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Sample records for gajdo elika ochodkov

  1. Glycine decarboxylase in Rhodopseudomonas spheroides and in rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Tait, G. H.

    1970-01-01

    1. Glycine decarboxylase and glycine–bicarbonate exchange activities were detected in extracts of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides and in rat liver mitochondria and their properties were studied. 2. The glycine decarboxylase activity from both sources is stimulated when glyoxylate is added to the assay system. 3. Several proteins participate in these reactions and a heat-stable low-molecular-weight protein was purified from both sources. 4. These enzyme activities increase markedly when R. spheroides is grown in the presence of glycine, glyoxylate, glycollate, oxalate or serine. 5. All the enzymes required to catalyse the conversion of glycine into acetyl-CoA via serine and pyruvate were detected in extracts of R. spheroides; of these glycine decarboxylase has the lowest activity. 6. The increase in the activity of glycine decarboxylase on illumination of R. spheroides in a medium containing glycine, and the greater increase when ATP is also present in the medium, probably accounts for the increased incorporation of the methylene carbon atom of glycine into fatty acids found previously under these conditions (Gajdos, Gajdos-Török, Gorchein, Neuberger & Tait, 1968). 7. The results are compared with those obtained by other workers on the glycine decarboxylase and glycine–bicarbonate exchange activities in other systems. PMID:5476725

  2. The Lower Triassic Sorkh Shale Formation of the Tabas Block, east central Iran: Succesion of a failed-rift basin at the Paleotethys margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasemi, Y.; Ghomashi, M.; Amin-Rasouli, H.; Kheradmand, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Lower Triassic Sorkh Shale Formation is a dominantly red colored marginal marine succession deposited in the north-south trending Tabas Basin of east central Iran. It is correlated with the unconformity-bounded lower limestone member of the Elika Formation of the Alborz Mountains of northern Iran. The Sorkh Shale is bounded by the pre-Triassic and post-Lower Triassic interregional unconformities and consists mainly of carbonates, sandstones, and evaporites with shale being a minor constituent. Detailed facies analysis of the Sorkh Shale Formation resulted in recognition of several genetically linked peritidal facies that are grouped into restricted subtidal, carbonate tidal flat, siliciclastic tidal flat, coastal plain and continental evaporite facies associations. These were deposited in a low energy, storm-dominated inner-ramp setting with a very gentle slope that fringed the Tabas Block of east central Iran and passed northward (present-day coordinates) into deeper water facies of the Paleotethys passive margin of northern Cimmerian Continent. Numerous carbonate storm beds containing well-rounded intraclasts, ooids and bioclasts of mixed fauna are present in the Sorkh Shale Formation of the northern Tabas Basin. The constituents of the storm beds are absent in the fair weather peritidal facies of the Sorkh Shale Formation, but are present throughout the lower limestone member of the Elika Formation. The Tabas Block, a part of the Cimmerian continent in east central Iran, is a rift basin that developed during Early Ordovician-Silurian Paleotethys rifting. Facies and sequence stratigraphic analyses of the Sorkh Shale Formation has revealed additional evidence supporting the Tabas Block as a failed rift basin related to the Paleotethys passive margin. Absence of constituents of the storm beds in the fair weather peritidal facies of the Sorkh Shale Formation, presence of the constituents of the storm beds in the fair weather facies of the Elika Formation (the

  3. The Kosice meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, J.; Svoren, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sciences (under the leadership of the second author), Comenius University in Bratislava (under the leadership of the first author), and the Czech Academy of Sciences (under the leadership of Pavel Spurny) started to sweep meadows and forests at the calculated area. The first meteorite was discovered by Juraj Toth on March 20th. By October 6th, 77 meteorite fragments were found. The heaviest fragment weighs 2.17 kg and was found by Tereza Krejcova; the smallest pieces were only about 0.5 g (finder Julius Koza). The total mass recovered is 4.3 kg. There were 28 finders: Juraj Toth, Diana Buzova, Marek Husarik, Tereza Krejcova, Jan Svoren, Julius Koza, David Capek, Pavel Spurny, Stanislav Kaniansky, Eva Schunova, Marcel Skreka, Dusan Tomko, Pavol Zigo, Miroslav Seben, Jiri Silha, Leonard Kornos, Marcela Bodnarova, Peter Veres, Jozef Nedoroscik, Zuzana Mimovicova, Zuzana Krisandova, Jaromir Petrzala, Stefan Gajdos, Tomas Dobrovodsky, Peter Delincak, Zdenko Bartos, Ales Kucera, and Jozef Vilagi. Preliminary as well as complex mineralogic analysis implies that the recovered meteorite is classified as an ordinary H5 chondrite (Dr. J. Haloda, Czech Geological Survey, D. Ozdin, and P. Uher, Comenius University in Bratislava). The authors are grateful to all collaborators mentioned above. More details about the meteorite will be published in the near future.