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Sample records for gag facilitates hiv-1

  1. Sprouty 2 binds ESCRT-II factor Eap20 and facilitates HIV-1 gag release.

    PubMed

    Medina, G N; Ehrlich, L S; Chen, M H; Khan, M B; Powell, M D; Carter, C A

    2011-07-01

    The four ESCRT (endocytic sorting complexes required for transport) complexes (ESCRT-0, -I, -II, and -III) normally operate sequentially in the trafficking of cellular cargo. HIV-1 Gag trafficking and release as virus-like particles (VLPs) require the participation of ESCRTs; however, its use of ESCRTs is selective and nonsequential. Specifically, Gag trafficking to release sites on the plasma membrane does not require ESCRT-0 or -II. It is known that a bypass of ESCRT-0 is achieved by the direct linkage of the ESCRT-I component, Tsg101, to the primary L domain motif (PTAP) in Gag and that bypass of ESCRT-II is achieved by the linkage of Gag to ESCRT-III through the adaptor protein Alix. However, the mechanism by which Gag suppresses the interaction of bound ESCRT-I with ESCRT-II is unknown. Here we show (i) that VLP release requires the steady-state level of Sprouty 2 (Spry2) in COS-1 cells, (ii) that Spry2 binds the ESCRT-II component Eap20, (iii) that binding Eap20 permits Spry2 to disrupt ESCRT-I interaction with ESCRT-II, and (iv) that coexpression of Gag with a Spry2 fragment that binds Eap20 increases VLP release. Spry2 also facilitated release of P7L-Gag (i.e., release in the absence of Tsg101 binding). In this case, rescue required the secondary L domain (YPX(n)L) in HIV-1 Gag that binds Alix and the region in Spry2 that binds Eap20. The results identify Spry2 as a novel cellular factor that facilitates release driven by the primary and secondary HIV-1 Gag L domains.

  2. The phosphorylation of HIV-1 Gag by atypical protein kinase C facilitates viral infectivity by promoting Vpr incorporation into virions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is the main structural protein that mediates the assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) from an infected cell membrane. The Gag C-terminal p6 domain contains short sequence motifs that facilitate virus release from the plasma membrane and mediate incorporation of the viral Vpr protein. Gag p6 has also been found to be phosphorylated during HIV-1 infection and this event may affect virus replication. However, the kinase that directs the phosphorylation of Gag p6 toward virus replication remains to be identified. In our present study, we identified this kinase using a proteomic approach and further delineate its role in HIV-1 replication. Results A proteomic approach was designed to systematically identify human protein kinases that potently interact with HIV-1 Gag and successfully identified 22 candidates. Among this panel, atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) was found to phosphorylate HIV-1 Gag p6. Subsequent LC-MS/MS and immunoblotting analysis with a phospho-specific antibody confirmed both in vitro and in vivo that aPKC phosphorylates HIV-1 Gag at Ser487. Computer-assisted structural modeling and a subsequent cell-based assay revealed that this phosphorylation event is necessary for the interaction between Gag and Vpr and results in the incorporation of Vpr into virions. Moreover, the inhibition of aPKC activity reduced the Vpr levels in virions and impaired HIV-1 infectivity of human primary macrophages. Conclusion Our current results indicate for the first time that HIV-1 Gag phosphorylation on Ser487 is mediated by aPKC and that this kinase may regulate the incorporation of Vpr into HIV-1 virions and thereby supports virus infectivity. Furthermore, aPKC inhibition efficiently suppresses HIV-1 infectivity in macrophages. aPKC may therefore be an intriguing therapeutic target for HIV-1 infection. PMID:24447338

  3. Solution Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Protein: Differences from HIV-1 Gag

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Clark, Patrick K.; Campbell, Stephen J.; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan

    2012-05-09

    Immature retrovirus particles are assembled from the multidomain Gag protein. In these particles, the Gag proteins are arranged radially as elongated rods. We have previously characterized the properties of HIV-1 Gag in solution. In the absence of nucleic acid, HIV-1 Gag displays moderately weak interprotein interactions, existing in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Neutron scattering and hydrodynamic studies suggest that the protein is compact, and biochemical studies indicate that the two ends can approach close in three-dimensional space, implying the need for a significant conformational change during assembly. We now describe the properties of the Gag protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), a gammaretrovirus. We found that this protein is very different from HIV-1 Gag: it has much weaker protein-protein interaction and is predominantly monomeric in solution. This has allowed us to study the protein by small-angle X-ray scattering and to build a low-resolution molecular envelope for the protein. We found that MLV Gag is extended in solution, with an axial ratio of {approx}7, comparable to its dimensions in immature particles. Mutational analysis suggests that runs of prolines in its matrix and p12 domains and the highly charged stretch at the C terminus of its capsid domain all contribute to this extended conformation. These differences between MLV Gag and HIV-1 Gag and their implications for retroviral assembly are discussed.

  4. Efavirenz enhances HIV-1 gag processing at the plasma membrane through Gag-Pol dimerization.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Sho; Haraguchi, Hiyori; Hirai, Yoko; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Sakuragi, Jun-ichi; Momose, Fumitaka; Morikawa, Yuko

    2013-03-01

    Efavirenz (EFV), a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor, also inhibits HIV-1 particle release through enhanced Gag/Gag-Pol processing by protease (PR). To better understand the mechanisms of the EFV-mediated enhancement of Gag processing, we examined the intracellular localization of Gag/Gag-Pol processing products and their precursors. Confocal microscopy revealed that in the presence of EFV, the N-terminal p17 matrix (p17MA) fragment was uniformly distributed at the plasma membrane (PM) but the central p24 capsid (p24CA) and the Pol-encoded RT antigens were diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm, and all of the above were observed in puncta at the PM in the absence of EFV. EFV did not impair PM targeting of Gag/Gag-Pol precursors. Membrane flotation analysis confirmed these findings. Such uniform distribution of p17MA at the PM was not seen by overexpression of Gag-Pol and was suppressed when EFV-resistant HIV-1 was used. Forster's fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay revealed that Gag-Pol precursor dimerization occurred mainly at the PM and that EFV induced a significant increase of the Gag-Pol dimerization at the PM. Gag-Pol dimerization was not enhanced when HIV-1 contained the EFV resistance mutation in RT. Bacterial two-hybrid assay showed that EFV enhanced the dimerization of PR-RT fragments and restored the dimerization impaired by the dimerization-defective mutation in the RT tryptophan repeat motif but not that impaired by the mutation at the PR dimer interface. Collectively, our data indicate that EFV enhances Gag-Pol precursor dimerization, likely after PM targeting but before complete particle assembly, resulting in uniform distribution of p17MA to and dissociation of p24CA and RT from the PM.

  5. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  6. The tumour suppressor APC promotes HIV-1 assembly via interaction with Gag precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Kei; Nishi, Mayuko; Matsunaga, Satoko; Okayama, Akiko; Anraku, Masaki; Kudoh, Ayumi; Hirano, Hisashi; Kimura, Hirokazu; Morikawa, Yuko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ono, Akira; Ryo, Akihide

    2017-01-30

    Diverse cellular proteins and RNAs are tightly regulated in their subcellular localization to exert their local function. Here we report that the tumour suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) directs the localization and assembly of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 Gag polyprotein at distinct membrane components to enable the efficient production and spread of infectious viral particles. A proteomic analysis and subsequent biomolecular interaction assay reveals that the carboxyl terminus of APC interacts with the matrix region of Gag. Ectopic expression of APC, but not its familial adenomatous polyposis-related truncation mutant, prominently enhances HIV-1 production. Conversely, the depletion of APC leads to a significant decrease in membrane targeting of viral components, resulting in the severe loss of production of infectious virions. Furthermore, APC promotes the directional assembly of viral components at virological synapses, thereby facilitating cell-to-cell viral transmission. These findings reveal an unexpected role of APC in the directional spread of HIV-1.

  7. The tumour suppressor APC promotes HIV-1 assembly via interaction with Gag precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Kei; Nishi, Mayuko; Matsunaga, Satoko; Okayama, Akiko; Anraku, Masaki; Kudoh, Ayumi; Hirano, Hisashi; Kimura, Hirokazu; Morikawa, Yuko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ono, Akira; Ryo, Akihide

    2017-01-01

    Diverse cellular proteins and RNAs are tightly regulated in their subcellular localization to exert their local function. Here we report that the tumour suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) directs the localization and assembly of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 Gag polyprotein at distinct membrane components to enable the efficient production and spread of infectious viral particles. A proteomic analysis and subsequent biomolecular interaction assay reveals that the carboxyl terminus of APC interacts with the matrix region of Gag. Ectopic expression of APC, but not its familial adenomatous polyposis-related truncation mutant, prominently enhances HIV-1 production. Conversely, the depletion of APC leads to a significant decrease in membrane targeting of viral components, resulting in the severe loss of production of infectious virions. Furthermore, APC promotes the directional assembly of viral components at virological synapses, thereby facilitating cell-to-cell viral transmission. These findings reveal an unexpected role of APC in the directional spread of HIV-1. PMID:28134256

  8. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    SciTech Connect

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  9. Reconstitution of selective HIV-1 RNA packaging in vitro by membrane-bound Gag assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Lars-Anders; Bai, Yun; Keane, Sarah C; Doudna, Jennifer A; Hurley, James H

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Gag selects and packages a dimeric, unspliced viral RNA in the context of a large excess of cytosolic human RNAs. As Gag assembles on the plasma membrane, the HIV-1 genome is enriched relative to cellular RNAs by an unknown mechanism. We used a minimal system consisting of purified RNAs, recombinant HIV-1 Gag and giant unilamellar vesicles to recapitulate the selective packaging of the 5’ untranslated region of the HIV-1 genome in the presence of excess competitor RNA. Mutations in the CA-CTD domain of Gag which subtly affect the self-assembly of Gag abrogated RNA selectivity. We further found that tRNA suppresses Gag membrane binding less when Gag has bound viral RNA. The ability of HIV-1 Gag to selectively package its RNA genome and its self-assembly on membranes are thus interdependent on one another. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14663.001 PMID:27343348

  10. HIV-1 Gag Blocks Selenite-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Altering the mRNA Cap-Binding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cinti, Alessandro; Le Sage, Valerie; Ghanem, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress granules (SGs) are dynamic accumulations of stalled preinitiation complexes and translational machinery that assemble under stressful conditions. Sodium selenite (Se) induces the assembly of noncanonical type II SGs that differ in morphology, composition, and mechanism of assembly from canonical SGs. Se inhibits translation initiation by altering the cap-binding activity of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4EBP1). In this work, we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is able to block the assembly of type II noncanonical SGs to facilitate continued Gag protein synthesis. We demonstrate that expression of Gag reduces the amount of hypophosphorylated 4EBP1 associated with the 5′ cap potentially through an interaction with its target, eIF4E. These results suggest that the assembly of SGs is an important host antiviral defense that HIV-1 has evolved for inhibition through several distinct mechanisms. PMID:27025252

  11. Real-time visualization of HIV-1 GAG trafficking in infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gousset, Karine; Ablan, Sherimay D; Coren, Lori V; Ono, Akira; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Ott, David E; Freed, Eric O

    2008-03-07

    HIV-1 particle production is driven by the Gag precursor protein Pr55(Gag). Despite significant progress in defining both the viral and cellular determinants of HIV-1 assembly and release, the trafficking pathway used by Gag to reach its site of assembly in the infected cell remains to be elucidated. The Gag trafficking itinerary in primary monocyte-derived macrophages is especially poorly understood. To define the site of assembly and characterize the Gag trafficking pathway in this physiologically relevant cell type, we have made use of the biarsenical-tetracysteine system. A small tetracysteine tag was introduced near the C-terminus of the matrix domain of Gag. The insertion of the tag at this position did not interfere with Gag trafficking, virus assembly or release, particle infectivity, or the kinetics of virus replication. By using this in vivo detection system to visualize Gag trafficking in living macrophages, Gag was observed to accumulate both at the plasma membrane and in an apparently internal compartment that bears markers characteristic of late endosomes or multivesicular bodies. Significantly, the internal Gag rapidly translocated to the junction between the infected macrophages and uninfected T cells following macrophage/T-cell synapse formation. These data indicate that a population of Gag in infected macrophages remains sequestered internally and is presented to uninfected target cells at a virological synapse.

  12. Live-cell observation of cytosolic HIV-1 assembly onset reveals RNA-interacting Gag oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Jelle; Baumgärtel, Viola; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ivanchenko, Sergey; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of the Gag polyprotein into new viral particles in infected cells is a crucial step in the retroviral replication cycle. Currently, little is known about the onset of assembly in the cytosol. In this paper, we analyzed the cytosolic HIV-1 Gag fraction in real time in live cells using advanced fluctuation imaging methods and thereby provide detailed insights into the complex relationship between cytosolic Gag mobility, stoichiometry, and interactions. We show that Gag diffuses as a monomer on the subsecond timescale with severely reduced mobility. Reduction of mobility is associated with basic residues in its nucleocapsid (NC) domain, whereas capsid (CA) and matrix (MA) domains do not contribute significantly. Strikingly, another diffusive Gag species was observed on the seconds timescale that oligomerized in a concentration-dependent manner. Both NC- and CA-mediated interactions strongly assist this process. Our results reveal potential nucleation steps of cytosolic Gag fractions before membrane-assisted Gag assembly. PMID:26283800

  13. HIV-1 Nef-associated Factor 1 Enhances Viral Production by Interacting with CRM1 to Promote Nuclear Export of Unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Hai-Bo; Li, Chuan; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Xiong, Si-Dong; Jin, Xia; Wu, Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-02-26

    HIV-1 depends on host-cell-encoded factors to complete its life cycle. A comprehensive understanding of how HIV-1 manipulates host machineries during viral infection can facilitate the identification of host targets for antiviral drugs or gene therapy. The cellular protein Naf1 (HIV-1 Nef-associated factor 1) is a CRM1-dependent nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, and has been identified to regulate multiple receptor-mediated signal pathways in inflammation. The cytoplasm-located Naf1 can inhibit NF-κB activation through binding to A20, and the loss of Naf1 controlled NF-κB activation is associated with multiple autoimmune diseases. However, the effect of Naf1 on HIV-1 mRNA expression has not been characterized. In this study we found that the nucleus-located Naf1 could promote nuclear export of unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA. We demonstrated that the association between Naf1 and CRM1 was required for this function as the inhibition or knockdown of CRM1 expression significantly impaired Naf1-promoted HIV-1 production. The mutation of Naf1 nuclear export signals (NESs) that account for CRM1 recruitment for nuclear export decreased Naf1 function. Additionally, the mutation of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Naf1 diminished its ability to promote HIV-1 production, demonstrating that the shuttling property of Naf1 is required for this function. Our results reveal a novel role of Naf1 in enhancing HIV-1 production, and provide a potential therapeutic target for controlling HIV-1 infection.

  14. Interaction of HIV-1 gag and membranes in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuzhan; Ratner, Lee

    2002-10-10

    A coupled transcription-translation (TNT) reticulocyte lysate system was used to examine posttranslational alterations in HIV-1 Gag upon addition of Jurkat T cell membranes. Incubation of the Gag precursor protein, Pr55gag, with membranes resulted in a time-dependent alteration in Gag resulting in partial resistance to trypsin treatment. Treatment of membranes and TNT extract with apyrase or pretreatment of membranes with trypsin prevented this posttranslational alteration of Gag. In contrast, this activity was not disrupted by pretreatment of membranes with Triton X-100 at 4 degrees C, under conditions which do not solubilize raft-associated proteins. Flotation studies revealed that acquisition of trypsin-resistance was accompanied by Gag binding to membranes. The myristylation signal and nucleocapsid domain were found to mediate Gag binding to membranes. The posttranslational alteration of Gag accompanying membrane interaction may represent a conformational change, oligomerization, and/or association with or envelopment by membranes. These findings provide new clues to the stepwise process of HIV-1 assembly.

  15. HIV-1 RNA genome dimerizes on the plasma membrane in the presence of Gag protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Rahman, Sheikh Abdul; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Grunwald, David; Sardo, Luca; Burdick, Ryan C; Plisov, Sergey; Liang, Edward; Tai, Sheldon; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2016-01-12

    Retroviruses package a dimeric genome comprising two copies of the viral RNA. Each RNA contains all of the genetic information for viral replication. Packaging a dimeric genome allows the recovery of genetic information from damaged RNA genomes during DNA synthesis and promotes frequent recombination to increase diversity in the viral population. Therefore, the strategy of packaging dimeric RNA affects viral replication and viral evolution. Although its biological importance is appreciated, very little is known about the genome dimerization process. HIV-1 RNA genomes dimerize before packaging into virions, and RNA interacts with the viral structural protein Gag in the cytoplasm. Thus, it is often hypothesized that RNAs dimerize in the cytoplasm and the RNA-Gag complex is transported to the plasma membrane for virus assembly. In this report, we tagged HIV-1 RNAs with fluorescent proteins, via interactions of RNA-binding proteins and motifs in the RNA genomes, and studied their behavior at the plasma membrane by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We showed that HIV-1 RNAs dimerize not in the cytoplasm but on the plasma membrane. Dynamic interactions occur among HIV-1 RNAs, and stabilization of the RNA dimer requires Gag protein. Dimerization often occurs at an early stage of the virus assembly process. Furthermore, the dimerization process is probably mediated by the interactions of two RNA-Gag complexes, rather than two RNAs. These findings advance the current understanding of HIV-1 assembly and reveal important insights into viral replication mechanisms.

  16. Functional Equivalence of Retroviral MA Domains in Facilitating Psi RNA Binding Specificity by Gag

    PubMed Central

    Rye-McCurdy, Tiffiny; Olson, Erik D.; Liu, Shuohui; Binkley, Christiana; Reyes, Joshua-Paolo; Thompson, Brian R.; Flanagan, John M.; Parent, Leslie J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses specifically package full-length, dimeric genomic RNA (gRNA) even in the presence of a vast excess of cellular RNA. The “psi” (Ψ) element within the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) of gRNA is critical for packaging through interaction with the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag. However, in vitro Gag binding affinity for Ψ versus non-Ψ RNAs is not significantly different. Previous salt-titration binding assays revealed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag bound to Ψ RNA with high specificity and relatively few charge interactions, whereas binding to non-Ψ RNA was less specific and involved more electrostatic interactions. The NC domain was critical for specific Ψ binding, but surprisingly, a Gag mutant lacking the matrix (MA) domain was less effective at discriminating Ψ from non-Ψ RNA. We now find that Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag also effectively discriminates RSV Ψ from non-Ψ RNA in a MA-dependent manner. Interestingly, Gag chimeras, wherein the HIV-1 and RSV MA domains were swapped, maintained high binding specificity to cognate Ψ RNAs. Using Ψ RNA mutant constructs, determinants responsible for promoting high Gag binding specificity were identified in both systems. Taken together, these studies reveal the functional equivalence of HIV-1 and RSV MA domains in facilitating Ψ RNA selectivity by Gag, as well as Ψ elements that promote this selectivity. PMID:27657107

  17. Mechanistic Studies and Modeling Reveal the Origin of Differential Inhibition of Gag Polymorphic Viruses by HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zeyu; Cantone, Joseph; Lu, Hao; Protack, Tricia; Yuan, Tian; Yang, Hong; Liu, Zheng; Drexler, Dieter; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Cockett, Mark; Krystal, Mark; Lataillade, Max; Dicker, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 maturation inhibitors (MIs) disrupt the final step in the HIV-1 protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag polyprotein between capsid p24 capsid (CA) and spacer peptide 1 (SP1), leading to the production of infectious virus. BMS-955176 is a second generation MI with improved antiviral activity toward polymorphic Gag variants compared to a first generation MI bevirimat (BVM). The underlying mechanistic reasons for the differences in polymorphic coverage were studied using antiviral assays, an LC/MS assay that quantitatively characterizes CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics of virus like particles (VLPs) and a radiolabel binding assay to determine VLP/MI affinities and dissociation kinetics. Antiviral assay data indicates that BVM does not achieve 100% inhibition of certain polymorphs, even at saturating concentrations. This results in the breakthrough of infectious virus (partial antagonism) regardless of BVM concentration. Reduced maximal percent inhibition (MPI) values for BVM correlated with elevated EC50 values, while rates of HIV-1 protease cleavage at CA/SP1 correlated inversely with the ability of BVM to inhibit HIV-1 Gag polymorphic viruses: genotypes with more rapid CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics were less sensitive to BVM. In vitro inhibition of wild type VLP CA/SP1 cleavage by BVM was not maintained at longer cleavage times. BMS-955176 exhibited greatly improved MPI against polymorphic Gag viruses, binds to Gag polymorphs with higher affinity/longer dissociation half-lives and exhibits greater time-independent inhibition of CA/SP1 cleavage compared to BVM. Virological (MPI) and biochemical (CA/SP1 cleavage rates, MI-specific Gag affinities) data were used to create an integrated semi-quantitative model that quantifies CA/SP1 cleavage rates as a function of both MI and Gag polymorph. The model outputs are in accord with in vitro antiviral observations and correlate with observed in vivo MI efficacies. Overall, these findings may be useful to further understand antiviral

  18. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-04-25

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (L-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane.

  19. Immunological Characterization of Plant-Based HIV-1 Gag/Dgp41 Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kessans, Sarah A.; Linhart, Mark D.; Meador, Lydia R.; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Hogue, Brenda G.; Fromme, Petra; Matoba, Nobuyuki; Mor, Tsafrir S.

    2016-01-01

    It is widely anticipated that a prophylactic vaccine may be needed to control the HIV/AIDS epidemic worldwide. Despite over two decades of research, a vaccine against HIV-1 remains elusive, although a recent clinical trial has shown promising results. Recent studies have focused on highly conserved domains within HIV-1 such as the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of the envelope glycoprotein, gp41. MPER has been shown to play critical roles in mucosal transmission of HIV-1, though this peptide is poorly immunogenic on its own. Here we provide evidence that plant-produced HIV-1 enveloped virus-like particles (VLPs) consisting of Gag and a deconstructed form of gp41 comprising the MPER, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic domains (Dgp41) provides an effective platform to display MPER for use as an HIV vaccine candidate. Prime-boost strategies combining systemic and mucosal priming with systemic boosting using two different vaccine candidates (VLPs and CTB-MPR—a fusion of MPER and the B-subunit of cholera toxin) were investigated in BALB/c mice. Serum antibody responses against both the Gag and gp41 antigens were elicited when systemically primed with VLPs. These responses could be recalled following systemic boosting with VLPs. In addition, mucosal priming with VLPs allowed for a boosting response against Gag and gp41 when boosted with either candidate. Importantly, the VLPs also induced Gag-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses. This report on the immunogenicity of plant-based Gag/Dgp41 VLPs may represent an important milestone on the road towards a broadly efficacious and inexpensive subunit vaccine against HIV-1. PMID:26986483

  20. A restriction enzyme based cloning method to assess the in vitro replication capacity of HIV-1 subtype C Gag-MJ4 chimeric viruses.

    PubMed

    Claiborne, Daniel T; Prince, Jessica L; Hunter, Eric

    2014-08-31

    The protective effect of many HLA class I alleles on HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease progression is, in part, attributed to their ability to target conserved portions of the HIV-1 genome that escape with difficulty. Sequence changes attributed to cellular immune pressure arise across the genome during infection, and if found within conserved regions of the genome such as Gag, can affect the ability of the virus to replicate in vitro. Transmission of HLA-linked polymorphisms in Gag to HLA-mismatched recipients has been associated with reduced set point viral loads. We hypothesized this may be due to a reduced replication capacity of the virus. Here we present a novel method for assessing the in vitro replication of HIV-1 as influenced by the gag gene isolated from acute time points from subtype C infected Zambians. This method uses restriction enzyme based cloning to insert the gag gene into a common subtype C HIV-1 proviral backbone, MJ4. This makes it more appropriate to the study of subtype C sequences than previous recombination based methods that have assessed the in vitro replication of chronically derived gag-pro sequences. Nevertheless, the protocol could be readily modified for studies of viruses from other subtypes. Moreover, this protocol details a robust and reproducible method for assessing the replication capacity of the Gag-MJ4 chimeric viruses on a CEM-based T cell line. This method was utilized for the study of Gag-MJ4 chimeric viruses derived from 149 subtype C acutely infected Zambians, and has allowed for the identification of residues in Gag that affect replication. More importantly, the implementation of this technique has facilitated a deeper understanding of how viral replication defines parameters of early HIV-1 pathogenesis such as set point viral load and longitudinal CD4+ T cell decline.

  1. Comprehensive Mutational Analysis Reveals p6Gag Phosphorylation To Be Dispensable for HIV-1 Morphogenesis and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, Benjamin; Morales, Ivonne; Rahman, Sheikh Abdul; Radau, Sonja; Glass, Bärbel; Zahedi, René Peiman; Müller, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural polyprotein Gag of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is necessary and sufficient for formation of virus-like particles. Its C-terminal p6 domain harbors short peptide motifs that facilitate virus release from the plasma membrane and mediate incorporation of the viral Vpr protein. p6 has been shown to be the major viral phosphoprotein in HIV-1-infected cells and virions, but the sites and functional relevance of p6 phosphorylation are not clear. Here, we identified phosphorylation of several serine and threonine residues in p6 in purified virus preparations using mass spectrometry. Mutation of individual candidate phosphoacceptor residues had no detectable effect on virus assembly, release, and infectivity, however, suggesting that phosphorylation of single residues may not be functionally relevant. Therefore, a comprehensive mutational analysis was conducted changing all potentially phosphorylatable amino acids in p6, except for a threonine that is part of an essential peptide motif. To avoid confounding changes in the overlapping pol reading frame, mutagenesis was performed in a provirus with genetically uncoupled gag and pol reading frames. An HIV-1 derivative carrying 12 amino acid changes in its p6 region, abolishing all but one potential phosphoacceptor site, showed no impairment of Gag assembly and virus release and displayed only very subtle deficiencies in viral infectivity in T-cell lines and primary lymphocytes. All mutations were stable over 2 weeks of culture in primary cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that phosphorylation of p6 is dispensable for HIV-1 assembly, release, and infectivity in tissue culture. PMID:23115284

  2. Comprehensive mutational analysis reveals p6Gag phosphorylation to be dispensable for HIV-1 morphogenesis and replication.

    PubMed

    Radestock, Benjamin; Morales, Ivonne; Rahman, Sheikh Abdul; Radau, Sonja; Glass, Bärbel; Zahedi, René Peiman; Müller, Barbara; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg

    2013-01-01

    The structural polyprotein Gag of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is necessary and sufficient for formation of virus-like particles. Its C-terminal p6 domain harbors short peptide motifs that facilitate virus release from the plasma membrane and mediate incorporation of the viral Vpr protein. p6 has been shown to be the major viral phosphoprotein in HIV-1-infected cells and virions, but the sites and functional relevance of p6 phosphorylation are not clear. Here, we identified phosphorylation of several serine and threonine residues in p6 in purified virus preparations using mass spectrometry. Mutation of individual candidate phosphoacceptor residues had no detectable effect on virus assembly, release, and infectivity, however, suggesting that phosphorylation of single residues may not be functionally relevant. Therefore, a comprehensive mutational analysis was conducted changing all potentially phosphorylatable amino acids in p6, except for a threonine that is part of an essential peptide motif. To avoid confounding changes in the overlapping pol reading frame, mutagenesis was performed in a provirus with genetically uncoupled gag and pol reading frames. An HIV-1 derivative carrying 12 amino acid changes in its p6 region, abolishing all but one potential phosphoacceptor site, showed no impairment of Gag assembly and virus release and displayed only very subtle deficiencies in viral infectivity in T-cell lines and primary lymphocytes. All mutations were stable over 2 weeks of culture in primary cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that phosphorylation of p6 is dispensable for HIV-1 assembly, release, and infectivity in tissue culture.

  3. An Essential Role of INI1/hSNF5 Chromatin Remodeling Protein in HIV-1 Posttranscriptional Events and Gag/Gag-Pol Stability

    PubMed Central

    La Porte, Annalena; Cano, Jennifer; Wu, Xuhong; Mitra, Doyel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT INI1/hSNF5/SMARCB1/BAF47 is an HIV-specific integrase (IN)-binding protein that influences HIV-1 transcription and particle production. INI1 binds to SAP18 (Sin3a-associated protein, 18 kDa), and both INI1 and SAP18 are incorporated into HIV-1 virions. To determine the significance of INI1 and the INI1-SAP18 interaction during HIV-1 replication, we isolated a panel of SAP18-interaction-defective (SID)-INI1 mutants using a yeast reverse two-hybrid screen. The SID-INI1 mutants, which retained the ability to bind to IN, cMYC, and INI1 but were impaired for binding to SAP18, were tested for their effects on HIV-1 particle production. SID-INI1 dramatically reduced the intracellular Gag/Gag-Pol protein levels and, in addition, decreased viral particle production. The SID-INI1-mediated effects were less dramatic in trans complementation assays using IN deletion mutant viruses with Vpr-reverse transcriptase (RT)-IN. SID-INI1 did not inhibit long-terminal-repeat (LTR)-mediated transcription, but it marginally decreased the steady-state gag RNA levels, suggesting a posttranscriptional effect. Pulse-chase analysis indicated that in SID-INI1-expressing cells, the pr55Gag levels decreased rapidly. RNA interference analysis indicated that small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of INI1 reduced the intracellular Gag/Gag-Pol levels and further inhibited HIV-1 particle production. These results suggest that SID-INI1 mutants inhibit multiple stages of posttranscriptional events of HIV-1 replication, including intracellular Gag/Gag-Pol RNA and protein levels, which in turn inhibits assembly and particle production. Interfering INI1 leads to a decrease in particle production and Gag/Gag-Pol protein levels. Understanding the role of INI1 and SAP18 in HIV-1 replication is likely to provide novel insight into the stability of Gag/Gag-Pol, which may lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies to inhibit HIV-1 late events. IMPORTANCE Significant gaps exist in our

  4. Role of Transmitted Gag CTL Polymorphisms in Defining Replicative Capacity and Early HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jonathan M.; Schaefer, Malinda; Yu, Tianwei; Lahki, Shabir; Prentice, Heather A.; Yue, Ling; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Kilembe, William; Goepfert, Paul; Price, Matthew A.; Gilmour, Jill; Mulenga, Joseph; Farmer, Paul; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Tang, Jiaming; Heckerman, David; Kaslow, Richard A.; Allen, Susan A.; Hunter, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Initial studies of 88 transmission pairs in the Zambia Emory HIV Research Project cohort demonstrated that the number of transmitted HLA-B associated polymorphisms in Gag, but not Nef, was negatively correlated to set point viral load (VL) in the newly infected partners. These results suggested that accumulation of CTL escape mutations in Gag might attenuate viral replication and provide a clinical benefit during early stages of infection. Using a novel approach, we have cloned gag sequences isolated from the earliest seroconversion plasma sample from the acutely infected recipient of 149 epidemiologically linked Zambian transmission pairs into a primary isolate, subtype C proviral vector, MJ4. We determined the replicative capacity (RC) of these Gag-MJ4 chimeras by infecting the GXR25 cell line and quantifying virion production in supernatants via a radiolabeled reverse transcriptase assay. We observed a statistically significant positive correlation between RC conferred by the transmitted Gag sequence and set point VL in newly infected individuals (p = 0.02). Furthermore, the RC of Gag-MJ4 chimeras also correlated with the VL of chronically infected donors near the estimated date of infection (p = 0.01), demonstrating that virus replication contributes to VL in both acute and chronic infection. These studies also allowed for the elucidation of novel sites in Gag associated with changes in RC, where rare mutations had the greatest effect on fitness. Although we observed both advantageous and deleterious rare mutations, the latter could point to vulnerable targets in the HIV-1 genome. Importantly, RC correlated significantly (p = 0.029) with the rate of CD4+ T cell decline over the first 3 years of infection in a manner that is partially independent of VL, suggesting that the replication capacity of HIV-1 during the earliest stages of infection is a determinant of pathogenesis beyond what might be expected based on set point VL alone. PMID:23209412

  5. HIV-1 Pr55(Gag) binds genomic and spliced RNAs with different affinity and stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Abd El-Wahab, Ekram W; Dubois, Noé; Hijnen, Marcel; Smyth, Redmond P; Mak, Johnson; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-02

    The HIV-1 Pr55(Gag) precursor specifically selects genomic RNA (gRNA) from a large variety of cellular and spliced viral RNAs (svRNAs), however the molecular mechanisms of this selective recognition remains poorly understood. To gain better understanding of this process, we analyzed the interactions between Pr55(Gag) and a large panel of viral RNA (vRNA) fragments encompassing the main packaging signal (Psi) and its flanking regions by fluorescence spectroscopy. We showed that the gRNA harbors a high affinity binding site which is absent from svRNA species, suggesting that this site might be crucial for selecting the HIV-1 genome. Our stoichiometry analysis of protein/RNA complexes revealed that few copies of Pr55(Gag) specifically associate with the 5' region of the gRNA. Besides, we found that gRNA dimerization significantly impacts Pr55(Gag) binding, and we confirmed that the internal loop of stem-loop 1 (SL1) in Psi is crucial for specific interaction with Pr55(Gag). Our analysis of gRNA fragments of different length supports the existence of a long-range tertiary interaction involving sequences upstream and downstream of the Psi region. This long-range interaction might promote optimal exposure of SL1 for efficient Pr55(Gag) recognition. Altogether, our results shed light on the molecular mechanisms allowing the specific selection of gRNA by Pr55(Gag) among a variety of svRNAs, all harboring SL1 in their first common exon.

  6. HIV-1 gag expression is quantitatively dependent on the ratio of native and optimized codons.

    PubMed

    Kofman, Alexander; Graf, Marcus; Bojak, Alexandra; Deml, Ludwig; Bieler, Kurt; Kharazova, Alexandra; Wolf, Hans; Wagner, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    There is a significant variation of codon usage bias among different species and even among genes within the same organisms. Codon optimization, this is, gene redesigning with the use of codons preferred for the specific expression system, results in improved expression of heterologous genes in bacteria, plants, yeast, mammalian cells, and transgenic animals. The mechanisms preventing expression of genes with rare or low-usage codons at adequate levels are not completely elucidated. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) represents an interesting model for studying how differences in codon usage affect gene expression in heterologous systems. Construction of synthetic genes with optimized codons demonstrated that the codon-usage effects might be a major impediment to the efficient expression of HIV gag/pol and env gene products in mammalian cells. According to another hypothesis, the poor expression of HIV structural proteins even without HIV context is attributed to the so-called cis-acting inhibitory elements (INS), which are located within the protein-coding region. They consist of AU-rich sequences and may be inactivated through the introduction of multiple mutations over the large regions of gag gene. In our work, we evaluated expression of hybrid HIV-1 gag mRNAs where wild-type (A-rich) gag sequences were combined with artificial sequences. In such "humanized" gag fragments with adapted codon usage, AT-content was significantly reduced in favor of G and C nucleotides without any changes in protein sequence. We show that wild-type gag sequences negatively influence expression of gag-reporter, and the addition of fragments with optimized codons to gag mRNA partially rescues its expression. The results demonstrate that the expression of HIV-1 gag is determined by the ratio of optimized and rare codons within mRNA. Our data also indicates that some wtgag fragments counteract the influence of the other wtgag sequences, which cause the inhibition of gag expression. The

  7. Induction of HIV-1 gag specific immune responses by cationic micelles mediated delivery of gag mRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengnan; Li, Man; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, mRNA-based vaccines have emerged to be a great alternative to DNA-based vaccines due to the safety of not inserting into host genome. However, mRNA molecules are single-stranded nucleic acids that are vulnerable under RNase existing in human skin and tissues. In this study, a self-assembled cationic nanomicelles based on polyethyleneimine-stearic acid (PSA) copolymer were developed to delivery HIV-1 gag encoding mRNA to dendritic cells and BALB/c mice. We evaluated the transfection efficiency and cell uptake efficiency of naked EGFP mRNA, PSA, PEI-2k and PEI-25k nanoparticles format on DC2.4 cell lines. Immune responses after sub-cutaneous administration of gag mRNA to BALB/c mice were notably induced by PSA as compared with naked gag mRNA. We found the PSA/mRNA nanomicelles were potent systems that can effectively deliver mRNA and induce antigen-specific immune response, stimulating various new vaccine strategies using mRNA.

  8. HIV-1 Gag as an Antiviral Target: Development of Assembly and Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Gag is the master orchestrator of particle assembly. The central role of Gag at multiple stages of the HIV lifecycle has led to efforts to develop drugs that directly target Gag and prevent the formation and release of infectious particles. Until recently, however, only the catalytic site protease inhibitors have been available to inhibit late stages of HIV replication. This review summarizes the current state of development of antivirals that target Gag or disrupt late events in the retrovirus lifecycle such as maturation of the viral capsid. Maturation inhibitors represent an exciting new series of antiviral compounds, including those that specifically target CA-SP1 cleavage and the allosteric integrase inhibitors that inhibit maturation by a completely different mechanism. Numerous small molecules and peptides targeting CA have been studied in attempts to disrupt steps in assembly. Efforts to target CA have recently gained have considerable momentum from the development of small molecules that bind CA and alter capsid stability at the post-entry stage of the lifecycle. Efforts to develop antivirals that inhibit incorporation of genomic RNA or to inhibit late budding events remain in preliminary stages of development. Overall, the development of novel antivirals targeting Gag and the late stages in HIV replication appears much closer to success than ever, with the new maturation inhibitors leading the way. PMID:26329615

  9. HIV-1 gag proteins in virions and in infected cell fractions.

    PubMed

    Sharova, N K; Grigor'ev, V B; Bukrinskaya, A G

    1991-01-01

    The relation of the initial products of the HIV-1 gag gene to the final products was determined in virus samples and cell fractions of infected H9 and Jurkat-tat cell cultures. The proteins were identified by immunoblotting with pooled sera from AIDS patients or monoclonal antibodies. The proportion in the virions of gag precursor proteins and the products of their proteolytic cleavage varied according to the maturity of the virus particles as determined by electron microscopy. The distribution of viral gag proteins in the cell fractions was determined 2, 4, and 24 h after infection. Treatment of cells with cycloheximide to block de novo protein synthesis did not significantly affect the results. Gag proteins containing the N terminus of the precursor p55 (including p55, the intermediate precursors p41(45) and p39, and mature protein p17) were found in the cell nuclei up to 24 h after infection. The major core protein p24 was located in the cytoplasmic fraction. These data strongly suggest that gag precursors from the p55 N terminus and the matrix protein p17 enter the infected cell separately from the major core protein p24, or become separated from it in the cytoplasm.

  10. Cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from HIV-1 subtype C-infected Indian patients recognize CTL epitopes from a conserved immunodominant region of HIV-1 Gag and Nef.

    PubMed

    Thakar, Madhuri R; Bhonge, Leena S; Lakhashe, Samir K; Shankarkumar, U; Sane, Suvarna S; Kulkarni, Smita S; Mahajan, Bharati A; Paranjape, Ramesh S

    2005-09-01

    Analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes recognized by the targeted population is critical for HIV-1 vaccine design. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 47 Indian subjects at different stages of HIV-1 infection were tested for HIV-1 Gag-, Nef-, and Env-specific T cell responses by interferon (IFN)- gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, using pools of overlapping peptides. The Gag and Nef antigens were targeted by 83% and 36% of responders. Five immunodominant regions, 4 in Gag and 1 in Nef, were identified in the study; these regions are conserved across clades, including the African subtype C clade. Three antigenic regions were also found to be recognized by CTLs of the study participants. These regions were not identified as immunodominant regions in studies performed in Africa, which highlights the importance of differential clustering of responses within HIV-1 subtype C. Twenty-six putative epitopes--15 Gag (10 in p24 and 5 in p17), 10 Nef, and 1 Env (gp 41)--were predicted using a combination of peptide matrix ELISPOT assay and CTL epitope-prediction software. Ninety percent of the predicted epitopes were clustered in the conserved immunodominant regions of the Gag and Nef antigens. Of 26 predicted epitopes, 8 were promiscuous, 3 of which were highly conserved across clades. Three Gag and 4 Nef epitopes were novel. The identification of conserved epitopes will be important in the planning of an HIV-1 vaccine strategy for subtype C-affected regions.

  11. Cross-Reactive Potential of HIV-1 Subtype C-Infected Indian Individuals Against Multiple HIV-1 Potential T Cell Epitope Gag Variants.

    PubMed

    Negi, Neema; Vajpayee, Madhu; Singh, Ravinder; Sharma, Ashutosh; Murugavel, Kailapuri G; Ranga, Udaykumar; Thakar, Madhuri; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Das, Bimal Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Vaccine immunogen with expanded T cell coverage for protection against HIV-1 diversity is the need of the hour. This study was undertaken to examine the ability of T cells to respond to a broad spectrum of potential T cell epitope (PTE) peptides containing variable as well as conserved sequences that would most accurately reflect immune responses to different circulating strains. Set of 320 PTE peptides were pooled in a matrix format that included 40 pools of 32 peptides per pool. These pools were used in interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay for screening and confirmation of HIV-1 PTE Gag-specific T cell immune responses in 34 HIV-1 seropositive Indian individuals. "Deconvolute This" software was used for result analysis. The dominant target in terms of magnitude and breadth of responses was observed to be the p24 subunit of Gag protein. Of the 34 study subjects, 26 (77%) showed a response to p24 PTE Gag peptides, 17 (50%) to p17, and 17 (50%) responded to p15 PTE peptides. The total breadth and magnitude of immune response ranged from 0.75 to 14.50 and 95.02 to 1,103 spot-forming cells/10(6) cells, respectively. Seventy-six peptides located in p24 Gag were targeted by 77% of the study subjects followed by 51 peptides in p17 Gag and 46 peptides in p15 Gag with multiple variants being recognized. Maximum study participants recognized PTE peptide sequence Gag271→285NKIVRMYSPVSILDI located in p24 Gag subunit. T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals can recognize multiple PTE peptide variants, although the magnitude of the responses can vary greatly across these variants.

  12. Crystallographic and Functional Analysis of the ESCRT-I /HIV-1 Gag PTAP Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Young Jun; Kuo, Lillian; Ren, Xuefeng; Burgos, Patricia V.; Zhao, Xue Zhi; Liu, Fa; Burke, Jr., Terrence R.; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Freed, Eric O.; Hurley, James H.

    2010-12-03

    Budding of HIV-1 requires the binding of the PTAP late domain of the Gag p6 protein to the UEV domain of the TSG101 subunit of ESCRT-I. The normal function of this motif in cells is in receptor downregulation. Here, we report the 1.41.6 {angstrom} structures of the human TSG101 UEV domain alone and with wild-type and mutant HIV-1 PTAP and Hrs PSAP nonapeptides. The hydroxyl of the Thr or Ser residue in the P(S/T)AP motif hydrogen bonds with the main chain of Asn69. Mutation of the Asn to Pro, blocking the main-chain amide, abrogates PTAP motif binding in vitro and blocks budding of HIV-1 from cells. N69P and other PTAP binding-deficient alleles of TSG101 did not rescue HIV-1 budding. However, the mutant alleles did rescue downregulation of endogenous EGF receptor. This demonstrates that the PSAP motif is not rate determining in EGF receptor downregulation under normal conditions.

  13. Crystallographic and Functional Analysis of the ESCRT-I /HIV-1 Gag PTAP Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Im, Young Jun; Kuo, Lillian; Ren, Xuefeng; Burgos, Patricia V.; Zhao, Xue Zhi; Liu, Fa; Burke, Terrence R.; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Freed, Eric O.; Hurley, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Budding of HIV-1 requires the binding of the PTAP late domain of the Gag p6 protein to the UEV domain of the TSG101 subunit of ESCRT-I. The normal function of this motif in cells is in receptor downregulation. Here we report the 1.4 to 1.6 Å structures of the human TSG101 UEV domain alone and with wild-type and mutant HIV-1 PTAP and Hrs PSAP nonapeptides. The hydroxyl of the Thr or Ser residue in the P(S/T)AP motif hydrogen bonds with the main-chain of Asn69. Mutation of the Asn to Pro, blocking the main-chain amide, abrogates PTAP motif binding in vitro and blocks budding of HIV-1 from cells. N69P and other PTAP binding-deficient alleles of TSG101 did not rescue HIV-1 budding. However, the mutant alleles did rescue downregulation of endogenous EGF receptor. This demonstrates that the PSAP motif is not rate determining in EGF receptor downregulation under normal conditions. PMID:21070952

  14. The Use of Directed Evolution to Create a Stable and Immunogenic Recombinant BCG Expressing a Modified HIV-1 Gag Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Douglass, Nicola; Mgwebi, Thandi; Meyers, Ann; Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Numerous features make Mycobacterium bovis BCG an attractive vaccine vector for HIV. It has a good safety profile, it elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable. Despite these advantages it is often difficult to express viral antigens in BCG, which results in genetic instability and low immunogenicity. The aim of this study was to generate stable recombinant BCG (rBCG) that express high levels of HIV antigens, by modification of the HIV genes. A directed evolution process was applied to recombinant mycobacteria that expressed HIV-1 Gag fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Higher growth rates and increased GFP expression were selected for. Through this process a modified Gag antigen was selected. Recombinant BCG that expressed the modified Gag (BCG[pWB106] and BCG[pWB206]) were more stable, produced higher levels of antigen and grew faster than those that expressed the unmodified Gag (BCG[pWB105]). The recombinant BCG that expressed the modified HIV-1 Gag induced 2 to 3 fold higher levels of Gag-specific CD4 T cells than those expressing the unmodified Gag (BCG[pWB105]). Mice primed with 107 CFU BCG[pWB206] and then boosted with MVA-Gag developed Gag-specific CD8 T cells with a frequency of 1343±17 SFU/106 splenocytes, 16 fold greater than the response induced with MVA-Gag alone. Levels of Gag-specific CD4 T cells were approximately 5 fold higher in mice primed with BCG[pWB206] and boosted with MVA-Gag than in those receiving the MVA-Gag boost alone. In addition mice vaccinated with BCG[pWB206] were protected from a surrogate vaccinia virus challenge. PMID:25061753

  15. Dual Mechanisms of Translation Initiation of the Full-Length HIV-1 mRNA Contribute to Gag Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Matias; Cohen, Éric A.; Lopez-Lastra, Marcelo; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The precursor group-specific antigen (pr55Gag) is central to HIV-1 assembly. Its expression alone is sufficient to assemble into virus-like particles. It also selects the genomic RNA for encapsidation and is involved in several important virus-host interactions for viral assembly and restriction, making its synthesis essential for aspects of viral replication. Here, we show that the initiation of translation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA is mediated through both a cap-dependent and an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated mechanisms. In support of this notion, pr55Gag synthesis was maintained at 70% when cap-dependent translation initiation was blocked by the expression of eIF4G- and PABP targeting viral proteases in two in vitro systems and in HIV-1-expressing cells directly infected with poliovirus. While our data reveal that IRES-dependent translation of the viral genomic RNA ensures pr55Gag expression, the synthesis of other HIV-1 proteins, including that of pr160Gag/Pol, Vpr and Tat is suppressed early during progressive poliovirus infection. The data presented herein implies that the unspliced HIV-1 genomic RNA utilizes both cap-dependent and IRES-dependent translation initiation to supply pr55Gag for virus assembly and production. PMID:23861855

  16. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Carolina G D O; Matassoli, Flavio L; Peçanha, Ligia M T; Santillo, Bruna Tereso; Oliveira, Luanda Mara da Silva; Oshiro, Telma Miyuki; Marques, Ernesto T D A; Oxenius, Annette; de Arruda, Luciana B

    2016-08-01

    The decline in number and function of T cells is a hallmark of HIV infection, and preservation or restoration of HIV-specific cellular immune response is a major goal of AIDS treatment. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in the initiation and maintenance of the immune response, and their use as a vaccine vehicle is a promising strategy for enhancing vaccine efficacy. We evaluated the potential of DC-mediated immunization with a DNA vaccine consisting of HIV-1-p55gag (gag, group-specific antigen) associated to lysosomal associated protein (LAMP) sequence (LAMP/gag vaccine). Immunization of mice with mouse DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-mDCs) stimulated more potent B- and T-cell responses than naked DNA or DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV. Anti-Gag antibody levels were sustained for at least 3 mo after immunization, and recall T-cell responses were also strongly detected at this time point. Human DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-hDCs) were also activated and able to stimulate greater T-cell response than native gag-transfected DCs. Coculture between Lg-hDCs and T lymphocytes obtained from patients with HIV resulted in upregulation of CD38, CD69, HLA-DR, and granzyme B by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and increased IFN-γ and TNF-α production. These results indicate that the use of LAMP/gag-DC may be an efficient strategy for enhancing immune function in patients with HIV.-Lucas, C. G. D. O., Matassoli, F. L., Peçanha, L. M. T., Santillo, B. T., Oliveira, L. M. D. S., Oshiro, T. M., Marques, E. T. D. A., Jr., Oxenius, A., de Arruda, L. B. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

  17. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with DNA and MVA vaccines, expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag virus-like particles, is highly immunogenic in mice

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, Nicola; Chege, Gerald; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to make affordable vaccines suitable for the regions most affected by HIV-1, we have constructed stable vaccines that express an HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag immunogen (BCG-GagM, MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM). Mosaic immunogens have been designed to address the tremendous diversity of this virus. Here we have shown that GagM buds from cells infected and transfected with MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM respectively and forms virus-like particles. Previously we showed that a BCG-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost generated strong cellular immune responses in mice. In this study immune responses to the DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM vaccines were evaluated in homologous and heterologous prime-boost vaccinations. The DNA homologous prime boost vaccination elicited predominantly CD8+ T cells while the homologous MVA vaccination induced predominantly CD4+ T cells. A heterologous DNA-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost induced strong, more balanced Gag CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses and that were predominantly of an effector memory phenotype. The immunogenicity of the mosaic Gag (GagM) was compared to a naturally occurring subtype C Gag (GagN) using a DNA homologous vaccination regimen. DNA-GagN expresses a natural Gag with a sequence that was closest to the consensus sequence of subtype C viruses sampled in South Africa. DNA-GagM homologous vaccination induced cumulative HIV-1 Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses that were 6.5-fold higher than those induced by the DNA-GagN vaccination. Similarly, DNA-GagM vaccination generated 7-fold higher levels of cytokine-positive CD8+ T cells than DNA-GagN, indicating that this subtype C mosaic Gag elicits far more potent immune responses than a consensus-type Gag. Cells transfected and infected with DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM respectively, expressed high levels of GagM and produced budding virus-like particles. Our data indicates that a heterologous prime boost regimen using DNA and MVA vaccines expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag is highly immunogenic in mice and

  18. Conformational changes of Gag HIV-1 on a lipid bilayer measured by neutron reflectivity provides insights into viral particle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, H.; Datta, S. A. K.; Heinrich, F.; Loesche, M.; Rein, A.; Krueger, S.

    2009-03-01

    Formation of the HIV-1 is mediated by the Gag polyprotein at the cytoplasmic membrane surface of the infected host cell. Studies suggest large conformational changes in the Gag protein may occur during self-assembly on the membrane [Current Biology, 1997 (7) p.729, J. Mol. Biol. 2007 (365) p. 812]. The one-dimensional profile of Gag bound to a lipid bilayer interface was determined at angstrom resolution by neutron reflectometry. This was done using a novel method for modeling reflectivity data by a Monte Carlo simulation technique. The results show conditions under which the Gag protein can be made to extend or stay compact on the membrane surface. Further atomic detail was obtained using atomistic models to fit the one-dimensional Gag structural data. This involved combining X-ray resolution structures of the ordered protein domains with conformational sampling of the flexible linker region.

  19. Generation of HIV-1 Gag VLPs by transient transfection of HEK 293 suspension cell cultures using an optimized animal-derived component free medium.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Laura; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Martínez, Marta; Blanco, Julià; Gòdia, Francesc; Segura, María Mercedes

    2013-07-20

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) offer great promise as candidates for new vaccine strategies. Large-scale approaches for the manufacturing of HIV-1 Gag VLPs have mainly focused on the use of the baculovirus expression system. In this work, the development and optimization of an HIV-1 Gag VLP production protocol by transient gene expression in mammalian cell suspension cultures is reported. To facilitate process optimization, a Gag-GFP fusion construct enabling the generation of fluorescent VLPs was used. The great majority of Gag-GFP present in cell culture supernatants was shown to be correctly assembled into virus-like particles of the expected size and morphology consistent with immature HIV-1 particles. Medium optimization was performed using design of experiments (DoE). Culture medium supplementation with non-animal derived components including recombinant proteins and lipids of synthetic or non-animal-derived origin resulted in improved HEK 293 cell growth and VLP production. The maximum cell density attained using the optimized Freestyle culture medium was 5.4×10(6)cells/mL in batch mode, almost double of that observed using the unsupplemented medium (2.9×10(6)cells/mL). Best production performance was attained when cells were transfected at mid-log phase (2-3×10(6)cells/mL) with medium exchange at the time of transfection using standard amounts of plasmid DNA and polyethylenimine. By using an optimized production protocol, VLP titers were increased 2.4-fold obtaining 2.8μg of Gag-GFP/mL or 2.7×10(9)VLPs/mL according to ELISA and nanoparticle tracking quantification analyses, respectively.

  20. C-terminal HIV-1 transframe p6* tetra-peptide blocks enhanced Gag cleavage incurred by leucine zipper replacement of a deleted p6* domain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fu-Hsien; Huang, Kuo-Jung; Wang, Chin-Tien

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) functions as a homodimer mediating virus maturation following virus budding. Gag-Pol dimerization is believed to trigger embedded PR activation by promoting PR dimer formation. Early PR activation can lead to markedly reduced virus yields due to premature Gag cleavage. The p6* peptide, located between Gag and PR, is believed to ensure virus production by preventing early PR maturation. Studies aimed at finding supporting evidence for this proposal are limited due to a reading frame overlap between p6* and the p6gag budding domain. To determine if p6* affects virus production via the modulation of PR activation, we engineered multiple constructs derived from Dp6*PR (an assembly- and processing-competent construct with Pol fused at the inactivated PR C-terminus). The data indicate that a p6* deletion adjacent to active PR significantly impaired virus processing. We also observed that the insertion of a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization motif in the deleted region eliminated virus production in a PR activity-dependent manner, suggesting that the LZ insertion triggered premature PR activation by facilitating PR dimer formation. As few as four C-terminal p6* residues remaining at the p6*/PR junction were sufficient to restore virus yields, with a Gag processing profile similar to that of the wild type. Our study provides supporting evidence in a virus assembly context that the C-terminal p6* tetra-peptide plays a role in preventing premature PR maturation.IMPORTANCE Supporting evidence is lacking for the assumption that p6* retards PR maturation in the context of virus assembly. We found that replacing p6* with a leucine-zipper peptide abolished virus assembly due to the significant enhancement of Gag cleavage. However, as few as four C-terminal p6* residues remaining in the deleted region were sufficient for significant PR release, as well as for counteracting leucine zipper-incurred premature Gag cleavage. Our data provide evidence that (a) p6

  1. Self assembly of HIV-1 Gag protein on lipid membranes generates PI(4,5)P2/Cholesterol nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Yandrapalli, Naresh; Lubart, Quentin; Tanwar, Hanumant S.; Picart, Catherine; Mak, Johnson; Muriaux, Delphine; Favard, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of HIV-1 Gag polyprotein at the inner leaflet of the cell host plasma membrane is the key orchestrator of virus assembly. The binding between Gag and the plasma membrane is mediated by specific interaction of the Gag matrix domain and the PI(4,5)P2 lipid (PIP2). It is unknown whether this interaction could lead to local reorganization of the plasma membrane lipids. In this study, using model membranes, we examined the ability of Gag to segregate specific lipids upon self-assembly. We show for the first time that Gag self-assembly is responsible for the formation of PIP2 lipid nanoclusters, enriched in cholesterol but not in sphingomyelin. We also show that Gag mainly partition into liquid-disordered domains of these lipid membranes. Our work strongly suggests that, instead of targeting pre-existing plasma membrane lipid domains, Gag is more prone to generate PIP2/Cholesterol lipid nanodomains at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane during early events of virus assembly. PMID:28008947

  2. Conserved Interaction of Lentiviral Vif Molecules with HIV-1 Gag and Differential Effects of Species-Specific Vif on Virus Production.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenwen; Ling, Limian; Li, Zhaolong; Wang, Hong; Rui, Yajuan; Gao, Wenying; Wang, Shaohua; Su, Xing; Wei, Wei; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2017-04-01

    The virion infectivity factor (Vif) open reading frame is conserved among most lentiviruses. Vif molecules contribute to viral replication by inactivating host antiviral factors, the APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases. However, various species of lentiviral Vif proteins have evolved different strategies for overcoming host APOBEC3. Whether different species of lentiviral Vif proteins still preserve certain common features has not been reported. Here, we show for the first time that diverse lentiviral Vif molecules maintain the ability to interact with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag precursor (Pr55(Gag)) polyprotein. Surprisingly, bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) Vif, but not HIV-1 Vif, interfered with HIV-1 production and viral infectivity even in the absence of APOBEC3. Further analysis revealed that BIV Vif demonstrated an enhanced interaction with Pr55(Gag) compared to that of HIV-1 Vif, and BIV Vif defective for the Pr55(Gag) interaction lost its ability to inhibit HIV-1. The C-terminal region of capsid (CA) and the p2 region of Pr55(Gag), which are important for virus assembly and maturation, were involved in the interaction. Transduction of CD4(+) T cells with BIV Vif blocked HIV-1 replication. Thus, the conserved Vif-Pr55(Gag) interaction provides a potential target for the future development of antiviral strategies.IMPORTANCE The conserved Vif accessory proteins of primate lentiviruses HIV-1, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and BIV all form ubiquitin ligase complexes to target host antiviral APOBEC3 proteins for degradation, with different cellular requirements and using different molecular mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that BIV Vif can interfere with HIV-1 Gag maturation and suppress HIV-1 replication through interaction with the precursor of the Gag (Pr55(Gag)) of HIV-1 in virus-producing cells. Moreover, the HIV-1 and SIV Vif proteins are conserved in terms of their interactions with HIV-1 Pr55(Gag) although HIV-1 Vif proteins

  3. Phenotype of HIV-1 lacking a functional nuclear localization signal in matrix protein of gag and Vpr is comparable to wild-type HIV-1 in primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kootstra, N A; Schuitemaker, H

    1999-01-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is considered to infect nondividing cells because nuclear localization signals (NLS) in matrix (MA, p17(Gag)) and Vpr allow active nuclear transport of the preintegration complex. Previous studies demonstrated that HIV-1 reverse transcription is successful only in cells with proliferative potential, thus restricting HIV-1 replication to cycling cells. To sort out this apparent discrepancy we compared the phenotype of a chimeric HIV-1 variant lacking a functional Vpr and MA-NLS (R7. deltaVpr.deltaNLS), and previously described to lack replicative capacity in macrophages and growth-arrested cells, with a chimera lacking a functional Vpr (R7.deltaVpr). Both variants replicated efficiently in primary macrophages, with only minimal differences in the kinetics of reverse transcription, integration, or p24 production. In agreement with our previous observation, elongation of reverse transcription was restricted to the proliferating subpopulation of macrophages. Replication of R7.deltaVpr and R7.deltaVpr.deltaNLS could also be demonstrated in aphidicolin-treated macrophages, indicating efficient nuclear transport in G1/S phase-arrested cells. In conclusion, our results confirm the dependency of the process of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase on cell proliferation in primary macrophages and exclude an important role of MA-NLS and Vpr in macrophage infection.

  4. Identification of peptides from human pathogens able to cross-activate an HIV-1-gag-specific CD4+ T cell clone.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Sara; Allicotti, Gina; Zhao, Yindong; Simon, Richard; Burton, Dennis R; Pinilla, Clemencia; Poignard, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Antigen recognition by T cells is degenerate both at the MHC and the TCR level. In this study, we analyzed the cross-reactivity of a human HIV-1 gag p24-specific CD4(+) T cell clone obtained from an HIV-1-seronegative donor using a positional scanning synthetic combinatorial peptide library (PS-SCL)-based biometrical analysis. A number of decapeptides able to activate the HIV-1 gag-specific clone were identified and shown to correspond to sequences found in other human pathogens. Two of these peptides activated the T cell clone with the same stimulatory potency as the original HIV-1 gag p24 peptide. These findings show that an HIV-1-specific human T helper clone can react efficiently with peptides from other pathogens and suggest that cellular immune responses identified as being specific for one human pathogen (HIV-1) could arise from exposure to other pathogens.

  5. Phase I safety and immunogenicity evaluations of an alphavirus replicon HIV-1 subtype C gag vaccine in healthy HIV-1-uninfected adults.

    PubMed

    Wecker, M; Gilbert, P; Russell, N; Hural, J; Allen, M; Pensiero, M; Chulay, J; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Abdool Karim, S S; Burke, D S

    2012-10-01

    On the basis of positive preclinical data, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of an alphavirus replicon HIV-1 subtype C gag vaccine (AVX101), expressing a nonmyristoylated form of Gag, in two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials in healthy HIV-1-uninfected adults. Escalating doses of AVX101 or placebo were administered subcutaneously to participants in the United States and Southern Africa. Because of vaccine stability issues, the first trial was halted prior to completion of all dose levels and a second trial was implemented. The second trial was also stopped prematurely due to documentation issues with the contract manufacturer. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated through assessments of reactogenicity, reports of adverse events, and assessment of replication-competent and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) viremia. Immunogenicity was measured using the following assays: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chromium 51 ((51)Cr)-release cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), gamma interferon (IFN-γ) ELISpot, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and lymphoproliferation assay (LPA). Anti-vector antibodies were also measured. AVX101 was well tolerated and exhibited only modest local reactogenicity. There were 5 serious adverse events reported during the trials; none were considered related to the study vaccine. In contrast to the preclinical data, immune responses in humans were limited. Only low levels of binding antibodies and T-cell responses were seen at the highest doses. This trial also highlighted the difficulties in developing a novel vector for HIV.

