribution with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique allows the multi-elemental analysis of solid samples with high resolution and little sample preparation. The analysis of L. minor showed that the uptake of Gd correlated with the concentration of gadodiamide in the water. The higher the concentration in the exposed water, the larger the Gd signal in the LA-ICP-MS acquired image. Exposure time experiments showed saturation within one day. The L. minor had contact with the CAs through roots and fronds, whereas the L. sativum only showed uptake through the roots. These results show that an external absorption of the CA through the leaves of L. sativum was impossible. All the analyzed parts of the plant showed Gd signal from the CA; the highest being at the main vein of the leaf. It is shown that the CAs can be taken up from plants. Furthermore, the uptake and distribution of Gd in Daphnia magna were shown. The exposure via cultivation medium is followed by Gd signals on the skin and in the area of the intestine, while the uptake via exposed nutrition algae causes the significantly highest Gd intensities in the area of the intestine. Because there are hints of negative effects for human organism these findings are important as they show that Gd based

  1. Effect of gadolinium on stretch-induced changes in contraction and intracellularly recorded action- and afterpotentials of rat isolated atrium.

    PubMed Central

    Tavi, P.; Laine, M.; Weckström, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Atrial arrhythmias, like atrial fibrillation and extrasystoles, are common in clinical situations when atrial pressure is increased. Although cardiac mechanoelectrical feedback has been under intensive study for many years, the mechanisms of stretch-induced arrhythmias are not known in detail. This is partly due to methodological difficulties in recording intracellular voltage during stretch stimulation. In this study we investigated the effects of gadolinium (Gd3+), a blocker of stretch-activated (SA) channels, on stretch-induced changes in rat atrial action potentials and contraction force. 2. By intracellular voltage recordings from rat isolated atria we studied the effects of Gd3+ (80 microM) on stretch-induced changes in action potentials. The stretch was induced by increasing pressure inside the atrium (1 mmHg to 7 mmHg). An elastic electrode holder that moved along the atrial tissue was used in the recordings. Thus the mechanical artifacts were eliminated and the cell-electrode contact was made more stable. To examine the influence of Gd3+ on atrial contraction we stretched the atria at different diastolic pressure levels (1 to 7 mmHg) with Gd3+ application of (80 microM) or diltiazem (5.0 microM). Contraction force was monitored by recording the pressure changes generated by the atrial contractions. 3. Our results show that: (1) atrial stretch induces delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs), increase in action potential amplitude and increase in relative conduction speed; (ii) Gd3+ blocks stretch-induced DADs and action potential changes; (iii) Gd3+ inhibits pressure-stimulated increase in the atrial contraction force, while similar inhibition is not observed with diltiazem, a blocker of L-type calcium channels. 4. This study suggests that Gd3+ inhibits stretch-induced changes in cell electrophysiology and contraction in the rat atrial cells and that the effects of gadolinium are due to rather specific block of stretch-activated ion channels with only a

  2. Gadolinium-uptake by aquatic and terrestrial organisms-distribution determined by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lingott, Jana; Lindner, Uwe; Telgmann, Lena; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Jakubowski, Norbert; Panne, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) based contrast agents (CA) are used to enhance magnetic resonance imaging. As a consequence of excretion by patients and insufficient elimination in wastewater treatment plants they are detected in high concentrations in surface water. At present, little is known about the uptake of these species by living organisms in aquatic systems. Therefore the uptake of gadolinium containing chelates by plants and animals grown in exposed water or on soil irrigated with exposed water was investigated. For this purpose two types of plants were treated with two different contrast agents. The uptake of the Gd contrast agents was studied by monitoring the elemental distribution with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique allows the multi-elemental analysis of solid samples with high resolution and little sample preparation. The analysis of L. minor showed that the uptake of Gd correlated with the concentration of gadodiamide in the water. The higher the concentration in the exposed water, the larger the Gd signal in the LA-ICP-MS acquired image. Exposure time experiments showed saturation within one day. The L. minor had contact with the CAs through roots and fronds, whereas the L. sativum only showed uptake through the roots. These results show that an external absorption of the CA through the leaves of L. sativum was impossible. All the analyzed parts of the plant showed Gd signal from the CA; the highest being at the main vein of the leaf. It is shown that the CAs can be taken up from plants. Furthermore, the uptake and distribution of Gd in Daphnia magna were shown. The exposure via cultivation medium is followed by Gd signals on the skin and in the area of the intestine, while the uptake via exposed nutrition algae causes the significantly highest Gd intensities in the area of the intestine. Because there are hints of negative effects for human organism these findings are important as they show that Gd based

