Science.gov

Sample records for galactic nuclear region

  1. 3-D Mapping of the Galactic Nuclear Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel

    The Galactic center of our Galaxy provides an excellent laboratory to study the star formation mode and history as well as the structure and dynamics of stars and gas under an extreme galactic nuclear environment. We propose a comprehensive data analysis program to investigate the 3-D properties of the region enclosed by the Central Molecular Zone of the Galaxy. We will capitalize on an extensive data set now available from Planck, Herschel, Spitzer, and Hubble Space Telescopes, as well as the Large Millimeter Telescope and other ground-based facilities. This data set provides sensitive high-resolution probes of the region over the millimeter to nearIR wavelength range. The data set, together with dedicated state-of-art analysis tools that we have been developing, will enable us to obtain (1) the first full-spacing millimeter dust emission image of the region at a resolution better than 10 arcseconds (FWHM), (2) the column density, temperature, and opacity spectral index distributions of dusty gas; (3) the mapping of dust extinction toward individual stars; (4) the line-of-sight locations of individual dense clouds, (5) the global spatial distribution and formation history of stars, and (6) the characterization of environment effects on stellar and gas dynamics in the region. The combined analysis of the dust emission and extinction will represent a major step forward in determining the properties of the dusty gas as well as its effect on the stellar light observations of the region. This body of work will likely have strong implications for our understanding the stellar and gas properties in other galactic nuclei and their role in regulating the evolution of galaxies as whole.

  2. UNCOVERING THE DEEPLY EMBEDDED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN THE NUCLEAR REGIONS OF THE INTERACTING GALAXY Arp 299

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Roche, P. F.; Esquej, P.; Colina, L.; González-Martín, O.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Alvarez, C.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Packham, C.; Mason, R. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Perlman, E.; Telesco, C. M.

    2013-12-10

    We present mid-infrared (MIR) 8-13 μm spectroscopy of the nuclear regions of the interacting galaxy Arp 299 (IC 694+NGC 3690) obtained with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The high angular resolution (∼0.''3-0.''6) of the data allows us to probe nuclear physical scales between 60 and 120 pc, which is a factor of 10 improvement over previous MIR spectroscopic observations of this system. The GTC/CC spectroscopy displays evidence of deeply embedded active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in both nuclei. The GTC/CC nuclear spectrum of NGC 3690/Arp 299-B1 can be explained as emission from AGN-heated dust in a clumpy torus with both a high covering factor and high extinction along the line of sight. The estimated bolometric luminosity of the AGN in NGC 3690 is 3.2 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}. The nuclear GTC/CC spectrum of IC 694/Arp 299-A shows 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission stemming from a deeply embedded (A{sub V} ∼ 24 mag) region of less than 120 pc in size. There is also a continuum-emitting dust component. If associated with the putative AGN in IC 694, we estimate that it would be approximately five times less luminous than the AGN in NGC 3690. The presence of dual AGN activity makes Arp 299 a good example to study such phenomena in the early coalescence phase of interacting galaxies.

  3. Finding Distant Galactic HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Wenger, Trey V.; Cunningham, V.

    2015-12-01

    The WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions contains ˜2000 H ii region candidates lacking ionized gas spectroscopic observations. All candidates have the characteristic H ii region mid-infrared morphology of WISE 12 μ {{m}} emission surrounding 22 μ {{m}} emission, and additionally have detected radio continuum emission. We here report Green Bank Telescope hydrogen radio recombination line and radio continuum detections in the X-band (9 GHz; 3 cm) of 302 WISE H ii region candidates (out of 324 targets observed) in the zone 225^\\circ ≥slant {\\ell }≥slant -20^\\circ , | {\\text{}}b| ≤slant 6^\\circ . Here we extend the sky coverage of our H ii region Discovery Survey, which now contains nearly 800 H ii regions distributed across the entire northern sky. We provide LSR velocities for the 302 detections and kinematic distances for 131 of these. Of the 302 new detections, 5 have ({\\ell },{\\text{}}b,v) coordinates consistent with the Outer Scutum-Centaurus Arm (OSC), the most distant molecular spiral arm of the Milky Way. Due to the Galactic warp, these nebulae are found at Galactic latitudes >1° in the first Galactic quadrant, and therefore were missed in previous surveys of the Galactic plane. One additional region has a longitude and velocity consistent with the OSC but lies at a negative Galactic latitude (G039.183-01.422 -54.9 {km} {{{s}}}-1). With Heliocentric distances >22 kpc and Galactocentric distances >16 kpc, the OSC H ii regions are the most distant known in the Galaxy. We detect an additional three H ii regions near {\\ell }≃ 150^\\circ whose LSR velocities place them at Galactocentric radii >19 kpc. If their distances are correct, these nebulae may represent the limit to Galactic massive star formation.

  4. The Galactic nucleus: A unique region in the Galactic ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genzel, Reinhard; Poglitsch, Albrecht

    1995-01-01

    The nucleus is a unique region in the Galactic ecosystem. It is also superb laboratory of modern astrophysics where astronomers can study, at unprecedented spatial resolution and across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, physical processes that may also happen at the cores of other galaxies. Infrared observations from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory have made important contributions to unraveling the mysteries of the Galactic nucleus and this review highlights some of these measurements, as well as recent results regarding the central parsec.

  5. Trajectories of Cepheid variable stars in the Galactic nuclear bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2012-06-01

    The central region of our Galaxy provides us with a good opportunity to study the evolution of galactic nuclei and bulges because we can observe various phenomena in detail at the proximity of 8 kpc. There is a hierarchical alignment of stellar systems with different sizes; from the extended bulge, the nuclear bulge, down to the compact cluster around the central supermassive blackhole. The nuclear bulge contains stars as young as a few Myr, and even hosts the ongoing star formation. These are in contrast to the more extended bulge which are dominated by old stars, ~10Gyr. It is considered that the star formation in the nuclear bulge is caused by fresh gas provided from the inner disk. In this picture, the nuclear bulge plays an important role as the interface between the gas supplier, the inner disk, and the galactic nucleus. Kinematics of young stars in the nuclear bulge is important to discuss the star forming process and the gas circulation in the Galactic Center. We here propose spectroscopic observations of Cepheid variable stars, ~25 Myr, which we recently discovered in the nuclear bulge. The spectra taken in this proposal will allow timely estimates of the systemic velocities of the variable stars.

  6. Formation of Galactic Prominence in the Galactic Central Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chih-Han; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2017-02-01

    We carried out 2.5-dimensional resistive MHD simulations to study the formation mechanism of molecular loops observed by Fukui et al. in the Galactic central region. Since it is hard to form molecular loops by lifting up dense molecular gas, we study the formation mechanism of molecular gas in rising magnetic arcades. This model is based on the in situ formation model of solar prominences, in which prominences are formed by cooling instability in helical magnetic flux ropes formed by imposing converging and shearing motion at footpoints of the magnetic arch anchored to the solar surface. We extended this model to Galactic center scale (a few hundreds of parsecs). Numerical results indicate that magnetic reconnection taking place in the current sheet that formed inside the rising magnetic arcade creates dense blobs confined by the rising helical magnetic flux ropes. Thermal instability taking place in the flux ropes forms dense molecular filaments floating at high Galactic latitude. The mass of the filament increases with time and can exceed {10}5 {M}ȯ .

  7. The GBT HII Region Discovery Survey: Galactic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balser, Dana S.; Anderson, Loren D.; Bania, Thomas M.; Wenger, Trey

    2015-01-01

    The HII region discovery survey (HRDS) has significantly expanded the census of HII regions in the Galaxy using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). HII regions are the formation sites of massive OB stars and reveal the locations of current Galactic star formation. They are the archetypical tracers of spiral arms since, unlike other tracers, the identification of an HII region unambiguously locates massive star formation. Their chemical abundances indicate the present state of the ISM and reveal the elemental enrichment caused by the nuclear processing of many stellar generations. We determine kinematic distances in a self consistent way and explore Galactic structure across the Milky Way disk. In thermal equilibrium metal abundances are expected to set the nebular electron temperature with high abundances producing low temperatures. We derive the electron temperature using the radio recombination line-to-continuum ratio and use these values to explore metallicity structure.

  8. Galactic Archaeology via Relics Of Nuclear Accretion Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, Fabrizio; Senatore, F.; Krongold, Y.; Elvis, M.; Mathur, S.

    2016-10-01

    I will report on the presence of large amounts of million-degree gas in the Milky Way's interstellar and circum-galactic medium, and will show that this gas: (1) permeates both the Galactic plane and the halo, (2) extends to distances larger than 60-200 kpc from the center, and (3) its mass is sufficient to close the Galaxy's baryon census.I will also show that a vast, 6 kpc radius, spherically-symmetric central region of the Milky Way above and below the 0.16 kpc thick plane, has either been emptied of hot gas or the density of this gas within the cavity has a peculiar profile, increasing from the center up to a radius of 6 kpc, and then decreasing with a typical halo density profile. This, and several other converging pieces of evidence, suggest that the current surface of the cavity, at 6 kpc from the Galaxy's center, traces the distant echo of a period of strong nuclear activity of our super-massive black-hole, occurred about 6 Myrs ago.

  9. THE INNER GALACTIC BULGE: EVIDENCE FOR A NUCLEAR BAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, Ortwin; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma

    2012-01-15

    Recent data from the VVV survey have strengthened evidence for a structural change in the Galactic bulge inward of |l| {<=} 4 Degree-Sign . Here we show with an N-body barred galaxy simulation that a boxy bulge formed through the bar and buckling instabilities effortlessly matches measured bulge longitude profiles for red clump stars. The same simulation snapshot was earlier used to clarify the apparent boxy bulge-long bar dichotomy, for the same orientation and scaling. The change in the slope of the model longitude profiles in the inner few degrees is caused by a transition from highly elongated to more nearly axisymmetric isodensity contours in the inner boxy bulge. This transition is confined to a few degrees from the Galactic plane; thus the change of slope is predicted to disappear at higher Galactic latitudes. We also show that the nuclear star count map derived from this simulation snapshot displays a longitudinal asymmetry similar to that observed in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) data, but is less flattened to the Galactic plane than the 2MASS map. These results support the interpretation that the Galactic bulge originated from disk evolution and question the evidence advanced from star count data for the existence of a secondary nuclear bar in the Milky Way.

  10. The Green Bank Telescope Galactic H II Region Discovery Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bania, T. M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.; Rood, R. T.

    2010-08-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic H II regions by using the Green Bank Telescope to detect their hydrogen radio recombination line emission. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect H II regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24 μm and 21 cm continuum emission. For the Galactic zone -16 ° <= ell <= 67° and |b| <= 1°, we detected 602 discrete recombination line components from 448 lines of sight, 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known H II regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative LSR velocities, placing them beyond the solar orbit. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing H II region catalogs, give a more accurate census of Galactic H II regions and their properties. The distribution of H II regions across the Galactic disk shows strong, narrow (~1 kpc wide) peaks at Galactic radii of 4.3 and 6.0 kpc. The longitude-velocity distribution of H II regions now gives unambiguous evidence for Galactic structure, including the kinematic signatures of the radial peaks in the spatial distribution, a concentration of nebulae at the end of the Galactic Bar, and nebulae located on the kinematic locus of the 3 Kpc Arm.

  11. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE GALACTIC H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bania, T. M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.; Rood, R. T.

    2010-08-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic H II regions by using the Green Bank Telescope to detect their hydrogen radio recombination line emission. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect H II regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24 {mu}m and 21 cm continuum emission. For the Galactic zone -16 {sup 0} {<=} l {<=} 67{sup 0} and |b| {<=} 1{sup 0}, we detected 602 discrete recombination line components from 448 lines of sight, 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known H II regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative LSR velocities, placing them beyond the solar orbit. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing H II region catalogs, give a more accurate census of Galactic H II regions and their properties. The distribution of H II regions across the Galactic disk shows strong, narrow ({approx}1 kpc wide) peaks at Galactic radii of 4.3 and 6.0 kpc. The longitude-velocity distribution of H II regions now gives unambiguous evidence for Galactic structure, including the kinematic signatures of the radial peaks in the spatial distribution, a concentration of nebulae at the end of the Galactic Bar, and nebulae located on the kinematic locus of the 3 Kpc Arm.

  12. The Green Bank Telescope Galactic H II Region Discovery Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bania, Thomas M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, D. S.; Rood, R. T.

    2010-05-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic HII regions by using the NRAO Green Bank Telescope to detect hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) emission from these nebulae. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect HII regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24µm (Spitzer/MIPSGAL) and 21 cm (either from the VLA Galactic Plane Survey or the NRAO NVSS) continuum emission. For the Galactic zone, -16° < Lgal < 67° and |Bgal|<1°, we detected 602 discrete RRL components from 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known HII regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative RRL velocities, placing them beyond the Solar orbit in the Perseus arm. We plan to determine the distance to over 90% of our sources (for the region Lgal>18°) by using HI emission/absorption experiments to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the Solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing HII region catalogs, will give a more accurate census of Galactic HII regions and their properties. The distribution of HII regions across the Galactic disk shows strong, narrow ( 1 kpc wide) peaks at Galactic radii of 4.3 and 6.0 kpc. There is still an overall dearth of HII regions within 4 kpc radius. For the first time the longitude-velocity distribution of HII regions gives unambiguous evidence for Galactic structure, including the kinematic signatures of the radial peaks in the spatial distribution, a concentration of nebulae at the end of the Galactic Bar, and nebulae located in kinematic locus of the 3 kpc Arm.

  13. Nuclear Structure and Galactic γ-Ray Activity.

    PubMed

    Görres, J

    2000-01-01

    The observation of galactic γ lines following the decay of radioactive nuclei provides a direct link between nuclear physics experiments in earth-based laboratories and astrophysical observations with space-based observatories. Two examples are presented to illustrate this interplay: the measurement of the lifetime of (44)Ti to allow an improved determination of the (44)Ti mass of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A from the observed γ ray activity and the measurements of excited states in (24)Si to determine the reaction rate of (23)Al(p, γ)(24)Si which might be important for a reduced production of (22)Na in novae.

  14. Molecular Lines of 13 Galactic Infrared Bubble Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qing-zeng; Xu, Ye; Zhang, Bo; Lu, Deng-rong; Chen, Xi; Tang, Zheng-hong

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the physical properties of molecular clouds and star formation (SF) processes around infrared bubbles, which are essentially expanding H ii regions. We performed observations of 13 galactic infrared bubble fields containing 18 bubbles. We observed five molecular lines—12CO (J=1\\to 0), 13CO (J=1\\to 0), C18O (J=1\\to 0), HCN (J=1\\to 0), and HCO+ (J=1\\to 0)—and several publicly available surveys were used for comparison: Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire, Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer Galactic Plane Survey, APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy, Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, Very Large Array (VLA) Galactic Plane Survey, Multi-Array Galactic Plane Imaging Survey, and NRAO VLA Sky Survey. We find that these bubbles are generally connected with molecular clouds, most of which are giant. Several bubble regions display velocity gradients and broad-shifted profiles, which could be due to the expansion of bubbles. The masses of molecular clouds within bubbles range from 100 to 19,000 M ⊙, and their dynamic ages are about 0.3-3.7 Myr, which takes into account the internal turbulence pressure of surrounding molecular clouds. Clumps are found in the vicinity of all 18 bubbles, and molecular clouds near four of these bubbles with larger angular sizes show shell-like morphologies, indicating that either collect-and-collapse or radiation-driven implosion processes may have occurred. Due to the contamination of adjacent molecular clouds, only six bubble regions are appropriate to search for outflows, and we find that four have outflow activities. Three bubbles display ultra-compact H ii regions at their borders, and one is probably responsible for its outflow. In total, only six bubbles show SF activities in the vicinity, and we suggest that SF processes might have been triggered.

  15. Star Formation and Cloud Dynamics in the Galactic Bar Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker

    The Inner Galaxy (IG) that is the Galactic Bar Region (GBR) and the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) including the Galactic Center (GC) are, despite being the sites of dramatic processes and unique sources, still only incompletely understood. Detailed new datasets from the Herschel Space Observatory can be systematically combined with older archival material to enable a new and more complete analysis of the region, its large-scale dynamics, its unusual giant molecular clouds, and the likely influences of its bar and its supermassive black hole. Such a study is both timely and important: the region has affected the structure and evolution of the galaxy; its individual sources are opportunities to examine star formation (for example) under extreme conditions; the processes feeding the CMZ and, subsequently, its black hole are important; and not least, it is a nearby template for the inner regions of other galaxies. The Herschel Space Observatory has provided us with exciting new datasets including full FIR photometric maps and highand low-resolution far-infrared/submillimeter spectra of key sources and lines of the locations of dynamical importance. All these datasets are publicly available from the Herschel Science Archive. Our experienced team has already developed preliminary models, and we propose a thorough investigation to combine the Herschel datasets with Spitzer and WISE datasets. We will supplement them with ground-based observations in cases when it will improve the results. We will then analyze the data and use the results to refine the models and improve our understanding of this key region. Our specific goal is to characterize and model the 3 giant high-velocity molecular cloud clumps in the Galaxy Bar Region (GBR) in detail and to combine the conclusions to produce an improved model of the IG. We have seven tasks: (1) identify all smaller scale gas and dust cores using archival Herschel FIR photometric observations and obtain their physical characteristics

  16. Searches for point sources in the Galactic Center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mauro, Mattia; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Several groups have demonstrated the existence of an excess in the gamma-ray emission around the Galactic Center (GC) with respect to the predictions from a variety of Galactic Interstellar Emission Models (GIEMs) and point source catalogs. The origin of this excess, peaked at a few GeV, is still under debate. A possible interpretation is that it comes from a population of unresolved Millisecond Pulsars (MSPs) in the Galactic bulge. We investigate the detection of point sources in the GC region using new tools which the Fermi-LAT Collaboration is developing in the context of searches for Dark Matter (DM) signals. These new tools perform very fast scans iteratively testing for additional point sources at each of the pixels of the region of interest. We show also how to discriminate between point sources and structural residuals from the GIEM. We apply these methods to the GC region considering different GIEMs and testing the DM and MSPs intepretations for the GC excess. Additionally, we create a list of promising MSP candidates that could represent the brightest sources of a MSP bulge population.

  17. Variable position annihilation radiation from the galactic center region

    SciTech Connect

    Riegler, G.R.; Ling, J.C.; Mahoney, W.A.; Wheaton, W.A.; Willett, J.B.; Jacobson, A.S.; Prince, T.A.

    1981-08-15

    The HEAO 3 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Spectrometer performed the first high spectral resolution survey of the entire sky at gamma-ray energies from 50 keV to 10 MeV. Studies of 511 keV positron annihilation radiation from the vicinity of the galactic center are reported here, based on data which were recorded during 1979 September/October and 1980 March/April. The 1979 fall data show unshifted, narrow 511 keV line emission of intensity (1.85 +- 0.21) x 10/sup -3/ photons cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/, consistent with earlier measurments. The 1980 spring measurement showed a statistically significant reduction in 511 keV emission from this region, thus requiring that a significant fraction of the flux originate in one or more compact sources of size < or =10/sup 18/ cm. While distribution of sources within approx.22/sup 0/ (at 90% confidence level) of the direction of the galactic center are allowed by the observations, the data rule out most extended models for positron production, such as by cosmic ray interaction in the interstellar medium or by distributions of many supernovae, novae, or pulsars. The data are well satisfied by assuming that the emission originates in a single compact source at the galactic center.

  18. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands in the Galactic Centre region.

    PubMed

    Geballe, T R; Najarro, F; Figer, D F; Schlegelmilch, B W; de la Fuente, D

    2011-11-02

    The spectrum of any star viewed through a sufficient quantity of diffuse interstellar material reveals a number of absorption features collectively called 'diffuse interstellar bands' (DIBs). The first DIBs were reported about 90  years ago, and currently well over 500 are known. None of them has been convincingly identified with any specific element or molecule, although recent studies suggest that the DIB carriers are polyatomic molecules containing carbon. Most of the DIBs currently known are at visible and very near-infrared wavelengths, with only two previously known at wavelengths beyond one micrometre (10,000 ångströms), the longer of which is at 1.318 micrometres (ref. 6). Here we report 13 diffuse interstellar bands in the 1.5-1.8 micrometre interval on high-extinction sightlines towards stars in the Galactic Centre. We argue that they originate almost entirely in the Galactic Centre region, a considerably warmer and harsher environment than where DIBs have been observed previously. The relative strengths of these DIBs towards the Galactic Centre and the Cygnus OB2 diffuse cloud are consistent with their strengths scaling mainly with the extinction by diffuse material.

  19. A NEW GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP OF THE CYGNUS REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kohyama, T.; Shibai, H.; Fukagawa, M.; Hibi, Y.

    2010-08-10

    We have made a Galactic extinction map of the Cygnus region with 5' spatial resolution. The selected area is 80{sup 0} to 90{sup 0} in the Galactic longitude and -4{sup 0} to 8{sup 0} in the Galactic latitude. The intensity at 140 {mu}m is derived from the intensities at 60 and 100 {mu}m of the IRAS data using the tight correlation between 60, 100, and 140 {mu}m found in the Galactic plane. The dust temperature and optical depth are calculated with 5' resolution from the 140 and 100 {mu}m intensity, and A{sub V} is calculated from the optical depth. In the selected area, the mean dust temperature is 17 K, the minimum is 16 K, and the maximum is 30 K. The mean A{sub V} is 6.5 mag, the minimum is 0.5 mag, and the maximum is 11 mag. The dust temperature distribution shows significant spatial variation on smaller scales down to 5'. Because the present study can trace the 5'-scale spatial variation of the extinction, it has an advantage over the previous studies, such as the one by Schlegel, Finkbeiner, and Davis, who used the COBE/DIRBE data to derive the dust temperature distribution with a spatial resolution of 1{sup 0}. The difference of A{sub V} between our map and Schlegel et al.'s is {+-} 3 mag. A new extinction map of the entire sky can be produced by applying the present method.

  20. Gamma rays from the Galactic Centre region: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eldik, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades, increasingly precise astronomical observations of the Galactic Centre (GC) region at radio, infrared, and X-ray wavelengths laid the foundations to a detailed understanding of the high energy astroparticle physics of this most remarkable location in the Galaxy. Recently, observations of this region in high energy (HE, 10 MeV-100 GeV) and very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) γ-rays added important insights to the emerging picture of the Galactic nucleus as a most violent and active region where acceleration of particles to very high energies - possibly up to a PeV - and their transport can be studied in great detail. Moreover, the inner Galaxy is believed to host large concentrations of dark matter (DM), and is therefore one of the prime targets for the indirect search for γ-rays from annihilating or decaying dark matter particles. In this article, the current understanding of the γ-ray emission emanating from the GC is summarised and the results of recent DM searches in HE and VHE γ-rays are reviewed.

  1. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report details work done in a project involving spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star-formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data including some from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and other spectroscopic databases. We will include four kinds of regions: (1) disks around more evolved objects; (2) young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star-formation regions; (3) star formation in external, bright IR (infrared) galaxies; and (4) the galactic center. During this period, work proceeded fully on track and on time. Details on workshops and conferences attended and research results are presented. A preprint article entitled 'The Far Infrared Lines of OH as Molecular Cloud Diagnostics' is included as an appendix.

  2. Chemical distribution of H II regions towards the Galactic anticentre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martín, A.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M.; Mampaso, A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The study of the radial variations of metallicity across the Galactic disc is a powerful method for understanding the history of star formation and chemical evolution of the Milky Way. Although several studies about gradients have been performed so far, the knowledge of the Galactic antincentre is still poor. Aims: This work aims to determine accurately the physical and chemical properties of a sample of H ii regions located at RG > 11 kpc and to study the radial distribution of abundances in the outermost part of the Galaxy disc. Methods: We carried out new optical spectroscopic observations of nine H ii regions with the William Herschel Telescope covering the spectral range from 3500 Å to 10 100 Å. In addition, we increased the sample by searching the literature for optical observations of regions towards the Galactic anticentre, re-analysing them to obtain a single sample of 23 objects to be processed in a homogeneous and consistent manner. The total sample distribution covers the Galactocentric radius from 11 kpc to 18 kpc. Results: Emission line ratios were used to determine accurate electron densities and temperatures of several ionic species in 13 H ii regions. These physical parameters were applied to the spectra to determine direct total chemical abundances. For those regions without direct estimations of temperature, chemical abundances were derived by performing tailor-made photoionisation models and/or by using an empirical relation obtained from radio recombination and optical temperatures. We performed weighted least-squares fits to the distribution of the derived abundances along the Galactocentric distances to study the radial gradients of metallicity across the outermost part of the MW. The distributions O/H, N/H, S/H, and Ar/H towards the anticentre can be represented by decreasing linear radial gradients, while in the case of N/O abundances the radial distribution is better fitted with a two-zone model. The He/H radial gradient is

  3. HI Clouds Near the Galactic Center: Possible Tracers of the Nuclear Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi; DiTeodoro, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    We have used the Green Bank Telescope to discover more than one hundred neutral hydrogen clouds that appear to be embedded in the Fermi Bubble -- the Milky Way’s nuclear wind. With the other members of this population that were previously found with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we now have a sample of about 200 such clouds. They are identified by their peculiar velocities. The cloud kinematics show no trace of Galactic rotation or association with the Galactic bar. Near longitude zero the clouds can have values of VLSR = +-200 km/s. No clouds have been detected with |VLSR| > 350 km/s. The clouds are concentrated toward the Galactic plane, but some are still found to |b|=10 degrees, or z > 1 kpc at the Galactic Center, where the current surveys end. These clouds are important tracers of conditions in the nuclear wind of the Milky Way.

  4. The Intermediate-line Region in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, T. P.; Różańska, A.; Czerny, B.; Hryniewicz, K.; Ferland, G. J.

    2016-11-01

    We show that the recently observed suppression of the gap between the broad-line region (BLR) and the narrow-line region (NLR) in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can be fully explained by an increase of the gas density in the emitting region. Our model predicts the formation of the intermediate-line region (ILR) that is observed in some Seyfert galaxies by the detection of emission lines with intermediate-velocity FWHM ˜ 700-1200 km s-1. These lines are believed to be originating from an ILR located somewhere between the BLR and NLR. As was previously proved, the apparent gap is assumed to be caused by the presence of dust beyond the sublimation radius. Our computations with the use of the cloudy photoionization code show that the differences in the shape of the spectral energy distribution from the central region of AGNs do not diminish the apparent gap in the line emission in those objects. A strong discontinuity in the line emission versus radius exists for all lines at the dust sublimation radius. However, increasing the gas density to ˜{10}11.5 cm-3 at the sublimation radius provides the continuous line emission versus radius and fully explains the recently observed lack of apparent gap in some AGNs. We show that such a high density is consistent with the density of upper layers of an accretion disk atmosphere. Therefore, the upper layers of the disk atmosphere can give rise to the formation of observed emission-line clouds.

  5. Nuclear Infrared Spectral Energy Distribution of Type II Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videla, Liza; Lira, Paulina; Andrews, Heather; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin

    2013-02-01

    We present near- and mid-IR observations of a sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 μm Galaxy sample. The sample was observed in the J, H, K, L, M and N bands. Galaxy surface brightness profiles are modeled using nuclear, bulge, bar (when necessary), and disk components. To check the reliability of our findings, the procedure was tested using Spitzer observations of M 31. Nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are determined for 34 objects, and optical spectra are presented for 38, including analysis of their stellar populations using the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code. Emission line diagnostic diagrams are used to discriminate between genuine active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and H II nuclei. Combining our observations with those found in the literature, we have a total of 40 SEDs. It is found that about 40% of the SEDs are characterized by an upturn in the near-IR, which we have quantified as a NIR slope α < 1 for an SED characterized as λf λvpropλα. The three objects with an H II nucleus and two Seyfert nuclei with strong contamination from a circumnuclear also show an upturn. For genuine AGNs, this component could be explained as emission from the accretion disk, a jet, or from a very hot dust component leaking from the central region through a clumpy obscuring structure. The presence of a very compact nuclear starburst as the origin for this NIR excess emission is not favored by our spectroscopic data for these objects.

  6. Nuclear weapons and regional conflict

    SciTech Connect

    Latter, A.L.; Martinelli, E.A.

    1993-05-01

    An important national defense objective for the US in the post cold-war era -- according to Secretary of Defense, Cheney is to deter regional conflicts. To satisfy this objective there is more or less general agreement that nuclear weapons are not needed, especially against regional powers like Iraq that do not (as yet) have a nuclear capability. Modern conventional weapons (PGMs), it is believed, are adequate when used in the traditional way of fighting: massive ground forces with heavy ground equipment, supported by air and naval forces. Of course, there are arguments against this view. For example, nuclear advocates call attention to deeply buried targets that are unattackable with conventional munitions. But this argument, and others, for US use (or threat of use) of nuclear weapons are presently discounted in favor of the political/moral advantages of a no-first-use policy. We do not wish to take sides in this debate. We believe, however, that the debate win continue as political, military, technical and economic factors undergo inevitable changes. In this brief paper, we want to present another pro-nuclear argument which, to the best of our knowledge, has received little or no attention. This argument, we believe, could become important in weighing the pros and cons of the debate if domestic pressures cause the defense budget to undergo such severe cuts that we must either abandon our political commitments or adopt a non-traditional war-fighting strategy that is effective under a greatly reduced defense budget.

  7. Gamma-ray spectrum of the galactic center region

    SciTech Connect

    Riegler, G.R.; Ling, J.C.; Mahoney, W.A.; Wheaton, W.A.; Jacobson, A.S.

    1985-07-01

    The Galactic center region was observed with the HEAO 3 High Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometer during the fall of 1979 and the spring of 1980. Between these epochs we observed (1) a statistically significant decrease in the high-energy (511 keV to approx.3 MeV) luminosity (2) a decrease in the positron annihilation line intensity, reported previously, and (3) a low positronium annihilation fraction f = 0.38 +- 0.19 during the fall of 1979. If positrons are generated by photon-photon collisions of high-energy photons, then the absence of a detected flux above 511 keV in the spring of 1980 may indicate a time delay between positron production and annihilation.

  8. A new method to estimate the Galactic extinction for the analysis of large scale structure in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Malkan, M. A.; Sekiguchi, K.; Menzies, J. W.; Parker, Q. A.; Jugaku, J.; Karoji, H.; Okamura, S.

    In order to study the large scale structure in the region of low Galactic latitude, it is indispensable to discriminate true features in the projected galaxy distribution from spurious ones due to the patchy Galactic extinction. We derive a linear relation between the Galactic extinction and the flux density at 100 microns in IRAS Sky Survey Atlas (ISSA) based on the analysis of the number count of faint galaxies. Thus, ISSA 100 microns flux density can be used to estimate the Galactic extinction with a fine resolution of 1.5 arcmin. With the aid of this estimate, we investigate large scale structure in the Galactic center region. We made a galaxy survey in the 175 square degree field centered at the Ophiuchus cluster (l = 0.5circ, b = +9.5circ, cz = 8,500 km s^{-1}) using ESO/SERC Southern Sky Survey films. We detected 4,021 galaxies and compiled redshifts for 219 galaxies including 179 new determinations. Seven clumps were identified in the distribution of luminous galaxies. On the basis of redshifts in these seven clumps, the Ophiuchus cluster, two new clusters of irregular type and four new groups of galaxies are found to form a supercluster. The region of cz = 0 - 5,000 km s^{-1}, this side of the supercluster, is found to be a void.

  9. Examining XMM Observations in the Galactic Bulge Survey Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada-Carpenter, Vicente; Hynes, R. I.; Britt, C.; Johnson, C.; Jonker, P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Torres, M.; Steeghs, D.; Greiss, S.; Nelemans, G.; Galactic Bulge Survey Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The VXMM catalog was created in an effort to find help find low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) as part of the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS). VXMM consists of XMM-Newton detections made in the GBS region, two 6x1 degree regions 1 degree above and below the Galactic plane. The goal of the project was to find GBS X-ray sources that exist in XMM observations in order to classify them. The XMM data were downloaded from NASA’s database. Source detection was conducted on the filtered data sets using the 2XMM Serendipitous Survey as a guideline for the procedure but incorporating more recent data than 2XMM. The sources detected make up the VXMM catalog, which was used to cross reference with the GBS catalog to find GBS sources in the XMM data. In total the VXMM catalog found 107 GBS sources also detected by XMM. The spectra of several of these sources were examined to see which could be classified based on the XMM data. We focus on CX13 as it was the brightest unclassified GBS source detected by XMM. CX13 was determined to not be an active star as its temperature would to be high. Using a power-law model fit an LMXB was ruled out, as was a background AGN after the variability power spectrum was analyzed. The most likely remaining interpretation of its X-ray spectrum and variability is that it is an absorbed magnetic cataclysmic variable. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908789. Vicente Estrada-Carpenter also acknowledges support from the REU Site in Physics and Astronomy (NSF Grant No. 1262890) at Louisiana State University

  10. A dynamical model for gas flows, star formation and nuclear winds in galactic centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Crocker, Roland M.

    2017-04-01

    We present a dynamical model for gas transport, star formation and winds in the nuclear regions of galaxies, focusing on the Milky Way's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). In our model angular momentum and mass are transported by a combination of gravitational and bar-driven acoustic instabilities. In gravitationally unstable regions the gas can form stars, and the resulting feedback drives both turbulence and a wind that ejects mass from the CMZ. We show that the CMZ is in a quasi-steady state where mass deposited at large radii by the bar is transported inwards to a star-forming, ring-shaped region at ∼100 pc from the Galactic Centre, where the shear reaches a minimum. This ring undergoes episodic starbursts, with bursts lasting ∼5-10 Myr occurring at ∼20-40 Myr intervals. During quiescence the gas in the ring is not fully cleared, but is driven out of a self-gravitating state by the momentum injected by expanding supernova remnants. Starbursts also drive a wind off the star-forming ring, with a time-averaged mass flux comparable to the star formation rate. We show that our model agrees well with the observed properties of the CMZ, and places it near a star formation minimum within the evolutionary cycle. We argue that such cycles of bursty star formation and winds should be ubiquitous in the nuclei of barred spiral galaxies, and show that the resulting distribution of galactic nuclei on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation is in good agreement with that observed in nearby galaxies.

  11. Radio Recombination Lines in Galactic H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quireza, Cintia; Rood, Robert T.; Balser, Dana S.; Bania, T. M.

    2006-07-01

    We report radio recombination line (RRL) and continuum observations of a sample of 106 Galactic H II regions made with the NRAO 140 Foot (43 m) radio telescope in Green Bank, West Virginia. We believe this to be the most sensitive RRL survey ever made for a sample this large. Most of our source integration times range between 6 and 90 hr, yielding typical rms noise levels of ~1.0-3.5 mK. Our data result from two different experiments performed, calibrated, and analyzed in similar ways. A C II survey was made at the 3.5 cm wavelength to obtain accurate measurements of carbon radio recombination lines. When combined with atomic (C I) and molecular (CO) data, these measurements will constrain the composition, structure, kinematics, and physical properties of the photodissociation regions that lie on the edges of H II regions. A second survey was made at the 3.5 cm wavelength to determine the abundance of 3He in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Together with measurements of the 3He+ hyperfine line, we get high-precision RRL parameters for H, 4He, and C. Here we discuss significant improvements in these data with both longer integrations and newly observed sources.

  12. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frogel, Jay (Technical Monitor); Smith, Howard A.

    2004-01-01

    In this program we proposed to perform a series of spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and to take advantage of other spectroscopic databases including the first results from SIRTF. Our empha- sis has been on star formation in external, bright IR galaxies, but other areas of research have in- cluded young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star formation regions, and the galactic center. The OH lines in the far infrared were proposed as one key focus of this inquiry because the Principal Investigator (H. Smith) had a full set of OH IR lines from IS0 observations. It was planned that during the proposed 2-1/2 year timeframe of the proposal other data (including perhaps from SIRTF) would become available, and we intended to be responsive to these and other such spec- troscopic data sets. Three papers are included:The Infrared Lines of OH: Diagnostics of Molecular Cloud Conditions in Infrared Bright Galaxies; The Far-Infrared Spectrum of Arp 220; andThe Far-Infrared Emission Line and Continuum Spectrum of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068.

  13. The Transition between the Inner Disc and the Innermost Galactic Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, G.; Genovali, K.; Lemasle, B.; Romaniello, M.; Nonino, M.; Bergemann, M.; Buonanno, R.; Fabrizio, M.; François, P.; Inno, L.; Laney, C.; Matsunaga, N.; Pedicelli, S.; Primas, F.; Thévenin, F.

    2015-05-01

    We discuss the iron and the α-element gradients in the Galactic disc and in the innermost Galactic regions (bulge, bar, nuclear bulge). Accurate spectroscopic measurements of young stellar tracers show a well defined iron gradient between the inner and the outer disc. The same outcome applies to light, α, and heavy elements. Moreover, the [α/Fe] ratio attains solar values over a significant fraction of the disc, in the bar and in the nuclear bulge. Thus suggesting that the slopes of iron and α-elements attain quite similar values. There is evidence of a mild enhancement in the outer disc, but this is the consequence of the steady decrease in iron abundance. Current findings do not allow us to constrain whether the chemical enrichment in the nuclear bulge and in the bar is currently driven by bar instabilities. The recent results by the ARGOS spectroscopic survey of intermediate-age stellar tracers (red clump) suggest that the metal-rich stellar components associated with the boxy/peanut bulge show evidence of a mild iron gradient, while the metal-poor component associated with the thick disc/halo shows a flat iron distribution across the bulge. The [α/Fe] ratio of the metal-rich components is slightly enhanced in the bulge, but attains a solar value in the disc. On the other hand, the metal-poor component is α-enhanced both in the bulge and at larger Galactocentric distances. The chemical enrichment history of the bulge supports N-body simulations suggesting that the bulge formed via a bar-forming and bar-buckling instabilities (Ness et al. 2013a,b).

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In this program we proposed to perform a series of spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and to take advantage of other spectroscopic databases including the first results from SIRTF. Our emphasis has been on star formation in external, bright IR galaxies, but other areas of research have included young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star formation regions, and the galactic center. The OH lines in the far infrared were proposed as one key focus of this inquiry, because the Principal Investigator (H. Smith) had a full set of OH IR lines from IS0 observations. It was planned that during the proposed 2-1/2 year timeframe of the proposal other data (including perhaps from SIRTF) would become available, and we intended to be responsive to these and other such spectroscopic data sets. The program has the following goals: 1) Refine the data analysis of IS0 observations to obtain deeper and better SNR results on selected sources. The IS0 data itself underwent pipeline 10 reductions in early 2001, and the more 'hands-on data reduction packages' have been released. The IS0 Fabry-Perot database is particularly sensitive to noise and can have slight calibration errors, and improvements are anticipated. We plan to build on these deep analysis tools and contribute to their development. Model the atomic and molecular line shapes, in particular the OH lines, using revised montecarlo techniques developed by the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) team at the Center for Astrophysics. 2) 3) Use newly acquired space-based SIRTF or SOFIA spectroscopic data as they become available, and contribute to these observing programs as appropriate. 4) Attend scientific meetings and workshops. 5) E&PO activities, especially as related to infrared astrophysics and

  15. THE NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R. E.; Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Elitzur, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Roche, P. F.; Oi, N.

    2012-07-15

    We present high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) imaging, nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and archival Spitzer spectra for 22 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; L{sub bol} {approx}< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). Infrared (IR) observations may advance our understanding of the accretion flows in LLAGNs, the fate of the obscuring torus at low accretion rates, and, perhaps, the star formation histories of these objects. However, while comprehensively studied in higher-luminosity Seyferts and quasars, the nuclear IR properties of LLAGNs have not yet been well determined. We separate the present LLAGN sample into three categories depending on their Eddington ratio and radio emission, finding different IR characteristics for each class. (1) At the low-luminosity, low-Eddington-ratio (log L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} < -4.6) end of the sample, we identify 'host-dominated' galaxies with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands that may indicate active (circum-)nuclear star formation. (2) Some very radio-loud objects are also present at these low Eddington ratios. The IR emission in these nuclei is dominated by synchrotron radiation, and some are likely to be unobscured type 2 AGNs that genuinely lack a broad-line region. (3) At higher Eddington ratios, strong, compact nuclear sources are visible in the MIR images. The nuclear SEDs of these galaxies are diverse; some resemble typical Seyfert nuclei, while others lack a well-defined MIR 'dust bump'. Strong silicate emission is present in many of these objects. We speculate that this, together with high ratios of silicate strength to hydrogen column density, could suggest optically thin dust and low dust-to-gas ratios, in accordance with model predictions that LLAGNs do not host a Seyfert-like obscuring torus. We anticipate that detailed modeling of the new data and SEDs in terms of accretion disk, jet, radiatively inefficient accretion flow, and torus components will provide further insights into the nuclear

  16. The sub-galactic and nuclear main sequences for local star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragkoudakis, A.; Zezas, A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.

    2017-04-01

    We describe a sub-galactic main sequence (SGMS) relating star formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR) and stellar mass density (Σ⋆) for distinct regions within star-forming galaxies, including their nuclei. We use a sample of 246 nearby star-forming galaxies from the 'Star Formation Reference Survey and demonstrate that the SGMS holds down to ∼1 kpc scales with a slope of α = 0.91 and a dispersion of 0.31 dex, similar to the well-known main sequence (MS) measured for globally integrated SFRs and stellar masses. The SGMS slope depends on galaxy morphology, with late-type galaxies (Sc-Irr) having α = 0.97 and early-type spirals (Sa-Sbc) having α = 0.81. The SGMS constructed from subregions of individual galaxies has on average the same characteristics as the composite SGMS from all galaxies. The SGMS for galaxy nuclei shows a dispersion similar to that seen for other subregions. Sampling a limited range of SFR-M⋆ space may produce either sublinearity or superlinearity of the SGMS slope. For nearly all galaxies, both SFR and stellar mass peak in the nucleus, indicating that circumnuclear clusters are among the most actively star-forming regions in the galaxy and the most massive. The nuclear SFR also correlates with total galaxy mass, forming a distinct sequence from the standard MS of star formation. The nuclear MS will be useful for studying bulge growth and for characterizing feedback processes connecting AGN and star formation.

  17. CMB and galactic maps in the millimetric region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia; Vittorio, Nicola

    We present low angular resolution, full sky maps of the expected millimetric diffuse emission, in order to illustrate the level of Galactic contamination in CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background) large scale anisotropy experiments. The maps are obtained by simple modelling the diffuse emission of our Galaxy at mm wavelengths, including dust and radio continuum emission. CMB maps expected in cold dark matter (CDM) and baryonic isocurvature scenarios are compared to the Galactic anisotropy pattern. We present the results of a complete analysis of the Quadrupole anisotropy, which, in the case of COBE-DMR, seems to be the most useful tool for cosmological tests.

  18. Dynamical Evolution of Globular Clusters Moving within the Galactic Central Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miocchi, P.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.

    The decaying of globular clusters towards galactic nuclei can be an efficient dynamical mechanism to concentrate high amounts of stellar matter in the very inner galactic regions, so to contribute significantly to the accretion and feeding of a central massive black hole. Such decaying is made possible by the dynamical friction which dissipates the cluster orbital kinetic energy in a reasonably short time. Quantitative indications that this mechanism is capable to sustain the observed AGN luminosities have been already given. However, there is need of a more refined numerical approach. In particular, while in normal conditions dynamical friction is well understood and its effects sufficiently well described, it is not clear what happens when a cluster decays into a region which ``encloses'' a bulge mass comparable with that of the cluster itself. In this case the gravitational feed-back of the cluster on the bulge is very important and cannot be neglected. Moreover, it is quite difficult to predict, by just analytical means, the tidal effects due to the presence of the massive black hole on clusters' dynamics. We want to show the results obtained by our simulations in this context. The simulations have been performed both with a serial and a parallel `tree-code' (on a CRAY T3E), using a leap-frog scheme for the integration of particles' trajectories, with individual and variable time steps. A completely self-consistent particle representation has been used, not only for the globular cluster but also for the nuclear region of the bulge and for the massive black hole.

  19. Ground-state OH maser distributions in the Galactic Centre region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Walsh, Andrew J.; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Dawson, Joanne R.

    2017-01-01

    Ground-state OH masers identified in the Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl were observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to obtain positions with high accuracy (~1 arcsec). We classified these OH masers into evolved star OH maser sites, star formation OH maser sites, supernova remnant OH maser sites, planetary nebula OH maser sites and unknown maser sites using their accurate positions. Evolved star and star formation OH maser sites in the Galactic Centre region (between Galactic longitudes of -5° to +5° and Galactic latitudes of -2° and +2°) were studied in detail to understand their distributions.

  20. Multiphase environment of compact galactic nuclei: the role of the nuclear star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, A.; Kunneriath, D.; Czerny, B.; Adhikari, T. P.; Karas, V.

    2017-01-01

    We study the conditions for the onset of thermal instability in the innermost regions of compact galactic nuclei, where the properties of the interstellar environment are governed by the interplay of quasi-spherical accretion on to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and the heating/cooling processes of gas in a dense nuclear star cluster (NSC). Stellar winds are the source of material for radiatively inefficient (quasi-spherical, non-magnetized) inflow/outflow on to the central SMBH, where a stagnation point develops within the Bondi-type accretion. We study the local thermal equilibrium to determine the parameter space that allows cold and hot phases in mutual contact to co-exist. We include the effects of mechanical heating by stellar winds and radiative cooling/heating by the ambient field of the dense star cluster. We consider two examples: the NSC in the Milky Way central region (including the gaseous mini-spiral of Sgr A*), and the ultracompact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1. We find that the two systems behave in different ways because they are placed in different areas of parameter space in the instability diagram: gas temperature versus dynamical ionization parameter. In the case of Sgr A*, stellar heating prevents the spontaneous formation of cold clouds. The plasma from stellar winds joins the hot X-ray emitting phase and forms an outflow. In M60-UCD1, our model predicts spontaneous formation of cold clouds in the inner part of the galaxy. These cold clouds may survive since the cooling time-scale is shorter than the inflow/outflow time-scale.

  1. DO MOST ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI LIVE IN HIGH STAR FORMATION NUCLEAR CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Mushotzky, Richard F.; Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We present early results of the Herschel PACS (70 and 160 μm) and SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 μm) survey of 313 low redshift (z < 0.05), ultra-hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the 58 month Swift/Burst Alert Telescope catalog. Selection of AGNs from ultra-hard X-rays avoids bias from obscuration, providing a complete sample of AGNs to study the connection between nuclear activity and star formation in host galaxies. With the high angular resolution of PACS, we find that >35% and >20% of the sources are ''point-like'' at 70 and 160 μm respectively and many more have their flux dominated by a point source located at the nucleus. The inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of 0.1-100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} using the 70 and 160 μm flux densities as SFR indicators are consistent with those inferred from Spitzer Ne II fluxes, but we find that 11.25 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon data give ∼3× lower SFR. Using GALFIT to measure the size of the far-infrared emitting regions, we determined the SFR surface density (M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}) for our sample, finding that a significant fraction of these sources exceed the threshold for star formation driven winds (0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2})

  2. A NEW PERSPECTIVE OF THE RADIO BRIGHT ZONE AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: FEEDBACK FROM NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the Jansky VLA in the B and C arrays using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz. The field of view covers the central 13′ (30 pc) region of the radio-bright zone at the Galactic center. Using the multi-scale and multi-frequency-synthesis (MS-MFS) algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1″, achieving an rms noise of 8 μJy beam{sup −1}, and a dynamic range of 100,000:1. Both previously known and newly identified radio features in this region are revealed, including numerous filamentary sources. The radio continuum image is compared with Chandra X-ray images, with a CN emission-line image obtained with the Submillimeter Array and with detailed Paschen-α images obtained with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS. We discuss several prominent features in the radio image. The “Sgr A west Wings” extend 2′ (5 pc) from the NW and SE tips of the Sgr A west H ii region (the “Mini-spiral”) to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arcmin to the northwest and southeast of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the previously identified “NW Streamers,” form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 6.′3 × 3.′2 (14.4 pc × 7.3 pc), has a known X-ray counterpart. In the outer region of the NW lobe, a row of three thermally emitting rings is observed. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ∼2 arcmin beyond the tip of the SE wing; these newly recognized features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-α counterparts. We propose that they have been produced by shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind or an outflow that originated from within the circumnuclear disk (CND). We also discuss the possibility that the ionized

  3. A New Perspective of the Radio Bright Zone at The Galactic Center: Feedback from Nuclear Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the Jansky VLA in the B and C arrays using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz. The field of view covers the central 13‧ (30 pc) region of the radio-bright zone at the Galactic center. Using the multi-scale and multi-frequency-synthesis (MS-MFS) algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1″, achieving an rms noise of 8 μJy beam-1, and a dynamic range of 100,000:1. Both previously known and newly identified radio features in this region are revealed, including numerous filamentary sources. The radio continuum image is compared with Chandra X-ray images, with a CN emission-line image obtained with the Submillimeter Array and with detailed Paschen-α images obtained with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS. We discuss several prominent features in the radio image. The “Sgr A west Wings” extend 2‧ (5 pc) from the NW and SE tips of the Sgr A west H ii region (the “Mini-spiral”) to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arcmin to the northwest and southeast of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the previously identified “NW Streamers,” form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 6.‧3 × 3.‧2 (14.4 pc × 7.3 pc), has a known X-ray counterpart. In the outer region of the NW lobe, a row of three thermally emitting rings is observed. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ˜2 arcmin beyond the tip of the SE wing; these newly recognized features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-α counterparts. We propose that they have been produced by shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind or an outflow that originated from within the circumnuclear disk (CND). We also discuss the possibility that the ionized wind or

  4. Final SAS-2 gamma-ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Final results are presented for SAS-2 observations of high-energy gamma-rays from the galactic anticenter region. Three main gamma-ray features are shown to characterize this region: a localized source associated with the Crab Nebula and its pulsar, another localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg, and a general enhancement of the diffuse background 10 to 15 deg south of the galactic plane, which is associated with the Gould Belt. For the Crab, it is found that the radiation is mostly pulsed, the pulsed fraction increases with energy, and the intensity of the radiation in the main and interpulse peaks is approximately the same. The other localized source, provisionally designated as gamma 195+5, is found to have a harder spectrum than the Crab but no obvious radio counterpart; emission from an external galaxy is ruled out.

  5. SAS-2 observations of the galactic gamma radiation from the Vela region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg l2 290 deg show a statistically-significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy 100 MeV in the region 260 deg l2 270 deg and -7.5 deg b2 0 deg. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant, with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from this supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, then on the order of 3.10 to the 50th power ergs would be released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  6. Multicolour far infrared photometry of galactic H2 regions. [data acquisition using high altitude balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olthof, H.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of far infrared photometric measurements of H2 regions in the galactic plane between longitudes 350 and 40 degrees. The results are combined from balloon flights in 1972 and 1973 carried out in cooperation with CNES in the south of France.

  7. Differences in the size-internal velocity relation of galactic and extragalactic HII regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the size-internal velocity relation in extragalactic HII regions is examined in order to improve their use as distance determinants. The relation between the linear size and the internal velocity was compared for HII regions in the Galaxy and in external galaxies. Data for the former are from the researcher's own studies at high spatial resolution, while the latter have been the subject of spectroscopy that includes almost the entire objects. The Galactic HII regions are corrected to values of the internal velocity that would be observed if they were at extragalactic distances. A very different size-internal velocity relation was found for the two types of objects in the sense that the extragalactic objects are some ten times larger at the same internal velocity. This is interpreted to mean that the extragalactic HII regions are actually complexes of small HII regions comparable in size to their Galactic counterparts.

  8. Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Multiple Merger, Extended Massive Star Formation, Galactic Wind, and Nuclear Inflow in NGC 3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lípari, S.; Díaz, R.; Taniguchi, Y.; Terlevich, R.; Dottori, H.; Carranza, G.

    2000-08-01

    ouflow axis (at P.A.~160deg). We analyze in detail the physical conditions in the giant H II regions located in the asymmetric spiral arms, the two main optical nuclei, and the outflow component (using long-slit spectroscopy, plus standard models of photoionization, shocks, and starbursts). We present four detailed emission-line ratios (N II/Hα, S II/Hα, S II/S II), and FWHM (Hα) maps for the central region (30''×30'' rmax~22''~4 kpc), with a spatial resolution of 1". In the central region (r~5-6 kpc) we detected that the nuclear starburst and the extended giant H II regions (in the spiral arms) have very similar properties, i.e., high metallicity and low-ionization spectra, with Teff=35,000 K, solar abundance, a range of Te~6000-7000 K, and Ne~100-1000 cm-3. The nuclear and extended outflow shows properties typical of galactic wind/shocks, associated with the nuclear starburst. We suggest that the interaction between dynamical effects, the galactic wind (outflow), low-energy cosmic rays, and the molecular+ionized gas (probably in the inflow phase) could be the possible mechanism that generate the ``similar extended properties in the massive star formation, at a scale of 5-6 kpc!'' We have also studied the presence of the close merger/interacting systems NGC 3256C (at ~150 kpc, ΔV=-100 km s-1) and the possible association between the NGC 3256 and 3263 groups of galaxies. In conclusion, these results suggest that NGC 3256 is the product of a multiple merger, which generated an extended massive star formation process with an associated galactic wind plus a nuclear inflow. Therefore, NGC 3256 is another example in which the relation between mergers and extreme starburst (and the powerful galactic wind, ``multiple'' Type II supernova explosions) play an important role in the evolution of galaxies (the hypothesis of Rieke et al., Joseph et al., Terlevich et al., Heckman et al., and Lípari et al.). Based on observations obtained at the Hubble Space Telescope (HST; Wide

  9. Agriculture Impacts of Regional Nuclear Conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lili; Robock, Alan; Mills, Michael; Toon, Owen Brian

    2013-04-01

    One of the major consequences of nuclear war would be climate change due to massive smoke injection into the atmosphere. Smoke from burning cities can be lofted into the stratosphere where it will have an e-folding lifetime more than 5 years. The climate changes include significant cooling, reduction of solar radiation, and reduction of precipitation. Each of these changes can affect agricultural productivity. To investigate the response from a regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan, we used the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer agricultural simulation model. We first evaluated the model by forcing it with daily weather data and management practices in China and the USA for rice, maize, wheat, and soybeans. Then we perturbed observed weather data using monthly climate anomalies for a 10-year period due to a simulated 5 Tg soot injection that could result from a regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan, using a total of 100 15 kt atomic bombs, much less than 1% of the current global nuclear arsenal. We computed anomalies using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE and NCAR's Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). We perturbed each year of the observations with anomalies from each year of the 10-year nuclear war simulations. We found that different regions respond differently to a regional nuclear war; southern regions show slight increases of crop yields while in northern regions crop yields drop significantly. Sensitivity tests show that temperature changes due to nuclear war are more important than precipitation and solar radiation changes in affecting crop yields in the regions we studied. In total, crop production in China and the USA would decrease 15-50% averaged over the 10 years using both models' output. Simulations forced by ModelE output show smaller impacts than simulations forced by WACCM output at the end of the 10 year period because of the different temperature responses in the two models.

  10. An estimate of the DM profile in the Galactic bulge region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iocco, Fabio; Benito, Maria

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis of the mass distribution in the region of the Galactic bulge, which leads to constraints on the total amount and distribution of Dark Matter (DM) therein. Our results - based on the dynamical measurement of the BRAVA collaboration - are quantitatively compatible with those of a recent analysis, and generalized to a vast sample of observationally inferred morphologies of the stellar components in the region of the Galactic bulge. By fitting the inferred DM mass to a generalized NFW profile, we find that cores (γ ≲ 0 . 6) are forbidden only for very light configurations of the bulge, and that cusps (γ ≳ 1 . 2) are allowed, but not necessarily preferred. Interestingly, we find that the results for the bulge region are compatible with those obtained with dynamical methods (based on the rotation curve) applied to outer regions of the Milky Way, for all morphologies adopted. We find that the uncertainty on the shape of the stellar morphology heavily affects the determination of the DM distribution in the bulge region, which is gravitationally dominated by baryons, adding up to the uncertainty on its normalization. The combination of the two hinders the actual possibility to infer sound conclusions about the distribution of DM in the region of the Galactic bulge, and only future observations of the stellar census and dynamics in this region will bring us closer to a quantitatively more definite answer.

  11. Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory Observations of CO J=7-->6 and J=4-->3 Emission toward the Galactic Center Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunguen; Martin, Christopher L.; Stark, Antony A.; Lane, Adair P.

    2002-12-01

    We present position-velocity strip maps of the Galactic center region in the CO J=7-->6 and J=4-->3 transitions observed with the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Emission from the two rotational transitions of 12CO was mapped at b=0deg for 3.5d>l>-1.5d on a 1' grid with a FWHM beam size of 58" at 806 GHz and 105" at 461 GHz. Previous observations of CO J=4-->3 (C. L. Martin et al., in preparation) and of [C I] emission (Ojha et al.) from this region show that these lines are distributed in a manner similar to CO J=1-->0 (Stark et al.); the (CO J=4-->3)/(CO J=1-->0) line ratio map is almost featureless across the entire Galactic center region. In contrast, the CO J=7-->6 emission from the Galactic center is strongly peaked toward the Sgr A and Sgr B molecular complexes. A large velocity gradient analysis shows that, aside from the two special regions Sgr A and Sgr B, the photon-dominated regions within a few hundred parsecs of the Galactic center are remarkably uniform in mean density and kinetic temperature at n=2500-4000 cm-3 and T=30-45 K. The (CO J=7-->6)/(CO J=4-->3) line temperature ratios near Sgr B are a factor of 2 higher than those observed in the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy M82 (Mao et al.), while the CO(J=7-->6)/CO(J=4-->3) line temperature ratios around Sgr A are similar to M82. The line ratio on large scales from the Galactic center region is an order of magnitude less than that from M82.

  12. AST/RO Observations of CO J = 7 → 6 and J = 4 → 3 Emission toward the Galactic Center Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Martin, C. L.; Stark, A. A.; Lane, A. P.

    We present position-velocity strip maps of the Galactic Center region in the CO J = 7 → 6 and J = 4 → 3 transitions observed with the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) located at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Emission from the two rotational transitions of 12CO was mapped at b = 0circ for 3.5circ > ell > -1.5circ, on a 1' grid with a FWHM beamsize of 58'' at 806 GHz and 105'' at 461 GHz. CO J = 4 → 3, and [C I] (Ojha et al. 2001) emission from this region show that these lines are distributed in a manner similar to CO J = 1 → 0 (Stark et al. 1987); the (CO J = 4 → 3)/(CO J = 1 → 0) line ratio map is almost featureless across the entire Galactic Center region. In contrast, the CO J = 7 → 6 emission from the Galactic Center is strongly peaked toward the Sgr A and Sgr B molecular complexes. A Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) analysis shows that aside from the two special regions Sgr A and Sgr B, the photon-dominated regions within a few hundred parsecs of the Galactic Center are remarkably uniform in mean density and kinetic temperature at n = 2500 to 4000 cm3 and T = 30 to 45 K. The (CO J = 7 → 6) / (CO J = 4 → 3) line temperature ratios near Sgr B are a factor of two higher than those observed in the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy M82 (Mao et al. 2000), while the CO(J = 7 → 6) / CO(J = 4 → 3) line temperature ratios around Sgr A are similar to M82. The line ratio on large scales from the Galactic Center region is an order of magnitude less than that from M82.

  13. Uncovering the Beast: The Galactic Starburst Region W49A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeier, N.; Alves, J.

    2002-12-01

    We present J, H, and Ks images of an unbiased 5‧ x 5‧ (16 pc x 16 pc) survey of the densest region of the W49 giant molecular cloud. The observations reveal a massive stellar cluster (Cluster 1) about 3 pc East of the well-known Welch ring of ultra-compact H II regions, as well as three smaller clusters associated with compact sources of radio emission. Cluster 1 powers a 6 pc diameter giant H II region seen at both the NIR and radio continuum, and has more than 30 visual magnitudes of internal imhomogeneous extinction, implying that it is still deeply embedded in its parent molecular cloud. The census of massive stars in W49A agrees or slightly overabundant when compared with the number of Lyman continuum photons derived from radio observations. We argue that although the formation of the Welch ring could have been triggered by Cluster 1, the entire W49A starburst region seems to have been multi-seeded instead of resulting from a coherent trigger.

  14. Light ion components of the galactic cosmic rays: Nuclear interactions and transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G. D.; Dubey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Light nuclei are present in the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and are produced in thick targets due to projectile or target fragmentation from both nucleon and heavy induced reactions. In the primary GCR, He-4 is the most abundant nucleus after H-1. However, there are also a substantial fluxes of H-2 and He-3. In this paper we describe theoretical models based on quantum multiple scattering theory for the description of light ion nuclear interactions. The energy dependence of the light ion fragmentation cross section is considered with comparisons of inclusive yields and secondary momentum distributions to experiments described. We also analyze the importance of a fast component of lights ions from proton and neutron induced target fragementation. These theoretical models have been incorporated into the cosmic ray transport code HZETRN and will be used to analyze the role of shielding materials in modulating the production and the energy spectrum of light ions.

  15. Gamma-ray astronomy: Nuclear transition region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    This monograph reviews the major theoretical and experimental efforts made during the past 12 years in gamma-ray astronomy over the energy range from 10 keV to about 100 MeV, where nuclear-transition lines are expected. Early attempts to detect celestial gamma rays are recounted, mechanisms of gamma-ray line and continuum production are examined, and formulas giving the various possible differential gamma-ray spectral shapes are provided. Predicted fluxes are discussed for solar gamma rays as well as for gamma emission from supernova remnants, supernovae, neutron stars, flare stars, the galactic core and disk, black holes, and diffuse sources. Gamma-ray interactions with matter are analyzed, particularly the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering from free electrons, and pair production in nuclear fields. Significant results are summarized for observations of gamma rays from the sun as well as from point and extended sources within and beyond the Galaxy, including diffuse fluxes and transient gamma-ray bursts. Factors pertaining to the design of gamma-ray astronomy experiments are considered, especially detector background limitations, gamma-ray production within instruments, and present-day detection methods.

  16. SIGMA discovery of a transient hard X-ray source in the galactic center region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Goldwurm, A.; Paul, J.; Denis, M.; Borrel, V.; Bouchet, L.; Roques, J. P.; Jourdain, E.; Trudolyubov, S.; Gilfanov, M.; Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.; Khavenson, N.; Dyachkov, A.; Novikov, B.; Chulkov, I.

    1996-09-01

    A new X-ray transient source, GRS 1730-312 (=KS 1730-312), was discovered by the hard X-ray/soft γ-ray coded mask telescope SIGMA/GRANAT in the Galactic Center region during observations performed in September 1994. The flare started on September 22 and lasted approximately 3days, during which the source became the brightest object of the region at energies above 35keV. The average 35-200keV spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index of -2.5 or by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT_e_=~70keV. SIGMA data have been found consistent with the spectral shape and with the spectral evolution observed by the TTM/Mir-Kvant telescope at lower energies. This new source belongs to the population of hard X-ray sources already detected by SIGMA in the direction of the Galactic Bulge region.

  17. NUCLEAR RADIO JET FROM A LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Akihiro; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kameno, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Hada, Kazuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    The nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) NGC 4258 has a weak radio continuum component at the galactic center. We investigate its radio spectral properties on the basis of our new observations using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array at 100 GHz and archival data from the Very Large Array at 1.7-43 GHz and the James Clerk Maxwell telescope at 347 GHz. The NGC 4258 nuclear component exhibits (1) an intra-month variable and complicated spectral feature at 5-22 GHz and (2) a slightly inverted spectrum at 5-100 GHz ({alpha} {approx} 0.3; F {sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}) in time-averaged flux densities, which are also apparent in the closest LLAGN M81. These similarities between NGC 4258 and M81 in radio spectral natures in addition to previously known core shift in their AU-scale jet structures produce evidence that the same mechanism drives their nuclei. We interpret the observed spectral property as the superposition of emission spectra originating at different locations with frequency-dependent opacity along the nuclear jet. Quantitative differences between NGC 4258 and M81 in terms of jet/counter jet ratio, radio loudness, and degree of core shift can be consistently understood by fairly relativistic speeds ({Gamma} {approx}> 3) of jets and their quite different inclinations. The picture established from the two closest LLAGNs is useful for understanding the physical origin of unresolved and flat/inverted spectrum radio cores that are prevalently found in LLAGNs, including Sgr A*, with starved supermassive black holes in the present-day universe.

