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Sample records for galactic star clusters

  1. Super Star Clusters: the Engines of Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, Kelly; Lu, Jessica R.; Kewley, Lisa; Kudritzki, Rolf; Barnes, Joshua Edward

    2015-08-01

    Winds in starburst galaxies are ubiquitous; however, we still do not understand how winds from individual star clusters unite into a large-scale galactic outflow. Recent work suggests that radiation pressure from young (<7 Myr) massive super star clusters (SSCs) may be a necessary first step in launching global starburst winds. We have begun a program using integral field spectroscopy with Keck/OSIRIS to investigate the winds from these very young clusters, and how energy is transferred from the stellar population to the surrounding medium to launch galactic-scale outflows. We present preliminary work on a sample of young massive clusters from the Antennae.

  2. HUBBLE SPIES GIANT STAR CLUSTERS NEAR GALACTIC CENTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of a pair of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster clusters are ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. Both clusters are destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the Galaxy's core. But in the brief time they are around, they shine more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Arches cluster (left): The more compact Arches cluster is so dense, over 100,000 of its stars would fill a spherical region in space whose radius is the distance between the Sun and its nearest neighbor, the star Alpha Centauri, 4.3 light-years away. At least 150 of its stars are among the brightest ever seen in the Galaxy. Quintuplet cluster (right): This 4-million-year-old cluster is more dispersed than the Arches cluster. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the Galaxy, called the Pistol star. Both pictures were taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The clusters are hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the clusters could be seen from Earth they would appear to the naked eye as a pair of third magnitude 'stars,' 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart. Credit: Don Figer (Space Telescope Science Institute) and NASA

  3. HUBBLE SPIES GIANT STAR CLUSTERS NEAR GALACTIC CENTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of a pair of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster clusters are ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. Both clusters are destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the Galaxy's core. But in the brief time they are around, they shine more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Arches cluster (left): The more compact Arches cluster is so dense, over 100,000 of its stars would fill a spherical region in space whose radius is the distance between the Sun and its nearest neighbor, the star Alpha Centauri, 4.3 light-years away. At least 150 of its stars are among the brightest ever seen in the Galaxy. Quintuplet cluster (right): This 4-million-year-old cluster is more dispersed than the Arches cluster. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the Galaxy, called the Pistol star. Both pictures were taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The clusters are hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the clusters could be seen from Earth they would appear to the naked eye as a pair of third magnitude 'stars,' 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart. Credit: Don Figer (Space Telescope Science Institute) and NASA

  4. On the mass of the Galactic star cluster NGC 4337

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, Anton F.; Carraro, Giovanni; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto; Monaco, Lorenzo; Baume, Gustavo

    2017-06-01

    Only a small number of Galactic open clusters survive for longer than a few hundred million years. Longer lifetimes are routinely explained in term of larger initial masses, particularly quiet orbits and off-plane birthplaces. We derive in this work the actual mass of NGC 4337, one of the few open clusters in the Milky Way inner disc that has managed to survive for about 1.5 Gyr. We derive its mass in two different ways. First, we exploit an unpublished photometric data set in the UBVI passbands to estimate - using star counts - the cluster luminosity profile, luminosity and mass function and hence its actual mass from both the luminosity profile and mass function. This data set is also used to infer crucial cluster parameters, such as the cluster half-mass radius and distance. Secondly, we make use of a large survey of cluster star radial velocities to derive dynamical estimates for the cluster mass. Using the assumption of virial equilibrium and neglecting the external gravitational field leads to values for the mass significantly larger than those obtained by means of the observed density distribution or with the mass function, but still marginally compatible with the inferred values of invisible mass in the form of both low-mass stars and remnants of high-mass stars in the cluster. Finally, we derive the cluster initial mass by computing the mass loss experienced by the cluster during its lifetime and adopting the various estimates of the actual mass.

  5. Giant Star Clusters Near Galactic Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A video sequence of still images goes deep into the Milky Way galaxy to the Arches Cluster. Hubble, penetrating through dust and clouds, peers into the core where two giant clusters shine more brightly than any other clusters in the galaxy. Footage shows the following still images: (1) wide view of Sagittarius constellation; (2) the Palomar Observatory's 2 micron all-sky survey; and (3) an image of the Arches Cluster taken with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS instrument. Dr. Don Figer of the Space Telescope Science Institute discusses the significance of the observations and relates his first reaction to the images.

  6. Clues on the Galactic evolution of sulphur from star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Monaco, L.; Spite, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Carraro, G.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Villanova, S.; Beletsky, Y.; Sbordone, L.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The abundances of α-elements are a powerful diagnostic of the star formation history and chemical evolution of a galaxy. Sulphur, being moderately volatile, can be reliably measured in the interstellar medium (ISM) of damped Ly-α galaxies and extragalactic H ii regions. Measurements in stars of different metallicity in our Galaxy can then be readily compared to the abundances in external galaxies. Such a comparison is not possible for Si or Ca that suffer depletion onto dust in the ISM. Furthermore, studying sulphur is interesting because it probes nucleosynthetic conditions that are very different from those of O or Mg. In this context measurements in star clusters are a reliable tracers of the Galactic evolution of sulphur. Aims: The aim of this paper is to determine sulphur abundances in several Galactic clusters that span a metallicity range -1.5 < [Fe/H] < 0.0. Methods: We use a standard abundance analysis, based on 1D model atmospheres in local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) and literature corrections for non-LTE (NLTE), as well as 3D corrections based on hydrodynamical model atmospheres, to derive sulphur abundances in a sample of stars in the globular cluster M 4, and the open clusters Trumpler 5, NGC 2477, and NGC 5822. Results: We find ⟨ A(S) ⟩ NLTE = 6.11 ± 0.04 for M 4, ⟨ A(S) ⟩ NLTE = 7.17 ± 0.02 for NGC 2477, and ⟨ A(S) ⟩ NLTE = 7.13 ± 0.06 for NGC 5822. For the only star studied in Trumpler 5 we find A(S)NLTE = 6.43 ± 0.03 and A(S)LTE = 6.94 ± 0.05. Conclusions: Our measurements show that, by and large, the S abundances in Galactic clusters trace reliably those in field stars. The only possible exception is Trumpler 5, for which the NLTE sulphur abundance implies an [S/Fe] ratio lower by roughly 0.4 dex than observed in field stars of comparable metallicity, even though its LTE sulphur abundance is in line with abundances of field stars. Moreover the LTE sulphur abundance is consistent only with the abundance of another

  7. Blue straggler stars in Galactic open clusters and the effect of field star contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, G.; Vázquez, R. A.; Moitinho, A.

    2008-05-01

    Context: We investigate the distribution of blue straggler stars in the field of three open star clusters. Aims: The main purpose is to highlight the crucial role played by general Galactic disk fore-/back-ground field stars, which are often located in the same region of the color magnitude diagram as blue straggler stars. Methods: We analyze photometry taken from the literature of 3 open clusters of intermediate/old age rich in blue straggler stars, which are projected in the direction of the Perseus arm, and study their spatial distribution and the color magnitude diagram. Results: As expected, we find that a large portion of the blue straggler population in these clusters are simply young field stars belonging to the spiral arm. This result has important consequences on the theories of the formation and statistics of blue straggler stars in different population environments: open clusters, globular clusters, or dwarf galaxies. Conclusions: As previously emphasized by many authors, a detailed membership analysis is mandatory before comparing the blue straggler population in star clusters to theoretical models. Moreover, these sequences of young field stars (blue plumes) are potentially powerful tracers of Galactic structure and they require further consideration.

  8. POST T-Tauri Stars in Galactic Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, G.

    1983-08-01

    spectral type and luminosity: the earlier the spectral type, the shorter the vanishing effect. Therefore, if we look for weakened T Tauri features in stellar aggregates of various ages from which the typical and extreme T Tauri stars have already disappeared, we find that the older the aggregate, the later the spectral type in which the last prominent features are detectable. Everything seems to suggest that it is within these possible evolved T Tauri objects that we can find the so-called post-T Tauri stars, and that a good number of flare stars detected in galactic clusters are among them. These clusters are: the Orion stellar aggregate, NOC 2264, the Pleiades, and possibly the flare stars in stellar aggregates of ages equal or superior to 108 years. As I have in the past, I would like to place special emphasis on the genetic relationship between certain flare stars and their T Tauri ancestors, based not only on the very rapid outbursts of the former but also, and primarily, on the fact that these flare stars show spectroscopic characteristics reminiscent of the T Tauri original stars. In other words, the simple fact that a star presents the "flare" phenomenon does not constitute necessary and sufficient proof that it should be regarded as an evolutionary product of a T Tauri star: in addition to the flare-up the spectral types of the investigated objects must present -during maximum and minimum light- clear and reminiscent spectroscopic evidences of the original T Tauri objects; that is, spectral types as late or later than G and some emission lines, at least in H and Call. There are some flare stars in Orion and NGC 2264 which, even during minimum light, can be classified spectroscopically as typical T Tauri stars. In the case of the Pleiades, where undoubtedly there are no T Tauri stars, many of the flare stars show spectral emission lines (H and Call) of great intensity during maximum and of detectable intensity in slit spectrograms of not high dispersion, during

  9. Southern near-infrared photometric monitoring of Galactic young star clusters (NIP of Stars)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbá, R.; Morrell, N. I.; Gunthardt, G.; Torres Robledo, S.; Jaque, M.; Soto, M.; Ferrero, G.; Arias, J. I.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Gamen, R. C.; Astudillo Hormazabal, J.

    We have performed a near-infrared photometric monitoring of 39 galactic young star clusters and star-forming regions, known as NIP of Stars, be- tween the years 2009-2011, using the Swope telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (Chile) and the RetroCam camera. The primary objective of the campaign is to perform a census of photometric variability of such clus- ters and to discover massive eclipsing binary stars. In this work, we describe the general idea, the implementation of the survey, and the first preliminary results of some of the observed clusters. This monitoring program is com- plementary to the Vista Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV), as the brightest sources observed in NIP of Stars are saturated in VVV.

  10. Hypervelocity stars from young stellar clusters in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragione, G.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Kroupa, P.

    2017-01-01

    The enormous velocities of the so called hypervelocity stars (HVSs) derive, likely, from close interactions with massive black holes, binary stars encounters or supernova explosions. In this paper, we investigate the origin of hypervelocity stars as consequence of the close interaction between the Milky Way central massive black hole and a passing-by young stellar cluster. We found that both single and binary HVSs may be generated in a burst-like event, as the cluster passes near the orbital pericentre. High velocity stars will move close to the initial cluster orbital plane and in the direction of the cluster orbital motion at the pericentre. The binary fraction of these HVS jets depends on the primordial binary fraction in the young cluster. The level of initial mass segregation determines the value of the average mass of the ejected stars. Some binary stars will merge, continuing their travel across and out of the Galaxy as blue stragglers.

  11. Hypervelocity stars from young stellar clusters in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragione, G.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Kroupa, P.

    2017-05-01

    The enormous velocities of the so-called hypervelocity stars (HVSs) derive, likely, from close interactions with massive black holes, binary stars encounters or supernova explosions. In this paper, we investigate the origin of HVSs as consequence of the close interaction between the Milky Way central massive black hole and a passing-by young stellar cluster. We found that both single and binary HVSs may be generated in a burst-like event, as the cluster passes near the orbital pericentre. High-velocity stars will move close to the initial cluster orbital plane and in the direction of the cluster orbital motion at the pericentre. The binary fraction of these HVS jets depends on the primordial binary fraction in the young cluster. The level of initial mass segregation determines the value of the average mass of the ejected stars. Some binary stars will merge, continuing their travel across and out of the Galaxy as blue stragglers.

  12. New cluster members and halo stars of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, Colin A.; Martell, Sarah L.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2015-10-01

    NGC 1851 is an intriguing Galactic globular cluster, with multiple stellar evolutionary sequences, light and heavy element abundance variations and indications of a surrounding stellar halo. We present the first results of a spectroscopic study of red giant stars within and outside of the tidal radius of this cluster. Our results identify nine probable new cluster members (inside the tidal radius) with heliocentric radial velocities consistent with that of NGC 1851. We also identify, based on their radial velocities, four probable extratidal cluster halo stars at distances up to ˜3.1 times the tidal radius, which are supportive of previous findings that NGC 1851 is surrounded by an extended stellar halo. Proper motions were available for 12 of these 13 stars and all are consistent with that of NGC 1851. Apart from the cluster members and cluster halo stars, our observed radial velocity distribution agrees with the expected distribution from a Besançon disc/N-body stellar halo Milky Way model generated by the GALAXIA code, suggesting that no other structures at different radial velocities are present in our field. The metallicities of these stars are estimated using equivalent width measurements of the near-infrared calcium triplet absorption lines and are found, within the limitations of this method, to be consistent with that of NGC 1851. In addition we recover 110 red giant cluster members from previous studies based on their radial velocities and identify three stars with unusually high radial velocities.

  13. UBVI CCD photometry and star counts in nine inner disc Galactic star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni; Seleznev, Anton F.

    2012-02-01

    We present and discuss new CCD-based photometric material in the UBVI passbands for nine Galactic star clusters located inside the solar ring, for which no CCD data are currently available. These star clusters are IC 2714, NGC 4052, ESO 131SC09, NGC 5284, NGC 5316, NGC 5715, VdB-Hagen 164, NGC 6268 and Czernik 38. The main aim of this study is to establish the nature of real clusters or random field star enhancements and, when real, estimate their fundamental parameters. To this aim, we first perform star counts by combining our optical photometry with 2MASS, and derive cluster sizes and radial density profiles. The fundamental parameters such as age, reddening and distance are then inferred from the analysis of the star distribution in the colour-colour and colour-magnitude diagrams of only the spatially selected likely members. Our analysis shows that ESO 131SC09, NGC 5284 and VdB-Hagen 164 are most probably not clusters, but random enhancements of a few bright stars along the line of sight, with properties much similar to so-called open cluster remnants. The remaining clusters are physical groups and are all younger than about 1 Gyr. We use the newly derived set of parameters, in particular distance and reddening, to investigate their position in the Galaxy in the context of the spiral structure of the Milky Way. We find that the youngest clusters (IC 2714, NGC 5316 and NGC 6268) are located close to or inside the Carina-Sagittarius arm, and are therefore bona fide spiral structure tracers. On the other hand, the oldest clusters (Czernik 38, NGC 4052 and NGC 5715) are floating in the interarm space between the Carina-Sagittarius and the more distant Scutum-Crux arm. Interestingly enough, the oldest clusters of this sample - Czernik 38 and NGC 5715 - are among the few known open clusters to be older or as old as the Hyades in the inner Galactic disc, where star clusters are not expected to survive for a long time, because of the strong tidal field and the higher

  14. Homogeneous photometry and star counts in the field of 9 Galactic star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, A. F.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.; Loktin, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    We present homogeneous V, I CCD photometry of nine stellar fields in the two inner quadrants of the Galactic plane. The lines-of-view to most of these fields aim in the direction of the very inner Galaxy, where the Galactic field is very dense, and extinction is high and patchy. Our nine fields are, according to several catalogs, centred on Galactic star clusters, namely Trumpler 13, Trumpler 20, Lynga 4, Hogg 19, Lynga 12, Trumpler 25, Trumpler 26, Ruprecht 128, and Trumpler 34. Apart from their coordinates, and in some cases additional basic data (mainly from the 2MASS archive), their properties are poorly known. By means of star count techniques and field star decontaminated Color Magnitude diagrams, the nature and size of these visual over-densities has been established; and, when possible, new cluster fundamental parameters have been derived. To strengthen our findings, we complement our data-set with JHKs photometry from the 2MASS archive, that we analyze using a suitably defined Q-parameter. Most clusters are projected towards the Carina-Sagittarium spiral arm. Because of that, we detect in the Color Magnitude diagrams of most of the other fields several distinctive sequences produced by young population within the arm. All the clusters are of intermediate or old age. The most interesting cases detected by our study are, perhaps, that of Trumpler 20, which seems to be much older than previously believed, as indicated by its prominent - and double - red clump; and that of Hogg 19, a previously overlooked old open cluster, whose existence in such regions of the Milky Way is puzzling.

  15. New compact star cluster candidates in the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froebrich, D.

    2017-08-01

    The sample of known star clusters, the fundamental building blocks of galaxies, in the Milky Way is still extremely incomplete for objects beyond a distance of 1-2 kpc. Many of the more distant and young clusters are compact and hidden behind large amounts of extinction. We thus utilized the deep high-resolution near-infrared surveys UGPS and VVV to uncover so far unknown compact clusters and to analyse their properties. Images of all objects in the area covered by these two surveys, which are listed as galaxy in SIMBAD, have been inspected and 125 so far unknown stellar clusters and candidate clusters have been identified. Based on the frequent associations with star formation indicators (nebulosities, IRAS sources, H II regions, masers) we find that the typical cluster in our sample is young, at distances between 1-10 kpc and has a typical apparent radius of 25 arcsec. We suggest more systematic searches, e.g. at all positions of 2MASS extended sources to increase the completeness of the known cluster sample beyond distances of 2 kpc.

  16. Massive Star Clusters and the high-mass population in the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolte, A.

    2013-06-01

    With a star formation rate of 10% of the SFR in the Milky Way disc, the Galactic center is the most active star-forming environment in the Milky Way today. The small volume of the central molecular zone (CMZ), spanning a diameter of merely 400 pc, appears to foster especially the formation of high-mass stars. The CMZ is host to three of the most massive, young star clusters and a quarter of the known Wolf-Rayet population in the Galaxy. In this review, I will present the census of high-mass star formation that emerged from the recent Galactic center surveys, and will summarise the properties of the starburst clusters as the most productive sites of high-mass star formation.

  17. THE FRACTION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SECOND-GENERATION STARS IN THE GALACTIC HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Vesperini, Enrico; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; D'Antona, Francesca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2010-08-01

    Many observational studies have revealed the presence of multiple stellar generations in Galactic globular clusters. These studies suggest that second-generation stars make up a significant fraction of the current mass of globular clusters, with the second-generation mass fraction ranging from {approx}50% to 80% in individual clusters. In this Letter, we carry out hydrodynamical simulations to explore the dependence of the mass of second-generation stars on the initial mass and structural parameters and stellar initial mass function (IMF) of the parent cluster. We then use the results of these simulations to estimate the fraction f{sub SG,H} of the mass of the Galactic stellar halo composed of second-generation stars that originated in globular clusters. We study the dependence of f{sub SG,H} on the parameters of the IMF of the Galactic globular cluster system. For a broad range of initial conditions, we find that the fraction of mass of the Galactic stellar halo in second-generation stars is always small, f{sub SG,H} < 4%-6% for a Kroupa-1993 IMF and f{sub SG,H} < 7%-9% for a Kroupa-2001 IMF.

  18. A KINEMATIC AND PHOTOMETRIC STUDY OF THE GALACTIC YOUNG STAR CLUSTER NGC 7380

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W. P.; Chen, C. W.; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Chen Li; Sperauskas, J.; Ogura, K.; Chuang, R. J.; Boyle, R. P.

    2011-09-15

    We present proper motions, radial velocities, and a photometric study of the Galactic open cluster NGC 7380, which is associated with prominent emission nebulosity and dark molecular clouds. On the basis of the sample of highly probable member stars, the star cluster is found to be at a distance of 2.6 {+-} 0.4 kpc, has an age of around 4 Myr, and a physical size of {approx}6 pc across with a tidal structure. The binary O-type star DH Cep is a member of the cluster in its late stage of clearing the surrounding material, and may have triggered the ongoing star formation in neighboring molecular clouds which harbor young stars that are coeval and comoving with, but not gravitationally bound by, the star cluster.

  19. The life-cycle of young star-clusters; the role of the galactic environment on cluster formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Angela

    2015-08-01

    Our understanding of star formation on galactic scales has been fairly grasped (e.g. the rate at which stars form scales proportionally to the molecular gas content) both in the local and high redshift universe. However, our knowledge on how star formation proceeds at small scales (e.g. the fraction of star formation happening in stellar clusters, the time-scales for star-forming regions to dissolve, the impact of the galactic environment on star and cluster formation) remains a challenge. Gravitationally bound young stellar clusters appear to be a commune product of star formation. There are tantalizing similarities between young star clusters and globular clusters, the latter formed by gravitationally bound ancient stellar populations. However, the young and globular cluster populations show statistical properties (mass functions, formation efficiencies, and survival times) that have been claimed incompatible, leaving the two populations being the results of distinct processes of formation. In my contribution, I will discuss the latest results produced with the analysis of the young cluster populations in several nearby galaxies. The use of new statistical methods, the link with dense gas fueling star formation, the access to homogenous datasets show, for the first time, clear evidence of the influence of the galactic environment in shaping the properties of young star cluster populations. After all, the differences between the two cluster populations may not be so pronounced, suggesting that the same physical formation process under different environmental conditions has been (and currently is) at work at high redshift (when globular clusters were formed) and in the local universe.

  20. New Wolf-Rayet stars in Galactic open clusters - Sher 1 and the giant H II region core Westerlund 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shara, Michael M.; Potter, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Two new Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars were found in open clusters: a WN4 star in the O9 cluster Sher 1 and a WN7 star in the O7 cluster Westerlund 2. This confirms a previous trend, namely that fainter, hotter WN stars tend to be older than brighter, cooler WN stars. This may be a consequence of evolution via extreme mass loss.

  1. New Wolf-Rayet stars in Galactic open clusters - Sher 1 and the giant H II region core Westerlund 2

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, A.F.J.; Shara, M.M.; Potter, M. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD )

    1991-08-01

    Two new Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars were found in open clusters: a WN4 star in the O9 cluster Sher 1 and a WN7 star in the O7 cluster Westerlund 2. This confirms a previous trend, namely that fainter, hotter WN stars tend to be older than brighter, cooler WN stars. This may be a consequence of evolution via extreme mass loss. 18 refs.

  2. Herbig Ae/Be Candidate Stars in the Innermost Galactic Disk: Quartet Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Chikako; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Kondo, Sohei; Izumi, Natsuko; Saito, Masao; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the Galactic-scale environmental effects on the evolution of protoplanetary disks, we explored the near-infrared (NIR) disk fraction of the Quartet cluster, which is a young cluster in the innermost Galactic disk at the Galactocentric radius {R}g˜ 4 {{kpc}}. Because this cluster has a typical cluster mass of ˜103 {M}⊙ as opposed to very massive clusters, which have been observed in previous studies (>104 {M}⊙ ), we can avoid intra-cluster effects such as strong UV field from OB stars. Although the age of the Quartet is previously estimated to be 3-8 Myr old, we find that it is most likely ˜3-4.5 Myr old. In moderately deep JHK images from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey, we found eight HAeBe candidates in the cluster, and performed K-band medium-resolution (R\\equiv {{Δ }}λ /λ ˜ 800) spectroscopy for three of them with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope. These are found to have both Brγ absorption lines as well as CO bandhead emission, suggesting that they are HAeBe stars with protoplanetary disks. We estimated the intermediate-mass disk fraction (IMDF) to be ˜25% for the cluster, suggesting slightly higher IMDF compared to those for young clusters in the solar neighborhood with similar cluster age, although such a conclusion should await future spectroscopic study of all candidates of cluster members.

  3. Discovery of Variable Stars in the Field of the Galactic Open Cluster NGC 7039

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Juei-Hwa; Chen, Hui-Chen; Chen, Ying-Tung; Chang, Ding-Cheng; Lin, Hsing-Wen; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Chen, W. P.; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2011-06-01

    We report variable stars identified in the field of the Galactic open cluster, NGC 7039. In the fall/winter of 2009, imaging photometry has been acquired, mainly in the R band, for eight open clusters using the 81 cm Tenagra telescope in Arizona. We present the results for our first target, NGC 7039. We have found 42 new variable stars and six suspected variable stars. Among the variable stars, there are 14 eclipsing binaries, including one RS Canum Venaticorum-type system, one RR Lyrae, two Cepheid, one β Cephei, three δ Scuti, eight pulsatinglike stars, five variable stars with periods longer than the observation window of 41 days, and eight irregular variable stars. Two contact binary systems could be members of NGC 7039 because of their loci in the color-magnitude diagram and their distance moduli close to that of the open cluster. One of the contact binary systems shows infrared excess in the (J - H) and (H - Ks) diagrams. It could have circumstellar dust. None of the pulsating stars belong to the open cluster.

  4. The ultraviolet spectra of the O and B stars in the young galactic cluster NGC 6530

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.; Hodge, P.; Boggs, D.

    1984-12-01

    The UV spectra between 1200 and 3000 A of stars in the young galactic cluster NGC 6530 and the surrounding association are studied. From the UBV colors and empirical as well as theoretical calibrations, the T(eff) and L for those stars which follow a sequence in the H-R diagram corresponding to the main sequence are determined. From a comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks, the age of the cluster is estimated to be 5 + or - 2 x 10 to the 6th yr, with a very small scatter for the different stars. The UV extinction is determined for the stars from a comparison of theoretical model energy distributions for the stellar T(eff)s and the observed energy distributions. The stellar wind lines are studied, and strong stellar winds are found for bolometric magnetidues less than -8.

  5. The ultraviolet spectra of the O and B stars in the young galactic cluster NGC 6530

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.; Hodge, P.; Boggs, D.

    1984-01-01

    The UV spectra between 1200 and 3000 A of stars in the young galactic cluster NGC 6530 and the surrounding association are studied. From the UBV colors and empirical as well as theoretical calibrations, the T(eff) and L for those stars which follow a sequence in the H-R diagram corresponding to the main sequence are determined. From a comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks, the age of the cluster is estimated to be 5 + or - 2 x 10 to the 6th yr, with a very small scatter for the different stars. The UV extinction is determined for the stars from a comparison of theoretical model energy distributions for the stellar T(eff)s and the observed energy distributions. The stellar wind lines are studied, and strong stellar winds are found for bolometric magnetidues less than -8.

  6. X-ray Emission from the Star Clusters Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Law, C.; Fruscione, A.

    2001-09-01

    The detection of two thermal X-ray sources from an extraordinarily compact massive star cluster, the Arches cluster (G0.12-0.02), is reported. This cluster is embedded within a bath of diffuse X-ray emission extending beyond the edge of the cluster to at least 90''×60'' (3.6 pc × 2.4 pc). The diffuse emission beyond the boundary of the cluster is discussed in the context of combined shocked stellar winds escaping from the cluster. The presence of such a high velocity wind flow has implications for other dense systems of mass-losing hot stars such as the IRS 16 at the Galactic center. IRS 16 consists of a number of hot mass-losing stars which could produce an X-ray emitting high cluster wind flow with a velocity of ≈1000 km s-1 as predicted by Canto et al. and detected in the Arches cluster. The interaction of such a hot cluster wind flow with Sgr A* may affect the mass accretion rate. We also present the distribution of the 6.4 keV emission from the Arches cluster as well as discuss the relationship between the X-ray filaments at the edge of the nonthermal radio filaments of the Arc.

  7. Mid-infrared [NeII] Imaging of Young Massive Star Clusters Near Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sherry C. C.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Geballe, Thomas R.; Herrera, Cinthya N.

    2015-08-01

    We present a straightforward approach to study young and highly obscured massive star clusters in ground-based MIR observations. The Kennicutt-Schmitt Law does not necessarily operate near galactic nuclei, and the universality of the cluster formation efficiency (CFE) and mass function is yet to be validated. Ground-based, mid-infrared imaging of [NeII] at 12.8 μm does not suffer from severe extinction, and it simultaneously delivers sub-arcsecond angular resolution and recovers extended emission. We mapped the nuclei of NGC 6946, IC 342, Maffei 2, and NGC 7714 in [NeII] using Subaru Telescope. We identified ~20 compact thermal sources which are likely to be young massive clusters, as well as very extended emission which is presumably associated with non-compact, field star formation. The masses of the clusters are estimated to be 104 to 105 M⊙. By comparing [NeII] fluxes of the compact sources and extended emission, we estimated the CFE to be ~ 5% to 13% in the target galaxies, while a CFE of 10% is found in other galactic environments. We will discuss the cluster physical properties, cluster formation efficiency, cluster mass function, their implications, and the followup spectroscopic work.

  8. PROGRESSIVE STAR FORMATION IN THE YOUNG GALACTIC SUPER STAR CLUSTER NGC 3603

    SciTech Connect

    Beccari, Giacomo; Spezzi, Loredana; De Marchi, Guido; Andersen, Morten; Paresce, Francesco; Young, Erick; Panagia, Nino; Bond, Howard; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C. Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Saha, Abhijit

    2010-09-10

    Early Release Science observations of the cluster NGC 3603 with the WFC3 on the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope allow us to study its recent star formation history. Our analysis focuses on stars with H{alpha} excess emission, a robust indicator of their pre-main sequence (PMS) accreting status. The comparison with theoretical PMS isochrones shows that 2/3 of the objects with H{alpha} excess emission have ages from 1 to 10 Myr, with a median value of 3 Myr, while a surprising 1/3 of them are older than 10 Myr. The study of the spatial distribution of these PMS stars allows us to confirm their cluster membership and to statistically separate them from field stars. This result establishes unambiguously for the first time that star formation in and around the cluster has been ongoing for at least 10-20 Myr, at an apparently increasing rate.

  9. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  10. A DEEP UBVRI CCD PHOTOMETRY OF SIX OPEN STAR CLUSTERS IN THE GALACTIC ANTICENTER REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Lata, Sneh; Pandey, Anil K.; Kumar, Brijesh; Bhatt, Himali; Pace, Giancarlo; Sharma, Saurabh

    2010-02-15

    We present deep UBVRI CCD photometry of six open star clusters situated in the Galactic anticenter region (l{approx} 120-200 deg.). The sample includes three unstudied (Be 6, Be 77, King 17) and three partly studied open clusters (Be 9, NGC 2186, and NGC 2304). The fundamental parameters have been determined by comparing color-color and color-magnitude diagrams with the theoretical models. The structural parameters and morphology of the clusters were discussed on the basis of radial density profiles and isodensity contours, respectively. The isodensity contours show that all the clusters have asymmetric shapes. An investigation of structural parameters indicates that the evolution of core and corona of the clusters is mainly controlled by internal relaxation processes.

  11. Mining the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey: star formation and embedded clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solin, O.; Ukkonen, E.; Haikala, L.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Data mining techniques must be developed and applied to analyse the large public data bases containing hundreds to thousands of millions entries. Aims: We develop methods for locating previously unknown stellar clusters from the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) catalogue data. Methods: The cluster candidates are computationally searched from pre-filtered catalogue data using a method that fits a mixture model of Gaussian densities and background noise using the expectation maximization algorithm. The catalogue data contains a significant number of false sources clustered around bright stars. A large fraction of these artefacts were automatically filtered out before or during the cluster search. The UKIDSS data reduction pipeline tends to classify marginally resolved stellar pairs and objects seen against variable surface brightness as extended objects (or "galaxies" in the archive parlance). 10% or 66 × 106 of the sources in the UKIDSS GPS catalogue brighter than 17m in the K band are classified as "galaxies". Young embedded clusters create variable NIR surface brightness because the gas/dust clouds in which they were formed scatters the light from the cluster members. Such clusters appear therefore as clusters of "galaxies" in the catalogue and can be found using only a subset of the catalogue data. The detected "galaxy clusters" were finally screened visually to eliminate the remaining false detections due to data artefacts. Besides the embedded clusters the search also located locations of non clustered embedded star formation. Results: The search covered an area of 1302 deg2 and 137 previously unknown cluster candidates and 30 previously unknown sites of star formation were found. Appendices A-C are available in electronic form at http://www.anda.org

  12. A Luminous Yellow Post-AGB Star in the Galactic Globular Cluster M79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Siegel, Michael H.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of a luminous F-type post-asymptotic-giant-branch (PAGB) star in the Galactic globular cluster (GC) M79 (NGC 1904). At visual apparent and absolute magnitudes of V=12.20 and {M}V=-3.46, this “yellow” PAGB star is by a small margin the visually brightest star known in any GC. It was identified using CCD observations in the uBVI photometric system, which is optimized to detect stars with large Balmer discontinuities, indicative of very low surface gravities. Follow-up observations with the SMARTS 1.3 and 1.5 m telescopes show that the star is not variable in light or radial velocity, and that its velocity is consistent with cluster membership. Near- and mid-infrared observations with 2MASS and WISE show no evidence for circumstellar dust. We argue that a sharp upper limit to the luminosity function exists for yellow PAGB stars in old populations, making them excellent candidates for Population II standard candles, which are four magnitudes brighter than RR Lyrae variables. Their luminosities are consistent with the stars being in a PAGB evolutionary phase, with core masses of ˜ 0.53 {M}⊙ . We also detected four very hot stars lying above the horizontal branch (“AGB-manqué” stars); along with the PAGB star, they are the brightest objects in M79 in the near-ultraviolet. In the Appendix, we give periods and light curves for five variables in M79: three RR Lyrae stars, a Type II Cepheid, and a semiregular variable. Based in part on observations with the 1.3 and 1.5 m telescopes operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory.

  13. Extinction in the Star Cluster SAI 113 and Galactic Structure in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni; Turner, David G.; Majaess, Daniel J.; Baume, Gustavo L.; Gamen, Roberto; Molina Lera, José A.

    2017-04-01

    Photometric CCD UB VI C photometry obtained for 4860 stars surrounding the embedded southern cluster SAI 113 (Skiff 8) is used to examine the reddening in the field and derive the distance to the cluster and nearby van Genderen 1. Spectroscopic color excesses for bright cluster stars, photometric reddenings for A3 dwarfs, and dereddening of cluster stars imply that the reddening and extinction laws match results derived for other young clusters in Carina: {E}U-B/{E}B-V≃ 0.64 and {R}V≃ 4. SAI 113 displays features that may be linked to a history of dynamical interactions among member stars: possible circumstellar reddening and rapid rotation of late B-type members, ringlike features in star density, and a compact core, with most stars distributed randomly across the field. The group van Genderen 1 resembles a stellar asterism, with potential members distributed randomly across the field. Distances of 3.90 ± 0.19 kpc and 2.49 ± 0.09 kpc are derived for SAI 113 and van Genderen 1, respectively, with variable reddenings {E}B-V ranging from 0.84 to 1.29 and 0.23 to 1.28. The SRC variables CK Car and EV Car may be outlying members of van Genderen 1, thereby of use for calibrating the period–luminosity relation for pulsating M supergiants. More importantly, the anomalous reddening and extinction evident in Carina and nearby regions of the Galactic plane in the fourth quadrant impact the mapping of spiral structure from young open clusters. The distribution of spiral arms in the fourth quadrant may be significantly different from how it is often portrayed.

  14. Erratum: Evaporation, Tidal Disruption, and Orbital Decay of Star Clusters in a Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capriotti, E. R.; Hawley, S. L.

    1997-07-01

    In § 2 of the recent paper ``Evaporation, Tidal Disruption, and Orbital Decay of Star Clusters in a Galactic Halo'' by E. R. Capriotti and S. L. Hawley (ApJ, 464, 765 [1996]), equation (1) contains a misprint. It should read rt=2r/3 [(Mc)/(AMH(r))]1/3/[1-r/(AMH(r)) (dMH(r))/dr]1/3 , (1)where the difference from the published version is that an A replaces the 3 in the denominator of the last term. The authors regret the error.

  15. Searching for IMBHs in Galactic globular clusters through radial velocities of individual stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzoni, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    I present an overview of our ongoing project aimed at building a new generation of velocity dispersion profiles ad rotation curves for a representative sample of Galactic globular clusters, from the the radial velocity of hundreds of individual stars distributed at different distances from the cluster center. The innermost portion of the profiles will be used to constrain the possible presence of intermediate-mass black holes. The adopted methodology consists of combining spectroscopic observations acquired with three different instruments at the ESO-VLT: the adaptive-optics assisted, integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph SINFONI for the innermost and highly crowded cluster cores, the multi-IFU spectrograph KMOS for the intermediate regions, and the multi-fiber instrument FLAMES/GIRAFFE-MEDUSA for the outskirts. The case of NGC 6388, representing the pilot project that motivated the entire program, is described in some details.

  16. AAOmega spectroscopy of 29 351 stars in fields centered on ten Galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, R. R.; Kiss, L. L.; Lewis, G. F.; Ibata, R. A.; Siebert, A.; Bedding, T. R.; Székely, P.; Szabó, G. M.

    2011-06-01

    Galactic globular clusters have been pivotal in our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena. Here we publish the extracted stellar parameters from a recent large spectroscopic survey of ten globular clusters. A brief review of the project is also presented. Stellar parameters have been extracted from individual stellar spectra using both a modified version of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) pipeline and a pipeline based on the parameter estimation method of RAVE. We publish here all parameters extracted from both pipelines. We calibrate the metallicity and convert this to [Fe/H] for each star and, furthermore, we compare the velocities and velocity dispersions of the Galactic stars in each field to the Besançon Galaxy model. We find that the model does not correspond well with the data, indicating that the model is probably of little use for comparisons with pencil beam survey data such as this. The data described in Tables 1-3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/530/A31

  17. Very low-mass stellar content of the young supermassive Galactic star cluster Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, M.; Gennaro, M.; Brandner, W.; Stolte, A.; de Marchi, G.; Meyer, M. R.; Zinnecker, H.

    2017-06-01

    We present deep near-infrared HST/WFC3 observations of the young supermassive Galactic star cluster Westerlund 1 and an adjacent control field. The depth of the data is sufficient to derive the mass function for the cluster as a function of radius down to 0.15 M⊙ in the outer parts of the cluster. We identify for the first time a flattening in the mass function (in logarithmic units) at a mass range that is consistent with that of the field and nearby embedded clusters. Through log-normal functional fits to the mass functions we find the nominal peak mass to be comparable to that of the field and nearby embedded star clusters. The width of a log-normal fit appears slightly narrow compared to the width of the field initial mass function, closer to the values found for globular clusters. The subsolar content within the cluster does not appear to be mass segregated in contrast to the findings for the supersolar content. The total mass of Westerlund 1 is estimated to be 44-57 × 103M⊙ where the main uncertainty is the choice of the isochrone age and the higher mass slope. Comparing the photometric mass with the dynamically determined mass, Westerlund 1 is sufficiently massive to remain bound and could potentially evolve into a lowmass globular cluster. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/602/A22

  18. STAR-TO-STAR IRON ABUNDANCE VARIATIONS IN RED GIANT BRANCH STARS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 3201

    SciTech Connect

    Simmerer, Jennifer; Ivans, Inese I.; Filler, Dan; Francois, Patrick; Charbonnel, Corinne; Monier, Richard; James, Gaeel E-mail: iii@physics.utah.edu E-mail: patrick.francois@obspm.fr E-mail: richard.monier@unice.fr

    2013-02-10

    We present the metallicity as traced by the abundance of iron in the retrograde globular cluster NGC 3201, measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 red giant branch stars. A spectroscopic analysis reveals a spread in [Fe/H] in the cluster stars at least as large as 0.4 dex. Star-to-star metallicity variations are supported both through photometry and through a detailed examination of spectra. We find no correlation between iron abundance and distance from the cluster core, as might be inferred from recent photometric studies. NGC 3201 is the lowest mass halo cluster to date to contain stars with significantly different [Fe/H] values.

  19. New Halo Stars of the Galactic Globular Clusters M3 and M13 in the LAMOST DR1 Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, Colin A.; Martell, Sarah L.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2016-10-01

    M3 and M13 are Galactic globular clusters with previous reports of surrounding stellar halos. We present the results of a search for members and extratidal cluster halo stars within and outside of the tidal radius of these clusters in the LAMOST Data Release 1. We find seven candidate cluster members (inside the tidal radius) of both M3 and M13, respectively. In M3 we also identify eight candidate extratidal cluster halo stars at distances up to ˜9.8 times the tidal radius, and in M13 we identify 12 candidate extratidal cluster halo stars at distances up to ˜13.8 times the tidal radius. These results support previous indications that both M3 and M13 are surrounded by extended stellar halos, and we find that the GC destruction rates corresponding to the observed mass loss are generally significantly higher than theoretical studies predict.

  20. New variable stars discovered in the fields of three Galactic open clusters using the VVV survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, T.; Minniti, D.; Dékány, I.; Clariá, J. J.; Alonso-García, J.; Gramajo, L. V.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-11-01

    This project is a massive near-infrared (NIR) search for variable stars in highly reddened and obscured open cluster (OC) fields projected on regions of the Galactic bulge and disk. The search is performed using photometric NIR data in the J-, H- and Ks- bands obtained from the Vista Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey. We performed in each cluster field a variability search using Stetson's variability statistics to select the variable candidates. Later, those candidates were subjected to a frequency analysis using the Generalized Lomb-Scargle and the Phase Dispersion Minimization algorithms. The number of independent observations range between 63 and 73. The newly discovered variables in this study, 157 in total in three different known OCs, are classified based on their light curve shapes, periods, amplitudes and their location in the corresponding color-magnitude (J -Ks ,Ks) and color-color (H -Ks , J - H) diagrams. We found 5 possible Cepheid stars which, based on the period-luminosity relation, are very likely type II Cepheids located behind the bulge. Among the newly discovered variables, there are eclipsing binaries, δ Scuti, as well as background RR Lyrae stars. Using the new version of the Wilson & Devinney code as well as the "Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries" (PHOEBE) code, we analyzed some of the best eclipsing binaries we discovered. Our results show that these studied systems turn out to be ranging from detached to double-contact binaries, with low eccentricities and high inclinations of approximately 80°. Their surface temperatures range between 3500 K and 8000 K.

  1. Testing multimass dynamical models of star clusters with real data: mass segregation in three Galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollima, A.; Dalessandro, E.; Beccari, G.; Pallanca, C.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of the analysis of deep photometric data for a sample of three Galactic globular clusters (NGC5466, NGC6218 and NGC 6981) with the aim of estimating their degree of mass segregation and testing the predictions of analytic dynamical models. The adopted data set, composed of both Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based data, reaches the low-mass end of the mass functions of these clusters from the centre up to their tidal radii allowing us to derive the radial distribution of stars with different masses. All the analysed clusters show evidence of mass segregation with the most massive stars being more concentrated than the low-mass ones. The structures of NGC5466 and NGC6981 are well reproduced by multimass dynamical models adopting a lowered Maxwellian distribution function and the prescription for mass segregation given by Gunn & Griffin. Instead, NGC6218 appears to be more mass segregated than model predictions. By applying the same technique to mock observations derived from snapshots selected from suitable N-body simulations, we show that the deviation from the behaviour predicted by these models depends on the particular stage of dynamical evolution regardless of initial conditions.

  2. Sodium abundances of AGB and RGB stars in Galactic globular clusters. I. Analysis and results of NGC 2808

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Primas, F.; Charbonnel, C.; Van der Swaelmen, M.; Bono, G.; Chantereau, W.; Zhao, G.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Galactic globular clusters (GC) are known to have multiple stellar populations and be characterised by similar chemical features, e.g. O-Na anti-correlation. While second-population stars, identified by their Na overabundance, have been found from the main sequence turn-off up to the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) in various Galactic GCs, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars have rarely been targeted. The recent finding that NGC 6752 lacks an Na-rich AGB star has thus triggered new studies on AGB stars in GCs, since this result questions our basic understanding of GC formation and stellar evolution theory. Aims: We aim to compare the Na abundance distributions of AGB and RGB stars in Galactic GCs and investigate whether the presence of Na-rich stars on the AGB is metallicity-dependent. Methods: With high-resolution spectra obtained with the multi-object high-resolution spectrograph FLAMES on ESO/VLT, we derived accurate Na abundances for 31 AGB and 40 RGB stars in the Galactic GC NGC 2808. Results: We find that NGC 2808 has a mean metallicity of -1.11 ± 0.08 dex, in good agreement with earlier analyses. Comparable Na abundance dispersions are derived for our AGB and RGB samples, with the AGB stars being slightly more concentrated than the RGB stars. The ratios of Na-poor first-population to Na-rich second-population stars are 45:55 in the AGB sample and 48:52 in the RGB sample. Conclusions: NGC 2808 has Na-rich second-population AGB stars, which turn out to be even more numerous - in relative terms - than their Na-poor AGB counterparts and the Na-rich stars on the RGB. Our findings are well reproduced by the fast rotating massive stars scenario and they do not contradict the recent results that there is not an Na-rich AGB star in NGC 6752. NGC 2808 thus joins the larger group of Galactic GCs for which Na-rich second-population stars on the AGB have recently been found. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory

  3. Multiphase environment of compact galactic nuclei: the role of the nuclear star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, A.; Kunneriath, D.; Czerny, B.; Adhikari, T. P.; Karas, V.

    2017-01-01

    We study the conditions for the onset of thermal instability in the innermost regions of compact galactic nuclei, where the properties of the interstellar environment are governed by the interplay of quasi-spherical accretion on to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and the heating/cooling processes of gas in a dense nuclear star cluster (NSC). Stellar winds are the source of material for radiatively inefficient (quasi-spherical, non-magnetized) inflow/outflow on to the central SMBH, where a stagnation point develops within the Bondi-type accretion. We study the local thermal equilibrium to determine the parameter space that allows cold and hot phases in mutual contact to co-exist. We include the effects of mechanical heating by stellar winds and radiative cooling/heating by the ambient field of the dense star cluster. We consider two examples: the NSC in the Milky Way central region (including the gaseous mini-spiral of Sgr A*), and the ultracompact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1. We find that the two systems behave in different ways because they are placed in different areas of parameter space in the instability diagram: gas temperature versus dynamical ionization parameter. In the case of Sgr A*, stellar heating prevents the spontaneous formation of cold clouds. The plasma from stellar winds joins the hot X-ray emitting phase and forms an outflow. In M60-UCD1, our model predicts spontaneous formation of cold clouds in the inner part of the galaxy. These cold clouds may survive since the cooling time-scale is shorter than the inflow/outflow time-scale.