  3. Luminescence properties of barium--gadolinium-titanate ceramics doped with rare-earth ions (Eu3+ and Tb3+).

    PubMed

    Hemasundara Raju, S; Muni Sudhakar, B; Sudhakar Reddy, B; Dhoble, S J; Thyagarajan, K; Nageswara Raju, C

    2014-11-01

    Barium-gadolinium-titanate (BaGd2 Ti4 O12) powder ceramics doped with rare-earth ions (Eu(3+) and Tb(3+)) were synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. From the X-ray diffraction spectrum, it was observed that Eu(3+) and Tb(3+):BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics are crystallized in the form of an orthorhombic structure. Scanning electron microscopy image shows that the particles are agglomerated and the particle size is about 200 nm. Eu(3+) - and Tb(3+) -doped BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics were examined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra. Emission spectra of Eu(3+)-doped BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics showed bright red emission at 613 nm ((5)D0 →(7)F2) with an excitation wavelength λ(exci)  = 408 nm ((7)F0 → (5)D3) and Tb(3+):BaGd2 Ti4 O12 ceramic powder has shown green emission at 534 nm ((5)D4 → (7)F5) with an excitation wavelength λ(exci)  = 331 nm (((7)F6 → (5)D1). TL spectra show that Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions affect TL sensitivity.

  4. Indirect MR lymphangiography of the head and neck using conventional gadolinium contrast: A pilot study in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Billy W. . E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu; Draney, Mary T.; Sivanandan, Ranjiv; Ruehm, Stefan G.; Pawlicki, Todd; Xing Lei; Herfkens, Robert J.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MR-LAG) using interstitial injection of conventional gadolinium contrast (gadoteridol and gadopentetate dimeglumine) for delineating the primary lymphatic drainage of head-and-neck sites. Methods and Materials: We performed head-and-neck MR-LAG in 5 healthy volunteers, with injection of dermal and mucosal sites. We evaluated the safety of the procedure, the patterns of enhancement categorized by injection site and nodal level, the time course of enhancement, the optimal concentration and volume of contrast, and the optimal imaging sequence. Results: The worst side effects of interstitial contrast injection were brief, mild pain and swelling at the injected sites that were self-limited. MR-LAG resulted in consistent visualization of the primary lymphatic drainage pattern specific to each injected site, which was reproducible on repeated examinations. The best enhancement was obtained with injection of small volumes (0.3-0.5 mL) of either agent diluted, imaging within 5-15 min of injection, and a three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo sequence with magnetization transfer. Conclusions: We found head-and-neck MR-LAG to be a safe, convenient imaging method that provides functional information about the lymphatic drainage of injected sites. Applied to head-and-neck cancer, it has the potential to identify sites at highest risk of occult metastatic spread for radiotherapy or surgical planning, and possibly to visualize micrometastases.

  5. Anthropogenic gadolinium anomalies and rare earth elements in the water of Atibaia River and Anhumas Creek, Southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Francisco Ferreira; Enzweiler, Jacinta

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), measured in water samples from Atibaia River and its tributary Anhumas Creek, Brazil, present excess of dissolved gadolinium. Such anthropogenic anomalies of Gd in water, already described in other parts of the world, result from the use of stable and soluble Gd chelates as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Atibaia River constitutes the main water supply of Campinas Metropolitan area, and its basin receives wastewater effluents. The REE concentrations in water samples were determined in 0.22-μm pore size filtered samples, without and after preconcentration by solid-phase extraction with bis-(2-ethyl-hexyl)-phosphate. This preconcentration method was unable to retain the anthropogenic Gd quantitatively. The probable reason is that the Gd chelates dissociate slowly in acidic media to produce the free ion that is retained by the phosphate ester. Strong correlations between Gd and constituents or parameters associated with effluents confirmed the source of most Gd in water samples as anthropogenic. The shale-normalized REE patterns of Atibaia River and Anhumas Creek water samples showed light and heavy REE enrichment trends, respectively. Also, positive Ce anomalies in many Atibaia River samples, as well as the strong correlations of the REE (except Gd) with terrigenous elements, imply that inorganic colloidal particles contributed to the REE measured values. PMID:27068533