  18. Mapping Galactic 60Fe Synthesis in Cen CIR Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, Stanford

    2005-01-01

    This included a 1 year no cost time extension. The grant was for research into the origin of radioactive 60Fe, whose detection was a mission goal for INTEGRAL and RHESSI. During the grant period, both missions ultimately discovered gamma-line emission from this long lived radioactivity at precisely the value that had been predicted years before by Timmes and Woosley (ApJ, 449,204 (1995)). Unfortunately, using "revised" stellar models and cross sections Rauscher et a1 (ApJ, 576, 323 (2002)), had meanwhile predicted a much larger value. During the grant period, Dieter Hartmann (PI on the complementary grant at Clemson) and Woosley corresponded on this discrepancy and Hartmann visited Santa Cruz (November 20 - 28,2004). All of the grant funds in NAG513659 paid for the expenses of that visit. Subsequently, partly motivated by conversations with Hartmann and Diehl, Woosley re-investigated the production of 60Fe and 26A1 in massive stars from 12 - 120 solar masses, with an eye towards determining the relevant, uncertain physics. The chief changes in Rauscher et a1 were "new" Hauser Feshbach cross sections for 59,60Fe(ng) and 26Al(np)26Mg. The latter has an experimental evaluation which was actually better represented in the study of Timmes and Woosley. The iron (ng) cross sections are from theory and the Timmes and Woosley values were just as reliable as those from Rauscher. Experiments need to be done to resolve who is right. In addition uncertainties in stellar winds, opacities and the IMF were explored. The bottom line is that the value predicted by Timmes and Woosley could well be the correct one, but the experimental error bar is larger than was realized. At least half of the uncertainty is nuclear cross sections that can, and should be measured in the laboratory.

  19. Very-high energy observations of the galactic center region by VERITAS in 2010-2012

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Chen, W.; Barnacka, A.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; and others

    2014-08-01

    The Galactic center is an interesting region for high-energy (0.1-100 GeV) and very-high-energy (E > 100 GeV) γ-ray observations. Potential sources of GeV/TeV γ-ray emission have been suggested, e.g., the accretion of matter onto the supermassive black hole, cosmic rays from a nearby supernova remnant (e.g., Sgr A East), particle acceleration in a plerion, or the annihilation of dark matter particles. The Galactic center has been detected by EGRET and by Fermi/LAT in the MeV/GeV energy band. At TeV energies, the Galactic center was detected with moderate significance by the CANGAROO and Whipple 10 m telescopes and with high significance by H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS. We present the results from three years of VERITAS observations conducted at large zenith angles resulting in a detection of the Galactic center on the level of 18 standard deviations at energies above ∼2.5 TeV. The energy spectrum is derived and is found to be compatible with hadronic, leptonic, and hybrid emission models discussed in the literature. Future, more detailed measurements of the high-energy cutoff and better constraints on the high-energy flux variability will help to refine and/or disentangle the individual models.

  20. THE STAR-FORMATION RELATION FOR REGIONS IN THE GALACTIC PLANE: THE EFFECT OF SPATIAL RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans II, Neal J.; Battersby, Cara

    2014-12-20

    We examined the relations between molecular gas surface density and star-formation rate surface density in an 11 deg{sup 2} region of the Galactic plane. Dust continua at 1.1 mm from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey and 22 μm emission from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey were used as tracers of molecular gas and the star-formation rate, respectively, across the Galactic longitude of 31.5 ≥ l ≥ 20.5 and Galactic latitude of 0.5 ≥ b ≥ –0.5. The relation was studied over a range of resolutions from 33'' to 20' by convolving images to larger scales. The pixel-by-pixel correlation between 1.1 mm and 22 μm increases rapidly at small scales and levels off at the scale of 5'-8'. We studied the star-formation relation based on a pixel-by-pixel analysis and on an analysis of the 1.1 mm and 22 μm peaks. The star-formation relation was found to be nearly linear with no significant changes in the form of the relation across all spatial scales, and it lies above the extragalactic relation from Kennicutt. The average gas-depletion time is ≈200 Myr and does not change significantly at different scales, but the scatter in the depletion time decreases as the scale increases.

  1. Final SAS-2 gamma ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of SAS-2 high energy Gamma ray data from the direction of the galactic anticenter shows that this region is characterized by: a diffuse emission from the galactic plane which has a maximum along b=0 deg and an enhancement toward negative latitudes associated with Gould's Belt, a strong point source in the direction of the Crab nebula, and a second intense localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg. Gamma ray emission from the Crab source is dominated by a pulsed flux from PSR 0531+21. The total flux above 100MeV is 3.7 + or - 0.8 million/sq cm s. The source near 195 deg, + 5 deg has a flux above 100 MeV of 4.3 + or - 0.9 million/sq cm s. Its spectrum appears flatter than that of the Crab. The diffuse galactic plane emission at negative lattitudes shows a general correlation with the local matter distribution associated with Gould's Belt. The calculated Gamma ray intensity agrees well with the SAS-2 observations.

  2. Distribution of cosmic gamma rays in the galactic anticenter region as observed by SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Ozel, M. E.; Tumer, T.; Bignami, G. F.; Ogelman, H.

    1975-01-01

    The high energy (above 35 MeV) gamma ray telescope flown on the second Small Astronomy Satellite has collected over one thousand gamma rays from the direction of the galactic anticenter. In addition to the diffuse galactic emission the distribution indicates a strong pulsed contribution from the Crab nebula with the same period and phase as the NP0532 pulsar. There also seems to be an excess in the direction of (gal. long. ? 195 deg; gal. lat ? +5 deg) where there is a region containing old supernova remnants. Search for gamma ray pulsations from other pulsars in the region do not show any statistically significant signal. The general intensity distribution of the gamma rays away from the plane appear to be similar to nonthermal radio emission brightness contours.

  3. Large-Scale Structures in the Zone of Avoidance: The Galactic Anticenter Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Nanyao Y.; Freudling, Wolfram

    1995-01-01

    We have selected a sample of 876 galaxy candidates from the IRAS Point Source Catalog in the region of 2(exp h) < alpha < 10(exp h) and 0 deg < delta < 36 deg, which crosses the Galactic anticenter part of the Zone of Avoidance (ZOA) and includes most of the highly obscured Orion-Taurus complex region. We have identified galaxies among the candidate sources by attempting to detect the 21 cm H I line of those sources which were not known to be galaxies at the beginning of the survey. In this manner, we constructed a galaxy sample which is largely free from Galactic reddening. Of the 272 observed candidates, 89 were detected in the H I line up to a heliocentric velocity of v(sub h) approximately 16,000 km/s. The resulting galaxy sample of 717 galaxies is fairly complete (within about 10%) and uniform (within about 4%) in the part of the survey area 10 deg away from the Galactic plane and for velocities up to at least 9000 km/s. This provides, for the first time, a largely unbiased view on the large-scale structures in much of the survey area. Our main results are the following: (1) Several large voids are identified. In particular, a void between alpha approximately equals 3(sup h) and 4(sup h), up to v(sub h) approximately 6000 km/s, separates the Pisces-Perseus supercluster at alpha < 3(sup h) from structures at alpha > 4(sup h); and a "nearby void" occupies most of our survey area and reaches out to a redshift of nearly 3000 km/s. (2) We found no nearby galaxy concentration that could significantly contribute to the "Local Velocity Anomoly" (LVA), but a general excess of galaxies around v(sub h) approximately 5000 km/s in the survey area. (3) The contrast between the "Great Wall" at v(sub h) approximately 8500 km/s and the void in front of it appears to gradually diffuse out after it enters the Zone of Avoidance from the northern Galactic hemisphere. (4) Our data combined with other galaxy surveys in or near the Galactic anticenter part of the ZOA suggest that the

  4. Locating the TeV-excess from the Galactic Centre region

    SciTech Connect

    Gillessen, S.; Hinton, J.; Funk, S.

    2005-02-21

    Gamma-ray experiments using the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique have an angular resolution of typically better than 0.1 deg. per event in stereoscopic mode. The centroid of a point-source emitter, however, can be determined with higher precision, down to a few arcseconds for strong sources. This is of special interest when an excess could be due to several potential sources in the field of view. Here it is shown that H.E.S.S. achieves a pointing precision of 10 to 20 arcseconds by means of a mechanical pointing model. This is demonstrated by reconstructing the position of the AGN PKS 2155-304, which is a point source emitter with a priori known position. The high precision allows to show that the TeV signal from the galactic centre region is consistent with the position of the galactic centre Sgr A*.

  5. Kinetic temperatures toward X1/X2 orbit interceptions regions and giant molecular loops in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, D.; Amo-Baladrón, M. A.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Mauersberger, R.; Martín, S.; Bronfman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Context. It is well known that the kinetic temperatures, Tkin, of the molecular clouds in the Galactic center region are higher than in typical disk clouds. However, the Tkin of the molecular complexes found at higher latitudes towards the giant molecular loops in the central region of the Galaxy is so far unknown. The gas of these high-latitude molecular clouds (hereafter referred to as "halo clouds") is located in a region where the gas in the disk may interact with the gas in the halo in the Galactic center region. Aims: To derive Tkin in the molecular clouds at high latitude and understand the physical process responsible for the heating of the molecular gas both in the central molecular zone (the concentration of molecular gas in the inner ~500 pc) and in the giant molecular loops. Methods: We measured the metastable inversion transitions of NH3 from (J,K) = (1,1) to (6,6) toward six positions selected throughout the Galactic central disk and halo. We used rotational diagrams and large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling to estimate the kinetic temperatures toward all the sources. We also observed other molecules like SiO, HNCO, CS, C34S, C18O, and 13CO, to derive the densities and to trace different physical processes (shocks, photodissociation, dense gas) expected to dominate the heating of the molecular gas. Results: We derive for the first time Tkin of the high-latitude clouds interacting with the disk in the Galactic center region. We find high rotational temperatures in all the observed positions. We derive two kinetic temperature components (~150 K and ~40 K) for the positions in the central molecular zone, and only the warm kinetic temperature component for the clouds toward the giant molecular loops. The fractional abundances derived from the different molecules suggest that shocks provide the main heating mechanism throughout the Galactic center, also at high latitudes. Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Hard X-ray observations of the region from the galactic center to Centaurus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, D. D.; Webber, W. R.; Damle, S. V.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon flight from Parana, Argentina, was conducted to observe emissions from discrete or extended sources in the southern sky. The sources observed include GX 304-1, Nor X-2, GX 340+0, GX 354-5, a possibly composite source near the galactic center, and the nova-like source (2U1543-47) in the Lupus-Norma region which has been reported previously only in satellite observations. Data concerning the possibility of line emission near 0.5 MeV from different regions of the southern sky are also presented.

  7. A discussion of the H-alpha filamentary nebulae and galactic structure in the Cygnus region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, T. A.; Simonson, S. C., III

    1971-01-01

    From observation of the galactic structure in Cygnus, the system of filamentary nebulae was found to lie at a distance of roughly 1.5 kpc, in the same region as about half the thermal radio sources in Cygnus X, the supernova remnant near gamma Cygni, and the association Cygnus OB2, in the direction of which the X-ray source Cygnus XR-3 is observed. The source of excitation was probably the pulse of radiation from a supernova explosion, as proposed in the case of Gum nebula. However continuing excitation by early stars in the region of Cygnus X cannot be excluded.

  8. Climatic Effects of Regional Nuclear War

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Luke D.

    2011-01-01

    We use a modern climate model and new estimates of smoke generated by fires in contemporary cities to calculate the response of the climate system to a regional nuclear war between emerging third world nuclear powers using 100 Hiroshima-size bombs (less than 0.03% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal) on cities in the subtropics. We find significant cooling and reductions of precipitation lasting years, which would impact the global food supply. The climate changes are large and longlasting because the fuel loadings in modern cities are quite high and the subtropical solar insolation heats the resulting smoke cloud and lofts it into the high stratosphere, where removal mechanisms are slow. While the climate changes are less dramatic than found in previous "nuclear winter" simulations of a massive nuclear exchange between the superpowers, because less smoke is emitted, the changes seem to be more persistent because of improvements in representing aerosol processes and microphysical/dynamical interactions, including radiative heating effects, in newer global climate system models. The assumptions and calculations that go into these conclusions will be described.

  9. The Fan Region at 1.5 GHz with GMIMS: Polarized synchrotron emission tracing Galactic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alex S.; Landecker, Tom; Carretti, Ettore; Douglas, Kevin A.; Sun, Xiaohui; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Mao, Sui Ann; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi; Reich, Wolfgang; Wolleben, Maik; Miller Dickey, John; Gray, Andrew; Haverkorn, Marijke; Leahy, John Patrick; Schnitzeler, Dominic

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse polarized radio continuum emission provides information about the structure of the Galactic magnetic field. With the Global Magneto-Ionic Medium Survey (GMIMS), we are mapping this emission from the entire sky from 300 to 1800 MHz. We will present a brief overview of the GMIMS survey.We will focus on 1270-1750 MHz observations from the Northern hemisphere GMIMS data to determine the geometry of the magnetic field in the Fan Region. The Fan Region is one of the dominant features of the sky in polarized radio continuum, long thought to be a local (d < 500 pc) synchrotron emission feature. We find that the 1.5 GHz polarized radio emission is anti-correlated with Halpha emission from the Perseus Arm, 2 kpc away. This indicates that ionized gas in the Perseus Arm depolarizes about 30% of the Fan Region emission, indicating that some of the Fan Region emission originates in or beyond the Perseus Arm. The synchrotron emission must therefore be produced along a large path length, suggesting the presence of a coherent magnetic field in the plane in the outer Galaxy. We argue that the polarized emission from the Fan Region is a consequence of the structure of the Galactic magnetic field and ISM. We model beam depolarization due to the ISM, finding that in the presence of depolarization the rotation measure measured from polarized emission is much lower than that measured towards background point sources, explaining an observed discrepancy between the GMIMS rotation measures and background rotation measures.

  10. How Space Radiation Risk from Galactic Cosmic Rays at the International Space Station Relates to Nuclear Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts is a major obstacle for long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have thus been developed to evaluate radiation effects at the International Space Station (ISS) and in missions to the Moon or Mars. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes in such radiation transport affect predictions on the radiation risk from galactic cosmic rays. Taking into account effects of the geomagnetic field on the cosmic ray spectra, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on the radiation risk (represented by dose-equivalent) from galactic cosmic rays behind typical spacecraft materials. These results tell us how the radiation risk at the ISS is related to nuclear cross sections at different energies, and consequently how to most efficiently reduce the physical uncertainty in our predictions on the radiation risk at the ISS.

  11. Global Famine after a Regional Nuclear War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.; Xia, L.; Mills, M. J.; Stenke, A.; Helfand, I.

    2014-12-01

    A regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan, using 100 15-kt atomic bombs, could inject 5 Tg of soot into the upper troposphere from fires started in urban and industrial areas. Simulations by three different general circulation models, GISS ModelE, WACCM, and SOCOL, all agree that global surface temperature would decrease by 1 to 2°C for 5 to 10 years, and have major impacts on precipitation and solar radiation reaching Earth's surface. Local summer climate changes over land would be larger. Using the DSSAT crop simulation model forced by these three global climate model simulations, we investigate the impacts on agricultural production in China, the largest grain producer in the world. In the first year after the regional nuclear war, a cooler, drier, and darker environment would reduce annual rice production by 23 Mt (24%), maize production by 41 Mt (23%), and wheat production by 23 Mt (50%). This reduction of food availability would continue, with gradually decreasing amplitude, for more than a decade. Results from simulations in other major grain producing regions produce similar results. Thus a nuclear war using much less than 1% of the current global arsenal could produce a global food crisis and put a billion people at risk of famine.

  12. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on Space Radiation Exposure from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zi-Wei; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major hazard to space crews, especially in long duration human space explorations. For this reason, they will be protected by radiation shielding that fragments the GCR heavy ions. Here we investigate how sensitive the crew's radiation exposure is to nuclear fragmentation cross sections at different energies. We find that in deep space cross sections between about 0.2 and 1.2 GeV/u have the strongest effect on dose equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV/u are the most important at solar maximum'. On the other hand, at the location of the International Space Station, cross sections at_higher -energies, between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV /u at solar minimum and between about 1.7 and 3.4 GeV/u'at,solar maximum, are the most important This is. due-to the average geomagnetic cutoff for the ISS orbit. We also show the effect of uncertainties in the fragmentation cross sections on the elemental energy spectra behind shielding. These results help to focus the studies of fragmentation cross sections on the proper energy range in order to improve our predictions of crew exposures.

  13. RE-ANALYSIS OF THE RADIO LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF GALACTIC H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paladini, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; DeZotti, G.

    2009-09-10

    We have re-analyzed continuum and recombination lines radio data available in the literature in order to derive the luminosity function (LF) of Galactic H II regions. The study is performed by considering the first and fourth Galactic quadrants independently. We estimate the completeness level of the sample in the fourth quadrant at 5 Jy, and the one in the first quadrant at 2 Jy. We show that the two samples (fourth or first quadrant) include, as well as giant and supergiant H II regions, a significant number of subgiant sources. The LF is obtained, in each Galactic quadrant, with a generalized Schmidt's estimator using an effective volume derived from the observed spatial distribution of the considered H II regions. The re-analysis also takes advantage of recently published ancillary absorption data allowing to solve the distance ambiguity for several objects. A single power-law fit to the LFs retrieves a slope equal to -2.23 {+-} 0.07 (fourth quadrant) and to -1.85 {+-} 0.11 (first quadrant). We also find marginal evidence of a luminosity break at L{sub knee} = 10{sup 23.45} erg s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1} for the LF in the fourth quadrant. We convert radio luminosities into equivalent H{alpha} and Lyman continuum luminosities to facilitate comparisons with extragalactic studies. We obtain an average total H II regions Lyman continuum luminosity of 0.89 {+-} 0.23 x 10{sup 53} s{sup -1}, corresponding to 30% of the total ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy.

  14. THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS. VII. W3

    SciTech Connect

    Navarete, F.; Figueredo, E.; Damineli, A.; Moises, A. P.; Blum, R. D.; Conti, P. S.

    2011-09-15

    Spectrophotometric distances in the K band have been reported by different authors for a number of obscured Galactic H II regions. Almost 50% of them show large discrepancies compared to the classical method using radial velocities measured in the radio spectral region. In order to provide a crucial test of both methods, we selected a target that does not present particular difficulty for any method and which has been measured by as many techniques as possible. The W3 star-forming complex, located in the Perseus arm, offers a splendid opportunity for such a task. We used the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph on the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North telescope to classify candidate 'naked photosphere' OB stars based on Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Two of the targets are revealed to be mid-O-type main-sequence stars leading to a distance of d = 2.20 kpc. This is in excellent agreement with the spectrophotometric distance derived in the optical band (d = 2.18 pc) and with a measurement of the W3 trigonometric parallax (d = 1.95 kpc). Such results confirm that the spectrophotometric distances in the K band are reliable. The radio-derived kinematic distance, on the contrary, gives a distance twice as large (d = 4.2 kpc). This indicates that this region of the Perseus arm does not follow the Galactic rotation curve, and this may also be the case for other H II regions for which discrepancies have been found.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galactic HII regions. I. Stellar distances (Foster+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.; Brunt, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The cornerstone of our catalog of HII regions is the new systemic velocity measurements (with respect to the LSR), which come from high-resolution (1arcmin) λ21cm HI data and λ2.6mm 12CO (J=1-0) data. The HI data are entirely from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS; Taylor et al. 2003, cat. VI/128), whereas CO data are from either CGPS or the Exeter Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) CO Galactic Plane Survey (described in Mottram & Brunt, 2010ASPC..438...98M; C. M. Brunt et al. 2013, in preparation), depending on longitude. Our catalog covers HII regions in the outer Galaxy only (R>R0) in the longitude range 90°{<=}l{<=}193° and mainly within a latitude of -3.5°{<=}b{<=}+5.5°. A high-latitude extension was also observed as part of the CGPS (99.85°{<=}l{<=}116.96°) up to b=+17.56°. The complete CGPS data set of 21cm line and continuum from 50.2°{<=}l{<=}193.3° and -3.55°{<=}b{<=}+5.55° are available at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC; http://cadc.hia.nrc.ca/). 21cm HI line observations used herein were carried out with the seven-element interferometer and 26m radio telescopes at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory for the CGPS (Taylor et al. 2033, cat. VI/128). To trace molecular material in the second quadrant, we make use of the FCRAO Outer Galaxy Survey (OGS; Heyer et al., 1998ApJS..115..241H). We present our full catalog of 355 stars found in and around Galactic HII regions in Table1. Table2 in this paper gives the final heliocentric stellar distance to each of 103 nebulae in the outer Galaxy. (3 data files).

  16. Energy spectrum of medium energy gamma-rays from the galactic center region. [experimental design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmeira, R. A. R.; Ramanujarao, K.; Dutra, S. L. G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Kniffen, D. A.; Morris, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A balloon-borne magnetic core digitized spark chamber with two assemblies of spark-chambers above and below the scintillation counters was used to measure the medium energy gamma ray flux from the galactic center region. Gamma ray calculations are based on the multiple scattering of the pair electrons in 15 aluminum plates interleaved in the spark chamber modules. Counting rates determined during ascent and at ceiling indicate the presence of diffuse component in this energy range. Preliminary results give an integral flux between 15 and 70 MeV compared to the differential points in other results.

  17. Investigating the uniformity of the excess gamma rays towards the galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Kwa, Anna

    2016-11-01

    We perform a composite likelihood analysis of subdivided regions within the central 26° × 20° of the Milky Way, with the aim of characterizing the spectrum of the gamma-ray galactic center excess in regions of varying galactocentric distance. Outside of the innermost few degrees, we find that the radial profile of the excess is background-model dependent and poorly constrained. The spectrum of the excess emission is observed to extend upwards of 10 GeV outside ~5° in radius, but cuts off steeply between 10-20 GeV only in the innermost few degrees. If interpreted as a real feature of the excess, this radial variation in the spectrum has important implications for both astrophysical and dark matter interpretations of the galactic center excess. Single-component dark matter annihilation models face challenges in reproducing this variation; on the other hand, a population of unresolved millisecond pulsars contributing both prompt and secondary inverse Compton emission may be able to explain the spectrum as well as its spatial dependency. We show that the expected differences in the photon-count distributions of a smooth dark matter annihilation signal and an unresolved point source population are an order of magnitude smaller than the fluctuations in residuals after fitting the data, which implies that mismodeling is an important systematic effect in point source analyses aimed at resolving the gamma-ray excess.

  18. The Radio and IR Luminosity Function of compact Galactic HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, R.; De Zotti, G.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    We present the radio luminosity function (LF) of compact Galactic HII regions, derived by using ˜ 200 sources from the recombination line survey by Caswell & Haynes (1987). The data set is complete for Speak > 1.3 Jy at 5 GHz, corresponding to an integrated flux density of ˜ 3 Jy. The LF is reconstructed by means of a generalized Schmidt's estimator which takes into account the actual spatial distribution of the HII regions along the plane of the Galaxy. The resulting LF is described by a two-component power-law, with a cut-off at log L(α) = ˜ 38.3 erg/sec. This work will be complemented with the derivation, by means of the MIPSGAL data set, of the IR counterpart of the radio LF here presented. An extension of this work will consist in deriving the IR counterpart of the radio LF here obtained, by making use of the MIPSGAL data set.

  19. Dynamics of Nuclear Regions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard H.

    1996-01-01

    Current research carried out with the help of the ASEE-NASA Summer Faculty Program, at NASA-Ames, is concentrated on the dynamics of nuclear regions of galaxies. From a dynamical point of view a galaxy is a collection of around 10(sup 11) stars like our Sun, each of which moves in the summed gravitational field of all the remaining stars. Thus galaxy dynamics becomes a self-consistent n-body problem with forces given by Newtonian gravitation. Strong nonlinearity in the gravitational force and the inherent nonlinearity of self-consistent problems both argue for a numerical approach. The technique of numerical experiments consis of constructing an environment in the computer that is as close as possible to the physical conditions in a real galaxy and then carrying out experiments much like laboratory experiments in physics or engineering, in this environment. Computationally, an experiment is an initial value problem, and a good deal of thought and effort goes into the design of the starting conditions that serve as initial values. Experiments are run at Ames because all the 'equipment' is in place-the programs, the necessary computational power, and good facilities for post-run analysis. Our goal for this research program is to study the nuclear regions in detail and this means replacing most of the galaxy by a suitable boundary condition to allow the full capability of numerical experiments to be brought to bear on a small region perhaps 1/1000 of the linear dimensions of an entire galaxy. This is an extremely delicate numerical problem, one in which some small feature overlook, can easily lead to a collapse or blow-up of the entire system. All particles attract each other in gravitational problems, and the 1/r(sup 2) force is: (1) nonlinear; (2) strong at short range; (3) long-range, and (4) unscreened at any distance.

  20. Vertical flows and structures excited by magnetic activity in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Kensuke; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Machida, Mami; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2017-01-01

    Various observations show peculiar features in the Galactic Center region, such as loops and filamentary structure. It is still unclear how such characteristic features are formed. Magnetic field is believed to play very important roles in the dynamics of gas in the Galaxy Center. Suzuki et al. (2015) performed a global magneto-hydrodynamical simulation focusing on the Galactic Center with an axisymmetric gravitational potential and claimed that non-radial motion is excited by magnetic activity. We further analyzed their simulation data and found that vertical motion is also excited by magnetic activity. In particular, fast down flows with speed of ~100 km/s are triggered near the footpoint of magnetic loops that are buoyantly risen by Parker instability. These downward flows are accelerated by the vertical component of the gravity, falling along inclined field lines. As a result, the azimuthal and radial components of the velocity are also excited, which are observed as high velocity features in a simulated position-velocity diagram. Depending on the viewing angle, these fast flows will show a huge variety of characteristic features in the position-velocity diagram.

  1. Deterring regional threats from nuclear proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, L.S.

    1992-03-12

    The most prominent shift in the National Military Strategy is from the global Soviet threat to a new focus on regional contingencies. No threat looms larger in these contingencies than the proliferation of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles. This study examines proliferation trends and proposes a predominately diplomatic strategy for containing the problem. Dr. Spector identifies three waves of proliferation: the first is the five states with declared weapons and doctrine-the United States, Russia, Great Britain, France, and China; the second includes a less visible group that developed a covert capability, without testing weapons or declaring a doctrine of deterrence-for example, Israel, India, and probably Pakistan; and, a third wave of would-be proliferators includes radical states like Iraq, Iran, Libya, and North Korea. Spector's political approach is based on the common interest of wave one and two states to prevent further proliferation. Political-economic incentives have already worked in the cases of Brazil, Argentina, Taiwan, and South Africa-states which appear to have abandoned their nuclear weapons programs. Spector does not rule out the option of military force. Force, especially under international sanctions, can be a powerful tool to back diplomatic efforts. Use of force, however, remains a last resort.

  2. HOT DIFFUSE EMISSION IN THE NUCLEAR STARBURST REGION OF NGC 2903

    SciTech Connect

    Yukita, Mihoko; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Soria, Roberto

    2012-10-20

    We present a deep Chandra observation of the central regions of the late-type barred spiral galaxy NGC 2903. The Chandra data reveal soft (kT{sub e} {approx} 0.2-0.5 keV) diffuse emission in the nuclear starburst region and extending {approx}2' ({approx}5 kpc) to the north and west of the nucleus. Much of this soft hot gas is likely to be from local active star-forming regions; however, besides the nuclear region, the morphology of hot gas does not strongly correlate with the bar or other known sites of active star formation. The central {approx}650 pc radius starburst zone exhibits much higher surface brightness diffuse emission than the surrounding regions and a harder spectral component in addition to a soft component similar to the surrounding zones. We interpret the hard component as also being of thermal origin with kT{sub e} {approx} 3.6 keV and to be directly associated with a wind fluid produced by supernovae and massive star winds similar to the hard diffuse emission seen in the starburst galaxy M82. The inferred terminal velocity for this hard component, {approx}1100 km s{sup -1}, exceeds the local galaxy escape velocity suggesting a potential outflow into the halo and possibly escape from the galaxy gravitational potential. Morphologically, the softer extended emission from nearby regions does not display an obvious outflow geometry. However, the column density through which the X-rays are transmitted is lower in the zone to the west of the nucleus compared to that from the east and the surface brightness is relatively higher suggesting some of the soft hot gas originates from above the disk: viewed directly from the western zone but through the intervening disk of the host galaxy along sight lines from the eastern zone. There are several point-like sources embedded in the strong diffuse nuclear emission zone. Their X-ray spectra show them to likely be compact binaries. None of these detected point sources are coincident with the mass center of the

  3. Detections of 2 cm formaldehyde emissions towards Galactic star-forming regions with 6 cm counterpart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Qiong; Yang, Kai; Li, Juan; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Wu, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Rong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Qing; Dong, Jian; Jiang, Dong-Rong; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    We report the detections of H2CO emission at the 2 cm transition towards Galactic star-forming regions with known 6 cm counterpart using the Shanghai Tianma Radio Telescope (TMRT). One significant detection (in NGC7538) and two possible detections (in G23.01-0.41 and G29.96-0.02) were made. Comparing with previous observations, we found that there is a time lag of appearance of 2 cm and 6 cm emissions detected in NGC7538, contradicting with the prediction of radiative pumping via radio continuum radiation. Combinations of the variability of 6 cm masers in NGC7538 suggest that collisional pumping via high-velocity shocks could better explain the 6 cm H2CO maser emission. Under this scheme, excitation of the 2 cm maser may require a higher collision energy compared to the 6 cm transition.

  4. Determination of magnetic fields in broad line region of active galactic nuclei from polarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrovich, Mikhail; Silant'ev, Nikolai; Gnedin, Yuri; Natsvlishvili, Tinatin; Buliga, Stanislava

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in confining gas clouds in the broad line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and in maintaining the stability of these clouds. Without magnetic fields the clouds would not be stable, and soon after their formation they would expand and disperse. We show that the strength of the magnetic field can be derived from the polarimetric observations. Estimates of magnetic fields for a number of AGNs are based on the observed polarization degrees of broad Hα lines and nearby continuum. The difference between their values allows us to estimate the magnetic field strength in the BLR using the method developed by Silant'ev et al. (2013). Values of magnetic fields in BLR for a number of AGNs have been derived.

  5. Outflow and Metallicity in the Broad-Line Region of Low-Redshift Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaejin; nagao, Tohru; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2017-01-01

    Outflows in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are crucial to understand in investigating the co-evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies since outflows may play an important role as an AGN feedback mechanism. Based on archival UV spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and IUE, we investigate outflows in the broad-line region (BLR) in low-redshift AGNs (z < 0.4) through detailed analysis of the velocity profile of the C iv emission line. We find a dependence of the outflow strength on the Eddington ratio and the BLR metallicity in our low-redshift AGN sample, which is consistent with earlier results obtained for high-redshift quasars. These results suggest that BLR outflows, gas accretion onto SMBHs, and past star formation activity in host galaxies are physically related in low-redshift AGNs as in powerful high-redshift quasars.

  6. A DEEP UBVRI CCD PHOTOMETRY OF SIX OPEN STAR CLUSTERS IN THE GALACTIC ANTICENTER REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Lata, Sneh; Pandey, Anil K.; Kumar, Brijesh; Bhatt, Himali; Pace, Giancarlo; Sharma, Saurabh

    2010-02-15

    We present deep UBVRI CCD photometry of six open star clusters situated in the Galactic anticenter region (l{approx} 120-200 deg.). The sample includes three unstudied (Be 6, Be 77, King 17) and three partly studied open clusters (Be 9, NGC 2186, and NGC 2304). The fundamental parameters have been determined by comparing color-color and color-magnitude diagrams with the theoretical models. The structural parameters and morphology of the clusters were discussed on the basis of radial density profiles and isodensity contours, respectively. The isodensity contours show that all the clusters have asymmetric shapes. An investigation of structural parameters indicates that the evolution of core and corona of the clusters is mainly controlled by internal relaxation processes.

  7. Observations of medium energy gamma ray emission from the galactic center region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Morris, D. J.; Palmeira, R. A. R.; Rao, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the gamma-ray emission in the medium energy range between 15 and 100 MeV, obtained during two ballon flights from Brazil are presented. The importance of this energy region in determining whether pi deg - decay of electron bremsstrahlung is the most likely dominant source mechanism is discussed along with the implications of such observations. Specifically, the data from this experiment suggest that emission from the galactic plane is similar to theoretical spectrum calculations including both sources mechanisms, but with the bremsstrahlung component enhanced by a factor of about 2. A spectral distribution of gamma-rays produced in the residual atmosphere above the instrument is also presented and compared with other data. A rather smooth spectral variation from high to low energies is found for the atmospheric spectrum.

  8. CO observations of the galactic star-forming region W58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, F. P.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of (C-12)O and (C-13)O have been made in the direction of the strong galactic radio source W58, which contains the compact H II regions K3-50 and ON-3. An extended molecular cloud with dimensions of 55 x 40 pc is associated with the northern part of the H II region complex. The density of the molecular cloud increases from west to east; the molecular cloud is bounded on the east by a larger H I cloud. Present star-formation activity is taking place at the position of maximum molecular density, at what appears to be the interface of the H I cloud and the H II region complex. The velocity structure of the CO cloud and the compact H II regions are in agreement with the blister model. Radio continuum and H I line observations show indications of a shell structure in the southwest of W58. Present star formation in W58 may be caused by this expanding shell.

  9. Stochastic non-circular motion and outflows driven by magnetic activity in the Galactic bulge region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Machida, Mami; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2015-12-01

    By performing a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation for the Milky Way with an axisymmetric gravitational potential, we propose that spatially dependent amplification of magnetic fields possibly explains the observed noncircular motion of the gas in the Galactic centre region. The radial distribution of the rotation frequency in the bulge region is not monotonic in general. The amplification of the magnetic field is enhanced in regions with stronger differential rotation, because magnetorotational instability and field-line stretching are more effective. The strength of the amplified magnetic field reaches ≳0.5 mG, and radial flows of the gas are excited by the inhomogeneous transport of angular momentum through turbulent magnetic field that is amplified in a spatially dependent manner. In addition, the magnetic pressure-gradient force also drives radial flows in a similar manner. As a result, the simulated position-velocity diagram exhibits a time-dependent asymmetric parallelogram-shape owing to the intermittency of the magnetic turbulence; the present model provides a viable alternative to the bar-potential-driven model for the parallelogram shape of the central molecular zone. This is a natural extension into the central few 100 pc of the magnetic activity, which is observed as molecular loops at radii from a few 100 pc to 1 kpc. Furthermore, the time-averaged net gas flow is directed outward, whereas the flows are highly time dependent, which we discuss from a viewpoint of the outflow from the bulge.

  10. SOFIA/FORCAST Observations of the Arched Filamentary Region in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, Matthew; Lau, Ryan M.; Morris, Mark; Herter, Terry L.

    2016-06-01

    Abstract: We present 19.7, 25.2, 31.5, and 37.1 μm maps of the Thermal Arched Filament region in the Galactic Center taken with the Faint Object Infrared Camera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) with an angular resolution of 3.2-3.8". We calculate the integrated infrared luminosity of the Arched Filaments and show that they are consistent with being heated by the nearby Arches cluster. Additionally, using our observations, we infer dust temperatures (75 - 90 K) across the Arched Filaments which are remarkably consistent over large spatial scales (˜ 25 pc). We discuss the possible geometric effects needed to recreate this temperature structure. Additionally, we compare the observed morphology of the Arches in the FORCAST maps with the Paschen-α emission in the region to study what fraction of the infrared emission may be coming from dust in the HII region versus the PDR beneath it. Finally, we use Spitzer/IRAC 8 μm data to look for spatial variations in PAH abundance in the rich UV environment of the young (~2-4 Myr) and massive Arches cluster.

  11. The Fossil Nuclear Outflow in the Central 30 pc of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Matsushita, Satoki; Koch, Patrick M.; Iono, Daisuke

    2016-11-01

    We report a new 1 pc (30″) resolution CS(J=2-1) line map of the central 30 pc of the Galactic center (GC), made with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. We revisit our previous study of an extraplanar feature called the polar arc (PA), which is a molecular cloud located above SgrA*, with a velocity gradient perpendicular to the galactic plane. We find that the PA can be traced back to the galactic disk. This provides clues to the launching point of the PA, roughly 6 × 106 years ago. Implications of the dynamical timescale of the PA might be related to the Galactic center lobe at parsec scale. Our results suggest that, in the central 30 pc of the GC, the feedback from past explosions could alter the orbital path of molecular gas down to the central tenth of a parsec. In the follow-up work of our new CS(J=2-1) map, we also find that, near systemic velocity, the molecular gas shows an extraplanar hourglass-shaped feature (HG-feature) with a size of ˜13 pc. The latitude-velocity diagrams show that the eastern edge of the HG-feature is associated with an expanding bubble B1, ˜7 pc away from SgrA*. The dynamical timescale of this bubble is ˜3 × 105 years. This bubble is interacting with the 50 km s-1 cloud. Part of the molecular gas from the 50 km s-1 cloud was swept away by the bubble to b=-0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 2. The western edge of the HG-feature seems to be molecular gas entrained from the 20 km s-1 cloud toward the north of the galactic disk. Our results suggest a fossil explosion in the central 30 pc of the GC, a few 105 years ago.

  12. Chandra Deep X-ray Observation of a Typical Galactic Plane Region and Near-Infrared Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebisawa, K.; Tsujimoto, M.; Paizis, A.; Hamaguichi, K.; Bamba, A.; Cutri, R.; Kaneda, H.; Maeda, Y.; Sato, G.; Senda, A.

    2004-01-01

    Using the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer Imaging array (ACIS-I), we have carried out a deep hard X-ray observation of the Galactic plane region at (l,b) approx. (28.5 deg,0.0 deg), where no discrete X-ray source has been reported previously. We have detected 274 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) as well as strong Galactic diffuse emission within two partidly overlapping ACIS-I fields (approx. 250 sq arcmin in total). The point source sensitivity was approx. 3 x 10(exp -15)ergs/s/sq cm in the hard X-ray band (2-10 keV and approx. 2 x 10(exp -16) ergs/s/sq cm in the soft band (0.5-2 keV). Sum of all the detected point source fluxes account for only approx. 10 % of the total X-ray fluxes in the field of view. In order to explain the total X-ray fluxes by a superposition of fainter point sources, an extremely rapid increase of the source population is required below our sensitivity limit, which is hardly reconciled with any source distribution in the Galactic plane. Therefore, we conclude that X-ray emission from the Galactic plane has truly diffuse origin. Only 26 point sources were detected both in the soft and hard bands, indicating that there are two distinct classes of the X-ray sources distinguished by the spectral hardness ratio. Surface number density of the hard sources is only slightly higher than observed at the high Galactic latitude regions, strongly suggesting that majority of the hard X-ray sources are active galaxies seen through the Galactic plane. Following the Chandra observation, we have performed a near-infrared (NIR) survey with SOFI at ESO/NTT to identify these new X-ray sources. Since the Galactic plane is opaque in NIR, we did not see the background extragalactic sources in NIR. In fact, only 22 % of the hard sources had NIR counterparts which are most likely to be Galactic origin. Composite X-ray energy spectrum of those hard X-ray sources having NIR counterparts exhibits a narrow approx. 6.7 keV iron emission line, which

  13. Star Formation Activity in the Galactic H II Region Sh2-297

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.; Dewangan, L. K.; Tamura, M.

    2012-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic H II region Sh2-297, located in the Canis Major OB1 complex. Optical spectroscopic observations are used to constrain the spectral type of ionizing star HD 53623 as B0V. The classical nature of this H II region is affirmed by the low values of electron density and emission measure, which are calculated to be 756 cm-3 and 9.15 × 105 cm-6 pc using the radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz, and Very Large Array archival data at 1420 MHz. To understand local star formation, we identified the young stellar object (YSO) candidates in a region of area ~7farcm5 × 7farcm5 centered on Sh2-297 using grism slitless spectroscopy (to identify the Hα emission line stars), and near infrared (NIR) observations. NIR YSO candidates are further classified into various evolutionary stages using color-color and color-magnitude (CM) diagrams, giving 50 red sources (H - K > 0.6) and 26 Class II-like sources. The mass and age range of the YSOs are estimated to be ~0.1-2 M ⊙ and 0.5-2 Myr using optical (V/V-I) and NIR (J/J-H) CM diagrams. The mean age of the YSOs is found to be ~1 Myr, which is of the order of dynamical age of 1.07 Myr of the H II region. Using the estimated range of visual extinction (1.1-25 mag) from literature and NIR data for the region, spectral energy distribution models have been implemented for selected YSOs which show masses and ages to be consistent with estimated values. The spatial distribution of YSOs shows an evolutionary sequence, suggesting triggered star formation in the region. The star formation seems to have propagated from the ionizing star toward the cold dark cloud LDN1657A located west of Sh2-297.

  14. SUBMILLIMETER AND MOLECULAR VIEWS OF THREE GALACTIC RING-LIKE H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Arvidsson, K.; Kerton, C. R. E-mail: kerton@iastate.edu

    2011-05-15

    We use SCUBA 850 {mu}m and CO observations to analyze the surroundings of three Galactic ring-like H II regions, KR 7, KR 81, and KR 120 (Sh 2-124, Sh 2-165, and Sh 2-187), with the aim of finding sites of triggered star formation. We find one prominent submillimeter (sub-mm) source for each region, located at the interface between the H II region and its neutral surroundings. Using Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry, we find that the prominent sub-mm source for KR 120 probably contains an embedded cluster of young stellar objects (YSOs), making it a likely site for triggered star formation. The KR 7 sub-mm source could possibly contain embedded YSOs, while the KR 81 sub-mm source likely does not. The mass column densities for these dominant sub-mm sources fall in the {approx}0.1-0.6 g cm{sup -2} range. The mass of the cold, dense material (clumps) seen as the three dominant sub-mm sources falls around {approx}100 M{sub sun}. We use the SCUBA Legacy catalog to characterize the populations of sub-mm sources around the H II regions, and compare them to the sources found around a previously studied similar ring-like H II region (KR 140) and near a massive star-forming region (W3). Finally, we estimate the IR luminosities of the prominent newly detected sub-mm sources and find that they are correlated with the clump mass, consistent with a previously known luminosity-mass relationship which this study shows to be valid over four orders of magnitude in mass.

  15. GRIS detection of Al-26 1809 keV line emission from the Galactic center region as a broad line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naya, Juan E.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Bartlett, Lyle M.; Gehrels, Neil; Leventhal, Marvin; Parsons, Ann; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Tueller, Jack

    1997-01-01

    The gamma ray imaging spectrometer (GRIS) was used to observe the 1809 keV emission from the Galactic center region. The observed line is broader than the instrument resolution. The measured intrinsic width is 5.4 +/- 1.4 keV full width half medium, which is more than three times the maximum Doppler broadening expected due to Galactic rotation. The detection of such a wide feature, suggesting a high dispersion velocity has implications for the origin of Galactic Al-26. It suggests a supernova explosion origin or a Wolf-Rayet stellar wind origin of Al-26. The fact that the Al-26 has not come to rest after 10(exp 6) years presents a challenge to the current understanding of the Al-26 production and propagation in the Galaxy.

  16. The Schmidt Law in Six Galactic Massive Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, S.; Guzman, A.; Marengo, M.; Smith, H. A.; Martínez-Galarza, J. R.; Allen, L.

    2015-08-01

    We present a census of young stars in five massive star-forming regions in the 4th Galactic quadrant, G305, G326-4, G326-6, G333 (RCW 106), and G351, and combine this census with an earlier census of young stars in NGC 6334. Each region was observed at J, H, and Ks with the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager and combined with deep observations taken with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope at the wavelengths 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We derived a five band point-source catalog containing >200,000 infrared sources in each region. We have identified a total of 2871 YSO candidates, 363 Class I YSOs, and 2508 Class II YSOs. We mapped the column density of each cloud using observations from Herschel between 160 and 500 μm and near-infrared extinction maps in order to determine the average gas surface density above AV > 2. We study the surface density of the YSOs and the star-formation rate as a function of the column density within each cloud and compare them to the results for nearby star-forming regions. We find a range in power-law indices across the clouds, with the dispersion in the local relations in an individual cloud much lower than the average over the six clouds. We find the average over the six clouds to be {{{Σ }}}{SFR}∼ {{{Σ }}}{gas}2.15+/- 0.41 and power-law exponents ranging from 1.77 to 2.86, similar to the values derived within nearby star-forming regions, including Taurus and Orion. The large dispersion in the power-law relations between individual Milky Way molecular clouds reinforces the idea that there is not a direct universal connection between Σgas and a cloud's observed star-formation rate.

  17. Stellar populations in the Carina region. The Galactic plane at l = 291°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Lera, J. A.; Baume, G.; Gamen, R.; Costa, E.; Carraro, G.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Previous studies of the Carina region have revealed its complexity and richness as well as a significant number of early-type stars. However, in many cases, these studies only concentrated on the central region (Trumpler 14/16) or were not homogeneous. This latter aspect, in particular, is crucial because very different ages and distances for key clusters have been claimed in recent years. Aims: The aim of this work is to study in detail an area of the Galactic plane in Carina, eastward η Carina. We analyze the properties of different stellar populations and focus on a sample of open clusters and their population of young stellar objects and highly reddened early stars. We also studied the stellar mass distribution in these clusters and the possible scenario of their formation. Finally, we outline the Galactic spiral structure in this direction. Methods: We obtained deep and homogeneous photometric data (UBVIKC) for six young open clusters: NGC 3752, Trumpler 18, NGC 3590, Hogg 10, 11, and 12, located in Carina at l ~ 291°, and their adjacent stellar fields, which we complemented with spectroscopic observations of a few selected targets. We also culled additional information from the literature, which includes stellar spectral classifications and near-infrared photometry from 2MASS. We finally developed a numerical code that allowed us to perform a homogeneous and systematic analysis of the data. Our results provide more reliable estimates of distances, color excesses, masses, and ages of the stellar populations in this direction. Results: We estimate the basic parameters of the studied clusters and find that they identify two overdensities of young stellar populations located at about 1.8 kpc and 2.8 kpc, with EB - V ~ 0.1 - 0.6. We find evidence of pre-main-sequence populations inside them, with an apparent coeval stellar formation in the most conspicuous clusters. We also discuss apparent age and distance gradients in the direction NW-SE. We study the

  18. The Dynamics of Molecular Clouds in the Galactic Bar Region on the Near-Side of the CMZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker; Smith, Howard Alan; HIGGS Team

    2017-01-01

    The inner Galaxy, the area inside the 3-kpc arms, can be divided into two main regions, the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ; Morris and Serabyn 1996) and the Galactic Bar region. Gas and dust moves from the end points of the Galactic Bar on dust lanes towards the CMZ, where it merges with the gas and dust forming a 100-pc molecular ring or stream around the central black hole. The stream of gas and dust on the dust lanes is not continuous, but fragmented into irregularly separated clumps of varying sizes and clustering. On the near side of the CMZ the most prominent cloud clusters are the l=1.6o complex, Clump 2, and the molecular clouds around l=5.5o. We are analyzing Herschel, MOPRA, APEx, and other archival observations in order a) to identify molecular clouds that are part of the gas and dust stream in the Galactic Bar region near the CMZ, b) to determine the dynamics of the Galactic Bar clouds, and c) to derive a gas and dust mass flow rate to the CMZ. This poster will present our initial results.

  19. THE COMPLEX NORTH TRANSITION REGION OF CENTAURUS A: A GALACTIC WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Susan G.; Eilek, Jean A.; Owen, Frazer N.

    2015-04-01

    We present deep GALEX images of NGC 5128, the parent galaxy of Centaurus A. We detect a striking “weather ribbon” of far-UV (FUV) and Hα emission which extends more than 35 kpc northeast of the galaxy. This ribbon is associated with a knotty ridge of radio/X-ray emission and is an extension of the previously known string of optical emission-line filaments. Many phenomena in the region are too short-lived to have survived transit out from the inner galaxy; something must be driving them locally. We also detect FUV emission from the galaxy’s central dust lane. Combining this with previous radio and far-IR measurements, we infer an active starburst in the central galaxy which is currently forming stars at ∼2 M{sub ☉} yr{sup −1}, and has been doing so for 50–100 Myr. If the wind from this starburst is enhanced by energy and mass driven out from the active galactic nucleus, the powerful augmented wind can be the driver needed for the northern weather system. We argue that both the diverse weather system, and the enhanced radio emission in the same region, result from the wind’s encounter with cool gas left by one of the recent merger/encounter events in the history of NGC 5128.

  20. Far-infrared study of N/O abundance ratio in galactic H 2 regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, D.F.; Dinerstein, H.L.; Werner, M.W.; Watson, D.M.

    1983-03-01

    Far-infrared lines of N++ and O++ in several galactic H II regions were measured in an effort to probe the abundance ratio N/O. New measurements are presented for W32 (630.8-0.0), Orion A, and G75.84+0.4. The combination of (N III) 57.3 millimicrons and (O III) 88.4 and 51.8 millimicrons yields measurements of N++/O++ that are largely insensitive to electron temperature, density uncertainties, and to clumping of the ionized gas, due to the similarity of the critical densities for these transitions. In the observed nebulae, N++/O++ should be indicative of N/O, a ratio that is of special importance in nucleosynthesis theory. Measurements are compared with previous measurements of M17 and W51. For nebulae in the solar circle, N++/O++ is greater than the N/O values derived from optical studies of N+/O+ in low ionization zones of the same nebulae. We find that N++/O++ in W43 is significantly higher than for the other H II regions in the sample. Since W43 is located at R 5 kpc, which is the smallest galactocentric distance in our sample, our data appear consistent with the presence of a negative abundance gradient d(N/O)dR.

  1. A COMPLETE ATLAS OF H I ABSORPTION TOWARD H II REGIONS IN THE SOUTHERN GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY (SGPS I)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.; Dickey, J. M.; Dawson, J. R.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present a complete catalog of H I emission and absorption spectrum pairs, toward H II regions, detectable within the boundaries of the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS I), a total of 252 regions. The catalog is presented in graphical, numerical, and summary formats. We demonstrate an application of this new data set through an investigation of the locus of the Near 3 kpc Arm.

  2. A new perspective on the radio active zone at the Galactic center - feedback from nuclear activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.-H.; Morris, M. R.; Goss, W. M.

    2014-05-01

    Based on our deep image of Sgr A using broadband data observed with the VLA† at 6 cm, we present a new perspective of the radio bright zone at the Galactic center. We further show the radio detection of the X-ray Cannonball, a candidate neutron star associated with the Galactic center SNR Sgr A East. The radio image is compared with the Chandra X-ray image to show the detailed structure of the radio counterparts of the bipolar X-ray lobes. The bipolar lobes are likely produced by the winds from the activities within Sgr A West, which could be collimated by the inertia of gas in the CND, or by the momentum driving of Sgr A*; and the poloidal magnetic fields likely play an important role in the collimation. The less-collimated SE lobe, in comparison to the NW one, is perhaps due to the fact that the Sgr A East SN might have locally reconfigured the magnetic field toward negative galactic latitudes. In agreement with the X-ray observations, the time-scale of ˜1 × 104 yr estimated for the outermost radio ring appears to be comparable to the inferred age of the Sgr A East SNR.

  3. LINE SHIFTS, BROAD-LINE REGION INFLOW, AND THE FEEDING OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskell, C. Martin; Goosmann, Rene W. E-mail: rene.goosmann@astro.unistra.fr

    2013-05-20

    Velocity-resolved reverberation mapping suggests that the broad-line regions (BLRs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can have significant net inflow. We use the STOKES radiative transfer code to show that electron and Rayleigh scattering off the BLR and torus naturally explains the blueshifted profiles of high-ionization lines and the ionization dependence of the blueshifts. This result is insensitive to the geometry of the scattering region. If correct, then this model resolves the long-standing conflict between the absence of outflow implied by velocity-resolved reverberation mapping and the need for outflow if the blueshifting is the result of obscuration. The accretion rate implied by the inflow is sufficient to power the AGN. We suggest that the BLR is part of the outer accretion disk and that similar magnetohydrodynamic processes are operating. In the scattering model, the blueshifting is proportional to the accretion rate so high-accretion-rate AGNs will show greater high-ionization line blueshifts, as is observed. Scattering can lead to systematically too high black hole mass estimates from the C IV line. We note many similarities between narrow-line region (NLR) and BLR blueshiftings, and suggest that NLR blueshiftings have a similar explanation. Our model explains the higher blueshifts of broad absorption line QSOs if they are more highly inclined. Rayleigh scattering from the BLR and torus could be more important in the UV than electron scattering for predominantly neutral material around AGNs. The importance of Rayleigh scattering versus electron scattering can be assessed by comparing line profiles at different wavelengths arising from the same emission-line region.

  4. TRIGONOMETRIC PARALLAXES OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS. VI. GALACTIC STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS, AND NONCIRCULAR MOTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, M. J.; Sato, M.; Menten, K. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Xu, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Zheng, X. W.; Zhang, B.; Moscadelli, L.; Honma, M.; Hirota, T.; Hachisuka, K.; Moellenbrock, G. A.; Bartkiewicz, A.

    2009-07-20

    We are using the Very Long Baseline Array and the Japanese VLBI Exploration of Radio Astronomy project to measure trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions of masers found in high-mass star-forming regions across the Milky Way. Early results from 18 sources locate several spiral arms. The Perseus spiral arm has a pitch angle of 16 deg. {+-} 3 deg., which favors four rather than two spiral arms for the Galaxy. Combining positions, distances, proper motions, and radial velocities yields complete three-dimensional kinematic information. We find that star-forming regions on average are orbiting the Galaxy {approx}15 km s{sup -1} slower than expected for circular orbits. By fitting the measurements to a model of the Galaxy, we estimate the distance to the Galactic center R {sub 0} = 8.4 {+-} 0.6 kpc and a circular rotation speed {theta}{sub 0} = 254 {+-} 16 km s{sup -1}. The ratio {theta}{sub 0}/R {sub 0} can be determined to higher accuracy than either parameter individually, and we find it to be 30.3 {+-} 0.9 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1}, in good agreement with the angular rotation rate determined from the proper motion of Sgr A*. The data favor a rotation curve for the Galaxy that is nearly flat or slightly rising with Galactocentric distance. Kinematic distances are generally too large, sometimes by factors greater than 2; they can be brought into better agreement with the trigonometric parallaxes by increasing {theta}{sub 0}/R {sub 0} from the IAU recommended value of 25.9 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1} to a value near 30 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1}. We offer a 'revised' prescription for calculating kinematic distances and their uncertainties, as well as a new approach for defining Galactic coordinates. Finally, our estimates of {theta}{sub 0} and {theta}{sub 0}/R{sub 0}, when coupled with direct estimates of R {sub 0}, provide evidence that the rotation curve of the Milky Way is similar to that of the Andromeda galaxy, suggesting that the dark matter halos of these two

  5. Origin of X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Emission from the Galactic Central Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshov, D. O.; Cheng, K.-S.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C. M.

    2017-02-01

    We study a possible connection between different non-thermal emissions from the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy. We analyze the origin of the gamma-ray source 2FGL J1745.6‑2858 (or 3FGL J1745.6‑2859c) in the Galactic Center (GC) and the diffuse hard X-ray component recently found by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, as well as the radio emission and processes of hydrogen ionization from this area. We assume that a source in the GC injected energetic particles with power-law spectrum into the surrounding medium in the past or continues to inject until now. The energetic particles may be protons, electrons, or a combination of both. These particles diffuse to the surrounding medium and interact with gas, magnetic field, and background photons to produce non-thermal emissions. We study the spectral and spatial features of the hard X-ray emission and gamma-ray emission by the particles from the central source. Our goal is to examine whether the hard X-ray and gamma-ray emissions have a common origin. Our estimations show that, in the case of pure hadronic models, the expected flux of hard X-ray emission is too low. Despite the fact that protons can produce a non-zero contribution in gamma-ray emission, it is unlikely that they and their secondary electrons can make a significant contribution in hard X-ray flux. In the case of pure leptonic models, it is possible to reproduce both X-ray and gamma-ray emissions for both transient and continuous supply models. However, in the case of the continuous supply model, the ionization rate of molecular hydrogen may significantly exceed the observed value.

  6. Evidence for a physical linkage between galactic cosmic rays and regional climate time series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of solar variability on regional climate time series were examined using a sequence of physical connections between total solar irradiance (TSI) modulated by galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), and ocean and atmospheric patterns that affect precipitation and streamflow. The solar energy reaching the Earth's surface and its oceans is thought to be controlled through an interaction between TSI and GCRs, which are theorized to ionize the atmosphere and increase cloud formation and its resultant albedo. High (low) GCR flux may promote cloudiness (clear skies) and higher (lower) albedo at the same time that TSI is lowest (highest) in the solar cycle which in turn creates cooler (warmer) ocean temperature anomalies. These anomalies have been shown to affect atmospheric flow patterns and ultimately affect precipitation over the Midwestern United States. This investigation identified a relation among TSI and geomagnetic index aa (GI-AA), and streamflow in the Mississippi River Basin for the period 1878-2004. The GI-AA was used as a proxy for GCRs. The lag time between the solar signal and streamflow in the Mississippi River at St. Louis, Missouri is approximately 34 years. The current drought (1999-2007) in the Mississippi River Basin appears to be caused by a period of lower solar activity that occurred between 1963 and 1977. There appears to be a solar "fingerprint" that can be detected in climatic time series in other regions of the world, with each series having a unique lag time between the solar signal and the hydroclimatic response. A progression of increasing lag times can be spatially linked to the ocean conveyor belt, which may transport the solar signal over a time span of several decades. The lag times for any one region vary slightly and may be linked to the fluctuations in the velocity of the ocean conveyor belt.

  7. Examining molecular clouds in the Galactic Centre region using X-ray reflection spectra simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, M.; Chernyakova, M.; Terrier, R.; Goldwurm, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the centre of our Galaxy lies a supermassive black hole, identified with the radio source Sagittarius A⋆. This black hole has an estimated mass of around 4 million solar masses. Although Sagittarius A⋆ is quite dim in terms of total radiated energy, having a luminosity that is a factor of 1010 lower than its Eddington luminosity, there is now compelling evidence that this source was far brighter in the past. Evidence derived from the detection of reflected X-ray emission from the giant molecular clouds in the Galactic Centre region. However, the interpretation of the reflected emission spectra cannot be done correctly without detailed modelling of the reflection process. Attempts to do so can lead to an incorrect interpretation of the data. In this paper, we present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation code we developed in order to fully model the complex processes involved in the emerging reflection spectra. The simulated spectra can be compared to real data in order to derive model parameters and constrain the past activity of the black hole. In particular, we apply our code to observations of Sagittarius B2, in order to constrain the position and density of the cloud and the incident luminosity of the central source. The results of the code have been adapted to be used in XSPEC by a large community of astronomers.

  8. The galactic center region gamma ray excess from a supersymmetric leptophilic Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Gardner; Primulando, Reinard

    2011-05-01

    In a recent paper by Hooper and Goodenough, data from the Fermi Gamma Ray Telescope was analyzed and an excess of gamma rays was claimed to be found in the emission spectrum from the Galactic Center Region. Hooper and Goodenough suggest that the claimed excess can be well explained by 7-10 GeV annihilating dark matter with a power law density profile if the dark matter annihilates predominantly to tau pairs. In this paper we present such a dark matter model by extending the MSSM to include four Higgs doublets and one scalar singlet. A {mathbb{Z}_2} symmetry is imposed that enforces a Yukawa structure so that the up quarks, down quarks, and leptons each receive mass from a distinct doublet. This leads to an enhanced coupling of scalars to leptons and allows the model to naturally achieve the required phenomenology in order to explain the gamma ray excess. Our model yields the correct dark matter thermal relic density and avoids collider bounds from measurements of the Z width as well as direct production at LEP.

  9. Echo mapping of active galactic nuclei broad-line regions: Fundamental algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vio, Roberto; Horne, Keith; Wamsteker, Willem

    1994-01-01

    We formulate and test a series of algorithms for echo mapping the emission-line regions near active galactic nuclei from measurements of correlated variability in their line and continuum light curves. The linear regularization method (LRM) employs a direct inversion of evenly spaced light-curve data, with a regularization parameter that can be used to control the trade-off between noise and resolution. Matrix formulas express the formal solution as well as its variance and covariance in terms of uncertainties in the measurements. Unlike the maximum-entropy method (MEM), LRM applies to kernels with both positive and negative values, but the results are somewhat limited by ringing effects. A positivity constraint proves effective in controlling the ringing. MEM combines regularization and positivity in a natural way, but similar results are also found using positivity constraints with nonentropic regularization functions. Direct inversions of unevenly sampled light curves require interpolating the noisy data. In this case better results are found by solving for both the continuum light curve and kernel function in a simultaneous fit to the data. Our conclusion is that while echo mapping currently gives ambiguous results, the algorithms are not the limiting factor. Progress depends on efforts to increase the accuracy and completeness of sampling of the observed light curves.

  10. Physical properties of the broad line region in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilić, Dragana; Popović, Luka Č.; Ciroi, Stefano; La Mura, Giovanni; Rafanelli, Piero

    2010-11-01

    We present here the study of the plasma in the broad line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN). In order to probe the physical properties of the emitting plasma in the BLR we analyze the fluxes of the following broad emission lines (BELs): the hydrogen Balmer lines (Hα to Hɛ) and the helium lines from two subsequent ionization levels (He II λ4686 and He I λ5876). The BELs are obtained from the spectral synthesis photoionization code CLOUDY. We investigate these BELs in order to find conditions in the BLR where so-called Boltzmann-plot (BP) can be applied, and we found that in a number of modeled spectra it is working. We used these spectra to explore the dependence between plasma parameters (e.g. the averaged temperature, hydrogen density, etc.) and the ratio of He II λ4686 and He I λ5876 lines. In this progress report we present our investigation of the emitting plasma in the BLR using the most intensive broad spectral lines in AGN spectra.

  11. Star formation towards the Galactic H II region RCW 120. Herschel observations of compact sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, M.; Zavagno, A.; Deharveng, L.; Russeil, D.; Anderson, L. D.; Men'shchikov, A.; Schneider, N.; Hill, T.; Motte, F.; Mège, P.; LeLeu, G.; Roussel, H.; Bernard, J.-P.; Traficante, A.; Paradis, D.; Tigé, J.; André, P.; Bontemps, S.; Abergel, A.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The expansion of H ii regions can trigger the formation of stars. An overdensity of young stellar objects is observed at the edges of H ii regions but the mechanisms that give rise to this phenomenon are not clearly identified. Moreover, it is difficult to establish a causal link between H ii -region expansion and the star formation observed at the edges of these regions. A clear age gradient observed in the spatial distribution of young sources in the surrounding might be a strong argument in favor of triggering. Aims: We aim to characterize the star formation observed at the edges of H ii regions by studying the properties of young stars that form there. We aim to detect young sources, derive their properties and their evolution stage in order to discuss the possible causal link between the first-generation massive stars that form the H ii region and the young sources observed at their edges. Methods: We have observed the Galactic H ii region RCW 120 with Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometers at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm. We produced temperature and H2 column density maps and use the getsources algorithm to detect compact sources and measure their fluxes at Herschel wavelengths. We have complemented these fluxes with existing infrared data. Fitting their spectral energy distributions with a modified blackbody model, we derived their envelope dust temperature and envelope mass. We computed their bolometric luminosities and discuss their evolutionary stages. Results: The overall temperatures of the region (without background subtraction) range from 15 K to 24 K. The warmest regions are observed towards the ionized gas. The coldest regions are observed outside the ionized gas and follow the emission of the cold material previously detected at 870 μm and 1.3 mm. The H2 column density map reveals the distribution of the cold medium to be organized in filaments and highly structured. Column densities range from 7 × 1021 cm-2 up to 9 × 1023 cm-2

  12. Effects of nuclear cross sections at different energies on the radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Adams, J H

    2007-03-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major obstacle to long-duration human space exploration. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate the radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport calculations. We find that, in deep space, cross sections at energies between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/nucleon have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  13. The Galactic Starburst Region NGC 3603 : exciting new insights on the formation of high mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nürnberger, D. E. A.