  4. APOGEE Chemical Tagging Constraint on the Maximum Star Cluster Mass in the Alpha-enhanced Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-01-01

    Stars born from the same molecular cloud should be nearly homogeneous in their element abundances. The concept of chemical tagging is to identify members of disrupted clusters by their clustering in element abundance space. Chemical tagging requires large samples of stars with precise abundances for many individual elements. With uncertainties of {σ }[X/{{Fe}]} and {σ }[{Fe/{{H}}]}≃ 0.05 for 10 elements measured for \\gt {10}4 stars, the APOGEE DR12 spectra may be the first well-suited data set to put this idea into practice. We find that even APOGEE data offer only ˜500 independent volume elements in the 10-dimensional abundance space, when we focus on the α-enhanced Galactic disk. We develop and apply a new algorithm to search for chemically homogeneous sets of stars against a dominant background. By injecting star clusters into the APOGEE data set, we show that chemically homogeneous clusters with masses ≳ 3× {10}7 {M}⊙ would be easily detectable and yet no such signal is seen in the data. By generalizing this approach, we put a first abundance-based constraint on the cluster mass function for the old disk stars in the Milky Way.

  5. Bolometric correction and spectral energy distribution of cool stars in Galactic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, A.; Patelli, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Pecci, F. Fusi; Oliva, E.

    2010-04-01

    We have investigated the relevant trend of the bolometric correction (BC) at the cool-temperature regime of red giant stars and its possible dependence on stellar metallicity. Our analysis relies on a wide sample of optical-infrared spectroscopic observations, along the 3500 Å ==> 2.5μm wavelength range, for a grid of 92 red giant stars in five (three globular + two open) Galactic clusters, along the full metallicity range covered by the bulk of the stars, -2.2 <= [Fe/H] <= +0.4. Synthetic BVRCIC JHK photometry from the derived spectral energy distributions allowed us to obtain robust temperature (Teff) estimates for each star, within +/-100K or less. According to the appropriate temperature estimate, blackbody extrapolation of the observed spectral energy distribution allowed us to assess the unsampled flux beyond the wavelength limits of our survey. For the bulk of our red giants, this fraction amounted to 15 per cent of the total bolometric luminosity, a figure that raises up to 30 per cent for the coolest targets (Teff <~ 3500K). Overall, we obtain stellar Mbol values with an internal accuracy of a few percentages. Even neglecting any correction for lost luminosity etc., we would be overestimating Mbol by <~0.3mag, in the worst cases. Making use of our new data base, we provide a set of fitting functions for the V and K BC versus Teff and versus (B - V) and (V - K) broad-band colours, valid over the interval 3300 <= Teff <= 5000K, especially suited for red giants. The analysis of the BCV and BCK estimates along the wide range of metallicity spanned by our stellar sample shows no evident drift with [Fe/H]. Things may be different for the B-band correction, where the blanketing effects are more and more severe. A drift of Δ(B - V) versus [Fe/H] is in fact clearly evident from our data, with metal-poor stars displaying a `bluer' (B - V) with respect to the metal-rich sample, for fixed Teff. Our empirical bolometric corrections are in good overall agreement with

  6. Phase mixing due to the Galactic potential: steps in the position and velocity distributions of popped star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.; Smith, R.; Fellhauer, M.; Gibson, B. K.; Kroupa, P.; Assmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    As star clusters are expected to form with low star formation efficiencies, the gas in the cluster is expelled quickly and early in their development: the star cluster `pops'. This leads to an unbound stellar system, evolving in the Galactic potential. Previous N-body simulations have demonstrated the existence of a stepped number density distribution of cluster stars after popping, both in vertical position and vertical velocity, with a passing resemblance to a Christmas tree. Using numerical and analytical methods, we investigate the source of this structure, which arises due to the phase mixing of the out-of-equilibrium stellar system, determined entirely by the background analytic potential. Considering only the vertical motions, we construct a theoretical model to describe the time evolution of the phase space distribution of stars in a Miyamoto-Nagai disc potential and a full Milky Way-type potential comprising bulge, halo and disc components, which is then compared with N-body simulations. Using our theoretical model, we investigate the possible observational signatures and the feasibility of detection.

  7. Clear Evidence for the Presence of Second-generation Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in Metal-poor Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Mészáros, Sz.; Monelli, M.; Cassisi, S.; Stetson, P. B.; Zamora, O.; Shetrone, M.; Lucatello, S.

    2015-12-01

    Galactic globular clusters (GCs) are known to host multiple stellar populations: a first generation (FG) with a chemical pattern typical of halo field stars and a second generation (SG) enriched in Na and Al and depleted in O and Mg. Both stellar generations are found at different evolutionary stages (e.g., the main-sequence turnoff, the subgiant branch, and the red giant branch (RGB)). The non detection of SG asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in several metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1) GCs suggests that not all SG stars ascend the AGB phase, and that failed AGB stars may be very common in metal-poor GCs. This observation represents a serious problem for stellar evolution and GC formation/evolution theories. We report fourteen SG-AGB stars in four metal-poor GCs (M13, M5, M3, and M2) with different observational properties: horizontal branch (HB) morphology, metallicity, and age. By combining the H-band Al abundances obtained by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey with ground-based optical photometry, we identify SG Al-rich AGB stars in these four GCs and show that Al-rich RGB/AGB GC stars should be Na-rich. Our observations provide strong support for present, standard stellar models, i.e., without including a strong mass-loss efficiency, for low-mass HB stars. In fact, current empirical evidence is in agreement with the predicted distribution of FG and SG stars during the He-burning stages based on these standard stellar models.

  8. New galactic star clusters discovered in the VVV survey. Candidates projected on the inner disk and bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissova, J.; Chené, A.-N.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Sharma, S.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Kurtev, R.; Negueruela, I.; Marco, A.; Amigo, P.; Minniti, D.; Bica, E.; Bonatto, C.; Catelan, M.; Fierro, C.; Geisler, D.; Gromadzki, M.; Hempel, M.; Hanson, M. M.; Ivanov, V. D.; Lucas, P.; Majaess, D.; Moni Bidin, C.; Popescu, B.; Saito, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    Context. VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) is one of six ESO Public Surveys using the 4 meter Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). The VVV survey covers the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the disk, and one of the principal objectives is to search for new star clusters within previously unreachable obscured parts of the Galaxy. Aims: The primary motivation behind this work is to discover and analyze obscured star clusters in the direction of the inner Galactic disk and bulge. Methods: Regions of the inner disk and bulge covered by the VVV survey were visually inspected using composite JHKS color images to select new cluster candidates on the basis of apparent overdensities. DR1, DR2, CASU, and point spread function photometry of 10 × 10 arcmin fields centered on each candidate cluster were used to construct color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. Follow-up spectroscopy of the brightest members of several cluster candidates was obtained in order to clarify their nature. Results: We report the discovery of 58 new infrared cluster candidates. Fundamental parameters such as age, distance, and metallicity were determined for 20 of the most populous clusters. Based on observations gathered as part of observing programs: 179.B-2002,VIRCAM, VISTA at ESO, Paranal Observatory; NTT at ESO, La Silla Observatory (programs 087.D-0490A and 089.D-0462A) and with the SOAR telescope at the NOAO (program CN2012A-045).

  9. Metal abundances of A-type stars in galactic clusters. III. alpha Persei: new results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Bon-Hoa, A.

    1999-03-01

    We complete our study (Hui-Bon-Hoa et al. 1997) of the abundances of Mg, Ca, Sc, Cr, Fe, and Ni in alpha Per cluster stars using new spectra of two stars of the previous sample and also adding two more objects. The new spectra of BD +48°894 and HD 21527 show that the former has an almost solar composition whereas the latter is an Am star with the iron peak elements being all enhanced and Ca marginally underabundant. As for the additional stars of this study, HD 19954 has a pattern very close to solar, and HD 20135 is an SB2 system where both components seem to be Am stars: Ca and Sc are strongly deficient; Cr and Ni are overabundant in one component. A more thorough study is needed for confirmation. Based on observations collected at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France)

  10. Young open clusters in the Galactic star forming region NGC 6357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, F.; Giannetti, A.; Di Carlo, E.; Brand, J.; Beltrán, M. T.; Marconi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Context. NGC 6357 is an active star forming region with very young massive open clusters. These clusters contain some of the most massive stars in the Galaxy and strongly interact with nearby giant molecular clouds. Aims: We study the young stellar populations of the region and of the open cluster Pismis 24, focusing on their relationship with the nearby giant molecular clouds. We seek evidence of triggered star formation "propagating" from the clusters. Methods: We used new deep JHKs photometry, along with unpublished deep Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared photometry, complemented with optical HST/WFPC2 high spatial resolution photometry and X-ray Chandra observations, to constrain age, initial mass function, and star formation modes in progress. We carefully examine and discuss all sources of bias (saturation, confusion, different sensitivities, extinction). Results: NGC 6357 hosts three large young stellar clusters, of which Pismis 24 is the most prominent. We found that Pismis 24 is a very young (~1-3 Myr) open cluster with a Salpeter-like initial mass function and a few thousand members. A comparison between optical and infrared photometry indicates that the fraction of members with a near-infrared excess (i.e., with a circumstellar disk) is in the range 0.3-0.6, consistent with its photometrically derived age. We also find that Pismis 24 is likely subdivided into a few different subclusters, one of which contains almost all the massive members. There are indications of current star formation triggered by these massive stars, but clear age trends could not be derived (although the fraction of stars with a near-infrared excess does increase towards the Hii region associated with the cluster). The gas out of which Pismis 24 formed must have been distributed in dense clumps within a cloud of less dense gas ~1 pc in radius. Conclusions: Our findings provide some new insight into how young stellar populations and massive stars emerge, and evolve in the first few Myr after

  11. Abundances of lithium, oxygen, and sodium in the turn-off stars of Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskas, V.; Kučinskas, A.; Bonifacio, P.; Korotin, S. A.; Steffen, M.; Sbordone, L.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Royer, F.; Prakapavičius, D.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The cluster 47 Tuc is among the most metal-rich Galactic globular clusters and its metallicity is similar to that of metal-poor disc stars and open clusters. Like other globular clusters, it displays variations in the abundances of elements lighter than Si, which is generally interpreted as evidence of the presence of multiple stellar populations. Aims: We aim to determine abundances of Li, O, and Na in a sample of of 110 turn-off (TO) stars, in order to study the evolution of light elements in this cluster and to put our results in perspective with observations of other globular and open clusters, as well as with field stars. Methods: We use medium resolution spectra obtained with the GIRAFFE spectrograph at the ESO 8.2 m Kueyen VLT telescope and use state of the art 1D model atmospheres and NLTE line transfer to determine the abundances. We also employ CO5BOLD hydrodynamical simulations to assess the impact of stellar granulation on the line formation and inferred abundances. Results: Our results confirm the existence of Na-O abundance anti-correlation and hint towards a possible Li-O anti-correlation in the TO stars of 47 Tuc. At the same time, we find no convincing evidence supporting the existence of Li-Na correlation. The obtained 3D NLTE mean lithium abundance in a sample of 94 TO stars where Li lines were detected reliably, ⟨A(Li)3D NLTE⟩ = 1.78 ± 0.18 dex, appears to be significantly lower than what is observed in other globular clusters. At the same time, star-to-star spread in Li abundance is also larger than seen in other clusters. The highest Li abundance observed in 47 Tuc is about 0.1 dex lower than the lowest Li abundance observed among the un-depleted stars of the metal-poor open cluster NGC 2243. Conclusions: The correlations/anti-correlations among light element abundances confirm that chemical enrichment history of 47 Tuc was similar to that of other globular clusters, despite the higher metallicity of 47 Tuc. The lithium

  12. Are there radical cyanogen abundance differences between galactic globular cluster RGB and AGB stars?. Possibly a Vital Clue to the Globular Cluster Abundance Anomaly Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. W.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Elliott, L. M.

    On reading an old paper about galactic globular cluster abundance observations (of NGC 6752) we came across an intriguing result. \\citet{NCF81} found that there was a distinct lack of cyanogen-strong (CN-strong) stars in their sample of AGB stars, as compared to their sample of RGB stars (which had roughly equal numbers of CN-normal and CN-strong stars). Further reading revealed that similar features have been discovered in the AGB populations of other clusters. Recently, \\citet{SIK00} followed up on this possibility (and considered other proton-capture products) by compiling the existing data at the time and came to a similar conclusion for two more clusters. Unfortunately all of these studies suffer from low AGB star counts so the conclusions are not necessarily robust -- larger, statistically significant, sample sizes are needed. In this conference paper, presented at the Eighth Torino Workshop on Nucleosynthesis in AGB Stars (Universidad de Granada, Spain, 2006), we outline the results of a literature search for relevant CN observations and describe our observing proposal to test the suggestion that there are substantial abundance differences between the AGB and RGB in galactic globular clusters. The literature search revealed that the AGB star counts for all studies (which are not, in general, studies about AGB stars in particular) are low, usually being < 10. The search also revealed that the picture may not be consistent between clusters. Although most clusters appear to have CN-weak AGBs, at least two seem to have CN-strong AGBs (M5 & 47 Tuc). To further complicate the picture, clusters often appear to have a combination of both CN-strong and CN-weak stars on their AGBs - although one population tends to dominate. Again, all these assertions are however based on small sample sizes. We aim to increase the sample sizes by an order of magnitude using existing high quality photometry in which the AGB and RGB can be reliably separated. For the observations we

  13. Gaia 1 and 2. A pair of new Galactic star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koposov, Sergey E.; Belokurov, V.; Torrealba, G.

    2017-09-01

    We present the results of the very first search for faint Milky Way satellites in the Gaia data. Using stellar positions only, we are able to re-discover objects detected in much deeper data as recently as the last couple of years. While we do not identify new prominent ultrafaint dwarf galaxies, we report the discovery of two new star clusters, Gaia 1 and Gaia 2. Gaia 1 is particularly curious, as it is a massive (2.2 × 104 M⊙), large (∼9 pc) and nearby (4.6 kpc) cluster, situated 10 arcmin away from the brightest star on the sky, Sirius! Even though this satellite is detected at significance in excess of 10, it was missed by previous sky surveys. We conclude that Gaia possesses powerful and unique capabilities for satellite detection, thanks to its unrivalled angular resolution and highly efficient object classification.

  14. Hierarchical Star Formation Across Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Most stars form in clusters. This fact has emerged from the finding that "embedded clusters account for the 70 - 90% fraction of all stars formed in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs)." While this is the case at scales of few 10 parsecs, typical for GMCs, a look at star-forming galaxies in the Local Group (LG) shows significant populations of enormous loose complexes of early-type stars extending at scales from few 100 to few 1000 parsecs. The fact that these stellar complexes host extremely large numbers of loosely distributed massive blue stars implies either that stars form also in an unbound fashion or they are immediately dislocated from their original compact birthplaces or both. The Legacy Extra-Galactic UV Survey (LEGUS) has produced remarkable collections of resolved early-type stars in 50 star-forming LG galaxies, suited for testing ideas about recent star formation. I will present results from our ongoing project on star formation across LEGUS disk galaxies. We characterize the global clustering behavior of the massive young stars in order to understand the morphology of star formation over galactic scales. This morphology appears to be self-similar with fractal dimensions comparable to those of the molecular interstellar medium, apparently driven by large-scale turbulence. Our clustering analysis reveals compact stellar systems nested in larger looser concentrations, which themselves are the dense parts of unbound complexes and super-structures, giving evidence of hierarchical star formation up to galactic scales. We investigate the structural and star formation parameters demographics of the star-forming complexes revealed at various levels of compactness. I will discuss the outcome of our correlation and regression analyses on these parameters in an attempt to understand the link between galactic disk dynamics and morphological structure in spiral and ring galaxies of the local universe.

  15. Exploring the crowded central region of ten Galactic globular clusters using EMCCDs. Variable star searches and new discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figuera Jaimes, R.; Bramich, D. M.; Skottfelt, J.; Kains, N.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; Harpsøe, K. B. W.; Haugbølle, T.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Juncher, D.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Schmidt, R. W.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Starkey, D.; Street, R. A.; Surdej, J.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We aim to obtain time-series photometry of the very crowded central regions of Galactic globular clusters; to obtain better angular resolution thanhas been previously achieved with conventional CCDs on ground-based telescopes; and to complete, or improve, the census of the variable star population in those stellar systems. Methods: Images were taken using the Danish 1.54-m Telescope at the ESO observatory at La Silla in Chile. The telescope was equipped with an electron-multiplying CCD, and the short-exposure-time images obtained (ten images per second) were stacked using the shift-and-add technique to produce the normal-exposure-time images (minutes). Photometry was performed via difference image analysis. Automatic detection of variable stars in the field was attempted. Results: The light curves of 12 541 stars in the cores of ten globular clusters were statistically analysed to automatically extract the variable stars. We obtained light curves for 31 previously known variable stars (3 long-period irregular, 2 semi-regular, 20 RR Lyrae, 1 SX Phoenicis, 3 cataclysmic variables, 1 W Ursae Majoris-type and 1 unclassified) and we discovered 30 new variables (16 long-period irregular, 7 semi-regular, 4 RR Lyrae, 1 SX Phoenicis and 2 unclassified). Fluxes and photometric measurements for these stars are available in electronic form through the Strasbourg astronomical Data Center. Based on data collected by the MiNDSTEp team with the Danish 1.54m telescope at ESO's La Silla observatory in Chile.Full Table 1 is only available at CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A128

  16. Star cluster evolution with primordial binaries. 3: Effect of the Galactic tidal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Steve; Hut, Piet

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of N-body simulations of tidally limited star clusters with an initial population of 0%-20% binaries. We find that (1) if enough binaries are initially present, the binary fraction may fall to a minimum value, then increase at late times; (2) the cluster evaporation timescale is quite insensitive to the details of the initial binary distribution; (3) the cluster core radius stabilizes at a few percent of the half-mass radius when binaries are present, just as in the case of isolated clusters; and (4) there may be a marked difference between the spatial distribution of low-energy and high-energy binaries as the cluster evolves. Specifically, the spatial distribution of the lower energy systems is often substantially more extended than that of the more tightly bound pairs. At no time are our simulated clusters well described by simple dynamical models that neglect the close coupling between the binding energies and the center-of-mass energies of the binaries they contain.

  17. Star cluster evolution with primordial binaries. 3: Effect of the Galactic tidal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Steve; Hut, Piet

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of N-body simulations of tidally limited star clusters with an initial population of 0%-20% binaries. We find that (1) if enough binaries are initially present, the binary fraction may fall to a minimum value, then increase at late times; (2) the cluster evaporation timescale is quite insensitive to the details of the initial binary distribution; (3) the cluster core radius stabilizes at a few percent of the half-mass radius when binaries are present, just as in the case of isolated clusters; and (4) there may be a marked difference between the spatial distribution of low-energy and high-energy binaries as the cluster evolves. Specifically, the spatial distribution of the lower energy systems is often substantially more extended than that of the more tightly bound pairs. At no time are our simulated clusters well described by simple dynamical models that neglect the close coupling between the binding energies and the center-of-mass energies of the binaries they contain.

  18. W49A: A Massive Molecular Cloud Forming a Massive Star Cluster in the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Pineda, Jaime E.; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Roman-Zuñiga, Carlos; Peters, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    I summarize our current results of the MUSCLE survey of W49A, the most luminous star formation region in the Milky Way. Our approach emphasizes multi-scale, multi-resolution imaging in dust, ionized-, and molecular gas, to trace the multiple gas components from <0.1 pc (core scale) all the way up to the scale of the entire giant molecular cloud (GMC), ˜100 pc. The 106 M⊙ GMC is structured in a radial network of filaments that converges toward the central 'hub' with ˜2x105 M⊙, which contains within a few pc a deeply embedded young massive cluster (YMC) of stellar mass ~5x104 M⊙. We also discuss the dynamics of the filamentary network, the role of turbulence in the formation of this YMC, and how objects like W49A can link Milky Way and extragalactic star formation relations.

  19. A NEW MILKY WAY HALO STAR CLUSTER IN THE SOUTHERN GALACTIC SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Balbinot, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Da Costa, L.; Maia, M. A. G.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.; Majewski, S. R.; Nidever, D.; Thomas, D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Yanny, B.

    2013-04-20

    We report on the discovery of a new Milky Way (MW) companion stellar system located at ({alpha}{sub J2000,}{delta}{sub J2000}) = (22{sup h}10{sup m}43{sup s}.15, 14 Degree-Sign 56 Prime 58 Double-Prime .8). The discovery was made using the eighth data release of SDSS after applying an automated method to search for overdensities in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey footprint. Follow-up observations were performed using Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope/MegaCam, which reveal that this system is comprised of an old stellar population, located at a distance of 31.9{sup +1.0}{sub -1.6} kpc, with a half-light radius of r{sub h}= 7.24{sup +1.94}{sub -1.29} pc and a concentration parameter of c = log{sub 10}(r{sub t} /r{sub c} ) = 1.55. A systematic isochrone fit to its color-magnitude diagram resulted in log (age yr{sup -1}) = 10.07{sup +0.05}{sub -0.03} and [Fe/H] = -1.58{sup +0.08}{sub -0.13}. These quantities are typical of globular clusters in the MW halo. The newly found object is of low stellar mass, whose observed excess relative to the background is caused by 95 {+-} 6 stars. The direct integration of its background decontaminated luminosity function leads to an absolute magnitude of M{sub V} = -1.21 {+-} 0.66. The resulting surface brightness is {mu}{sub V} = 25.90 mag arcsec{sup -2}. Its position in the M{sub V} versus r{sub h} diagram lies close to AM4 and Koposov 1, which are identified as star clusters. The object is most likely a very faint star cluster-one of the faintest and lowest mass systems yet identified.

  20. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    2011-03-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introductory Papers: 1. What is the galaxy's halo population?; 2. Theoretical properties of horizontal-branch stars; 3. A review of A-type horizontal-branch stars; Part II. Surveys: 4. A progress report on the Edinburgh-Cape object survey; 5. A 300 square degree survey of young stars at high galactic latitudes; 6. The isolation of a new sample of B stars in the halo; 7. A northern catalog of FHB/A stars; 8. Recent progress on a continuing survey of galactic globular clusters for blue stragglers; 9. UV observations with FAUST and the galactic model; 10. Hot stars at the South Galactic Pole; Part III. Clusters: 11. Population II horizontal branches: a photometric study of globular clusters; 12. The period-shift effect in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters; 13. UV photometry of hot stars in omega centauri; 14. Spectroscopic and UBV observations of blue stars at the NGP; 15. Population I horizontal branches: probing the halo-to-disk transition; Part IV. Stars: 16. Very hot subdwarf O stars; 17. Quantitative spectroscopy of the very hot subluminous O-stars: K646, PG1159-035, and KPD0005+5106; 18. Analyzing the helium-rich hot sdO stars in the Palomar Green Survey; 19. Late type companions of hot sd O stars; 20. Hot stars in globular clusters; 21. Faint blue stars from the Hamburg Schmidt Survey; 22. Stellar winds and the evolution of sdB's to sdO's; 23. Halo stars in the Vilnius photometric system; 24. Horizontal branch stars in the geneva photometric system; 25. Zeeman observations of FHB stars and hot subdwarf stars; 26. What does a FHB star's spectrum look like?; 27. A technique for distinguishing FHB stars from A-type stars; 28. eEemental abundances of halo A and interloper stars; 29. The mass of blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC6397; 30. IUE observations of blue HB stars in the globular clusters M3 and NGC6752; 31. Metallicities and kinematics of the local RR lyraes: lukewarm stars

  1. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    1994-08-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introductory Papers: 1. What is the galaxy's halo population?; 2. Theoretical properties of horizontal-branch stars; 3. A review of A-type horizontal-branch stars; Part II. Surveys: 4. A progress report on the Edinburgh-Cape object survey; 5. A 300 square degree survey of young stars at high galactic latitudes; 6. The isolation of a new sample of B stars in the halo; 7. A northern catalog of FHB/A stars; 8. Recent progress on a continuing survey of galactic globular clusters for blue stragglers; 9. UV observations with FAUST and the galactic model; 10. Hot stars at the South Galactic Pole; Part III. Clusters: 11. Population II horizontal branches: a photometric study of globular clusters; 12. The period-shift effect in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters; 13. UV photometry of hot stars in omega centauri; 14. Spectroscopic and UBV observations of blue stars at the NGP; 15. Population I horizontal branches: probing the halo-to-disk transition; Part IV. Stars: 16. Very hot subdwarf O stars; 17. Quantitative spectroscopy of the very hot subluminous O-stars: K646, PG1159-035, and KPD0005+5106; 18. Analyzing the helium-rich hot sdO stars in the Palomar Green Survey; 19. Late type companions of hot sd O stars; 20. Hot stars in globular clusters; 21. Faint blue stars from the Hamburg Schmidt Survey; 22. Stellar winds and the evolution of sdB's to sdO's; 23. Halo stars in the Vilnius photometric system; 24. Horizontal branch stars in the geneva photometric system; 25. Zeeman observations of FHB stars and hot subdwarf stars; 26. What does a FHB star's spectrum look like?; 27. A technique for distinguishing FHB stars from A-type stars; 28. eEemental abundances of halo A and interloper stars; 29. The mass of blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC6397; 30. IUE observations of blue HB stars in the globular clusters M3 and NGC6752; 31. Metallicities and kinematics of the local RR lyraes: lukewarm stars

  2. SOAR Optical and Near-infrared Spectroscopic Survey of Newly Discovered Massive Stars in the Periphery of Galactic Massive Star Clusters I-NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Lopes, A.; Franco, G. A. P.; Sanmartim, D.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present the results of a spectroscopic study of very massive stars (VMSs) found outside the center of the massive stellar cluster NGC 3603. From the analysis of the associated Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope spectroscopic data and related optical-near-IR (NIR) photometry, we confirm the existence of several VMSs in the periphery of NGC 3603. The first group of objects (MTT58, WR42e, and RF7) is composed of three new Galactic exemplars of the OIf*/WN type, all of them with probable initial masses well above 100 {M}⊙ and estimated ages of about 1 Myr. Based on our Goodman blue-optical spectrum of another source in our sample (MTT68), we can confirm the previous finding in the NIR of the only other Galactic exemplar (besides HD 93129A) of the O2If* type known to date. Based on its position relative to a set of theoretical isochrones in a Hertzprung-Russel (H-R) diagram, we concluded that the new O2If* star could be one of the most massive (150 {M}⊙ ) and luminous (M V = -7.3) O-stars in the Galaxy. Also, another remarkable result is the discovery of a new O2v star (MTT31), which is the first exemplar of that class so far identified in the Milk Way. From its position in the H-R diagram it is found that this new star probably had an initial mass of 80 {M}⊙ , as well as an absolute magnitude of M V = -6.0, corresponding to a luminosity similar to other known O2v stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Finally, we also communicate the discovery of a new Galactic O3.5If* star (RFS8) that is quite an intriguing case. Indeed, it is located far to the south of the NGC 3603 center, in apparent isolation at a large radial projected linear distance of ˜62 pc. Its derived luminosity is similar to that of the other O3.5If* (Sh18) found in NGC 3603's innermost region, and the fact that a such high mass star is observed so isolated in the field led us to speculate that perhaps it could have been expelled from the innermost parts of the complex

  3. Abundances of Na, Mg, and K in the atmospheres of red giant branch stars of Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černiauskas, A.; Kučinskas, A.; Klevas, J.; Prakapavičius, D.; Korotin, S.; Bonifacio, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.; Steffen, M.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We study the abundances of Na, Mg, and K in the atmospheres of 32 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster (GGC) 47 Tuc, with the goal to investigate the possible existence of Na-K and Mg-K correlations/anti-correlations, similar to those that were recently discovered in two other GGCs, NGC 2419 and 2808. Methods: The abundances of K, Na, and Mg were determined using high-resolution 2dF/HERMES spectra obtained with the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The one-dimensional (1D) NLTE abundance estimates were obtained using 1D hydrostatic ATLAS9 model atmospheres and spectral line profiles synthesized with the MULTI package. We also used three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical CO5BOLD and 1D hydrostatic LHD model atmospheres to compute 3D-1D LTE abundance corrections, Δ3D - 1D LTE, for the spectral lines of Na, Mg, and K used in our study. These abundance corrections were used to understand the role of convection in the formation of spectral lines, as well as to estimate the differences in the abundances obtained with the 3D hydrodynamical and 1D hydrostatic model atmospheres. Results: The average element-to-iron abundance ratios and their RMS variations due to star-to-star abundance spreads determined in our sample of RGB stars were ⟨ [ Na / Fe ] ⟩ 1D NLTE = 0.42 ± 0.13, ⟨ [ Mg / Fe ] ⟩ 1D NLTE = 0.41 ± 0.11, and ⟨ [ K / Fe ] ⟩ 1D NLTE = 0.05 ± 0.14. We found no statistically significant relations between the abundances of the three elements studied here. Also, there were no abundance trends with the distance from the cluster center, nor any statistically significant relations between the abundance/abundance ratios and absolute radial velocities of individual stars. All these facts suggest the similarity of K abundance in stars that belong to different generations in 47 Tuc which, in turn, may hint that evolution of K in this particular cluster was unrelated to the nucleosynthesis of Na and/or Mg.

  4. DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RADIATION PRESSURE-DRIVEN TURBULENCE AND WINDS IN STAR CLUSTERS AND GALACTIC DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Thompson, Todd A. E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-12-01

    The pressure exerted by the radiation of young stars may be an important feedback mechanism that drives turbulence and winds in forming star clusters and the disks of starburst galaxies. However, there is great uncertainty in how efficiently radiation couples to matter in these high optical depth environments. In particular, it is unclear what levels of turbulence the radiation can produce, and whether the infrared radiation trapped by the dust opacity can give rise to heavily mass-loaded winds. In this paper, we report a series of two-dimensional flux-limited diffusion radiation-hydrodynamics calculations performed with the code ORION in which we drive strong radiation fluxes through columns of dusty matter confined by gravity in order to answer these questions. We consider both systems where the radiation flux is sub-Eddington throughout the gas column, and those where it is super-Eddington at the midplane but sub-Eddington in the atmosphere. In the latter, we find that the radiation-matter interaction gives rise to radiation-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which drives supersonic turbulence at a level sufficient to fully explain the turbulence seen in Galactic protocluster gas clouds, and to make a non-trivial contribution to the turbulence observed in starburst galaxy disks. However, the instability also produces a channel structure in which the radiation-matter interaction is reduced compared to time-steady analytic models because the radiation field is not fully trapped. For astrophysical parameters relevant to forming star clusters and starburst galaxies, we find that this effect reduces the net momentum deposition rate in the dusty gas by a factor of {approx}2-6 compared to simple analytic estimates, and that in steady state the Eddington ratio reaches unity and there are no strong winds. We provide an approximation formula, appropriate for implementation in analytic models and non-radiative simulations, for the force exerted by the infrared radiation

  5. A close view of Galactic Starburst Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, Wolfgang; Stolte, Andrea; Gennaro, Mario; Habibi, Maryam; Hußmann, Benjamin; Kudryavtseva, Natalia; Andersen, Morten; Rochau, Boyke; Zinnecker, Hans

    2013-07-01

    Galactic starburst clusters represent the most extreme mode of present-day star formation in the Milky Way, and are ideal laboratories for studies over the entire stellar mass range from less then 0.1 to more than 120 solar masses. We report on the results of our adaptive optics and HST high angular resolution studies comprising both multi-epoch astrometric monitoring of the cluster's internal and external dynamics, and the photometric and spectroscopic characterization of their stellar populations. Among the most surprising results are i) the distinct motions of Galactic Center starburst clusters with respect to the field, ii) the strict coevality of star formation in the spiral arm clusters NGC 3603 YC and Westerlund 1, and iii) the close agreement between dynamical and photometric mass estimates for each of the clusters (indicating that the clusters are dynamically stable and could survive for extended periods of time).

  6. IC 1257: A New Globular Cluster in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, W. E.; Phelps, R. L.; Madore, B. F.; Pevunova, O.; Skiff, B. A.; Crute, C.; Wilson, B.

    1996-01-01

    New CCD photometry of the faint, compact star cluster IC 1257 (L = 17? = +/- 15?obtained with the Palomar 5m telescope, reveals that it is a highly reddened globular cluster well beyond the Galactic center.

  7. IC 1257: A New Globular Cluster in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, W. E.; Phelps, R. L.; Madore, B. F.; Pevunova, O.; Skiff, B. A.; Crute, C.; Wilson, B.

    1996-01-01

    New CCD photometry of the faint, compact star cluster IC 1257 (L = 17? = +/- 15?obtained with the Palomar 5m telescope, reveals that it is a highly reddened globular cluster well beyond the Galactic center.

  8. Variable Stars and Galactic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feast, Michael; Whitelock, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Variable stars have a unique part to play in Galactic astronomy. Among the most important of these variables are the Cepheids (types I and II), the RR Lyraes and the Miras (O- and C-rich). The current status of the basic calibration of these stars in their roles as distance, structure and population indicators is outlined and some examples of recent applications of these stars to Galactic and extragalactic problems are reviewed. The expected impact of Gaia on this type of work is discussed and the need for complementary ground based observations, particularly large scale near-infrared photometry, is stressed.

  9. Stellar populations in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Yuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Li-Cai

    2016-12-01

    Stellar populations contain the most important information about star cluster formation and evolution. Until several decades ago, star clusters were believed to be ideal laboratories for studies of simple stellar populations (SSPs). However, discoveries of multiple stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters have expanded our view on stellar populations in star clusters. They have simultaneously generated a number of controversies, particularly as to whether young star clusters may have the same origin as old globular clusters. In addition, extensive studies have revealed that the SSP scenario does not seem to hold for some intermediate-age and young star clusters either, thus making the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters even more complicated. Stellar population anomalies in numerous star clusters are well-documented, implying that the notion of star clusters as true SSPs faces serious challenges. In this review, we focus on stellar populations in massive clusters with different ages. We present the history and progress of research in this active field, as well as some of the most recent improvements, including observational results and scenarios that have been proposed to explain the observations. Although our current ability to determine the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters is unsatisfactory, we propose a number of promising projects that may contribute to a significantly improved understanding of this subject.

  10. Masses of the Planetary Nebula Central Stars in the Galactic Globular Cluster System from HST Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, George H.; De Marco, Orsola; Davies, James; Lotarevich, I.; Bond, Howard E.; Harrington, J. Patrick; Lanz, Thierry

    2017-02-01

    The globular cluster (GC) system of our Galaxy contains four planetary nebulae (PNe): K 648 (or Ps 1) in M15, IRAS 18333-2357 in M22, JaFu 1 in Pal 6, and JaFu 2 in NGC 6441. Because single-star evolution at the low stellar mass of present-epoch GCs was considered incapable of producing visible PNe, their origin presented a puzzle. We imaged the PN JaFu 1 with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to obtain photometry of its central star (CS) and high-resolution morphological information. We imaged IRAS 18333-2357 with better depth and resolution, and we analyzed its archival HST spectra to constrain its CS temperature and luminosity. All PNe in Galactic GCs now have quality HST data, allowing us to improve CS mass estimates. We find reasonably consistent masses between 0.53 and 0.58 M ⊙ for all four objects, though estimates vary when adopting different stellar evolutionary calculations. The CS mass of IRAS 18333-2357, though, depends strongly on its temperature, which remains elusive due to reddening uncertainties. For all four objects, we consider their CS and nebula masses, their morphologies, and other incongruities to assess the likelihood that these objects formed from binary stars. Although generally limited by uncertainties (∼0.02 M ⊙) in post-AGB tracks and core mass versus luminosity relations, the high-mass CS in K 648 indicates a binary origin. The CS of JaFu 1 exhibits compact, bright [O iii] and Hα emission, like EGB 6, suggesting a binary companion or disk. Evidence is weaker for a binary origin of JaFu 2. Based, in part, on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained [from the Data Archive] at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-11558.

  11. Starburst clusters in the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Maryam

    2014-09-01

    The central region of the Galaxy is the most active site of star formation in the Milky Way, where massive stars have formed very recently and are still forming today. The rich population of massive stars in the Galactic center provide a unique opportunity to study massive stars in their birth environment and probe their initial mass function, which is the spectrum of stellar masses at their birth. The Arches cluster is the youngest among the three massive clusters in the Galactic center, providing a collection of high-mass stars and a very dense core which makes this cluster an excellent site to address questions about massive star formation, the stellar mass function and the dynamical evolution of massive clusters in the Galactic center. In this thesis, I perform an observational study of the Arches cluster using K_{s}-band imaging obtained with NAOS/CONICA at the VLT combined with Subaru/Cisco J-band data to gain a full understanding of the cluster mass distribution out to its tidal radius for the first time. Since the light from the Galactic center reaches us through the Galactic disc, the extinction correction is crucial when studying this region. I use a Bayesian method to construct a realistic extinction map of the cluster. It is shown in this study that the determination of the mass of the most massive star in the Arches cluster, which had been used in previous studies to establish an upper mass limit for the star formation process in the Milky Way, strongly depends on the assumed slope of the extinction law. Assuming the two regimes of widely used infrared extinction laws, I show that the difference can reach up to 30% for individually derived stellar masses and Δ A_{Ks}˜ 1 magnitude in acquired K_{s}-band extinction, while the present-day mass function slope changes by ˜ 0.17 dex. The present-day mass function slope derived assuming the more recent extinction law, which suggests a steeper wavelength dependence for the infrared extinction law, reveals

  12. SiO and H2O Maser Observations of Red Supergiants in Star Clusters Embedded in the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Shuji; Nakashima, Jun-Ichi; Zhang, Yong; Chong, Selina S. N.; Koike, Kazutaka; Kwok, Sun

    2010-04-01

    We present the results of radio observations of red supergiants in a star cluster, Stephenson (1990, AJ, 99, 1867)'s #2, and of candidates for red supergiants in three star clusters, Mercer et al. (2005, ApJ, 635, 560)'s #4, #8, and #13, in the SiO and H2O maser lines. The Stephenson's #2 cluster and nearby aggregation at the southwest contain more than 15 red supergiants. We detected one red supergiant at the center of Stephenson's #2 and three in a southwest aggregation in the SiO maser line; three out of these four were also detected in the H2O maser line. The average radial velocity of the four detected objects is 97 km s-1, giving a kinematic distance of 5.5 kpc, which locates this cluster near the base of the Scutum-Crux spiral arm. We also detected six SiO emitting objects associated with other star clusters. In addition, mapping observations in the CO J = 1-0 line toward these clusters revealed that an appreciable amount of molecular gas still remains around the Stephenson's #2 cluster in contrast to the prototypical red-supergiant cluster, Bica et al. (2003, A&A, 404, 223)'s #122. This indicates that the time scale of gas expulsion differs considerably in individual clusters.

  13. Globular Cluster Contributions to the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, Sarah; Grebel, Eva; Lai, David

    2010-08-01

    The goal of this project is to confirm chemically that globular clusters are the source of as much as half the population of the Galactic halo. Using moderate-resolution spectroscopy from the SEGUE survey, we have identified a previously unknown population of halo field giants with distinctly strong CN features. CN variations are typically only observed in globular clusters, so these stars are interpreted as immigrants to the halo that originally formed in globular clusters. In one night of Keck/HIRES time, we will obtain high-quality, high- resolution spectra for five such stars, and determine abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, alpha, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements. With this information we can state clearly whether these unusual CN-strong halo stars carry the full abundance pattern seen in CN-strong globular cluster stars, with depleted C, O, and Mg and enhanced N, Na, and Al. This type of coarse ``chemical tagging'' will allow a clearer division of the Galactic halo into contributions from globular clusters and from dwarf galaxies, and will place constraints on theoretical models of globular cluster formation and evolution.

  14. SIZES OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Sidney

    2012-02-20

    A study is made of deviations from the mean power-law relationship between the Galactocentric distances and the half-light radii of Galactic globular clusters. Surprisingly, deviations from the mean R{sub h} versus R{sub gc} relationship do not appear to correlate with cluster luminosity, cluster metallicity, or horizontal-branch morphology. Differences in orbit shape are found to contribute to the scatter in the R{sub h} versus R{sub gc} relationship of Galactic globular clusters.

  15. Blue straggler star populations in globular clusters - II. Proper-motion cleaned HST catalogues of BSSs in 38 Galactic GCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunovic, Mirko; Puzia, Thomas H.

    2016-11-01

    We present new blue straggler star (BSS) catalogues in 38 Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) based on multipassband and multi-epoch treasury survey data from the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure precise astrometry and relative proper motions of stars in all target clusters and performed a subsequent cluster membership selection. We study the accuracy of our proper-motion measurements using estimates of central velocity dispersions and find very good agreement with previous studies in the literature. Finally, we present a homogeneous BSS selection method, that expands the classic BSS selection parameter space to more evolved BSS evolutionary stages. We apply this method to the proper-motion cleaned GC star catalogues in order to define proper-motion cleaned BSS catalogues in all 38 GCs, which we make publicly available to enable further study and follow-up observations.

  16. Active galactic nuclei. IV - Supplying black hole clusters by tidal disruption and by tidal capture of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.; Pacholczyk, A. G.; Stepinski, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The extent to which individual holes in a cluster of black holes with a mass spectrum can liberate and accrete the resulting material by tidally disrupting stars they encounter, or by capturing stars as binary companions is studied. It is found that the smaller black holes in 'the halo' of such clusters can adequately supply themselves to the level M-dot sub h or greater than 0.0001(M-dot sub h) sub crit, and up to 0.05(M-dot sub h)sub crit for the smallest holes, by tidal disruption, as long as the cluster is embedded in a distribution of stars of relatively high density (not less than 0.1M sub cl/cu pc), and as long as the entire cluster of stars is not too compact (not less than 0.5 pc). Consideration is given to modifications this 'internal' mode of supply introduces in the spectrum emitted by such black hole clusters, and to the current status of their viability as models for AGN and QSOs in light of dynamical studies by Quinlan and Shapiro (1987, 1989).

  17. Active galactic nuclei. IV - Supplying black hole clusters by tidal disruption and by tidal capture of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.; Pacholczyk, A. G.; Stepinski, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The extent to which individual holes in a cluster of black holes with a mass spectrum can liberate and accrete the resulting material by tidally disrupting stars they encounter, or by capturing stars as binary companions is studied. It is found that the smaller black holes in 'the halo' of such clusters can adequately supply themselves to the level M-dot sub h or greater than 0.0001(M-dot sub h) sub crit, and up to 0.05(M-dot sub h)sub crit for the smallest holes, by tidal disruption, as long as the cluster is embedded in a distribution of stars of relatively high density (not less than 0.1M sub cl/cu pc), and as long as the entire cluster of stars is not too compact (not less than 0.5 pc). Consideration is given to modifications this 'internal' mode of supply introduces in the spectrum emitted by such black hole clusters, and to the current status of their viability as models for AGN and QSOs in light of dynamical studies by Quinlan and Shapiro (1987, 1989).

  18. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass

  19. The role of massive stars in the turbulent infancy of Galactic globular clusters: feedback on the intracluster medium, and detailed timeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnel, C.; Krause, M.; Decressin, T.; Prantzos, N.; Meynet, G.

    A major paradigm shift has recently revolutionized our picture of globular clusters (GC) that were long thought to be simple systems of coeval stars born out of homogeneous material. Indeed, detailed abundance studies of GC long-lived low-mass stars performed with 8-10m class telescopes, together with high-precision photometry of Galactic GCs obtained with HST, have brought compelling clues on the presence of multiple stellar populations in individual GCs. These stellar subgroups can be recognized thanks to their different chemical properties (more precisely by abundance differences in light elements from carbon to aluminium; see Bragaglia, this volume) and by the appearance of multimodal sequences in the colour-magnitude diagrams (see Piotto, this volume). This has a severe impact on our understanding of the early evolution of GCs, and in particular of the possible role that massive stars played in shaping the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and in inducing secondary star formation. Here we summarize the detailed timeline we have recently proposed for the first 40 Myrs in the lifetime of a typical GC following the general ideas of our so-called "Fast Rotating Massive stars scenario" (FRMS, Decressin et al. 2007b) and taking into account the dynamics of interstellar bubbles produced by stellar winds and supernovae. More details can be found in Krause et al. (2012, 2013).

  20. Lithium and beryllium depletion by rotation-induced mixing in the Sun and in galactic cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnel, C.; Vauclair, S.; Maeder, A.; Meynet, G.; Schaller, G.

    1994-03-01

    Lithium and beryllium depletion by rotation-induced mixing in Population I G and F stars is investigated under the scope of recent strides of the theory of rotational mixing and of the observational constraints on rotational velocities. Following Zahn (1992) who proposed a consistent picture of the interaction between meridional circulation and turbulence induced by rotation in stars, we calculate the effect of the resulting mixing on the lithium and beryllium depletion in low mass stars. We restrict our study to the case where the stars are submitted to a moderate wind which obeys Skumanich's (1972) spindown relation. Stellar models are computed with the new OPAL opacities, and adjustable stellar parameters are calibrated using the Sun. The results of our numerical simulations are precisely compared with lithium and beryllium abundances observed in seven galactic lusters. The red side of the lithium dip is well explained by rotation-induced mixing and a beryllium dip consistent with observations is predicted. The rotation velocity dispersion in the Hyades accounts for the lithium abundance dispersion.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motion (HSTPROMO) Catalogs of Galactic Globular Clusters. IV. Kinematic Profiles and Average Masses of Blue Straggler Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, A. T.; Watkins, L. L.; van der Marel, R. P.; Bianchini, P.; Bellini, A.; Anderson, J.