  6. Cytotoxic and genotoxic characterization of titanium dioxide, gadolinium oxide, and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Khoo, Pheng Kian Stella; Eng, Bao Hui; Xiong, Sijing; Zhao, Xinxin; Das, Gautom Kumar; Tan, Timothy Thatt-Yang; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Leong, David Tai; Ng, Kee Woei

    2013-03-01

    Engineered nanomaterials have become prevalent in our everyday life. While the popularity of using nanomaterials in consumer products continues to rise, increasing awareness of nanotoxicology has also fuelled efforts to accelerate our understanding of the ill effects that different nanomaterials can bring to biological systems. In this study, we investigated the potential cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of three nanoparticles: titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), terbium-doped gadolinium oxide (Tb-Gd(2)O(3)), and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). To evaluate nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity more realistically, a human skin fibroblast cell line (BJ) with less mutated genotype compared with cancer cell line was used. The nanoparticles were first characterized by size, morphology, and surface charge. Cytotoxicity effects of the nanoparticles were then evaluated by monitoring the proliferation of treated BJ cells. Genotoxic influence was ascertained by profiling DNA damage via detection of γH2AX expression. Our results suggested that both TiO(2) and Tb-Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles induced cytotoxicity in a dose dependent way on BJ cells. These two nanomaterials also promoted genotoxicity via DNA damage. On the contrary, PLGA nanoparticles did not induce significant cytotoxic or genotoxic effects on BJ cells. PMID:22927021

  7. Gd(DOTAlaP): Exploring the Boundaries of Fast Water Exchange in Gadolinium-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis of the single amino acid chelator DOTAlaP and four of its derivatives. The corresponding gadolinium(III) complexes were investigated for their kinetic inertness, relaxometric properties at a range of fields and temperatures, water exchange rate, and interaction with human serum albumin (HSA). Derivatives with one inner-sphere water (q = 1) were determined to have a mean water residency time between 8 and 6 ns in phoshate-buffered saline at 37 °C. The corresponding europium complexes were also formed and used to obtain information on the hydration number of the corresponding coordination complexes. Two complexes capable of binding HSA were also synthesized, of which one, Gd(5b), contains no inner-sphere water, while the other derivative, Gd(4b), is a mixture of ca. 15% q =1 and 85% q = 0. In the presence of HSA, the latter displayed a very short mean water residency time (τM310 = 2.4 ns) and enhanced relaxivity at intermediate and high fields. The kinetic inertness of Gd(4b) with respect to complex dissociation was decreased compared to its DOTAla analogue but still 100-fold more inert than [Gd(BOPTA)(H2O)]2–. Magnetic resonance imaging in mice showed that Gd(4b) was able to provide 38% better vessel to muscle contrast compared to the clinically used HSA binding agent MS-325. PMID:24922178

  8. Immediate Adverse Reactions to Gadolinium-Based MR Contrast Media: A Retrospective Analysis on 10,608 Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; dell'Aprovitola, Nicoletta; Catalano, Orlando; Filice, Salvatore; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Contrast media (CM) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may determine the development of acute adverse reactions. Objective was to retrospectively assess the frequency and severity of adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) injection in patients who underwent MRI. Material and Methods. At our center 10608 MRI examinations with CM were performed using five different GBCAs: Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance), Gd-DTPA (Magnevist), Gd-EOBDTPA (Primovist), Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), and Gd-BTDO3A (Gadovist). Results. 32 acute adverse reactions occurred, accounting for 0.3% of all administration. Twelve reactions were associated with Gd-DOTA injection (0.11%), 9 with Gd-BOPTA injection (0.08%), 6 with Gd-BTDO3A (0.056%), 3 with Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.028%), and 2 with Gd-DTPA (0.018%). Twenty-four reactions (75.0%) were mild, four (12.5%) moderate, and four (12.5%) severe. The most severe reactions were seen associated with use of Gd-BOPTA, with 3 severe reactions in 32 total reactions. Conclusion. Acute adverse reactions are generally rare with the overall adverse reaction rate of 0.3%. The most common adverse reactions were not severe, consisting in skin rash and hives.