    2004-10-01

    powerful stellar winds which evaporate and disperse the surrounding interstellar medium, thus "lifting the courtains" around nearby young stars at a relatively early evolutionary stage. Such premises are given in the Galactic starburst region NGC 3603. Nevertheless, a large observational effort with different telescopes and instruments -- in particular, taking advantage of the high angular resolution and high sensitivity of near and mid IR instruments available at ESO -- was necessary to achieve the goals of my study. After a basic introduction on the topic of (high mass) star formation in Chapter 1, a short overview of the investigated region NGC 3603 and its importance for both galactic and extragalactic star formation studies is given in Chapter 2. Then, in Chapter 3, I report on a comprehensive investigation of the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas and dust associated with the NGC 3603 region. In Chapter 4 I thoroughly address the radial extent of the NGC 3603 OB cluster and the spatial distribution of the cluster members. Together with deep Ks band imaging data, a detailed survey of NGC 3603 at mid IR wavelengths allows to search the neighbourhood of the cold molecular gas and dust for sources with intrinsic mid IR excess (Chapter 5). In Chapter 6 I characterize the most prominent sources of NGC 3603 IRS 9 and show that these sources are bona-fide candidates for high mass protostars. Finally, a concise summary as well as an outlook on future prospects in high mass star formation research is given in Chapter 7.

  14. The Fe II Emission in Active Galactic Nuclei: Excitation Mechanisms and Location of the Emitting Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinello, M.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Garcia-Rissmann, A.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of Fe ii emission in the near-infrared region (NIR) for 25 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to obtain information about the excitation mechanisms that power it and the location where it is formed. We employ an NIR Fe ii template derived in the literature and find that it successfully reproduces the observed Fe ii spectrum. The Fe ii bump at 9200 Å detected in all objects studied confirms that Lyα fluorescence is always present in AGNs. The correlation found between the flux of the 9200 Å bump, the 1 μm lines, and the optical Fe ii implies that Lyα fluorescence plays an important role in Fe ii production. We determined that at least 18% of the optical Fe ii is due to this process, while collisional excitation dominates the production of the observed Fe ii. The line profiles of Fe ii λ10502, O i λ11287, Ca ii λ8664, and Paβ were compared to gather information about the most likely location where they are emitted. We found that Fe ii, O i and Ca ii have similar widths and are, on average, 30% narrower than Paβ. Assuming that the clouds emitting the lines are virialized, we show that the Fe ii is emitted in a region twice as far from the central source than Paβ. The distance, though, strongly varies: from 8.5 light-days for NGC 4051 to 198.2 light-days for Mrk 509. Our results reinforce the importance of the Fe ii in the NIR to constrain critical parameters that drive its physics and the underlying AGN kinematics, as well as more accurate models aimed at reproducing this complex emission.

  15. THE Fe II EMISSION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: EXCITATION MECHANISMS AND LOCATION OF THE EMITTING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Marinello, M.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Garcia-Rissmann, A.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of Fe ii emission in the near-infrared region (NIR) for 25 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to obtain information about the excitation mechanisms that power it and the location where it is formed. We employ an NIR Fe ii template derived in the literature and find that it successfully reproduces the observed Fe ii spectrum. The Fe ii bump at 9200 Å detected in all objects studied confirms that Lyα fluorescence is always present in AGNs. The correlation found between the flux of the 9200 Å bump, the 1 μm lines, and the optical Fe ii implies that Lyα fluorescence plays an important role in Fe ii production. We determined that at least 18% of the optical Fe ii is due to this process, while collisional excitation dominates the production of the observed Fe ii. The line profiles of Fe ii λ10502, O i λ11287, Ca ii λ8664, and Paβ were compared to gather information about the most likely location where they are emitted. We found that Fe ii, O i and Ca ii have similar widths and are, on average, 30% narrower than Paβ. Assuming that the clouds emitting the lines are virialized, we show that the Fe ii is emitted in a region twice as far from the central source than Paβ. The distance, though, strongly varies: from 8.5 light-days for NGC 4051 to 198.2 light-days for Mrk 509. Our results reinforce the importance of the Fe ii in the NIR to constrain critical parameters that drive its physics and the underlying AGN kinematics, as well as more accurate models aimed at reproducing this complex emission.

  16. Physical Properties Of The Broad Line Region In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, D.; Popovic, L.; Ciroi, S.; Mura, G. L.; Rafanelli, P.

    2010-07-01

    One of the most intriguing objects in the Universe are active galactic nuclei (AGN), being the brightest and the most distant objects. The most accepted scenario of the structure of AGN is the one in which AGN are powered by the accretion of matter from the host galaxy on to super-massive black hole. One of the ways to study the inner emitting region of an AGN, one that is closest to the black hole, is by analyzing its broad emission lines (BELs). These lines originate in the broad line region (BLR), which physics is still not fully understood. In order to probe the physical properties of the emitting plasma in the BLR we analyze the ratios of the following BELs: the hydrogen Balmer lines (Ha to He) and the helium lines from two subsequent ionization levels (He II ?4686 and He I ?5876). We used two samples of the BELs, one obtained from the spectral synthesis photoionization code and the other taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database. We investigate the above BELs in order to find conditions in the BLR where so-called Boltzmann-plot (BP) method might be applicable. For these special cases, we found relations between the average temperature, hydrogen density and He II/He I line ratio. We estimated the physical parameters in the BLR, the average temperature and hydrogen density, to be in the range Tav=5700-18700 K and nH=10^8.2 -10^11.1 cm-3. Moreover, we found relations between the BLR physical parameters and gas velocities, indicating that there should be some connection between the physics and kinematics in the BLR.

  17. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on the Radiation Hazard from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Z. W.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays is a major obstacle in long duration human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. We find that, in deep space, cross sections between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/u usually have the largest effect on dose-equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between 0.85 and 1.2 GeV/u have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  18. The Broad-Line Region and Dust Torus Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo Nuñez, Francisco

    2014-06-01

    I present the results from optical and infrared multi-month monitoring campaigns at the Universitätssternwarte Bochum (USB) in Chile to explore the structure of the central engine in active galactic nuclei (AGN). I apply and test photometric reverberation mapping (PRM) for measuring the time delay between variations in the continuum and Hbeta, Halpha emission lines. This time delay is used to infer the size of the broad-line region (BLR) for three Seyfert 1 galaxies. I place the results in context of the known BLR size luminosity relationship from spectroscopic reverberation mapping (SRM) and discuss its potential application to constrain cosmological parameters. The BLR size and the velocity dispersion of the emission line are used to calculate the virial mass of the supermassive black hole (SMBH). Through the direct modelling of PRM data, I infer the geometry type of the BLR allowing the determination of the geometry scaling factor used to constrain the real black hole mass. I find strong evidence for a disk-like BLR geometry. If this result holds for Seyfert galaxies in general, then the determination of the geometry scaling factor and the black hole mass can be remarkably improved. I discuss deviations of Seyfert-1 galaxies from the SMBH-bulge velocity dispersion relation MBH - sigma* for quiescent galaxies. Finally, I perform dust-reverberation mapping to determine the dust-torus size for the Seyfert 1 galaxy WPVS48. The light curves in the optical and near-infrared revealed unexpected variations which allow to solve an old puzzle on the geometry of the dusttorus.

  19. Time-dependent modulation of galactic cosmic rays by merged interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perko, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    Models that solve the one-dimensional, solar modulation equation have reproduced the 11-year galactic cosmic ray using functional representations of global merged interaction regions (MIRs). This study extends those results to the solution of the modulation equation with explicit time dependence. The magnetometers on Voyagers 1 and 2 provide local magnetic field intensities at regular intervals, from which one calculates the ratio of the field intensity to the average local field. These ratios in turn are inverted to form diffusion coefficients. Strung together in radius and time, these coefficents then fall and rise with the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field, becoming representations of MIRs. These diffusion coefficients, calculated locally, propagate unchanged from approx. 10 AU to the outer boundary (120 AU). Inside 10 AU, all parameters, including the diffusion coefficient are assumed constant in time and space. The model reproduces the time-intensity profiles of Voyager 2 and Pioneer 10. Radial gradient data from 1982-1990 between Pioneer 10 and Voyager 2 are about the same magnitude as those calculated in the model. It is also shows agreement in rough magnitude with the radial gradient between Pioneer 10 and 1 AU. When coupled with enhanced, time-dependent solar wind speed at the probe's high latitude, as measured by independent observers, the model also follows Voyager 1's time-intensity profile reasonably well, providing a natural source the model also follows Voyager 1's time-intensity profile reasonably well, providing a natural source for the observed negative latitudinal gradients. The model exhibits the 11-year cyclical cosmic ray intensity behavior at all radii, including 1 AU, not just at the location of the spacecraft where the magnetic fields are measured. In addition, the model's point of cosmic ray maximum correctly travels at the solar wind speed, illustrating the well-known propagation of modulation. Finally, at least in the inner

  20. Nuclear planetology: understanding habitable planets as Galactic bulge stellar remnants (black dwarfs) in a Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, Goetz

    2016-04-01

    model constraining the evolution of a rocky planet like Earth or Mercury from a stellar precursor of the oldest population to a Fe-C BLD, shifting through different spectral classes in a HR diagram after massive decompression and tremendous energy losses. In the light of WD/BLD cosmochronology [1], solar system bodies like Earth, Mercury and Moon are regarded as captured interlopers from the Galactic bulge, Earth and Moon possibly representing remnants of an old binary system. Such a preliminary scenario is supported by similar ages obtained from WD's for the Galactic halo [1] and, independently, by means of 187Re-232Th-238U nuclear geochronometry [2, 4, 5], together with recent observations extremely metal-poor stars from the cosmic dawn in the bulge of the Milky Way [6]. This might be further elucidated in the near future by Th/U cosmochronometry based upon a nuclear production ratio Th/U = 0.96 [5] and additionally by means of a newly developed nucleogeochronometric age dating method for stellar spectroscopy, which will be presented in a forthcoming paper. The model shall stimulate geochemical data interpretation from a different perspective to constrain the (thermal) evolution of a habitable planet as to its geo-, bio-, hydro- and atmosphere. [1] Fontaine et al. (2001), Public. Astron. Soc. of the Pacific 113, 409-435. [2] Roller (2015), Abstract T34B-0407, AGU Spring Meeting 2015. [3] Arevalo et al. (2010), Chem. Geol. 271, 70-85. [4] Roller (2015), Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17, EGU2015-2399. [5] Roller (2015), 78th Annu. Meeting Met. Soc., Abstract #5041. [6] Howes et al. (2015), Nature 527, 484-487.

  1. X-ray filament with a strong 6.7-keV line in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Shigeo; Shimizu, Miku; Nakashima, Shinya; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Koyama, Katsuji

    2014-12-01

    An elongated X-ray source with a strong K-shell line from He-like iron (Fe XXVI) is found at (RA, Dec)J2000.0 = (17h44m00{s.}0, - 29°13'40{^''.}9) in the Galactic center region. The position coincides with the X-ray thread, G359.55+0.16, which is aligned with the radio non-thermal filament. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted with an absorbed thin thermal plasma (apec) model. The best-fitting temperature, metal abundance, and column density are 4.1^{+2.7}_{-1.8} keV, 0.58^{+0.41}_{-0.32} solar, and 6.1^{+2.5}_{-1.3} × 10^{22} cm-2, respectively. These values are similar to those of the largely extended Galactic center X-ray emission.

  2. Does atomic polarizability play a role in hydrogen radio recombination spectra from Galactic H II regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2013-09-01

    Since highly excited atoms, which contribute to the radio recombination spectra from Galactic H II regions, possess large polarizabilities, their lifetimes are influenced by ion (proton)-induced dipole collisions. It is shown that, while these ion-radiator collisional processes, if acting alone, would effectively limit the upper principal quantum number attainable for given plasma parameters, their influence is small relative to that of electron impacts within the framework of line broadening theory. The present work suggests that ion-permanent dipole interactions (Hey et al 2004 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 2543) would also be of minor importance in limiting the occupation of highly excited states. On the other hand, the ion-induced dipole collisions are essential for ensuring equipartition of energy between atomic and electron kinetic distributions (Hey et al 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3555; 2005 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 38 3517), without which Voigt profile analysis to extract impact broadening widths would not be possible. Electron densities deduced from electron impact broadening of individual lines (Griem 1967 Astrophys. J. 148 547; Watson 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889) may be used to check the significance of the constraints arising from the present analysis. The spectra of Bell et al (2000 Publ. Astron. Soc. Pac. 112 1236; 2011 Astrophys. Space Sci. 333 377; 2011 Astrophys. Space Sci. 335 451) for Orion A and W51 in the vicinity of 6.0 and 17.6 GHz are examined in this context, and also in terms of a possible role of the background ion microfield in reducing the near-elastic contributions to the electron impact broadening below the predictions of theory (Hey 2012 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 45 065701). These spectra are analysed, subject to the constraint that calculated relative intensities of lines, arising from upper states in collisional-radiative equilibrium, should be consistent with those obtained from

  3. Spectral classification and distance determination of stars in nine southern Galactic H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, M. C.; Copetti, M. V. F.; Oliveira, V. A.

    2010-10-01

    Aims: We attempt to identify the ionising stars and to determine the photometric distances of nine southern Galactic ion{H}{ii} regions. Methods: We carried out optical spectroscopy and UBV photometry of the stellar content of these objects. The distance of individual stars were obtained by spectroscopic parallax. To avoid using a fixed value for the total-to-selective extinction ratio RV, the reddening AV was determined directly by the colour-difference approach by comparing our V apparent magnitudes and the JHK magnitudes from the 2MASS survey with the intrinsic colour indices. Results: As types O or B, we classified 24 of the 31 stars for which optical spectra were obtained. In particular, we identified two new O stars, one in RCW 98 and the other in RCW 99. The values of reddening obtained correspond to a mean < R_V> = 3.44, which is about 10% higher than the value found for field stars. For three of the ion{H}{ii} regions studied (Bran 186, NGC 2626, and RCW 32), the distance estimates (with errors from 25% to 50%) were based on the data obtained for only one star. For the other six objects (NGC 3503, NGC 6334, RCW 55, RCW 87, RCW 98, and RCW 99), we obtained more precise photometric distances (with a mean error of ≈18%) calculated to be the median of the parallax distances obtained for two to six different stars in each nebulae. The parallax distances of individual stars belonging to a given nebula were similar to each other, with internal errors smaller than 5%, as a consequence of the method used to derive the reddening correction AV. The distance of 1.23 ± 0.30 kpc obtained for RCW 87 disagrees with the value of 7.6 kpc previously found. Conclusions: The dispersion in individual distance estimates for stars in a given nebula can be significantly reduced by calculating the reddening AV from a comparison between the V and the 2MASS JHK magnitudes instead of using AV = RV E(B-V) with a fixed value for RV. Therefore, more precise distances can be calculated

  4. Observational studies on the near-infrared unidentified emission bands in galactic H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Tamami I.; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Bell, Aaron C.; Ishihara, Daisuke; Shimonishi, Takashi

    2014-03-20

    Using a large collection of near-infrared spectra (2.5-5.4 μm) of Galactic H II regions and H II region-like objects, we perform a systematic investigation of astronomical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. Thirty-six objects were observed using the infrared camera on board the AKARI satellite as a part of a director's time program. In addition to the well known 3.3-3.6 μm features, most spectra show a relatively weak emission feature at 5.22 μm with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, which we identify as the PAH 5.25 μm band (previously reported). By careful analysis, we find good correlations between the 5.25 μm band and both the aromatic hydrocarbon feature at 3.3 μm and the aliphatic hydrocarbon features at around 3.4-3.6 μm. The present results give us convincing evidence that the astronomical 5.25 μm band is associated with C-H vibrations, as suggested by previous studies, and show its potential to probe the PAH size distribution. The analysis also shows that the aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio of I {sub 3.4-3.6} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm} decreases against the ratio of the 3.7 μm continuum intensity to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub cont,} {sub 3.7} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}, which is an indicator of the ionization fraction of PAHs. The midinfrared color of I {sub 9} {sub μm}/I {sub 18} {sub μm} also declines steeply against the ratio of the hydrogen recombination line Brα at 4.05 μm to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub Brα}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}. These facts indicate possible dust processing inside or at the boundary of ionized gas.

  5. The stellar content of the nuclear regions of Sc galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnrose, B. E.

    1976-01-01

    Stellar-population syntheses based on absolute spectral energy distributions over the wavelength range from 3300 to 10,400 A are used to determine the stellar content of the nuclear regions of seven nearby Sc galaxies (NGC 628, 1073, 1084, 1637, 2903, 4321, and 5194). A linear-programming procedure is employed to construct models of the overall stellar populations whose spectra closely match those of the seven galaxies. Absolute measurements of the emission-line spectra of the nuclear regions are also provided. It is found that: (1) intrinsic reddening is probably present in each nuclear region; (2) the upper main sequence is substantially populated in most of the models; (3) the lower main sequence contributes insignificantly to the luminosity in all optimal solutions; (4) substantial contributions are made by evolved M stars at long wavelengths in all the models; (5) the model photometric M/L ratios are low, of the order of unity; and (6) the O-B stars arising naturally in the population models are just sufficient to provide the observed nuclear ionization in all the galaxies except NGC 5194, which may be collisionally ionized. The properties of the nuclear regions are shown to be consistent with the existence of a common initial mass function for star formation and a variety of time dependences for the star-formation process. A possibly significant correlation is noted between nuclear stellar content and overall dynamical properties in four of the galaxies.

  6. Nuclear Deterrence in a Regional Context

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    with these questions. The first report’ presents a general re- formulation of deterrence geared toward potential regional adver - saries. The second... adver - saries are willing to take substantial risks because they frequently enter crises out of a desire to avert some loss, e.g., a loss of territory...the specific motivations of the adver - sary, the interests and reputation that affect the resolve of each con- testant (these may change as the

  7. Tables of nuclear cross sections for galactic cosmic rays: Absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A simple but comprehensive theory of nuclear reactions is presented. Extensive tables of nucleon, deuteron, and heavy-ion absorption cross sections over a broad range of energies are generated for use in cosmic ray shielding studies. Numerous comparisons of the calculated values with available experimental data show agreement to within 3 percent for energies above 80 MeV/nucleon and within approximately 10 percent for energies as low as 30 MeV/nucleon. These tables represent the culmination of the development of the absorption cross section formalism and supersede the preliminary absorption cross sections published previously in NASA TN D-8107, NASA TP-2138, and NASA TM-84636.

  8. Tables of nuclear cross sections for galactic cosmic rays: Absorption cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1985-05-01

    A simple but comprehensive theory of nuclear reactions is presented. Extensive tables of nucleon, deuteron, and heavy-ion absorption cross sections over a broad range of energies are generated for use in cosmic ray shielding studies. Numerous comparisons of the calculated values with available experimental data show agreement to within 3 percent for energies above 80 MeV/nucleon and within approximately 10 percent for energies as low as 30 MeV/nucleon. These tables represent the culmination of the development of the absorption cross section formalism and supersede the preliminary absorption cross sections published previously in NASA TN D-8107, NASA TP-2138, and NASA TM-84636.

  9. Voyager 1 observes low-energy galactic cosmic rays in a region depleted of heliospheric ions.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Cummings, A C; McDonald, F B; Heikkila, B C; Lal, N; Webber, W R

    2013-07-12

    On 25 August 2012, Voyager 1 was at 122 astronomical units when the steady intensity of low-energy ions it had observed for the previous 6 years suddenly dropped for a third time and soon completely disappeared as the ions streamed away into interstellar space. Although the magnetic field observations indicate that Voyager 1 remained inside the heliosphere, the intensity of cosmic ray nuclei from outside the heliosphere abruptly increased. We report the spectra of galactic cosmic rays down to ~3 × 10(6) electron volts per nucleon, revealing H and He energy spectra with broad peaks from 10 × 10(6) to 40 × 10(6) electron volts per nucleon and an increasing galactic cosmic-ray electron intensity down to ~10 × 10(6) electron volts.

  10. Consequences of Regional Scale Nuclear Conflicts and Acts of Individual Nuclear Terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    The number of nuclear warheads in the world has fallen by about a factor of three since its peak in 1986. However, the potential exists for numerous regional nuclear arms races, and for a significant expansion in the number of nuclear weapons states. Eight countries are known to have nuclear weapons, 2 are constructing them, and an additional 32 nations already have the fissile material needed to build weapons if they so desire. Population and economic activity worldwide are congregated to an increasing extent in "megacities", which are ideal targets for nuclear weapons. We find that low yield weapons, which new nuclear powers are likely to construct, can produce 100 times as many fatalities and 100 times as much smoke from fires per kt yield as high-yield weapons, if they are targeted at city centers. A single low-yield nuclear detonation in an urban center could lead to more fatalities, in some cases by orders of magnitude, than have occurred in major historical conflicts. A regional war between the smallest current nuclear states involving 100 15-kt explosions (less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal) could produce direct fatalities comparable to all of those worldwide in World War II (WW-II), or to those once estimated for a "counterforce" nuclear war between the superpowers. Portions of megacities attacked with nuclear devices or exposed to fallout of long-lived isotopes, through armed conflict or terrorism, would likely be abandoned indefinitely, with severe national and international implications. Smoke from urban firestorms in a regional war might induce significant climatic and ozone anomalies on global scales. While there are many uncertainties in the issues we discuss here, the major uncertainties are the type and scale of conflict that might occur. Each of these potential hazards deserves careful analysis by governments worldwide advised by a broad section of the world scientific community, as well as widespread

  11. Kinematics of the nuclear region of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, I.; Díaz, R. J.; Dottori, H.; Mediavilla, E.; Agüero, M. P.; Mast, D.

    2006-06-01

    The enormous energy output detected in many cores of galaxies is one of the key issues in the studies of galaxies and their evolution, notwithstanding several questions remain unsolved: Are accretion onto super-massive black holes and violent star formation just coevolving phenomena or necessary partners of the activity? How is the detailed physics of the mechanisms triggering the nuclear extended violent star formation? Which is the relationship of the triggering mechanisms with galaxy evolution? The main drawback to face these issues is that developed stages of large star formation events at galactic centres do not provide enough clues about their origin, since the morphological signatures of the triggering mechanism are smeared out in the time scale of a few orbital revolutions of the galaxy core. Here we present the onset of such an event undergone by M83, a galaxy nearby enough to allow detailed spatial cinematic and morphological studies. High resolution 3D near-IR spectroscopy sugests the capture of a satellite galaxy, whose spur left behind a giant nuclear arc of violent star formation. The age gradient within the arc supports that this structure traces the orbital path of the intruder. Our numerical modelling indicates that the two nuclei would coalesce in less than 50 Myr.

  12. 74 MHz nonthermal emission from molecular clouds: evidence for a cosmic ray dominated region at the galactic center.

    PubMed

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Wardle, M; Lis, D; Viti, S; Brogan, C; Chambers, E; Pound, M; Rickert, M

    2013-10-03

    We present 74 MHz radio continuum observations of the Galactic center region. These measurements show nonthermal radio emission arising from molecular clouds that is unaffected by free–free absorption along the line of sight. We focus on one cloud, G0.13-0.13, representative of the population of molecular clouds that are spatially correlated with steep spectrum (α(327MHz)(74MHz) = 1.3 ± 0.3) nonthermal emission from the Galactic center region. This cloud lies adjacent to the nonthermal radio filaments of the Arc near l 0.2° and is a strong source of 74 MHz continuum, SiO (2-1), and Fe I Kα 6.4 keV line emission. This three-way correlation provides the most compelling evidence yet that relativistic electrons, here traced by 74 MHz emission, are physically associated with the G0.13-0.13 molecular cloud and that low-energy cosmic ray electrons are responsible for the Fe I Kα line emission. The high cosmic ray ionization rate 10(–1)3 s(–1) H(–1) is responsible for heating the molecular gas to high temperatures and allows the disturbed gas to maintain a high-velocity dispersion. Large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling of multitransition SiO observations of this cloud implies H2 densities 10(4–5) cm(–3) and high temperatures. The lower limit to the temperature of G0.13-0.13 is 100 K, whereas the upper limit is as high as 1000 K. Lastly, we used a time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas to investigate for molecular line diagnostics of cosmic ray heating. When the cloud reaches chemical equilibrium, the abundance ratios of HCN/HNC and N2H+/HCO+ are consistent with measured values. In addition, significant abundance of SiO is predicted in the cosmic ray dominated region of the Galactic center. We discuss different possibilities to account for the origin of widespread SiO emission detected from Galactic center molecular clouds.

  13. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. VII. CHARACTERIZING THE PROPERTIES OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Miranda K.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Evans II, Neal J.; Cyganowski, Claudia; Urquhart, James S.

    2011-11-10

    We present the results of a Green Bank Telescope survey of NH{sub 3}(1,1), (2,2), (3,3) lines toward 631 Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) sources at a range of Galactic longitudes in the inner Galaxy. We have detected the NH{sub 3}(1,1) line toward 72% of our targets (456), demonstrating that the high column density features identified in the BGPS and other continuum surveys accurately predict the presence of dense gas. We have determined kinematic distances and resolved the distance ambiguity for all BGPS sources detected in NH{sub 3}. The BGPS sources trace the locations of the Scutum and Sagittarius spiral arms, with the number of sources. We measure the physical properties of each source and find that depending on the distance, BGPS sources are primarily clumps, with some cores and clouds. We have examined the physical properties as a function of Galactocentric distance, and find a mean gas kinetic temperature of 15.6 K, and that the NH{sub 3} column density and abundance decrease by nearly an order of magnitude. Comparing sources at similar distances demonstrates that the physical properties are indistinguishable, which suggests a similarity in clump structure across the Galactic disk. We have also compared the BGPS sources to criteria for efficient star formation presented independently by Heiderman et al. and Lada et al., and for massive star formation presented by Kauffmann et al. Forty-eight percent of our sample should be forming stars (including massive stars) with high efficiency, and 87% contain subregions that should be efficiently forming stars. Indeed, we find that 67% of the sample exhibit signs of star formation activity based on an association with a mid-infrared source.

  14. Magnetically elevated accretion discs in active galactic nuclei: broad emission-line regions and associated star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Silk, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    We propose that the accretion discs fueling active galactic nuclei (AGN) are supported vertically against gravity by a strong toroidal (φ-direction) magnetic field that develops naturally as the result of an accretion disc dynamo. The magnetic pressure elevates most of the gas carrying the accretion flow at R to large heights z ≳ 0.1R and low densities, while leaving a thin dense layer containing most of the mass - but contributing very little accretion - around the equator. We show that such a disc model leads naturally to the formation of a broad emission-line region through thermal instability. Extrapolating to larger radii, we demonstrate that local gravitational instability and associated star formation are strongly suppressed compared to standard disc models for AGN, although star formation in the equatorial zone is predicted for sufficiently high mass supply rates. This new class of accretion disc models thus appears capable of resolving two longstanding puzzles in the theory of AGN fueling: the formation of broad emission-line regions and the suppression of fragmentation thought to inhibit accretion at the required rates. We show that the disc of stars that formed in the Galactic Center a few million years ago could have resulted from an episode of magnetically elevated accretion at ≳ 0.1 of the Eddington limit.

  15. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems Regional Studies: West Texas & Northeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Humberto E.; Chen, Jun; Kim, Jong Suk; McKellar, Michael George; Deason, Wesley R; Richard B. Vilim; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Boardman, Richard D.

    2015-04-01

    The primary objective of this study is to conduct a preliminary dynamic analysis of two realistic hybrid energy systems (HES) including a nuclear reactor as the main baseload heat generator (denoted as nuclear HES or nuclear hybrid energy systems [[NHES]) and to assess the local (e.g., HES owners) and system (e.g., the electric grid) benefits attainable by the application of NHES in scenarios with multiple commodity production and high penetration of renewable energy. It is performed for regional cases not generic examples based on available resources, existing infrastructure, and markets within the selected regions. This study also briefly addresses the computational capabilities developed to conduct such analyses, reviews technical gaps, and suggests some research paths forward.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: G5 and later stars in a North Galactic Pole region (Upgren 1962)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upgren, A. R., Jr.

    2015-11-01

    The catalog is an objective-prism survey of late-type stars in a region of 396 square degrees surrounding the north galactic pole. The objective-prism spectra employed have a dispersion of 58 nm/mm at H-γ and extend into the ultraviolet region. The catalog contains the magnitudes and spectral classes of 4027 stars of class G5 and later, complete to a limiting photographic magnitude of 13.0. The spectral classification of the stars is based on the Yerkes system. The catalog includes the serial numbers of the stars corresponding to the numbers on the identification charts in Upgren (1984), BD and HD numbers, B magnitudes, spectral classes, and letters designating the subregion and identification chart on which each star is located. This survey was undertaken to determine the space densities at varying distances from the galactic plane. Accurate separation of the surveyed stars of G5 and later into giants and dwarfs was achieved through the use of the UV region as well as conventional methods of classification. The resulting catalog of 4027 stars is probably complete over the region to a limiting photographic magnitude of 13.0. The region covered by the survey is the same as that discussed by Slettebak and Stock (1959) and is in the approximate range RA 11:30 to 13:00, Declination +25 to +50 (B1950.0). The catalog includes all M and Carbon stars previously published by Upgren (1960). For a discussion of the classification criteria, the combining of multiple classifications (each spectral image was classified twice), the determination of magnitudes, and additional details about the catalog, the source reference should be consulted. Corrections, accurate positions, more identifications, and remarks have been added in Nov. 2015 by B. Skiff in the file "positions.dat"; see the "History" section below for details. (3 data files).

  17. Galaxy gas as obscurer - II. Separating the galaxy-scale and nuclear obscurers of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Johannes; Bauer, Franz E.

    2017-03-01

    The 'torus' obscurer of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is poorly understood in terms of its density, sub-structure and physical mechanisms. Large X-ray surveys provide model boundary constraints, for both Compton-thin and Compton-thick levels of obscuration, as obscured fractions are mean covering factors fcov. However, a major remaining uncertainty is host-galaxy obscuration. In Paper I, we discovered a relation of {NH} ∝ M_{star }^{1/3} for the obscuration of galaxy-scale gas. Here, we apply this observational relation to the AGN population, and find that galaxy-scale gas is responsible for a luminosity-independent fraction of Compton-thin AGN, but does not produce Compton-thick columns. With the host-galaxy obscuration understood, we present a model of the remaining nuclear obscurer, which is consistent with a range of observations. Our radiation-lifted torus model consists of a Compton-thick component (fcov ∼ 35 per cent) and a Compton-thin component (fcov ∼ 40 per cent), which depends on both black hole mass and luminosity. This provides a useful summary of observational constraints for torus modellers who attempt to reproduce this behaviour. It can also be employed as a sub-grid recipe in cosmological simulations that do not resolve the torus. We also investigate host-galaxy X-ray obscuration inside cosmological, hydrodynamic simulations (Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment; Illustris). The obscuration from ray-traced galaxy gas can agree with observations, but is highly sensitive to the chosen feedback assumptions.

  18. Regional and temporal variability of solar activity and galactic cosmic ray effects on the lower atmosphere circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veretenenko, S.; Ogurtsov, M.

    2012-02-01

    In this work we studied the spatial and temporal structure of long-term effects of solar activity (SA) and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) variations on the lower atmosphere circulation as well as possible reasons for the peculiarities of this structure. The study revealed a strong latitudinal and regional dependence of SA/GCR effects on pressure variations in the lower troposphere which seems to be determined by specific features of baric systems formed in different regions. The temporal structure of SA/GCR effects on the troposphere circulation at high and middle latitudes is characterized by a roughly 60-year periodicity which is apparently due to the epochs of the large-scale atmospheric circulation. It is suggested that a possible mechanism of long-term effects of solar activity and cosmic ray variations on the troposphere circulation involves changes in the evolution of the polar vortex in the stratosphere of high latitudes, as well as planetary frontal zones.

  19. The Sins/zC-Sinf Survey of z ~ 2 Galaxy Kinematics: Evidence for Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus-Driven Nuclear Outflows in Massive Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Newman, S. F.; Kurk, J. D.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Burkert, A.; Buschkamp, P.; Carollo, C. M.; Cresci, G.; Daddi, E.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Lang, P.; Lilly, S. J.; Mainieri, V.; Mancini, C.; Naab, T.; Peng, Y.; Renzini, A.; Rosario, D.; Shapiro Griffin, K.; Shapley, A. E.; Sternberg, A.; Tacchella, S.; Vergani, D.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, E.; Zamorani, G.

    2014-05-01

    We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (>=1011 M ⊙) z ~ 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics-assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Hα and forbidden [N II] and [S II] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ~ 1500 km s-1, [N II]/Hα ratio ≈ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2-3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ~60 M ⊙ yr-1 and mass loading of ~3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ~485 km s-1 and [N II]/Hα ≈ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest that the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial in confirming the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO program IDs 074.A-0911, 075.A-0466, 076.A-0527, 078.A-0600, 082.A-0396, 183.A-0781, 088.A-0202, 091.A-0126). Also based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  20. Atmospheric effects and societal consequences of regional scale nuclear conflicts and acts of individual nuclear terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2007-04-01

    We assess the potential damage and smoke production associated with the detonation of small nuclear weapons in modern megacities. While the number of nuclear warheads in the world has fallen by about a factor of three since its peak in 1986, the number of nuclear weapons states is increasing and the potential exists for numerous regional nuclear arms races. Eight countries are known to have nuclear weapons, 2 are constructing them, and an additional 32 nations already have the fissile material needed to build substantial arsenals of low-yield (Hiroshima-sized) explosives. Population and economic activity worldwide are congregated to an increasing extent in megacities, which might be targeted in a nuclear conflict. We find that low yield weapons, which new nuclear powers are likely to construct, can produce 100 times as many fatalities and 100 times as much smoke from fires per kt yield as previously estimated in analyses for full scale nuclear wars using high-yield weapons, if the small weapons are targeted at city centers. A single "small" nuclear detonation in an urban center could lead to more fatalities, in some cases by orders of magnitude, than have occurred in the major historical conflicts of many countries. We analyze the likely outcome of a regional nuclear exchange involving 100 15-kt explosions (less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal). We find that such an exchange could produce direct fatalities comparable to all of those worldwide in World War II, or to those once estimated for a "counterforce" nuclear war between the superpowers. Megacities exposed to atmospheric fallout of long-lived radionuclides would likely be abandoned indefinitely, with severe national and international implications. Our analysis shows that smoke from urban firestorms in a regional war would rise into the upper troposphere due to pyro-convection. Robock et al. (2007) show that the smoke would subsequently rise deep into the stratosphere due

  1. Heating of H II regions with application to the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip R.; Hollenbach, David J.; Townes, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    The heating and thermal equilibrium of photoionized gas is reviewed. Photon-heating mechanisms (UV photoionization heating, grain photoelectric heating, and X-ray heating) either fail to provide the required heating rates or else require that the ionization state of the gas is very high. Specific application to the Galactic center observations show that the total heating power required to maintain the gas at the derived temperatures, using the observed emission measure in the bar and the temperature distribution derived from the radio recombination lines, is about 7 x 10 exp 6 solar luminosities, comparable to the bolometric luminosity of the central source as measured by the FIR flux from grains. Thus, the cooling emission from this hot gas, if LTE-derived temperatures are correct, would supply a major fraction of the bolometric and ionizing luminosity inferred from the ionized gas in the central 1 pc cavity and the dust and neutral gas in the surrounding torus.

  2. The Power Source(s) of Nearby Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Mallory; Eracleous, Michael; Maoz, Dan; Barth, Aaron J.; Walsh, Jonelle; Ho, Luis C.; Shields, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of low-ionization nuclear emission regions (LINERs) harbor supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with very low accretion rates. Since SMBHs spend most of their lifetimes in these low-accretion rate states, understanding LINERs is important for understanding active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the context of galaxy evolution. On scales of ~100 pc, the energy budget of LINERs appears to be deficient when the only source of power considered is the AGN. Thus, other energy sources are likely to contribute to the excitation of the emission-line gas. To probe these sources, we observed three nearby, bright LINERs, NGC 1052, NGC 4278 and NGC 4579, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We specifically looked at the 0.1-1 arcsecond (corresponding to 5-50 pc) scale to find what and how far from the nucleus these other energy sources are. After subtracting both the unresolved nuclear light and the spatially-extended starlight, we measured a number of diagnostic emission line ratios. We find that line ratios, such as [O III]/[O II] and [O III]/H-beta change as a function of distance from the nucleus. Within 5 pc, the line ratios suggest AGN photoionization. At larger distances the line ratios seem to be inconsistent with AGN photoionization, but they appear to be consistent with excitation by hot stars or shocks.

  3. Climatic Consequences and Agricultural Impact of Regional Nuclear Conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan; Mills, Michael; Toon, Owen Brian; Xia, Lili

    2013-04-01

    A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with each country using 50 Hiroshima-sized atom bombs as airbursts on urban areas, would inject smoke from the resulting fires into the stratosphere. This could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history and global-scale ozone depletion, with enhanced ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the surface. Simulations with the NCAR Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), run at higher vertical and horizontal resolution than a previous simulation with the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE, and incorporating ozone chemistry for the first time, show a longer stratospheric residence time for smoke and hence a longer-lasting climate response, with global average surface air temperatures still 1.1 K below normal and global average precipitation 4% below normal after a decade. The erythemal dose from the enhanced UV radiation would greatly increase, in spite of enhanced absorption by the remaining smoke, with the UV index more than 3 units higher in the summer midlatitudes, even after a decade. Scenarios of changes in temperature, precipitation, and downward shortwave radiation from the ModelE and WACCM simulations, applied to the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer crop model for winter wheat, rice, soybeans, and maize by perturbing observed time series with anomalies from the regional nuclear war simulations, produce decreases of 10-50% in yield averaged over a decade, with larger decreases in the first several years, over several regions in the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The impact of the nuclear war simulated here, using much less than 1% of the global nuclear arsenal, would be devastating to world agricultural production and trade, possibly sentencing a billion people now living marginal existences to starvation. The continued environmental threat of the use of even a small number of nuclear weapons must be considered in nuclear policy deliberations in Russia

  4. COEXISTENCE OF GRAVITATIONALLY-BOUND AND RADIATION-DRIVEN C IV EMISSION LINE REGIONS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyuan; Wang Tinggui; Zhou Hongyan; Liu Bo; Dong Xiaobo; Wang Jianguo

    2011-09-01

    There are mutually contradictory views in the literature of the kinematics and structure of high-ionization line (e.g., C IV) emitting regions in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two kinds of broad emission line region (BELR) models have been proposed, outflow and gravitationally-bound BELR, which are supported, respectively, by blueshift of the C IV line and reverberation mapping observations. To reconcile these two apparently different models, we present a detailed comparison study between the C IV and Mg II lines using a sample of AGNs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the kinematics of the C IV region is different from that of Mg II, which is thought to be controlled by gravity. A strong correlation is found between the blueshift and asymmetry of the C IV profile and the Eddington ratio. This provides strong observational support for the postulation that the outflow is driven by radiation pressure. In particular, we find robust evidence that the C IV line region is largely dominated by outflow at high Eddington ratios, while it is primarily gravitationally-bounded at low Eddington ratios. Our results indicate that these two emitting regions coexist in most AGNs. The emission strength from these two gases varies smoothly with Eddington ratio in opposite ways. This explanation naturally reconciles the apparently contradictory views proposed in previous studies. Finally, candidate models are discussed which can account for both the enhancement of outflow emission and suppression of normal BEL in AGNs with high Eddington ratios.

  5. Decadal reduction of Chinese agriculture after a regional nuclear war

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lili; Robock, Alan; Mills, Michael; Stenke, Andrea; Helfand, Ira

    2015-02-01

    A regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan could decrease global surface temperature by 1°C-2°C for 5-10 years and have major impacts on precipitation and solar radiation reaching Earth's surface. Using a crop simulation model forced by three global climate model simulations, we investigate the impacts on agricultural production in China, the largest grain producer in the world. In the first year after the regional nuclear war, a cooler, drier, and darker environment would reduce annual rice production by 30 megaton (Mt) (29%), maize production by 36 Mt (20%), and wheat production by 23 Mt (53%). With different agriculture management—no irrigation, auto irrigation, 200 kg/ha nitrogen fertilizer, and 10 days delayed planting date—simulated national crop production reduces 16%-26% for rice, 9%-20% for maize, and 32%-43% for wheat during 5 years after the nuclear war event. This reduction of food availability would continue, with gradually decreasing amplitude, for more than a decade. Assuming these impacts are indicative of those in other major grain producers, a nuclear war using much less than 1% of the current global arsenal could produce a global food crisis and put a billion people at risk of famine.

  6. Atmospheric effects and societal consequences of regional scale nuclear conflicts and acts of individual nuclear terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2006-11-01

    We assess the potential damage and smoke production associated with the detonation of small nuclear weapons in modern megacities. While the number of nuclear warheads in the world has fallen by about a factor of three since its peak in 1986, the number of nuclear weapons states is increasing and the potential exists for numerous regional nuclear arms races. Eight countries are known to have nuclear weapons, 2 are constructing them, and an additional 32 nations already have the fissile material needed to build substantial arsenals of low-yield (Hiroshima-sized) explosives. Population and economic activity worldwide are congregated to an increasing extent in megacities, which might be targeted in a nuclear conflict. Our analysis shows that, per kiloton of yield, low yield weapons can produce 100 times as many fatalities and 100 times as much smoke from fires as high-yield weapons, if they are targeted at city centers. A single "small'' nuclear detonation in an urban center could lead to more fatalities, in some cases by orders of magnitude, than have occurred in the major historical conflicts of many countries. We analyze the likely outcome of a regional nuclear exchange involving 100 15-kt explosions (less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal). We find that such an exchange could produce direct fatalities comparable to all of those worldwide in World War II, or to those once estimated for a "counterforce'' nuclear war between the superpowers. Megacities exposed to atmospheric fallout of long-lived radionuclides would likely be abandoned indefinitely, with severe national and international implications. Our analysis shows that smoke from urban firestorms in a regional war would rise into the upper troposphere due to pyro-convection. Robock et al. (2006) show that the smoke would subsequently rise deep into the stratosphere due to atmospheric heating, and then might induce significant climatic anomalies on global scales.We also

  7. The 6-GHz methanol multibeam maser catalogue - IV. Galactic longitudes 186°-330° including the Orion-Monoceros region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Avison, A.; Breen, S. L.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    We present the fourth portion of a Galactic plane survey of methanol masers at 6668 MHz, spanning the longitude range 186°-330°. We report 207 maser detections, 89 new to the survey. This completes the southern sky part of the methanol multibeam survey and includes a large proportion of new sources, 43 per cent. We also include results from blind observations of the Orion-Monoceros star-forming region, formally outside the latitude range of the methanol multibeam survey; only the four previously known methanol emitting sites were detected, of which we present new positions and spectra for masers at Orion A (south) and Orion B, obtained with the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) array.

  8. Ice Mapping Observations in Galactic Star-Forming Regions: the AKARI Legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Helen Jane; Suutarinnen, Aleksi; Noble, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that explaining the small-scale distribution of many gas-phase molecules relies on our interpretation of the complex inter-connectivity between gas- and solid-phase interstellar chemistries. Inputs to proto-stellar astrochemical models are required that exploit ice compositions reflecting the historical physical conditions in pre-stellar environments when the ices first formed. Such data are required to translate the near-universe picture of ice-composition to our understanding of the role of extra-galactic ices in star-formation at higher redshifts.Here we present the first attempts at multi-object ice detections, and the subsequent ice column density mapping. The AKARI space telescope was uniquely capable of observing all the ice features between 2 and 5 microns, thereby detecting H2O, CO and CO2 ices concurrently, through their stretching vibrational features. Our group has successfully extracted an unprecedented volume of ice spectra from AKARI, including sources with not more than 2 mJy flux at 3 microns, showing:(a) H2O CO and CO2 ices on 30 lines of sight towards pre-stellar and star-forming cores, which when combined with laboratory experiments indicate how the chemistries of these three ices are interlinked (Noble et al (2013)),(b) ice maps showing the spatial distribution of water ice across 12 pre-stellar cores, in different molecular clouds (Suutarinnen et al (2015)), and the distribution of ice components within these cores on 1000 AU scales (Noble et al (2015)),(c) over 200 new detections of water ice, mostly on lines of sight towards background sources (> 145), indicating that water ice column density has a minimum value as a function of Av, but on a cloud-by-cloud basis typically correlates with Av, and dust emissivity at 250 microns (Suutarinnen et al (2015)),(d) the first detections of HDO ice towards background stars (Fraser et al (2015)).We discuss whether these results support the picture of a generic chemical

  9. THE OFF-CENTERED SEYFERT-LIKE COMPACT EMISSION IN THE NUCLEAR REGION OF NGC 3621

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Silva, Patricia da

    2016-02-01

    We analyze an optical data cube of the nuclear region of NGC 3621, taken with the integral field unit of the Gemini Multi-object Spectrograph. We found that the previously detected central line emission in this galaxy actually comes from a blob, located at a projected distance of 2.″14 ± 0.″08 (70.1 ± 2.6 pc) from the stellar nucleus. Only diffuse emission was detected in the rest of the field of view, with a deficit of emission at the position of the stellar nucleus. Diagnostic diagram analysis reveals that the off-centered emitting blob has a Seyfert 2 spectrum. We propose that the line-emitting blob may be a “fossil” emission-line region or a light “echo” from an active galactic nucleus (AGN), which was significantly brighter in the past. Our estimates indicate that the bolometric luminosity of the AGN must have decreased by a factor of ∼13–500 during the past ∼230 yr. A second scenario to explain the morphology of the line-emitting areas in the nuclear region of NGC 3621 involves no decrease of the AGN bolometric luminosity and establishes that the AGN is highly obscured toward the observer but not toward the line-emitting blob. The third scenario proposed here assumes that the off-centered line-emitting blob is a recoiling supermassive black hole, after the coalescence of two black holes. Finally, an additional hypothesis is that the central X-ray source is not an AGN, but an X-ray binary. This idea is consistent with all the scenarios we proposed.

  10. Climatic Consequences and Agricultural Impact of Regional Nuclear Conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, O. B.; Robock, A.; Mills, M. J.; Xia, L.

    2013-05-01

    A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with each country using 50 Hiroshima-sized atom bombs as airbursts on urban areas, would inject smoke from the resulting fires into the stratosphere.This could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history and global-scale ozone depletion, with enhanced ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the surface.Simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), run at higher vertical and horizontal resolution than a previous simulation with the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE, and incorporating ozone chemistry for the first time, show a longer stratospheric residence time for smoke and hence a longer-lasting climate response, with global average surface air temperatures still 1.1 K below normal and global average precipitation 4% below normal after a decade.The erythemal dose from the enhanced UV radiation would greatly increase, in spite of enhanced absorption by the remaining smoke, with the UV index more than 3 units higher in the summer midlatitudes, even after a decade. Scenarios of changes in temperature, precipitation, and downward shortwave radiation from the ModelE and WACCM simulations, applied to the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer crop model for winter wheat, rice, soybeans, and maize by perturbing observed time series with anomalies from the regional nuclear war simulations, produce decreases of 10-50% in yield averaged over a decade, with larger decreases in the first several years, over the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The impact of the nuclear war simulated here, using much less than 1% of the global nuclear arsenal, would be devastating to world agricultural production and trade, possibly sentencing a billion people now living marginal existences to starvation.The continued environmental threat of the use of even a small number of nuclear weapons must be considered in nuclear policy deliberations in Russia, the U.S., and the rest of

  11. Optical spectrophotometry of the nuclear region of M51. II - Further evidence for nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J. A.; Cecil, G.

    1983-03-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of the spiral galaxy M51 conducted by Rose and Searle (1982) have revealed that the ionized gas within the central region exhibits a peculiar emission-line spectrum and is undergoing large chaotic motions. These phenomena appear to result from low-level nuclear activity qualitatively similar to that seen in Seyfert galaxy nuclei and QSOs. It has been proposed that the gas is photoionized by a central nonstellar ultraviolet continuum. The present study is concerned with a further investigation of the ionization source in the nuclear region of M51, taking into account high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with an intensified Reticon detector on the 2.24 m telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatory. It is found that photoionization by a central nonstellar ionizing continuum source provides the most consistent explanation for the observed anomalous emission-line spectrum.

  12. Cosmic rays and the emission line regions of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects that the synchrotron emitting relativistic electrons could have on the emission line regions which characterize active nuclei are discussed. Detailed models of both the inner, dense, broad line region and the outer, lower density, narrow line region are presented, together with the first models of the optically emitting gas often found within extended radio lobes. If the relativistic gas which produces the synchrotron radio emission is mixed with the emission line region gas then significant changes in the emission line spectrum will result. The effects of the synchrotron emitting electrons on filaments in the Crab Nebula are discussed in an appendix, along with a comparison between the experimental calculations, which employ the mean escape probability formalism, and recent Hubbard and Puetter models.

  13. GALACTIC ALL-SKY SURVEY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE REGION OF THE MAGELLANIC LEADING ARM

    SciTech Connect

    For, Bi-Qing; Staveley-Smith, Lister; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2013-02-10

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (H I) observations from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 419. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is discussed in the context of Magellanic System simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. We also discuss a newly identified population of clouds that forms the LA IV and a new diffuse bridge-like feature connecting the LA II and III complexes.

  14. A Rapidly Evolving Region in the Galactic Center: Why S-stars Thermalize and More Massive Stars are Missing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Amaro-Seoane, Pau

    2014-05-01

    The existence of "S-stars" within a distance of 1'' from Sgr A* contradicts our understanding of star formation, due to Sgr A* 's forbiddingly violent environment. A suggested possibility is that they form far away and were brought in by some fast dynamical process, since they are young. Nonetheless, all conjectured mechanisms either fail to reproduce their eccentricities—without violating their young age—or cannot explain the problem of "inverse mass segregation": the fact that lighter stars (the S-stars) are closer to Sgr A* and more massive ones, Wolf-Rayet (WR) and O-stars, are farther out. In this Letter we propose that the mechanism responsible for both the distribution of the eccentricities and the paucity of massive stars is the Kozai-Lidov-like resonance induced by a sub-parsec disk recently discovered in the Galactic center. Considering that the disk probably extended to a smaller radius in the past, we show that in as short as (a few) 106 yr, the stars populating the innermost 1'' region would redistribute in angular-momentum space and recover the observed "super-thermal" distribution. Meanwhile, WR and O-stars in the same region intermittently attain ample eccentricities that will lead to their tidal disruptions by the central massive black hole. Our results provide new evidences that Sgr A* was powered several millions years ago by an accretion disk as well as by tidal stellar disruptions.

  15. A RAPIDLY EVOLVING REGION IN THE GALACTIC CENTER: WHY S-STARS THERMALIZE AND MORE MASSIVE STARS ARE MISSING

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xian; Amaro-Seoane, Pau E-mail: Pau.Amaro-Seoane@aei.mpg.de

    2014-05-10

    The existence of ''S-stars'' within a distance of 1'' from Sgr A* contradicts our understanding of star formation, due to Sgr A* 's forbiddingly violent environment. A suggested possibility is that they form far away and were brought in by some fast dynamical process, since they are young. Nonetheless, all conjectured mechanisms either fail to reproduce their eccentricities—without violating their young age—or cannot explain the problem of {sup i}nverse mass segregation{sup :} the fact that lighter stars (the S-stars) are closer to Sgr A* and more massive ones, Wolf-Rayet (WR) and O-stars, are farther out. In this Letter we propose that the mechanism responsible for both the distribution of the eccentricities and the paucity of massive stars is the Kozai-Lidov-like resonance induced by a sub-parsec disk recently discovered in the Galactic center. Considering that the disk probably extended to a smaller radius in the past, we show that in as short as (a few) 10{sup 6} yr, the stars populating the innermost 1'' region would redistribute in angular-momentum space and recover the observed ''super-thermal'' distribution. Meanwhile, WR and O-stars in the same region intermittently attain ample eccentricities that will lead to their tidal disruptions by the central massive black hole. Our results provide new evidences that Sgr A* was powered several millions years ago by an accretion disk as well as by tidal stellar disruptions.

  16. Galactic cosmic rays and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiener, Juergen

    2010-03-01

    The nucleosynthesis of the light elements Li, Be and B by galactic cosmic rays is presented. Observations of cosmic rays and the nuclear reactions responsible for Li, Be and B nucleosynthesis are described, followed by some words on propagation. At the end, some open questions concerning galactic cosmic rays are discussed.

  17. Effects of interplanetary magnetic clouds, interaction regions, and high-speed streams on the transient modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Y. P.; Badruddin

    2007-02-01

    Interplanetary manifestations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with specific plasma and field properties, called ``interplanetary magnetic clouds,'' have been observed in the heliosphere since the mid-1960s. Depending on their associated features, a set of observed magnetic clouds identified at 1 AU were grouped in four different classes using data over 4 decades: (1) interplanetary magnetic clouds moving with the ambient solar wind (MC structure), (2) magnetic clouds moving faster than the ambient solar wind and forming a shock/sheath structure of compressed plasma and field ahead of it (SMC structure), (3) magnetic clouds ``pushed'' by the high-speed streams from behind, forming an interaction region between the two (MIH structure), and (4) shock-associated magnetic clouds followed by high-speed streams (SMH structure). This classification into different groups led us to study the role, effect, and the relative importance of (1) closed field magnetic cloud structure with low field variance, (2) interplanetary shock and magnetically turbulent sheath region, (3) interaction region with large field variance, and (4) the high-speed solar wind stream coming from the open field regions, in modulating the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). MC structures are responsible for transient decrease with fast recovery. SMC structures are responsible for fast decrease and slow recovery, MIH structures produce depression with slow decrease and slow recovery, and SMH structures are responsible for fast decrease with very slow recovery. Simultaneous variations of GCR intensity, solar plasma velocity, interplanetary magnetic field strength, and its variance led us to study the relative effectiveness of different structures as well as interplanetary plasma/field parameters. Possible role of the magnetic field, its topology, field turbulence, and the high-speed streams in influencing the amplitude and time profile of resulting decreases in GCR intensity have also been discussed.

  18. Massive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict.

    PubMed

    Mills, Michael J; Toon, Owen B; Turco, Richard P; Kinnison, Douglas E; Garcia, Rolando R

    2008-04-08

    We use a chemistry-climate model and new estimates of smoke produced by fires in contemporary cities to calculate the impact on stratospheric ozone of a regional nuclear war between developing nuclear states involving 100 Hiroshima-size bombs exploded in cities in the northern subtropics. We find column ozone losses in excess of 20% globally, 25-45% at midlatitudes, and 50-70% at northern high latitudes persisting for 5 years, with substantial losses continuing for 5 additional years. Column ozone amounts remain near or <220 Dobson units at all latitudes even after three years, constituting an extratropical "ozone hole." The resulting increases in UV radiation could impact the biota significantly, including serious consequences for human health. The primary cause for the dramatic and persistent ozone depletion is heating of the stratosphere by smoke, which strongly absorbs solar radiation. The smoke-laden air rises to the upper stratosphere, where removal mechanisms are slow, so that much of the stratosphere is ultimately heated by the localized smoke injections. Higher stratospheric temperatures accelerate catalytic reaction cycles, particularly those of odd-nitrogen, which destroy ozone. In addition, the strong convection created by rising smoke plumes alters the stratospheric circulation, redistributing ozone and the sources of ozone-depleting gases, including N(2)O and chlorofluorocarbons. The ozone losses predicted here are significantly greater than previous "nuclear winter/UV spring" calculations, which did not adequately represent stratospheric plume rise. Our results point to previously unrecognized mechanisms for stratospheric ozone depletion.

  19. Shocks and angular momentum flips: a different path to feeding the nuclear regions of merging galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelo, Pedro R.; Dotti, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    We study the dynamics of galaxy mergers, with emphasis on the gas feeding of nuclear regions, using a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy encounters. The high spatial and temporal resolution of the simulations allows us to not only recover the standard picture of tidal-torque-induced inflows, but also to detail another, important feeding path produced by ram pressure. The induced shocks effectively decouple the dynamics of the gas from that of the stars, greatly enhancing the loss of gas angular momentum and leading to increased central inflows. The ram-pressure shocks also cause, in many cases, the entire galactic gas disc of the smaller galaxy to abruptly change its direction of rotation, causing a complete 'flip' and, several 108 yr later, a subsequent 'counter-flip'. This phenomenon results in the existence of long-lived decoupled gas-stellar and stellar-stellar discs, which could hint at a new explanation for the origin of some of the observed kinematically decoupled cores/counter-rotating discs. Lastly, we speculate, in the case of non-coplanar mergers, on the possible existence of a new class of remnant systems similar to some of the observed X-shaped radio galaxies.

  20. A Survey of the Galactic Center Region in HCO+, H13CO+, and SiO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-07

    consequence of cloud-cloud collisions, interactions with supernova remnants, Page 15 of 180 A&A 523, A45 (2010) Table 4. Velocity components of each region...to the 50 km s−1 cloud, and a condensation close to Sgr A*) to the inter- action of the molecular clouds with nearby supernova remnants. Their SiO

  1. Ring currents and poloidal magnetic fields in nuclear regions of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesch, H.; Crusius, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Wielebinski, R.

    1989-06-01

    The origin of observed strong poloidal magnetic fields R(z) in the central regions of galaxies which have gaseous rings is discussed. In the context of galactic disk dynamo models only weak poloidal fields but strong toroidal fields result. The strength of the poloidal fields is tied to the central activity and apply known and tested ideas rigorously. A battery process on galactic scales is discussed which ensures the existence of a large-scale magnetic field in the inner galactic region. The frozen-in field may be amplified by v x B compression and turbulent stretching; the resulting field is poloidal. The central activity provides a flow field which can produce B(z) equal to or greater than B(phi).

  2. Sgr A* as Source of the Positrons Observed in the Galactic Center Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Pierre; Guessoum, Nidhal; Ferrière, Katia

    2017-01-01

    We explore the possibility that a substantial fraction of the positrons observed to annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy come from the supermassive black hole Sgr A* that lies at the center. This idea was proposed by several authors, but the propagation of the emitted positrons into the bulge and beyond remained a serious problem for models of the origin of GC positrons. We assume models of positron production with different energies. The propagation of positrons from their production site is followed in detail with Monte-Carlo simulations, taking into account the physical conditions of the propagation regions as well as various physical interactions. Using the known physics of positron annihilation in astrophysical environments, we calculate the properties of the annihilation emission (time evolution and spatial distribution) for the different models under consideration. We present the results of these simulations and the conclusions/constraints that can be inferred from them.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio observations of Galactic WISE HII regions (Anderson+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Wenger, T. V.; Cunningham, V.

    2016-01-01

    We draw our targets from the MIR objects in the WISE catalog of Anderson+, 2014, J/ApJS/212/1. We also include in our sample Sharpless H II regions (Sharpless 1959, VII/20). See section 2 for further details. Our observations were made with the GBT 100m telescope from 2012 July through 2014 August. There are seven radio recombination lines (RRLs) that can be cleanly observed simultaneously with the GBT in the X-band: H87α to H93α. We average these seven RRLs (each at two orthogonal polarizations) to create a single average RRL spectrum. We followed the same GBT observational procedure as in the original HRDS (Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS; Bania et al. 2010ApJ...718L.106B). (3 data files).

  4. Discovery in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    In our efforts to map our galaxys structure, one region has remained very difficult to probe: the galactic center. A new survey, however, uses infrared light to peer through the gas and dust in the galactic plane, searching for variable stars in the bulge of the galaxy. This study has discovered a population of very young stars in a thin disk in the galactic center, providing clues to the star formation history of the Milky Way over the last 100 million years.Obscured CenterThe center of the Milky Way is dominated by a region known as the galactic bulge. Efforts to better understand this region in particular, its star formation history have been hindered by the stars, gas, and dust of the galactic disk, which prevent us from viewing the galactic bulge at low latitudes in visible light.The positions of the 35 classical Cepheids discovered in VVV data, projected onto an image of the galactic plane. Click for a better look! The survey area is bounded by the blue lines, and the galactic bar is marked with a red curve. The bottom panel shows the position of the Cepheids overlaid on the VVV bulge extinction map. [Dkny et al. 2015]Infrared light, however, can be used to probe deeper through the dust than visible-light searches. A new survey called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) uses the VISTA telescope in Chile to search, in infrared, for variable stars in the inner part of the galaxy. The VVV survey area spans the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high.Led by Istvn Dkny, a researcher at the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, a team has now used VVV data to specifically identify classical Cepheid variable stars in the bulge. Why? Cepheids are pulsating stars with a very useful relation between their periods and luminosities that allows them to be used as distance indicators. Moreover, classical Cepheids are indicators of young stellar populations which can

  5. FEEDBACK FROM MASS OUTFLOWS IN NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. OUTFLOWS IN THE NARROW-LINE REGION OF NGC 4151

    SciTech Connect

    Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.; Kraemer, Steven B.; Schmitt, Henrique R. E-mail: fischer@astro.gsu.edu E-mail: schmitt.henrique@gmail.com

    2015-01-20

    We present a detailed study of active galactic nucleus feedback in the narrow-line region (NLR) of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. We illustrate the data and techniques needed to determine the mass outflow rate ( M-dot {sub out}) and kinetic luminosity (L {sub KE}) of the outflowing ionized gas as a function of position in the NLR. We find that M-dot {sub out} peaks at a value of 3.0 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} at a distance of 70 pc from the central supermassive black hole (SMBH), which is about 10 times the outflow rate coming from inside 13 pc, and 230 times the mass accretion rate inferred from the bolometric luminosity of NGC 4151. Thus, most of the outflow must arise from in situ acceleration of ambient gas throughout the NLR. L {sub KE} peaks at 90 pc and drops rapidly thereafter, indicating that most of the kinetic energy is deposited within about 100 pc from the SMBH. Both values exceed the M-dot {sub out} and L {sub KE} determined for the UV/X-ray absorber outflows in NGC 4151, indicating the importance of NLR outflows in providing feedback on scales where circumnuclear star formation and bulge growth occur.

  6. Observational analysis of the physical conditions in galactic and extragalactic active star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, L. E.

    2007-10-01

    In my thesis observations of near-infrared rovibrational H_2 emission in active star-forming regions are presented and analysed. The main subject of this work concerns new observations of the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC1) and in particular the BN-KL region. Data consist of images of individual H_2 lines with high spatial resolution obtained both at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). With the high spatial resolution of the VLT it is possible to analyse in detail (down to 60 AU ~ 0.13") individual objects in the region. I have also analysed H_2 and [FeII] emission from outflows in two dark clouds (Bok globules BHR71 and BHR137) and a high excitation blob in the Magellanic Clouds (N159-5). In the latter, data consist of long-slit spectra obtained at the ESO-VLT. In order to facilitate this work I ran a large grid of ~25000 shock models, producing almost 400 Gb of results. These models are state-of-the-art and there is a large number of free parameters which can be adjusted. A big part of my project has been to analyse the results from this grid and make it publically available. Furthermore, as it turned out, not all results are equally reliable and I have had to develop methods for checking the consistency of the wealth of results obtained. But with the model results and a sound knowledge of shock physics it is now relatively straightforward to interpret the H_2 and [FeII] data. The models allow me to predict the large-scale physical conditions in OMC1 such as density, shock velocities, magnetic field strengths, etc. Overall the preshock density is of the order of ~10^5-10^7 cm(-3) and shock velocities are in the interval 10-40 km/s. Another very interesting result is a new method developed for analysing bow shocks observed at high spatial resolution. For one isolated bow shock in OMC1 I predict a shock velocity of 50 km/s and a preshock density of the order of 5x10^5 cm(-3). The 3D velocity has recently been measured to 55 km

  7. Massive Star Formation of the SGR a East H (sub II) Regions Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Lacy, J. H.; Wardle, M.; Whitney, B.; Bushouse, H.; Roberts, D. A.; Arendt, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    A group of four compact H II regions associated with the well-known 50 km/s molecular cloud is the closest site of on-going star formation to the dynamical center of the Galaxy, at a projected distance of approximately 6 pc. We present a study of ionized gas based on the [Ne II] (12.8 micron) line, as well as multi-frequency radio continuum, Hubble Space Telescope Pa alpha, and Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations of the most compact member of the H II group, Sgr A East H II D. The radio continuum image at 6 cm shows that this source breaks up into two equally bright ionized features, D1 and D2. The spectral energy distribution of the D source is consistent with it being due to a 25 =/- 3 solar mass star with a luminosity of 8 +/- 3 x 10(exp 4) Solar luminosity . The inferred mass, effective temperature of the UV source, and the ionization rate are compatible with a young O9-B0 star. The ionized features D1 and D2 are considered to be ionized by UV radiation collimated by an accretion disk. We consider that the central massive star photoevaporates its circumstellar disk on a timescale of 3x (exp 4) years giving a mass flux approximately 3 x 10(exp -5) Solar Mass / year and producing the ionized material in D1 and D2 expanding in an inhomogeneous medium. The ionized gas kinematics, as traced by the [Ne II] emission, is difficult to interpret, but it could be explained by the interaction of a bipolar jet with surrounding gas along with what appears to be a conical wall of lower velocity gas. The other H II regions, Sgr A East A-C, have morphologies and kinematics that more closely resemble cometary flows seen in other compact H II regions, where gas moves along a paraboloidal surface formed by the interaction of a stellar wind with a molecular cloud.