    2016-08-01

    We make use of the Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion catalogs derived by Bellini et al. to produce the first radial velocity dispersion profiles σ (R) for blue straggler stars (BSSs) in Galactic globular clusters (GCs), as well as the first dynamical estimates for the average mass of the entire BSS population. We show that BSSs typically have lower velocity dispersions than stars with mass equal to the main-sequence turnoff mass, as one would expect for a more massive population of stars. Since GCs are expected to experience some degree of energy equipartition, we use the relation σ \\propto {M}-η , where η is related to the degree of energy equipartition, along with our velocity dispersion profiles to estimate BSS masses. We estimate η as a function of cluster relaxation from recent Monte Carlo cluster simulations by Bianchini et al. and then derive an average mass ratio {M}{BSS}/{M}{MSTO}=1.50+/- 0.14 and an average mass {M}{BSS}=1.22+/- 0.12 M ⊙ from 598 BSSs across 19 GCs. The final error bars include any systematic errors that are random between different clusters, but not any potential biases inherent to our methodology. Our results are in good agreement with the average mass of {M}{BSS}=1.22+/- 0.06 M ⊙ for the 35 BSSs in Galactic GCs in the literature with properties that have allowed individual mass determination. Based on proprietary and archival observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  2. Chemical evolution of star clusters.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Jacco Th

    2010-02-28

    I discuss the chemical evolution of star clusters, with emphasis on old Galactic globular clusters (GCs), in relation to their formation histories. GCs are clearly formed in a complex fashion, under markedly different conditions from any younger clusters presently known. Those special conditions must be linked to the early formation epoch of the Galaxy and must not have occurred since. While a link to the formation of GCs in dwarf galaxies has been suggested, present-day dwarf galaxies are not representative of the gravitational potential wells within which the GCs formed. Instead, a formation deep within the proto-Galaxy or within dark-matter mini-haloes might be favoured. Not all GCs may have formed and evolved similarly. In particular, we may need to distinguish Galactic Halo from Galactic Bulge clusters.

  3. The Gaia-ESO Survey: radial distribution of abundances in the Galactic disc from open clusters and young-field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, L.; Randich, S.; Kordopatis, G.; Prantzos, N.; Romano, D.; Chieffi, A.; Limongi, M.; François, P.; Pancino, E.; Friel, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Tautvaišienė, G.; Spina, L.; Overbeek, J.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Donati, P.; Vallenari, A.; Sordo, R.; Jiménez-Esteban, F. M.; Tang, B.; Drazdauskas, A.; Sousa, S.; Duffau, S.; Jofré, P.; Gilmore, G.; Feltzing, S.; Alfaro, E.; Bensby, T.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S.; Lanzafame, A.; Smiljanic, R.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Franciosini, E.; Hourihane, A.; Lardo, C.; Lewis, J.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G.; Sbordone, L.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2017-06-01

    Context. The spatial distribution of elemental abundances in the disc of our Galaxy gives insights both on its assembly process and subsequent evolution, and on the stellar nucleogenesis of the different elements. Gradients can be traced using several types of objects as, for instance, (young and old) stars, open clusters, HII regions, planetary nebulae. Aims: We aim to trace the radial distributions of abundances of elements produced through different nucleosynthetic channels - the α-elements O, Mg, Si, Ca and Ti, and the iron-peak elements Fe, Cr, Ni and Sc - by use of the Gaia-ESO IDR4 results for open clusters and young-field stars. Methods: From the UVES spectra of member stars, we have determined the average composition of clusters with ages > 0.1 Gyr. We derived statistical ages and distances of field stars. We traced the abundance gradients using the cluster and field populations and compared them with a chemo-dynamical Galactic evolutionary model. Results: The adopted chemo-dynamical model, with the new generation of metallicity-dependent stellar yields for massive stars, is able to reproduce the observed spatial distributions of abundance ratios, in particular the abundance ratios of [O/Fe] and [Mg/Fe] in the inner disc (5 kpc Galactic stellar populations. In addition, often [α/Fe] is computed combining several α-elements. Our results indicate, as expected, a complex and diverse nucleosynthesis of the various α-elements, in particular in the high metallicity regimes, pointing towards a different origin of these elements and highlighting the risk of considering them as a single class with common features. Tables A.1-A.4 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  4. Really Cool Stars at the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, R. D.; Sellgren, K.; Depoy, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    New and existing K-band spectra for 19 Galactic center late-type stars have been analyzed along with representative spectra of disk and bulge M giants and supergiants. Absorption strengths for strong atomic and molecular features have been measured. The Galactic center stars generally exhibit stronger absorption features centered near Na I (2.206 microns) and Ca I (2.264 microns) than representative disk M stars at the same CO absorption strength. Based on the absolute K - band magnitudes and CO and H2O absorption strengths for the Galactic center stars and known M supergiants and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, we conclude that only IRS 7 must be a supergiant. Two other bright stars in our Galactic center sample are likely supergiant as well. The remaining bright, cool stars in the Galactic center that we have observed are most consistent with being intermediate mass/age AGB stars. We identify four of the Galactic center stars as long period variables based on their K-band spectral properties and associated photometric variability. Estimates of initial masses and ages for the GC stars suggest multiple epochs of star formation have occurred in the Galactic center over the last 7-100 Myr. 0 1996 American Astronomical Society.

  5. Really Cool Stars at the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, R. D.; Sellgren, K.; Depoy, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    New and existing K-band spectra for 19 Galactic center late-type stars have been analyzed along with representative spectra of disk and bulge M giants and supergiants. Absorption strengths for strong atomic and molecular features have been measured. The Galactic center stars generally exhibit stronger absorption features centered near Na I (2.206 microns) and Ca I (2.264 microns) than representative disk M stars at the same CO absorption strength. Based on the absolute K-band magnitudes and CO and H2O absorption strengths for the Galactic center stars and known M supergiants and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, we conclude that only IRS 7 must be a supergiant. Two other bright stars in our Galactic center sample are likely supergiants as well. The remaining bright, cool stars in the Galactic center that we have observed are most consistent with being intermediate mass/age AGB stars. We identify four of the Galactic center stars as long period variables based on their K-band spectral properties and associated photometric variability. Estimates of initial masses and ages for the GC stars suggest multiple epochs of star formation have occurred in the Galactic center over the last 7-100 Myr.

  6. New detections of embedded clusters in the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, D.; Bica, E.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Until recently it was thought that high Galactic latitude clouds were a non-star-forming ensemble. However, in a previous study we reported the discovery of two embedded clusters (ECs) far away from the Galactic plane (~ 5 kpc). In our recent star cluster catalogue we provided additional high and intermediate latitude cluster candidates. Aims: This work aims to clarify whether our previous detection of star clusters far away from the disc represents just an episodic event or whether star cluster formation is currently a systematic phenomenon in the Galactic halo. We analyse the nature of four clusters found in our recent catalogue and report the discovery of three new ECs each with an unusually high latitude and distance from the Galactic disc midplane. Methods: The analysis is based on 2MASS and WISE colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and stellar radial density profiles (RDPs). The CMDs are built by applying a field-star decontamination procedure, which uncovers the cluster's intrinsic CMD morphology. Results: All of these clusters are younger than 5 Myr. The high-latitude ECs C 932, C 934, and C 939 appear to be related to a cloud complex about 5 kpc below the Galactic disc, under the Local arm. The other clusters are above the disc, C 1074 and C 1100 with a vertical distance of ~3 kpc, C 1099 with ~ 2 kpc, and C 1101 with ~1.8 kpc. Conclusions: According to the derived parameters ECs located below and above the disc occur, which gives evidence of widespread star cluster formation throughout the Galactic halo. This study therefore represents a paradigm shift, by demonstrating that a sterile halo must now be understood as a host for ongoing star formation. The origin and fate of these ECs remain open. There are two possibilities for their origin, Galactic fountains or infall. The discovery of ECs far from the disc suggests that the Galactic halo is more actively forming stars than previously thought. Furthermore, since most ECs do not survive the infant

  7. The galactic globular cluster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.; Meylan, G.

    1994-01-01

    We explore correlations between various properties of Galactic globular clusters, using a database on 143 objects. Our goal is identify correlations and trends which can be used to test and constrain theoretical models of cluster formation and evolution. We use a set of 13 cluster parameters, 9 of which are independently measured. Several arguments suggest that the number of clusters still missing in the obscured regions of the Galaxy is of the order of 10, and thus the selection effects are probably not severe for our sample. Known clusters follow a power-law density distribution with a slope approximately -3.5 to -4, and an apparent core with a core radius approximately 1 kpc. Clusters show a large dynamical range in many of their properties, more so for the core parameters (which are presumably more affected by dynamical evolution) than for the half-light parameters. There are no good correlations with luminosity, although more luminous clusters tend to be more concentrated. When data are binned in luminosity, several trends emerge: more luminous clusters tend to have smaller and denser cores. We interpret this as a differential survival effect, with more massive clusters surviving longer and reaching more evolved dynamical states. Cluster core parameters and concentrations also correlate with the position in the Galaxy, with clusters closer to the Galactic center or plane being more concentrated and having smaller and denser cores. These trends are more pronounced for the fainter (less massive) clusters. This is in agreement with a picture where tidal shocks form disk or bulge passages accelerate dynamical evolution of clusters. Cluster metallicities do not correlate with any other parameter, including luminosity and velocity dispersion; the only detectable trend is with the position in the Galaxy, probably reflecting Zinn's disk-halo dichotomy. This suggests that globular clusters were not self-enriched systems. Velocity dispersions show excellent correlations

  8. Peculiarities of α-element abundances in Galactic open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsakov, V. A.; Gozha, M. L.; Koval', V. V.; Shpigel', L. V.

    2016-01-01

    A catalog compiling the parameters of 346 open clusters, including their metallicities, positions, ages, and velocities has been composed. The elements of the Galactic orbits for 272 of the clusters have been calculated. Spectroscopic determinations of the relative abundances, [el/Fe], for 14 elements synthesized in various nuclear processes averaged over data from 109 publications are presented for 90 clusters. The compiled data indicate that the relative abundances of primary α elements (oxygen and magnesium) exhibit different dependences on metallicity, age, Galactocentric distance, and the elements of the Galactic orbits in clusters with high, elongated orbits satisfying the criterion ( Z max 2 + 4 e 2)1/2 > 0.40 and in field stars of the Galactic thin disk ( Z max is the maximum distance of the orbit from the Galactic plane in kiloparsec and e is the eccentricity of the Galactic orbit). Since no systematic effects distorting the relative abundances of the studied elements in these clusters have been found, these difference suggest real differences between clusters with high, elongated orbits and field stars. In particular, this supports the earlier conclusion, based on an analysis of the elements of the Galactic orbits, that some clusters formed as a result of interactions between high-velocity,metal-poor clouds and the interstellar mediumof theGalactic thin disk. On average, clusters with high, elongated orbits and metallicities [Fe/H] < -0.1 display lower relative abundances of the primary a elements than do field stars. The low [O, Mg/Fe] ratios of these clusters can be understood if the high-velocity clouds that gave rise to them were formed of interstellar material from regions where the star-formation rate and/or the masses of Type II supernovae were lower than near the Galactic plane. It is also shown that, on average, the relative abundances of the primary a elements are higher in relatively metal-rich clusters with high, elongated orbits than in

  9. Star formation inside a galactic outflow.

    PubMed

    Maiolino, R; Russell, H R; Fabian, A C; Carniani, S; Gallagher, R; Cazzoli, S; Arribas, S; Belfiore, F; Bellocchi, E; Colina, L; Cresci, G; Ishibashi, W; Marconi, A; Mannucci, F; Oliva, E; Sturm, E

    2017-04-13

    Recent observations have revealed massive galactic molecular outflows that may have the physical conditions (high gas densities) required to form stars. Indeed, several recent models predict that such massive outflows may ignite star formation within the outflow itself. This star-formation mode, in which stars form with high radial velocities, could contribute to the morphological evolution of galaxies, to the evolution in size and velocity dispersion of the spheroidal component of galaxies, and would contribute to the population of high-velocity stars, which could even escape the galaxy. Such star formation could provide in situ chemical enrichment of the circumgalactic and intergalactic medium (through supernova explosions of young stars on large orbits), and some models also predict it to contribute substantially to the star-formation rate observed in distant galaxies. Although there exists observational evidence for star formation triggered by outflows or jets into their host galaxy, as a consequence of gas compression, evidence for star formation occurring within galactic outflows is still missing. Here we report spectroscopic observations that unambiguously reveal star formation occurring in a galactic outflow at a redshift of 0.0448. The inferred star-formation rate in the outflow is larger than 15 solar masses per year. Star formation may also be occurring in other galactic outflows, but may have been missed by previous observations owing to the lack of adequate diagnostics.

  10. RR Lyrae Variables in Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Contreras, R.; Salinas, R.; Escobar, M. E.; Smith, H. A.; De Lee, N.; Pritzl, B. J.; Borissova, J.

    2004-12-01

    RR Lyrae variables are the cornerstone of the Population II distance scale, and yet our knowledge of the RR Lyrae variable star content in Galactic globular clusters is now known to be surprisingly incomplete. In the present paper, we present our new results in this area. Highlights of our work includes: i) The discovery of a vast number of variable stars in M62 (NGC 6266), making it one of the three most RR Lyrae-rich globular clusters known, and also placing it as Oosterhoff type I in spite of a blue horizontal branch morphology; ii) The determination of light curves and Oosterhoff types for globular clusters associated with the Sagittarius dSph galaxy, including NGC 5634, Arp 2, and Terzan 8; iii) A reassessment of the variable star content in the moderately metal-rich globular clusters M69 and NGC 6304; iv) The first theoretical calibration of the RR Lyrae period-luminosity-metallicity relation in I, J, and H, as well as an updated calibration of the K-band relation---along with comparisons against the empirical data, particularly in I. This project was supported in part by Proyecto Fondecyt Regular 1030954.

  11. THREE-DIMENSIONAL STELLAR KINEMATICS AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: MEASURING THE NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTER SPATIAL DENSITY PROFILE, BLACK HOLE MASS, AND DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T.; Martinez, G. D.; Bullock, J.; Kaplinghat, M.; Peter, A. H. G.; Yelda, S.; Ghez, A.; Phifer, K.; Lu, J. R.

    2013-12-10

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic observations of stars within the central 0.5 pc of the Milky Way (MW) nuclear star cluster (NSC) using adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy from the Keck telescopes. Recent observations have shown that the cluster has a shallower surface density profile than expected for a dynamically relaxed cusp, leading to important implications for its formation and evolution. However, the true 3D profile of the cluster is unknown due to the difficulty in de-projecting the stellar number counts. Here, we use spherical Jeans modeling of individual proper motions and radial velocities to constrain, for the first time, the de-projected spatial density profile, cluster velocity anisotropy, black hole mass (M {sub BH}), and distance to the Galactic center (R {sub 0}) simultaneously. We find that the inner stellar density profile of the late-type stars, ρ(r)∝r {sup –γ}, have a power law slope γ=0.05{sub −0.60}{sup +0.29}, much more shallow than the frequently assumed Bahcall-Wolf slope of γ = 7/4. The measured slope will significantly affect dynamical predictions involving the cluster, such as the dynamical friction time scale. The cluster core must be larger than 0.5 pc, which disfavors some scenarios for its origin. Our measurement of M{sub BH}=5.76{sub −1.26}{sup +1.76}×10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and R{sub 0}=8.92{sub −0.55}{sup +0.58} kpc is consistent with that derived from stellar orbits within 1'' of Sgr A*. When combined with the orbit of S0-2, the uncertainty on R {sub 0} is reduced by 30% (8.46{sub −0.38}{sup +0.42} kpc). We suggest that the MW NSC can be used in the future in combination with stellar orbits to significantly improve constraints on R {sub 0}.

  12. Star Clusters within FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  13. The Origin Billions Star Survey: Galactic Explorer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-18

    The Origins Billions Star Survey is a mission concept addressing the astrophysics of extrasolar planets , Galactic structure, the Galactic halo and...planetary transits. While current ground-based radial velocity searches for extrasolar planets are limited to 8th visual magnitude and thousands of stars...Sun. After only 1.5 years of operation, OBSS will have dis- covered about 10 times more extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) than are known at this time

  14. Metallicity of the Stars at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    A recent study suggests that the stars in the central parsec of our galaxy are not a single, roughly solar-metallicity population, as previously thought. Instead, these stars have a large variation in metallicities which has interesting implications for the formation history of the Milky Ways nuclear star cluster.Clues from AbundancesWhy do we care about the metallicity of stars and stellar populations? Metallicity measurements can help us to separate multiple populations of stars and figure out when and where they were formed.Measurements of the chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way have demonstrated that theres a metallicity gradient in the galaxy: on average, its below solar metallicity at the outer edges of the disk and increases to above solar metallicity within the central 5 kpc of the galaxy.So far, measurements of stars in the very center of the galaxy are consistent with this galactic trend: theyre all slightly above solar metallicity, with little variation between them. But these measurements exist for only about a dozen stars within the central 10 pc of the galaxy! Due to the high stellar density in this region, a larger sample is needed to get a complete picture of the abundances and thats what this study set out to find.Different PopulationsLed by Tuan Do (Dunlap Fellow at the University of Toronto and member of the Galactic Center Group at UCLA), the authors of this study determined the metallicities of 83 late-type giant stars within the central parsec of the galaxy. The metallicities were found by fitting the stars K-band spectra from observations by the NIFS instrument on the Gemini North telescope.In contrast to the previous studies, the authors found that the 83 stars exhibited a wide range of metallicities, from a tenth of solar metallicity all the way to super-solar metallicities.The abundances of the low-metallicity stars they found are consistent with globular cluster metallicities, suggesting that these stars (about 6% of the sample

  15. Equilibrium Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2006-04-01

    We argue that rich star clusters take at least several local dynamical times to form and so are quasi-equilibrium structures during their assembly. Observations supporting this conclusion include morphologies of star-forming clumps, momentum flux of protostellar outflows from forming clusters, age spreads of stars in the Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) and other clusters, and the age of a dynamical ejection event from the ONC. We show that these long formation timescales are consistent with the expected star formation rate in turbulent gas, as recently evaluated by Krumholz & McKee. Finally, we discuss the implications of these timescales for star formation efficiencies, the disruption of gas by stellar feedback, mass segregation of stars, and the longevity of turbulence in molecular clumps.

  16. Effect of tidal fields on star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David; Weinberg, Martin

    1991-01-01

    We follow the dynamical evolution of a star cluster in a galactic tidal field using a restricted N-body code. We find large asymmetric distortions in the outer profile of the cluster in the first 10 or so crossing times as material is lost. Prograde stars escape preferentially and establish a potentially observable retrograde rotation in the halo. We present the rate of particle loss and compare with the prescription proposed by Lee and Ostriker (1987).

  17. Nuclear Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumayer, Nadine

    2017-03-01

    The centers of galaxies host two distinct, compact components: massive black holes and nuclear star clusters. Nuclear star clusters are the densest stellar systems in the universe, with masses of ~ 107M⊙ and sizes of ~ 5pc. They are almost ubiquitous at the centres of nearby galaxies with masses similar to, or lower than the Milky Way. Their occurrence both in spirals and dwarf elliptical galaxies appears to be a strong function of total galaxy light or mass. Nucleation fractions are up to 100% for total galaxy magnitudes of M B = -19mag or total galaxy luminosities of about L B = 1010 L ⊙ and falling nucleation fractions for both smaller and higher galaxy masses. Although nuclear star clusters are so common, their formation mechanisms are still under debate. The two main formation scenarios proposed are the infall and subsequent merging of star clusters and the in-situ formation of stars at the center of a galaxy. Here, I review the state-of-the-art of nuclear star cluster observations concerning their structure, stellar populations and kinematics. These observations are used to constrain the proposed formation scenarios for nuclear star clusters. Constraints from observations show, that likely both cluster infall and in-situ star formation are at work. The relative importance of these two mechanisms is still subject of investigation.

  18. Proper Motions of Isolated Massive Stars Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The Galactic Center is one of the most perplexing and unusual regions of the Galaxy. Not only is it home to the central massive black hole but it contains three very massive young star clusters within the central 30 pc; the Arches, Quintuplet and Central clusters. Furthermore, emission-line surveys have revealed the presence of what appears to be a diaspora of 40 very massive isolated Wolf-Rayet-like stars scattered throughout the region, outside of these massive clusters. Their origin is currently unkown but the suspected causes include such diverse and exotic mechanisms as ejection by dynamical interaction within the massive clusters, ejection by supernovae events within those clusters old enough to have SN, ejection by interaction with the central black hole, stellar mergers in the field, and in situ star formation of isolated massive stars. These processes however should all leave clear and distinct dynamical signatures on their products.We propose using WFC3/IR to conduct a survey of 150 square arcminutes the Galactic Center region to measure relative proper motions to an accuracy of 10 km/s for stars with masses as low as a few solar masses {late B-type}. Our objectives include determining which of the known isolated massive stars are runaways, estimating their probable places of origin, discovering less luminous runaways that are invisible to emission line surveys, characterizing the dynamical properties of runaway stars in all luminosty ranges, and searching for signs of tidally disrupted massive clusters. The survey will have lasting legacy value to those trying to unravel the physics of galactic centers and the environments around massive black holes.

  19. Proper Motions of Isolated Massive Stars Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    The Galactic Center is one of the most perplexing and unusual regions of the Galaxy. Not only is it home to the central massive black hole but it contains three very massive young star clusters within the central 30 pc; the Arches, Quintuplet and Central clusters. Furthermore, emission-line surveys have revealed the presence of what appears to be a diaspora of ~40 very massive isolated Wolf-Rayet-like stars scattered throughout the region, outside of these massive clusters. Their origin is currently unkown but the suspected causes include such diverse and exotic mechanisms as ejection by dynamical interaction within the massive clusters, ejection by supernovae events within those clusters old enough to have SN, ejection by interaction with the central black hole, stellar mergers in the field, and in situ star formation of isolated massive stars. These processes however should all leave clear and distinct dynamical signatures on their products.We propose using WFC3/IR to conduct a survey of ~150 square arcminutes the Galactic Center region to measure relative proper motions to an accuracy of 10 km/s for stars with masses as low as a few solar masses (late B-type). Our objectives include determining which of the known isolated massive stars are runaways, estimating their probable places of origin, discovering less luminous runaways that are invisible to emission line surveys, characterizing the dynamical properties of runaway stars in all luminosty ranges, and searching for signs of tidally disrupted massive clusters. The survey will have lasting legacy value to those trying to unravel the physics of galactic centers and the environments around massive black holes.

  20. Trajectories of Cepheid variable stars in the Galactic nuclear bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2012-06-01

    The central region of our Galaxy provides us with a good opportunity to study the evolution of galactic nuclei and bulges because we can observe various phenomena in detail at the proximity of 8 kpc. There is a hierarchical alignment of stellar systems with different sizes; from the extended bulge, the nuclear bulge, down to the compact cluster around the central supermassive blackhole. The nuclear bulge contains stars as young as a few Myr, and even hosts the ongoing star formation. These are in contrast to the more extended bulge which are dominated by old stars, ~10Gyr. It is considered that the star formation in the nuclear bulge is caused by fresh gas provided from the inner disk. In this picture, the nuclear bulge plays an important role as the interface between the gas supplier, the inner disk, and the galactic nucleus. Kinematics of young stars in the nuclear bulge is important to discuss the star forming process and the gas circulation in the Galactic Center. We here propose spectroscopic observations of Cepheid variable stars, ~25 Myr, which we recently discovered in the nuclear bulge. The spectra taken in this proposal will allow timely estimates of the systemic velocities of the variable stars.

  1. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  2. Search for variables in six Galactic open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, Ernst; Handler, Gerald; Lendl, Monika; Baumann, Bernhard; Rab, Christian; Meingast, Stefan; Rode-Paunzen, Monika; Netopil, Martin; Antoci, Victoria; Zhu, Liying; Zejda, Miloslav; Božić, Hrvoje

    2017-04-01

    Variables in open cluster (known distance, age, and metallicity) fields play an important role in stellar astrophysics because they allow to investigate the interior of stars. Therefore, six Galactic open clusters were selected to search for new variables and to complement data for already known variables. As five of these clusters are younger than 40 Myr, we aim at finding variable high-mass stars such as β Cephei and Slowly Pulsating B-type stars as well as classical pulsating stars within the instability strip. About 26 000 images (312 h) photometric images were taken at the 0.8 m (Vienna, Austria) and 1.0 m (Hvar, Croatia) telescope using V and I filters. The differential light curves were analyzed with standard time series analysis methods. In total, 11 variables were found in all investigated clusters. For nine of them, we were able to determine their nature and period. In addition, the membership probabilities from the literature were analyzed.

  3. The Imprints Of Galactic Environment On Cluster Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Angela

    2017-03-01

    Young star clusters (YSCs) appear to be a ubiquitous product of star formation in local galaxies, thus, they can be used to study the star formation process at work in their host galaxies. Moreover, YSCs are intrinsically brighter that single stars, potentially becoming the most important tracers of the recent star formation history in galaxies in the local Universe. In local galaxies, we also witness the presence of a large population of evolved star clusters, commonly called globular clusters (GCs). GCs peak formation history is very close to the redshift (z ~ 2) when the cosmic star formation history reached the maximum. Therefore, GCs are usually associated to extreme star formation episodes in high-redshift galaxies. It is yet not clear whether YSCs and GCs share a similar formation process (same physics under different interstellar medium conditions) and evolution process, and whether the former can be used as progenitor analogs of the latter. In this invited contribution, I review general properties of YSC populations in local galaxies. I will summarise some of the current open questions in the field, with particular emphasis to whether or not galactic environments, where YSCs form, leave imprints on the nested populations. The importance of this rapidly developing field can be crucial in understanding GC formation and possibly the galactic environment condition where this ancient population formed.

  4. Red horizontal-branch stars in the galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J. A.

    1985-05-01

    A class of red horizontal-branch (RHB) stars, similar to those in the "metal-rich" globular cluster M71, has been identified in the Galactic disk, using a quantitative three-dimensional spectral classification system developed earlier (Rose 1984) that uses 2.5-Å resolution spectra in the blue. A prototype for this class is the G5 III star HD 79452, which has been found by Helfer and Wallerstein (1968) to have [Fe/H] = -0.85 and MV = +1. The RHB stars are shown to be evolved stars on the basis of the strength of their Sr II λ4077 line, and are distinguished from post-main-sequence stars evolving through the same region of the HR diagram because of the unique appearance of their CN λ3883 and λ4216 bands. A preliminary estimate has been made of their space density, scale height perpendicular to the Galactic plane, and kinematics by surveying G5 - G7 stars in the Upgren (1962) North Galactic Pole survey.

  5. Galactic Evolved Massive Stars Discovered by Their Infrared Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Anthony; Mauerhan, J. C.; Van Dyk, S.; Cohen, M.; Morris, P.

    2013-06-01

    Determining the Galactic distribution and numbers of massive stars, such as Wolf-Rayet stars (WRs), is hampered by intervening Galactic or local circumstellar dust obscuration. In order to probe such regions of the Galaxy we can use infrared observations, which provide a means for finding such hidden populations through the dust. The availability of both 2MASS and Spitzer/GLIMPSE large-scale survey data provides infrared colours from 1.25 to 8 μm for a large fraction of the inner Galactic plane. In 2005 we had initiated a pilot study of the combined set of infrared colours for early-release GLIMPSE fields and show that WRs typically occupy a sparsely populated region of the color space. (This has also subsequently been demonstrated by our work in Hadfield et al. [2007, MNRAS, 376, 248] and Mauerhan et al. [2009, PASP, 121, 591].) We followed up 42 of our WR candidates spectroscopically in the near-infrared, and with limited additional observations of some of these candidates in the optical. Six new WRs, four late-type WN and two late-type WC stars, were discovered as a result. Of the remaining ~86% of the sample, five appear to be O-type stars. 21 stars are likely of type Be, and 10 stars appear to be of late-type, or possibly young stellar objects, which have ``contaminated'' the infrared color space. The survey is generally unbiased towards clusters or field stars, and the new WRs found are in both the field and in and around the RCW 49 region (including cluster Westerlund 2). In this work, and in our other recent work, we show that the infrared broad-band colours so far to be the most efficient means of identifying (particularly, dust-obscured) candidate massive stars, notably WRs.

  6. THE SIZE SCALE OF STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Madrid, Juan P.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Sippel, Anna C.

    2012-09-10

    Direct N-body simulations of star clusters in a realistic Milky-Way-like potential are carried out using the code NBODY6. Based on these simulations, a new relationship between scale size and galactocentric distance is derived: the scale size of star clusters is proportional to the hyperbolic tangent of the galactocentric distance. The half-mass radius of star clusters increases systematically with galactocentric distance but levels off when star clusters orbit the galaxy beyond {approx}40 kpc. These simulations show that the half-mass radius of individual star clusters varies significantly as they evolve over a Hubble time, more so for clusters with shorter relaxation times, and remains constant through several relaxation times only in certain situations when expansion driven by the internal dynamics of the star cluster and the influence of the host galaxy tidal field balance each other. Indeed, the radius of a star cluster evolving within the inner 20 kpc of a realistic galactic gravitational potential is severely truncated by tidal interactions and does not remain constant over a Hubble time. Furthermore, the half-mass radius of star clusters measured with present-day observations bears no memory of the original cluster size. Stellar evolution and tidal stripping are the two competing physical mechanisms that determine the present-day size of globular clusters. These simulations also show that extended star clusters can form at large galactocentric distances while remaining fully bound to the host galaxy. There is thus no need to invoke accretion from an external galaxy to explain the presence of extended clusters at large galactocentric distances in a Milky-Way-type galaxy.

  7. H-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Gao, C. Y.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-06-01

    The study of dense matter at ultrahigh density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supranuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is essential for modelling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark clusters in cold dense matter have not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we therefore consider here a possible kind of quark clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there). Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars H-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be `superluminal' in the most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact difficult to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirement of causality. We study the stars composed of H-clusters, i.e. H-cluster stars, and derive the dependence of their maximum mass on the in-medium stiffening effect, showing that the maximum mass could be well above 2 M⊙ as observed and that the resultant mass-radius relation fits the measurement of the rapid burster under reasonable parameters. Besides a general

  8. A Galactic-Scale Origin for Stellar Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    We recently presented a model for the cluster formation efficiency (CFE), i.e. the fraction of star formation occurring in bound stellar clusters. It utilizes the idea that the formation of stars and stellar clusters occurs across a continuous spectrum of ISM densities. Bound stellar clusters naturally arise from the high-density end of this density spectrum. Due to short free-fall times, these high-density regions can achieve high star formation efficiencies (SFEs) and can be unaffected by gas expulsion. Lower-density regions remain gas-rich and substructured, and are unbound upon gas expulsion. The model enables the CFE to be calculated using galactic-scale observables. I present a brief summary of the model physics, assumptions and caveats, and show that it agrees well with observations. Fortran and IDL routines for calculating the CFE are publicly available at http://www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/cfe.

  9. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  10. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Clarke, T E; Sarazin, Craig L; Randall, Scott W; McNamara, Brian R

    2010-04-20

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves.

  11. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Clarke, T. E.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Randall, Scott W.; McNamara, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves. PMID:20351250

  12. Study of Stellar Clusters Containing Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costado, Teresa; Alfaro, E. J.; Delgado, A. J.; Djupvik, A. A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2013-06-01

    Most stars form in clusters, but the percentage of stars born in dense stellar systems is currently matter of controversy and depends very much on the own definition of cluster. The cluster definition and hence the morphologies of individual clusters appear to vary significantly from region to region, as well as with age, which suggests that either, star formation in clusters is not universal and may depend on the local environment, or that all clusters form with the same morphology but early dynamical evolution quickly modifies the structure of the phase space distribution. In addition, young populated clusters containing massive stars are excellent labs for the study of the formation of the massive stellar component of the Galactic disk. Three main scenarios have been proposed for the formation of high-mass stars (M > 7-8 M_{⊙}): a) monolithic collapse of proto-stellar nuclei; b) competitive accretion inside the proto-cluster molecular cloud; and c) coalescence of proto-stellar nuclei and low-mass stars in very dense atmospheres. Both scientific questions: a) cluster formation and b) formation of high mass stars in clusters are intimately connected via the structural description of the phase space distribution of cluster stars and their Mass Function (MF). Models of static clusters with different initial spatial and kinematic distributions show how the spatial distribution dynamically evolves with time, allowing a characterization of their dynamical state from snapshots of their spatial distribution. Four are the main variables (and their distribution with mass and position) needed for a reliable characterization of the cluster dynamical state: a) Mass segregation parameter; b) Mapping of surface density for different ranges of masses; c) Q morphological parameter based on the minimum spanning tree graph and its variation with mass and cluster age, and d) MF of the cluster members. Two years ago, the Stellar System Group of IAA has begun an observational

  13. CLUSTERED CEPHEID VARIABLES 90 KILOPARSECS FROM THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Saito, Roberto; Gran, Felipe; Klein, Christopher; Blitz, Leo

    2015-03-20

    Distant regions close to the plane of our Galaxy are largely unexplored by optical surveys as they are hidden by dust. We have used near-infrared data (which minimizes dust obscuration) from the ESO Public survey VISTA Variables of the Via Lactea to search for distant stars at low latitudes. We have discovered four Cepheid variables within an angular extent of 1° centered at a Galactic longitude of l = −27.°4 and a Galactic latitude of b = −1.°08. We use the tightly constrained period–luminosity relationship that these pulsating stars obey to derive distances. We infer an average distance to these Cepheid variables of 90 kpc. The Cepheid variables are highly clustered in angle (within 1°) and in distance (the standard deviation of the distances is 12 kpc). These young (∼100 Myr old), pulsating stars are unexpected at such large distances from the Galactic disk, which terminates at ∼15 kpc. The highly clustered nature in distance and angle of the Cepheid variables suggests that the stars may be associated with a dwarf galaxy; its location and mass were earlier predicted by a dynamical analysis. The Cepheids are at an average distance of ∼2 kpc from the plane and their maximum projected separation is ∼1 kpc.

  14. Cool Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we report current status of search and study for Faint High Latitude Carbon Stars (FHLCs). Data for more than 1800 spectroscopically confirmed FHLCs are known, which are found thanks to objective prism surveys and photometric selections. More than half of the detected objects belongs to group of dwarf Carbon (dC) stars. Many-sided investigations based on modern astrophysical databases are necessary to study the space distribution of different groups of the FHLC stars and their possible origin in the Halo of our Galaxy. We report about the selection of FHLCs by the spectroscopic surveys: First Byurakan Survey (FBS), Hamburg/ESO Survey (HES), LAMOST Pilot Survey and SDSS, as well as by photometric selection: APM Survey for Cool Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo, SDSS and 2MASS JHK colours.

  15. Runaway Stars in the Galactic Halo: Their Origin and Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte de Vasconcelos Silva, Manuel

    2012-03-01

    Star formation in the Milky Way is confined to star-forming regions (OB associ- ation, HII regions, and open clusters) in the Galactic plane. It is usually assumed that these regions are found preferably along spiral arms, as is observed in other spiral galaxies. However, young early-type stars are often found at high Galactic latitudes, far away from their birthplaces in the Galactic disc. These stars are called runaway stars, and it is believed that they were ejected from their birth- places early in their lifetimes by one of two mechanisms: ejection from a binary system following the destruction of the massive companion in a supernova type II event (the binary ejection mechanism), or ejection from a dense cluster following a close gravitational encounter between two close binaries (the dynamical ejection mechanism). The aims of our study were: to improve the current understanding of the nature of high Galactic latitude runaway stars, in particular by investigating whether the theoretical ejection mechanisms could explain the more extreme cases; to show the feasibility of using high Galactic latitude stars as tracers of the spiral arms. The main technique used in this investigation was the tracing of stellar orbits back in time, given their present positions and velocities in 3D space. This technique allowed the determination of the ejection velocities, flight times and birthplaces of a sample of runaway stars. In order to obtain reasonable velocity estimates several recent catalogues of proper motion data were used. We found that the evolutionary ages of the vast majority of runaway stars is consistent with the disc ejection scenario. However, we identified three outliers which would need flight times much larger then their estimated ages in order to reach their present positions in the sky. Moreover, the ejection velocity distribution appears to be bimodal, showing evidence for two populations of runaway stars: a "low" velocity population (89 per cent of the

  16. Searching for and Characterization of Galactic Open Clusters toward the Galactic Anti-Center with Pan-STARRS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Wen-Ping; Hou, Jinliang; Chen, Li; Shao, Zhengyi

    2015-08-01

    Hundreds of thousands star clusters were suggested to exist in the Galactic disk, but so far only a few thousands had been catalogued, all in the solar neighborhood (less than 2 kpc). We therefore aim to use Pan-STARRS1 3π data with its wide-field sky and sensitive camera to search for and to characterize star clusters. We used a star-counting algorithm to identify stellar density enhancements toward the Galactic anti-center. The detection rate of known star clusters in this region with radii less than 10' from the algorithm used was approximately 83%. In the field of 400 square degrees, we identified 491 stellar cluster candidates, 50 of which were matched with known star cluster catalog. The remaining 441 candidates were characterized with radius, reddening, distance, age, and lowest mass members, along with PPMXL proper motions and 2MASS and Pan-STARRS1 multi-band photometry. The revised star cluster sample was estimated to be complete up to a heliocentric distance of 5 kpc toward the Galactic anti-center. Moreover, this sample allowed us to estimate the separation between Sagittarius and Perseus arms was about 3.2 kpc with 0.2 kpc uncertainty and the widths of the nearby spiral arms---Sagittarius, Orion, and Perseus---with the full-width-half-maximum to be 1.4±0.1, 1.6±0.1, and 3.3±0.2 kpc, respectively.

  17. Applying Machine Learning to Star Cluster Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorenko, Kristina; Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Catalogs describing populations of star clusters are essential in investigating a range of important issues, from star formation to galaxy evolution. Star cluster catalogs are typically created in a two-step process: in the first step, a catalog of sources is automatically produced; in the second step, each of the extracted sources is visually inspected by 3-to-5 human classifiers and assigned a category. Classification by humans is labor-intensive and time consuming, thus it creates a bottleneck, and substantially slows down progress in star cluster research.We seek to automate the process of labeling star clusters (the second step) through applying supervised machine learning techniques. This will provide a fast, objective, and reproducible classification. Our data is HST (WFC3 and ACS) images of galaxies in the distance range of 3.5-12 Mpc, with a few thousand star clusters already classified by humans as a part of the LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) project. The classification is based on 4 labels (Class 1 - symmetric, compact cluster; Class 2 - concentrated object with some degree of asymmetry; Class 3 - multiple peak system, diffuse; and Class 4 - spurious detection). We start by looking at basic machine learning methods such as decision trees. We then proceed to evaluate performance of more advanced techniques, focusing on convolutional neural networks and other Deep Learning methods. We analyze the results, and suggest several directions for further improvement.

  18. Speckle Interferometry of Massive and Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian; Hartkopf, William I.; Gies, Douglas R.; Henry, Todd J.; Torres, Guillermo

    2005-08-01

    Conducted on NOAO 4-m telescopes in 1994, the first speckle survey of O stars (Mason et al. 1998) had success far in excess of our expectations. In addition to the frequently cited multiplicity analysis, many of the new systems which were first resolved in this paper are of significant astrophysical importance. To date, this paper has resulted in 86 citations in the refereed literature. Now, some ten years after the original survey, we propose to re-investigate all systems analyzed before (N=98) as well as make a first high-resolution inspection of the additional O stars (N=62) in the recent Galactic O Star Catalog of Maiz-Apellaniz & Walborn (2004). In addition, we propose to investigate several additional samples of interesting objects, including 10 accessible Galactic WR stars from the speckle survey of Hartkopf et al. (1999), 16 massive, hot stars with separations which would indicate their applicability for mass determinations (for fully detached O stars, we have only twelve mass determinations), 92 members of the Hyades and Pleiades clusters to complement RV studies of these clusters, and 197 Hyades & Pleiades stars, reobserved from the 1991 lists (Mason et al. 1993a,b).

  19. The Assembly History of the Milky Way Nuclear Star Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier-Krause, A.; Neumayer, N.; Schödel, R.; Seth, A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Walcher, C. J.; Lützgendorf, N.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Hilker, M.; Kuntschner, H.

    2017-03-01

    Within the central 10 pc of our Galaxy lies a dense cluster of stars, the nuclear star cluster. This cluster forms a distinct component of our Galaxy. Nuclear star clusters are common objects and are detected in ~ 75% of nearby galaxies. It is, however, not fully understood how nuclear star clusters form. The Milky Way nuclear star cluster is the closest of its kind. At a distance of only 8 kpc we can spatially resolve its stellar populations and kinematics much better than in external galaxies. This makes the Milky Way nuclear star cluster the perfect local reference object for understanding the structure and assembly history of nuclear star clusters in general. There are of the order of 107 stars within the central 10 pc of the Galactic center. Most of these stars are several Gyr old late-type stars. However, there are also more than 100 hot early-type stars in the central parsec of the Milky Way, with ages of only a few Myr. Beyond a projected distance of 0.5 pc of the Galactic center, the density of young stars was largely unknown, since only very few spectroscopic observations existed so far. We covered the central >4 pc2 (0.75 sq.arcmin) of the Galactic center using the integral-field spectrograph KMOS (VLT). We extracted more than 1,000 spectra from individual stars and identified >20 new early-type stars based on their spectra. We studied the spatial distribution of the different populations and their kinematics to put constraints on the assembly history of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster.

  20. Star Formation and Dynamics in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela; Gualandris, Alessia

    The centre of our Galaxy is one of the most studied and yet enigmatic places in the Universe. At a distance of about 8 kpc from our Sun, the Galactic centre (GC) is the ideal environment to study the extreme processes that take place in the vicinity of a supermassive black hole (SMBH). Despite the hostile environment, several tens of early-type stars populate the central parsec of our Galaxy. A fraction of them lie in a thin ring with mild eccentricity and inner radius ˜ 0.04 pc, while the S-stars, i.e. the ˜ 30 stars closest to the SMBH ( lesssim 0.04 pc), have randomly oriented and highly eccentric orbits. The formation of such early-type stars has been a puzzle for a long time: molecular clouds should be tidally disrupted by the SMBH before they can fragment into stars. We review the main scenarios proposed to explain the formation and the dynamical evolution of the early-type stars in the GC. In particular, we discuss the most popular in situ scenarios (accretion disc fragmentation and molecular cloud disruption) and migration scenarios (star cluster inspiral and Hills mechanism). We focus on the most pressing challenges that must be faced to shed light on the process of star formation in the vicinity of a SMBH.

  1. Metallicity in the Galactic Center: The Arches Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, Francisco; Figer, Donald F.; Hillier, D. John; Kudritzki, Rolf P.

    2004-04-01

    We present a quantitative spectral analysis of five very massive stars in the Arches cluster, located near the Galactic center, to determine stellar parameters, stellar wind properties, and, most importantly, metallicity content. The analysis uses a new technique, presented here for the first time, and uses line-blanketed non-LTE wind/atmosphere models fitted to high-resolution near-infrared spectra of late-type nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet stars and OfI+ stars in the cluster. It relies on the fact that massive stars reach a maximum nitrogen abundance that is related to initial metallicity when they are in the WNL phase. We determine the present-day nitrogen abundance of the WNL stars in the Arches cluster to be 1.6% (mass fraction) and constrain the stellar metallicity in the cluster to be solar. This result is invariant to assumptions about the mass-luminosity relationship, the mass-loss rates, and rotation speeds. In addition, from this analysis, we find the age of the Arches cluster to be 2-2.5 Myr, assuming coeval formation.

  2. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  3. Ultrahigh energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the production rate of ultrahigh energy (UHE) neutrinos from galactic neutron stars. The statistics of various stellar populations are reviewed as well as an evolutionary scheme linking several neutron star environments. An observational test for predicting stellar evolution is made using two mass ratio intervals of less than 0.3 and greater than or approximately equal to 0.3, which is supported by kinematical evidence. Attention is given to the problem of the target material that is required by UHE protons accelerated from the pulsar's surface to their rotational kinetic energy, and to the detectability of neutron stars in the UHE neutrinos by employing the deep underwater muon and neutrino detector (DUMAND) array.

  4. Ultrahigh energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the production rate of ultrahigh energy (UHE) neutrinos from galactic neutron stars. The statistics of various stellar populations are reviewed as well as an evolutionary scheme linking several neutron star environments. An observational test for predicting stellar evolution is made using two mass ratio intervals of less than 0.3 and greater than or approximately equal to 0.3, which is supported by kinematical evidence. Attention is given to the problem of the target material that is required by UHE protons accelerated from the pulsar's surface to their rotational kinetic energy, and to the detectability of neutron stars in the UHE neutrinos by employing the deep underwater muon and neutrino detector (DUMAND) array.

  5. Young stars in the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jessica R.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Morris, Mark R.; Clarkson, Will; Stolte, Andrea; Do, Tuan; Yelda, Sylvana; Anderson, Jay

    2014-05-01

    The central parsec of our Galaxy hosts not only a supermassive black hole, but also a large population of young stars (age <6 Myr) whose presence is puzzling given how inhospitable the region is for star formation. The strong tidal forces require gas densities many orders of magnitude higher than is found in typical molecular clouds. Kinematic observations of this young nuclear cluster show complex structures, including a well-defined inner disk, but also a substantial off-disk population. Spectroscopic and photometric measurements indicate the initial mass function (IMF) differs significantly from the canonical IMF found in the solar neighborhood. These observations have led to a number of proposed star formation scenarios, such as an infalling massive star cluster, a single infalling molecular cloud, or cloud-cloud collisions. I will review recent works on the young stars in the central parsec and discuss connections with young nuclear star clusters in other galaxies, such as M31, and with star formation in the larger central molecular zone.

  6. Old open clusters in the outer Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, G.; Geisler, D.; Villanova, S.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Majewski, S. R.