  9. Influence of gadolinium content on the tetragonal to cubic phase transition in zirconia-silica binary oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Behera, Pallavi Suhasinee; Vasanthavel, S.; Ponnilavan, V.; Kannan, S.

    2015-05-15

    The present study reports the effect of gadolinium (Gd{sup 3+}) in zirconia-silica (ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2}) binary oxides. The pure ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} synthesized at 1100 °C was tetragonal. The addition of Gd{sup 3+} in the concentration range of 5%–10% resulted in the formation of t-ZrO{sub 2}, whereas higher contents of Gd{sup 3+} led to the formation of cubic ZrO{sub 2} (c-ZrO{sub 2}). The presence of Gd{sup 3+} also affected the lattice parameters of both t-ZrO{sub 2} and c-ZrO{sub 2}. Magnetic studies confirmed a steady increase in the paramagnetic behaviour with increasing content of Gd{sup 3+}. - Graphical abstract: t-ZrO{sub 2} to c-ZrO{sub 2} phase transition influenced by Gd{sup 3+} content. - Highlights: • Sol-gel synthesis of Gd{sup 3+} added SiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} binary oxides. • Significant role of Gd{sup 3+} content in the tetragonal and cubic stabilization of ZrO{sub 2}. • Phase stability of either tetragonal or cubic stabilization till 1100 °C. • Gd{sup 3+} additions ensured additional paramagnetic behaviour in SiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} binary oxide.

  10. The Complex Fate in Plasma of Gadolinium Incorporated into High-Density Lipoproteins Used for Magnetic Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Barazza, Alessandra; Blachford, Courtney; Even-Or, Orli; Joaquin, Victor A.; Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Chen, Wei; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Cormode, David P.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported enhancing the imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in mice using reconstituted high density lipoproteins (HDL) as nanocarriers for the MRI contrast agent gadolinium (Gd). This study focuses on the underlying mechanisms of Gd delivery to atherosclerotic plaques. HDL, LDL, and VLDL particles containing Gd chelated to phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DTPA-DMPE) and a lipidic fluorophore were used to demonstrate the transfer of Gd-phospholipids among plasma lipoproteins in vitro and in vivo. To determine the basis of this transfer, the roles of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lipoprotein lipase (LpL) in mediating the migration of Gd-DTPA-DMPE among lipoproteins were investigated. The results indicated that neither was an important factor, suggesting that spontaneous transfer of Gd-DTPA-DMPE was the most probable mechanism. Finally, two independent mouse models were used to quantify the relative contributions of HDL and LDL reconstituted with Gd-DTPA-DMPE to plaque imaging enhancement by MR. Both sets of results suggested that Gd-DTPA-DMPE originally associated with LDL was about twice as effective as that injected in the form of Gd-HDL, and that some of Gd-HDL’s effectiveness in vivo is indirect through transfer of the imaging agent to LDL. In conclusion, the fate of Gd-DTPA-DMPE associated with a particular type of lipoprotein is complex, and includes its transfer to other lipoprotein species that are then cleared from the plasma into tissues. PMID:23617731

  11. Parallel Comparative Studies on Mouse Toxicity of Oxide Nanoparticle- and Gadolinium-Based T1 MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Ling, Daishun; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shuaifei; Liu, Ying; Bai, Ru; Baik, Seungmin; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-12-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with high relaxivity are highly desirable because they can significantly increase the accuracy of diagnosis. However, they can be potentially toxic to the patients. In this study, using a mouse model, we investigate the toxic effects and subsequent tissue damage induced by three T1 MRI contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine injection (GDI), a clinically used gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent (GBCAs), and oxide nanoparticle (NP)-based contrast agents, extremely small-sized iron oxide NPs (ESIONs) and manganese oxide (MnO) NPs. Biodistribution, hematological and histopathological changes, inflammation, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses are evaluated for 24 h after intravenous injection. These thorough assessments of the toxic and stress responses of these agents provide a panoramic description of safety concerns and underlying mechanisms of the toxicity of contrast agents in the body. We demonstrate that ESIONs exhibit fewer adverse effects than the MnO NPs and the clinically used GDI GBCAs, providing useful information on future applications of ESIONs as potentially safe MRI contrast agents.