  8. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION OF THE SGR A EAST H II REGIONS NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Lacy, J. H.; Wardle, M.; Whitney, B.; Bushouse, H.; Roberts, D. A.; Arendt, R. G.

    2010-12-20

    A group of four compact H II regions associated with the well-known 50 km s{sup -1} molecular cloud is the closest site of on-going star formation to the dynamical center of the Galaxy, at a projected distance of {approx}6 pc. We present a study of ionized gas based on the [Ne II] (12.8 {mu}m) line, as well as multi-frequency radio continuum, Hubble Space Telescope Pa{alpha}, and Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations of the most compact member of the H II group, Sgr A East H II D. The radio continuum image at 6 cm shows that this source breaks up into two equally bright ionized features, D1 and D2. The spectral energy distribution of the D source is consistent with it being due to a 25 {+-} 3 M{sub sun} star with a luminosity of 8 {+-} 3 x 10{sup 4} L{sub sun}. The inferred mass, effective temperature of the UV source, and the ionization rate are compatible with a young O9-B0 star. The ionized features D1 and D2 are considered to be ionized by UV radiation collimated by an accretion disk. We consider that the central massive star photoevaporates its circumstellar disk on a timescale of 3 x 10{sup 4} years giving a mass flux {approx}3 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and producing the ionized material in D1 and D2 expanding in an inhomogeneous medium. The ionized gas kinematics, as traced by the [Ne II] emission, is difficult to interpret, but it could be explained by the interaction of a bipolar jet with surrounding gas along with what appears to be a conical wall of lower velocity gas. The other H II regions, Sgr A East A-C, have morphologies and kinematics that more closely resemble cometary flows seen in other compact H II regions, where gas moves along a paraboloidal surface formed by the interaction of a stellar wind with a molecular cloud.

  9. SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION OF THE BRIGHTEST OBJECTS IN THE GALACTIC STAR-FORMING REGION W40

    SciTech Connect

    Shuping, R. Y.; Vacca, William D.; Kassis, Marc; Yu, Ka Chun

    2012-10-01

    We present high signal-to-noise, moderate resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 2000) near-infrared spectra, as well as 10 {mu}m imaging, for the brightest members of the central stellar cluster in the W40 H II region, obtained using the SpeX and MIRSI instruments at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility. Using these observations combined with archival Spitzer Space Telescope data, we have determined the spectral classifications, extinction, distances, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the brightest members of the cluster. Of the eight objects observed, we identify four main-sequence (MS) OB stars (one late-O, three early-B), two Herbig Ae/Be stars, and two low-mass young stellar objects (Class II). Strong He I absorption at 1.083 {mu}m in the MS star spectra strongly suggests that at least some of these sources are in fact close binaries. Two out of the four MS stars also show significant infrared excesses typical of circumstellar disks. Extinctions and distances were determined for each MS star by fitting model stellar atmospheres to the SEDs. We estimate a distance to the cluster of between 455 and 535 pc, which agrees well with earlier (but far less precise) distance estimates. We conclude that the late-O star we identify is the dominant source of Lyman continuum luminosity needed to power the W40 H II region and is the likely source of the stellar wind that has blown a large ( Almost-Equal-To 4 pc) pinched-waist bubble observed in wide-field mid-IR images. We also suggest that 3.6 cm radio emission observed from some of the sources in the cluster is likely not due to emission from ultracompact H II regions, as suggested in other work, due to size constraints based on our derived distance to the cluster. Finally, we also present a discussion of the curious source IRS 3A, which has a very strong mid-IR excess (despite its B3 MS classification) and appears to be embedded in a dusty envelope roughly 2700 AU in size.

  10. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 20 - United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Offices D Appendix D to Part 20 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Pt. 20, App. D Appendix D to Part 20—United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional...

  11. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 20 - United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Offices D Appendix D to Part 20 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Pt. 20, App. D Appendix D to Part 20—United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional...

  12. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 20 - United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Offices D Appendix D to Part 20 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Pt. 20, App. D Appendix D to Part 20—United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional...

  13. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 20 - United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Offices D Appendix D to Part 20 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Pt. 20, App. D Appendix D to Part 20—United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional...

  14. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 20 - United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Offices D Appendix D to Part 20 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Pt. 20, App. D Appendix D to Part 20—United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional...

  15. The Baryon Cycle at High Redshifts: Effects of Galactic Winds on Galaxy Evolution in Overdense and Average Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoun, Raphael; Shlosman, Isaac; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Romano-Díaz, Emilio

    2016-10-01

    We employ high-resolution cosmological zoom-in simulations focusing on a high-sigma peak and an average cosmological field at z ˜ 6-12 in order to investigate the influence of environment and baryonic feedback on galaxy evolution in the reionization epoch. Strong feedback, e.g., galactic winds, caused by elevated star formation rates (SFRs) is expected to play an important role in this evolution. We compare different outflow prescriptions: (i) constant wind velocity (CW), (ii) variable wind scaling with galaxy properties (VW), and (iii) no outflows (NW). The overdensity leads to accelerated evolution of dark matter and baryonic structures, absent from the “normal” region, and to shallow galaxy stellar mass functions at the low-mass end. Although CW shows little dependence on the environment, the more physically motivated VW model does exhibit this effect. In addition, VW can reproduce the observed specific SFR (sSFR) and the sSFR-stellar mass relation, which CW and NW fail to satisfy simultaneously. Winds also differ substantially in affecting the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM). The difference lies in the volume-filling factor of hot, high-metallicity gas, which is near unity for CW, while such gas remains confined in massive filaments for VW, and locked up in galaxies for NW. Such gas is nearly absent from the normal region. Although all wind models suffer from deficiencies, the VW model seems to be promising in correlating the outflow properties with those of host galaxies. Further constraints on the state of the IGM at high z are needed to separate different wind models.

  16. Massive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Michael J.; Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Garcia, Rolando R.

    2008-01-01

    We use a chemistry-climate model and new estimates of smoke produced by fires in contemporary cities to calculate the impact on stratospheric ozone of a regional nuclear war between developing nuclear states involving 100 Hiroshima-size bombs exploded in cities in the northern subtropics. We find column ozone losses in excess of 20% globally, 25–45% at midlatitudes, and 50–70% at northern high latitudes persisting for 5 years, with substantial losses continuing for 5 additional years. Column ozone amounts remain near or <220 Dobson units at all latitudes even after three years, constituting an extratropical “ozone hole.” The resulting increases in UV radiation could impact the biota significantly, including serious consequences for human health. The primary cause for the dramatic and persistent ozone depletion is heating of the stratosphere by smoke, which strongly absorbs solar radiation. The smoke-laden air rises to the upper stratosphere, where removal mechanisms are slow, so that much of the stratosphere is ultimately heated by the localized smoke injections. Higher stratospheric temperatures accelerate catalytic reaction cycles, particularly those of odd-nitrogen, which destroy ozone. In addition, the strong convection created by rising smoke plumes alters the stratospheric circulation, redistributing ozone and the sources of ozone-depleting gases, including N2O and chlorofluorocarbons. The ozone losses predicted here are significantly greater than previous “nuclear winter/UV spring” calculations, which did not adequately represent stratospheric plume rise. Our results point to previously unrecognized mechanisms for stratospheric ozone depletion. PMID:18391218

  17. Kinematics and structure of clumps in broad-line regions in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayuri, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    We use the Jeans equations for an ensemble of collisionless particles to describe the distribution of broad-line region (BLR) cloud in three classes: (A) non-disc (B) disc-wind (C) pure disc structure. We propose that clumpy structures in the brightest quasars belong to class A, fainter quasars and brighter Seyferts belong to class B, and dimmer Seyfert galaxies and all low-luminosity AGNs (LLAGNs) belong to class C. We derive the virial factor, f, for disc-like structures and find a negative correlation between the inclination angle, θ0, and f. We find similar behaviour for f as a function of the FWHM and σz, the z component of velocity dispersion. For different values of θ0 we find that 1.0 ≲ f ≲ 9.0 in type1 AGNs and 0.5 ≲ f ≲ 1.0 in type2 AGNs. Moreover we have 0.5 ≲ f ≲ 6.5 for different values of FWHM and 1.4 ≲ f ≲ 1.8 for different values of σz. We also find that f is relatively insensitive to the variations of bolometric luminosity and column density of each cloud and the range of variation of f is in order of 0.01. Considering wide range of f we see the use of average virial factor is not very safe. Therefore we propose AGN community to divide a sample into a few subsamples based on the value of θ0 and FWHM of members and calculate for each group separately to reduce uncertainty in black hole mass estimation.

  18. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenke, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; Luo, B.; Rozanov, E.; Gröbner, J.; Maag, L.; Brönnimann, S.; Peter, T.

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on Earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size") against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a tremendous self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests Earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with massive sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of Northern America and Eurasia to chilling coldness. In the

  19. Star Formation in Self-gravitating Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Episodic Formation of Broad-line Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Min; Du, Pu; Baldwin, Jack A.; Ge, Jun-Qiang; Hu, Chen; Ferland, Gary J.

    2012-02-01

    This is the second in a series of papers discussing the process and effects of star formation in the self-gravitating disk around the supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We have previously suggested that warm skins are formed above the star-forming (SF) disk through the diffusion of warm gas driven by supernova explosions. Here we study the evolution of the warm skins when they are exposed to the powerful radiation from the inner part of the accretion disk. The skins initially are heated to the Compton temperature, forming a Compton atmosphere (CAS) whose subsequent evolution is divided into four phases. Phase I is the duration of pure accumulation supplied by the SF disk. During phase II clouds begin to form due to line cooling and sink to the SF disk. Phase III is a period of preventing clouds from sinking to the SF disk through dynamic interaction between clouds and the CAS because of the CAS overdensity driven by continuous injection of warm gas from the SF disk. Finally, phase IV is an inevitable collapse of the entire CAS through line cooling. This CAS evolution drives the episodic appearance of broad-line regions (BLRs). We follow the formation of cold clouds through the thermal instability of the CAS during phases II and III, using linear analysis. Since the clouds are produced inside the CAS, the initial spatial distribution of newly formed clouds and angular momentum naturally follow the CAS dynamics, producing a flattened disk of clouds. The number of clouds in phases II and III can be estimated, as well as the filling factor of clouds in the BLR. Since the cooling function depends on the metallicity, the metallicity gradients that originate in the SF disk give rise to different properties of clouds in different radial regions. We find from the instability analysis that clouds have column density N H <~ 1022 cm-2 in the metal-rich regions whereas they have N H >~ 1022 cm-2 in the metal-poor regions. The metal-rich clouds compose

  20. Exploring the crowded central region of ten Galactic globular clusters using EMCCDs. Variable star searches and new discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figuera Jaimes, R.; Bramich, D. M.; Skottfelt, J.; Kains, N.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; Harpsøe, K. B. W.; Haugbølle, T.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Juncher, D.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Schmidt, R. W.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Starkey, D.; Street, R. A.; Surdej, J.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We aim to obtain time-series photometry of the very crowded central regions of Galactic globular clusters; to obtain better angular resolution thanhas been previously achieved with conventional CCDs on ground-based telescopes; and to complete, or improve, the census of the variable star population in those stellar systems. Methods: Images were taken using the Danish 1.54-m Telescope at the ESO observatory at La Silla in Chile. The telescope was equipped with an electron-multiplying CCD, and the short-exposure-time images obtained (ten images per second) were stacked using the shift-and-add technique to produce the normal-exposure-time images (minutes). Photometry was performed via difference image analysis. Automatic detection of variable stars in the field was attempted. Results: The light curves of 12 541 stars in the cores of ten globular clusters were statistically analysed to automatically extract the variable stars. We obtained light curves for 31 previously known variable stars (3 long-period irregular, 2 semi-regular, 20 RR Lyrae, 1 SX Phoenicis, 3 cataclysmic variables, 1 W Ursae Majoris-type and 1 unclassified) and we discovered 30 new variables (16 long-period irregular, 7 semi-regular, 4 RR Lyrae, 1 SX Phoenicis and 2 unclassified). Fluxes and photometric measurements for these stars are available in electronic form through the Strasbourg astronomical Data Center. Based on data collected by the MiNDSTEp team with the Danish 1.54m telescope at ESO's La Silla observatory in Chile.Full Table 1 is only available at CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A128

  1. CONNECTION BETWEEN MID-INFRARED EMISSION PROPERTIES AND NARROW-LINE REGION OUTFLOWS IN TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Kai; Wang Tinggui; Dong Xiaobo; Yan Lin

    2013-05-01

    The location of warm dust producing the mid-infrared (MIR) emission in type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is complex and not yet fully known. We explore this problem by studying how the MIR covering factor (CF{sub MIR} = L{sub MIR}/L{sub bol}) correlates with the fundamental parameters of AGN accretion process (such as L{sub bol}, black hole mass M{sub BH}, and Eddington ratio L/L{sub Edd}) and the properties of narrow emission lines (as represented by [O III] {lambda}5007), using large data sets derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS) and the Wide Infrared Sky Survey (WISE). First, we find that the luminosity of the [O III] wing component (L{sub wing}) correlates more tightly with the continuum luminosity ({lambda}L{sub {lambda}}(5100)) than the luminosity of the line core component (L{sub core}) does, which is in line with our previous conclusion that the wing component, generally blueshifted, originates from the polar outflows in the inner narrow-line region (NLR). We then find that the MIR CF shows the strongest correlation with L{sub wing}/L{sub bol} rather than with L{sub core}/L{sub bol} or the above fundamental AGN parameters, and the correlation becomes stronger as the infrared wavelength increases. We also confirm the anti-correlations of CF{sub MIR} with L{sub bol} and M{sub BH}, and the lack of dependence of CF{sub MIR} on the Eddington ratio. These results suggest that a large fraction of the warm dust producing MIR emission in AGNs is likely embedded in polar outflows in the NLR instead of in the torus.

  2. American Nuclear Society 1994 student conference eastern region

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report contains abstracts from the 1994 American Nuclear Society Student Conference. The areas covered by these abstracts are: fusion and plasma physics; nuclear chemistry; radiation detection; reactor physics; thermal hydraulics; and corrosion science and waste issues.

  3. The Galactic plane region near ℓ = 93°. III. Multi-wavelength emission from SNR 3C 434.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.

    2005-10-01

    New Canadian Galactic Plane Survey radio continuum, ROSAT X-ray, and optical line observations of supernova remnant (SNR) 3C 434.1 (G94.0+1.0) are presented. A radio spectrum of index α=0.4 (where S∝ ν -α ) confirms this SNR's emission signature as predominantly synchrotron, and suggests the SNR is in the Sedov expansion phase. The morphology of the remnant is compared in X-ray, optical, and radio continuum, and the brightest emission in all three wavelength regimes is from the eastern hemisphere of 3C 434.1, which marks where the SNR shock is interacting with the inside wall of its stellar wind bubble (SWB) home. The system is determined to be 4.5 kpc distant, residing in the Perseus Arm Spiral shock. From a deep Hα mosaic of the region, λ 656 nm Hα line emission is observed that correlates well with radio synchrotron emission and anticorrelates with X-ray emission from the SNR. The origin of this optical emission is likely dense (ne=40 cm-3) cooling H II from the wall of the SWB, where the SNR shock has penetrated and become radiative (vs˜ 100 km s-1). The X-ray spectrum of this SNR between 0.5 and 2.4 keV is well modelled by a single-temperature thermal plasma (Te=4.5×106 K, ne=0.2 cm-3). The magnetic field of the bright radio synchrotron emission region is found (under the assumption of near equipartition) to be B˜ 15 μ G, a factor of 3 compression of the ambient ISM field (5 μ G). The westward extension of 3C 434.1 is the result of ongoing free expansion of the shock into the lower density interior of the SWB. I use multiwavelength observations to arrive at a unique solution for an interaction model of 3C 434.1 with the SWB, from which the age (t=25 000 yr) and mass ejected in the explosion (Mej=15.5 M⊙ ) are determined. I also find an initial blast-wave velocity of 1350 km s-1, typical of type 1b SNe.

  4. GS34-6+65: A Large Galactic Supershell Originating in an Active Star Formation Region and Extending to the Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Witold; Murphy, Edward M.; Lockman, Felix J.; Savage, Blair D.

    1995-03-01

    The Galactic supershell GS34-6+65 (Heiles 1979) was mapped in the H{I}; 21 cm emission line with the NRAO 140 ft radiotelescope. The observations cover galactic longitudes 30(deg) ; to 40(deg) ; and latitudes -1(deg) ; to -15(deg) ; with 10 arcmin spacing in both coordinates. Centered at l=35, b=-5 and v_rad=+56km/s, the supershell consists of an irregular spherical shell about 7(deg) ; in diameter, which reaches 9.5(deg) ; below the galactic plane, and of a well defined, massive cone at low latitudes which connects to the molecular cloud CO[35,44] (Dame et al.1986) through a narrow (20 pc wide) channel of reduced H{I}; emission. On the basis of an investigation of objects near the line of sight to the supershell and information from the galactic rotation curve, we derive a distance of ~ 3.7 kpc, which implies that the shell has a diameter of ~ 450 pc and extends at least 600 pc into the Galactic halo. The distance also indicates that the supershell originates in the Sagittarius arm. The concentration of supernova remnants, star forming regions and H{II}; regions in this direction implies that the supershell is a remnant of multiple supernovae and that strong star formation activity persists in this region of the Galaxy, though the large column density (greater than 10(22) H/cm(2) ) prevents us from seeing the stars. We interpret W48 as a region of star formation induced by a shock wave related to the cone. We consider simple models to take into account geometrical and dynamical effects resulting in observed H{I}; emission at given radial velocity. We estimate the swept up mass in the shell to be 7.3*E(4) Msun ; and the mass in the cone -- 1.3*E(5) Msun ;. The estimated kinetic energy of the supershell, 5.0*E(51) ergs, imposes a minimicrons limit of about 5.0*E(52) ergs on the total energy of the event creating the supershell. REFERENCES: Dame, T. M., Elmegreen, B. G., Cohen, R. S., Thaddeus, P. 1986, Astroph. Journ., 305, 892 Heiles, C. 1979, Astroph. Journ., 229

  5. The SINS/zC-SINF survey of z ∼ 2 galaxy kinematics: Evidence for powerful active galactic nucleus-driven nuclear outflows in massive star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Kurk, J. D.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Buschkamp, P.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Lang, P.; Newman, S. F.; Burkert, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Cresci, G.; Daddi, E.; Mainieri, V.; Mancini, C.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (≥10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}) z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics-assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Hα and forbidden [N II] and [S II] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ∼ 1500 km s{sup –1}, [N II]/Hα ratio ≈ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2-3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ∼60 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and mass loading of ∼3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ∼485 km s{sup –1} and [N II]/Hα ≈ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest that the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial in confirming the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth.

  6. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenke, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; Luo, B.; Rozanov, E.; Gröbner, J.; Maag, L.; Brönnimann, S.; Peter, T.

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size") against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a rapid self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere within a few days after emission, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with an increase in sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of North America and Eurasia to a

  7. Spatial Analysis of Spectra from Galactic Planetary Nebulae and Extragalactic H II Regions: Testing for Abundance Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    Presented here is a spatial analysis of spectra for seven planetary nebulae (NGC 2440, NGC 3242, NGC 5315, NGC 5882, NGC 7662, IC 2165, and IC 3568) as well as H II regions from six nearly face-on, spiral galaxies (NGC 2403, NGC 3310, NGC 4321, NGC 5194, NGC 5236, and NGC 5457). The two main goals of the study were (1) to investigate whether or not each planetary nebula (PN) is chemically homogeneous; and (2) to search for evidence of azimuthal abundance gradients in the disks of the galaxies. Each of these test the validity of assumptions commonly made for these two object types, i.e., (1) Ejecta from asymptotic giant branch stars are well mixed and (2) elements returned to the interstellar medium of a spiral galaxy are “instantaneously” distributed around the disk for a fixed distance from the center.The PN homogeneity problem was addressed by spatially dividing each long-slit HST/STIS spectrum into many smaller regions across each object and calculating the abundances of each region. The major result is that the ejecta are indeed homogeneous in each planetary nebula for the elements probed. A secondary goal was to constrain the temperature and luminosity of each PN central star, which was accomplished by modeling each object using the photoionization code CLOUDY.The spectra for the galaxies are from the VIRUS-P spectrograph, an integral field unit consisting of 246 fibers arranged in a square, with the observations centered on or near the nuclear bulge, covering a full 360 degrees around each galaxy and encompassing numerous H II regions located near the bulge. Additional goals for each galaxy included obtaining radial abundance gradients and accurate carbon and neon abundances for high metallicity H II regions.

  8. The Challenge of Nuclear-Armed Regional Adversaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1999; Vladislav M . Zubok , “Stalin and the Nuclear Age,” in John Lewis Gaddis, Philip H. Gordon, Ernest...Press, 1999, pp. 39–61; Vladislav M . Zubok and Hope M . Harrison, “The Nuclear Education of Nikita Khrushchev,” in John Lewis Gaddis, Philip H. Gordon...Bomb: Nuclear Diplomacy Since 1945, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1999, pp. 194–215. Zubok , Vladislav M ., “Stalin and the Nuclear Age

  9. The mid-infrared emission of narrow-line active galactic nuclei: Star formation, nuclear activity, and two populations revealed by WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, David J.; Burtscher, Leonard; Davies, Richard; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Tacconi, Linda J.

    2013-12-01

    We explore the nature of the long-wavelength mid-infrared (MIR) emission of a sample of 13,000 local Type II (narrow-line) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using 12 μm and 22 μm photometry from the WISE all-sky survey. In combination with FIRST 1.4 GHz photometry, we show that AGNs divide into two relatively distinct populations or 'branches' in the plane of MIR and radio luminosity. Seyfert galaxies lie almost exclusively on an MIR-bright branch (Branch A), while low-ionization nuclear emission line galaxies (LINERs) are split evenly into Branch A and the MIR-faint Branch B. We devise various tests to constrain the processes that define the branches, including a comparison to the properties of pure star-forming inactive galaxies on the MIR-radio plane. We demonstrate that the total MIR emission of objects on Branch A, including most Seyfert galaxies, is governed primarily by host star formation, with ≈15% of the 22 μm luminosity coming from AGN-heated dust. This implies that ongoing dusty star formation is a general property of Seyfert host galaxies. We show that the 12 μm broadband luminosity of AGNs on Branch A is suppressed with respect to star-forming galaxies, possibly due to the destruction of PAHs or deeper 10 μm Si absorption in AGNs. We uncover a correlation between the MIR luminosity and [O III] λ5007 luminosity in AGNs. This suggests a relationship between the star formation rate and nuclear luminosity in the AGN population, but we caution on the importance of selection effects inherent to such AGN-dominated emission-line galaxies in driving such a correlation. We highlight the MIR-radio plane as a useful tool in comparative studies of star formation and nuclear activity in AGNs.

  10. Confronting Emergent Nuclear-Armed Regional Adversaries: Prospects for Neutralization, Strategies for Escalation Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report Confronting Emergent Nuclear-Armed Regional Adversaries Prospects for Neutralization, Strategies for...Armed Regional Adversaries: Prospects for Neutralization, Strategies for Escalation Management 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...states with small nuclear arsenals. It examines prospects for neutralizing their nuclear capabilities via combinations of offensive and defensive

  11. Neutrinos and γ -rays from the Galactic Center Region after H.E.S.S. multi-TeV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Silvia; Palladino, Andrea; Vissani, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    The hypothesis of a PeVatron in the Galactic Center, emerged with the recent γ -ray measurements of H.E.S.S. [1], motivates the search for neutrinos from this source. The effect of γ -ray absorption is studied: at the energies currently probed, the known background radiation fields lead to small effects, whereas it is not possible to exclude large effects due to new IR radiation fields near the very center. Precise upper limits on neutrino fluxes are derived and the underlying hypotheses are discussed. The expected number of events for ANTARES, IceCube and KM3NeT, based on the H.E.S.S. measurements, are calculated. It is shown that km^3-class telescopes in the Northern hemisphere have the potential of observing high-energy neutrinos from this important astronomical object and can check the existence of a hadronic PeV galactic accelerator.

  12. Near-infrared surface photometry and morphology in virgo cluster spiral galaxy nuclear regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents very high spatial resolution (seeing 0.75 arcsec FWHM) K band surface photometry of 15 Virgo cluster spiral galaxy nuclear regions (radii less then 1 kpc). It presents B and I CCD images of 13 of these galaxies. The goals of the study were: (1) to begin to establish a K band baseline of normal spiral galaxy nuclear regions against which peculiar galaxies may be compared, (2) to provide better contsraints on N-body models, and (3) to complement near-infrared studies of large scale structure in spiral galaxies with very high resolution imaging of the important nuclear regions. The principle findings are (1) between 1/4 and 1/3 of these nuclear regions show K band evidence of traxiality, (2) approximately 1/2 of these galaxies have axisymmetric nuclear regions, and (3) NGC 4321 has a bar that is not detectable in the optical images.

  13. Radiogenic p-isotopes from type Ia supernova, nuclear physics uncertainties, and galactic chemical evolution compared with values in primitive meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Rauscher, T.; Dauphas, N.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W. E-mail: claudia.travaglio@b2fh.org

    2014-11-10

    The nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes is calculated for multi-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with different metallicities. The predicted abundances of the short-lived radioactive isotopes {sup 92}Nb, {sup 97,} {sup 98}Tc, and {sup 146}Sm are given in this framework. The abundance seeds are obtained by calculating s-process nucleosynthesis in the material accreted onto a carbon-oxygen white dwarf from a binary companion. A fine grid of s-seeds at different metallicities and {sup 13}C-pocket efficiencies is considered. A galactic chemical evolution model is used to predict the contribution of SN Ia to the solar system p-nuclei composition measured in meteorites. Nuclear physics uncertainties are critical to determine the role of SNe Ia in the production of {sup 92}Nb and {sup 146}Sm. We find that, if standard Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia are at least 50% of all SN Ia, they are strong candidates for reproducing the radiogenic p-process signature observed in meteorites.

  14. CHANDRA X-RAY AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF OPTICALLY SELECTED KILOPARSEC-SCALE BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. NATURE OF THE NUCLEAR IONIZING SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Civano, Francesca; Shen, Yue; Green, Paul; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2013-01-10

    Kiloparsec-scale binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) signal active supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs in merging galaxies. Despite their significance, unambiguously confirmed cases remain scarce and most have been discovered serendipitously. In a previous systematic search, we optically identified four kpc-scale binary AGNs from candidates selected with double-peaked narrow emission lines at z = 0.1-0.2. Here, we present Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of these four systems. We critically examine and confirm the binary-AGN scenario for two of the four targets, by combining high angular resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra ACIS-S, better nuclear position constraints from WFC3 F105W imaging, and direct starburst estimates from WFC3 F336W imaging; for the other two targets, the existing data are still consistent with the binary-AGN scenario, but we cannot rule out the possibility of only one AGN ionizing gas in both merging galaxies. We find tentative evidence for a systematically smaller X-ray-to-[O III] luminosity ratio and/or higher Compton-thick fraction in optically selected kpc-scale binary AGNs than in single AGNs, possibly caused by a higher nuclear gas column due to mergers and/or a viewing angle bias related to the double-peak narrow-line selection. While our result lends some further support to the general approach of optically identifying kpc-scale binary AGNs, it also highlights the challenge and ambiguity of X-ray confirmation.

  15. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ENERGY BUDGETS OF LOW-IONIZATION NUCLEAR EMISSION REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Eracleous, Michael; Hwang, Jason A.; Flohic, Helene M. L. G.

    2010-03-10

    Using the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the weak active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in 35 low-ionization nuclear emission regions (LINERs) presented in a companion paper, we assess whether photoionization by the weak AGN can power the emission-line luminosities measured through the large (few-arcsecond) apertures used in ground-based spectroscopic surveys. Spectra taken through such apertures are used to define LINERs as a class and constrain non-stellar photoionization models for LINERs. Therefore, our energy budget test is a self-consistency check of the idea that the observed emission lines are powered by an AGN. We determine the ionizing luminosities and photon rates by integrating the observed SEDs and by scaling a template SED. We find that even if all ionizing photons are absorbed by the line-emitting gas, more than half of the LINERs in this sample suffer from a deficit of ionizing photons. In 1/3 of LINERs the deficit is severe. If only 10% of the ionizing photons are absorbed by the gas, there is an ionizing photon deficit in 85% of LINERs. We disfavor the possibility that additional electromagnetic power, either obscured or emitted in the unobservable far-UV band, is available from the AGN. Therefore, we consider other power sources such as mechanical heating by compact jets from the AGN and photoionization by either young or old stars. Photoionization by young stars may be important in a small fraction of cases. Mechanical heating can provide enough power in most cases but it is not clear how this power would be transferred to the emission-line gas. Photoionization by post asymptotic giant branch stars is an important power source; it provides more ionizing photons than the AGN in more than half of the LINERs and enough ionizing photons to power the emission lines in 1/3 of the LINERs. It appears likely that the emission-line spectra of LINERs obtained from the ground include the sum of emission from different regions where different power sources

  16. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to regulate the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxies. The most direct evidence of AGN feedback is probably galactic outflows. This thesis addresses the link between SMBHs and their host galaxies from four different observational perspectives. First, I study the local correlation between black hole mass and the galactic halo potential (the MBH - Vc relation) based on Very Large Array (VLA) HI observations of galaxy rotation curves. Although there is a correlation, it is no tighter than the well-studied MBH - sigma* relation between the black hole mass and the potential of the galactic bulge, indicating that physical processes, such as feedback, could link the evolution of the black hole to the baryons in the bulge. In what follows, I thus search for galactic outflows as direct evidence of AGN feedback. Second, I use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe a luminous obscured AGN that hosts an ionized galactic outflow and find a compact but massive molecular outflow that can potentially quench the star formation in 10. 6 years.The third study extends the sample of known ionized outflows with new Magellan long-slit observations of 12 luminous obscured AGN. I find that most luminous obscured AGN (Lbol > 1046 ergs s-1) host ionized outflows on 10 kpc scales, and the size of the outflow correlates strongly with the luminosity of the AGN. Lastly, to capitalize on the power of modern photometric surveys, I experiment with a new broadband imaging technique to study the morphology of AGN emission line regions and outflows. With images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), this method successfully constructs images of the [OIII]lambda5007 emission line and reveals hundreds of extended emission-line systems. When applied to current and future surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), this technique could open a new parameter space for the study of AGN outflows. In

  17. Galactic arm structure and gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    Unexpectedly high energy gamma radiation over a broad region of the galactic plane in the general direction of the galactic center was observed. A model is proposed wherein the galactic cosmic rays are preferentially located in the high matter density regions of galactic arm segments, as a result of the weight of the matter in these arms tieing the magnetic fields and hence the cosmic rays to these regions. The presently observed galactic gamma ray longitudinal distribution can be explained with the current estimate of the average galactic matter density: if the average arm to interarm matter ratio is five to one for the major arm segments toward the galactic center from the sun; and if the cosmic ray density normalized to its local value is assumed to be directly proportional to the matter density.

  18. Nuclear wastes in the arctic: An analysis of arctic and other regional impacts from Soviet nuclear contamination

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    One of the lasting legacies of the Cold War, and the buildup in nuclear weaponry and military over the past 50 years, is nuclear waste and its threat to human health and the environment. Notable examples of waste dumped into the open environment have caused people and nations to demand information about what was done and what health risks may result. In 1993, disclosures about Russian dumping of submarine reactors, nuclear fuel, and other wastes into the Arctic and North Pacific Oceans brought this region and its problems into the world spotlight. This report examines the environmental and human health impacts from wastes dumped into the Arctic and North Pacific regions, from nuclear contaminants discharged into these environments, and from radioactive releases from both past and future nuclear activities in the region. The report presents what is known and unknown about this waste and contamination and how it may affect public health. It also stresses the need for a stable and enduring institutional framework and international cooperation for long-term observation and monitoring.

  19. Galactic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    Galactic winds have become arguably one of the hottest topics in extragalactic astronomy. This enthusiasm for galactic winds is due in part to the detection of winds in many, if not most, high-redshift galaxies. Galactic winds have also been invoked by theorists to (1) suppress the number of visible dwarf galaxies and avoid the "cooling catastrophe" at high redshift that results in the overproduction of massive luminous galaxies, (2) remove material with low specific angular momentum early on and help enlarge gas disks in CDM + baryons simulations, (3) reduce the dark mass concentrations in galaxies, (4) explain the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies from selective loss of metal-enriched gas from smaller galaxies, (5) enrich and "preheat" the ICM, (6) enrich the IGM without disturbing the Lyαforest significantly, and (7) inhibit cooling flows in galaxy clusters with active cD galaxies. The present paper highlights a few key aspects of galactic winds taken from a recent ARAA review by Veilleux, Cecil, &Bland-Hawthorn (2005; herafter VCBH). Readers interested in a more detailed discussion of this topic are encouraged to refer to the original ARAA article.

  20. Searching for dark clouds in the outer galactic plane. I. A statistical approach for identifying extended red(dened) regions in 2MASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieswijk, W. W. F.; Shipman, R. F.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Most of what is known about clustered star formation to date comes from well studied star forming regions located relatively nearby, such as Rho-Ophiuchus, Serpens and Perseus. However, the recent discovery of infrared dark clouds may give new insights in our understanding of this dominant mode of star formation in the Galaxy. Though the exact role of infrared dark clouds in the formation process is still somewhat unclear, they seem to provide useful laboratories to study the very early stages of clustered star formation. Infrared dark clouds have been identified predominantly toward the bright inner parts of the galactic plane. The low background emission makes it more difficult to identify similar objects in mid-infrared absorption in the outer parts. This is unfortunate, because the outer Galaxy represents the only nearby region where we can study effects of different (external) conditions on the star formation process. Aims: The aim of this paper is to identify extended red regions in the outer galactic plane based on reddening of stars in the near-infrared. We argue that these regions appear reddened mainly due to extinction caused by molecular clouds and young stellar objects. The work presented here is used as a basis for identifying star forming regions and in particular the very early stages. An accompanying paper describes the cross-identification of the identified regions with existing data, uncovering more on the nature of the reddening. Methods: We use the Mann-Whitney U-test, in combination with a friends-of-friends algorithm, to identify extended reddened regions in the 2MASS all-sky JHK survey. We process the data on a regular grid using two different resolutions, 60´´ and 90´´. The two resolutions have been chosen because the stellar surface density varies between the crowded spiral arm regions and the sparsely populated galactic anti-center region. Results: We identify 1320 extended red regions at the higher resolution and 1589 in the

  1. Massive accretion disks in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, N. Z.

    In the luminous infrared galaxies, very large masses of interstellar matter have been concentrated in the galactic nuclei at radii less than 300 pc as a result of galactic merging, while in lower luminosity systems, this material is probably concentrated by stellar bars and viscous accretion. In both cases, the nuclear region will be highly obscured by dust at visible wavelengths, forcing studies to longer wavelengths where the extinction is reduced. We review recent high resolution near infrared (HST-NICMOS) and mm-interferometric imaging of the dense gas and dust accretion disks in nearby luminous galactic nuclei. Since this nuclear ISM is the active ingredient for both starburst activity and a likely fuel for central AGNs, the nuclear accretion disks are critical to both the activity and the optical appearance of the nucleus. For a sample of 24 luminous galaxies imaged with NICMOS at 1-2μm, approximately 13 show nuclear point sources, indicating the existence of a central AGN or an intense starburst at <= 50 pc radius. Approximately 14 of the sample galaxies have apparent central dust disks. In the best studied ultraluminous IR galaxy, Arp 220, the 2μm imaging shows dust disks in both of the merging galactic nuclei and mm-CO line imaging indicates molecular gas masses ~ 109Msolar for each disk. The two gas disks in Arp 220 are counterrotating and their dynamical masses are ~ 2×109Msolar, that is, only slightly larger than the gas masses. These disks have radii ~ 100 pc and thickness 10-50 pc. The high brightness temperatures of the CO lines indicate that the gas in the disks has area filling factors ~25-50% and mean densities of >= 104 cm-3. Within these nuclear disks, the rate of massive star formation is undoubtedly prodigious and, given the high viscosity of the gas, there will also be high radial accretion rates, perhaps >= 10 Msolar yr-1. If this inflow persists to very small radii, it is enough to feed even the highest

  2. Cloud Structure of Galactic OB Cluster-forming Regions from Combining Ground- and Space-based Bolometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuxin; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Li, Di; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Pineda, Jaime E.; Qian, Lei; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; McLeod, Anna Faye; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dale, James E.; Immer, Katharina; Koch, Eric; Longmore, Steve; Walker, Daniel; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground-based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, and IRAM-30 m) and space telescopes (Herschel and Planck). For the seven luminous (L\\gt {10}6 L ⊙) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, and G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified blackbody fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The ˜10″ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3 kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed ˜10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (i.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations). In particular, the massive molecular gas clumps located at the center of G10.6-0.4 and

  3. The Galactic Plane region near ℓ = 93°. II. A stellar wind bubble surrounding SNR 3C 434.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.; Routledge, D.; Kothes, R.

    2004-04-01

    New Canadian Galactic Plane Survey λ 21 cm H I line observations towards supernova remnant (SNR) 3C 434.1 (G94.0+1.0) are presented. We find a fragmented and thin-walled atomic hydrogen shell inside which the SNR is seen to be contained at v≃ -80 km s-1, which we report to be a highly evolved stellar wind bubble (SWB) associated with the remnant. A dark area in the midst of otherwise bright line emission is also seen near -71 km s-1. An absorption profile to the extragalactic continuum source 4C 51.45 (superimposed on the shell's north face) allows us to probe the shell's optical depth, kinetic temperature and expansion velocity. The material in the dark area has the same properties as material in the fragmented shell, suggesting that the dark area is actually the far-side ``cap'' of the shell seen absorbing emission from warm background gas, the first instance of H I Self Absorption (HISA) seen in such a structure. We show that the kinematic distance of 10 kpc derived from a flat Galactic rotation model is highly improbable, and that this bubble/SNR system is most likely resident in the Perseus Spiral Arm, lying 5.2 kpc distant. We model the SWB shell in three dimensions as a homologously expanding ellipsoid. Physical and dynamical characteristics of the bubble are determined, showing its advanced evolutionary state. Finally, from a photometric search for one or more stars associated with the SWB, we determine that three B0V stars and one O4V star currently inhabit this bubble, and that the progenitor of 3C 434.1 was at latest also an O4 type star.

  4. The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Hoare, M. G.; Longmore, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Davis, C. J.; Adamson, A.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; de Grijs, R.; Smith, M.; Gosling, A.; Mitchison, S.; Gáspár, A.; Coe, M.; Tamura, M.; Parker, Q.; Irwin, M.; Hambly, N.; Bryant, J.; Collins, R. S.; Cross, N.; Evans, D. W.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hodgkin, S.; Lewis, J.; Read, M.; Riello, M.; Sutorius, E. T. W.; Lawrence, A.; Drew, J. E.; Dye, S.; Thompson, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near-infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 deg2 of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5° < b < 5° in the J, H and K filters and a ~200-deg2 area of the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus molecular cloud complex in these three filters and the 2.12 μm (1-0) H2 filter. It will provide data on ~2 × 109 sources. Here we describe the properties of the data set and provide a user's guide for its exploitation. We also present brief Demonstration Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science comprises six studies. (1) A GPS-Spitzer-GLIMPSE cross-match for the star formation region G28.983-0.603 to identify YSOs. This increases the number of YSOs identified by a factor of 10 compared to GLIMPSE alone. (2) A wide-field study of the M17 nebula, in which an extinction map of the field is presented and the effect of source confusion on luminosity functions in different subregions is noted. (3) H2 emission in the ρ Ophiuchi dark cloud. All the molecular jets are traced back to a single active clump containing only a few protostars, which suggests that the duration of strong jet activity and associated rapid accretion in low-mass protostars is brief. (4) X-ray sources in the nuclear bulge. The GPS data distinguishes local main-sequence counterparts with soft X-ray spectra from nuclear bulge giant counterparts with hard X-ray spectra. (5) External galaxies in the zone of avoidance. The galaxies are clearly distinguished from stars in fields at longitudes l > 90°. (6) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. The (i' - J) versus (J - H) diagram is used to distinguish A-F type

  5. Comparison of the activity measurements in nuclear medicine services in the Brazilian northeast region.

    PubMed

    de Farias Fragoso, Maria da Conceição; de Albuquerque, Antônio Morais; de Oliveira, Mércia L; de Lima, Fabiana Farias; Barreto, Flávio Chiappetta Paes; de Andrade Lima, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    The Northeastern Regional Centre for Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE), National Nuclear Energy Commission, has organized for the first time in nuclear medicine services (NMSs) in the Brazilian northeast region a comparison of activity measurements for (99m)Tc, (131)I, (67)Ga, (201)Tl and (57)Co. This tool is widely utilized to evaluate not only the accuracy of radionuclide calibrators, but also the competence of NMSs to measure the activity of the radiopharmaceuticals and the performance of the personnel involved in these measurements. The comparison results showed that 90% of the results received from participants are within the ±10% limit established by the Brazilian Norm.

  6. Galactic plane gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tumer, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of the SAS 2 data together with the COS B results shows that the distribution of galactic gamma-radiation has several similarities to that of other large-scale tracers of galactic structure. The radiation is primarily confined to a thin disc which exhibits offsets from b = 0 degrees similar to warping at radio frequencies. The principal distinction of the gamma-radiation is a stronger contrast in intensity between the region from 310 to 45 degrees in longitude and the regions away from the center that can be attributed to a variation in cosmic-ray density as a function of position in Galaxy. The diffuse galactic gamma-ray energy spectrum shows no significant variation in direction, and the spectrum seen along the plane is the same as that for the galactic component of the gamma-radiation at high altitudes. The uniformity of the galactic gamma-ray spectrum, the smooth decrease in intensity as a function of altitude, and the absence of any galactic gamma-ray sources at high altitudes indicate a diffuse origin for bulk of the galactic gamma-radiation rather than a collection of localized sources.

  7. Regional nuclear proliferation and future conflict: Implications for the operational commander. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swicker, C.C.

    1995-02-13

    The end of the Cold War is thought to signal a watershed in American military thought, allowing the practical application of operational art in conventional conflict, unshackled by the doctrine of the strategic defensive imposed by the nuclear stalemate of a bipolar world. This thesis is proven by the success of the U.S.-led coalition in Operation DESERT STORM. But what if Iraq had had a deliverable nuclear capability. The operational impact of a nuclear-capable regional predator on U.S. power projection capabilities is examined in the context of three assumptions: (1) Nuclear proliferation into the ranks of the regional powers is inevitable, given the present dynamics of power, politics and economics. (2) Given the concomitant inevitability of United States engagement in future regional conflicts throughout the world, American forces (either unilaterally or as part of a coalition) will eventually have to confront a regional nuclear power. (3) For a variety of reasons, the United States will not elect a nuclear response to such a challenge. Given these assumptions, the impact of a credible, localized nuclear threat on the operational commander is examined, concentrating on the extent to which such a threat might constrain his free exercise of classical operational art.

  8. Peculiarities of α-element abundances in Galactic open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsakov, V. A.; Gozha, M. L.; Koval', V. V.; Shpigel', L. V.

    2016-01-01

    A catalog compiling the parameters of 346 open clusters, including their metallicities, positions, ages, and velocities has been composed. The elements of the Galactic orbits for 272 of the clusters have been calculated. Spectroscopic determinations of the relative abundances, [el/Fe], for 14 elements synthesized in various nuclear processes averaged over data from 109 publications are presented for 90 clusters. The compiled data indicate that the relative abundances of primary α elements (oxygen and magnesium) exhibit different dependences on metallicity, age, Galactocentric distance, and the elements of the Galactic orbits in clusters with high, elongated orbits satisfying the criterion ( Z max 2 + 4 e 2)1/2 > 0.40 and in field stars of the Galactic thin disk ( Z max is the maximum distance of the orbit from the Galactic plane in kiloparsec and e is the eccentricity of the Galactic orbit). Since no systematic effects distorting the relative abundances of the studied elements in these clusters have been found, these difference suggest real differences between clusters with high, elongated orbits and field stars. In particular, this supports the earlier conclusion, based on an analysis of the elements of the Galactic orbits, that some clusters formed as a result of interactions between high-velocity,metal-poor clouds and the interstellar mediumof theGalactic thin disk. On average, clusters with high, elongated orbits and metallicities [Fe/H] < -0.1 display lower relative abundances of the primary a elements than do field stars. The low [O, Mg/Fe] ratios of these clusters can be understood if the high-velocity clouds that gave rise to them were formed of interstellar material from regions where the star-formation rate and/or the masses of Type II supernovae were lower than near the Galactic plane. It is also shown that, on average, the relative abundances of the primary a elements are higher in relatively metal-rich clusters with high, elongated orbits than in

  9. A Large-Scale, Low-Frequency Murchison Widefield Array Survey of Galactic H ii Regions between 260 < l < 340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Callingham, J. R.; Su, H.; Morgan, J.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Mckinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Ord, S. M.; Procopio, P.; Prabu, T.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2016-05-01

    We have compiled a catalogue of H ii regions detected with the Murchison Widefield Array between 72 and 231 MHz. The multiple frequency bands provided by the Murchison Widefield Array allow us identify the characteristic spectrum generated by the thermal Bremsstrahlung process in H ii regions. We detect 306 H ii regions between 260° < l < 340° and report on the positions, sizes, peak, integrated flux density, and spectral indices of these H ii regions. By identifying the point at which H ii regions transition from the optically thin to thick regime, we derive the physical properties including the electron density, ionised gas mass, and ionising photon flux, towards 61 H ii regions. This catalogue of H ii regions represents the most extensive and uniform low frequency survey of H ii regions in the Galaxy to date.

  10. Parameters of the Galactic density-wave spiral structure: Line-of-sight velocities of 156 star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Jiang, Ing-Guey; Russeil, Delphine

    2015-02-01

    This paper is the third in a series of articles devoted to the determination of the Milky Way's spiral density-wave structure from the kinematics of the Galactic objects, using the ordinary Oort equation. The minor effects caused by the Lin-Shu type two-dimensional density waves are also taken into account. The results obtained allow us to conclude that (a) several low-m spiral patterns with different number of spiral arms m and amplitudes of the perturbed gravitational potential may coexist in the Galaxy. (b) the single-armed m=1 spiral mode dominates the pattern. The distribution of stars and gas in outer parts of the system is thus asymmetric (“lopsided”), (c) the phase velocity of spiral waves (or the pattern rotation speed) does not depend on m and therefore each Fourier component of a gravity perturbation rotates with the same angular velocity, (d) the Sun lies between the main trailing spiral-arm segments in Carina-Sagittarius and Perseus, closer to the inner Carina-Sagittarius one. The local Cygnus-Orion arm in which the Sun is located is thus not a part of the main spiral pattern, and finally (e) the Galaxy seems to be more homogeneous and rotating more like a solid body than in the standard m=0 model (i.e. spiral arms not included in the model).

  11. THE STRUCTURE OF THE BROAD-LINE REGION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. RECONSTRUCTED VELOCITY-DELAY MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Grier, C. J.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; De Rosa, G.; Martini, Paul; Kochanek, C. S.; Zu, Y.; Shappee, B.; Beatty, T. G.; Salvo, C. Araya; Bird, J. C.; Horne, Keith; Bentz, M. C.; Denney, K. D.; Siverd, R.; Sergeev, S. G.; Borman, G. A.; Bord, D. J.; Che, X.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We present velocity-resolved reverberation results for five active galactic nuclei. We recovered velocity-delay maps using the maximum entropy method for four objects: Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, 3C 120, and PG 2130+099. For the fifth, Mrk 6, we were only able to measure mean time delays in different velocity bins of the H{beta} emission line. The four velocity-delay maps show unique dynamical signatures for each object. For 3C 120, the Balmer lines show kinematic signatures consistent with both an inclined disk and infalling gas, but the He II {lambda}4686 emission line is suggestive only of inflow. The Balmer lines in Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, and PG 2130+099 show signs of infalling gas, but the He II emission in Mrk 335 is consistent with an inclined disk. We also see tentative evidence of combined virial motion and infalling gas from the velocity-binned analysis of Mrk 6. The maps for 3C 120 and Mrk 335 are two of the most clearly defined velocity-delay maps to date. These maps constitute a large increase in the number of objects for which we have resolved velocity-delay maps and provide evidence supporting the reliability of reverberation-based black hole mass measurements.

  12. Gamma ray constraints on the Galactic supernova rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, Donald D.; Leising, M.; Mathews, G.; Woosley, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the expected gamma ray signatures of Galactic supernovae of all types to estimate the significance of the lack of a gamma ray signal due to supernovae occurring during the last millenium. Using recent estimates of the nuclear yields, we determine mean Galactic supernova rates consistent with the historic supernova record and the gamma ray limits. Another objective of these calculations of Galactic supernova histories is their application to surveys of diffuse Galactic gamma ray line emission.

  13. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  14. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera, including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera. We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in molecular systematic studies of Lepidoptera, particularly at the intrafamilial level, and our new set of primers now provides a route to generating phylogenomic datasets using traditional methods.

  15. Extension of chromatin accessibility by nuclear matrix attachment regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenuwein, Thomas; Forrester, William C.; Fernández-Herrero, Luis A.; Laible, Götz; Dull, Maude; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    1997-01-01

    Transcription of the variable region of the rearranged immunoglobulin μ gene is dependent on an enhancer sequence situated within one of the introns of the gene. Experiments with transgenic mice have shown that activation of the promoter controlling this transcription also requires the matrix-attachment regions (MARs) that flank the intronic enhancer1. As this μ gene enhancer can establish local areas of accessible chromatin2, we investigated whether the MARs can extend accessibility to more distal positions. We eliminated interactions between enhancer- and promoter-bound factors by linking μ enhancer/MAR fragments to the binding sites for bacteriophage RNA polymerases that were either close to or one kilobase distal to the enhancer. The μ enhancer alone mediated chromatin accessibility at the proximal site but required a flanking MAR to confer accessibility upon the distal promoter. This long-range accessibilty correlates with extended demethylation of the geμ enhancer to generate an extended domain of accessible chromatin.

  16. Modeling Regional Seismic Waves from Underground Nuclear Explosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-15

    highest amplitude regions of the wavefield have maxima and minima at approximately the same fraction of propagated past the right-most edge of the grid...Methods In Coeimpuldatu Physics 11, southwester United States and Mexico , Bi. seiwn. Soc. Air., Seimolog, Aider, B., Ferabad, S. & Bolt. B. A., Academic...Albuquerque, New Mexico , 84 pp. Reshef, M., D. Kosloff, M. Edwards and C. lislung (1988a). Three-dimensional acoustic modeling by the Fourier method

  17. Modeling Regional Seismic Waves From Underground Nuclear Explosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-09

    Nuttli, 0. W., ( 1975 ). Ground Motion Modelling at Regional Distances for Earthquakes in a Continental Interior, 11. Effect of Focal Depth, Azimuth...Johnson, C. E. and D. M. Hadley, 1976. Tectonic Implications of the Brawley earthquake swarm, Imperial Valley, California, January 1975 , Bull. Seism...long period seismograms recorded at Pasadena of earthquakes occurring along a profile to Imperial Valley are studied in terms of source phenomena

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL STELLAR KINEMATICS AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: MEASURING THE NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTER SPATIAL DENSITY PROFILE, BLACK HOLE MASS, AND DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T.; Martinez, G. D.; Bullock, J.; Kaplinghat, M.; Peter, A. H. G.; Yelda, S.; Ghez, A.; Phifer, K.; Lu, J. R.

    2013-12-10

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic observations of stars within the central 0.5 pc of the Milky Way (MW) nuclear star cluster (NSC) using adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy from the Keck telescopes. Recent observations have shown that the cluster has a shallower surface density profile than expected for a dynamically relaxed cusp, leading to important implications for its formation and evolution. However, the true 3D profile of the cluster is unknown due to the difficulty in de-projecting the stellar number counts. Here, we use spherical Jeans modeling of individual proper motions and radial velocities to constrain, for the first time, the de-projected spatial density profile, cluster velocity anisotropy, black hole mass (M {sub BH}), and distance to the Galactic center (R {sub 0}) simultaneously. We find that the inner stellar density profile of the late-type stars, ρ(r)∝r {sup –γ}, have a power law slope γ=0.05{sub −0.60}{sup +0.29}, much more shallow than the frequently assumed Bahcall-Wolf slope of γ = 7/4. The measured slope will significantly affect dynamical predictions involving the cluster, such as the dynamical friction time scale. The cluster core must be larger than 0.5 pc, which disfavors some scenarios for its origin. Our measurement of M{sub BH}=5.76{sub −1.26}{sup +1.76}×10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and R{sub 0}=8.92{sub −0.55}{sup +0.58} kpc is consistent with that derived from stellar orbits within 1'' of Sgr A*. When combined with the orbit of S0-2, the uncertainty on R {sub 0} is reduced by 30% (8.46{sub −0.38}{sup +0.42} kpc). We suggest that the MW NSC can be used in the future in combination with stellar orbits to significantly improve constraints on R {sub 0}.

  19. Dusty cradles in a turbulent nursery: the SGR A east H II region complex at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Adams, J. D.; Morris, M. R.

    2014-10-20

    We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 μm of the compact H II region complex G-0.02-0.07 located 6 pc in projection from the center of the Galaxy obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. G-0.02-0.07 contains three compact H II regions (A, B, and C) and one ultra-compact H II region (D). Our observations reveal the presence of two faint, infrared sources located 23'' and 35'' to the east of region C (FIRS 1 and 2) and detect dust emission in two of the three 'ridges' of ionized gas west of region A. The 19/37 color temperature and 37 μm optical depth maps of regions A-C are used to characterize the dust energetics and morphology. Regions A and B exhibit average 19/37 color temperatures of ∼105 K, and regions C and D exhibit color temperatures of ∼115 K and ∼130 K, respectively. Using the DustEM code, we model the SEDs of regions A-D and FIRS 1, all of which require populations of very small, transiently heated grains and large, equilibrium-heated grains. We also require the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in regions A-C in order to fit the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm fluxes observed by Spitzer/IRAC. The location of the heating source for region A is determined by triangulation from distances and temperatures derived from DustEM models fit to SEDs of three different points around the region, and it is found to be displaced to the northeast of the center of curvature near the color temperature peak. Based on total luminosity, expected 1.90 μm fluxes, and proximity to the mid-IR color temperature peaks, we identify heating source candidates for regions A, B, and C. However, for region D, the observed fluxes at 1.87 and 1.90 μm of the previously proposed ionizing star are a factor of ∼40 times too bright to be the heating source and hence is likely just a star lying along the line of sight toward region D.

  20. The Galactic Center compared with nuclei of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Francoise

    2017-01-01

    Understanding our Galactic Center is easier with insights from nearby galactic nuclei. Both the star formation activity in nuclear gas disks, driven by bars and nuclear bars, and the fueling of low-luminosity AGN, followed by feedback of jets, driving molecular outflows, were certainly present in our Galactic Center, which appears now quenched. Comparisons and diagnostics are reviewed, in particular of m = 2 and m = 1 modes, lopsidedness, different disk orientations, and fossil evidences of activity and feedback.

  1. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma-ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitude 310 and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315 deg, 330 deg, 345 deg, 0 deg, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with such galactic features and components as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  2. Radio structure at 8.4 GHz in Sagittarius A, the compact radio source at the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauncey, David L.; Batchelor, Robert A.; Gates, John; Preston, Robert A.; Meier, David L.; Morabito, David D.; Skjerve, Lyle; Slade, Martin A.; Niell, Arthur E.; Wehrle, Ann E.

    1989-01-01

    VLBI observations of the compact, nonthermal radio source at the Galactic center show it to be elongated at 8.4 GHz along a position angle of 82 + or - 6 deg. The source has an axial ratio of 0.53 + or - 0.10 with a major axis of 17.4 + or - 0.5 mas. Examination of VLA maps of the Galactic center region indicate no obvious alignment with this smaller-scale elongation of the nuclear region, nor is the nuclear position angle aligned with the axis of Galactic rotation. Comparison with the size measured at frequencies from 1 to 22 GHz shows that the size follows very closely the lambda-squared dependence expected from interstellar scattering. The alongated nature of the source implies either that the scattering medium is anisotropic or that some remnant of the intrinsic structure remains visible through the scattering medium.

  3. The distribution of cosmic rays in the galaxy and their dynamics as deduced from recent gamma ray observations. [noting maximum in toroidal region between 4 and 5 kpc from galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puget, J. L.; Stecker, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    Data from SAS-2 on the galactic gamma ray line flux as a function of longitude is examined. It is shown that the gamma ray emissivity varies with galactocentric distance and is about an order of magnitude higher than the local value in a toroidal region between 4 and 5 kpc from the galactic center. This enhancement is accounted for in part by first-order Fermi acceleration, compression, and trapping of cosmic rays consistent with present ideas of galactic dynamics and galactic structure theory. Calculations indicate that cosmic rays in the 4 to 5 kpc region are trapped and accelerated over a mean time of the order of a few million years or about 2 to 4 times the assumed trapping time in the solar region of the galaxy on the assumption that only an increased cosmic ray flux is responsible for the observed emission. Cosmic ray nucleons, cosmic ray electrons, and ionized hydrogen gas were found to have a strikingly similar distribution in the galaxy according to both the observational data and the theoretical model discussed.

  4. A Multiwavelength Study of Star Formation in the Vicinity of Galactic H II Region Sh 2-100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; Kulkarni, V. K.; Kusakabe, N.; Tamura, M.; Bhatt, B. C.; Thompson, M. A.; Sagar, R.

    2010-05-01

    We present multiwavelength investigation of morphology, physical-environment, stellar contents, and star formation activity in the vicinity of star-forming region Sh 2-100. It is found that the Sh 2-100 region contains seven H II regions of ultracompact and compact nature. The present estimation of distance for three H II regions, along with the kinematic distance for others, suggests that all of them belong to the same molecular cloud complex. Using near-infrared photometry, we identified the most probable ionizing sources of six H II regions. Their approximate photometric spectral type estimates suggest that they are massive early-B to mid-O zero-age-main-sequence stars and agree well with radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz, for sources whose emissions are optically thin at this frequency. The morphology of the complex shows a non-uniform distribution of warm and hot dust, well mixed with the ionized gas, which correlates well with the variation of average visual extinction (~4.2-97 mag) across the region. We estimated the physical parameters of ionized gas with the help of radio continuum observations. We detected an optically visible compact nebula located to the south of the 850 μm emission associated with one of the H II regions and the diagnostic of the optical emission line ratios gives electron density and electron temperature of ~0.67 × 103 cm-3 and ~104 K, respectively. The physical parameters suggest that all the H II regions are in different stages of evolution, which correlate well with the probable ages in the range ~0.01-2 Myr of the ionizing sources. The spatial distribution of infrared excess stars, selected from near-infrared and Infrared Array Camera color-color diagrams, correlates well with the association of gas and dust. The positions of infrared excess stars, ultracompact and compact H II regions at the periphery of an H I shell, possibly created by a WR star, indicate that star formation in Sh 2-100 region might have been induced

  5. TESTING 24 {mu}m AND INFRARED LUMINOSITY AS STAR FORMATION TRACERS FOR GALACTIC STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans, Neal J. II

    2013-03-10

    We have tested some relations for star formation rates used in extragalactic studies for regions within the Galaxy. In nearby molecular clouds, where the initial mass function is not fully sampled, the dust emission at 24 {mu}m greatly underestimates star formation rates (by a factor of 100 on average) when compared to star formation rates determined from counting young stellar objects. The total infrared emission does no better. In contrast, the total far-infrared method agrees within a factor of two on average with star formation rates based on radio continuum emission for massive, dense clumps that are forming enough massive stars to have L{sub TIR} exceed 10{sup 4.5} L{sub Sun }. The total infrared and 24 {mu}m also agree well with each other for both nearby, low-mass star-forming regions and the massive, dense clump regions.

  6. Self-shadowing effects of slim accretion disks in active galactic nuclei: the diverse appearance of the broad-line region

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Min; Qiu, Jie; Du, Pu; Ho, Luis C.

    2014-12-10

    Supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) undergo a wide range of accretion rates, which lead to diversity of appearance. We consider the effects of anisotropic radiation from accretion disks on the broad-line region (BLR) from the Shakura-Sunyaev regime to slim disks with super-Eddington accretion rates. The geometrically thick funnel of the inner region of slim disks produces strong self-shadowing effects that lead to very strong anisotropy of the radiation field. We demonstrate that the degree of anisotropy of the radiation fields grows with increasing accretion rate. As a result of this anisotropy, BLR clouds receive different spectral energy distributions depending on their location relative to the disk, resulting in the diverse observational appearance of the BLR. We show that the self-shadowing of the inner parts of the disk naturally produces two dynamically distinct regions of the BLR, depending on accretion rate. These two regions manifest themselves as kinematically distinct components of the broad Hβ line profile with different line widths and fluxes, which jointly account for the Lorentzian profile generally observed in narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies. In the time domain, these two components are expected to reverberate with different time lags with respect to the varying ionizing continuum, depending on the accretion rate and the viewing angle of the observer. The diverse appearance of the BLR due to the anisotropic ionizing energy source can be tested by reverberation mapping of Hβ and other broad emission lines (e.g., Fe II), providing a new tool to diagnose the structure and dynamics of the BLR. Other observational consequences of our model are also explored.

  7. Induced starburst and nuclear activity: Faith, facts, and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosman, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    The problem of the origin of starburst and nuclear (nonstellar) activity in galaxies is reviewed. A physical understanding of the mechanism(s) that induce both types of activity requires one to address the following issues: (1) what is the source of fuel that powers starbursts and active galactic nuclei; and (2) how is it channeled towards the central regions of host galaxies? As a possible clue, the author examines the role of non-axisymmetric perturbations of galactic disks and analyzes their potential triggers. Global gravitational instabilities in the gas on scales approx. 100 pc appear to be crucial for fueling the active galactic nuclei.

  8. Nuclear-Spin-Induced Circular Dichroism in the Infrared Region for Liquids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Yao, Guo-hua; Zhang, Zhen-lin; Liu, Fan-chen; Chen, Dong-ming

    2015-06-22

    Recently, the nuclear-spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) and circular dichroism (NSCD) for liquids were discovered and extensively studied and developed. However, so far, nuclear-spin-induced magnetic circular dichroism in the IR region (IR-NSCD) has not been explored, even though all polyatomic molecules exhibit extensive IR spectra. Herein, IR-NSCD is proposed and discussed theoretically. The results indicate that in favorable conditions the IR-NSCD angle may be much larger than the NSOR angle in the UV/Vis region due to a vibrational resonance effect and can be measurable by using the NSOR experiment scheme. IR-NSCD can automatically combine and give NMR spectra and IRCD spectra of the nuclear spin prepolarized samples in liquids, which, in principle, could be developed to become a unique, novel analytical tool.

  9. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems - Regional Studies. West Texas and Northeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Humberto E.; Chen, Jun; Kim, Jong S.; McKellar, Michael G.; Deason, Wesley R.; Vilim, Richard B.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Boardman, Richard D.