    2007-12-01

    Context: The outer parts of the Milky Way disk are believed to be one of the main arenas where the accretion of external material in the form of dwarf galaxies and subsequent formation of streams is taking place. The Monoceros stream and the Canis Major and Argo over-densities are notorious examples. Understanding whether what we detect is the signature of accretion or, more conservatively, simply the intrinsic nature of the disk, represents one of the major goals of modern Galactic astronomy. Aims: We try to shed more light on the properties of the outer disk by exploring the properties of distant anti-center old open clusters. We want to verify whether distant clusters follow the chemical and dynamical behavior of the solar vicinity disk, or whether their properties can be better explained in terms of an extra-galactic population. Methods: VLT high resolution spectra have been acquired for five distant open clusters: Ruprecht 4, Ruprecht 7, Berkeley 25, Berkeley 73 and Berkeley 75. We derive accurate radial velocities to distinguish field interlopers and cluster members. For the latter we perform a detailed abundance analysis and derive the iron abundance [Fe/H] and the abundance ratios of several α elements. Results: Our analysis confirms previous indications that the radial abundance gradient in the outer Galactic disk does not follow the expectations extrapolated from the solar vicinity, but exhibits a shallower slope. By combining the metallicity of the five program clusters with eight more clusters for which high resolution spectroscopy is available, we find that the mean metallicity in the outer disk between 12 and 21 kpc from the Galactic center is [Fe/H] ≈ -0.35, with only marginal indications for a radial variation. In addition, all the program clusters exhibit solar scaled or slightly enhanced α elements, similar to open clusters in the solar vicinity and thin disk stars. Conclusions: We investigate whether this outer disk cluster sample might

  7. HOW GALACTIC ENVIRONMENT REGULATES STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Meidt, Sharon E.

    2016-02-10

    In a new simple model I reconcile two contradictory views on the factors that determine the rate at which molecular clouds form stars—internal structure versus external, environmental influences—providing a unified picture for the regulation of star formation in galaxies. In the presence of external pressure, the pressure gradient set up within a self-gravitating turbulent (isothermal) cloud leads to a non-uniform density distribution. Thus the local environment of a cloud influences its internal structure. In the simple equilibrium model, the fraction of gas at high density in the cloud interior is determined simply by the cloud surface density, which is itself inherited from the pressure in the immediate surroundings. This idea is tested using measurements of the properties of local clouds, which are found to show remarkable agreement with the simple equilibrium model. The model also naturally predicts the star formation relation observed on cloud scales and at the same time provides a mapping between this relation and the closer-to-linear molecular star formation relation measured on larger scales in galaxies. The key is that pressure regulates not only the molecular content of the ISM but also the cloud surface density. I provide a straightforward prescription for the pressure regulation of star formation that can be directly implemented in numerical models. Predictions for the dense gas fraction and star formation efficiency measured on large-scales within galaxies are also presented, establishing the basis for a new picture of star formation regulated by galactic environment.

  8. The Orion nebula star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Photography through filters which suppress nebular light reveal a clustering of faint red stars centered on the Trapezium, this evidences a distinct cluster within the larger OB1 association. Stars within about 20 ft of trapezium comprise the Orion Nebula star cluster are considered. Topics discussed re: (1) extinction by dust grains; (2) photometric peculiarities; (3) spectroscopic peculiarities; (4) young variables; (5) the distribution and motion of gas within the cluster.

  9. Massive star clusters in galaxies.

    PubMed

    Harris, William E

    2010-02-28

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GC research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  10. YSO Clusters on Galactic Infrared Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gábor; Kiss, Zoltán Tamás; Tóth, L. Viktor; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Pásztor, László; Ueno, Munateka; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Tamura, Motohide; Kawamura, Akiko; Onishi, Toshikazu

    The AKARI all sky survey (Murakami et al. Publ. Astron. Soc. Jpn. 59:369, 2007) was investigated for YSO candidates. Distribution of candidate sources have been analysed and compared to that of galactic CO and medium scale structures. Clustering and other inhomogenities have been found.

  11. Integrated spectral study of small angular diameter galactic open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clariá, J. J.; Ahumada, A. V.; Bica, E.; Pavani, D. B.; Parisi, M. C.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents flux-calibrated integrated spectra obtained at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO, Argentina) for a sample of 9 Galactic open clusters of small angular diameter. The spectra cover the optical range (3800-6800 Å), with a resolution of ∼14 Å. With one exception (Ruprecht 158), the selected clusters are projected into the fourth Galactic quadrant (282o < l < 345o) near the Galactic plane (∣b∣ ≤ 9o). We performed simultaneous estimates of foreground interstellar reddening and age by comparing the continuum distribution and line strenghts of the cluster spectra with those of template cluster spectra with known parameters. We thus provide spectroscopic information independent from that derived through color-magnitude diagram studies. We found three clusters (Collinder 249, NGC 4463 and Ruprecht 122) younger than ∼40 Myr, four moderately young ones (BH 92, Harvard 5, Hogg 14 and Pismis 23) with ages within 200-400 Myr, and two intermediate-age ones (Ruprecht 158 and ESO 065-SC07) with ages within 1.0-2.2 Gyr. The derived foreground E(B - V) color excesses vary from around 0.0 in Ruprecht 158 to ∼1.1 in Pismis 23. In general terms, the results obtained show good agreement with previous photometric results. In Ruprecht 158 and BH 92, however, some differences are found between the parameters here obtained and previous values in the literature. Individual spectra of some comparatively bright stars located in the fields of 5 out of the 9 clusters here studied, allowed us to evaluate their membership status. The current cluster sample complements that of 46 open clusters previously studied by our group in an effort to gather a spectral library with several clusters per age bin. The cluster spectral library that we have been building is an important tool to tie studies of resolved and unresolved stellar content.

  12. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ≃0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 μG. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  13. Magnetic Fields and Galactic Star Formation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Loo, Sven; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-01

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ≃ 0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas ({{n}H}\\gt {{10}5} c{{m}-3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 μG. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  14. Star Formation at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Could stars be forming in the inhospitable environment near Sagittarius A* in the heart of the Milky Way? A possible signature of low-mass star formation has recently been found just two light-years from the black hole at the center of our galaxy — a region that was previously thought to be too hostile for such activity. Searching for Signatures: Previous observations of the central few light-years of the Milky Way had focused on a population of about 200 massive, young and very bright stars in tight orbits around Sgr A*. These stars are only a few million years old and prompted scientists to wonder: have they somehow managed to form in situ, in spite of their close proximity to the black hole, or did they form further out and then migrate in? Motivated by this mystery, Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University and collaborators looked for evidence of even younger stars close to Sagittarius A*, which would demonstrate that star formation in the area is an ongoing process. Using the Very Large Array (VLA), the collaboration discovered several small sources in one arm of activity near Sgr A*. This 34-GHz image provides a close-up view of two protoplanetary disk candidates (labeled P26 and P8) located near Sgr A*. These objects are outlined on the right side by a bow shock caused by impacting stellar wind that streams from the young, hot stars closer to the Galactic center. The disks are thought to contain recently-formed, low-mass stars. (Credit: Yusef-Zadeh et al., 2015) Heated Disks: The team identified these sources as candidate photoevaporative protoplanetary disks, or “proplyds” — areas of dense, ionized gas and dust surrounding young, newly formed stars. The proplyd candidates are between 10,000 and 100,000 years old, and they lie along the edge of a large molecular cloud. It is likely that this cloud produced the disks by providing a reservoir of gas to feed the star-formation activity. The region surrounding these proplyds is blasted with harsh

  15. KMOS view of the Galactic Centre - II. Metallicity distribution of late-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier-Krause, A.; Kerzendorf, W.; Neumayer, N.; Schödel, R.; Nogueras-Lara, F.; Do, T.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Kuntschner, H.

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the metallicity distribution of stars in the Galactic Centre has important implications for the formation history of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster. However, this distribution is not well known, and is currently based on a small sample of fewer than 100 stars. We obtained near-infrared K-band spectra of more than 700 late-type stars in the central 4 pc2 of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster with the integral-field spectrograph KMOS (VLT). We analyse the medium-resolution spectra using a full-spectral fitting method employing the Göttingen spectral library of synthetic PHOENIX spectra. The derived stellar metallicities range from metal-rich [M/H] > +0.3 dex to metal-poor [M/H] <-1.0 dex, with a fraction of 5.2^{+6.0}_{-3.1} per cent metal-poor ([M/H] ≤ -0.5 dex) stars. The metal-poor stars are distributed over the entire observed field. The origin of metal-poor stars remains unclear. They could originate from infalling globular clusters. For the metal-rich stellar population ([M/H] > 0 dex), a globular cluster origin can be ruled out. As there is only a very low fraction of metal-poor stars in the central 4 pc2 of the Galactic Centre, we believe that our data can discard a scenario in which the Milky Way nuclear star cluster is purely formed from infalling globular clusters.

  16. Be Stars in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, A. E.

    2017-06-01

    Based on high and medium resolution spectra, we analyze the population of Be stars in young open clusters. We have found a clear dependence of the relative content of early-type (B0-B3) stars on the cluster age. The relative concentration of Be stars of spectral types B0-B3 gradually increases with cluster age, reaching its maximum value 0.46 in clusters with ages of 12-20 Myr. Such a distribution of Be stars in clusters unequivocally points to the evolutionary status of the Be phenomenon. Two possibilities of Be stars' origin is discussed. The first one is for single B stars with rotational velocities increasing from moderate in the beginning of their life on Main Sequence (MS) to near critical in the end of MS. The second one includes evolution of close double systems, that are widely spreaded among early type stars.

  17. Sketching Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jeremy

    The next time you plan a quiet evening under a salted sky, with hopes of bathing your eyes in the ancient light of a majestic star cluster, be sure that your sketching kit comes with you! A casual glance at these celestial marvels will not give you a decent appreciation for an object whose history and character are as unique as the fingerprints you should be pressing into the side of your trusty pencil. I can think of no better way to connect with these stellar ballets, to understand their intricacies, and to recall your view later than to spend time sketching the soft glow or blazing pinpricks you see through the eyepiece.

  18. Co-evolution of galactic nuclei and globular cluster systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Tremaine, Scott

    2014-04-10

    We revisit the hypothesis that dense galactic nuclei are formed from inspiraling globular clusters. Recent advances in the understanding of the continuous formation of globular clusters over cosmic time and the concurrent evolution of the galaxy stellar distribution allow us to construct a simple model that matches the observed spatial and mass distributions of clusters in the Galaxy and the giant elliptical galaxy M87. In order to compare with observations, we model the effects of dynamical friction and dynamical evolution, including stellar mass loss, tidal stripping of stars, and tidal disruption of clusters by the growing galactic nucleus. We find that inspiraling globular clusters form a dense central structure, with mass and radius comparable to the typical values in observed nuclear star clusters (NSCs) in late-type and low-mass early-type galaxies. The density contrast associated with the NSC is less pronounced in giant elliptical galaxies. Our results indicate that the NSC mass as a fraction of mass of the galaxy stellar spheroid scales as M{sub NSC}/M{sub ∗}≈0.0025 M{sub ∗,11}{sup −0.5}. Thus disrupted globular clusters could contribute most of the mass of NSCs in galaxies with stellar mass below 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The inner part of the accumulated cluster may seed the growth of a central black hole via stellar dynamical core collapse, thereby relieving the problem of how to form luminous quasars at high redshift. The seed black hole may reach ∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} within ≲ 1 Gyr of the beginning of globular cluster formation.

  19. PHAT Star Clusters in M31: Insight on Environmental Dependence of Star & Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lent C.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Seth, Anil; Beerman, Lori; Lewis, Alexia; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Andromeda Project Team, PHAT Team

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical studies of star cluster formation suggest that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a cluster's progenitor cloud dictates whether or not a gravitationally bound grouping will emerge from an embedded region after gas expulsion. I measure the fraction of stars formed in long-lived clusters relative to unbound field stars on a spatial resolved basis in the Andromeda galaxy. These observations test theoretical predictions that star clusters are formed within a hierarchical interstellar medium at peaks in the gas density where local SFEs are enhanced and regions become stellar dominated. Using data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey and ancillary observations of M31's gas phase, I investigate how cluster formation correlates with galactic environment and galaxy-scale properties of the star formation. We construct a sample of >2700 star clusters through a crowd-sourced visual search of the high spatial resolution HST imaging data. Our catalog uses ~2 million image classifications collected by the Andromeda Project citizen science website to provide an unparalleled census of clusters that spans ~4 orders of magnitude in mass (50% completeness at ~500 M⊙ at <100 Myr) and increases the number of known clusters within the PHAT survey footprint by a factor of ~6. Cluster ages and masses are obtained by fitting to color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of individually resolved stars within each cluster. Furthermore, we insure our ability to accurately interpret cluster age and mass distributions through careful catalog completeness characterization, made possible by thousands of synthetic cluster tests included during catalog construction work. We combine our high quality cluster sample with spatially resolved star formation histories, derived from CMD fitting of PHAT's photometry of ~117 million resolved field stars. We derived the fraction of stars formed in long-lived clusters and show that only a few percent of coeval stars are found in

  20. Mechanism for ejecting stars from the Galactic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, P.J.T.

    1992-08-01

    The two most popular mechanisms for ejecting stars from the plane of the Galaxy are the supernova ejection and dynamical (or cluster) ejection scenarios. These two processes make definite predictions regarding the properties of the runaway stars (e.g., mass-velocity diagram and binary characteristics). The relations between mass and velocity predicted by the two theories are more similar to each other than had been previously believed. The binary properties of the runaways provide the best means of discriminating between the two scenarios. Supernova ejection predicts a high frequency of neutron star companions ({approx_gt} 50%) and a very low frequency of runaway binaries consisting of two normal stars ({approx_equal} 1%), while dynamical ejection predicts modest frequencies of both normal ({approx_equal} 10%) and neutron star companions ({approx_lt} 10%). The observed binary characteristics of runaway stars are more consistent with dynamical rather than supernova ejection. The normality of the runaways and the production rate per unit surface area of the Galactic disk may be two other areas where the predictions of the two theories differ.

  1. Mechanism for ejecting stars from the Galactic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, P.J.T.

    1992-01-01

    The two most popular mechanisms for ejecting stars from the plane of the Galaxy are the supernova ejection and dynamical (or cluster) ejection scenarios. These two processes make definite predictions regarding the properties of the runaway stars (e.g., mass-velocity diagram and binary characteristics). The relations between mass and velocity predicted by the two theories are more similar to each other than had been previously believed. The binary properties of the runaways provide the best means of discriminating between the two scenarios. Supernova ejection predicts a high frequency of neutron star companions ({approx gt} 50%) and a very low frequency of runaway binaries consisting of two normal stars ({approx equal} 1%), while dynamical ejection predicts modest frequencies of both normal ({approx equal} 10%) and neutron star companions ({approx lt} 10%). The observed binary characteristics of runaway stars are more consistent with dynamical rather than supernova ejection. The normality of the runaways and the production rate per unit surface area of the Galactic disk may be two other areas where the predictions of the two theories differ.

  2. Integrated spectral properties of 7 galactic open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Bica, E.; Piatti, A. E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents flux-calibrated integrated spectra in the range 3600-9000 Ä for 7 concentrated, relatively populous Galactic open clusters. We perform simultaneous estimates of age and foreground interstellar reddening by comparing the continuum distribution and line strengths of the cluster spectra with those of template cluster spectra with known parameters. For five clusters these two parameters have been determined for the first time (Ruprecht 144, BH 132, Pismis 21, Lyng\\aa 11 and BH 217), while the results here derived for the remaining two clusters (Hogg 15 and Melotte 105) show very good agreement with previous studies based mainly on colour-magnitude diagrams. We also provide metallicity estimates for six clusters from the equivalent widths of CaII triplet and TiO features. The present cluster sample improves the age resolution around solar metal content in the cluster spectral library for population synthesis. We compare the properties of the present sample with those of clusters in similar directions. Hogg 15 and Pismis 21 are among the most reddened clusters in sectors centered at l = 270o and l = 0o, respectively. Besides, the present results would favour an important dissolution rate of star clusters in these zones. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  3. The Dynamics Of Galactic Globular Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chen

    2008-10-01

    We have used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to measure proper motion of the globular cluster NGC 6656 (M22) with respect to the background bulge stars and its internal velocity dispersion profile. With the space velocity of (Π, Θ, W) = (184±3, 209±14, 132±15) km s-1, we also calculate the orbit of the cluster. The central velocity dispersion in both components of the proper motion of cluster stars is 16.99 km s-1. We derive the mass-to-ration (M/L)˜1.7 which is relatively higher than the past works.

  4. Galactic flows and the formation of stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the formation of stellar clusters from a Galactic scale SPH simulation. The simulation traces star formation over a 5.6 Myr timescale, with local gravitational instabilities resulting in ~ 105 solar masses of star formation in the form of sink particles. We investigate the time evolution of the physical properties of the forming clusters including their half-mass radii, their energies and the depletion time of the gas. Star formation is driven by the large scale flows which compress the gas to higher densities where self gravity takes over and collapse occurs. We show that the more massive clusters (up to ~ 2 × 104 solar masses) gather their material from of order 10 pc due to these large scale motions associated with the spiral arm passage and shock. The bulk of the gas becomes gravitationally bound near 1-2 Myr before sink formation, and in the absence of feedback, significant accretion ongoing on longer timescales. We trace the hierarchical merging process of cluster formation which naturally results in age spreads of order the crossing time of the original region which provides the gas reservoir for the cluster.

  5. The properties of energetically unbound stars in stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claydon, Ian; Gieles, Mark; Zocchi, Alice

    2017-04-01

    Several Milky Way star clusters show a roughly flat velocity dispersion profile at large radii, which is not expected from models with a tidal cut-off energy. Possible explanations for this excess velocity include the effects of a dark matter halo, modified gravity theories and energetically unbound stars inside of clusters. These stars are known as potential escapers (PEs) and can exist indefinitely within clusters that are on circular orbits. Through a series of N-body simulations of star cluster systems, where we vary the galactic potential, orbital eccentricity and stellar mass function, we investigate the properties of the PEs and their effects on the kinematics. We derive a prediction for the scaling of the velocity dispersion at the Jacobi surface due to PEs, as a function of cluster mass, angular velocity of the cluster orbit, and slope of the mass profile of the host galaxy. We see a tentative signal of the mass and orbital velocity dependence in kinematic data of globular clusters from the literature. We also find that the fraction of PEs depends sensitively on the galactic mass profile, reaching as high as 40 per cent in the cusp of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and as the velocity anisotropy also depends on the slope of the galactic mass profile, we conclude that PEs provide an independent way of inferring the properties of the dark matter mass profile at the galactic radius of (globular) clusters in the Gaia era.

  6. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  7. White dwarf stars and the age of the Galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    The history of the Galaxy is written in its oldest stars, the white dwarf (WD) stars. Significant limits can be placed on both the Galactic age and star formation history. A wide range of input WD model sequences is used to derive the current limits to the age estimates suggested by fitting to the observed falloff in the WD luminosity function. The results suggest that the star formation rate over the history of the Galaxy has been relatively constant, and that the disk age lies in the range 6-12 billion years, depending upon the assumed structure of WD stars, and in particular on the core composition and surface helium layer mass. Using plausible mixed C/O core input models, the estimates for the disk age range from 8-10.5 Gyr, i.e.,sustantially younger than most age estimates for the halo globular clusters. After speculating on the significance of the results, expected observational and theoretical refinements which will further enhance the reliability of the method are discussed.

  8. Spectral Types of Field and Cluster O-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bergh, Sidney

    2004-10-01

    The recent catalog of spectral types of Galactic O-type stars by Maíz-Apellániz et al. is used to study the differences between the frequencies of various subtypes of O-type stars in the field, in OB associations, and among runaway stars. At a high level of statistical significance, the data show that O stars in clusters and associations have earlier types (and, hence, presumably larger masses or younger ages) than those that are situated in the general field. Furthermore, it is found that the distribution of spectral subtypes among runaway O stars is indistinguishable from that among field stars and differs significantly from that of the O-type stars that are situated in clusters and associations. The difference is in the sense that runaway O stars, on average, have later subtypes than do those that are still located in clusters and associations.

  9. ORIGIN OF THE GALACTIC CENTER S-STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Griv, Evgeny

    2009-09-01

    The supermassive black hole at the Galactic center is surrounded by a parsec-scale star disk, with about a hundred massive young stars that move in approximately circular Keplerian orbits. Another group of roughly 20 young stars ('S-stars') follow eccentric, randomly oriented orbits well inside the disk stars. A model is proposed to explain the S-stars. Accordingly, the stars formed originally in the parsec-scale disk through gravitational fragmentation of gas. The newly formed S-stars then migrated inward via the gravitational torques exerted by a Lin-Shu-type spiral density wave on the stars at an inner Lindblad resonance.

  10. Exploring the total Galactic extinction with SDSS BHB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hai-Jun; Liu, Chao; Hu, Jing-Yao; Xu, Yang; Chen, Xue-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We used 12 530 photometrically-selected blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to estimate the total extinction of the Milky Way at the high Galactic latitudes, RV and AV in each line of sight. Methods: A Bayesian method was developed to estimate the reddening values in the given lines of sight. Based on the most likely values of reddening in multiple colors, we were able to derive the values of RV and AV. Results: We selected 94 zero-reddened BHB stars from seven globular clusters as the template. The reddening in the four SDSS colors for the northern Galactic cap were estimated by comparing the field BHB stars with the template stars. The accuracy of this estimation is around 0.01 mag for most lines of sight. We also obtained ⟨ RV ⟩ to be around 2.40 ± 1.05 and AV map within an uncertainty of 0.1 mag. The results, including reddening values in the four SDSS colors, AV, and RV in each line of sight, are released on line. In this work, we employ an up-to-date parallel technique on GPU card to overcome time-consuming computations. We plan to release online the C++ CUDA code used for this analysis. Conclusions: The extinction map derived from BHB stars is highly consistent with that from Schlegel et al. (1998, ApJ, 500, 525). The derived RV is around 2.40 ± 1.05. The contamination probably makes the RV be larger. Tables 1-4 (excerpt) are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Table 4 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A142

  11. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Southern Galactic O and WN Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamen, R.; Barbá, R. H.; Morrell, N. I.; Arias, J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2008-08-01

    We are conducting a spectroscopic monitoring of O- and WN-type stars for which there is no indication of multiplicity in the Galactic O-Stars Catalog (Maíz-Apellániz et al. 2004) or in the VIIth Catalog of Galactic Wolf-Rayet Stars (van der Hucht 2001). We search for radial-velocity (RV) variations indicative of orbital motion.

  12. Infalling young clusters in the Galactic Centre: implications for IMBHs and young stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petts, J. A.; Gualandris, A.

    2017-06-01

    The central parsec of the Milky Way hosts two puzzlingly young stellar populations, a tight isotropic distribution of B stars around SgrA* (the S-stars) and a disc of OB stars extending to ˜0.5 pc. Using a modified version of Sverre Aarseth's direct summation code nbody6, we explore the scenario in which a young star cluster migrates to the Galactic Centre within the lifetime of the OB disc population via dynamical friction. We find that star clusters massive and dense enough to reach the central parsec form a very massive star via physical collisions on a mass segregation time-scale. We follow the evolution of the merger product using the most up to date, yet conservative, mass-loss recipes for very massive stars. Over a large range of initial conditions, we find that the very massive star expels most of its mass via a strong stellar wind, eventually collapsing to form a black hole of mass ˜ 20-400 M⊙, incapable of bringing massive stars to the Galactic Centre. No massive intermediate mass black hole can form in this scenario. The presence of a star cluster in the central ˜10 pc within the last 15 Myr would also leave an ˜2 pc ring of massive stars, which is not currently observed. Thus, we conclude that the star cluster migration model is highly unlikely to be the origin of either young population, and in situ formation models or binary disruptions are favoured.

  13. Gravothermal Star Clusters - Theory and Computer Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurzem, Rainer

    2010-11-01

    In the George Darwin lecture, delivered to the British Royal Astronomical Society in 1960 by Viktor A. Ambartsumian he wrote on the evolution of stellar systems that it can be described by the "dynamic evolution of a gravitating gas" complemented by "a statistical description of the changes in the physical states of stars". This talk will show how this physical concept has inspired theoretical modeling of star clusters in the following decades up to the present day. The application of principles of thermodynamics shows, as Ambartsumian argued in his 1960 lecture, that there is no stable state of equilibrium of a gravitating star cluster. The trend to local thermodynamic equilibrium is always disturbed by escaping stars (Ambartsumian), as well as by gravothermal and gravogyro instabilities, as it was detected later. Here the state-of-the-art of modeling the evolution of dense stellar systems based on principles of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics (Fokker-Planck approximation) will be reviewed. Recent progress including rotation and internal correlations (primordial binaries) is presented. The models have also very successfully been used to study dense star clusters around massive black holes in galactic nuclei and even (in a few cases) relativistic supermassive dense objects in centres of galaxies (here again briefly touching one of the many research fields of V.A. Ambartsumian). For the modern present time of high-speed supercomputing, where we are tackling direct N-body simulations of star clusters, we will show that such direct modeling supports and proves the concept of the statistical models based on the Fokker-Planck theory, and that both theoretical concepts and direct computer simulations are necessary to support each other and make scientific progress in the study of star cluster evolution.

  14. STELLAR ENCOUNTER RATE IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C.

    2013-04-01

    The high stellar densities in the cores of globular clusters cause significant stellar interactions. These stellar interactions can produce close binary mass-transferring systems involving compact objects and their progeny, such as X-ray binaries and radio millisecond pulsars. Comparing the numbers of these systems and interaction rates in different clusters drives our understanding of how cluster parameters affect the production of close binaries. In this paper we estimate stellar encounter rates ({Gamma}) for 124 Galactic globular clusters based on observational data as opposed to the methods previously employed, which assumed 'King-model' profiles for all clusters. By deprojecting cluster surface brightness profiles to estimate luminosity density profiles, we treat 'King-model' and 'core-collapsed' clusters in the same way. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the effects of uncertainties in various observational parameters (distance, reddening, surface brightness) on {Gamma}, producing the first catalog of globular cluster stellar encounter rates with estimated errors. Comparing our results with published observations of likely products of stellar interactions (numbers of X-ray binaries, numbers of radio millisecond pulsars, and {gamma}-ray luminosity) we find both clear correlations and some differences with published results.

  15. Red giants in the vicinity of open clusters. Field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.; Antipova, L. I.; Boyarchuk, A. A.; Zhao, G.; Liang, Ya.

    2009-08-01

    We present a comparative analysis of the atmospheric abundances of red giants in the vicinity of open clusters. The atmospheric parameters, atmospheric abundances, masses, ages, Galactic velocities, and elements of the Galactic orbits are derived for all the studied stars. We have discovered high metal abundances (close to 0.3dex) for five stars, which we classify as super-metal-rich stars. Several stars have lower [Na/Fe] than normal red giants with similar atmospheric parameters. The kinematic characteristics of these stars are somewhat different from those for objects in the Galactic thin disk. We suggest that the observed effect can be explained by inhomogeneity of the chemical composition of gas-dust clouds, which could be due to different rates of SNe II supernovae in different regions of the Galaxy.

  16. YOUNG RADIO PULSARS IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Boyles, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Turk, P. J.; Mnatsakanov, R.; Lynch, R. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Freire, P. C.; Belczynski, K.

    2011-11-20

    Currently three isolated radio pulsars and one binary radio pulsar with no evidence of any previous recycling are known in 97 surveyed Galactic globular clusters (GCs). As pointed out by Lyne et al., the presence of these pulsars cannot be explained by core-collapse supernovae, as commonly assumed for their counterparts in the Galactic disk. We apply a Bayesian analysis to the results from surveys for radio pulsars in GCs and find the number of potentially observable non-recycled radio pulsars present in all clusters to be <3600. Accounting for beaming and retention considerations, the implied birthrate for any formation scenario for all 97 clusters is <0.25 pulsars century{sup -1} assuming a Maxwellian distribution of velocities with a dispersion of 10 km s{sup -1}. The implied birthrates for higher velocity dispersions are substantially higher than inferred for such pulsars in the Galactic disk. This suggests that the velocity dispersion of young pulsars in GCs is significantly lower than those of disk pulsars. These numbers may be substantial overestimates due to the fact that the currently known sample of young pulsars is observed only in metal-rich clusters. We propose that young pulsars may only be formed in GCs with metallicities with log[Fe/H] > - 0.6. In this case, the potentially observable population of such young pulsars is 447{sup +1420}{sub -399} (the error bars give a 95% confidence interval) and their birthrate is 0.012{sup +0.037}{sub -0.010} pulsars century{sup -1}. The most likely creation scenario to explain these pulsars is the electron capture supernova of an OMgNe white dwarf.

  17. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Beerman, Lori C.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Larsen, Søren S.; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey data set to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency (Γ), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda’s cluster and field populations over the last ˜300 Myr. We measure Γ of 4%-8% for young, 10-100 Myr-old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These Γ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an H i-dominated, low-intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where Γ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time (τ dep) when modeling Γ, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H2-dominated to a H i-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that Γ measurements in high ΣSFR starburst systems are well-explained by τ dep-dependent fiducial Γ models.

  18. Massive black holes in dense star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurkan, Mehmet Atakan

    2005-11-01

    In this thesis, we study the formation of massive black holes in dense star clusters and their effects on the clusters' further evolution. We determine the necessary conditions for early core collapse, leading to the formation of a very massive star via runaway collisions. This process provides a natural mechanism for the formation of intermediate-mass black holes in young dense star clusters, which have been inferred from recent X-ray and optical observations. We performed about a hundred N -body simulations using our Monte Carlo technique, with a wide variety of initial conditions, containing up to 10 7 stars from a broad initial mass distribution. We find that for realistic initial mass functions, mass segregation and dynamical instabilities reduce the core collapse time, t cc , by two orders of magnitude compared to single- component cluster models. The ratio of the core collapse time to central relaxation time is generally ~0.15, which translates into ~0.07 for ratio of core collapse time to half-mass relaxation time for moderately concentrated clusters. This ratio can be smaller if there is initial mass segregation. We also find that typically the mass of the stars in the collapsing core is ~0.2% of the cluster's total mass. We then study the inspiral towards the Galactic center of young clusters which undergo early core collapse. We find that such clusters can bring many young stars to the central parsec, and hence explain the presence of many young stars in this region. However, this mechanism requires a large initial mass, and deposits more stars, both in the central parsec and outside it, than observed. We provide possible explanations for this discrepancy, and suggest future directions for research. Finally, we study the effects of primordial binaries on early core collapse runaway collisions. Even though such binaries generally delay and prevent core collapse (e.g., in globular clusters) they are expected to facilitate collisions and hence accelerate

  19. Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae: new ties between the chemical and dynamical evolution of globular clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučinskas, A.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Bonifacio, P.

    2014-08-01

    Context. It is generally accepted today that Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) consist of at least two generations of stars that are different in their chemical composition and perhaps age. However, knowledge about the kinematical properties of these stellar generations, which may provide important information for constraining evolutionary scenarios of the GGCs, is still limited. Aims: We study the connections between chemical and kinematical properties of different stellar generations in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tuc. Methods: To achieve this goal, we used abundances of Li, O, and Na determined in 101 main sequence turn-off (TO) stars with the aid of 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres and NLTE abundance analysis methodology. We divided our sample TO stars into three groups according to their position in the [Li/Na] - [Na/O] plane to study their spatial distribution and kinematical properties. Results: We find that there are statistically significant radial dependencies of lithium and oxygen abundances, A(Li) and A(O), as well as that of [Li/Na] abundance ratio. Our results show that first-generation stars are less centrally concentrated and dynamically hotter than stars belonging to subsequent generations. We also find a significant correlation between the velocity dispersion and O and Na abundance, and between the velocity dispersion and the [Na/O] abundance ratio.

  20. Star-disc interaction in galactic nuclei: orbits and rates of accreted stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Gareth F.; Meiron, Yohai; Shukirgaliyev, Bekdaulet; Panamarev, Taras; Berczik, Peter; Just, Andreas; Spurzem, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    We examine the effect of an accretion disc on the orbits of stars in the central star cluster surrounding a central massive black hole by performing a suite of 39 high-accuracy direct N-body simulations using state-of-the art software and accelerator hardware, with particle numbers up to 128k. The primary focus is on the accretion rate of stars by the black hole (equivalent to their tidal disruption rate for black holes in the small to medium mass range) and the eccentricity distribution of these stars. Our simulations vary not only the particle number, but disc model (two models examined), spatial resolution at the centre (characterized by the numerical accretion radius) and softening length. The large parameter range and physically realistic modelling allow us for the first time to confidently extrapolate these results to real galactic centres. While in a real galactic centre both particle number and accretion radius differ by a few orders of magnitude from our models, which are constrained by numerical capability, we find that the stellar accretion rate converges for models with N ≥ 32k. The eccentricity distribution of accreted stars, however, does not converge. We find that there are two competing effects at work when improving the resolution: larger particle number leads to a smaller fraction of stars accreted on nearly circular orbits, while higher spatial resolution increases this fraction. We scale our simulations to some nearby galaxies and find that the expected boost in stellar accretion (or tidal disruption, which could be observed as X-ray flares) in the presence of a gas disc is about a factor of 10. Even with this boost, the accretion of mass from stars is still a factor of ˜100 slower than the accretion of gas from the disc. Thus, it seems accretion of stars is not a major contributor to black hole mass growth.

  1. UV Spectroscopic Indices of Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Hernández, J.; Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present the calculation of a set of 12 mid-ultraviolet (1900-3200 Å) spectroscopic indices for a sample of 15 galactic globular clusters (GGC) observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). We explore the dependence of the indices on age and metal abundance. We found that five indices (BL 2538, Fe II 2609, Mg II 2800, Mg I 2852 and Mg Wide) display a remarkably good correlation with [Fe/H]. With respect to age, only one index (BL 2740) shows a good correlation. Results from theoretical simple stellar populations well reproduce the global trends of indices vs. [Fe/H].

  2. Origins of massive field stars in the Galactic Centre: a spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Mauerhan, Jon; Morris, Mark R.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Cotera, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Outside of the known star clusters in the Galactic Centre, a large number of evolved massive stars have been detected; but their origins remain uncertain. We present a spectroscopic study of eight such stars, based on new Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph (GNIRS) and Near-IR Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) near-infrared observations. This work has led to the discovery of a new O If+ star. We compare the reddening-corrected J - K versus K diagram for our stars with the massive ones in the Arches cluster and use stellar evolutionary tracks to constrain their ages and masses. The radial velocities of both the stars and their nearby H II regions are also reported. All of the stars are blueshifted relative to the Arches cluster by > 50 km s-1. We find that our source P35 has a velocity consistent with that of the surrounding molecular gas. The velocity gradient of nearby ionized gas along the Gemini GNIRS long slit, relative to P35 and the adjacent -30 to 0 km s-1 molecular cloud, can best be explained by a pressure-driven flow model. Thus, P35 most likely formed in situ. Three more of our stars have radial velocities different from their adjacent molecular gas, indicating that they are interlopers. The four stars closest to the Arches cluster have similar spectra, ages and masses to known cluster members, suggesting that they were likely ejected from the cluster via three-body interactions. Therefore, we find that the relatively isolated stars are partly form in situ and partly be ejected from the known star clusters in the Galactic Center.

  3. The impact of galaxy geometry and mass evolution on the survival of star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Madrid, Juan P.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Martig, Marie

    2014-04-01

    Direct N-body simulations of globular clusters in a realistic Milky-Way-like potential are carried out using the code NBODY6 to determine the impact of the host galaxy disk mass and geometry on the survival of star clusters. A relation between disk mass and star-cluster dissolution timescale is derived. These N-body models show that doubling the mass of the disk from 5 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} to 10 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} halves the dissolution time of a satellite star cluster orbiting the host galaxy at 6 kpc from the galactic center. Different geometries in a disk of identical mass can determine either the survival or dissolution of a star cluster orbiting within the inner 6 kpc of the galactic center. Furthermore, disk geometry has measurable effects on the mass loss of star clusters up to 15 kpc from the galactic center. N-body simulations performed with a fine output time step show that at each disk crossing the outer layers of star clusters experiences an increase in velocity dispersion of ∼5% of the average velocity dispersion in the outer section of star clusters. This leads to an enhancement of mass loss—a clearly discernable effect of disk shocking. By running models with different inclinations, we determine that star clusters with an orbit that is perpendicular to the Galactic plane have larger mass loss rates than do clusters that evolve in the Galactic plane or in an inclined orbit.

  4. Multiple Stellar Populations in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotto, G.

    2013-09-01

    For half a century it had been astronomical dogma that a globular cluster (GC) consists of stars born at the same time out of the same material, and this doctrine has borne rich fruits. In recent years, high resolution spectroscopy and high precision photometry (from space and ground-based observations) have shattered this paradigm, and the study of GC populations has acquired a new life that is now moving it in new directions. Evidence of multiple stellar populations have been identified in the color-magnitude diagrams of several Galactic and Magellanic Cloud GCs where they had never been imagined before.

  5. Galactic evolution of sulphur as traced by globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacharov, N.; Koch, A.; Caffau, E.; Sbordone, L.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Sulphur is an important volatile α element, but its role in the Galactic chemical evolution is still uncertain, and more observations constraining the sulphur abundance in stellar photospheres are required. Aims: We derive the sulphur abundances in red giant branch (RGB) stars in three Galactic halo globular clusters (GC) that cover a wide metallicity range (-2.3 < [Fe/H] < -1.2): M 4 (NGC 6121), M 22 (NGC 6656), and M 30 (NGC 7099). The halo field stars show a large scatter in the [S/Fe] ratio in this metallicity span, which is inconsistent with canonical chemical evolution models. To date, very few measurements of [S/Fe] exist for stars in GCs, which are good tracers of the chemical enrichment of their environment. However, some light and α elements show star-to-star variations within individual GCs, and it is as yet unclear whether the α element sulphur also varies between GC stars. Methods: We used the infrared spectrograph CRIRES to obtain high-resolution (R ~ 50 000), high signal-to-noise (S/N ~ 200 per px) spectra in the region of the S I multiplet 3 at 1045 nm for 15 GC stars selected from the literature (six stars in M 4,six stars in M 22, and three stars in M 30). Multiplet 3 is better suited for S abundance derivation than the more commonly used lines of multiplet 1 at 920 nm, since its lines are not blended by telluric absorption or other stellar features at low metallicity. Results: We used spectral synthesis to derive the [S/Fe] ratio of the stars assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We find mean [S/Fe]LTE = 0.58 ± 0.01 ± 0.20 dex (statistical and systematic error) for M 4, [S/Fe]LTE = 0.57 ± 0.01 ± 0.19 dex for M 22, and [S/Fe]LTE = 0.55 ± 0.02 ± 0.16 dex for M 30. The negative NLTE corrections are estimated to be in the order of the systematic uncertainties. We do not detect star-to-star variations of the S abundance in any of the observed GCs, with the possible exception of two individual stars, one in M 22 and one in M

  6. A New Insight to the Galactic O Vz Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, J. I.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Barbá, R.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Walborn, N. R.; Sota, A.; Morrell, N.; Gamen, R.; Alfaro, E.; Sabín-Sanjulián, C.; Herrero, A.

    2014-10-01

    Based on a large sample of spectra from the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS, Maíz Apellániz et al. 2011) a systematic study of the Galactic O dwarfs belonging to the luminosity subclass Vz is being performed. Preliminary results suggest a redefinition of the quantitative criterion to assign the ``z'' qualifier to the spectra.

  7. Emission line galaxies and active galactic nuclei in WINGS clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Bettoni, D.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fasano, G.; Fritz, J.; Cava, A.; Varela, J.; Omizzolo, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present the analysis of the emission line galaxies members of 46 low-redshift (0.04 < z < 0.07) clusters observed by WINGS (WIde-field Nearby Galaxy cluster Survey). Emission line galaxies were identified following criteria that are meant to minimize biases against non-star-forming galaxies and classified employing diagnostic diagrams. We examined the emission line properties and frequencies of star-forming galaxies, transition objects, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs: LINERs and Seyferts), unclassified galaxies with emission lines, and quiescent galaxies with no detectable line emission. A deficit of emission line galaxies in the cluster environment is indicated by both a lower frequency, and a systematically lower Balmer emission line equivalent width and luminosity with respect to control samples; this implies a lower amount of ionized gas per unit mass and a lower star formation rate if the source is classified as Hii region. A sizable population of transition objects and of low-luminosity LINERs (≈ 10-20% of all emission line galaxies) are detected among WINGS cluster galaxies. These sources are a factor of ≈1.5 more frequent, or at least as frequent, as in control samples with respect to Hii sources. Transition objects and LINERs in clusters are most affected in terms ofline equivalent width by the environment and appear predominantly consistent with so-called retired galaxies. Shock heating can be a possible gas excitation mechanism that is able to account for observed line ratios. Specific to the cluster environment, we suggest interaction between atomic and molecular gas and the intracluster medium as a possible physical cause of line-emitting shocks. The data whose description is provided in Table B.1, and emission line catalog of the WINGS database are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A83

  8. Initial Dynamical Evolution of Star Clusters with Tidal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, So-Myoung; Goodwin, Simon P.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2017-03-01

    Observations have been suggested that star clusters could form from the rapid collapse and violent relaxation of substructured distributions. We investigate the collapse of fractal stellar distributions in no, weak, and very strong tidal fields. We find that the rapid collapse of substructure into spherical clusters happens quickly with no or a weak tidal field, but very strong tidal fields prevent a cluster forming. However, we also find that dense Plummer spheres are also rapidly destroyed in strong tidal fields. We suggest that this is why the low-mass star clusters cannot survive near the galactic centre which has strong tidal field.

  9. Did globular clusters contribute to the stellar population of the Galactic halo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnel, Corinne; Krause, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The origin of Galactic halo stars and the contribution of globular clusters (GC) to this stellar population have long been (and still are) debated. The discovery of multiple stellar populations with peculiar chemical properties in GCs both in the Milky Way and in Local Group galaxies recently brought a renewal on these questions. Indeed most of the scenarios that compete to reproduce the present-day GC characteristics call for fast expulsion of both gas and low-mass stars from these clusters in their early infancy. In this framework, the initial masses of GCs could have been 8 to 25 times higher than their present-day stellar mass, and they could have contributed to 5 to 20 % of the low-mass stars in the Galactic halo. Here we revisit these conclusions, which are in tension with observations of dwarf galaxies and of young massive star clusters in the Local Group. We come back in particular on the paradigm of gas expulsion from massive star clusters, and propose an alternative interpretation of the GC abundance properties. We conclude by proposing a major revision of the current concepts regarding the role massive star clusters play in the assembly of galactic haloes.

  10. Ultraviolet properties of hot stars in globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Altner, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Most of the interesting and important stages of stellar evolution beyond the horizontal branch (HB) occur in the temperature realms best investigated by ultraviolet (UV) astronomy. In this dissertation the author studies the UV properties of hot HB and post-HB stars found in a sample of galactic globular clusters, based on spectra obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Using techniques developed specifically for the purpose, he separates the overlapping spectra of individual hot stars in the crowded central regions of the clusters. He determines the physical properties of the separated core sources by comparing them to model stellar atmospheres, Population I standards, faint blue halo stars and previously known UV-bright cluster stars, from which he attempts to better understand their evolutionary status. The majority of the more than one hundred spatially separated components turn out to be individual blue HB stars, but a few have properties similar to those of the more evolved supra-HB stars or post-asymptotic-giant-branch (post-AGB) stars, substantially increasing the number of UV-bright stars found in galactic globular clusters. Derived properties of the post-AGB stars imply, through the use of the Paczynski mass-luminosity relation, that these stars span a very narrow range in total core mass, with a mean value near 0.55 Mass of sun - somewhat smaller than that derived for central stars of planetary nebulae in the galactic disk. Several of the clusters observed to have luminous ultraviolet sources in their cores have also shown the presence of a central cusp in the visual.

  11. Variable stars in the VVV globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-García, Javier; Catelan, Márcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Dékány, István; Minniti, Dante

    2017-09-01

    The VVV survey observed some of the most crowded and most obscured regions in the inner MilkyWay during the last years. A significant sample of the less known globular clusters in our galaxy lie there. Combining the high-resolution, wide-field, nearinfrared capabilities of the survey camera, the use of 5 different filters, and multi-epoch observations, we are able to overcome many of the previous challenges that prevented a proper study of these objects. Particularly, the identification of the RR Lyrae stars in these globular clusters is proving to be a fundamental tool to establish accurately their distances and reddenings, and to infer information about the Oosterhoff dichotomy that Galactic globular clusters seem to follow.

  12. Evolution of Star Clusters in Time-variable Tidal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamikonyan, Ernest N.; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Vesperini, Enrico; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2017-03-01

    Strong tidal forces can dominate star cluster evolution in merging galaxies, determining their mass-loss rates and lifetimes. In order to model this evolution, we have developed a second-order accurate numerical method for integrating a star cluster in an arbitrary time-variable tidal field. We extend the Kira N-body integrator to handle these external fields. We obtain realistic tidal histories from a galaxy merger simulation including sink particles, which we interpret as young star clusters. Coupling these tidal accelerations to N-body models of isolated clusters, we perform detailed dynamical studies. This generalizes the formalism previously used to explore the dynamical effects of the galactic tidal field on clusters in circular orbits. We find that, in contrast to previous studies that considered only stellar and dark matter dynamics, tidal interactions between clusters and dense gas in the galactic disk can significantly influence cluster mass loss and lifetimes. Using our models, we develop an effective semianalytic model that can be used for fast estimation of cluster mass loss in a galactic tidal field and to study the evolution of the globular cluster mass function in isolated and merging galaxies.