  12. Possible gadolinium ions leaching and MR sensitivity over-estimation in mesoporous silica-coated upconversion nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengjian; Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, XiaoHang; Zhou, Liangping; Peng, Weijun

    2013-09-01

    Mesoporous silica (m-SiO2) coated gadolinium (Gd) ions-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are regarded as one of most attractive nano-platforms which hold great potential in future cancer theranostics. The current general synthetic strategy for such promising structures includes the extraction of surfactant molecules in the final step. Here, in this article, we focus our interest on probing the potential influence of hydrochloric acid extraction on lanthanide ions leakage, MR sensitivity over-estimation and the optical intensity weakening of m-SiO2 coated Gd-doped UCNPs. Control experiments provide evidence of inner core damage, Gd(3+) ion release and residual Gd(3+) ions "trapped" within the core@shell structures. Our investigation shows that: (1) the small Gd-doped UCNPs could be fragile and sensitive to the hydrochloric acid-extraction and thermal treatment processes; and (2) the presence of "trapped" Gd(3+) ions not only provokes the concerns of potential cytotoxicity but also interfere with the contrast imaging tests of Gd-doped UCNPs, providing possible erroneous information on the determination of the longitudinal relaxivities of given probes.

  13. Size-induced effect upon the Néel temperature of the antiferro/paramagnetic transition in gadolinium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutelet, B.; Keller, N.; Roux, S.; Flores-Gonzales, M. A.; Lux, F.; Martini, M.; Tillement, O.; Billotey, C.; Janier, M.; Villiers, C.; Novitchi, Ghenadie; Luneau, Dominique; Perriat, P.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that cubic gadolinium oxide is paramagnetic and follows the Curie-Weiss law from 20 K to room temperature for particles size comprised between 3.5 and 60 nm. The largest particles (60 nm) possess the macroscopic behaviour of Gd oxide with a Néel temperature, T N, close to 18 K (Gd oxide is antiferromagnetic below T N, paramagnetic above). Then size-induced effects can be encountered only for particles smaller than 60 nm. We find that the finite-size scaling model used for describing the size evolution of the antiferro/paramagnetic transition is valid for sizes comprised between 3.5 and 35 nm with parameters in excellent agreement with those usually found for antiferromagnetic materials. The correlation length (3.6 nm) is of the order of magnitude of a few lattice parameters and the critical exponent λ is found equal to 1.3, a value very close to that predicted by the three dimensional Heisenberg model ( λ=1.4).

  14. Cytotoxic and genotoxic characterization of titanium dioxide, gadolinium oxide, and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Khoo, Pheng Kian Stella; Eng, Bao Hui; Xiong, Sijing; Zhao, Xinxin; Das, Gautom Kumar; Tan, Timothy Thatt-Yang; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Leong, David Tai; Ng, Kee Woei

    2013-03-01

    Engineered nanomaterials have become prevalent in our everyday life. While the popularity of using nanomaterials in consumer products continues to rise, increasing awareness of nanotoxicology has also fuelled efforts to accelerate our understanding of the ill effects that different nanomaterials can bring to biological systems. In this study, we investigated the potential cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of three nanoparticles: titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), terbium-doped gadolinium oxide (Tb-Gd(2)O(3)), and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). To evaluate nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity more realistically, a human skin fibroblast cell line (BJ) with less mutated genotype compared with cancer cell line was used. The nanoparticles were first characterized by size, morphology, and surface charge. Cytotoxicity effects of the nanoparticles were then evaluated by monitoring the proliferation of treated BJ cells. Genotoxic influence was ascertained by profiling DNA damage via detection of γH2AX expression. Our results suggested that both TiO(2) and Tb-Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles induced cytotoxicity in a dose dependent way on BJ cells. These two nanomaterials also promoted genotoxicity via DNA damage. On the contrary, PLGA nanoparticles did not induce significant cytotoxic or genotoxic effects on BJ cells.