    2015-04-01

    The primary objective of this study is to conduct a preliminary dynamic analysis of two realistic hybrid energy systems (HES) including a nuclear reactor as the main baseload heat generator (denoted as nuclear HES or nuclear hybrid energy systems [NHES]) and to assess the local (e.g., HES owners) and system (e.g., the electric grid) benefits attainable by the application of NHES in scenarios with multiple commodity production and high penetration of renewable energy. It is performed for regional cases - not generic examples - based on available resources, existing infrastructure, and markets within the selected regions. This study also briefly addresses the computational capabilities developed to conduct such analyses, reviews technical gaps, and suggests some research paths forward.

  10. Multi-frequency polarimetry of the Galactic radio background around 350 MHz. I. A region in Auriga around l = 161 deg, b = 16 deg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, M.; Katgert, P.; de Bruyn, A. G.

    2003-06-01

    With the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), multi-frequency polarimetric images were taken of the diffuse radio synchrotron background in a ~ 5 deg times 7 deg region centered on (l,b) = (161 deg ,16 deg ) in the constellation of Auriga. The observations were done simultaneously in 5 frequency bands, from 341 MHz to 375 MHz, and have a resolution of ~ 5.0arcminx5 .0arcmin cosec delta . The polarized intensity P and polarization angle phi show ubiquitous structure on arcminute and degree scales, with polarized brightness temperatures up to about 13 K. On the other hand, no structure at all is observed in total intensity I to an rms limit of 1.3 K, indicating that the structure in the polarized radiation must be due to Faraday rotation and depolarization mostly in the warm component of the nearby Galactic interstellar medium (ISM). Different depolarization processes create structure in polarized intensity P. Beam depolarization creates ``depolarization canals'' of one beam wide, while depth depolarization is thought to be responsible for creating most of the structure on scales larger than a beam width. Rotation measures (RM) can be reliably determined, and are in the range -17 <~ RM <~ 10 rad m-2 with a non-zero average RM0 ~ -3.4 rad m-2. The distribution of RMs on the sky shows both abrupt changes on the scales of the beam and a gradient in the direction of positive Galactic longitude of ~ 1 rad m-2 per degree. The gradient and average RM are consistent with a regular magnetic field of ~ 1 mu G which has a pitch angle of p = -14 deg. There are 13 extragalactic sources in the field for which RMs could be derived, and those have |RM| <~ 13 rad m-2, with an estimated intrinsic source contribution of ~ 3.6 rad m-2. The RMs of the extragalactic sources show a gradient that is about 3 times larger than the gradient in the RMs of the diffuse emission and that is approximately in Galactic latitude. This difference is ascribed to a vastly different effective

  11. Proliferation concerns in the Russian closed nuclear weapons complex cities : a study of regional migration behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, Kristen Lee

    2004-07-01

    The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 left the legacy of the USSR weapons complex with an estimated 50 nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons cities containing facilities responsible for research, production, maintenance, and destruction of the weapons stockpile. The Russian Federation acquired ten such previously secret, closed nuclear weapons complex cities. Unfortunately, a lack of government funding to support these facilities resulted in non-payment of salaries to employees and even plant closures, which led to an international fear of weapons material and knowledge proliferation. This dissertation analyzes migration in 33 regions of the Russian Federation, six of which contain the ten closed nuclear weapons complex cities. This study finds that the presence of a closed nuclear city does not significantly influence migration. However, the factors that do influence migration are statistically different in regions containing closed nuclear cities compared to regions without closed nuclear cities. Further, these results show that the net rate of migration has changed across the years since the break up of the Soviet Union, and that the push and pull factors for migration have changed across time. Specifically, personal and residential factors had a significant impact on migration immediately following the collapse of the Soviet Union, but economic infrastructure and societal factors became significant in later years. Two significant policy conclusions are derived from this research. First, higher levels of income are found to increase outmigration from regions, implying that programs designed to prevent migration by increasing incomes for closed city residents may be counter-productive. Second, this study finds that programs designed to increase capital and build infrastructure in the new Russian Federation will be more effective for employing scientists and engineers from the weapons complex, and consequently reduce the potential for emigration of

  12. A study of four galactic small H II regions: Searching for spontaneous and sequential star formation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung-Ju

    This thesis describes observational studies of four small star-forming H II regions (KR 7, KR 81, KR 120 and KR 140) and star-formation scenario associated with the Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in each region. In addition to that, we also present an analysis of HCO+ (J=3→2) and H13CO+ (J=3→2) observations of the Massive (M ˜ 20 M[special character omitted] ) submillimeter/infrared source IRAS 01202+6133 located on the periphery of the H II region. In this research, we improved existing 1-D radiative transfer model for a collapsing core that happens in the early phase -- Class I protostar -- of star formation. The molecular gas surrounding an H II region is thought to be a place where star formation can be induced. We selected four small H II region in order to minimize the feedbacks and dynamics from multiple exciting sources. These regions are very young and ionized by the single O or B spectral type stars. A space based telescope Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) used for identifying and classifying the YSOs population surrounding a sample of H II regions. First, we used WISE data from AllWISE catalog with some constrains such as spatial coordinates, signal-to-noise ratio and contaminations. After we retrieved sources from catalog in each region, we classified YSOs with two different methods; color-color diagram and spectral index (alpha). Based on the color-color diagram using WISE 3.4 mum, 4.6 mum and 12 mum bands, we classified the YSOs as Class I, Class II and using 3.4 mum, 4.6 mum and 22 mum, we were able to classify Transition Disks and Class III YSOs. 2MASS and WISE combined color-color diagram also used in order to compare the classification only use of WISE color-color diagram. Considering a reddening effect from 2MASS Ks band, the classification from both WISE only and 2MASS, WISE combined color-colordiagram. A spectral index (alpha) also can be used as classifying YSOs. Based on the WISE magnitude, spectral index (alpha) can be derived

  13. Atomic Hydrogen in a Galactic Center Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Green, J. A.; Hill, A. S.; Lockman, F. J.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Green, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a population of small, high-velocity, atomic hydrogen clouds, loops, and filaments found above and below the disk near the Galactic center. The objects have a mean radius of 15 pc, velocity widths of ~14 km s-1, and are observed at |z| heights up to 700 pc. The velocity distribution of the clouds shows no signature of Galactic rotation. We propose a scenario where the clouds are associated with an outflow from a central star-forming region at the Galactic center. We discuss the clouds as entrained material traveling at ~200 km s-1 in a Galactic wind.

  14. A lack of classical Cepheids in the inner part of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Feast, Michael W.; Bono, Giuseppe; Kobayashi, Naoto; Inno, Laura; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Shogo; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Nagata, Tetsuya

    2016-10-01

    Recent large-scale infrared surveys have been revealing stellar populations in the inner Galaxy seen through strong interstellar extinction in the disc. In particular, classical Cepheids with their period-luminosity and period-age relations are useful tracers of Galactic structure and evolution. Interesting groups of Cepheids reported recently include four Cepheids in the nuclear stellar disc (NSD), about 200 pc around the Galactic Centre, found by Matsunaga et al. and those spread across the inner part of the disc reported by Dékány and collaborators. We here report our discovery of nearly 30 classical Cepheids towards the bulge region, some of which are common with Dékány et al., and discuss the large impact of the reddening correction on distance estimates for these objects. Assuming that the four Cepheids in the NSD are located at the distance of the Galactic Centre and that the near-infrared extinction law, i.e. wavelength dependency of the interstellar extinction, is not systematically different between the NSD and other bulge lines of sight, most of the other Cepheids presented here are located significantly further than the Galactic Centre. This suggests a lack of Cepheids in the inner 2.5 kpc region of the Galactic disc except the NSD. Recent radio observations show a similar distribution of star-forming regions.

  15. SOAR Near-Infrared and Optical Survey of OIf* and OIf*/WN Stars in the Periphery of Galactic Massive Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Lopes, A.; Franco, G. A. P.; Sanmartin, D.

    In this contribution we present some preliminary results obtained from a SOAR-Goodman optical spectroscopic survey aimed to confirm the OIf* - OIf*/WN nature of a sample of Galactic candidates that were previously confirmed as massive stars based on near-infrared spectra taken with OSIRIS at SOAR. With only a few of such stars known in the Galaxy to date, our study significantly contributes to improve the number of known Galactic O2If* stars, as well as almost doubling the number of known members of the galactic sample of the rare type OIf*/WN.

  16. Constraining UV continuum slopes of active galactic nuclei with cloudy models of broad-line region extreme-ultraviolet emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Moloney, Joshua; Michael Shull, J. E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the composition and structure of the broad-line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is important for answering many outstanding questions in supermassive black hole evolution, galaxy evolution, and ionization of the intergalactic medium. We used single-epoch UV spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope to measure EUV emission-line fluxes from four individual AGNs with 0.49 ≤ z ≤ 0.64, two AGNs with 0.32 ≤ z ≤ 0.40, and a composite of 159 AGNs. With the CLOUDY photoionization code, we calculated emission-line fluxes from BLR clouds with a range of density, hydrogen ionizing flux, and incident continuum spectral indices. The photoionization grids were fit to the observations using single-component and locally optimally emitting cloud (LOC) models. The LOC models provide good fits to the measured fluxes, while the single-component models do not. The UV spectral indices preferred by our LOC models are consistent with those measured from COS spectra. EUV emission lines such as N IV λ765, O II λ833, and O III λ834 originate primarily from gas with electron temperatures between 37,000 K and 55,000 K. This gas is found in BLR clouds with high hydrogen densities (n {sub H} ≥ 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}) and hydrogen ionizing photon fluxes (Φ{sub H} ≥ 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}).

  17. Type 2 Active Galactic Nuclei with Double-Peaked [O III] Lines: Narrow-Line Region Kinematics or Merging Supermassive Black Hole Pairs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2010-01-01

    We present a sample of 167 type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with double-peaked [O III] λλ4959,5007 narrow emission lines, selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The double-peaked profiles can be well modeled by two velocity components, blueshifted and redshifted from the systemic velocity. Half of these objects have a more prominent redshifted component. In cases where the Hβ emission line is strong, it also shows two velocity components whose line-of-sight (LOS) velocity offsets are consistent with those of [O III]. The relative LOS velocity offset between the two components is typically a few hundred km s-1, larger by a factor of ~1.5 than the line full width at half maximum of each component. The offset correlates with the host stellar velocity dispersion σ*. The host galaxies of this sample show systematically larger σ*, stellar masses, and concentrations, and older luminosity-weighted mean stellar ages than a regular type 2 AGN sample matched in redshift, [O III] λ5007 equivalent width, and luminosity; they show no significant difference in radio properties. These double-peaked features could be due to narrow-line region kinematics, or binary black holes. The statistical properties do not show strong preference for or against either scenario, and spatially resolved optical imaging, spectroscopy, radio or X-ray follow-up are needed to draw firm conclusions.

  18. Modeling the Destruction and Survival of PAHs in Astrophysical Regions: from Low-metallicity Galaxies to Elliptical Galaxies and Galactic Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aigen

    2006-05-01

    The 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3 micron emission features of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have been seen in a wide variety of Galactic and extragalactic objects. However, the PAH features are weak or absent in low-metallicity galaxies and AGN, as generally interpreted as the destruction of PAHs by hard UV photons in metal-poor galaxies or by extreme UV and soft X-ray photons in AGN. On the other hand, the PAH emission features have recently been detected in elliptical galaxies, tidal dwarf galaxies, galaxy halos, and distant galaxies at redshift >=2. However, it is not clear how PAHs can survive in elliptical galaxies containing X-ray emitting hot gas where PAHs are expected to be easily destroyed through sputtering by hot plasma ions. It is also not clear how PAHs get ``levitated'' and survive from galactic plane to galaxy halo where the physical conditions are similar to those of elliptical galaxies. We propose to study the destruction of PAHs (1) by UV photons in low-metallicity galaxies, (2) by extreme UV and X-ray photons in AGN, (3) by intense UV radiation in regions with strong star-forming activities, and (4) through sputtering by plasma ions in hot gas. This will allow us, by the first time, to quantitatively investigate the deficiency or lack of PAHs in AGN and low-metallicity galaxies, as well as the survivability of PAHs in elliptical galaxies, galaxy halo, and superwind, and the method of using the IRAC 8 micron photometry as a tracer of star formation rates. This program will create a web-based ``library'' of the destruction rates of PAHs by UV and X-ray photons as a function of size, intensity and hardness of the radiation field, and the sputtering rates of PAHs by plasma ions as a function of size, gas density and temperature. This library will be made publicly available to the astronomical community by May 2007 on the internet at http://www.missouri.edu/~lia/.

  19. REGIONAL BINNING FOR CONTINUED STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    W. Lee Poe, Jr

    1998-10-01

    In the Continued Storage Analysis Report (CSAR) (Reference 1), DOE decided to analyze the environmental consequences of continuing to store the commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at 72 commercial nuclear power sites and DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste at five Department of Energy sites by region rather than by individual site. This analysis assumes that three commercial facilities pairs--Salem and Hope Creek, Fitzpatrick and Nine-Mile Point, and Dresden and Moms--share common storage due to their proximity to each other. The five regions selected for this analysis are shown on Figure 1. Regions 1, 2, and 3 are the same as those used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in their regulatory oversight of commercial power reactors. NRC Region 4 was subdivided into two regions to more appropriately define the two different climates that exist in NRC Region 4. A single hypothetical site in each region was assumed to store all the SNF and HLW in that region. Such a site does not exist and has no geographic location but is a mathematical construct for analytical purposes. To ensure that the calculated results for the regional analyses reflect appropriate inventory, facility and material degradation, and radionuclide transport, the waste inventories, engineered barriers, and environmental conditions for the hypothetical sites were developed from data for each of the existing sites within the given region. Weighting criteria to account for the amount and types of SNF and HLW at each site were used in the development of the environmental data for the regional site, such that the results of the analyses for the hypothetical site were representative of the sum of the results of each actual site if they had been modeled independently. This report defines the actual site data used in development of this hypothetical site, shows how the individual site data was weighted to develop the regional site, and provides the weighted data used in the CSAR analysis. It is

  20. Multi-Decadal Global Cooling and Unprecedented Ozone Loss Following a Regional Nuclear Conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, M. J.; Toon, O. B.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Robock, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first study of the global impacts of a regional nuclear war with an Earth system model including atmospheric chemistry, ocean dynamics, and interactive sea-ice and land models (Mills et al., 2014). A limited, regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan in which each side detonates 50 15-kt weapons could produce about 5 Tg of black carbon. This would self-loft to the stratosphere, where it would spread globally, producing a sudden drop in surface temperatures and intense heating of the stratosphere. Using the Community Earth System Model with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (CESM1(WACCM)), we calculate an e-folding time of 8.7 years for stratospheric black carbon, compared to 4-6.5 years for previous studies (figure panel a). Our calculations show that global ozone losses of 20-50% over populated areas, levels unprecedented in human history, would accompany the coldest average surface temperatures in the last 1000 years (figure panel c). We calculate summer enhancements in UV indices of 30-80% over Mid-Latitudes, suggesting widespread damage to human health, agriculture, and terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Killing frosts would reduce growing seasons by 10-40 days per year for 5 years. Surface temperatures would be reduced for more than 25 years, due to thermal inertia and albedo effects in the ocean and expanded sea ice. The combined cooling and enhanced UV would put significant pressures on global food supplies and could trigger a global nuclear famine. Knowledge of the impacts of 100 small nuclear weapons should motivate the elimination of the more than 17,000 nuclear weapons that exist today. Mills, M. J., O. B. Toon, J. Lee-Taylor, and A. Robock (2014), Multidecadal global cooling and unprecedented ozone loss following a regional nuclear conflict, Earth's Future, 2(4), 161-176, doi:10.1002/2013EF000205.

  1. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W.; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera, including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera. We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in molecular systematic studies of Lepidoptera, particularly at the intrafamilial level, and our new set of primers now provides a route to generating phylogenomic datasets using traditional methods. PMID:27408580

  2. Radial metallicity gradients in spiral galaxies from H II regions and planetary nebulae: probing galactic chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Radial metallicity gradients, typically observed in spiral galaxies, are excellent constraints for chemical evolution models. The contemporary studies of the two stellar populations, whose progenitors have formed at different times, yield to the chemical and time constraining of the models. In this context, planetary nebula and HII region analysis proved to be ideal two-epochs test populations. We present an assortment of galaxies whose oxygen abundances have been determined both with weak- and strong-line methods, and whose radial metallicity gradients and their evolution in time have disclosed very interesting correlations with the galaxy characteristics. New results from our Gemini/GMOS observations, and a review of the best literature data, set the stage for a better understanding of spiral galaxy evolution.

  3. Keplerian Motion of Broad-Line Region Gas as Evidence for Supermassive Black Holes in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Bradley M.; Wandel, Amri

    1999-01-01

    Emission-line variability data on NGC 5548 argue strongly for the existence of a mass of order 7 x l0(exp 7) solar mass, within the inner few light-days of the nucleus in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. The time-delayed response of the emission lines to continuum variations is used to infer the size of the line-emitting region, and these determinations are combined with measurements of the Doppler widths of the variable line components to estimate a virial mass. The data for several different emission lines spanning an order of magnitude in distance from the central source show the expected V proportional to r(sup -1/2) correlation and are consistent with a single value for the mass.

  4. Perspective on Advances in Resonance-Region Nuclear Modeling and Opportunities for Future Research

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Michael E; Larson, Nancy M; Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C

    2007-01-01

    The advent of high-fidelity radiation-transport modeling capabilities, coupled with the need to analyze complex nuclear systems, has served to emphasize the importance of high-precision cross section data, including the associated covariance information. Due to the complex nature of resonance-region interactions, cross section data cannot be calculated directly from theory; rather, high-precision resonance-region cross section measurements must be made at facilities such as the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Geel Electron Linear Accelerator (GELINA), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). To extract accurate cross section data from these measurements, detailed nuclear modeling of the measured data is performed to parameterize the cross section behavior in the resonance range. The objective of this paper is to highlight recent advances in resonance-region nuclear modeling with particular emphasis on the covariance analysis capabilities. Opportunities for future research are identified in an effort to stimulate further advances in the state of the art nuclear modeling capabilities.

  5. A New Database of Digitized Regional Seismic Waveforms from Nuclear Explosions in Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, I. N.; Richards, P. G.; Kim, W. Y.; Mikhailova, N. N.

    2014-12-01

    Seismology is an observational science. Hence, the effort to understand details of seismic signals from underground nuclear explosions requires analysis of waveforms recorded from past nuclear explosions. Of principal interest, are regional signals from explosions too small to be reliably identified via teleseismic recording. But the great majority of stations operated today, even those in networks for nuclear explosion monitoring, have never recorded explosion signals at regional distances, because most stations were installed long after the period when most underground nuclear explosions were conducted; and the few nuclear explosions since the early 1990s were mostly recorded only at teleseismic distances. We have therefore gathered thousands of nuclear explosion regional seismograms from more than 200 analog stations operated in the former Soviet Union. Most of them lie in a region stretching approximately 6000 km East-West and 2000 km North-South and including much of Central Asia. We have digitized them and created a modern digital database, including significant metadata. Much of this work has been done in Kazakhstan. Most of the explosions were underground, but several were conducted in the atmosphere. This presentation will characterize the content and overall quality of the new database for signals from nuclear explosions in Eurasia, which were conducted across substantial ranges of yield and shot-point depth, and under a great variety of different geological conditions. This work complements a 20-year collaborative effort which made the original digital recordings of the Borovoye Geophysical Observatory, Kazakhstan, openly available in a modern format (see http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/Monitoring/Data/). For purposes of characterizing explosive sources, it would be of assistance to have seismogram archives from explosions conducted in all regions including the Pacific, North Africa, and the United States (including the Aleutians). Openly available

  6. Investigating the Local Physical and Chemical Environments toward the Galactic Center Region - SgrB2(N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remijan, Anthony; Jones, Paul; Cunningham, Maria; Thorwirth, Sven; Menten, Karl; Schilke, Peter; Belloche, Arnaud; Meier, David; Walsh, Andrew; Kurtz, Stan; Bruenken, Sandra; Mccarthy, Michael C.; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Pate, Brooks; Corby, Joanna`; Steber, Amanda

    2011-04-01

    The proposed observation will image multiple transitions of four structurally diverse molecules (methanol, formamide, methylamine, and cyanoacetylene) toward the pre-eminent source of molecular emission in the Galaxy, Sgr B2(N). The overall goal is to investigate the local physical and chemical environment of this highly complex region of space. Our hypthesis is that the spatial distributions and localized physical environments of each molecule will help predict the most favorable chemical formation pathways for these species and eventually others. The improved capabilities of the ATCA allow for simultaneous observation of ten 3-cm band transitions of the target molecules using the 64MHz x 32kHz zoom modes of the CABB. This project is an essential extension of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) PRebiotic Interstellar MOlecular Survey (PRIMOS) toward Sgr B2(N) which has previously been observed across the full 2GHz of the 3-cm band. We will analyze ATCA data from the proposed observation, together with the single dish data from PRIMOS, to obtain a more complete understanding of the compact and extended distributions of these four abundant complex molecules as we work towards the broader goal of determining chemical formation pathways in space.

  7. Infrared Study of the Southern Galactic Star-Forming Regions Associated with IRAS 10049-5657 and IRAS 10031-5632

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vig, S.; Ghosh, S. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Verma, R. P.

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the physical conditions of the interstellar medium and stellar components in the regions of the southern Galactic star-forming complexes associated with IRAS 10049-5657 and IRAS 10031-5632. These regions have been mapped simultaneously in two far-infrared bands (λeff ~ 150 and 210 μm), with ~1' angular resolution using the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research 1 m balloon-borne telescope. Spatial distribution of the temperature of cool dust and optical depth at 200 μm have been obtained taking advantage of the similar beams in the two bands. The HIRES processed Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) maps at 12, 25, 60, and 100 μm have been used for comparison. Using the Two Micron All Sky Survey near-infrared sources, we find the stellar populations of the embedded young clusters. A rich cluster of OB stars is seen in the IRAS 10049-5657 region. The fits to the stellar density radial profile of the cluster associated with IRAS 10049-5657 have been explored with the inverse radius profile as well as the King's profile; the cluster radius is ~2 pc. The source in the cluster closest to the IRAS peak is IRA-7, which lies above the zero-age main-sequence curve of spectral type O5 in the color-magnitude diagram. Unlike IRAS 10049-5657, a small cluster comprising a few deeply embedded sources is seen at the location of IRAS 10031-5632. Self-consistent radiative transfer modeling aimed at extracting important physical and geometrical details of the two IRAS sources shows that the best-fit models are in good agreement with the observed spectral energy distributions. The geometric details of the associated cloud and optical depths (τ100) have been estimated. A uniform density distribution of dust and gas is implied for both the sources. In addition, the infrared ionic fine-structure line emission from gas has been modeled for both the regions and compared with data from the IRAS low-resolution spectrometer. For IRAS 10049-5657, the observed and modeled

  8. Telomere-surrounding regions are transcription-permissive 3D nuclear compartments in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Quina, Ana Sofia; Parreira, Leonor . E-mail: lparreir@igc.gulbenkian.pt

    2005-07-01

    Positioning of genes relative to nuclear heterochromatic compartments is thought to help regulate their transcriptional activity. Given that human subtelomeric regions are rich in highly expressed genes, we asked whether human telomeres are related to transcription-permissive nuclear compartments. To address this question, we investigated in the nuclei of normal human lymphocytes the spatial relations of two constitutively expressed genes (ACTB and RARA) and three nuclear transcripts (ACTB, IL2RA and TCRB) to telomeres and centromeres, as a function of gene activity and transcription levels. We observed that genes and gene transcripts locate close to telomere clusters and away from chromocenters upon activation of transcription. These findings, together with the observation that SC35 domains, which are enriched in pre-mRNA processing factors, are in close proximity to telomeres, indicate that telomere-neighboring regions are permissive to gene expression in human cells. Therefore, the associations of telomeres observed in the interphase nucleus might contribute, as opposed to chromocenters, for the establishment of transcription-permissive 3D nuclear compartments.

  9. Nuclear Deformation and Neutron Excess as Competing Effects for Dipole Strength in the Pygmy Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Dönau, F.; Frauendorf, S.; Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Beyer, R.; Bhatia, C.; Birgersson, E.; Butterling, M.; Elekes, Z.; Ferrari, A.; Gooden, M. E.; Hannaske, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Kempe, M.; Kelley, J. H.; Kögler, T.; Matic, A.; Menzel, M. L.; Müller, S.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Röder, M.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Schmidt, K.; Schramm, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Wagner, A.

    2014-02-01

    The electromagnetic dipole strength below the neutron-separation energy has been studied for the xenon isotopes with mass numbers A =124, 128, 132, and 134 in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using the γELBE bremsstrahlung facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the HIγS facility at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Durham. The systematic study gained new information about the influence of the neutron excess as well as of nuclear deformation on the strength in the region of the pygmy dipole resonance. The results are compared with those obtained for the chain of molybdenum isotopes and with predictions of a random-phase approximation in a deformed basis. It turned out that the effect of nuclear deformation plays a minor role compared with the one caused by neutron excess. A global parametrization of the strength in terms of neutron and proton numbers allowed us to derive a formula capable of predicting the summed E1 strengths in the pygmy region for a wide mass range of nuclides.

  10. Fe K LINE COMPLEX IN THE NUCLEAR REGION OF NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh

    2011-12-15

    A bright, nearby edge-on starburst galaxy, NGC 253, was studied using the Suzaku, XMM, and Chandra X-ray observatories. With Suzaku and XMM we detected complex line structure of Fe K, which is resolved into three lines (Fe I at 6.4 keV, Fe XXV at 6.7 keV, and Fe XXVI at 7.0 keV) around the center of NGC 253. Especially, the Fe I and Fe XXVI lines are the first clear detections, with a significance of >99.99% and 99.89% estimated by a Monte Carlo procedure. Imaging spectroscopy with Chandra revealed that the emission is distributed in {approx}60 arcsec{sup 2} region around the nucleus, which suggests that the source is not only the buried active galactic nucleus. The flux of highly ionized Fe lines can be explained by the accumulation of 10-1000 supernova remnants that are the result of high star-forming activity, while the Fe I line flux is consistent with the fluorescent line emission expected with the molecular clouds in the region.

  11. Angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level density in the A ≈170 -200 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohil, M.; Roy, Pratap; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Mukherjee, G.; Pandey, R.; Pai, H.; Srivastava, V.; Meena, J. K.; Banerjee, S. R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, D.; Pal, S.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron evaporation spectra along with γ multiplicity has been measured from 201Tl*,185Re*, and 169Tm* compound nuclei at the excitation energies of ˜27 and 37 MeV. Statistical model analysis of the experimental data has been carried out to extract the value of the inverse level density parameter k at different angular-momentum (J ) regions corresponding to different γ multiplicities. It is observed that, for the present systems the value of k remains almost constant for different J . The present results for the angular-momentum dependence of the nuclear level density (NLD) parameter a ˜(=A /k ) , for nuclei with A ˜180 are quite different from those obtained in earlier measurements in the case of light- and medium-mass systems. The present study provides useful information to understand the angular-momentum dependence of the NLD at different nuclear mass regions.

  12. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region I: Hard X-Ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Krivonos, Roman; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Tomsick, John A.; Alexander, David M.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Canipe, Alicia M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Luu, Vy; Madsen, Kristen K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Westergaard, Niels J.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ˜ 1.3-2.3 up to ˜50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (˜1023 cm-2), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ˜ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to LX ≳ 1038 erg s-1. Above ˜20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95-0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses MWD ˜ 0.9 M⊙. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95-0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745-290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  13. [Fe II] 1.64 μm IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF THE OUTFLOW FEATURES AROUND ULTRACOMPACT H II REGIONS IN THE FIRST GALACTIC QUADRANT

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Kim, Kee-Tae; Lee, Jae-Joon; Kyeong, Jaemann; Hwang, Narae; Park, Byeong-Gon; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul; Pyo, Tae-Soo

    2014-09-01

    We present [Fe II] 1.644 μm features around ultracompact H II regions (UCHIIs) found on a quest for the ''footprint'' outflow features of UCHIIs—the features produced by outflowing materials ejected during an earlier, active accretion phase of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs). We surveyed 237 UCHIIs in the first Galactic quadrant, employing the CORNISH UCHII catalog and UWIFE data, which is an imaging survey in [Fe II] 1.644 μm performed with UKIRT-WFCAM under ∼0.''8 seeing conditions. The [Fe II] features were found around five UCHIIs, one of which was less plausible. We interpret the [Fe II] features to be shock-excited by outflows from YSOs and estimate the outflow mass-loss rates from the [Fe II] flux which are ∼1 × 10{sup –6}-4 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We propose that the [Fe II] features might be the ''footprint'' outflow features, but more studies are required to clarify whether or not this is the case. This is based on the morphological relation between the [Fe II] and 5 GHz radio features, the outflow mass-loss rate, the travel time of the [Fe II] features, and the existence of several YSO candidates near the UCHIIs. The UCHIIs accompanying the [Fe II] features have relatively higher peak flux densities. The fraction of UCHIIs accompanying the [Fe II] features, 5/237, is small when compared to the ∼90% detection rate of high-velocity CO gas around UCHIIs. We discuss some possible explanations for the low detection rate.

  14. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Conrad L.; Seifert, Keith A.; Huhndorf, Sabine; Robert, Vincent; Spouge, John L.; Levesque, C. André; Chen, Wen; Bolchacova, Elena; Voigt, Kerstin; Crous, Pedro W.; Miller, Andrew N.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Aime, M. Catherine; An, Kwang-Deuk; Bai, Feng-Yan; Barreto, Robert W.; Begerow, Dominik; Bergeron, Marie-Josée; Blackwell, Meredith; Boekhout, Teun; Bogale, Mesfin; Boonyuen, Nattawut; Burgaz, Ana R.; Buyck, Bart; Cai, Lei; Cai, Qing; Cardinali, G.; Chaverri, Priscila; Coppins, Brian J.; Crespo, Ana; Cubas, Paloma; Cummings, Craig; Damm, Ulrike; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Del-Prado, Ruth; Dentinger, Bryn; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier; Divakar, Pradeep K.; Douglas, Brian; Dueñas, Margarita; Duong, Tuan A.; Eberhardt, Ursula; Edwards, Joan E.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Fliegerova, Katerina; Furtado, Manohar; García, Miguel A.; Ge, Zai-Wei; Griffith, Gareth W.; Griffiths, K.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Groenewald, Marizeth; Grube, Martin; Gryzenhout, Marieka; Guo, Liang-Dong; Hagen, Ferry; Hambleton, Sarah; Hamelin, Richard C.; Hansen, Karen; Harrold, Paul; Heller, Gregory; Herrera, Cesar; Hirayama, Kazuyuki; Hirooka, Yuuri; Ho, Hsiao-Man; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Hofstetter, Valérie; Högnabba, Filip; Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Hong, Seung-Beom; Hosaka, Kentaro; Houbraken, Jos; Hughes, Karen; Huhtinen, Seppo; Hyde, Kevin D.; James, Timothy; Johnson, Eric M.; Johnson, Joan E.; Johnston, Peter R.; Jones, E.B. Gareth; Kelly, Laura J.; Kirk, Paul M.; Knapp, Dániel G.; Kõljalg, Urmas; Kovács, Gábor M.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Landvik, Sara; Leavitt, Steven D.; Liggenstoffer, Audra S.; Liimatainen, Kare; Lombard, Lorenzo; Luangsa-ard, J. Jennifer; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Maganti, Harinad; Maharachchikumbura, Sajeewa S. N.; Martin, María P.; May, Tom W.; McTaggart, Alistair R.; Methven, Andrew S.; Meyer, Wieland; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc; Mongkolsamrit, Suchada; Nagy, László G.; Nilsson, R. Henrik; Niskanen, Tuula; Nyilasi, Ildikó; Okada, Gen; Okane, Izumi; Olariaga, Ibai; Otte, Jürgen; Papp, Tamás; Park, Duckchul; Petkovits, Tamás; Pino-Bodas, Raquel; Quaedvlieg, William; Raja, Huzefa A.; Redecker, Dirk; Rintoul, Tara L.; Ruibal, Constantino; Sarmiento-Ramírez, Jullie M.; Schmitt, Imke; Schüßler, Arthur; Shearer, Carol; Sotome, Kozue; Stefani, Franck O.P.; Stenroos, Soili; Stielow, Benjamin; Stockinger, Herbert; Suetrong, Satinee; Suh, Sung-Oui; Sung, Gi-Ho; Suzuki, Motofumi; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Tedersoo, Leho; Telleria, M. Teresa; Tretter, Eric; Untereiner, Wendy A.; Urbina, Hector; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Vialle, Agathe; Vu, Thuy Duong; Walther, Grit; Wang, Qi-Ming; Wang, Yan; Weir, Bevan S.; Weiß, Michael; White, Merlin M.; Xu, Jianping; Yahr, Rebecca; Yang, Zhu L.; Yurkov, Andrey; Zamora, Juan-Carlos; Zhang, Ning; Zhuang, Wen-Ying; Schindel, David

    2012-01-01

    Six DNA regions were evaluated as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life, by a multinational, multilaboratory consortium. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it is difficult to amplify in fungi, often includes large introns, and can be insufficiently variable. Three subunits from the nuclear ribosomal RNA cistron were compared together with regions of three representative protein-coding genes (largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, and minichromosome maintenance protein). Although the protein-coding gene regions often had a higher percent of correct identification compared with ribosomal markers, low PCR amplification and sequencing success eliminated them as candidates for a universal fungal barcode. Among the regions of the ribosomal cistron, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has the highest probability of successful identification for the broadest range of fungi, with the most clearly defined barcode gap between inter- and intraspecific variation. The nuclear ribosomal large subunit, a popular phylogenetic marker in certain groups, had superior species resolution in some taxonomic groups, such as the early diverging lineages and the ascomycete yeasts, but was otherwise slightly inferior to the ITS. The nuclear ribosomal small subunit has poor species-level resolution in fungi. ITS will be formally proposed for adoption as the primary fungal barcode marker to the Consortium for the Barcode of Life, with the possibility that supplementary barcodes may be developed for particular narrowly circumscribed taxonomic groups. PMID:22454494

  15. New symmetry regions in the IBA and a simplified approach to nuclear phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The IBA treatment of nuclear symmetries and transition regions is discussed. A new, extensive region of O(6) nuclei near A = 130 is presented and compared with the Pt isotopes. Nearly identical level schemes characterize both regions, including similar relations between the O(6) and O(5) steps in the dynamical symmetry chain decomposition, and similar discrepancies with the O(6) limit. Simple calculations that incorporate a triaxial component as an O(6) symmetry breaking mechanism remove these discrepancies in both regions. The evidence for a new, and perhaps the only, good region of SU(3) symmetry is given and discussed in a context of mixing with non-collective degrees of freedom. Finally, a systematic approach to transition regions is presented in which the key determinant of structure is the product N/sub ..pi../.N/sub ..nu../ of the number of valence proton and neutron bosons. Recognition of this allows an extremely simple treatment of complex transition regions. As an example, calculations for the U(5)..-->..O(6)..-->..SU(3) sequence from A = 120-140, which involve only six constants for the entire region of approx. = 30 nuclei, are discussed. The use of N/sub ..pi../.N/sub ..nu../ plots allows the study of the dissipation of shell and subshell gaps. Results for the A approx. = 100 and A approx. = 150 regions are presented and effective proton-boson numbers are extracted and compared with earlier results from g factor measurements and from microscopic calculations. 43 references.

  16. Multidecadal global cooling and unprecedented ozone loss following a regional nuclear conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Michael J.; Toon, Owen B.; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Robock, Alan

    2014-04-01

    We present the first study of the global impacts of a regional nuclear war with an Earth system model including atmospheric chemistry, ocean dynamics, and interactive sea ice and land components. A limited, regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan in which each side detonates 50 15 kt weapons could produce about 5 Tg of black carbon (BC). This would self-loft to the stratosphere, where it would spread globally, producing a sudden drop in surface temperatures and intense heating of the stratosphere. Using the Community Earth System Model with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, we calculate an e-folding time of 8.7 years for stratospheric BC compared to 4-6.5 years for previous studies. Our calculations show that global ozone losses of 20%-50% over populated areas, levels unprecedented in human history, would accompany the coldest average surface temperatures in the last 1000 years. We calculate summer enhancements in UV indices of 30%-80% over midlatitudes, suggesting widespread damage to human health, agriculture, and terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Killing frosts would reduce growing seasons by 10-40 days per year for 5 years. Surface temperatures would be reduced for more than 25 years due to thermal inertia and albedo effects in the ocean and expanded sea ice. The combined cooling and enhanced UV would put significant pressures on global food supplies and could trigger a global nuclear famine. Knowledge of the impacts of 100 small nuclear weapons should motivate the elimination of more than 17,000 nuclear weapons that exist today.

  17. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a national capital region nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2011-12-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kT detonation in the National Capital Region. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at one exemplary point. For most Washington, DC neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

  18. Steps toward Determination of the Size and Structure of the Broad-Line Region in Active Galactic Nuclei. IX. Ultraviolet Observations of Fairall 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pascual, P. M.; Alloin, D.; Clavel, J.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Horne, K.; Kriss, G. A.; Krolik, J. H.; Malkan, M. A.; Netzer, H.; O'Brien, P. T.; Peterson, B. M.; Reichert, G. A.; Wamsteker, W.; Alexander, T.; Barr, P.; Blandford, R. D.; Bregman, J. N.; Carone, T. E.; Clements, S.; Courvoisier, T.-J.; Robertis, M. M. De; Dietrich, M.; Dottori, H.; Edelson, R. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Gaskell, C. M.; Huchra, J. P.; Hutchings, J. B.; Kollatschny, W.; Koratkar, A. P.; Korista, K. T.; Laor, A.; MacAlpine, G. M.; Martin, P. G.; Maoz, D.; McCollum, B.; Morris, S. L.; Perola, G. C.; Pogge, R. W.; Ptak, R. L.; Recondo-González, M. C.; J. M. Rodríguez-Espinoza; Rokaki, E. L.; Santos-Lleó, M.; Sekiguchi, K.; Shull, J. M.; Snijders, M. A. J.; Sparke, L. S.; Stirpe, G. M.; Stoner, R. E.; Sun, W.-H.; Wagner, S. J.; Wanders, I.; Wilkes, J.; Winge, C.; Zheng, W.

    1997-05-01

    An 8 month monitoring campaign on the Seyfert 1 galaxy Fairall 9 has been conducted with the International Ultraviolet Explorer in an attempt to obtain reliable estimates of continuum-continuum and continuum-emission-line delays for a high-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN). While the results of this campaign are more ambiguous than those of previous monitoring campaigns on lower luminosity sources, we find general agreement with the earlier results: (1) there is no measurable lag between ultraviolet continuum bands, and (2) the measured emission-line time lags are very short. It is especially notable that the Lyα + N V emission-line lag is about 1 order of magnitude smaller than determined from a previous campaign by Clavel, Wamsteker, & Glass (1989) when Fairall 9 was in a more luminous state. In other well-monitored sources, specifically NGC 5548 and NGC 3783, the highest ionization lines are found to respond to continuum variations more rapidly than the lower ionization lines, which suggests a radially ionization-stratified broad-line region. In this case, the results are less certain, since none of the emission-line lags are very well determined. The best-determined emission line lag is Lyα + N V, for which we find that the centroid of the continuum-emission-line cross-correlation function is τcent ~ 14-20 days. We measure a lag τcent <~ 4 days for He II λ1640 this result is consistent with the ionization-stratification pattern seen in lower luminosity sources, but the relatively large uncertainties in the emission-line lags measured here cannot rule out similar lags for Lyα + N V and He II λ1640 at a high level of significance. We are unable to determine a reliable lag for C IV λ1550, but we note that the profiles of the variable parts of Lyα and C IV λ1550 are not the same, which does not support the hypothesis that the strongest variations in these two lines arise in the same region.

  19. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  20. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  1. Mapping regions in Ste5 that support Msn5-dependent and -independent nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenhua; Wang, Yunmei; Yu, Lu; Mahanty, Sanjoy K; Mendoza, Natalia; Elion, Elaine A

    2016-04-01

    Careful control of the available pool of the MAPK scaffold Ste5 is important for mating-pathway activation and the prevention of inappropriate mating differentiation in haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ste5 shuttles constitutively through the nucleus, where it is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism triggered by G1 CDK phosphorylation. Here we narrow-down regions of Ste5 that mediate nuclear export. Four regions in Ste5 relocalize SV40-TAgNLS-GFP-GFP from nucleus to cytoplasm. One region is N-terminal, dependent on exportin Msn5/Ste21/Kap142, and interacts with Msn5 in 2 hybrid assays independently of mating pheromone, Fus3, Kss1, Ptc1, the NLS/PM, and RING-H2. A second region overlaps the PH domain and Ste11 binding site and 2 others are on the vWA domain and include residues essential for MAPK activation. We find no evidence for dependence on Crm1/Xpo1, despite numerous potential nuclear export sequences (NESs) detected by LocNES and NetNES1.1 predictors. Thus, Msn5 (homolog of human Exportin-5) and one or more exportins or adaptor molecules besides Crm1/Xpo1 may regulate Ste5 through multiple recognition sites.

  2. Avoiding Armageddon: The US Military’s Response to Trans-Regional Nuclear Proliferation in a Post-Soviet World

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-26

    Union in 1991, black markets for nuclear material rapidly expanded and proliferation by both state and non-state actors soared. The Department of...dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, black markets for nuclear material rapidly expanded and proliferation by both state and non-state actors soared. The...trans- regional black market —representing a threat that persists today with nearly eighteen open-source reports of nuclear-related trafficking

  3. The Galactic Habitable Zone: Galactic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Guillermo; Brownlee, Donald; Ward, Peter

    2001-07-01

    We propose the concept of a "Galactic Habitable Zone" (GHZ). Analogous to the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ), the GHZ is that region in the Milky Way where an Earth-like planet can retain liquid water on its surface and provide a long-term habitat for animal-like aerobic life. In this paper we examine the dependence of the GHZ on Galactic chemical evolution. The single most important factor is likely the dependence of terrestrial planet mass on the metallicity of its birth cloud. We estimate, very approximately, that a metallicity at least half that of the Sun is required to build a habitable terrestrial planet. The mass of a terrestrial planet has important consequences for interior heat loss, volatile inventory, and loss of atmosphere. A key issue is the production of planets that sustain plate tectonics, a critical recycling process that provides feedback to stabilize atmospheric temperatures on planets with oceans and atmospheres. Due to the more recent decline from the early intense star formation activity in the Milky Way, the concentration in the interstellar medium of the geophysically important radioisotopes 40K, 235,238U, and 232Th has been declining relative to Fe, an abundant element in the Earth. Also likely important are the relative abundances of Si and Mg to Fe, which affects the mass of the core relative to the mantle in a terrestrial planet. All these elements and isotopes vary with time and location in the Milky Way; thus, planetary systems forming in other locations and times in the Milky Way with the same metallicity as the Sun will not necessarily form habitable Earth-like planets. As a result of the radial Galactic metallicity gradient, the outer limit of the GHZ is set primarily by the minimum required metallicity to build large terrestrial planets. Regions of the Milky Way least likely to contain Earth-mass planets are the halo (including globular clusters), the thick disk, and the outer thin disk. The bulge should contain Earth

  4. The Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.

    1997-01-01

    We are continuing our systematic investigation of the nuclear structure of nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN). Upon completion, our study will characterize hypothetical constructs such as narrow-line clouds, obscuring tori, nuclear gas disks. and central black holes with physical measurements for a complete sample of nearby AGN. The major scientific goals of our program are: (1) the morphology of the NLR; (2) the physical conditions and dynamics of individual clouds in the NLR; (3) the structure and physical conditions of the warm reflecting gas; (4) the structure of the obscuring torus; (5) the population and morphology of nuclear disks/tori in AGN; (6) the physical conditions in nuclear disks; and (7) the masses of central black holes in AGN. We will use the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to obtain high-resolution images and spatially resolved spectra. Far-UV spectroscopy of emission and absorption in the nuclear regions using HST/FOS and the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) will help establish physical conditions in the absorbing and emitting gas. By correlating the dynamics and physical conditions of the gas with the morphology revealed through our imaging program, we will be able to examine mechanisms for fueling the central engine and transporting angular momentum. The kinematics of the nuclear gas disks may enable us to measure the mass of the central black hole. Contemporaneous X-ray observations using ASCA will further constrain the ionization structure of any absorbing material. Monitoring of variability in the UV and X-ray absorption will be used to determine the location of the absorbing gas, possibly in the outflowing warm reflecting gas, or the broad-line region, or the atmosphere of the obscuring torus. Supporting ground-based observations in the optical, near-IR, imaging polarimetry, and the radio will complete our picture of the nuclear structures. With a comprehensive survey of these characteristics in a complete sample of nearby AGN, our

  5. NuSTAR HARD X-RAY SURVEY OF THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION. I. HARD X-RAY MORPHOLOGY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE DIFFUSE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Canipe, Alicia M.; Krivonos, Roman; Tomsick, John A.; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Alexander, David M.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Christensen, Finn E.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; and others

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456–2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ∼ 1.3–2.3 up to ∼50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (∼10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ∼ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to L{sub X} ≳ 10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}. Above ∼20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95–0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses M{sub WD} ∼ 0.9 M{sub ⊙}. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95–0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745–290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  6. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. III. CHARACTERIZING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN THE GEMINI OB1 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul; Merello, Manuel; Rosolowsky, Erik; Cyganowski, Claudia J.; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Ginsburg, Adam; Glenn, Jason; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Bradley, Eric Todd; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2010-07-10

    We present the 1.1 mm Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) observations of the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud complex, and targeted NH{sub 3} observations of the BGPS sources. When paired with molecular spectroscopy of a dense gas tracer, millimeter observations yield physical properties such as masses, radii, mean densities, kinetic temperatures, and line widths. We detect 34 distinct BGPS sources above 5{sigma} = 0.37 Jy beam{sup -1} with corresponding 5{sigma} detections in the NH{sub 3}(1,1) transition. Eight of the objects show water maser emission (20%). We find a mean millimeter source FWHM of 1.12 pc and a mean gas kinetic temperature of 20 K for the sample of 34 BGPS sources with detections in the NH{sub 3}(1,1) line. The observed NH{sub 3} line widths are dominated by non-thermal motions, typically found to be a few times the thermal sound speed expected for the derived kinetic temperature. We calculate the mass for each source from the millimeter flux assuming the sources are isothermal and find a mean isothermal mass within a 120'' aperture of 230 {+-} 180 M{sub sun}. We find a total mass of 8400 M{sub sun} for all BGPS sources in the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud, representing 6.5% of the cloud mass. By comparing the millimeter isothermal mass to the virial mass calculated from the NH{sub 3} line widths within a radius equal to the millimeter source size, we find a mean virial parameter (M{sub vir}/M {sub iso}) of 1.0 {+-} 0.9 for the sample. We find mean values for the distributions of column densities of 1.0 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} for H{sub 2}, and 3.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} for NH{sub 3}, giving a mean NH{sub 3} abundance of 3.0 x 10{sup -8} relative to H{sub 2}. We find volume-averaged densities on the order of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}. The sizes and densities suggest that in the Gem OB1 region the BGPS is detecting the clumps from which stellar clusters form, rather than smaller, higher density cores where single stars or small multiple systems

  7. Resonance Region Nuclear Data Analysis to Support Advanced Fuel Cycle Development

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Michael E; Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Gil, Choong-Sup; Kim, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) are performing collaborative research as part of a three-year United States (U.S.) / Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) project to provide improved neutron cross-section data with uncertainty or covariance data important for advanced fuel cycle and nuclear safeguards applications. ORNL and KAERI have initiated efforts to prepare new cross-section evaluations for 240Pu, 237Np, and the stable Cm isotopes. At the current stage of the I-NERI project, ORNL has recently completed a preliminary resonance-region cross-section evaluation with covariance data for 240Pu and initiated resonance evaluation efforts for 237Np and 244Cm. Likewise, KAERI is performing corresponding high-energy cross-section analyses (i.e., above the resonance region) for the noted isotopes. The paper provides results pertaining to the new resonance region evaluation efforts with emphasis on the new 240Pu evaluation.

  8. Alimentary Tract Absorption (f1 Values) for Radionuclides in Local and Regional Fallout from Nuclear Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Shawki; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g. local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the ICRP (e.g. iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively. The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout. PMID:20622554

  9. Alimentary tract absorption (f1 values) for radionuclides in local and regional fallout from nuclear tests.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shawki A; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g., local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (e.g., iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively). The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout.

  10. Gamma ray constraints on the galactic supernova rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, D. D.; Leising, M.; Mathews, G.; Woosley, S. E.

    1992-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expected gamma-ray signatures of galactic supernovae of all types are performed in order to estimate the significance of the lack of a gamma-ray signal due to supernovae occurring during the last millenium. Using recent estimates of nuclear yields, we determine galactic supernova rates consistent with the historic supernova record and the gamma-ray limits. Another objective of these calculations of galactic supernova histories is their application to surveys of diffuse galactic gamma-ray line emission.

  11. The signal sequence coding region promotes nuclear export of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Springer, Michael; Shibata, Yoko; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha P; Rapoport, Tom A

    2007-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, most mRNAs are exported from the nucleus by the transcription export (TREX) complex, which is loaded onto mRNAs after their splicing and capping. We have studied in mammalian cells the nuclear export of mRNAs that code for secretory proteins, which are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by hydrophobic signal sequences. The mRNAs were injected into the nucleus or synthesized from injected or transfected DNA, and their export was followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. We made the surprising observation that the signal sequence coding region (SSCR) can serve as a nuclear export signal of an mRNA that lacks an intron or functional cap. Even the export of an intron-containing natural mRNA was enhanced by its SSCR. Like conventional export, the SSCR-dependent pathway required the factor TAP, but depletion of the TREX components had only moderate effects. The SSCR export signal appears to be characterized in vertebrates by a low content of adenines, as demonstrated by genome-wide sequence analysis and by the inhibitory effect of silent adenine mutations in SSCRs. The discovery of an SSCR-mediated pathway explains the previously noted amino acid bias in signal sequences and suggests a link between nuclear export and membrane targeting of mRNAs.

  12. Geology of the Chinese nuclear test site near Lop Nor, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Chinese underground nuclear test site in the Kuruktag and Kyzyltag mountains of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of northwest China, is the location of sixteen underground tests that occurred between 1969 and 1992. The largest test to date, conducted on 21 May 1992, had a reported yield of about one megaton. Geophysical properties of the rocks and a large-scale geologic map of part of the test area were published by the Chinese in 1986 and 1987 and are the first site-specific data available for this test site. In areas of low relief, underground nuclear testing has occurred below the water table, in shafts drilled vertically into dense, low porosity Paleozoic granitic and metasedimentary rocks. Additional testing in areas of more rugged terrain has occurred in horizontal tunnels, probably above the water table. At least one of these tunnels was driven into granite. The upper 50 m of the rock in the area of the vertical tests is weathered and fractured; these conditions have been shown to influence the magnitude of the disturbance of the land surface after a nuclear explosion. These descriptions suggest hard rock coupling at depth and a closer resemblance to the former Soviet test site in eastern Kazakhstan than to the U.S. test site in Nevada. ?? 1994.

  13. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is a dynamic nuclear and sarcomeric protein.

    PubMed

    Hanel, Meredith L; Sun, Chia-Yun Jessica; Jones, Takako I; Long, Steven W; Zanotti, Simona; Milner, Derek; Jones, Peter L

    2011-02-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is a candidate gene for mediating FSHD pathophysiology, however, very little is known about the endogenous FRG1 protein. This study uses immunocytochemistry (ICC) and histology to provide insight into FRG1's role in vertebrate muscle development and address its potential involvement in FSHD pathophysiology. In cell culture, primary myoblast/myotube cultures, and mouse and human muscle sections, FRG1 showed distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic localizations and nuclear shuttling assays indicated the subcellular pools of FRG1 are linked. During myoblast differentiation, FRG1's subcellular distribution changed dramatically with FRG1 eventually associating with the matured Z-discs. This Z-disc localization was confirmed using isolated mouse myofibers and found to be maintained in adult human skeletal muscle biopsies. Thus, FRG1 is not likely involved in the initial assembly and alignment of the Z-disc but may be involved in sarcomere maintenance or signaling. Further analysis of human tissue showed FRG1 is strongly expressed in arteries, veins, and capillaries, the other prominently affected tissue in FSHD. Overall, we show that in mammalian cells, FRG1 is a dynamic nuclear and cytoplasmic protein, however in muscle, FRG1 is also a developmentally regulated sarcomeric protein suggesting FRG1 may perform a muscle-specific function. Thus, FRG1 is the only FSHD candidate protein linked to the muscle contractile machinery and may address why the musculature and vasculature are specifically susceptible in FSHD.

  14. The source and distribution of Galactic positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Dixon, D. D.; Cheng, L.-X.; Leventhal, M.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Skibo, J. G.; Smith, D. M.; Tueller, J.

    1997-01-01

    The oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment (OSSE) observations of the Galactic plane and the Galactic center region were combined with observations acquired with other instruments in order to produce a map of the Galactic 511 keV annihilation radiation. Two mapping techniques were applied to the data: the maximum entropy method, and the basis pursuit inversion method. The resulting maps are qualitatively similar and show evidence for a central bulge and a weak galactic disk component. The weak disk is consistent with that expected from positrons produced by the decay of radioactive Al-26 in the interstellar medium. Both maps suggest an enhanced region of emission near l = -4 deg, b = 7 deg, with a flux of approximately 50 percent of that of the bulge. The existence of this emission appears significant, although the location is not well determined. The source of this enhanced emission is presently unknown.

  15. Climate effects of a hypothetical regional nuclear war: Sensitivity to emission duration and particle composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Lindvall, Jenny; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Svensson, Gunilla

    2016-11-01

    Here, we use a coupled atmospheric-ocean-aerosol model to investigate the plume development and climate effects of the smoke generated by fires following a regional nuclear war between emerging third-world nuclear powers. We simulate a standard scenario where 5 Tg of black carbon (BC) is emitted over 1 day in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere. However, it is likely that the emissions from the fires ignited by bomb detonations include a substantial amount of particulate organic matter (POM) and that they last more than 1 day. We therefore test the sensitivity of the aerosol plume and climate system to the BC/POM ratio (1:3, 1:9) and to the emission length (1 day, 1 week, 1 month). We find that in general, an emission length of 1 month substantially reduces the cooling compared to the 1-day case, whereas taking into account POM emissions notably increases the cooling and the reduction of precipitation associated with the nuclear war during the first year following the detonation. Accounting for POM emissions increases the particle size in the short-emission-length scenarios (1 day/1 week), reducing the residence time of the injected particle. While the initial cooling is more intense when including POM emission, the long-lasting effects, while still large, may be less extreme compared to the BC-only case. Our study highlights that the emission altitude reached by the plume is sensitive to both the particle type emitted by the fires and the emission duration. Consequently, the climate effects of a nuclear war are strongly dependent on these parameters.

  16. Structure of the disturbed region of the atmosphere after the nuclear explosion in Hiroshima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbin, M. D.; Pavlyukov, K. V.; Salo, A. A.; Pertsev, S. F.; Rikunov, A. V.

    2013-09-01

    An attempt is undertaken to describe the development of the disturbed region of the atmosphere caused by the nuclear explosion over Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Numerical simulation of the phenomenon is performed using the dynamic equations for a nonconducting inviscid gas taking into account the combustion of urban buildings, phase changes of water, electrification of ice particles, and removal of soot particles. The results of the numerical calculation of the development of the disturbed region indicate heavy rainfall, the formation of a storm cloud with lightning discharges, removal of soot particles, and the formation of vertical vortices. The temporal sequence of these meteorological phenomena is consistent with the data of observations. Because of the assumptions and approximations used in solving the problem, the results are of qualitative nature. Refinement of the results can be obtained by a more detailed study of the approximate initial and boundary conditions of the problem.

  17. Relativistic Dark Matter at the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Wizansky, Tommer; /SLAC

    2007-11-16

    In a large region of the supersymmetry parameter space, the annihilation cross section for neutralino dark matter is strongly dependent on the relative velocity of the incoming particles. We explore the consequences of this velocity dependence in the context of indirect detection of dark matter from the galactic center. We find that the increase in the annihilation cross section at high velocities leads to a flattening of the halo density profile near the galactic center and an enhancement of the annihilation signal.

  18. Nuclear energy surfaces at high-spin in the A{approximately}180 mass region

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.; Egido, J.L.; Robledo, L.M.

    1995-08-01

    We are studying nuclear energy surfaces at high spin, with an emphasis on very deformed shapes using two complementary methods: (1) the Strutinsky method for making surveys of mass regions and (2) Hartree-Fock calculations using a Gogny interaction to study specific nuclei that appear to be particularly interesting from the Strutinsky method calculations. The great advantage of the Strutinsky method is that one can study the energy surfaces of many nuclides ({approximately}300) with a single set of calculations. Although the Hartree-Fock calculations are quite time-consuming relative to the Strutinsky calculations, they determine the shape at a minimum without being limited to a few deformation modes. We completed a study of {sup 182}Os using both approaches. In our cranked Strutinsky calculations, which incorporate a necking mode deformation in addition to quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations, we found three well-separated, deep, strongly deformed minima. The first is characterized by nuclear shapes with axis ratios of 1.5:1; the second by axis ratios of 2.2:1 and the third by axis ratios of 2.9:1. We also studied this nuclide with the density-dependent Gogny interaction at I = 60 using the Hartree-Fock method and found minima characterized by shapes with axis ratios of 1.5:1 and 2.2:1. A comparison of the shapes at these minima, generated in the two calculations, shows that the necking mode of deformation is extremely useful for generating nuclear shapes at large deformation that minimize the energy. The Hartree-Fock calculations are being extended to larger deformations in order to further explore the energy surface in the region of the 2.9:1 minimum.

  19. Local, Regional and National Responses for Medical Management of a Radiological/Nuclear Incident

    PubMed Central

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Skudlarska, Beata; Albanese, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Radiological and nuclear devices may be used by terrorists or may be the source of accidental exposure. A tiered approach has been recommended for response to a terrorist event wherein local, regional, state and federal assets become involved sequentially, as the magnitude in severity of the incident increases. State-wide hospital plans have been developed and published for Connecticut, New York and California. These plans address delineation of responsibilities of various categories of health professionals, protection of healthcare providers, identification and classification of individuals who might have been exposed to and/or contaminated by radiation and, in the case of Connecticut response plan, early management of victims. Regional response programs such as the New England Regional Health Compact (consisting of 6 member states) have been developed to manage consequences of radiation injury. The Department of Homeland Security is ultimately responsible for managing both health consequences and the crisis. Multiple US national response assets may be called upon for use in radiological incidents. These include agencies and programs that have been developed by the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Defense. Coordination of national, regional and state assets with local response efforts is necessary to provide a timely and efficient response. PMID:23447742

  20. AST/RO Observations of CO J=7-6 Emission from the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Martin, C. L.; Stark, A. A.; Lane, A. P.

    2000-12-01

    We present a map of the Galactic Center region in the CO J=7-6 transition observed with the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) located at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Emission from the 809 GHz J=7-6 transition of 12CO was mapped over the region -2.7 < l < 3.6, -1.0 < b < 1.0, on a 1' grid with a spatial resolution of ~ 85''. The CO J=4-3 and [CI] emissions from this region have been mapped with AST/RO by Martin et al. (2001) and Ojha et al. (2000). These two spectral lines are distributed throughout the Galactic Center region in a manner almost identical to that of CO J=1-0; the CO(4-3)/ CO(1-0) line ratio and the [CI]/CO line ratios are remarkably uniform across a wide variety of Galactic Center features. In contrast, the CO J=7-6 emission from the Galactic Center region is confined to the Sgr A and Sgr B2 complexes. The implication is that the photon-dominated regions surrounding the Galactic Center are remarkably similar in mean density and kinetic temperature at n = 3000 cm-3 and T = 35 K, except for the two special regions Sgr A and Sgr B2, which are denser. The CO(7-6)/CO(4-3) line temperature ratios near Sgr B2 are similar to those observed in the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy M82 (Mao et al. 2000), while the CO(7-6)/CO(4-3) line temperature ratios around Sgr A are a factor of three lower than those near Sgr B2. The CO(7-6)/CO(4-3) line ratio in the Galactic Center region as a whole is at least an order of magnitude less than that in a comparable region near the center of M82. This research was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under a cooperative agreement with the Center for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (CARA), grant number NSF OPP 89-20223. CARA is a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center.

  1. Duelling winds: a model for broad-line regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.; Raine, D. J.

    A model for broad-line regions in active galactic nuclei is discussed. When the X-ray flux from a galactic nucleus Compton-heats an accretion disc a large amount of hot gas can be released in the form of a wind. This material becomes entrained into a wind blowing from the nucleus. Provided the ram pressure of the nuclear wind exceeds that of the disc wind, it will collapse into clouds. The nuclear wind accelerates small clouds to higher velocities, corresponding to observed line widths. Large clouds fall inwards. Cloud sizes, line asymmetries and variability characteristics are determined.

  2. COS-B observations of the high-energy gamma radiation from the galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The COS-B experiment has observed approximately one-fourth of the galactic disk, including the galactic-center region, the galactic anticenter, and the Vela region. A completely automatic analysis of the events recorded during these observations reveals a galactic gamma ray emission from the three regions. In the galactic center and Vela regions, the disk emission distribution was measured. From these data, the existence of a local (less than 1 kpc) and a distant (greater than 3 kpc) emitting region is apparent in the general direction of the inner galaxy.

  3. FAST TRACK PAPER: Regional observations of the second North Korean nuclear test on 2009 May 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jin Soo; Sheen, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Geunyoung

    2010-01-01

    The suspicious seismic event that occurred in the northern Korean Peninsula on 2009 May 25 was declared to be the second underground nuclear test (NK2ND) by North Korea. We investigated the characteristics of NK2ND using seismic signals recorded at regional-distance stations in South Korea and China. The Pn/Lg ratios of NK2ND definitely discriminate this event from two nearby natural earthquakes at frequencies above 4 Hz. Full moment tensor inversion of full waveform data shows that NK2ND had a very large isotropic component. Pure isotropic moment tensor inversion also resulted in good recovery of observed waveforms, with clear indication that NK2ND was explosive in origin. The moment magnitude (Mw) from the full moment tensor inversion was estimated to be 4.5 and network-averaged values of 4.6 and 3.6 were calculated for rms mb(Lg) and Ms(VMAX), respectively. Although mb - Ms signature has been considered one of the most reliable discriminants for separating explosions and earthquakes, this signature showed poor discrimination in the case of NK2ND. The Pn/Lg ratios and moment tensor inversion give more reliable evidence than does the mb - Ms for classifying the suspicious event in the northern Korean Peninsula as a possible explosion. The characteristics of NK2ND are also quite similar to those of the first North Korean nuclear test on 2006 October 9.

  4. Expression, function, and targeting of the nuclear exporter chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, Jo; Kojima, Kensuke; Hail, Numsen; Tabe, Yoko; Andreeff, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of proteins/RNAs is essential to normal cellular function. Indeed, accumulating evidence suggests that cancer cells escape anti-neoplastic mechanisms and benefit from pro-survival signals via the dysregulation of this system. The nuclear exporter chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein is the only protein in the karyopherin-β protein family that contributes to the trafficking of numerous proteins and RNAs from the nucleus. It is considered to be an oncogenic, anti-apoptotic protein in transformed cells, since it reportedly functions as a gatekeeper for cell survival, including affecting p53 function, and ribosomal biogenesis. Furthermore, abnormally high expression of CRM1 is correlated with poor patient prognosis in various malignancies. Therapeutic targeting of CRM1 has emerged as a novel cancer treatment strategy, starting with a clinical trial with leptomycin B, the original specific inhibitor of CRM1, followed by development of several next-generation small molecules. KPT-330, a novel member of the CRM1-selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE) class of compounds, is currently undergoing clinical evaluation for the therapy of various malignancies. Results from these trials suggest that SINE compounds may be particularly useful against hematological malignancies, which often become refractory to standard chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 1: Diffuse emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitudes 310 deg and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7 kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315, 330, 345, 0, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with galactic features and components such as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic-ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  6. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  7. Systematic nuclear structure studies using relativistic mean field theory in mass region A ˜ 130

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, A.; Åberg, Sven; Bajpeyi, Awanish

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear structure studies for even-even nuclei in the mass region \\backsim 130, have been performed, with a special focus around N or Z = 64. On the onset of deformation and lying between two closed shell, these nuclei have attracted attention in a number of studies. A revisit to these experimentally accessible nuclei has been made via the relativistic mean field. The role of pairing and density depletion in the interior has been specially investigated. Qualitative analysis between two versions of relativistic mean field suggests that there is no significant difference between the two approaches. Moreover, the role of the filling {{{s}}}1/2 orbital in density depletion towards the centre has been found to be consistent with our earlier work on the subject Shukla and Åberg (2014 Phys. Rev. C 89 014329).