  6. Interactions between Nef and AIP1 proliferate multivesicular bodies and facilitate egress of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luciana J; Chen, Nan; Lopes, Adriana; Aguiar, Renato S; Tanuri, Amilcar; Plemenitas, Ana; Peterlin, B Matija

    2006-01-01

    Background Nef is an accessory protein of primate lentiviruses, HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV. Besides removing CD4 and MHC class I from the surface and activating cellular signaling cascades, Nef also binds GagPol during late stages of the viral replicative cycle. In this report, we investigated further the ability of Nef to facilitate the replication of HIV-1. Results To this end, first the release of new viral particles was much lower in the absence of Nef in a T cell line. Since the same results were obtained in the absence of the viral envelope using pseudo-typed viruses, this phenomenon was independent of CD4 and enhanced infectivity. Next, we found that Nef not only possesses a consensus motif for but also binds AIP1 in vitro and in vivo. AIP1 is the critical intermediate in the formation of multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which play an important role in the budding and release of viruses from infected cells. Indeed, Nef proliferated MVBs in cells, but only when its AIP1-binding site was intact. Finally, these functions of Nef were reproduced in primary macrophages, where the wild type but not mutant Nef proteins led to increased release of new viral particles from infected cells. Conclusion We conclude that by binding GagPol and AIP1, Nef not only proliferates MVBs but also contributes to the egress of viral particles from infected cells. PMID:16764724

  7. Circularization of the HIV-1 genome facilitates strand transfer during reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Beerens, Nancy; Kjems, Jørgen

    2010-06-01

    Two obligatory DNA strand transfers take place during reverse transcription of a retroviral RNA genome. The first strand transfer involves a jump from the 5' to the 3' terminal repeat (R) region positioned at each end of the viral genome. The process depends on base pairing between the cDNA synthesized from the 5' R region and the 3' R RNA. The tertiary conformation of the viral RNA genome may facilitate strand transfer by juxtaposing the 5' R and 3' R sequences that are 9 kb apart in the linear sequence. In this study, RNA sequences involved in an interaction between the 5' and 3' ends of the HIV-1 genome were mapped by mutational analysis. This interaction appears to be mediated mainly by a sequence in the extreme 3' end of the viral genome and in the gag open reading frame. Mutation of 3' R sequences was found to inhibit the 5'-3' interaction, which could be restored by a complementary mutation in the 5' gag region. Furthermore, we find that circularization of the HIV-1 genome does not affect the initiation of reverse transcription, but stimulates the first strand transfer during reverse transcription in vitro, underscoring the functional importance of the interaction.

  8. HIV-1 Gag, Envelope, and Extracellular Determinants Cooperate To Regulate the Stability and Turnover of Virological Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Jaye C.; Mauer, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retroviruses spread more efficiently when infected and uninfected cells form tight, physical interfaces known as virological synapses (VSs). VS formation is initiated by adhesive interactions between viral Envelope (Env) glycoproteins on the infected cell and CD4 receptor molecules on the uninfected cell. How high-avidity Env-CD4 linkages are resolved over time is unknown. We describe here a tractable two-color, long-term (>24 h) live cell imaging strategy to study VS turnover in the context of a large cell population, quantitatively. We show that Env's conserved cytoplasmic tail (CT) can potently signal the recruitment of Gag capsid proteins to the VS, a process also dependent on residues within Gag's N-terminal matrix (MA) domain. Additionally, we demonstrate that Env's CT and Gag's MA domain both regulate the duration of interactions between viral donor and target cells, as well as the stability of this interaction over time (i.e., its capacity to resolve or form a syncytium). Finally, we report the unexpected finding that modulating extracellular fluid viscosity markedly impacts target T cell trafficking and thus affects the duration, stability, and turnover of virus-induced cell-cell contacts. Combined, these results suggest a stepwise model for viral cell-to-cell transmission wherein (i) Env-receptor interactions anchor target cells to infected cells, (ii) Env signals Gag's recruitment to the cell-cell contact dependent on an intact Env CT and Gag MA, and (iii) Env CT and Gag MA, in conjunction with extracellular forces, combine to regulate VS stability and infectious outcomes. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 spreads efficiently at physical, cell-cell interfaces known as virological synapses (VSs). The VS provides for spatiotemporal coupling of virus assembly and entry into new host cells and may transmit signals relevant to pathogenesis. Disrupting this mode of transmission may be critical to the goal of abolishing viral persistence in infected individuals. We

  9. HIV-1 Subtype C Mosaic Gag Expressed by BCG and MVA Elicits Persistent Effector T Cell Responses in a Prime-Boost Regimen in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jongwe, Tsungai Ivai; Chapman, Ros; Douglass, Nicola; Chetty, Shivan; Chege, Gerald; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2016-01-01

    Over 90% of HIV/AIDS positive individuals in sub-Saharan Africa are infected with highly heterogeneous HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) viruses. One of the best ways to reduce the burden of this disease is the development of an affordable and effective prophylactic vaccine. Mosaic immunogens are computationally designed to overcome the hurdle of HIV diversity by maximizing the expression of potential T cell epitopes. Mycobacterium bovis BCG ΔpanCD auxotroph and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccines expressing HIV-1C mosaic Gag (GagM) were tested in a prime-boost regimen to demonstrate immunogenicity in a mouse study. The BCG-GagM vaccine was stable and persisted 11.5 weeks post vaccination in BALB/c mice. Priming with BCG-GagM and boosting with MVA-GagM elicited higher Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses than the BCG-GagM only and MVA-GagM only homologous vaccination regimens. The heterologous vaccination also generated a more balanced and persistent CD4+ and CD8+ T cell Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT response with a predominant effector memory phenotype. A Th1 bias was induced by the vaccines as determined by the predominant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2. This study shows that a low dose of MVA (104 pfu) can effectively boost a BCG prime expressing the same mosaic immunogen, generating strong, cellular immune responses against Gag in mice. Our data warrants further evaluation in non-human primates. A low dose vaccine would be an advantage in the resource limited countries of sub-Saharan Africa and India (where the predominating virus is HIV-1 subtype C). PMID:27427967

  10. Vaccination with a Fusion Protein That Introduces HIV-1 Gag Antigen into a Multitrimer CD40L Construct Results in Enhanced CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protection from Viral Challenge by Vaccinia-Gag

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M.; Raffa, Francesca N.; Williams, Cindi-Ann; Kornbluth, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) is a membrane protein that is important for the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and DC-induced CD8+ T cell responses. To be active, CD40L must cluster CD40 receptors on responding cells. To produce a soluble form of CD40L that clusters CD40 receptors necessitates the use of a multitrimer construct. With this in mind, a tripartite fusion protein was made from surfactant protein D (SPD), HIV-1 Gag as a test antigen, and CD40L, where SPD serves as a scaffold for the multitrimer protein complex. This SPD-Gag-CD40L protein activated CD40-bearing cells and bone marrow-derived DCs in vitro. Compared to a plasmid for Gag antigen alone (pGag), DNA vaccination of mice with pSPD-Gag-CD40L induced an increased number of Gag-specific CD8+ T cells with increased avidity for major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted Gag peptide and improved vaccine-induced protection from challenge by vaccinia-Gag virus. The importance of the multitrimeric nature of the complex was shown using a plasmid lacking the N terminus of SPD that produced a single trimer fusion protein. This plasmid, pTrimer-Gag-CD40L, was only weakly active on CD40-bearing cells and did not elicit strong CD8+ T cell responses or improve protection from vaccinia-Gag challenge. An adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vaccine incorporating SPD-Gag-CD40L was much stronger than Ad5 expressing Gag alone (Ad5-Gag) and induced complete protection (i.e., sterilizing immunity) from vaccinia-Gag challenge. Overall, these results show the potential of a new vaccine design in which antigen is introduced into a construct that expresses a multitrimer soluble form of CD40L, leading to strongly protective CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:24227853

  11. Comparative structural effects of HIV-1 Gag and nucleocapsid proteins in binding to and unwinding of the viral RNA packaging signal.

    PubMed

    Bell, Neil M; Kenyon, Julia C; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Lever, Andrew M L

    2012-04-17

    The major RNA binding region of the HIV-1 Gag polyprotein is the nucleocapsid (NC) domain, which is responsible for the specific capture of the genomic RNA genome during viral assembly. The Gag polyprotein has other RNA chaperone functions, which are mirrored by the isolated NC protein after physiological cleavage from Gag. Gag, however, is suggested to have superior nucleic acid chaperone activity. Here we investigate the interaction of Gag and NC with the core RNA structure of the HIV-1 packaging signal (Ψ), using 2-aminopurine substitution to create a series of modified RNAs based on the Ψ helix loop structure. The effects of 2-aminopurine substitution on the physical and structural properties of the viral Ψ were characterized. The fluorescence properties of the 2-aminopurine substitutions showed features consistent with the native GNAR tetraloop. Dissociation constants (K(d)) of the two viral proteins, measured by fluorescence polarization (FP), were similar, and both NC and Gag affected the 2-aminopurine fluorescence of bases close to the loop binding region in a similar fashion. However, the influence of Gag on the fluorescence of the 2-aminopurine nucleotides at the base of the helix implied a much more potent helix destabilizing action on the RNA stem loop (SL) versus that seen with NC. This was further supported when the viral Ψ SL was tagged with a 5' fluorophore and 3' quencher. In the absence of any viral protein, minimal fluorescence was detected; addition of NC yielded a slight increase in fluorescence, while addition of the Gag protein yielded a large change in fluorescence, further suggesting that, compared to NC, the Gag protein has a greater propensity to affect RNA structure and that Ψ helix unwinding may be an intrinsic step in RNA encapsidation.

  12. Selection of HLA-B57-associated Gag A146P mutant by HLA-B∗48:01-restricted Gag140-147-specific CTLs in chronically HIV-1-infected Japanese.

    PubMed

    Naruto, Takuya; Murakoshi, Hayato; Chikata, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Madoka; Kawashima, Yuka; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2011-08-01

    We previously showed the possibility that Gag A146P, which is an escape mutant from HLA-B∗57-restricted CTLs, was selected by HLA-B∗48:01-restricted Gag138-147(LI10)-specific CTLs in a Japanese cohort in which HLA-B∗57 individuals were not detected. We herein demonstrated Gag140-147(GI8) to be the optimal epitope rather than LI10 and that GI8-specific T cells failed to recognize the A146P mutant virus-infected cells. The sequence analysis of Gag146 in 261 chronically HIV-1-infected Japanese showed the accumulation of the A146P mutation in HLA-B∗48:01(+) individuals. These findings together indicate that the A146P mutant is accumulating in Japanese by selection by GI8-specific CTLs.

  13. Mutations of Conserved Residues in the Major Homology Region Arrest Assembling HIV-1 Gag as a Membrane-Targeted Intermediate Containing Genomic RNA and Cellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Motoko; Robinson, Bridget A.; Chutiraka, Kasana; Geary, Clair D.; Reed, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The major homology region (MHR) is a highly conserved motif that is found within the Gag protein of all orthoretroviruses and some retrotransposons. While it is widely accepted that the MHR is critical for assembly of HIV-1 and other retroviruses, how the MHR functions and why it is so highly conserved are not understood. Moreover, consensus is lacking on when HIV-1 MHR residues function during assembly. Here, we first addressed previous conflicting reports by confirming that MHR deletion, like conserved MHR residue substitution, leads to a dramatic reduction in particle production in human and nonhuman primate cells expressing HIV-1 proviruses. Next, we used biochemical analyses and immunoelectron microscopy to demonstrate that conserved residues in the MHR are required after assembling Gag has associated with genomic RNA, recruited critical host factors involved in assembly, and targeted to the plasma membrane. The exact point of inhibition at the plasma membrane differed depending on the specific mutation, with one MHR mutant arrested as a membrane-associated intermediate that is stable upon high-salt treatment and other MHR mutants arrested as labile, membrane-associated intermediates. Finally, we observed the same assembly-defective phenotypes when the MHR deletion or conserved MHR residue substitutions were engineered into Gag from a subtype B, lab-adapted provirus or Gag from a subtype C primary isolate that was codon optimized. Together, our data support a model in which MHR residues act just after membrane targeting, with some MHR residues promoting stability and another promoting multimerization of the membrane-targeted assembling Gag oligomer. IMPORTANCE The retroviral Gag protein exhibits extensive amino acid sequence variation overall; however, one region of Gag, termed the major homology region, is conserved among all retroviruses and even some yeast retrotransposons, although the reason for this conservation remains poorly understood. Highly

  14. Sprouty2 Regulates PI(4,5)P2/Ca2+ Signaling and HIV-1 Gag Release

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Lorna S.; Medina, Gisselle N.; Carter, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported that activation of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) is required for efficient HIV-1 Gag trafficking and viral particle release (Ehrlich 2010). IP3R activation requires phospholipase C (PLC)-catalyzed hydrolysis of PI(4,5)P2 to IP3 and diacylglycerol. Here we show that Sprouty2 (Spry2), which binds PI(4,5)P2 and PLCγ, interfered with PI(4,5)P2 in a manner similar to U73122, an inhibitor of PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, suggesting that Spry2 may negatively regulate IP3R by preventing formation of its activating ligand, IP3. Mutation to Asp of R252, a critical determinant of PI(4,5)P2 binding in the C-terminal domain of Spry2, prevented the interference completely, indicating that binding to the phospholipid is required. In contrast, deletion of the PLCγ binding region or mutation of a critical Tyr residue in the region did not prevent the interference but Spry2-PI(4,5)P2 colocalization was not detected, suggesting that PLC binding is required for their stable association. Like U73122, Spry2 over-expression inhibited WT Gag release as virus-like particles. The inhibition was relieved by disrupting either binding determinant. IP3R-mediated Ca2+ signaling, in turn, was found to influence Spry2 subcellular distribution and ERK, a Spry2 regulator. Our findings suggest that Spry2 influences IP3R function through control of PI(4,5)P2 and IP3R influences Spry2 function by controlling its distribution and ERK activation. PMID:21762810

  15. Mutation of the Highly Conserved Ser-40 of the HIV-1 p6 Gag Protein to Phe Causes the Formation of a Hydrophobic Patch, Enhances Membrane Association, and Polyubiquitination of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Friedrich; Setz, Christian; Friedrich, Melanie; Rauch, Pia; Solbak, Sara Marie; Frøystein, Nils Åge; Henklein, Petra; Votteler, Jörg; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein contains two late assembly (l-) domains that recruit proteins of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway to mediate membrane fission between the nascent virion and the cell membrane. It was recently demonstrated that mutation of the highly conserved Ser-40 to Phe (S40F) disturbs CA-SP1 processing, virus morphogenesis, and infectivity. It also causes the formation of filopodia-like structures, while virus release remains unaffected. Here, we show that the mutation S40F, but not the conservative mutation to Asp (S40D) or Asn (S40N), augments membrane association, K48-linked polyubiquitination, entry into the 26S proteasome, and, consequently, enhances MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag derived epitopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure analyses revealed that the newly introduced Phe-40, together with Tyr-36, causes the formation of a hydrophobic patch at the C-terminal α-helix of p6, providing a molecular rationale for the enhanced membrane association of Gag observed in vitro and in HIV-1 expressing cells. The extended exposure of the S40F mutant to unidentified membrane-resident ubiquitin E3-ligases might trigger the polyubiquitination of Gag. The cumulative data support a previous model of a so far undefined property of p6, which, in addition to MA, acts as membrane targeting domain of Gag. PMID:25279819

  16. Mutation of the highly conserved Ser-40 of the HIV-1 p6 gag protein to Phe causes the formation of a hydrophobic patch, enhances membrane association, and polyubiquitination of Gag.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Friedrich; Setz, Christian; Friedrich, Melanie; Rauch, Pia; Solbak, Sara Marie; Frøystein, Nils Age; Henklein, Petra; Votteler, Jörg; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2014-10-02

    The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein contains two late assembly (l-) domains that recruit proteins of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway to mediate membrane fission between the nascent virion and the cell membrane. It was recently demonstrated that mutation of the highly conserved Ser-40 to Phe (S40F) disturbs CA-SP1 processing, virus morphogenesis, and infectivity. It also causes the formation of filopodia-like structures, while virus release remains unaffected. Here, we show that the mutation S40F, but not the conservative mutation to Asp (S40D) or Asn (S40N), augments membrane association, K48-linked polyubiquitination, entry into the 26S proteasome, and, consequently, enhances MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag derived epitopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure analyses revealed that the newly introduced Phe-40, together with Tyr-36, causes the formation of a hydrophobic patch at the C-terminal α-helix of p6, providing a molecular rationale for the enhanced membrane association of Gag observed in vitro and in HIV-1 expressing cells. The extended exposure of the S40F mutant to unidentified membrane-resident ubiquitin E3-ligases might trigger the polyubiquitination of Gag. The cumulative data support a previous model of a so far undefined property of p6, which, in addition to MA, acts as membrane targeting domain of Gag.

  17. A cis-acting element present within the Gag open reading frame negatively impacts on the activity of the HIV-1 IRES.

    PubMed

    Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Vallejos, Maricarmen; Monette, Anne; Pino, Karla; Letelier, Alejandro; Huidobro-Toro, J Pablo; Mouland, Andrew J; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Translation initiation from the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) mRNA can occur through a cap or an IRES dependent mechanism. Cap-dependent translation initiation of the HIV-1 mRNA can be inhibited by the instability element (INS)-1, a cis-acting regulatory element present within the gag open reading frame (ORF). In this study we evaluated the impact of the INS-1 on HIV-1 IRES-mediated translation initiation. Using heterologous bicistronic mRNAs, we show that the INS-1 negatively impact on HIV-1 IRES-driven translation in in vitro and in cell-based experiments. Additionally, our results show that the inhibitory effect of the INS-1 is not general to all IRESes since it does not hinder translation driven by the HCV IRES. The inhibition by the INS-1 was partially rescued in cells by the overexpression of the viral Rev protein or hnRNPA1.

  18. A cis-Acting Element Present within the gag Open Reading Frame Negatively Impacts on the Activity of the HIV-1 IRES

    PubMed Central

    Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Vallejos, Maricarmen; Monette, Anne; Pino, Karla; Letelier, Alejandro; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo; Mouland, Andrew J.; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Translation initiation from the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) mRNA can occur through a cap or an IRES dependent mechanism. Cap-dependent translation initiation of the HIV-1 mRNA can be inhibited by the instability element (INS)-1, a cis-acting regulatory element present within the gag open reading frame (ORF). In this study we evaluated the impact of the INS-1 on HIV-1 IRES-mediated translation initiation. Using heterologous bicistronic mRNAs, we show that the INS-1 negatively impact on HIV-1 IRES-driven translation in in vitro and in cell-based experiments. Additionally, our results show that the inhibitory effect of the INS-1 is not general to all IRESes since it does not hinder translation driven by the HCV IRES. The inhibition by the INS-1 was partially rescued in cells by the overexpression of the viral Rev protein or hnRNPA1. PMID:23451120

  19. The HIV-1 Pr55 gag polyprotein binds to plastidial membranes and leads to severe impairment of chloroplast biogenesis and seedling lethality in transplastomic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Scotti, N; Sannino, L; Idoine, A; Hamman, P; De Stradis, A; Giorio, P; Maréchal-Drouard, L; Bock, R; Cardi, T

    2015-04-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering has long been recognised as a powerful technology to produce recombinant proteins. To date, however, little attention has been given to the causes of pleiotropic effects reported, in some cases, as consequence of the expression of foreign proteins in transgenic plastids. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic alterations observed in transplastomic tobacco plants accumulating the Pr55(gag) polyprotein of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The expression of Pr55(gag) at high levels in the tobacco plastome leads to a lethal phenotype of seedlings grown in soil, severe impairment of plastid development and photosynthetic activity, with chloroplasts largely resembling undeveloped proplastids. These alterations are associated to the binding of Pr55(gag) to thylakoids. During particle assembly in HIV-1 infected human cells, the binding of Pr55(gag) to a specific lipid [phosphatidylinositol-(4-5) bisphosphate] in the plasma membrane is mediated by myristoylation at the amino-terminus and the so-called highly basic region (HBR). Surprisingly, the non-myristoylated Pr55(gag) expressed in tobacco plastids was likely able, through the HBR motif, to bind to nonphosphorous glycerogalactolipids or other classes of lipids present in plastidial membranes. Although secondary consequences of disturbed chloroplast biogenesis on expression of nuclear-encoded plastid proteins cannot be ruled out, results of proteomic analyses suggest that their altered accumulation could be due to retrograde control in which chloroplasts relay their status to the nucleus for fine-tuning of gene expression.

  20. Identification and Characterization of BMS-955176, a Second-Generation HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitor with Improved Potency, Antiviral Spectrum, and Gag Polymorphic Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Protack, Tricia; Lin, Zeyu; Li, Zhufang; Zhang, Sharon; Sun, Yongnian; Samanta, Himadri; Terry, Brian; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yan; Sin, Ny; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Swidorski, Jacob J.; Chen, Jie; Venables, Brian L.; Healy, Matthew; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Cockett, Mark; Hanumegowda, Umesh; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Krystal, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BMS-955176 is a second-generation human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation inhibitor (MI). A first-generation MI, bevirimat, showed clinical efficacy in early-phase studies, but ∼50% of subjects had viruses with reduced susceptibility associated with naturally occurring polymorphisms in Gag near the site of MI action. MI potency was optimized using a panel of engineered reporter viruses containing site-directed polymorphic changes in Gag that reduce susceptibility to bevirimat (including V362I, V370A/M/Δ, and T371A/Δ), leading incrementally to the identification of BMS-955176. BMS-955176 exhibits potent activity (50% effective concentration [EC50], 3.9 ± 3.4 nM [mean ± standard deviation]) toward a library (n = 87) of gag/pr recombinant viruses representing 96.5% of subtype B polymorphic Gag diversity near the CA/SP1 cleavage site. BMS-955176 exhibited a median EC50 of 21 nM toward a library of subtype B clinical isolates assayed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Potent activity was maintained against a panel of reverse transcriptase, protease, and integrase inhibitor-resistant viruses, with EC50s similar to those for the wild-type virus. A 5.4-fold reduction in EC50 occurred in the presence of 40% human serum plus 27 mg/ml of human serum albumin (HSA), which corresponded well to an in vitro measurement of 86% human serum binding. Time-of-addition and pseudotype reporter virus studies confirm a mechanism of action for the compound that occurs late in the virus replication cycle. BMS-955176 inhibits HIV-1 protease cleavage at the CA/SP1 junction within Gag in virus-like particles (VLPs) and in HIV-1-infected cells, and it binds reversibly and with high affinity to assembled Gag in purified HIV-1 VLPs. Finally, in vitro combination studies showed no antagonistic interactions with representative antiretrovirals (ARVs) of other mechanistic classes. In conclusion, BMS-955176 is a second-generation MI with potent in vitro anti-HIV-1

  1. Clustered epitopes within the Gag-Pol fusion protein DNA vaccine enhance immune responses and protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol antigens.

    PubMed

    Bolesta, Elizabeth; Gzyl, Jaroslaw; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Kmieciak, Dariusz; Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Kaneko, Yutaro; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy; Kozbor, Danuta

    2005-02-20

    We have generated a codon-optimized hGagp17p24-Polp51 plasmid DNA expressing the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag-Pol fusion protein that consists of clusters of highly conserved cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes presented by multiple MHC class I alleles. In the hGagp17p24-Polp51 construct, the ribosomal frameshift site had been deleted together with the potentially immunosuppressive Gag nucleocapsid (p15) as well as Pol protease (p10) and integrase (p31). Analyses of the magnitude and breadth of cellular responses demonstrated that immunization of HLA-A2/K(b) transgenic mice with the hGagp17p24-Polp51 construct induced 2- to 5-fold higher CD8+ T-cell responses to Gag p17-, p24-, and Pol reverse transcriptase (RT)-specific CTL epitopes than the full-length hGag-PolDeltaFsDeltaPr counterpart. The increases were correlated with higher protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVVs) expressing gag and pol gene products. Consistent with the profile of Gag- and Pol-specific CD8+ T cell responses, an elevated level of type 1 cytokine production was noted in p24- and RT-stimulated splenocyte cultures established from hGagp17p24-Polp51-immunized mice compared to responses induced with the hGag-PolDeltaFsDeltaPr vaccine. Sera of mice immunized with the hGagp17p24-Polp51 vaccine also exhibited an increased titer of p24- and RT-specific IgG2 antibody responses. The results from our studies provide insights into approaches for boosting the breadth of Gag- and Pol-specific immune responses.

  2. Live attenuated measles vaccine expressing HIV-1 Gag virus like particles covered with gp160DELTAV1V2 is strongly immunogenic

    SciTech Connect

    Guerbois, Mathilde; Moris, Arnaud; Combredet, Chantal; Najburg, Valerie; Ruffie, Claude; Fevrier, Michele; Cayet, Nadege; Brandler, Samantha; Schwartz, Olivier; Tangy, Frederic

    2009-05-25

    Although a live attenuated HIV vaccine is not currently considered for safety reasons, a strategy inducing both T cells and neutralizing antibodies to native assembled HIV-1 particles expressed by a replicating virus might mimic the advantageous characteristics of live attenuated vaccine. To this aim, we generated a live attenuated recombinant measles vaccine expressing HIV-1 Gag virus-like particles (VLPs) covered with gp160DELTAV1V2 Env protein. The measles-HIV virus replicated efficiently in cell culture and induced the intense budding of HIV particles covered with Env. In mice sensitive to MV infection, this recombinant vaccine stimulated high levels of cellular and humoral immunity to both MV and HIV with neutralizing activity. The measles-HIV virus infected human professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and B cells, and induced efficient presentation of HIV-1 epitopes and subsequent activation of human HIV-1 Gag-specific T cell clones. This candidate vaccine will be next tested in non-human primates. As a pediatric vaccine, it might protect children and adolescents simultaneously from measles and HIV.

  3. Human Ubc9 Is Involved in Intracellular HIV-1 Env Stability after Trafficking out of the Trans-Golgi Network in a Gag Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Bohl, Christopher R.; Abrahamyan, Levon G.; Wood, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The cellular E2 Sumo conjugase, Ubc9 interacts with HIV-1 Gag, and is important for the assembly of infectious HIV-1 virions. In the previous study we demonstrated that in the absence of Ubc9, a defect in virion assembly was associated with decreased levels of mature intracellular Envelope (Env) that affected Env incorporation into virions and virion infectivity. We have further characterized the effect of Ubc9 knockdown on HIV Env processing and assembly. We found that gp160 stability in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and its trafficking to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) were unaffected, indicating that the decreased intracellular mature Env levels in Ubc9-depleted cells were due to a selective degradation of mature Env gp120 after cleavage from gp160 and trafficked out of the TGN. Decreased levels of Gag and mature Env were found to be associated with the plasma membrane and lipid rafts, which suggest that these viral proteins were not trafficked correctly to the assembly site. Intracellular gp120 were partially rescued when treated with a combination of lysosome inhibitors. Taken together our results suggest that in the absence of Ubc9, gp120 is preferentially degraded in the lysosomes likely before trafficking to assembly sites leading to the production of defective virions. This study provides further insight in the processing and packaging of the HIV-1 gp120 into mature HIV-1 virions. PMID:23861967

  4. Gag-Specific CD4 T Cell Proliferation, Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells, and Ethnicity in Perinatally HIV-1-Infected Youths: The ANRS-EP38-IMMIP Study.

    PubMed

    Scott-Algara, Daniel; Warszawski, Josiane; Chenadec, Jérôme Le; Didier, Céline; Montange, Thomas; Viard, Jean-Paul; Dollfus, Catherine; Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique; Rouzioux, Christine; Blanche, Stéphane; Buseyne, Florence

    2017-01-01

    In perinatally HIV-1-infected youths living in France, we previously reported that Gag-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation is more frequently detected in patients of black ethnicity than in those of other ethnicities. We observed that black patients had higher levels of dendritic cells (DCs) than other patients. We aimed at studying the association of DC levels with Gag-specific T cell proliferation. The ANRS-EP38-IMMIP study is an observational study of youths aged between 15 and 24 years who were perinatally infected with HIV. A single blood sample was drawn for virological and immunological assays. Data from cART-treated 53 youths with undetectable plasma HIV RNA were analyzed. Gag-specific T cell proliferation was assessed by using a CFSE-based test. Peripheral blood myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were phenotyped by flow cytometry. Plasma markers were quantified by ELISA or multiplex assays. Logistic regression was used for univariate and multivariate analyses. Patients with Gag-specific CD4 T cell proliferative responses had significantly higher percentages and absolute counts of mDCs and pDCs in the peripheral blood than nonresponding patients. Gag-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation was associated with lower plasma sCD14 levels. Plasma levels of IFN-α, TRAIL, and chemokines involved in T cell migration to secondary lymphoid organs were not associated with T cell proliferation. Multivariate analysis confirmed the association between Gag-specific CD4 T cell proliferation and pDC levels. In conclusion, DC levels are a robust correlate of the presence of Gag-specific T cell proliferation in successfully treated youths.

  5. Nedd4-mediated increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env proteins and immunity following DNA-vaccination of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brad; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Galmin, Lindsey; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Cristillo, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation.

  6. Nedd4-Mediated Increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env Proteins and Immunity following DNA-Vaccination of BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Brad; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Galmin, Lindsey; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Cristillo, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation. PMID:24614057

  7. Improved quantification of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells using an optimised method of intracellular HIV-1 gag p24 antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongbing; Yorke, Elisabeth; Hancock, Gemma; Clutton, Genevieve; Sande, Nellia; Angus, Brian; Smyth, Redmond; Mak, Johnson; Dorrell, Lucy

    2013-05-31

    The capacity of CD8+ T cells to inhibit HIV-1 replication in vitro strongly correlates with virus control in vivo. Post-hoc evaluations of HIV-1 vaccine candidates suggest that this immunological parameter is a promising benchmark of vaccine efficacy. Large-scale analysis of CD8+ T cell antiviral activity requires a rapid, robust and economical assay for accurate quantification of HIV-1 infection in primary CD4+ T cells. Detection of intracellular HIV-1 p24 antigen (p24 Ag) by flow cytometry is one such method but it is thought to be less sensitive and quantitative than p24 Ag ELISA. We report that fixation and permeabilisation of HIV-infected cells using paraformaldehyde/50% methanol/Nonidet P-40 instead of a conventional paraformaldehyde/saponin-based protocol improved their detection across multiplicities of infection (MOI) ranging from 10(-2) to 8×10(-5), and by nearly two-fold (p<0.001) at the optimal MOI tested (10(-2)). The frequency of infected cells was strongly correlated with p24 Ag release during culture, thus validating its use as a measure of productive infection. We were also able to quantify infection with a panel of HIV-1 isolates representing the major clades. The protocol described here is rapid and cost-effective compared with ELISA and thus could be a useful component of immune monitoring of HIV-1 vaccines and interventions to reduce viral reservoirs.

  8. A Conserved Target Site in HIV-1 Gag RNA is Accessible to Inhibition by Both an HDV Ribozyme and a Short Hairpin RNA

    PubMed Central

    Scarborough, Robert J; Lévesque, Michel V; Boudrias-Dalle, Etienne; Chute, Ian C; Daniels, Sylvanne M; Ouellette, Rodney J; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Gatignol, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Antisense-based molecules targeting HIV-1 RNA have the potential to be used as part of gene or drug therapy to treat HIV-1 infection. In this study, HIV-1 RNA was screened to identify more conserved and accessible target sites for ribozymes based on the hepatitis delta virus motif. Using a quantitative screen for effects on HIV-1 production, we identified a ribozyme targeting a highly conserved site in the Gag coding sequence with improved inhibitory potential compared to our previously described candidates targeting the overlapping Tat/Rev coding sequence. We also demonstrate that this target site is highly accessible to short hairpin directed RNA interference, suggesting that it may be available for the binding of antisense RNAs with different modes of action. We provide evidence that this target site is structurally conserved in diverse viral strains and that it is sufficiently different from the human transcriptome to limit off-target effects from antisense therapies. We also show that the modified hepatitis delta virus ribozyme is more sensitive to a mismatch in its target site compared to the short hairpin RNA. Overall, our results validate the potential of a new target site in HIV-1 RNA to be used for the development of antisense therapies. PMID:25072692

  9. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun; Geng, Guannan; Liang, Juanran; Li, Yingniang; Chen, Jingliang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hui

    2015-12-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-box of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. - Highlights: • MOV10 can function as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev. • MOV10 facilitates Rev/RRE-dependent transport of viral mRNAs. • MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. • The DEAG-box of MOV10 is required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent export.

  10. Human Endogenous Retrovirus K(HML-2) Gag- and Env-Specific T-Cell Responses Are Infrequently Detected in HIV-1-Infected Subjects Using Standard Peptide Matrix-Based Screening

    PubMed Central

    John, Vivek M.; Hunter, Diana V.; Martin, Eric; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Burgers, Peter C.; Luider, Theo M.; Gyenes, Gabor; Sheppard, Neil C.; SenGupta, Devi; Tandon, Ravi; Yue, Feng-Yun; Benko, Erika; Kovacs, Colin; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    T-cell responses to human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) K(HML-2) Gag and Env were mapped in HIV-1-infected subjects using 15mer peptides. Small peptide pools and high concentrations were used to maximize sensitivity. In the 23 subjects studied, only three bona fide HERV-K(HML-2)-specific responses were detected. At these high peptide concentrations, we detected false-positive responses, three of which were mapped to an HIV-1 Gag peptide contaminant. Thus, HERV-K(HML-2) Gag- and Env-specific T-cell responses are infrequently detected by 15mer peptide mapping. PMID:22205657

  11. Prime-boost vaccination with heterologous live vectors encoding SIV gag and multimeric HIV-1 gp160 protein: efficacy against repeated mucosal R5 clade C SHIV challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lakhashe, Samir K.; Velu, Vijayakumar; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; DiPasquale, Janet M.; Hemashettar, Girish; Yoon, John K.; Rasmussen, Robert A.; Yang, Feng; Lee, Sandra J.; Montefiori, David C.; Novembre, Francis J.; Villinger, François; Amara, Rama Rao; Kahn, Maria; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Li, Sufen; Li, Zhongxia; Frankel, Fred R.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Johnson, Welkin E.; Lieberman, Judy; Ruprecht, Ruth M.

    2011-01-01

    We sought to induce primate immunodeficiency virus-specific cellular and neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses in rhesus macaques (RM) through a bimodal vaccine approach. RM were immunized intragastrically (i.g.) with the live-attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) vector Lmdd-BdopSIVgag encoding SIVmac239 gag. SIV Gag-specific cellular responses were boosted by intranasal and intratracheal administration of replication-competent adenovirus (Ad5hr-SIVgag) encoding the same gag. To broaden antiviral immunity, the RM were immunized with multimeric HIV clade C (HIV-C) gp160 and HIV Tat. SIV Gag-specific cellular immune responses and HIV-1 nAb developed in some RM. The animals were challenged intrarectally with five low doses of R5 SHIV-1157ipEL-p, encoding a heterologous HIV-C Env (22.1% divergent to the Env immunogen). All five controls became viremic. One out of ten vaccinees was completely protected and another had low peak viremia. Sera from the completely and partially protected RM neutralized the challenge virus >90%; these RM also had strong SIV Gag-specific proliferation of CD8+ T cells. Peak and area under the curve of plasma viremia (during acute phase) among vaccinees was lower than for controls, but did not attain significance. The completely protected RM showed persistently low numbers of the α4β7-expressing CD4+ T cells; the latter have been implicated as preferential virus targets in-vivo. Thus, vaccine-induced immune responses and relatively lower numbers of potential target cells were associated with protection. PMID:21693155

  12. Cell-dependent gag mutants of HIV-1 are crucially defective at the stage of uncoating/reverse transcription in non-permissive cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, K; Miyaura, M; Yoshida, A; Sakurai, A; Fujita, M; Adachi, A

    2000-10-01

    We have previously shown that some of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gag matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) mutants display host-cell-dependent replication potential, and that they are defective at the early phase of the virus replication cycle in non-permissive cells. To determine the defective replication stage of the cell-dependent mutants precisely, the processes of virus entry into cells and virus DNA synthesis were monitored by the highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction amplification analysis. The results obtained indicated that all the cell-dependent MA, CA and NC mutants are defective at the stage of uncoating/reverse transcription, and that a cellular factor(s) is involved in this process.

  13. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell and functional HIV Gag p55-specific T cells before treatment interruption can inform set-point plasma HIV viral load after treatment interruption in chronically suppressed HIV-1+ patients

    PubMed Central

    Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Foulkes, Andrea; Yin, Xiangfan; Joseph, Jocelin; Ross, Brian; Azzoni, Livio; Kostman, Jay R; Mounzer, Karam; Shull, Jane; Montaner, Luis J

    2015-01-01

    The identification of immune correlates of HIV control is important for the design of immunotherapies that could support cure or antiretroviral therapy (ART) intensification-related strategies. ART interruptions may facilitate this task through exposure of an ART partially reconstituted immune system to endogenous virus. We investigated the relationship between set-point plasma HIV viral load (VL) during an ART interruption and innate/adaptive parameters before or after interruption. Dendritic cell (DC), natural killer (NK) cell and HIV Gag p55-specific T-cell functional responses were measured in paired cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained at the beginning (on ART) and at set-point of an open-ended interruption from 31 ART-suppressed chronically HIV-1+ patients. Spearman correlation and linear regression modeling were used. Frequencies of plasmacytoid DC (pDC), and HIV Gag p55-specific CD3+ CD4− perforin+ IFN-γ+ cells at the beginning of interruption associated negatively with set-point plasma VL. Inclusion of both variables with interaction into a model resulted in the best fit (adjusted R2 = 0·6874). Frequencies of pDC or HIV Gag p55-specific CD3+ CD4− CSFElo CD107a+ cells at set-point associated negatively with set-point plasma VL. The dual contribution of pDC and anti-HIV T-cell responses to viral control, supported by our models, suggests that these variables may serve as immune correlates of viral control and could be integrated in cure or ART-intensification strategies. PMID:25684333

  14. Biochemical and Biologic Characterization of Exosomes and Microvesicles as Facilitators of HIV-1 Infection in Macrophages1

    PubMed Central

    Kadiu, Irena; Narayanasamy, Prabagaran; Dash, Prasanta K.; Zhang, Wei; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles are cell membranous sacs originating from multivesicular bodies and plasma membranes that facilitate long-distance intercellular communications. Lipidomic, proteomic and cell biologic approaches uncovered processes by which the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) can use exosomes and MV to facilitate its dissemination. Macrophage MV and exosomes were isolated by immunoaffinity and sucrose cushion centrifugation and characterized by morphologic, biochemical and molecular assays. HIV-1 was “entrapped” in exosome aggregates. Robust HIV-1 replication followed infection with exosome-enhanced fractions isolated from infected cell supernatants. MV and exosomes facilitated viral infection that was affected by a range of cell surface receptors and adhesion proteins. HIV-1 readily completed its life cycle in human monocyte-derived macrophages but not in CD4 negative cells. The data support a significant role for exosomes as facilitators of viral infection. PMID:22711894

  15. Primary Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Endocytose HIV-1 and Facilitate Viral Infection of CD4+ T Lymphocytes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dorosko, Stephanie M.; Connor, Ruth I.

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of mammary epithelial cells (MEC) to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in breast milk remains largely unknown. While breast milk contains CD4+ cells throughout the breast-feeding period, it is not known whether MEC directly support HIV-1 infection or facilitate infection of CD4+ cells in the breast compartment. This study evaluated primary human MEC for direct infection with HIV-1 and for indirect transfer of infection to CD4+ target cells. Primary human MEC were isolated and assessed for expression of HIV-1 receptors. MEC were exposed to CCR5-, CXCR4- and dual-tropic strains of HIV-1 and evaluated for viral reverse transcription and integration and productive viral infection. MEC were also tested for the ability to transfer HIV to CD4+ target cells and to activate resting CD4+ T cells. Our results demonstrate that MEC express HIV-1 receptor proteins CD4, CCR5, CXCR4, and galactosyl ceramide (GalCer). While no evidence for direct infection of MEC was found, HIV-1 virions were observed in MEC endosomal compartments. Coculture of HIV-exposed MEC resulted in productive infection of activated CD4+ T cells. In addition, MEC secretions increased HIV-1 replication and proliferation of infected target cells. Overall, our results indicate that MEC are capable of endosomal uptake of HIV-1 and can facilitate virus infection and replication in CD4+ target cells. These findings suggest that MEC may serve as a viral reservoir for HIV-1 and may enhance infection of CD4+ T lymphocytes in vivo. PMID:20702626

  16. Mutations in both env and gag genes are required for HIV-1 resistance to the polysulfonic dendrimer SPL2923, as corroborated by chimeric virus technology.

    PubMed

    Hantson, Anke; Fikkert, Valery; Van Remoortel, Barbara; Pannecouque, Chistophe; Cherepanov, Peter; Matthews, Barry; Holan, George; De Clercq, Erik; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Debyser, Zeger; Witvrouw, Myriam

    2005-01-01

    A drug-resistant NL4.3/SPL2923 strain has previously been generated by in vitro selection of HIV-1(NL4.3) in the presence of the polysulfonic dendrimer SPL2923 and mutations were reported in its gp120 gene (Witvrouw et al., 2000). Here, we further analysed the (cross) resistance profile of NL4.3/SPL2923. NL4.3/SPL2923 was found to contain additional mutations in gp41 and showed reduced susceptibility to SPL2923, dextran sulfate (DS) and enfuvirtide. To delineate to what extent the mutations in each env gene were accountable for the phenotypic (cross) resistance of NL4.3/SPL2923, the gp120-, gp41- and gp160-sequences derived from this strain were placed into a wild-type background using env chimeric virus technology (CVT). The cross resistance of NL4.3/SPL2923 towards DS was fully reproduced following gp160-recombination, while it was only partially reproduced following gp120- or gp41-recombination. The mutations in gp41 of NL4.3/SPL2923 were sufficient to reproduce the cross resistance to enfuvirtide. Unexpectedly, the reduced sensitivity towards SPL2923 was not fully reproduced after gp160-recombination. The search for mutations in NL4.3/SPL2923 in viral genes other than env revealed several mutations in the gene encoding the HIV p17 matrix protein (MA) and one mutation in the gene encoding the p24 capsid protein (CA). In order to analyse the impact of the gag mutations alone and in combination with the mutations in env on the phenotypic resistance towards SPL2923, we developed a novel p17- and p17/gp160-CVT. Phenotypic analysis of the NL4.3/SPL2923 p17- and p17/gp160-recombined strains indicated that the mutations in both env and gag have to be present to fully reproduce the resistance of NL4.3/SPL2923 towards SPL2923.

  17. Fusion of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1-derived glycine-alanine repeat to trans-dominant HIV-1 Gag increases inhibitory activities and survival of transduced cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Diana; Wild, Jens; Ludwig, Christine; Asbach, Benedikt; Notka, Frank; Wagner, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    Trans-dominant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag derivatives have been shown to efficiently inhibit late steps of HIV-1 replication in vitro by interfering with Gag precursor assembly, thus ranking among the interesting candidates for gene therapy approaches. However, efficient antiviral activities of corresponding transgenes are likely to be counteracted in particular by cell-mediated host immune responses toward the transgene-expressing cells. To decrease this potential immunogenicity, a 24-amino acid Gly-Ala (GA) stretch derived from Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) and known to overcome proteasomal degradation was fused to a trans-dominant Gag variant (sgD1). To determine the capacity of this fusion polypeptide to repress viral replication, PM-1 cells were transduced with sgD1 and GAsgD1 transgenes, using retroviral gene transfer. Challenge of stably transfected permissive cell lines with various viral strains indicated that N-terminal GA fusion even enhanced the inhibitory properties of sgD1. Further studies revealed that the GA stretch increased protein stability by blocking proteasomal degradation of Gag proteins. Immunization of BALB/c mice with a DNA vaccine vector expressing sgD1 induced substantial Gag-specific immune responses that were, however, clearly diminished in the presence of GA. Furthermore, recognition of cells expressing the GA-fused transgene by CD8(+) T cells was drastically reduced, both in vitro and in vivo, resulting in prolonged survival of the transduced cells in recipient mice.

  18. Replication Competent Molecular Clones of HIV-1 Expressing Renilla Luciferase Facilitate the Analysis of Antibody Inhibition in PBMC

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Tara G.; Ding, Haitao; Yuan, Xing; Wei, Qing; Smith, Kendra S.; Conway, Joan A.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Brown, Bruce; Polonis, Victoria; West, John T.; Montefiori, David C.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Effective vaccine development for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will require assays that ascertain the capacity of vaccine immunogens to elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAb) to diverse HIV-1 strains. To facilitate NAb assessment in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based assays, we developed an assay-adaptable platform based on a Renilla luciferase (LucR) expressing HIV-1 proviral backbone. LucR was inserted into pNL4-3 DNA, preserving all viral open reading frames. The proviral genome was engineered to facilitate expression of diverse HIV-1 env sequences, allowing analysis in an isogenic background. The resulting Env-IMC-LucR viruses are infectious, and LucR is stably expressed over multiple replications in PBMC. HIV-1 neutralization, targeting TZM-bl cells, was highly correlative comparing virus (LucR) and cell (firefly luciferase) readouts. In PBMC, NAb activity can be analyzed either within a single or multiple cycles of replication. These results represent advancement toward a standardizable PBMC-based neutralization assay for assessing HIV-1 vaccine immunogen efficacy. PMID:20863545

  19. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8+ T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses. PMID:23941868

  20. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-10-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8(+) T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses.

  1. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojha, R. P.; Dhingra, M. M.; Sarma, M. H.; Myer, Y. P.; Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.; Turner, C. J.; Sarma, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    between the anti HIV-1 gag ribozyme and its abortive DNA substrate manifests in the detection of a continuous track of A.T base pairs; this suggests that the interaction between the ribozyme and its DNA substrate is stronger than the one observed in the case of the free ribozyme where the bases in stem I and stem III regions interact strongly with the ribozyme core region (Sarma, R. H., et al. FEBS Letters 375, 317-23, 1995). The complex formation provides certain guidelines in the design of suitable therapeutic ribozymes. If the residues in the ribozyme stem regions interact with the conserved core, it may either prevent or interfere with the formation of a catalytically active tertiary structure.

  2. Transmembrane TNF-α Facilitates HIV-1 Infection of Podocytes Cultured from Children with HIV-Associated Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinliang; Das, Jharna R; Tang, Pingtao; Han, Zhe; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Ray, Patricio E

    2017-03-01

    Studies have shown that podocytes and renal tubular epithelial cells from patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) express HIV-1 transcripts, suggesting that productive infection of renal epithelial cells precipitates development of HIVAN. However, podocytes and renal tubular epithelial cells do not express CD4 receptors, and it is unclear how these cells become productively infected in vivo We investigated the mechanisms underlying the infection by HIV-1 of podocytes cultured from the urine of children with HIVAN. We observed low-level productive infection on exposure of these cells to primary cell-free HIV-1 supernatants. However, envelope-defective recombinant HIV-1 did not infect the renal epithelial cell lines. Moreover, treatment of podocytes to inhibit endocytic transport or dynamin activity or remove cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans reduced infection efficiency. Transfection of CD4- 293T cells with a cDNA expression library developed from a podocyte cell line derived from a child with HIVAN led to the identification of TNF-α as a possible mediator of HIV-1 infection. Overexpression of transmembrane TNF-α in cultured CD4- renal tubular epithelial cells, 293T cells, and HeLa cells enabled the infection of these cells; exposure to soluble TNF-α did not. Immunohistochemistry showed TNF-α expression in podocytes of renal sections from children with HIVAN. Furthermore, we found that TNF-α enhanced NF-κB activation and integration of HIV-1 into the podocyte DNA. Finally, inhibition of dynamin activity blocked TNF-α-mediated infection. These data establish a role for transmembrane TNF-α in facilitating the viral entry and integration of HIV-1 into the DNA of renal epithelial cells.

  3. Ectopic ATP synthase facilitates transfer of HIV-1 from antigen-presenting cells to CD4+ target cells

    PubMed Central

    Yavlovich, Amichai; Viard, Mathias; Zhou, Ming; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Wang, Ji Ming; Gong, Wanghua; Heldman, Eliahu; Blumenthal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) act as vehicles that transfer HIV to their target CD4+ cells through an intercellular junction, termed the virologic synapse. The molecules that are involved in this process remain largely unidentified. In this study, we used photoaffinity labeling and a proteomic approach to identify new proteins that facilitate HIV-1 transfer. We identified ectopic mitochondrial ATP synthase as a factor that mediates HIV-1 transfer between APCs and CD4+ target cells. Monoclonal antibodies against the β-subunit of ATP synthase inhibited APC-mediated transfer of multiple strains HIV-1 to CD4+ target cells. Likewise, the specific inhibitors of ATPase, citreoviridin and IF1, completely blocked APC-mediated transfer of HIV-1 at the APC-target cell interaction step. Confocal fluorescent microscopy showed localization of extracellular ATP synthase at junctions between APC and CD4+ target cells. We conclude that ectopic ATP synthase could be an accessible molecular target for inhibiting HIV-1 proliferation in vivo. PMID:22753871

  4. Extracellular ATP acts on P2Y2 purinergic receptors to facilitate HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Séror, Claire; Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Subra, Frédéric; Raza, Syed Qasim; Bras, Marlène; Saïdi, Héla; Nardacci, Roberta; Voisin, Laurent; Paoletti, Audrey; Law, Frédéric; Martins, Isabelle; Amendola, Alessandra; Abdul-Sater, Ali A; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Delelis, Olivier; Niedergang, Florence; Thierry, Sylvain; Said-Sadier, Najwane; Lamaze, Christophe; Métivier, Didier; Estaquier, Jérome; Fimia, Gian Maria; Falasca, Laura; Casetti, Rita; Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Ojcius, David M; Piacentini, Mauro; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Kroemer, Guido; Perfettini, Jean-Luc

    2011-08-29

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can activate purinergic receptors of the plasma membrane and modulate multiple cellular functions. We report that ATP is released from HIV-1 target cells through pannexin-1 channels upon interaction between the HIV-1 envelope protein and specific target cell receptors. Extracellular ATP then acts on purinergic receptors, including P2Y2, to activate proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) kinase and transient plasma membrane depolarization, which in turn stimulate fusion between Env-expressing membranes and membranes containing CD4 plus appropriate chemokine co-receptors. Inhibition of any of the constituents of this cascade (pannexin-1, ATP, P2Y2, and Pyk2) impairs the replication of HIV-1 mutant viruses that are resistant to conventional antiretroviral agents. Altogether, our results reveal a novel signaling pathway involved in the early steps of HIV-1 infection that may be targeted with new therapeutic approaches.

  5. Extracellular ATP acts on P2Y2 purinergic receptors to facilitate HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Séror, Claire; Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Subra, Frédéric; Raza, Syed Qasim; Bras, Marlène; Saïdi, Héla; Nardacci, Roberta; Voisin, Laurent; Paoletti, Audrey; Law, Frédéric; Martins, Isabelle; Amendola, Alessandra; Abdul-Sater, Ali A.; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Delelis, Olivier; Niedergang, Florence; Thierry, Sylvain; Said-Sadier, Najwane; Lamaze, Christophe; Métivier, Didier; Estaquier, Jérome; Fimia, Gian Maria; Falasca, Laura; Casetti, Rita; Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Ojcius, David M.; Piacentini, Mauro; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can activate purinergic receptors of the plasma membrane and modulate multiple cellular functions. We report that ATP is released from HIV-1 target cells through pannexin-1 channels upon interaction between the HIV-1 envelope protein and specific target cell receptors. Extracellular ATP then acts on purinergic receptors, including P2Y2, to activate proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) kinase and transient plasma membrane depolarization, which in turn stimulate fusion between Env-expressing membranes and membranes containing CD4 plus appropriate chemokine co-receptors. Inhibition of any of the constituents of this cascade (pannexin-1, ATP, P2Y2, and Pyk2) impairs the replication of HIV-1 mutant viruses that are resistant to conventional antiretroviral agents. Altogether, our results reveal a novel signaling pathway involved in the early steps of HIV-1 infection that may be targeted with new therapeutic approaches. PMID:21859844

  6. Sequence conservation, HLA-E-Restricted peptide, and best-defined CTL/CD8+ epitopes in gag P24 (capsid) of HIV-1 subtype B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Dharmawan, Ruben; Sari, Yulia; Sariyatun, Ratna

    2017-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains a cause of global health problem. Continuous studies of HIV-1 genetic and immunological profiles are important to find strategies against the virus. This study aimed to conduct analysis of sequence conservation, HLA-E-restricted peptide, and best-defined CTL/CD8+ epitopes in p24 (capsid) of HIV-1 subtype B worldwide. The p24-coding sequences from 3,557 HIV subtype B isolates were aligned using MUSCLE and analysed. Some highly conserved regions (sequence conservation ≥95%) were observed. Two considerably long series of sequences with conservation of 100% was observed at base 349-356 and 550-557 of p24 (HXB2 numbering). The consensus from all aligned isolates was precisely the same as consensus B in the Los Alamos HIV Database. The HLA-E-restricted peptide in amino acid (aa) 14-22 of HIV-1 p24 (AISPRTLNA) was found in 55.9% (1,987/3,557) of HIV-1 subtype B worldwide. Forty-four best-defined CTL/CD8+ epitopes were observed, in which VKNWMTETL epitope (aa 181-189 of p24) restricted by B*4801 was the most frequent, as found in 94.9% of isolates. The results of this study would contribute information about HIV-1 subtype B and benefits for further works willing to develop diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against the virus.

  7. HIV-1 Gag p17 presented as virus-like particles on the E2 scaffold from Geobacillus stearothermophilus induces sustained humoral and cellular immune responses in the absence of IFNγ production by CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Caivano, Antonella; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Buelow, Benjamin; Sartorius, Rossella; Trovato, Maria; D’Apice, Luciana; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Sutton, William F.; Haigwood, Nancy L.; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed stable virus-like particles displaying the HIV-1 Gag(p17) protein as an N-terminal fusion with an engineered protein domain from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E2. Mice immunized with the Gag(p17)-E2 60-mer scaffold particles mounted a strong and sustained antibody response. Antibodies directed to Gag(p17) were boosted significantly with additional immunizations, while anti-E2 responses reached a plateau. The isotype of the induced antibodies was biased towards IgG1, and the E2-primed CD4+ T cells did not secrete IFNγ. Using transgenic mouse model systems, we demonstrated that CD8+ T cells primed with E2 particles were able to exert lytic activity and produce IFNγ. These results show that the E2 scaffold represents a powerful vaccine delivery system for whole antigenic proteins or polyepitope engineered proteins, evoking antibody production and antigen specific CTL activity even in the absence of IFNγ-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:20850858

  8. HIV-1 Gag p17 presented as virus-like particles on the E2 scaffold from Geobacillus stearothermophilus induces sustained humoral and cellular immune responses in the absence of IFN{gamma} production by CD4+ T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Caivano, Antonella; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Buelow, Benjamin; Sartorius, Rossella; Trovato, Maria; D'Apice, Luciana; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Sutton, William F.; Haigwood, Nancy L.; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2010-11-25

    We have constructed stable virus-like particles displaying the HIV-1 Gag(p17) protein as an N-terminal fusion with an engineered protein domain from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E2. Mice immunized with the Gag(p17)-E2 60-mer scaffold particles mounted a strong and sustained antibody response. Antibodies directed to Gag(p17) were boosted significantly with additional immunizations, while anti-E2 responses reached a plateau. The isotype of the induced antibodies was biased towards IgG1, and the E2-primed CD4+ T cells did not secrete IFN{gamma}. Using transgenic mouse model systems, we demonstrated that CD8+ T cells primed with E2 particles were able to exert lytic activity and produce IFN{gamma}. These results show that the E2 scaffold represents a powerful vaccine delivery system for whole antigenic proteins or polyepitope engineered proteins, evoking antibody production and antigen specific CTL activity even in the absence of IFN{gamma}-producing CD4+ T cells.

  9. Recombination Enhances HIV-1 Envelope Diversity by Facilitating the Survival of Latent Genomic Fragments in the Plasma Virus Population.

    PubMed

    Immonen, Taina T; Conway, Jessica M; Romero-Severson, Ethan O; Perelson, Alan S; Leitner, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation process including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness

  10. Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating the survival of latent genomic fragments in the plasma virus population

    SciTech Connect

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Perelson, Alan S.; Leitner, Thomas; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-12-22

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation process including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness

  11. Recombination Enhances HIV-1 Envelope Diversity by Facilitating the Survival of Latent Genomic Fragments in the Plasma Virus Population

    PubMed Central

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Perelson, Alan S.; Leitner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation process including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness

  12. Presence of HIV-1 Gag-specific IFN-gamma+IL-2+ and CD28+IL-2+ CD4 T cell responses is associated with nonprogression in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Boaz, Mark J; Waters, Anele; Murad, Shahed; Easterbrook, Philippa J; Vyakarnam, Annapurna

    2002-12-01

    HIV immunity is likely CD4 T cell dependent. HIV-specific CD4 T cell proliferative responses are reported to correlate inversely with virus load and directly with specific CD8 responses. However, the phenotype and cytokine profile of specific CD4 T cells that correlate with disease is unknown. We compared the number/function of Gag p24-specific CD4 T cells in 17 HIV-infected long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) infected for a median of 14.6 years with those of 16 slow progressors (SPs), also HIV infected for a median of 14 years but whose CD4 count had declined to <500 cells/ micro l. Compared with SPs, LTNPs had higher numbers of specific CD4s that were double positive for IFN-gamma and IL-2 as well as CD28 and IL-2. However, CD4 T cells that produced IL-2 alone (IL-2(+)IFN-gamma(-)) or IFN-gamma alone (IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(-)) did not differ between LTNPs and SPs. The decrease in p24-specific CD28(+)IL-2(+) cells with a concomitant increase of p24-specific CD28(-)IL-2(+) cells occurred before those specific for a non-HIV Ag, CMV. p24-specific CD28(-)IL-2(+) cells were evident in LTNPs and SPs, whereas the CMV-specific CD28(-)IL-2(+) response was confined to SPs. The difference between LTNPs and SPs in the Gag p24 IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(+) response was maintained when responses to total Gag (p17 plus p24) were measured. The percentage and absolute number of Gag-specific IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(+) but not of IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(-) CD4s correlated inversely with virus load. The Gag-specific IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(+) CD4 response also correlated positively with the percentage of Gag-specific IFN-gamma(+) CD8 T cells in these subjects. Accumulation of specific CD28(-)IL-2(+) helpers and loss of IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(+) CD4 T cells may compromise specific CD8 responses and, in turn, immunity to HIV.

  13. Molecular mimicry of human tRNALys anti-codon domain by HIV-1 RNA genome facilitates tRNA primer annealing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher P; Saadatmand, Jenan; Kleiman, Lawrence; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-02-01

    The primer for initiating reverse transcription in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tRNA(Lys3). Host cell tRNA(Lys) is selectively packaged into HIV-1 through a specific interaction between the major tRNA(Lys)-binding protein, human lysyl-tRNA synthetase (hLysRS), and the viral proteins Gag and GagPol. Annealing of the tRNA primer onto the complementary primer-binding site (PBS) in viral RNA is mediated by the nucleocapsid domain of Gag. The mechanism by which tRNA(Lys3) is targeted to the PBS and released from hLysRS prior to annealing is unknown. Here, we show that hLysRS specifically binds to a tRNA anti-codon-like element (TLE) in the HIV-1 genome, which mimics the anti-codon loop of tRNA(Lys) and is located proximal to the PBS. Mutation of the U-rich sequence within the TLE attenuates binding of hLysRS in vitro and reduces the amount of annealed tRNA(Lys3) in virions. Thus, LysRS binds specifically to the TLE, which is part of a larger LysRS binding domain in the viral RNA that includes elements of the Psi packaging signal. Our results suggest that HIV-1 uses molecular mimicry of the anti-codon of tRNA(Lys) to increase the efficiency of tRNA(Lys3) annealing to viral RNA.

  14. CRISPR-Cas9 Can Inhibit HIV-1 Replication but NHEJ Repair Facilitates Virus Escape.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2016-03-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 can be used for guide RNA (gRNA)-directed, sequence-specific cleavage of HIV proviral DNA in infected cells. We here demonstrate profound inhibition of HIV-1 replication by harnessing T cells with Cas9 and antiviral gRNAs. However, the virus rapidly and consistently escaped from this inhibition. Sequencing of the HIV-1 escape variants revealed nucleotide insertions, deletions, and substitutions around the Cas9/gRNA cleavage site that are typical for DNA repair by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. We thus demonstrate the potency of CRISPR-Cas9 as an antiviral approach, but any therapeutic strategy should consider the viral escape implications.

  15. RNA Structures Facilitate Recombination-Mediated Gene Swapping in HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny. PMID:20881047

  16. RNA structures facilitate recombination-mediated gene swapping in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P; Weeks, Kevin M; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-12-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny.