  13. Supra-galactic colour patterns in globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Juan C.

    2017-07-01

    An analysis of globular cluster systems associated with galaxies included in the Virgo and Fornax Hubble Space Telescope-Advanced Camera Surveys reveals distinct (g - z) colour modulation patterns. These features appear on composite samples of globular clusters and, most evidently, in galaxies with absolute magnitudes Mg in the range from -20.2 to -19.2. These colour modulations are also detectable on some samples of globular clusters in the central galaxies NGC 1399 and NGC 4486 (and confirmed on data sets obtained with different instruments and photometric systems), as well as in other bright galaxies in these clusters. After discarding field contamination, photometric errors and statistical effects, we conclude that these supra-galactic colour patterns are real and reflect some previously unknown characteristic. These features suggest that the globular cluster formation process was not entirely stochastic but included a fraction of clusters that formed in a rather synchronized fashion over large spatial scales, and in a tentative time lapse of about 1.5 Gy at redshifts z between 2 and 4. We speculate that the putative mechanism leading to that synchronism may be associated with large scale feedback effects connected with violent star-forming events and/or with supermassive black holes.

  14. THE ORIGIN OF S-STARS AND A YOUNG STELLAR DISK: DISTRIBUTION OF DEBRIS STARS OF A SINKING STAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, M.; Iwasawa, M.; Makino, J.; Funato, Y. E-mail: makino@cfca.j E-mail: funato@artcompsci.or

    2010-06-10

    Within the distance of 1 pc from the Galactic center (GC), more than 100 young massive stars have been found. The massive stars at 0.1-1 pc from the GC are located in one or two disks, while those within 0.1 pc from the GC, S-stars, have an isotropic distribution. How these stars are formed is not well understood, especially for S-stars. Here, we propose that a young star cluster with an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) can form both the disks and S-stars. We performed a fully self-consistent N-body simulation of a star cluster near the GC. Stars that escaped from the tidally disrupted star cluster were carried to the GC due to a 1:1 mean motion resonance with the IMBH formed in the cluster. In the final phase of the evolution, the eccentricity of the IMBH becomes very high. In this phase, stars carried by the 1:1 resonance with the IMBH were dropped from the resonance and their orbits are randomized by a chaotic Kozai mechanism. The mass function of these carried stars is extremely top-heavy within 10''. The surface density distribution of young massive stars has a slope of -1.5 within 10'' from the GC. The distribution of stars in the most central region is isotropic. These characteristics agree well with those of stars observed within 10'' from the GC.

  15. Open Clusters as Tracers of the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantat-Gaudin, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Open clusters (OCs) are routinely used as reliable tracers of the properties and evolution of the galactic disk, as they can be found at all galactocentric distances and span a wide range of ages. More than 3000 OCs are listed in catalogues, although few have been studied in details. The goal of this work is to study the properties of open clusters. This work was conducted in the framework of the Gaia-ESO Survey (GES). GES is an observational campaign targeting more than 100,000 stars in all major components of the Milky Way, including stars in a hundred open clusters. It uses the FLAMES instrument at the VLT to produce high and medium-resolution spectra, which provide accurate radial velocities and individual elemental abundances. In this framework, the goals of the Thesis are: * to study the properties of OCs and of their stars from photometry and spectroscopy to derive their age, the extinction and the chemical composition of the stars, to begin to build a homogeneous data base. Looking at literature data it is clear that different authors derive substantially different chemical compositions, and in general OC parameters. * the study of OCs and their chemical homogeneity (or inhomogeneity) can cast light on what is still an open issue: the presence of multiple populations in clusters. While multiple generations of stars are now ubiquitously found in globular clusters in the Milky Way and in the Magellanic Clouds, they have not been yet detected in open clusters. What is the main driver of the self-pollution process? * to study the cluster formation process. All, or at least a significant fraction of stars form in clusters. Young clusters (a few Myr) can retain some of the properties of the molecular cloud they originate from and give us insight about the cluster assembly process. The first GES data release contains data for the young OC Gamma Velorum, in which two (dynamically different) subpopulations have been identified. This cluster can serve as a test case

  16. Astrochemical studies of galactic star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Ronak Yogendra

    2000-08-01

    This thesis characterizes and quantifies a key part of the chemical evolution associated with star formation towards nearby molecular clouds by analyzing the radiation from abundant molecules and their deuterium- substituted counterparts, or deuterated molecules. As clouds evolve to form stars, molecular spectra probe the dynamics. Deuterium fractionation ratios sample the variations in temperature, density and activity of protostellar systems and offer clues into their dynamics. We present three projects to examine the scope and scale of deuterium fractionation of ammonia, NH3, and formylium, HCO+, in low mass star forming regions. Analysis of single aperture NH2D and NH3 spectra from prestellar and protostellar cores indicates the predominance of gas-phase reactions in the production of these species. Our survey suggests that these species deplete onto grain surfaces at late times in the evolution of molecular cores into protostars. Since the collapse of protostars is rapid, deuterium fractionation of ammonia is not likely to be affected substantially by grain chemistry. This should be the case for even more massive molecular clouds such as Orion Molecular Cloud I or Sgr B2. Thus, observed NH2D/NH3 values probe the cold gas-phase evolution of molecular clouds. The relationship between gas dynamics and star formation are explored in our survey of DCO+ and H13CO+. We extend previous analyses of the DCO+HCO+ as a measure of the ionization fraction and magnetic field-neutral coupling of molecular clouds by examining high energy transitions. This method traces warmer, denser gas associated with near-protostellar regions and clustered star formation. Although we find that most DCO+HCO + values are consistent with previous studies, we also discover regions where DCO+HCO+ is larger than predicted by the paradigm of ambipolar diffusion-regulated star formation. Single aperture surveys examine the ambient gas on ~105 AU scales. However, only aperture synthesis studies

  17. New Star Clusters Discovered in the GLIMPSE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, E. P.; Clemens, D. P.; Meade, M. R.; Babler, B. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Whitney, B. A.; Watson, C.; Wolfire, M. G.; Wolff, M. J.; Bania, T. M.; Benjamin, R. A.; Cohen, M.; Dickey, J. M.; Jackson, J. M.; Kobulnicky, H. A.; Mathis, J. S.; Stauffer, J. R.; Stolovy, S. R.; Uzpen, B.; Churchwell, E. B.

    2005-12-01

    A systematic and automated search of the extensive GLIMPSE mid-infrared survey data of the inner Galaxy was carried out to uncover new star clusters. This search has yielded 59 new clusters. Using our automated search algorithm, these clusters were identified as significant localized overdensities in the GLIMPSE point-source catalog (GLMC) and archive (GLMA). Subsequent visual inspection of the GLIMPSE image mosaics confirmed the existence of these clusters plus an additional 33 heavily embedded clusters missed by our detection algorithm, for a total of 92 newly discovered clusters. These previously uncataloged clusters range in type from heavily embedded to fully exposed clusters. More than half of the clusters have memberships exceeding 35 stars, and nearly all the clusters have diameters of 3' or less. The Galactic latitude distribution of the clusters reveals that the majority are concentrated toward the Galactic midplane. There is an asymmetry in the number of clusters located above and below the midplane, with more clusters detected below the midplane. We also observe an asymmetry in the number of clusters detected in the northern and southern halves of the Galaxy, with more than twice as many clusters detected in the south.

  18. The complex stellar populations in the background of open clusters in the third Galactic quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni; Seleznev, Anton F.; Baume, Gustavo; Turner, David. G.

    2016-02-01

    Multicolour photometry of the stellar populations in five fields in the third Galactic quadrant centred on the clusters NGC 2215, NGC 2354, Haffner 22, Ruprecht 11, and ESO489 SC01 is interpreted in terms of a warped and flared Galactic disc, without resort to an external entity such as the popular Monoceros or Canis Major overdensities. Except for NGC 2215, the clusters are poorly or unstudied previously. The data generate basic parameters for each cluster, including the distribution of stars along the line of sight. We use star counts and photometric analysis, without recourse to Galactic-model-based predictions or interpretations, and confirms earlier results for NGC 2215 and NGC 2354. ESO489 SC01 is not a real cluster, while Haffner 22 is an overlooked cluster aged ˜2.5 Gyr. Conclusions for Ruprecht 11 are preliminary, evidence for a cluster being marginal. Fields surrounding the clusters show signatures of young and intermediate-age stellar populations. The young population background to NGC 2354 and Ruprecht 11 lies ˜8-9 kpc from the Sun and ˜1 kpc below the formal Galactic plane, tracing a portion of the Norma-Cygnus arm, challenging Galactic models that adopt a sharp cut-off of the disc 12-14 kpc from the Galactic Centre. The old population is metal-poor with an age of ˜2-3 Gyr, resembling star clusters like Tombaugh 2 or NGC 2158. It has a large colour spread and is difficult to locate precisely. Young and old populations follow a pattern that depends critically on the vertical location of the thin and/or thick disc, and whether or not a particular line of sight intersects one, both, or none.

  19. Westerlund 1 is a Galactic Treasure Chest: The Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosslowe, C. K.; Crowther, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    The Westerlund 1 Galactic cluster hosts an eclectic mix of coeval massive stars. At a modest distance of 4-5 kpc, it offers a unique opportunity to study the resolved stellar content of a young (~5 Myr) high mass (5.104 M ⊙) star cluster. With the aim of testing single-star evolutionary predictions, and revealing any signatures of binary evolution, we discuss on-going analyses of NTT/SOFI near-IR spectroscopy of Wolf-Rayet stars in Westerlund 1. We find that late WN stars are H-poor compared to their counterparts in the Milky Way field, and nearly all are less luminous than predicted by single-star Geneva isochrones at the age of Westerlund 1.

  20. Multiple populations in more metal-rich galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Maria J.

    In this thesis we present chemical abundances for bright stars in the intermediate metallicity globular cluster (GC) M5, and the relatively metal-rich GCs M71 and 47 Tuc with the goal of improving the understanding of chemical evolution in the metallicity regime sampled by these three GCs. The first chapter presents a brief historical overview in light element abundance variations in globular clusters. In the second chapter we present the results obtained for 47 Tuc, the most-metal rich cluster of my sample. 47 Tuc is an ideal target to study chemical evolution and GC formation in massive more metal-rich GCs since it is the closest massive GC. Chemical abundances for O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, La, and Eu were determined for 164 red giant branch (RGB) stars in 47 Tuc using spectra obtained with both the Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph at the Blanco 4-m telescope and the FLAMES multi-object spectrograph at the ESO Very Large Telescope. The average [Fe/H]= --0.79+/-0.09 dex is consistent with literature values, as well as over-abundances of alpha-elements ([alpha/Fe] ~ 0.3 dex). The n-capture process elements indicate that 47 Tuc is r-process dominated ([Eu/La]=+0.24), and the light elements O, Na, and Al exhibit star-to-star variations. The Na-O anti-correlation, a signature typically seen in Galactic GCs, is present in 47 Tuc, and extends to include a small number of stars with [O/Fe] ~ --0.5. Additionally, the [O/Na] ratios of our sample reveal that the cluster stars can be separated into three distinct populations. A KS-test demonstrates that the O-poor/Na-rich stars are more centrally concentrated than the O-rich/Na-poor stars. The observed number and radial distribution of 47 Tuc's stellar populations, as distinguished by their light element composition, agrees closely with the results obtained from photometric data. We do not find evidence supporting a strong Na-Al correlation in 47 Tuc, which is consistent with current models of AGB nucleosynthesis yields

  1. N-body simulations of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Kimberly Anne

    1999-10-01

    We investigate the structure and evolution of underfilling (i.e. non-Roche-lobe-filling) King model globular star clusters using N-body simulations. We model clusters with various underfilling factors and mass distributions to determine their evolutionary tracks and lifetimes. These models include a self-consistent galactic tidal field, mass loss due to stellar evolution, ejection, and evaporation, and binary evolution. We find that a star cluster that initially does not fill its Roche lobe can live many times longer than one that does initially fill its Roche lobe. After a few relaxation times, the cluster expands to fill its Roche lobe. We also find that the choice of initial mass function significantly affects the lifetime of the cluster. These simulations were performed on the GRAPE-4 (GRAvity PipE) special-purpose hardware with the stellar dynamics package ``Starlab.'' The GRAPE-4 system is a massively-parallel computer designed to calculate the force (and its first time derivative) due to N particles. Starlab's integrator ``kira'' employs a 4th- order Hermite scheme with hierarchical (block) time steps to evolve the stellar system. We discuss, in some detail, the design of the GRAPE-4 system and the manner in which the Hermite integration scheme with block time steps is implemented in the hardware.

  2. The Milky Way's nuclear star cluster and massive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Because of its nearness to Earth, the centre of the Milky Way is the only galaxy nucleus in which we can study the characteristics, distribution, kinematics, and dynamics of the stars on milli-parsec scales. We have accurate and precise measurements of the Galactic centre's central black hole, Sagittarius A*, and can study its interaction with the surrounding nuclear star cluster in detail. This contribution aims at providing a concise overview of our current knowledge about the Milky Way's central black hole and nuclear star cluster, at highlighting the observational challenges and limitations, and at discussing some of the current key areas of investigation.

  3. OPEN CLUSTERS AS PROBES OF THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD. I. CLUSTER PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hoq, Sadia; Clemens, D. P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Stars in open clusters are powerful probes of the intervening Galactic magnetic field via background starlight polarimetry because they provide constraints on the magnetic field distances. We use 2MASS photometric data for a sample of 31 clusters in the outer Galaxy for which near-IR polarimetric data were obtained to determine the cluster distances, ages, and reddenings via fitting theoretical isochrones to cluster color–magnitude diagrams. The fitting approach uses an objective χ{sup 2} minimization technique to derive the cluster properties and their uncertainties. We found the ages, distances, and reddenings for 24 of the clusters, and the distances and reddenings for 6 additional clusters that were either sparse or faint in the near-IR. The derived ranges of log(age), distance, and E(B−V) were 7.25–9.63, ∼670–6160 pc, and 0.02–1.46 mag, respectively. The distance uncertainties ranged from ∼8% to 20%. The derived parameters were compared to previous studies, and most cluster parameters agree within our uncertainties. To test the accuracy of the fitting technique, synthetic clusters with 50, 100, or 200 cluster members and a wide range of ages were fit. These tests recovered the input parameters within their uncertainties for more than 90% of the individual synthetic cluster parameters. These results indicate that the fitting technique likely provides reliable estimates of cluster properties. The distances derived will be used in an upcoming study of the Galactic magnetic field in the outer Galaxy.

  4. Stellar and Binary Evolution in Star Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Stephen L. W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on research activities covered on Stellar and Binary Evolution in Star Clusters. Substantial progress was made in the development and dissemination of the "Starlab" software environment. Significant improvements were made to "kira," an N-body simulation program tailored to the study of dense stellar systems such as star clusters and galactic nuclei. Key advances include (1) the inclusion of stellar and binary evolution in a self-consistent manner, (2) proper treatment of the anisotropic Galactic tidal field, (3) numerous technical enhancements in the treatment of binary dynamics and interactions, and (4) full support for the special-purpose GRAPE-4 hardware, boosting the program's performance by a factor of 10-100 over the accelerated version. The data-reduction and analysis tools in Starlab were also substantially expanded. A Starlab Web site (http://www.sns.ias.edu/-starlab) was created and developed. The site contains detailed information on the structure and function of the various tools that comprise the package, as well as download information, "how to" tips and examples of common operations, demonstration programs, animations, etc. All versions of the software are freely distributed to all interested users, along with detailed installation instructions.

  5. Photoelectric UBVRI sequences in the Galactic globular clusters NGC 6752 and NGC 6864

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E.; Alcaino, G.; Liller, W. )

    1990-05-01

    UBVRI photoelectric sequences for the Galactic globular clusters NGC 6752 and NGC 6864 are presented. Both of them include fields suitable for CCD exposures. From five UBV sequences in NGC 6572, only five stars are in common with the previous works. 15 refs.

  6. The halo+cluster system of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P.; Yong, D.; Dotter, A.; Da Costa, G.; Asplund, M.; Jerjen, H.; Mackey, D.; Norris, J.; Cassisi, S.; Sbordone, L.; Stetson, P. B.; Weiss, A.; Aparicio, A.; Bedin, L. R.; Lind, K.; Monelli, M.; Piotto, G.; Angeloni, R.; Buonanno, R.

    2014-08-01

    NGC 1851 is surrounded by a stellar component that extends more than 10 times beyond the tidal radius. Although the nature of this stellar structure is not known, it has been suggested to be a sparse halo of stars or associated with a stellar stream. We analyse the nature of this intriguing stellar component surrounding NGC 1851 by investigating its radial velocities and chemical composition, in particular in comparison with those of the central cluster analysed in a homogeneous manner. In total we observed 23 stars in the halo with radial velocities consistent with NGC 1851, and for 15 of them we infer [Fe/H] abundances. Our results show that (i) stars dynamically linked to NGC 1851 are present at least up to ˜2.5 tidal radii, supporting the presence of a halo of stars surrounding the cluster; (ii) apart from the NGC 1851 radial velocity-like stars, our observed velocity distribution agrees with that expected from Galactic models, suggesting that no other substructure (such as a stream) at different radial velocities is present in our field; (iii) the chemical abundances for the s-process elements Sr and Ba are consistent with the s-normal stars observed in NGC 1851; (iv) all halo stars have metallicities, and abundances for the other studied elements Ca, Mg and Cr, consistent with those exhibited by the cluster. The complexity of the whole NGC 1851 cluster+halo system may agree with the scenario of a tidally disrupted dwarf galaxy in which NGC 1851 was originally embedded.

  7. NGC 2548: clumpy spatial and kinematic structure in an intermediate-age Galactic cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, Belén; Sánchez, Néstor; Alfaro, Emilio J.

    2016-09-01

    NGC 2548 is a ˜400-500 Myr old open cluster with evidence of spatial substructures likely caused by its interaction with the Galactic disc. In this work we use precise astrometric data from the Carte du Ciel - San Fernando (CdC-SF) catalogue to study the clumpy structure in this cluster. We confirm the fragmented structure of NGC 2548 but, additionally, the relatively high precision of our kinematic data lead us to the first detection of substructures in the proper motion space of a stellar cluster. There are three spatially separated cores each of which has its own counterpart in the proper motion distribution. The two main cores lie nearly parallel to the Galactic plane whereas the third one is significantly fainter than the others and it moves towards the Galactic plane separating from the rest of the cluster. We derive core positions and proper motions, as well as the stars belonging to each core.

  8. Probing the link between dynamics and stellar evolution: Blue Straggler Stars in Globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.

    2009-11-01

    In this contribution we review the main observational properties of Blue Straggler Stars (BSS) in Galactic Globular Clusters. A flower of results on the BSS frequency, radial distribution, and chemical composition are presented and discussed.

  9. Refining the Dynamical Clock for Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Alessandrini, E.; Dalessandro, E.; Vesperini, E.; Raso, S.

    2016-12-01

    We used a sample of 25 Galactic globular clusters to empirically measure the parameter A + recently introduced by Alessandrini et al., and defined as the area enclosed between the cumulative radial distribution of blue straggler stars (BSSs) and that of a reference population. Based on N-body simulations, this parameter is expected to efficiently measure the level of BSS central segregation. Observationally, for a proper cluster-to-cluster comparison we use {A}{rh}+, i.e., the value of the parameter determined out to the half-mass radius in each system. We find that {A}{rh}+ nicely correlates with the position of the minimum of the BSS normalized radial distribution and with the cluster central relaxation time. This demonstrates that it is a sensitive indicator of the cluster dynamical age as traced by the spatial segregation of the BSS population. In the context of the “stellar system dynamical clock,” this parameter provides a new clock-hand, which is easier to determine observationally and allows a more robust measure of the cluster dynamical age.

  10. Hot stars in globular clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, S.

    Globular clusters are ideal laboratories to study the evolution of low-mass stars. In this review, I shall concentrate on two types of hot stars observed in globular clusters: horizontal branch stars and UV bright stars. The third type, the white dwarfs, are covered by Bono in this volume. While the morphology of the horizontal branch correlates strongly with metallicity, it has been known for a long time that one parameter is not sufficient to describe the diversity of observed horizontal branch morphologies. A veritable zoo of candidates for this elusive ``2{nd} parameter'' has been suggested over the past decades, and the most prominent ones will be briefly discussed here. Adding to the complications, diffusion is active in the atmospheres of hot horizontal branch stars, which makes their analysis much more diffcult. The latest twist along the horizontal branch was added by the recent discovery of an extension to hotter temperatures and fainter magnitudes, the so-called ``blue hook''. The evolutionary origin of these stars is still under debate. I shall also give a brief overview of our current knowledge about hot UV bright stars and use them to illustrate the adverse effects of selection bias.

  11. Variable stars in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6401

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapras, Y.; Arellano Ferro, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Kains, N.; Street, R.; Hundertmark, M.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Snodgrass, C.

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of variable stars in globular cluster NGC 6401. The cluster is only 5.3° away from the Galactic Centre and suffers from strong differential reddening. The photometric precision afforded us by difference image analysis resulted in improved sensitivity to variability in formerly inaccessible interior regions of the cluster. We find 23 RRab and 11 RRc stars within one cluster radius (2.4 arcmin), for which we provide coordinates, finder-charts and time series photometry. Through Fourier decomposition of the RR Lyrae star light curves we derive a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]UVES = -1.13 ± 0.06 ([Fe/H]ZW = -1.25 ± 0.06), and a distance of d ≈ 6.35 ± 0.81 kpc. Using the RR Lyrae population, we also determine that NGC 6401 is an Oosterhoff type I cluster.

  12. The era of star formation in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, C. L.; Gettings, D. P.; Zeimann, G. R.; Snyder, G. F.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Pope, A.; Alberts, S.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Stern, D.; Moustakas, L. A.; Brown, M. J. I.; Chary, R.-R.; Dey, Arjun; Galametz, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Miller, E. D.; Moustakas, J.

    2013-12-20

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 1.5 from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new spectroscopic confirmation for six of these high-redshift clusters, five of which are at z > 1.35. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations at 24 μm, along with robust optical + IRAC photometric redshifts and spectral-energy-distribution-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates, and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that z ∼ 1.4 represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift, the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at z > 1.4 environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. By combining these observations with complementary studies showing a rapid increase in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, a stochastic star formation history, and a major merging episode at the same epoch in this cluster sample, we suggest that the starburst activity is likely merger-driven and that the subsequent quenching is due to feedback from merger-fueled AGNs. The totality of the evidence suggests we are witnessing the final quenching period that brings an end to the era of star formation in galaxy clusters and initiates the era of passive evolution.

  13. Star Cluster Mass Functions and Hierarchical Clustering: Learning from Koposov 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paust, Nathaniel; Wilson, Danielle; van Belle, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    We present photometry of two halo star clusters, Koposov 1 and 2. Found as over-densities in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, these clusters were intially believed to be heavily stripped globular clusters, given the small number of stars per cluster. In this work, we have used isochrone fitting to determine the age, distance, and metallicity of the clusters. These results confirm tha tthe clusters are in the halo but also reveal surprisingly young ages and high metallicities. Investigation of the cluster mass functions reveals a steep negatively-sloped present day mass function in contrast to the flatish positively-sloped mass functions seen in heavily stripped Galactic globular clusters. The mass function slope, proximity to the Sagittarius stream, and common metallicity with M54, which is related to the Sagittarius dwarf, leads to a very interesting conclusion: Koposov 1 and 2 are open clusters removed from the Sagittarius dwarf through tidal stripping.

  14. Star formation in Galactic spiral arms and the interarm regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, D. J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Morgan, L. K.; Thompson, M. A.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2013-05-01

    The line of sight through the Galactic plane between longitudes l = 37°.83 and 42°.50 allows for the separation of Galactic Ring Survey molecular clouds into those that fall within the spiral arms and those located in the interarm regions. By matching these clouds in both position and velocity with dense clumps detected in the mm continuum by the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, we are able to look for changes in the clump formation efficiency (CFE), the ratio of clump to cloud mass, with Galactic environment. We find no evidence of any difference in the CFE between the interarm and spiral-arm regions along this line of sight. This is further evidence that, outside the Galactic Centre region, the large-scale structures of the Galaxy play little part in changing the dense, potentially star-forming structures within molecular clouds.

  15. Evidence for recent star formation in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.

    1986-09-01

    Observational data for PHL 346 obtained with the 2.5 m Issac Newton telescope on August 1985 are studied. Measured stellar Stromgren colors, hydrogen-line profiles, and helium and metal-line equivalent widths are compared with those predicted by local thermodynamic equilibrium model-atmosphere calculations. Effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity, and helium and metal abundances for the star are derived. A mass of 13 + or - 2 solar masses, a lifetime of 11 x 10 to the 6th yr, a distance from the galactic plane of 8.7 + or - 1.5 kpc, and a velocity in the z direction of +56 + or - 10 km/s are calculated for the star. The data reveal that the star was not ejected from the galactic plane, but that it formed out of galactic fountain gas at about 6 kpc from the disc.

  16. A Census of High-Mass Star Formation in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Our Galactic center (GC) region, the inner ~200 pc of the Milky Way, hosts a turbulent, warm interstellar medium influenced by energetic ejections from the central supermassive black hole, frequent cloud collisions, supernova shocks, and powerful stellar winds. The presence of three clusters of massive stars as well as several dozen isolated, massive stars distributed throughout the region raises a profound question about the nature of star formation in the GC: does the extreme environment favor clustered or isolated star formation? Since it is the closest galactic center to us, the GC provides an ideal laboratory to study star formation in such extreme environments and greatly contributes to understanding the properties of nuclear regions in distant galaxies. We propose a photometric survey of warm dust emission from the inner 100 pc of the GC at 19, 25, 31, and 37 micrometers to characterize the prevalence of isolated vs clustered star formation modes. The large area surveyed here will produce a legacy dataset of a critically important region at wavelengths inaccessible by other current or planned observatories within the next decades.

  17. ORIGIN OF THE GALACTIC CENTER S-STARS: GRAVITATIONAL TORQUES FROM LIN-SHU-TYPE SPIRAL DENSITY WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Griv, Evgeny

    2010-02-01

    The supermassive approx4 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} black hole at the Galactic center is surrounded by a parsec-scale star disk, with several thousands of dynamically relaxed, evolved, late-type CO absorption line stars and a small approx100 population of luminous O and Wolf-Rayet stars which move in approximately circular Keplerian orbits. These bluish in color massive O and Wolf-Rayet stars are very young with an estimated age of 6 +- 2 Myr. Another small group of roughly 20 young (<10 Myr) blue B stars with the orbital periods as short as 15 years ('S-stars') follow eccentric, randomly oriented orbits well inside the disk stars. A model is proposed to explain the S-stars. Accordingly, the stars formed originally in the parsec-scale disk through Jeans' gravitational fragmentation of gas. The newly formed S-stars then migrated inward to the Galactic center via the torques exerted by Lin-Shu-type spiral density waves on the stars at an inner Lindblad resonance. The model explains both the number of observed S-stars orbiting the Galactic black hole within the nuclear (<0.05 pc) star cluster and the key property of the S-star orbits, namely, their high eccentricities.

  18. Origin of the Galactic Center S-Stars: Gravitational Torques from Lin-Shu-Type Spiral Density Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny

    2010-02-01

    The supermassive ~4 × 106 M sun black hole at the Galactic center is surrounded by a parsec-scale star disk, with several thousands of dynamically relaxed, evolved, late-type CO absorption line stars and a small ~100 population of luminous O and Wolf-Rayet stars which move in approximately circular Keplerian orbits. These bluish in color massive O and Wolf-Rayet stars are very young with an estimated age of 6 ± 2 Myr. Another small group of roughly 20 young (<10 Myr) blue B stars with the orbital periods as short as 15 years ("S-stars") follow eccentric, randomly oriented orbits well inside the disk stars. A model is proposed to explain the S-stars. Accordingly, the stars formed originally in the parsec-scale disk through Jeans' gravitational fragmentation of gas. The newly formed S-stars then migrated inward to the Galactic center via the torques exerted by Lin-Shu-type spiral density waves on the stars at an inner Lindblad resonance. The model explains both the number of observed S-stars orbiting the Galactic black hole within the nuclear (<0.05 pc) star cluster and the key property of the S-star orbits, namely, their high eccentricities.

  19. The extended stellar substructures of four metal-poor globular clusters in the galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2015-08-01

    We investigated stellar spatial density distribution around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642 and NGC 6723) in order to find extended stellar substructures. Wide-field deep J, H, and K imaging data were taken using the WFCAM near-infrared array on United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). The contamination of field stars around clusters was minimised by applying a statistical weighted filtering algorithm for the stars on the color-magnitude diagram. In two-dimensional isodensity contour map, we find that all four of the globular clusters shows tidal stripping stellar features in the form of tidal tails (NGC 6266 and NGC 6723) or small density lobes/chunk (NGC 6642 and NGC 6723). The stellar substructures extend toward the Galactic centre or anticancer, and the proper motion direction of the clusters. The radial density profiles of the clusters also depart from theoretical King and Wilson models and show overdensity feature with a break in a slope of profile at the outer region of clusters. The observed results indicate that four globular clusters in the Galactic bulge have experienced strong tidal force or bulge/disk shock effect of the Galaxy. These observational results provide us further constraints to understand the evolution of clusters in the Galactic bulge region as well as the formation of the Galaxy.

  20. Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS): The HST View of Star Formation in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, Daniela; Lee, J. C.; Adamo, A.; Aloisi, A.; Andrews, J. E.; Brown, T. M.; Chandar, R.; Christian, C. A.; Cignoni, M.; Clayton, G. C.; Da Silva, R. L.; de Mink, S. E.; Dobbs, C.; Elmegreen, B.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Evans, A. S.; Fumagalli, M.; Gallagher, J. S.; Gouliermis, D.; Grebel, E.; Herrero-Davo`, A.; Hilbert, B.; Hunter, D. A.; Johnson, K. E.; Kennicutt, R.; Kim, H.; Krumholz, M. R.; Lennon, D. J.; Martin, C. D.; Nair, P.; Nota, A.; Pellerin, A.; Prieto, J.; Regan, M. W.; Sabbi, E.; Schaerer, D.; Schiminovich, D.; Smith, L. J.; Thilker, D. A.; Tosi, M.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Walterbos, R. A.; Whitmore, B. C.; Wofford, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Treasury program LEGUS (HST/GO-13364) is the first HST UV Atlas of nearby galaxies, and is aimed at the thorough investigation of star formation and its relation with galaxy environment, from the scales of individual stars to those of ~kpc clustered structures. The 154-orbits program is obtaining NUV,U,B,V,I images of 50 star-forming galaxies in the distance range 4-12 Mpc, covering the full range of morphology, star formation rate (SFR), mass, metallicity, internal structure, and interaction state found in the local Universe. The imaging survey will yield accurate recent (<50 Myr) star formation histories (SFHs) from resolved massive stars, and the extinction-corrected ages and masses of star clusters and associations. These extensive inventories of massive stars, clustered systems, and SFHs will be used to: (1) quantify how the clustering of star formation evolves both in space and in time; (2) discriminate among models of star cluster evolution; (3) investigate the effects of SFH on the UV SFR calibrations; (4) explore the impact of environment on star formation and cluster evolution across the full range of galactic and ISM properties. LEGUS observations will inform theories of star formation and galaxy evolution, and improve the understanding of the physical underpinning of the gas-star formation relation and the nature of the clumpy star formation at high redshift. LEGUS will generate the most homogeneous high-resolution, wide-field UV dataset to date, building and expanding on the GALEX legacy. Data products that will be delivered to the community include: catalogs of massive stars and star clusters, catalogs of star cluster properties (ages, masses, extinction), and a one-stop shop for all the ancillary data available for this well-studied galaxy sample. LEGUS will provide the reference survey and the foundation for future observations with JWST and with ALMA. This abstract accompanies another one from the same project, and presents the status of the

  1. Planetary systems in star clusters .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Shu, Qi; Cai, Maxwell Xu; Spurzem, Rainer

    Thousands of confirmed and candidate exoplanets have been identified in recent years. Consequently, theoretical research on the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems has seen a boost, and the processes of planet-planet scattering, secular evolution, and interaction between planets and gas/debris disks have been well-studied. Almost all of this work has focused on the formation and evolution of isolated planetary systems, and neglect the effect of external influences, such as the gravitational interaction with neighbouring stars. Most stars, however, form in clustered environments that either quickly disperse, or evolve into open clusters. Under these conditions, young planetary systems experience frequent close encounters with other stars, at least during the first 106-107 years, which affects planets orbiting at any period range, as well as their debris structures.

  2. Simulating the Birth of Massive Star Clusters: Is Destruction Inevitable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Very early in its operation, the Hubble Space Telescope {HST} opened an entirely new frontier: study of the demographics and properties of star clusters far beyond the Milky Way. However, interpretation of HST's observations has proven difficult, and has led to the development of two conflicting models. One view is that most massive star clusters are disrupted during their infancy by feedback from newly formed stars {i.e., "infant mortality"}, independent of cluster mass or environment. The other model is that most star clusters survive their infancy and are disrupted later by mass-dependent dynamical processes. Since observations at present have failed to discriminate between these views, we propose a theoretical investigation to provide new insight. We will perform radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive star clusters, including for the first time a realistic treatment of the most important stellar feedback processes. These simulations will elucidate the physics of stellar feedback, and allow us to determine whether cluster disruption is mass-dependent or -independent. We will also use our simulations to search for observational diagnostics that can distinguish bound from unbound clusters, and to predict how cluster disruption affects the cluster luminosity function in a variety of galactic environments.

  3. Bayesian Analysis of Multiple Populations in Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Kaiser, Rachel A.; Sarajedini, Ata; von Hippel, Ted; Stenning, David; Piotto, Giampaolo; Milone, Antonino; van Dyk, David A.; Robinson, Elliot; Stein, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    We use GO 13297 Cycle 21 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and archival GO 10775 Cycle 14 HST ACS Treasury observations of Galactic Globular Clusters to find and characterize multiple stellar populations. Determining how globular clusters are able to create and retain enriched material to produce several generations of stars is key to understanding how these objects formed and how they have affected the structural, kinematic, and chemical evolution of the Milky Way. We employ a sophisticated Bayesian technique with an adaptive MCMC algorithm to simultaneously fit the age, distance, absorption, and metallicity for each cluster. At the same time, we also fit unique helium values to two distinct populations of the cluster and determine the relative proportions of those populations. Our unique numerical approach allows objective and precise analysis of these complicated clusters, providing posterior distribution functions for each parameter of interest. We use these results to gain a better understanding of multiple populations in these clusters and their role in the history of the Milky Way.Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant numbers HST-GO-10775 and HST-GO-13297 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant NNX11AF34G issued through the Office of Space Science. This project was supported by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration through the University of Central Florida's NASA Florida Space Grant Consortium.

  4. Galactic Internet made possible by star gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we study how to create a radio bridge between the Sun and any other star made up by both the gravitational lenses of the Sun and that star. The alignment for this radio bridge to work is very strict, but the power-saving is enormous, due to the huge contributions of the two stars' lenses to the overall antenna gain of the system. In particular, we study in detail: The Sun-Alpha Centauri A radio bridge. The Sun-Barnard's star radio bridge. The Sun-Sirius A radio bridge. The radio bridge between the Sun and any Sun-like star located in the Galactic Bulge. The radio bridge between the Sun and a similar Sun-like star located inside the Andromeda galaxy (M31). Finally, we find the information channel capacity for each of the above radio bridges, putting thus a physical constraint to the maximum information transfer that will be enabled even by exploiting the stars as gravitational lenses. The conclusion is that a Galactic Internet is indeed physically possible. May be the Galactic Internet already is in existence, and was created long ago by civilizations more advanced than ours. But the potential for creating such a system has only recently been realized by Humans.

  5. Barium stars, galactic populations and evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Luri, X.; Figueras, F.; Gomez, A. E.; Grenier, S.; Torra, J.; North, P.

    1997-10-01

    In this paper HIPPARCOS astrometric and kinematical data together with radial velocities from other sources are used to calibrate both luminosity and kinematics parameters of Ba stars and to classify them. We confirm the results of our previous paper (where we used data from the HIPPARCOS Input Catalogue), and show that Ba stars are an inhomogeneous group. Five distinct classes have been found i.e. some halo stars and four groups belonging to disk population: roughly super-giants, two groups of giants (one on the giant branch, the other at the clump location) and dwarfs, with a few subgiants mixed with them. The confirmed or suspected duplicity, the variability and the range of known orbital periods found in each group give coherent results supporting the scenario for Ba stars that are not too highly massive binary stars in any evolutionary stages but that all were previously enriched with Ba from a more evolved companion. The presence in the sample of a certain number of ``false'' Ba stars is confirmed. The estimates of age and mass are compatible with models for stars with a strong Ba anomaly. The mild Ba stars with an estimated mass higher than 3Msun_ may be either stars Ba enriched by themselves or ``true'' Ba stars, which imposes new constraints on models.

  6. The distance to the Galactic center determined by OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branham, Richard L.

    2014-09-01

    The OB stars are concentrated near the Galactic plane and should permit a determination of the distance to the Galactic center. van Leeuwen's new reduction of the Hipparcos catalog provides, after 824 Gould belt stars have been excluded, 6288 OB stars out to 1 kpc and Westin's compilation an additional 112 stars between 1 kpc and 3 kpc. The reduction model involves 14 unknowns: the Oort A and B constants, the distance to the Galactic center R 0, 2 second-order partial derivatives, the 3 components of solar motion, a K term, a first order partial derivative for motion perpendicular to the Galactic plane, a second-order partial for acceleration perpendicular to the plane, two terms for a possible expansion of the OB stars, and a C constant. The model is nonlinear, and the unknowns are calculated by use the simplex algorithm for nonlinear adjustment applied to 14313 equations of condition, 12694 in proper motion and 1619 in radial velocity. Various solutions were tried: an L1 solution, a least squares solution with modest (2.7 %) trim of the data, and two robust least squares solutions (biweight and Welsch weighting) with more extreme trimming. The Welsch solution seems to give the best results and calculates a distance to the Galactic center 6.72±0.39 kpc. Statistical tests show that the data are homogeneous, that the reduction model seems adequate and conforms with the assumptions used in its derivation, and that the post-fit residuals are random. Inclusion of more terms, such as streaming motion induced by Galactic density waves, degrades the solution.

  7. DISRUPTED GLOBULAR CLUSTERS CAN EXPLAIN THE GALACTIC CENTER GAMMA-RAY EXCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Kocsis, Bence

    2015-10-10

    The Fermi satellite has recently detected gamma-ray emission from the central regions of our Galaxy. This may be evidence for dark matter particles, a major component of the standard cosmological model, annihilating to produce high-energy photons. We show that the observed signal may instead be generated by millisecond pulsars that formed in dense star clusters in the Galactic halo. Most of these clusters were ultimately disrupted by evaporation and gravitational tides, contributing to a spherical bulge of stars and stellar remnants. The gamma-ray amplitude, angular distribution, and spectral signatures of this source may be predicted without free parameters, and are in remarkable agreement with the observations. These gamma-rays are from fossil remains of dispersed clusters, telling the history of the Galactic bulge.

  8. Ultraviolet Properties of Galactic Globular Clusters with GALEX. I. The Color-Magnitude Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Rood, Robert T.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Lanzoni, Barbara; Beccari, Giacomo; Rey, Soo-Chang; Rhee, Jaehyon; Rich, R. Michael; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook

    2012-05-01

    We present Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) data for 44 Galactic globular clusters (GCs) obtained during three GALEX observing cycles between 2004 and 2008. This is the largest homogeneous data set on the UV photometric properties of Galactic GCs ever collected. The sample selection and photometric analysis are discussed, and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented. The blue and intermediate-blue horizontal branch is the dominant feature of the UV CMDs of old Galactic GCs. Our sample is large enough to display the remarkable variety of horizontal branch shapes found in old stellar populations. Other stellar types that are obviously detected are blue stragglers and post-core-He burning stars. The main features of UV CMDs of Galactic GCs are briefly discussed. We establish the locus of post-core-He burning stars in the UV CMD and present a catalog of candidate asymptotic giant branch (AGB), AGB-manqué, post early-AGB, and post-AGB stars within our cluster sample. The authors dedicate this paper to the memory of co-author Bob Rood, a pioneer in the theory of the evolution of low-mass stars, and a friend, who sadly passed away on 2011 November 2.

  9. Young star clusters in the circumnuclear region of NGC 2110

    SciTech Connect

    Durré, Mark; Mould, Jeremy

    2014-03-20

    High-resolution observations in the near infrared show star clusters around the active galactic nucleus (AGN) of the Seyfert 1 NGC 2110, along with a 90 × 35 pc bar of shocked gas material around its nucleus. These are seen for the first time in our imaging and gas kinematics of the central 100 pc with the Keck OSIRIS instrument with adaptive optics. Each of these clusters is two to three times brighter than the Arches cluster close to the center of the Milky Way. The core star formation rate is 0.3 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. The photoionized gas (He I) dynamics imply an enclosed mass of 3-4 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. These observations demonstrate the physical linkage between AGN feedback, which triggers star formation in massive clusters, and the resulting stellar (and supernovae) winds, which cause the observed [Fe II] emission and feed the black hole.

  10. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  11. The Be Population in 10 Galactic Open Clusters From the Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia Thao, Pa; Richardson, Noel; Gerhartz, Cody; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Wisniewski, John P.; Burrow, Anthony; Lomax, Jamie R.; Covey, Kevin R.

    2017-01-01

    As part of a multi-site, multi-epoch campaign to study the time-scales of disk growth and dissipation for classical Be stars, we have studied ten Galactic open clusters with multi-color photometry (Johnson BVRIJK and narrow band H-alpha and an adjacent continuum filter). We have created color-color diagrams to isolate the Be stars in the targeted clusters. These clusters have previously been determined to contain multiple Be stars. From our early analysis of the clusters we have found a number of new candidate Be stars, as well as a few stars in each cluster that appear to have lost their gaseous disks. Such studies of clusters will provide a statistical basis for understanding the evolution of the disks around these stars and may provide insights into the formation processes for the Be stars. We are grateful for support of the NSF REU program at the University of Toledo through NSF grant 1262810, as well as for support from NSF AST 1411563, 1412110, and 1412135.

  12. On the existence of young embedded clusters at high Galactic latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. G.; Carraro, G.; Panko, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    Careful analyses of photometric and star count data available for the nine putative young clusters identified by Camargo et al. at high Galactic latitudes reveal that none of the groups contain early-type stars, and most are not significant density enhancements above the field level. Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) colours for stars in the groups match those of unreddened late-type dwarfs and giants, as expected for the contamination by (mostly) thin disc objects. A simulation of one such field using only typical high-latitude foreground stars yields a colour-magnitude diagram that is very similar to those constructed by Camargo et al. as evidence for their young groups as well as the means of deriving their reddenings and distances. Although some of the fields are coincident with clusters of galaxies, one must conclude that there is no evidence that the putative clusters are extremely young stellar groups.

  13. Star formation scales and efficiency in Galactic spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, D. J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Urquhart, J. S.; Elia, D.; Plume, R.; Rigby, A. J.; Thompson, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    We positionally match a sample of infrared-selected young stellar objects, identified by combining the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and Herschel Space Observatory Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey, to the dense clumps identified in the millimetre continuum by the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey in two Galactic lines of sight centred towards l = 30° and 40°. We calculate the ratio of infrared luminosity, LIR, to the mass of the clump, Mclump, in a variety of Galactic environments and find it to be somewhat enhanced in spiral arms compared to the interarm regions when averaged over kiloparsec scales. We find no compelling evidence that these changes are due to the mechanical influence of the spiral arm on the star formation efficiency rather than, e.g. different gradients in the star formation rate due to patchy or intermittent star formation, or local variations that are not averaged out due to small source samples. The largest variation in LIR/Mclump is found in individual clump values, which follow a lognormal distribution and have a range of over three orders of magnitude. This spread is intrinsic as no dependence of LIR/Mclump with Mclump was found. No difference was found in the luminosity distribution of sources in the arm and interarm samples and a strong linear correlation was found between LIR and Mclump.

  14. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER This stunningly beautiful image [right] taken with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope shows the heart of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. The ongoing violent star formation due to an ancient encounter with its large galactic neighbor, M81, gives this galaxy its disturbed appearance. The smaller picture at upper left shows the entire galaxy. The image was taken in December 1994 by the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 0.9-meter telescope. Hubble's view is represented by the white outline in the center. In the Hubble image, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the huge lanes of dust that crisscross M82's disk are another telltale sign of the flurry of star formation. Below the center and to the right, a strong galactic wind is spewing knotty filaments of hydrogen and nitrogen gas. More than 100 super star clusters -- very bright, compact groupings of about 100,000 stars -- are seen in this detailed Hubble picture as white dots sprinkled throughout M82's central region. The dark region just above the center of the picture is a huge dust cloud. A collaboration of European and American scientists used these clusters to date the ancient interaction between M82 and M81. About 600 million years ago, a region called 'M82 B' (the bright area just below and to the left of the central dust cloud) exploded with new stars. Scientists have discovered that this ancient starburst was triggered by the violent encounter with M81. M82 is a bright (eighth magnitude), nearby (12 million light-years from Earth) galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear). The Hubble picture was taken Sept. 15, 1997. The natural-color composite was constructed from three Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 exposures, which were combined in chromatic order: 4,250 seconds through a blue filter (428 nm); 2,800 seconds through a green filter (520 nm); and 2,200 seconds through a red (820 nm) filter. Credits for Hubble image: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of

  15. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER This stunningly beautiful image [right] taken with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope shows the heart of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. The ongoing violent star formation due to an ancient encounter with its large galactic neighbor, M81, gives this galaxy its disturbed appearance. The smaller picture at upper left shows the entire galaxy. The image was taken in December 1994 by the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 0.9-meter telescope. Hubble's view is represented by the white outline in the center. In the Hubble image, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the huge lanes of dust that crisscross M82's disk are another telltale sign of the flurry of star formation. Below the center and to the right, a strong galactic wind is spewing knotty filaments of hydrogen and nitrogen gas. More than 100 super star clusters -- very bright, compact groupings of about 100,000 stars -- are seen in this detailed Hubble picture as white dots sprinkled throughout M82's central region. The dark region just above the center of the picture is a huge dust cloud. A collaboration of European and American scientists used these clusters to date the ancient interaction between M82 and M81. About 600 million years ago, a region called 'M82 B' (the bright area just below and to the left of the central dust cloud) exploded with new stars. Scientists have discovered that this ancient starburst was triggered by the violent encounter with M81. M82 is a bright (eighth magnitude), nearby (12 million light-years from Earth) galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear). The Hubble picture was taken Sept. 15, 1997. The natural-color composite was constructed from three Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 exposures, which were combined in chromatic order: 4,250 seconds through a blue filter (428 nm); 2,800 seconds through a green filter (520 nm); and 2,200 seconds through a red (820 nm) filter. Credits for Hubble image: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of

  16. STAR cluster-finder ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Botlo, M.; LeVine, M.J.; Scheetz, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    The STAR experiment reads out a TPC and an SVT (silicon vertex tracker), both of which require in-line pedestal subtraction, compression of ADC values from 10-bit to 8-bit, and location of time sequences representing responses to charged-particle tracks. The STAR cluster finder ASIC responds to all of these needs. Pedestal subtraction and compression are performed using lookup tables in attached RAM. We describe its design and implementation, as well as testing methodology and results of tests performed on foundry prototypes.