  8. Investigation of nuclear shell structure far from stability in the region of {sup 78}Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, E.

    2008-11-11

    Neutron rich nuclei close to shell closures play an important role on recent nuclear structure studies since they allow to search for possible modifications of single-particle energies, thus a possible shell evolution with increasing N/Z ratio. Their high-spin states will be unique observable in order to understand the size and eventually the evolution of the energy gaps far from stability. In such context, the {sup 83}As, {sup 82}Ge, and {sup 81}Ga nuclei located in the {sup 78}Ni region have been studied in Legnaro National Laboratory (LNL) and we will present our experimental results on the single-particle structure of these nuclei as well as the evolution of the N = 50 shell gap size.

  9. COS-B observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the galactic disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, J.

    1976-01-01

    During the first months of operation, COS-B has observed galactic high energy gamma rays from the galactic disc. In the galactic center and Vela regions the disc emission distribution was measured. From these data the existence of a local ( 1 kpc) and a distant ( 3 kpc) emitting region is apparent in the general direction of the inner galaxy.

  10. The nuclear region of low luminosity flat radio spectrum sources. II. Emission-line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. C.; Serote Roos, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the spectroscopic study of 19 low luminosity Flat Radio Spectrum (LL FRS) sources selected from Marchã's et al. (\\cite{March96}) 200 mJy sample. In the optical, these objects are mainly dominated by the host galaxy starlight. After correcting the data for this effect, we obtain a new set of spectra clearly displaying weak emission lines; such features carry valuable information concerning the excitation mechanisms at work in the nuclear regions of LL FRS sources. We have used a special routine to model the spectra and assess the intensities and velocities of the emission lines; we have analyzed the results in terms of diagnostic diagrams. Our analysis shows that 79% of the studied objects harbour a Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region (or LINER) whose contribution was swamped by the host galaxy starlight. The remaining objects display a higher ionization spectrum, more typical of Seyferts; due to the poor quality of the spectra, it was not possible to identify any possible large Balmer components. The fact that we observe a LINER-type spectrum in LL FRS sources supports the idea that some of these objects could be undergoing an ADAF phase; in addition, such a low ionization emission-line spectrum is in agreement with the black hole mass values and sub-Eddington accretion rates published for some FRS sources. Based on observations collected at the Multiple Mirror Telescope on Mt. Hopkins. Full Fig. 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  11. Planetary nebulae near the Galactic Centre: chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavichia, O.; Costa, R. D. D.; Maciel, W. J.; Mollá, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report physical parameters and abundances derived for a sample of high extinction planetary nebulae located in the Galactic bulge, near the Galactic Centre, based on low dispersion spectroscopy secured at the SOAR telescope using the Goodman spectrograph. The results show that the abundances of our sample are similar to those from other regions of the bulge. Nevertheless, the average abundances of the Galactic bulge do not follow the observed trend of the radial abundance gradient in the disk.

  12. The Molecular Structures of the Local Arm and Perseus Arm in the Galactic Region of l = [139.°75, 149.°75], b = [‑5.°25, 5.°25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xinyu; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji; Sun, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Using the Purple Mountain Observatory Delingha (PMODLH) 13.7 m telescope, we report a 96 deg2 12CO/13CO/C18O mapping observation toward the Galactic region of l = [139.°75,149.°75], b = [‑5.°25, 5.°25]. The molecular structures of the Local Arm and Perseus Arm are presented. Combining H i data and part of the Outer Arm results, we obtain that the warp structure of both atomic and molecular gas is obvious, while the flare structure only exists in atomic gas in this observing region. In addition, five filamentary giant molecular clouds on the Perseus Arm are identified. Among them, four are newly identified. Their relations with the Milky Way large-scale structure are discussed.

  13. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63Cu and 65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Forget, Benoit; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-01-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63Cu and 65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at ORELA and one from MITR, and two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identied for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope was based on the identied resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) were determined to match the dierential thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Double dierential elastic scattering cross sections were calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  14. On the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the nuclear region of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji-Ren; Mao, Shu-De

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the nuclear region of M51 combining both XMM-Newton RGS and Chandra data. Most of the RGS spectrum of M51 can be fitted with a thermal model with a temperature of ∼ 0.5 keV except for the O VII triplet, which is forbidden-line dominated. The Fe L-shell lines peak around the southern cloud, where the O VIII and N VII Lyα lines also peak. In contrast, the peak of the O VII forbidden line is about 10″ offset from that of the other lines, indicating that it is from a spatially distinct component. The spatial distribution of the O VII triplet mapped by the Chandra data shows that most of the O VII triplet flux is located at faint regions near edges, instead of the southern cloud where other lines peak. This distribution of the O VII triplet is inconsistent with the photoionization model. Other mechanisms that could produce the anomalous O VII triplet, including a recombining plasma and charge exchange X-ray emission, are discussed.

  15. a Study of Proton Induced Nuclear Fragmentation in the Threshold Region: 1 TO 20 GEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, Thomas Craig

    This thesis contains the details of the experimental set-up and final results of BNL E-778. The experimental objective was to study proton induced nuclear fragmentation using an internal gas jet target facility that was specifically designed for this experiment and installed in the AGS main ring. The fragment telescopes were designed to measure a broad range of fragment charge (2 to 14) and kinetic energy (5 to 100 MeV). Using a mixed gas target (1% or 3% Xe with H(,2)), normalized fragment production cross sections were obtained by separately measuring p-p elastic production from the H(,2) component. Fragment production cross sections are observed to rise dramatically ((TURN) x 10) for incident proton energies between 1 and 10 GeV, while above 10 GeV, fragment production appears to be independent of the incident proton energy. The measured differential cross sections (above 10 GeV) are found to agree (within 20%) with the differential cross sections measured during a previous internal target experiment (E-591) conducted at FNAL, where the lowest available proton energies were 50 GeV. The measured fragment kinetic energy spectra (above 10 GeV) are fit with a functional form motivated by the observation that fragment production in an excited nuclear system is consistent with a critical phenomenon (a liquid -gas phase transition). The failure of this functional form at the lowest available incident energies (below 10 GeV) is interpreted as the observation of an additional fragment production mechanism. Recent theoretical and experimental evidence for an asymmetric fission process (binary decay), is used to modify the original functional form for the two-component spectra. It is concluded that, in the threshold region, two fragment production mechanisms are observed. Although insufficient information is available to uniquely separate the two components, certain features of the asymmetric fission mechanism are identified. The observed p-nucleus systematics are also

  16. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  17. Galactic cosmic ray composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment is given of the galactic cosmic ray source (GCRS) elemental composition and its correlation with first ionization potential. The isotopic composition of heavy nuclei; spallation cross sections; energy spectra of primary nuclei; electrons; positrons; local galactic reference abundances; comparison of solar energetic particles and solar coronal compositions; the hydrogen; lead; nitrogen; helium; and germanium deficiency problems; and the excess of elements are among the topics covered.

  18. On the biological hazard of galactic antinuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Buck, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of antinuclei in the galactic cosmic-ray beam with biological systems is studied. A nuclei-antinuclei annihilation event observed in nuclear emulsion near the end of the slowing-down trajectories of singly charged particle is discussed. An annihilation event that occurred by capture of the antinucleus into an atomic orbital followed by cascade to or near the ground atomic state and subsequent annihilation with the nuclear material of the atom is described. Microdosimetric quantities relevant to potential biological hazards are estimated. The average linear-energy-transfer spectrum for galactic cosmic ray antinuclei annihilation events in tissues is presented. It is observed that the annihilation in tissues occurs mainly in O and the heavier elements around K.

  19. Establishment of data base of regional seismic recordings from earthquakes, chemical explosions and nuclear explosions in the Former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Ermolenko, N.A.; Kopnichev, Yu.F.; Kunakov, V.G.; Kunakova, O.K.; Rakhmatullin, M.Kh.; Sokolova, I.N.; Vybornyy, Zh.I.

    1995-06-01

    In this report results of work on establishment of a data base of regional seismic recordings from earthquakes, chemical explosions and nuclear explosions in the former Soviet Union are described. This work was carried out in the Complex Seismological Expedition (CSE) of the Joint Institute of Physics of the Earth of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The recording system, methods of investigations and primary data processing are described in detail. The largest number of digital records was received by the permanent seismic station Talgar, situated in the northern Tien Shan, 20 km to the east of Almaty city. More than half of the records are seismograms of underground nuclear explosions and chemical explosions. The nuclear explosions were recorded mainly from the Semipalatinsk test site. In addition, records of the explosions from the Chinese test site Lop Nor and industrial nuclear explosions from the West Siberia region were obtained. Four records of strong chemical explosions were picked out (two of them have been produced at the Semipalatinsk test site and two -- in Uzbekistan). We also obtained 16 records of crustal earthquakes, mainly from the Altai region, close to the Semipalatinsk test site, and also from the West China region, close to the Lop Nor test site. In addition, a small number of records of earthquakes and underground nuclear explosions, received by arrays of temporary stations, that have been working in the southern Kazakhstan region are included in this report. Parameters of the digital seismograms and file structure are described. Possible directions of future work on the digitizing of unique data archive are discussed.

  20. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Jason; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Ginsburg, Adam; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 millimeter continuum survey of the northern Galactic Plane made with Bolocam and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The coverage totals 170 square degrees, comprised of a contiguous range from -10.5 deg is less than or equal to 90.5 deg, 0.5 deg is less than or equal to b is less than or equal to 0.5 deg, with extended coverage in b in selected regions, and four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy, including: IC1396, toward the Perseus arm at l is approximately 111 deg, W3/4/5, and Gem OB1. Depths of the maps range from 30 to 60 mJy beam (sup 1). Approximately 8,400 sources were detected and the maps and source catalog have been made publicly available. Millimeter-wave thermal dust emission reveals dense regions within molecular clouds, thus the BGPS serves as a database for studies of the dense interstellar medium and star formation within the Milky Way.

  1. NuSTAR results from the Galactic Center - diffuse emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailey, Charles

    2016-03-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) was launched in June 2012. It carried the first true, hard X-ray (>~10 keV-79 keV) focusing telescopes into orbit. Its twin telescopes provide 10 times better angular resolution and 100 times better sensitivity than previously obtainable in the hard X-ray band. Consequently NuSTAR is able to resolve faint diffuse structures whose hard X-rays offer insight into some of the most energetic processes in the Galactic Center. One of the surprising discoveries that NuSTAR made in the Galactic Center is the central hard X-ray emission (CHXE). The CHXE is a diffuse emission detected from ~10 keV to beyond 50 keV in X-ray energy, and extending spatially over a region ~8 parsecs x ~4 parsecs in and out of the plane of the galaxy respectively, and centered on the supermassive black hole Sgr A*. The CHXE was speculated to be due to a large population of unresolved black hole X-ray binaries, millisecond pulsars (MSP), a class of highly magnetized white dwarf binaries called intermediate polars, or to particle outflows from Sgr A*. The presence of an unexpectedly large population of MSP in the Galactic Center would be particularly interesting, since MSP emitting at higher energies and over a much larger region have been posited to be the origin of the gamma-ray emission that is also ascribed to dark matter annihilation in the galaxy. In addition, the connection of the CHXE to the ~9000 unidentified X-ray sources in the central the the ~100 pc detected by the Chandra Observatory, to the soft X-ray emission detected by the Chandra and XMM/Newton observatories in the Galactic Center, and to the hard X-ray emission detected by both the RXTE and INTEGRAL observatories in the Galactic Ridge, is unclear. I review these results and present recent NuSTAR observations that potentially resolve the origin of the CHXE and point to a unified origin for all these X-ray emissions. Two other noteworthy classes of diffuse structures in the

  2. Mapping of nuclear import signal and importin {alpha}3 binding regions of 52K protein of bovine adenovirus-3

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, Carolyn P.; Ayalew, Lisanework E.; Tikoo, Suresh K.

    2012-10-10

    The L1 region of bovine adenovirus (BAdV)-3 encodes a non-structural protein designated 52K. Anti-52K serum detected a protein of 40 kDa, which localized to the nucleus but not to the nucleolus in BAdV-3-infected or transfected cells. Analysis of mutant 52K proteins suggested that three basic residues ({sup 105}RKR{sup 107}) of the identified domain (amino acids {sup 102}GMPRKRVLT{sup 110}) are essential for nuclear localization of 52K. The nuclear import of a GST-52K fusion protein utilizes the classical importin {alpha}/{beta}-dependent nuclear transport pathway. The 52K protein is preferentially bound to the cellular nuclear import receptor importin {alpha}3. Although deletion of amino acid 102-110 is sufficient to abrogate the nuclear localization of 52K, amino acid 90-133 are required for interaction with importin-{alpha}3 and localizing a cytoplasmic protein to the nucleus. These results suggest that 52K contains a bipartite NLS, which preferentially utilize an importin {alpha}3 nuclear import receptor-mediated pathway to transport 52K to the nucleus.

  3. A Green Bank Telescope 21cm survey of HI clouds in the Milky Way's nuclear wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denbo, Sara; Endsley, Ryan; Lockman, Felix J.; Ford, Alyson

    2015-01-01

    Feedback processes such as large-scale galactic winds are thought to be responsible for distributing enriched gas throughout a galaxy and even into the IGM. Such winds have been found in many galaxies with active star formation near their center, and the Fermi bubbles provide evidence for such a nuclear wind in our own Milky Way. A recent 21 cm HI survey by the Australia Telescope Compact Array discovered a population of compact, isolated clouds surrounding the Galactic Center that may be entrained in the Fermi bubble wind. We present data from a survey of 21cm HI over an extended region around the Galactic Center using the Green Bank Telescope. These observations provide more strict constraints on neutral clouds in the Fermi bubble wind, and a more robust description of the parameters of HI clouds (i.e., mass, column density, and lifetime) near the Galactic Center.

  4. Argon and neon in Galactic nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, Dan F.; Rank, David M.; Witteborn, F. C.; Wooden, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    KAO observations of the 6.98 micron line of (Ar II), and KAO and ground-based observations of the 8.99 micron line of (Ar III) and the 12.8 micron line of (Ne II) are presented for a number of Galactic H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  5. The case for cases B and C: intrinsic hydrogen line ratios of the broad-line region of active galactic nuclei, reddenings, and accretion disc sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. Martin

    2017-01-01

    Low-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with extremely blue optical spectral indices are shown to have a mean, velocity-averaged, broad-line Hα/Hβ ratio of ≈2.72 ± 0.04, consistent with a Baker-Menzel Case B value. Comparison of a wide range of properties of the very bluest AGNs with those of a luminosity-matched subset of the Dong et al. blue AGN sample indicates that the only difference is the internal reddening. Ultraviolet fluxes are brighter for the bluest AGNs by an amount consistent with the flat AGN reddening curve of Gaskell et al. (2004). The lack of a significant difference in the GALEX (FUV-NUV) colour index strongly rules out a steep SMC-like reddening curve and also argues against an intrinsically harder spectrum for the bluest AGNs. For very blue AGNs the Lyα/Hβ ratio is also consistent with being the Case B value. The Case B ratios provide strong support for the self-shielded broad-line model of Gaskell, Klimek & Nazarova. It is proposed that the greatly enhanced Lyα/Hβ ratio at very high velocities is a consequence of continuum fluorescence in the Lyman lines (Case C). Reddenings of AGNs mean that the far-UV luminosity is often underestimated by up to an order of magnitude. This is a major factor causing the discrepancies between measured accretion disc sizes and the predictions of simple accretion disc theory. Dust covering fractions for most AGNs are lower than has been estimated. The total mass in lower mass supermassive black holes must be greater than hitherto estimated.

  6. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND356-58, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3.

  7. Gene-rich chromosomal regions are preferentially localized in the lamin B deficient nuclear blebs of atypical progeria cells.

    PubMed

    Bercht Pfleghaar, Katrin; Taimen, Pekka; Butin-Israeli, Veronika; Shimi, Takeshi; Langer-Freitag, Sabine; Markaki, Yolanda; Goldman, Anne E; Wehnert, Manfred; Goldman, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    More than 20 mutations in the gene encoding A-type lamins (LMNA) cause progeria, a rare premature aging disorder. The major pathognomonic hallmarks of progeria cells are seen as nuclear deformations or blebs that are related to the redistribution of A- and B-type lamins within the nuclear lamina. However, the functional significance of these progeria-associated blebs remains unknown. We have carried out an analysis of the structural and functional consequences of progeria-associated nuclear blebs in dermal fibroblasts from a progeria patient carrying a rare point mutation p.S143F (C428T) in lamin A/C. These blebs form microdomains that are devoid of major structural components of the nuclear envelope (NE)/lamina including B-type lamins and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and are enriched in A-type lamins. Using laser capture microdissection and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses, we show that, while these domains are devoid of centromeric heterochromatin and gene-poor regions of chromosomes, they are enriched in gene-rich chromosomal regions. The active form of RNA polymerase II is also greatly enriched in blebs as well as nascent RNA but the nuclear co-activator SKIP is significantly reduced in blebs compared to other transcription factors. Our results suggest that the p.S143F progeria mutation has a severe impact not only on the structure of the lamina but also on the organization of interphase chromatin domains and transcription. These structural defects are likely to contribute to gene expression changes reported in progeria and other types of laminopathies.

  8. Gene-rich chromosomal regions are preferentially localized in the lamin B deficient nuclear blebs of atypical progeria cells

    PubMed Central

    Bercht Pfleghaar, Katrin; Taimen, Pekka; Butin-Israeli, Veronika; Shimi, Takeshi; Langer-Freitag, Sabine; Markaki, Yolanda; Goldman, Anne E; Wehnert, Manfred; Goldman, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    More than 20 mutations in the gene encoding A-type lamins (LMNA) cause progeria, a rare premature aging disorder. The major pathognomonic hallmarks of progeria cells are seen as nuclear deformations or blebs that are related to the redistribution of A- and B-type lamins within the nuclear lamina. However, the functional significance of these progeria-associated blebs remains unknown. We have carried out an analysis of the structural and functional consequences of progeria-associated nuclear blebs in dermal fibroblasts from a progeria patient carrying a rare point mutation p.S143F (C428T) in lamin A/C. These blebs form microdomains that are devoid of major structural components of the nuclear envelope (NE)/lamina including B-type lamins and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and are enriched in A-type lamins. Using laser capture microdissection and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses, we show that, while these domains are devoid of centromeric heterochromatin and gene-poor regions of chromosomes, they are enriched in gene-rich chromosomal regions. The active form of RNA polymerase II is also greatly enriched in blebs as well as nascent RNA but the nuclear co-activator SKIP is significantly reduced in blebs compared to other transcription factors. Our results suggest that the p.S143F progeria mutation has a severe impact not only on the structure of the lamina but also on the organization of interphase chromatin domains and transcription. These structural defects are likely to contribute to gene expression changes reported in progeria and other types of laminopathies. PMID:25738644

  9. Diffuse Galactic Soft Gamma-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, S. E.; Lin, R. P.; Slassi-Sennou, S.; Coburn, W.; Pelling, R. M.

    2000-11-01

    The Galactic diffuse soft gamma-ray (30-800 keV) emission has been measured from the Galactic center by the High Resolution Gamma-Ray and Hard X-Ray Spectrometer balloon-borne germanium instrument to determine the spectral characteristics and origin of the emission. The resulting Galactic diffuse continuum is found to agree well with a single power law (plus positronium) over the entire energy range, consistent with RXTE and COMPTEL/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory observations at lower and higher energies, respectively. We find no evidence of spectral steepening below 200 keV, as has been reported in previous observations. The spatial distribution along the Galactic ridge is found to be nearly flat, with upper limits set on the longitudinal gradient and with no evidence of an edge in the observed region. The soft gamma-ray diffuse spectrum is well modeled by inverse Compton scattering of interstellar radiation off of cosmic-ray electrons, minimizing the need to invoke inefficient nonthermal bremsstrahlung emission. The resulting power requirement is well within that provided by Galactic supernovae. We speculate that the measured spectrum provides the first direct constraints on the cosmic-ray electron spectrum below 300 MeV.

  10. Can Galactic H I be radiatively supported?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, A.

    1993-04-01

    I explore the effect of the photolevitation process, through which dusty diffuse clouds can rise to considerable high Galactic latitudes, on the global vertical distribution of the H I in the Galaxy. It is shown that the vertical support may be completely provided by the turbulence in the lower effective gravitational potential determined by the Galactic radiation field. The requirement of a population of fast clouds to match the observed profiles can be relaxed to consider only moderate-to-low values of the dispersion velocities of the neutral gas. In addition, the apparent observed constancy of the H I scale height with galactocentric radius is naturally explained by the model in terms of the similar behavior of the Galactic radiative (inclusive of the H II region distribution) and gravitational fields. Some discussion on the general validity of the study and on possible relevant additional effects is also given.

  11. The Extreme Nuclear Environments of Sgr A^* and Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, N. Z.

    2009-10-01

    The dense ISM which is the fuel for both nuclear starbursts is believed to be accreted to the nucleus by stellar bars and galactic interactions. In this contribution, I summarize the observational results for two galactic nuclei at the extreme ends of starburst/AGN activity - our own Galactic nucleus with SgrA^* and the ULIRG Arp 220. I discuss theoretical considerations for the properties of the ISM - it's density and scale height, whether it is likely to clump into gravitational bound GMCs - and the self-regulation of SB and AGN fueling due to radiation pressure support of the ISM. The latter yields an Eddington-like limit on the activity for both SB and AGN, corresponding to approximately 500 lsun/msun for optically thick regions in which the radiation has been degraded to the NIR.

  12. Implementation process and deployment initiatives for the regionalized storage of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Dearien, J.A.; Smith, N.E.L.

    1995-12-31

    This report describes how DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will be stored in the interim 40-year period from 1996 to 2035, by which time it is expected to be in a National Nuclear Repository. The process is described in terms of its primary components: fuel inventory, facilities where it is stored, how the fuel will be moved, and legal issues associated with the process. Tools developed to deploy and fulfill the implementation needs of the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program are also discussed.

  13. Nuclear dependence of structure functions in the shadowing region of deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.; Qiu, Jianwei

    1988-07-27

    A discussion of nuclear shadowing in deep inelastic lepton scattering is presented. We show that the parton recombination model suggests that shadowing should begin to occur at larger values of Bjorken x as A increases. This expectation as well as that of weak dependence on Q/sup 2/, and the trend of the x dependence of the shadowing phenomenon are consistent with recent data. Shadowing at small x is combined with nuclear bound state effects, responsible for nuclear dependence at larger x, to provide description of the A dependence of the structure function for the entire range of x. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  15. The Diffuse Galactic Far-ultraviolet Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamden, Erika T.; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark

    2013-12-01

    We present an all-sky map of the diffuse Galactic far ultraviolet (1344-1786 Å) background using Galaxy Evolution Explorer data, covering 65% of the sky with 11.79 arcmin2 pixels. We investigate the dependence of the background on Galactic coordinates, finding that a standard cosecant model of intensity is not a valid fit. Furthermore, we compare our map to Galactic all-sky maps of 100 μm emission, N H I column, and Hα intensity. We measure a consistent low level far-UV (FUV) intensity at zero points for other Galactic quantities, indicating a 300 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 Å-1 non-scattered isotropic component to the diffuse FUV. There is also a linear relationship between FUV and 100 μm emission below 100 μm values of 8 MJy sr-1. We find a similar linear relationship between FUV and N H I below 1021 cm-2. The relationship between FUV and Hα intensity has no such constant cutoff. For all Galactic quantities, the slope of the linear portion of the relationship decreases with Galactic latitude. A modified cosecant model, taking into account dust scattering asymmetry and albedo, is able to accurately fit the diffuse FUV at latitudes above 20°. The best fit model indicates an albedo, a, of 0.62 ± 0.04 and a scattering asymmetry function, g, of 0.78 ± 0.05. Deviations from the model fit may indicate regions of excess FUV emission from fluorescence or shock fronts, while low latitude regions with depressed FUV emission are likely the result of self-shielding dusty clouds.

  16. The diffuse galactic far-ultraviolet sky

    SciTech Connect

    Hamden, Erika T.; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark

    2013-12-20

    We present an all-sky map of the diffuse Galactic far ultraviolet (1344-1786 Å) background using Galaxy Evolution Explorer data, covering 65% of the sky with 11.79 arcmin{sup 2} pixels. We investigate the dependence of the background on Galactic coordinates, finding that a standard cosecant model of intensity is not a valid fit. Furthermore, we compare our map to Galactic all-sky maps of 100 μm emission, N {sub H} {sub I} column, and Hα intensity. We measure a consistent low level far-UV (FUV) intensity at zero points for other Galactic quantities, indicating a 300 photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} Å{sup –1} non-scattered isotropic component to the diffuse FUV. There is also a linear relationship between FUV and 100 μm emission below 100 μm values of 8 MJy sr{sup –1}. We find a similar linear relationship between FUV and N {sub H} {sub I} below 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}. The relationship between FUV and Hα intensity has no such constant cutoff. For all Galactic quantities, the slope of the linear portion of the relationship decreases with Galactic latitude. A modified cosecant model, taking into account dust scattering asymmetry and albedo, is able to accurately fit the diffuse FUV at latitudes above 20°. The best fit model indicates an albedo, a, of 0.62 ± 0.04 and a scattering asymmetry function, g, of 0.78 ± 0.05. Deviations from the model fit may indicate regions of excess FUV emission from fluorescence or shock fronts, while low latitude regions with depressed FUV emission are likely the result of self-shielding dusty clouds.

  17. Production and dissolution of nuclear explosive melt glasses at underground test sites in the Pacific Region

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, W.L.; Smith, D.K.

    1998-11-06

    From 1975 to 1996 the French detonated 140 underground nuclear explosions beneath the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa in the South Pacific; from 1965 to 1971 the United States detonated three high yield nuclear tests beneath Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain. Approximately 800 metric tons of basalt is melted per kiloton of nuclear yield; almost lo7 metric tons of basalt were melted in these tests. Long-lived and toxic radionuclides are partitioned into the melt glass at the time of explosion and are released by dissolution with seawater under saturated conditions. A glass dissolution model predicts that nuclear melt glasses at these sites will dissolve in lo6 to lo7 yea

  18. Where Galactic Snakes Live

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows what astronomers are referring to as a 'snake' (upper left) and its surrounding stormy environment. The sinuous object is actually the core of a thick, sooty cloud large enough to swallow dozens of solar systems. In fact, astronomers say the 'snake's belly' may be harboring beastly stars in the process of forming.

    The galactic creepy crawler to the right of the snake is another thick cloud core, in which additional burgeoning massive stars might be lurking. The colorful regions below the two cloud cores are less dense cloud material, in which dust has been heated by starlight and glows with infrared light. Yellow and orange dots throughout the image are monstrous developing stars; the red star on the 'belly' of the snake is 20 to 50 times as massive as our sun. The blue dots are foreground stars.

    The red ball at the bottom left is a 'supernova remnant,' the remains of massive star that died in a fiery blast. Astronomers speculate that radiation and winds from the star before it died, in addition to a shock wave created when it exploded, might have played a role in creating the snake.

    Spitzer was able to spot the two black cloud cores using its heat-seeking infrared vision. The objects are hiding in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy, invisible to optical telescopes. Because their heat, or infrared light, can sneak through the dust, they first showed up in infrared images from past missions. The cloud cores are so thick with dust that if you were to somehow transport yourself into the middle of them, you would see nothing but black, not even a star in the sky. Now, that's spooky!

    Spitzer's new view of the region provides the best look yet at the massive embryonic stars hiding inside the snake. Astronomers say these observations will ultimately help them better understand how massive stars form. By studying the clustering and range of masses of the stellar embryos, they hope

  19. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  20. Candidate Selection for the FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, Curtis; Eikenberry, Stephen; Bandyopadhyay, Reba; Blum, Robert; Muno, Michael; Sellgren, Kris

    2008-05-23

    We present a JHK{sub s} catalog of a 20'x20' region around the Galactic Center observed with the ISPI camera on the 4 m CTIO telescope. The data is being used to select targets for the FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey, which will take near-infrared spectra of thousands of GC sources in an effort to identify and characterize the unique X-ray binary source population in this region.

  1. Candidate Selection for the FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitt, Curtis; Eikenberry, Stephen; Bandyopadhyay, Reba; Blum, Robert; Muno, Michael; Sellgren, Kris

    2008-05-01

    We present a JHKs catalog of a 20'×20' region around the Galactic Center observed with the ISPI camera on the 4 m CTIO telescope. The data is being used to select targets for the FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey, which will take near-infrared spectra of thousands of GC sources in an effort to identify and characterize the unique X-ray binary source population in this region.

  2. X-ray narrow emission lines from the nuclear region of NGC 1365

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whewell, M.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Page, M. J.

    2016-11-01

    Context. NGC 1365 is a Seyfert 2 galaxy with a starburst ring in its nuclear region. In this work we look at the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) data from four 2012-13, three 2007 and two 2004 observations of NGC 1365, in order to analyse and characterise in a uniform way the soft X-ray narrow-line emitting gas in the nucleus. Aims: We characterise the narrow-line emitting gas visible by XMM-Newton RGS and make comparisons between the 2012-13 spectra and those from 2004-07, already published. Methods: This source is usually absorbed within the soft X-ray band, with a typical neutral column density of >1.5 × 1023 cm-2, and only one observation of the nine we investigate shows low enough absorption for the continuum to emerge in the soft X-rays. We stack all observations from 2004-07, and separately three of the four observations from 2012-13, analysing the less absorbed observation separately. We first model the spectra using Gaussian profiles representing the narrow line emission. We fit physically motivated models to the 2012-13 stacked spectra, with collisionally ionised components representing the starburst emission and photoionised line emission models representing the AGN line emission. The collisional and photoionised emission line models are fitted together (rather than holding either one constant), on top of a physical continuum and absorption model. Results: The X-ray narrow emission line spectrum of NGC 1365 is well represented by a combination of two collisionally ionised (kT of 220 ± 10 and 570 ± 15 eV) and three photoionised (log ξ of 1.5 ± 0.2, 2.5 ± 0.2, 1.1 ± 0.2) phases of emitting gas, all with higher than solar nitrogen abundances. This physical model was fitted to the 2012-13 stacked spectrum, and yet also fits well to the 2004-07 stacked spectrum, without changing any characteristics of the emitting gas phases. Our 2004-07 results are consistent with previous emission line work using these data, with five additional

  3. Synchrotron Emission Model from a Hypothetical Galactic Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Quintin; Everett, J.; Zwiebel, E.

    2007-12-01

    The ROSAT All Sky Survey (Snowden et al. 1993) discovered a pill-box shaped region of X-ray emission towards the galactic center. Elsewhere, we postulate that the emission is caused by a cosmic-ray and thermally driven Galactic wind (Everett et al, submitted). The objective of this project is to model synchrotron emission from a hypothetical Galactic wind to see whether the model can be tested with radio observations. The wind is launched from the Galactic disk from Galactic radii 1.5 kpc < R < 4.5 kpc to 1 Mpc in height. Observations of the corresponding cylindrical annulus geometry are simulated from Earth at z=0 height and R=8 kpc. We begin with a Galactic wind model fit by Everett et al. to the X-ray emission and integrate the equation for synchrotron intensity on lines of sight through the wind. Initially, we model simple launch geometry to validate our tools and compare the results with analytic single-ray calculations to verify accuracy. We choose to model synchrotron radiation at 1.5 GHz as all-sky surveys observe near this frequency. The result of the model currently predicts that the synchrotron flux from the Galactic wind should be observable using radio telescopes, such as the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, to Galactic latitude b +/- 20 degrees and Galactic longitude l +/- 35 degrees. Comparisons to all-sky surveys will test the existence of a wind-driven synchrotron spectrum. If a synchrotron spectrum comparable to the Galactic wind model is observed, it could provide evidence for the existence of a cosmic-ray and thermally driven Galactic wind.

  4. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident due to Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, M.; Wada, M.; Takeuchi, N.

    2012-01-01

    On March 11 2011, Great Eastern Japan Earthquake hit Japan and caused the devastating damage. Fukushima Nuclear Power Station (NPS) also suffered damages and provided the environmental effect with radioactive products. The situation has been settled to some extent about two months after the accidents, and currently, the cooling of reactor is continuing towards settling the situation. Japanese NPSs are designed based on safety requirements and have multiple-folds of hazard controls. However, according to publicly available information, due to the lager-than-anticipated Tsunami, all the power supply were lost, which resulted in loss of hazard controls. Also, although nuclear power plants are equipped with system/procedure in case of loss of all controls, recovery was not made as planned in Fukushima NPSs because assumptions for hazard controls became impractical or found insufficient. In consequence, a state of emergency was declared. Through this accident, many lessons learned have been obtained from the several perspectives. There are many commonality between nuclear safety and space safety. Both industries perform thorough hazard assessments because hazards in both industries can result in loss of life. Therefore, space industry must learn from this accident and reconsider more robust space safety. This paper will introduce lessons learned from Fukushima nuclear accident described in the "Report of the Japanese Government to the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety" [1], and discuss the considerations to establish more robust safety in the space systems. Detailed information of Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS are referred to this report.

  5. The Case Low-Dispersion Northern Sky Survey. X. A--F Stars in a Region at Intermediate Galactic Latitude Primarily in Lynx and Leo Minor: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesch, Peter; Sanduleak, N.

    1996-02-01

    In the paper "The Case Low-Dispersion Northern Sky Survey. XII. A Region in Southern Canes Venatici" by Peter Pesch, N..Sanduleak, and C. B. Stephenson (ApJS, 76,1043(1991]), the finding chart (Fig. 4, Pl. [43]) for CG 1064 has the wrong object marked. CG 1064 is the bright galaxy due west of the object marked.

  6. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Petroff, E.; Van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F.; Johnston, S.; Bates, S. D.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Ng, C.; Levin, L.; and others

    2014-07-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15° region. Several effects such as dispersion, scattering, sky temperature, and scintillation decrease the sensitivity by more than 3σ in ∼20% of survey pointings. Including all of these effects, we exclude the hypothesis that FRBs are uniformly distributed on the sky with 99% confidence. This low probability implies that additional factors—not accounted for by standard Galactic models—must be included to ease the discrepancy between the detection rates at high and low Galactic latitudes. A revised rate estimate or another strong and heretofore unknown selection effect in Galactic latitude would provide closer agreement between the surveys' detection rates. The dearth of detections at low Galactic latitude disfavors a Galactic origin for these bursts.

  7. Nuclear Translocation Sequence and Region in Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus ME53 That Are Important for Optimal Baculovirus Production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; de Jong, Jondavid; Nagy, Éva; Theilmann, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is in the family Baculoviridae, genus Alphabaculovirus. AcMNPV me53 is a highly conserved immediate early gene in all lepidopteran baculoviruses that have been sequenced and is transcribed up to late times postinfection. Although me53 is not essential for viral DNA synthesis, infectious budded virus (BV) production is greatly attenuated when it is deleted. ME53 associates with the nucleocapsid on both budded virus and occlusion-derived virus, but not with the virus envelope. ME53 colocalizes in plasma membrane foci with the envelope glycoprotein GP64 in a GP64-dependent manner. ME53 localizes in the cytoplasm early postinfection, and despite the lack of a reported nuclear localization signal (NLS), ME53 translocates to the nucleus at late times postinfection. To map determinants of ME53 that facilitate its nuclear translocation, recombinant AcMNPV bacmids containing a series of ME53 truncations, internal deletions, and peptides fused with hemagglutinin (HA) or green fluorescent protein (GFP) tags were constructed. Intracellular-localization studies identified residues within amino acids 109 to 137 at the N terminus of ME53 that acted as the nuclear translocation sequence (NTS), facilitating its nuclear transport at late times postinfection. The first 100 N-terminal amino acids and the last 50 C-terminal amino acids of ME53 are dispensable for high levels of budded virus production. The region within amino acids 101 to 398, which also contains the NTS, is critical for optimal levels of budded virus production. IMPORTANCE Baculovirus me53 is a conserved immediate early gene found in all sequenced lepidopteran alpha- and betabaculoviruses. We first identified residues within amino acids 109 to 137 at the N terminus that act as the ME53 nuclear translocation sequence (NTS) to facilitate its nuclear translocation and defined an internal region within amino acids 101 to 398, which includes the NTS, as

  8. The nuclear regions of NGC 3311 and NGC 7768 imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Planetary Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillmair, Carl J.; Faber, S.M.; Lauer, Tod R.; Baum, William A.; Lynds, Roger C.; O'Neil, Earl J., Jr.; Shaya, Edward J.

    1994-01-01

    We present high-resolution, V band images of the central regions of the brightest cluster ellipticals NGC 3311 and NGC 7768 taken with the Planetary Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope. The nuclei of both galaxies are found to be obscured by dust, though the morphology of the dust is quite different in the two cases. The dust cloud which obscures the central 3 arcsec of NGC 3311 is complex and irregular, while the central region of NGC 7768 contains a disk of material similar in appearance and scale to that recently observed in HST images of NGC 4261. The bright, relatively blue source detected in ground-based studies of NGC 3311 is marginally resolved and is likely to be a site of ongoing star formation. We examine the distribution of globular clusters in the central regions of NGC 3311. The gradient in the surface density profile of the cluster system is significantly shallower than that found by previous investigators at larger radii. We find a core radius for the cluster distribution of 12 plus or minus 3 kpc, which is even larger than the core radius of the globular cluster system surrounding M87. It is also an order of magnitude larger than the upper limit on the core radius of NGC 3311's stellar light and suggests that the central field-star population and the globular cluster system are dynamically distinct. We briefly discuss possible sources for the cold/warm interstellar material in early-type galaxies. While the issue has not been resolved, models which involve galactic wind failure appear to be mo st naturally consistent with the observations.

  9. The nuclear regions of NGC 3311 and NGC 7768 imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Planetary Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillmair, Carl J.; Faber, S. M.; Lauer, Tod R.; Baum, William A.; Lynds, Roger C.; O'Neil, Earl J., Jr.; Shaya, Edward J.

    1994-07-01

    We present high-resolution, V band images of the central regions of the brightest cluster ellipticals NGC 3311 and NGC 7768 taken with the Planetary Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope. The nuclei of both galaxies are found to be obscured by dust, though the morphology of the dust is quite different in the two cases. The dust cloud which obscures the central 3 arcsec of NGC 3311 is complex and irregular, while the central region of NGC 7768 contains a disk of material similar in appearance and scale to that recently observed in HST images of NGC 4261. The bright, relatively blue source detected in ground-based studies of NGC 3311 is marginally resolved and is likely to be a site of ongoing star formation. We examine the distribution of globular clusters in the central regions of NGC 3311. The gradient in the surface density profile of the cluster system is significantly shallower than that found by previous investigators at larger radii. We find a core radius for the cluster distribution of 12 plus or minus 3 kpc, which is even larger than the core radius of the globular cluster system surrounding M87. It is also an order of magnitude larger than the upper limit on the core radius of NGC 3311's stellar light and suggests that the central field-star population and the globular cluster system are dynamically distinct. We briefly discuss possible sources for the cold/warm interstellar material in early-type galaxies. While the issue has not been resolved, models which involve galactic wind failure appear to be mo st naturally consistent with the observations.

  10. Nuclear power-related facilities and neighboring land price: a case study on the Mutsu-Ogawara region, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Fumihiro; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Asano, Kota

    2011-12-01

    From the perspective of risk, nuclear-power-related facilities (NPRFs) are often regarded as locally undesirable land use. However, construction of NPRFs contributes to social infrastructural improvement and job creation in the host communities. This raises a question: How large are these positive and negative effects? To approach this question from an economic viewpoint, we estimated the hedonic land price function for the Mutsu-Ogawara region of Japan from 1976 to 2004 and analyzed year-by-year fluctuations in land prices around the NPRFs located there. Land prices increased gradually in the neighborhood of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities (NFCFs) in Rokkasho Village, except for some falling (i) from 1982 to 1983 (the first official announcement of the project of construction came in 1983), (ii) from 1987 to 1988 (in 1988, the construction began and opposition movements against the project reached their peak), and (iii) from 1998 to 1999 (the pilot carry-in of spent fuels into the reprocessing plant began in 1998). Land prices around the Higashidori Nuclear Power Plant decreased during the period 1981-1982, when the Tohoku Electric Power Corp. and Tokyo Electric Power Corp. announced their joint construction plan. On the other hand, we obtained some results, even though not significant, indicating that land prices around Ohminato and Sekinehama harbors changed with the arrival and departure of the nuclear ship Mutsu, which suffered a radiation leak in 1974.

  11. Interaction between the yeast mitochondrial and nuclear genomes influences the abundance of novel transcripts derived from the spacer region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, V S; Conrad-Webb, H; Docherty, R; Butow, R A

    1989-01-01

    We have identified stable transcripts from the so-called nontranscribed spacer region (NTS) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat in certain respiration-deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These RNAs, which are transcribed from the same strand as is the 37S rRNA precursor, are 500 to 800 nucleotides long and extend from the 5' end of the 5S rRNA gene to three major termination sites about 1,780, 1,830, and 1,870 nucleotides from the 3' end of the 26S rRNA gene. A survey of various wild-type and respiration-deficient strains showed that NTS transcript abundance depended on the mitochondrial genotype and a single codominant nuclear locus. In strains with that nuclear determinant, NTS transcripts were barely detected in [rho+] cells, were slightly more abundant in various mit- derivatives, and were most abundant in petites. However, in one petite that was hypersuppressive and contained a putative origin of replication (ori5) within its 757-base-pair mitochondrial genome, NTS transcripts were no more abundant than in [rho+] cells. The property of low NTS transcript abundance in the hypersuppressive petite was unstable, and spontaneous segregants that contained NTS transcripts as abundant as in the other petites examined could be obtained. Thus, respiration deficiency per se is not the major factor contributing to the accumulation of these unusual RNAs. Unlike RNA polymerase I transcripts, the abundant NTS RNAs were glucose repressible, fractionated as poly(A)+ RNAs, and were sensitive to inhibition by 10 micrograms of alpha-amanitin per ml, a concentration that had no effect on rRNA synthesis. Abundant NTS RNAs are therefore most likely derived by polymerase II transcription. Images PMID:2473390

  12. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Shiheido, Hirokazu Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  13. Karl G. Jansky VLA 3.6 cm Continuum and RRL Observations of the Galactic Massive Star Forming Region W49A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pree, Christopher G.; Wilner, David J.; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Goss, Miller; Klessen, Ralf; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Peters, Thomas; Amason, Charlee

    2016-01-01

    We are using the VLA to make a multi-configuration study at 3.6 cm of the massive star forming region W49A. Using new observations from 2015, we have imaged W49A in the A, B, and D configurations in 3.6 cm continuum and H92α and H93α recombination line emission. We present initial continuum images, and selected line spectra of individual sources. This study is part of an ongoing campaign to search for variability in ultracompact HII regions, as predicted by models of unsteady accretion flows. Such variability has been detected in systematic searches of sources in the crowded Sgr B2 Main and North regions (De Pree et al., 2014, 2015). Deep VLA continuum and line observations were first made of W49A in 1993-94 in the B, C, and D configurations, and we will discuss preliminary comparisons of the new data with these 1993-94 archival data.

  14. Regional geology of nuclear Central America and petroleum prospects of Belize

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.R.; Nair, K.M.; Ramanathan, R.

    1989-03-01

    The subsurface stratigraphy and structural evolution of nuclear Central American are reviewed in the light of new data from Belize. The northern Belize Corozal basin is the southern continuation of the Yucatan platform of Mexico and the eastern extension of the Peten basin of Mexico and Guatemala. The southern Belize basin is contiguous with the Chapayal basin of Guatemala.

  15. STABILITY OF GAS CLOUDS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI: AN EXTENDED VIRIAL THEOREM

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xian; Cuadra, Jorge; Amaro-Seoane, Pau E-mail: jcuadra@astro.puc.cl

    2016-03-10

    Cold gas entering the central 1–10{sup 2} pc of a galaxy fragments and condenses into clouds. The stability of the clouds determines whether they will be turned into stars or can be delivered to the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) to turn on an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The conventional criteria to assess the stability of these clouds, such as the Jeans criterion and Roche (or tidal) limit, are insufficient here, because they assume the dominance of self-gravity in binding a cloud, and neglect external agents, such as pressure and tidal forces, which are common in galactic nuclei. We formulate a new scheme for judging this stability. We first revisit the conventional Virial theorem, taking into account an external pressure, to identify the correct range of masses that lead to stable clouds. We then extend the theorem to further include an external tidal field, which is equally crucial for the stability in the region of our interest—in dense star clusters, around SMBHs. We apply our extended Virial theorem to find new solutions to controversial problems, namely, the stability of the gas clumps in AGN tori, the circum-nuclear disk in the Galactic Center, and the central molecular zone of the Milky Way. The masses we derive for these structures are orders of magnitude smaller than the commonly used Virial masses (equivalent to the Jeans mass). Moreover, we prove that these clumps are stable, contrary to what one would naively deduce from the Roche (tidal) limit.

  16. Integral field spectroscopy of the circum-nuclear region of the radio Galaxy Pictor A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Guilherme S.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Robinson, Andrew; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Kharb, Preeti; Lena, Davide; Schnorr-Müller, Allan

    2016-05-01

    We present optical integral field spectroscopy of the inner 2.5 × 3.4 kpc2 of the broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A, at a spatial resolution of ≈400 pc. Line emission is observed over the whole field of view, being strongest at the nucleus and in an elongated linear feature (ELF) crossing the nucleus from the south-west to the north-east along PA ≈70°. Although the broad double-peaked Hα line and the [O I]6300/Hα and [S II]6717+31/Hα ratios are typical of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the [N II]6584/Hα ratio (0.15-0.25) is unusually low. We suggest that this is due to the unusually low metallicity of the gas. Centroid velocity maps show mostly blueshifts to the south and redshifts to the north of the nucleus, but the velocity field is not well fitted by a rotation model. Velocity dispersions are low (<100 km s- 1 ) along the ELF, ruling out a jet-cloud interaction as the origin of this structure. The ELF shows both blueshifts and redshifts in channel maps, suggesting that it is close to the plane of the sky. The ELF is evidently photoionized by the AGN, but its kinematics and inferred low metallicity suggest that this structure may have originated in a past merger event with another galaxy. We suggest that the gas acquired in this interaction may be feeding the ELF.

  17. Investigation of the Chromosome Regions with Significant Affinity for the Nuclear Envelope in Fruit Fly – A Model Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Sharakhov, Igor V.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional nuclear architecture is important for genome function, but is still poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the role of the “boundary conditions” – points of attachment between chromosomes and the nuclear envelope. We describe a method for modeling the 3D organization of the interphase nucleus, and its application to analysis of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments of polytene (giant) chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster salivary glands. The model represents chromosomes as self-avoiding polymer chains confined within the nucleus; parameters of the model are taken directly from experiment, no fitting parameters are introduced. Methods are developed to objectively quantify chromosome territories and intertwining, which are discussed in the context of corresponding experimental observations. In particular, a mathematically rigorous definition of a territory based on convex hull is proposed. The self-avoiding polymer model is used to re-analyze previous experimental data; the analysis suggests 33 additional Chr-NE attachments in addition to the 15 already explored Chr-NE attachments. Most of these new Chr-NE attachments correspond to intercalary heterochromatin – gene poor, dark staining, late replicating regions of the genome; however, three correspond to euchromatin – gene rich, light staining, early replicating regions of the genome. The analysis also suggests 5 regions of anti-contact, characterized by aversion for the NE, only two of these correspond to euchromatin. This composition of chromatin suggests that heterochromatin may not be necessary or sufficient for the formation of a Chr-NE attachment. To the extent that the proposed model represents reality, the confinement of the polytene chromosomes in a spherical nucleus alone does not favor the positioning of specific chromosome regions at the NE as seen in experiment; consequently, the 15 experimentally known Chr-NE attachment positions do not appear to

  18. Investigation of the chromosome regions with significant affinity for the nuclear envelope in fruit fly--a model based approach.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Sharakhov, Igor V; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional nuclear architecture is important for genome function, but is still poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the role of the "boundary conditions"--points of attachment between chromosomes and the nuclear envelope. We describe a method for modeling the 3D organization of the interphase nucleus, and its application to analysis of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments of polytene (giant) chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster salivary glands. The model represents chromosomes as self-avoiding polymer chains confined within the nucleus; parameters of the model are taken directly from experiment, no fitting parameters are introduced. Methods are developed to objectively quantify chromosome territories and intertwining, which are discussed in the context of corresponding experimental observations. In particular, a mathematically rigorous definition of a territory based on convex hull is proposed. The self-avoiding polymer model is used to re-analyze previous experimental data; the analysis suggests 33 additional Chr-NE attachments in addition to the 15 already explored Chr-NE attachments. Most of these new Chr-NE attachments correspond to intercalary heterochromatin--gene poor, dark staining, late replicating regions of the genome; however, three correspond to euchromatin--gene rich, light staining, early replicating regions of the genome. The analysis also suggests 5 regions of anti-contact, characterized by aversion for the NE, only two of these correspond to euchromatin. This composition of chromatin suggests that heterochromatin may not be necessary or sufficient for the formation of a Chr-NE attachment. To the extent that the proposed model represents reality, the confinement of the polytene chromosomes in a spherical nucleus alone does not favor the positioning of specific chromosome regions at the NE as seen in experiment; consequently, the 15 experimentally known Chr-NE attachment positions do not appear to arise due to

  19. Galactic massive star forming regions near and far: a (sub)millimeter study of the Orion Molecular Cloud 1 and W49A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tzu-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    Massive stars play an important role in shaping the structure of galaxies due to the large energy output during their lifetime. However, because of the short evolutionary time scales, the large extinction toward their birth places, and the large distance of massive stars, our understanding of their formation is still sketchy. Hence, the observations of two well-known massive star forming regions in our Galaxy (W49A at 11.4 kpc and Orion Molecular Cloud 1 at 414 pc) were carried out using the IRAM 30 m and APEX telescopes, including large-scale mappings of various molecular line emission, such as CO isotopologues, HCN, HCO+, and SiO. The results of W49A show that its starburst was triggered by expanding shells, causing fragmentation that lead to the formation of massive stars. The cause of the shell expansion is not clear, but likely due to the stellar feedbacks from a first generation of young massive stars by strong stellar winds and ultraviolet radiation, or the interaction between stars in a cluster, which is possibly related to the large-scale gas ejections found in the W49 complex with a total kinetic energy of few times 1050 erg. Apart from W49A, the study in Orion Molecular Cloud 1 reveals a more detailed picture of young massive stars strongly interacting with their local environment. The highly excited CO emission in Orion Molecular Cloud 1 shows two main components: one is the north-south dense ridge where two active star-forming regions (Orion BN/KL and Orion South) are located, and the other one consists of photon-dominated regions (e.g., the Orion Bar and Orion East) spread over the whole area, where gas and dust are heated by ultraviolet photons from the Trapezium cluster. In addition, several outflows are detected in the higher-J transitions of CO, which indicates the important role of shock heating associated with star-forming activities.

  20. Carbon and Oxygen Galactic Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carigi, L.; Peimbert, M.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.

    2006-06-01

    A chemical evolution model of the Galaxy has been computed to reproduce the O/H gradients from Galactic HII regions. This model solves the C enrichment problem because it fits the C/H and C/O gradients and the C and O histories of the solar vicinity. The model is based on C yields dependent on metallicity (Z) owing to stellar winds. The C yields of massive stars (MS) increase with Z and those of low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) decrease with Z. An important result is that the fraction of carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) due to MS and LIMS is strongly dependent on Z of the ISM, therefore, that fraction depends on time and on the Galactocentric distance. At present and in the solar vicinity about half of the C in the interstellar medium has been produced by MS and half by LIMS.

  1. Galactic-scale civilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.

    1980-01-01

    Evolutionary arguments are presented in favor of the existence of civilization on a galactic scale. Patterns of physical, chemical, biological, social and cultural evolution leading to increasing levels of complexity are pointed out and explained thermodynamically in terms of the maximization of free energy dissipation in the environment of the organized system. The possibility of the evolution of a global and then a galactic human civilization is considered, and probabilities that the galaxy is presently in its colonization state and that life could have evolved to its present state on earth are discussed. Fermi's paradox of the absence of extraterrestrials in light of the probability of their existence is noted, and a variety of possible explanations is indicated. Finally, it is argued that although mankind may be the first occurrence of intelligence in the galaxy, it is unjustified to presume that this is so.

  2. The Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.

    2016-06-01

    The Galactic bulge is the least studied component of our Galaxy. Yet, its formation and evolution are key to understand the formation of the Galaxy itself. Studies on the Galactic bulge have increased significantly in the last years, but still there are many points of controversy. This volume contains several contributions from experts in different aspects of the bulge. Issues discussed include the following: the presence of an old spheroidal bulge, or identification of its old stellar population with the thick disk or halo; fraction of stars younger than 10 Gyr is estimated to be of < 5 to 22% depending on method and authors; multiple populations or only a metal-poor and a metal-rich ones; spheroidal or ellipsoidal distribution of RR Lyrae; formation of the bulge from early mergers or from secular evolution of the bar; different methods of mapping extinction; selection and identification of bulge globular clusters.

  3. KINEMATICS OF CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS IN THE NUCLEAR STELLAR DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Fukue, Kei; Yamamoto, Ryo; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Inno, Laura; Genovali, Katia; Bono, Giuseppe; Baba, Junichi; Fujii, Michiko S.; Aoki, Wako; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Kondo, Sohei; Ikeda, Yuji; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya

    2015-01-20

    Classical Cepheids are useful tracers of the Galactic young stellar population because their distances and ages can be determined from their period-luminosity and period-age relations. In addition, the radial velocities and chemical abundance of the Cepheids can be derived from spectroscopic observations, providing further insights into the structure and evolution of the Galaxy. Here, we report the radial velocities of classical Cepheids near the Galactic center, three of which were reported in 2011 and a fourth being reported for the first time. The velocities of these Cepheids suggest that the stars orbit within the nuclear stellar disk, a group of stars and interstellar matter occupying a region of ∼200 pc around the center, although the three-dimensional velocities cannot be determined until the proper motions are known. According to our simulation, these four Cepheids formed within the nuclear stellar disk like younger stars and stellar clusters therein.

  4. The Sky is NOT Falling: Regional Reaction to a Nuclear-Armed Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    remains perhaps the greatest hero that state has ever had, second only to Muhammad Ali Jinnah , Pakistan’s founding father.165 3. C2 Investigating how...States to Shah Muhammad Reza Pahlavi.29 These carried a back-door path to nuclear weapons for Iran. However, as was allegedly the case with Israel...on Israel, as outlined by Iranian Minister of Defense Admiral Ali Shamkhani: Iran’s defense strategy is based on safeguarding Iran’s territorial

  5. Resonance Region Cross-Section Data Advancements for Nuclear Criticality Safety Applications and ENDF/B-VII.1

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Michael E; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea; Sayer, Royce O; Derrien, Herve; HARVEY, JACK

    2011-01-01

    ORNL has completed new resonance region cross-section evaluations with covariance data to support nuclear criticality safety applications. This paper summarizes some of the most recent cross-section evaluations that have been completed and will be made available to process into nuclear data libraries for use with radiation transport codes. Specifically, the paper summarizes the work that has been completed for {sup 35}Cl, {sup 37}Cl , {sup 50}Cr, {sup 52}Cr, {sup 53}Cr, {sup 54}Cr, {sup 39}K, {sup 41}K, {sup 19}F, {sup 55}Mn, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 60}Ni, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Many of the new cross-section evaluations are based on new differential data measurements in the resonance region. Furthermore, corresponding covariance data analyses have been performed in conjunction with the resonance evaluation effort thereby providing a consistent set of covariance data to complement the resonance region cross-section evaluations. As a result, the new cross-section evaluations with covariance data can be used to support sensitivity/uncertainty analyses for criticality safety applications.

  6. Yield ratio estimates using regional Pn and Pg from North Korea's underground nuclear explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Sung; Kang, Ik-Bum; Kim, Geun-Young

    2009-11-01

    On May 25, 2009 North Korea executed a second nuclear test in the vicinity of P'unggyeri where the first nuclear test was performed on October 9, 2006. Seismic signals from the two underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) are recorded at broadband stations in South Korea and China. Seismic signals from fourteen broadband stations operated by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), three broadband stations of Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) in South Korea and the Mudanjiang station (MDJ) of GSN in China are used for this study. Clear Pn, Pg, and Lg phases propagated over 800 km. The nearly co-located two UNEs and seismic recordings at the same stations enable us to estimate the ratio of the Pn and Pg displacement amplitude spectra between two events by eliminating the path effect. The 95% confidence interval of the mean yield ratio is constrained as a function of the depth ratio and all the estimates of Pn and Pg spectral ratios. The mean yield ratio ranges from 3.45 to 6.36 in the 95% confidence interval based on the depth range estimates by Bennett (2008, 2009).

  7. The iPTF Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric Christopher; Prince, Thomas A.; Miller, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Kupfer, Thomas; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank J.; Oded Ofek, Eran; Shupe, David L.; Surace, Jason A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2013, the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory has conducted a survey of the Northern Galactic Plane. The major science goals of the survey include mapping variable stars throughout the Galaxy; discovering outbursting sources such as Cataclysmic Variables, FU Ori outbursts, and M-dwarf flares; and identifying rare types of compact binaries. Through 2015 the survey has obtained an average of 60 epochs in R-band in the spatial region 0 < l < 150 degrees, |b| < 20 degrees, with greatest coverage in the |b| < 5 degree region.I will describe the performance of the survey and present initial results, with a focus on variability-based identification of X-ray sources. The Zwicky Transient Facility, to begin in 2017, will include an extensive public variability survey of the Galactic Plane.

  8. SUBMILLIMETER H{sub 2}O MASER IN CIRCINUS GALAXY-A NEW PROBE FOR THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR REGION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Miyoshi, Makoto; Doi, Akihiro; Horiuchi, Shinji

    2013-05-10

    We present the first detection of extragalactic submillimeter H{sub 2}O maser in the 321 GHz transition toward the center of Circinus galaxy, the nearby Type 2 Seyfert using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. We find that Doppler features of the detected 321 GHz H{sub 2}O maser straddle the systemic velocity of the galaxy as seen in the spectrum of the known 22 GHz H{sub 2}O maser in the galaxy. By comparing the velocities of the maser features in both transitions, it can be deduced that the 321 GHz maser occurs in a region similar to that of the 22 GHz maser, where the sub-parsec-scale distribution of the 22 GHz maser was revealed by earlier very long baseline interferometry observations. The detected maser features remain unresolved at the synthesized beam of {approx}0.''66 ({approx}15 pc) and coincide with the 321 GHz continuum peak within small uncertainties. We also present a tentative detection of the highest velocity feature (redshifts up to {approx}635 km s{sup -1}) in the galaxy. If this high-velocity feature arises from a Keplerian rotating disk well established in this galaxy, it is located at a radius of {approx}0.018 pc ({approx}1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} Schwarzschild radii), which might probe molecular material closest to the central engine.

  9. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six DNA regions were evaluated in a multi-national, multi-laboratory consortium as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it...

  10. The age of the Galactic disk - Inflow, chemical evolution, astration, and radioactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models of Galactic evolution and observational data on the age of the Galaxy are compared, with a focus on recent results. Topics addressed include the infall of material and its effects on the age-metallicity relation, the distribution of metallicity, the present gas fraction and metallicity, and the age spectrum of interstellar nuclei; the chemical evolution of the solar neighborhood; the key results of nuclear cosmochronology; and astration effects on Galactic age. It is found that both nuclear cosmochronology and detailed stellar and Galactic evolution models tend to support an age of 12-16 Gyr.

  11. Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Project for an Integral Oncology Center at the Oaxaca High Specialization Regional Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Jesús, M.; Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.

    2010-12-01

    A building project of Radiotherapy & Nuclear Medicine services (diagnostic and therapy), within an Integral Oncology Center (IOC), requires interdisciplinary participation of architects, biomedical engineers, radiation oncologists and medical physicists. This report focus on the medical physicist role in designing, building and commissioning stages, for the final clinical use of an IOC at the Oaxaca High Specialization Regional Hospital (HRAEO). As a first step, during design stage, the medical physicist participates in discussions about radiation safety and regulatory requirements for the National Regulatory Agency (called CNSNS in Mexico). Medical physicists propose solutions to clinical needs and take decisions about installing medical equipment, in order to fulfill technical and medical requirements. As a second step, during the construction stage, medical physicists keep an eye on building materials and structural specifications. Meanwhile, regulatory documentation must be sent to CNSNS. This documentation compiles information about medical equipment, radioactivity facility, radiation workers and nuclear material data, in order to obtain the license for the linear accelerator, brachytherapy and nuclear medicine facilities. As a final step, after equipment installation, the commissioning stage takes place. As the conclusion, we show that medical physicists are essentials in order to fulfill with Mexican regulatory requirements in medical facilities.

  12. Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Project for an Integral Oncology Center at the Oaxaca High Specialization Regional Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    De Jesus, M.; Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.

    2010-12-07

    A building project of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine services (diagnostic and therapy), within an Integral Oncology Center (IOC), requires interdisciplinary participation of architects, biomedical engineers, radiation oncologists and medical physicists. This report focus on the medical physicist role in designing, building and commissioning stages, for the final clinical use of an IOC at the Oaxaca High Specialization Regional Hospital (HRAEO). As a first step, during design stage, the medical physicist participates in discussions about radiation safety and regulatory requirements for the National Regulatory Agency (called CNSNS in Mexico). Medical physicists propose solutions to clinical needs and take decisions about installing medical equipment, in order to fulfill technical and medical requirements. As a second step, during the construction stage, medical physicists keep an eye on building materials and structural specifications. Meanwhile, regulatory documentation must be sent to CNSNS. This documentation compiles information about medical equipment, radioactivity facility, radiation workers and nuclear material data, in order to obtain the license for the linear accelerator, brachytherapy and nuclear medicine facilities. As a final step, after equipment installation, the commissioning stage takes place. As the conclusion, we show that medical physicists are essentials in order to fulfill with Mexican regulatory requirements in medical facilities.

  13. Nuclear factors that bind two regions important to transcriptional activity of the simian immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Winandy, S; Renjifo, B; Li, Y; Hopkins, N

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies identified two regions in the U3 region of a molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac142, that are important to transcriptional activity under conditions of induction as well as basal-level expression (B. Renjifo, N. A. Speck, S. Winandy, N. Hopkins, and Y. Li, J. Virol. 64:3130-3134, 1990). One region includes the NF-kappa B binding site, while the other lies just 5' of this site between nucleotides -162 and -114 (the -162 to -114 region). The fact that the NF-kappa B site mutation attenuated transcriptional activity in uninduced T cells and fibroblasts where activated NF-kappa B would not be present suggested that a factor(s) other than NF-kappa B could be acting through this site. In this study, we have identified a factor which binds to a cis element overlapping the NF-kappa B site. This factor, which we call simian factor 3 (SF3), would play a role in regulation under conditions of basal level expression, whereas under conditions of induction, NF-kappa B would act via this region. SF3 may also bind to an element in the -162 to -114 region. In addition, we have identified two other factors that bind the -162 to -114 region. One, which we designated SF1, is a ubiquitous basal factor, and the other, SF2, is a T-cell-predominant phorbol myristate acetate-inducible factor. Through identification of nuclear factors that interact with the U3 region of the SIVmac142 long terminal repeat, we can gain insight into how this virus is transcriptionally regulated under conditions of basal-level expression as well as conditions of T-cell activation. Images PMID:1501272

  14. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  15. Galactic worms. I - Catalog of worm candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Heiles, Carl; Reach, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A catalog of candidates for the Galactic worms that are possibly the walls surrounding the superbubbles is compiled; 118 isolated structures that appear both in H I and in IR (60 and 100 microns). Fifty-two are possibly associated with H II regions. It is found that the 100-micron emissivity increases systematically toward the Galactic interior, which is consistent with the increase of the general interstellar radiation field. The 100-micron emissivity of the structures associated with the H II regions is larger than that of the structures without associated H II regions. The 60-100-micron ratio is large, 0.28 +/- 0.03, which may indicate that the grains associated with the atomic gas have a relatively large population of small grains. Thirty-five structures appear in the 408-MHz continuum. The IR and the radio continuum properties suggest that the 408-MHz continuum emission in those structures is very likely thermal. The implications of these results on the ionization of gas far from the Galactic plane are discussed.