  17. Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating the survival of latent genomic fragments in the plasma virus population

    DOE PAGES

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; ...

    2015-12-22

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation processmore » including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different

  18. FACT Proteins, SUPT16H and SSRP1, Are Transcriptional Suppressors of HIV-1 and HTLV-1 That Facilitate Viral Latency.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huachao; Santoso, Netty; Power, Derek; Simpson, Sydney; Dieringer, Michael; Miao, Hongyu; Gurova, Katerina; Giam, Chou-Zen; Elledge, Stephen J; Zhu, Jian

    2015-11-06

    Our functional genomic RNAi screens have identified the protein components of the FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) complex, SUPT16H and SSRP1, as top host factors that negatively regulate HIV-1 replication. FACT interacts specifically with histones H2A/H2B to affect assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes, as well as transcription elongation. We further investigated the suppressive role of FACT proteins in HIV-1 transcription. First, depletion of SUPT16H or SSRP1 protein enhances Tat-mediated HIV-1 LTR (long terminal repeat) promoter activity. Second, HIV-1 Tat interacts with SUPT16H but not SSRP1 protein. However, both SUPT16H and SSRP1 are recruited to LTR promoter. Third, the presence of SUPT16H interferes with the association of Cyclin T1 (CCNT1), a subunit of P-TEFb, with the Tat-LTR axis. Removing inhibitory mechanisms to permit HIV-1 transcription is an initial and key regulatory step to reverse post-integrated latent HIV-1 proviruses for purging of reservoir cells. We therefore evaluated the role of FACT proteins in HIV-1 latency and reactivation. Depletion of SUPT16H or SSRP1 protein affects both HIV-1 transcriptional initiation and elongation and spontaneously reverses latent HIV-1 in U1/HIV and J-LAT cells. Similar effects were observed with a primary CD4+ T cell model of HIV-1 latency. FACT proteins also interfere with HTLV-1 Tax-LTR-mediated transcription and viral latency, indicating that they may act as general transcriptional suppressors for retroviruses. We conclude that FACT proteins SUPT16H and SSRP1 play a key role in suppressing HIV-1 transcription and promoting viral latency, which may serve as promising gene targets for developing novel HIV-1 latency-reversing agents.

  19. Sequential Deletion of the Integrase (Gag-Pol) Carboxyl Terminus Reveals Distinct Phenotypic Classes of Defective HIV-1 ▿ † §

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Kevin D.; Topper, Michael B.; Muesing, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A requisite step in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the insertion of the viral genome into that of the host cell, a process catalyzed by the 288-amino-acid (32-kDa) viral integrase (IN). IN recognizes and cleaves the ends of reverse-transcribed viral DNA and directs its insertion into the chromosomal DNA of the target cell. IN function, however, is not limited to integration, as the protein is required for other aspects of viral replication, including assembly, virion maturation, and reverse transcription. Previous studies demonstrated that IN is comprised of three domains: the N-terminal domain (NTD), catalytic core domain (CCD), and C-terminal domain (CTD). Whereas the CCD is mainly responsible for providing the structural framework for catalysis, the roles of the other two domains remain enigmatic. This study aimed to elucidate the primary and subsidiary roles that the CTD has in protein function. To this end, we generated and tested a nested set of IN C-terminal deletion mutants in measurable assays of virologic function. We discovered that removal of up to 15 residues (IN 273) resulted in incremental diminution of enzymatic function and infectivity and that removal of the next three residues resulted in a loss of infectivity. However, replication competency was surprisingly reestablished with one further truncation, corresponding to IN 269 and coinciding with partial restoration of integration activity, but it was lost permanently for all truncations extending N terminal to this position. Our analyses of these replication-competent and -incompetent truncation mutants suggest potential roles for the IN CTD in precursor protein processing, reverse transcription, integration, and IN multimerization. PMID:21367893

  20. HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Freed, E O

    2001-11-01

    In general terms, the replication cycle of lentiviruses, including HIV-1, closely resembles that of other retroviruses. There are, however, a number of unique aspects of HIV replication; for example, the HIVs and SIVs target receptors and coreceptors distinct from those used by other retroviruses. Lentiviruses encode a number of regulatory and accessory proteins not encoded by the genomes of the prototypical "simple" retroviruses. Of particular interest from the gene therapy perspective, lentiviruses possess the ability to productively infect some types of non-dividing cells. This chapter, while reiterating certain points discussed in Chapter 1, will attempt to focus on issues unique to HIV-1 replication. The HIV-1 genome encodes the major structural and non-structural proteins common to all replication-competent retroviruses (Fig. 1, and Chapter 1). From the 5'- to 3'-ends of the genome are found the gag (for group-specific antigen), pol (for polymerase), and env (for envelope glycoprotein) genes. The gag gene encodes a polyprotein precursor whose name, Pr55Gag, is based on its molecular weight. Pr55Gag is cleaved by the viral protease (PR) to the mature Gag proteins matrix (also known as MA or p17), capsid (CA or p24), nucleocapsid (NC or p7), and p6. Two spacer peptides, p2 and p1, are also generated upon Pr55Gag processing. The pol-encoded enzymes are initially synthesized as part of a large polyprotein precursor, Pr160GagPol, whose synthesis results from a rare frameshifting event during Pr55Gag translation. The individual pol-encoded enzymes, PR, reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN), are cleaved from Pr160GagPol by the viral PR. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins are also synthesized as a polyprotein precursor (Fig. 1). Unlike the Gag and Pol precursors, which are cleaved by the viral PR, the Env precursor, known as gp160, is processed by a cellular protease during Env trafficking to the cell surface, gp160 processing results in the generation of the

  1. Randomized, placebo-controlled, phase I/IIa evaluation of the safety and immunogenicity of fowlpox virus expressing HIV gag-pol and interferon-gamma in HIV-1 infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Emery, S; Workman, C; Puls, R L; Bloch, M; Baker, D; Bodsworth, N; Anderson, J; Crowe, S M; French, M A H; Hoy, J; Aichelburg, A; Ward, L D; Boyle, D B; Law, M G; Kelleher, A D; Cooper, D A

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind trial to examine the safety and immunogenicity of a candidate HIV therapeutic vaccine based upon a recombinant fowl pox virus capable of coexpressing the human cytokine interferon-gamma and/or genes from HIV-1. Thirty-five eligible subjects were randomized (12 placebo, 11 fowlpox + HIV genes, 12 fowl pox + HIV genes + interferon gamma). All but one subject (placebo group) received three immunizations (by intramuscular injection on day 0, week 4 and week 12) and all completed 52 weeks of follow-up. All subjects continued to take combination antiretroviral therapy for the duration of study. There were no significant toxicity or safety concerns and the distribution of adverse events and their severity was consistent across each randomly assigned vaccine group. Comparison of placebo recipients with the combined recipients of the two vaccine constructs, in terms of anti-HIV gag ELISpot or lymphoproliferative responses, tended to favour the placebo group, but were not significantly different (difference in time-weighted mean change from baseline = 56 Spot forming units (sfu)/10(6) PBMC; p = 0.062 and 4.4 SI; p = 0.337). There were no significant changes in CTL responses by standard Cr(51) release assay. Anti-FPV antibodies were detected by week 14 in 0 placebo and 20 (87%) vaccine recipients. Although safe, neither vaccine construct appeared to possess detectable T-cell mediated anti-HIV immunogenic properties in HIV infected individuals, as measured by standard T cell assays.

  2. Recombination elevates the effective evolutionary rate and facilitates the establishment of HIV-1 infection in infants after mother-to-child transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, Keri B.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Leitner, Thomas K.

    2015-11-16

    Some previous studies have demonstrated that single HIV-1 genotypes are commonly transmitted from mother to child, but such analyses primarily used single samples from mother and child. It is possible that in a single sample, obtained early after infection, only the most replication competent virus is detected even when other forms may have been transmitted. Such forms may have advantages later in infection, and may thus be detected in follow-up samples. Furthermore, because HIV-1 frequently recombines, phylogenetic analyses that ignore recombination may miss transmission of multiple forms if they recombine after transmission. Moreover, recombination may facilitate adaptation, thus providing an advantage in establishing infection. The effect of recombination on viral evolution in HIV-1 infected children has not been well defined.

  3. Recombination elevates the effective evolutionary rate and facilitates the establishment of HIV-1 infection in infants after mother-to-child transmission

    DOE PAGES

    Sanborn, Keri B.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine; ...

    2015-11-16

    Some previous studies have demonstrated that single HIV-1 genotypes are commonly transmitted from mother to child, but such analyses primarily used single samples from mother and child. It is possible that in a single sample, obtained early after infection, only the most replication competent virus is detected even when other forms may have been transmitted. Such forms may have advantages later in infection, and may thus be detected in follow-up samples. Furthermore, because HIV-1 frequently recombines, phylogenetic analyses that ignore recombination may miss transmission of multiple forms if they recombine after transmission. Moreover, recombination may facilitate adaptation, thus providing anmore » advantage in establishing infection. The effect of recombination on viral evolution in HIV-1 infected children has not been well defined.« less

  4. Identifying Recombination Hot Spots in the HIV-1 Genome

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Redmond P.; Schlub, Timothy E.; Grimm, Andrew J.; Waugh, Caryll; Ellenberg, Paula; Chopra, Abha; Mallal, Simon; Cromer, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 infection is characterized by the rapid generation of genetic diversity that facilitates viral escape from immune selection and antiretroviral therapy. Despite recombination's crucial role in viral diversity and evolution, little is known about the genomic factors that influence recombination between highly similar genomes. In this study, we use a minimally modified full-length HIV-1 genome and high-throughput sequence analysis to study recombination in gag and pol in T cells. We find that recombination is favored at a number of recombination hot spots, where recombination occurs six times more frequently than at corresponding cold spots. Interestingly, these hot spots occur near important features of the HIV-1 genome but do not occur at sites immediately around protease inhibitor or reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance mutations. We show that the recombination hot and cold spots are consistent across five blood donors and are independent of coreceptor-mediated entry. Finally, we check common experimental confounders and find that these are not driving the location of recombination hot spots. This is the first study to identify the location of recombination hot spots between two similar viral genomes with great statistical power and under conditions that closely reflect natural recombination events among HIV-1 quasispecies. IMPORTANCE The ability of HIV-1 to evade the immune system and antiretroviral therapy depends on genetic diversity within the viral quasispecies. Retroviral recombination is an important mechanism that helps to generate and maintain this genetic diversity, but little is known about how recombination rates vary within the HIV-1 genome. We measured recombination rates in gag and pol and identified recombination hot and cold spots, demonstrating that recombination is not random but depends on the underlying gene sequence. The strength and location of these recombination hot and cold spots can be used to improve models of

  5. Nef enhances HIV-1 infectivity via association with the virus assembly complex

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Mingli; Aiken, Christopher

    2008-04-10

    The HIV-1 accessory protein Nef enhances virus infectivity by facilitating an early post-entry step of infection. Nef acts in the virus producer cell, leading to a beneficial modification to HIV-1 particles. Nef itself is incorporated into HIV-1 particles, where it is cleaved by the viral protease during virion maturation. To probe the role of virion-associated Nef in HIV-1 infection, we generated a fusion protein consisting of the host protein cyclophilin A (CypA) linked to the amino terminus of Nef. The resulting CypA-Nef protein enhanced the infectivity of Nef-defective HIV-1 particles and was specifically incorporated into the virions via association with Gag during particle assembly. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of CypA-Nef binding to Gag prevented incorporation of CypA-Nef into virions and inhibited infectivity enhancement. Our results indicate that infectivity enhancement by Nef requires its association with a component of the assembling HIV-1 particle.

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis-Induced Epithelial Monolayer Disruption and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Replication: Implications for the Sexual Transmission of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Guenthner, Patricia C.; Secor, W. Evan; Dezzutti, Charlene S.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate potential mechanisms of Trichomonas vaginalis involvement in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. Polarized monolayer integrity of primary cervical and prostate epithelial cells or cell lines cultured with T. vaginalis was measured by monitoring transepithelium resistance. The effect of T. vaginalis isolates on HIV-1 passage through polarized epithelial cell monolayers was evaluated for HIV-1 p24gag in the basolateral supernatants. Coincubation with T. vaginalis isolates induced disruption of monolayer integrity and resulted in passage of virus to the basolateral side of the monolayer. Furthermore, there was isolate variability in which two isolates induced greater monolayer damage and increased HIV-1 passage than did the other two isolates. Coincubation of T. vaginalis isolates with acutely HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhanced HIV-1 replication. This enhancement was associated with cellular proliferation and activation, as well as with tumor necrosis factor alpha production. In contrast to the monolayer disruption, the effect of T. vaginalis on HIV-1 replication was not isolate dependent. Thus, two mechanisms have been identified that could contribute to the epidemiologic association of trichomoniasis with the sexual transmission of HIV-1. (i) T. vaginalis disruption of urogenital epithelial monolayers could facilitate passage of HIV-1 to underlying layers. (ii) Activation of local immune cells by T. vaginalis in the presence of infectious HIV-1 might lead to increased viral replication. Collectively, these data suggest the need for more vigilant efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of T. vaginalis in women and men, especially in countries with a high prevalence of HIV-1. PMID:15972505

  7. Trichomonas vaginalis-induced epithelial monolayer disruption and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication: implications for the sexual transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, Patricia C; Secor, W Evan; Dezzutti, Charlene S

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate potential mechanisms of Trichomonas vaginalis involvement in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. Polarized monolayer integrity of primary cervical and prostate epithelial cells or cell lines cultured with T. vaginalis was measured by monitoring transepithelium resistance. The effect of T. vaginalis isolates on HIV-1 passage through polarized epithelial cell monolayers was evaluated for HIV-1 p24gag in the basolateral supernatants. Coincubation with T. vaginalis isolates induced disruption of monolayer integrity and resulted in passage of virus to the basolateral side of the monolayer. Furthermore, there was isolate variability in which two isolates induced greater monolayer damage and increased HIV-1 passage than did the other two isolates. Coincubation of T. vaginalis isolates with acutely HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhanced HIV-1 replication. This enhancement was associated with cellular proliferation and activation, as well as with tumor necrosis factor alpha production. In contrast to the monolayer disruption, the effect of T. vaginalis on HIV-1 replication was not isolate dependent. Thus, two mechanisms have been identified that could contribute to the epidemiologic association of trichomoniasis with the sexual transmission of HIV-1. (i) T. vaginalis disruption of urogenital epithelial monolayers could facilitate passage of HIV-1 to underlying layers. (ii) Activation of local immune cells by T. vaginalis in the presence of infectious HIV-1 might lead to increased viral replication. Collectively, these data suggest the need for more vigilant efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of T. vaginalis in women and men, especially in countries with a high prevalence of HIV-1.

  8. NLRX1 Sequesters STING to Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response, Thereby Facilitating the Replication of HIV-1 and DNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haitao; König, Renate; Deng, Meng; Riess, Maximilian; Mo, Jinyao; Zhang, Lu; Petrucelli, Alex; Yoh, Sunnie M; Barefoot, Brice; Samo, Melissa; Sempowski, Gregory D; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M; Feng, Hui; Lemon, Stanley M; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yanping; Wen, Haitao; Zhang, Zhigang; Damania, Blossom; Tsao, Li-Chung; Wang, Qi; Su, Lishan; Duncan, Joseph A; Chanda, Sumit K; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2016-04-13

    Understanding the negative regulators of antiviral immune responses will be critical for advancing immune-modulated antiviral strategies. NLRX1, an NLR protein that negatively regulates innate immunity, was previously identified in an unbiased siRNA screen as required for HIV infection. We find that NLRX1 depletion results in impaired nuclear import of HIV-1 DNA in human monocytic cells. Additionally, NLRX1 was observed to reduce type-I interferon (IFN-I) and cytokines in response to HIV-1 reverse-transcribed DNA. NLRX1 sequesters the DNA-sensing adaptor STING from interaction with TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), which is a requisite for IFN-1 induction in response to DNA. NLRX1-deficient cells generate an amplified STING-dependent host response to cytosolic DNA, c-di-GMP, cGAMP, HIV-1, and DNA viruses. Accordingly, Nlrx1(-/-) mice infected with DNA viruses exhibit enhanced innate immunity and reduced viral load. Thus, NLRX1 is a negative regulator of the host innate immune response to HIV-1 and DNA viruses.

  9. Interleukin-1- and Type I Interferon-Dependent Enhanced Immunogenicity of an NYVAC-HIV-1 Env-Gag-Pol-Nef Vaccine Vector with Dual Deletions of Type I and Type II Interferon-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Delaloye, Julie; Filali-Mouhim, Abdelali; Cameron, Mark J.; Haddad, Elias K.; Harari, Alexandre; Goulet, Jean-Pierre; Gomez, Carmen E.; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Esteban, Mariano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Roger, Thierry; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NYVAC, a highly attenuated, replication-restricted poxvirus, is a safe and immunogenic vaccine vector. Deletion of immune evasion genes from the poxvirus genome is an attractive strategy for improving the immunogenic properties of poxviruses. Using systems biology approaches, we describe herein the enhanced immunological profile of NYVAC vectors expressing the HIV-1 clade C env, gag, pol, and nef genes (NYVAC-C) with single or double deletions of genes encoding type I (ΔB19R) or type II (ΔB8R) interferon (IFN)-binding proteins. Transcriptomic analyses of human monocytes infected with NYVAC-C, NYVAC-C with the B19R deletion (NYVAC-C-ΔB19R), or NYVAC-C with B8R and B19R deletions (NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R) revealed a concerted upregulation of innate immune pathways (IFN-stimulated genes [ISGs]) of increasing magnitude with NYVAC-C-ΔB19R and NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R than with NYVAC-C. Deletion of B8R and B19R resulted in an enhanced activation of IRF3, IRF7, and STAT1 and the robust production of type I IFNs and of ISGs, whose expression was inhibited by anti-type I IFN antibodies. Interestingly, NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R induced the production of much higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-8) than NYVAC-C or NYVAC-C-ΔB19R as well as a strong inflammasome response (caspase-1 and IL-1β) in infected monocytes. Top network analyses showed that this broad response mediated by the deletion of B8R and B19R was organized around two upregulated gene expression nodes (TNF and IRF7). Consistent with these findings, monocytes infected with NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R induced a stronger type I IFN-dependent and IL-1-dependent allogeneic CD4+ T cell response than monocytes infected with NYVAC-C or NYVAC-C-ΔB19R. Dual deletion of type I and type II IFN immune evasion genes in NYVAC markedly enhanced its immunogenic properties via its induction of the increased expression of type I IFNs and IL-1β and make it an attractive candidate HIV

  10. Spinoculation Triggers Dynamic Actin and Cofilin Activity That Facilitates HIV-1 Infection of Transformed and Resting CD4 T Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Wang, Weifeng; Yu, Dongyang; Wu, Yuntao

    2011-01-01

    Centrifugal inoculation, or spinoculation, is widely used in virology research to enhance viral infection. However, the mechanism remained obscure. Using HIV-1 infection of human T cells as a model, we demonstrate that spinoculation triggers dynamic actin and cofilin activity, probably resulting from cellular responses to centrifugal stress. This actin activity also leads to the upregulation of the HIV-1 receptor and coreceptor, CD4 and CXCR4, enhancing viral binding and entry. We also demonstrate that an actin inhibitor, jasplakinolide, diminishes spin-mediated enhancement. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of LIMK1, a cofilin kinase, decreases the enhancement. These results suggest that spin-mediated enhancement cannot be explained simply by a virus-concentrating effect; rather, it is coupled with spin-induced cytoskeletal dynamics that promote receptor mobilization, viral entry, and postentry processes. Our results highlight the importance of cofilin and a dynamic cytoskeleton for the initiation of viral infection. Our results also indicate that caution needs to be taken in data interpretation when cells are spinoculated; some of the spin-induced cellular permissiveness may be beyond the natural capacity of an infecting virus. PMID:21795326

  11. Phenyl-1-Pyridin-2yl-Ethanone-Based Iron Chelators Increase IκB-α Expression, Modulate CDK2 and CDK9 Activities, and Inhibit HIV-1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Namita; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Breuer, Denitra; Niu, Xiaomei; Lin, Xionghao; Xu, Min; Gavrilenko, Konstantin; Kashanchi, Fatah; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein, which recruits CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. CDK9 is phosphorylated by CDK2, which facilitates formation of the high-molecular-weight positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex. We previously showed that chelation of intracellular iron inhibits CDK2 and CDK9 activities and suppresses HIV-1 transcription, but the mechanism of the inhibition was not understood. In the present study, we tested a set of novel iron chelators for the ability to inhibit HIV-1 transcription and elucidated their mechanism of action. Novel phenyl-1-pyridin-2yl-ethanone (PPY)-based iron chelators were synthesized and examined for their effects on cellular iron, HIV-1 inhibition, and cytotoxicity. Activities of CDK2 and CDK9, expression of CDK9-dependent and CDK2-inhibitory mRNAs, NF-κB expression, and HIV-1- and NF-κB-dependent transcription were determined. PPY-based iron chelators significantly inhibited HIV-1, with minimal cytotoxicity, in cultured and primary cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 subtype B, but they had less of an effect on HIV-1 subtype C. Iron chelators upregulated the expression of IκB-α, with increased accumulation of cytoplasmic NF-κB. The iron chelators inhibited CDK2 activity and reduced the amount of CDK9/cyclin T1 in the large P-TEFb complex. Iron chelators reduced HIV-1 Gag and Env mRNA synthesis but had no effect on HIV-1 reverse transcription. In addition, iron chelators moderately inhibited basal HIV-1 transcription, equally affecting HIV-1 and Sp1- or NF-κB-driven transcription. By virtue of their involvement in targeting several key steps in HIV-1 transcription, these novel iron chelators have the potential for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25155598

  12. Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Matrix Protein: Dependence on Bilayer Composition and Protein Lipidation

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Nanda, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By assembling in a protein lattice on the host's plasma membrane, the retroviral Gag polyprotein triggers formation of the viral protein/membrane shell. The MA domain of Gag employs multiple signals—electrostatic, hydrophobic, and lipid-specific—to bring the protein to the plasma membrane, thereby complementing protein-protein interactions, located in full-length Gag, in lattice formation. We report the interaction of myristoylated and unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag MA domains with bilayers composed of purified lipid components to dissect these complex membrane signals and quantify their contributions to the overall interaction. Surface plasmon resonance on well-defined planar membrane models is used to quantify binding affinities and amounts of protein and yields free binding energy contributions, ΔG, of the various signals. Charge-charge interactions in the absence of the phosphatidylinositide PI(4,5)P2 attract the protein to acidic membrane surfaces, and myristoylation increases the affinity by a factor of 10; thus, our data do not provide evidence for a PI(4,5)P2 trigger of myristate exposure. Lipid-specific interactions with PI(4,5)P2, the major signal lipid in the inner plasma membrane, increase membrane attraction at a level similar to that of protein lipidation. While cholesterol does not directly engage in interactions, it augments protein affinity strongly by facilitating efficient myristate insertion and PI(4,5)P2 binding. We thus observe that the isolated MA protein, in the absence of protein-protein interaction conferred by the full-length Gag, binds the membrane with submicromolar affinities. IMPORTANCE Like other retroviral species, the Gag polyprotein of HIV-1 contains three major domains: the N-terminal, myristoylated MA domain that targets the protein to the plasma membrane of the host; a central capsid-forming domain; and the C-terminal, genome-binding nucleocapsid domain. These domains act in concert to condense Gag into a membrane

  13. The C-Terminal Portion of the Hrs Protein Interacts with Tsg101 and Interferes with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Particle Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Bouamr, Fadila; Houck-Loomis, Brian R.; De Los Santos, Martha; Casaday, Rebecca J.; Johnson, Marc C.; Goff, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein recruits Tsg101 to facilitate HIV-1 particle budding and release. In uninfected cells, the Hrs protein recruits the ESCRT-I complex to the endosome, also through an interaction with Tsg101, to promote the sorting of host proteins into endosomal vesicles and multivesicular bodies. Here, we show that the overexpression of the C-terminal fragment of Hrs (residues 391 to 777) or Hrs mutants lacking either the N-terminal FYVE domain (mutant dFYVE) or the PSAP (residues 348 to 351) motif (mutant ASAA) all efficiently inhibit HIV-1 Gag particle production. Expression of the dFYVE or ASAA mutants of Hrs had no effect on the release of Moloney murine leukemia virus. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis showed that the expression of Hrs mutant dFYVE or ASAA significantly reduced or abolished the HIV-1 Gag-Tsg101 interaction. Yeast-two hybrid assays were used to identify two new and independent Tsg101 binding sites, one in the Hrs coiled-coil domain and one in the proline/glutamic acid-rich domain. Scanning electron microscopy of HeLa cells expressing HIV-1 Gag and the Hrs ASAA mutant showed viral particles arrested in “lump-like” structures that remained attached to the cell surface. Together, these data indicate that fragments of Hrs containing the C-terminal portion of the protein can potently inhibit HIV-1 particle release by efficiently sequestering Tsg101 away from the Gag polyprotein. PMID:17182674

  14. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Thomas; Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Scrensen, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  15. Trimer Enhancement Mutation Effects on HIV-1 Matrix Protein Binding Activities

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhli, Ayna; Mack, Andrew; Ritchie, Christopher; Cylinder, Isabel; Harper, Logan; Tedbury, Philip R.; Freed, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein is the amino-terminal domain of the HIV-1 precursor Gag (Pr55Gag) protein. MA binds to membranes and RNAs, helps transport Pr55Gag proteins to virus assembly sites at the plasma membranes of infected cells, and facilitates the incorporation of HIV-1 envelope (Env) proteins into virions by virtue of an interaction with the Env protein cytoplasmic tails (CTs). MA has been shown to crystallize as a trimer and to organize on membranes in hexamer lattices. MA mutations that localize to residues near the ends of trimer spokes have been observed to impair Env protein assembly into virus particles, and several of these are suppressed by the 62QR mutation at the hubs of trimer interfaces. We have examined the binding activities of wild-type (WT) MA and 62QR MA variants and found that the 62QR mutation stabilized MA trimers but did not alter the way MA proteins organized on membranes. Relative to WT MA, the 62QR protein showed small effects on membrane and RNA binding. However, 62QR proteins bound significantly better to Env CTs than their WT counterparts, and CT binding efficiencies correlated with trimerization efficiencies. Our data suggest a model in which multivalent binding of trimeric HIV-1 Env proteins to MA trimers contributes to the process of Env virion incorporation. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 Env proteins assemble as trimers, and incorporation of the proteins into virus particles requires an interaction of Env CT domains with the MA domains of the viral precursor Gag proteins. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the mechanisms by which MA facilitates the virion incorporation of Env proteins. To help elucidate this process, we examined the binding activities of an MA mutant that stabilizes MA trimers. We found that the mutant proteins organized similarly to WT proteins on membranes, and that mutant and WT proteins revealed only slight differences in their binding to RNAs or lipids. However, the mutant proteins showed

  16. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  17. Adaptation of HIV-1 to its human host.

    PubMed

    Wain, Louise V; Bailes, Elizabeth; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Decker, Julie M; Keele, Brandon F; Van Heuverswyn, Fran; Li, Yingying; Takehisa, Jun; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Shaw, George M; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Sharp, Paul M

    2007-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) originated from three independent cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVcpzPtt) infecting chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) in west central Africa, giving rise to pandemic (group M) and non-pandemic (groups N and O) clades of HIV-1. To identify host-specific adaptations in HIV-1 we compared the inferred ancestral sequences of HIV-1 groups M, N and O to 12 full length genome sequences of SIVcpzPtt and four of the outlying but closely related SIVcpzPts (from P. t. schweinfurthii). This analysis revealed a single site that was completely conserved among SIVcpzPtt strains but different (due to the same change) in all three groups of HIV-1. This site, Gag-30, lies within p17, the gag-encoded matrix protein. It is Met in SIVcpzPtt, underwent a conservative replacement by Leu in one lineage of SIVcpzPts but changed radically to Arg on all three lineages leading to HIV-1. During subsequent diversification this site has been conserved as a basic residue (Arg or Lys) in most lineages of HIV-1. Retrospective analysis revealed that Gag-30 had reverted to Met in a previous experiment in which HIV-1 was passaged through chimpanzees. To examine whether this substitution conferred a species specific growth advantage, we used site-directed mutagenesis to generate variants of these chimpanzee-adapted HIV-1 strains with Lys at Gag-30, and tested their replication in both human and chimpanzee CD4+ T lymphocytes. Remarkably, viruses encoding Met replicated to higher titers than viruses encoding Lys in chimpanzee T cells, but the opposite was found in human T cells. Taken together, these observations provide compelling evidence for host-specific adaptation during the emergence of HIV-1 and identify the viral matrix protein as a modulator of viral fitness following transmission to the new human host.

  18. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  19. Novel two-round phenotypic assay for protease inhibitor susceptibility testing of recombinant and primary HIV-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Maria C; Buzón, Maria J; Ballestero, Mònica; Van Den Eede, Peter; Clotet, Bonaventura; Prado, Julia G; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2012-12-01

    Antiretroviral drug susceptibility tests facilitate therapeutic management of HIV-1-infected patients. Although genotyping systems are affordable, inaccuracy in the interpretation of complex mutational patterns may limit their usefulness. Currently available HIV-1 phenotypic assays are based on the generation of recombinant viruses in which the specific viral gene of interest, derived from a patient plasma sample, is cloned into a susceptible genetic viral backbone prior to in vitro drug susceptibility evaluation. Nevertheless, in the case of protease inhibitors, not only are mutations in the HIV-1 protease-coding region involved in resistance, but the role of Gag in drug susceptibility has also recently been reported. In order to avoid the inherent limitations resulting from partial cloning of the viral genome, we designed and evaluated a new experimental strategy to test the in vitro susceptibility of primary viral isolates to protease inhibitors. Our protocol, which is based on a two-round infection protocol using the reporter TZM-bl cell line, showed a good correlation with genotypic resistance prediction and with the Antivirogram phenotypic assay, in both protease-recombinant viruses and primary viral isolates. The protocol is suitable for any HIV-1 subtype and enables rapid in-house measurement of protease inhibitor susceptibility, thus making it possible to evaluate the concomitant effects of both patient-derived gag and protease-coding regions.

  20. Cocaine Enhances DC to T-cell HIV-1 Transmission by Activating DC-SIGN/LARG/LSP1 Complex and Facilitating Infectious Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Anil; Kulkarni, Rutuja; Jiang, Shuxian; Groopman, Jerome E.

    2017-01-01

    DC-SIGN is a dendritic cell surface structure which participates in binding and transmission of HIV-1. Here, for the first time we demonstrate that cocaine induces over expression of DC-SIGN and significantly enhances virus transfer from DCs to T-cells by increasing the binding and internalization of HIV-1 in DCs. We found that cocaine activates a DC-SIGN mediated ‘signalosome’ complex by enhancing its association with LARG and LSP1. Further, LARG was observed to participate in DC-SIGN mediated internalization of HIV-1 in DCs. Intracellular trafficking studies of HIV-1 in cocaine treated DCs revealed increased co-localization of HIV-1 with endosomal or multi vesicular body (MVB) markers such as CD81 and VPS4 and decreased co-localization with the phagolysomal marker LAMP1; this signified altered intracellular trafficking and decreased degradation of HIV-1 in cocaine treated DCs. Furthermore, we found that cocaine induced activation of LARG which in turn activated Rho A and the focal adhesion molecules FAK, Pyk2 and paxillin. This signaling cascade enhanced the formation of an infectious synapse between DCs and T-cells. Our study provides insight into the molecular mechanisms of cocaine’s contribution to key components in HIV pathogenesis and highlights novel targets for interrupting the virus life cycle in substance using hosts. PMID:28094782

  1. A Phase I Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study of the Safety and Immunogenicity of an Adjuvanted HIV-1 Gag-Pol-Nef Fusion Protein and Adenovirus 35 Gag-RT-Int-Nef Vaccine in Healthy HIV-Uninfected African Adults

    PubMed Central

    Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Mpendo, Juliet; Ruzagira, Eugene; Kilembe, William; Chomba, Elwyn; Roman, François; Bourguignon, Patricia; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Collard, Alix; Voss, Gerald; Laufer, Dagna; Stevens, Gwynn; Hayes, Peter; Clark, Lorna; Cormier, Emmanuel; Dally, Len; Barin, Burc; Ackland, Jim; Syvertsen, Kristen; Zachariah, Devika; Anas, Kamaal; Sayeed, Eddy; Lombardo, Angela; Gilmour, Jill; Cox, Josephine; Fast, Patricia; Priddy, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Background Sequential prime-boost or co-administration of HIV vaccine candidates based on an adjuvanted clade B p24, RT, Nef, p17 fusion protein (F4/AS01) plus a non-replicating adenovirus 35 expressing clade A Gag, RT, Int and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) may lead to a unique immune profile, inducing both strong T-cell and antibody responses. Methods In a phase 1, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 146 healthy adult volunteers were randomized to one of four regimens: heterologous prime-boost with two doses of F4/AS01E or F4/AS01B followed by Ad35-GRIN; Ad35-GRIN followed by two doses of F4/AS01B; or three co-administrations of Ad35-GRIN and F4/AS01B. T cell and antibody responses were measured. Results The vaccines were generally well-tolerated, and did not cause serious adverse events. The response rate, by IFN-γ ELISPOT, was greater when Ad35-GRIN was the priming vaccine and in the co-administration groups. F4/AS01 induced CD4+ T-cells expressing primarily CD40L and IL2 +/- TNF-α, while Ad35-GRIN induced predominantly CD8+ T-cells expressing IFN-γ +/- IL2 or TNF-α. Viral inhibition was induced after Ad35-GRIN vaccination, regardless of the regimen. Strong F4-specific antibody responses were induced. Immune responses persisted at least a year after the last vaccination. The complementary response profiles, characteristic of each vaccine, were both expressed after co-administration. Conclusion Co-administration of an adjuvanted protein and an adenovirus vector showed an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile and resulted in strong, multifunctional and complementary HIV-specific immune responses. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01264445 PMID:25961283

  2. M2BP inhibits HIV-1 virion production in a vimentin filaments-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Han, Yuling; Wang, Xinlu; Gao, Guangxia

    2016-01-01

    M2BP (also called 90K) is an interferon-stimulated gene product that is upregulated in HIV-1 infection. A recent study revealed that M2BP reduces the infectivity of HIV-1 by inhibiting the processing of the viral envelope protein. Here we report that in addition to reducing viral infectivity, M2BP inhibits HIV-1 virion production. We provide evidence showing that M2BP inhibits HIV-1 Gag trafficking to the plasma membrane in a vimentin-dependent manner. When vimentin filaments were collapsed by treating cells with acrylamide or by overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of vimentin, M2BP inhibition of HIV-1 virion production was significantly relieved. We further show that M2BP interacts with both HIV-1 Gag and vimentin and thereby mediates their interactions. We propose that M2BP traps HIV-1 Gag to vimentin filaments to inhibit the transportation of HIV-1 Gag to the plasma membrane. These findings uncover a novel mechanism by which a host antiviral factor inhibits HIV-1 virion production. PMID:27604950

  3. Molecular cloning and biological characterization of full-length HIV-1 subtype C from Botswana.

    PubMed

    Ndung'u, T; Renjifo, B; Novitsky, V A; McLane, M F; Gaolekwe, S; Essex, M

    2000-12-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C is now responsible for more than half of all HIV-1 infections in the global epidemic and for the high levels of HIV-1 prevalence in southern Africa. To facilitate studies of the biological nature and the underlying molecular determinants of this virus, we constructed eight full-length proviral clones from two asymptomatic and three AIDS patients infected with HIV-1 subtype C from Botswana. Analysis of viral lysates showed that Gag, Pol, and Env structural proteins were present in the virions. In four clones, the analysis suggested inefficient envelope glycoprotein processing. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the eight clones did not reveal frameshifts, deletions, premature truncations, or translational stop codons in any structural, regulatory, or accessory genes. None of the subtype C clones were replication competent in donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), macrophages, Jurkat(tat) cells, or U87. CD4.CCR5 cells. However, infection by two clones could be rescued by complementation with a functional subtype C envelope clone, resulting in a productive infection of PBMCs, macrophages, and U87. CD4.CCR5 cells.

  4. ACTG 5197: A Placebo Controlled Trial of Immunization of HIV-1 Infected Persons with a Replication Deficient Ad5 Vaccine Expressing the HIV-1 Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Schooley, Robert T.; Spritzler, John; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Havlir, Diane; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Pollard, Richard; Battaglia, Cathy; Robertson, Michael; Mehrotra, Devan; Casimiro, Danilo; Cox, Kara; Schock, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-1 specific cellular immunity contributes to control of HIV-1 replication. HIV-1 infected volunteers on antiretroviral therapy received a replication defective Ad5 HIV-1 gag vaccine in a randomized, blinded therapeutic vaccination study. Methods HIV-1-infected vaccine or placebo recipients underwent a 16-wk analytical treatment interruption (ATI). The log10 HIV-1 RNA at the ATI set point and time averaged area under the curve (TA-AUC) served as co-primary endpoints. Immune responses were measured by intracellular cytokine staining and CFSE dye dilution. Results Vaccine benefit trends were seen for both primary endpoints, but did not reach a pre-specified p ≤ 0.025 level of significance. The estimated shift in TA-AUC and set point were 0.24 (unadjusted p=0.04) and 0.26 (unadjusted p=0.07) log10 copies lower in the vaccine than in the placebo arm. HIV-1 gag-specific CD4+ interferon-γ producing cells were an immunologic correlate of viral control. Conclusion The vaccine was generally safe and well tolerated. Despite a trend favoring viral suppression among vaccine recipients, differences in HIV-1 RNA levels did not meet the pre-specified level of significance. Induction of HIV-1 gag-specific CD4 cells correlated with control of viral replication in vivo. Future immunogenicity studies should require a substantially higher immunogenicity threshold before an ATI is contemplated. PMID:20662716

  5. Generation of Rhesus Macaque-Tropic HIV-1 Clones That Are Resistant to Major Anti-HIV-1 Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nomaguchi, Masako; Yokoyama, Masaru; Kono, Ken; Nakayama, Emi E.; Shioda, Tatsuo; Doi, Naoya; Fujiwara, Sachi; Saito, Akatsuki; Akari, Hirofumi; Miyakawa, Kei; Ryo, Akihide; Ode, Hirotaka; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in macaque cells is restricted mainly by antiviral cellular APOBEC3, TRIM5α/TRIM5CypA, and tetherin proteins. For basic and clinical HIV-1/AIDS studies, efforts to construct macaque-tropic HIV-1 (HIV-1mt) have been made by us and others. Although rhesus macaques are commonly and successfully used as infection models, no HIV-1 derivatives suitable for in vivo rhesus research are available to date. In this study, to obtain novel HIV-1mt clones that are resistant to major restriction factors, we altered Gag and Vpu of our best HIV-1mt clone described previously. First, by sequence- and structure-guided mutagenesis, three amino acid residues in Gag-capsid (CA) (M94L/R98S/G114Q) were found to be responsible for viral growth enhancement in a macaque cell line. Results of in vitro TRIM5α susceptibility testing of HIV-1mt carrying these substitutions correlated well with the increased viral replication potential in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with different TRIM5 alleles, suggesting that the three amino acids in HIV-1mt CA are involved in the interaction with TRIM5α. Second, we replaced the transmembrane domain of Vpu of this clone with the corresponding region of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVgsn166 Vpu. The resultant clone, MN4/LSDQgtu, was able to antagonize macaque but not human tetherin, and its Vpu effectively functioned during viral replication in a macaque cell line. Notably, MN4/LSDQgtu grew comparably to SIVmac239 and much better than any of our other HIV-1mt clones in rhesus macaque PBMCs. In sum, MN4/LSDQgtu is the first HIV-1 derivative that exhibits resistance to the major restriction factors in rhesus macaque cells. PMID:23966385

  6. HIV-1 Vpr Abrogates the Effect of TSG101 Overexpression to Support Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Siarot, Lowela; Takeda, Eri; Shioda, Tatsuo; Ueda, Motoki; Aida, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 budding requires interaction between Gag and cellular TSG101 to initiate viral particle assembly and release via the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) pathway. However, some reports show that overexpression of TSG101 inhibits virus release by disruption of Gag targeting process. Since a HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpr binds to Gag p6 domain at the position close to the binding site for TSG101, whether Vpr implicates TSG101 overexpression effect has not been investigated. Here, we found that Vpr abrogates TSG101 overexpression effect to rescue viral production. Co-transfection of TSG101 and Gag with Vpr prevented TSG101-induced Gag accumulation in endosomes and lysosomes. In addition, Vpr rescued virus-like particle (VLP) production in a similar manner as a lysosomal inhibitor, Bafilomycin A1 indicating that Vpr inhibits TSG101-induced Gag downregulation via lysosomal pathway. Vpr and Gag interaction is required to counteract TSG101 overexpression effect since Vpr A30F mutant which is unable to interact with Gag and incorporate into virions, reduced ability to prevent Gag accumulation and to rescue VLP production. In addition, GST pull-down assays and Biacore analysis revealed that Vpr competed with TSG101 for Gag binding. These results indicate that Vpr overcomes the effects of TSG101 overexpression to support viral production by competing with TSG101 to bind Gag. PMID:27648839

  7. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic HIV-1 gag proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette T.; Perkins, Simon; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Fischer, William M.; Theiler, James; Letvin, Norman; Haynes, Barton F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Yusim, Karina; Kuiken, Carla

    2016-11-15

    The disclosure generally relates to an immunogenic composition (e.g., a vaccine) and, in particular, to a polyvalent immunogenic composition, such as a polyvalent HIV vaccine, and to methods of using same.

  8. Tracking the assembly pathway of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag deletion mutants by immunogold labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, J J; Sandefur, S; Spearman, P; Chiou, C T; Chiang, P H; Ratner, L

    2001-12-01

    The Pr55gag gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is sufficient to direct the formation of retrovirus-like particles (RVLPs). Recent biochemical evidence has indicated the presence of Gag intermediates in the cytoplasm; however, the Gag assembly process into RVLPs remains incompletely defined. The authors present here the subcellular localization of Gag mutant proteins in BSC40 and Jurkat cells by immunoelectron microscopy (IEM). The full Gag/Pol and Gag precursors, a C-terminal deletion mutant lacking a portion of nucleocapsid (NC), and all p6Gag gave rise to similar levels of RVLPs at the cell surface. A C-terminal deletion of all NC and p6Gag abrogated particle formation, whereas p24 was found in patches at the cell surface. Deletion of matrix (MA) sequences from Gag resulted in intracellular particles, and myristylation was not required for particle formation in the context of the MA deletion. Matrix expression was enhanced with Gag/Pol or Env coexpression as determined by semiquantitative IEM. p24 protein was targeted at vacuolar and mitochondrial membranes, but not at Golgi cisternae. In addition, aggregations of Gag intermediates and RVLPs in the cytoplasm, rough endoplasmic reticulum, cisternae, and mitochondria were noted. These results provide defined in situ evidence that HIV-1 particle assembly occurs in the cytosol in addition to budding at most intracellular membranes.

  9. HIV-1 molecular epidemiology among newly diagnosed HIV-1 individuals in Hebei, a low HIV prevalence province in China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinli; Kang, Xianjiang; Liu, Yongjian; Cui, Ze; Guo, Wei; Zhao, Cuiying; Li, Yan; Chen, Suliang; Li, Jingyun; Zhang, Yuqi; Zhao, Hongru

    2017-01-01

    New human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) diagnoses are increasing rapidly in Hebei. The aim of this study presents the most extensive HIV-1 molecular epidemiology investigation in Hebei province in China thus far. We have carried out the most extensive systematic cross-sectional study based on newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive individuals in 2013, and characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 based on full length gag-partial pol gene sequences in the whole of Hebei. Nine HIV-1 genotypes based on full length gag-partial pol gene sequence were identified among 610 newly diagnosed naïve individuals. The four main genotypes were circulating recombinant form (CRF)01_AE (53.4%), CRF07_BC (23.4%), subtype B (15.9%), and unique recombinant forms URFs (4.9%). Within 1 year, three new genotypes (subtype A1, CRF55_01B, CRF65_cpx), unknown before in Hebei, were first found among men who have sex with men (MSM). All nine genotypes were identified in the sexually contracted HIV-1 population. Among 30 URFs, six recombinant patterns were revealed, including CRF01_AE/BC (40.0%), CRF01_AE/B (23.3%), B/C (16.7%), CRF01_AE/C (13.3%), CRF01_AE/B/A2 (3.3%) and CRF01_AE/BC/A2 (3.3%), plus two potential CRFs. This study elucidated the complicated characteristics of HIV-1 molecular epidemiology in a low HIV-1 prevalence northern province of China and revealed the high level of HIV-1 genetic diversity. All nine HIV-1 genotypes circulating in Hebei have spread out of their initial risk groups into the general population through sexual contact, especially through MSM. This highlights the urgency of HIV prevention and control in China. PMID:28178737

  10. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, Robert A.; Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M.; Sundquist, W. I.

    2016-05-06

    Previously, no retroviral Gag protein has been highly purified in milligram quantities and in a biologically relevant and active form. We have purified Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein and in parallel several truncation mutants of Gag and have studied their biophysical properties and membrane interactionsin vitro. RSV Gag is unusual in that it is not naturally myristoylated. From its ability to assemble into virus-like particlesin vitro, we infer that RSV Gag is biologically active. By size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, Gag in solution appears extended and flexible, in contrast to previous reports on unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag, which is compact. However, by neutron reflectometry measurements of RSV Gag bound to a supported bilayer, the protein appears to adopt a more compact, folded-over conformation. At physiological ionic strength, purified Gag binds strongly to liposomes containing acidic lipids. This interaction is stimulated by physiological levels of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and by cholesterol. However, unlike HIV-1 Gag, RSV Gag shows no sensitivity to acyl chain saturation. In contrast with full-length RSV Gag, the purified MA domain of Gag binds to liposomes only weakly. Similarly, both an N-terminally truncated version of Gag that is missing the MA domain and a C-terminally truncated version that is missing the NC domain bind only weakly. These results imply that NC contributes to membrane interactionin vitro, either by directly contacting acidic lipids or by promoting Gag multimerization.

    Retroviruses like HIV assemble at and bud from the plasma membrane of cells. Assembly requires the interaction between thousands of Gag molecules to form a lattice. Previous work indicated that lattice formation at the plasma membrane is influenced by the conformation of monomeric HIV. We have extended this work to the more tractable RSV Gag. Our

  11. In vitro assembly of the feline immunodeficiency virus Gag polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Affranchino, José L; González, Silvia A

    2010-06-01

    The retroviral Gag protein is the only viral product that is necessary for the assembly of virions in mammalian cells. We have established an in vitro assembly system to study the assembly properties of purified feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Gag protein expressed in bacteria. Under fully defined conditions, the FIV Gag protein assembles into spherical particles of 33 nm in diameter which are morphologically similar to authentic immature particles, albeit smaller than virions. The in vitro assembly of FIV Gag into particles was found to be resistant to the addition of Triton X-100 and required the presence of RNA. Notably, we found that an amino acid substitution in the nucleocapsid domain of Gag that impairs RNA binding and blocks virion production in vivo, also abrogates Gag assembly in vitro. The development of an in vitro assembly system for FIV Gag protein will facilitate the study of the mechanisms by which this protein assembles into immature particles.

  12. Maternal plasma and breastmilk viral loads are associated with HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses among HIV-1-exposed, uninfected infants in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Liu, A Y; Lohman-Payne, B; Chung, M H; Kiarie, J; Kinuthia, J; Slyker, J; Richardson, B; Lehman, D; Farquhar, C; John-Stewart, G

    2015-01-01

    Infants exposed to maternal HIV-1 provide an opportunity to assess correlates of HIV-1-specific interferon (IFN)-γ responses and may be informative in the development of HIV-1 vaccines. HIV-1-infected women with CD4 counts 200–500 cells/mm3 were randomized to short-course zidovudine/nevirapine (ZDV/NVP) or highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) between 2003 and 2005. Maternal plasma and breastmilk HIV-1 RNA and DNA were quantified during the first 6–12 months postpartum. HIV-1 gag peptide-stimulated enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays were conducted in HIV-1-exposed, uninfected infants (EU), and correlates were determined using regression and generalized estimating equations. Among 47 EU infants, 21 (45%) had ≥1 positive ELISPOT result during follow-up. Infants had a median response magnitude of 177 HIV-1-specific spot-forming units (SFU)/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) [interquartile range (IQR) = 117–287] directed against 2 (IQR = 1–3) gag peptide pools. The prevalence and magnitude of responses did not differ by maternal anti-retroviral (ARV) randomization arm. Maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA levels during pregnancy (P = 0·009) and breastmilk HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 month (P = 0·02) were associated with a higher magnitude of infant HIV-1-specific ELISPOT responses at 1 month postpartum. During follow-up, concurrent breastmilk HIV-1 RNA and DNA (cell-free virus and cell-associated virus, respectively) each were associated positively with magnitude of infant HIV-1-specific responses (P = 0·01). Our data demonstrate the importance of antigenic exposure on the induction of infant HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses in the absence of infection. PMID:25652232

  13. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  14. Unusual Fusion Proteins of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Simon; Sauter, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Despite its small genome size, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) is one of the most successful pathogens and has infected more than 70 million people worldwide within the last decades. In total, HIV-1 expresses 16 canonical proteins from only nine genes within its 10 kb genome. Expression of the structural genes gag, pol, and env, the regulatory genes rev and tat and the accessory genes vpu, nef, vpr, and vif enables assembly of the viral particle, regulates viral gene transcription, and equips the virus to evade or counteract host immune responses. In addition to the canonically expressed proteins, a growing number of publications describe the existence of non-canonical fusion proteins in HIV-1 infected cells. Most of them are encoded by the tat-env-rev locus. While the majority of these fusion proteins (e.g., TNV/p28tev, p186Drev, Tat1-Rev2, Tat^8c, p17tev, or Ref) are the result of alternative splicing events, Tat-T/Vpt is produced upon programmed ribosomal frameshifting, and a Rev1-Vpu fusion protein is expressed due to a nucleotide polymorphism that is unique to certain HIV-1 clade A and C strains. A better understanding of the expression and activity of these non-canonical viral proteins will help to dissect their potential role in viral replication and reveal how HIV-1 optimized the coding potential of its genes. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of previously described HIV-1 fusion proteins and to summarize our current knowledge of their expression patterns and putative functions. PMID:28119676

  15. Naf1 Regulates HIV-1 Latency by Suppressing Viral Promoter-Driven Gene Expression in Primary CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Wang, Hai-Bo; Kuang, Wen-Dong; Ren, Xiao-Xin; Song, Shu-Ting; Zhu, Huan-Zhang; Li, Qiang; Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-Jun; Wu, Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 latency is characterized by reversible silencing of viral transcription driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter of HIV-1. Cellular and viral factors regulating LTR activity contribute to HIV-1 latency, and certain repressive cellular factors modulate viral transcription silencing. Nef-associated factor 1 (Naf1) is a host nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that regulates multiple cellular signaling pathways and HIV-1 production. We recently reported that nuclear Naf1 promoted nuclear export of unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA, leading to increased Gag production. Here we demonstrate new functions of Naf1 in regulating HIV-1 persistence. We found that Naf1 contributes to the maintenance of HIV-1 latency by inhibiting LTR-driven HIV-1 gene transcription in a nuclear factor kappa B-dependent manner. Interestingly, Naf1 knockdown significantly enhanced viral reactivation in both latently HIV-1-infected Jurkat T cells and primary central memory CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, Naf1 knockdown in resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals treated with antiretroviral therapy significantly increased viral reactivation upon T-cell activation, suggesting an important role of Naf1 in modulating HIV-1 latency in vivo Our findings provide new insights for a better understanding of HIV-1 latency and suggest that inhibition of Naf1 activity to activate latently HIV-1-infected cells may be a potential therapeutic strategy.

  16. Insights into the activity of maturation inhibitor PF-46396 on HIV-1 clade C

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Dibya; Timilsina, Uddhav; Srivastava, Tryambak Pratap; Gaur, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    HIV maturation inhibitors are an emerging class of anti-retroviral compounds that inhibit the viral protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag, CA-SP1 (capsid-spacer peptide 1) peptide to mature CA. The first-in-class maturation inhibitor bevirimat (BVM) displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B but was ineffective against other HIV-1 clades including clade C. Another pyridone-based maturation inhibitor, PF-46396 displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B. In this study, we aimed at determining the activity of PF-46396 against HIV-1 clade C. We employed various biochemical and virological assays to demonstrate that PF-46396 is effective against HIV-1 clade C. We observed a dose dependent accumulation of CA-SP1 intermediate in presence of the compound. We carried out mutagenesis in the CA- SP1 region of HIV-1 clade C Gag and observed that the mutations conferred resistance against the compound. Many mutations inhibited Gag processing thereby reducing virus release in the absence of the compound. However, presence of PF-46396 rescued these defects and enhanced virus release, replication capacity and infectivity of HIV-1 clade C. These results put together identify PF-46396 as a broadly active maturation inhibitor against HIV-1 clade B and C and help in rational designing of novel analogs with reduced toxicity and increased efficacy for its potential use in clinics. PMID:28252110

  17. War and peace between microbes: HIV-1 interactions with coinfecting viruses.

    PubMed

    Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2009-11-19

    HIV-1 disrupts the homeostatic equilibrium between the host and coinfecting microbes, facilitating reactivation of persistent viruses and invasion by new viruses. These viruses usually accelerate HIV disease but occasionally create conditions detrimental for HIV-1. Understanding these phenomena may lead to anti-HIV-1 strategies that specifically target interactions between HIV-1 and coinfecting viruses.

  18. Molecular characterization of gag proteins from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVMne).

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, L E; Benveniste, R E; Sowder, R; Copeland, T D; Schultz, A M; Oroszlan, S

    1988-01-01

    A simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) designated SIVMne was isolated from a pig-tailed macaque with lymphoma housed at the University of Washington Regional Primate Research Center, Seattle. To better establish the relationship of SIVMne to other immunodeficiency viruses, we purified and determined the partial amino acid sequences of six structural proteins (p1, p2, p6, p8, p16, and p28) from SIVMne and compared these amino acid sequences to the translated nucleotide sequences of SIVMac and human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2). A total of 125 residues of SIVMne amino acid sequence were compared to the predicted amino acid sequences of the gag precursors of SIV and HIVs. In the compared regions 92% of the SIVMne amino acids were identical to predicted residues of SIVMac, 83% were identical to predicted residues of HIV-2, and 41% were identical to predicted residues of HIV-1. These data reveal that the six SIVMne proteins are proteolytic cleavage products of the gag precursor (Pr60gag) and that their order in the structure of Pr60gag is p16-p28-p2-p8-p1-p6. Rabbit antisera prepared against purified p28 and p16 were shown to cross-react with proteins of 60, 54, and 47 kilodaltons present in the viral preparation and believed to be SIVMne Pr60gag and intermediate cleavage products, respectively. SIVMne p16 was shown to contain covalently bound myristic acid, and p8 was identified as a nucleic acid-binding protein. The high degree of amino acid sequence homology between SIVs and HIV-2 around proven proteolytic cleavage sites in SIV Pr60gag suggests that proteolytic processing of the HIV-2 gag precursor is probably very similar to processing of the SIV gag precursor. Peptide bonds cleaved during proteolytic processing of the SIV gag precursor were similar to bonds cleaved during processing of HIV-1 gag precursors, suggesting that the SIV and HIV viral proteases have similar cleavage site specificities. Images PMID:3292789

  19. Cellular aspartyl proteases promote the unconventional secretion of biologically active HIV-1 matrix protein p17

    PubMed Central

    Caccuri, Francesca; Iaria, Maria Luisa; Campilongo, Federica; Varney, Kristen; Rossi, Alessandro; Mitola, Stefania; Schiarea, Silvia; Bugatti, Antonella; Mazzuca, Pietro; Giagulli, Cinzia; Fiorentini, Simona; Lu, Wuyuan; Salmona, Mario; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    The human immune deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix protein p17 (p17), although devoid of a signal sequence, is released by infected cells and detected in blood and in different organs and tissues even in HIV-1-infected patients undergoing successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Extracellularly, p17 deregulates the function of different cells involved in AIDS pathogenesis. The mechanism of p17 secretion, particularly during HIV-1 latency, still remains to be elucidated. A recent study showed that HIV-1-infected cells can produce Gag without spreading infection in a model of viral latency. Here we show that in Gag-expressing cells, secretion of biologically active p17 takes place at the plasma membrane and occurs following its interaction with phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate and its subsequent cleavage from the precursor Gag (Pr55Gag) operated by cellular aspartyl proteases. These enzymes operate a more complex Gag polypeptide proteolysis than the HIV-1 protease, thus hypothetically generating slightly truncated or elongated p17s in their C-terminus. A 17 C-terminal residues excised p17 was found to be structurally and functionally identical to the full-length p17 demonstrating that the final C-terminal region of p17 is irrelevant for the protein’s biological activity. These findings offer new opportunities to identify treatment strategies for inhibiting p17 release in the extracellular microenvironment. PMID:27905556

  20. A Single Residue within the V5 Region of HIV-1 Envelope Facilitates Viral Escape from the Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody VRC01*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dongxing; Shi, Xuanling; Arledge, Kelly C.; Song, Dingka; Jiang, Liwei; Fu, Lili; Gong, Xinqi; Zhang, Senyan; Wang, Xinquan; Zhang, Linqi

    2012-01-01

    VRC01, a broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody, is capable of neutralizing a diverse array of HIV-1 isolates by mimicking CD4 binding with the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Nonetheless, resistant strains have been identified. Here, we examined two genetically related and two unrelated envelope clones, derived from CRF08_BC-infected patients, with distinct VRC01 neutralization profiles. A total of 22 chimeric envelope clones was generated by interchanging the loop D and/or V5 regions between the original envelopes or by single alanine substitutions within each region. Analysis of pseudoviruses built from these mutant envelopes showed that interchanging the V5 region between the genetically related or unrelated clones completely swapped their VRC01 sensitivity profiles. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that the asparagine residue at position 460 (Asn-460), a potential N-linked glycosylation site in the V5 region, is a key factor for observed resistance in these strains, which is further supported by our structural modeling. Moreover, changes in resistance were found to positively correlate with deviations in VRC01 binding affinity. Overall, our study indicates that Asn-460 in the V5 region is a critical determinant of sensitivity to VRC01 specifically in these viral strains. The long side chain of Asn-460, and potential glycosylation, may create steric hindrance that lowers binding affinity, thereby increasing resistance to VRC01 neutralization. PMID:23100255

  1. A single residue within the V5 region of HIV-1 envelope facilitates viral escape from the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody VRC01.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongxing; Shi, Xuanling; Arledge, Kelly C; Song, Dingka; Jiang, Liwei; Fu, Lili; Gong, Xinqi; Zhang, Senyan; Wang, Xinquan; Zhang, Linqi

    2012-12-14

    VRC01, a broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody, is capable of neutralizing a diverse array of HIV-1 isolates by mimicking CD4 binding with the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Nonetheless, resistant strains have been identified. Here, we examined two genetically related and two unrelated envelope clones, derived from CRF08_BC-infected patients, with distinct VRC01 neutralization profiles. A total of 22 chimeric envelope clones was generated by interchanging the loop D and/or V5 regions between the original envelopes or by single alanine substitutions within each region. Analysis of pseudoviruses built from these mutant envelopes showed that interchanging the V5 region between the genetically related or unrelated clones completely swapped their VRC01 sensitivity profiles. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that the asparagine residue at position 460 (Asn-460), a potential N-linked glycosylation site in the V5 region, is a key factor for observed resistance in these strains, which is further supported by our structural modeling. Moreover, changes in resistance were found to positively correlate with deviations in VRC01 binding affinity. Overall, our study indicates that Asn-460 in the V5 region is a critical determinant of sensitivity to VRC01 specifically in these viral strains. The long side chain of Asn-460, and potential glycosylation, may create steric hindrance that lowers binding affinity, thereby increasing resistance to VRC01 neutralization.

  2. Viral Evolution and Cytotoxic T Cell Restricted Selection in Acute Infant HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Knight, Miguel A.; Slyker, Jennifer; Payne, Barbara Lohman; Pond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky; de Silva, Thushan I.; Chohan, Bhavna; Khasimwa, Brian; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; John-Stewart, Grace; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.; Esbjörnsson, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-1 infected infants experience poor viral containment and rapid disease progression compared to adults. Viral factors (e.g. transmitted cytotoxic T- lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations) or infant factors (e.g. reduced CTL functional capacity) may explain this observation. We assessed CTL functionality by analysing selection in CTL-targeted HIV-1 epitopes following perinatal infection. HIV-1 gag, pol and nef sequences were generated from a historical repository of longitudinal specimens from 19 vertically infected infants. Evolutionary rate and selection were estimated for each gene and in CTL-restricted and non-restricted epitopes. Evolutionary rate was higher in nef and gag vs. pol, and lower in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag and nef. Selection pressure was stronger in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag. The analysis also showed that infants with non-severe immunosuppression had stronger selection in CTL-restricted vs. non-restricted epitopes in gag and nef. Evidence of stronger CTL selection was absent in infants with severe immunosuppression. These data indicate that infant CTLs can exert selection pressure on gag and nef epitopes in early infection and that stronger selection across CTL epitopes is associated with favourable clinical outcomes. These results have implications for the development of paediatric HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:27403940

  3. Assembly, processing, and infectivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag mutants.

    PubMed

    Wang, C T; Barklis, E

    1993-07-01

    We studied the effects of gag mutations on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) assembly, processing, and infectivity by using a replication-defective HIV expression system. HIV mutants were screened for infectivity by transduction of a selectable marker and were examined for assembly by monitoring particle release from transfected cells. Gag protein processing and reverse transcriptase activities of mutant particles were also assayed. Surprisingly, most Gag protein mutants were assembled and processed. The two exceptions to this rule were a myristylation-minus mutant, and one gag matrix domain mutant which expressed proteins that were trapped intracellularly. Interestingly, a mutant with a 56-amino-acid deletion within the HIV gag capsid domain still could assemble and process virus particles, exhibited a wild-type retrovirus particle density, and had wild-type reverse transcriptase activity. Indeed, although most HIV-1 gag mutants were noninfectious or poorly infectious, they produced apparently normal particles which possessed significant reverse transcriptase activities. These results strongly support the notion that the HIV-1 Gag proteins are functionally involved in post-assembly, postprocessing stages of virus infectivity.