  17. The relation between the most-massive star and its parental star cluster mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, C.; Kroupa, P.; Bonnell, I. A. D.

    2010-01-01

    We present a thorough literature study of the most-massive star, mmax, in several young star clusters in order to assess whether or not star clusters are populated from the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by random sampling over the mass range 0.01 <= m <= 150Msolar without being constrained by the cluster mass, Mecl. The data reveal a partition of the sample into lowest mass objects (Mecl <= 102Msolar), moderate mass clusters (102Msolar < Mecl <= 103Msolar) and rich clusters above 103Msolar. Additionally, there is a plateau of a constant maximal star mass (mmax ~ 25Msolar) for clusters with masses between 103Msolar and 4 × 103Msolar. Statistical tests of this data set reveal that the hypothesis of random sampling from the IMF between 0.01 and 150Msolar is highly unlikely for star clusters more massive than 102Msolar with a probability of p ~ 2 × 10-7 for the objects with Mecl between 102 and 103Msolar and p ~ 3 × 10-9 for the more massive star clusters. Also, the spread of mmax values at a given Mecl is smaller than expected from random sampling. We suggest that the basic physical process able to explain this dependence of stellar inventory of a star cluster on its mass may be the interplay between stellar feedback and the binding energy of the cluster-forming molecular cloud core. Given these results, it would follow that an integrated galactic IMF (IGIMF) sampled from such clusters would automatically be steeper in comparison to the IMF within individual star clusters.

  18. The Galactic O-Star Catalog (GOSC) and the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS): current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Alonso Moragón, A.; Ortiz de Zárate Alcarazo, L.; The Gosss Team

    2017-03-01

    We present the updates of the Galactic O-Star Catalog (GOSC) that we have undertaken in the last two years: new spectral types, more objects, additional information, and coordination with CDS. We also present updates for the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS). A new paper (GOSSS-III) has been published and ˜ 1000 targets have been observed since 2014. Four new setups have been added to our lineup and for two of them we have already obtained over 100 spectra: with OSIRIS at the 10.4 m GTC we are observing northern dim stars and with FRODOspec at the 2.0 m Liverpool Telescope we are observing northern bright stars. Finally, we also make available new versions of MGB, the spectral classification tool associated with the project, and of the GOSSS grid of spectroscopic standards.

  19. How a Star Cluster Ruled Out MACHOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Are massive black holes hiding in the halos of galaxies, making up the majority of the universes mysterious dark matter? This possibility may have been ruled out by a star cluster in a small galaxy recently discovered orbiting the Milky Way.Dark Matter CandidatesThe relative amounts of the different constituents of the universe. Dark matter makes up ~27%. [ESA/Planck]Roughly 27% of the mass and energy in the observable universe is made up of dark matter matter invisible to us, which is neither accounted for by observable baryonic matter nor dark energy.What makes up this dark matter? Among the many proposed candidates, one of the least exotic is that of massive compact halo objects, or MACHOs. MACHOs are hypothesized to be black holes that formed in the early universe and now hide in galactic halos. We cant detect light from these objects but their mass adds to the gravitational pull of galaxies.So far, MACHOs prospects arent looking great. They have not been detected in gravitational lensing surveys, ruling out MACHOs between 10-7 and 30 solar masses as the dominant component of dark matter in our galaxy. MACHOs over 100 solar masses have also been ruled out, due to the existence of fragile wide halo binaries that would have been disrupted by the presence of such large black holes.But what about MACHOs between 30 and 100 solar masses? In a new study, Timothy Brandt (NASA Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study, in Princeton, NJ) uses a recently discovered faint galaxy, Eridanus II, to place constraints on MACHOs in this mass range.MACHO constraints from the survival of a star cluster in Eri II, assuming a cluster age of 3 Gyr (a lower bound; constraints increase when assuming an age of 12 Gyr). [Adapted from Brandt 2016]A Star Cluster in Eri IIEridanus II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy that lies roughly 1.2 million light-years away from us. This dim object is a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, discovered as part of the Dark Energy Survey

  20. Tidal stripping stellar substructures around four metal-poor globular clusters in the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Minhee; Jung, DooSeok; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spatial density configuration of stars around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge region using wide-field deep J, H, and K imaging data obtained with the Wide Field Camera near-infrared array on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. A statistical weighted filtering algorithm for the stars on the color–magnitude diagram is applied in order to sort cluster member candidates from the field star contamination. In two-dimensional isodensity contour maps of the clusters, we find that all four of the globular clusters exhibit strong evidence of tidally stripped stellar features beyond the tidal radius in the form of tidal tails or small density lobes/chunks. The orientations of the extended stellar substructures are likely to be associated with the effect of dynamic interaction with the Galaxy and the cluster's space motion. The observed radial density profiles of the four globular clusters also describe the extended substructures; they depart from theoretical King and Wilson models and have an overdensity feature with a break in the slope of the profile at the outer region of clusters. The observed results could imply that four globular clusters in the Galactic bulge region have experienced strong environmental effects such as tidal forces or bulge/disk shocks of the Galaxy during the dynamical evolution of globular clusters. These observational results provide further details which add to our understanding of the evolution of clusters in the Galactic bulge region as well as the formation of the Galaxy.

  1. Tidal Stripping Stellar Substructures Around Four Metal-Poor Globular Clusters in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Minhee; Jung, DooSeok; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spatial density configuration of stars around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge region using wide-field deep J, H, and K imaging data obtained with the Wide Field Camera near-infrared array on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. A statistical weighted filtering algorithm for the stars on the color-magnitude diagram is applied in order to sort cluster member candidates from the field star contamination. In two-dimensional isodensity contour maps of the clusters, we find that all four of the globular clusters exhibit strong evidence of tidally stripped stellar features beyond the tidal radius in the form of tidal tails or small density lobes/chunks. The orientations of the extended stellar substructures are likely to be associated with the effect of dynamic interaction with the Galaxy and the cluster's space motion. The observed radial density profiles of the four globular clusters also describe the extended substructures; they depart from theoretical King and Wilson models and have an overdensity feature with a break in the slope of the profile at the outer region of clusters. The observed results could imply that four globular clusters in the Galactic bulge region have experienced strong environmental effects such as tidal forces or bulge/disk shocks of the Galaxy during the dynamical evolution of globular clusters. These observational results provide further details which add to our understanding of the evolution of clusters in the Galactic bulge region as well as the formation of the Galaxy.

  2. Messier's nebulae and star clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. G.

    Charles Messier's Catalogue of nebulae and star clusters, published in 1784, marked the start of a new era of deep sky astronomy. Today, this tradition of observing galaxies and clusters is kept alive by serious amateur astronomers who study the objects of the deep sky. Nearly all the objects are visible in a small telescope. The author has revised his definitive version of Messier's Catalogue. His own observations and drawings, together with maps and diagrams, make this a valuable introduction to deep sky observing. Historical and astrophysical notes bring the science of these nebulae right up to date.

  3. DISTANCE SCALE ZERO POINTS FROM GALACTIC RR LYRAE STAR PARALLAXES

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Barnes, Thomas G.; Feast, Michael W.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Bean, Jacob L.; Kolenberg, Katrien; Menzies, John W.; Laney, C. D.; Chaboyer, Brian; Fossati, Luca; Nesvacil, Nicole; Smith, Horace A.; Kochukhov, Oleg; Nelan, Edmund P.; Taylor, Denise; Shulyak, D. V.; Freedman, Wendy L.

    2011-12-15

    We present new absolute trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions for seven Population II variable stars-five RR Lyr variables: RZ Cep, XZ Cyg, SU Dra, RR Lyr, and UV Oct; and two type 2 Cepheids: VY Pyx and {kappa} Pav. We obtained these results with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors, white-light interferometers on Hubble Space Telescope. We find absolute parallaxes in milliseconds of arc: RZ Cep, 2.12 {+-} 0.16 mas; XZ Cyg, 1.67 {+-} 0.17 mas; SU Dra, 1.42 {+-} 0.16 mas; RR Lyr, 3.77 {+-} 0.13 mas; UV Oct, 1.71 {+-} 0.10 mas; VY Pyx, 6.44 {+-} 0.23 mas; and {kappa} Pav, 5.57 {+-} 0.28 mas; an average {sigma}{sub {pi}}/{pi} = 5.4%. With these parallaxes, we compute absolute magnitudes in V and K bandpasses corrected for interstellar extinction and Lutz-Kelker-Hanson bias. Using these RR Lyrae variable star absolute magnitudes, we then derive zero points for M{sub V} -[Fe/H] and M{sub K} -[Fe/H]-log P relations. The technique of reduced parallaxes corroborates these results. We employ our new results to determine distances and ages of several Galactic globular clusters and the distance of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The latter is close to that previously derived from Classical Cepheids uncorrected for any metallicity effect, indicating that any such effect is small. We also discuss the somewhat puzzling results obtained for our two type 2 Cepheids.

  4. The SUNBIRD survey: characterizing the super star cluster populations of intensely star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamanakoto, Zara; Väisänen, Petri

    2017-03-01

    Super star clusters (SSCs) represent the youngest and most massive form of known gravitationally bound star clusters in the Universe. They are born abundantly in environments that trigger strong and violent star formation. We investigate the properties of these massive SSCs in a sample of 42 nearby starbursts and luminous infrared galaxies. The targets form the sample of the SUperNovae and starBursts in the InfraReD (SUNBIRD) survey that were imaged using near-infrared (NIR) K-band adaptive optics mounted on the Gemini/NIRI and the VLT/NaCo instruments. Results from i) the fitted power-laws to the SSC K-band luminosity functions, ii) the NIR brightest star cluster magnitude - star formation rate (SFR) relation and iii) the star cluster age and mass distributions have shown the importance of studying SSC host galaxies with high SFR levels to determine the role of the galactic environments in the star cluster formation, evolution and disruption mechanisms.

  5. Two New Ultra-Faint Star Clusters in the Milky Way Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwon

    2016-08-01

    Kim 1 & 2 are two new star clusters discovered in the Stromlo Missing Satellite Survey. Kim 1, located at a heliocentric distance of 19.8 +/- 0.9 kpc, features an extremely low total luminosity (M V = 0.3 +/- 0.5 mag) and low star concentration. Together with the large ellipticity (ɛ = 0.42 +/- 0.10) and irregular isophotes, these properties suggest that Kim 1 is an intermediate mass star cluster being stripped by the Galactic tidal field. Kim 2 is a rare ultra-faint outer halo globular cluster located at a heliocentric distance of 104.7 +/- 4.1 kpc. The cluster exhibits evidence of significant mass loss such as extra-tidal stars and mass-segregation. Kim 2 is likely to follow an orbit confined to the peripheral region of the Galactic halo, and/or to have formed in a dwarf galaxy that was later accreted into the Galactic halo.

  6. Bayesian analysis of two stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters- III. Analysis of 30 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Kaiser, R.; Stenning, D. C.; Sarajedini, A.; von Hippel, T.; van Dyk, D. A.; Robinson, E.; Stein, N.; Jefferys, W. H.

    2016-12-01

    We use Cycle 21 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and HST archival ACS Treasury observations of 30 Galactic globular clusters to characterize two distinct stellar populations. A sophisticated Bayesian technique is employed to simultaneously sample the joint posterior distribution of age, distance, and extinction for each cluster, as well as unique helium values for two populations within each cluster and the relative proportion of those populations. We find the helium differences among the two populations in the clusters fall in the range of ˜0.04 to 0.11. Because adequate models varying in carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are not presently available, we view these spreads as upper limits and present them with statistical rather than observational uncertainties. Evidence supports previous studies suggesting an increase in helium content concurrent with increasing mass of the cluster and we also find that the proportion of the first population of stars increases with mass as well. Our results are examined in the context of proposed globular cluster formation scenarios. Additionally, we leverage our Bayesian technique to shed light on the inconsistencies between the theoretical models and the observed data.

  7. NEW UBVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 234 M33 STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2013-04-15

    This is the second paper of our series. In this paper, we present UBVRI photometry for 234 star clusters in the field of M33. For most of these star clusters, there is photometry in only two bands in previous studies. The photometry of these star clusters is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements, and in particular that our photometry is in good agreement with that of Zloczewski and Kaluzny. Combined with star cluster photometry in previous studies, we present some results: none of the M33 youngest clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }, and comparisons with models of simple stellar populations suggest a large range of ages for M33 star clusters and some as old as the Galactic globular clusters.

  8. The Extinction Toward the Galactic Bulge from RR Lyrae Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kunder, A; Popowski, P; Cook, K; Chaboyer, B

    2007-11-07

    The authors present mean reddenings toward 3525 RR0 Lyrae stars from the Galactic bulge fields of the MACHO Survey. These reddenings are determined using the color at minimum V-band light of the RR0 Lyrae stars themselves and are found to be in general agreement with extinction estimates at the same location obtained from other methods. Using 3256 stars located in the Galactic Bulge, they derive the selective extinction coefficient R{sub V,VR} = A{sub V}/E(V-R) = 4.2 {+-} 0.2. this value is what is expected for a standard extinction law with R{sub V,BV} = 3.1 {+-} 0.3

  9. The spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of Galactic massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, N.; Fossati, L.; Langer, N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Izzard, R. G.

    2014-10-01

    The distribution of stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram narrates their evolutionary history and directly assesses their properties. Placing stars in this diagram however requires the knowledge of their distances and interstellar extinctions, which are often poorly known for Galactic stars. The spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (sHRD) tells similar evolutionary tales, but is independent of distance and extinction measurements. Based on spectroscopically derived effective temperatures and gravities of almost 600 stars, we derive for the first time the observational distribution of Galactic massive stars in the sHRD. While biases and statistical limitations in the data prevent detailed quantitative conclusions at this time, we see several clear qualitative trends. By comparing the observational sHRD with different state-of-the-art stellar evolutionary predictions, we conclude that convective core overshooting may be mass-dependent and, at high mass (≳15 M⊙), stronger than previously thought. Furthermore, we find evidence for an empirical upper limit in the sHRD for stars with Teff between 10 000 and 32 000 K and, a strikingly large number of objects below this line. This over-density may be due to inflation expanding envelopes in massive main-sequence stars near the Eddington limit. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Galactic kinematics from a sample of young massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.; Bajkova, A. T.

    2013-08-01

    Based on published sources, we have created a kinematic database on 220 massive (> 10 M ⊙) young Galactic star systems located within ≤3 kpc of the Sun. Out of them, ≈100 objects are spectroscopic binary and multiple star systems whose components are massive OB stars; the remaining objects are massive Hipparcos B stars with parallax errors of no more than 10%. Based on the entire sample, we have constructed the Galactic rotation curve, determined the circular rotation velocity of the solar neighborhood around the Galactic center at R 0 = 8kpc, V 0 = 259±16 km s-1, and obtained the following spiral density wave parameters: the amplitudes of the radial and azimuthal velocity perturbations f R = -10.8 ± 1.2 km s-1 and f θ = 7.9 ± 1.3 km s-1, respectively; the pitch angle for a two-armed spiral pattern i = -6.0° ± 0.4°, with the wavelength of the spiral density wave near the Sun being λ = 2.6 ± 0.2 kpc; and the radial phase of the Sun in χ ⊙ = -120° ± 4°. We show that such peculiarities of the Gould Belt as the local expansion of the system, the velocity ellipsoid vertex deviation, and the significant additional rotation can be explained in terms of the density wave theory. All these effects decrease noticeably once the influence of the spiral density wave on the velocities of nearby stars has been taken into account. The influence of Gould Belt stars on the Galactic parameter estimates has also been revealed. Eliminating them from the kinematic equations has led to the following new values of the spiral density wave parameters: f θ = 2.9 ± 2.1 km s-1 and χ ⊙ = -104° ± 6°.

  11. Galactic Sources Detected in the NuSTAR Serendipitous Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John A.; Lansbury, George B.; Rahoui, Farid; Clavel, Maïca; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Hong, JaeSub; Aird, James; Alexander, David M.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Krivonos, Roman A.; Mori, Kaya; Stern, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) provides an improvement in sensitivity at energies above 10 keV by two orders of magnitude over non-focusing satellites, making it possible to probe deeper into the Galaxy and universe. Lansbury and collaborators recently completed a catalog of 497 sources serendipitously detected in the 3-24 keV band using 13 deg2 of NuSTAR coverage. Here, we report on an optical and X-ray study of 16 Galactic sources in the catalog. We identify 8 of them as stars (but some or all could have binary companions), and use information from Gaia to report distances and X-ray luminosities for 3 of them. There are 4 CVs or CV candidates, and we argue that NuSTAR J233426-2343.9 is a relatively strong CV candidate based partly on an X-ray spectrum from XMM-Newton. NuSTAR J092418-3142.2, which is the brightest serendipitous source in the Lansbury catalog, and NuSTAR J073959-3147.8 are low-mass X-ray binary candidates, but it is also possible that these 2 sources are CVs. One of the sources is a known high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB), and NuSTAR J105008-5958.8 is a new HMXB candidate that has strong Balmer emission lines in its optical spectrum and a hard X-ray spectrum. We discuss the implications of finding these HMXBs for the surface density (log N-log S) and luminosity function of Galactic HMXBs. We conclude that with the large fraction of unclassified sources in the Galactic plane detected by NuSTAR in the 8-24 keV band, there could be a significant population of low-luminosity HMXBs.

  12. Early turbulent mixing as the origin of chemical homogeneity in open star clusters.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Krumholz, Mark R

    2014-09-25

    The abundances of elements in stars are critical clues to stars' origins. Observed star-to-star variations in logarithmic abundance within an open star cluster--a gravitationally bound ensemble of stars in the Galactic plane--are typically only about 0.01 to 0.05 over many elements, which is noticeably smaller than the variation of about 0.06 to 0.3 seen in the interstellar medium from which the stars form. It is unknown why star clusters are so homogenous, and whether homogeneity should also prevail in regions of lower star formation efficiency that do not produce bound clusters. Here we report simulations that trace the mixing of chemical elements as star-forming clouds assemble and collapse. We show that turbulent mixing during cloud assembly naturally produces a stellar abundance scatter at least five times smaller than that in the gas, which is sufficient to explain the observed chemical homogeneity of stars. Moreover, mixing occurs very early, so that regions with star formation efficiencies of about 10 per cent are nearly as well mixed as those with formation efficiencies of about 50 per cent. This implies that even regions that do not form bound clusters are likely to be well mixed, and improves the prospects of using 'chemical tagging' to reconstruct (via their unique chemical signatures, or tags) star clusters whose constituent stars have become unbound from one another and spread across the Galactic disk.

  13. ULTRAVIOLET PROPERTIES OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS WITH GALEX. I. THE COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Rhee, Jaehyon; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Lanzoni, Barbara E-mail: emanuele.dalessandr2@unibo.it E-mail: barbara.lanzoni@unibo.it; and others

    2012-05-15

    We present Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) data for 44 Galactic globular clusters (GCs) obtained during three GALEX observing cycles between 2004 and 2008. This is the largest homogeneous data set on the UV photometric properties of Galactic GCs ever collected. The sample selection and photometric analysis are discussed, and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented. The blue and intermediate-blue horizontal branch is the dominant feature of the UV CMDs of old Galactic GCs. Our sample is large enough to display the remarkable variety of horizontal branch shapes found in old stellar populations. Other stellar types that are obviously detected are blue stragglers and post-core-He burning stars. The main features of UV CMDs of Galactic GCs are briefly discussed. We establish the locus of post-core-He burning stars in the UV CMD and present a catalog of candidate asymptotic giant branch (AGB), AGB-manque, post early-AGB, and post-AGB stars within our cluster sample.

  14. The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. VIII. Effects of Environment on Globular Cluster Global Mass Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paust, Nathaniel E. Q.; Reid, I. Neill; Piotto, Giampaolo; Aparicio, Antonio; Anderson, Jay; Sarajedini, Ata; Bedin, Luigi R.; Chaboyer, Brian; Dotter, Aaron; Hempel, Maren; Majewski, Steven; Marín-Franch, A.; Milone, Antonino; Rosenberg, Alfred; Siegel, Michael

    2010-02-01

    We have used observations obtained as part of the Hubble Space Telescope/ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters to construct global present-day mass functions for 17 globular clusters utilizing multi-mass King models to extrapolate from our observations to the global cluster behavior. The global present-day mass functions for these clusters are well matched by power laws from the turnoff, ≈0.8 M sun, to 0.2-0.3 M sun on the lower main sequence. The slopes of those power-law fits, α, have been correlated with an extensive set of intrinsic and extrinsic cluster properties to investigate which parameters may influence the form of the present-day mass function. We do not confirm previous suggestions of correlations between α and either metallicity or Galactic location. However, we do find a strong statistical correlation with the related parameters central surface brightness, μ V , and inferred central density, ρ0. The correlation is such that clusters with denser cores (stronger binding energy) tend to have steeper mass functions (a higher proportion of low-mass stars), suggesting that dynamical evolution due to external interactions may have played a key role in determining α. Thus, the present-day mass function may owe more to nurture than to nature. Detailed modeling of external dynamical effects is therefore a requisite for determining the initial mass function for Galactic globular clusters.

  15. THE ACS SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. VIII. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENT ON GLOBULAR CLUSTER GLOBAL MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paust, Nathaniel E. Q.; Reid, I. Neill; Anderson, Jay E-mail: inr@stsci.edu

    2010-02-15

    We have used observations obtained as part of the Hubble Space Telescope/ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters to construct global present-day mass functions for 17 globular clusters utilizing multi-mass King models to extrapolate from our observations to the global cluster behavior. The global present-day mass functions for these clusters are well matched by power laws from the turnoff, {approx}0.8 M {sub sun}, to 0.2-0.3 M {sub sun} on the lower main sequence. The slopes of those power-law fits, {alpha}, have been correlated with an extensive set of intrinsic and extrinsic cluster properties to investigate which parameters may influence the form of the present-day mass function. We do not confirm previous suggestions of correlations between {alpha} and either metallicity or Galactic location. However, we do find a strong statistical correlation with the related parameters central surface brightness, {mu} {sub V}, and inferred central density, {rho}{sub 0}. The correlation is such that clusters with denser cores (stronger binding energy) tend to have steeper mass functions (a higher proportion of low-mass stars), suggesting that dynamical evolution due to external interactions may have played a key role in determining {alpha}. Thus, the present-day mass function may owe more to nurture than to nature. Detailed modeling of external dynamical effects is therefore a requisite for determining the initial mass function for Galactic globular clusters.

  16. The Role of Radiation Pressure in Assembling Super Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsz-Ho Tsang, Benny; Milosavljevic, Milos

    2016-06-01

    Super star clusters are the most extreme star-forming regions of the Universe - they occupy the most massive end of the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, forming stars at exceptionally high rates and gas surface densities. The radiation feedback from the dense population of massive stars is expected to play a dynamic role during the assembly of the clusters, and represents a potential mechanism for launching large-scale galactic outflows. Observationally, large distances and dust obscuration have been withholding clues about the early stages of massive cluster formation; theoretically, the lack of accurate and efficient radiation transfer schemes in multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations has been deterring our understanding of radiative feedback. By extending the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH with a closure-free, Monte Carlo radiation transport scheme, we perform 3D radiation hydrodynamical simulations of super star cluster formation from the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds. Our simulations probe the star formation in densities typical for starbursts, with both non-ionizing UV and dust-reprocessed IR radiation treated self-consistently. We aim to determine the role of radiation pressure in regulating star formation, and its capacity in driving intense outflows.

  17. Color excesses, intrinsic colors, and absolute magnitudes of Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vacca, William D.; Torres-Dodgen, Ana V.

    1990-01-01

    A new method of determining the color excesses of WR stars in the Galaxy and the LMC has been developed and is used to determine the excesses for 44 Galactic and 32 LMC WR stars. The excesses are combined with line-free, narrow-band spectrophotometry to derive intrinsic colors of the WR stars of nearly all spectral subtypes. No correlation of UV spectral index or intrinsic colors with spectral subtype is found for the samples of single WN or WC stars. There is evidence that early WN stars in the LMC have flatter UV continua and redder intrinsic colors than early WN stars in the Galaxy. No separation is found between the values derived for Galactic WC stars and those obtained for LMC WC stars. The intrinsic colors are compared with those calculated from model atmospheres of WR stars and generally good agreement is found. Absolute magnitudes are derived for WR stars in the LMC and for those Galactic WR stars located in clusters and associations for which there are reliable distance estimates.

  18. Extended Star Formation in the Intermediate-age Large Magellanic Cloud Star Cluster NGC 2209

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, A. Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S.

    2012-12-01

    We present observations of the 1 Gyr old star cluster NGC 2209 in the Large Magellanic Cloud made with the GMOS imager on the Gemini South Telescope. These observations show that the cluster exhibits a main-sequence turnoff that spans a broader range in luminosity than can be explained by a single-aged stellar population. This places NGC 2209 amongst a growing list of intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) clusters that show evidence for extended or multiple epochs of star formation of between 50 and 460 Myr in extent. The extended main-sequence turnoff observed in NGC 2209 is a confirmation of the prediction in Keller et al. made on the basis of the cluster's large core radius. We propose that secondary star formation is a defining feature of the evolution of massive star clusters. Dissolution of lower mass clusters through evaporation results in only clusters that have experienced secondary star formation surviving for a Hubble time, thus providing a natural connection between the extended main-sequence turnoff phenomenon and the ubiquitous light-element abundance ranges seen in the ancient Galactic globular clusters.

  19. EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 2209

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, A. Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S.

    2012-12-10

    We present observations of the 1 Gyr old star cluster NGC 2209 in the Large Magellanic Cloud made with the GMOS imager on the Gemini South Telescope. These observations show that the cluster exhibits a main-sequence turnoff that spans a broader range in luminosity than can be explained by a single-aged stellar population. This places NGC 2209 amongst a growing list of intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) clusters that show evidence for extended or multiple epochs of star formation of between 50 and 460 Myr in extent. The extended main-sequence turnoff observed in NGC 2209 is a confirmation of the prediction in Keller et al. made on the basis of the cluster's large core radius. We propose that secondary star formation is a defining feature of the evolution of massive star clusters. Dissolution of lower mass clusters through evaporation results in only clusters that have experienced secondary star formation surviving for a Hubble time, thus providing a natural connection between the extended main-sequence turnoff phenomenon and the ubiquitous light-element abundance ranges seen in the ancient Galactic globular clusters.

  20. Burst of Star Formation Drives Galactic Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) captures a lumpy bubble of hot gas rising from a cauldron of glowing matter in Galaxy NGC 3079, located 50 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. Astronomers suspect the bubble is being blown by 'winds' or high speed streams of particles, released during a burst of star formation. The bubble's lumpy surface has four columns of gaseous filaments towering above the galaxy's disc that whirl around in a vortex and are expelled into space. Eventually, this gas will rain down on the disc and may collide with gas clouds, compress them, and form a new generation of stars.

  1. Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. S., III

    2014-09-01

    The Magellanic Clouds (MC) are prime locations for studies of star clusters covering a full range in age and mass. This contribution briefly reviews selected properties of Magellanic star clusters, by focusing first on young systems that show evidence for hierarchical star formation. The structures and chemical abundance patterns of older intermediate age star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are a second topic. These suggest a complex history has affected the chemical enrichment in the SMC and that low tidal stresses in the SMC foster star cluster survival.

  2. The impact of galactic environment on star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, Kathryn; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Schinnerer, Eva; Groves, Brent; Adamo, Angela; Hughes, Annie; Meidt, Sharon; SFNG Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    While spiral arms are the most prominent sites for star formation in disk galaxies, interarm star formation contributes significantly to the overall star formation budget. However, it is still an open question if the star formation proceeds differently in the arm and inter-arm environment. We use deep VLT/MUSE optical IFU spectroscopy to resolve and fully characterize the physical properties of 428 interarm and arm HII regions in the nearby grand design spiral galaxy NGC 628. Unlike molecular clouds (the fuel for star formation) which exhibit a clear dependence on galactic environment, we find that most HII region properties (luminosity, size, metallicity, ionization parameter) are independent of environment. One clear exception is the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) contribution to the arm and interarm flux (traced via the temperature sensitive [SII]/Halpha line ratio inside and outside of the HII region boundaries). We find a systematically higher DIG background within HII regions, particularly on the spiral arms. Correcting for this DIG contamination can result in significant (70%) changes to the star formation rate measured. We also show preliminary results comparing well-corrected star formation rates from our MUSE HII regions to ALMA CO(2-1) molecular gas observations at matched 1"=50pc resolution, tracing the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law at the scales relevant to the physics of star formation. We estimate the timescales relevant for GMC evolution using distance from the spiral arm as a proxy for age, and test whether star formation feedback or galactic-scale dynamical processes dominate GMC disruption.

  3. The Impact Of Galactic Environment On Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, Kathryn

    2016-09-01

    While spiral arms are the most prominent sites for star formation in disk galaxies, interarm star formation contributes significantly to the overall star formation budget. However, it is still an open question if the star formation proceeds differently in the arm and inter-arm environment. We use deep VLT/MUSE optical IFU spectroscopy to resolve and fully characterize the physical properties of 428 interarm and arm HII regions in the nearby grand design spiral galaxy NGC 628. Unlike molecular clouds (the fuel for star formation) which exhibit a clear dependence on galactic environment, we find that most HII region properties (luminosity, size, metallicity, ionization parameter) are independent of environment. One clear exception is the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) contribution to the arm and interarm flux (traced via the temperature sensitive [SII]/Halpha line ratio inside and outside of the HII region boundaries). We find a systematically higher DIG background within HII regions, particularly on the spiral arms. Correcting for this DIG contamination can result in significant (70%) changes to the star formation rate measured. We also show preliminary results comparing well@corrected star formation rates from our MUSE HII regions to ALMA CO(2-1) molecular gas observations at matched 1"=35pc resolution, tracing the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law at the scales relevant to the physics of star formation. We estimate the timescales relevant for GMC evolution using distance from the spiral arm as a proxy for age, and test whether star formation feedback or galactic@scale dynamical processes dominate GMC disruption.

  4. Evolution of massive stars in very young clusters and associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Statistics concerning the stellar content of young galactic clusters and associations which show well defined main sequence turnups have been analyzed in order to derive information about stellar evolution in high-mass galaxies. The analytical approach is semiempirical and uses natural spectroscopic groups of stars on the H-R diagram together with the stars' apparent magnitudes. The new approach does not depend on absolute luminosities and requires only the most basic elements of stellar evolution theory. The following conclusions are offered on the basis of the statistical analysis: (1) O-tupe main-sequence stars evolve to a spectral type of B1 during core hydrogen burning; (2) most O-type blue stragglers are newly formed massive stars burning core hydrogen; (3) supergiants lying redward of the main-sequence turnup are burning core helium; and most Wolf-Rayet stars are burning core helium and originally had masses greater than 30-40 solar mass. The statistics of the natural spectroscopic stars in young galactic clusters and associations are given in a table.

  5. Ba STARS AND OTHER BINARIES IN FIRST AND SECOND GENERATION STARS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    D'Orazi, Valentina; Gratton, Raffaele; Lucatello, Sara; Carretta, Eugenio; Bragaglia, Angela; Marino, Anna F.

    2010-08-20

    The determination of the Ba abundance in globular cluster (GC) stars is a very powerful test to address several issues in the framework of multiple population scenarios. We measured the Ba content for a sample of more than 1200 stars in 15 Galactic GCs, using high-resolution FLAMES/Giraffe spectra. We found no variation in [Ba/Fe] ratios for different stellar populations within each cluster; this means that low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars do not significantly contribute to the intracluster pollution. Very interestingly, we found that the fraction of Ba stars in first generation (FG) stars is close to the values derived for field stars ({approx}2%); on the other hand, second generation (SG) stars present a significantly lower fraction. An independent and successful test, based on radial velocity variations among giant stars in NGC 6121, confirms our finding: the binary fraction among FG stars is about {approx}12%, to be compared with {approx}1% of SG stars. This is an evidence that SG stars formed in a denser environment, where infant mortality of binary systems was particularly efficient.

  6. Molecular Clouds, Star Formation and Galactic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoville, Nick; Young, Judith S.

    1984-01-01

    Radio observations show that the gigantic clouds of molecules where stars are born are distributed in various ways in spiral galaxies, perhaps accounting for the variation in their optical appearance. Research studies and findings in this area are reported and discussed. (JN)

  7. Molecular Clouds, Star Formation and Galactic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoville, Nick; Young, Judith S.

    1984-01-01

    Radio observations show that the gigantic clouds of molecules where stars are born are distributed in various ways in spiral galaxies, perhaps accounting for the variation in their optical appearance. Research studies and findings in this area are reported and discussed. (JN)

  8. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. II. Discovery of six clusters with Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Borissova, J.; Bonatto, C.; Majaess, D. J.; Baume, G.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Kurtev, R.; Schnurr, O.; Bouret, J.-C.; Catelan, M.; Emerson, J. P.; Feinstein, C.; Geisler, D.; de Grijs, R.; Hervé, A.; Ivanov, V. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lucas, P.; Mahy, L.; Martins, F.; Mauro, F.; Minniti, D.; Moni Bidin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea" (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. degrees of the Galactic bulge, and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: This is the second in a series of papers about young, massive open clusters observed using the VVV survey. We present the first study of six recently discovered clusters. These clusters contain at least one newly discovered Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters for a subset of clusters. Results: We find that the six studied stellar groups are real young (2-7 Myr) and massive (between 0.8 and 2.2 × 103 M⊙) clusters. They are highly obscured (AV ~ 5-24 mag) and compact (1-2 pc). In addition to WR stars, two of the six clusters also contain at least one red supergiant star, and one of these two clusters also contains a blue supergiant. We claim the discovery of 8 new WR stars, and 3 stars showing WR-like emission lines which could be classified WR or OIf. Preliminary analysis provides initial masses of ~30-50 M⊙ for the WR stars. Finally, we discuss the spiral structure of the Galaxy using the six new clusters as tracers, together with the previously studied VVV clusters. Based on observations with ISAAC, VLT, ESO (programme 087.D-0341A), New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory (programme 087.D-0490A) and with the Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory (programme CN2011A-086). Also based on data from the VVV survey (programme 172.B-2002).

  9. Galactic Sources Detected in the NuSTAR Serendipitous Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John; Lansbury, George; Rahoui, Farid; Clavel, Maica; Fornasini, Francesca; Hong, JaeSub; Aird, James; Alexander, David M.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Hailey, Charles James; Harrison, Fiona; Krivonos, Roman; Mori, Kaya; Stern, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) provides an improvement in sensitivity at energies above 10 keV by two orders of magnitude over non-focusing satellites, making it possible to probe deeper into the Galaxy and Universe. Lansbury and collaborators recently completed a catalog of 497 sources serendipitously detected in the 3-24 keV band using 13 square degrees of NuSTAR coverage. Many of these NuSTAR "serendips" have counterparts at soft X-ray and other wavelengths, and about half of them have been classified, primarily via ground-based optical spectroscopy. While Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are, by far, the largest group within the classified sources, Galactic sources have also been identified based on optical spectra showing emission or absorption lines at zero redshift, previous classifications, or other observed features. We have carried out an optical and X-ray study of 16 Galactic serendips that include X-ray binaries, Cataclysmic Variables, and active stars. We focus, in particular, on constraints on the population of High-Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) as their overall numbers and fraction that include black holes vs. neutron stars is relevant to predictions for the types of compact object mergers that we expect to see with gravitational wave detectors. Also, X-rays from HMXBs may be important for heating the early Universe. In addition to the HMXBs, we will report on results of observations of other serendips, including a relatively bright and variable source with unusual properties that may be an ultracompact X-ray binary. Finally, we discuss on-going work to classify more of the serendips in the Galactic plane.

  10. The Shape Evolution of Galactic Open Clusters from Observations Under Galactic External Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Meng; Abt, Helmut; Zhao, Gang; Li, Chengdong

    2017-02-01

    We present the Galactic characteristics of 154 open clusters using the stellar statistics method with data from the WEBDA database. We find that all clusters in our sample are elongated in shape, which indicates that the spherical clusters are stretched out to be ellipsoid as a function of age ({log}({age}/{year})=6.64{--}9.7). By dividing a cluster into a central core and an outer part, we have computed the apparent ellipticities of these two parts respectively. The scale relations between ellipticities and age indicate that the outer parts of open clusters become more elliptical while the central cores remain circular. We suppose that the outer parts become more elliptical because they are more subjected to the external forces, e.g., Galactic differential rotation, while the central cores form a circular shape under the domination of stellar dynamics. We have also performed an analysis of the crucial influence of cluster mass and location on its shape.

  11. Stellar Dynamical Processes in Massive Star and Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Eyer, L.

    2009-01-01

    We study how high precision astrometric measurements by SIM and GAIA of stars involved in dynamical ejection events from star clusters can constrain theories of massive star and star cluster formation. We focus on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). First, we investigate the scientific potential associated with an accurate measurement of the distance and proper motion of Theta 1 Ori C, which is the most massive star in the cluster and was recently involved (about 4000 years ago) in the ejection of a B star: the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) star. The motion of the BN star has taken it close to a massive protostar, known as source I, where it appears to have influenced the accretion and outflow activity, most likely by a tidal interaction with the accretion disk. An accurate proper motion measurement of Theta 1 Ori C will constrain BN's initial motion, allowing us to search for deflections caused by the gravitational potential of the massive protostar. Second, we search the Hipparcos catalog for candidate runaway stars, i.e. that have been dynamically ejected from the cluster over the course of the last several Myr. SIM and GAIA observations of these stars will be needed to confirm their origin from the ONC. The results of this study will constrain the star cluster formation timescale and the statistics of the population of ejected stars. JCT acknowledges support from from NSF CAREER grant AST-0645412 and a grant from NASA for SIM Science Studies.

  12. From the sun to the Galactic Center: dust, stars and black hole(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Tobias

    2013-07-01

    The centers of galaxies are their own ultimate gravitational sinks. Massive black holes and star clusters as well as gas are especially likely to fall into the centers of galaxies by dynamical friction or dissipation. Many galactic centers harbor supermassive black holes (SMBH) and dense nuclear (star) clusters which possibly arrived there by these processes. Nuclear clusters can be formed in situ from gas, or from smaller star clusters which fall to the center. Since the Milky Way harbors both an SMBH and a nuclear cluster, both can be studied best in the Galactic Center (GC), which is the closest galactic nucleus to us. In Chapter 1, I introduce the different components of the Milky Way, and put these into the context of the GC. I then give an overview of relevant properties (e.g. star content and distribution) of the GC. Afterwards, I report the results of four different studies about the GC. In Chapter 2, I analyze the limitations of astrometry, one of the most useful methods for the study of the GC. Thanks to the high density of stars and its relatively small distance from us it is possible to measure the motions of thousands of stars in the GC with images, separated by few years only. I find two main limitations to this method: (1) for bright stars the not perfectly correctable distortion of the camera limits the accuracy, and (2) for the majority of the fainter stars, the main limitation is crowding from the other stars in the GC. The position uncertainty of faint stars is mainly caused by the seeing halos of bright stars. In the very center faint unresolvable stars are also important for the position uncertainty. In Chapter 3, I evaluate the evidence for an intermediate mass black hole in the small candidate cluster IRS13E within the GC. Intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) have a mass between the two types of confirmed black hole: the stellar remnants and the supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies. One possibility for! their formation is the

  13. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC O-TYPE STARS. II. SINGLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S. J.; Gies, D. R.; Hillwig, T. C.; McSwain, M. V.; Huang, W. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: mcswain@lehigh.edu

    2013-02-01

    We report on new radial velocity measurements of massive stars that are either suspected binaries or lacking prior observations. This is part of a survey to identify and characterize spectroscopic binaries among O-type stars with the goal of comparing the binary fraction of field and runaway stars with those in clusters and associations. We present orbits for HDE 308813, HD 152147, HD 164536, BD-16 Degree-Sign 4826, and HDE 229232, Galactic O-type stars exhibiting single-lined spectroscopic variation. By fitting model spectra to our observed spectra, we obtain estimates for effective temperature, surface gravity, and rotational velocity. We compute orbital periods and velocity semiamplitudes for each system and note the lack of photometric variation for any system. These binaries probably appear single-lined because the companions are faint and because their orbital Doppler shifts are small compared to the width of the rotationally broadened lines of the primary.

  14. A galactic cloak for an exploding star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-23

    The galaxy pictured here is NGC 4424, located in the constellation of  Virgo. It is not visible with the naked eye but has been captured here with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Although it may not be obvious from this image, NGC 4424 is in fact a spiral galaxy. In this image it is seen more or less edge on, but from above you would be able to see the arms of the galaxy wrapping around its centre to give the characteristic spiral form . In 2012 astronomers observed a supernova in NGC 4424 — a violent explosion marking the end of a star’s life. During a supernova explosion, a single star can often outshine an entire galaxy. However, the supernova in NGC 4424, dubbed SN 2012cg, cannot be seen here as the image was taken ten years prior to the explosion. Along the central region of the galaxy, clouds of dust block the light from distant stars and create dark patches. To the left of NGC 4424 there are two bright objects in the frame. The brightest is another, smaller galaxy known as LEDA 213994 and the object closer to NGC 4424 is an anonymous star in our Milky Way. A version of this image was entered into the Hubble's Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Gilles Chapdelaine.

  15. INTERACTION OF RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES WITH STARS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shuo; Liu, F. K.; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer; Chen Xian E-mail: fkliu@bac.pku.edu.cn

    2012-03-20

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are the products of frequent galaxy mergers. The coalescence of the SMBHBs is a distinct source of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. The detections of the strong GW radiation and their possible electromagnetic counterparts are essential. Numerical relativity suggests that the post-merger supermassive black hole (SMBH) gets a kick velocity up to 4000 km s{sup -1} due to the anisotropic GW radiations. Here, we investigate the dynamical coevolution and interaction of the recoiling SMBHs and their galactic stellar environments with one million direct N-body simulations including the stellar tidal disruption by the recoiling SMBHs. Our results show that the accretion of disrupted stars does not significantly affect the SMBH dynamical evolution. We investigate the stellar tidal disruption rates as a function of the dynamical evolution of oscillating SMBHs in the galactic nuclei. Our simulations show that most stellar tidal disruptions are contributed by the unbound stars and occur when the oscillating SMBHs pass through the galactic center. The averaged disruption rate is {approx}10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which is about an order of magnitude lower than that by a stationary SMBH at similar galactic nuclei. Our results also show that a bound star cluster is around the oscillating SMBH of about {approx}0.7% the black hole mass. In addition, we discover a massive cloud of unbound stars following the oscillating SMBH. We also investigate the dependence of the results on the SMBH masses and density slopes of the galactic nuclei.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Northern Galactic OB stars vsini (Simon-Diaz+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon-Diaz, S.; Herrero, A.

    2014-04-01

    The spectroscopic observations considered for this study are part of the IACOB spectroscopic database of northern Galactic OB stars (last described in Simon-Diaz et al., 2011, Bull. Soc. Roy. Sci. Liege, 80, 514 and Stellar Clusters and Associations: Proc. A RIA Workshop on Gaia, eds. E. J. Alfaro Navarro, A. T. Gallego Calvente, & M. R. Zapatero Osorio, 255). This unique high-quality spectroscopic database has been compiled in the framework of the IACOB project. To date, the IACOB database comprises 1250 spectra of 153 and 97 Galactic O- and early B-type stars, respectively, observable from the Roque de los Muchachos observatory in La Palma (Spain). The spectra have a resolving power of 46000 and 23000, a typical signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) above 150, and were compiled between November 2008 and January 2013 with the high-resolution FIbre-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES) attached to the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT). The IACOB database has a multi-epoch character that enables investigations of the binary/multiple nature of considered stars and the temporal variations in individual objects with at least three spectra per observed target. In this study, we only used a subsample of the spectra, discarding all stars with signatures of multiplicity (which means that we only considered apparently single and SB1 stars), and only considering the spectrum with the highest S/N ratio per star. (5 data files).

  17. Hierarchical Star Formation in Turbulent Media: Evidence from Young Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasha, K.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Calzetti, D.; Adamo, A.; Aloisi, A.; Bright, S. N.; Cook, D. O.; Dale, D. A.; Fumagalli, M.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; Kahre, L.; Kim, H.; Krumholz, M. R.; Lee, J. C.; Messa, M.; Ryon, J. E.; Ubeda, L.

    2017-06-01

    We present an analysis of the positions and ages of young star clusters in eight local galaxies to investigate the connection between the age difference and separation of cluster pairs. We find that star clusters do not form uniformly but instead are distributed so that the age difference increases with the cluster pair separation to the 0.25-0.6 power, and that the maximum size over which star formation is physically correlated ranges from ˜200 pc to ˜1 kpc. The observed trends between age difference and separation suggest that cluster formation is hierarchical both in space and time: clusters that are close to each other are more similar in age than clusters born further apart. The temporal correlations between stellar aggregates have slopes that are consistent with predictions of turbulence acting as the primary driver of star formation. The velocity associated with the maximum size is proportional to the galaxy’s shear, suggesting that the galactic environment influences the maximum size of the star-forming structures.