  16. ALMA observations of the dense and shocked gas in the nuclear region of NGC 4038 (Antennae galaxies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Iono, Daisuke; Wilner, David J.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ohashi, Satoshi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Saito, Toshiki; Komugi, Shinya

    2017-02-01

    We present 1″(<100 pc) resolution maps of millimeter emission from five molecules-CN, HCN, HCO+, CH3OH, and HNCO-obtained towards NGC 4038, which is the northern galaxy of the mid-stage merger, Antennae galaxies, with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Three molecules (CN, CH3OH, and HNCO) were detected for the first time in the nuclear region of NGC 4038. High-resolution mapping reveals a systematic difference in distributions of different molecular species and continuum emission. Active star-forming regions identified by the 3 mm and 850 μm continuum emission are offset from the gas-rich region associated with the HCN (1-0) and CO (3-2) peaks. The CN (1-0)/HCN (1-0) line ratios are enhanced (CN/HCN ≃ 0.8-1.2) in the star-forming regions, suggesting that the regions are photon dominated. The large molecular gas mass (108 M⊙) within a 0{^''.}6 (˜60 pc) radius of the CO (3-2) peak and a high dense gas fraction (>20%) suggested by the HCN (1-0)/CO (3-2) line ratio may signify a future burst of intense star formation there. The shocked gas traced in the CH3OH and HNCO emission indicates sub-kpc-scale molecular shocks. We suggest that the molecular shocks may be driven by collisions between inflowing gas and the central massive molecular complex.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of Australian and New Zealand feral pigs assessed by mitochondrial control region sequence and nuclear GPIP genotype.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Jaime; Fleming, Peter; Spencer, Peter B S; Mason, Richard; Garkavenko, Olga; Meyer, Johann-Nikolaus; Droegemueller, Cord; Lee, Jun Heon; Moran, Chris

    2004-11-01

    Pigs were introduced into Australia and New Zealand in the 18th and 19th centuries, with some establishing feral populations. With few records of pig introductions into these two countries, molecular phylogenetic analysis was used to assess their origins. Mitochondrial (mt) control region sequence and nuclear glucosephosphate isomerase pseudogene (GPIP) restriction fragments were used, as distinct European and Asian domestic pig and Wild Boar control region clades and GPIP genotypes can be recognised. Feral pig control region sequences clustered with either European or Asian domestic pig sequences and both Asian and European GPIP alleles were segregating. It was not possible to distinguish direct importation of Asian domestic animals into Australia and New Zealand from indirect introgression of Asian domestic sequences via Europe. However, the clustering of three feral control region sequences of pigs from northern Australia with Asian Wild Boar implies unrecorded introduction of Wild Boar or crossbred animals into Australia. However, two of these feral pigs had European GPIP alleles. In combination, analyses of control region and GPIP markers suggest that both European and Asian pigs have contributed in similar frequencies to the origins of Australian feral pigs.

  18. Nuclear level densities below 40 MeV excitation energy in the mass region A ≃ 50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Ivaşcu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1990-09-01

    Consistent pre-equilibrium emission and statistical model calculations of fast neutron induced reaction cross sections are used to validate nuclear level densities for excitation energies up to 40 MeV in the mass region A ≃50. A “composed” level density approach has been employed by using the back-shifted Fermi gas model for excitation energies lower than 12 MeV and a realistic analytical formula for higher excitations. In the transition region from the BSFG model range to that of full applicability of the realistic formula, an interpolation between the predictions of the two models is adopted. The interpolation rule, suggested by microscopic level density calculations, has been validated through the comparison of the calculated and experimental cross sections.

  19. Radiation heat transfer calculations for the uranium fuel-containment region of the nuclear light bulb engine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Latham, T. S.; Krascella, N. L.

    1971-01-01

    Calculation results are reviewed of the radiant heat transfer characteristics in the fuel and buffer gas regions of a nuclear light bulb engine based on the transfer of energy by thermal radiation from gaseous uranium fuel in a neon vortex, through an internally cooled transparent wall, to seeded hydrogen propellant. The results indicate that the fraction of UV energy incident on the transparent walls increases with increasing power level. For the reference engine power level of 4600 megw, it is necessary to employ space radiators to reject the UV radiated energy absorbed by the transparent walls. This UV energy can be blocked by employing nitric oxide and oxygen seed gases in the fuel and buffer gas regions. However, this results in increased UV absorption in the buffer gas which also requires space radiators to reject the heat load.

  20. On the metallicity distribution of classical Cepheids in the Galactic inner disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovali, K.; Lemasle, B.; Bono, G.; Romaniello, M.; Primas, F.; Fabrizio, M.; Buonanno, R.; François, P.; Inno, L.; Laney, C. D.; Matsunaga, N.; Pedicelli, S.; Thévenin, F.

    2013-06-01

    We present homogeneous and accurate iron abundances for almost four dozen (47) of Galactic Cepheids using high-spectral resolution (R ~ 40 000) high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≥ 100) optical spectra collected with UVES at VLT. A significant fraction of the sample (32) is located in the inner disk (RG ≤ 6.9 kpc) and for half of them we provide new iron abundances. Current findings indicate a steady increase in iron abundance when approaching the innermost regions of the thin disk. The metallicity is super-solar and ranges from 0.2 dex for RG ~ 6.5 kpc to 0.4 dex for RG ~ 5.5 kpc. Moreover, we do not find evidence of correlation between iron abundance and distance from the Galactic plane. We collected similar data available in the literature and ended up with a sample of 420 Cepheids. Current data suggest that the mean metallicity and the metallicity dispersion in the four quadrants of the Galactic disk attain similar values. The first-second quadrants show a more extended metal-poor tail, while the third-fourth quadrants show a more extended metal-rich tail, but the bulk of the sample is at solar iron abundance. Finally, we found a significant difference between the iron abundance of Cepheids located close to the edge of the inner disk ([Fe/H] ~ 0.4) and young stars located either along the Galactic bar or in the nuclear bulge ([Fe/H] ~ 0). Thus suggesting that the above regions have had different chemical enrichment histories. The same outcome applies to the metallicity gradient of the Galactic bulge, since mounting empirical evidence indicates that the mean metallicity increases when moving from the outer to the inner bulge regions. Based on spectra collected with the spectrograph UVES available at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), Cerro Paranal, (081.D-0928(A) PI: S. Pedicelli - 082.D-0901(A) PI: S. Pedicelli).Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  1. Molecular phylogenetics of subfamily Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) based on nuclear and plastid DNA regions, including a new taxonomic arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Azorín, Mario; Crespo, Manuel B.; Juan, Ana; Fay, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The taxonomic arrangement within subfamily Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) has been a matter of controversy in recent decades: several new taxonomic treatments have been proposed, based exclusively on plastid DNA sequences, and these have resulted in classifications which are to a great extent contradictory. Some authors have recognized only a single genus Ornithogalum for the whole subfamily, including 250–300 species of variable morphology, whereas others have recognized many genera. In the latter case, the genera are inevitably much smaller and they are better defined morphologically. However, some are not monophyletic as circumscribed. Methods Phylogenetic analyses of Ornithogaloideae were based on nucleotide sequences of four plastid regions (trnL intron, trnL-F spacer, rbcL and matK) and a nuclear region (ITS). Eighty species covering all relevant taxonomic groups previously recognized in the subfamily were sampled. Parsimony and Bayesian analyses were performed. The molecular data were compared with a matrix of 34 morphological characters. Key Results Combinations of plastid and nuclear data yielded phylogenetic trees which are better resolved than those obtained with any plastid region alone or plastid regions in combination. Three main clades are found, corresponding to the previously recognized tribes Albuceae, Dipcadieae and Ornithogaleae. In these, up to 19 clades are described which are definable by morphology and biogeography. These mostly correspond to previously described taxa, though some need recircumscription. Morphological characters are assessed for their diagnostic value for taxonomy in the subfamily. Conclusions On the basis of the phylogenetic analyses, 19 monophyletic genera are accepted within Ornithogaloideae: Albuca, Avonsera, Battandiera, Cathissa, Coilonox, Dipcadi, Eliokarmos, Elsiea, Ethesia, Galtonia, Honorius, Loncomelos, Melomphis, Neopatersonia, Nicipe, Ornithogalum, Pseudogaltonia, Stellarioides and

  2. [Comparative Analysis of DNA Sequences of Regions of X-Chromosome Attachment to the Nuclear Envelope of Nurse Cells Anopheles messeae Fall].

    PubMed

    Artemov, G N; Vasil'eva, O Yu; Stegniy, V N

    2015-07-01

    Polytene chromosomes of ovarian nurse cells of Anopheles mosquitoes form strong contacts with the nuclear envelope. The presence of contacts, their position at nurse cell chromosomes, and their morphological features are species-specific in malaria mosquitoes. It is important to determine the nature of these interspecies differences in the nuclear architecture, both to understand the function of the nucleus and to assess the role of the spatial organization of chromosomes in evolution. Using dot-blot hybridization, we compared DNA sequences of the clone library from the X-chromosome attachment region to the nuclear envelope of ovarian nurse cells of Anopheles messeae with DNA-probes: (1) of the X-chromosome attachment region of An. atroparvus, (2) of the 3R chromosome attachment region ofAn. messeae, and (3) of the chromosome 2 pericentromeric region of An. messeae, without expressed contacts with the nuclear envelope. It has been shown that the chromosome attachment regions have a significantly higher number of homologous DNA sequences as compared with the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2. Sequences that are common for attachment regions are largely potentially able to participate in the formation of chromatin loop domains and to interact with some nucleus frameworks, according to the analysis in the ChrClass program. The obtained results support the important role of DNA in the formation of strong chromosomal attachments to the nuclear envelope in nurse cells of Anopheles mosquitoes.

  3. Population Health in Regions Adjacent to the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    The surplus cancer mortality in this group to archived material at Dispensary Number 4 be- was 6.6 x 106 cases and coincides with biological cause...type, with feather-grass, wild oats, desert East Kazakhstan region, Semipalatinsk region, timothy-grass, and different kinds of wormwood . southern part...Ust’- tons were provided. The limits on fats, fish, vege- Kamenogorsk, severe contamination of the atmos- tables, sweets , cookies, and other products

  4. Supershells and galactic fountains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, B. M.

    1989-03-01

    In the gaseous disk of our Galaxy as well as in other galaxies, HI structures (shells, bubbles, holes, etc.) on scales of 0.1-1 kpc are recognized to be common features; see e.g. the comprehensive review by Tenorio-Tagle and Bodenheimer (1988). The larger ones are usually named with the prefix "super". The estimated energies which are required to produee sueh large objeets are high - up to some 1054 erg. These energetic events must exert a significant influenee upon the gaseous galactic disk and eorona.

  5. Diffuse Galactic low energy gamma ray continuum emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, J. G.; Ramaty, R.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the origin of diffuse low-energy Galactic gamma-ray continuum down to about 30 keV. We calculate gamma-ray emission via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering by propagating an unbroken electron power law injection spectrum and employing a Galactic emmissivity model derived from COSB observations. To maintain the low energy electron population capable of producing the observed continuum via bremsstrahlung, a total power input of 4 x 10 exp 41 erg/s is required. This exceeds the total power supplied to the nuclear cosmic rays by about an order of magnitude.

  6. Radio galaxy jets as probes of galactic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Saslaw, W.C.; Whittle, M.

    1988-02-01

    It has been noted that the central source of an asymmetric nuclear galactic radio jet may experience considerable net thrust and consequently behave like a massive rocket. In this paper, simple models for the motion of a rocket through a galaxy are examined. It is found that the density distribution of the galaxy is important, and determines whether a given source can escape. Thus, observations of the location and velocity of a source relative to its galactic center may provide new constraints on models of the density distribution in galaxies. 35 references.

  7. An interpretation of galactic observations of CNO isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J. J.; Rose, W. K.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear network calculations are used to interpret observations of N-15/N-14 and O-17/O-18 abundance ratios in interstellar clouds. Recent observations of the N-15/N-14 abundance ratio in the galactic disk and the galactic center are consistent with the idea that N-15 is produced in intermediate-mass stars by means of the hot CNO tri-cycle. It is suggested that low-mass stars in the glactic center could be responsible for producing the local enhancement of O-17 by low-temperature (below 100 million K) CNO burning.

  8. Nuclear fragmentation and charge-exchange reactions induced by pions in the Δ -resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of the nuclear fragmentations and the charge exchange reactions in pion-nucleus collisions near the Δ (1232) resonance energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics transport model. An isospin-, momentum-, and density-dependent pion-nucleon potential is implemented in the model, which influences the pion dynamics, in particular the kinetic energy spectra, but weakly impacts the fragmentation mechanism. The absorption process in pion-nucleon collisions to form the Δ (1232) resonance dominates the heating mechanism of the target nucleus. The excitation energy transferred to the target nucleus increases with the pion kinetic energy and is similar for both π-- and π+-induced reactions. The magnitude of fragmentation of the target nucleus weakly depends on the pion energy. The isospin ratio in the pion double-charge exchange is influenced by the isospin ingredient of target nucleus.

  9. Characterization of amino acid residues within the N-terminal region of Ubc9 that play a role in Ubc9 nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhri, Palak; Tao, Tao; Kaplan, Feige; Zhang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-02-27

    As the sole E2 enzyme for SUMOylation, Ubc9 is predominantly nuclear. However, the underlying mechanisms of Ubc9 nuclear localization are still not well understood. Here we show that RNAi-depletion of Imp13, an importin known to mediate Ubc9 nuclear import, reduces both Ubc9 nuclear accumulation and global SUMOylation. Furthermore, Ubc9-R13A or Ubc9-H20D mutation previously shown to interrupt the interaction of Ubc9 with nucleus-enriched SUMOs reduces the nuclear enrichment of Ubc9, suggesting that the interaction of Ubc9 with the nuclear SUMOs may enhance Ubc9 nuclear retention. Moreover, Ubc9-R17E mutation, which is known to disrupt the interaction of Ubc9 with both SUMOs and Imp13, causes a greater decrease in Ubc9 nuclear accumulation than Ubc9-R13A or Ubc9-H20D mutation. Lastly, Ubc9-K74A/S89D mutations that perturb the interaction of Ubc9 with nucleus-enriched SUMOylation-consensus motifs has no effect on Ubc9 nuclear localization. Altogether, our results have elucidated that the amino acid residues within the N-terminal region of Ubc9 play a pivotal role in regulation of Ubc9 nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Imp13-mediated nuclear import of Ubc9 is critical for global SUMOylation. • Ubc9 mutations disrupting Ubc9-SUMO interaction decrease Ubc9 nuclear accumulation. • N-terminal amino acid residues of Ubc9 are critical for Ubc9 nuclear enrichment.

  10. Nuclear matrix attachment regions antagonize methylation-dependent repression of long-range enhancer–promoter interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, William C.; Fernández, Luis A.; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    The immunoglobulin intragenic μ enhancer region acts as a locus control region that mediates transcriptional activation over large distances in germ line transformation assays. In transgenic mice, but not in transfected tissue culture cells, the activation of a variable region (VH) promoter by the μ enhancer is dependent on flanking nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs). Here, we examine the effects of DNA methylation, which occurs in early mouse development, on the function of the μ enhancer and the MARs. We find that methylation of rearranged μ genes in vitro, before transfection, represses the ability of the μ enhancer to activate the VH promoter over the distance of 1.2 kb. However, methylation does not affect enhancer-mediated promoter activation over a distance of 150 bp. In methylated DNA templates, the μ enhancer alone induces only local chromatin remodeling, whereas in combination with MARs, the μ enhancer generates an extended domain of histone acetylation. These observations provide evidence that DNA methylation impairs the distance independence of enhancer function and thereby imposes a requirement for additional regulatory elements, such as MARs, which facilitate long-range chromatin remodeling. PMID:10580007

  11. Air Pollution Studies in Tver Region of Russia using Moss-Biomonitoring with Nuclear Analytical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vergel, K. N.; Frontasyeva, M. V.; Pavlov, S. S.; Povtoreyko, E. A.

    2007-11-26

    Results of the trace element atmospheric deposition in the Tver region based on moss analysis are presented. Moss samples were collected in the summer of 1999 and 2004 from 174 sites evenly distributed over the region. As bioaccumulators, two common mosses were used: Pleurozium schreberi ({approx}80%) and Hylocomium splendens ({approx}20%). The moss samples were subject to neutron activation analysis at the IBR-2 reactor JINR Dubna. The purpose of this study was to determine deposition patterns of potent sources of air pollution such as the largest Russian thermal power plant nearby the town of Konakovo and to reveal previously unknown pollution sources located in towns and settlements within the sampled territory. Multivariate statistical analysis was applied to determine possible pollution sources over the examined territory. Comparison of the results obtained with those from other surveys in Russia and Europe shows that Tver region could be considered as a background territory for the Russian Federation.

  12. BARYON LOADING OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS MEDIATED BY NEUTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, K.; Takahara, F.

    2012-08-01

    Plasmas of geometrically thick, black hole (BH) accretion flows in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are generally collisionless for protons, and involve magnetic field turbulence. Under such conditions a fraction of protons can be accelerated stochastically and create relativistic neutrons via nuclear collisions. These neutrons can freely escape from the accretion flow and decay into protons in the dilute polar region above the rotating BH to form relativistic jets. We calculate geometric efficiencies of the neutron energy and mass injections into the polar region, and show that this process can deposit luminosity as high as L{sub j}{approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M-dot c{sup 2} and mass loading M-dot{sub j}{approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M-dot for the case of the BH mass M {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate. The terminal Lorentz factors of the jets are {Gamma} {approx} 3, and they may explain the AGN jets having low luminosities. For higher luminosity jets, which can be produced by additional energy inputs such as Poynting flux, the neutron decay still can be a dominant mass loading process, leading to, e.g., {Gamma} {approx} 50 for L{sub j,tot}{approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M-dot c{sup 2}.

  13. The Molecular H2 Emission and the Stellar Kinematics in the Nuclear Region of the Sombrero Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the molecular H2 emission and the stellar kinematics in a data cube of the nuclear region of M104, the Sombrero galaxy, obtained with NIFS on the Gemini-north telescope. After a careful subtraction of the stellar continuum, the only emission line we detected in the data cube was {{{H}}}2λ 21218. An analysis of this emission revealed the existence of a rotating molecular torus/disk, aproximately co-planar with a dusty structure detected by us in a previous work. We interpret these two structures as being associated with the same obscuring torus/disk. The kinematic maps provided by the Penalized Pixel Fitting method revealed that the stellar kinematics in the nuclear region of M104 appears to be the result of the superposition of a “cold” rotating disk and a “hot” bulge. Using a model of a thin eccentric disk, we reproduced the main properties of the maps of the stellar radial velocity and of the stellar velocity dispersion, especially within a distance of 0\\prime\\prime .2 from the kinematic axis (in regions at larger distances, the limitations of a model of a thin rotating disk become more visible). The general behavior of the h3 map, which is significantly noisier than the other maps, was also reproduced by our model (although the discrepancies, in this case, are considerably higher). With our model, we obtained a mass of (9.0+/- 2.0)× {10}8{M}⊙ for the supermassive black hole of M104, which is compatible, at 1σ or 2σ levels, with the values obtained by previous studies.

  14. LLNL's Regional Model Calibration and Body-Wave Discrimination Research in the Former Soviet Union using Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNEs)

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, J.; Rodgers, A.; Swenson, J.; Schultz, C.; Walter, W.; Mooney, W.; Clitheroe, G.

    2000-07-14

    Long-range seismic profiles from Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE) in the Former Soviet Union (FSU) provide a unique data set to investigate several important issues in regional Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring. The recording station spacing ({approx}15 km) allows for extremely dense sampling of the propagation from the source to {approx} 3300 km. This allows us to analyze the waveforms at local, near- and far-regional and teleseismic distances. These data are used to: (1) study the evolution of regional phases and phase amplitude ratios along the profile; (2) infer one-dimensional velocity structure along the profile; and (3) evaluate the spatial correlation of regional and teleseismic travel times and regional phase amplitude ratios. We analyzed waveform data from four PNE's (m{sub b} = 5.1-5.6) recorded along profile KRATON, which is an east-west trending profile located in northern Sibertil. Short-period regional discriminants, such as P/S amplitude ratios, will be essential for seismic monitoring of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) at small magnitudes (m{sub b} < 4.0). However, P/S amplitude ratios in the short-period band, 0.5-5.0 Hz, show some scatter. This scatter is primarily due to propagation and site effects, which arise from variability in the elastic and anelastic structure of the crustal waveguide. Preliminary results show that Pg and Lg propagate efficiently in north Siberia at regional distances. The amplitude ratios show some variability between adjacent stations that are modeled by simple distance trends. The effect of topography, sediment and crustal thickness, and upper mantle discontinuities on these ratios, after removal of the distance trends, will be investigated. The travel times of the body wave phases recorded on KEATON have been used to compute the one-dimensional structure of the crust and upper mantle in this region. The path-averaged one-dimensional velocity model was computed by minimizing the

  15. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The existing models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  16. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The exising models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  17. Cold Regions Environmental Test of Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Decontamination Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    6502, Engine, Cold-starting and Warmup Tests. (2) Decontaminant mixing/filling. Evaluate ease of filling and mixing decontaminants at low temperatures...2. TOP 2-2-650, Engine Cold-Starting and Warmup Tests, 18 July 1980. 3. TOP 8-4-015, Cold Regions Logistics, Supportability Testing of Chemical

  18. Spatially Offset Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Triggering in Galaxy Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, R. Scott; Comerford, Julia M.; Greene, Jenny E.; Pooley, David

    2017-04-01

    Galaxy mergers are likely to play a role in triggering active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but the conditions under which this process occurs are poorly understood. In Paper I, we constructed a sample of spatially offset X-ray AGNs that represent galaxy mergers hosting a single AGN. In this paper, we use our offset AGN sample to constrain the parameters that affect AGN observability in galaxy mergers. We also construct dual-AGN samples with similar selection properties for comparison. We find that the offset AGN fraction shows no evidence for a dependence on AGN luminosity, while the dual-AGN fractions show stronger evidence for a positive dependence, suggesting that the merger events forming dual AGNs are more efficient at instigating accretion onto supermassive black holes than those forming offset AGNs. We also find that the offset and dual-AGN fractions both have a negative dependence on nuclear separation and are similar in value at small physical scales. This dependence may become stronger when restricted to high AGN luminosities, although a larger sample is needed for confirmation. These results indicate that the probability of AGN triggering increases at later merger stages. This study is the first to systematically probe down to nuclear separations of <1 kpc (∼0.8 kpc) and is consistent with predictions from simulations that AGN observability peaks in this regime. We also find that the offset AGNs are not preferentially obscured compared to the parent AGN sample, suggesting that our selection may be targeting galaxy mergers with relatively dust-free nuclear regions.

  19. Galactic wind in NGC 4460: New observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oparin, D. V.; Moiseev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    NGC 4460 is an isolated lenticular galaxy, in which galactic wind has been earlier discovered as a gas outflow associated with circumnuclear regions of star formation. Using the results of observations in the H α line with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the SAO RAS 6-m telescope, we studied the kinematics of the ionized gas in this galaxy. The parameters of gas outflow from the plane of the galactic disk were refined within a simple geometric model. We show that it is impossible to characterize the wind by a fixed velocity value. Characteristic outflow velocities are within 30-80 km s-1, and they are insufficient to make the swept-out matter ultimately leave the galaxy.

  20. A PUZZLE INVOLVING GALACTIC BULGE MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Feltzing, Sofia; Bensby, Thomas; Huang Wenjin; Melendez, Jorge; Lucatello, Sara; Asplund, Martin E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ian@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: tbensby@eso.org E-mail: jorge@astro.up.pt E-mail: asplund@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE

    2010-03-01

    We study a sample of 16 microlensed Galactic bulge main-sequence turnoff region stars for which high-dispersion spectra have been obtained with detailed abundance analyses. We demonstrate that there is a very strong and highly statistically significant correlation between the maximum magnification of the microlensed bulge star and the value of the [Fe/H] deduced from the high resolution spectrum of each object. Physics demands that this correlation, assuming it to be real, be the result of some sample bias. We suggest several possible explanations, but are forced to reject them all, and are left puzzled. To obtain a reliable metallicity distribution in the Galactic bulge based on microlensed dwarf stars, it will be necessary to resolve this issue through the course of additional observations.

  1. Galactic transients from the OGLE survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Przemek

    2016-07-01

    For many years, there were not any systematic, large-scale surveys for transients in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. This gap is being filled by discoveries from the OGLE survey, which has been regularly monitoring the densest sky regions (the Galactic bulge and disk, the Magellanic System) for over twenty years. The OGLE collection of Galactic transients contains several dozen classical novae and over a thousand other cataclysmic variables. I will tell how to select transients from billions of sources observed by the OGLE every night. I will show how the properties of classical novae depend on the underlying stellar population (and the star formation history). I will also discuss the preliminary results of the search for transients in the Milky Way disk from the OGLE-IV Galaxy Variability Survey. Finally, I will show some transients of yet unknown origin and present the OGLE-IV real time monitoring systems.

  2. MAF1, a novel plant protein interacting with matrix attachment region binding protein MFP1, is located at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Gindullis, F; Peffer, N J; Meier, I

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of chromatin with the nuclear matrix via matrix attachment region (MAR) DNA is considered to be of fundamental importance for chromatin organization in all eukaryotic cells. MAR binding filament-like protein 1 (MFP1) from tomato is a novel plant protein that specifically binds to MAR DNA. Its filament protein-like structure makes it a likely candidate for a structural component of the nuclear matrix. MFP1 is located at nuclear matrix-associated, specklelike structures at the nuclear envelope. Here, we report the identification of a novel protein that specifically interacts with MFP1 in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays. MFP1 associated factor 1 (MAF1) is a small, soluble, serine/threonine-rich protein that is ubiquitously expressed and has no similarity to known proteins. MAF1, like MFP1, is located at the nuclear periphery and is a component of the nuclear matrix. These data suggest that MFP1 and MAF1 are in vivo interaction partners and that both proteins are components of a nuclear substructure, previously undescribed in plants, that connects the nuclear envelope and the internal nuclear matrix. PMID:10488241

  3. CONDITIONS FOR SUPERNOVAE-DRIVEN GALACTIC WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Biman B.; Shchekinov, Yuri E-mail: yus@sfedu.ru

    2013-11-01

    We point out that the commonly assumed condition for galactic outflows, that supernovae (SNe) heating is efficient in the central regions of starburst galaxies, suffers from invalid assumptions. We show that a large filling factor of hot (≥10{sup 6} K) gas is difficult to achieve through SNe heating, irrespective of the SN's initial gas temperature and density, its uniformity, or its clumpiness. We instead suggest that correlated supernovae from OB associations in molecular clouds in the central region can drive powerful outflows if the molecular surface density is >10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}.

  4. Micronuclei and nuclear anomalies in urinary exfoliated cells of subjects in radionuclide-contaminated regions.

    PubMed

    Jen, Min Huan; Hwang, Jeng-Jeng; Yang, Jao-Yeh; Nabyvanets, Yuriy B; Hsieh, Wanhwa A; Tsai, Mon-Hsung; Guo, Shin-Diau; Chang, Wushou P

    2002-09-26

    (137)Cs contamination in living or agricultural environments may contribute to significant human internal exposure and cause adverse health effects. Contamination by (137)Cs and other radionuclides was detected in a river valley in northern Taiwan, in the 1990s. Given that the radioactivity appeared to be widely distributed in soil, rice and several other food plants in the areas surrounding several communities in the late 1990s [Y.B. Nabyvanents, T.F. Gesell, M.H. Jen, W.P. Chang, Distribution of (137)Cs in soil along Ta-han River Valley in Tau-Yuan County in Taiwan, J. Environ. Radioact. 54 (2001) 391], its possible impact on local occupants was further studied. Ten subjects in three families residing continuously in the highly contaminated valley and 10 non-exposed subjects matched for age, sex, and cigarette smoking habits from neighboring communities were evaluated for micronucleus frequencies and for degenerative nuclear changes in urinary exfoliated epithelial cells (EE cells). Micronucleus frequencies ( per thousand ) were significantly higher in the exposed subjects (4.79+/-1.21 per thousand ) than in the reference subjects (2.73+/-0.59 per thousand; Wilcoxon 2-sample test, P value 0.0004). There were also higher frequencies of EE cells with karyolysis and condensed chromatin in the exposed subjects than in reference subjects. These results indicate that genotoxic and/or mutagenic effects on urinary epithelial cells occur in human subjects who have resided for a long time in a radioactively contaminated environment.

  5. Nuclear Structure Investigations of Neutron Deficient Nuclei in the Region Z = 103 to 105

    SciTech Connect

    Heberger, F.P.; Hofmann, S.; Ackermann, D.; Armbruster, P.; Munzenberg, G.; Stodel, Ch.; Lavrentev, A.Yu.; Popeko, A.G.; Yeremin, A.V.; Saro, S.; Leino, M.

    1999-12-31

    The isotopes {sup 257,255}Rf, {sup 257,256}Db, {sup 253,252}Lr have been produced in bombardments of {sup 207,208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi target nuclei with {sup 50}Ti and identified by their {alpha}-decay. New or improved decay data could be obtained. Analysis of the fine structure of the {alpha}-decay pattern of {sup 257}Rf allowed the construction of a first tentative level scheme for the daughter nucleus {sup 253}No and also the identification of a low lying high spin isomeric state, while from {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence measurements for {sup 255}Rf a first tentative level scheme of the daughter nucleus {sup 251}No was derived. For {sup 257}Db we found that two nuclear levels decay by {alpha}-emission and populate also different levels in the daughter nucleus {sup 253}Lr. The levels are produced by the reaction process. In bombardments of {sup 209}Bi with {sup 50}Ti at E*{sub cn} = 26.4 MeV and 30.8 MeV the previously unknown isotopes {sup 256}Db and {sup 22}Lr were identified.

  6. Nuclear structure investigations of neutron deficient nuclei in the region Z=103 to 105

    SciTech Connect

    Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Armbruster, P.; Muenzenberg, G.; Stodel, Ch.; Ackermann, D.; Lavrentev, A. Yu.; Popeko, A. G.; Yeremin, A. V.; Saro, S.; Leino, M.

    1999-11-16

    The isotopes {sup 257,255}Rf, {sup 257,256}Db, {sup 253,252}Lr have been produced in bombardments of {sup 207,208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi target nuclei with {sup 50}Ti and identified by their {alpha}-decay. New or improved decay data could be obtained. Analysis of the fine structure of the {alpha}-decay pattern of {sup 257}Rf allowed the construction of a first tentative level scheme for the daughter nucleus {sup 253}No and also the identification of a low lying high spin isomeric state, while from {alpha}-{gamma}- coincidence measurements for {sup 255}Rf a first tentative level scheme of the daughter nucleus {sup 251}No was derived. For {sup 257}Db we found that two nuclear levels decay by {alpha}-emission and populate also different levels in the daughter nucleus {sup 253}Lr. The levels are produced by the reaction process. In bombardments of {sup 209}Bi with {sup 50}Ti at E{sub CN}*=26.4 MeV and 30.8 MeV the previously unknown isotopes {sup 256}Db and {sup 252}Lr were identified.

  7. Nuclear structure in the neutron-rich doubly magic sup 78 Ni region

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K.; Winger, J.A.; Warburton, E.K.; Gill, R.L.; Schuhmann, R.B.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Clark Univ., Worcester, MA )

    1989-01-01

    The magic numbers Z=28 and N=50 imply that very neutron-rich {sup 78}Ni, which has not yet been observed, is doubly magic. The {sup 78}Ni region was investigated by studying the N=50 isotones and neutron-rich Zn isotopes. Results on the level structure of {sup 83}As, {sup 74}Zn, and {sup 76}Zn populated in the decays of {sup 83}Ge, {sup 74}Cu, and {sup 76}Cu are presented. The parent nuclides were produced and mass separated using the TRISTAN facility on-line to the High-Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven. The systematics of the N=50 isotones and even-A Zn isotopes are discussed and compared with shell-model calculations involving active nucleons outside of a {sup 78}Ni and {sup 66}Ni core, respectively. The extent to which the {sup 78}Ni region can be considered doubly magic is assessed. 43 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Nuclear factors in human brain cells bind specifically to the JCV regulatory region.

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, K; Rappaport, J; Khoury, G

    1988-01-01

    The human polyomavirus, JCV, differs from other papovaviruses in its tissue tropism for human glial cells. Transcription of the early region of the virus, at least in part, contributes to the tissue specificity of JCV. In this study, we have synthesized oligonucleotides which span the JCV 98 bp repeat unit. Using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking assays, we have demonstrated that four proteins from a human fetal brain extract interact specifically with the JCV promoter/enhancer. Two proteins of 82 kd and 78/80 kd recognize the 5'- and 3'-terminal regions of the JCV 98 bp repeat sequence, respectively. The mol. wt of these proteins are similar in HeLa and brain extracts. In contrast, the proteins which recognize the central region of the 98 bp enhancer are distinct in HeLa (85 kd) and fetal brain (45 kd) extracts. The possible role of these proteins in tissue-specific expression of the JCV early promoter in brain cells is discussed. Images PMID:2841118

  9. Far-infrared structure in the nuclear region of M51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. F.; Harvey, P. M.; Joy, M.

    1986-01-01

    Far-infrared (100-micron) scans across the nucleus of M51 are presented. These scans show that much of the far-infrared luminosity of this galaxy comes from a small, sharply bounded region within a 30 arcsec radius (700 pc) of the nucleus. This radius corresponds to the innermost spiral structure, as well as that estimated from dynamical models for the radius of the inner Lindblad resonance. The results of a nonlinear image restoration analysis of the data are presented. This analysis, carried out with two different algorithms, yields information on the spatial structure of star formation near the nucleus that exceeds the diffraction limit of the telescope at this wavelength. This 'superresolution' treatment shows that star formation is enhanced at the outer edge of this region compared to the nucleus, which appears to be relatively devoid of young stars. This ring of active star formation may be produced in the same way as that seen in our own Galaxy at a galactocentric radius of 4-5 kpc and may indicate that the region near the nucleus has been swept clean of material by violent processes.

  10. Galactic Hearts of Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger graph

    This artist's concept shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope detected more than 20 bright and dusty galactic mergers like the one depicted here, all teeming with the tiny gem-like crystals.

    When galaxies collide, they trigger the birth of large numbers of massive stars. Astronomers believe these blazing hot stars act like furnaces to produce silicate crystals in the same way that glass is made from sand. The stars probably shed the crystals as they age, and as they blow apart in supernovae explosions.

    At the same time the crystals are being churned out, they are also being destroyed. Fast-moving particles from supernova blasts easily convert silicates crystals back to their amorphous, or shapeless, form.

    How is Spitzer seeing the crystals if they are rapidly disappearing? Astronomers say that, for a short period of time at the beginning of galactic mergers, massive stars might be producing silicate crystals faster than they are eliminating them. When our own galaxy merges with the Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years, a similar burst of massive stars and silicate crystals might occur.

    Crystal Storm in Distant Galaxy The graph (see inset above) of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a distant galaxy called IRAS 08752+3915 is experiencing a storm of tiny crystals made up of silicates. The crystals are similar to the glass-like grains of sand found on Earth's many beaches.

    The data were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which splits light open to reveal its rainbow-like components. The resulting spectrum shown here reveals the signatures of both crystalline (green) and non-crystalline (brown) silicates.

    Spitzer detected the same

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis of a 'Jewel Orchid' Genus Goodyera (Orchidaceae) Based on DNA Sequence Data from Nuclear and Plastid Regions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao; Tian, Huaizhen; Li, Hongqing; Hu, Aiqun; Xing, Fuwu; Bhattacharjee, Avishek; Hsu, Tianchuan; Kumar, Pankaj; Chung, Shihwen

    2016-01-01

    A molecular phylogeny of Asiatic species of Goodyera (Orchidaceae, Cranichideae, Goodyerinae) based on the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and two chloroplast loci (matK and trnL-F) was presented. Thirty-five species represented by 132 samples of Goodyera were analyzed, along with other 27 genera/48 species, using Pterostylis longifolia and Chloraea gaudichaudii as outgroups. Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods were used to reveal the intrageneric relationships of Goodyera and its intergeneric relationships to related genera. The results indicate that: 1) Goodyera is not monophyletic; 2) Goodyera could be divided into four sections, viz., Goodyera, Otosepalum, Reticulum and a new section; 3) sect. Reticulum can be further divided into two subsections, viz., Reticulum and Foliosum, whereas sect. Goodyera can in turn be divided into subsections Goodyera and a new subsection.

  12. Galactic synchrotron emissivity measurements between 250° < l < 355° from the GLEAM survey with the MWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jackson, C. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Tingay, S. J.; Hindson, L.; Hancock, P.; Wayth, R. B.; Gaensler, B. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Morgan, J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lenc, E.; Bell, M. E.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarkanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Kapińska, A. D.; McKinley, B.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-03-01

    Synchrotron emission pervades the Galactic plane at low radio frequencies, originating from cosmic ray electrons interacting with the Galactic magnetic field. Using a low-frequency radio telescope, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), we measure the free-free absorption of this Galactic synchrotron emission by intervening H II regions along the line of sight. These absorption measurements allow us to calculate the Galactic cosmic ray electron emissivity behind and in front of 47 detected H II regions in the region 250° < l < 355°, |b| < 2°. We find that all average emissivities between the H II regions and the Galactic edge along the line of sight (εb) are in the range of 0.39 ∼ 1.45 K pc-1 with a mean of 0.77 K pc-1 and a variance of 0.14 K pc-1 at 88 MHz. Our best model, the two-circle model, divides the Galactic disc into three regions using two circles centring on the Galactic Centre. It shows a high emissivity region near the Galactic Centre, a low emissivity region near the Galactic edge, and a medium emissivity region between these two regions, contrary to the trend found by previous studies.

  13. Meso-diencephalic regions projecting to spinal cord and dorsal column nuclear complex in the hedgehog-tenrec, Echinops telfairi.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of neurons projecting to the spinal cord and dorsal column nuclear complex was investigated in the mesodiencephalic regions of the lesser hedgehog-tenrec, Echinops telfairi (Insectivora) by using the retrograde flow technique. While only few neurons projected to the dorsal column nuclear complex, numerous cells were found to give rise to spinal projections. Rubro-spinal neurons of various sizes were distributed over the entire rostrocaudal extent of the contra-lateral nucleus; a few neurons were also located ipsilaterally, Unlike that of the opossum, the projection appeared to be somatotopically organised. Interstitio-spinal neurons were differentiated into several subpopulations according to their location and laterality of projection. In the ipsilateral periventricular grey, in addition, there was a distinct population of cells possibly corresponding to the nucleus of Darkschewitsch. The mesencephalic central grey contained relatively few labeled neurons, the great majority of them being mesencephalic trigeminal, ectopic cuneiform or midline cells. Labeled cuneiform and midline cells, on the other hand, were quite numerous, extending both from a level just caudal to the trochlear nucleus to levels far beyond the rostral tip of the somatic oculomotor nucleus. The discrepancy between the poorly differentiated oculomotor nuclei and the apparently well-developed Edinger-Westphal complex is discussed. Hypothalamo-spinal neurons were essentially restricted to dorsal regions: the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PAV), the dorso-medial (DmHy) and dorso-intermediate cell groups as well as the lateral hypothalamic zone. The latter two cell groups were bilaterally labeled, while the labeled neurons in DmHy and PAV were located predominantly ipsilaterally. Labeled neurons in the amygdala, colliculus superior and mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus were only found following cervical injections; all other mentioned areas and the posterior commissure complex

  14. Nuclear translocation of Acinetobacter baumannii transposase induces DNA methylation of CpG regions in the promoters of E-cadherin gene.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Choi, Chul Hee; Lee, Su Man; Lee, Jung Hwa; Kim, Seung Il; Kim, Dong Sun; Lee, Je Chul

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins has emerged as a pathogenic mechanism whereby bacterial proteins induce host cell pathology. In this study, we examined nuclear targeting of Acinetobacter baumannii transposase (Tnp) and subsequent epigenetic changes in host cells. Tnp of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 possesses nuclear localization signals (NLSs), (225)RKRKRK(230). Transient expression of A. baumannii Tnp fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) resulted in the nuclear localization of these proteins in COS-7 cells, whereas the truncated Tnp without NLSs fused with GFP were exclusively localized in the cytoplasm. A. baumannii Tnp was found in outer membrane vesicles, which delivered this protein to the nucleus of host cells. Nuclear expression of A. baumannii Tnp fused with GFP in A549 cells induced DNA methylation of CpG regions in the promoters of E-cadherin (CDH1) gene, whereas the cytoplasmic localization of the truncated Tnp without NLSs fused with GFP did not induce DNA methylation. DNA methylation in the promoters of E-cadherin gene induced by nuclear targeting of A. baumannii Tnp resulted in down-regulation of gene expression. In conclusion, our data show that nuclear traffic of A. baumannii Tnp induces DNA methylation of CpG regions in the promoters of E-cadherin gene, which subsequently down-regulates gene expression. This study provides a new insight into the epigenetic control of host genes by bacterial proteins.

  15. [Nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility and the state of mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA regions in alloplasmic recombinant and introgressive lines (H. vulgare)-T. aestivum].

    PubMed

    Pershina, L A; Trubacheva, N V; Sinyavskaya, M G; Devyatkina, E P; Kravtsova, L A

    2014-10-01

    Alloplasmic lines combining alien nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes are convenient models for studying the mechanisms of nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility/incompatibility. In the.present study, we have investigated the correlation between the characters and state of mitochondrial (mt) and chloroplast (cp) DNA regions in alloplasmic recombinant common wheat lines with barley cytoplasm characterized by partial or total fertility. Fertility restoration in the studied lines (Hordeum vulgare)-Triticum aestivum is determined by different ratios of the genetic material of common wheat variety Pyrotrix 28, which is a fertility restorer in the cytoplasm of barley, and varietySaratovskaya 29, which is a fixer of sterility. In partially fertile lines with nuclear genomes dominated by the genetic material of Saratovskaya 29, plant growth and development are suppressed. In these lines we have identified the barley homoplasmy of cpDNA regions infA and rpoB and the heteroplasmy of the 18S/5S mt repeat and the cpDNA ycf5 region. Nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in lines with reduced fertility (the genetic material of Pyrotrix 28 predominates in their nuclear genomes) is associated with restoration of normal plant growth and development and the changes in thestate of the studied cpDNA and mtDNA regions towards the wheat type. Thus, in fertile lines, the cpDNA regions (infA, rpoB) and the 18S/5S mt repeat were identified in the homoplasmic wheat state; though the cpDNAycf5 region was in the heteroplasmic state, it was dominated by the wheat type of the copies. The nuclearicytoplasmic compatibility is not broken as a result of introgression of the alien genetic material into the nuclear genome of one of the fertile lines; the plants of introgressive lines are fertile and normally developed, and the states of the cpDNA and mtDNA regions correspond to their states in fertile recombinant lines.

  16. Hard X-ray Point Sources Detected in the NuSTAR Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailey, Chuck

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has surveyed the Galactic Center and Norma region with total exposure of approximately 2 Msec and 50 pointings. Hard X-ray spectroscopy with NuSTAR is a powerful tool to identify sources previously discovered by Chandra, and thus perform comparative population studies in the Galactic Center and Norma region. The NuSTAR survey, with a depth ranging from 20 to 40 ksec, detected dozens of point source above 10 keV including three known X-ray transients (GRS 1741-2853, AXJ1745.6-2901 and CXOGC J174540.0-29005) during their outbursts in 2013. Some of the NuSTAR point sources exhibit remarkably hard X-ray spectra extending beyond 40 keV, indicating that they are either hot intermediate polars with temperatures greater than 50 keV or X-ray binaries with either a neutron star or black hole. We will present our spectral and timing analysis of the NuSTAR sources as well as results of IR counterpart searches.

  17. Galactic Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, Benjamin P.

    The precise phase-space distribution and properties of Galactic dark matter necessary for its direct and indirect detection are currently unknown. Since the distributions of normal and dark matter in the Milky Way are coupled to each other as they both move in the same gravitational potential, constraints on the distribution and properties of dark matter can be derived by studying the distribution of visible matter in the Galaxy and making some general assumptions regarding the phase-space distribution of the dark matter. In this study, the visible components of the Galaxy have been comprehensively reviewed to create an axisymmetric model of the Galaxy that is consistent with the available observations, and the dark matter phase-space distribution is assumed to follow a lowered-isothermal form. Poisson's equations are then solved self-consistently to construct models of the spatial and velocity distribution of Galactic dark matter. The total gravitational potential from normal and dark matter are calculated and compared to the current observations of the rotation curve and to the radial velocity distributions of blue horizontal-branch and blue straggler stars. It is found that this analysis allows for a wide range of parameters for the dark matter. The implications for direct and indirect detection of dark matter are discussed in detail. In the appendices, two additional projects are presented. In Appendix A, the recent observations of the positron fraction and the total electron spectrum in cosmic rays are addressed by considering a nested leaky-box model for the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. This is found to obviate the need for exotic processes such as the annihilation or decay of dark matter to explain the recent observations. In Appendix B, we discuss a novel dark matter detector involving triggered cavitation in acoustic fields. The theory behind the detector is presented in detail, and we discuss the work than has been done to create a prototype

  18. Galaxy interactions and the stimulation of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.

    1990-01-01

    The author discusses the idea that interactions between galaxies can lead to enhanced galactic activity. He discusses whether, apart from the observational evidence, there is a strong theoretical or heuristic motivation for investigating galaxy interactions as stimulators of nuclear activity in galaxies. Galactic interactions as mechanisms for triggering nuclear starbursts are covered.

  19. Megamaser Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartje, John F.; Königl, Arieh; Elitzur, Moshe

    1999-03-01

    Recent spectroscopic and VLBI-imaging observations of bright extragalactic H2O maser sources have revealed that the megamaser emission often originates in thin circumnuclear disks near the centers of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using general radiative and kinematic considerations and taking account of the observed flux variability, we argue that the maser emission regions are clumpy, a conclusion that is independent of the detailed mechanism (X-ray heating, shocks, etc.) driving the collisionally pumped masers. We examine scenarios in which the clumps represent discrete gas condensations (i.e., clouds) and do not merely correspond to velocity irregularities in the disk. We show that even two clouds that overlap within the velocity-coherence length along the line of sight could account (through self-amplification) for the entire maser flux of a high-velocity ``satellite'' feature in sources like NGC 4258 and NGC 1068, and we suggest that cloud self-amplification likely contributes also to the flux of the background-amplifying ``systemic'' features in these objects. Analogous interpretations have previously been proposed for water maser sources in Galactic star-forming regions. We argue that this picture provides a natural explanation of the time-variability characteristics of extragalactic megamaser sources and of their apparent association with Seyfert 2-like galaxies. We also show that the requisite cloud space densities and internal densities are consistent with the typical values of nuclear (broad emission line region type) clouds. We examine two scenarios of clumpy disks in which the maser emission is excited by a central continuum source. This excitation mechanism was first considered in the context of megamaser disks by Neufeld & Maloney, but our proposed models are clearly distinct from their warped, homogeneous disk interpretation. In our first scenario we consider an annular disk (or ``ring'') whose inner edge corresponds to the innermost radius of the

  20. First regional evaluation of nuclear genetic diversity and population structure in northeastern coyotes ( Canis latrans)

    PubMed Central

    Monzón, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Previous genetic studies of eastern coyotes ( Canis latrans) are based on one of two strategies: sampling many individuals using one or very few molecular markers, or sampling very few individuals using many genomic markers. Thus, a regional analysis of genetic diversity and population structure in eastern coyotes using many samples and several molecular markers is lacking. I evaluated genetic diversity and population structure in 385 northeastern coyotes using 16 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A region-wide analysis of population structure revealed three primary genetic populations, but these do not correspond to the same three subdivisions inferred in a previous analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences. More focused geographic analyses of population structure indicated that ample genetic structure occurs in coyotes from an intermediate contact zone where two range expansion fronts meet. These results demonstrate that genotyping several highly heterozygous SNPs in a large, geographically dense sample is an effective way to detect cryptic population genetic structure. The importance of SNPs in studies of population and wildlife genomics is rapidly increasing; this study adds to the growing body of recent literature that demonstrates the utility of SNPs ascertained from a model organism for evolutionary inference in closely related species. PMID:25075291

  1. Nuclear Structure Studies with Radioactive Ion Beams in the Mass A = 80 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Batchelder, J. C.; Beene, J. R.; Lagergren, K. B.; Mueller, P. E.; Radford, D. C.; Stracener, D. W.; Urrego-Blanco, J. P.; Varner, R. L.; Yu, C.-H.

    2009-03-01

    An experimental program to measure spectroscopic properties of neutron-rich nuclei in the A = 80 region is underway at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Our approach has been to get a comprehensive picture of the shell structure in this region by studying a series of properties of low lying states (E(2+), B(E2), g-factors and quadrupole moments). The beams, instrumentation and techniques developed specifically for this purpose have allowed us to systematically study the behavior of these observables along isotopic and isotonic chains using both stable and radioactive nuclei under almost identical experimental conditions. We have developed many techniques and detectors for in-beam gamma spectroscopy with radioactive ion beams. Most of the detectors can be used individually or in combination. Generally these detector systems have very large efficiencies. We give examples of their use from three recent experiments; namely, Coulomb excitation of n-rich nuclei along the N = 50 shell closure, the static quadrupole moment of the first 2+ in 78Ge and g-factor measurements of n-rich isotopes near N = 50.

  2. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63,65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobes, V.; Leal, L. C.; Guber, K.; Forget, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-04-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63,65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation is based on three experimental transmission data sets: two measured at ORELA and one at MITR, plus two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identified for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope is based on the identified resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) have been determined to match the thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Differential elastic scattering cross sections have been calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks.

  3. First regional evaluation of nuclear genetic diversity and population structure in northeastern coyotes ( Canis latrans).

    PubMed

    Monzón, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Previous genetic studies of eastern coyotes ( Canis latrans) are based on one of two strategies: sampling many individuals using one or very few molecular markers, or sampling very few individuals using many genomic markers. Thus, a regional analysis of genetic diversity and population structure in eastern coyotes using many samples and several molecular markers is lacking. I evaluated genetic diversity and population structure in 385 northeastern coyotes using 16 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A region-wide analysis of population structure revealed three primary genetic populations, but these do not correspond to the same three subdivisions inferred in a previous analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences. More focused geographic analyses of population structure indicated that ample genetic structure occurs in coyotes from an intermediate contact zone where two range expansion fronts meet. These results demonstrate that genotyping several highly heterozygous SNPs in a large, geographically dense sample is an effective way to detect cryptic population genetic structure. The importance of SNPs in studies of population and wildlife genomics is rapidly increasing; this study adds to the growing body of recent literature that demonstrates the utility of SNPs ascertained from a model organism for evolutionary inference in closely related species.

  4. Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on High Energy Nuclear Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukahori, Tokio

    1992-03-01

    This report consists of the Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on High Energy Nuclear Data. The meeting was held on October 3-4, 1991, at the Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the participation of forty-odd specialists, who were the evaluators, theorists, experimentalists, and users of high energy nuclear data including the members of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The need of the nuclear data in the high energy region up to a few GeV was stressed in the meeting for many applications, such as spallation neutron sources for radioactive waste treatment, accelerator shielding design, medical isotope production, radiation therapy, the effects of space radiation on astronauts and their equipment, and the cosmic history of meteorites and other galactic substances. Although the neutron nuclear data below 20 MeV have been well evaluated for fission and fusion reactor applications, the nuclear data in the high energy region have never been prepared in Japan. With the view of producing an evaluated high energy nuclear data file, theoretical models and codes, available and necessary measurements, needs of nuclear data, and various applications were reviewed and discussed. The consensus, that the wide collaboration was necessary to produce the evaluated file and should be established, has been obtained.

  5. Microscopic analysis of nuclear quantum phase transitions in the N{approx_equal}90 region

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2009-05-15

    The analysis of shape transitions in Nd isotopes, based on the framework of relativistic energy-density functionals and restricted to axially symmetric shapes in T. Niksic, D. Vretenar, G. A. Lalazissis, and P. Ring [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 092502 (2007)], is extended to the region Z=60,62,64 with N{approx_equal}90 and includes both {beta} and {gamma} deformations. Collective excitation spectra and transition probabilities are calculated starting from a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce available data and show that there is an abrupt change of structure at N=90 that can be approximately characterized by the X(5) analytic solution at the critical point of the first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and axially deformed shapes.

  6. Disposal of high-level nuclear waste above the water table in arid regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseboom, Eugene H.

    1983-01-01

    Locating a repository in the unsaturated zone of arid regions eliminates or simplifies many of the technological problems involved in designing a repository for operation below the water table and predicting its performance. It also offers possible accessibility and ease of monitoring throughout the operational period and possible retrieval of waste long after. The risks inherent in such a repository appear to be no greater than in one located in the saturated zone; in fact, many aspects of such a repository's performance will be much easier to predict and the uncertainties will be reduced correspondingly. A major new concern would be whether future climatic changes could produce significant consequences due to possible rise of the water table or increased flux of water through the repository. If spent fuel were used as a waste form, a second new concern would be the rates of escape of gaseous iodine-129 and carbon-14 to the atmosphere.

  7. Disposal of high-level nuclear waste above the water table in arid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Roseboom, E.H. Jr.

    1983-12-31

    Locating a repository in the unsaturated zone of arid regions eliminates or simplifies many of the technological problems involved in designing a repository for operation below the water table and predicting its performance. It also offers possible accessibility and ease of monitoring throughout the operational period and possible retrieval of waste long after. The risks inherent in such a repository appear to be no greater than in one located in the saturated zone; in fact, many aspects of such a repository`s performance will be much easier to predict and the uncertainties will be reduced correspondingly. A major new concern would be whether future climatic changes could produce significant consequences due to possible rise of the water table or increased flux of water through the repository. If spent fuel were used as a waste form, a second new concern would be the rates of escape of gaseous {sup 129}I and {sup 14}C to the atmosphere.

  8. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HESS Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E. O.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dewilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemiére, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Lui, R.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seyffert, A. S.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Valerius, K.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Żywucka, N.

    2016-03-01

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 1015 electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators (‘PeVatrons’), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 1013 electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators—not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays—has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 106-107 years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays.

  9. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    2016-03-24

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 10(15) electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators ('PeVatrons'), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 10(13) electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators--not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays--has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 10(6)-10(7) years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays.

  10. The galactic globular cluster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.; Meylan, G.

    1994-01-01

    We explore correlations between various properties of Galactic globular clusters, using a database on 143 objects. Our goal is identify correlations and trends which can be used to test and constrain theoretical models of cluster formation and evolution. We use a set of 13 cluster parameters, 9 of which are independently measured. Several arguments suggest that the number of clusters still missing in the obscured regions of the Galaxy is of the order of 10, and thus the selection effects are probably not severe for our sample. Known clusters follow a power-law density distribution with a slope approximately -3.5 to -4, and an apparent core with a core radius approximately 1 kpc. Clusters show a large dynamical range in many of their properties, more so for the core parameters (which are presumably more affected by dynamical evolution) than for the half-light parameters. There are no good correlations with luminosity, although more luminous clusters tend to be more concentrated. When data are binned in luminosity, several trends emerge: more luminous clusters tend to have smaller and denser cores. We interpret this as a differential survival effect, with more massive clusters surviving longer and reaching more evolved dynamical states. Cluster core parameters and concentrations also correlate with the position in the Galaxy, with clusters closer to the Galactic center or plane being more concentrated and having smaller and denser cores. These trends are more pronounced for the fainter (less massive) clusters. This is in agreement with a picture where tidal shocks form disk or bulge passages accelerate dynamical evolution of clusters. Cluster metallicities do not correlate with any other parameter, including luminosity and velocity dispersion; the only detectable trend is with the position in the Galaxy, probably reflecting Zinn's disk-halo dichotomy. This suggests that globular clusters were not self-enriched systems. Velocity dispersions show excellent correlations

  11. Far-UV properties of the nuclear region of M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ivan R.; Stanford, S. Adam; Crane, Philippe

    1995-01-01

    Comparison of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far-UV and visible images of the nucleus of M31 deepens the mystery of the two brightness peaks recently discovered by Lauer et al. At 175 mm the brightest point is the optically fainter peak (P2) that is close to the dynamical center. The very center of P2 has a UV upturn that is much greater than that of the bulge light, while the UV upturn of the optically brighter but off-center P1 is very similar to that of its surroundings. The excess FUV radiation form P2 is closely confined to its center and has a total flux density of 3 micro-joules, a level that is less likely to come from stellar radiation than from a high-frequency extension of the radio source at the center of M31. A surrounding region of 1.8 pc radius has a somewhat smaller Uv upturn than the rest of the bulge, but there is some lingering possibility that this depression might be an artifact of our correction of the spherical aberration. Our improvement decomposition of the V image removes the need to postulate a dust lane near the center. We confirm that P1 is very compact, and we derive a luminosity for it similar to that found by Lauer et al. The implications of all of this are briefly discussed.

  12. Nuclear Structure Studies in the 132Sn Region: Safe Coulex with Carbon Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M; Stuchbery, Andrew E; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Radford, David C; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, Meredith E; Liang, J Felix; Manning, Brett M; Pain, Steven D; Stone, N. J.; Varner, Jr, Robert L; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The collective and single-particle structure of nuclei in the 132Sn region was recently studied by Coulomb excitation and heavy-ion induced transfer reactions using carbon, beryllium, and titanium targets. In particular, Coulomb excitation was used determine a complete set of electromagnetic moments for the first 2+ states and one-neutron transfer was used to probe the purity and evolution of single-neutron states. These recent experiments were conducted at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at ORNL using a CsI-HPGe detector array (BareBall- CLARION) to detect scattered particles and emitted gamma rays from the in-beam reactions. A Bragg-curve detector was used to measure the energy loss of the various beams through the targets and to measure the radioactive beam compositions. A sample of the Coulomb excitation results is presented here with an emphasis placed on 116Sn. In particular, the safe Coulex criterion for carbon targets will be analyzed and discussed.

  13. Nuclear Structure Studies in the 132Sn Region: “Safe Coulex” with Carbon Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allmond, J. M.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Radford, D. C.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, M. E.; Liang, J. F.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Stone, N. J.; Varner, R. L.; Yu, C.-H.

    2015-09-01

    The collective and single-particle structure of nuclei in the 132Sn region was recently studied by Coulomb excitation and heavy-ion induced transfer reactions using carbon, beryllium, and titanium targets. In particular, Coulomb excitation was used determine a complete set of electromagnetic moments for the first 2+ states and one-neutron transfer was used to probe the purity and evolution of single-neutron states. These recent experiments were conducted at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at ORNL using a Csl-HPGe detector array (BareBall- CLARION) to detect scattered particles and emitted gamma rays from the in-beam reactions. A Bragg-curve detector was used to measure the energy loss of the various beams through the targets and to measure the radioactive beam compositions. A sample of the Coulomb excitation results is presented here with an emphasis placed on 116Sn. In particular, the “safe Coulex” criterion for carbon targets will be analyzed and discussed.

  14. SOX9 is an astrocyte-specific nuclear marker in the adult brain outside the neurogenic regions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Cornwell, Adam; Li, Jiashu; Peng, Sisi; Osorio, M Joana; Su Wanga, Nadia Aalling; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Lou, Nanhong; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-03-23

    Astrocytes have in recent years become the focus of intense experimental interest, yet markers for their definitive identification remain both scarce and imperfect. Astrocytes may be recognized as such by their expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)quaporin-4 (AQP4)ldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family member L1 (ALDH1L1)nd other proteins. Yet these proteins may all be regulated both developmentally and functionally, restricting their utility. To identify a nuclear marker pathognomonic of astrocytic phenotype, we assessed differential RNA expression by FACS-purified adult astrocytesnd on that basis evaluated the expression of the transcription factor SOX9 in both mouse and human brain. We found that SOX9 is almost selectively expressed by astrocytes in the adult brain except for ependymal cells and in the neurogenic regions, where SOX9 is also expressed by neural progenitor cells. Transcriptome comparisons of SOX9+ cells with GLT1+ cells showed that the two populations of cells exhibit largely overlapping gene expression. Expression of SOX9 did not decrease during agingnd was instead upregulated by reactive astrocytes in a number of settings, including a murine model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SOD1G93A), middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)nd multiple mini-strokes. We quantified the relative number of astrocytes using the isotropic fractionator technique in combination with SOX9 immunolabeling. The analysis showed that SOX9+ astrocytes constitute 10%∼20% of the total cell number in most CNS regions smaller fraction of total cell number than previously estimated in the normal adult brain.Significance Statement Astrocytes are traditionally identified immuno-histochemically by antibodies that target cell-specific antigens in the cytosol or plasma membrane. We show here that SOX9 is an astrocyte-specific nuclear marker in all major areas of the central nervous system outside of the neurogenic

  15. Far-Infrared [CII] Line Observation of the Galactic Plane by IRTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Shibai, Hiroshi; Okuda, Haruyuki; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Hiromoto, Norihisa; Okumura, Ken'ichi

    1996-10-01

    A detailed map of the distribution of the [CII] 158 mu m line intensity from the galactic plane around l = 50(deg) was obtained by the Far-Infrared Line Mapper (FILM) on board the Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS). The distribution of the [CII] emission is similar to that of the far-infrared continuum emission. There are a number of discrete sources, most of which correspond to known objects, such as compact HII regions and molecular clouds, near to the galactic plane. Moreover, an extended component concentrated in the galactic plane was found, and its distribution does not clearly depend on the galactic longitude in the observed area. This extended component decreases rapidly as the galactic latitude increases. The FWHM of this component is about 2.(deg) 6 in the galactic latitude. This is larger than that of the CO (J=1 -> 0) intensity, but is much smaller than that of the HI 21 cm intensity.

  16. Imprints to the terrestrial environment at galactic arm crossings of the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, H. J.; Fichtner, H.; Scherer, K.; Stawicki, O.

    At its itinerary through our milky way galaxy the solar system moves through highly variable interstellar environments. Due to its orbital revolution around the galactic center, the solar system also crosses periodically the spiral arms of our galactic plane and thereby expe riences pronounced enviromental changes. Gas densities, magnetic fields and galactic cosmic ray intensities are substantially higher there compared to interarm conditions. Here we present theoretical calculations describing the SN-averaged galactic cosmic ray spectrum for regions inside and outside of galactic arms which then allow to predict how periodic passages of the solar system through galactic arms should be reflected by enhanced particle irradiations of the earth`s atmosphere and by correlated terrestrial Be-10 production rates.

  17. The 16-45 micron observations of the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kin-Wing; Moseley, S. Harvey; Casey, Sean; Dwek, E.; Loewenstein, Robert F.; Glaccum, W.

    1995-01-01

    Existing observations of the Galactic Center at infrared and radio wavelengths challenge our understanding of the detailed morphology and energy balance of the inner few parsec, including the Galactic Center and the infrared torus. The distribution and nature of the sources heating this region are still not well understood; existing determinations of dust temperature and ionization do not provide us with consistent pictures of the relative important of the central source and the embedded stars in this dusty region. The composite IR emission of the Galactic Center can be crudely divided into three categories: (1) hot dust heated directly by an incident UV field along the inner region of the Galactic Center torus; (2) warm dust heated by te non-ionizing radiation of the embedded stars and re-radiated NIR dust emission; (3) cooler absorbing dust located along the galactic line of sight. The apparent inconsistencies between the observations and theoretical expectations may stem from the interplay of various physical process and source-cloud geometries. Observations with increased spatial and spectral resolution are clearly needed to provide the information necessary to address the various problems. Therefore, we made 15-45 micron spectrophotometric observations of the inner 80 min (3 pc) regions surrounding the Galactic Center with the 20 min aperture of Goddard Cryogenic Grating Spectrometer No. 2 in May 1994 from the KAO. We measured nine points, including the 50 and 90 micron peaks of Davidson et al. and points between them and SgrA,. The wavelength coverage of our instrument ensures sensitivity to the hot dust component, silicate emission and/or absorption features, and cooler dust at longer wavelengths. Our observations will be used to set limits on the luminosity of any central sources, or give an independent estimate of central luminosity, and to set limits on the range of acceptable dust parameters for this region.