  4. Bioorthogonal mimetics of palmitoyl-CoA and myristoyl-CoA and their subsequent isolation by click chemistry and characterization by mass spectrometry reveal novel acylated host-proteins modified by HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, David R; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Ubaida Mohien, Ceereena; Aquino, Veronica N; Bullock, Brandon T; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Agnew, Brian J; Graham, David R M

    2015-06-01

    Protein acylation plays a critical role in protein localization and function. Acylation is essential for human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) assembly and budding of HIV-1 from the plasma membrane in lipid raft microdomains and is mediated by myristoylation of the Gag polyprotein and the copackaging of the envelope protein is facilitated by colocalization mediated by palmitoylation. Since the viral accessory protein NEF has been shown to alter the substrate specificity of myristoyl transferases, and alter cargo trafficking lipid rafts, we hypothesized that HIV-1 infection may alter protein acylation globally. To test this hypothesis, we labeled HIV-1 infected cells with biomimetics of acyl azides, which are incorporated in a manner analogous to natural acyl-Co-A. A terminal azide group allowed us to use a copper catalyzed click chemistry to conjugate the incorporated modifications to a number of substrates to carry out SDS-PAGE, fluorescence microscopy, and enrichment for LC-MS/MS. Using LC-MS/MS, we identified 103 and 174 proteins from the myristic and palmitic azide enrichments, with 27 and 45 proteins respectively that differentiated HIV-1 infected from uninfected cells. This approach has provided us with important insights into HIV-1 biology and is widely applicable to many virological systems.

  5. HIV-1 production is specifically associated with human NMT1 long form in human NMT isozymes.

    PubMed

    Takamune, Nobutoki; Gota, Kayoko; Misumi, Shogo; Tanaka, Kenzo; Okinaka, Shigetaka; Shoji, Shozo

    2008-02-01

    The N-myristoylation of the N-terminal of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Pr55(gag) by human N-myristoyltransferase (hNMT) is a prerequisite modification for HIV-1 production. hNMT consists of multiple isozymes encoded by hNMT1 and hNMT2. The hNMT1 isozyme consists of long, medium, and short forms. Here, we investigated which isozyme is crucial for HIV-1 production. Human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells transfected with infectious HIV-1 vectors were used as models of HIV-1-infected cells in this study. The significant reduction in HIV-1 production and the failure of the specific localization of Pr55(gag) in a detergent-resistant membrane fraction were dependent on the knockdown of the different forms of the hNMT1 isozyme but not of the hNMT2 isozyme. Additionally, the coexpression of an inactive mutant hNMT1 isozyme, namely the hNMT1 long form (hNMT1(L)), but not that of other hNMT mutants resulted in a significant reduction in HIV-1 production. These results strongly suggest that HIV-1 production is specifically associated with hNMT1, particularly hNMT1(L), but not with hNMT2 in vivo, contributing to the understanding of a step in HIV-1 replication.

  6. HIV-1 Capsid: The Multifaceted Key Player in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Edward M.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In a mature, infectious HIV-1 virion, the viral genome is housed within a conical capsid core comprised of the viral capsid (CA) protein. The CA protein, and the structure into which it assembles, facilitate virtually every step of infection through a series of interactions with multiple host cell factors. This review describes our understanding of the interactions between the viral capsid core and several cellular factors that enable efficient HIV-1 genome replication, timely core disassembly, nuclear import and the integration of the viral genome into the genome of the target cell. We then discuss how elucidating these interactions can reveal new targets for therapeutic interactions against HIV-1. PMID:26179359

  7. Effect of Multimerization on Membrane Association of Rous Sarcoma Virus and HIV-1 Matrix Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Robert A.; Kamynina, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In most retroviruses, plasma membrane (PM) association of the Gag structural protein is a critical step in viral assembly, relying in part on interaction between the highly basic Gag MA domain and the negatively charged inner leaflet of the PM. Assembly is thought to begin with Gag dimerization followed by multimerization, resulting in a hexameric lattice. To directly address the role of multimerization in membrane binding, we fused the MA domains of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and HIV-1 to the chemically inducible dimerization domain FK506-binding protein (FKBP) or to the hexameric protein CcmK4 from cyanobacteria. The cellular localization of the resulting green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged chimeric proteins was examined by fluorescence imaging, and the association of the proteins with liposomes was quantified by flotation in sucrose gradients, following synthesis in a reticulocyte extract or as purified proteins. Four lipid compositions were tested, representative of liposomes commonly reported in flotation experiments. By themselves, GFP-tagged RSV and HIV-1 MA proteins were largely cytoplasmic, but both hexamerized proteins were highly concentrated at the PM. Dimerization led to partial PM localization for HIV-1 MA. These in vivo effects of multimerization were reproduced in vitro. In flotation analyses, the intact RSV and HIV-1 Gag proteins were more similar to multimerized MA than to monomeric MA. RNA is reported to compete with acidic liposomes for HIV-1 Gag binding, and thus we also examined the effects of RNase treatment or tRNA addition on flotation. tRNA competed with liposomes in the case of some but not all lipid compositions and ionic strengths. Taken together, our results further underpin the model that multimerization is critical for PM association of retroviral Gag proteins. In addition, they suggest that the modulation of membrane binding by RNA, as previously reported for HIV-1, may not hold for RSV. PMID:24109216

  8. Identification of a Key Target Sequence To Block Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication within the gag-pol Transframe Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Shizuko; Yang, Quan-en; O'Neill, Dennis; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Nagashima, Kunio; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2000-01-01

    Although the full sequence of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome has been known for more than a decade, effective genetic antivirals have yet to be developed. Here we show that, of 22 regions examined, one highly conserved sequence (ACTCTTTGGCAACGA) near the 3′ end of the HIV-1 gag-pol transframe region, encoding viral protease residues 4 to 8 and a C-terminal Vpr-binding motif of p6Gag protein in two different reading frames, can be successfully targeted by an antisense peptide nucleic acid oligomer named PNAPR2. A disrupted translation of gag-pol mRNA induced at the PNAPR2-annealing site resulted in a decreased synthesis of Pr160Gag-Pol polyprotein, hence the viral protease, a predominant expression of Pr55Gag devoid of a fully functional p6Gag protein, and the excessive intracellular cleavage of Gag precursor proteins, hindering the processes of virion assembly. Treatment with PNAPR2 abolished virion production by up to 99% in chronically HIV-1-infected H9 cells and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with clinical HIV-1 isolates with the multidrug-resistant phenotype. This particular segment of the gag-pol transframe gene appears to offer a distinctive advantage over other regions in invading viral structural genes and restraining HIV-1 replication in infected cells and may potentially be exploited as a novel antiviral genetic target. PMID:10775598

  9. Interaction with the p6 Domain of the Gag Precursor Mediates Incorporation into Virions of Vpr and Vpx Proteins from Primate Lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Selig, L.; Pages, J.-C.; Tanchou, V.; Prévéral, S.; Berlioz-Torrent, C.; Liu, L. X.; Erdtmann, L.; Darlix, J.-L.; Benarous, R.; Benichou, S.

    1999-01-01

    Vpr and Vpx proteins from human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) are incorporated into virions in quantities equivalent to those of the viral Gag proteins. We demonstrate here that Vpr and Vpx proteins from distinct lineages of primate lentiviruses were able to bind to their respective Gag precursors. The capacity of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr mutants to bind to Pr55Gag was correlated with their incorporation into virions. Molecular analysis of these interactions revealed that they required the C-terminal p6 domain of the Gag precursors. While the signal for HIV-1 Vpr binding lies in the leucine triplet repeat region of the p6 domain reported to be essential for incorporation, SIVsm Gag lacking the equivalent region still bound to SIVsm Vpr and Vpx, indicating that the determinants for Gag binding are located upstream of this region of the p6 domain. Binding to Gag cleavage products showed that HIV-1 Vpr interacted directly with the nucleocapsid protein (NC), whereas SIVsm Vpr and Vpx did not interact with NC but with the p6 protein. These results (i) reveal differences between HIV-1 and SIVsm for the p6 determinants required for Vpr and Vpx binding to Gag and (ii) suggest that HIV-1 Vpr and SIVsm Vpr and Vpx interact with distinct cleavage products of the precursor following proteolytic processing in the virions. PMID:9847364

  10. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang

    2016-05-15

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. - Highlights: • HIV-1 NC possess a NLS and leads to nuclear and nucleolus localization. • Mutations in basic residues between two ZFs in NC decrease the nucleus localization. • ZFs of NC affect cytoplasmic organelles localization rather than nucleus localization.

  11. Macrophage polarization and HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cassol, Edana; Cassetta, Luca; Alfano, Massimo; Poli, Guido

    2010-04-01

    Polarization of MP into classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2a, M2b, and M2c) macrophages is critical in mediating an effective immune response against invading pathogens. However, several pathogens use these activation pathways to facilitate dissemination and pathogenesis. Viruses generally induce an M1-like phenotype during the acute phase of infection. In addition to promoting the development of Th1 responses and IFN production, M1 macrophages often produce cytokines that drive viral replication and tissue damage. As shown for HIV-1, polarization can also alter macrophage susceptibility to infection. In vitro polarization into M1 cells prevents HIV-1 infection, and M2a polarization inhibits viral replication at a post-integration level. M2a cells also express high levels of C-type lectins that can facilitate macrophage-mediated transmission of HIV-1 to CD4(+) T cells. Macrophages are particularly abundant in mucosal membranes and unlike DCs, do not usually migrate to distal tissues. As a result, macrophages are likely to contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis in mucosal rather than lymphatic tissues. In vivo polarization of MP is likely to span a spectrum of activation phenotypes that may change the permissivity to and alter the outcome of HIV-1 and other viral infections.

  12. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Budding Sites and Released Virus Suggests a Revised Model for HIV-1 Morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, L.; Simon, M.; Briggs, J. A. G.; Glass, B.; Riches, J. D.; Johnson, M. C.; Muller, B.; Grunewald, K.; Krausslich, H.-G.

    2008-12-11

    Current models of HIV-1 morphogenesis hold that newly synthesized viral Gag polyproteins traffic to and assemble at the cell membrane into spherical protein shells. The resulting late-budding structure is thought to be released by the cellular ESCRT machinery severing the membrane tether connecting it to the producer cell. Using electron tomography and scanning transmission electron microscopy, we find that virions have a morphology and composition distinct from late-budding sites. Gag is arranged as a continuous but incomplete sphere in the released virion. In contrast, late-budding sites lacking functional ESCRT exhibited a nearly closed Gag sphere. The results lead us to propose that budding is initiated by Gag assembly, but is completed in an ESCRT-dependent manner before the Gag sphere is complete. This suggests that ESCRT functions early in HIV-1 release - akin to its role in vesicle formation - and is not restricted to severing the thin membrane tether.

  13. In vitro protease cleavage and computer simulations reveal the HIV-1 capsid maturation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jiying; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Yufenyuy, Ernest L.; Wagner, Jef; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Aiken, Christopher; Zandi, Roya; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virions assemble as immature particles containing Gag polyproteins that are processed by the viral protease into individual components, resulting in the formation of mature infectious particles. There are two competing models for the process of forming the mature HIV-1 core: the disassembly and de novo reassembly model and the non-diffusional displacive model. To study the maturation pathway, we simulate HIV-1 maturation in vitro by digesting immature particles and assembled virus-like particles with recombinant HIV-1 protease and monitor the process with biochemical assays and cryoEM structural analysis in parallel. Processing of Gag in vitro is accurate and efficient and results in both soluble capsid protein and conical or tubular capsid assemblies, seemingly converted from immature Gag particles. Computer simulations further reveal probable assembly pathways of HIV-1 capsid formation. Combining the experimental data and computer simulations, our results suggest a sequential combination of both displacive and disassembly/reassembly processes for HIV-1 maturation. PMID:27958264

  14. In vitro protease cleavage and computer simulations reveal the HIV-1 capsid maturation pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jiying; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Yufenyuy, Ernest L.; Wagner, Jef; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Aiken, Christopher; Zandi, Roya; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 virions assemble as immature particles containing Gag polyproteins that are processed by the viral protease into individual components, resulting in the formation of mature infectious particles. There are two competing models for the process of forming the mature HIV-1 core: the disassembly and de novo reassembly model and the non-diffusional displacive model. To study the maturation pathway, we simulate HIV-1 maturation in vitro by digesting immature particles and assembled virus-like particles with recombinant HIV-1 protease and monitor the process with biochemical assays and cryoEM structural analysis in parallel. Processing of Gag in vitro is accurate and efficient and results in both soluble capsid protein and conical or tubular capsid assemblies, seemingly converted from immature Gag particles. Computer simulations further reveal probable assembly pathways of HIV-1 capsid formation. Combining the experimental data and computer simulations, our results suggest a sequential combination of both displacive and disassembly/reassembly processes for HIV-1 maturation.

  15. HIV-1 Vpu Promotes Release and Prevents Endocytosis of Nascent Retrovirus Particles from the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Neil, Stuart J. D; Eastman, Scott W; Jouvenet, Nolwenn; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 viral protein U (Vpu) protein enhances the release of diverse retroviruses from human, but not monkey, cells and is thought to do so by ablating a dominant restriction to particle release. Here, we determined how Vpu expression affects the subcellular distribution of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MLV) Gag proteins in human cells where Vpu is, or is not, required for efficient particle release. In HeLa cells, where Vpu enhances HIV-1 and MLV release approximately 10-fold, concentrations of HIV-1 Gag and MLV Gag fused to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) were initially detected at the plasma membrane, but then accumulated over time in early and late endosomes. Endosomal accumulation of Gag-CFP was prevented by Vpu expression and, importantly, inhibition of plasma membrane to early endosome transport by dominant negative mutants of Rab5a, dynamin, and EPS-15. Additionally, accumulation of both HIV and MLV Gag in endosomes required a functional late-budding domain. In human HOS cells, where HIV-1 and MLV release was efficient even in the absence of Vpu, Gag proteins were localized predominantly at the plasma membrane, irrespective of Vpu expression or manipulation of endocytic transport. While these data indicated that Vpu inhibits nascent virion endocytosis, Vpu did not affect transferrin endocytosis. Moreover, inhibition of endocytosis did not restore Vpu-defective HIV-1 release in HeLa cells, but instead resulted in accumulation of mature virions that could be released from the cell surface by protease treatment. Thus, these findings suggest that a specific activity that is present in HeLa cells, but not in HOS cells, and is counteracted by Vpu, traps assembled retrovirus particles at the cell surface. This entrapment leads to subsequent endocytosis by a Rab5a- and clathrin-dependent mechanism and intracellular sequestration of virions in endosomes. PMID:16699598

  16. Insights into the mechanisms of RNA secondary structure destabilization by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Belfetmi, Anissa; Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Sleiman, Dona; Morellet, Nelly; Lescop, Ewen; Maskri, Ouerdia; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The mature HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) plays a key role in reverse transcription facilitating the two obligatory strand transfers. Several properties contribute to its efficient chaperon activity: preferential binding to single-stranded regions, nucleic acid aggregation, helix destabilization, and rapid dissociation from nucleic acids. However, little is known about the relationships between these different properties, which are complicated by the ability of the protein to recognize particular HIV-1 stem–loops, such as SL1, SL2, and SL3, with high affinity and without destabilizing them. These latter properties are important in the context of genome packaging, during which NC is part of the Gag precursor. We used NMR to investigate destabilization of the full-length TAR (trans activating response element) RNA by NC, which is involved in the first strand transfer step of reverse transcription. NC was used at a low protein:nucleotide (nt) ratio of 1:59 in these experiments. NMR data for the imino protons of TAR identified most of the base pairs destabilized by NC. These base pairs were adjacent to the loops in the upper part of the TAR hairpin rather than randomly distributed. Gel retardation assays showed that conversion from the initial TAR–cTAR complex to the fully annealed form occurred much more slowly at the 1:59 ratio than at the higher ratios classically used. Nevertheless, NC significantly accelerated the formation of the initial complex at a ratio of 1:59. PMID:26826129

  17. Insights into the mechanisms of RNA secondary structure destabilization by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Belfetmi, Anissa; Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Sleiman, Dona; Morellet, Nelly; Lescop, Ewen; Maskri, Ouerdia; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The mature HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) plays a key role in reverse transcription facilitating the two obligatory strand transfers. Several properties contribute to its efficient chaperon activity: preferential binding to single-stranded regions, nucleic acid aggregation, helix destabilization, and rapid dissociation from nucleic acids. However, little is known about the relationships between these different properties, which are complicated by the ability of the protein to recognize particular HIV-1 stem-loops, such as SL1, SL2, and SL3, with high affinity and without destabilizing them. These latter properties are important in the context of genome packaging, during which NC is part of the Gag precursor. We used NMR to investigate destabilization of the full-length TAR (trans activating response element) RNA by NC, which is involved in the first strand transfer step of reverse transcription. NC was used at a low protein:nucleotide (nt) ratio of 1:59 in these experiments. NMR data for the imino protons of TAR identified most of the base pairs destabilized by NC. These base pairs were adjacent to the loops in the upper part of the TAR hairpin rather than randomly distributed. Gel retardation assays showed that conversion from the initial TAR-cTAR complex to the fully annealed form occurred much more slowly at the 1:59 ratio than at the higher ratios classically used. Nevertheless, NC significantly accelerated the formation of the initial complex at a ratio of 1:59.

  18. The role of nucleocapsid of HIV-1 in virus assembly.

    PubMed

    Dawson, L; Yu, X F

    1998-11-10

    The role of the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1 Gag in virus assembly was investigated using Gag truncation mutants, a nucleocapsid deletion mutant, and point mutations in the nucleocapsid region of Gag, in transfected COS cells, and in stable T-cell lines. Consistent with previous investigations, a truncation containing only the matrix and capsid regions of Gag was unable to assemble efficiently into particles; also, the pelletable material released was lighter than the density of wild-type HIV-1. A deletion mutant lacking p7 nucleocapsid but containing the C-terminal p6 protein was also inefficient in particle release and released lighter particles, while a truncation containing only the first zinc finger of p7 could assemble more efficiently into virions. These results clearly show that p7 is indispensable for virus assembly and release. Some point mutations in the N-terminal basic domain and in the basic linker region between the two zinc fingers, which had been previously shown to have reduced RNA binding in vitro [Schmalzbauer, E., Strack, B., Dannull, J., Guehmann, S., and Moelling, K. (1996). J. Virol. 70: 771-777], were shown to reduce virus assembly dramatically when expressed in full-length viral clones. A fusion protein consisting of matrix and capsid fused to a heterologous viral protein known to have nonspecific RNA binding activity [Ribas, J. C., Fujimura, T., and Wickner, R. B. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269: 28420-28428] released pelletable material slightly more efficiently than matrix and capsid alone, and these particles had density higher than matrix and capsid alone. These results demonstrate the essential role of HIV-1 nucleocapsid in the virus assembly process and show that the positively charged N terminus of p7 is critical for this role.

  19. Control of HIV-1 replication in vitro by vaccine-induced human CD8+ T cells through conserved subdominant Pol epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tina; Borthwick, Nicola J.; Gilmour, Jill; Hayes, Peter; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Objective The specificity of CD8+ T cells is critical for early control of founder/transmitted and reactivated HIV-1. To tackle HIV-1 variability and escape, we designed vaccine immunogen HIVconsv assembled from 14 highly conserved regions of mainly Gag and Pol proteins. When administered to HIV-1-negative human volunteers in trial HIV-CORE 002, HIVconsv vaccines elicited CD8+ effector T cells which inhibited replication of up to 8 HIV-1 isolates in autologous CD4+ cells. This inhibition correlated with interferon-γ production in response to Gag and Pol peptide pools, but direct evidence of the inhibitory specificity was missing. Here, we aimed to define through recognition of which epitopes these effectors inhibit HIV-1 replication. Design CD8+ T-cells from the 3 broadest HIV-1 inhibitors out of 23 vaccine recipients were expanded in culture by Gag or Pol peptide restimulation and tested in viral inhibition assay (VIA) using HIV-1 clade B and A isolates. Methods Frozen PBMCs were expanded first using peptide pools from Gag or Pol conserved regions and tested on HIV-1-infected cells in VIA or by individual peptides for their effector functions. Single peptide specificities responsible for inhibition of HIV-1 replication were then confirmed by single-peptide expanded effectors tested on HIV-1-infected cells. Results We formally demonstrated that the vaccine-elicited inhibitory human CD8+ T cells recognized conserved epitopes of both Pol and Gag proteins. We defined 7 minimum epitopes, of which 3 were novel, presumably naturally subdominant. The effectors were oligofunctional producing several cytokines and chemokines and killing peptide-pulsed target cells. Conclusions These results implicate the use of functionally conserved regions of Pol in addition to the widely used Gag for T-cell vaccine design. Proportion of volunteers developing these effectors and their frequency in circulating PBMC are separate issues, which can be addressed, if needed, by more efficient

  20. Particle size determinants in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag protein.

    PubMed

    Garnier, L; Ratner, L; Rovinski, B; Cao, S X; Wills, J W

    1998-06-01

    The retroviral Gag protein plays the central role in the assembly process and can form membrane-enclosed, virus-like particles in the absence of any other viral products. These particles are similar to authentic virions in density and size. Three small domains of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein have been previously identified as being important for budding. Regions that lie outside these domains can be deleted without any effect on particle release or density. However, the regions of Gag that control the size of HIV-1 particles are less well understood. In the case of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), the size determinant maps to the CA (capsid) and adjacent spacer sequences within Gag, but systematic mapping of the HIV Gag protein has not been reported. To locate the size determinants of HIV-1, we analyzed a large collection of Gag mutants. To our surprise, all mutants with defects in the MA (matrix), CA, and the N-terminal part of NC (nucleocapsid) sequences produced dense particles of normal size, suggesting that oncoviruses (RSV) and lentiviruses (HIV-1) have different size-controlling elements. The most important region found to be critical for determining HIV-1 particle size is the p6 sequence. Particles lacking all or small parts of p6 were uniform in size distribution but very large as measured by rate zonal gradients. Further evidence for this novel function of p6 was obtained by placing this sequence at the C terminus of RSV CA mutants that produce heterogeneously sized particles. We found that the RSV-p6 chimeras produced normally sized particles. Thus, we present evidence that the entire p6 sequence plays a role in determining the size of a retroviral particle.

  1. The choreography of HIV-1 proteolytic processing and virion assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Potempa, Marc; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2012-11-30

    HIV-1 has been the target of intensive research at the molecular and biochemical levels for >25 years. Collectively, this work has led to a detailed understanding of viral replication and the development of 24 approved drugs that have five different targets on various viral proteins and one cellular target (CCR5). Although most drugs target viral enzymatic activities, our detailed knowledge of so much of the viral life cycle is leading us into other types of inhibitors that can block or disrupt protein-protein interactions. Viruses have compact genomes and employ a strategy of using a small number of proteins that can form repeating structures to enclose space (i.e. condensing the viral genome inside of a protein shell), thus minimizing the need for a large protein coding capacity. This creates a relatively small number of critical protein-protein interactions that are essential for viral replication. For HIV-1, the Gag protein has the role of a polyprotein precursor that contains all of the structural proteins of the virion: matrix, capsid, spacer peptide 1, nucleocapsid, spacer peptide 2, and p6 (which contains protein-binding domains that interact with host proteins during budding). Similarly, the Gag-Pro-Pol precursor encodes most of the Gag protein but now includes the viral enzymes: protease, reverse transcriptase (with its associated RNase H activity), and integrase. Gag and Gag-Pro-Pol are the substrates of the viral protease, which is responsible for cleaving these precursors into their mature and fully active forms (see Fig. 1A).

  2. Clustering and Mobility of HIV-1 Env at Viral Assembly Sites Predict Its Propensity To Induce Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nathan H.; Chan, Jany; Lambelé, Marie

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 Env mediates virus attachment to and fusion with target cell membranes, and yet, while Env is still situated at the plasma membrane of the producer cell and before its incorporation into newly formed particles, Env already interacts with the viral receptor CD4 on target cells, thus enabling the formation of transient cell contacts that facilitate the transmission of viral particles. During this first encounter with the receptor, Env must not induce membrane fusion, as this would prevent the producer cell and the target cell from separating upon virus transmission, but how Env's fusion activity is controlled remains unclear. To gain a better understanding of the Env regulation that precedes viral transmission, we examined the nanoscale organization of Env at the surface of producer cells. Utilizing superresolution microscopy (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy [STORM]) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we quantitatively assessed the clustering and dynamics of Env upon its arrival at the plasma membrane. We found that Gag assembly induced the aggregation of small Env clusters into larger domains and that these domains were completely immobile. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of Env abrogated Gag's ability to induce Env clustering and restored Env mobility at assembly sites, both of which correlated with increased Env-induced fusion of infected and uninfected cells. Hence, while Env trapping by Gag secures Env incorporation into viral particles, Env clustering and its sequestration at assembly sites likely also leads to the repression of its fusion function, and thus, by preventing the formation of syncytia, Gag helps to secure efficient transfer of viral particles to target cells. PMID:23637402

  3. Non-POU Domain-Containing Octamer-Binding Protein Negatively Regulates HIV-1 Infection in CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    St Gelais, Corine; Roger, Jonathan; Wu, Li

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 interacts with numerous cellular proteins during viral replication. Identifying such host proteins and characterizing their roles in HIV-1 infection can deepen our understanding of the dynamic interplay between host and pathogen. We previously identified non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NonO or p54nrb) as one of host factors associated with catalytically active preintegration complexes (PIC) of HIV-1 in infected CD4(+) T cells. NonO is involved in nuclear processes including transcriptional regulation and RNA splicing. Although NonO has been identified as an HIV-1 interactant in several recent studies, its role in HIV-1 replication has not been characterized. We investigated the effect of NonO on the HIV-1 life cycle in CD4(+) T cell lines and primary CD4(+) T cells using single-cycle and replication-competent HIV-1 infection assays. We observed that short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated stable NonO knockdown in a CD4(+) Jurkat T cell line and primary CD4(+) T cells did not affect cell viability or proliferation, but enhanced HIV-1 infection. The enhancement of HIV-1 infection in Jurkat T cells correlated with increased viral reverse transcription and gene expression. Knockdown of NonO expression in Jurkat T cells modestly enhanced HIV-1 gag mRNA expression and Gag protein synthesis, suggesting that viral gene expression and RNA regulation are the predominantly affected events causing enhanced HIV-1 replication in NonO knockdown (KD) cells. Furthermore, overexpression of NonO in Jurkat T cells reduced HIV-1 single-cycle infection by 41% compared to control cells. Our data suggest that NonO negatively regulates HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, albeit it has modest effects on early and late stages of the viral life cycle, highlighting the importance of host proteins associated with HIV-1 PIC in regulating viral replication.

  4. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J.; Belshan, Michael

    2016-02-15

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. - Highlights: • CypB has been identified in several proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection. • CypB expression is upregulated in activated and infected T-cells. • Over-expression of CypB enhances HIV nuclear import and infection. • The N-terminus of CypB is necessary for these effects.

  5. HIV-1 Nef responsiveness is determined by Env variable regions involved in trimer association and correlates with neutralization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Usami, Yoshiko; Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2013-11-14

    HIV-1 Nef and the unrelated murine leukemia virus glycoGag similarly enhance the infectivity of HIV-1 virions. We now show that the effects of Nef and glycoGag are similarly determined by variable regions of HIV-1 gp120 that control Env trimer association and neutralization sensitivity. Whereas neutralization-sensitive X4-tropic Env proteins conferred high responsiveness to Nef and glycoGag, particles bearing neutralization-resistant R5-tropic Envs were considerably less affected. The profoundly different Nef/glycoGag responsiveness of a neutralization-resistant and a neutralization-sensitive R5-tropic Env could be switched by exchanging their gp120 V1/V2 regions, which also switches their neutralization sensitivity. Within V1/V2, the same determinants governed Nef/glycoGag responsiveness and neutralization sensitivity, indicating that these phenotypes are mechanistically linked. The V1/V2 and V3 regions, which form an apical trimer-association domain, together determined the Nef and glycoGag responsiveness of an X4-tropic Env. Our results suggest that Nef and glycoGag counteract the inactivation of Env spikes with relatively unstable apical trimer-association domains.

  6. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Zachary S.; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R.

    2016-01-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4+ T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. PMID:27431232

  7. Identifying the Important HIV-1 Recombination Breakpoints

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Arts, Eric J.; Negroni, Matteo; Robertson, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant HIV-1 genomes contribute significantly to the diversity of variants within the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It is assumed that some of these mosaic genomes may have novel properties that have led to their prevalence, particularly in the case of the circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). In regions of the HIV-1 genome where recombination has a tendency to convey a selective advantage to the virus, we predict that the distribution of breakpoints—the identifiable boundaries that delimit the mosaic structure—will deviate from the underlying null distribution. To test this hypothesis, we generate a probabilistic model of HIV-1 copy-choice recombination and compare the predicted breakpoint distribution to the distribution from the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Across much of the HIV-1 genome, we find that the observed frequencies of inter-subtype recombination are predicted accurately by our model. This observation strongly indicates that in these regions a probabilistic model, dependent on local sequence identity, is sufficient to explain breakpoint locations. In regions where there is a significant over- (either side of the env gene) or under- (short regions within gag, pol, and most of env) representation of breakpoints, we infer natural selection to be influencing the recombination pattern. The paucity of recombination breakpoints within most of the envelope gene indicates that recombinants generated in this region are less likely to be successful. The breakpoints at a higher frequency than predicted by our model are approximately at either side of env, indicating increased selection for these recombinants as a consequence of this region, or at least part of it, having a tendency to be recombined as an entire unit. Our findings thus provide the first clear indication of the existence of a specific portion of the genome that deviates from a probabilistic null model for recombination. This suggests that, despite the wide diversity of recombinant forms seen in the viral

  8. Cyclophilin A is required for the replication of group M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(CPZ)GAB but not group O HIV-1 or other primate immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Braaten, D; Franke, E K; Luban, J

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag polyprotein binds to cyclophilin A and incorporates this cellular peptidyl prolyl-isomerase into virions. Disruption of cyclophilin A incorporation, either by gag mutations or by cyclosporine A, inhibits virion infectivity, indicating that cyclophilin A plays an essential role in the HIV-1 life cycle. Using assays for packaging of cyclophilin A into virions and for viral replication sensitivity to cyclosporine A, as well as information gleaned from the alignment of Gag residues encoded by representative viral isolates, we demonstrate that of the five lineages of primate immunodeficiency viruses, only HIV-1 requires cyclophilin A for replication. Cloned viral isolates from clades A, B, and D of HIV-1 group M, as well as a phylogenetically related isolate from chimpanzee, all require cyclophilin A for replication. In contrast, the replication of two outlier (group O) HIV-1 isolates is unaffected by concentrations of cyclosporine A which disrupt cyclophilin A incorporation into virions, indicating that these viruses are capable of replicating independently of cyclophilin A. These studies identify the first phenotypic difference between HIV-1 group M and group O and are consistent with phylogenetic studies suggesting that the two HIV-1 groups were introduced into human populations via separate zoonotic transmission events. PMID:8676442

  9. An atomic model of HIV-1 capsid-SP1 reveals structures regulating assembly and maturation.

    PubMed

    Schur, Florian K M; Obr, Martin; Hagen, Wim J H; Wan, William; Jakobi, Arjen J; Kirkpatrick, Joanna M; Sachse, Carsten; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A G

    2016-07-29

    Immature HIV-1 assembles at and buds from the plasma membrane before proteolytic cleavage of the viral Gag polyprotein induces structural maturation. Maturation can be blocked by maturation inhibitors (MIs), thereby abolishing infectivity. The CA (capsid) and SP1 (spacer peptide 1) region of Gag is the key regulator of assembly and maturation and is the target of MIs. We applied optimized cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging to resolve this region within assembled immature HIV-1 particles at 3.9 angstrom resolution and built an atomic model. The structure reveals a network of intra- and intermolecular interactions mediating immature HIV-1 assembly. The proteolytic cleavage site between CA and SP1 is inaccessible to protease. We suggest that MIs prevent CA-SP1 cleavage by stabilizing the structure, and MI resistance develops by destabilizing CA-SP1.

  10. A Truncated Nef Peptide from SIVcpz Inhibits the Production of HIV-1 Infectious Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Sabino Cunha, Marcela; Lima Sampaio, Thatiane; Peterlin, B. Matija; Jesus da Costa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Nef proteins from all primate Lentiviruses, including the simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVcpz), increase viral progeny infectivity. However, the function of Nef involved with the increase in viral infectivity is still not completely understood. Nonetheless, until now, studies investigating the functions of Nef from SIVcpz have been conducted in the context of the HIV-1 proviruses. In an attempt to investigate the role played by Nef during the replication cycle of an SIVcpz, a Nef-defective derivative was obtained from the SIVcpzWTGab2 clone by introducing a frame shift mutation at a unique restriction site within the nef sequence. This nef-deleted clone expresses an N-terminal 74-amino acid truncated peptide of Nef and was named SIVcpz-tNef. We found that the SIVcpz-tNef does not behave as a classic nef-deleted HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques SIVmac. Markedly, SIVcpz-tNef progeny from both Hek-293T and Molt producer cells were completely non-infectious. Moreover, the loss in infectivity of SIVcpz-tNef correlated with the inhibition of Gag and GagPol processing. A marked accumulation of Gag and very low levels of reverse transcriptase were detected in viral lysates. Furthermore, these observations were reproduced once the tNef peptide was expressed in trans both in SIVcpzΔNef and HIV-1WT expressing cells, demonstrating that the truncated peptide is a dominant negative for viral processing and infectivity for both SIVcpz and HIV-1. We demonstrated that the truncated Nef peptide binds to GagPol outside the protease region and by doing so probably blocks processing of both GagPol and Gag precursors at a very early stage. This study demonstrates for the first time that naturally-occurring Nef peptides can potently block lentiviral processing and infectivity. PMID:27399760

  11. Ultrastructural evidence of an interaction between Env and Gag proteins during assembly of HIV type 1.

    PubMed

    Bugelski, P J; Maleeff, B E; Klinkner, A M; Ventre, J; Hart, T K

    1995-01-01

    Assembly and budding of retroviruses is believed to involve a complex interaction of envelope and capsid proteins at the host cell membrane. The nature of these interactions is, however, incompletely understood. Studies of the topography of the surface of HIV-1 have shown that the envelope glycoprotein projections (knobs) are arranged in a T = 7 levo rotational symmetry. Similarly, an icosahedral structure has been suggested for the p17 matrix of HIV-1. In an effort to investigate whether there is a structural interaction between these molecules, virions whose maturation was blocked by an inhibitor of HIV protease were studied using cytochemistry, morphometry, and 2D fast Fourier transform image enhancement. Analysis of the relationship between core morphology and the topographic distribution of envelope glycoprotein projections on HIV-1 provided structural evidence of an interaction between Env and Gag proteins. Furthermore, image enhancement revealed a periodic substructure in the Pr55gag plaque. Taken together, the data suggest an interaction between Pr55gag and the gp120-gp41 complex during assembly and budding of HIV-1. This interaction may, in part, contribute to determining the amount of Env glycoprotein that will be incorporated into a virion, and therefore play a role in the biology of HIV-1.

  12. The effect of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on amyloid aggregation and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, Clara; Irace, Gaetano; Sirangelo, Ivana

    2015-02-02

    Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  13. The thermodynamics of Pr55Gag-RNA interaction regulate the assembly of HIV.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Hanumant S; Khoo, Keith K; Garvey, Megan; Waddington, Lynne; Leis, Andrew; Hijnen, Marcel; Velkov, Tony; Dumsday, Geoff J; McKinstry, William J; Mak, Johnson

    2017-02-01

    The interactions that occur during HIV Pr55Gag oligomerization and genomic RNA packaging are essential elements that facilitate HIV assembly. However, mechanistic details of these interactions are not clearly defined. Here, we overcome previous limitations in producing large quantities of full-length recombinant Pr55Gag that is required for isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies, and we have revealed the thermodynamic properties of HIV assembly for the first time. Thermodynamic analysis showed that the binding between RNA and HIV Pr55Gag is an energetically favourable reaction (ΔG<0) that is further enhanced by the oligomerization of Pr55Gag. The change in enthalpy (ΔH) widens sequentially from: (1) Pr55Gag-Psi RNA binding during HIV genome selection; to (2) Pr55Gag-Guanosine Uridine (GU)-containing RNA binding in cytoplasm/plasma membrane; and then to (3) Pr55Gag-Adenosine(A)-containing RNA binding in immature HIV. These data imply the stepwise increments of heat being released during HIV biogenesis may help to facilitate the process of viral assembly. By mimicking the interactions between A-containing RNA and oligomeric Pr55Gag in immature HIV, it was noted that a p6 domain truncated Pr50Gag Δp6 is less efficient than full-length Pr55Gag in this thermodynamic process. These data suggest a potential unknown role of p6 in Pr55Gag-Pr55Gag oligomerization and/or Pr55Gag-RNA interaction during HIV assembly. Our data provide direct evidence on how nucleic acid sequences and the oligomeric state of Pr55Gag regulate HIV assembly.

  14. The thermodynamics of Pr55Gag-RNA interaction regulate the assembly of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Waddington, Lynne; Hijnen, Marcel; Velkov, Tony; McKinstry, William J.

    2017-01-01

    The interactions that occur during HIV Pr55Gag oligomerization and genomic RNA packaging are essential elements that facilitate HIV assembly. However, mechanistic details of these interactions are not clearly defined. Here, we overcome previous limitations in producing large quantities of full-length recombinant Pr55Gag that is required for isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies, and we have revealed the thermodynamic properties of HIV assembly for the first time. Thermodynamic analysis showed that the binding between RNA and HIV Pr55Gag is an energetically favourable reaction (ΔG<0) that is further enhanced by the oligomerization of Pr55Gag. The change in enthalpy (ΔH) widens sequentially from: (1) Pr55Gag-Psi RNA binding during HIV genome selection; to (2) Pr55Gag-Guanosine Uridine (GU)-containing RNA binding in cytoplasm/plasma membrane; and then to (3) Pr55Gag-Adenosine(A)-containing RNA binding in immature HIV. These data imply the stepwise increments of heat being released during HIV biogenesis may help to facilitate the process of viral assembly. By mimicking the interactions between A-containing RNA and oligomeric Pr55Gag in immature HIV, it was noted that a p6 domain truncated Pr50Gag Δp6 is less efficient than full-length Pr55Gag in this thermodynamic process. These data suggest a potential unknown role of p6 in Pr55Gag-Pr55Gag oligomerization and/or Pr55Gag-RNA interaction during HIV assembly. Our data provide direct evidence on how nucleic acid sequences and the oligomeric state of Pr55Gag regulate HIV assembly. PMID:28222188

  15. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah B; Arrildt, Kathryn T; Sturdevant, Christa B; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the "immune privileged" CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir.

  16. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sarah B.; Arrildt, Kathryn T.; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the “immune privileged” CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir. PMID:25236812

  17. HIV-1 Vpr—a still “enigmatic multitasker”

    PubMed Central

    Guenzel, Carolin A.; Hérate, Cécile; Benichou, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Like other HIV-1 auxiliary proteins, Vpr is conserved within all the human (HIV-1, HIV-2) and simian (SIV) immunodeficiency viruses. However, Vpr and homologous HIV-2, and SIV Vpx are the only viral auxiliary proteins specifically incorporated into virus particles through direct interaction with the Gag precursor, indicating that this presence in the core of the mature virions is mainly required for optimal establishment of the early steps of the virus life cycle in the newly infected cell. In spite of its small size, a plethora of effects and functions have been attributed to Vpr, including induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, modulation of the fidelity of reverse transcription, nuclear import of viral DNA in macrophages and other non-dividing cells, and transcriptional modulation of viral and host cell genes. Even if some more recent studies identified a few cellular targets that HIV-1 Vpr may utilize in order to perform its different tasks, the real role and functions of Vpr during the course of natural infection are still enigmatic. In this review, we will summarize the main reported functions of HIV-1 Vpr and their significance in the context of the viral life cycle. PMID:24744753

  18. Membrane Binding of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein Is Cooperative and Dependent on the Spacer Peptide Assembly Domain

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Jin, Danni; Lösche, Mathias; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The principles underlying membrane binding and assembly of retroviral Gag proteins into a lattice are understood. However, little is known about how these processes are related. Using purified Rous sarcoma virus Gag and Gag truncations, we studied the interrelation of Gag-Gag interaction and Gag-membrane interaction. Both by liposome binding and by surface plasmon resonance on a supported bilayer, Gag bound to membranes much more tightly than did matrix (MA), the isolated membrane binding domain. In principle, this difference could be explained either by protein-protein interactions leading to cooperativity in membrane binding or by the simultaneous interaction of the N-terminal MA and the C-terminal nucleocapsid (NC) of Gag with the bilayer, since both are highly basic. However, we found that NC was not required for strong membrane binding. Instead, the spacer peptide assembly domain (SPA), a putative 24-residue helical sequence comprising the 12-residue SP segment of Gag and overlapping the capsid (CA) C terminus and the NC N terminus, was required. SPA is known to be critical for proper assembly of the immature Gag lattice. A single amino acid mutation in SPA that abrogates assembly in vitro dramatically reduced binding of Gag to liposomes. In vivo, plasma membrane localization was dependent on SPA. Disulfide cross-linking based on ectopic Cys residues showed that the contacts between Gag proteins on the membrane are similar to the known contacts in virus-like particles. Taken together, we interpret these results to mean that Gag membrane interaction is cooperative in that it depends on the ability of Gag to multimerize. IMPORTANCE The retroviral structural protein Gag has three major domains. The N-terminal MA domain interacts directly with the plasma membrane (PM) of cells. The central CA domain, together with immediately adjoining sequences, facilitates the assembly of thousands of Gag molecules into a lattice. The C-terminal NC domain interacts with

  19. A strongly transdominant mutation in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene defines an Achilles heel in the virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Harris, Janera; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2009-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (PR) makes five obligatory cleavages in the viral Gag polyprotein precursor. The cleavage events release the virion structural proteins from the precursor and allow the virion to undergo maturation to become infectious. The protease cleavage between the matrix protein (MA) domain and the adjacent capsid protein (CA) domain releases CA from the membrane-anchored MA and allows the N terminus of CA to refold into a structure that facilitates the formation of hexamer arrays that represent the structural unit of the capsid shell. In this study, we analyzed the extent to which each of the HIV-1 Gag processing sites must be cleaved by substituting the P1-position amino acid at each processing site with Ile. A mutation that blocks cleavage at the MA/CA processing site (Y132I) displayed a strong transdominant effect when tested in a phenotypic mixing strategy, inhibiting virion infectivity with a 50% inhibitory concentration of only 4% of the mutant relative to the wild type. This mutation is 10- to 20-fold more potent in phenotypic mixing than an inactivating mutation in the viral protease, the target of many successful inhibitors, and more potent than an inactivating mutation at any of the other Gag cleavage sites. The transdominant effect is manifested as the assembly of an aberrant virion core. Virus containing 20% of the Y132I mutant and 80% of the wild type (to assess the transdominant effect on infectivity) was blocked either before reverse transcription (RT) or at an early RT step. The ability of a small amount of the MA/CA fusion protein to poison the oligomeric assembly of infectious virus identifies an essential step in the complex process of virion formation and maturation. The effect of a small-molecule inhibitor that is able to block MA/CA cleavage even partially would be amplified by this transdominant negative effect on the highly orchestrated process of virion assembly.

  20. Determinants of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) Structure

    PubMed Central

    Prydz, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are glycosylated proteins of biological importance at cell surfaces, in the extracellular matrix, and in the circulation. PGs are produced and modified by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains in the secretory pathway of animal cells. The most common GAG attachment site is a serine residue followed by a glycine (-ser-gly-), from which a linker tetrasaccharide extends and may continue as a heparan sulfate, a heparin, a chondroitin sulfate, or a dermatan sulfate GAG chain. Which type of GAG chain becomes attached to the linker tetrasaccharide is influenced by the structure of the protein core, modifications occurring to the linker tetrasaccharide itself, and the biochemical environment of the Golgi apparatus, where GAG polymerization and modification by sulfation and epimerization take place. The same cell type may produce different GAG chains that vary, depending on the extent of epimerization and sulfation. However, it is not known to what extent these differences are caused by compartmental segregation of protein cores en route through the secretory pathway or by differential recruitment of modifying enzymes during synthesis of different PGs. The topic of this review is how different aspects of protein structure, cellular biochemistry, and compartmentalization may influence GAG synthesis. PMID:26308067

  1. Efficient HIV-1 replication can occur in the absence of the viral matrix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Reil, H; Bukovsky, A A; Gelderblom, H R; Göttlinger, H G

    1998-01-01

    Matrix (MA), a major structural protein of retroviruses, is thought to play a critical role in several steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle, including the plasma membrane targeting of Gag, the incorporation of envelope (Env) glycoproteins into nascent particles, and the nuclear import of the viral genome in non-dividing cells. We now show that the entire MA protein is dispensable for the incorporation of HIV-1 Env glycoproteins with a shortened cytoplasmic domain. Furthermore, efficient HIV-1 replication in the absence of up to 90% of MA was observed in a cell line in which the cytoplasmic domain of Env is not required. Additional compensatory changes in Gag permitted efficient virus replication even if all of MA was replaced by a heterologous membrane targeting signal. Viruses which lacked the globular domain of MA but retained its N-terminal myristyl anchor exhibited an increased ability to form both extracellular and intracellular virus particles, consistent with a myristyl switch model of Gag membrane targeting. Pseudotyped HIV-1 particles that lacked the structurally conserved globular head of MA efficiently infected macrophages, indicating that MA is dispensable for nuclear import in terminally differentiated cells. PMID:9564051

  2. Efficient HIV-1 replication can occur in the absence of the viral matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Reil, H; Bukovsky, A A; Gelderblom, H R; Göttlinger, H G

    1998-05-01

    Matrix (MA), a major structural protein of retroviruses, is thought to play a critical role in several steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle, including the plasma membrane targeting of Gag, the incorporation of envelope (Env) glycoproteins into nascent particles, and the nuclear import of the viral genome in non-dividing cells. We now show that the entire MA protein is dispensable for the incorporation of HIV-1 Env glycoproteins with a shortened cytoplasmic domain. Furthermore, efficient HIV-1 replication in the absence of up to 90% of MA was observed in a cell line in which the cytoplasmic domain of Env is not required. Additional compensatory changes in Gag permitted efficient virus replication even if all of MA was replaced by a heterologous membrane targeting signal. Viruses which lacked the globular domain of MA but retained its N-terminal myristyl anchor exhibited an increased ability to form both extracellular and intracellular virus particles, consistent with a myristyl switch model of Gag membrane targeting. Pseudotyped HIV-1 particles that lacked the structurally conserved globular head of MA efficiently infected macrophages, indicating that MA is dispensable for nuclear import in terminally differentiated cells.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) Gag Is Trafficked in an AP-3 and AP-5 Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Justine E.; Marongiu, Michela; Watkins, Gemma L.

    2016-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 are closely related lentiviruses with similar replication cycles, HIV-2 infection is associated with slower progression to AIDS, a higher proportion of long term non-progressors, and lower rates of transmission than HIV-1, likely as a consequence of a lower viral load during HIV-2 infection. A mechanistic explanation for the differential viral load remains unclear but knowledge of differences in particle production between HIV-1 and HIV-2 may help to shed light on this issue. In contrast to HIV-1, little is known about the assembly of HIV-2 particles, and the trafficking of HIV-2 Gag, the structural component of the virus, within cells. We have established that HIV-2 Gag accumulates in intracellular CD63 positive compartments, from which it may be delivered or recycled to the cell surface, or degraded. HIV-2 particle release was dependent on the adaptor protein complex AP-3 and the newly identified AP-5 complex, but much less so on AP-1. In contrast, HIV-1 particle release required AP-1 and AP-3, but not AP-5. AP-2, an essential component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which was previously shown to be inhibitory to HIV-1 particle release, had no effect on HIV-2. The differential requirement for adaptor protein complexes confirmed that HIV-1 and HIV-2 Gag have distinct cellular trafficking pathways, and that HIV-2 particles may be more susceptible to degradation prior to release. PMID:27392064

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) Gag Is Trafficked in an AP-3 and AP-5 Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Alford, Justine E; Marongiu, Michela; Watkins, Gemma L; Anderson, Emma C

    2016-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 are closely related lentiviruses with similar replication cycles, HIV-2 infection is associated with slower progression to AIDS, a higher proportion of long term non-progressors, and lower rates of transmission than HIV-1, likely as a consequence of a lower viral load during HIV-2 infection. A mechanistic explanation for the differential viral load remains unclear but knowledge of differences in particle production between HIV-1 and HIV-2 may help to shed light on this issue. In contrast to HIV-1, little is known about the assembly of HIV-2 particles, and the trafficking of HIV-2 Gag, the structural component of the virus, within cells. We have established that HIV-2 Gag accumulates in intracellular CD63 positive compartments, from which it may be delivered or recycled to the cell surface, or degraded. HIV-2 particle release was dependent on the adaptor protein complex AP-3 and the newly identified AP-5 complex, but much less so on AP-1. In contrast, HIV-1 particle release required AP-1 and AP-3, but not AP-5. AP-2, an essential component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which was previously shown to be inhibitory to HIV-1 particle release, had no effect on HIV-2. The differential requirement for adaptor protein complexes confirmed that HIV-1 and HIV-2 Gag have distinct cellular trafficking pathways, and that HIV-2 particles may be more susceptible to degradation prior to release.

  5. Tsg101 and the vacuolar protein sorting pathway are essential for HIV-1 budding.

    PubMed

    Garrus, J E; von Schwedler, U K; Pornillos, O W; Morham, S G; Zavitz, K H; Wang, H E; Wettstein, D A; Stray, K M; Côté, M; Rich, R L; Myszka, D G; Sundquist, W I

    2001-10-05

    Like other enveloped viruses, HIV-1 uses cellular machinery to bud from infected cells. We now show that Tsg101 protein, which functions in vacuolar protein sorting (Vps), is required for HIV-1 budding. The UEV domain of Tsg101 binds to an essential tetrapeptide (PTAP) motif within the p6 domain of the structural Gag protein and also to ubiquitin. Depletion of cellular Tsg101 by small interfering RNA arrests HIV-1 budding at a late stage, and budding is rescued by reintroduction of Tsg101. Dominant negative mutant Vps4 proteins that inhibit vacuolar protein sorting also arrest HIV-1 and MLV budding. These observations suggest that retroviruses bud by appropriating cellular machinery normally used in the Vps pathway to form multivesicular bodies.

  6. Manipulating CD4+ T cells by optical tweezers for the initiation of cell-cell transfer of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    McNerney, Gregory P.; Hübner, Wolfgang; Chen, Benjamin K.; Huser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Cell-cell interactions through direct contact are very important for cellular communication and coordination – especially for immune cells. The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) induces immune cell interactions between CD4+ cells to shuttle between T cells via a virological synapse. A goal to understand the process of cell-cell transmission through virological synapses is to determine the cellular states that allow a chance encounter between cells to become a stable cell-cell adhesion. Here we demonstrate the use of optical tweezers to manipulate uninfected primary CD4+ T cells near HIV Gag-iGFP transfected Jurkat T cells to probe the determinants that induce stable adhesion. When combined with fast 4D confocal fluorescence microscopy, optical tweezers can be utilized to not only facilitate cell-cell contact, but to also allow one to simultaneously track the formation of a virological synapse, and ultimately to enable us to precisely determine all events preceding virus transfer. HIV-1 infected T cell (green) decorated with uninfected primary T cells (red) by manipulating the primary cells with an optical tweezers system PMID:20301121

  7. HIV-1 Adaptation to Antigen Processing Results in Population-Level Immune Evasion and Affects Subtype Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Tenzer, Stefan; Crawford, Hayley; Pymm, Phillip; Gifford, Robert; Sreenu, Vattipally B.; Weimershaus, Mirjana; de Oliveira, Tulio; Burgevin, Anne; Gerstoft, Jan; Akkad, Nadja; Lunn, Daniel; Fugger, Lars; Bell, John; Schild, Hansjörg; van Endert, Peter; Iversen, Astrid K.N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The recent HIV-1 vaccine failures highlight the need to better understand virus-host interactions. One key question is why CD8+ T cell responses to two HIV-Gag regions are uniquely associated with delayed disease progression only in patients expressing a few rare HLA class I variants when these regions encode epitopes presented by ∼30 more common HLA variants. By combining epitope processing and computational analyses of the two HIV subtypes responsible for ∼60% of worldwide infections, we identified a hitherto unrecognized adaptation to the antigen-processing machinery through substitutions at subtype-specific motifs. Multiple HLA variants presenting epitopes situated next to a given subtype-specific motif drive selection at this subtype-specific position, and epitope abundances correlate inversely with the HLA frequency distribution in affected populations. This adaptation reflects the sum of intrapatient adaptations, is predictable, facilitates viral subtype diversification, and increases global HIV diversity. Because low epitope abundance is associated with infrequent and weak T cell responses, this most likely results in both population-level immune evasion and inadequate responses in most people vaccinated with natural HIV-1 sequence constructs. Our results suggest that artificial sequence modifications at subtype-specific positions in vitro could refocus and reverse the poor immunogenicity of HIV proteins. PMID:24726370

  8. HERV-K–specific T cells eliminate diverse HIV-1/2 and SIV primary isolates

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R. Brad; Garrison, Keith E.; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Aidarus, Nasra; Hunter, Diana V.; Martin, Eric; John, Vivek M.; Zhan, Wei; Faruk, Nabil F.; Gyenes, Gabor; Sheppard, Neil C.; Priumboom-Brees, Ingrid M.; Goodwin, David A.; Chen, Lianchun; Rieger, Melanie; Muscat-King, Sophie; Loudon, Peter T.; Stanley, Cole; Holditch, Sara J.; Wong, Jessica C.; Clayton, Kiera; Duan, Erick; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; SenGupta, Devi; Tandon, Ravi; Sacha, Jonah B.; Brockman, Mark A.; Benko, Erika; Kovacs, Colin; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HIV-1 represents a major challenge in vaccine development. In this study, we establish a rationale for eliminating HIV-1–infected cells by targeting cellular immune responses against stable human endogenous retroviral (HERV) antigens. HERV DNA sequences in the human genome represent the remnants of ancient infectious retroviruses. We show that the infection of CD4+ T cells with HIV-1 resulted in transcription of the HML-2 lineage of HERV type K [HERV-K(HML-2)] and the expression of Gag and Env proteins. HERV-K(HML-2)–specific CD8+ T cells obtained from HIV-1–infected human subjects responded to HIV-1–infected cells in a Vif-dependent manner in vitro. Consistent with the proposed mode of action, a HERV-K(HML-2)–specific CD8+ T cell clone exhibited comprehensive elimination of cells infected with a panel of globally diverse HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV isolates in vitro. We identified a second T cell response that exhibited cross-reactivity between homologous HIV-1-Pol and HERV-K(HML-2)-Pol determinants, raising the possibility that homology between HIV-1 and HERVs plays a role in shaping, and perhaps enhancing, the T cell response to HIV-1. This justifies the consideration of HERV-K(HML-2)–specific and cross-reactive T cell responses in the natural control of HIV-1 infection and for exploring HERV-K(HML-2)–targeted HIV-1 vaccines and immunotherapeutics. PMID:23143309

  9. Covalent conjugation of the equine infectious anemia virus Gag with SUMO.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinzhong; Wen, Shuping; Zhao, Rui; Qi, Jing; Liu, Zhao; Li, Weiwei; An, Jing; Wood, Charles; Wang, Ying

    2017-03-22

    The conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to the target protein, namely, SUMOylation, is involved in the regulation of many important biological events including host-pathogen interaction. Some viruses have evolved to exploit the host SUMOylation machinery to modify their own protein. Retroviral Gag protein plays critical roles in the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 p6 and the Moloney murine leukemia virus CA have been reported to be conjugated with SUMO. In this study, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, the covalent conjugation of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Gag with SUMO. The C-terminal p9 domain of Gag is a main target for SUMOylation and SUMO is attached to multiple sites of p9, including K30 whose mutation abolished p9 SUMOylation completely. The SUMOylation of p9, but not the p9-K30 mutant, was also detected in equine fibroblastic cells ATCC(®) CCL-57™. Ubc9 and its C93 residue are indispensable for the SUMOylation of p9. Using confocal microscopy, it is found that EIAV Gag localizes primarily, if not exclusively, in the cytoplasm of the cell and the co-localization of EIAV Gag with Ubc9 was observed. Our findings that EIAV Gag is SUMOylated at p9-K30, together with previous findings on the defects of p9-K30 mutant in viral DNA translocation from cytoplasm to the nucleus, suggests that SUMOylation of Gag may be involved in such functions.

  10. Alkyl Amine Bevirimat Derivatives Are Potent and Broadly Active HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Emiko; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Mandt, Rebecca; Pauly, Gary T.; Sigano, Dina M.; Schneider, Joel P.; Martin, David E.; Nitz, Theodore J.; Wild, Carl T.

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant with the release of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles from the infected cell, the viral protease cleaves the Gag polyprotein precursor at a number of sites to trigger virus maturation. We previously reported that a betulinic acid-derived compound, bevirimat (BVM), blocks HIV-1 maturation by disrupting a late step in protease-mediated Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. BVM was shown in multiple clinical trials to be safe and effective in reducing viral loads in HIV-1-infected patients. However, naturally occurring polymorphisms in the SP1 region of Gag (e.g., SP1-V7A) led to a variable response in some BVM-treated patients. The reduced susceptibility of SP1-polymorphic HIV-1 to BVM resulted in the discontinuation of its clinical development. To overcome the loss of BVM activity induced by polymorphisms in SP1, we carried out an extensive medicinal chemistry campaign to develop novel maturation inhibitors. In this study, we focused on alkyl amine derivatives modified at the C-28 position of the BVM scaffold. We identified a set of derivatives that are markedly more potent than BVM against an HIV-1 clade B clone (NL4-3) and show robust antiviral activity against a variant of NL4-3 containing the V7A polymorphism in SP1. One of the most potent of these compounds also strongly inhibited a multiclade panel of primary HIV-1 isolates. These data demonstrate that C-28 alkyl amine derivatives of BVM can, to a large extent, overcome the loss of susceptibility imposed by polymorphisms in SP1. PMID:26482309

  11. A leucine triplet repeat sequence (LXX)4 in p6gag is important for Vpr incorporation into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particles.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y L; Bennett, R P; Wills, J W; Gorelick, R; Ratner, L

    1995-01-01

    Incorporation of Vpr into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions is mediated by the Gag protein, independently of other viral components. We have coexpressed Vpr and Gag constructs in a vaccinia virus expression system in order to map the region of Gag involved in Vpr packaging. Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal p6 region of Gag impaired the ability of Gag to package Vpr. To confirm the role of p6 in Vpr packaging, Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-HIV chimeras containing HIV-1 p6 were constructed. Although RSV Gag does not package Vpr into virus particles, a chimera containing HIV-1 p6 is sufficient for Vpr incorporation. To map the region of p6 involved in Vpr packaging, a series of p6 point mutations and deletion mutations was analyzed. Mutations in the N-terminal p6 proline-rich domain, for which preliminary evidence shows a marked decrease in virion incorporated RNA, did not affect Vpr incorporation. Deletion of residues 1 to 31 of HIV-1 p6 did not affect Vpr packaging, but residues 35 to 47, including an (LXX)4 domain, were required for Vpr incorporation into virus particles. PMID:7474102

  12. HIV-1 subtypes in Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Stanojevic, Maja; Papa, Anna; Papadimitriou, Evagelia; Zerjav, Sonja; Jevtovic, Djordje; Salemovic, Dubravka; Jovanovic, Tanja; Antoniadis, Antonis

    2002-05-01

    To gain insight concerning the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viruses associated with the HIV-1 epidemic in Yugoslavia, 45 specimens from HIV-1-infected individuals were classified into subtypes by sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase (pol) region of the viral genome. Forty-one of 45 specimens (91.2%) were identified as pol subtype B, 2 of 45 as subtype C (4.4%), 1 of 45 as CRF01_AE (2.2%), and 1 as CRF02_AG recombinant (2.2%). Nucleotide divergence among subtype B sequences was 4.8%. Results of this study show that among HIV-1-infected patients in Yugoslavia subtype B predominates (91.5%), whereas non-B subtypes are present at a low percentage, mostly related to travel abroad.