  15. Biodistribution study of nanometric hybrid gadolinium oxide particles as a multimodal SPECT/MR/optical imaging and theragnostic agent.

    PubMed

    Kryza, David; Taleb, Jacqueline; Janier, Marc; Marmuse, Laurence; Miladi, Imen; Bonazza, Pauline; Louis, Cédric; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier; Billotey, Claire

    2011-06-15

    Nanometric hybrid gadolinium oxide particles (Gado-6Si-NP) for diagnostic and therapeutic applications (mean diameter 3-4 nm) were obtained by encapsulating Gd(2)O(3) cores within a polysiloxane shell, which carries organic fluorophore (Cy 5) and is derivatized by a hydrophilic carboxylic layer. As residency time in the living body and methods of waste elimination are crucial to defining a good nanoparticle candidate and moving forward with steps for validation, this study was aimed at evaluating the biodistribution of these multimodal Gado-6Si-NP in rodents. Gado-6Si-NP were imaged following intravenous injection in control Wistar rats and mice using MRI (7 T), optical fluorescent imaging, and SPECT. A clear correlation was observed among MRI, optical imaging, and SPECT regarding the renal elimination. Quantitative biodistribution using gamma-counting of each sampled organ confirmed that these nanoparticles circulated freely in the blood pool and were rapidly cleared by renal excretion without accumulation in liver and RES uptake. These results demonstrate that Gado-6Si-NP display optimal biodistribution properties, enabling them to be developed as multimodal agents for in vivo imaging and theragnostics, especially in oncological applications.

  16. Designing tripodal and triangular gadolinium oxide nanoplates and self-assembled nanofibrils as potential multimodal bioimaging probes.

    PubMed

    Paik, Taejong; Gordon, Thomas R; Prantner, Andrew M; Yun, Hongseok; Murray, Christopher B

    2013-03-26

    Here, we report the shape-controlled synthesis of tripodal and triangular gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates. In the presence of lithium ions, the shape of the nanocrystals is readily controlled by tailoring reaction parameters such as temperature and time. We observe that the morphology transforms from an initial tripodal shape to a triangular shape with increasing reaction time or elevated temperatures. Highly uniform Gd2O3 nanoplates are self-assembled into nanofibril-like liquid-crystalline superlattices with long-range orientational and positional order. In addition, shape-directed self-assemblies are investigated by tailoring the aspect ratio of the arms of the Gd2O3 nanoplates. Due to a strong paramagnetic response, Gd2O3 nanocrystals are excellent candidates for MRI contrast agents and also can be doped with rare-earth ions to form nanophosphors, pointing to their potential in multimodal imaging. In this work, we investigate the MR relaxometry at high magnetic fields (9.4 and 14.1 T) and the optical properties including near-IR to visible upconversion luminescence and X-ray excited optical luminescence of doped Gd2O3 nanoplates. The complex shape of Gd2O3 nanoplates, coupled with their magnetic properties and their ability to phosphoresce under NIR or X-ray excitation which penetrate deep into tissue, makes these nanoplates a promising platform for multimodal imaging in biomedical applications.

  17. MR imaging of Ménière's disease after combined intratympanic and intravenous injection of gadolinium using HYDROPS2.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Shinji; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Kawai, Hisashi; Bokura, Kiminori; Iida, Tatsuo; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Endolymphatic hydrops (EH) in Ménière's disease is currently evaluated by 3-dimensional (3D)-real inversion recovery (IR) sequence after intratympanic (IT) administration of gadolinium (Gd) or by heavily T2-weighted (hT2W)-3D-fluid-attenuated IR (FLAIR) sequence after intravenous (IV) injection of Gd. Unilateral IT injection is usually performed. We employed a method in which we simultaneously administered contrast into one ear intravenously (IV side) and into the other ear both intravenously and intratympanically (IT + IV side) to evaluate EH in 10 patients with Ménière's disease. We then compared a HYDROPS2 image obtained by subtracting magnetic resonance cisternography from hT2W-3D-FLAIR with an image obtained by 3D-real IR and found that we could evaluate EH in all ears on the HYDROPS2 image but only in the IT + IV side on the 3D-real IR image.