  18. The life and death of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, B. C.

    It is generally believed that most stars are born in groups and clusters, rather than in the field. In recent years it has been demonstrated that merging galaxies produce large numbers of young massive star clusters, sometimes called super star clusters. Understanding what triggers the formation of these young massive clusters provides important information about the formation of stars in general. In recent years it has also become apparent that most clusters do not survive more than ~ 10 Myr (i.e., "infant mortality"). Hence, it is just as important to understand the disruption of star clusters as it is to to understand their formation if we want to understand the demographics of both star clusters and field stars. This talk will first discuss what triggers star cluster formation in merging galaxies (primarily in the Antennae galaxies) and will then outline a general framework designed to empirically fit observations of both star clusters and field stars in a wide variety of galaxies from mergers to quiescent spirals.

  19. Variable stars in the northern Galactic plane from KISOGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2017-09-01

    We have conducted a large-scale survey of the northern plane using KisoWide Field Camera attached to Schmidt telescope at Kiso Observatory. The KISOGP (KWFC Intensive Survey of the Galactic Plane) project has made 40-70 epoch observations in I band of about 320 square degrees for 5 years starting in 2012. The limiting magnitude is around 16.5 in I. In the data analysis so far, we detected a couple of thousands of variable stars including approximately 100 Cepheids and more than 700 Miras. Roughly 90% of them were not previously reported as variable stars, indicating that there are still many relatively bright variables to be found in the Galactic plane.

  20. Super massive black hole in galactic nuclei with tidal disruption of stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Shiyan; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-09-10

    Tidal disruption of stars by super massive central black holes from dense star clusters is modeled by high-accuracy direct N-body simulation. The time evolution of the stellar tidal disruption rate, the effect of tidal disruption on the stellar density profile, and, for the first time, the detailed origin of tidally disrupted stars are carefully examined and compared with classic papers in the field. Up to 128k particles are used in simulation to model the star cluster around a super massive black hole, and we use the particle number and the tidal radius of the black hole as free parameters for a scaling analysis. The transition from full to empty loss-cone is analyzed in our data, and the tidal disruption rate scales with the particle number, N, in the expected way for both cases. For the first time in numerical simulations (under certain conditions) we can support the concept of a critical radius of Frank and Rees, which claims that most stars are tidally accreted on highly eccentric orbits originating from regions far outside the tidal radius. Due to the consumption of stars moving on radial orbits, a velocity anisotropy is found inside the cluster. Finally we estimate the real galactic center based on our simulation results and the scaling analysis.

  1. An HST/WFPC2 Survey for Nearby Companions of Galactic Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, D. J.

    2003-12-01

    Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars provide key insights about the final evolutionary phase of the most massive stars. I present here the results of a new, high angular resolution, imaging survey of 61 Galactic WR stars, which was designed to detect new companions, clusters, and/or associations surrounding these stars. High resolution observations are essential to provide a true census of the number and astrophysical parameters of massive stars, to understand the effects of nearby companions on their evolutionary paths, and to understand the effects of these companions on the stellar environment. The survey is based on images of each WR target made with the Planetary Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 instrument (usually through the F336W, F439W, and F555W filters, which are near counterparts of the Johnson UBV filters). I measured astrometric positions and photometric magnitudes on the HST synthetic system for all the stars found within 15 arcsec of each WR star. I present results on new companions for 23 (38%) of the 61 WR stars in the survey sample. Three WR stars (WR 86, WR 146, and WR 147) are resolved as close colliding-wind binary systems. Another three WR stars (WR 98a, WR 104, and WR 112) are dusty WC9 type stars in hierarchical multiple systems. Six WR stars are members of previously unrecognized stellar groups. Finally, for thirteen WR stars, I determine new stellar parameters based on an analysis of the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams of the nearby cluster/association main sequence stars. My WR sample breaks down into 57% cluster/association members, 33% field stars, and 10% runaways. This agrees reasonably well with the fractions determined by Mason et al. (1998) of 72%, 20%, and 8% for the same categories among the O stars. I find the same trend that the binary fraction decreases from cluster/association to field and to runaway groups in accordance with our expectation that many of the latter were originally binary members that were ejected by

  2. Dynamics of the coronas of open star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, V. M.; Putkov, S. I.; Seleznev, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    A method for distinguishing coronas in models of open star clusters is proposed. The method uses trajectories of stars that do not leave the coronas over time intervals t comparable to the mean lifetime τ of the clusters. Corona models are constructed for six numerical cluster models, and the direction and character of the dynamical evolution of the coronas are determined. Retrograde stellar motions are dominant in the coronas. In spite of some signs of dynamical instability of the coronas (small densities compared to the critical density and accelerated expansion of the coronas), the formation of close-toequilibrium density and phase-density distributions at distances from one to three cluster tidal radii from the cluster center can be seen. Approximations are constructed for the corona and cluster phase density using distributions that depend on three parameters (the parameters of the stellar motion in the Lindblad rotating coordinate system). This temporary equilibrium of the corona is due to balance in the number of starsmoving from the central areas of the cluster to the corona, and from the corona to the corona periphery or beyond. Evidence that corona stars can be gravitationally bound at distances out to four tidal radii from the cluster center is found: the presence of nearly periodic retrograde mean motions of a large number of corona stars in the Galactic plane; 91-99% of corona stars satisfy the gravitational binding criterion of Ross, Mennim and Heggie over time intervals that are close to the mean cluster lifetime. The escape rate from the corona is estimated for t ≥ τ, and found to be from 0.03 to 0.23 of the number of corona stars per violent relaxation time.

  3. Kinematic structure in the Galactic halo at the North Galactic Pole: RR Lyrae and blue horizontal branch stars show different kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinman, T. D.; Cacciari, C.; Bragaglia, A.; Buzzoni, A.; Spagna, A.

    2007-03-01

    Radial velocities and proper motions (derived from the GSC-II data base) are given for 38 RR Lyrae (RRL) stars and 79 blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars in a ~200 deg2 area around the North Galactic Pole (NGP). Both heliocentric (UVW) and galactocentric (VR, Vφ, Vz) space motions are derived for these stars using a homogeneous distance scale consistent with (m - M)0 = 18.52 for the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). An analysis of the 26 RRL and 52 BHB stars whose height (Z) above the plane is less than 8 kpc shows that this halo sample is not homogeneous. Our BHB sample (like that of Sirko et al.) has a zero galactic rotation (Vφ) and roughly isotropic velocity dispersions. The RRL sample shows a definite retrograde rotation (Vφ = -95 +/- 29 kms-1) and non-isotropic velocity dispersions. The combined BHB and RRL sample has a retrograde galactic rotation (V) that is similar to that found by Majewski for his sample of subdwarfs in Selected Area (SA) 57. The velocity dispersion of the RRL stars that have a positive W motion is significantly smaller than the dispersion of those `streaming down' with a negative W. Also, the ratio of RRL to BHB stars is smaller for the sample that has positive W. Our halo sample occupies 10.4 kpc3 at a mean height of 5 kpc above the Galactic plane. In this volume, one component (rich in RRL stars) shows retrograde rotation and the streaming motion that we associate with the accretion process. The other component (traced by the BHB stars) shows essentially no rotation and less evidence of streaming. These two components have horizontal branch (HB) morphologies that suggest that they may be the field star equivalents of the young and old halo globular clusters, respectively. Clearly, it is quite desirable to use more than one tracer in any kinematic analysis of the halo.

  4. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report details work done in a project involving spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star-formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data including some from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and other spectroscopic databases. We will include four kinds of regions: (1) disks around more evolved objects; (2) young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star-formation regions; (3) star formation in external, bright IR (infrared) galaxies; and (4) the galactic center. During this period, work proceeded fully on track and on time. Details on workshops and conferences attended and research results are presented. A preprint article entitled 'The Far Infrared Lines of OH as Molecular Cloud Diagnostics' is included as an appendix.

  5. Star Factory Near Galactic Center Bathed In High-Energy X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    X-ray Image The Arches Cluster X-ray Image Credit: NASA/CXC/Northwestern/ F.Zadeh et al. Starburst galaxies are known for creating huge hot bubbles of gas that escape from the galaxy. In a similar way, Chandra observations of the Arches clusters may provide clues to the origin of a much larger cloud of hot gas known to exist in the center of the galaxy. "Our data suggest that the gas within the Arches cluster may get so hot that it escapes from the cluster," said Cornelia Lang of the University of Massachusetts. "The Arches and other clusters like it may contribute to the reservoir of mysterious hot gas long observed near the Milky Way." Zadeh and collaborators intend to search for X-ray emission from other clusters of stars near the Galactic center and compare this to newer, longer Chandra observations of the Arches cluster. Chandra observed Arches cluster region with its Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). The research team for this investigation also included Casey Law and Antonella Fruscione from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Cornelia Lang and Daniel Wang from University of Massachusetts; Mark Wardle of the University of Sydney, Australia; and Angela Cotera from University of Arizona. The ACIS X-ray camera was developed for NASA by Penn State and MIT. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, California, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. Images associated with this release are available on the World Wide Web at: http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov

  6. RELATIVITY AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE GALACTIC CENTER S-STAR ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio; Merritt, David E-mail: merritt@astro.rit.edu

    2013-01-20

    We consider the orbital evolution of the S-stars, the young main-sequence stars near the supermassive black hole (SBH) at the Galactic center, and put constraints on competing models for their origin. Our analysis includes for the first time the joint effects of Newtonian and relativistic perturbations to the motion, including the dragging of inertial frames by a spinning SBH as well as torques due to finite-N asymmetries in the field-star distribution (resonant relaxation, RR). The evolution of the S-star orbits is strongly influenced by the Schwarzschild barrier (SB), the locus in the (E, L) plane where RR is ineffective at driving orbits to higher eccentricities. Formation models that invoke tidal disruption of binary stars by the SBH tend to place stars below (i.e., at higher eccentricities than) the SB; some stars remain below the barrier, but most stars are able to penetrate it, after which they are subject to RR and achieve a nearly thermal distribution of eccentricities. This process requires roughly 50 Myr in nuclear models with relaxed stellar cusps, or {approx}> 10 Myr, regardless of the initial distribution of eccentricities, in nuclear models that include a dense cluster of 10 M{sub Sun} black holes. We find a probability of {approx}< 1% for any S-star to be tidally disrupted by the SBH over its lifetime.

  7. Unveiling the Role of Galactic Rotation on Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utreras, José; Becerra, Fernando; Escala, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    We study the star formation process at galactic scales and the role of rotation through numerical simulations of spiral and starburst galaxies using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo. We focus on the study of three integrated star formation laws found in the literature: the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) and Silk-Elmegreen (SE) laws, and the dimensionally homogeneous equation proposed by Escala {{{Σ }}}{SFR}\\propto \\sqrt{G/L}{{{Σ }}}{gas}1.5. We show that using the last we take into account the effects of the integration along the line of sight and find a unique regime of star formation for both types of galaxies, suppressing the observed bi-modality of the KS law. We find that the efficiencies displayed by our simulations are anti-correlated with the angular velocity of the disk Ω for the three laws studied in this work. Finally, we show that the dimensionless efficiency of star formation is well represented by an exponentially decreasing function of -1.9{{Ω }}{t}{ff}{ini}, where {t}{ff}{ini} is the initial free-fall time. This leads to a unique galactic star formation relation which reduces the scatter of the bi-modal KS, SE, and Escala relations by 43%, 43%, and 35%, respectively.

  8. A multiwavelength study of evolved massive stars in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Wang, Q. D.; Morris, M. R.

    2012-09-01

    the Galactic Centre are located outside the three known massive stellar clusters. The ionization of several compact H II regions can be accounted for by their enclosed individual evolved massive stars, which thus likely formed in isolation or in small groups.

  9. The VMC survey. XI. Radial stellar population gradients in the galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chengyuan; De Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Rubele, Stefano; Girardi, Leo; Gullieuszik, Marco; Wang, Chuchu; Bekki, Kenji; For, Bi-Qing; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; Clementini, Gisella; Emerson, Jim; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Guandalini, Roald; Marconi, Marcella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Piatti, Andrés E.; Van Loon, Jacco Th. E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn

    2014-07-20

    We present a deep near-infrared color-magnitude diagram of the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae, obtained with the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) as part of the VISTA near-infrared Y, J, K{sub s} survey of the Magellanic System (VMC). The cluster stars comprising both the subgiant and red giant branches exhibit apparent, continuous variations in color-magnitude space as a function of radius. Subgiant branch stars at larger radii are systematically brighter than their counterparts closer to the cluster core; similarly, red-giant-branch stars in the cluster's periphery are bluer than their more centrally located cousins. The observations can very well be described by adopting an age spread of ∼0.5 Gyr as well as radial gradients in both the cluster's helium abundance (Y) and metallicity (Z), which change gradually from (Y = 0.28, Z = 0.005) in the cluster core to (Y = 0.25, Z = 0.003) in its periphery. We conclude that the cluster's inner regions host a significant fraction of second-generation stars, which decreases with increasing radius; the stellar population in the 47 Tuc periphery is well approximated by a simple stellar population.

  10. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC HALO STARS IN VIRGO

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Thomas G.; Mateo, Mario; Martinez-Delgado, David E-mail: mmateo@umich.ed

    2010-11-15

    We present multi-slit radial velocity measurements for 111 stars in the direction of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS). The stars were photometrically selected to be probable main-sequence stars in the Galactic halo. When compared with the radial velocity distribution expected for the halo of the Milky Way, as well as the distribution seen in a control field, we observe a significant excess of negative velocity stars in the field, which can likely be attributed to the presence of a stellar stream. This kinematic excess peaks at a Galactic standard of rest radial velocity of -75 km s{sup -1}. A rough distance estimate suggests that this feature extends from {approx}15 kpc out to, and possibly beyond, the {approx}30 kpc limit of the study. The mean velocity of these stars is incompatible with those of the VSS itself (V{sub gsr} {approx} 130 km s{sup -1}), which we weakly detect, but it is consistent with radial velocity measurements of nearby 2MASS M-giants and SDSS+SEGUE K/M-giants and blue horizontal branch stars that constitute the leading tidal tail of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Some oblate models for the shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo predict that the leading arm of the Sagittarius Stream should pass through this volume, and have highly negative (V{sub gsr} {approx}< -200 km s{sup -1}) radial velocities, as it descends down from the northern Galactic hemisphere toward the Galactic plane. The kinematic feature observed in this study, if it is in fact Sagittarius debris, is not consistent with these predictions, and instead, like other leading stream radial velocity measurements, is consistent with a recently published triaxial halo model, or, if axisymmetry is imposed, favors a prolate shape for the Galactic halo potential. However, a rough distance estimate to the observed kinematic feature places it somewhat closer (D {approx} 15-30 kpc) than the Sagittarius models predict (D {approx} 35-45 kpc).

  11. Distance Scale Zero Points from Galactic RR Lyrae Star Parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Feast, Michael W.; Barnes, Thomas G.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Bean, Jacob L.; Menzies, John W.; Chaboyer, Brian; Fossati, Luca; Nesvacil, Nicole; Smith, Horace A.; Kolenberg, Katrien; Laney, C. D.; Kochukhov, Oleg; Nelan, Edmund P.; Shulyak, D. V.; Taylor, Denise; Freedman, Wendy L.

    2011-12-01

    We present new absolute trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions for seven Population II variable stars—five RR Lyr variables: RZ Cep, XZ Cyg, SU Dra, RR Lyr, and UV Oct; and two type 2 Cepheids: VY Pyx and κ Pav. We obtained these results with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors, white-light interferometers on Hubble Space Telescope. We find absolute parallaxes in milliseconds of arc: RZ Cep, 2.12 ± 0.16 mas XZ Cyg, 1.67 ± 0.17 mas SU Dra, 1.42 ± 0.16 mas RR Lyr, 3.77 ± 0.13 mas UV Oct, 1.71 ± 0.10 mas VY Pyx, 6.44 ± 0.23 mas and κ Pav, 5.57 ± 0.28 mas an average σπ/π = 5.4%. With these parallaxes, we compute absolute magnitudes in V and K bandpasses corrected for interstellar extinction and Lutz-Kelker-Hanson bias. Using these RR Lyrae variable star absolute magnitudes, we then derive zero points for MV -[Fe/H] and MK -[Fe/H]-log P relations. The technique of reduced parallaxes corroborates these results. We employ our new results to determine distances and ages of several Galactic globular clusters and the distance of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The latter is close to that previously derived from Classical Cepheids uncorrected for any metallicity effect, indicating that any such effect is small. We also discuss the somewhat puzzling results obtained for our two type 2 Cepheids. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  12. Calcium triplet metallicity calibration for stars in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez, S.; Zoccali, M.; Hill, V.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Saviane, I.; Rejkuba, M.; Battaglia, G.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We present a new calibration of the calcium II triplet equivalent widths versus [Fe/H], constructed upon K giant stars in the Galactic bulge. This calibration will be used to derive iron abundances for the targets of the GIBS survey, and is in general especially well suited for solar and supersolar metallicity giants, which are typical of external massive galaxies. Methods: About 150 bulge K giants were observed with the GIRAFFE spectrograph at the VLT with a resolution of R ~ 20 000 and at R ~ 6000. In the first case, the spectra allowed us to directly determine the Fe abundances from several unblended Fe lines, deriving what we call here high-resolution [Fe/H] measurements. The low-resolution spectra allowed us to measure equivalent widths of the two strongest lines of the near-infrared calcium II triplet at 8542 and 8662 Å. Results: By comparing the two measurements, we derived a relation between calcium equivalent widths and [Fe/H] that is linear over the metallicity range probed here, - 1 < [Fe/H] < +0.7. By adding a small second-order correction based on literature globular cluster data, we derived the unique calibration equation [Fe/H] CaT = -3.150 + 0.432W' + 0.006W'2, with an rms dispersion of 0.197 dex, valid across the whole metallicity range -2.3 < [Fe/H] < +0.7. Based on observations taken with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 385.B-0735(B).Full Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A121

  13. Statistical Properties of Galactic δ Scuti Stars: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.-W.; Protopapas, P.; Kim, D.-W.; Byun, Y.-I.

    2013-05-01

    We present statistical characteristics of 1578 δ Scuti stars including nearby field stars and cluster member stars within the Milky Way. We obtained 46% of these stars (718 stars) from work by Rodríguez and collected the remaining 54% of stars (860 stars) from other literature. We updated the entries with the latest information of sky coordinates, color, rotational velocity, spectral type, period, amplitude, and binarity. The majority of our sample is well characterized in terms of typical period range (0.02-0.25 days), pulsation amplitudes (<0.5 mag), and spectral types (A-F type). Given this list of δ Scuti stars, we examined relations between their physical properties (i.e., periods, amplitudes, spectral types, and rotational velocities) for field stars and cluster members, and confirmed that the correlations of properties are not significantly different from those reported in Rodríguez's work. All the δ Scuti stars are cross-matched with several X-ray and UV catalogs, resulting in 27 X-ray and 41 UV-only counterparts. These counterparts are interesting targets for further study because of their uniqueness in showing δ Scuti-type variability and X-ray/UV emission at the same time. The compiled catalog can be accessed through the Web interface http://stardb.yonsei.ac.kr/DeltaScuti.

  14. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF GALACTIC {delta} SCUTI STARS: REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-W.; Kim, D.-W.; Byun, Y.-I.; Protopapas, P. E-mail: kim@mpia-hd.mpg.de

    2013-05-15

    We present statistical characteristics of 1578 {delta} Scuti stars including nearby field stars and cluster member stars within the Milky Way. We obtained 46% of these stars (718 stars) from work by Rodriguez and collected the remaining 54% of stars (860 stars) from other literature. We updated the entries with the latest information of sky coordinates, color, rotational velocity, spectral type, period, amplitude, and binarity. The majority of our sample is well characterized in terms of typical period range (0.02-0.25 days), pulsation amplitudes (<0.5 mag), and spectral types (A-F type). Given this list of {delta} Scuti stars, we examined relations between their physical properties (i.e., periods, amplitudes, spectral types, and rotational velocities) for field stars and cluster members, and confirmed that the correlations of properties are not significantly different from those reported in Rodriguez's work. All the {delta} Scuti stars are cross-matched with several X-ray and UV catalogs, resulting in 27 X-ray and 41 UV-only counterparts. These counterparts are interesting targets for further study because of their uniqueness in showing {delta} Scuti-type variability and X-ray/UV emission at the same time. The compiled catalog can be accessed through the Web interface http://stardb.yonsei.ac.kr/DeltaScuti.

  15. STAR-FORMING GALAXY EVOLUTION IN NEARBY RICH CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, K. D.; Rieke, G. H.; Bai, L.

    2013-08-20

    Dense environments are known to quench star formation in galaxies, but it is still unknown what mechanism(s) are directly responsible. In this paper, we study the star formation of galaxies in A2029 and compare it to that of Coma, combining indicators at 24 {mu}m, H{alpha}, and UV down to rates of 0.03 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We show that A2029's star-forming galaxies follow the same mass-SFR relation as the field. The Coma cluster, on the other hand, has a population of galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) significantly lower than the field mass-SFR relation, indicative of galaxies in the process of being quenched. Over half of these galaxies also host active galactic nuclei. Ram-pressure stripping and starvation/strangulation are the most likely mechanisms for suppressing the star formation in these galaxies, but we are unable to disentangle which is dominating. The differences we see between the two clusters' populations of star-forming galaxies may be related to their accretion histories, with A2029 having accreted its star-forming galaxies more recently than Coma. Additionally, many early-type galaxies in A2029 are detected at 24 {mu}m and/or in the far-UV, but this emission is not directly related to star formation. Similar galaxies have probably been classified as star forming in previous studies of dense clusters, possibly obscuring some of the effects of the cluster environment on true star-forming galaxies.

  16. STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUSTER ELLIPTICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Cory R.; Brodwin, Mark; Snyder, Gregory F.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor L.; Stanford, S. A.; Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Dey, Arjun; Moustakas, John

    2015-02-20

    We measure the star formation rates (SFRs) of massive (M {sub *} > 10{sup 10.1} M {sub ☉}) early-type galaxies (ETGs) in a sample of 11 high-redshift (1.0 < z < 1.5) galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We identify ETGs visually from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and select likely cluster members as having either an appropriate spectroscopic redshift or red-sequence color. Mid-infrared SFRs are measured using Spitzer 24 μm data for isolated cluster galaxies for which contamination by neighbors, and active galactic nuclei, can be ruled out. Cluster ETGs show enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFRs) compared to cluster galaxies in the local universe, but have sSFRs more than four times lower than that of field ETGs at 1 < z < 1.5. Relative to the late-type cluster population, isolated ETGs show substantially quenched mean SFRs, yet still contribute 12% of the overall star formation activity measured in 1 < z < 1.5 clusters. We find that new ETGs are likely being formed in ISCS clusters; the fraction of cluster galaxies identified as ETGs increases from 34% to 56% from z ∼ 1.5 → 1.25. While the fraction of cluster ETGs that are highly star-forming (SFR ≥ 26 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) drops from 27% to 10% over the same period, their sSFRs are roughly constant. All these factors taken together suggest that, particularly at z ≳ 1.25, the events that created these distant cluster ETGs—likely mergers, at least among the most massive—were both recent and gas-rich.

  17. Clustering of Local Group Distances: Publication Bias or Correlated Measurements? V. Galactic Rotation Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Bono, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    As part of an extensive data mining effort, we have compiled a database of 162 Galactic rotation speed measurements at R 0 (the solar Galactocentric distance), {{{\\Theta }}}0. Published between 1927 and 2017 June, this represents the most comprehensive set of {{{\\Theta }}}0 values since the 1985 meta-analysis that led to the last revision of the International Astronomical Union’s recommended Galactic rotation constants. Although we do not find any compelling evidence for the presence of “publication bias” in recent decades, we find clear differences among the {{{\\Theta }}}0 values and the {{{\\Theta }}}0/{R}0 ratios resulting from the use of different tracer populations. Specifically, young tracers (including OB and supergiant stars, masers, Cepheid variables, H ii regions, and young open clusters), as well as kinematic measurements of Sgr A* near the Galactic Center, imply a significantly larger Galactic rotation speed at the solar circle and a higher {{{\\Theta }}}0/{R}0 ratio (i.e., {{{\\Theta }}}0=247+/- 3 km s‑1 and {{{\\Theta }}}0/{R}0=29.81+/- 0.32 km s‑1 kpc‑1 statistical uncertainties only) than any of the tracers dominating the Galaxy’s mass budget (i.e., field stars and the H i/CO distributions). Using the latter to be most representative of the bulk of the Galaxy’s matter distribution, we arrive at an updated set of Galactic rotation constants,

  18. THE GALACTIC O-STAR SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY (GOSSS). II. BRIGHT SOUTHERN STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sota, A.; Apellániz, J. Maíz; Alfaro, E. J.; Barbá, R. H.; Arias, J. I.; Walborn, N. R.; Gamen, R. C.

    2014-03-01

    We present the second installment of GOSSS, a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ∼ 2500 digital observations from both hemispheres selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog (GOSC). In this paper we include bright stars and other objects drawn mostly from the first version of GOSC, all of them south of δ = –20°, for a total number of 258 O stars. We also revise the northern sample of Paper I to provide the full list of spectroscopically classified Galactic O stars complete to B = 8, bringing the total number of published GOSSS stars to 448. Extensive sequences of exceptional objects are given, including the early Of/WN, O Iafpe, Ofc, ON/OC, Onfp, Of?p, and Oe types, as well as double/triple-lined spectroscopic binaries. The new spectral subtype O9.2 is also discussed. The magnitude and spatial distributions of the observed sample are analyzed. We also present new results from OWN, a multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopic survey coordinated with GOSSS that is assembling the largest sample of Galactic spectroscopic massive binaries ever attained. The OWN data combined with additional information on spectroscopic and visual binaries from the literature indicate that only a very small fraction (if any) of the stars with masses above 15-20 M {sub ☉} are born as single systems. In the future we will publish the rest of the GOSSS survey, which is expected to include over 1000 Galactic O stars.

  19. Resolving Star Formation, Multiphase ISM Structure, and Wind Driving with MHD and RHD Models of Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, Eve

    Current studies of star and galaxy formation have concluded that energetic feedback from young stars and supernovae (SNe) is crucial, both for controlling observed interstellar medium (ISM) properties and star formation rates in the Milky Way and other galaxies, and for driving galactic winds that govern the baryon abundance in dark matter halos. However, in many numerical studies of the ISM, energy inputs have not been implemented self-consistently with the evolving rate of gravitational collapse to make stars, or have considered only isolated star-forming clouds without a realistic galactic environment (including sheared rotation and externally-originating SNe), or have not directly incorporated radiation, magnetic, and chemical effects that are important or even dominant. In models of galaxy formation and evolution in the cosmic context, galactic winds are indispensable but highly uncertain as the physics of superbubble evolution and radiation-gas interactions cannot be resolved. Our central objectives are (1) to address the above limitations of current models, developing self-consistent simulations of the multiphase ISM in disk galaxies that resolve both star formation and stellar feedback, covering the range of scales needed to connect star cluster formation to galactic superwind ejection, and the range of environments from dwarfs to ULIRGs; and (2) to analyze the detailed properties of the gas, magnetic field, radiation field, and star formation/SNe in our simulations, including dependencies on local galactic disk environment, and to connect intrinsic properties with observable diagnostics. The proposed project will employ the Athena code for numerical magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) and radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations, using comprehensive physics modules that have been developed, tested, and demonstrated in sample simulations. We will consider local ``shearing box'' disk models with gas surface density Sigma = 2 - 10,000 Msun/pc^2, and a range of stellar

  20. Peering into the heart of galactic star formation: A detailed characterization of infrared-dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan, Sarah E.

    2009-09-01

    study of sub- structure in particular shows that IRDCs are undergoing fragmentation and are the precursors to star clusters, and thus we have placed IRDCs in context with Galactic star formation. The characterization presented here offers new constraints on theories of molecular cloud fragmentation and clustered star formation.

  1. Tracing the Galactic spiral structure with embedded clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, D.; Bonatto, C.; Bica, E.

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the properties of 18 embedded clusters (ECs). The sample includes 11 previously known clusters and we report the discovery of seven ECs on WISE images, thus complementing our recent list of 437 new clusters. The main goal is to use such clusters to shed new light on the Galactic structure by tracing the spiral arms with cluster distances. Our results favour a four-armed spiral pattern tracing three arms, Sagitarius-Carina, Perseus, and the Outer arm. The Sagitarius-Carina spiral arm is probed in the borderline of the third and fourth quadrants at a distance from the Galactic Centre of d1 ˜ 6.4 kpc adopting R⊙ = 7.2 kpc, or d2 ˜ 7.2 kpc for R⊙ = 8.0 kpc. Most ECs in our sample are located in the Perseus arm that is traced in the second and third quadrants and appear to be at Galactocentric distances in the range d1 = 9-10.5 kpc or d2 = 9.8-11.3 kpc. Dolidze 25, Bochum 2, and Camargo 445 are located in the Outer arm that extends along the second and third Galactic quadrants with a distance from the Galactic Centre in the range of d1 = 12.5-14.5 kpc or d2 = 13.5-15.5 kpc. We find further evidence that in the Galaxy ECs are predominantly located within the thin disc and along spiral arms. They are excellent tools for tracing these Galactic features and therefore new searches for ECs can contribute to a better understanding of the Galactic structure. We also report an EC aggregate located in key italicthe Perseus arm.

  2. Be Stars in Open Stellar Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, A. E.

    2017-06-01

    The current status of the problem of anomalous increases in the relative number of Be stars in young open stellar clusters is summarized in this article. The relative content of Be stars is shown to increase with the age of the clusters and reaches a maximum for stars in spectral classes B0-B3 when the age of the clusters is 12-20 Myr. In some clusters that are rich in B stars, the relative content exceeds 40%. It is shown that in young clusters with ages less than 9 Myr, Be stars are very rare or not observed at all. Models of the evolution of rotating massive stars indicates that the Be phenomenon may occur toward the end of the lifetime of B stars in the main sequence because of an increase in the ratio of the rotation velocity of a star to the critical velocity, but this cannot explain the presence of more than 40% Be stars in some young open stellar clusters. In this review, considerable attention is devoted to massive binary systems in different stages of the evolution of the binary system. The transfer of angular momentum during exchanges of mass in systems with different periods is a noteworthy alternative to the evolution of angular momentum in single stars. Some examples are shown of binary systems of different types which are or may be encountered in open stellar clusters.

  3. No Evidence for Multiple Stellar Populations in the Low-mass Galactic Globular Cluster E 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Strader, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Multiple stellar populations are a widespread phenomenon among Galactic globular clusters. Even though the origin of the enriched material from which new generations of stars are produced remains unclear, it is likely that self-enrichment will be feasible only in clusters massive enough to retain this enriched material. We searched for multiple populations in the low mass (M˜ 1.4× {10}4 {M}⊙ ) globular cluster E3, analyzing SOAR/Goodman multi-object spectroscopy centered on the blue cyanogen (CN) absorption features of 23 red giant branch stars. We find that the CN abundance does not present the typical bimodal behavior seen in clusters hosting multistellar populations, but rather a unimodal distribution that indicates the presence of a genuine single stellar population, or a level of enrichment much lower than in clusters that show evidence for two populations from high-resolution spectroscopy. E3 would be the first bona fide Galactic old globular cluster where no sign of self-enrichment is found. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  4. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  5. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-09

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  6. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  7. ENHANCED ACCRETION RATES OF STARS ON SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES BY STAR-DISK INTERACTIONS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Just, Andreas; Yurin, Denis; Makukov, Maxim; Berczik, Peter; Omarov, Chingis; Spurzem, Rainer; Vilkoviskij, Emmanuil Y.

    2012-10-10

    We investigate the dynamical interaction of a central star cluster surrounding a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and a central accretion disk (AD). The dissipative force acting on stars in the disk leads to an enhanced mass flow toward the SMBH and to an asymmetry in the phase space distribution due to the rotating AD. The AD is considered as a stationary Keplerian rotating disk, which is vertically extended in order to employ a fully self-consistent treatment of stellar dynamics including the dissipative force originating from star-gas ram pressure effects. The stellar system is treated with a direct high-accuracy N-body integration code. A star-by-star representation, desirable in N-body simulations, cannot be extended to real particle numbers yet. Hence, we carefully discuss the scaling behavior of our model with regard to particle number and tidal accretion radius. The main idea is to find a family of models for which the ratio of two-body relaxation time and dissipation time (for kinetic energy of stellar orbits) is constant, which then allows us to extrapolate our results to real parameters of galactic nuclei. Our model is derived from basic physical principles and as such it provides insight into the role of physical processes in galactic nuclei, but it should be regarded as a first step toward more realistic and more comprehensive simulations. Nevertheless, the following conclusions appear to be robust: the star accretion rate onto the AD and subsequently onto the SMBH is enhanced by a significant factor compared to purely stellar dynamical systems neglecting the disk. This process leads to enhanced fueling of central disks in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and to an enhanced rate of tidal stellar disruptions. Such disruptions may produce electromagnetic counterparts in the form of observable X-ray flares. Our models improve predictions for their rates in quiescent galactic nuclei. We do not yet model direct stellar collisions in the gravitational potential

  8. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. II. The NGC 6357 star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Kroupa, P.; Oh, S.

    2011-11-01

    Dynamical few-body encounters in the dense cores of young massive star clusters are responsible for the loss of a significant fraction of their massive stellar content. Some of the escaping (runaway) stars move through the ambient medium supersonically and can be revealed via detection of their bow shocks (visible in the infrared, optical or radio). In this paper, which is the second of a series of papers devoted to the search for OB stars running away from young ( ≲ several Myr) Galactic clusters and OB associations, we present the results of the search for bow shocks around the star-forming region NGC 6357. Using the archival data of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite and the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the preliminary data release of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered seven bow shocks, whose geometry is consistent with the possibility that they are generated by stars expelled from the young (~1-2 Myr) star clusters, Pismis 24 and AH03 J1725-34.4, associated with NGC 6357. Two of the seven bow shocks are driven by the already known OB stars, HD 319881 and [N78] 34. Follow-up spectroscopy of three other bow-shock-producing stars showed that they are massive (O-type) stars as well, while the 2MASS photometry of the remaining two stars suggests that they could be B0 V stars, provided that both are located at the same distance as NGC 6357. Detection of numerous massive stars ejected from the very young clusters is consistent with the theoretical expectation that star clusters can effectively lose massive stars at the very beginning of their dynamical evolution (long before the second mechanism for production of runaway stars, based on a supernova explosion in a massive tight binary system, begins to operate) and lends strong support to the idea that probably all field OB stars have been dynamically ejected from their birth clusters. A by-product of our search for bow shocks around NGC 6357 is the detection of three circular

  9. Decaying globular cluster systems and galactic nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.

    Globular cluster are systems that evolve dissipatively in non symmetric galactic potentials, losing energy and angular momentum. As a consequence, the GCS radial profile in a galaxy evolves significantly, so to differ from the one of the collisionless stellar bulge phase: this can explain the observations, which indicate how the GCS distribution in galaxies is usually more extended than the underlining stellar distribution. Moreover, the GCS orbital decay implies that a significant quantity of mass is carried toward the mother galaxy's central galactic region in a time scale short compared to the Hubble time. We show that this mass can accrete a galactic nucleus and fuel its activity in early stages of galactic life.

  10. NuSTAR results from the Galactic Center - diffuse emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailey, Charles

    2016-03-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) was launched in June 2012. It carried the first true, hard X-ray (>~10 keV-79 keV) focusing telescopes into orbit. Its twin telescopes provide 10 times better angular resolution and 100 times better sensitivity than previously obtainable in the hard X-ray band. Consequently NuSTAR is able to resolve faint diffuse structures whose hard X-rays offer insight into some of the most energetic processes in the Galactic Center. One of the surprising discoveries that NuSTAR made in the Galactic Center is the central hard X-ray emission (CHXE). The CHXE is a diffuse emission detected from ~10 keV to beyond 50 keV in X-ray energy, and extending spatially over a region ~8 parsecs x ~4 parsecs in and out of the plane of the galaxy respectively, and centered on the supermassive black hole Sgr A*. The CHXE was speculated to be due to a large population of unresolved black hole X-ray binaries, millisecond pulsars (MSP), a class of highly magnetized white dwarf binaries called intermediate polars, or to particle outflows from Sgr A*. The presence of an unexpectedly large population of MSP in the Galactic Center would be particularly interesting, since MSP emitting at higher energies and over a much larger region have been posited to be the origin of the gamma-ray emission that is also ascribed to dark matter annihilation in the galaxy. In addition, the connection of the CHXE to the ~9000 unidentified X-ray sources in the central the the ~100 pc detected by the Chandra Observatory, to the soft X-ray emission detected by the Chandra and XMM/Newton observatories in the Galactic Center, and to the hard X-ray emission detected by both the RXTE and INTEGRAL observatories in the Galactic Ridge, is unclear. I review these results and present recent NuSTAR observations that potentially resolve the origin of the CHXE and point to a unified origin for all these X-ray emissions. Two other noteworthy classes of diffuse structures in the

  11. Neutron stars and white dwarfs in galactic halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Olive, Keith A.; Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that galactic halos are composed of stellar remnants such as neutron stars and white dwarfs is discussed. On the basis of a simple model for the evolution of galactic halos, researchers follow the history of halo matter, luminosity, and metal and helium abundances. They assume conventional yields for helium and the heavier elements. By comparing with the observational constraints, which may be considered as fairly conservative, it is found that, for an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR) with e-folding time tau, only values between 6 x 10(8) less than similar to tau less than similar to 2 x 10(9) years are allowed together with a very limited range of masses for the initial mass function (IMF). Star formation is allowed for 2 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 8 solar mass if tau = 2 x 10(9) years, and for 4 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 6 solar mass if tau = 10(9) years. For tau = 6 x 10(8) years, the lower and upper mass limits merge to similar to 5 solar mass. Researchers conclude that, even though the possibility of neutron stars as halo matter may be ruled out, that of white dwarfs may still be a viable hypothesis, though with very stringent constraints on allowed parameters, that merits further consideration.

  12. Neutron stars and white dwarfs in galactic halos?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Olive, Keith A.; Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that galactic halos are composed of stellar remnants such as neutron stars and white dwarfs is discussed. On the basis of a simple model for the evolution of galactic halos, researchers follow the history of halo matter, luminosity, and metal and helium abundances. They assume conventional yields for helium and the heavier elements. By comparing with the observational constraints, which may be considered as fairly conservative, it is found that, for an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR) with e-folding time tau, only values between 6 x 10(8) less than similar to tau less than similar to 2 x 10(9) years are allowed together with a very limited range of masses for the initial mass function (IMF). Star formation is allowed for 2 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 8 solar mass if tau = 2 x 10(9) years, and for 4 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 6 solar mass if tau = 10(9) years. For tau = 6 x 10(8) years, the lower and upper mass limits merge to similar to 5 solar mass. Researchers conclude that, even though the possibility of neutron stars as halo matter may be ruled out, that of white dwarfs may still be a viable hypothesis, though with very stringent constraints on allowed parameters, that merits further consideration.

  13. New orbital analysis of stars at the Galactic center using speckle holography and orbital priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehle, Anna; Schödel, Rainer; Meyer, Leo; Ghez, Andrea M.

    2014-05-01

    We present initial results of a study that has more than doubled the time baseline for astrometric measurements of faint stars orbiting the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the Galactic center. The advent of adaptive optics has enabled stars as faint as K = 19 mag to be tracked at 50 mas resolution for the last decade. While similar resolution images exist from the prior decade, they were obtained from speckle imaging data analyzed with the technique of shift-and-add, which limited detections to stars brighter than K = 16 mag. By improving the speckle data analysis technique with speckle holography and using prior orbital knowledge, we are now able to track stars as faint as ˜18 mag at 50 mas resolution through the early Keck speckle data sets (1995-2005). This methodology has already led to the detection of two short-period stars never previously seen in speckle images, such that our data now spans their full orbits. We can now better constrain the orbital parameters of all stars in the intriguing "S-star cluster," which will ultimately give us insight into the origin of these stars and be used to probe the curvature of space-time in the unexplored regime near a SMBH.

  14. The Galactic Starburst Region NGC 3603 : exciting new insights on the formation of high mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nürnberger, D. E. A.

    2004-10-01

    powerful stellar winds which evaporate and disperse the surrounding interstellar medium, thus "lifting the courtains" around nearby young stars at a relatively early evolutionary stage. Such premises are given in the Galactic starburst region NGC 3603. Nevertheless, a large observational effort with different telescopes and instruments -- in particular, taking advantage of the high angular resolution and high sensitivity of near and mid IR instruments available at ESO -- was necessary to achieve the goals of my study. After a basic introduction on the topic of (high mass) star formation in Chapter 1, a short overview of the investigated region NGC 3603 and its importance for both galactic and extragalactic star formation studies is given in Chapter 2. Then, in Chapter 3, I report on a comprehensive investigation of the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas and dust associated with the NGC 3603 region. In Chapter 4 I thoroughly address the radial extent of the NGC 3603 OB cluster and the spatial distribution of the cluster members. Together with deep Ks band imaging data, a detailed survey of NGC 3603 at mid IR wavelengths allows to search the neighbourhood of the cold molecular gas and dust for sources with intrinsic mid IR excess (Chapter 5). In Chapter 6 I characterize the most prominent sources of NGC 3603 IRS 9 and show that these sources are bona-fide candidates for high mass protostars. Finally, a concise summary as well as an outlook on future prospects in high mass star formation research is given in Chapter 7.

  15. HOPS + MALT90 + Hi-GAL: Probing star formation on a Galactic scale through mm molecular line and far-IR continuum Galactic plane surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmore, Steven N.; Rathborne, Jill; Bastian, Nate; Alves, Joao; Ascenso, Joana; Bally, John; Testi, Leonardo; Longmore, Andy; Battersby, Cara; Bressert, Eli; Purcell, Cormac; Walsh, Andrew; Jackson, James; Foster, Jonathan; Molinari, Sergio; Meingast, Stefan; Amorim, A.; Lima, J.; Marques, R.; Moitinho, A.; Pinhao, J.; Rebordao, J.; Santos, F. D.

    2012-03-01

    With the HOPS and MALT90 Galactic plane surveys we are mapping a significant fraction of the dense molecular gas in the Galaxy in over 20 dense-gas-tracing transitions (e.g. from H2O, NH3, HC3N, HC5N, N2H+, HCN, HNC, HCO+, CH3CN, SiO, C2H, ...). Combining this with the far-IR continuum emission from Hi-GAL we can derive the physical/chemical/kinematic properties and evolutionary state of much of the molecular gas in the Galaxy destined to form stars. I will present results from three science projects based on this combined dataset, namely: i) looking for variations in the star formation rate across the Galaxy as a function of environment, in particular, comparing the CMZ with the rest of the Galactic disk -- we find the rate of star formation per unit mass of dense gas in the CMZ may be an order of magnitude lower than that in the disk; ii) seeing if Galactic dense molecular clouds follow the empirical relations observed in extragalactic systems (e.g. the Kennicutt-Schmidt and Gao & Solomon relations) and what this implies for interpretating the extragalactic relations; iii) searching for molecular cloud progenitors of the most extreme (massive and dense) stellar clusters. I will present one cloud we have studied as part of project iii) which lies close to the Galactic center and which is clearly extreme compared to the rest of the Galactic molecular cloud population. With a mass of 10^5 Msun, a radius of only ~3pc and almost no signs of star formation it appears to be the progenitor of an Arches-like stellar cluster. As such, we speculate this molecular cloud may be a local-universe-analogue of the initial conditions of a super star cluster or potentially even a small globular cluster. From our Galactic plane survey data this object appears to be unique in the Galaxy, making it extremely important for testing massive cluster formation models. We have been awarded 6 hours of ALMA Cycle 0 observing time to study this object in detail and I hope to show preliminary

  16. The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. VII. Relative Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín-Franch, Antonio; Aparicio, Antonio; Piotto, Giampaolo; Rosenberg, Alfred; Chaboyer, Brian; Sarajedini, Ata; Siegel, Michael; Anderson, Jay; Bedin, Luigi R.; Dotter, Aaron; Hempel, Maren; King, Ivan; Majewski, Steven; Milone, Antonino P.; Paust, Nathaniel; Reid, I. Neill

    2009-04-01

    The ACS Survey of Galactic globular clusters is a Hubble Space Telescope Treasury program designed to provide a new large, deep, and homogeneous photometric database. Based on observations from this program, we have measured precise relative ages for a sample of 64 Galactic globular clusters by comparing the relative position of the clusters' main-sequence (MS) turnoffs, using MS fitting to cross-compare clusters within the sample. This method provides relative ages to a formal precision of 2%-7%. We demonstrate that the calculated relative ages are independent of the choice of theoretical model. We find that the Galactic globular cluster sample can be divided into two groups—a population of old clusters with an age dispersion of ~5% and no age-metallicity relation, and a group of younger clusters with an age-metallicity relation similar to that of the globular clusters associated with the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. These results are consistent with the Milky Way halo having formed in two phases or processes. The first one would be compatible with a rapid (<0.8 Gyr) assembling process of the halo, in which the clusters in the old group were formed. Also these clusters could have been formed before re-ionization in dwarf galaxies that would later merge to build the Milky Way halo as predicted by ΛCDM cosmology. However, the galactocentric metallicity gradient shown by these clusters seems difficult to reconcile with the latter. As for the younger clusters, it is very tempting to argue that their origin is related to their formation within Milky Way satellite galaxies that were later accreted, but the origin of the age-metallicity relation remains unclear. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, under program GO-10775 (PI: A. Sarajedini).