  13. APOBEC3G ubiquitination by Nedd4-1 favors its packaging into HIV-1 particles.

    PubMed

    Dussart, Sylvie; Douaisi, Marc; Courcoul, Marianne; Bessou, Gilles; Vigne, Robert; Decroly, Etienne

    2005-01-21

    APOBEC3G is a cytidine deaminase that limits the replication of many retroviruses. This antiviral host factor is packaged into retrovirus particles, where it targets single-stranded DNA generated during reverse transcription and induces up to 2% of G-to-A mutations, which are lethal for the HIV-1 provirus. Vif protein counteracts this antiviral factor by decreasing its packaging into lentivirus particles. Here, we demonstrate that Nedd4-1, an HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase, interacts with APOBEC3G, through its WW2 and WW3 domains. As a result of this interaction, APOBEC3G undergoes post-translational modification by addition of ubiquitin moieties. Accordingly, we demonstrate that the dominant negative Nedd4-1 C/S form prevents APOBEC3G ubiquitination. Moreover, the packaging of APOBEC3G into Pr55 Gag virus-like particles and into HIV-1 virions is reduced when Nedd4-1 C/S is expressed. During HIV-1 viral production in the presence of APOBEC3G, Nedd4-1 C/S restores partially the infectivity of Deltavif HIV-1. We conclude that the ubiquitination of APOBEC3G by Nedd4-1 favors its targeting to the virus assembly site where APOBEC3G interacts with Gag and is packaged into HIV-1 particles in the absence of Vif.

  14. Biochemical evidence of a role for matrix trimerization in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Novikova, Mariia; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Freed, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    The matrix (MA) domain of HIV Gag has important functions in directing the trafficking of Gag to sites of assembly and mediating the incorporation of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) into assembling particles. HIV-1 MA has been shown to form trimers in vitro; however, neither the presence nor the role of MA trimers has been documented in HIV-1 virions. We developed a cross-linking strategy to reveal MA trimers in virions of replication-competent HIV-1. By mutagenesis of trimer interface residues, we demonstrated a correlation between loss of MA trimerization and loss of Env incorporation. Additionally, we found that truncating the long cytoplasmic tail of Env restores incorporation of Env into MA trimer-defective particles, thus rescuing infectivity. We therefore propose a model whereby MA trimerization is required to form a lattice capable of accommodating the long cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 Env; in the absence of MA trimerization, Env is sterically excluded from the assembling particle. These findings establish MA trimerization as an obligatory step in the assembly of infectious HIV-1 virions. As such, the MA trimer interface may represent a novel drug target for the development of antiretrovirals. PMID:26711999

  15. Implementation of a multiregion hybridization assay to characterize HIV-1 strains detected among injecting drug users in Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Roni; Sengupta, Satarupa; Mullick, Ranajoy; Singh, N Brajachand; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2009-01-01

    We have implemented the latest technology of a multiregion hybridization assay (MHAbce, version 2) for the molecular characterization of HIV-1 among injecting drug users (IDUs) of Manipur, India. This study provides a more detailed analysis on the basis of probes designed from eight different genomic regions of HIV-1, to achieve a clear picture of HIV-1 genomic diversity in Manipur. Out of 30 samples, 15 were found to be of subtype C, 1 of subtype B, 5 with dual-probe reactivity, 8 with multigenomic recombination pattern and 1 sample showed both dual-probe reactivity and multigenomic variations. In contrast, the heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) with respect to gag and env genes revealed 21 samples to be of subtype C (gag C/env C), 3 samples of subtype B (gag B/env B) and 6 samples of B/C recombinants (gag C/env B). MHAbce illustrates the occurrence of inter- and intragenomic variants and dual infection in an IDU population from India. It also indicates the possibility of the presence of new circulating recombinant forms of HIV-1 strains, which might have been difficult to trace by HMA alone.

  16. Nuclear entry and CRM1-dependent nuclear export of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag polyprotein

    PubMed Central

    Scheifele, Lisa Z.; Garbitt, Rachel A.; Rhoads, Jonathan D.; Parent, Leslie J.

    2002-01-01

    The retroviral Gag polyprotein directs budding from the plasma membrane of infected cells. Until now, it was believed that Gag proteins of type C retroviruses, including the prototypic oncoretrovirus Rous sarcoma virus, were synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and targeted directly to the plasma membrane. Here we reveal a previously unknown step in the subcellular trafficking of the Gag protein, that of transient nuclear localization. We have identified a targeting signal within the N-terminal matrix domain that facilitates active nuclear import of the Gag polyprotein. We also found that Gag is transported out of the nucleus through the CRM1 nuclear export pathway, based on observations that treatment of virus-expressing cells with leptomycin B resulted in the redistribution of Gag proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Internal deletion of the C-terminal portion of the Gag p10 region resulted in the nuclear sequestration of Gag and markedly diminished budding, suggesting that the nuclear export signal might reside within p10. Finally, we observed that a previously described matrix mutant, Myr1E, was insensitive to the effects of leptomycin B, apparently bypassing the nuclear compartment during virus assembly. Myr1E has a defect in genomic RNA packaging, implying that nuclear localization of Gag might be involved in viral RNA interactions. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that nuclear entry and egress of the Gag polyprotein are intrinsic components of the Rous sarcoma virus assembly pathway. PMID:11891341

  17. Drug-Based Lead Discovery: The Novel Ablative Antiretroviral Profile of Deferiprone in HIV-1-Infected Cells and in HIV-Infected Treatment-Naive Subjects of a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Exploratory Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Deepti; Spino, Michael; Tricta, Fernando; Connelly, John; Cracchiolo, Bernadette M.; Hanauske, Axel-Rainer; D’Alliessi Gandolfi, Darlene; Mathews, Michael B.; Karn, Jonathan; Holland, Bart; Park, Myung Hee; Pe’ery, Tsafi; Palumbo, Paul E.; Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M.

    2016-01-01

    cluster (‘polyproline’)-containing proteins, exemplified by Gag/p24, and facilitated by the excess of deoxyhypusine-containing eIF5A, releases the innate apoptotic defense of HIV-infected cells from viral blockade, thus depleting the cellular reservoir of HIV-1 DNA that drives breakthrough and rebound. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrial.gov NCT02191657 PMID:27191165

  18. Multiple T-cell responses are associated with better control of acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianping; Zhao, Yan; Peng, Yanchun; Han, Zhen; Liu, Guihai; Qin, Ling; Liu, Sai; Sun, Huanhuan; Wu, Hao; Dong, Tao; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses play pivotal roles in controlling the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but the correlation between CTL responses and the progression of HIV-1 infection are controversial on account of HIV immune escape mutations driven by CTL pressure were reported. The acute HIV-1-infected patients from Beijing were incorporated into our study to investigate the effects of CTL response on the progression of HIV-1 infection. A longitudinal study was performed on acute HIV-1-infected patients to clarify the kinetic of T-cell responses, the dynamic of escape mutations, as well as the correlation between effective T-cell response and the progression of HIV infection. Seven human leukocyte antigen-B51+ (HLA-B51+) individuals were screened from 105 acute HIV-1 infectors. The detailed kinetic of HLA-B51-restricted CTL responses was described through blood sampling time points including seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection in the 7 HLA-B51+ individuals, by using 16 known HLA-B51 restricted epitopes. Pol743–751 (LPPVVAKEI, LI9), Pol283–289 (TAFTIPSI, TI8), and Gag327–3459 (NANPDCKTI, NI9) were identified as 3 dominant epitopes, and ranked as starting with LI9, followed by TI8 and NI9 in the ability to induce T-cell responses. The dynamics of escape mutations in the 3 epitopes were also found with the same order as T-cell response, by using sequencing for viral clones on blood sampling at seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection. We use solid evidence to demonstrate the correlation between T-cell response and HIV-1 mutation, and postulate that multiple T-cell responses might benefit the control of HIV-1 infection, especially in acute infection phase. PMID:27472741

  19. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8(+) T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Masakazu; Kim, Patrick Y; Ng, Hwee L; Ringpis, Gene-Errol E; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O'Connor, Sean; Yang, Otto O; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2015-07-31

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8(+) T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8(+) T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8(+) T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24(Gag) in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8(+) T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8(+) T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8(+) T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance.

  20. Expression of HIV-1 matrix protein p17 and association with B-cell lymphoma in HIV-1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Virginia A.; Lafferty, Mark K.; Marchionni, Luigi; Bryant, Joseph L.; Gallo, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is associated with increased risk for B-cell lymphomas. How HIV infection promotes the development of lymphoma is unclear, but it may involve chronic B-cell activation, inflammation, and/or impaired immunity, possibly leading to a loss of control of oncogenic viruses and reduced tumor immunosurveillance. We hypothesized that HIV structural proteins may contribute to lymphomagenesis directly, because they can persist long term in lymph nodes in the absence of viral replication. The HIV-1 transgenic mouse Tg26 carries a noninfectious HIV-1 provirus lacking part of the gag-pol region, thus constituting a model for studying the effects of viral products in pathogenesis. Approximately 15% of Tg26 mice spontaneously develop leukemia/lymphoma. We investigated which viral proteins are associated with the development of leukemia/lymphoma in the Tg26 mouse model, and performed microarray analysis on RNA from spleen and lymph nodes to identify potential mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. Of the viral proteins examined, only expression of HIV-1 matrix protein p17 was associated with leukemia/lymphoma development and was highly expressed in bone marrow before disease. The tumor cells resembled pro-B cells, and were CD19+IgM−IgD−CD93+CD43+CD21−CD23−VpreB+CXCR4+. Consistent with the pro-B-cell stage of B-cell development, microarray analysis revealed enrichment of transcripts, including Rag1, Rag2, CD93, Vpreb1, Vpreb3, and Igll1. We confirmed RAG1 expression in Tg26 tumors, and hypothesized that HIV-1 matrix protein p17 may directly induce RAG1 in B cells. Stimulation of human activated B cells with p17 enhanced RAG1 expression in three of seven donors, suggesting that intracellular signaling by p17 may lead to genomic instability and transformation. PMID:27799525

  1. Broad and potent immune responses to a low dose intradermal HIV-1 DNA boosted with HIV-1 recombinant MVA among healthy adults in Tanzania☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakari, Muhammad; Aboud, Said; Nilsson, Charlotta; Francis, Joel; Buma, Deus; Moshiro, Candida; Aris, Eric A.; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Janabi, Mohamed; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Joachim, Agricola; Polonis, Victoria R.; Bråve, Andreas; Earl, Patricia; Robb, Merlin; Marovich, Mary; Wahren, Britta; Pallangyo, Kisali; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted a phase I/II randomized placebo-controlled trial with the aim of exploring whether priming with a low intradermal dose of a multiclade, multigene HIV-1 DNA vaccine could improve the immunogenicity of the same vaccine given intramuscularly prior to boosting with a heterologous HIV-1 MVA among healthy adults in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Sixty HIV-uninfected volunteers were randomized to receive DNA plasmid vaccine 1 mg intradermally (id), n = 20, or 3.8 mg intramuscularly (im), n = 20, or placebo, n = 20, using a needle-free injection device. DNA plasmids encoding HIV-1 genes gp160 subtype A, B, C; rev B; p17/p24 gag A, B and Rtmut B were given at weeks 0, 4 and 12. Recombinant MVA (108 pfu) expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol of CRF01_AE or placebo was administered im at month 9 and 21. Results The vaccines were well tolerated. Two weeks after the third HIV-DNA injection, 22/38 (58%) vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses to Gag. Two weeks after the first HIV-MVA boost all 35 (100%) vaccinees responded to Gag and 31 (89%) to Env. Two to four weeks after the second HIV-MVA boost, 28/29 (97%) vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses, 27 (93%) to Gag and 23 (79%) to Env. The id-primed recipients had significantly higher responses to Env than im recipients. Intracellular cytokine staining for Gag-specific IFN-γ/IL-2 production showed both CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses. All vaccinees had HIV-specific lymphoproliferative responses. All vaccinees reacted in diagnostic HIV serological tests and 26/29 (90%) had antibodies against gp160 after the second HIV-MVA boost. Furthermore, while all of 29 vaccinee sera were negative for neutralizing antibodies against clade B, C and CRF01 AE pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl neutralization assay, in a PBMC assay, the response rate ranged from 31% to 83% positives, depending upon the clade B or CRF01_AE virus tested. This vaccine approach is safe and highly immunogenic. Low dose, id HIV-DNA priming elicited higher

  2. Effective Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Targeting of Persistent HIV-1 during Antiretroviral Therapy Requires Priming of Naive CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kellie N.; Mailliard, Robbie B.; Piazza, Paolo A.; Fischer, Will; Korber, Bette T.; Fecek, Ronald J.; Ratner, Deena; Gupta, Phalguni; Mullins, James I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing HIV-1 infection will require elimination of persistent cellular reservoirs that harbor latent virus in the face of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Proposed immunotherapeutic strategies to cure HIV-1 infection include enhancing lysis of these infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). A major challenge in this strategy is overcoming viral immune escape variants that have evaded host immune control. Here we report that naive CD8+ T cells from chronic HIV-1-infected participants on long-term cART can be primed by dendritic cells (DC). These DC must be mature, produce high levels of interleukin 12p70 (IL-12p70), be responsive to CD40 ligand (CD40L), and be loaded with inactivated, autologous HIV-1. These DC-primed CD8+ T cell responders produced high levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in response to a broad range of both conserved and variable regions of Gag and effectively killed CD4+ T cell targets that were either infected with the autologous latent reservoir-associated virus or loaded with autologous Gag peptides. In contrast, HIV-1-specific memory CD8+ T cells stimulated with autologous HIV-1-loaded DC produced IFN-γ in response to a narrow range of conserved and variable Gag peptides compared to the primed T cells and most notably, displayed significantly lower cytolytic function. Our findings highlight the need to selectively induce new HIV-1-specific CTL from naive precursors while avoiding activation of existing, dysfunctional memory T cells in potential curative immunotherapeutic strategies for HIV-1 infection. PMID:27247230

  3. Structure of the immature HIV-1 capsid in intact virus particles at 8.8 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schur, Florian K. M.; Hagen, Wim J. H.; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, Tomáš; Müller, Barbara; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) assembly proceeds in two stages. First, the 55 kilodalton viral Gag polyprotein assembles into a hexameric protein lattice at the plasma membrane of the infected cell, inducing budding and release of an immature particle. Second, Gag is cleaved by the viral protease, leading to internal rearrangement of the virus into the mature, infectious form. Immature and mature HIV-1 particles are heterogeneous in size and morphology, preventing high-resolution analysis of their protein arrangement in situ by conventional structural biology methods. Here we apply cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging methods to resolve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature HIV-1 particles at subnanometre resolution, allowing unambiguous positioning of all α-helices. The resulting model reveals tertiary and quaternary structural interactions that mediate HIV-1 assembly. Strikingly, these interactions differ from those predicted by the current model based on in vitro-assembled arrays of Gag-derived proteins from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. To validate this difference, we solve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature Mason-Pfizer monkey virus particles. Comparison with the immature HIV-1 structure reveals that retroviral capsid proteins, while having conserved tertiary structures, adopt different quaternary arrangements during virus assembly. The approach demonstrated here should be applicable to determine structures of other proteins at subnanometre resolution within heterogeneous environments.

  4. PI4P5-kinase Ialpha is required for efficient HIV-1 entry and infection of T cells.

    PubMed

    Barrero-Villar, Marta; Barroso-González, Jonathan; Cabrero, J R; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Alvarez-Losada, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, M A; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2008-11-15

    HIV-1 envelope (Env) triggers membrane fusion between the virus and the target cell. The cellular mechanism underlying this process is not well known. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) is known to be important for the late steps of the HIV-1 infection cycle by promoting Gag localization to the plasma membrane during viral assembly, but it has not been implicated in early stages of HIV-1 membrane-related events. In this study, we show that binding of the initial HIV-1 Env-gp120 protein induces PIP(2) production in permissive lymphocytes through the activation of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (PI4P5-K) Ialpha. Overexpression of wild-type PI4P5-K Ialpha increased HIV-1 Env-mediated PIP(2) production and enhanced viral replication in primary lymphocytes and CEM T cells, whereas PIP(2) production and HIV-1 infection were both severely reduced in cells overexpressing the kinase-dead mutant D227A (D/A)-PI4P5-K Ialpha. Similar results were obtained with replicative and single-cycle HIV-1 particles. HIV-1 infection was also inhibited by knockdown of endogenous expression of PI4P5-K Ialpha. These data indicate that PI4P5-K Ialpha-mediated PIP(2) production is crucial for HIV-1 entry and the early steps of infection in permissive lymphocytes.

  5. Enrichment of intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants in a dual infection system using HIV-1 strain-specific siRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    env regions suggest that other mechanisms are at play. Conclusion These findings show that siRNAs can be used as an efficient in vitro tool for enriching recombinants, to facilitate further study on mechanisms of intersubytpe HIV-1 recombination, and to generate replication-competent intersubtype recombinant proteins with a breadth in HIV-1 diversity for future vaccine studies. PMID:21232148

  6. The Life-Cycle of the HIV-1 Gag–RNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mailler, Elodie; Bernacchi, Serena; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Smyth, Redmond P.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication is a highly regulated process requiring the recruitment of viral and cellular components to the plasma membrane for assembly into infectious particles. This review highlights the recent process of understanding the selection of the genomic RNA (gRNA) by the viral Pr55Gag precursor polyprotein, and the processes leading to its incorporation into viral particles. PMID:27626439

  7. Engineering T Cells to Functionally Cure HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leibman, Rachel S; Riley, James L

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ability of antiretroviral therapy to minimize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and increase the duration and quality of patients' lives, the health consequences and financial burden associated with the lifelong treatment regimen render a permanent cure highly attractive. Although T cells play an important role in controlling virus replication, they are themselves targets of HIV-mediated destruction. Direct genetic manipulation of T cells for adoptive cellular therapies could facilitate a functional cure by generating HIV-1–resistant cells, redirecting HIV-1–specific immune responses, or a combination of the two strategies. In contrast to a vaccine approach, which relies on the production and priming of HIV-1–specific lymphocytes within a patient's own body, adoptive T-cell therapy provides an opportunity to customize the therapeutic T cells prior to administration. However, at present, it is unclear how to best engineer T cells so that sustained control over HIV-1 replication can be achieved in the absence of antiretrovirals. This review focuses on T-cell gene-engineering and gene-editing strategies that have been performed in efforts to inhibit HIV-1 replication and highlights the requirements for a successful gene therapy–mediated functional cure. PMID:25896251

  8. Temporal and spatial organization of ESCRT protein recruitment during HIV-1 budding.

    PubMed

    Bleck, Marina; Itano, Michelle S; Johnson, Daniel S; Thomas, V Kaye; North, Alison J; Bieniasz, Paul D; Simon, Sanford M

    2014-08-19

    HIV-1 virions assemble at the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and recruit the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery to enable particle release. However, little is known about the temporal and spatial organization of ESCRT protein recruitment. Using multiple-color live-cell total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we observed that the ESCRT-I protein Tsg101 is recruited together with Gag to the sites of HIV-1 assembly, whereas later-acting ESCRT proteins (Chmp4b and Vps4A) are recruited sequentially, once Gag assembly is completed. Chmp4b, a protein that is required to mediate particle scission, is recruited to HIV-1 assembly sites ∼10 s before the ATPase Vps4A. Using two-color superresolution imaging, we observed that the ESCRT machinery (Tsg101, Alix, and Chmp4b/c proteins) is positioned at the periphery of the nascent virions, with the Tsg101 assemblages positioned closer to the Gag assemblages than Alix, Chmp4b, or Chmp4c. These results are consistent with the notion that the ESCRT machinery is recruited transiently to the neck of the assembling particle and is thus present at the appropriate time and place to mediate fission between the nascent virus and the plasma membrane.

  9. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  10. HIV-1 reservoirs in breast milk and challenges to elimination of breast-feeding transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Van de Perre, Philippe; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Viljoen, Johannes; Nagot, Nicolas; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Lepage, Philippe; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2012-07-18

    By compensating for the relative immaturity of the neonatal immune system, breast milk and breast-feeding prevent deaths in children. Nevertheless, transmission of HIV-1 through breast-feeding is responsible for more than half of new pediatric HIV infections. Recent studies of possible HIV-1 reservoirs in breast milk shed new light on features that influence HIV-1 transmission through breast-feeding. The particular characteristics of breast milk CD4(+) T cells that distinguish them from circulating blood lymphocytes (high frequency of cell activation and expression of memory and mucosal homing markers) facilitate the establishment of HIV-1 replication. Breast milk also contains a plethora of factors with anti-infectious, immunomodulatory, or anti-inflammatory properties that can regulate both viral replication and infant susceptibility. In addition, CD8(+) T lymphocytes, macrophages, and epithelial cells in breast milk can alter the dynamics of HIV-1 transmission. Even during efficient antiretroviral therapy, a residual stable, CD4(+) T cell-associated reservoir of HIV-1 is persistently present in breast milk, a likely source of infection. Only prophylactic treatment in infants--ideally with a long-acting drug, administered for the entire duration of breast-feeding--is likely to protect HIV-exposed babies against all forms of HIV transmission from breast milk, including cell-to-cell viral transfer.

  11. Control of HIV-1 in Elite Suppressors despite Ongoing Replication and Evolution in Plasma Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Karen A.; Brennan, Timothy P.; Bailey, Justin R.; Ray, Stuart C.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Blankson, Joel N.

    2010-01-01

    A subset of HIV-1-infected patients known as elite controllers or suppressors (ES) control the virus naturally. We have previously demonstrated sequence discordance between proviral and plasma gag clones in ES, much of which can be attributed to selective pressure from the host (J. R. Bailey, T. M. Williams, R. F. Siliciano, and J. N. Blankson, J. Exp. Med. 203:1357-1369, 2006). However, it is not clear whether ongoing viral replication continues in ES once the control of viremia has been established or whether selective pressure impacts this evolution. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in ES often targets Gag and frequently is superior to that of HIV-1 progressors, partially due to the HLA class I alleles B*57/5801 and B*27, which are overrepresented in ES. We therefore examined longitudinal plasma and proviral gag sequences from HLA-B*57/5801 and -B*27 ES. Despite the highly conserved nature of gag, we observed clear evidence of evolution in the plasma virus, largely due to synonymous substitutions. In contrast, evolution was rare in proviral clones, suggesting that ongoing replication in ES does not permit the significant reseeding of the latent reservoir. Interestingly, there was little continual evolution in CTL epitopes, and we detected de novo CTL responses to autologous viral mutants. Thus, some ES control viremia despite ongoing replication and evolution. PMID:20444904

  12. Comprehensive epitope analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific T-cell responses directed against the entire expressed HIV-1 genome demonstrate broadly directed responses, but no correlation to viral load.

    PubMed

    Addo, M M; Yu, X G; Rathod, A; Cohen, D; Eldridge, R L; Strick, D; Johnston, M N; Corcoran, C; Wurcel, A G; Fitzpatrick, C A; Feeney, M E; Rodriguez, W R; Basgoz, N; Draenert, R; Stone, David R; Brander, C; Goulder, P J R; Rosenberg, E S; Altfeld, M; Walker, B D

    2003-02-01

    Cellular immune responses play a critical role in the control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1); however, the breadth of these responses at the single-epitope level has not been comprehensively assessed. We therefore screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 57 individuals at different stages of HIV-1 infection for virus-specific T-cell responses using a matrix of 504 overlapping peptides spanning all expressed HIV-1 proteins in a gamma interferon-enzyme-linked immunospot (Elispot) assay. HIV-1-specific T-cell responses were detectable in all study subjects, with a median of 14 individual epitopic regions targeted per person (range, 2 to 42), and all 14 HIV-1 protein subunits were recognized. HIV-1 p24-Gag and Nef contained the highest epitope density and were also the most frequently recognized HIV-1 proteins. The total magnitude of the HIV-1-specific response ranged from 280 to 25,860 spot-forming cells (SFC)/10(6) PBMC (median, 4,245) among all study participants. However, the number of epitopic regions targeted, the protein subunits recognized, and the total magnitude of HIV-1-specific responses varied significantly among the tested individuals, with the strongest and broadest responses detectable in individuals with untreated chronic HIV-1 infection. Neither the breadth nor the magnitude of the total HIV-1-specific CD8+-T-cell responses correlated with plasma viral load. We conclude that a peptide matrix-based Elispot assay allows for rapid, sensitive, specific, and efficient assessment of cellular immune responses directed against the entire expressed HIV-1 genome. These data also suggest that the impact of T-cell responses on control of viral replication cannot be explained by the mere quantification of the magnitude and breadth of the CD8+-T-cell response, even if a comprehensive pan-genome screening approach is applied.

  13. The HIV-1 capsid protein as a drug target: recent advances and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Rosa; Neira, José L

    2013-12-01

    HIV-1, the agent responsible for AIDS, belongs to the retrovirus family. Assembly of the immature HIV-1 capsid occurs through the controlled polymerization of the Gag polyprotein, which is transported to the plasma membrane of infected cells, where morphogenesis of the immature, non-infectious virion occurs. Moreover, the mature capsid of HIV-1 is formed by the assembly of copies of the capsid protein (CA), which results, among other proteins, from cleavage of Gag. The C-terminal domain of CA (CTD) can homodimerize, and most of the dimerization interface is formed by a single α-helix from each monomer. Assembly of the HIV-1 capsid critically depends on CA-CA interactions, including CTD interaction with itself and with the N-terminal domain of CA (NTD). This review will report on recent advances for the search of small organic compounds and peptides that have been designed in the last four years to hamper CA assembly. Most of the molecules have been proved to interact with CA; such molecules aim to disrupt and/or alter the oligomerization capability of CTD and/or NTD.

  14. Involvement of a small GTP binding protein in HIV-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Audoly, Gilles; Popoff, Michel R; Gluschankof, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Background There is evidence suggesting that actin binding to HIV-1 encoded proteins, or even actin dynamics themselves, might play a key role in virus budding and/or release from the infected cell. A crucial step in the reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton is the engagement of various different GTP binding proteins. We have thus studied the involvement of GTP-binding proteins in the final steps of the HIV-1 viral replication cycle. Results Our results demonstrate that virus production is abolished when cellular GTP binding proteins involved in actin polymerisation are inhibited with specific toxins. Conclusion We propose a new HIV budding working model whereby Gag interactions with pre-existing endosomal cellular tracks as well as with a yet non identified element of the actin polymerisation pathway are required in order to allow HIV-1 to be released from the infected cell. PMID:16080789

  15. Efficient particle formation can occur if the matrix domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag is substituted by a myristylation signal.

    PubMed

    Lee, P P; Linial, M L

    1994-10-01

    Lentiviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), assemble at and bud through the cytoplasmic membrane. Both the matrix (MA) domain of Gag and its amino-terminal myristylation have been implicated in these processes. We have created HIV-1 proviruses lacking the entire matrix domain of gag which either lack or contain an amino-terminal myristate addition sequence at the beginning of the capsid domain. Myristate- and matrix-deficient [myr(-)MA(-)] viruses produced after transient transfection are still able to assemble into particles, although the majority do not form at the plasma membrane or bud efficiently. Myristylation of the amino terminus of the truncated Gag precursor permits a much more efficient release of the mutant virions. While myr(-)MA(-) particles were inefficient in proteolytic processing of the Gag precursor, myristylation enabled efficient proteolysis of the mutant Gag. All matrix-deficient viruses are noninfectious. Particles produced by matrix-deficient mutants contain low levels of glycoproteins, indicating the importance of matrix in either incorporation or stable retention of Env. Since matrix-deficient viruses contain a normal complement of viral genomic RNA, a role for MA in genomic incorporation can be excluded. Contrary to previous reports, the HIV-1 genome does not require sequences between the 5' splice donor site and the gag start codon for efficient packaging.

  16. Neuroinflammation and Behavior in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats Exposed to Chronic Adolescent Stress.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Sydney A; Harrell, Constance S; Bekhbat, Mandakh; Gangavelli, Apoorva; Wu, Matthew J; Kelly, Sean D; Reddy, Renuka; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2016-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved prognosis for people living with HIV (PLWH) and dramatically reduced the incidence of AIDS. However, even when viral load is controlled, PLWH develop psychiatric and neurological disorders more frequently than those living without HIV. Adolescents with HIV are particularly susceptible to the development of psychiatric illnesses and neurocognitive impairments. While both psychiatric and neurocognitive disorders have been found to be exacerbated by stress, the extent to which chronic stress and HIV-1 viral proteins interact to impact behavior and relevant neuroinflammatory processes is unknown. Determination of the individual contributions of stress and HIV to neuropsychiatric disorders is heavily confounded in humans. In order to isolate the influence of HIV-1 proteins and chronic stress on behavior and neuroinflammation, we employed the HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rat model, which expresses HIV-1 proteins with a gag and pol deletion, allowing for viral protein expression without viral replication. This Tg line has been characterized as a model of HAART-controlled HIV-1 infection due to the lack of viral replication but continued presence of HIV-1 proteins. We exposed male and female adolescent HIV-1 Tg rats to a mixed-modality chronic stress paradigm consisting of isolation, social defeat and restraint, and assessed behavior, cerebral vascularization, and neuroinflammatory endpoints. Stress, sex, and presence of the HIV-1 transgene impacted weight gain in adolescent rats. Female HIV-1 Tg rats showed decreases in central tendency during the light cycle in the open field regardless of stress exposure. Both male and female HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited decreased investigative behavior in the novel object recognition task, but no memory impairments. Adolescent stress had no effect on the tested behaviors. Microglia in female HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited a hyper-ramified structure, and gene expression of complement factor B was

  17. Neuroinflammation and Behavior in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats Exposed to Chronic Adolescent Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rowson, Sydney A.; Harrell, Constance S.; Bekhbat, Mandakh; Gangavelli, Apoorva; Wu, Matthew J.; Kelly, Sean D.; Reddy, Renuka; Neigh, Gretchen N.

    2016-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved prognosis for people living with HIV (PLWH) and dramatically reduced the incidence of AIDS. However, even when viral load is controlled, PLWH develop psychiatric and neurological disorders more frequently than those living without HIV. Adolescents with HIV are particularly susceptible to the development of psychiatric illnesses and neurocognitive impairments. While both psychiatric and neurocognitive disorders have been found to be exacerbated by stress, the extent to which chronic stress and HIV-1 viral proteins interact to impact behavior and relevant neuroinflammatory processes is unknown. Determination of the individual contributions of stress and HIV to neuropsychiatric disorders is heavily confounded in humans. In order to isolate the influence of HIV-1 proteins and chronic stress on behavior and neuroinflammation, we employed the HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rat model, which expresses HIV-1 proteins with a gag and pol deletion, allowing for viral protein expression without viral replication. This Tg line has been characterized as a model of HAART-controlled HIV-1 infection due to the lack of viral replication but continued presence of HIV-1 proteins. We exposed male and female adolescent HIV-1 Tg rats to a mixed-modality chronic stress paradigm consisting of isolation, social defeat and restraint, and assessed behavior, cerebral vascularization, and neuroinflammatory endpoints. Stress, sex, and presence of the HIV-1 transgene impacted weight gain in adolescent rats. Female HIV-1 Tg rats showed decreases in central tendency during the light cycle in the open field regardless of stress exposure. Both male and female HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited decreased investigative behavior in the novel object recognition task, but no memory impairments. Adolescent stress had no effect on the tested behaviors. Microglia in female HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited a hyper-ramified structure, and gene expression of complement factor B was

  18. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamata, Masakazu; Kim, Patrick Y.; Ng, Hwee L.; Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O'Connor, Sean; Yang, Otto O.; Chen, Irvin S.Y.

    2015-07-31

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8{sup +} T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8{sup +} T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24{sup Gag} in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect.

  19. Prevalence and persistence of antibody titers to recombinant HIV-1 core and matrix proteins in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Janvier, B; Mallet, F; Cheynet, V; Dalbon, P; Vernet, G; Besnier, J M; Choutet, P; Goudeau, A; Mandrand, B; Barin, F

    1993-08-01

    Numerous studies have established the correlation between antibodies to the core protein p24 of HIV-1 and the progression of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In this study, we analyzed the immune response to two recombinant gag proteins, p24 and p17, in order to evaluate their diagnostic or prognostic significance. Immune response to the immunodominant domain of the transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 was used as a reference. Sera collected from individuals from France and Burundi (Central Africa) at various CDC stages of HIV-1 infection were tested using three sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassays developed with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the immunodominant domain of gp41, SP gp41, or recombinant p24 and p17 cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. These assays allowed detection of titer antibodies to the three cited antigens. Antibodies to SP gp41 were detected in every HIV-1-positive patient from France and Burundi, generally at a high and stable level. Results obtained with p24 confirmed the value of antibodies to p24 as a prognostic marker only in European and North American populations, since the African population had very high levels of these antibodies even at an advanced stage of the disease. They also confirmed that initial antibody response to p24 is more predictive of outcome than antibody titer change over time. Although antibodies to p17 decline during progression to AIDS, they are frequently absent in French patients at early, asymptomatic stages and therefore could not be used as a prognostic marker. In contrast, antibodies to p17 are significantly less common in African patients with AIDS when compared with symptomless HIV-1-infected African individuals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Anti-HIV-1 potency of the CRISPR/Cas9 system insufficient to fully inhibit viral replication.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shuhei; Ebina, Hirotaka; Kanemura, Yuka; Misawa, Naoko; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    The range of genome-editing tools has recently been expanded. In particular, an RNA-guided genome-editing tool, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated 9 (Cas9) system, has many applications for human diseases. In this study, guide RNA (gRNA) to target gag, pol and a long terminal repeat of HIV-1 was designed and used to generate gRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors. An HIV-1-specific gRNA and Cas9 were stably dually transduced into a highly HIV-1-susceptible human T-cell line and the inhibitory ability of the anti-HIV-1 CRISPR/Cas9 lentiviral vector assessed. Although clear inhibition of the early phase of HIV-1 infection was observed, as evaluated by a VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 reporter system, the anti-HIV-1 potency in multiple rounds of wild type (WT) viral replication was insufficient, either because of generation of resistant viruses or overcoming of the activity of the WT virus. Thus, there are potential difficulties that must be addressed when considering anti-HIV-1 treatment with the CRISPR/Cas9 system alone.

  1. Interaction of the phospholipid scramblase 1 with HIV-1 Tat results in the repression of Tat-dependent transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Shuichi Eizuru, Yoshito

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •PLSCR1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 Tat in vitro and in vivo. •PLSCR1 repressed Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR. •Suppression of PLSCR1 expression enhanced the levels of HIV-1 transcripts. •PLSCR1 reduced the nuclear localization of Tat. -- Abstract: Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene and possesses an IFN-mediated antiviral function. We show here that PLSCR1 directly interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat. This interaction occurs both in vitro and in vivo through amino acids 160–250 of PLSCR1. Overexpression of PLSCR1 efficiently represses the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) and reduces the nuclear translocation of Tat. In addition, shRNA-mediated suppression of endogenous PLSCR1 expression enhances the levels of gag mRNA in an HIV-1-infected T-cell line. These findings indicate that PLSCR1 negatively regulates the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR during HIV-1 infection.

  2. Reliability of laboratory markers of HIV-1 infection in Argentinian infants at risk of perinatal infection.

    PubMed

    Mangano, A; Pittis, G; Galindez, C; Bologna, R; Sen, L

    1998-09-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants born to HIV-1-seropositive mothers is of great importance. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), HIV culture, and p24 antigen detection assays were evaluated for their ability to detect the presence of HIV in 195 infants at risk of perinatal infection. Using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for assessing HIV infection status in children younger than 18 months, 70 infants (36%) were diagnosed as HIV-1 infected and 125 (64%) lacked virologic and clinical evidence of infection. PCR and HIV culture were the most sensitive laboratory markers, detecting 100% and 98% of positive samples, respectively, regardless of age at testing. HIV-1 p24 antigen assay was detected in 26 of 38 positive samples but not in negative samples. PCR was performed with three different sets of primers (SK38/SK39-SK19-gag, SK68/SK69-SK70-env, and SK150/SK431-SK102-gag). The sensitivity/specificity of the individual assays were for SK19, 96.1%/94.25%; SK70, 89.6%/100%; and SK102, 100%/100%. A sample was considered HIV-1 positive when two positive PCR results were obtained with two different pairs of primers, and negative if the sample was negative when three sets of primers were used. False-positive results were occasionally obtained with probe SK19 in six seroreverter infants before serologic status was known. This suggested that the infection was caused by nonreplicative strains or were false-positive results probably by nonspecific amplification due to cross-reaction with other microorganisms; contamination was discarded because there was no specific amplification with the other two primers. All the HIV-1-infected infants were correctly identified with PCR; all except one could be identified with coculture and only 68.4% were confirmed with p24 antigen assay. No seroreverter infant was misdiagnosed using the criteria selected.

  3. Kinetics of HIV-1 Latency Reversal Quantified on the Single-Cell Level Using a Novel Flow-Based Technique

    PubMed Central

    Martrus, G.; Niehrs, A.; Cornelis, R.; Rechtien, A.; García-Beltran, W.; Lütgehetmann, M.; Hoffmann, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 establishes a pool of latently infected cells early following infection. New therapeutic approaches aiming at diminishing this persisting reservoir by reactivation of latently infected cells are currently being developed and tested. However, the reactivation kinetics of viral mRNA and viral protein production, and their respective consequences for phenotypical changes in infected cells that might enable immune recognition, remain poorly understood. We adapted a novel approach to assess the dynamics of HIV-1 mRNA and protein expression in latently and newly infected cells on the single-cell level by flow cytometry. This technique allowed the simultaneous detection of gagpol mRNA, intracellular p24 Gag protein, and cell surface markers. Following stimulation of latently HIV-1-infected J89 cells with human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNF-α)/romidepsin (RMD) or HIV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T cells, four cell populations were detected according to their expression levels of viral mRNA and protein. gagpol mRNA in J89 cells was quantifiable for the first time 3 h after stimulation with hTNF-α and 12 h after stimulation with RMD, while p24 Gag protein was detected for the first time after 18 h poststimulation. HIV-1-infected primary CD4+ T cells downregulated CD4, BST-2, and HLA class I expression at early stages of infection, proceeding Gag protein detection. In conclusion, here we describe a novel approach allowing quantification of the kinetics of HIV-1 mRNA and protein synthesis on the single-cell level and phenotypic characterization of HIV-1-infected cells at different stages of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Early after infection, HIV-1 establishes a pool of latently infected cells, which hide from the immune system. Latency reversal and immune-mediated elimination of these latently infected cells are some of the goals of current HIV-1 cure approaches; however, little is known about the HIV-1 reactivation kinetics following stimulation with

  4. Cell type specificity and structural determinants of IRES activity from the 5' leaders of different HIV-1 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Whitehurst, James T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2013-07-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are important regulators of gene expression, but their diverse molecular mechanisms remain partially understood. The HIV-1 gag transcript leader contains an IRES that may be a good model for understanding the function of many other IRESs. We investigated the possibility that this IRES' function is linked to both the structure of the RNA and its cellular environment. We find that in the context of a bicistronic reporter construct, HIV-1 gag IRES' activity is cell type-specific, with higher activity in T-cell culture systems that model the natural target cells for HIV-1 infection. This finding underscores how an IRES may be fine tuned to function in certain cells, perhaps owing to cell type-specific protein factors. Using RNA probing and mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the HIV-1 gag IRES does not use pre-folded RNA structure to drive function, a finding that gives insight into how conformationally dynamic IRESs operate. Furthermore, we find that a common exon drives IRES activity in a diverse set of alternatively spliced transcripts. We propose a mechanism in which a structurally plastic RNA element confers the ability to initiate translation internally, and activity from this common element is modulated by 3' nucleotides added by alternative splicing.

  5. HIV-1: the confounding variables of virus neutralization.

    PubMed

    Nara, Peter L; Lin, George

    2005-06-01

    The development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 would be greatly facilitated by the ability to elicit potent, high affinity antibodies that are capable of broad neutralization, viral inactivation and protection against infection and/or disease. New insights into the structure and function of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) that mediates viral fusion and entry may ultimately lead to strategies successful in eliciting these protective antibody responses. Insights have been gained regarding HIV-1 Env attachment and receptor engagement, the fusion process and kinetics, and the structural/functional attributes of Env that allow humoral immune evasion. In addition, studies of a limited number of broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies have shed some light as to how antibodies may penetrate the immune evading armor that HIV-1 has evolved. As the elusive goal of generating these types of antibodies emerge and are developed in the context of generating new candidate HIV-1 vaccines, a relevant in vitro measurement of neutralization by these types of antibodies becomes a complex task. This is in part due to a list of confounding variables which include: the physical and genomic nature (amino acid variation) of the infecting virion, the type of target cells, the concentration and clonality of the reactants, assay format and design, the affinity and kinetics of the reaction, receptors/coreceptors and attachment factors, and soluble host factors. This review will focus on the past, current, and future knowledge required to advance the field of HIV-1 humoral immunity as it impacts future HIV-1 vaccine development.

  6. Constitutively Active MAVS Inhibits HIV-1 Replication via Type I Interferon Secretion and Induction of HIV-1 Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M.; Issac, Biju; Guirado, Elizabeth; Stone, Geoffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon is known to inhibit HIV-1 replication through the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISG), including a number of HIV-1 restriction factors. To better understand interferon-mediated HIV-1 restriction, we constructed a constitutively active form of the RIG-I adapter protein MAVS. Constitutive MAVS was generated by fusion of full length MAVS to a truncated form of the Epstein Barr virus protein LMP1 (ΔLMP1). Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells contained high levels of type I interferons and inhibited HIV replication in both TZM-bl and primary human CD4+ T cells. Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells also inhibited replication of VSV-G pseudotyped single cycle SIV in TZM-bl cells, suggesting restriction was post-entry and common to both HIV and SIV. Gene array analysis of ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells and trans-activated CD4+ T cells showed significant upregulation of ISG, including previously characterized HIV restriction factors Viperin, Tetherin, MxB, and ISG56. Interferon blockade studies implicated interferon-beta in this response. In addition to direct viral inhibition, ΔLMP1-MAVS markedly enhanced secretion of IFN-β and IL-12p70 by dendritic cells and the activation and maturation of dendritic cells. Based on this immunostimulatory activity, an adenoviral vector (Ad5) expressing ΔLMP1-MAVS was tested as a molecular adjuvant in an HIV vaccine mouse model. Ad5-Gag antigen combined with Ad5-ΔLMP1-MAVS enhanced control of vaccinia-gag replication in a mouse challenge model, with 4/5 animals showing undetectable virus following challenge. Overall, ΔLMP1-MAVS is a promising reagent to inhibit HIV-1 replication in infected tissues and enhance vaccine-mediated immune responses, while avoiding toxicity associated with systemic type I interferon administration. PMID:26849062

  7. Dynamic Post-Transcriptional Regulation of HIV-1 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kula, Anna; Marcello, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a highly regulated process. Basal transcription of the integrated provirus generates early transcripts that encode for the viral products Tat and Rev. Tat promotes the elongation of RNA polymerase while Rev mediates the nuclear export of viral RNAs that contain the Rev-responsive RNA element (RRE). These RNAs are exported from the nucleus to allow expression of Gag-Pol and Env proteins and for the production of full-length genomic RNAs. A balance exists between completely processed mRNAs and RRE-containing RNAs. Rev functions as an adaptor that recruits cellular factors to re-direct singly spliced and unspliced viral RNAs to nuclear export. The aim of this review is to address the dynamic regulation of this post-transcriptional pathway in light of recent findings that implicate several novel cellular cofactors of Rev function. PMID:24832221

  8. Striking HIV-1 Entry by Targeting HIV-1 gp41. But, Where Should We Target?

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Cátia; Barbault, Florent; Couesnon, Thierry; Gomes, José R B; Gomes, Paula; Maurel, François

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 gp41 facilitates the viral fusion through a conformational switch involving the association of three C-terminal helices along the conserved hydrophobic grooves of three N-terminal helices coiled-coil. The control of these structural rearrangements is thought to be central to HIV-1 entry and, therefore, different strategies of intervention are being developed. Herewith, we describe a procedure to simulate the folding of an HIV-1 gp41 simplified model. This procedure is based on the construction of plausible conformational pathways, which describe protein transition between non-fusogenic and fusogenic conformations. The calculation of the paths started with 100 molecular dynamics simulations of the non-fusogenic conformation, which were found to converge to different intermediate states. Those presenting defined criteria were selected for separate targeted molecular dynamics simulations, subjected to a force constant imposing a movement towards the gp41 fusogenic conformation. Despite significant diversity, a preferred sequence of events emerged when the simulations were analyzed in terms of the formation, breakage and evolution of the contacts. We pointed out 29 residues as the most relevant for the movement of gp41; also, 2696 possible interactions were reduced to only 48 major interactions, which reveals the efficiency of the method. The analysis of the evolution of the main interactions lead to the detection of four main behaviors for those contacts: stable, increasing, decreasing and repulsive interactions. Altogether, these results suggest a specific small cavity of the HIV-1 gp41 hydrophobic groove as the preferred target to small molecules.

  9. Striking HIV-1 Entry by Targeting HIV-1 gp41. But, Where Should We Target?

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Cátia; Barbault, Florent; Couesnon, Thierry; Gomes, José R. B.; Gomes, Paula; Maurel, François

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 gp41 facilitates the viral fusion through a conformational switch involving the association of three C-terminal helices along the conserved hydrophobic grooves of three N-terminal helices coiled-coil. The control of these structural rearrangements is thought to be central to HIV-1 entry and, therefore, different strategies of intervention are being developed. Herewith, we describe a procedure to simulate the folding of an HIV-1 gp41 simplified model. This procedure is based on the construction of plausible conformational pathways, which describe protein transition between non-fusogenic and fusogenic conformations. The calculation of the paths started with 100 molecular dynamics simulations of the non-fusogenic conformation, which were found to converge to different intermediate states. Those presenting defined criteria were selected for separate targeted molecular dynamics simulations, subjected to a force constant imposing a movement towards the gp41 fusogenic conformation. Despite significant diversity, a preferred sequence of events emerged when the simulations were analyzed in terms of the formation, breakage and evolution of the contacts. We pointed out 29 residues as the most relevant for the movement of gp41; also, 2696 possible interactions were reduced to only 48 major interactions, which reveals the efficiency of the method. The analysis of the evolution of the main interactions lead to the detection of four main behaviors for those contacts: stable, increasing, decreasing and repulsive interactions. Altogether, these results suggest a specific small cavity of the HIV-1 gp41 hydrophobic groove as the preferred target to small molecules. PMID:26785380

  10. The Use of an Alternative Extraoral Periapical Technique for Patients with Severe Gag Reflex

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Mauro Henrique Chagas; Santos, Mariane Floriano Lopes; de Lima, Carolina Oliveira; Campos, Celso Neiva

    2016-01-01

    Gag reflex is a physiologic mechanism that promotes contraction of the muscles of the tongue and pharyngeal walls. Different factors, including intraoral radiographic films and sensors, may trigger this reflex. Patients with severe gag reflex may not be able to tolerate the presence of intraoral radiographic films or sensors during root canal therapy (RCT). This factor may prevent an appropriate intraoral radiograph, which is important in RCT. Different approaches have been used to facilitate dental procedures in patients suffering from severe gag reflex. The use of an extraoral radiographic technique is an alternative method to obtain working length confirmation in patients with severe gag reflex. In this report of 2 cases, the use of an extraoral radiographic technique as an alternative approach during RCT in patients with severe gag reflex associated with phobic behavior and trismus was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27547474

  11. Sequence-specific interaction between HIV-1 matrix protein and viral genomic RNA revealed by in vitro genetic selection.

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, P; Dupont, S; Stevenson, M; Green, M R

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 matrix protein (HIV-1 MA) is a multifunctional structural protein synthesized as part of the Pr55 gag polyprotein. We have used in vitro genetic selection to identify an RNA consensus sequence that specifically interacts with MA (Kd = 5 x 10(-7) M). This 13-nt MA binding consensus sequence bears a high degree of homology (77%) to a region (nt 1433-1446) within the POL open reading frame of the HIV-1 genome (consensus sequence from 38 HIV-1 strains). Chemical interference experiments identified the nucleotides within the MA binding consensus sequence involved in direct contact with MA. We further demonstrate that this RNA-protein interaction is mediated through a stretch of basic amino acids within MA. Mutations that disrupt the interaction between MA and its RNA binding site within the HIV-1 genome resulted in a measurable decrease in viral replication. PMID:11345436

  12. T cell receptor clonotypes modulate the protective effect of HLA class I alleles in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huabiao; Ndhlovu, Zaza M.; Liu, Dongfang; Porter, Lindsay C.; Fang, Justin W.; Darko, Sam; Brockman, Mark A.; Miura, Toshiyuki; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Schneidewind, Arne; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cesa, Kevin T.; Sela, Jennifer; Cung, Thai D.; Toth, Ildiko; Pereyra, Florencia; Yu, Xu G.; Douek, Daniel C.; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Allen, Todd M.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B*27 and B*57 are associated with protection against HIV-1 disease progression, yet most persons expressing these alleles are unable to control HIV-1. Here we show that HLA-B*27-restricted CD8+ T cells in controllers and progressors differ in their ability to inhibit virus replication through targeting of the immunodominant Gag epitope. This is associated with distinct TCR clonotypes, characterized by superior control of HIV-1 replication in vitro, greater cross-reactivity against epitope variants, and enhanced perforin delivery. Clonotype-specific differences in antiviral efficacy were also observed for an immunodominant HLA-B*57 restricted response in controllers and progressors. Thus, the efficacy of protective alleles is modulated by specific TCR clonotypes selected in natural infection, providing a functional explanation for divergent HIV-1 outcomes. PMID:22683743

  13. Multiplexed next-generation sequencing and de novo assembly to obtain near full-length HIV-1 genome from plasma virus.

    PubMed

    Aralaguppe, Shambhu G; Siddik, Abu Bakar; Manickam, Ashokkumar; Ambikan, Anoop T; Kumar, Milner M; Fernandes, Sunjay Jude; Amogne, Wondwossen; Bangaruswamy, Dhinoth K; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Sonnerborg, Anders; Neogi, Ujjwal

    2016-10-01

    Analysing the HIV-1 near full-length genome (HIV-NFLG) facilitates new understanding into the diversity of virus population dynamics at individual or population level. In this study we developed a simple but high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) protocol for HIV-NFLG using clinical specimens and validated the method against an external quality control (EQC) panel. Clinical specimens (n=105) were obtained from three cohorts from two highly conserved HIV-1C epidemics (India and Ethiopia) and one diverse epidemic (Sweden). Additionally an EQC panel (n=10) was used to validate the protocol. HIV-NFLG was performed amplifying the HIV-genome (Gag-to-nef) in two fragments. NGS was performed using the Illumina HiSeq2500 after multiplexing 24 samples, followed by de novo assembly in Iterative Virus Assembler or VICUNA. Subtyping was carried out using several bioinformatics tools. Amplification of HIV-NFLG has 90% (95/105) success-rate in clinical specimens. NGS was successful in all clinical specimens (n=45) and EQA samples (n=10) attempted. The mean error for mutations for the EQC panel viruses were <1%. Subtyping identified two as A1C recombinant. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a simple NGS-based HIV-NFLG that can potentially be used in the molecular surveillance for effective identification of subtypes and transmission clusters for operational public health intervention.

  14. Crystal structure of an antiviral ankyrin targeting the HIV-1 capsid and molecular modeling of the ankyrin-capsid complex.

    PubMed

    Praditwongwan, Warachai; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Saoin, Somphot; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nangola, Sawitree; Hong, Saw See; Minard, Philippe; Boulanger, Pierre; Chen, Chun-Jung; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2014-08-01

    Ankyrins are cellular repeat proteins, which can be genetically modified to randomize amino-acid residues located at defined positions in each repeat unit, and thus create a potential binding surface adaptable to macromolecular ligands. From a phage-display library of artificial ankyrins, we have isolated Ank(GAG)1D4, a trimodular ankyrin which binds to the HIV-1 capsid protein N-terminal domain (NTD(CA)) and has an antiviral effect at the late steps of the virus life cycle. In this study, the determinants of the Ank(GAG)1D4-NTD(CA) interaction were analyzed using peptide scanning in competition ELISA, capsid mutagenesis, ankyrin crystallography and molecular modeling. We determined the Ank(GAG)1D4 structure at 2.2 Å resolution, and used the crystal structure in molecular docking with a homology model of HIV-1 capsid. Our results indicated that NTD(CA) alpha-helices H1 and H7 could mediate the formation of the capsid-Ank(GAG)1D4 binary complex, but the interaction involving H7 was predicted to be more stable than with H1. Arginine-18 (R18) in H1, and R132 and R143 in H7 were found to be the key players of the Ank(GAG)1D4-NTD(CA) interaction. This was confirmed by R-to-A mutagenesis of NTD(CA), and by sequence analysis of trimodular ankyrins negative for capsid binding. In Ank(GAG)1D4, major interactors common to H1 and H7 were found to be S45, Y56, R89, K122 and K123. Collectively, our ankyrin-capsid binding analysis implied a significant degree of flexibility within the NTD(CA) domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein, and provided some clues for the design of new antivirals targeting the capsid protein and viral assembly.

  15. Crystal structure of an antiviral ankyrin targeting the HIV-1 capsid and molecular modeling of the ankyrin-capsid complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praditwongwan, Warachai; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Saoin, Somphot; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nangola, Sawitree; Hong, Saw See; Minard, Philippe; Boulanger, Pierre; Chen, Chun-Jung; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2014-08-01

    Ankyrins are cellular repeat proteins, which can be genetically modified to randomize amino-acid residues located at defined positions in each repeat unit, and thus create a potential binding surface adaptable to macromolecular ligands. From a phage-display library of artificial ankyrins, we have isolated AnkGAG1D4, a trimodular ankyrin which binds to the HIV-1 capsid protein N-terminal domain (NTDCA) and has an antiviral effect at the late steps of the virus life cycle. In this study, the determinants of the AnkGAG1D4-NTDCA interaction were analyzed using peptide scanning in competition ELISA, capsid mutagenesis, ankyrin crystallography and molecular modeling. We determined the AnkGAG1D4 structure at 2.2 Å resolution, and used the crystal structure in molecular docking with a homology model of HIV-1 capsid. Our results indicated that NTDCA alpha-helices H1 and H7 could mediate the formation of the capsid-AnkGAG1D4 binary complex, but the interaction involving H7 was predicted to be more stable than with H1. Arginine-18 (R18) in H1, and R132 and R143 in H7 were found to be the key players of the AnkGAG1D4-NTDCA interaction. This was confirmed by R-to-A mutagenesis of NTDCA, and by sequence analysis of trimodular ankyrins negative for capsid binding. In AnkGAG1D4, major interactors common to H1 and H7 were found to be S45, Y56, R89, K122 and K123. Collectively, our ankyrin-capsid binding analysis implied a significant degree of flexibility within the NTDCA domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein, and provided some clues for the design of new antivirals targeting the capsid protein and viral assembly.

  16. Successful Isolation of Infectious and High Titer Human Monocyte-Derived HIV-1 from Two Subjects with Discontinued Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haiying; Andrus, Thomas; Ivanov, Sergei B.; Pan, Charlotte; Dolores, Jazel; Dann, Gregory C.; Zhou, Michael; Forte, Dominic; Yang, Zihuan; Holte, Sarah; Corey, Lawrence; Zhu, Tuofu

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 DNA in blood monocytes is considered a viral source of various HIV-1 infected tissue macrophages, which is also known as “Trojan horse” hypothesis. However, whether these DNA can produce virions has been an open question for years, due to the inability of isolating high titer and infectious HIV-1 directly from monocytes. Results In this study, we demonstrated successful isolation of two strains of M-HIV-1 (1690 M and 1175 M) from two out of four study subjects, together with their in vivo controls, HIV-1 isolated from CD4+ T-cells (T-HIV-1), 1690 T and 1175 T. All M- and T- HIV-1 isolates were detected CCR5-tropic. Both M- HIV-1 exhibited higher levels of replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) than the two T- HIV-1. Consistent with our previous reports on the subject 1175 with late infection, compartmentalized env C2-V3-C3 sequences were identified between 1175 M and 1175 T. In contrast, 1690 M and 1690 T, which were isolated from subject 1690 with relatively earlier infection, showed homogenous env C2-V3-C3 sequences. However, multiple reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor resistance-associated variations were detected in the Gag-Pol region of 1690 M, but not of 1690 T. By further measuring HIV DNA intracellular copy numbers post-MDM infection, 1690 M was found to have significantly higher DNA synthesis efficiency than 1690 T in macrophages, indicating a higher RT activity, which was confirmed by AZT inhibitory assays. Conclusions These results suggested that the M- and T- HIV-1 are compartmentalized in the two study subjects, respectively. Therefore, we demonstrated that under in vitro conditions, HIV-1 infected human monocytes can productively release live viruses while differentiating into macrophages. PMID:23741458

  17. Universal amplification, next-generation sequencing, and assembly of HIV-1 genomes.

    PubMed

    Gall, Astrid; Ferns, Bridget; Morris, Clare; Watson, Simon; Cotten, Matthew; Robinson, Mark; Berry, Neil; Pillay, Deenan; Kellam, Paul

    2012-12-01

    Whole HIV-1 genome sequences are pivotal for large-scale studies of inter- and intrahost evolution, including the acquisition of drug resistance mutations. The ability to rapidly and cost-effectively generate large numbers of HIV-1 genome sequences from different populations and geographical locations and determine the effect of minority genetic variants is, however, a limiting factor. Next-generation sequencing promises to bridge this gap but is hindered by the lack of methods for the enrichment of virus genomes across the phylogenetic breadth of HIV-1 and methods for the robust assembly of the virus genomes from short-read data. Here we report a method for the amplification, next-generation sequencing, and unbiased de novo assembly of HIV-1 genomes of groups M, N, and O, as well as recombinants, that does not require prior knowledge of the sequence or subtype. A sensitivity of at least 3,000 copies/ml was determined by using plasma virus samples of known copy numbers. We applied our novel method to compare the genome diversities of HIV-1 groups, subtypes, and genes. The highest level of diversity was found in the env, nef, vpr, tat, and rev genes and parts of the gag gene. Furthermore, we used our method to investigate mutations associated with HIV-1 drug resistance in clinical samples at the level of the complete genome. Drug resistance mutations were detected as both major variant and minor species. In conclusion, we demonstrate the feasibility of our method for large-scale HIV-1 genome sequencing. This will enable the phylogenetic and phylodynamic resolution of the ongoing pandemic and efficient monitoring of complex HIV-1 drug resistance genotypes.

  18. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  19. Interplay between the alpharetroviral Gag protein and SR proteins SF2 and SC35 in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Breanna L.; Kaddis, Rebecca J.; Stake, Matthew S.; Lochmann, Timothy L.; Parent, Leslie J.

    2015-01-01

    Retroviruses are positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses that reverse transcribe their RNA genomes into double-stranded DNA for integration into the host cell chromosome. The integrated provirus is used as a template for the transcription of viral RNA. The full-length viral RNA can be used for the translation of the Gag and Gag-Pol structural proteins or as the genomic RNA (gRNA) for encapsidation into new virions by the Gag protein. The mechanism by which Gag selectively incorporates unspliced gRNA into virus particles is poorly understood. Although Gag was previously thought to localize exclusively to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane where particles are released, we found that the Gag protein of Rous sarcoma virus, an alpharetrovirus, undergoes transient nuclear trafficking. When the nuclear export signal of RSV Gag is mutated (Gag.L219A), the protein accumulates in discrete subnuclear foci reminiscent of nuclear bodies such as splicing speckles, paraspeckles, and PML bodies. In this report, we observed that RSV Gag.L219A foci appeared to be tethered in the nucleus, partially co-localizing with the splicing speckle components SC35 and SF2. Overexpression of SC35 increased the number of Gag.L219A nucleoplasmic foci, suggesting that SC35 may facilitate the formation of Gag foci. We previously reported that RSV Gag nuclear trafficking is required for efficient gRNA packaging. Together with the data presented herein, our findings raise the intriguing hypothesis that RSV Gag may co-opt splicing factors to localize near transcription sites. Because splicing occurs co-transcriptionally, we speculate that this mechanism could allow Gag to associate with unspliced viral RNA shortly after its transcription initiation in the nucleus, before the viral RNA can be spliced or exported from the nucleus as an mRNA template. PMID:26441864

  20. HIV-1 and Human PEG10 Frameshift Elements Are Functionally Distinct and Distinguished by Novel Small Molecule Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Sleebs, Brad E.; Lackovic, Kurt; Parisot, John P.; Moss, Rebecca M.; Crowe-McAuliffe, Caillan; Mathew, Suneeth F.; Edgar, Christina D.; Kleffmann, Torsten; Tate, Warren P.