  18. Anthropogenic gadolinium anomalies and rare earth elements in the water of Atibaia River and Anhumas Creek, Southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Francisco Ferreira; Enzweiler, Jacinta

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), measured in water samples from Atibaia River and its tributary Anhumas Creek, Brazil, present excess of dissolved gadolinium. Such anthropogenic anomalies of Gd in water, already described in other parts of the world, result from the use of stable and soluble Gd chelates as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Atibaia River constitutes the main water supply of Campinas Metropolitan area, and its basin receives wastewater effluents. The REE concentrations in water samples were determined in 0.22-μm pore size filtered samples, without and after preconcentration by solid-phase extraction with bis-(2-ethyl-hexyl)-phosphate. This preconcentration method was unable to retain the anthropogenic Gd quantitatively. The probable reason is that the Gd chelates dissociate slowly in acidic media to produce the free ion that is retained by the phosphate ester. Strong correlations between Gd and constituents or parameters associated with effluents confirmed the source of most Gd in water samples as anthropogenic. The shale-normalized REE patterns of Atibaia River and Anhumas Creek water samples showed light and heavy REE enrichment trends, respectively. Also, positive Ce anomalies in many Atibaia River samples, as well as the strong correlations of the REE (except Gd) with terrigenous elements, imply that inorganic colloidal particles contributed to the REE measured values.

  19. Immediate Adverse Reactions to Gadolinium-Based MR Contrast Media: A Retrospective Analysis on 10,608 Examinations.

    PubMed

    Granata, Vincenza; Cascella, Marco; Fusco, Roberta; dell'Aprovitola, Nicoletta; Catalano, Orlando; Filice, Salvatore; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Cuomo, Arturo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Contrast media (CM) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may determine the development of acute adverse reactions. Objective was to retrospectively assess the frequency and severity of adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) injection in patients who underwent MRI. Material and Methods. At our center 10608 MRI examinations with CM were performed using five different GBCAs: Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance), Gd-DTPA (Magnevist), Gd-EOBDTPA (Primovist), Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), and Gd-BTDO3A (Gadovist). Results. 32 acute adverse reactions occurred, accounting for 0.3% of all administration. Twelve reactions were associated with Gd-DOTA injection (0.11%), 9 with Gd-BOPTA injection (0.08%), 6 with Gd-BTDO3A (0.056%), 3 with Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.028%), and 2 with Gd-DTPA (0.018%). Twenty-four reactions (75.0%) were mild, four (12.5%) moderate, and four (12.5%) severe. The most severe reactions were seen associated with use of Gd-BOPTA, with 3 severe reactions in 32 total reactions. Conclusion. Acute adverse reactions are generally rare with the overall adverse reaction rate of 0.3%. The most common adverse reactions were not severe, consisting in skin rash and hives. PMID:27652261

  20. Optical spectra, energy levels, and emission intensity calculations of trivalent thulium ions in gadolinium scandium gallium garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, Michael D.; Gruber, John B.; Rosenblatt, Gregg H.; Morrison, Clyde A.; Filer, Elizabeth D.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption spectra of trivalent thulium ions in gadolinium scandium gallium garnet are reported between 1.9 and 0.25 μm at 4 K. Laser-induced fluorescence was observed at 4 K from the 1D2, 1G4, and 3H4 (4 and 300 K) manifolds. Site-selective excitation experiments reveal large fractions of thulium ions in both regular D2 sites and alternate sites. A crystal-field splitting calculation was carried out in which a parameterized Hamiltonian (including Coulombic, spin-orbit, and crystal-field terms in D2 symmetry) was diagonalized for all multiplet manifolds of the Tm3+ (4f12) configuration. The rms deviation between 56 experimental and calculated Stark levels was 10 cm-1. Calculations were carried out to predict branching ratios for emission from the 3H4 manifold to the 3H5, 3F4, and 3H6 manifolds, as well as line-to-line transition probabilities for transitions between the 3H4 manifold and the 3H5 manifold.