  18. Regional Rivalries and Nuclear Responses. Volume 2. The South Korean Case: A Nuclear Weapons Program Embedded in an Environment of Great Power Concerns. (Sanitized)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-28

    Japanese might also expect the South Koreans to submit to such practical safeguards as low Inventories of nuclear fuel , rigorous site Inspection and...program during the 1980s by closing the fuel cycle and stock- piling plutonlum, by developing or acquiring delivery systems that would be capa- ble...well as political design—design of guidelines for nuclear export policies of the "supplier1’ nations, acceptance of safer fuel cycles, and the

  19. Nucleoporin's Like Charge Regions Are Major Regulators of FG Coverage and Dynamics Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Soheilypour, Mohammad; Ghavami, Ali; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport has been the subject of a large body of research in the past few decades. Recently, the focus of investigations in this field has shifted from studies of the overall function of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) to the examination of the role of different domains of phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporin (FG Nup) sequences on the NPC function. In our recent bioinformatics study, we showed that FG Nups have some evolutionarily conserved sequence-based features that might govern their physical behavior inside the NPC. We proposed the 'like charge regions' (LCRs), sequences of charged residues with only one type of charge, as one of the features that play a significant role in the formation of FG network inside the central channel. In this study, we further explore the role of LCRs in the distribution of FG Nups, using a recently developed coarse-grained molecular dynamics model. Our results demonstrate how LCRs affect the formation of two transport pathways. While some FG Nups locate their FG network at the center of the NPC forming a homogeneous meshwork of FG repeats, other FG Nups cover the space adjacent to the NPC wall. LCRs in the former group, i.e. FG Nups that form an FG domain at the center, tend to regulate the size of the highly dense, doughnut-shaped FG meshwork and leave a small low FG density area at the center of the pore for passive diffusion. On the other hand, LCRs in the latter group of FG Nups enable them to maximize their interactions and cover a larger space inside the NPC to increase its capability to transport numerous cargos at the same time. Finally, a new viewpoint is proposed that reconciles different models for the nuclear pore selective barrier function.

  20. The role of nuclear matrix proteins binding to matrix attachment regions (Mars) in prostate cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Barboro, Paola; Repaci, Erica; D'Arrigo, Cristina; Balbi, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In tumor progression definite alterations in nuclear matrix (NM) protein composition as well as in chromatin structure occur. The NM interacts with chromatin via specialized DNA sequences called matrix attachment regions (MARs). In the present study, using a proteomic approach along with a two-dimensional Southwestern assay and confocal laser microscopy, we show that the differentiation of stabilized human prostate carcinoma cells is marked out by modifications both NM protein composition and bond between NM proteins and MARs. Well-differentiated androgen-responsive and slowly growing LNCaP cells are characterized by a less complex pattern and by a major number of proteins binding MAR sequences in comparison to 22Rv1 cells expressing androgen receptor but androgen-independent. Finally, in the poorly differentiated and strongly aggressive androgen-independent PC3 cells the complexity of NM pattern further increases and a minor number of proteins bind the MARs. Furthermore, in this cell line with respect to LNCaP cells, these changes are synchronous with modifications in both the nuclear distribution of the MAR sequences and in the average loop dimensions that significantly increase. Although the expression of many NM proteins changes during dedifferentiation, only a very limited group of MAR-binding proteins seem to play a key role in this process. Variations in the expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 (SATB1) along with an increase in the phosphorylation of lamin B represent changes that might trigger passage towards a more aggressive phenotype. These results suggest that elucidating the MAR-binding proteins that are involved in the differentiation of prostate cancer cells could be an important tool to improve our understanding of this carcinogenesis process, and they could also be novel targets for prostate cancer therapy.

  1. Starburst clusters in the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Maryam

    2014-09-01

    The central region of the Galaxy is the most active site of star formation in the Milky Way, where massive stars have formed very recently and are still forming today. The rich population of massive stars in the Galactic center provide a unique opportunity to study massive stars in their birth environment and probe their initial mass function, which is the spectrum of stellar masses at their birth. The Arches cluster is the youngest among the three massive clusters in the Galactic center, providing a collection of high-mass stars and a very dense core which makes this cluster an excellent site to address questions about massive star formation, the stellar mass function and the dynamical evolution of massive clusters in the Galactic center. In this thesis, I perform an observational study of the Arches cluster using K_{s}-band imaging obtained with NAOS/CONICA at the VLT combined with Subaru/Cisco J-band data to gain a full understanding of the cluster mass distribution out to its tidal radius for the first time. Since the light from the Galactic center reaches us through the Galactic disc, the extinction correction is crucial when studying this region. I use a Bayesian method to construct a realistic extinction map of the cluster. It is shown in this study that the determination of the mass of the most massive star in the Arches cluster, which had been used in previous studies to establish an upper mass limit for the star formation process in the Milky Way, strongly depends on the assumed slope of the extinction law. Assuming the two regimes of widely used infrared extinction laws, I show that the difference can reach up to 30% for individually derived stellar masses and Δ A_{Ks}˜ 1 magnitude in acquired K_{s}-band extinction, while the present-day mass function slope changes by ˜ 0.17 dex. The present-day mass function slope derived assuming the more recent extinction law, which suggests a steeper wavelength dependence for the infrared extinction law, reveals

  2. The galactic plane survey performed by the Milagro detector

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, Sabrina

    2008-01-03

    Milagro is a water Cherenkov detector that continuously views the entire overhead sky at TeV energies. The large field-of-view of 2 steradians combined with the long observation time makes Milagro the most sensitive instrument available for the study of large, low surface brightness sources such as the gamma radiation arising from interactions of cosmic radiation with interstellar matter and for the search of steady and transient sources. Recent development in the analysis techniques used by the Milagro collaboration significantly improved the sensitivity of the Milagro detector. Here we report on observations of gamma-ray sources in the region of Galactic longitude included between 30 and 220 degrees and Galactic latitude between -10 and 10 degrees, on the evaluation of the Galactic diffuse emission from the same region and on the observation of long time variability of Mrk 421.

  3. OSSE observations of galactic 511 keV annihilation radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory has performed several observations of the galactic plane and galactic center region to measure the distribution of galactic 511 keV positron annihilation radiation. Preliminary analysis of data collected during the observation of the galactic center region over the period 13-24 Jun. 1991, indicates the presence of a 511 keV line and positronium continuum superimposed on a power-law continuum. The line of flux was found to be (2.7 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm sec, with a positronium fraction of (0.9 +/- 0.2). The 3(sigma) upper limit to daily variations in the 511 keV line flux from the mean during the observation interval is 3 x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm sec. If all of the observed annihilation radiation is assumed to originate from the x-ray source 1E 1740.7-2942, the corresponding 511 keV line flux would be (3.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm sec. The 3(sigma) upper limit for 511 keV line emission from the x-ray binary GX1+4 is 6 x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm sec. Results from the galactic plane observations at galactic longitudes of 25 degrees (16-21 Aug. 1991) and 339 degrees (6-11 Sep. 1991) suggest that the emission is concentrated near the galactic center. The observations and the preliminary results are described.

  4. The 2011 Great East Japan earthquake: a report of a regional hospital in Fukushima Prefecture coping with the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Irisawa, Atsushi

    2012-05-01

    A catastrophic undersea megathrust earthquake of magnitude 9.0 off the coast of Japan occurred at 14:46 JST on Friday, 11 March 2011. The earthquake triggered powerful tsunami waves, and the tsunami precipitated Fukushima nuclear accidents. After the terrible earthquake, many people fled from the nuclear accident and arrived at places far from the nuclear power plant. In this article, I present a story of one measure devised to deal with the problem of the Fukushima nuclear accident at a regional hospital of Fukushima prefecture, Aizu General Hospital, which is located far from the Fukushima nuclear plant. In addition, I briefly report the current situation of Fukushima prefecture after the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. In our hospital, the countermeasure headquarters was established to supply medical care for those who had been injured by tsunami waves and the Fukushima nuclear accident. Especially, the screening for radioactive exposure using a dosimeter to take decontamination measures for cases of external exposure was extremely important task. Nevertheless, because the accurate knowledge related to radioactive contamination didn't provide, most medical staff fell into confusion. Fukushima prefecture has been 'shrinking' since the nuclear accident. However, today, although some hot spots remain in residential areas, the radioactive contamination is decreasing little by little. Many people in Fukushima Prefecture advance as one, facing forward. Recently, decontamination projects started. Efforts must be continued over a long period.

  5. Galactic planetary science.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-04-28

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets--mainly radial velocity and transit--or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even 'just' in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current 'understanding'. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy.

  6. Galactic planetary science

    PubMed Central

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets—mainly radial velocity and transit—or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even ‘just’ in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current ‘understanding’. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy. PMID:24664916

  7. Analysis of the Radio-Ecological State of Units and Installations Involved in Nuclear Submarine Decommissioning in the Northwest Region of Russia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-31

    Northwest region of the Russian Federation occupies an area of 1,677,000 km2 in the North and the Northwest parts of East Europe , making up about 10...19 1. ANALYSIS OF THE RADIOECOLOGICAL STATE OF UNITS AND INSTALLATIONS DEALING WITH NUCLEAR SUBMARINE HANDLING AFTER THE...VICINITY OF UNITS & INSTALLATIONS OF NS HANDLING AFTER THE DECOMMISSIONING

  8. Is There a Maximum Mass for Black Holes in Galactic Nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    The largest observed supermassive black holes (SMBHs) have a mass of {M}{{BH}}≃ {10}10 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ , nearly independent of redshift, from the local (z≃ 0) to the early (z\\gt 6) universe. We suggest that the growth of SMBHs above a few × {10}10 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ is prevented by small-scale accretion physics, independent of the properties of their host galaxies or of cosmology. Growing more massive BHs requires a gas supply rate from galactic scales onto a nuclear region as high as ≳ {10}3 {M}⊙ {{{yr}}}-1. At such a high accretion rate, most of the gas converts to stars at large radii (˜10-100 pc), well before reaching the BH. We adopt a simple model for a star-forming accretion disk and find that the accretion rate in the subparsec nuclear region is reduced to the smaller value of at most a few × {M}⊙ {{{yr}}}-1. This prevents SMBHs from growing above ≃ {10}11 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ in the age of the universe. Furthermore, once an SMBH reaches a sufficiently high mass, this rate falls below the critical value at which the accretion flow becomes advection dominated. Once this transition occurs, BH feeding can be suppressed by strong outflows and jets from hot gas near the BH. We find that the maximum SMBH mass, given by this transition, is between {M}{{BH,max}}≃ (1{--}6)× {10}10 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ , depending primarily on the efficiency of angular momentum transfer inside the galactic disk, and not on other properties of the host galaxy.

  9. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, D.; Savin, D. W.; Schnell, M.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E.; Schippers, S.; Müller, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Sprenger, F.; Wolf, A.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N. R.

    2006-05-01

    Recent X-ray satelitte observations of active galactic nuclei point out shortcomings in our understanding of low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) for iron M- shell ions. In order to resolve this issue and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for modeling astrophysical plasmas, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring at the Max- Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage rings are currently the only laboratory method capable of studying low temperature DR. We use our results to produce experimentally- derived DR rate coefficients. We are also providing our data to atomic theorist to benchmark their DR calculations. Here we will report our recent DR results for selected Fe M-shell ions. At temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in photoionized gas, we find a significant discrepancy between our experimental results and previously recommended DR rate coefficients.

  10. Active galactic nuclei as scaled-up Galactic black holes.

    PubMed

    McHardy, I M; Koerding, E; Knigge, C; Uttley, P; Fender, R P

    2006-12-07

    A long-standing question is whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) vary like Galactic black hole systems when appropriately scaled up by mass. If so, we can then determine how AGN should behave on cosmological timescales by studying the brighter and much faster varying Galactic systems. As X-ray emission is produced very close to the black holes, it provides one of the best diagnostics of their behaviour. A characteristic timescale--which potentially could tell us about the mass of the black hole--is found in the X-ray variations from both AGN and Galactic black holes, but whether it is physically meaningful to compare the two has been questioned. Here we report that, after correcting for variations in the accretion rate, the timescales can be physically linked, revealing that the accretion process is exactly the same for small and large black holes. Strong support for this linkage comes, perhaps surprisingly, from the permitted optical emission lines in AGN whose widths (in both broad-line AGN and narrow-emission-line Seyfert 1 galaxies) correlate strongly with the characteristic X-ray timescale, exactly as expected from the AGN black hole masses and accretion rates. So AGN really are just scaled-up Galactic black holes.

  11. A Peptide mimicking a region in proliferating cell nuclear antigen specific to key protein interactions is cytotoxic to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shanna J; Gu, Long; Phipps, Elizabeth A; Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Mabrey, Karla S; Gulley, Pattie; Dillehay, Kelsey L; Dong, Zhongyun; Fields, Gregg B; Chen, Yun-Ru; Ann, David; Hickey, Robert J; Malkas, Linda H

    2015-02-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a highly conserved protein necessary for proper component loading during the DNA replication and repair process. Proteins make a connection within the interdomain connector loop of PCNA, and much of the regulation is a result of the inherent competition for this docking site. If this target region of PCNA is modified, the DNA replication and repair process in cancer cells is potentially altered. Exploitation of this cancer-associated region has implications for targeted breast cancer therapy. In the present communication, we characterize a novel peptide (caPeptide) that has been synthesized to mimic the sequence identified as critical to the cancer-associated isoform of PCNA. This peptide is delivered into cells using a nine-arginine linking mechanism, and the resulting peptide (R9-cc-caPeptide) exhibits cytotoxicity in a triple-negative breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-436, while having less of an effect on the normal counterparts (MCF10A and primary breast epithelial cells). The novel peptide was then evaluated for cytotoxicity using various in vivo techniques, including ATP activity assays, flow cytometry, and clonogenetic assays. This cytotoxicity has been observed in other breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and HCC1937) and other forms of cancer (pancreatic and lymphoma). R9-cc-caPeptide has also been shown to block the association of PCNA with chromatin. Alanine scanning of the peptide sequence, combined with preliminary in silico modeling, gives insight to the disruptive ability and the molecular mechanism of action of the therapeutic peptide in vivo.

  12. Lifetime measurements in mass regions A=100 and A=130 as a test for chirality in nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonev, D.; Yavahchova, M. S.; de Angelis, G.; Brant, S.; Frauendorf, S.; Petkov, P.; Dewald, A.; Zhong, Q.; Curien, D.; Goutev, N.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Madhavan, N.; Kumar, R.; Raju, M. Kumar; Kaur, J.; Mahanto, G.; Singh, A.; Kaur, N.; Garg, R.; Sukla, A.; Geleva, E.; Marinov, Ts. K.

    2016-01-01

    Two odd-odd nuclei from the A ~ 100 and A ~ 130 regions, namely 102Rh and 134Pr have been studied in search for chiral doublet bands via 94Zr(11B,3n)102Rh and 119Sn(19F,4n)134Pr reactions, respectively. Two nearly degenerate bands built on the πg9/2 ⊗ vh11/2 configuration have been identified in 102Rh and on the πg11/2 ⊗ vh11/2 configuration for 134Pr. Lifetimes of excited nuclear states were measured using Dopplershift attenuation method and recoil distance Doppler-shift method. The deexciting gamma rays were registered by the Indian National Gamma Array for 102Rh and using the EUROBALL IV detector array with an inner Bismuth Germanate (BGO) ball for 134Pr, respectively. Polarization and angular correlation measurements have been performed to establish the spin and parity assignments for these bands. The derived reduced transition probabilities are compared to the predicitons of the two quasiparticles + triaxial rotor and interacting boson fermion-fermion models.

  13. Effect of indoor air pollution from biomass fuel use on argyrophilic nuclear organizer regions in buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Nandan K; Dutta, Anindita; Banerjee, Anirban; Chakraborty, Sreeparna; Lahiri, Twisha; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of indoor air pollution from biomass-fuel use on the expression of argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs), an indicator of ribosome biosynthesis, in epithelial cells of oral mucosa. AgNORs were evaluated using cytochemical staining in 62 nonsmoking indian women (median age, 34 years), who cooked exclusively with biomass, and 55 age-matched women, who were from a similar neighborhood and cooked with relatively clean liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Concentrations of particulate pollutants in indoor air were measured using a real-time aerosol monitor. Compared to the LPG-using controls, biomass-fuel users showed a remarkably increased number of AgNOR dots per nucleus (6.08 +/-2.26 vs 3.16 +/-0.86, p < 0.001), AgNOR size (0.85 +/-0.19 vs 0.53 +/-0.15 mum2, p < 0.001), and percentage of AgNOR-occupied nuclear area (4.88 +/-1.49 vs 1.75 +/-0.13%, p < 0.001). Biomass-using households had 2 to 4 times more particulate pollutants than that of LPG-using households. The changes in AgNOR expression were positively associated with PM10 and PM2.5 levels in indoor air after controlling for potential confounders such as age, kitchen location, and family income. Thus, biomass smoke appears to be a risk factor for abnormal cell growth via upregulation of ribosome biogenesis.

  14. Flanking nuclear matrix attachment regions synergize with the T cell receptor δ enhancer to promote V(D)J recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Carabaña, Juan; Krangel, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs) that are closely associated with transcriptional enhancers in the IgH, Igκ, and T cell receptor (TCR) β loci, but have yielded conflicting information regarding their functional significance. In this report, a combination of in vitro and in situ mapping approaches was used to localize three MARs associated with the human TCR δ gene. Two of these are located within the Jδ3–Cδ intron, flanking the core TCR δ enhancer (Eδ) both 5′ and 3′ in a fashion reminiscent of the Ig heavy chain intronic enhancer-associated MARs. The third is located about 20 kb upstream, tightly linked to Dδ1 and Dδ2. We have previously used a transgenic minilocus V(D)J recombination reporter to establish that Eδ functions as a developmental regulator of V(D)J recombination, and that it does so by modulating substrate accessibility to the V(D)J recombinase. We show here that the Eδ-associated MARs function synergistically with the core Eδ to promote V(D)J recombination in this system, as they are required for enhancer-dependent transgene rearrangement in single-copy transgene integrants. PMID:10518560

  15. Inferring Invasion History of Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in China from Mitochondrial Control Region and Nuclear Intron Sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhe; Guo, Xianwu; Chen, Liping; Bai, Xiaohui; Wei, Xinlan; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Huang, Songqian; Wang, Weimin

    2015-06-29

    Identifying the dispersal pathways of an invasive species is useful for adopting the appropriate strategies to prevent and control its spread. However, these processes are exceedingly complex. So, it is necessary to apply new technology and collect representative samples for analysis. This study used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) in combination with traditional genetic tools to examine extensive sample data and historical records to infer the invasion history of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, in China. The sequences of the mitochondrial control region and the proPOx intron in the nuclear genome of samples from 37 sites (35 in China and one each in Japan and the USA) were analyzed. The results of combined scenarios testing and historical records revealed a much more complex invasion history in China than previously believed. P. clarkii was most likely originally introduced into China from Japan from an unsampled source, and the species then expanded its range primarily into the middle and lower reaches and, to a lesser extent, into the upper reaches of the Changjiang River in China. No transfer was observed from the upper reaches to the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River. Human-mediated jump dispersal was an important dispersal pathway for P. clarkii. The results provide a better understanding of the evolutionary scenarios involved in the rapid invasion of P. clarkii in China.

  16. Identification of a nuclear matrix attachment region like sequence in the last intron of PI3K{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Bingbing; Ying Lei; Cai Rong; Li Ying; Zhang Xingqian; Lu Jian; Qian Guanxiang . E-mail: sundai0@163.com

    2006-03-10

    MARs are not only the structure bases of chromatin higher order structure but also have much biological significance. In this study, the whole sequence of about 100 kb in length from BAC clone of GS1-223D4 (GI: 5931478), in which human PI3K{gamma} gene is localized, was analyzed by two online-based computer programs, MARFinder and SMARTest. A strong potential MAR was predicted in the last and largest intron of PI3K{gamma}. The predicted 2 kb MAR, we refer to PIMAR, was further analyzed through biochemical methods in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the PIMAR could be associated with nuclear matrices from HeLa cells both in vitro and in vivo. Further reporter gene analysis showed that in the transient transfection the expression of reporter gene linked with reversed PIMAR was repressed slightly, while in stably integrated state, the luciferase reporter both linked with reversed and orientated PIMAR was enhanced greatly in NIH-3T3 and K-562. These results suggest that the PIMAR maybe has the capacity of shielding integrated heterogeneous gene from chromatin position effect. Through combination of computer program analysis with confirmation by biochemical methods, we identified, for First time, a 2 kb matrix attachment region like sequence in the last intron of human PI3K{gamma}.

  17. JASMINE: galactic structure surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, Naoteru; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Taihei; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Suganuma, Masahiro; Niwa, Yoshito; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Matsuhara, Hideo; Noda, Atsushi; Tsuiki, Atsuo; Utashima, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Akira

    2006-06-01

    We introduce a Japanese plan of infrared(z-band:0.9μm) space astrometry(JASMINE-project). JASMINE is the satellite (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for INfrared Exploration) which will measure distances and apparent motions of stars around the center of the Milky Way with yet unprecedented precision. It will measure parallaxes, positions with the accuracy of 10 micro-arcsec and proper motions with the accuracy of ~ 4microarcsec/ year for stars brighter than z=14mag. JASMINE can observe about ten million stars belonging to the bulge components of our Galaxy, which are hidden by the interstellar dust extinction in optical bands. Number of stars with σ/π < 0.1 in the direction of the Galactic central bulge is about 1000 times larger than those observed in optical bands, where π is a parallax and σ is an error of the parallax. With the completely new "map of the bulge in the Milky Way", it is expected that many new exciting scientific results will be obtained in various fields of astronomy. Presently, JASMINE is in a development phase, with a target launch date around 2015. We adopt the following instrument design of JASMINE in order to get the accurate positions of many stars. A 3-mirrors optical system(modified Korsch system)with a primary mirror of~ 0.85m is one of the candidate for the optical system. On the astro-focal plane, we put dozens of new type of CCDs for z-band to get a wide field of view. The accurate measurements of the astrometric parameters requires the instrument line-of-sight highly stability and the opto-mechanical highly stability of the payload in the JASMINE spacecraft. The consideration of overall system(bus) design is now going on in cooperation with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency(JAXA).

  18. The Galactic stellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltzing, S.; Bensby, T.

    2008-12-01

    The study of the Milky Way stellar discs in the context of galaxy formation is discussed. In particular, we explore the properties of the Milky Way disc using a new sample of about 550 dwarf stars for which we have recently obtained elemental abundances and ages based on high-resolution spectroscopy. For all the stars we also have full kinematic information as well as information about their stellar orbits. We confirm results from previous studies that the thin and the thick discs have distinct abundance patterns. But we also explore a larger range of orbital parameters than what has been possible in our previous studies. Several new results are presented. We find that stars that reach high above the Galactic plane and have eccentric orbits show remarkably tight abundance trends. This implies that these stars formed out of well-mixed gas that had been homogenized over large volumes. We find some evidence that suggest that the event that most likely caused the heating of this stellar population happened a few billion years ago. Through a simple, kinematic exploration of stars with super-solar [Fe/H], we show that the solar neighbourhood contains metal-rich, high velocity stars that are very likely associated with the thick disc. Additionally, the HR1614 moving group and the Hercules and Arcturus stellar streams are discussed and it is concluded that, probably, a large fraction of the groups and streams so far identified in the disc are the result of evolution and interactions within the stellar disc rather than being dissolved stellar clusters or engulfed dwarf galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Also based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, Spain, and at the European Southern Observatories on La Silla and Paranal, Chile, Proposals no. 65.L-0019(B), 67.B-0108(B), 69.B-0277.

  19. Galactic Halos of Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image shows two companion galaxies, NGC 4625 (top) and NGC 4618 (bottom), and their surrounding cocoons of cool hydrogen gas (purple). The huge set of spiral arms on NGC 4625 (blue) was discovered by the ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. Though these arms are nearly invisible when viewed in optical light, they glow brightly in ultraviolet. This is because they are bustling with hot, newborn stars that radiate primarily ultraviolet light.

    The vibrant spiral arms are also quite lengthy, stretching out to a distance four times the size of the galaxy's core. They are part of the largest ultraviolet galactic disk discovered so far.

    Astronomers do not know why NGC 4625 grew arms while NGC 4618 did not. The purple nebulosity shown here illustrates that hydrogen gas - an ingredient of star formation - is diffusely distributed around both galaxies. This means that other unknown factors led to the development of the arms of NGC 4625.

    Located 31 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4625 is the closest galaxy ever seen with such a young halo of arms. It is slightly smaller than our Milky Way, both in size and mass. However, the fact that this galaxy's disk is forming stars very actively suggests that it might evolve into a more massive and mature galaxy resembling our own.

    The image is composed of ultraviolet, visible-light and radio data, from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the California Institute of Technology's Digitized Sky Survey, and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, the Netherlands, respectively. Near-ultraviolet light is colored green; far-ultraviolet light is colored blue; and optical light is colored red. Radio emissions are colored purple.

  20. A Disturbed Galactic Duo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    The galaxies in this cosmic pairing, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, display some curious features, demonstrating that each member of the duo is close enough to feel the distorting gravitational influence of the other. The gravitational tug of war has warped the spiral shape of one galaxy, NGC 3169, and fragmented the dust lanes in its companion NGC 3166. Meanwhile, a third, smaller galaxy to the lower right, NGC 3165, has a front-row seat to the gravitational twisting and pulling of its bigger neighbours. This galactic grouping, found about 70 million light-years away in the constellation Sextans (The Sextant), was discovered by the English astronomer William Herschel in 1783. Modern astronomers have gauged the distance between NGC 3169 (left) and NGC 3166 (right) as a mere 50 000 light-years, a separation that is only about half the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy. In such tight quarters, gravity can start to play havoc with galactic structure. Spiral galaxies like NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 tend to have orderly swirls of stars and dust pinwheeling about their glowing centres. Close encounters with other massive objects can jumble this classic configuration, often serving as a disfiguring prelude to the merging of galaxies into one larger galaxy. So far, the interactions of NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 have just lent a bit of character. NGC 3169's arms, shining bright with big, young, blue stars, have been teased apart, and lots of luminous gas has been drawn out from its disc. In NGC 3166's case, the dust lanes that also usually outline spiral arms are in disarray. Unlike its bluer counterpart, NGC 3166 is not forming many new stars. NGC 3169 has another distinction: the faint yellow dot beaming through a veil of dark dust just to the left of and close to the galaxy's centre [1]. This flash is the leftover of a supernova detected in 2003 and known accordingly as SN 2003cg. A supernova of this

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OGLE microlensing events in Galactic Bulge (Udalski+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.; Zebrun, K.; Szymanski, M.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Wozniak, P.

    2006-09-01

    We present the Catalog of microlensing events detected toward the Galactic bulge in three observing seasons, 1997-1999, during the OGLE-II microlensing survey. The search for microlensing events was performed using a database of about 4x109 photometric measurements of about 20.5 million stars from the Galactic bulge. The Catalog comprises 214 microlensing events found in the fields covering about 11 square degrees on the sky and distributed in different parts of the Galactic bulge. The sample includes 20 binary microlensing events, 14 of them are caustic crossing. In one case a double star is likely lensed. We present distribution of the basic parameters of microlensing events and show preliminary rate of microlensing in different regions of the Galactic bulge. The latter reveals clear dependence on the Galactic coordinates. The dependence on l indicates that the majority of lenses toward the Galactic bulge are located in the Galactic bar. Models of the Galactic bar seem to reasonably predict the observed spatial distribution of microlensing events in the Galactic bulge. All data presented in the Catalog and photometry of all events are available from the OGLE Internet archive. (3 data files).

  2. Characterizing the X-Ray Spectrum of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine the spectrum of the Galactic halo's soft X-ray emission. These photons are emitted by hot, diffuse gas hundreds to thousands of parsecs from the Galactic plane. Thus, the emission is weak, can be confused with locally produced photons, and must be distinguished from noise. My co-I has made significant progress on determining the background. I have been working on a complementary aspect of the project: computer simulations of the hot gas in the local and distant regions.

  3. Photometric Surveys of the Galactic Bulge and Long Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, O.; Wegg, C.; Portail, M.

    The Galactic bar and box/peanut bulge can be studied in an unrivaled manner, star-by-star, with detailed chemical information and full 3D kinematics. Because of intervening dust this is greatly facilitated by the availability of wide field deep NIR photometric surveys. Here we summarize recent results on the three-dimensional structure of the bulge and the long bar region, based on 2MASS, UKIDSS, and particularly the ongoing VVV survey. We also summarize results from dynamical models for the Galactic bulge constructed with the Made-to-Measure method.

  4. Interaction of nuclear factors with the upstream region of the alpha-subunit gene of chicken muscle acetylcholine receptor: variations with muscle differentiation and denervation.

    PubMed Central

    Piette, J; Klarsfeld, A; Changeux, J P

    1989-01-01

    The region lying between nucleotides (nt) -110 and -45 of chicken acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit gene 5' upstream sequence confers developmental control of expression in primary cultures of chicken myotubes. This region interacts with several nuclear factors present in muscle cells as shown by DNase I footprinting and gel-retardation experiments. An Sp1-like factor and a guanine stretch-binding protein were found to bind to overlapping sites immediately upstream of the TATA box. Several factors interacting in the same region with a domain similar to the SV40 enhancer core appeared during in vitro differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. The concentration of some of these factors increased also after denervation of leg muscle in newborn chickens. The specific interaction of nuclear factors with this domain may thus play a critical role in the regulation of alpha-subunit gene expression by muscle differentiation and electrical activity. Images PMID:2721497

  5. AHM1, a Novel Type of Nuclear Matrix–Localized, MAR Binding Protein with a Single AT Hook and a J Domain–Homologous Region

    PubMed Central

    Morisawa, Gaku; Han-yama, Atsushi; Moda, Ichiro; Tamai, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2000-01-01

    Interactions between the nuclear matrix and special regions of chromosomal DNA called matrix attachment regions (MARs) have been implicated in various nuclear functions. We have identified a novel protein from wheat, AT hook–containing MAR binding protein1 (AHM1), that binds preferentially to MARs. A multidomain protein, AHM1 has the special combination of a J domain–homologous region and a Zn finger–like motif (a J-Z array) and an AT hook. For MAR binding, the AT hook at the C terminus was essential, and an internal portion containing the Zn finger–like motif was additionally required in vivo. AHM1 was found in the nuclear matrix fraction and was localized in the nucleoplasm. AHM1 fused to green fluorescent protein had a speckled distribution pattern inside the nucleus. AHM1 is most likely a nuclear matrix component that functions between intranuclear framework and MARs. J-Z arrays can be found in a group of (hypothetical) proteins in plants, which may share some functions, presumably to recruit specific Hsp70 partners as co-chaperones. PMID:11041885

  6. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemsitry in the region of Thulium, Lutetium, and Tantalum I. Results of Built in Spherical Symmetry in a Deformed Region

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R. D.

    2013-09-06

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from Terbium (Z = 65) to Rhenium (Z = 75). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Tm, Lu, and Ta including reactions on isomeric targets.

  7. A deep look at the nuclear region of UGC 5101 through high angular resolution mid-IR data with GTC/CanariCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Paredes, M.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Aretxaga, I.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; González-Martín, O.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Packham, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Elitzur, M.; Esquej, P.; García-Bernete, I.; Imanishi, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the nuclear infrared (IR, 1.6-18 μm) emission of the ultraluminous IR galaxy UGC 5101 to derive the properties of its active galactic nucleus (AGN) and its obscuring material. We use new mid-IR high angular resolution (0.3-0.5 arcsec) imaging using the Si-2 filter (λC = 8.7 μm) and 7.5-13 μm spectroscopy taken with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS. We also use archival Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS and Subaru/COMICS imaging and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy. We estimate the near- and mid-IR unresolved nuclear emission by modelling the imaging data with GALFIT. We decompose the Spitzer/IRS and CC spectra using a power-law component, which represents the emission due to dust heated by the AGN, and a starburst component, both affected by foreground extinction. We model the resulting unresolved near- and mid-IR, and the starburst subtracted CC spectrum with the CLUMPY torus models of Nenkova et al. The derived geometrical properties of the torus, including the large covering factor and the high foreground extinction needed to reproduce the deep 9.7 μm silicate feature, are consistent with the lack of strong AGN signatures in the optical. We derive an AGN bolometric luminosity Lbol ˜ 1.9 × 1045 erg s-1 that is in good agreement with other estimates in the literature.

  8. Galactic evolution of Beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; King, Jeremy R.

    1993-12-01

    The abundance of Be in the lowest-metallicity stars is a probe of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and its abundance in halo and disk stars is a probe of galactic evolution and stellar structure. We present observations of the Be II resonance lines in 14 halo stars and 27 (mostly old) disk stars with (Fe/H) from -2.7 to +0.13. The spectra were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii (CFH) 3.6 m telescope and have a measured resolution of 0.13 A and a median signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 50. For 18 of the 41 stars we have also made observations of the O I triplet at the Palomar 5 m telescope, the UH 2.2 m telescope, and the CFH telescope. Stellar parameters of Teff, log g, and (Fe/H) were carefully determined from several independent estimates. Abundances are determined for log N (Be/H) and (O/H) from measured equivalent widths, model parameters, and Kurucz (1991) model atmospheres with the RAI10 model atmosphere abundance program. The agreement with previously published Be detections is very good (a mean difference of 0.05 dex) for five of six determinations in four halo stars and in four of five disk stars. The agreement with very recently published O abundances is 0.0075 dex. It is plausible, but far from conclusive, that there is a plateau in the amount of Be present in the lowest metallicity stars: log N (Be/H) approximately -12.8 for (Fe/H) less than -2.2 As (Fe/H) increases from -2.2 to -1.0, log N (Be/H) increases and the slope is 1.2-1.3, indicating a faster increase in Be than in Fe. This is consistent with the production of Be by spallation reactions between cosmic rays and O atoms from massive stars and the production of Fe from intermediate mass stars. Evidence for stellar processing of Be exists in the disk stars and in at least two of the halo stars. A plot of Be abundance vs O abundances shows that Be increases as O1.12, indicating that Be is produced primarily is the vicinity of supernovae envelopes, but a small and interesting fraction is produced in

  9. Star formation scales and efficiency in Galactic spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, D. J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Urquhart, J. S.; Elia, D.; Plume, R.; Rigby, A. J.; Thompson, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    We positionally match a sample of infrared-selected young stellar objects, identified by combining the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and Herschel Space Observatory Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey, to the dense clumps identified in the millimetre continuum by the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey in two Galactic lines of sight centred towards l = 30° and 40°. We calculate the ratio of infrared luminosity, LIR, to the mass of the clump, Mclump, in a variety of Galactic environments and find it to be somewhat enhanced in spiral arms compared to the interarm regions when averaged over kiloparsec scales. We find no compelling evidence that these changes are due to the mechanical influence of the spiral arm on the star formation efficiency rather than, e.g. different gradients in the star formation rate due to patchy or intermittent star formation, or local variations that are not averaged out due to small source samples. The largest variation in LIR/Mclump is found in individual clump values, which follow a lognormal distribution and have a range of over three orders of magnitude. This spread is intrinsic as no dependence of LIR/Mclump with Mclump was found. No difference was found in the luminosity distribution of sources in the arm and interarm samples and a strong linear correlation was found between LIR and Mclump.

  10. PREFACE: Astronomy at High Angular Resolution 2011: The central kiloparsec in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserlohe, Christof; Karas, Vladimir; Krips, Melanie; Eckart, Andreas; Britzen, Silke; Fischer, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Astronomy at High Angular Resolution 2011: The central kiloparsec in galactic nuclei conference. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (DPG), Bad Honnef, Germany, from 28 August to 2 September 2011. It was the second conference of this kind, following the Astronomy at High Angular Resolution conference held in Bad Honnef, three years earlier in 2008. The main objective of the conference was to frame the discussion of the broad range of physical processes that occur in the central 100pc of galactic nuclei. In most cases, this domain is difficult to probe through observations. This is mainly because of the lack of angular resolution, the brightness of the central engine and possible obscurations through dust and gas, which play together in the central regions of host galaxies of galactic nuclei within a broad range of activity. The presence of large amounts of molecular and atomic (both neutral and ionized) gas, dust and central engines with outflows and jets implies that the conditions for star formation in these regions are very special, and probably different from those in the disks of host galaxies. Numerous presentations covering a broad range of topics, both theoretical and experimental, those related to research on Active Galactic Nuclei and on a wide range of observed wavelengths were submitted to the Scientific Organizing Committee. Presentations have been grouped into six sessions: The nuclei of active galaxies The Galactic Center The immediate environment of Super Massive Black Holes The physics of nuclear jets and the interaction of the interstellar medium The central 100pc of the nuclear environment Star formation in that region The editors thank all participants of the AHAR 2011 conference for their enthusiasm and their numerous and vivid contributions to this conference. We would especially like to thank John Hugh Seiradakis from the Aristotle

  11. Herschel far-infrared photometry of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope active galactic nuclei sample of the local universe - III. Global star-forming properties and the lack of a connection to nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael J.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2017-04-01

    We combine the Herschel Space Observatory PACS (Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer) and SPIRE (Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver) photometry with archival WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) photometry to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for over 300 local (z < 0.05), ultrahard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) 58-month catalogue. Using a simple analytical model that combines an exponentially cutoff power law with a single temperature modified blackbody, we decompose the SEDs into a host galaxy and AGN component. We calculate dust masses, dust temperatures, and star formation rates (SFRs) for our entire sample and compare them to a stellar mass-matched sample of local non-AGN galaxies. We find AGN host galaxies have systematically higher dust masses, dust temperatures, and SFRs due to the higher prevalence of late-type galaxies to host an AGN, in agreement with previous studies of the Swift/BAT AGN. We provide a scaling to convert X-ray luminosities into 8-1000 μm AGN luminosities, as well as determine the best mid-to-far IR colours for identifying AGN-dominated galaxies in the IR regime. We find that for nearly 30 per cent of our sample, the 70 μm emission contains a significant contribution from the AGN (>0.5), especially at higher luminosities (L14 - 195 keV > 1042.5 erg s-1). Finally, we measure the local SFR-AGN luminosity relationship, finding a slope of 0.18, large scatter (0.37 dex), and no evidence for an upturn at high AGN luminosity. We conclude with a discussion on the implications of our results within the context of galaxy evolution with and without AGN feedback.

  12. SIZES OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Sidney

    2012-02-20

    A study is made of deviations from the mean power-law relationship between the Galactocentric distances and the half-light radii of Galactic globular clusters. Surprisingly, deviations from the mean R{sub h} versus R{sub gc} relationship do not appear to correlate with cluster luminosity, cluster metallicity, or horizontal-branch morphology. Differences in orbit shape are found to contribute to the scatter in the R{sub h} versus R{sub gc} relationship of Galactic globular clusters.

  13. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z.; Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (≅ 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (≅ 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (∼3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub −2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub −0.8}{sup +1.4} per

  14. Expression of nuclear matrix proteins binding matrix attachment regions in prostate cancer. PARP-1: New player in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Barboro, Paola; Ferrari, Nicoletta; Capaia, Matteo; Petretto, Andrea; Salvi, Sandra; Boccardo, Simona; Balbi, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) displays infrequent point mutations, whereas genomic rearrangements are highly prevalent. In eukaryotes, the genome is compartmentalized into chromatin loop domains by the attachment to the nuclear matrix (NM), and it has been demonstrated that several recombination hot spots are situated at the base of loops. Here, we have characterized the binding between NM proteins and matrix attachment regions (MARs) in PCa. Nontumor and 44 PCa tissues were analyzed. More aggressive tumors were characterized by an increase in the complexity of the NM protein patterns that was synchronous with a decrease in the number of proteins binding the MAR sequences. PARP-1 was the protein that showed the most evident changes. The expression of the PARP-1 associated with NM increased and it was dependent on tumor aggressiveness. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the protein was significantly overexpressed in tumor cells. To explore the role of PARP-1 in PCa progression, PCa cells were treated with the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888. In androgen-independent PC3 cells, PARP inhibition significantly decreased cell viability, migration, invasion, chromatin loop dimensions and histone acetylation. Collectively, our study provides evidence that MAR-binding proteins are involved in the development and progression of PCa. PARP could play a key role in the compartmentalization of chromatin and in the development of the more aggressive phenotype. Thus, PARP can no longer be viewed only as an enzyme involved in DNA repair, but that its role in chromatin modulation could provide the basis for a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of PCa.

  15. Extensive Pyrosequencing Reveals Frequent Intra-Genomic Variations of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dezhu; Sun, Yongzhen; Niu, Yunyun; Chen, Zhiduan; Luo, Hongmei; Pang, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhiying; Liu, Chang; Lv, Aiping; Deng, Youping; Larson-Rabin, Zachary; Wilkinson, Mike; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background Internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) is already one of the most popular phylogenetic and DNA barcoding markers. However, the existence of its multiple copies has complicated such usage and a detailed characterization of intra-genomic variations is critical to address such concerns. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used sequence-tagged pyrosequencing and genome-wide analyses to characterize intra-genomic variations of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions from 178 plant species. We discovered that mutation of ITS2 is frequent, with a mean of 35 variants per species. And on average, three of the most abundant variants make up 91% of all ITS2 copies. Moreover, we found different congeneric species share identical variants in 13 genera. Interestingly, different species across different genera also share identical variants. In particular, one minor variant of ITS2 in Eleutherococcus giraldii was found identical to the ITS2 major variant of Panax ginseng, both from Araliaceae family. In addition, DNA barcoding gap analysis showed that the intra-genomic distances were markedly smaller than those of the intra-specific or inter-specific variants. When each of 5543 variants were examined for its species discrimination efficiency, a 97% success rate was obtained at the species level. Conclusions Identification of identical ITS2 variants across intra-generic or inter-generic species revealed complex species evolutionary history, possibly, horizontal gene transfer and ancestral hybridization. Although intra-genomic multiple variants are frequently found within each genome, the usage of the major variants alone is sufficient for phylogeny construction and species determination in most cases. Furthermore, the inclusion of minor variants further improves the resolution of species identification. PMID:22952830

  16. Galactic Center gamma-ray ``excess'' from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Jovana; Dario Serpico, Pasquale; Zaharijaš, Gabrijela

    2014-10-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over the diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in the Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this excess can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ~ 1052÷1053 erg roughly Script O(106) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for—together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted ``steady state'' astrophysical sources—before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches (together with the energy budget) what is indirectly inferred by other evidences suggesting a very active Galactic Center in the past, for instance related to intense star formation and accretion phenomena.

  17. Galactic Center gamma-ray ''excess'' from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    SciTech Connect

    Petrović, Jovana; Serpico, Pasquale Dario; Zaharijaš, Gabrijela E-mail: serpico@lapth.cnrs.fr

    2014-10-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over the diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in the Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this excess can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ∼ 10{sup 52}÷10{sup 53} erg roughly O(10{sup 6}) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for—together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted ''steady state'' astrophysical sources—before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches (together with the energy budget) what is indirectly inferred by other evidences suggesting a very active Galactic Center in the past, for instance related to intense star formation and accretion phenomena.

  18. The Heliosphere and Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heliosphere deflects galactic cosmic rays from entering the system. Galactic cosmic rays are a very high energy form of particle radiation that are extremely difficult to shield against and are...

  19. Interpretation of astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube experiment by setting Galactic and extra-Galactic spectral components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, Antonio; Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario; Urbano, Alfredo; Valli, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    The last IceCube catalog of High Energy Starting Events (HESE) obtained with a livetime of 1347 days comprises 54 neutrino events equally-distributed between the three families with energies between 25 TeV and few PeVs. Considering the homogeneous flavors distribution (1:1:1) and the spectral features of these neutrinos the IceCube collaboration claims the astrophysical origin of these events with more than 5σ. The spatial distribution of cited events does not show a clear correlation with known astrophysical accelerators leaving opened both the Galactic and the extra-Galactic origin interpretations. Here, we compute the neutrino diffuse emission of our Galaxy on the basis of a recently proposed phenomenological model characterized by radially-dependent cosmic-ray (CR) transport properties. We show that the astrophysical spectrum measured by IceCube experiment can be well explained adding to the diffuse Galactic neutrino flux (obtained with this new model) a extra-Galactic component derived from the astrophysical muonic neutrinos reconstructed in the Northern hemisphere. A good agreement between the expected astrophysical neutrino flux and the IceCube data is found for the full sky as well as for the Galactic plane region.

  20. ALMA view of the Galactic Center 50km/s molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Kenta; Tsuboi, Masato; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Miyawaki, Ryosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    We have observed the Galactic Center 50km/s molecular cloud (50MC) with ALMA to search for filamentary structures. In the CS J=2-1 emission line channel maps, we succeeded in identifying 27 molecular cloud filaments using the DisPerSE algorithm. This is the first attempt of filament-finding in the Galactic Center Region. These molecular cloud filaments strongly suggest that the molecular cloud filaments are also ubiquitous in the molecular clouds of the Galactic Center Region.

  1. GRIS observations of the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Barthelmy, S.; Teegarden, B. J.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Maccallum, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    The 511 keV positron annihilation line source in the Galactic Center (GC) region has reappeared after being in a quiescent state since the early 1980's. Observations are reported made by the GRIS balloon instrument showing that the 511 keV line has returned to an intensity level similar to that seen in the 1970's. The line width was resolved for the first time and a measurement of the spatial extent of the emission along the galactic plane was made. Gamma ray imaging spectrometer (GRIS) is a high resolution germanium (Ge) spectrometer with a 17 deg field-of-view. Eleven hours of data were obtained from GC pointings on balloon flights over Australia on 1 May 1988 and again on 29 October 1988. An additional seven hours were obtained on 30 October 1988 from a point in the galactic plane (GP) 25 deg west of the center. Preliminary results for the line fluxes from the GC are 9.8 + or - 1.9 in May and 12.3 + or - 1.6 in October, and from the GP are 2.4 + or - 1.6 (1 sigma statistical errors). The flux for the off-center pointing is significantly lower than that for the GC pointings and indicates that the dominant emission is narrowly concentrated at the center. The line width for the GC pointing in October is 3.6 + or - 0.5 keV, which implies a temperature for the annihilation medium of less than or + 10(exp 5)K. A step in the continuum emission at 511 keV is found in both the GC and GP data. The step may be due to orthopositronium three-photon annihilation for the GC, but is too large relative to the 511 keV line for the GP to be simply explained by positronium.

  2. Echo Mapping of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Horne, K.

    2004-01-01

    Echo mapping makes use of the intrinsic variability of the continuum source in active galactic nuclei to map out the distribution and kinematics of line-emitting gas from its light travel time-delayed response to continuum changes. Echo mapping experiments have yielded sizes for the broad line-emitting region in about three dozen AGNs. The dynamics of the line-emitting gas seem to be dominated by the gravity of the central black hole, enabling measurement of the black-hole masses in AGNs. We discuss requirements for future echo-mapping experiments that will yield the high quality velocity-delay maps of the broad-line region that are needed to determine its physical nature.

  3. Relativistic neutrons in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rudak, Bronislaw

    1989-01-01

    The acceleration of protons to relativistic energies in active galactic nuclei leads to the creation of relativistic neutrons which escape from the central engine. The neutrons decay at distances of up to 1-100 pc, depositing their energies and momenta in situ. Energy deposition by decaying neutrons may inhibit spherical accretion and drive a wind, which could be responsible for the velocity fields in emission-line regions and the outflow of broad absorption line systems. Enhanced pressure in the neutron decay region may also help to confine emission line clouds. A fraction of the relativistic proton energy is radiated in gamma-rays with energies which may be as large as about 100,000 GeV.

  4. Search of the Galactic sources of the cosmic ray triplet with energies above 1020 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnatyk, R.; Zhdanov, V.

    2016-06-01

    Among the registered extremely high energy cosmic rays (EHECR, E > 1020 eV) there is a triplet of events in a circle with radius of 40 in the Galactic center region. With the use of the backtracking method for the calculation of EHECR trajectories in the Galactic magnetic it is shown that potential sources of galactic triplet can be microquasars SS433, GRS1915+105, magnetar SGR1900+14 and globular star cluster NGC6760.

  5. Genomic Regions Targeted by DNA Topoisomerase IIβ Frequently Interact With a Nuclear Scaffold/Matrix Protein hnRNP U/SAF‐A/SP120

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Ryohei; Sano, Kuniaki; Tsutsui, Kimiko M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type II DNA topoisomerases (topo II) play critical roles in some cellular events through repeated cleavage/rejoining of nuclear DNA. The β isoform (topo IIβ) is essential for the transcriptional induction of neuronal genes in terminal differentiation. Genomic sites targeted by the enzyme are nonrandom. Although previous studies have claimed that topo II cleavage sites are close to the nuclear scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR), it is still unclear whether this view can be generalized. We report here that a library of cloned genomic DNA fragments targeted by topo IIβ in vivo frequently contains S/MAR and binding sites for hnRNP U/SAF‐A/SP120. Binding assays in vitro showed that a large proportion of the target DNAs bound to SP120 but their affinity to the nuclear scaffold/matrix varied significantly. Topo IIβ targets were extremely AT‐rich and often located in gene‐poor long intergenic regions (so‐called gene desert) that are juxtaposed to long genes expressed in neurons under differentiation. Sequence analysis revealed that topo IIβ targets are not just AT‐rich but are enriched with short tracts of A's and T's (termed A/T‐patches). Their affinity to the nuclear scaffold/matrix showed a moderate positive correlation with the coverage rate of A/T‐patches. The results suggest that the interaction of topo IIβ/SP120 with target regions modulates their proximity to the nuclear scaffold/matrix in a dynamic fashion and that A/T‐patch is a sequence motif assisting this process. J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 677–685, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25418483

  6. THE GALACTIC PLANE INFRARED POLARIZATION SURVEY (GPIPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Dan P.; Pinnick, A. F.; Pavel, M. D.; Taylor, B. W. E-mail: apinnick@bu.edu E-mail: bwtaylor@bu.edu

    2012-06-01

    The scientific motivation, data collection strategy, data reduction, and analysis methods are presented for the Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (GPIPS). The chief goal for the Survey was to reveal the nature of the magnetic field threading the Galactic disk, in particular through regions of low to moderate extinction (1-20 mag of A{sub V} ) and star formation in the cool interstellar medium. The Survey region spans 76 deg{sup 2} of the northern Milky Way disk, from l = 18 Degree-Sign to 56 Degree-Sign and b =-1 Degree-Sign to +1 Degree-Sign . Linear polarimetric imaging observations began in 2006 in the near-infrared H band (1.6 {mu}m) using the Mimir instrument on the 1.8 m Perkins telescope, located outside Flagstaff, AZ. Mimir used a cold, fixed wire grid and a rotateable cold, compound half-wave plate to obtain 'step-and-integrate' polarimetry over its full 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 arcmin field of view. The GPIPS bright and faint polarimetric limits are approximately 7th and 15th mag, respectively, set by saturation and photon noise. Polarimetric uncertainties track with stellar magnitude, from about 0.1% to 25%, on average, from the brightest to faintest stars. Across the 3237 field GPIPS region, approximately 0.5 million stars are estimated to show detectable linear polarization (P/{sigma}{sub P} > 3); most of these have m{sub H} < 12. This represents many orders of magnitude improvement in the number of polarization measurements across this region. GPIPS observations are more than 90% complete and should finish in 2012.

  7. The Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (GPIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Dan P.; Pinnick, A. F.; Pavel, M. D.; Taylor, B. W.

    2012-06-01

    The scientific motivation, data collection strategy, data reduction, and analysis methods are presented for the Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (GPIPS). The chief goal for the Survey was to reveal the nature of the magnetic field threading the Galactic disk, in particular through regions of low to moderate extinction (1-20 mag of AV ) and star formation in the cool interstellar medium. The Survey region spans 76 deg2 of the northern Milky Way disk, from l = 18° to 56° and b =-1° to +1°. Linear polarimetric imaging observations began in 2006 in the near-infrared H band (1.6 μm) using the Mimir instrument on the 1.8 m Perkins telescope, located outside Flagstaff, AZ. Mimir used a cold, fixed wire grid and a rotateable cold, compound half-wave plate to obtain "step-and-integrate" polarimetry over its full 10 × 10 arcmin field of view. The GPIPS bright and faint polarimetric limits are approximately 7th and 15th mag, respectively, set by saturation and photon noise. Polarimetric uncertainties track with stellar magnitude, from about 0.1% to 25%, on average, from the brightest to faintest stars. Across the 3237 field GPIPS region, approximately 0.5 million stars are estimated to show detectable linear polarization (P/σ P > 3); most of these have mH < 12. This represents many orders of magnitude improvement in the number of polarization measurements across this region. GPIPS observations are more than 90% complete and should finish in 2012.

  8. Regulated expression of nuclear protein(s) in myogenic cells that binds to a conserved 3' untranslated region in pro alpha 1 (I) collagen cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Herget, T; Burba, M; Schmoll, M; Zimmermann, K; Starzinski-Powitz, A

    1989-01-01

    We describe the identification and DNA-binding properties of nuclear proteins from rat L6 myoblasts which recognize an interspecies conserved 3' untranslated segment of pro alpha 1 (I) collagen cDNA. Levels of the two pro alpha 1 (I) collagen RNAs, present in L6 myoblasts, decreased drastically between 54 and 75 h after induction of myotube formation in serum-free medium. Both mRNAs contained a conserved sequence segment of 135 nucleotides (termed tame sequence) in the 3' untranslated region that had 96% homology to the human and murine pro alpha 1 (I) collagen genes. The cDNA of this tame sequence was specifically recognized by nuclear protein(s) from L6 myoblasts, as judged by gel retardation assays and DNase I footprints. The tame-binding protein(s) was able to recognize its target sequence on double-stranded DNA but bound also to the appropriate single-stranded oligonucleotide. Protein that bound to the tame sequence was undetectable in nuclear extracts of L6 myotubes that did not accumulate the two collagen mRNAs. Therefore, the activity of this nuclear protein seems to be linked to accumulation of the sequences that it recognizes in vitro. The collagen RNAs and the nuclear tame-binding proteins reappeared after a change of medium, which further suggests that the RNAs and the protein(s) are coordinately regulated. Images PMID:2779548

  9. [C II] absorption and emission in the diffuse interstellar medium across the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerin, M.; Ruaud, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Gusdorf, A.; Godard, B.; de Luca, M.; Falgarone, E.; Goldsmith, P.; Lis, D. C.; Menten, K. M.; Neufeld, D.; Phillips, T. G.; Liszt, H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Ionized carbon is the main gas-phase reservoir of carbon in the neutral diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and its 158 μm fine structure transition [C ii] is the most important cooling line of the diffuse ISM. We combine [C ii] absorption and emission spectroscopy to gain an improved understanding of physical conditions in the different phases of the ISM. Methods: We present high-resolution [C ii] spectra obtained with the Herschel/HIFI instrument towards bright dust continuum regions in the Galactic plane, probing simultaneously the diffuse gas along the line of sight and the background high-mass star forming regions. These data are complemented by single pointings in the 492 and 809 GHz fine structure lines of atomic carbon and by medium spectral resolution spectral maps of the fine structure lines of atomic oxygen at 63 and 145 μm with Herschel/PACS. Results: We show that the presence of foreground absorption may completely cancel the emission from the background source in medium spectral resolution PACS data and that high spectral resolution spectra are needed to interpret the [C ii] and [O i] emission and the [C ii]/FIR ratio. This phenomenon may explain part of the [C ii]/FIR deficit seen in external luminous infrared galaxies where the bright emission from the nuclear regions may be partially canceled by absorption from diffuse gas in the foreground. The C+ and C excitation in the diffuse gas is consistent with a median pressure of ~5900 K cm-3 for a mean kinetic temperature of ~100 K. A few higher pressure regions are detected along the lines of sight, as emission features in both fine structure lines of atomic carbon. The knowledge of the gas density allows us to determine the filling factor of the absorbing gas along the selected lines of sight. The derived median value of the filling factor is 2.4%, in good agreement with the properties of the Galactic cold neutral medium. The mean excitation temperature is used to derive the average cooling due

  10. The Galactic Nova Rate Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, a reliable estimate of the Galactic nova rate has remained elusive. Here, the overall Galactic nova rate is estimated by extrapolating the observed rate for novae reaching m≤slant 2 to include the entire Galaxy using a two component disk plus bulge model for the distribution of stars in the Milky Way. The present analysis improves on previous work by considering important corrections for incompleteness in the observed rate of bright novae and by employing a Monte Carlo analysis to better estimate the uncertainty in the derived nova rates. Several models are considered to account for differences in the assumed properties of bulge and disk nova populations and in the absolute magnitude distribution. The simplest models, which assume uniform properties between bulge and disk novae, predict Galactic nova rates of ∼50 to in excess of 100 per year, depending on the assumed incompleteness at bright magnitudes. Models where the disk novae are assumed to be more luminous than bulge novae are explored, and predict nova rates up to 30% lower, in the range of ∼35 to ∼75 per year. An average of the most plausible models yields a rate of {50}-23+31 yr‑1, which is arguably the best estimate currently available for the nova rate in the Galaxy. Virtually all models produce rates that represent significant increases over recent estimates, and bring the Galactic nova rate into better agreement with that expected based on comparison with the latest results from extragalactic surveys.

  11. Rice University observations of the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    The most sensitive of the four balloon fight observations of the galactic center made by Rice University was conducted in 1974 from Rio Cuarto, Argentina at a float altitude of 4 mbar. The count rate spectrum of the observed background and the energy spectrum of the galactic center region are discussed. The detector used consists of a 6 inch Nal(T 1ambda) central detector collimated to approximately 15 deg FWHM by a Nal(T lamdba) anticoincidence shield. The shield in at least two interaction mean free paths thick at all gamma ray energies. The instrumental resolution is approximately 11% FWHM at 662 keV. Pulses from the central detector are analyzed by two 256 channel PHA's covering the energy range approximately 20 keV to approximately 12 MeV. The detector is equatorially mounted and pointed by command from the ground. Observations are made by measuring source and background alternately for 10 minute periods. Background is measured by rotating the detector 180 deg about the azimuthal axis.

  12. A New Galactic Center Composite Supernova Remnant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, G. R.; Hyman, S. D.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Kassim, N. E.

    2001-12-01

    We report the possible radio detection of a new supernova remnant located only 1 degree east of the Galactic center. The SNR candidate has both a shell and a core component on 6, 20, and 90 cm VLA images. Preliminary measurements indicate that both components have steep spectra between 6 and 20 cm, and that the spectra flatten and become inverted between 20 and 90 cm, due likely to significant free-free absorption. The source may be a composite-type SNR, which constitute only 10% of known SNRS, and which consist of a steep-spectrum radio shell corresponding to expanding debris from the supernova and a flatter spectrum, significantly polarized, core component corresponding to a central neutron star. Further radio and X-ray observations are planned in order to definitively identify this source. The detection of additional SNRs in or near the Galactic center will help place constraints on the star formation rate in this region, and may also provide clues about the GC environment. This research is supported by funding from the Sweet Briar College Faculty Grants program. Basic research in radio astronomy at NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Global Simulations of Galactic Winds Including Cosmic-ray Streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Yang, H.-Y. Karen; Zweibel, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Galactic outflows play an important role in galactic evolution. Despite their importance, a detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for the driving of these winds is lacking. In an effort to gain more insight into the nature of these flows, we perform global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of an isolated Milky Way-size starburst galaxy. We focus on the dynamical role of cosmic rays (CRs) injected by supernovae, and specifically on the impact of the streaming and anisotropic diffusion of CRs along the magnetic fields. We find that these microphysical effects can have a significant effect on the wind launching and mass loading factors, depending on the details of the plasma physics. Due to the CR streaming instability, CRs propagating in the interstellar medium scatter on self-excited Alfvén waves and couple to the gas. When the wave growth due to the streaming instability is inhibited by some damping process, such as turbulent damping, the coupling of CRs to the gas is weaker and their effective propagation speed faster than the Alfvén speed. Alternatively, CRs could scatter from “extrinsic turbulence” that is driven by another mechanism. We demonstrate that the presence of moderately super-Alfvénic CR streaming enhances the efficiency of galactic wind driving. Cosmic rays stream away from denser regions near the galactic disk along partially ordered magnetic fields and in the process accelerate more tenuous gas away from the galaxy. For CR acceleration efficiencies broadly consistent with the observational constraints, CRs reduce the galactic star formation rates and significantly aid in launching galactic winds.

  14. Regional Seismic Signals from Chemical Explosions, Nuclear Explosions and Earthquakes: Results from the Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Gok, R; Mayeda, K; Sicherman, A; Bonner, J; Leidig, M

    2005-09-02

    Routine industrial mining explosions play two important roles in seismic nuclear monitoring research: (1) they are a source of background events that need to be discriminated from potential nuclear explosions; (2) as some of the only explosions occurring in the current de facto global moratoria on nuclear testing, their signals should be exploited to improve the calibration of seismic m monitoring systems. A common issue monitoring arising in both of these roles is our limited physical understanding of the causes behind observed differences and similarities in the seismic signals produced by routine industrial mining blasts and small underground nuclear tests. In 2003 a consortium (Weston, SMU, LLNL, LANL and UTEP) carried out a Source Phenomenology Experiment (SPE), a series of dedicated explosions designed to improve this physical understanding, particularly as it relates to seismic methods of discriminating between signals from three different source types: earthquakes, industrial blasts, and nuclear tests. Here we very briefly review prior field experimental work that examined the seismic relationships between these source types.

  15. The Galactic Centre Mini-Spiral with CARMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunneriath, D.; Eckart, A.; Vogel, S. N.; Teuben, P.; Muzic, K.; Schodel. R.; Garcia-Marin, M.; Moultaka, J.; Staguhn, J.; Straubmeier, C.; Zensus, J.; Valencia-S, M.; Karas, V.

    2012-01-01

    The Galactic centre mini-spiral region is a mixture of gas and dust with temperatures ranging from a few hundred K to 10(exp 4) K. We report results from 1.3 and 3mm radio interferometric observations of this region with CARMA, and present a spectral index map of this region. We find a range of emission mechanisms in the region, including the inverted synchrotron spectrum of Sgr A*, free-free emission from the mini-spiral arms, and a possible dust emission contribution indicated by a positive spectral index.

  16. Structure of the Galactic Halo Towards the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinman, T. D.; Bragaglia, A.; Cacciari, C.; Buzzoni, A.; Spagna, A.

    2005-01-01

    We have used RR Lyrae and Blue HB stars as tracers of the old Galactic halo, in order to study the halo structure and the galactic rotation as a function of height above the plane. Our sample includes 40 RR Lyrae and 80 BHB stars that are about 2 to 15 kpc above the plane, in a roughly 250 deg2 area around the North Galactic Pole (NGP). We use proper motions (derived from the GSCII data base) and radial velocities to determine the rotation of the halo. From the whole sample the motion appears to be significantly more retrograde than the samples in the solar neighbourhood, confirming Majewski (1992) results and our own preliminary results based on 1/3 the present sample (Kinman et al. 2003; Spagna et al. 2003). However, the better statistics have now revealed the likely existence of two components, whose characteristics need an accurate analysis of systematic errors on the proper motions in order to be assessed in detail.

  17. ON THE SCATTER IN THE RADIUS-LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Kilerci Eser, E.; Vestergaard, M.; Peterson, B. M.; Denney, K. D.; Bentz, M. C. E-mail: vester@dark-cosmology.dk E-mail: peterson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2015-03-01

    We investigate and quantify the observed scatter in the empirical relationship between the broad line region size R and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus, in order to better understand its origin. This study is motivated by the indispensable role of this relationship in the mass estimation of cosmologically distant black holes, but may also be relevant to the recently proposed application of this relationship for measuring cosmic distances. We study six nearby reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for which simultaneous UV and optical monitoring data