    2015-01-01

    Frameshifting during translation of viral or in rare cases cellular mRNA results in the synthesis of proteins from two overlapping reading frames within the same mRNA. In HIV-1 the protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase enzymes are in a second reading frame relative to the structural group-specific antigen (gag), and their synthesis is dependent upon frameshifting. This ensures that a strictly regulated ratio of structural proteins and enzymes, which is critical for HIV-1 replication and viral infectivity, is maintained during protein synthesis. The frameshift element in HIV-1 RNA is an attractive target for the development of a new class of anti HIV-1 drugs. However, a number of examples are now emerging of human genes using −1 frameshifting, such as PEG10 and CCR5. In this study we have compared the HIV-1 and PEG10 frameshift elements and shown they have distinct functional characteristics. Frameshifting occurs at several points within each element. Moreover, frameshift modulators that were isolated by high-throughput screening of a library of 114,000 lead-like compounds behaved differently with the PEG10 frameshift element. The most effective compounds affecting the HIV-1 element enhanced frameshifting by 2.5-fold at 10 μM in two different frameshift reporter assay systems. HIV-1 protease:gag protein ratio was affected by a similar amount in a specific assay of virally-infected cultured cell, but the modulation of frameshifting of the first-iteration compounds was not sufficient to show significant effects on viral infectivity. Importantly, two compounds did not affect frameshifting with the human PEG10 element, while one modestly inhibited rather than enhanced frameshifting at the human element. These studies indicate that frameshift elements have unique characteristics that may allow targeting of HIV-1 and of other viruses specifically for development of antiviral therapeutic molecules without effect on human genes like PEG10 that use the same

  1. In vitro analysis of human immunodeficiency virus particle dissociation: gag proteolytic processing influences dissociation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Müller, Barbara; Anders, Maria; Reinstein, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus particles undergo a step of proteolytic maturation, in which the main structural polyprotein Gag is cleaved into its mature subunits matrix (MA), capsid (CA), nucleocapsid (NC) and p6. Gag proteolytic processing is accompanied by a dramatic structural rearrangement within the virion, which is necessary for virus infectivity and has been proposed to proceed through a sequence of dissociation and reformation of the capsid lattice. Morphological maturation appears to be tightly regulated, with sequential cleavage events and two small spacer peptides within Gag playing important roles by regulating the disassembly of the immature capsid layer and formation of the mature capsid lattice. In order to measure the influence of individual Gag domains on lattice stability, we established Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporter virions and employed rapid kinetic FRET and light scatter measurements. This approach allowed us to measure dissociation properties of HIV-1 particles assembled in eukaryotic cells containing Gag proteins in different states of proteolytic processing. While the complex dissociation behavior of the particles prevented an assignment of kinetic rate constants to individual dissociation steps, our analyses revealed characteristic differences in the dissociation properties of the MA layer dependent on the presence of additional domains. The most striking effect observed here was a pronounced stabilization of the MA-CA layer mediated by the presence of the 14 amino acid long spacer peptide SP1 at the CA C-terminus, underlining the crucial role of this peptide for the resolution of the immature particle architecture.

  2. Expansion of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells dampens T cell function in HIV-1-seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Qin, Aiping; Cai, Weiping; Pan, Ting; Wu, Kang; Yang, Qiong; Wang, Nina; Liu, Yufeng; Yan, Dehong; Hu, Fengyu; Guo, Pengle; Chen, Xiaoping; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Xiaoping; Zhou, Jie

    2013-02-01

    T lymphocyte dysfunction contributes to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease progression by impairing antivirus cellular immunity. However, the mechanisms of HIV-1 infection-mediated T cell dysfunction are not completely understood. Here, we provide evidence that expansion of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) suppressed T cell function in HIV-1-infected individuals. We observed a dramatic elevation of M-MDSCs (HLA-DR(-/low) CD11b(+) CD33(+/high) CD14(+) CD15(-) cells) in the peripheral blood of HIV-1-seropositive subjects (n = 61) compared with healthy controls (n = 51), despite efficacious antiretroviral therapy for nearly 2 years. The elevated M-MDSC frequency in HIV-1(+) subjects correlated with prognostic HIV-1 disease markers, including the HIV-1 load (r = 0.5957; P < 0.0001), CD4(+) T cell loss (r = -0.5312; P < 0.0001), and activated T cells (r = 0.4421; P = 0.0004). Functional studies showed that M-MDSCs from HIV-1(+) subjects suppressed T cell responses in both HIV-1-specific and antigen-nonspecific manners; this effect was dependent on the induction of arginase 1 and required direct cell-cell contact. Further investigations revealed that direct HIV-1 infection or culture with HIV-1-derived Tat protein significantly enhanced human MDSC generation in vitro, and MDSCs from healthy donors could be directly infected by HIV-1 to facilitate HIV-1 replication and transmission, indicating that a positive-feedback loop between HIV-1 infection and MDSC expansion existed. In summary, our studies revealed a novel mechanism of T cell dysfunction in HIV-1-infected individuals and suggested that targeting MDSCs may be a promising strategy for HIV-1 immunotherapy.

  3. A Generalized Entropy Measure of Within-Host Viral Diversity for Identifying Recent HIV-1 Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Julia Wei; Patterson-Lomba, Oscar; Novitsky, Vladimir; Pagano, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is a need for incidence assays that accurately estimate HIV incidence based on cross-sectional specimens. Viral diversity-based assays have shown promises but are not particularly accurate. We hypothesize that certain viral genetic regions are more predictive of recent infection than others and aim to improve assay accuracy by using classification algorithms that focus on highly informative regions (HIRs). We analyzed HIV gag sequences from a cohort in Botswana. Forty-two subjects newly infected by HIV-1 Subtype C were followed through 500 days post-seroconversion. Using sliding window analysis, we screened for genetic regions within gag that best differentiate recent versus chronic infections. We used both nonparametric and parametric approaches to evaluate the discriminatory abilities of sequence regions. Segmented Shannon Entropy measures of HIRs were aggregated to develop generalized entropy measures to improve prediction of recency. Using logistic regression as the basis for our classification algorithm, we evaluated the predictive power of these novel biomarkers and compared them with recently reported viral diversity measures using area under the curve (AUC) analysis. Change of diversity over time varied across different sequence regions within gag. We identified the top 50% of the most informative regions by both nonparametric and parametric approaches. In both cases, HIRs were in more variable regions of gag and less likely in the p24 coding region. Entropy measures based on HIRs outperformed previously reported viral-diversity-based biomarkers. These methods are better suited for population-level estimation of HIV recency. The patterns of diversification of certain regions within the gag gene are more predictive of recency of infection than others. We expect this result to apply in other HIV genetic regions as well. Focusing on these informative regions, our generalized entropy measure of viral diversity demonstrates the potential for

  4. A Generalized Entropy Measure of Within-Host Viral Diversity for Identifying Recent HIV-1 Infections.

    PubMed

    Wu, Julia Wei; Patterson-Lomba, Oscar; Novitsky, Vladimir; Pagano, Marcello

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for incidence assays that accurately estimate HIV incidence based on cross-sectional specimens. Viral diversity-based assays have shown promises but are not particularly accurate. We hypothesize that certain viral genetic regions are more predictive of recent infection than others and aim to improve assay accuracy by using classification algorithms that focus on highly informative regions (HIRs).We analyzed HIV gag sequences from a cohort in Botswana. Forty-two subjects newly infected by HIV-1 Subtype C were followed through 500 days post-seroconversion. Using sliding window analysis, we screened for genetic regions within gag that best differentiate recent versus chronic infections. We used both nonparametric and parametric approaches to evaluate the discriminatory abilities of sequence regions. Segmented Shannon Entropy measures of HIRs were aggregated to develop generalized entropy measures to improve prediction of recency. Using logistic regression as the basis for our classification algorithm, we evaluated the predictive power of these novel biomarkers and compared them with recently reported viral diversity measures using area under the curve (AUC) analysis.Change of diversity over time varied across different sequence regions within gag. We identified the top 50% of the most informative regions by both nonparametric and parametric approaches. In both cases, HIRs were in more variable regions of gag and less likely in the p24 coding region. Entropy measures based on HIRs outperformed previously reported viral-diversity-based biomarkers. These methods are better suited for population-level estimation of HIV recency.The patterns of diversification of certain regions within the gag gene are more predictive of recency of infection than others. We expect this result to apply in other HIV genetic regions as well. Focusing on these informative regions, our generalized entropy measure of viral diversity demonstrates the potential for improving

  5. High genetic diversity of HIV-1 was found in men who have sex with men in Shijiazhuang, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Lu, Xinli; Li, Hanping; Chen, Lili; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yongjian; Bao, Zuoyi; Li, Tianyi; Tian, Chong; Liu, Hongxin; Zhuang, Daomin; Liu, Siyang; Li, Jingyun

    2011-08-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) have become one of the populations with severely HIV prevalence in China. However, very few genetic studies have been done on HIV-1 spreading in this population. In this study, the genetic characterization of HIV-1 strains prevalent in the MSM in Shijiazhuang, China, was analyzed basing on the HIV-1 full-length gag, pol, and partial env gene. 21 drug-naïve HIV-1 sero-positive patients were enrolled into the study. Full length gag, pol, partial env genes and some near full length genomes were amplified with nest RT-PCR followed by sequencing. Multiple subtypes, including CRF01_AE (52.9%), subtype B (35.3%) and CRF07_BC (11.8%), were found in the population. Phylogenetic analysis showed close relationship between our strains with those from Beijing MSM but not those from paid blood donors of local area. Drug resistance surveillance evaluation showed no transmitted drug resistance (TDR). However, some drug-resistance related polymorphism sites (V181I and V106I) were popularly found in B subtype strains. The findings will contribute to understanding the distribution and evolution of HIV-1 in MSM and also help the behavior change intervention.

  6. Pandemic HIV-1 Vpu overcomes intrinsic herd immunity mediated by tetherin.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Shingo; Sato, Kei; Morita, Satoru; Inaba, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Junko S; Kimura, Yuichi; Misawa, Naoko; Ren, Fengrong; Iwasa, Yoh; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2015-07-17

    Among the four groups of HIV-1 (M, N, O, and P), HIV-1M alone is pandemic and has rapidly expanded across the world. However, why HIV-1M has caused a devastating pandemic while the other groups remain contained is unclear. Interestingly, only HIV-1M Vpu, a viral protein, can robustly counteract human tetherin, which tethers budding virions. Therefore, we hypothesize that this property of HIV-1M Vpu facilitates human-to-human viral transmission. Adopting a multilayered experimental-mathematical approach, we demonstrate that HIV-1M Vpu confers a 2.38-fold increase in the prevalence of HIV-1 transmission. When Vpu activity is lost, protected human populations emerge (i.e., intrinsic herd immunity develops) through the anti-viral effect of tetherin. We also reveal that all Vpus of transmitted/founder HIV-1M viruses maintain anti-tetherin activity. These findings indicate that tetherin plays the role of a host restriction factor, providing 'intrinsic herd immunity', whereas Vpu has evolved in HIV-1M as a tetherin antagonist.

  7. Polyepitope protein incorporated the HIV-1 mimotope recognized by monoclonal antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, Larisa I; Scherbakova, Nadezhda S; Chikaev, Anton N; Tumanova, Olga Yu; Lebedev, Leonid R; Shalamova, Lyudmila A; Pyankova, Olga G; Ryzhikov, Alexander B; Ilyichev, Alexander A

    2012-04-01

    A major goal in HIV-1 vaccine research is to develop an immunogen that can elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies that efficiently neutralize a wide range of the HIV-1 subtypes. Using biopanning procedure we have selected linear peptide VGAFGSFYRLSVLQS mimicking the structure of discontinuous binding sites of broadly neutralizing antibodies 2G12 from phage peptide library. As a protein carrier, we used the earlier designed artificial polyepitope immunogen named TBI (T- and B-cell immunogen), which comprises B-cell and T-helper epitopes from the HIV-1 Env and Gag proteins. On the base of selected peptide mimotope VGAFGSFYRLSVLQS the artificial protein TBI-2g12 was constructed and its immunogenic properties was investigated. It was shown that the TBI-2g12 as well as the original TBI induces antibodies that recognize HIV-1 proteins and TBI protein using ELISA and immunoblotting. However only anti-TBI-2g12 serum recognized the synthetic peptide mimotope VGAFGSFYRLSVLQS, whereas the antibodies against original TBI don't recognize it. The neutralization assay demonstrated that serum antibodies of the mice immunized with TBI-2g12 possess virus neutralizing activity. The addition of selected peptide leads to inhibition neutralizing activity of anti- TBI-2g12 serum. We conclude from these results that immunogen TBI-2g12 containing the selected peptide VGAFGSFYRLSVLQS elicits HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies during immunization. Our data suggest that this immunogen may be useful in designing effective HIV-vaccine candidates.

  8. HIV-1 conserved-element vaccines: relationship between sequence conservation and replicative capacity.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Morgane; Manocheewa, Siriphan; Swain, J Victor; Lanxon-Cookson, Erinn C; Kim, Moon; Westfall, Dylan H; Larsen, Brendan B; Gilbert, Peter B; Mullins, James I

    2013-05-01

    To overcome the problem of HIV-1 variability, candidate vaccine antigens have been designed to be composed of conserved elements of the HIV-1 proteome. Such candidate vaccines could be improved with a better understanding of both HIV-1 evolutionary constraints and the fitness cost of specific mutations. We evaluated the in vitro fitness cost of 23 mutations engineered in the HIV-1 subtype B Gag-p24 Center-of-Tree (COT) protein through fitness competition assays. While some mutations at conserved sites exacted a high fitness cost, as expected under the assumption that the most conserved residue confers the highest fitness, there was no overall strong relationship between sequence conservation and replicative capacity. By comparing sites that have evolved since the beginning of the epidemic to those that have remain unchanged, we found that sites that have evolved over time were more likely to correspond to HLA-associated sites and that their mutation had limited fitness costs. Our data showed no transcendent link between high conservation and high fitness cost, indicating that merely focusing on conserved segments of HIV-1 would not be sufficient for a successful vaccine strategy. Nonetheless, a subset of sites exacted a high fitness cost upon mutation--these sites have been under selective pressure to change since the beginning of the epidemic but have proved virtually nonmutable and could constitute preferred targets for vaccine design.

  9. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  10. Lack of Detection of XMRV in Seminal Plasma from HIV-1 Infected Men in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Marion; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Blom, Petra; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Repping, Sjoerd; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth; Bakker, Margreet; Berkhout, Ben; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a recently discovered human gammaretrovirus with yet unknown prevalence and transmission route(s). Its presence in prostate stromal fibroblasts and prostatic secretions suggests that XMRV might be sexually transmitted. We chose to study a compartment closely connected to the prostate, a location where XMRV was detected in independent studies. Seminal plasma samples from HIV-1 infected men were examined as they have an increased probability of acquiring sexually transmitted pathogens. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied the prevalence of XMRV in 93 seminal plasma samples of 54 HIV-1 infected men living in The Netherlands with a nested PCR amplification specifically targeting the XMRV gag gene. As a control for the presence and integrity of retrovirus particles, HIV-1 was amplified from the same samples with a PCR amplification targeting the env gene of the virus, or HIV-1 was quantified with a real-time PCR amplifying part of the pol gene. Conclusions/Significance Although HIV-1 was amplified from 25% of the seminal plasma samples, no XMRV was detected, suggesting that either the prevalence of XMRV is very low in The Netherlands, or that XMRV is not naturally present in the seminal plasma. PMID:20706581

  11. Broad CTL response is required to clear latent HIV-1 due to dominance of escape mutations

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kai; Pertea, Mihaela; Rongvaux, Anthony; Wang, Leyao; Durand, Christine M.; Ghiaur, Gabriel; Lai, Jun; McHugh, Holly L.; Hao, Haiping; Zhang, Hao; Margolick, Joseph B.; Gurer, Cagan; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Strowig, Till; Kumar, Priti; Siliciano, Janet D.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Shan, Liang; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-1 persists in a stable latent reservoir1, 2, primarily in resting memory CD4+ T cells3, 4. This reservoir presents a major barrier to the cure of HIV-1 infection. To purge the reservoir, pharmacological reactivation of latent HIV-1 has been proposed5 and tested both in vitro and in vivo6–8. A key remaining question is whether virus-specific immune mechanisms including cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) can clear infected cells in ART-treated patients after latency is reversed. Here we show that there is a striking all or none pattern for CTL escape mutations in HIV-1 Gag epitopes. Unless ART is started early, the vast majority (>98%) of latent viruses carry CTL escape mutations that render infected cells insensitive to CTLs directed at common epitopes. To solve this problem, we identified CTLs that could recognize epitopes from latent HIV-1 that were unmutated in every chronically infected patient tested. Upon stimulation, these CTLs eliminated target cells infected with autologous virus derived from the latent reservoir, both in vitro and in patient-derived humanized mice. The predominance of CTL-resistant viruses in the latent reservoir poses a major challenge to viral eradication. Our results demonstrate that chronically infected patients retain a broad spectrum viral-specific CTL response and that appropriate boosting of this response may be required for the elimination of the latent reservoir. PMID:25561180

  12. Structured Observations Reveal Slow HIV-1 CTL Escape

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Hannah E.; Hurst, Jacob; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Flanagan, Peter; Vass, Laura; Fidler, Sarah; Weber, Jonathan; Babiker, Abdel; Phillips, Rodney E.; McLean, Angela R.; Frater, John

    2015-01-01

    The existence of viral variants that escape from the selection pressures imposed by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in HIV-1 infection is well documented, but it is unclear when they arise, with reported measures of the time to escape in individuals ranging from days to years. A study of participants enrolled in the SPARTAC (Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at HIV Seroconversion) clinical trial allowed direct observation of the evolution of CTL escape variants in 125 adults with primary HIV-1 infection observed for up to three years. Patient HLA-type, longitudinal CD8+ T-cell responses measured by IFN-γ ELISpot and longitudinal HIV-1 gag, pol, and nef sequence data were used to study the timing and prevalence of CTL escape in the participants whilst untreated. Results showed that sequence variation within CTL epitopes at the first time point (within six months of the estimated date of seroconversion) was consistent with most mutations being transmitted in the infecting viral strain rather than with escape arising within the first few weeks of infection. Escape arose throughout the first three years of infection, but slowly and steadily. Approximately one third of patients did not drive any new escape in an HLA-restricted epitope in just under two years. Patients driving several escape mutations during these two years were rare and the median and modal numbers of new escape events in each patient were one and zero respectively. Survival analysis of time to escape found that possession of a protective HLA type significantly reduced time to first escape in a patient (p = 0.01), and epitopes escaped faster in the face of a measurable CD8+ ELISpot response (p = 0.001). However, even in an HLA matched host who mounted a measurable, specific, CD8+ response the average time before the targeted epitope evolved an escape mutation was longer than two years. PMID:25642847

  13. Defective HIV-1 proviruses produce novel protein-coding RNA species in HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Imamichi, Hiromi; Dewar, Robin L; Adelsberger, Joseph W; Rehm, Catherine A; O'Doherty, Una; Paxinos, Ellen E; Fauci, Anthony S; Lane, H Clifford

    2016-08-02

    Despite years of plasma HIV-RNA levels <40 copies per milliliter during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the majority of HIV-infected patients exhibit persistent seropositivity to HIV-1 and evidence of immune activation. These patients also show persistence of proviruses of HIV-1 in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Many of these proviruses have been characterized as defective and thus thought to contribute little to HIV-1 pathogenesis. By combining 5'LTR-to-3'LTR single-genome amplification and direct amplicon sequencing, we have identified the presence of "defective" proviruses capable of transcribing novel unspliced HIV-RNA (usHIV-RNA) species in patients at all stages of HIV-1 infection. Although these novel usHIV-RNA transcripts had exon structures that were different from those of the known spliced HIV-RNA variants, they maintained translationally competent ORFs, involving elements of gag, pol, env, rev, and nef to encode a series of novel HIV-1 chimeric proteins. These novel usHIV-RNAs were detected in five of five patients, including four of four patients with prolonged viral suppression of HIV-RNA levels <40 copies per milliliter for more than 6 y. Our findings suggest that the persistent defective proviruses of HIV-1 are not "silent," but rather may contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by stimulating host-defense pathways that target foreign nucleic acids and proteins.

  14. Quantitative, competitive PCR assay for HIV-1 using a microplate-based detection system.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, P C; Hart, C E

    1998-05-01

    We have developed a quantitative competitive PCR (QC-PCR) assay in a microplate format for quantifying human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) DNA or RNA in a broad range of source materials. Our QC-PCR assay is a modification of technique originally described by Piatak et al. (1993), which is based on the presence of a competitive internal standard containing an internal 80-bp deletion of HIV-1 gag target sequence. For improved detection and quantification of the wild-type and internal-standard PCR products in a microplate format, we introduced a non-HIV, 31-bp insert into the internal standard as a probe hybridization site that does not cross-hybridize with wild-type HIV-1 products. By using a primer pair in which one primer is biotinylated, QC-PCRs can be bound to a streptavidin-coated microplate, denatured and probed with a digoxigenin (Dig)-labeled, wild-type or internal-standard probe. The hybridized Dig-labeled probes are detected with an anti-Dig antibody conjugated to detector molecules for luminometry (aequorin) or optical densitometry (peroxidase), yielding results that are quantifiable over the range of 100-10,000 copies of HIV gag. Tested source materials for HIV-1 DNA or RNA quantification include plasma, vaginal lavage and cultured cells. The application of the QC-PCR assay using the microplate format affords a convenient and cost-effective method for quantifying HIV-1 proviral and viral loads from a variety of body fluids, cells and tissues.

  15. Excision of HIV-1 DNA by gene editing: a proof-of-concept in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, R; Bella, R; Yin, C; Otte, J; Ferrante, P; Gendelman, H E; Li, H; Booze, R; Gordon, J; Hu, W; Khalili, K

    2016-08-01

    A CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing strategy has been remarkable in excising segments of integrated HIV-1 DNA sequences from the genome of latently infected human cell lines and by introducing InDel mutations, suppressing HIV-1 replication in patient-derived CD4+ T-cells, ex vivo. Here, we employed a short version of the Cas9 endonuclease, saCas9, together with a multiplex of guide RNAs (gRNAs) for targeting the viral DNA sequences within the 5'-LTR and the Gag gene for removing critically important segments of the viral DNA in transgenic mice and rats encompassing the HIV-1 genome. Tail-vein injection of transgenic mice with a recombinant Adeno-associated virus 9 (rAAV9) vector expressing saCas9 and the gRNAs, rAAV:saCas9/gRNA, resulted in the cleavage of integrated HIV-1 DNA and excision of a 978 bp DNA fragment spanning between the LTR and Gag gene in the spleen, liver, heart, lung and kidney as well as in the circulating lymphocytes. Retro-orbital inoculation of rAAV9:saCas9/gRNA in transgenic rats eliminated a targeted segment of viral DNA and substantially decreased the level of viral gene expression in circulating blood lymphocytes. The results from the proof-of-concept studies, for the first time, demonstrate the in vivo eradication of HIV-1 DNA by CRISPR/Cas9 on delivery by an rAAV9 vector in a range of cells and tissues that harbor integrated copies of viral DNA.

  16. Continued Follow-Up of Phambili Phase 2b Randomized HIV-1 Vaccine Trial Participants Supports Increased HIV-1 Acquisition among Vaccinated Men

    PubMed Central

    Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Churchyard, Gavin; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Laher, Fatima; Roux, Surita; Mngadi, Kathryn; Innes, Craig; Mathebula, Matsontso; Allen, Mary; Bentley, Carter; Gilbert, Peter B.; Robertson, Michael; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Gray, Glenda E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Phase 2b double-blinded, randomized Phambili/HVTN 503 trial evaluated safety and efficacy of the MRK Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine vs placebo in sexually active HIV-1 seronegative participants in South Africa. Enrollment and vaccinations stopped and participants were unblinded but continued follow-up when the Step study evaluating the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean, and Australia was unblinded for non-efficacy. Final Phambili analyses found more HIV-1 infections amongst vaccine than placebo recipients, impelling the HVTN 503-S recall study. Methods HVTN 503-S sought to enroll all 695 HIV-1 uninfected Phambili participants, provide HIV testing, risk reduction counseling, physical examination, risk behavior assessment and treatment assignment recall. After adding HVTN 503-S data, HIV-1 infection hazard ratios (HR vaccine vs. placebo) were estimated by Cox models. Results Of the 695 eligible, 465 (67%) enrolled with 230 from the vaccine group and 235 from the placebo group. 38% of the 184 Phambili dropouts were enrolled. Enrollment did not differ by treatment group, gender, or baseline HSV-2. With the additional 1286 person years of 503-S follow-up, the estimated HR over Phambili and HVTN 503-S follow-up was 1.52 (95% CI 1.08–2.15, p = 0.02, 82 vaccine/54 placebo infections). The HR was significant for men (HR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.49, 5.06, p = 0.001) but not for women (HR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.73, 1.72, p = 0.62). Conclusion The additional follow-up from HVTN 503-S supported the Phambili finding of increased HIV-1 acquisition among vaccinated men and strengthened the evidence of lack of vaccine effect among women. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00413725 SA National Health Research Database DOH-27-0207-1539 PMID:26368824

  17. Sequence analysis of the gag-pol gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 of intersubtype (B'/C) recombinant strain in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jing-rong; Xin, Ruo-lei; Bai, Li-shi; Lu, Hong-yan; Yu, Shuang-qin; Zeng, Yi

    2011-03-01

    Little is known about the molecular and biological properties of HIV-1 intersubtype B'/C in Beijing. To fill the gap, we sequenced and analyzed the gag-pol genes from 39 HIV-1 B'/C recombinant infectors in Beijing, China during 2007. The results show that 36 CRF07_BC and 2 CRF08_BC isolates have a structural profile identical or nearly identical to CRF07_BC or CRF08_BC according to sequences in the gag-pol regions. The CRF07_BC circulating in injecting drug users (IDUs) and heterosexuals forms a diverse phylogenetic tree and most isolates from homosexuals cluster together. However, all the B'/C recombinant strains were remarkable for their low interpatient diversity in gag-pol genes (3.1, 3.0, and 2.2% for isolates from IDUs, heterosexuals, and homosexuals, respectively). We identified I7V, E91G, N242T, and K361R in the gag gene and R290I (HXB2 positions) in the pol gene as signature amino acid substitutions characteristic of HIV-1 CRF07_BC from the Beijing lineage. In addition, one new B'/C recombinant was detected. These results may contribute to an understanding of HIV-1 in Beijing.

  18. Complex subtype diversity of HIV-1 among drug users in major Kenyan cities.

    PubMed

    Gounder, Kamini; Oyaro, Micah; Padayachi, Nagavelli; Zulu, Thando Mbali; de Oliveira, Tulio; Wylie, John; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2017-01-09

    Drug users are increasingly recognized as a key population driving HIV spread in sub-Saharan Africa. To determine HIV-1 subtypes circulating in this population group and explore possible geographic differences, we analyzed HIV-1 sequences among drug users from Nairobi, Mombasa and Kisumu in Kenya. We sequenced gag and env from 55 drug users. Subtype analysis from 220 gag clonal sequences from 54/55 participants (median=4/participant) showed that 44.4% were A, 16.7% were C, 3.7% were D and 35.2% were intersubtype recombinants. Of 156 env clonal sequences from 48/55 subjects (median=3/participant), 45.8% were subtype A, 14.6% were C, 6.3% were D and 33.3% were recombinants. Comparative analysis of both genes showed that 30 (63.8%) participants had concordant subtypes while 17 (36.2%) were discordant. We identified one genetically-linked transmission pair and 2 cases of dual infection. These data are indicative of extensive HIV-1 intersubtype recombination in Kenya and suggest decline in subtype D prevalence.

  19. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and GAG mimetics regulate the behavior of stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Lyu, Zhonglin; Gu, Hao; Li, Dan; Chen, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear sulfated polysaccharides that exist in most mammalian cells. By undergoing conjugation with various proteins, GAGs play important roles in a variety of bioactivities, including promoting stem cell differentiation. However, they have their own intrinsic disadvantages that limit their further applications for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Therefore, more and more GAG-mimetic materials have been studied as natural GAG analogs for emerging applications. This review explains the mechanism of how GAGs regulate stem cell differentiation and elaborates on the current progress of the applications of GAG-based materials on regulating stem cell differentiation. The types and applications of GAG-mimetic materials on regulating stem cell differentiation are introduced as well. Finally, the challenges and perspectives for GAGs and their mimetics in regulating stem cell differentiation are discussed.

  20. Development of a novel anti-HIV-1 agent from within: Effect of chimeric Vpr-containing protease cleavage site residues on virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Serio, D.; Rizvi, T. A.; Cartas, M.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Weber, I. T.; Koprowski, H.; Srinivasan, A.

    1997-01-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag–Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection. PMID:9096396

  1. The HIV-1 p6/EIAV p9 docking site in Alix is autoinhibited as revealed by a conformation-sensitive anti-Alix monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xi; Pan, Shujuan; Sun, Le; Corvera, Joe; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2008-09-01

    Alix [ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2)-interacting protein X], a component of the endosomal sorting machinery, contains a three-dimensional docking site for HIV-1 p6(Gag) or EIAV (equine infectious anaemia virus) p9(Gag), and binding of the viral protein to this docking site allows the virus to hijack the host endosomal sorting machinery for budding from the plasma membrane. In the present study, we identified a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes the docking site for p6(Gag)/p9(Gag) and we used this antibody to probe the accessibility of the docking site in Alix. Our results show that the docking site is not available in cytosolic or recombinant Alix under native conditions and becomes available upon addition of the detergent Nonidet P40 or SDS. In HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cell lysates, an active p6(Gag)/p9(Gag) docking site is specifically available in Alix from the membrane fraction. The findings of the present study demonstrate that formation or exposure of the p6(Gag)/p9(Gag) docking site in Alix is a regulated event and that Alix association with the membrane may play a positive role in this process.

  2. Structural And Functional Studies of ALIX Interactions With YPXnL Late Domains of HIV-1 And EIAV

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Q.; Fisher, R.D.; Chung, H.-Y.; Myszka, D.G.; Sundquist, W.I.; Hill, C.P.

    2009-05-28

    Retrovirus budding requires short peptide motifs (late domains) located within the viral Gag protein that function by recruiting cellular factors. The YPX{sub n}L late domains of HIV and other lentiviruses recruit the protein ALIX (also known as AIP1), which also functions in vesicle formation at the multivesicular body and in the abscission stage of cytokinesis. Here, we report the crystal structures of ALIX in complex with the YPX{sub n}L late domains from HIV-1 and EIAV. The two distinct late domains bind at the same site on the ALIX V domain but adopt different conformations that allow them to make equivalent contacts. Binding studies and functional assays verified the importance of key interface residues and revealed that binding affinities are tuned by context-dependent effects. These results reveal how YPX{sub n}L late domains recruit ALIX to facilitate virus budding and how ALIX can bind YPX{sub n}L sequences with both n = 1 and n = 3.

  3. Progress in HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors: A Review of their Chemical Structure Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hajimahdi, Zahra; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme, one of the three main enzymes of HIV-1, catalyzed the insertion of the viral DNA into the genome of host cells. Because of the lack of its homologue in human cells and its essential role in HIV-1 replication, IN inhibition represents an attractive therapeutic target for HIV-1 treatment. Since identification of IN as a promising therapeutic target, a major progress has been made, which has facilitated and led to the approval of three drugs. This review focused on the structural features of the most important IN inhibitors and categorized them structurally in 10 scaffolds. We also briefly discussed the structural and functional properties of HIV-1 IN and binding modes of IN inhibitors. The SAR analysis of the known IN inhibitors provides some useful clues to the possible future discovery of novel IN inhibitors. PMID:28243261

  4. Macrophages and HIV-1: An Unhealthy Constellation.

    PubMed

    Sattentau, Quentin J; Stevenson, Mario

    2016-03-09

    Lentiviruses have a long-documented association with macrophages. Abundant evidence exists for in vitro and, in a tissue-specific manner, in vivo infection of macrophages by the primate lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, macrophage contribution to aspects of HIV-1 and SIV pathogenesis, and their role in viral persistence in individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, remains unclear. Here we discuss recent evidence implicating macrophages in HIV-1-mediated disease and highlight directions for further investigation.

  5. Probing the HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking pathway and dimerization by genetic recombination and single virion analyses.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael D; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Chen, Jianbo; Hammarskjöld, Marie-Louise; Rekosh, David; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2009-10-01

    Once transcribed, the nascent full-length RNA of HIV-1 must travel to the appropriate host cell sites to be translated or to find a partner RNA for copackaging to form newly generated viruses. In this report, we sought to delineate the location where HIV-1 RNA initiates dimerization and the influence of the RNA transport pathway used by the virus on downstream events essential to viral replication. Using a cell-fusion-dependent recombination assay, we demonstrate that the two RNAs destined for copackaging into the same virion select each other mostly within the cytoplasm. Moreover, by manipulating the RNA export element in the viral genome, we show that the export pathway taken is important for the ability of RNA molecules derived from two viruses to interact and be copackaged. These results further illustrate that at the point of dimerization the two main cellular export pathways are partially distinct. Lastly, by providing Gag in trans, we have demonstrated that Gag is able to package RNA from either export pathway, irrespective of the transport pathway used by the gag mRNA. These findings provide unique insights into the process of RNA export in general, and more specifically, of HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking.

  6. The HIV-1 epidemic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Puren, A J

    2002-01-01

    The first reported cases of HIV-1 infection in South Africa occurred in 1982. Two distinct HIV-1 epidemic patterns were recognized. Initially the infection was prevalent in white males who had sex with males. The HIV-1 clade B was associated with this group. By 1989, the second epidemic was recognized primarily in the black population. Infections in this case were mainly heterosexual in origin. The HIV-1 clade involved was mainly C. The national HIV-1 sero-prevalence in antenatal attendees was less than 1% in 1990 and by 1994 this figure had risen to 7.5%. The most recent antenatal surveillance for HIV-1 sero-prevalence in 1999 revealed the following. The national prevalence rate for 1999 was 22.4% compared with the 1998 rate of 22.8%. The data highlighted the profound effect the epidemic had and will have on the disease burden in South Africa and by extension on the social and economic fronts. This view was emphasised by the impact HIV-1 infection had on tuberculosis. For example, sentinel surveys have attributed 44% of tuberculosis cases to HIV-1 infection. Moreover, the high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections will certainly exacerbate the HIV-1 epidemic.

  7. HIV-1 Adapts To Replicate in Cells Expressing Common Marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Oliva, Alberto; Finzi, Andrés; Haim, Hillel; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that a major block to HIV-1 replication in common marmosets operates at the level of viral entry and that this block can be overcome by adaptation of the virus in tissue-cultured cells. However, our current studies indicate that HIV-1 encounters additional postentry blocks in common marmoset peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Here, we show that the common marmoset APOBEC3G (A3G) and BST2 proteins block HIV-1 in cell cultures. Using a directed-evolution method that takes advantage of the natural ability of HIV-1 to mutate during replication, we have been able to overcome these blocks in tissue-cultured cells. In the adapted viruses, specific changes were observed in gag, vif, env, and nef. The contribution of these changes to virus replication in the presence of the A3G and BST2 restriction factors was studied. We found that certain amino acid changes in Vif and Env that arise during adaptation to marmoset A3G and BST2 allow the virus to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors. The changes in Vif reduce expression levels and encapsidation of marmoset APOBEC3G, while the changes in Env increase viral fitness and discretely favor cell-to-cell transmission of the virus, allowing viral escape from these restriction factors. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 can infect only humans and chimpanzees. The main reason for this narrow tropism is the presence in many species of dominant-acting factors, known as restriction factors, that block viral replication in a species-specific way. We have been exploring the blocks to HIV-1 in common marmosets, with the ultimate goal of developing a new animal model of HIV-1 infection in these monkeys. In this study, we observed that common marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2, two known restriction factors, are able to block HIV-1 in cell cultures. We have adapted HIV-1 to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors and have characterized the mechanisms of escape. These studies can help in the

  8. Ordered processing of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 GagPol precursor is influenced by the context of the embedded viral protease.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Steven C; Clemente, Jose C; Jeung, Jennifer A; Dunn, Ben M; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2005-08-01

    Ordered and accurate processing of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) GagPol polyprotein precursor by a virally encoded protease is an indispensable step in the appropriate assembly of infectious viral particles. The HIV-1 protease (PR) is a 99-amino-acid enzyme that is translated as part of the GagPol precursor. Previously, we have demonstrated that the initial events in precursor processing are accomplished by the PR domain within GagPol in cis, before it is released from the polyprotein. Despite the critical role that ordered processing of the precursor plays in viral replication, the forces that define the order of cleavage remain poorly understood. Using an in vitro assay in which the full-length HIV-1 GagPol is processed by the embedded PR, we examined the effect of PR context (embedded within GagPol versus the mature 99-amino-acid enzyme) on precursor processing. Our data demonstrate that the PR domain within GagPol is constrained in its ability to cleave some of the processing sites in the precursor. Further, we find that this constraint is dependent upon the presence of a proline as the initial amino acid in the embedded PR; substitution of an alanine at this position produces enhanced cleavage at additional sites when the precursor is processed by the embedded, but not the mature, PR. Overall, our data support a model in which the selection of processing sites and the order of precursor processing are defined, at least in part, by the structure of GagPol itself.

  9. Defined amino acids in the gag proteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 are functionally active during virus assembly.

    PubMed

    Kattenbeck, B; Rohrhofer, A; Niedrig, M; Wolf, H; Modrow, S

    1996-01-01

    A structurally highly ordered arrangement of the polyprotein precursor, Pr55gag is a necessary prerequisite for assembly, budding and maturation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In particular, distinct regions of the matrix protein (p17) and the capsid protein (p24) contained within Pr55gag are functionally active during these processes. In order to determine such regions we exchanged amino acid triplets within p17 (amino acids 46-61) and p24 (amino acids 341-352) for alanine residues and deleted the whole regions. Synthetic peptides derived from these regions had been shown previously to inhibit the production of infectious virus. The effect of the mutations on the release of viral particles was investigated by using recombinant baculoviruses for the expression of mutated Pr55gag as virus-like particles and by use of the respective HI proviruses for monitoring the production of infectious particles.

  10. Dendritic Cells from HIV Controllers Have Low Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection In Vitro but High Capacity to Capture HIV-1 Particles.

    PubMed

    Hamimi, Chiraz; David, Annie; Versmisse, Pierre; Weiss, Laurence; Bruel, Timothée; Zucman, David; Appay, Victor; Moris, Arnaud; Ungeheuer, Marie-Noëlle; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Boufassa, Faroudy; Lambotte, Olivier; Pancino, Gianfranco; Sáez-Cirión, Asier

    2016-01-01

    HIV controllers (HICs), rare HIV-1 infected individuals able to control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy, are characterized by an efficient polyfunctional and cytolytic HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response. The mechanisms underlying the induction and maintenance of such response in many HICs despite controlled viremia are not clear. Dendritic cells play a crucial role in the generation and reactivation of T cell responses but scarce information is available on those cells in HICs. We found that monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) from HICs are less permissive to HIV-1 infection than cells from healthy donors. In contrast MDDCs from HICs are particularly efficient at capturing HIV-1 particles when compared to cells from healthy donors or HIV-1 patients with suppressed viral load on antiretroviral treatment. MDDCs from HICs expressed on their surface high levels of syndecan-3, DC-SIGN and MMR, which could cooperate to facilitate HIV-1 capture. The combination of low susceptibility to HIV-1 infection but enhanced capacity to capture particles might allow MDDCs from HICs to preserve their function from the deleterious effect of infection while facilitating induction of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells by cross-presentation in a context of low viremia.

  11. Dendritic Cells from HIV Controllers Have Low Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection In Vitro but High Capacity to Capture HIV-1 Particles

    PubMed Central

    Hamimi, Chiraz; David, Annie; Versmisse, Pierre; Weiss, Laurence; Bruel, Timothée; Zucman, David; Appay, Victor; Moris, Arnaud; Ungeheuer, Marie-Noëlle; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Boufassa, Faroudy; Lambotte, Olivier; Pancino, Gianfranco; Sáez-Cirión, Asier

    2016-01-01

    HIV controllers (HICs), rare HIV-1 infected individuals able to control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy, are characterized by an efficient polyfunctional and cytolytic HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response. The mechanisms underlying the induction and maintenance of such response in many HICs despite controlled viremia are not clear. Dendritic cells play a crucial role in the generation and reactivation of T cell responses but scarce information is available on those cells in HICs. We found that monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) from HICs are less permissive to HIV-1 infection than cells from healthy donors. In contrast MDDCs from HICs are particularly efficient at capturing HIV-1 particles when compared to cells from healthy donors or HIV-1 patients with suppressed viral load on antiretroviral treatment. MDDCs from HICs expressed on their surface high levels of syndecan-3, DC-SIGN and MMR, which could cooperate to facilitate HIV-1 capture. The combination of low susceptibility to HIV-1 infection but enhanced capacity to capture particles might allow MDDCs from HICs to preserve their function from the deleterious effect of infection while facilitating induction of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells by cross-presentation in a context of low viremia. PMID:27505169

  12. A Phase I Randomized Therapeutic MVA-B Vaccination Improves the Magnitude and Quality of the T Cell Immune Responses in HIV-1-Infected Subjects on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Carmen Elena; Perdiguero, Beatriz; García-Arriaza, Juan; Cepeda, Victoria; Sánchez-Sorzano, Carlos Óscar; Mothe, Beatriz; Jiménez, José Luis; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; Gatell, Jose M.; López Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Brander, Christian; García, Felipe; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Trial Design Previous studies suggested that poxvirus-based vaccines might be instrumental in the therapeutic HIV field. A phase I clinical trial was conducted in HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), with CD4 T cell counts above 450 cells/mm3 and undetectable viremia. Thirty participants were randomized (2:1) to receive either 3 intramuscular injections of MVA-B vaccine (coding for clade B HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens) or placebo, followed by interruption of HAART. Methods The magnitude, breadth, quality and phenotype of the HIV-1-specific T cell response were assayed by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in 22 volunteers pre- and post-vaccination. Results MVA-B vaccine induced newly detected HIV-1-specific CD4 T cell responses and expanded pre-existing responses (mostly against Gag, Pol and Nef antigens) that were high in magnitude, broadly directed and showed an enhanced polyfunctionality with a T effector memory (TEM) phenotype, while maintaining the magnitude and quality of the pre-existing HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses. In addition, vaccination also triggered preferential CD8+ T cell polyfunctional responses to the MVA vector antigens that increase in magnitude after two and three booster doses. Conclusion MVA-B vaccination represents a feasible strategy to improve T cell responses in individuals with pre-existing HIV-1-specific immunity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571466 PMID:26544853

  13. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  14. Immunological and pharmacological strategies to reactivate HIV-1 from latently infected cells: a possibility for HIV-1 paediatric patients?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bonet, M; Clemente, M I; Serramía, M J; Moreno, S; Muñoz, E; Muñoz-Fernández, M A

    2015-07-01

    The limitations to establishing a viral reservoir facilitated by early cART in children could play a critical role in achieving natural control of viral replication upon discontinuation of cART, which could be defined as 'functional cure'. Viral reservoirs could provide a persistent source of recrudescent viraemia after withdrawal of cART, despite temporary remission of HIV-1 infection, as observed in the 'Mississippi baby'. Intensification of cART has been proposed as a strategy to control residual replication and to diminish the reservoirs. The effects of cART intensification with maraviroc persisted after discontinuation of the drug in HIV-1-infected adults. However, in HIV-1-infected children, the emergence of CXCR4-using variants occurs very early, and the use of CCR5 antagonists in these children as intensification therapy may not be the best alternative. New treatments to eradicate HIV-1 are focused on the activation of viral production from latently infected cells to purge and clear HIV-1 reservoirs. This strategy involves the use of a wide range of small molecules called latency-reversing agents (LRAs). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) such as givinostat, belinostat and panobinostat, and class I-selective HDACis that include oxamflatin, NCH-51 and romidepsin, are the most advanced in clinical testing for HIV-1 LRAs. Panobinostat and romidepsin show an efficient reactivation profile in J89GFP cells, a lymphocyte HIV-1 latently infected cell line considered a relevant model to study post-integration HIV-1 latency and reactivation. Clinical trials with panobinostat and romidepsin have been performed in children with other pathologies and it could be reasonable to design a clinical trial using these drugs in combination with cART in HIV-1-infected children.

  15. Evidence for direct association of Vpr and matrix protein p17 within the HIV-1 virion.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Yoshimoto, J; Isaka, Y; Miki, S; Suyama, A; Adachi, A; Hayami, M; Fujiwara, T; Yoshie, O

    1996-06-01

    Vpr is one of the auxiliary proteins of HIV-1 and is selectively incorporated into the virion by a process involving the C-terminal p6 portion of the Gag precursor Pr55. Vpr and the matrix protein p17 are the components of the viral preintegration complex and appear to play important roles in the nuclear transport of proviral DNA in nondividing cells. In the present study, we have demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments that Vpr associates with matrix protein p17 but not with capsid protein p24 within the HIV-1 virion. Experiments employing the yeast two-hybrid GAL4 assay for protein-protein interactions also demonstrated a direct association between Vpr and the C-terminal region of matrix protein p17. Association of Vpr and the matrix protein p17 within the mature virion is consistent with their collaborative role in the nuclear transportation of the viral preintegration complex in nondividing cells such as macrophages.

  16. A Unique Spumavirus Gag N-terminal Domain with Functional Properties of Orthoretroviral Matrix and Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Neil J.; Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Yap, Melvyn W.; Ogrodowicz, Roksana W.; Stanke, Nicole; Reh, Juliane; Lindemann, Dirk; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Taylor, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    The Spumaretrovirinae, or foamyviruses (FVs) are complex retroviruses that infect many species of monkey and ape. Although FV infection is apparently benign, trans-species zoonosis is commonplace and has resulted in the isolation of the Prototypic Foamy Virus (PFV) from human sources and the potential for germ-line transmission. Despite little sequence homology, FV and orthoretroviral Gag proteins perform equivalent functions, including genome packaging, virion assembly, trafficking and membrane targeting. In addition, PFV Gag interacts with the FV Envelope (Env) protein to facilitate budding of infectious particles. Presently, there is a paucity of structural information with regards FVs and it is unclear how disparate FV and orthoretroviral Gag molecules share the same function. Therefore, in order to probe the functional overlap of FV and orthoretroviral Gag and learn more about FV egress and replication we have undertaken a structural, biophysical and virological study of PFV-Gag. We present the crystal structure of a dimeric amino terminal domain from PFV, Gag-NtD, both free and in complex with the leader peptide of PFV Env. The structure comprises a head domain together with a coiled coil that forms the dimer interface and despite the shared function it is entirely unrelated to either the capsid or matrix of Gag from other retroviruses. Furthermore, we present structural, biochemical and virological data that reveal the molecular details of the essential Gag-Env interaction and in addition we also examine the specificity of Trim5α restriction of PFV. These data provide the first information with regards to FV structural proteins and suggest a model for convergent evolution of gag genes where structurally unrelated molecules have become functionally equivalent. PMID:23675305

  17. The Safety and Immunogenicity of an Interleukin-12-Enhanced Multiantigen DNA Vaccine Delivered by Electroporation for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Zheng, Lu; Wilson, Cara C.; Tebas, Pablo; Matining, Roy M.; Egan, Michael A.; Eldridge, John; Landay, Alan L.; Clifford, David B.; Luetkemeyer, Anne F.; Tiu, Jennifer; Martinez, Ana; Janik, Jennifer; Spitz, Teresa A.; Hural, John; McElrath, Juliana; Frahm, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic vaccination is being studied in eradication and “functional cure” strategies for HIV-1. The Profectus Biosciences (Tarrytown, NY) multiantigen (MAG) HIV-1 DNA vaccine encodes HIV-1 Gag/Pol, Nef/Tat/Vif, and Envelope, and interleukin-12 (IL-12) and is delivered by electroporation (EP) combined with intramuscular injection (IM-EP). Methods Sixty-two HIV-1-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (plasma HIV-1 RNA levels ≤200 copies/mL; CD4+ T-cell counts ≥500 cells/mm3) were randomly allocated 5:1 to receive vaccine or placebo. At weeks 0, 4 and 12, four consecutive cohorts received 3000 μg HIV MAG pDNA with 0, 50, 250, or 1000 μg of IL-12 pDNA by IM-EP. A 5th cohort received HIV MAG pDNA plus 1000 μg of IL-12 pDNA by standard IM injection. Results CD4+ T cells expressing IL-2 in response to Gag and Pol and interferon-γ responses to Gag, Pol, and Env increased from baseline to week 14 in the low-dose (50-μg) IL-12 arm vs. placebo (P < 0.05; intracellular cytokine staining). The total increase in the IL-2 expressing CD4+ T-cell responses to any antigen was also higher in the low-dose IL-12 arm vs. placebo (P = 0.04). Cytokine responses by CD8 T cells to HIV antigens were not increased in any vaccine arm relative to placebo. Conclusions HIV-1 MAG/low-dose IL-12 DNA vaccine delivered by IM-EP augmented CD4+ but not CD8+ T-cell responses to multiple HIV-1 antigens. PMID:26761518

  18. High Prevalence of HIV-1 Intersubtype B′/C Recombinants among Injecting Drug Users in Dehong, China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaoxu; An, Minghui; Zhao, Bin; Duan, Song; Yang, Shaomin; Xu, Junjie; Zhang, Min; McGoogan, Jennifer M.; Takebe, Yutaka; Shang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the distribution of HIV-1 genotypes among injecting drug users (IDUs) from Dehong, Yunnan province. Materials and Methods Blood samples from a total of 95 HIV-positive IDUs were retrospectively analyzed. Samples were collected between 2005 and 2009 from four cities in Dehong prefecture, western Yunnan province, the geographical origin of the HIV epidemic in China. HIV-1 gag, partial pol, vpr-env fragment, half-genome, or near-full-length sequences were analyzed to determine the HIV-1 genotypes of each subject. Results were compared with findings from past studies of IDUs in Dehong and in neighboring Myanmar. Results We observed a high prevalence of B′/C recombinants (82.4%) among IDUs in Dehong, the structural profiles of which do not match those previously reported in Dehong or in Myanmar. Furthermore, statistically significant differences in geographical and temporal distributions of HIV-1 genotypes were characterized by a predominance of HIV-1 B′/C recombinant forms among older subjects(p = 0.034), subjects from Longchuan district (p = 0.022), and subjects diagnosed between 2000 and 2004 (p = 0.004). Conclusions The increasing prevalence of multiple, new B′/C recombinant forms suggest that HIV-1 intersubtype recombination is substantial and ongoing in western Yunnan. This reflects the high-risk behavior of IDUs in this region and argues the need for stronger monitoring and prevention measures in Dehong and other high-prevalence areas around China. PMID:23741489

  19. RNA and DNA binding properties of HIV-1 Vif protein: a fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Henriet, Simon; Dumas, Philippe; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2007-09-07

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is a small basic protein essential for viral fitness and pathogenicity. Some "non-permissive" cell lines cannot sustain replication of Vif(-) HIV-1 virions. In these cells, Vif counteracts the natural antiretroviral activity of the DNA-editing enzymes APOBEC3G/3F. Moreover, Vif is packaged into viral particles through a strong interaction with genomic RNA in viral nucleoprotein complexes. To gain insights into determinants of this binding process, we performed the first characterization of Vif/nucleic acid interactions using Vif intrinsic fluorescence. We determined the affinity of Vif for RNA fragments corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. Our results demonstrated preferential and moderately cooperative binding for RNAs corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of HIV-1 (5'-untranslated region) and gag (cooperativity parameter omega approximately 65-80, and K(d) = 45-55 nM). In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy allowed us to point out the TAR apical loop and a short region in gag as primary strong affinity binding sites (K(d) = 9.5-14 nM). Interestingly, beside its RNA binding properties, the Vif protein can also bind the corresponding DNA oligonucleotides and their complementary counterparts with an affinity similar to the one observed for the RNA sequences, while other DNA sequences displayed reduced affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that Vif binding to RNA and DNA offers several non-exclusive ways to counteract APOBEC3G/3F factors, in addition to the well documented Vif-induced degradation by the proteasome and to the Vif-mediated repression of translation of these antiviral factors.

  20. Early HLA-B*57-Restricted CD8+ T Lymphocyte Responses Predict HIV-1 Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ibarrondo, F. Javier; Sugar, Catherine A.; Hausner, Mary Ann; Shih, Roger; Ng, Hwee L.; Detels, Roger; Margolick, Joseph B.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Phair, John; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Yang, Otto O.

    2012-01-01

    Although HLA-B*57 (B57) is associated with slow progression to disease following HIV-1 infection, B57 heterozygotes display a wide spectrum of outcomes, including rapid progression, viremic slow progression, and elite control. Efforts to identify differences between B57-positive (B57+) slow progressors and B57+ rapid progressors have largely focused on cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) phenotypes and specificities during chronic stages of infection. Although CTL responses in the early months of infection are likely to be the most important for the long-term rate of HIV-1 disease progression, few data on the early CTL responses of eventual slow progressors have been available. Utilizing the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS), we retrospectively examined the early HIV-1-specific CTL responses of 14 B57+ individuals whose time to development of disease ranged from 3.5 years to longer than 25 years after infection. In general, a greater breadth of targeting of epitopes from structural proteins, especially Gag, as well as of highly conserved epitopes from any HIV-1 protein, correlated with longer times until disease. The single elite controller in the cohort was an outlier on several correlations of CTL targeting and time until disease, consistent with reports that elite control is typically not achieved solely by protective HLA-mediated CTLs. When targeting of individual epitopes was analyzed, we found that early CTL responses to the IW9 (ISPRTLNAW) epitope of Gag, while generally subdominant, correlated with delayed progression to disease. This is the first study to identify early CTL responses to IW9 as a correlate of protection in persons with HLA-B*57. PMID:22811521

  1. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol treatment during human monocyte differentiation reduces macrophage susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Julie C; Appelberg, Sofia; Goldberger, Bruce A; Klein, Thomas W; Sleasman, John W; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The major psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), also acts to suppress inflammatory responses. Receptors for THC, CB1, CB2, and GPR55, are differentially expressed on multiple cell types including monocytes and macrophages, which are important modulators of inflammation in vivo and target cells for HIV-1 infection. Use of recreational and medicinal marijuana is increasing, but the consequences of marijuana exposure on HIV-1 infection are unclear. Ex vivo studies were designed to investigate effects on HIV-1 infection in macrophages exposed to THC during or following differentiation. THC treatment of primary human monocytes during differentiation reduced HIV-1 infection of subsequent macrophages by replication competent or single cycle CCR5 using viruses. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with THC immediately prior to or continuously following HIV-1 exposure failed to alter infection. Specific receptor agonists indicated that the THC effect during monocyte differentiation was mediated primarily through CB2. THC reduced the number of p24 positive cells with little to no effect on virus production per infected cell, while quantitation of intracellular viral gag pinpointed the THC effect to an early event in the viral life cycle. Cells treated during differentiation with THC displayed reduced expression of CD14, CD16, and CD163 and donor dependent increases in mRNA expression of selected viral restriction factors, suggesting a fundamental alteration in phenotype. Ultimately, the mechanism of THC suppression of HIV-1 infection was traced to a reduction in cell surface HIV receptor (CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4) expression that diminished entry efficiency.

  2. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication by newly developed adamantane-containing polyanionic agents.

    PubMed

    Burstein, M E; Serbin, A V; Khakhulina, T V; Alymova, I V; Stotskaya, L L; Bogdan, O P; Manukchina, E E; Jdanov, V V; Sharova, N K; Bukrinskaya, A G

    1999-04-01

    Newly developed antiviral compounds consisting of an adamantane derivative chemically linked to a water-soluble polyanionic matrix were shown to inhibit HIV-1 infection in lymphoblastoid cells, HeLa CD4+ beta-galactosidase (MAGI) cells and macrophages. The effect of the compounds was recorded by measuring viral reverse transcriptase activity and p24 by ELISA in culture supernatant and by immunoblotting of cell lysates. In this paper we describe the data obtained with one of the most promising compounds, Amant. Amant was not toxic for the host cells at concentrations as high as 1 mg/ml. The inhibition of HIV-1 replication in MT-4 and MAGI cells was observed when Amant was added either before infection or with the virus (0 h of infection), and was expressed even when the compound added at 0 h was removed 1.5 h after infection. Its inhibitory concentration (IC50) against HIV-1 and HIV-2 replication was 2-6 and 93 microg/ml, respectively. The anti-HIV-1 effect of the compound was gradually decreased when it was added 1 and 2 h post infection, and no inhibition was observed when the compound was added 4 h after infection, suggesting that the compound as a membranotropic drug blocks an early step of replication. It completely prevented the transport of Gag proteins into the nuclei. Pretreatment of the virus with Amant did not reduce its infectious activity. The classical adamantane derivatives amantadine and rimantadine hydrochloride did not inhibit HIV replication.

  3. HIV-1-induced AIDS in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Del Prete, Gregory Q; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; McNatt, Matthew W; Bitzegeio, Julia; Raymond, Alice; Rodriguez, Anthony; Schmidt, Fabian; Mac Trubey, C; Smedley, Jeremy; Piatak, Michael; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2014-06-20

    Primate lentiviruses exhibit narrow host tropism, reducing the occurrence of zoonoses but also impairing the development of optimal animal models of AIDS. To delineate the factors limiting cross-species HIV-1 transmission, we passaged a modified HIV-1 in pigtailed macaques that were transiently depleted of CD8(+) cells during acute infection. During adaptation over four passages in macaques, HIV-1 acquired the ability to antagonize the macaque restriction factor tetherin, replicated at progressively higher levels, and ultimately caused marked CD4(+) T cell depletion and AIDS-defining conditions. Transient treatment with an antibody to CD8 during acute HIV-1 infection caused rapid progression to AIDS, whereas untreated animals exhibited an elite controller phenotype. Thus, an adapted HIV-1 can cause AIDS in macaques, and stark differences in outcome can be determined by immunological perturbations during early infection.

  4. A triclinic crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal domain of HIV-1 capsid protein with four molecules in the asymmetric unit reveals a novel packing interface.

    PubMed

    Lampel, Ayala; Yaniv, Oren; Berger, Or; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud; Frolow, Felix

    2013-06-01

    The Gag precursor is the major structural protein of the virion of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Capsid protein (CA), a cleavage product of Gag, plays an essential role in virus assembly both in Gag-precursor multimerization and in capsid core formation. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of CA contains 20 residues that are highly conserved across retroviruses and constitute the major homology region (MHR). Genetic evidence implies a role for the MHR in interactions between Gag precursors during the assembly of the virus, but the structural basis for this role remains elusive. This paper describes a novel triclinic structure of the HIV-1 CA CTD at 1.6 Å resolution with two canonical dimers of CA CTD in the asymmetric unit. The canonical dimers form a newly identified packing interface where interactions of four conserved MHR residues take place. This is the first structural indication that these MHR residues participate in the putative CTD-CTD interactions. These findings suggest that the molecules forming this novel interface resemble an intermediate structure that participates in the early steps of HIV-1 assembly. This interface may therefore provide a novel target for antiviral drugs.

  5. Sialoadhesin Expressed on IFN-Induced Monocytes Binds HIV-1 and Enhances Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Hans; Calosing, Cyrus; Sun, Bing; Pulliam, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Background HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1), a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-α and interferon-γ but not tumor necrosis factor-α. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection. Conclusions/Significance Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells. PMID:18414664

  6. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  7. A Novel Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form CRF76_01B Identified by Near Full-Length Genome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Satoko; Hachiya, Atsuko; Hosaka, Masumi; Matsuda, Masakazu; Ode, Hirotaka; Shigemi, Urara; Okazaki, Reiko; Sadamasu, Kenji; Nagashima, Mami; Toyokawa, Takao; Tateyama, Masao; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Sugiura, Wataru; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-03-01

    HIV-1 CRF01_AE and subtype B (B) have dominated and their different circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) have emerged in East and Southeast Asian countries. Here, we report a novel drug-resistant HIV-1 CRF. Five independent recombinant specimens exhibiting discordant subtype results for the gag, pol, and env sequences were isolated. These recombinants had the CRF01_AE (gag p17)/B (pol PR-RT and IN)/CRF01_AE (env C2-V3) pattern similar to CRF69_01B. Sequence analysis of four near full-length HIV-1 genomes revealed a unique phylogenetic cluster distinct from previously reported CRFs. Of the four recombinants, three shared an identical mosaic structure including seven breakpoints in the gag, pol, vif, and env regions, designated CRF76_01B. The one remaining recombinant had additional recombination breakpoints in the vpu region and exhibited another unique recombinant form composed of CRF76_01B and B. These findings provide important insight into the transmission dynamics of HIV-1 in Asia that may be important for its effective prevention.

  8. HIV-1 adenoviral vector vaccines expressing multi-trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL enhance T cell mediated anti-viral immunity.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Termini, James M; Gupta, Sachin; Raffa, Francesca N; Fuller, Katherine A; Rivas, Yaelis; Philip, Sakhi; Kornbluth, Richard S; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF) are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5) vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization) for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag) adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag) which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from vaccinia-Gag

  9. Gag grouper larvae pathways on the West Florida Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan; Peebles, Ernst

    2014-10-01

    A numerical circulation model, quantitatively assessed against in situ observations, is used to describe the circulation on the West Florida Continental Shelf during spring 2007 when pre-settlement gag (Mycteroperca microlepis) were present in the surf zone near Tampa Bay, Florida. The pre-settlement fish were found to be isotopically distinct from settled juveniles in the area, which is consistent with recent arrival at near shore nursery habitats from offshore spawning grounds. Simulated particle trajectories are employed to test hypotheses relating to either a surface or a near-bottom route of across-shelf transport. The surface-route hypothesis is rejected, whereas the bottom-route hypothesis is found to be consistent with the location of pre-settlement fish and their co-occurrence with macroalgae of offshore, hard-bottom origin. We conclude that gag larvae are transported to the near shore via the bottom Ekman layer and that such transport is facilitated by remote forcing associated with Gulf of Mexico Loop Current interactions with the shelf slope near the Dry Tortugas. Being that such remote forcing occurs inter-annually and not always in phase with the preferred spawning months (late winter through early spring), gag recruitment success should similarly vary with year and location.

  10. AIDS-protective HLA-B*27/B*57 and chimpanzee MHC class I molecules target analogous conserved areas of HIV-1/SIVcpz.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Natasja G; Heijmans, Corrine M C; Zoet, Yvonne M; de Ru, Arnoud H; Verreck, Frank A; van Veelen, Peter A; Drijfhout, Jan W; Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Remarque, Edmond J; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; van Rood, Jon J; Koning, Frits; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2010-08-24

    In the absence of treatment, most HIV-1-infected humans develop AIDS. However, a minority are long-term nonprogressors, and resistance is associated with the presence of particular HLA-B*27/B*57 molecules. In contrast, most HIV-1-infected chimpanzees do not contract AIDS. In comparison with humans, chimpanzees experienced an ancient selective sweep affecting the MHC class I repertoire. We have determined the peptide-binding properties of frequent chimpanzee MHC class I molecules, and show that, like HLA-B*27/B*57, they target similar conserved areas of HIV-1/SIV(cpz). In addition, many animals appear to possess multiple molecules targeting various conserved areas of the HIV-1/SIV(cpz) Gag protein, a quantitative aspect of the immune response that may further minimize the chance of viral escape. The functional characteristics of the contemporary chimpanzee MHC repertoire suggest that the selective sweep was caused by a lentiviral pandemic.

  11. Contribution of Gag and protease to variation in susceptibility to protease inhibitors between different strains of subtype B human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Katherine A; Mbisa, Jean L; Cane, Patricia A; Pillay, Deenan; Parry, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag can directly affect susceptibility to protease inhibitors (PIs) in the absence of known resistance mutations in protease. Inclusion of co-evolved Gag alongside protease in phenotypic drug susceptibility assays can alter PI susceptibility in comparison with protease with a WT Gag. Using a single-replication-cycle assay encompassing full-length Gag together with protease we demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility between a number of PI-naïve subtype B viruses. Six publicly available subtype B molecular clones, namely HXB2, NL4-3, SF2, YU2, JRFL and 89.6, displayed up to nine-fold reduced PI susceptibility in comparison with the assay reference strain. For two molecular clones, YU2 and JRFL, Gag contributed solely to the observed reduction in susceptibility, with the N-terminal region of Gag contributing significantly. Gag and protease from treatment-naïve, patient-derived viruses also demonstrated significant variation in susceptibility, with up to a 17-fold reduction to atazanavir in comparison with the assay reference strain. In contrast to the molecular clones, protease was the main determinant of the reduced susceptibility. Common polymorphisms in protease, including I13V, L63P and A71T, were shown to contribute to this reduction in PI susceptibility, in the absence of major resistance mutations. This study demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility of treatment-naïve patient viruses, and provided further evidence of the independent role of Gag, the protease substrate and in particular the N-terminus of Gag in PI susceptibility. It also highlighted the importance of considering co-evolved Gag and protease when assessing PI susceptibility.

  12. Adenoviral gene delivery for HIV-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vanniasinkam, T; Ertl, H C J

    2005-04-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues to spread throughout nations of Africa and Asia and is by now threatening to undermine the already frail infrastructure of developing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa that are hit the hardest. The only option to stem this epidemic is through inexpensive and efficacious vaccines that prevent or at least blunt HIV-1 infections. Despite decades of pre-clinical and clinical research such vaccines remain elusive. Most anti-viral vaccines act by inducing protective levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The envelope protein of HIV-1, the sole target of neutralizing antibodies, is constantly changing due to mutations, B cell epitopes are masked by heavy glycosylation and the protein's structural unfolding upon binding to its CD4 receptor and chemokine co-receptors. Efforts to induce broadly cross-reactive virus-neutralizing antibodies able to induce sterilizing or near sterilizing immunity to HIV-1 have thus failed. Studies have indicated that cell-mediated immune responses and in particular CD8+ T cell responses to internal viral proteins may control HIV-1 infections without necessarily preventing them. Adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of HIV-1 are eminently suited to stimulate potent CD8+ T cell responses against transgene products, such as antigens of HIV-1. They performed well in pre-clinical studies in rodents and nonhuman primates and are currently in human clinical trials. This review summarizes the published literature on adenoviral vectors as vaccine carriers for HIV-1 and discusses advantages and disadvantages of this vaccine modality.

  13. Structural mechanisms underlying sequence-dependent variations in GAG affinities of decorin binding protein A, a Borrelia burgdorferi adhesin.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli M; Wang, Xu

    2015-05-01

    Decorin-binding protein A (DBPA) is an important surface adhesin of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates the bacteria's colonization of human tissue by adhering to glycosaminoglycan (GAG), a sulfated polysaccharide. Interestingly, DBPA sequence variation among different strains of Borrelia spirochetes is high, resulting in significant differences in their GAG affinities. However, the structural mechanisms contributing to these differences are unknown. We determined the solution structures of DBPAs from strain N40 of B. burgdorferi and strain PBr of Borrelia garinii, two DBPA variants whose GAG affinities deviate significantly from strain B31, the best characterized version of DBPA. Our structures revealed that significant differences exist between PBr DBPA and B31/N40 DBPAs. In particular, the C-terminus of PBr DBPA, unlike C-termini from B31 and N40 DBPAs, is positioned away from the GAG-binding pocket and the linker between helices one and two of PBr DBPA is highly structured and retracted from the GAG-binding pocket. The repositioning of the C-terminus allowed the formation of an extra GAG-binding epitope in PBr DBPA and the retracted linker gave GAG ligands more access to the GAG-binding epitopes than other DBPAs. Characterization of GAG ligands' interactions with wild-type (WT) PBr and mutants confirmed the importance of the second major GAG-binding epitope and established the fact that the two epitopes are independent of one another and the new epitope is as important to GAG binding as the traditional epitope.

  14. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN76742797 and EudraCT2004-000446-20 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03821.001 PMID:25217531

  15. HIV-1 Entry and Trans-Infection of Astrocytes Involves CD81 Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Turville, Stuart G.; HItchen, Tina L.; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M.; Salimi, Hamid; Roche, Michael J.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are extensively infected with HIV-1 in vivo and play a significant role in the development of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Despite their extensive infection, little is known about how astrocytes become infected, since they lack cell surface CD4 expression. In the present study, we investigated the fate of HIV-1 upon infection of astrocytes. Astrocytes were found to bind and harbor virus followed by biphasic decay, with HIV-1 detectable out to 72 hours. HIV-1 was observed to associate with CD81-lined vesicle structures. shRNA silencing of CD81 resulted in less cell-associated virus but no loss of co-localization between HIV-1 and CD81. Astrocytes supported trans-infection of HIV-1 to T-cells without de novo virus production, and the virus-containing compartment required 37°C to form, and was trypsin-resistant. The CD81 compartment observed herein, has been shown in other cell types to be a relatively protective compartment. Within astrocytes, this compartment may be actively involved in virus entry and/or spread. The ability of astrocytes to transfer virus, without de novo viral synthesis suggests they are capable of sequestering and protecting virus and thus, they could potentially facilitate viral dissemination in the CNS. PMID:24587404

  16. Inhibition of HIV-1 Maturation via Small Molecule Targeting of the Amino-Terminal Domain in the Viral Capsid Protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weifeng; Zhou, Jing; Halambage, Upul D; Jurado, Kellie A; Jamin, Augusta V; Wang, Yujie; Engelman, Alan N; Aiken, Christopher

    2017-02-15

    The HIV-1 capsid protein is an attractive therapeutic target owing to its multifunctionality in virus replication and the high fitness cost of amino acid substitutions in capsid to HIV-1 infectivity. To date, small molecule inhibitors have been identified that inhibit HIV-1 capsid assembly and/or impair its function in target cells. Here we describe the mechanism of action of the previously reported capsid-targeting HIV-1 inhibitor, BI compound 1 (C1). We show that C1 acts during HIV-1 maturation to prevent assembly of a mature viral capsid. However, unlike the maturation inhibitor Bevirimat, C1 did not significantly affect the kinetics or fidelity of Gag processing. HIV-1 particles produced in the presence of C1 contained unstable capsids that lacked associated electron density and exhibited impairments in early postentry stages of infection, most notably reverse transcription. C1 inhibited assembly of recombinant HIV-1 CA in vitro and induced aberrant crosslinks in mutant HIV-1 particles capable of spontaneous intersubunit disulfide bonds at the interhexamer interface in the capsid lattice. Resistance to C1 was conferred by a single amino acid substitution within the compound-binding site in the N-terminal domain of the CA protein. Our results demonstrate that the binding site for C1 represents a new pharmacological vulnerability in the capsid assembly stage of the HIV-1 life cycle.IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 capsid protein is an attractive but unexploited target for clinical drug development. Prior studies have identified HIV-1 capsid-targeting compounds that display different mechanisms of action, which in part reflects the requirement for capsid function at both the efferent and afferent phases of viral replication. Here we show that one such compound, Compound 1, interferes with assembly of the conical viral capsid during virion maturation, and results in perturbations at a specific protein-protein interface in the capsid lattice. We also identify and characterize a

  17. Antiretroviral (HIV-1) activity of azulene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Peet, Julia; Selyutina, Anastasia; Bredihhin, Aleksei

    2016-04-15

    The antiretroviral activity of azulene derivatives was detected for the first time. A series of eighteen diversely substituted azulenes was synthesized and tested in vitro using HIV-1 based virus-like particles (VLPs) and infectious HIV-1 virus in U2OS and TZM-bl cell lines. Among the compounds tested, the 2-hydroxyazulenes demonstrated the most significant activity by inhibiting HIV-1 replication with IC50 of 2-10 and 8-20 μM for the VLPs and the infectious virus, respectively. These results indicate that azulene derivatives may be potentially useful candidates for the development of antiretroviral agents.

  18. HIV Type 1 (HIV-1) Proviral Reservoirs Decay Continuously Under Sustained Virologic Control in HIV-1–Infected Children Who Received Early Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Luzuriaga, Katherine; Tabak, Barbara; Garber, Manuel; Chen, Ya Hui; Ziemniak, Carrie; McManus, Margaret M.; Murray, Danielle; Strain, Matthew C.; Richman, Douglas D.; Chun, Tae-Wook; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Persaud, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Background. Early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected infants controls HIV-1 replication and reduces mortality. Methods. Plasma viremia (lower limit of detection, <2 copies/mL), T-cell activation, HIV-1–specific immune responses, and the persistence of cells carrying replication-competent virus were quantified during long-term effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in 4 perinatally HIV-1–infected youth who received treatment early (the ET group) and 4 who received treatment late (the LT group). Decay in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral DNA levels was also measured over time in the ET youth. Results. Plasma viremia was not detected in any ET youth but was detected in all LT youth (median, 8 copies/mL; P = .03). PBMC proviral load was significantly lower in ET youth (median, 7 copies per million PBMCs) than in LT youth (median, 181 copies; P = .03). Replication-competent virus was recovered from all LT youth but only 1 ET youth. Decay in proviral DNA was noted in all 4 ET youth in association with limited T-cell activation and with absent to minimal HIV-1–specific immune responses. Conclusions. Initiation of early effective cART during infancy significantly limits circulating levels of proviral and replication-competent HIV-1 and promotes continuous decay of viral reservoirs. Continued cART with reduction in HIV-1 reservoirs over time may facilitate HIV-1 eradication strategies. PMID:24850788

  19. Protection against Friend retrovirus-induced leukemia by recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the gag gene.

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, M; Nishio, J; Chesebro, B

    1992-01-01

    High sequence variability in the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus has provoked interest in nonenvelope antigens as potential immunogens against retrovirus infection. However, the role of core protein antigens encoded by the gag gene in protective immunity against retroviruses is unclear. By using recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) gag gene, we could prime CD4+ T-helper cells and protectively immunize susceptible strains of mice against Friend retrovirus infection. Recovery from leukemic splenomegaly developed more slowly after immunization with vaccinia virus-F-MuLV gag than with vaccinia virus-F-MuLV env; however, genetic nonresponders to the envelope protein could be partially protected with Gag vaccines. Class switching of F-MuLV-neutralizing antibodies from immunoglobulin M to immunoglobulin G after challenge with Friend virus complex was facilitated in mice immunized with the Gag antigen. Sequential deletion of the gag gene revealed that the major protective epitope was located on the N-terminal hydrophobic protein p15. Images PMID:1534853

  20. Development of prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Schiffner, Torben; Sattentau, Quentin J; Dorrell, Lucy

    2013-07-17

    The focus of most current HIV-1 vaccine development is on antibody-based approaches. This is because certain antibody responses correlated with protection from HIV-1 acquisition in the RV144 phase III trial, and because a series of potent and broad spectrum neutralizing antibodies have been isolated from infected individuals. Taken together, these two findings suggest ways forward to develop a neutralizing antibody-based vaccine. However, understanding of the correlates of protection from disease in HIV-1 and other infections strongly suggests that we should not ignore CTL-based research. Here we review recent progress in the field and highlight the challenges implicit in HIV-1 vaccine design and some potential solutions.

  1. HIV-1 Eradication: Early Trials (and Tribulations).

    PubMed

    Spivak, Adam M; Planelles, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has rendered HIV-1 infection a manageable illness for those with access to treatment. However, ART does not lead to viral eradication owing to the persistence of replication-competent, unexpressed proviruses in long-lived cellular reservoirs. The potential for long-term drug toxicities and the lack of access to ART for most people living with HIV-1 infection have fueled scientific interest in understanding the nature of this latent reservoir. Exploration of HIV-1 persistence at the cellular and molecular level in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, the predominant viral reservoir in patients on ART, has uncovered potential strategies to reverse latency. We review recent advances in pharmacologically based 'shock and kill' HIV-1 eradication strategies, including comparative analysis of early clinical trials.

  2. Super-resolution imaging of ESCRT-proteins at HIV-1 assembly sites.

    PubMed

    Prescher, Jens; Baumgärtel, Viola; Ivanchenko, Sergey; Torrano, Adriano A; Bräuchle, Christoph; Müller, Barbara; Lamb, Don C

    2015-02-01

    in the bud lumen. In the case of ALIX, a cloud of individual molecules surrounding the central clusters was often observed, which we attribute to ALIX molecules incorporated into the nascent HIV-1 Gag shell. Experiments performed using YFP-tagged Tsg101 led to an over 10-fold increase in ESCRT structures colocalizing with HIV-1 budding sites indicating an influence of the fusion protein tag on the function of the ESCRT protein.

  3. Super-Resolution Imaging of ESCRT-Proteins at HIV-1 Assembly Sites

    PubMed Central

    Prescher, Jens; Baumgärtel, Viola; Ivanchenko, Sergey; Torrano, Adriano A.; Bräuchle, Christoph; Müller, Barbara; Lamb, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    or in the bud lumen. In the case of ALIX, a cloud of individual molecules surrounding the central clusters was often observed, which we attribute to ALIX molecules incorporated into the nascent HIV-1 Gag shell. Experiments performed using YFP-tagged Tsg101 led to an over 10-fold increase in ESCRT structures colocalizing with HIV-1 budding sites indicating an influence of the fusion protein tag on the function of the ESCRT protein. PMID:25710462

  4. Structural Determinants and Mechanism of HIV-1 Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Heng, Xiao; Summers, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Like all retroviruses, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) selectively packages two copies of its unspliced RNA genome, both of which are utilized for strand-transfer mediated recombination during reverse transcription – a process that enables rapid evolution under environmental and chemotherapeutic pressures. The viral RNA appears to be selected for packaging as a dimer, and there is evidence that dimerization and packaging are mechanistically coupled. Both processes are mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domains of a small number of assembling viral Gag polyproteins and RNA elements within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the genome. A number of secondary structures have been predicted for regions of the genome that are responsible for packaging, and high-resolution structures have been determined for a few small RNA fragments and protein-RNA complexes. However, major questions remain open regarding the RNA structures, and potentially the structural changes, that are responsible for dimeric genome selection. Here we review efforts that have been made to identify the molecular determinants and mechanism of HIV-1 genome packaging. PMID:21762803

  5. Structural Basis for Broad and Potent Neutralization of HIV-1 by Antibody VRC01

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tongqing; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dai, Kaifan; Finzi, Andrés; Kwon, Young Do; Scheid, Johannes F.; Shi, Wei; Xu, Ling; Yang, Yongping; Zhu, Jiang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Sodroski, Joseph; Shapiro, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-08-26

    During HIV-1 infection, antibodies are generated against the region of the viral gp120 envelope glycoprotein that binds CD4, the primary receptor for HIV-1. Among these antibodies, VRC01 achieves broad neutralization of diverse viral strains. We determined the crystal structure of VRC01 in complex with a human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 gp120 core. VRC01 partially mimics CD4 interaction with gp120. A shift from the CD4-defined orientation, however, focuses VRC01 onto the vulnerable site of initial CD4 attachment, allowing it to overcome the glycan and conformational masking that diminishes the neutralization potency of most CD4-binding-site antibodies. To achieve this recognition, VRC01 contacts gp120 mainly through immunoglobulin V-gene regions substantially altered from their genomic precursors. Partial receptor mimicry and extensive affinity maturation thus facilitate neutralization of HIV-1 by natural human antibodies.

  6. Cryo-EM structures and atomic model of the HIV-1 strand transfer complex intasome.

    PubMed

    Passos, Dario Oliveira; Li, Min; Yang, Renbin; Rebensburg, Stephanie V; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Jeon, Youngmin; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Craigie, Robert; Lyumkis, Dmitry

    2017-01-06

    Like all retroviruses, HIV-1 irreversibly inserts a viral DNA (vDNA) copy of its RNA genome into host target DNA (tDNA). The intasome, a higher-order nucleoprotein complex composed of viral integrase (IN) and the ends of linear vDNA, mediates integration. Productive integration into host chromatin results in the formation of the strand transfer complex (STC) containing catalytically joined vDNA and tDNA. HIV-1 intasomes have been refractory to high-resolution structural studies. We used a soluble IN fusion protein to facilitate structural studies, through which we present a high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the core tetrameric HIV-1 STC and a higher-order form that adopts carboxyl-terminal domain rearrangements. The distinct STC structures highlight how HIV-1 can use the common retroviral intasome core architecture to accommodate different IN domain modules for assembly.

  7. Vaccination with gp120-depleted HIV-1 plus immunostimulatory CpG oligodeoxynucleotides in incomplete Freund's adjuvant stimulates cellular and humoral immunity in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Silvera, Peter; Savary, Jay R; Livingston, Virginia; White, Jessica; Manson, Kelledy H; Wyand, Michael H; Salk, Peter L; Moss, Ronald B; Lewis, Mark G

    2004-12-21

    Whole killed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) immunogens contain the more conserved epitopes of HIV-1 and therefore may provide some utility as potential HIV-1 vaccine candidates. Previous studies have shown that synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) dinucleotides trigger rapid stimulation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Here, we investigated whether immunization of rhesus macaques with an inactivated gp120-depleted HIV-1 immunogen, emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) together with immunostimulatory CpG-containing ODN (ODN 2006), would elicit HIV-specific cellular and humoral immune responses. High titer anti-p24 antibody levels were induced in all four immunized animals that were sustained 6 weeks after the fifth and final boost at 23 months. These anti-gag antibodies mapped to linear B-cell epitopes within the matrix (MA), capsid (CA), p2, nucleocapsid (NC) and p6 proteins of HIV-1 gag. HIV-specific interferon-gamma-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were measured before and after the fourth and fifth immunizations by both intracellular cytokine (ICC) and ELISPOT techniques; responses were detected in three of the four immunized animals. CD4+ T-cell epitopes appear to map within amino acids 261-290 and 291-320 of p24 CA protein. Immunizations were well tolerated both locally and systemically. Based on these results, further studies of this approach are warranted.

  8. Substance abuse, HIV-1 and hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nirzari; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Pirrone, Vanessa; Block, Timothy; Mehta, Anand; Wigdahl, Brian

    2012-10-01

    During the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease, the virus has been shown to effectively escape the immune response with the subsequent establishment of latent viral reservoirs in specific cell populations within the peripheral blood (PB) and associated lymphoid tissues, bone marrow (BM), brain, and potentially other end organs. HIV-1, along with hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV), are known to share similar routes of transmission, including intravenous drug use, blood transfusions, sexual intercourse, and perinatal exposure. Substance abuse, including the use of opioids and cocaine, is a significant risk factor for exposure to HIV-1 and the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as well as HBV and HCV exposure, infection, and disease. Thus, coinfection with HIV-1 and HBV or HCV is common and may be impacted by chronic substance abuse during the course of disease. HIV- 1 impacts the natural course of HBV and HCV infection by accelerating the progression of HBV/HCV-associated liver disease toward end-stage cirrhosis and quantitative depletion of the CD4+ T-cell compartment. HBV or HCV coinfection with HIV-1 is also associated with increased mortality when compared to either infection alone. This review focuses on the impact of substance abuse and coinfection with HBV and HCV in the PB, BM, and brain on the HIV-1 pathogenic process as it relates to viral pathogenesis, disease progression, and the associated immune response during the course of this complex interplay. The impact of HIV-1 and substance abuse on hepatitis virus-induced disease is also a focal point.

  9. Drug-eluting fibers for HIV-1 inhibition and contraception.

    PubMed

    Ball, Cameron; Krogstad, Emily; Chaowanachan, Thanyanan; Woodrow, Kim A

    2012-01-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that simultaneously prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy are a global health priority. Combining chemical and physical barriers offers the greatest potential to design effective MPTs, but integrating both functional modalities into a single device has been challenging. Here we show that drug-eluting fiber meshes designed for topical drug delivery can function as a combination chemical and physical barrier MPT. Using FDA-approved polymers, we fabricated nanofiber meshes with tunable fiber size and controlled degradation kinetics that facilitate simultaneous release of multiple agents against HIV-1, HSV-2, and sperm. We observed that drug-loaded meshes inhibited HIV-1 infection in vitro and physically obstructed sperm penetration. Furthermore, we report on a previously unknown activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML) to potently inhibit sperm motility and viability. The application of drug-eluting nanofibers for HIV-1 prevention and sperm inhibition may serve as an innovative platform technology for drug delivery to the lower female reproductive tract.

  10. Drug-Eluting Fibers for HIV-1 Inhibition and Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Cameron; Krogstad, Emily; Chaowanachan, Thanyanan; Woodrow, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that simultaneously prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy are a global health priority. Combining chemical and physical barriers offers the greatest potential to design effective MPTs, but integrating both functional modalities into a single device has been challenging. Here we show that drug-eluting fiber meshes designed for topical drug delivery can function as a combination chemical and physical barrier MPT. Using FDA-approved polymers, we fabricated nanofiber meshes with tunable fiber size and controlled degradation kinetics that facilitate simultaneous release of multiple agents against HIV-1, HSV-2, and sperm. We observed that drug-loaded meshes inhibited HIV-1 infection in vitro and physically obstructed sperm penetration. Furthermore, we report on a previously unknown activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML) to potently inhibit sperm motility and viability. The application of drug-eluting nanofibers for HIV-1 prevention and sperm inhibition may serve as an innovative platform technology for drug delivery to the lower female reproductive tract. PMID:23209601

  11. Application of Gene Editing Technologies to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Mary Jane; Bates, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review will highlight some of the recent advances in genome engineering with applications for both clinical and basic science investigations of HIV-1. Recent Findings Over the last year, the field of HIV cure research has seen major breakthroughs with the success of the first phase I clinical trial involving gene editing of CCR5 in patient-derived CD4+ T cells. This first human use of gene editing technology was accomplished using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). ZFNs and the advent of additional tools for genome engineering, including TALENS and the CRISPR/Cas9 system, have made gene editing remarkably simple and affordable. Here we will discuss the different gene editing technologies, the use of gene editing in HIV research over the past year, and potential applications of gene editing for both in vitro and in vivo studies. Summary Genome engineering technologies have rapidly progressed over the past few years such that these systems can be easily applied in any lab for a variety of purposes. For HIV-1, upcoming clinical trials will determine if gene editing can provide the long-awaited functional cure. Additionally, manipulation of host genomes, whether in vivo or in vitro, can facilitate development of better animal models and culture methods for studying HIV-1 transmission, pathogenesis, and virus-host interactions. PMID:25612322

  12. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Madison, Marisa N; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-07-20

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  13. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  14. Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on the ADAM10 intracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Endsley, Mark A.; Somasunderam, Anoma D.; Li, Guangyu; Oezguen, Numan; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Murray, James L.; Rubin, Donald H.; Hodge, Thomas W.; and others

    2014-04-15

    Previously, we showed that ADAM10 is necessary for HIV-1 replication in primary human macrophages and immortalized cell lines. Silencing ADAM10 expression interrupted the HIV-1 life cycle prior to nuclear translocation of viral cDNA. Furthermore, our data indicated that HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase, which proteolytically processes ADAM10. Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits HIV-1 replication between reverse transcription and nuclear entry. Here, we show that ADAM10 expression also supports replication in CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes. The intracellular domain (ICD) of ADAM10 associates with the HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC) in the cytoplasm and immunoprecipitates and co-localizes with HIV-1 integrase, a key component of PIC. Taken together, our data support a model whereby ADAM15/γ-secretase processing of ADAM10 releases the ICD, which then incorporates into HIV-1 PIC to facilitate nuclear trafficking. Thus, these studies suggest ADAM10 as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting HIV-1 prior to nuclear entry. - Highlights: • Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on ADAM10. • ADAM10 associates with HIV-1 integrase in the pre-integration complex. • HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase. • Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits nuclear import of viral cDNA. • ADAM10 is important for HIV-1 replication in human macrophages and CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes.

  15. Human Mucosal Mast Cells Capture HIV-1 and Mediate Viral trans-Infection of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ai-Ping; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Wei, Ji-Fu; Guo, Ming-Gao; Qin, Yan; Guo, Qian-Qian; Ma, Li; Liu, Bao-Chi; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gastrointestinal mucosa is the primary site where human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades, amplifies, and becomes persistently established, and cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 plays a pivotal role in mucosal viral dissemination. Mast cells are widely distributed in the gastrointestinal tract and are early targets for invasive pathogens, and they have been shown to have increased density in the genital mucosa in HIV-infected women. Intestinal mast cells express numerous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and have been shown to combat various viral, parasitic, and bacterial infections. However, the role of mast cells in HIV-1 infection is poorly defined. In this study, we investigated their potential contributions to HIV-1 transmission. Mast cells isolated from gut mucosal tissues were found to express a variety of HIV-1 attachment factors (HAFs), such as DC-SIGN, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), and α4β7 integrin, which mediate capture of HIV-1 on the cell surface. Intriguingly, following coculture with CD4+ T cells, mast cell surface-bound viruses were efficiently transferred to target T cells. Prior blocking with anti-HAF antibody or mannan before coculture impaired viral trans-infection. Cell-cell conjunctions formed between mast cells and T cells, to which viral particles were recruited, and these were required for efficient cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission. Our results reveal a potential function of gut mucosal mast cells in HIV-1 dissemination in tissues. Strategies aimed at preventing viral capture and transfer mediated by mast cells could be beneficial in combating primary HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE In this study, we demonstrate the role of human mast cells isolated from mucosal tissues in mediating HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. This finding facilitates our understanding of HIV-1 mucosal infection and will benefit the development of strategies to combat primary HIV-1 dissemination. PMID:26719250

  16. Inhibition of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particle formation by Gag protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Niedrig, M; Gelderblom, H R; Pauli, G; März, J; Bickhard, H; Wolf, H; Modrow, S

    1994-06-01

    Sequential overlapping Gag protein-derived oligopeptides of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 22 to 24 amino acids long, were synthesized and tested in vitro for antiviral activity. Two synthetic peptides, one derived from the matrix protein p17 (NPGLLETSEGCRQ, amino acids 47 to 59) and one located in the capsid protein p24 (PAATLEEMMTA, amino acids 339 to 349) inhibited the production of infectious virus when added to HIV-1-infected cultures when used in the range of 20 to 200 micrograms/ml. As shown by thin section electron microscopy, peptide treatment resulted in the release of immature, deformed virus particles suggesting that the two peptides interfered with assembly and maturation. Other Gag protein-derived oligopeptides had little or no influence on virus production. To characterize further the functionally active regions we synthesized peptide derivatives with three consecutive amino acids substituted by alanine; they did not cause inhibition. Therefore the regions responsible for inhibition were located between amino acids 50 to 61 in p17, and 342 to 350 in p24. These observations might lead to the development of a new antiviral strategy affecting the late stage of virus replication.

  17. Factors Associated With the Control of Viral Replication and Virologic Breakthrough in a Recently Infected HIV-1 Controller.

    PubMed

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Veenhuis, Rebecca T; May, Megan; Luna, Krystle A; Kirkpatrick, Allison R; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Cox, Andrea L; Carrington, Mary; Bailey, Justin R; Arduino, Roberto C; Blankson, Joel N

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1 controllers are patients who control HIV-1 viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. Control is achieved very early in the course of infection, but the mechanisms through which viral replication is restricted are not fully understood. We describe a patient who presented with acute HIV-1 infection and was found to have an HIV-1 RNA level of <100copies/mL. She did not have any known protective HLA alleles, but significant immune activation of CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells was present, and both cell types inhibited viral replication. Virus cultured from this patient replicated as well in vitro as virus isolated from her partner, a patient with AIDS who was the source of transmission. Virologic breakthrough occurred 9months after her initial presentation and was associated with an increase in CD4+ T cell activation levels and a significant decrease in NK cell inhibitory capacity. Remarkably, CD8+ T cell inhibitory capacity was preserved and there were no new escape mutations in targeted Gag epitopes. These findings suggest that fully replication-competent virus can be controlled in acute HIV-1 infection in some patients without protective HLA alleles and that NK cell responses may contribute to this early control of viral replication.

  18. Immunization with HIV-1 gp41 subunit virosomes induces mucosal antibodies protecting nonhuman primates against vaginal SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Bomsel, Morgane; Tudor, Daniela; Drillet, Anne-Sophie; Alfsen, Annette; Ganor, Yonatan; Roger, Marie-Gaëlle; Mouz, Nicolas; Amacker, Mario; Chalifour, Anick; Diomede, Lorenzo; Devillier, Gilles; Cong, Zhe; Wei, Qiang; Gao, Hong; Qin, Chuan; Yang, Gui-Bo; Zurbriggen, Rinaldo; Lopalco, Lucia; Fleury, Sylvain

    2011-02-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is mainly transmitted mucosally during sexual intercourse. We therefore evaluated the protective efficacy of a vaccine active at mucosal sites. Macaca mulatta monkeys were immunized via both the intramuscular and intranasal routes with an HIV-1 vaccine made of gp41-subunit antigens grafted on virosomes, a safe delivery carrier approved in humans with self-adjuvant properties. Six months after 13 vaginal challenges with simian-HIV (SHIV)-SF162P3, four out of five vaccinated animals remained virus-negative, and the fifth was only transiently infected. None of the five animals seroconverted to p27gag-SIV. In contrast, all 6 placebo-vaccinated animals became infected and seroconverted. All protected animals showed gp41-specific vaginal IgAs with HIV-1 transcytosis-blocking properties and vaginal IgGs with neutralizing and/or antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity activities. In contrast, plasma IgGs totally lacked virus-neutralizing activity. The protection observed challenges the paradigm whereby circulating antiviral antibodies are required for protection against HIV-1 infection and may serve in designing a human vaccine against HIV-1-AIDS.

  19. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  20. HIV-1 matrix protein p17 resides in cell nuclei in association with genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Bukrinskaya, A G; Vorkunova, G K; Tentsov YYu

    1992-10-01

    We have shown previously that HIV-1 matrix protein p17 is transported to the nucleus of Jurkat-tat and H9 cells soon after infection. As shown in this combination, gag polyprotein p55 synthesized 48 h after cell infection is cleaved in cytosol rapidly after its synthesis, and nascent p17 enters the nuclei and gradually accumulates there. Uncleaved p55 molecules and intermediate precursors are rapidly transported to the membranes and are also found in nuclei. Mature gag proteins are seen in membranes only after prolonged period of labelling or chase (4 or more hours later). To determine whether the nascent p17 is associated with viral genomic RNA in the nuclei, the cells were fractionated, the viral complexes were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against gag proteins, and RNA was extracted and analyzed by slot and blot hybridization. MAb against p17 precipitated all the viral RNA from the nuclei including full-size genomic RNA and essential parts from membranes while MAb against p24 did not precipitate any viral RNA from the nuclei. These data suggest that matrix protein is linked to genomic RNA in the nuclei and raise the possibility that p17 may transfer viral nucleocapsids from the nuclei to plasma membranes, the site of virus assembly.

  1. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity and Transmitted Drug Resistance Among Recently Infected Individuals at Men Who Have Sex with Men Sentinel Surveillance Points in Hebei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinli; Kang, Xianjiang; Chen, Suliang; Zhao, Hongru; Liu, Yongjian; Zhao, Cuiying; Zhang, Yuqi; Li, Jingyun; Cui, Ze; Wang, Xianfeng

    2015-10-01

    For this study, 50 HIV-1 plasma samples of recently infected men who have sex with men (MSM) were amplified and sequenced. Multiple subtypes were identified by phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 gag, env, and pol gene regions, including CRF01_AE (56.0%), CRF07_BC (30.0%), subtype B (12.0%), and unique recombinant forms (URFs, 6.0%). CRF01_AE was the most frequent genotype in the epidemic. Three recombination patterns of URFs were identified: 01BC, 01B, and 01C. The rate of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutation (M46L) was 2.08% (1/48). URFs and TDR first identified in this study suggest that HIV-1 prevalence is more and more complicated, and HIV-1 drug-resistant strains have begun to spread among at risk populations in Hebei. Our findings can provide vital information for an efficient surveillance system and strategic HIV prevention and control measures in China by revealing the evolutionary status and HIV-1 TDR of HIV-1 strains among recently infected MSM in Hebei Province.

  2. Characterization of the third generation enzyme immunoassay IEA-HIV1/2-III for the detection of anti-HIV specific antibodies in human sera.

    PubMed

    Rayevskaya, G; Pilipenko, V G; Tkáciková, L; Spivak, N Y; Mikula, I; Chumak, R M

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of the developed anti-HIV1/2 third generation enzyme immunoassay, the IEA-HIV1/2-III, was examined. The test system for the detection of anti-HIV antibodies included peroxidase-conjugated HIV-specific recombinant Gag protein fragments (epitopes of p24 and p17 proteins), Env-1 (epitopes of p41 and p120 proteins), and Env-2 (p36 epitopes). Sensitivity was evaluated with 346 sera from HIV1-seropositive subjects, Anti-HIV1 Low Titer panels no. 10 and PRB-106 and seropositive panel PRB-931 in comparison with other third- and second-generation assays. The IEA-HIV1/2-III assays are characterized with high sensitivity comparable to the other third generation assays and the better sensitivity with respect to the second generation test-kit to determine HIV-specific antibodies in human sera. The specificity was determined using three hundred sixty-seven potentially cross-reactive samples (but negative for anti-HIV1/2). Only one specimen among them was reactive by IEA-HIV1/2-III.

  3. IL-27 inhibits HIV-1 infection in human macrophages by down-regulating host factor SPTBN1 during monocyte to macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lue; Lidie, Kristy B; Chen, Qian; Adelsberger, Joseph W; Zheng, Xin; Huang, DaWei; Yang, Jun; Lempicki, Richard A; Rehman, Tauseef; Dewar, Robin L; Wang, Yanmei; Hornung, Ronald L; Canizales, Kelsey A; Lockett, Stephen J; Lane, H Clifford; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2013-03-11

    The susceptibility of macrophages to HIV-1 infection is modulated during monocyte differentiation. IL-27 is an anti-HIV cytokine that also modulates monocyte activation. In this study, we present new evidence that IL-27 promotes monocyte differentiation into macrophages that are nonpermissive for HIV-1 infection. Although IL-27 treatment does not affect expression of macrophage differentiation markers or macrophage biological functions, it confers HIV resistance by down-regulating spectrin β nonerythrocyte 1 (SPTBN1), a required host factor for HIV-1 infection. IL-27 down-regulates SPTBN1 through a TAK-1-mediated MAPK signaling pathway. Knockdown of SPTBN1 strongly inhibits HIV-1 infection of macrophages; conversely, overexpression of SPTBN1 markedly increases HIV susceptibility of IL-27-treated macrophages. Moreover, we demonstrate that SPTBN1 associates with HIV-1 gag proteins. Collectively, our results underscore the ability of IL-27 to protect macrophages from HIV-1 infection by down-regulating SPTBN1, thus indicating that SPTBN1 is an important host target to reduce HIV-1 replication in one major element of the viral reservoir.

  4. In Vitro Selection and Characterization of HIV-1 Variants with Increased Resistance to Sifuvirtide, a Novel HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhonghua; Shan, Mei; Li, Li; Lu, Lu; Meng, Shu; Chen, Cheng; He, Yuxian; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Linqi

    2011-01-01

    Sifuvirtide, a novel fusion inhibitor against human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1), which is more potent than enfuvirtide (T20) in cell culture, is currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. We now report that in vitro selection of HIV-1 variants resistant to sifuvirtide in the presence of increasing concentrations of sifuvirtide has led to several specific mutations in the gp41 region that had not been previously reported. Many of these substitutions were confined to the N-terminal heptad repeat region at positions 37, 38, 41, and 43, either singly or in combination. A downstream substitution at position 126 (N126K) in the C-terminal heptad repeat region was also found. Site-directed mutagenesis studies have further identified the critical amino acid substitutions and combinations thereof in conferring the resistant genotypes. Furthermore, the mutant viruses demonstrated variable degrees of cross-resistance to enfuvirtide, some of which are preferentially more resistant to sifuvirtide. Impaired infectivity was also found for many of the mutant viruses. Biophysical and structural analyses of the key substitutions have revealed several potential novel mechanisms against sifuvirtide. Our results may help to predict potential resistant patterns in vivo and facilitate the further clinical development and therapeutic utility of sifuvirtide. PMID:21098485

  5. Analytical Performances of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 RNA-Based Amplix® Real-Time PCR Platform for HIV-1 RNA Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Mboumba Bouassa, Ralph-Sydney; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Wolyec, Serge Tonen; Robin, Leman; Matta, Mathieu; Longo, Jean de Dieu; Grésenguet, Gérard; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the performances of Amplix real-time PCR platform developed by Biosynex (Strasbourg, France), combining automated station extraction (Amplix station 16 Dx) and real-time PCR (Amplix NG), for quantifying plasma HIV-1 RNA by lyophilized HIV-1 RNA-based Amplix reagents targeting gag and LTR, using samples from HIV-1-infected adults from Central African Republic. Results. Amplix real-time PCR assay showed low limit of detection (28 copies/mL), across wide dynamic range (1.4–10 log copies/mL), 100% sensitivity and 99% specificity, high reproducibility, and accuracy with mean bias < 5%. The assay showed excellent correlations and concordance of 95.3% with the reference HIV-1 RNA load assay (Roche), with mean absolute bias of +0.097 log copies/mL by Bland-Altman analysis. The assay was able to detect and quantify the most prevalent HIV-1 subtype strains and the majority of non-B subtypes, CRFs of HIV-1 group M, and HIV-1 groups N and O circulating in Central Africa. The Amplix assay showed 100% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity to diagnose virological failure in clinical samples from antiretroviral drug-experienced patients. Conclusions. The HIV-1 RNA-based Amplix real-time PCR platform constitutes sensitive and reliable system for clinical monitoring of HIV-1 RNA load in HIV-1-infected children and adults, particularly adapted to intermediate laboratory facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:28050283

  6. Requirements for nucleocapsid-mediated regulation of reverse transcription during the late steps of HIV-1 assembly

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Pierre-Jean; Chamontin, Célia; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Bernacchi, Serena; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 is a retrovirus replicating within cells by reverse transcribing its genomic RNA (gRNA) into DNA. Within cells, virus assembly requires the structural Gag proteins with few accessory proteins, notably the viral infectivity factor (Vif) and two copies of gRNA as well as cellular factors to converge to the plasma membrane. In this process, the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag binds to the packaging signal of gRNA which consists of a series of stem-loops (SL1-SL3) ensuring gRNA selection and packaging into virions. Interestingly, mutating NC activates a late-occurring reverse transcription (RT) step in producer cells, leading to the release of DNA-containing HIV-1 particles. In order to decipher the molecular mechanism regulating this late RT, we explored the role of several key partners of NC, such as Vif, gRNA and the cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G that restricts HIV-1 infection by targeting the RT. By studying combinations of deletions of these putative players, we revealed that NC, SL1-SL3 and in lesser extent Vif, but not APOBEC3G, interplay regulates the late RT. PMID:27273064

  7. Semen Bacterial Concentrations and HIV-1 RNA Shedding Among HIV-1–Seropositive Kenyan Men

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Huang, Dandi; Ko, Daisy L.; Sanders, Eduard J.; Peshu, Norbert M.; Krieger, John N.; Muller, Charles H.; Coombs, Robert W.; Fredricks, David N.; Graham, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: HIV-1 is transmitted through semen from men to their sexual partners. Genital infections can increase HIV-1 RNA shedding in semen, but shedding also occurs in the absence of typical pathogens. We hypothesized that higher bacterial concentrations in semen would be associated with higher HIV-1 RNA levels. Methods: We analyzed semen samples from 42 HIV-1–seropositive Kenyan men using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess bacterial concentrations and real-time PCR to measure HIV-1 RNA levels. Generalized estimation equations were used to evaluate associations between these 2 measures. Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing was performed on a subset of 13 samples to assess bacterial community composition. Results: Bacteria were detected in 96.6% of 88 samples by quantitative PCR. Semen bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA levels were correlated 0.30 (P = 0.01). The association between bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA detection was not significant after adjustment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) (adjusted odds ratio: 1.27, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.91). Factors associated with semen bacterial concentration included insertive anal sex (adjusted beta 0.92, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.73) and ART use (adjusted beta: −0.77, 95% CI: −1.50 to 0.04). Among 13 samples with pyrosequencing data, Corynebacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. were most frequently detected. Conclusion: Most of these HIV-1–infected men had bacteria in their semen. ART use was associated with undetectable semen HIV-1 RNA and lower semen bacterial concentrations, whereas insertive anal sex was associated with higher bacterial concentrations. Additional studies evaluating the relationship between semen bacteria, inflammation, mucosal immunity, and HIV-1 shedding are needed to understand implications for HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27861240

  8. Development of a high-throughput detection system for HIV-1 using real-time NASBA based on molecular beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beuningen, Rinie; Marras, Salvatore A.; Kramer, Fred R.; Oosterlaken, Tom; Weusten, Jos; Borst, G.; van de Wiel, Paul

    2001-04-01

    HIV-1 viral load assays require accuracy and sensitivity at low RNA levels with the capability to detect all subtypes. Furthermore, the assay should be easy to perform and fast to be useful for routine diagnostics. In order to meet these demands we have combined isothermal NASBA amplification with molecular beacon probes for real-time detection and quantitation of HIV-1 RNA. Quantitation is based on co-amplification of the HIV-1 RNA in the clinical sample and a synthetic calibrator RNA which is amplified by the same primer set but detected with a differently labeled molecular beacon. The entire procedure is simple and analysis of 48 samples requires less than 1» hours with minimal hands-on time. A fluorescent plate reader is used for real-time detection and isothermal amplification. The linearity and precision of the assay was determined with the VQC HIV-1 type B standard of the Central Laboratory of the Dutch Red Cross Blood Banks, The Netherlands. Sensitivity was shown to be 50 copies per ml (cps/ml). The average assay precision was 0,19 log10 over a range of 100-300,000 cps/ml tested at nine concentrations. The linearity of dilution series of 15 cultured HIV-1 gag clades A-H was shown. The specificity was 100% on non HIV-1 samples HIV-2, HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. The assay robustness in terms of valid results was 99%. In conclusion, the new real-time NASBA assay meets state-of-the-art HIV-1 viral load performance requirements combined with a high level of user convenience.

  9. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 variants circulating among injecting drug users in Mashhad-Iran.

    PubMed

    Naderi, H R; Tagliamonte, M; Tornesello, M L; Ciccozzi, M; Rezza, G; Farid, R; Buonaguro, F M; Buonaguro, L

    2006-09-19

    Genetic and phylogenetic information on the HIV-1 epidemic in Middle-East Countries, and in particular in Iran, are extremely limited. By March 2004, the Iranian Ministry of Health officially reported a cumulative number of 6'532 HIV positive individuals and 214 AIDS cases in the Iranian HIV-1 epidemic. The intra-venous drug users (IDUs) represent the group at highest risk for HIV-1 infection in Iran, accounting for almost 63% of all HIV-infected population. In this regards, a molecular phylogenetic study has been performed on a sentinel cohort of HIV-1 seropositive IDUs enrolled at the end of 2005 at the University of Mashhad, the largest city North East of Tehran. The study has been performed on both gag and env subgenomic regions amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and characterized by direct DNA sequence analysis. The results reported here show that the HIV-1 subtype A is circulating in this IDUs sentinel cohort. Moreover, the single phylogenetic cluster as well as the intra-group low nucleotide divergence is indicative of a recent outbreak. Unexpectedly, the Iranian samples appear to be phylogenetically derived from African Sub-Saharan subtype A viruses, raising stirring speculations on HIV-1 introduction into the IDUs epidemic in Mashhad. This sentinel study could represent the starting point for a wider molecular survey of the HIV-1 epidemics in Iran to evaluate in detail the distribution of genetic subtypes and possible natural drug-resistant variants, which are extremely helpful information to design diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  10. Galectin-1 promotes HIV-1 infectivity in macrophages through stabilization of viral adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, Simon; St-Pierre, Christian; Pelletier, Isabelle; Ouellet, Michel; Tremblay, Michel J. Sato, Sachiko

    2008-02-05

    Following primary infection with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), macrophages are thought to play an important role, as they are one of the first target cells the virus encounters and can also sustain a significant production of viruses over extended periods of time. While the interaction between the primary cellular receptor CD4 and the virus-encoded external envelope glycoprotein gp120 initiates the infection process, it has been suggested that various host factors are exploited by HIV-1 to facilitate adsorption onto the cell surface. Macrophages and other cells found at the infection site can secrete a soluble mammalian lectin, galectin-1, which binds to {beta}-galactoside residues through its carbohydrate recognition domain. Being a dimer, galectin-1 can cross-link ligands expressed on different constituents to mediate adhesion between cells or between cells and pathogens. We report here that galectin-1, but not galectin-3, increased HIV-1 infectivity in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). This phenomenon was likely due to an enhancement of virus adsorption kinetics, which facilitates HIV-1 entry. The fusion inhibitors T-20 and TAK779 remained effective at reducing infection even in the presence of galectin-1, indicating that the galectin-1-mediated effect is occurring at a step prior to fusion. Together, our data suggest that galectin-1 can facilitate HIV-1 infection in MDMs by promoting early events of the virus replicative cycle (i.e. adsorption)

  11. NMR detection of intermolecular interaction sites in the dimeric 5'-leader of the HIV-1 genome.

    PubMed

    Keane, Sarah C; Van, Verna; Frank, Heather M; Sciandra, Carly A; McCowin, Sayo; Santos, Justin; Heng, Xiao; Summers, Michael F

    2016-11-15

    HIV type-1 (HIV-1) contains a pseudodiploid RNA genome that is selected for packaging and maintained in virions as a noncovalently linked dimer. Genome dimerization is mediated by conserved elements within the 5'-leader of the RNA, including a palindromic dimer initiation signal (DIS) that has been proposed to form kissing hairpin and/or extended duplex intermolecular contacts. Here, we have applied a (2)H-edited NMR approach to directly probe for intermolecular interactions in the full-length, dimeric HIV-1 5'-leader (688 nucleotides; 230 kDa). The interface is extensive and includes DIS:DIS base pairing in an extended duplex state as well as intermolecular pairing between elements of the upstream Unique-5' (U5) sequence and those near the gag start site (AUG). Other pseudopalindromic regions of the leader, including the transcription activation (TAR), polyadenylation (PolyA), and primer binding (PBS) elements, do not participate in intermolecular base pairing. Using a (2)H-edited one-dimensional NMR approach, we also show that the extended interface structure forms on a time scale similar to that of overall RNA dimerization. Our studies indicate that a kissing dimer-mediated structure, if formed, exists only transiently and readily converts to the extended interface structure, even in the absence of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein or other RNA chaperones.

  12. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  13. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  14. HIV-1 Entry Inhbitors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on chemokine receptor antagonists. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells is an ordered multi-step process involving attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Inhibitors of each step have been identified and shown to have antiviral activity in clinical trials. Phase 1-2 trials of monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule attachment inhibitors have demonstrated activity in HIV-1-infected subjects, but none has progressed to later phase clinical trials. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonists maraviroc (now been approved for clinical use) and vicriviroc (in phase 3 trials) have shown significant benefit in controlled trials in treatment-experienced subjects; additional CCR5 antagonists are in various stages of clinical development. Targeting CXCR4 has proven to be more challenging. Although proof of concept has been demonstrated in phase 1-2 trials of two compounds, neither proved suitable for chronic administration. Little progress has been reported in developing longer acting or orally bioavailable fusion inhibitors. Summary ACCR5 antagonist and a fusion inhibitor are approved for use as HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Development of drugs targeting other steps in HIV-1 entry is ongoing. PMID:19339945

  15. Modulation of HIV-1 immunity by adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Moody, M. Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize the role of adjuvants in eliciting desirable antibody responses against HIV-1 with particular emphasis on both historical context and recent developments. Recent findings Increased understanding of the role of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors in recruiting and directing the immune system has increased the variety of adjuvant formulations being tested in animal models and humans. Across all vaccine platforms, adjuvant formulations have been shown to enhance desirable immune responses such as higher antibody titers and increased functional activity. Although no vaccine formulation has yet succeeded in eliciting broad neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1, the ability of adjuvants to direct the immune response to immunogens suggests they will be critically important in any successful HIV-1 vaccine. Summary The parallel development of adjuvants along with better HIV-1 immunogens will be needed for a successful AIDS vaccine. Additional comparative testing will be required to determine the optimal adjuvant and immunogen regimen that can elicit antibody responses capable of blocking HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24670321

  16. HIV-1 associated dementia: symptoms and causes

    PubMed Central

    Ghafouri, Mohammad; Amini, Shohreh; Khalili, Kamel; Sawaya, Bassel E

    2006-01-01

    Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), neuronal cell death remains a problem that is frequently found in the brains of HIV-1-infected patients. HAART has successfully prevented many of the former end-stage complications of AIDS, however, with increased survival times, the prevalence of minor HIV-1 associated cognitive impairment appears to be rising among AIDS patients. Further, HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD) is still prevalent in treated patients as well as attenuated forms of HAD and CNS opportunistic disorders. HIV-associated cognitive impairment correlates with the increased presence in the CNS of activated, though not necessarily HIV-1-infected, microglia and CNS macrophages. This suggests that indirect mechanisms of neuronal injury and loss/death occur in HIV/AIDS as a basis for dementia since neurons are not themselves productively infected by HIV-1. In this review, we discussed the symptoms and causes leading to HAD. Outcome from this review will provide new information regarding mechanisms of neuronal loss in AIDS patients. PMID:16712719

  17. The current status and challenges in the development of fusion inhibitors as therapeutics for HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jian Jun; Ma, Xue Ting; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Xiao Yi; Wang, Cun Xin

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 membrane fusion as a part of the process of viral entry in the target cells is facilitated by gp41 and gp120, which are encoded by Env gene of HIV-1. Based on the structure and the mechanism researches, new treatment options targeting HIV-1 entry process have been proposed. Enfuvirtide, which mimics amino acid sequences of viral envelope glycoprotein gp41, is the first HIV-1 fusion inhibitor approved by FDA. Although it fulfills vital functions by binding to gp41 and abolishing the membrane fusion reaction when used in combination, it could induce drug resistant virus variants. Currently, a number of design and modification schemes have been presented, a large number of prospective fusion peptides have emerged. For these fusion inhibitors, multiple mutations in gp41 have been associated with the loss of susceptibility to agents. This review reported the current developments and innovative designs of HIV-1 membrane fusion inhibitors.

  18. Cyclophilin A stabilizes the HIV-1 capsid through a novel non-canonical binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Perilla, Juan R.; Ning, Jiying; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Ramalho, Ruben; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Bedwell, Gregory J.; Byeon, In-Ja; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Prevelige, Peter E.; Rousso, Itay; Aiken, Christopher; Polenova, Tatyana; Schulten, Klaus; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-03-01

    The host cell factor cyclophilin A (CypA) interacts directly with the HIV-1 capsid and regulates viral infectivity. Although the crystal structure of CypA in complex with the N-terminal domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) has been known for nearly two decades, how CypA interacts with the viral capsid and modulates HIV-1 infectivity remains unclear. We determined the cryoEM structure of CypA in complex with the assembled HIV-1 capsid at 8-Å resolution. The structure exhibits a distinct CypA-binding pattern in which CypA selectively bridges the two CA hexamers along the direction of highest curvature. EM-guided all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and solid-state NMR further reveal that the CypA-binding pattern is achieved by single-CypA molecules simultaneously interacting with two CA subunits, in different hexamers, through a previously uncharacterized non-canonical interface. These results provide new insights into how CypA stabilizes the HIV-1 capsid and is recruited to facilitate HIV-1 infection.

  19. Chimeric adenovirus type 5/35 vector encoding SIV gag and HIV env genes affords protective immunity against the simian/human immunodeficiency virus in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Someya, Kenji; Xin, Ke-Qin; Ami, Yasushi; Izumi, Yasuyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Shinrai; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo; Okuda, Kenji

    2007-10-25

    Replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector-based vaccines are widely known to induce strong immunity against immunodeficiency viruses. To exploit this immunogenicity while overcoming the potential problem of preexisting immunity against human adenoviruses type 5, we developed a recombinant chimeric adenovirus type 5 with type 35 fiber vector (rAd5/35). We initially produced a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag DNA plasmid (rDNA-Gag), a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 89.6 env DNA plasmid (rDNA-Env) and a recombinant Ad5/35 vector encoding the SIV gag and HIV env gene (rAd5/35-Gag and rAd5/35-Env). Prime-boost vaccination with rDNA-Gag and -Env followed by high doses of rAd5/35-Gag and -Env elicited higher levels of cellular immune responses than did rDNAs or rAd5/35s alone. When challenged with a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), animals receiving a prime-boost regimen or rAd5/35s alone maintained a higher number of CD4(+) T cells and remarkably suppressed plasma viral RNA loads. These findings suggest the clinical promise of an rAd5/35 vector-based vaccine.

  20. Safety and Immunogenicity of the MRKAd5 gag HIV Type 1 Vaccine in a Worldwide Phase 1 Study of Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Ouzama; DiCandilo, Fay; Kublin, James; Sun, Xiao; Quirk, Erin; Miller, Michelle; Gray, Glenda; Pape, Jean; Mehrotra, Devan V.; Self, Steven; Turner, Katherine; Sanchez, Jorge; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Duerr, Ann; Dubey, Sheri; Kierstead, Lisa; Casimiro, Danilo; Hammer, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The safety and immunogenicity of the MRK adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) HIV-1 clade B gag vaccine was assessed in an international Phase I trial. Three-hundred and sixty healthy HIV-uninfected adults were enrolled on five continents. Subjects received placebo or 1 × 109 or 1 × 1010 viral particles (vp) per dose of the MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag vaccine at day 1, week 4, and week 26. Immunogenicity was evaluated using an IFN-γ ELISPOT gag 15-mer assay with positive responses defined as ≥55 SFC/106 PBMCs and ≥4-fold over mock control. The vaccine was well tolerated. The most common adverse events were injection site reactions, headache, pyrexia, diarrhea, fatigue, and myalgia. At week 30, geometric mean ELISPOT responses were 24, 114, and 226 SFC/106 PBMCs in the placebo, 1 × 109 vp/dose, and 1 × 1010 vp/dose groups, respectively. Overall, responses to 1 × 1010 vp were 85% and 68% in subjects with low (≤200) and high (>200) baseline Ad5 titers, respectively. The MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag vaccine was immunogenic in diverse geographic regions. Gag ELISPOT responses were greater in the 1 × 1010 vp/dose groups than in the 1 × 109 vp/dose groups. Data from this first international study indicate that adenovirus-vectored vaccines are well tolerated and may be immunogenic in subjects from regions with high prevalence of preexisting Ad5 immunity. PMID:20854108

  1. Novel and promiscuous CTL epitopes in conserved regions of Gag targeted by individuals with early subtype C HIV type 1 infection from southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Masemola, Agatha M; Mashishi, Tumelo N; Khoury, Greg; Bredell, Helba; Paximadis, Maria; Mathebula, Tiyani; Barkhan, Debra; Puren, Adrian; Vardas, Efthyia; Colvin, Mark; Zijenah, Lynn; Katzenstein, David; Musonda, Rosemary; Allen, Susan; Kumwenda, Newton; Taha, Taha; Gray, Glenda; McIntyre, James; Karim, Salim Abdool; Sheppard, Haynes W; Gray, Clive M

    2004-10-01

    Characterization of optimal CTL epitopes in Gag can provide crucial information for evaluation of candidate vaccines in populations at the epicenter of the HIV-1 epidemic. We screened 38 individuals with recent subtype C HIV-1 infection using overlapping consensus C Gag peptides and hypothesized that unique HLA-restricting alleles in the southern African population would determine novel epitope identity. Seventy-four percent of individuals recognized at least one Gag peptide pool. Ten epitopic regions were identified across p17, p24, and p2p7p1p6, and greater than two-thirds of targeted regions were directed at: TGTEELRSLYNTVATLY (p17, 35%); GPKEPFRDYVDRFFKTLRAEQATQDV (p24, 19%); and RGGKLDKWEKIRLRPGGKKHYMLKHL (p17, 15%). After alignment of these epitopic regions with consensus M and a consensus subtype C sequence from the cohort, it was evident that the regions targeted were highly conserved. Fine epitope mapping revealed that five of nine identified optimal Gag epitopes were novel: HLVWASREL, LVWASRELERF, LYNTVATLY, PFRDYVDRFF, and TLRAEQATQD, and were restricted by unique HLA-Cw*08, HLA-A*30/B*57, HLA-A*29/B*44, and HLA-Cw*03 alleles, respectively. Notably, three of the mapped epitopes were restricted by more than one HLA allele. Although these epitopes were novel and restricted by unique HLA, they overlapped or were embedded within previously described CTL epitopes from subtype B HIV-1 infection. These data emphasize the promiscuous nature of epitope binding and support our hypothesis that HLA diversity between populations can shape fine epitope identity, but may not represent a constraint for universal recognition of Gag in highly conserved domains.

  2. BCA2/Rabring7 Interferes with HIV-1 Proviral Transcription by Enhancing the SUMOylation of IκBα

    PubMed Central

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT BCA2/Rabring7 is a BST2 cofactor that promotes the lysosomal degradation of trapped HIV-1 virions but also functions as a BST2-independent anti-HIV factor by targeting Gag for lysosomal degradation. Since many antiviral factors regulate the NF-κB innate signaling pathway, we investigated whether BCA2 is also connected to this proinflammatory cascade. Here, we show for the first time that BCA2 is induced by NF-κB-activating proinflammatory cytokines and that upregulation of BCA2 provides regulatory negative feedback on NF-κB. Specifically, BCA2 serves as an E3 SUMO ligase in the SUMOylation of IκBα, which in turn enhances the sequestration of NF-κB components in the cytoplasm. Since HIV-1 utilizes NF-κB to promote proviral transcription, the BCA2-mediated inhibition of NF-κB significantly decreases the transcriptional activity of HIV-1 (up to 4.4-fold in CD4+ T cells). Therefore, our findings indicate that BCA2 poses an additional barrier to HIV-1 infection: not only does BCA2 prevent assembly and release of nascent virions, it also significantly restricts HIV-1 transcription by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. IMPORTANCE Understanding the interactions between HIV-1 and its host cells is highly relevant to the design of new drugs aimed at eliminating HIV-1 from infected individuals. We have previously shown that BCA2, a cofactor of BST2 in the restriction of HIV-1, also prevents virion assembly in a BST2-independent manner. In this study, we found that BCA2 negatively regulates the NF-κB pathway—a signaling cascade necessary for HIV-1 replication and infectivity—which in turn detrimentally affects proviral transcription and virus propagation. Thus, our results indicate that, besides its previously described functions as an antiviral factor, BCA2 poses an additional barrier to HIV-1 replication at the transcriptional level. PMID:28122985

  3. Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2014-02-10

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.

  4. Quantifying Susceptibility of CD4+ Stem Memory T-Cells to Infection by Laboratory Adapted and Clinical HIV-1 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs. PMID:24517971

  5. CD8+ T cells from HLA-B*57 elite suppressors effectively suppress replication of HIV-1 escape mutants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elite Controllers or Suppressors (ES) are HIV-1 positive individuals who maintain plasma viral loads below the limit of detection of standard clinical assays without antiretroviral therapy. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the control of viral replication in these patients is due to a strong and specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. The ability of CD8+ T cells to control HIV-1 replication is believed to be impaired by the development of escape mutations. Surprisingly, viruses amplified from the plasma of ES have been shown to contain multiple escape mutations, and it is not clear how immunologic control is maintained in the face of virologic escape. Results We investigated the effect of escape mutations within HLA*B-57-restricted Gag epitopes on the CD8+ T cell mediated suppression of HIV-1 replication. Using site directed mutagenesis, we constructed six NL4-3 based viruses with canonical escape mutations in one to three HLA*B-57-restricted Gag epitopes. Interestingly, similar levels of CTL-mediated suppression of replication in autologous primary CD4+ T cells were observed for all of the escape mutants. Intracellular cytokine staining was performed in order to determine the mechanisms involved in the suppression of the escape variants. While low baseline CD8+ T cells responses to wild type and escape variant peptides were seen, stimulation of PBMC with either wild type or escape variant peptides resulted in increased IFN-γ and perforin expression. Conclusions These data presented demonstrate that CD8+ T cells from ES are capable of suppressing replication of virus harboring escape mutations in HLA-B*57-restricted Gag epitopes. Additionally, our data suggest that ES CD8+ T cells are capable of generating effective de novo responses to escape mutants. PMID:24330837

  6. Global analysis of host-pathogen interactions that regulate early stage HIV-1 replication

    PubMed Central

    König, Renate; Zhou, Yingyao; Elleder, Daniel; Diamond, Tracy L.; Bonamy, Ghislain M.C.; Irelan, Jeffrey T.; Chiang, Chih-yuan; Tu, Buu P.; De Jesus, Paul D.; Lilley, Caroline E.; Seidel, Shannon; Opaluch, Amanda M.; Caldwell, Jeremy S.; Weitzman, Matthew D.; Kuhen, Kelli L.; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Ideker, Trey; Orth, Anthony P.; Miraglia, Loren J.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Young, John A.; Chanda, Sumit K.

    2008-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) rely upon host-encoded proteins to facilitate their replication. Here we combined genome-wide siRNA analyses with interrogation of human interactome databases to assemble a host-pathogen biochemical network containing 213 confirmed host cellular factors and 11 HIV-1-encoded proteins. Protein complexes that regulate ubiquitin conjugation, proteolysis, DNA damage response and RNA splicing were identified as important modulators of early stage HIV-1 infection. Additionally, over 40 new factors were shown to specifically influence initiation and/or kinetics of HIV-1 DNA synthesis, including cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, modulators of post-translational modification, and nucleic acid binding proteins. Finally, fifteen proteins with diverse functional roles, including nuclear transport, prostaglandin synthesis, ubiquitination, and transcription, were found to influence nuclear import or viral DNA integration. Taken together, the multi-scale approach described here has uncovered multiprotein virus-host interactions that likely act in concert to facilitate early steps of HIV-1 infection. PMID:18854154

  7. Assembly and immunogenicity of chimeric Gag-Env proteins derived from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Truong, C; Brand, D; Mallet, F; Roingeard, P; Brunet, S; Barin, F

    1996-03-01

    We evaluated the potential of the precursor Gag protein (Pr55) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as a carrier for the presentation of envelope epitopes. Recombinant chimeric core-envelope protein-expressing constructs were derived by deletion of regions within the gag gene, especially of regions encoding p24 capsid epitopes. Sequences encoding either the principal neutralization determinant (PND) and/or the CD4-binding domains (CD4BS) were then inserted. Deletion of residues 196-226 within the p24 capsid protein did not prevent self-assembly into virus-like particles (VLPs) whereas deletion of residues 299-328 completely abolished VLP formation. Thus the major homology region (MHR) and proximal sequences are required for capsid assembly. An immunization study in mice showed that assembled chimeric proteins elicited strong anti-Gag, weak anti-envelope, and no neutralizing humoral responses. Nonassembled chimeric proteins were poor immunogens. Mapping of Pr55 antigenic sites using sera from immunized mice and peptides overlapping the entire Gag precursor showed that p24 capsid and p17 matrix epitopes presented to the immune system differed from the mature form (p24 or p17) and the multimeric immature form (Pr55).

  8. First-in-Human Evaluation of the Safety and Immunogenicity of an Intranasally Administered Replication-Competent Sendai Virus–Vectored HIV Type 1 Gag Vaccine: Induction of Potent T-Cell or Antibody Responses in Prime-Boost Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Nyombayire, Julien; Anzala, Omu; Gazzard, Brian; Karita, Etienne; Bergin, Philip; Hayes, Peter; Kopycinski, Jakub; Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Jackson, Akil; Bizimana, Jean; Farah, Bashir; Sayeed, Eddy; Parks, Christopher L.; Inoue, Makoto; Hironaka, Takashi; Hara, Hiroto; Shu, Tsugumine; Matano, Tetsuro; Dally, Len; Barin, Burc; Park, Harriet; Gilmour, Jill; Lombardo, Angela; Excler, Jean-Louis; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna S.; Cox, Josephine H.

    2017-01-01

    Background. We report the first-in-human safety and immunogenicity assessment of a prototype intranasally administered, replication-competent Sendai virus (SeV)–vectored, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine. Methods. Sixty-five HIV-1–uninfected adults in Kenya, Rwanda, and the United Kingdom were assigned to receive 1 of 4 prime-boost regimens (administered at 0 and 4 months, respectively; ratio of vaccine to placebo recipients, 12:4): priming with a lower-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with an adenovirus 35–vectored vaccine encoding HIV-1 Gag, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) given intramuscularly (SLA); priming with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly (SHA); priming with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly, followed by boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (ASH); and priming and boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (SHSH). Results. All vaccine regimens were well tolerated. Gag-specific IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot–determined response rates and geometric mean responses were higher (96% and 248 spot-forming units, respectively) in groups primed with SeV-Gag and boosted with Ad35-GRIN (SLA and SHA) than those after a single dose of Ad35-GRIN (56% and 54 spot-forming units, respectively) or SeV-Gag (55% and 59 spot-forming units, respectively); responses persisted for ≥8 months after completion of the prime-boost regimen. Functional CD8+ T-cell responses with greater breadth, magnitude, and frequency in a viral inhibition assay were also seen in the SLA and SHA groups after Ad35-GRIN boost, compared with those who received either vaccine alone. SeV-Gag did not boost T-cell counts in the ASH group. In contrast, the highest Gag-specific antibody titers were seen in the ASH group. Mucosal antibody responses were sporadic. Conclusions. SeV-Gag primed functional, durable HIV-specific T

  9. Random Mutagenesis MAPPIT Analysis Identifies Binding Sites for Vif and Gag in Both Cytidine Deaminase Domains of Apobec3G

    PubMed Central

    Uyttendaele, Isabel; Lavens, Delphine; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Lemmens, Irma; Bovijn, Celia

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian two-hybrid system MAPPIT allows the detection of protein-protein interactions in intact human cells. We developed a random mutagenesis screening strategy based on MAPPIT to detect mutations that disrupt the interaction of one protein with multiple protein interactors simultanously. The strategy was used to detect residues of the human cytidine deaminase Apobec3G that are important for its homodimerization and its interaction with the HIV-1 Gag and Vif proteins. The strategy is able to identify the previously described head-to-head homodimerization interface in the N-terminal domain of Apobec3G. Our analysis further detects two new potential interaction surfaces in the N-and C-terminal domain of Apobec3G for interaction with Vif and Gag or for Apobec3G dimerization. PMID:22970171

  10. Highly conserved serine residue 40 in HIV-1 p6 regulates capsid processing and virus core assembly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of two late assembly (L-) domains. Although p6 is located within one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene, the 52 amino acid peptide binds at least to two cellular budding factors (Tsg101 and ALIX), is a substrate for phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, and mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into viral particles. As expected, known functional domains mostly overlap with several conserved residues in p6. In this study, we investigated the importance of the highly conserved serine residue at position 40, which until now has not been assigned to any known function of p6. Results Consistently with previous data, we found that mutation of Ser-40 has no effect on ALIX mediated rescue of HIV-1 L-domain mutants. However, the only feasible S40F mutation that preserves the overlapping pol open reading frame (ORF) reduces virus replication in T-cell lines and in human lymphocyte tissue cultivated ex vivo. Most intriguingly, L-domain mediated virus release is not dependent on the integrity of Ser-40. However, the S40F mutation significantly reduces the specific infectivity of released virions. Further, it was observed that mutation of Ser-40 selectively interferes with the cleavage between capsid (CA) and the spacer peptide SP1 in Gag, without affecting cleavage of other Gag products. This deficiency in processing of CA, in consequence, led to an irregular morphology of the virus core and the formation of an electron dense extra core structure. Moreover, the defects induced by the S40F mutation in p6 can be rescued by the A1V mutation in SP1 that generally enhances processing of the CA-SP1 cleavage site. Conclusions Overall, these data support a so far unrecognized function of p6 mediated by Ser-40 that occurs independently of the L-domain function, but selectively affects CA maturation and

  11. Oligoclonal CD8 lymphocytes from persons with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection inhibit HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Toso, J F; Chen, C H; Mohr, J R; Piglia, L; Oei, C; Ferrari, G; Greenberg, M L; Weinhold, K J

    1995-10-01

    CD8 lymphocytes from asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients can suppress virus production from infected CD4 cells. Suppressive activity is separate and distinct from cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) reactivities and is likely mediated by a soluble factor(s). The majority of HIV-1 suppression studies have been done in the context of bulk CD8 cell cultures. In this study, viral suppression was characterized by clonal populations of CD8 cells derived from HIV-1-infected patients. Most of the suppressive clones were devoid of detectable CTL reactivity against env-, gag-, pol-, and nef-expressing targets. Among the suppressive clones derived from an individual patient, a marked heterogeneity was evident with respect to phenotypic markers, cytokine production, and T cell receptor V beta expression. These results suggest that noncytolytic virus suppression is oligoclonal in nature. Clones provide tools for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanism of suppression and identifying the suppressive factor.

  12. Recombinant measles viruses expressing single or multiple antigens of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) induce cellular and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Liniger, Matthias; Zuniga, Armando; Morin, Teldja Neige Azzouz; Combardiere, Behazine; Marty, Rene; Wiegand, Marian; Ilter, Orhan; Knuchel, Marlyse; Naim, Hussein Y

    2009-05-26

    Recombinant measles viruses (rMV) based on the live attenuated measles vaccine strain (MVb) expressing antigens of HIV-1 clade B were generated by reverse genetics. Recombinants expressing single or double antigens of HIV-1 (rMV-HIV) were genetically highly stable on human diploid cells. The production process of these viruses was essentially similar to the parental MV strain, yielding comparative end titers. Immunization of tg-mice by different regimens and formulations showed potent humoral and cellular immune responses against MV and HIV antigens. Recombinant MV-HIV expressing Gag protein conferred protective immunity in tg-mice after a high-dose pseudochallenge with recombinant vaccinia virus. In addition, rMV-HIV boosted anti-HIV antibodies, in the presence of pre-existing anti-vector antibodies.

  13. Safety and Immunogenicity Study of Multiclade HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Alone or as Boost following a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Susan; Than, Soe; Adams, Elizabeth M.; Graham, Barney S.; Koup, Richard A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Smith, Carol; Dally, Len; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Bergin, Philip J.; Hayes, Peter; Ho, Martin; Loughran, Kelley; Komaroff, Wendy; Stevens, Gwynneth; Thomson, Helen; Boaz, Mark J.; Cox, Josephine H.; Schmidt, Claudia; Gilmour, Jill; Nabel, Gary J.; Fast, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I study of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vector expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol from subtype B and Env from subtypes A, B and C, given alone or as boost following a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing the same HIV-1 proteins plus Nef, in 114 healthy HIV-uninfected African adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were randomized to 4 groups receiving the rAd5 vaccine intramuscularly at dosage levels of 1×1010 or 1×1011 particle units (PU) either alone or as boost following 3 injections of the DNA vaccine given at 4 mg/dose intramuscularly by needle-free injection using Biojector® 2000. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for 12 months. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Overall, 62% and 86% of vaccine recipients in the rAd5 alone and DNA prime - rAd5 boost groups, respectively, responded to the HIV-1 proteins by an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISPOT. The frequency of immune responses was independent of rAd5 dosage levels. The highest frequency of responses after rAd5 alone was detected at 6 weeks; after DNA prime - rAd5 boost, at 6 months (end of study). At baseline, neutralizing antibodies against Ad5 were present in 81% of volunteers; the distribution was similar across the 4 groups. Pre-existing immunity to Ad5 did not appear to have a significant impact on reactogenicity or immune response rates to HIV antigens by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Binding antibodies against Env were detected in up to 100% recipients of DNA prime - rAd5 boost. One volunteer acquired HIV infection after the study ended, two years after receipt of rAd5 alone. Conclusions/Significance The HIV-1 rAd5 vaccine, either alone or as a boost following HIV-1 DNA vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic in African adults. DNA priming increased the frequency and magnitude of cellular and humoral immune responses, but there was no effect of rAd5 dosage on immunogenicity endpoints. Trial

  14. Phosphorylation of HIV-1 Tat by CDK2 in HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Berro, Reem; Jerebtsova, Marina; Jackson, Angela; Charles, Sharroya; Klase, Zachary; Southerland, William; Gordeuk, Victor R; Kashanchi, Fatah; Nekhai, Sergei

    2006-01-01

    Background Transcription of HIV-1 genes is activated by HIV-1 Tat protein, which induces phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD) by CDK9/cyclin T1. Earlier we showed that CDK2/cyclin E phosphorylates HIV-1 Tat in vitro. We also showed that CDK2 induces HIV-1 transcription in vitro and that inhibition of CDK2 expression by RNA interference inhibits HIV-1 transcription and viral replication in cultured cells. In the present study, we analyzed whether Tat is phosphorylated in cultured cells by CDK2 and whether Tat phosphorylation has a regulatory effect on HIV-1 transcription. Results We analyzed HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2 in vitro and identified Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat as potential phosphorylation sites. Tat was phosphorylated in HeLa cells infected with Tat-expressing adenovirus and metabolically labeled with 32P. CDK2-specific siRNA reduced the amount and the activity of cellular CDK2 and significantly decreased phosphorylation of Tat. Tat co-migrated with CDK2 on glycerol gradient and co-immunoprecipitated with CDK2 from the cellular extracts. Tat was phosphorylated on serine residues in vivo, and mutations of Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat reduced Tat phosphorylation in vivo. Mutation of Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat reduced HIV-1 transcription in transiently transfected cells. The mutations of Tat also inhibited HIV-1 viral replication and Tat phosphorylation in the context of the integrated HIV-1 provirus. Analysis of physiological importance of the S16QP(K/R)19 and S46YGR49 sequences of Tat showed that Ser16 and Ser46 and R49 residues are highly conserved whereas mutation of the (K/R)19 residue correlated with non-progression of HIV-1 disease. Conclusion Our results indicate for the first time that Tat is phosphorylated in vivo; Tat phosphorylation is likely to be mediated by CDK2; and phosphorylation of Tat is important for HIV-1 transcription. PMID:17083724

  15. Active cAMP-dependent protein kinase incorporated within highly purified HIV-1 particles is required for viral infectivity and interacts with viral capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Christine; Hemonnot, Bénédicte; Gay, Bernard; Bardy, Martine; Sanchiz, Céline; Devaux, Christian; Briant, Laurence

    2003-09-12

    Host cell components, including protein kinases such as ERK-2/mitogen-activated protein kinase, incorporated within human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions play a pivotal role in the ability of HIV to infect and replicate in permissive cells. The present work provides evidence that the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (C-PKA) is packaged within HIV-1 virions as demonstrated using purified subtilisin-digested viral particles. Virus-associated C-PKA was shown to be enzymatically active and able to phosphorylate synthetic substrate in vitro. Suppression of virion-associated C-PKA activity by specific synthetic inhibitor had no apparent effect on viral precursor maturation and virus assembly. However, virus-associated C-PKA activity was demonstrated to regulate HIV-1 infectivity as assessed by single round infection assays performed by using viruses produced from cells expressing an inactive form of C-PKA. In addition, virus-associated C-PKA was found to co-precipitate with and to phosphorylate the CAp24gag protein. Altogether our results indicate that virus-associated C-PKA regulates HIV-1 infectivity, possibly by catalyzing phosphorylation of the viral CAp24gag protein.

  16. Acid-labile formylation of amino terminal proline of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 p24(gag) was found by proteomics using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Takashi; Misumi, Shogo; Takamune, Nobutoki; Takahashi, Ichiro; Takama, Michiho; Shoji, Shozo

    2002-05-10

    HIV-1(LAV-1) particles were collected by ultracentrifugation, treated with subtilisin, and then purified by Sepharose CL-4B column chromatography to remove microvesicles. The lysate of the purified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles was subjected to two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and stained, and the stained spots were excised and digested with trypsin. The resulting peptide fragments were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Twenty-five proteins were identified as the proteins inside the virion and the acid-labile formyl group of an amino terminal proline residue of HIV-1(LAV-1) p24(gag) was determined by MALDI-TOF MS before and after weak-acid treatments (0.6 N hydrochloric acid) and confirmed by post-source decay (PSD) of the N-formylated N-terminal tryptic peptide (N-formylated Pro(1)-Arg(18)). The role of formylation has been unclear so far, but it is surmised that the acid-labile formylation of HIV-1(LAV-1) p24(gag) may play a critical role in the formation of the HIV-1 core for conferring HIV-1 infectivity.

  17. Heterologous Prime-Boost Regimens with a Recombinant Chimpanzee Adenoviral Vector and Adjuvanted F4 Protein Elicit Polyfunctional HIV-1-Specific T-Cell Responses in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lorin, Clarisse; Vanloubbeeck, Yannick; Baudart, Sébastien; Ska, Michaël; Bayat, Babak; Brauers, Geoffroy; Clarinval, Géraldine; Donner, Marie-Noëlle; Marchand, Martine; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Mettens, Pascal; Cohen, Joe; Voss, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are important for HIV-1 replication control. F4/AS01 consists of F4 recombinant fusion protein (containing clade B Gag/p24, Pol/RT, Nef and Gag/p17) formulated in AS01 Adjuvant System, and was shown to induce F4-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses in humans. While replication-incompetent recombinant HIV-1/SIV antigen-expressing human adenoviral vectors can elicit high-frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, their use is hampered by widespread pre-existing immunity to human serotypes. Non-human adenovirus serotypes associated with lower prevalence may offer an alternative strategy. We evaluated the immunogenicity of AdC7-GRN (‘A’), a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 7 vector expressing clade B Gag, RT and Nef, and F4/AS01 (‘P’), when delivered intramuscularly in homologous (PP or AA) and heterologous (AAPP or PPAA) prime-boost regimens, in macaques and mice. Vaccine-induced HIV-1-antigen-specific T cells in peripheral blood (macaques), liver, spleen, and intestinal and genital mucosa (mice) were characterized by intracellular cytokine staining. Vaccine-specific IgG antibodies (macaques) were detected using ELISA. In macaques, only the heterologous prime-boost regimens induced polyfunctional, persistent and balanced CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses specific to each HIV-1 vaccine antigen. AdC7-GRN priming increased the polyfunctionality of F4/AS01-induced CD4+ T cells. Approximately 50% of AdC7-GRN-induced memory CD8+ T cells exhibited an effector-memory phenotype. HIV-1-specific antibodies were detected with each regimen. In mice, antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in the mucosal and systemic anatomical compartments assessed. When administered in heterologous prime-boost regimens, AdC7-GRN and F4/AS01 candidate vaccines acted complementarily in inducing potent and persistent peripheral blood HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and antibodies in macaques

  18. HIV-1 vaccines: challenges and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure.

  19. HIV-1 transcription and latency: an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy, despite being potent and life-prolonging, is not curative and does not eradicate HIV-1 infection since interruption of treatment inevitably results in a rapid rebound of viremia. Reactivation of latently infected cells harboring transcriptionally silent but replication-competent proviruses is a potential source of persistent residual viremia in cART-treated patients. Although multiple reservoirs may exist, the persistence of resting CD4+ T cells carrying a latent infection represents a major barrier to eradication. In this review, we will discuss the latest reports on the molecular mechanisms that may regulate HIV-1 latency at the transcriptional level, including transcriptional interference, the role of cellular factors, chromatin organization and epigenetic modifications, the viral Tat trans-activator and its cellular cofactors. Since latency mechanisms may also operate at the post-transcriptional level, we will consider inhibition of nuclear RNA export and inhibition of translation by microRNAs as potential barriers to HIV-1 gene expression. Finally, we will review the therapeutic approaches and clinical studies aimed at achieving either a sterilizing cure or a functional cure of HIV-1 infection, with a special emphasis on the most recent pharmacological strategies to reactivate the latent viruses and decrease the pool of viral reservoirs. PMID:23803414

  20. Reconstituting the epidemic history of mono lineage of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in Guizhou province, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Haiyan; Sun, Binlian; Li, Lingnuo; Li, Yanpeng; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Yao; Jiang, Yan; Yang, Rongge

    2014-08-01

    Guizhou province, located between border provinces and Central province of China, plays a crucial role in the transmission of HIV-1, implying it is important to monitor the epidemic of HIV-1 in this region. Available HIV-1 infected patients' plasma (n=78) were collected from Tongren city, Eastern Guizhou. Full-length gag, partial pol and env gene sequences were amplified and analyzed using phylogenetic, recombinant and Bayesian molecular clock approaches. Phylogenetic and recombinant analyses showed that CRF01_AE predominated among injecting drug users and heterosexuals in Tongren city with 85.9% proportion, it was followed by B' (5.1%), CRF07_BC (3.8%), CRF08_BC (3.8%), and B (1.3%). Moreover, 98.5% of CRF01_AE strains belonged to the distinct lineage CRF01_AE-v previously found in Guangxi province. To infer the most probable origin of CRF01_AE-v in Guizhou province, we download all available full length of CRF01_AE gag, pol and env gene region sequences from China in Los Alamos HIV sequence database. Phylodynamic and phylogeographic analyses revealed that the expanding CRF01_AE-v epidemic in Guizhou province was the result of local epidemic driven by multiple independent introductions of CRF01_AE-v strains from Guangxi province in early 2000s. High prevalence of CRF01_AE in Guizhou province may bridge the epidemic to Central China. It provides a new insight for the understanding of HIV-1 epidemic in Guizhou province and makes the evolutionary history of CRF01_AE in China more intact.

  1. Molecular Dating of HIV-1 Subtype C from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Bontell, Irene; Sarker, Md. Safiullah; Rahman, Mustafizur; Afrad, Mokibul Hassan; Sönnerborg, Anders; Azim, Tasnim

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh has an overall low HIV prevalence of <0.1% in the general population and <1% among key affected populations, but it is one of few Asian countries that has yet to reverse the epidemic. In order to do this, it is important to understand the transmission dynamics in this country. The aim of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic relationships of HIV-1 subtype C strains from Bangladesh and related strains from other countries, and thereby clarify when and from where subtype C was introduced in the country and how it subsequently spread within Bangladesh. The phylogenetic analysis included 118 Bangladeshi gag sequences and 128 sequences from other countries and was performed using the BEAST package. Our analysis revealed that the vast majority of Bangladeshi sequences (97/118, 82%) fall into a large regional cluster of samples from Bangladesh, India, China and Myanmar, which dates back to the early 1960’s. Following its establishment in the region, this strain has entered Bangladesh multiple times from around 1975 and onwards, but extensive in-country transmission could only be detected among drug users and not through sexual transmission. In addition, there have been multiple (at least ten) introductions of subtype C to Bangladesh from outside this region, but no extensive spread could be detected for any of these. Since many HIV-infections remain undetected while asymptomatic, the true extent of the transmission of each strain remains unknown, especially among hard to reach groups such as clients of sex workers and returning migrants with families. PMID:24223905

  2. Genetic identity, biological phenotype, and evolutionary pathways of transmitted/founder viruses in acute and early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Keele, Brandon F.; Learn, Gerald H.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Li, Hui; Decker, Julie M.; Wang, Shuyi; Baalwa, Joshua; Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Guffey, M. Brad; Bar, Katharine J.; Davis, Katie L.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Saag, Michael S.; Cohen, Myron S.; Mulenga, Joseph; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric; Markowitz, Martin; Hraber, Peter; Perelson, Alan S.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Haynes, Barton F.; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of full-length transmitted HIV-1 genomes could be instrumental in HIV-1 pathogenesis, microbicide, and vaccine research by enabling the direct analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection. We show in 12 acutely infected subjects (9 clade B and 3 clade C) that complete HIV-1 genomes of transmitted/founder viruses can be inferred by single genome amplification and sequencing of plasma virion RNA. This allowed for the molecular cloning and biological analysis of transmitted/founder viruses and a comprehensive genome-wide assessment of the genetic imprint left on the evolving virus quasispecies by a composite of host selection pressures. Transmitted viruses encoded intact canonical genes (gag-pol-vif-vpr-tat-rev-vpu-env-nef) and replicated efficiently in primary human CD4+ T lymphocytes but much less so in monocyte-derived macrophages. Transmitted viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic and demonstrated concealment of coreceptor binding surfaces of the envelope bridging sheet and variable loop 3. 2 mo after infection, transmitted/founder viruses in three subjects were nearly completely replaced by viruses differing at two to five highly selected genomic loci; by 12–20 mo, viruses exhibited concentrated mutations at 17–34 discrete locations. These findings reveal viral properties associated with mucosal HIV-1 transmission and a limited set of rapidly evolving adaptive mutations driven primarily, but not exclusively, by early cytotoxic T cell responses. PMID:19487424

  3. HIV-1 subtype distribution in the Gambia and the significant presence of CRF49_cpx, a novel circulating recombinant form

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Detailed local HIV-1 sequence data are essential for monitoring the HIV epidemic, for maintaining sensitive sequence-based diagnostics, and to aid in designing vaccines. Results Reported here are full envelope sequences derived from 38 randomly selected HIV-1 infections identified at a Gambian clinic between 1991 and 2009. Special care was taken to generate sequences from circulating viral RNA as uncloned products, either by limiting dilution or single genome amplification polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Within these 38 isolates, eight were subtyped as A and 18 as CRF02_AG. A small number of subtype B, C, D viruses were identified. Surprising, however, was the identification of six isolates with subtype J-like envelopes, a subtype found normally in Central Africa and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), with gag p24 regions that clustered with subtype A sequences. Near full-length sequence from three of these isolates confirmed that these represent a novel circulating recombinant form of HIV-1, now named CRF49_cpx. Conclusions This study expands the HIV-1 sequence database from the Gambia and will provide important data for HIV diagnostics, patient care, and vaccine development. PMID:20932333

  4. Establishment of a Functional Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Reverse Transcription Complex Involves the Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Bukrinskaya, Alissa; Brichacek, Beda; Mann, Angela; Stevenson, Mario

    1998-01-01

    After interaction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions with cell surface receptors, a series of poorly characterized events results in establishment of a viral reverse transcription complex in the host cell cytoplasm. This process is coordinated in such a way that reverse transcription is initiated shortly after formation of the viral reverse transcription complex. However, the mechanism through which virus entry and initiation of reverse transcription are coordinated and how these events are compartmentalized in the infected cell are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that viral reverse transcription complexes associate rapidly with the host cell cytoskeleton during HIV-1 infection and that reverse transcription occurs almost entirely in the cytoskeletal compartment. Interruption of actin polymerization before virus infection reduced association of viral reverse transcription complexes with the cytoskeleton. In addition, efficient reverse transcription was dependent on intact actin microfilaments. The localization of reverse transcription to actin microfilaments was mediated by the interaction of a reverse transcription complex component (gag MA) with actin but not vimentin (intermediate filaments) or tubulin (microtubules). In addition, fusion, but not endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 infectivity, was impaired when actin depolymerizing agents were added to target cells before infection but not when added after infection. These results point to a previously unsuspected role for the host cell cytoskeleton in HIV-1 entry and suggest that components of the cytoskeleton promote establishment of the reverse transcription complex in the host cell and also the process of reverse transcription within this complex. PMID:9841925

  5. High degree of concordance between flow cytometry and geno2pheno methods for HIV-1 tropism determination in proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Torres, Alex José Leite; Brígido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Abrahão, Marcos Herculano Nunes; Angelo, Ana Luiza Dias; de Jesus Ferreira, Gilcivaldo; Coelho, Luana Portes; Ferreira, João Leandro; Jorge, Célia Regina Mayoral Pedroso; Netto, Eduardo Martins; Brites, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Use of CCR5 antagonists requires previous viral tropism determination. The available methods have high cost, are time-consuming, or require highly trained personnel, and sophisticated equipment. We compared a flow cytometry-based tropism assay with geno2pheno method to determine HIV-1 tropism in AIDS patients, in Bahia, Brazil. We tested peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 102 AIDS patients under antiretroviral therapy by using a cytometry-based tropism assay and geno2pheno assay. Cellular membrane receptors were identified by using CXCR4, CCR5 and CD4 monoclonal antibodies, while detection of cytoplasmic mRNAs for gag and pol HIV regions was achieved by using a labeled probe. Genotypic identification of X4 and R5 tropic viruses was attempted by geno2pheno algorithm. There was a high degree of concordance between cytometry-based tropism assay and geno2pheno algorithm in determination of HIV-1 tropism. Cytometry-based tropism assay demonstrated higher sensitivity and specificity in comparison to geno2pheno, which was used as a gold-standard. One sample could not be amplified by geno2pheno method, but was classified as duotropic by cytometry-based tropism assay. We did not find any association between CD4+ count or plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load and tropism results. The overall performances of cytometry-based tropism assay and geno2pheno assay were almost identical in determination of HIV-1 tropism.

  6. Host-Specific Adaptation of HIV-1 Subtype B in the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Chikata, Takayuki; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Tamura, Yoshiko; Borghan, Mohamed Ali; Naruto, Takuya; Hashimoto, Masao; Murakoshi, Hayato; Le, Anh Q.; Mallal, Simon; John, Mina; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extent to which HIV-1 clade B strains exhibit population-specific adaptations to host HLA alleles remains incompletely known, in part due to incomplete characterization of HLA-associated HIV-1 polymorphisms (HLA-APs) in different global populations. Moreover, it remains unknown to what extent the same HLA alleles may drive significantly different escape pathways across populations. As the Japanese population exhibits distinctive HLA class I allele distributions, comparative analysis of HLA-APs between HIV-1 clade B-infected Japanese and non-Asian cohorts could shed light on these questions. However, HLA-APs remain incompletely mapped in Japan. In a cohort of 430 treatment-naive Japanese with chronic HIV-1 clade B infection, we identified 284 HLA-APs in Gag, Pol, and Nef using phylogenetically corrected methods. The number of HLA-associated substitutions in Pol, notably those restricted by HLA-B*52:01, was weakly inversely correlated with the plasma viral load (pVL), suggesting that the transmission and persistence of B*52:01-driven Pol mutations could modulate the pVL. Differential selection of HLA-APs between HLA subtype members, including those differing only with respect to substitutions outside the peptide-binding groove, was observed, meriting further investigation as to their mechanisms of selection. Notably, two-thirds of HLA-APs identified in Japan had not been reported in previous studies of predominantly Caucasian cohorts and were attributable to HLA alleles unique to, or enriched in, Japan. We also identified 71 cases where the same HLA allele drove significantly different escape pathways in Japan versus predominantly Caucasian cohorts. Our results underscore the distinct global evolution of HIV-1 clade B as a result of host population-specific cellular immune pressures. IMPORTANCE Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations in HIV-1 are broadly predictable based on the HLA class I alleles expressed by the host. Because HLA allele

  7. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells.

  8. HIV-specific humoral and cellular immunity in rabbits vaccinated with recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-like gag-env particles

    SciTech Connect

    Haffar, O.K.; Smithgall, M.D.; Moran, P.A.; Travis, B.M.; Zarling, J.M.; Hu, S.L. )

    1991-08-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-like gag-env particles produced in mammalian cells were inoculated into two New Zealand white rabbits. In parallel, two control rabbits were inoculated with the homologous HIV-1 virions inactivated by ultraviolet light (uv) and psoralen treatments. The humoral and cellular immune responses to HIV-1 were evaluated for both groups of animals. Recombinant particles elicited humoral immunity that was specific for all the viral structural proteins. The antibodies recognized both denatured and nondenatured proteins. Moreover, the sera neutralized the in vitro infectivity of the homologous virus in CEM cells. Importantly, the recombinant particles also generated a T helper response by priming with the HIV proteins. Similar results were observed with inactivated virus immunization. Therefore, the authors results suggest that the recombinant HIV-like particles elicit functional humoral immunity as well as cellular immunity and represent a novel vaccine candidate for AIDS.

  9. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Yu, Jie; Zhu, Lei; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 Infection among Men who Have Sex with Men in Taiwan in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Szu-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Fan; Cowó, Ángel E.; Chen, Marcelo; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hung, Chun-Po; Chen, Yi-Hsien; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Tang, Hung-Jen; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The number of men who have sex with men (MSM) infected with HIV-1 in Taiwan has increased rapidly in the past few years. The goal of this study was to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 infection among MSM in Taiwan to identify risk factors for intervention. Voluntary counseling program and anonymous testing were provided to patrons at 1 gay bar, 7 night clubs and 3 gay saunas in Taipei and New Taipei Cities in 2012. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using gag subtype-specific PCR and phylogenetic analysis by env sequences. Recent HIV-1 infection was determined using LAg-Avidity EIA. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were used to identify risk factors. The prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan were 4.38% (53/1,208) and 3.29 per 100 person-years, respectively. Of 49 cases genotyped, 48 (97.9%) were infected with subtype B and 1 with CRF01_AE (2%). Phylogenetic analysis of 46 HIV-1 strains showed that 25 (54.4%) subtype B strains formed 9 clusters with each other or with other local strains. The CRF01_AE case clustered with a reference strain from a Thai blood donor with bootstrap value of 99. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection included use of oil-based solution as lubricant (vs. saliva or water-based lubricants, OR= 4.23; p <0.001); exclusively receptive role (vs. insertive role, OR= 9.69; p <0.001); versatile role (vs. insertive role, OR= 6.45; p= 0.003); oral sex (vs. insertive role, OR= 11.93; p= 0.044); times of sexual contact per week (2-3 vs. zero per week, OR= 3.41; p= 0.021); illegal drug use (OR= 4.12; p <0.001); and history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR= 3.65; p= 0.002). In conclusion, there was no new HIV-1 subtype or circulating recombinant form responsible for the increase of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan in 2012. Misuse of oil-based solution as lubricant is a new risk factor identified among MSM in Taiwan. The Taiwan’s Centers for Disease Control has

  11. Cell-type specific requirements for thiol/disulfide exchange during HIV-1 entry and infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    explanation for differences among previously published studies. More importantly, from an in vivo perspective, the preferential utilization of PDI may be relevant to the HIV-1 entry and establishment of virus reservoirs in resting CD4+ cells, while the elevated levels of Trx reported in the chronic stages of HIV-1 infection may facilitate the virus entry in macrophages and help to sustain high viremia during the decline of T lymphocytes. PMID:23206338

  12. The HIV-1 Entry Process: A Stoichiometric View.

    PubMed

    Brandenberg, Oliver F; Magnus, Carsten; Regoes, Roland R; Trkola, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 infection starts with fusion of the viral and the host cell membranes, a process mediated by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer. The number of trimers required to complete membrane fusion, referred to as HIV-1 entry stoichiometry, remains under debate. A precise definition of HIV-1 entry stoichiometry is important as it reflects the efficacy of the viral entry process and steers the infectivity of HIV-1 virion populations. Initial estimates suggested a unanimous entry stoichiometry across HIV-1 strains while recent findings showed that HIV-1 strains can differ in entry stoichiometry. Here, we review current analyses of HIV-1 entry stoichiometry and point out future research directions to further define the interplay between entry stoichiometry, virus entry fitness, transmission, and susceptibility to antibody neutralization.

  13. Transplanting Supersites of HIV-1 Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongping; Gorman, Jason; Ofek, Gilad; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Druz, Aliaksandr; Lees, Christopher R.; Lu, Gabriel; Soto, Cinque; Stuckey, Jonathan; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Connors, Mark; Kwon, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    One strategy for isolating or eliciting antibodies against a specific target region on the envelope glycoprotein trimer (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) involves the creation of site transplants, which present the target region on a heterologous protein scaffold with preserved antibody-binding properties. If the target region is a supersite of HIV-1 vulnerability, recognized by a collection of broadly neutralizing antibodies, this strategy affords the creation of “supersite transplants”, capable of binding (and potentially eliciting) antibodies similar to the template collection of effective antibodies. Here we transplant three supersites of HIV-1 vulnerability, each targeted by effective neutralizing antibodies from multiple donors. To implement our strategy, we chose a single representative antibody against each of the target supersites: antibody 10E8, which recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) on the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein; antibody PG9, which recognizes variable regions one and two (V1V2) on the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein; and antibody PGT128 which recognizes a glycopeptide supersite in variable region 3 (glycan V3) on gp120. We used a structural alignment algorithm to identify suitable acceptor proteins, and then designed, expressed, and tested antigenically over 100-supersite transplants in a 96-well microtiter-plate format. The majority of the supersite transplants failed to maintain the antigenic properties of their respective template supersite. However, seven of the glycan V3-supersite transplants exhibited nanomolar affinity to effective neutralizing antibodies from at least three donors and recapitulated the mannose9-N-linked glycan requirement of the template supersite. The binding of these transplants could be further enhanced by placement into self-assembling nanoparticles. Essential elements of the glycan V3 supersite, embodied by as few as 3 N-linked glycans and ∼25 Env residues, can be segregated

  14. Intra-spike crosslinking overcomes antibody evasion by HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Galimidi, Rachel P.; Klein, Joshua S.; Politzer, Maria S.; Bai, Shiyu; Seaman, Michael S.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; West, Anthony P.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Antibodies developed during HIV-1 infection lose efficacy as the viral spike mutates. We postulated that anti-HIV-1 antibodies primarily bind monovalently because HIV’s low spike density impedes bivalent binding through inter-spike crosslinking, and the spike structure prohibits bivalent binding through intra-spike crosslinking. Monovalent binding reduces avidity and potency, thus expanding the range of mutations permitting antibody evasion. To test this idea, we engineered antibody-based molecules capable of bivalent binding through intra-spike crosslinking. We used DNA as a “molecular ruler” to measure intra-epitope distances on virion-bound spikes and construct intra-spike crosslinking molecules. Optimal bivalent reagents exhibited up to 2.5 orders-of-magnitude increased potency (>100-fold average increases across virus panels) and identified conformational states of virion-bound spikes. The demonstration that intra-spike crosslinking lowers the concentration of antibodies required for neutralization supports the hypothesis that low spike densities facilitate antibody evasion and the use of molecules capable of intra-spike crosslinking for therapy or passive protection. PMID:25635457

  15. Gene loss and adaptation to hominids underlie the ancient origin of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Lucie; Hahn, Beatrice H; Sharp, Paul M; Matsen, Frederick A; Emerman, Michael

    2013-07-17

    HIV-1 resulted from cross-species transmission of SIVcpz, a simian immunodeficiency virus that naturally infects chimpanzees. SIVcpz, in turn, is a recombinant between two SIV lineages from Old World monkeys. Lentiviral interspecies transmissions are partly driven by the evolution and capacity of viral accessory genes, such as vpx, vpr, and vif, to antagonize host antiviral factors, such as SAMHD1 and the APOBEC3 proteins. We show that vpx, which in other lentiviruses antagonizes SAMHD1, was deleted during the creation of SIVcpz. This genomic deletion resulted in the reconstruction of the overlapping vif gene by "overprinting," creating a unique vif that overlaps in its 3' end with the vpr gene and can antagonize hominid APOBEC3s. Moreover, passage of SIVs through chimpanzees facilitated the subsequent adaptation of HIV-1 to humans. Thus, HIV-1 originated through a series of gene loss and adaptation events that generated its chimpanzee precursor and lowered the species barrier to human infection.

  16. Development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, K; Asyifah, M R; Shao, F; Zhang, D

    2014-06-01

    The HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein 41 (gp41) is crucial in the HIV-1 infection process, therefore gp41 has emerged as an attractive target for drug design against AIDS. During the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been made on developing inhibitors that can prevent the HIV-1 entry process via suppressing functional gp41. In this review, the development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41 including peptide inhibitors, small molecule inhibitors, vaccines and neutralized antibodies will be discussed.

  17. HIV-1 p6 - a structured to flexible multifunctional membrane-interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Solbak, Sara Marie Øie; Reksten, Tove Ragna; Hahn, Friedrich; Wray, Victor; Henklein, Petra; Henklein, Peter; Halskau, Øyvind; Schubert, Ulrich; Fossen, Torgils

    2013-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p6 protein has recently been recognized as a docking site for several cellular and viral binding partners and is important for the formation of infectious viruses. Most of its known functions are suggested to occur under hydrophobic conditions near the cytoplasmic membrane, where the protein is presumed to exist in its most structured state. Although p6 is involved in manifold specific interactions, the protein has previously been considered to possess a random structure in aqueous solution. We show that p6 exhibits a defined structure with N- and C-terminal helical domains, connected by a flexible hinge region in 100mM dodecylphosphocholine micelle solution at pH 7 devoid of any organic co-solvents, indicating that this is a genuine limiting structural feature of the molecule in a hydrophobic environment. Furthermore, we show that p6 directly interacts with a cytoplasmic model membrane through both N-terminal and C-terminal regions by use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Phosphorylation of Ser-40 located in the center of the C-terminal α-helix does not alter the secondary structure of the protein but amplifies the interaction with membranes significantly, indicating that p6 binds to the polar head groups at the surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. The increased hydrophobic membrane interaction of p6(23-52) S40F correlated with the observed increased amount of the polyprotein Gag in the RIPA insoluble fraction when Ser40 of p6 was mutated with Phe indicating that p6 modulates the membrane interactions of HIV-1 Gag.

  18. APOBEC3G impairs the multimerization of the HIV-1 Vif protein in living cells.

    PubMed

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago Xavier; Bernacchi, Serena; Richert, Ludovic; Godet, Julien; Goldschmidt, Valérie; Mély, Yves; Marquet, Roland; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2013-06-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is a small basic protein essential for viral fitness and pathogenicity. Vif allows productive infection in nonpermissive cells, including most natural HIV-1 target cells, by counteracting the cellular cytosine deaminases APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G [A3G]) and A3F. Vif is also associated with the viral assembly complex and packaged into viral particles through interactions with the viral genomic RNA and the nucleocapsid domain of Pr55(Gag). Recently, we showed that oligomerization of Vif into high-molecular-mass complexes induces Vif folding and influences its binding to high-affinity RNA binding sites present in the HIV genomic RNA. To get further insight into the role of Vif multimerization in viral assembly and A3G repression, we used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM)- and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assays to investigate Vif-Vif interactions in living cells. By using two N-terminally tagged Vif proteins, we show that Vif-Vif interactions occur in living cells. This oligomerization is strongly reduced when the putative Vif multimerization domain ((161)PPLP(164)) is mutated, indicating that this domain is crucial, but that regions outside this motif also participate in Vif oligomerization. When coexpressed together with Pr55(Gag), Vif is largely relocated to the cell membrane, where Vif oligomerization also occurs. Interestingly, wild-type A3G strongly interferes with Vif multimerization, contrary to an A3G mutant that does not bind to Vif. These findings confirm that Vif oligomerization occurs in living cells partly through its C-terminal motif and suggest that A3G may target and perturb the Vif oligomerization state to limit its functions in the cell.

  19. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rupal; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Caporini, Marc A.; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner; Struppe, Jochem; Suiter, Christopher; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Franks, W. Trent; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Bertarello, Andrea; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids comprised of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20 – 64 fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4 – 18.8 T) and temperature (109 – 180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine sidechain conformers, unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules, and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR as an excellent tool for characterization of HIV-1 assemblies. PMID:26709853

  20. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR Spectroscopy for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner; Struppe, Jochem; Suiter, Christopher; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L; Franks, W Trent; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Bertarello, Andrea; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-21

    Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids composed of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20-64-fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar-based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4-18.8 T) and temperature (109-180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine side-chain conformers; unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules; and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR spectroscopy as an excellent tool for the characterization of HIV-1 assemblies.

  1. Cross-subtype detection of HIV-1 using reverse transcription and recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara A; Siverson, Joshua B; Weis, Julie; Cantera, Jason; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S

    2016-04-01

    A low complexity diagnostic test that rapidly and reliably detects HIV infection in infants at the point of care could facilitate early treatment, improving outcomes. However, many infant HIV diagnostics can only be performed in laboratory settings. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that can rapidly amplify proviral DNA from multiple subtypes of HIV-1 in under twenty minutes without complex equipment. In this study we added reverse transcription (RT) to RPA to allow detection of both HIV-1 RNA and DNA. We show that this RT-RPA HIV-1 assay has a limit of detection of 10-30 copies of an exact sequence matched DNA or RNA, respectively. In addition, at 100 copies of RNA or DNA, the assay detected 171 of 175 (97.7%) sequence variants that represent all the major subtypes and recombinant forms of HIV-1 Groups M and O. This data suggests that the application of RT-RPA for the combined detection of HIV-1 viral RNA and proviral DNA may prove a highly sensitive tool for rapid and accurate diagnosis of infant HIV.

  2. Therapeutics for HIV-1 reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    Sgarbanti, Marco; Battistini, Angela

    2013-08-01

    Intensive combined antiretroviral therapy successfully suppresses HIV-1 replication and AIDS disease progression making infection manageable, but it is unable to eradicate the virus that persists in long-lived, drug-insensitive and immune system-insensitive reservoirs thus asking for life-long treatments with problems of compliance, resistance, toxicity and cost. These limitations and recent insights into latency mechanisms have fueled a renewed effort in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Proposed eradication strategies involve reactivation of the latent reservoir upon induction of viral transcription followed by the elimination of reactivated virus-producing cells by viral cytopathic effect or host immune response. Several molecules identified by mechanism-directed approaches or in large-scale screenings have been proposed as latency reversing agents. Some of them have already entered clinical testing in humans but with mixed or unsatisfactory results.

  3. Callosal Degradation in HIV-1 Infection Predicts Hierarchical Perception: A DTI study

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Oehring, Eva M.; Schulte, Tilman; Rosenbloom, Margaret J.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 infection affects white matter circuits linking frontal, parietal, and subcortical regions that subserve visuospatial attention processes. Normal perception requires the integration of details, preferentially processed in the left hemisphere, and the global composition of an object or scene, preferentially processed in the right hemisphere. We tested whether HIV-related callosal white matter degradation contributes to disruption of selective lateralized visuospatial and attention processes. A hierarchical letter target detection paradigm was devised, where large (global) letters were composed of small (local) letters. Participants were required to identify target letters among distractors presented at global, local, both or neither level. Attention was directed to one (global or local) or both levels. Participants were 21 HIV-1 infected and 19 healthy control men and women who also underwent Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). HIV-1 participants showed impaired hierarchical perception owing to abnormally enhanced global facilitation effects but no impairment in attentional control on local-global feature selection. DTI metrics revealed poorer fiber integrity of the corpus callosum in HIV-1 than controls that was more pronounced in posterior than anterior regions. Analysis revealed a double dissociation of anterior and posterior callosal compromise in HIV-1 infection: Compromise in anterior but not posterior callosal fiber integrity predicted response conflict elicited by global targets, whereas compromise in posterior but not anterior callosal fiber integrity predicted response facilitation elicited by global targets. We conclude that component processes of visuospatial perception are compromised in HIV-1 infection attributable, at least in part, to degraded callosal microstructural integrity relevant for local-global feature integration. PMID:20018201

  4. Evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Burkala, Evan; Poss, Mary

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the predicted biochemical properties of Gag proteins from a diverse group of feline immunodeficiency viruses (FIV) to determine how different evolutionary histories of virus and host have changed or constrained these important structural proteins. Our data are based on FIV sequences derived from domestic cat (FIVfca), cougar (FIVpco), and lions (FIVple). Analyses consisted of determining the selective forces acting at each position in the protein and the comparing predictions for secondary structure, charge, hydrophobicity and flexibility for matrix, capsid and nucleocapsid, and the C-terminal peptide, which comprise the Gag proteins. We demonstrate that differences among the FIV Gag proteins have largely arisen by neutral evolution, although many neutrally evolving regions have maintained biochemical features. Regions with predicted differences in biochemical features appear to involve intramolecular interactions and structural elements that undergo conformational changes during particle maturation. In contrast, the majority of sites involved in intermolecular contacts on the protein surface are constrained by purifying selection. There is also conservation of sites that interact with host proteins associated with cellular trafficking and particle budding. NC is the only protein with evidence of positive selection, two of which occur in the N-terminal region responsible for RNA binding and interaction with host proteins.

  5. Immunogenic Profiling in Mice of a HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidate (MVA-B) Expressing Four HIV-1 Antigens and Potentiation by Specific Gene Deletions

    PubMed Central

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Nájera, José Luis; Gómez, Carmen E.; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S.; Esteban, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    Background The immune parameters of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates that might be relevant in protection against HIV-1 infection are still undefined. The highly attenuated poxvirus strain MVA is one of the most promising vectors to be use as HIV-1 vaccine. We have previously described a recombinant MVA expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (referred as MVA-B), that induced HIV-1-specific immune responses in different animal models and gene signatures in human dendritic cells (DCs) with immunoregulatory function. Methodology/Principal Findings In an effort to characterize in more detail the immunogenic profile of MVA-B and to improve its immunogenicity we have generated a new vector lacking two genes (A41L and B16R), known to counteract host immune responses by blocking the action of CC-chemokines and of interleukin 1β, respectively (referred as MVA-B ΔA41L/ΔB16R). A DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol was used to compare the adaptive and memory HIV-1 specific immune responses induced in mice by the parental MVA-B and by the double deletion mutant MVA-B ΔA41L/ΔB16R. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that both vectors triggered HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, with the CD8+ T-cell compartment responsible for >91.9% of the total HIV-1 responses in both immunization groups. However, MVA-B ΔA41L/ΔB16R enhanced the magnitude and polyfunctionality of the HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immune responses. HIV-1-specific CD4+ T-cell responses were polyfunctional and preferentially Env-specific in both immunization groups. Significantly, while MVA-B induced preferentially Env-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, MVA-B ΔA41L/ΔB16R induced more GPN-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, with an enhanced polyfunctional pattern. Both vectors were capable of producing similar levels of antibodies against Env. Conclusions/Significance These findings revealed that MVA-B and MVA-B ΔA41L/ΔB16R induced in mice robust, polyfunctional and durable T

  6. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  7. Population genomics of intrapatient HIV-1 evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zanini, Fabio; Brodin, Johanna; Thebo, Lina; Lanz, Christa; Bratt, Göran; Albert, Jan; Neher, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Many microbial populations rapidly adapt to changing environments with multiple variants competing for survival. To quantify such complex evolutionary dynamics in vivo, time resolved and genome wide data including rare variants are essential. We performed whole-genome deep sequencing of HIV-1 populations in 9 untreated patients, with 6-12 longitudinal samples per patient spanning 5-8 years of infection. The data can be accessed and explored via an interactive web application. We show that patterns of minor diversity are reproducible between patients and mirror global HIV-1 diversity, suggesting a universal landscape of fitness costs that control diversity. Reversions towards the ancestral HIV-1 sequence are observed throughout infection and account for almost one third of all sequence changes. Reversion rates depend strongly on conservation. Frequent recombination limits linkage disequilibrium to about 100bp in most of the genome, but strong hitch-hiking due to short range linkage limits diversity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11282.001 PMID:26652000

  8. HIV-1 Transmission Networks Across South Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mi Young; Wertheim, Joel O; Kim, Woo Joo; Kim, Shin-Woo; Lee, Jin Soo; Ann, Hea Won; Jeon, Yongduk; Ahn, Jin Young; Song, Je Eun; Oh, Dong Hyun; Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Eun Jin; Jung, In Young; Kim, Moo Hyun; Jeong, Wooyoung; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Kim, June Myung; Smith, Davey M; Choi, Jun Yong

    2017-03-27

    Molecular epidemiology can help clarify the properties and dynamics of HIV-1 transmission networks in both global and regional scales. We studied 143 HIV-1-infected individuals recruited from four medical centers of three cities in South Korea between April 2013 and May 2014. HIV-1 env V3 sequence data were generated (337-793 bp) and analyzed using a pairwise distance-based clustering approach to infer putative transmission networks. Participants whose viruses were ≤2.0% divergent according to Tamura-Nei 93 genetic distance were defined as clustering. We collected demographic, risk, and clinical data and analyzed these data in relation to clustering. Among 143 participants, we identified nine putative transmission clusters of different sizes (range 2-4 participants). The reported risk factor of participants were concordant in only one network involving two participants, that is, both individuals reported homosexual sex as their risk factor. The participants in the other eight networks did not report concordant risk factors, although they were phylogenetically linked. About half of the participants refused to report their risk factor. Overall, molecular epidemiology provides more information to understand local transmission networks and the risks associated with these networks.

  9. ESCRT machinery potentiates HIV-1 utilization of the PI(4,5)P(2)-PLC-IP3R-Ca(2+) signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Lorna S; Medina, Gisselle N; Carter, Carol A

    2011-10-21

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) release efficiency is directed by late (L) domain motifs in the viral structural precursor polyprotein Gag, which serve as links to the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery. Linkage is normally through binding of Tsg101, an ESCRT-1 component, to the P(7)TAP motif in the p6 region of Gag. In its absence, budding is directed by binding of Alix, an ESCRT adaptor protein, to the LY(36)PX(n)L motif in Gag. We recently showed that budding requires activation of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R), a protein that "gates" Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, triggers Ca(2+) cell influx and thereby functions as a major regulator of Ca(2+) signaling. In the present study, we determined whether the L domain links Gag to Ca(2+) signaling machinery. Depletion of IP3R and inactivation of phospholipase C (PLC) inhibited budding whether or not Tsg101 was bound to Gag. PLC hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate generates inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate, the ligand that activates IP3R. However, with Tsg101 bound, Gag release was independent of Gq-mediated activation of PLC, and budding was readily enhanced by pharmacological stimulation of PLC. Moreover, IP3R was redistributed to the cell periphery and cytosolic Ca(2+) was elevated, events indicative of induction of Ca(2+) signaling. The results suggest that L domain function, ESCRT machinery and Ca(2+) signaling are linked events in Gag release.

  10. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  11. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nunzio, Francesca; Fricke, Thomas; Miccio, Annarita; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio; Souque, Philippe; Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco; Mavilio, Fulvio; Charneau, Pierre; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.

  12. Extensive Genetic Diversity of HIV-1 in Incident and Prevalent Infections among Malaysian Blood Donors: Multiple Introductions of HIV-1 Genotypes from Highly Prevalent Countries

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Bon, Abdul Hamid; Keating, Sheila; Anderios, Fread; Halim, Hazwan Abdul; Takebe, Yutaka; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Busch, Michael P.; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-transmissible infections including HIV-1 continue to pose major risks for unsafe blood transfusions due to both window phase infections and divergent viruses that may not be detected by donor screening assays. Given the recent emergence of several HIV-1 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) in high-risk populations in the Southeast Asia region, we investigated the genetic diversity of HIV-1 among the blood donors in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of 211 HIV-positive plasma samples detected among 730,188 donations to the National Blood Centre between 2013 and 2014 were provided (90.5% male, median age: 27.0 years old). Recent or long-term infection status at the time of donation was determined using a limiting antigen avidity enzyme immunoassay (LAg-Avidity EIA). HIV-1 gag-pol genes were amplified and sequenced from residual plasma for 149 cases followed by genotype determination using phylogenetic and recombination analyses. Transmitted antiretroviral resistance mutations were not observed among the blood donors, among which 22.7% were classified as recent or incident infections. Major circulating HIV-1 genotypes determined by neighbour-joining phylogenetic inference included CRF01_AE at 40.9% (61/149), CRF33_01B at 21.5% (32/149), and subtype B at 10.1% (15/149). Newly-described CRFs including CRF54_01B circulated at 4.0%, CRF74_01B at 2.0%, and CRF53_01B and CRF48_01B at 0.7% each. Interestingly, unique HIV-1 genotypes including African subtype G (8.7%), CRF45_cpx (1.3%), CRF02_AG (0.7%) and CRF07_BC (0.7%) from China were detected for the first time in the country. A cluster of subtype G sequences formed a distinct founder sub-lineage within the African strains. In addition, 8.7% (13/149) of HIV-infected donors had unique recombinant forms (URFs) including CRF01_AE/B' (4.7%), B'/C (2.7%) and B'/G (1.3%) recombinants. Detailed analysis identified similar recombinant structures with shared parental strains among the B'/C and B'/G URFs, some of which

  13. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  14. Transgenic 4-1BBL-engineered vaccine stimulates potent Gag-specific therapeutic and long-term immunity via increased priming of CD44(+)CD62L(high) IL-7R(+) CTLs with up- and downregulation of anti- and pro-apoptosis genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Freywald, Andrew; Chen, Yue; Xu, Jianqing; Tan, Xin; Xiang, Jim

    2015-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-specific dendritic cell (DC) vaccines have been used in clinical trials. However, they have been found to only induce some degree of immune responses in these studies. We previously demonstrated that the HIV-1 Gag-specific Gag-Texo vaccine stimulated Gag-specific effector CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, leading to completely protective, but very limited, therapeutic immunity. In this study, we constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector, adenovirus (AdV)4-1BBL, which expressed mouse 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL), and generated transgenic 4-1BBL-engineered OVA-Texo/4-1BBL and Gag-Texo/4-1BBL vaccines by transfecting ovalbumin (OVA)-Texo and Gag-Texo cells with AdV4-1BBL, respectively. We demonstrate that the OVA-specific OVA-Texo/4-1BBL vaccine stimulates more efficient OVA-specific CTL responses (3.26%) compared to OVA-Texo-activated responses (1.98%) in wild-type C57BL/6 mice and the control OVA-Texo/Null vaccine without transgenic 4-1BBL expression, leading to enhanced therapeutic immunity against 6-day established OVA-expressing B16 melanoma BL6-10OVA cells. OVA-Texo/4-1BBL-stimulated CTLs, which have a CD44(+)CD62L(high) IL-7R(+) phenotype, are likely memory CTL precursors, demonstrating prolonged survival and enhanced differentiation into memory CTLs with functional recall responses and long-term immunity against BL6-10OVA melanoma. In addition, we demonstrate that OVA-Texo/4-1BBL-stimulated CTLs up- and downregulate the expression of anti-apoptosis (Bcl2l10, Naip1, Nol3, Pak7 and Tnfrsf11b) and pro-apoptosis (Casp12, Trp63 and Trp73) genes, respectively, by RT(2) Profiler PCR array analysis. Importantly, the Gag-specific Gag-Texo/4-1BBL vaccine also stimulates more efficient Gag-specific therapeutic and long-term immunity against HLA-A2/Gag-expressing B16 melanoma BL6-10Gag/A2 cells than the control Gag-Texo/Null vaccine in transgenic HLA-A2 mice. Taken together, our novel Gag-Texo/4-1BBL vaccine, which is

  15. Transgenic 4-1BBL-engineered vaccine stimulates potent Gag-specific therapeutic and long-term immunity via increased priming of CD44+CD62Lhigh IL-7R+ CTLs with up- and downregulation of anti- and pro-apoptosis genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong; Freywald, Andrew; Chen, Yue; Xu, Jianqing; Tan, Xin; Xiang, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-specific dendritic cell (DC) vaccines have been used in clinical trials. However, they have been found to only induce some degree of immune responses in these studies. We previously demonstrated that the HIV-1 Gag-specific Gag-Texo vaccine stimulated Gag-specific effector CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, leading to completely protective, but very limited, therapeutic immunity. In this study, we constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector, adenovirus (AdV)4-1BBL, which expressed mouse 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL), and generated transgenic 4-1BBL-engineered OVA-Texo/4-1BBL and Gag-Texo/4-1BBL vaccines by transfecting ovalbumin (OVA)-Texo and Gag-Texo cells with AdV4-1BBL, respectively. We demonstrate that the OVA-specific OVA-Texo/4-1BBL vaccine stimulates more efficient OVA-specific CTL responses (3.26%) compared to OVA-Texo-activated responses (1.98%) in wild-type C57BL/6 mice and the control OVA-Texo/Null vaccine without transgenic 4-1BBL expression, leading to enhanced therapeutic immunity against 6-day established OVA-expressing B16 melanoma BL6-10OVA cells. OVA-Texo/4-1BBL-stimulated CTLs, which have a CD44+CD62Lhigh IL-7R+ phenotype, are likely memory CTL precursors, demonstrating prolonged survival and enhanced differentiation into memory CTLs with functional recall responses and long-term immunity against BL6-10OVA melanoma. In addition, we demonstrate that OVA-Texo/4-1BBL-stimulated CTLs up- and downregulate the expression of anti-apoptosis (Bcl2l10, Naip1, Nol3, Pak7 and Tnfrsf11b) and pro-apoptosis (Casp12, Trp63 and Trp73) genes, respectively, by RT2 Profiler PCR array analysis. Importantly, the Gag-specific Gag-Texo/4-1BBL vaccine also stimulates more efficient Gag-specific therapeutic and long-term immunity against HLA-A2/Gag-expressing B16 melanoma BL6-10Gag/A2 cells than the control Gag-Texo/Null vaccine in transgenic HLA-A2 mice. Taken together, our novel Gag-Texo/4-1BBL vaccine, which is capable of

  16. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    DOE PAGES

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; ...

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth ofmore » IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.« less

  17. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-