  17. The Formation and Early Evolution of Embedded Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    We propose to combine Spitzer, WISE, Herschel, and other archival spacecraft data with an existing ground- and space-based mm-wave to near-IR survey of molecular clouds over a large portion of the Milky Way, in order to systematically study the formation and early evolution of massive stars and star clusters, and provide new observational calibrations for a theoretical paradigm of this key astrophysical problem. Central Objectives: The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is a large, unbiased, uniform, and panchromatic survey of massive star and cluster formation and early evolution, covering 20°x6° of the Galactic Plane. Its uniqueness lies in the comprehensive molecular spectroscopy of 303 massive dense clumps, which have also been included in several archival spacecraft surveys. Our objective is a systematic demographic analysis of massive star and cluster formation, one which has not been possible without knowledge of our CHaMP cloud sample, including all clouds with embedded clusters as well as those that have not yet formed massive stars. For proto-clusters deeply embedded within dense molecular clouds, analysis of these space-based data will: 1. Yield a complete census of Young Stellar Objects in each cluster. 2. Allow systematic measurements of embedded cluster properties: spectral energy distributions, luminosity functions, protostellar and disk fractions, and how these vary with cluster mass, age, and density. Combined with other, similarly complete and unbiased infrared and mm data, CHaMP's goals include: 3. A detailed comparison of the embedded stellar populations with their natal dense gas to derive extinction maps, star formation efficiencies and feedback effects, and the kinematics, physics, and chemistry of the gas in and around the clusters. 4. Tying the demographics, age spreads, and timescales of the clusters, based on pre-Main Sequence evolution, to that of the dense gas clumps and Giant Molecular Clouds. 5. A

  18. Investigation of the open star cluster NGC 6800

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananjevskaja, Yu. K.; Frolov, V. N.; Polyakov, E. V.

    2015-07-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of the Galactic open cluster NGC 6800 are presented. The positions of stars to a limiting magnitude B ≃ 16{./ m }5 in an 80' × 80' field centered at the cluster were measured on eight plates from the Pulkovo normal astrograph with a maximum epoch difference of 57 years. The measurements were performed with the Pulkovo "Fantasy" automated measuring system. The corresponding field from the 2MASS catalogue was used as an additional plate. As a result, the relative proper motions of stars were obtained with a root-mean-square error of 3.0 mas yr-1. A catalogue of BV and JHK magnitudes for objects in the investigated region was compiled from available published resources. The astrometric selection of cluster members was made by the maximum likelihood method. An individual cluster membership probability of a star P ≥ 60% served as the first selection criterion. The position of a star on the photometric color-magnitude ( V ~ B - V, J ~ J - K s ) diagrams was considered as the second selection criterion. On the basis of these criteria, it was established that 109 stars are members of NGC 6800, These data were used to refine the physical parameters of the cluster: the mean reddening E( B - V) = 0 m . 40, the true distance modulus ( V - M V )0 = 10{./ m }05, and the cluster age ~250 Myr. The luminosity and mass functions were constructed. The position of the center of the cluster NGC 6800 was improved: α = 19h27m11{./s}2 and δ = +25°07'24〃(2000). The catalogue of relative proper motions for stars in the field is available in electronic form only.

  19. Catalogue of Galactic globular-cluster surface-brightness profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trager, S. C.; King, Ivan R.; Djorgovski, S.

    1995-01-01

    We present a catalogue of surface-brightness profiles (SBPs) of 125 Galactic globular clusters, the largest such collection ever gathered. The SPBs are constructed from generally inhomogeneous data, but are based heavily on the Berkeley Global Cluster Survey of Djorgovski & King. All but four of the SBPs have photometric zero points. We derive central surface brightness, King-model concentrations, core radii, half-light, and other fraction-of-light radii where data permit, and we briefly discuss their use.

  20. OH/IR stars near the Galactic Center: Pulsation periods, luminosities, and polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry Jay; Mcgregor, Peter J.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Lawrence, Geoffrey F.

    1994-01-01

    17 stars in the direction of the Galactic Center, 15 of which are OH/IR stars, have been monitored at infrared wavelengths over a period of nearly eight years. Pulsation periods, bolometric luminosities, and light curves for 14 OH/IR stars are presented. The Galactic Center OH/IR stars range in luminosity between M(sub Bol) = -4.5 to M(sub Bol) = -6, implying main sequence progenitors with masses less than 3 solar mass. When compared to optically visible long period variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with similar bolometric luminosities, the Galactic Center OH/IR stars have pulsation periods on average 30% longer. This shift to longer periods is consistent with the current picture of late asymptotic giant branch evolution, placing the OH/IR stars in a phase immediately following the optically visible Mira variable phase during which the star dramatically increases its mass loss rate, becoming invisible at optical wavelength. Infrared polarimetry of 11 of the stars is also presented. The polarization for all of the stars is consistent with purely interstellar polarization, with little evidence for a significant intrinsic component. When compared to OH/IR stars in the galactic plane, the Galactic Center OH/IR stars appear similar in photometric characteristics, except none of the Galactic Center OH/IR stars shows the extremely thick dust shells or very high intrinsic polarization found in the more extreme galactic plane OH/IR stars.

  1. Star clusters as simple stellar populations.

    PubMed

    Bruzual A, Gustavo

    2010-02-28

    In this paper, I review to what extent we can understand the photometric properties of star clusters, and of low-mass, unresolved galaxies, in terms of population-synthesis models designed to describe 'simple stellar populations' (SSPs), i.e. groups of stars born at the same time, in the same volume of space and from a gas cloud of homogeneous chemical composition. The photometric properties predicted by these models do not readily match the observations of most star clusters, unless we properly take into account the expected variation in the number of stars occupying sparsely populated evolutionary stages, owing to stochastic fluctuations in the stellar initial mass function. In this case, population-synthesis models reproduce remarkably well the full ranges of observed integrated colours and absolute magnitudes of star clusters of various ages and metallicities. The disagreement between the model predictions and observations of cluster colours and magnitudes may indicate problems with or deficiencies in the modelling, and does not necessarily tell us that star clusters do not behave like SSPs. Matching the photometric properties of star clusters using SSP models is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for clusters to be considered SSPs. Composite models, characterized by complex star-formation histories, also match the observed cluster colours.

  2. Environmental regulation of cloud and star formation in galactic bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, F.; Bournaud, F.; Emsellem, E.; Agertz, O.; Athanassoula, E.; Combes, F.; Elmegreen, B.; Kraljic, K.; Motte, F.; Teyssier, R.

    2015-12-01

    The strong time-dependence of the dynamics of galactic bars yields a complex and rapidly evolving distribution of dense gas and star forming regions. Although bars mainly host regions void of any star formation activity, their extremities can gather the physical conditions for the formation of molecular complexes and mini-starbursts. Using a sub-parsec resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy, we probe these conditions to explore how and where bar (hydro-)dynamics favours the formation or destruction of molecular clouds and stars. The interplay between the kpc-scale dynamics (gas flows, shear) and the parsec-scale (turbulence) is key to this problem. We find a strong dichotomy between the leading and trailing sides of the bar, in term of cloud fragmentation and in the age distribution of the young stars. After orbiting along the bar edge, these young structures slow down at the extremities of the bar, where orbital crowding increases the probability of cloud-cloud collision. We find that such events increase the Mach number of the cloud, leading to an enhanced star formation efficiency and finally the formation of massive stellar associations, in a fashion similar to galaxy-galaxy interactions. We highlight the role of bar dynamics in decoupling young stars from the clouds in which they form, and discuss the implications on the injection of feedback into the interstellar medium (ISM), in particular in the context of galaxy formation.

  3. On the observability of bow shocks of Galactic runaway OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; van Marle, A.-J.; Kuiper, R.; Kley, W.

    2016-06-01

    Massive stars that have been ejected from their parent cluster and supersonically sailing away through the interstellar medium (ISM) are classified as exiled. They generate circumstellar bow-shock nebulae that can be observed. We present two-dimensional, axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a representative sample of stellar wind bow shocks from Galactic OB stars in an ambient medium of densities ranging from nISM = 0.01 up to 10.0 cm- 3. Independently of their location in the Galaxy, we confirm that the infrared is the most appropriated waveband to search for bow shocks from massive stars. Their spectral energy distribution is the convenient tool to analyse them since their emission does not depend on the temporary effects which could affect unstable, thin-shelled bow shocks. Our numerical models of Galactic bow shocks generated by high-mass ( ≈ 40 M⊙) runaway stars yield H α fluxes which could be observed by facilities such as the SuperCOSMOS H-Alpha Survey. The brightest bow-shock nebulae are produced in the denser regions of the ISM. We predict that bow shocks in the field observed at H α by means of Rayleigh-sensitive facilities are formed around stars of initial mass larger than about 20 M⊙. Our models of bow shocks from OB stars have the emission maximum in the wavelength range 3 ≤ λ ≤ 50 μm which can be up to several orders of magnitude brighter than the runaway stars themselves, particularly for stars of initial mass larger than 20 M⊙.

  4. Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology Database. IV. Compilation of stars in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Takuma; Hidaka, Jun; Aoki, Wako; Katsuta, Yutaka; Yamada, Shimako; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.; Ohtani, Yukari; Masuyama, Miyu; Noda, Kazuhiro; Wada, Kentaro

    2017-10-01

    We have constructed a database of stars in Local Group galaxies using the extended version of the SAGA (Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology) database that contains stars in 24 dwarf spheroidal galaxies and ultra-faint dwarfs. The new version of the database includes more than 4500 stars in the Milky Way, by removing the previous metallicity criterion of [Fe/H] ≤ -2.5, and more than 6000 stars in the Local Group galaxies. We examined the validity of using a combined data set for elemental abundances. We also checked the consistency between the derived distances to individual stars and those to galaxies as given in the literature. Using the updated database, the characteristics of stars in dwarf galaxies are discussed. Our statistical analyses of α-element abundances show that the change of the slope of the [α/Fe] relative to [Fe/H] (so-called "knee") occurs at [Fe/H] = -1.0 ± 0.1 for the Milky Way. The knee positions for selected galaxies are derived by applying the same method. The star formation history of individual galaxies is explored using the slope of the cumulative metallicity distribution function. Radial gradients along the four directions are inspected in six galaxies where we find no direction-dependence of metallicity gradients along the major and minor axes. The compilation of all the available data shows a lack of CEMP-s population in dwarf galaxies, while there may be some CEMP-no stars at [Fe/H] ≲ -3 even in the very small sample. The inspection of the relationship between Eu and Ba abundances confirms an anomalously Ba-rich population in Fornax, which indicates a pre-enrichment of interstellar gas with r-process elements. We do not find any evidence of anti-correlations in O-Na and Mg-Al abundances, which characterizes the abundance trends in the Galactic globular clusters.

  5. HUBBLE'S SEARCH FOR FAINT FIELD STARS IN GALACTIC HALO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a randomly selected area of sky taken to search for faint red stars that might constitute dark matter in our Milky Way Galaxy. (Dark matter is material of an unknown type that makes up most of the mass of our galaxy). If the dark matter in our Galaxy was made of faint red stars -- as many scientists have previously conjectured -- then about 38 such stars should have been visible in this HST image. The simulated stars (diamond-shaped symbols), based on theoretical calculations, illustrate what scientists would have seen if the dark matter were locked-up in faint red stars. These surprising results rule out dim stars as an explanation for dark matter in our Galaxy. Right The unmodified HST image shows the region is actually so devoid of stars that far more distant background galaxies can easily be seen. The field is in the constellation Eridanus, far outside the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This region was chosen to highlight stars in the galactic halo, where dark matter exists, and to avoid the contribution of faint stars in the plane of the Galaxy. Technical Information: The image was constructed from seven exposures totaling almost three hours of searching by HST. The field shown is about 1.5 arc-minutes across. The image was taken in near-infrared light (814 nm) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on Feb 8, 1994. This observation is part of the HST parallel observing program. Credit: J Bahcall, Institute for Advance Study, Princeton and NASA

  6. HUBBLE'S SEARCH FOR FAINT FIELD STARS IN GALACTIC HALO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a randomly selected area of sky taken to search for faint red stars that might constitute dark matter in our Milky Way Galaxy. (Dark matter is material of an unknown type that makes up most of the mass of our galaxy). If the dark matter in our Galaxy was made of faint red stars -- as many scientists have previously conjectured -- then about 38 such stars should have been visible in this HST image. The simulated stars (diamond-shaped symbols), based on theoretical calculations, illustrate what scientists would have seen if the dark matter were locked-up in faint red stars. These surprising results rule out dim stars as an explanation for dark matter in our Galaxy. Right The unmodified HST image shows the region is actually so devoid of stars that far more distant background galaxies can easily be seen. The field is in the constellation Eridanus, far outside the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This region was chosen to highlight stars in the galactic halo, where dark matter exists, and to avoid the contribution of faint stars in the plane of the Galaxy. Technical Information: The image was constructed from seven exposures totaling almost three hours of searching by HST. The field shown is about 1.5 arc-minutes across. The image was taken in near-infrared light (814 nm) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on Feb 8, 1994. This observation is part of the HST parallel observing program. Credit: J Bahcall, Institute for Advance Study, Princeton and NASA

  7. Establishing binarity amongst Galactic RV Tauri stars with a disc⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manick, Rajeev; Van Winckel, Hans; Kamath, Devika; Hillen, Michel; Escorza, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Context. Over the last few decades it has become more evident that binarity is a prevalent phenomenon amongst RV Tauri stars with a disc. This study is a contribution to comprehend the role of binarity upon late stages of stellar evolution. Aims: In this paper we determine the binary status of six Galactic RV Tauri stars, namely DY Ori, EP Lyr, HP Lyr, IRAS 17038-4815, IRAS 09144-4933, and TW Cam, which are surrounded by a dusty disc. The radial velocities are contaminated by high-amplitude pulsations. We disentangle the pulsations from the orbital signal in order to determine accurate orbital parameters. We also place them on the HR diagram, thereby establishing their evolutionary nature. Methods: We used high-resolution spectroscopic time series obtained from the HERMES and CORALIE spectrographs mounted on the Flemish Mercator and Swiss Leonhard Euler Telescopes, respectively. An updated ASAS/AAVSO photometric time series is analysed to complement the spectroscopic pulsation search and to clean the radial velocities from the pulsations. The pulsation-cleaned orbits are fitted with a Keplerian model to determine the spectroscopic orbital parameters. We also calibrated a PLC relationship using type II cepheids in the LMC and apply the relation to our Galactic sample to obtain accurate distances and hence luminosities. Results: All six of the Galactic RV Tauri stars included in this study are binaries with orbital periods ranging between 650 and 1700 days and with eccentricities between 0.2 and 0.6. The mass functions range between 0.08 to 0.55 M⊙ which points to an unevolved low-mass companion. In the photometric time series we detect a long-term variation on the timescale of the orbital period for IRAS 17038-4815, IRAS 09144-4933, and TW Cam. Our derived stellar luminosities indicate that all except DY Ori and EP Lyr are post-AGB stars. DY Ori and EP Lyr are likely examples of the recently discovered dusty post-RGB stars. Conclusions: The orbital parameters

  8. A RAVE investigation on Galactic open clusters. I. Radial velocities and metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, C.; Scholz, R.-D.; Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.; Röser, S.; Boeche, C.; Kordopatis, G.; Siebert, A.; Williams, M.; Munari, U.; Matijevič, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Zwitter, T.; de Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Gilmore, G.; Seabroke, G.; Freeman, K.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W.; Watson, F.; Gibson, B. K.; Bienaymé, O.; Wyse, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Siviero, A.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Galactic open clusters (OCs) mainly belong to the young stellar population in the Milky Way disk, but are there groups and complexes of OCs that possibly define an additional level in hierarchical star formation? Current compilations are too incomplete to address this question, especially regarding radial velocities (RVs) and metallicities ([M/H]). Aims: Here we provide and discuss newly obtained RV and [M/H] data, which will enable us to reinvestigate potential groupings of open clusters and associations. Methods: We extracted additional RVs and [M/H] from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) via a cross-match with the Catalogue of Stars in Open Cluster Areas (CSOCA). For the identified OCs in RAVE we derived overlineRV and overline{[M/H]} from a cleaned working sample and compared the results with previous findings. Results: Although our RAVE sample does not show the same accuracy as the entire survey, we were able to derive reliable overlineRV for 110 Galactic open clusters. For 37 OCs we publish overlineRV for the first time. Moreover, we determined overline{[M/H]} for 81 open clusters, extending the number of OCs with overline{[M/H]} by 69. Tables 8 and 9 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/562/A54

  9. Galactic membership of BL Her type variable stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkovic, M. I.; Stojanovic, M.; Ninkovic, S.

    2016-05-01

    As the RR Lyrae stars evolve on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram they are believed to become short period Type II Cepheids, known as BL Her type (with a pulsation period from 1 to 3-8 days). Assuming that their mass is around 0.5-0.6M_Sol, and that they are low metallicity objects, they were thought to belong to the halo of the Milky Way. We investigated seven Galactic short period Type II Cepheids (BL Her, SW Tau, V553 Cen, DQ And, BD Cas, V383 Cyg, and KT Com) in order to establish their membership within the Galactic structure using the kinematic approach. Gaia should provide us with more data needed to conduct the study of the whole sample.

  10. A flux-limited sample of Galactic carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claussen, M. J.; Kleinmann, S. G.; Joyce, R. R.; Jura, M.

    1987-01-01

    Published observational data (including IRAS observations) for a flux-limited sample of 215 Galactic carbon stars (CSs) selected from the 2-micron sky survey of Neugebauer and Leighton (1969) are compiled in extensive tables and graphs and analyzed statistically. The sample is found to penetrate a volume of radius 1.5 kpc, and the local CS space density and surface density are calculated as log rho0 (per cu kpc) = 2.0 + or - 0.4 and log N (per sq kpc) = 1.6 + or - 0.2, respectively. The total Galactic mass-return rate from these CSs is estimated as 0.013 solar mass/yr, implying a time scale of 0.1-1 Myr for the CS evolutionary phase and a mass of 1.2-1.6 solar mass for the (probably F-type) main-seqence progenitors of CSs.

  11. Population III star clusters in the reionized Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2010-05-01

    In reionized regions of the Universe, gas can only collapse to form stars in dark matter (DM) haloes which grow to be sufficiently massive. If star formation is prevented in the minihalo progenitors of such DM haloes at redshifts z >~ 20, then these haloes will not be self-enriched with metals and so may host Population (Pop) III star formation. We estimate an upper limit for the abundance of Pop III star clusters which thus form in the reionized Universe, as a function of redshift. Depending on the minimum DM halo mass for star formation, between of the order of 1 and of the order of 1000, Pop III star clusters per square degree may be observable at 2 <~ z <~ 7. Thus, there may be a sufficient number density of Pop III star clusters for detection in surveys such as the Deep-Wide Survey (DWS) to be conducted by the James Webb Space Telescope. We predict that Pop III clusters formed after reionization are most likely to be found at z >~ 3 and within ~40arcsec (~1Mpc comoving) of DM haloes with masses of ~1011Msolar, the descendants of the haloes at z ~ 20 which host the first galaxies that begin reionization. However, if star formation is inefficient in the haloes hosting Pop III clusters due to the photoionizing background radiation, these clusters may not be bright enough for detection by the Near-Infrared Camera which will conduct the DWS. None the less, if the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is top-heavy the clusters may have sufficiently high luminosities in both Lyα and HeII λ1640 to be detected and for constraints to be placed on the Pop III IMF. While a small fraction of DM haloes with masses as high as ~109Msolar at redshifts z <~ 4 are not enriched due to star formation in their progenitors, external metal enrichment due to galactic winds is likely to preclude Pop III star formation in a large fraction of otherwise unenriched haloes, perhaps even preventing star formation in pristine haloes altogether after reionization is complete at z ~ 6.

  12. Constraining massive star evolution from massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chene, Andre-Nicolas; Herve, Anthony; Martins, Fabrice; Bouret, Jean-Claude; Borissova, Jordanka; Ramirez, Sebastian; Kurtev, Radostin; Kumar, Nanda; Amigo, Pia; Fierro, Celia

    2013-06-01

    The exact evolution of massive stars is not accurately known at present. The general trend is that stars with masses above 40 - 60 Mo go from O-type stars to H-rich WN stars, and Luminous Blue Variables (?), before turning into H-poor WN stars and finally WC stars. At lower masses, the H-rich WN and LBV phases are replaced by a blue and a red supergiant phases, respectively. However, what are the details of such evolutionary sequences? The study of massive clusters is a golden opportunity to establish this. Indeed, the turn-off mass of massive clusters can be directly translated into the mass, and hence the nature, of the progenitors of their evolved objects contents. So far, only the Arches, Quintuplet, NGC3603, NGC2244 and central clusters have been studied this way. But 6 newly discovered heavily-obscured clusters in the large survey â"VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea" (VVV) have been found to have Wolf-Rayet stars as well as blue and/or red supergiants, together with many main sequence OB stars. This poster presents our efforts to model the massive star components of these clusters using CMFGEN, bringing new blocks to the pavement of massive stellar evolution and more than doubling the number of clusters in which such evolutionary sequence are established.

  13. Kinematics of a Massive Star Cluster in Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    We propose to measure the proper motion stellar kinematics of a massive (~10^4Msun), forming proto-star-cluster to test basic theoretical models of formation. This will be the first time such a measurement has been performed. It requires HST-WFC3/IR and is beyond the practical capabilities of ground-based adaptive optics (AO) observations. In contrast to previously-studied massive, young (<10 Myr-old), already-formed clusters, such as NGC3603, Westerlund 1 or the Arches, our target protocluster, G286.21+0.17 (hereafter G286), is still gas-dominated and undergoing active star formation. It has been carefully selected from a complete survey of ~300 dense molecular gas clumps in a 120 sq. deg. region of the Galactic plane. The cluster is also relatively nearby (~2.5 kpc), but not too close that it would span a prohibitively large angular area or suffer from significant saturation problems. Such massive systems are rare and indeed we are unaware of any equivalent, early-stage (i.e., gas dominated) cluster that is closer. Given the depth of its gravitational potential based on its mass and size, the expected proper motions of many independent sub-clusters of stars are detectable at the ~5 sigma level over a 2-year baseline and global contraction of the cluster can be seen if it is happening even at just ~10% of the free-fall rate.

  14. PROJECTED ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES AND STELLAR CHARACTERIZATION OF 350 B STARS IN THE NEARBY GALACTIC DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Braganca, G. A.; Daflon, S.; Cunha, K.; Bensby, T.; Oey, M. S.; Walth, G.

    2012-11-01

    Projected rotational velocities (v sin i) are presented for a sample of 350 early B-type main-sequence stars in the nearby Galactic disk. The stars are located within {approx}1.5 kpc from the Sun, and the great majority within 700 pc. The analysis is based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay 6.5 m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Spectral types were estimated based on relative intensities of some key line absorption ratios and comparisons to synthetic spectra. Effective temperatures were estimated from the reddening-free Q index, and projected rotational velocities were then determined via interpolation on a published grid that correlates the synthetic FWHM of the He I lines at 4026, 4388 and 4471 A with v sin i. As the sample has been selected solely on the basis of spectral types, it contains a selection of B stars in the field, in clusters, and in OB associations. The v sin i distribution obtained for the entire sample is found to be essentially flat for v sin i values between 0 and 150 km s{sup -1}, with only a modest peak at low projected rotational velocities. Considering subsamples of stars, there appears to be a gradation in the v sin i distribution with the field stars presenting a larger fraction of the slow rotators and the cluster stars distribution showing an excess of stars with v sin i between 70 and 130 km s{sup -1}. Furthermore, for a subsample of potential runaway stars we find that the v sin i distribution resembles the distribution seen in denser environments, which could suggest that these runaway stars have been subject to dynamical ejection mechanisms.

  15. Multiple Stellar Populations in Galactic Globular Clusters: General Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotto, Giampaolo

    2015-08-01

    Globular clusters are the most ancient stellar systems for which we can have a reliable age estimate, and therefore bring information on star formation processes in the early Universe. The discovery that these objects host different, distinct populations of stars drastically changed our view on their origin and evolution. Some of the most plausible scenarios able to account for the photometric and chemical properties of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters necessarily imply that these objects must have been much more massive in the past. Whether globular clusters should be considered either as remnants of massive star clusters or nuclei of former dwarf galaxies (or both of them) is an open issue. Surely, we need to better know the chemical and kinematical properties of the different populations hosted by single clusters, and their relation with the cluster parameters, in order to shed light on this problem. Determination of the basic properties of stars hosted by (young ) massive clusters, nuclear clusters, and dwarf galaxies and a comparison with the parameters characterizing multiple stellar populations in globular cluster is a complementary approach that shall be pursued.For the first time, in my talk, I will discuss the results of a large, legacy multi-wavelength, astrometric and photometric survey based on ACS and WFC3/HST observations which include UV data. A census of the presence and frequency of multiple populations in almost half of the globular clusters of our Galaxy, their chemical tagging, radial distribution and kinematics will be presented. The relation between multiple population properties and cluster parameters will be illustrated. Consequences of these observational facts on different scenarios proposed for the formation and evolution of globular cluster stars will be critically discussed. Future perspectives towards our understanding if this complex phenomenon will be highlighted.

  16. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  17. Elemental Abundance Ratios in Stars of the Outer Galactic Disk. III. Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, David; Carney, Bruce W.; Teixera de Almeida, Maria Luísa; Pohl, Brian L.

    2006-04-01

    We present metallicities, [Fe/H], and elemental abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for a sample of 24 Cepheids in the outer Galactic disk based on high-resolution echelle spectra. The sample members have galactocentric distances covering 12 kpc<=RGC<=17.2 kpc, making them the most distant Galactic Cepheids upon which detailed abundance analyses have been performed. We find subsolar ratios of [Fe/H] and overabundances of [α/Fe], [La/Fe], and [Eu/Fe] in the program stars. All abundance ratios exhibit a dispersion that exceeds the measurement uncertainties. As seen in our previous studies of old open clusters and field giants, enhanced ratios of [α/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] reveal that recent star formation has taken place in the outer disk with Type II supernovae preferentially contributing ejecta to the interstellar medium and with Type Ia supernovae playing only a minor role. The enhancements for La suggest that asymptotic giant branch stars have contributed to the chemical evolution of the outer Galactic disk. Some of the young Cepheids are more metal-poor than the older open clusters and field stars at comparable galactocentric distances. This demonstrates that the outer disk is not the end result of the isolated evolution of an ensemble of gas and stars. We showed previously that the older open clusters and field stars reached a basement metallicity at about 10-11 kpc. The younger Cepheids reach the same metallicity but at larger galactocentric distances, roughly 14 kpc. This suggests that the Galactic disk has been growing with time, as predicted from numerical simulations. The outer disk Cepheids appear to exhibit a bimodal distribution for [Fe/H] and [α/Fe]. Most of the Cepheids continue the trends with galactocentric distance exhibited by S. M. Andrievsky's larger Cepheid sample, and we refer to these stars as the ``Galactic Cepheids.'' A minority of the Cepheids show considerably lower [Fe/H] and higher [α/Fe], and we refer to these stars as the ``Merger Cepheids.'' One

  18. Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor Parallaxes of Galactic RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, B. E.

    2011-04-01

    We present new absolute trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions for seven Pop II variable stars: the five RR Lyr stars; RZ Cep, XZ Cyg, SU Dra, RR Lyr, UV Oct; and two W Vir Pop II Cepheids; VY Pyx and kappa Pav. We obtain these results with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensor 1r, a white-light interferometer on Hubble Space Telescope. We measure absolute parallaxes with an average precision, 6.6%. Using these parallaxes we compute absolute magnitudes in V and K bandpasses corrected for interstellar extinction and Lutz-Kelker-Hanson bias. Considering only the RR Lyr stars, we use these absolute magnitudes to construct a K-band Leavitt Law (Period-Luminosity relation) and a Galactic Mv-[Fe/H] relation. We employ these relations to determine independent distances to the LMC and several globular clusters. For the LMC our K-band distance modulus from RR Lyr stars agrees within the errors with a previous value derived by us from Galactic Cepheids, uncorrected for metallicity. These results are based on observations made through grants GO-11211 and GO-11789 administered through the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  19. Intrinsic integrated UBVRI colors of Galactic globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, B. Cameron; Hesser, James E.; Shawl, Stephen J.

    1988-01-01

    Published observational data on 50 Galactic globular clusters, including spectral classifications, homogenized colors, and color excesses, are compiled in extensive tables, graphs, and diagrams and analyzed to determine the intrinsic-color/integrated-spectral-type relationship in the UBVRI system. These relationships are found to exhibit significant slopes, although the RI colors do not contribute substantially to the intrinsic-color determination. The values of a(B-V) for the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres are found to be 0.068 + or - 0.006 and 0.039 + or - 0.003 mag, respectively.

  20. Reddening and age for 13 southern Galactic open clusters determined from integrated spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Bica, E.; Dutra, C. M.; Torres, M. C.

    2001-10-01

    In this study we present flux-calibrated integrated spectra in the range 3800-6800 Å for 13 concentrated open clusters with Galactic longitudes between 219deg and 316deg, nine of which have not been previously studied. Using the equivalent widths of the Balmer lines and comparing the cluster spectra with template spectra of Magellanic Clouds and Galactic star clusters with known parameters, we derive both foreground interstellar reddening values and age. For nine clusters these two parameters have been determined for the first time, while for the rest of the sample the results show good agreement with previous studies. The present analysis indicates four very young (Hogg 11, NGC 5606, vdB-RN 80 and Pismis 17), seven moderately young (ESO 429-SC13, Hogg 3, Hogg 12, Haffner 7, BH 87, NGC 2368 and Bochum 12) and two intermediate-age (Berkeley 75 and NGC 2635) open clusters. The derived foreground interstellar reddening values are in the range 0.00 <= E(B-V) <= 0.38. The age and reddening distributions of the present sample of relatively faint open clusters match those of open clusters with known parameters in a 90deg sector centered at l = 270deg. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  1. Effects of intermediate mass black holes on nuclear star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B.; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-11-20

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are dense stellar clusters observed in galactic nuclei, typically hosting a central massive black hole. Here we study the possible formation and evolution of NSCs through the inspiral of multiple star clusters hosting intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). Using an N-body code, we examine the dynamics of the IMBHs and their effects on the NSC. We find that IMBHs inspiral to the core of the newly formed NSC and segregate there. Although the IMBHs scatter each other and the stars, none of them is ejected from the NSC. The IMBHs are excited to high eccentricities and their radial density profile develops a steep power-law cusp. The stars also develop a power-law cusp (instead of the central core that forms in their absence), but with a shallower slope. The relaxation rate of the NSC is accelerated due to the presence of IMBHs, which act as massive perturbers. This in turn fills the loss cone and boosts the tidal disruption rate of stars both by the MBH and the IMBHs to a value excluded by rate estimates based on current observations. Rate estimates of tidal disruptions can therefore provide a cumulative constraint on the existence of IMBHs in NSCs.

  2. Model for common growth of supermassive black holes, bulges and globular star clusters: Ripping off Jeans clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2012-02-01

    It is assumed that a galaxy starts as a dark halo of a few million Jeans clusters (JCs), each of which consists of nearly a trillion micro brown dwarfs, MACHOs of Earth mass. JCs in the galaxy center heat up their MACHOs by tidal forces, which makes them expand, so that coagulation and star formation occurs. Being continuously fed by matter from bypassing JCs, the central star(s) may transform into a super massive black hole. It has a fast t3 growth during the first mega years, and a slow t1/3 growth at giga years. JCs disrupted by a close encounter with this black hole can provide matter for the bulge. Those that survive can be so agitated that they form stars inside them and become globular star clusters. Thus black holes mostly arise together with galactic bulges in their own environment and are about as old as the oldest globular clusters. The age 13.2 Gy of the star HE 1523-0901 puts forward that the Galactic halo was fully assembled at that moment. The star formation rate has a maximum at black hole mass ~4·107Modot and bulge mass ~5·1010Modot. In case of merging supermassive black holes the JCs passing near the galactic center provide ideal assistance to overcome the last parsec.

  3. UV-selected Young Massive Star Cluster Populations in Nearby Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Linda J.

    2015-08-01

    The Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is an HST Treasury program aimed at the investigation of star-formation and its relationship to environment in nearby galaxies. The results of a UV-selected study of young massive star clusters in a sample of nearby galaxies (< 10 Mpc) using detections based on the WFC3/UVIS F275W filter will be presented. Previous studies have used V or I-band detections and tend to ignore clusters younger than 10 Myr old. This very young population, which represents the most recent cluster-forming event in the LEGUS galaxies will be discussed.This poster is presented on behalf of the LEGUS team (PI Daniela Calzetti).

  4. INTERRUPTED STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Aaron M.; Leigh, Nathan W. C. E-mail: nleigh@amnh.org

    2015-07-20

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single–binary and binary–binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%–40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.

  5. Galactic cluster winds in presence of a dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Merafina, M.

    2013-10-01

    We obtain a solution for the hydrodynamic outflow of the polytropic gas from the gravitating centre, in the presence of the uniform dark energy (DE). The antigravity of DE is enlightening the outflow and makes the outflow possible at smaller initial temperature, at the same density. The main property of the wind in the presence of DE is its unlimited acceleration after passing the critical point. In application of this solution to the winds from galaxy clusters, we suggest that collision of the strongly accelerated wind with another galaxy cluster, or with another galactic cluster wind, could lead to the formation of a highest energy cosmic rays.

  6. Tidal evolution of globular clusters. II - The effects of Galactic tidal field and diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, K. S.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1992-01-01

    The tidal evolution of globular clusters subject to various degrees of the internal diffusion process is investigated. In cases of negligible diffusion, clusters are found to be tidally truncated to the theoretical tidal radius at perigalacticon. There is no apparent orbital phase dependence of the tidal radius for clusters with eccentric orbits. In clusters with moderately short two-body relaxation time scales, diffusion processes significantly modify the structure of the outer regions in such a way that the limiting radius may be comparable to the tidal radius at apogalacticon. The Galactical tidal torque induces isotropy in the velocity dispersion of the outer regions of the cluster. For relaxed clusters, the velocity dispersion may be isotropic in the core, anisotropic in the envelope and isotropic near the limiting radius. Disk shocking is also very efficient for isotropizing the orbits of stars in the outer cluster regions. Stars with direct orbits are less stable, so that prolonged tidal interaction can lead to apparent retrograde rotation in the outer regions of the cluster.

  7. Planet host stars in open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, XiaoLing; Chen, YuQin; Zhao, Gang

    2015-03-01

    We have compiled a list of all planet host star candidates reported in the literature, which are likely to be cluster members, and we checked their memberships by the spatial location, radial velocity, proper motion and photometric criteria. We found that only six stars, BD-13 2130, HD 28305, Kepler-66, Kepler-67, Pr0201 and Pr0211, are planet orbiting stars in open clusters to date. Two stars, HD 70573 and HD 89744, belong to moving groups and one star, TYC 8975-2606-1, may not be a planet host star, while three stars, HD 16175, HD 46375 and HD 108874 are not members of open clusters. We note that all these six planetary systems in the stellar cluster environment are younger than ˜1 Gyr, which might indicate that the planetary system in open cluster can not survive for a long time, and we speculate that close stellar encounters between member stars in open cluster can potentially destroy, or at least strongly affect, the presence of planetary systems.

  8. The Gaia-ESO Survey: A globular cluster escapee in the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, K.; Koposov, S. E.; Battistini, C.; Marino, A. F.; Ruchti, G.; Serenelli, A.; Worley, C. C.; Alves-Brito, A.; Asplund, M.; Barklem, P. S.; Bensby, T.; Bergemann, M.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Bragaglia, A.; Edvardsson, B.; Feltzing, S.; Gruyters, P.; Heiter, U.; Jofre, P.; Korn, A. J.; Nordlander, T.; Ryde, N.; Soubiran, C.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Jeffries, R. D.; Vallenari, A.; Allende Prieto, C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Romano, D.; Smiljanic, R.; Bellazzini, M.; Damiani, F.; Hill, V.; de Laverny, P.; Jackson, R. J.; Lardo, C.; Zaggia, S.

    2015-03-01

    A small fraction of the halo field is made up of stars that share the light element (Z ≤ 13) anomalies characteristic of second generation globular cluster (GC) stars. The ejected stars shed light on the formation of the Galactic halo by tracing the dynamical history of the clusters, which are believed to have once been more massive. Some of these ejected stars are expected to show strong Al enhancement at the expense of shortage of Mg, but until now no such star has been found. We search for outliers in the Mg and Al abundances of the few hundreds of halo field stars observed in the first eighteen months of the Gaia-ESO public spectroscopic survey. One halo star at the base of the red giant branch, here referred to as 22593757-4648029 is found to have [ Mg/Fe ] = -0.36 ± 0.04 and [ Al/Fe ] = 0.99 ± 0.08, which is compatible with the most extreme ratios detected in GCs so far. We compare the orbit of 22593757-4648029 to GCs of similar metallicity andfind it unlikely that this star has been tidally stripped with low ejection velocity from any of the clusters. However, both chemical and kinematic arguments render it plausible that the star has been ejected at high velocity from the anomalous GC ω Centauri within the last few billion years. We cannot rule out other progenitor GCs, because some may have disrupted fully, and the abundance and orbital data are inadequate for many of those that are still intact. Based on data acquired by the Gaia-ESO Survey, programme ID 188.B-3002. Observations were made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Speckle Interferometry of Massive and Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian; Hartkopf, William I.; Gies, Douglas R.; Henry, Todd J.; Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    2006-02-01

    Conducted on NOAO 4-m telescopes in 1994, the first speckle survey of O stars (Mason et al. 1998) had success far in excess of our expectations. In addition to the frequently cited multiplicity analysis, many of the new systems which were first resolved in this paper are of significant astrophysical importance. Now, some ten years after the original survey, we propose to re-investigate all systems analyzed before (N=195). Improvements in detector technology will allow for the detection of companions missed before as well as systems which may have been closer than the resolution limit in 1994. We will also make a first high-resolution inspection of the additional O stars (N=108) in the recent Galactic O Star Catalog of Maiz- Apellaniz & Walborn (2004). Further, we propose to investigate several additional samples of interesting objects, including 15 accessible Galactic WR stars from the speckle survey of Hartkopf et al. (1999), 16 massive, hot stars with separations which would indicate their applicability for mass determinations (for fully detached O stars masses are presently known for only twelve pairs), and 56 multiple stars for a study of their co- planarity statistics.

  10. Tidal Densities of Globular Clusters and the Galactic Mass Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung Mok

    1990-12-01

    The tidal radii of globular clusters reflect the tidal field of the Galaxy. The mass distribution of the Galaxy thus may be obtained if the tidal fields of clusters are well known. Although large amounts of uncertainties in the determination of tidal radii have been obstacles in utilizing this method, analysis of tidal density could give independent check for the Galactic mass distribution. Recent theoretical modeling of dynamical evolution including steady Galactic tidal field shows that the observationally determined tidal radii could be systematically larger by about a factor of 1.5 compared to the theoretical values. From the analysis of entire sample of 148 globular clusters and 7 dwarf spheroidal systems compiled by Webbink(1985), we find that such reduction from observed values would make the tidal density(the mean density within the tidal radius) distribution consistent with the flat rotation curve of our Galaxy out to large distances if the velocity distribution of clusters and dwarf spheroidals with respect to the Galactic center is isotropic.

  11. The chemical composition of young galactic clusters and associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P. J. F.

    1986-09-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric data for main-sequence stars in the southern clusters NGC 2362, 3293, 4755, 6611, 6231, 6531, IC 2944, the Northern Hemisphere clusters h and Chi Per, Cep OBIII, Be 94, and a loose association obtained between April 1984-September 1985 using the South African Astronomical Observatory, Anglo-Australian, and Issac Newton telescopes are analyzed. The observed line strength and photometric data are compared with predictions derived using local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative-transfer codes. It is observed that, except for the stars of NGC 6611, the effective temperatures and gravities correlate well. Mean abundances for the southern clusters are derived and compared with the data of Lynga (1981); the good agreement between the average abundance for each cluster and those for normal objects indicate that the stars in this region formed from relatively homogeneous interstellar material.

  12. Kinematical evolution of tidally limited star clusters: rotational properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiongco, Maria A.; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2017-07-01

    We present the results of a set of N-body simulations following the long-term evolution of the rotational properties of star cluster models evolving in the external tidal field of their host galaxy, after an initial phase of violent relaxation. The effects of two-body relaxation and escape of stars lead to a redistribution of the ordered kinetic energy from the inner to the outer regions, ultimately determining a progressive general loss of angular momentum; these effects are reflected in the overall decline of the rotation curve as the cluster evolves and loses stars. We show that all of our models share the same dependence of the remaining fraction of the initial rotation on the fraction of the initial mass lost. As the cluster evolves and loses part of its initial angular momentum, it becomes increasingly dominated by random motions, but even after several tens of relaxation times, and losing a significant fraction of its initial mass, a cluster can still be characterized by a non-negligible ratio of the rotational velocity to the velocity dispersion. This result is in qualitative agreement with the recently observed kinematical complexity that characterizes several Galactic globular clusters.

  13. Bright Young Star Clusters in NGC5253 with LEGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, Daniela; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Adamo, Angela; Gallagher, John S.; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Smith, Linda J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Lee, Janice C.; Sabbi, Elena; Ubeda, Leonardo; Kim, Hwihyun; Ryon, Jenna E.; Thilker, David A.; Bright, Stacey N.; Zackrisson, Erik; Kennicutt, Robert; de Mink, Selma E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Chandar, Rupali; Cignoni, Michele; Cook, David; Dale, Daniel A.; Elmegreen, Bruce; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Evans, Aaron S.; Fumagalli, Michele; Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Grasha, Kathryn; Grebel, Eva; Krumholz, Mark R.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Wofford, Aida; Brown, Thomas M.; Christian, Carol A.; Dobbs, Claire; Herrero-Davo`, Artemio; Kahre, Lauren; Messa, Matteo; Nair, Preethi; Nota, Antonella; Östlin, Göran; Pellerin, Anne; Sacchi, Elena; Schaerer, Daniel; Tosi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Using UV-to-H broad and narrow-band HST imaging, we derive the ages and masses of the 11 brightest star clusters in the dwarf galaxy NGC5253. This galaxy, located at ~3 Mpc, hosts an intense starburst, which includes a centrally-concentrated dusty region with strong thermal radio emission (the `radio nebula'). The HST imaging includes data from the Cycle 21 Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey), in addition to narrow--band H-alpha (6563 A), P-beta (12820 A), and P-alpha (18756 A). The bright clusters have ages ~1-15 Myr and masses ~1E4 - 2.5E5 Msun. Two of the 11 star clusters are located within the radio nebula, and suffer from significant dust attenuation. Both are extremely young, with a best-fit age around 1 Myr, and masses ~7.5E4 and ~2.5E5 Msun, respectively. The most massive of the two `radio nebula' clusters is 2-4 times less massive than previously estimated and is embedded within a cloud of dust with A_V~50 mag. The two clusters account for about half of the ionizing photon rate in the radio nebula, and will eventually supply about 2/3 of the mechanical energy in present-day shocks. Additional sources are required to supply the remaining ionizing radiation, and may include very massive stars.

  14. Super star clusters in the starburst core of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmoquette, Mark

    2009-07-01

    M82 is the archetype starburst galaxy and the nearest {3.6 Mpc} analogue to the star-forming galaxies identified at high-z. No other galaxy affords the opportunity to study an active starburst at such high spatial resolution, and with such a wealth of complimentary data available in the literature. In our cycle 10 STIS programme, we carried out the first spectroscopic study of a cluster in the core of the M82 starburst. Intriguingly, we found this young {6.5 Myr} cluster to be surrounded by a compact {4.5 pc}, high-pressure HII region, whose evolution appears to have been significantly affected by the high ambient pressures found in this region of the starburst. We therefore propose to obtain spatially resolved STIS spectroscopy of a sample of star clusters within the starburst core, distributed over a range of ambient conditions. Together with measuring accurate ages, masses, sizes, and extinctions of the star clusters, we will also measure the properties of their immediate environments {gas dynamics, pressures/densities, excitations}. Only with the spatial resolution of STIS can we isolate individual clusters in the crowded starburst core of M82, where the background is also bright and highly variable.The data from this proposal will uniquely chart relationships between SSCs and the ISM in their immediate vicinities. By so doing, they will provide the first systematic measurements of how SSCs transmit their power to their surroundings, and ultimately to the starburst-powered galactic wind.

  15. THE STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF FORMING AND EARLY STAGE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jaehnig, Karl O.; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: ndario@ufl.edu

    2015-01-10

    We study the degree of angular substructure in the stellar position distribution of young members of Galactic star-forming regions, looking for correlations with distance from cluster center, surface number density of stars, and local dynamical age. To this end we adopt the catalog of members in 18 young (∼1-3 Myr) clusters from the Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray Survey and the statistical analysis of the angular dispersion parameter, δ{sub ADP,} {sub N}. We find statistically significant correlation between δ{sub ADP,} {sub N} and physical projected distance from the center of the clusters, with the centers appearing smoother than the outskirts, consistent with more rapid dynamical processing on local dynamical, free-fall or orbital timescales. Similarly, smoother distributions are seen in regions of higher surface density, or older dynamical ages. These results indicate that dynamical processing that erases substructure is already well-advanced in young, sometimes still-forming, clusters. Such observations of the dissipation of substructure have the potential to constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of young and forming clusters.

  16. Cloud-particle galactic gas dynamics and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Galactic gas dynamics, spiral structure, and star formation are discussed in relation to N-body computational studies based on a cloud-particle model of the interstellar medium. On the small scale, the interstellar medium is seen as cloud-dominated and supernova-perturbed. It is noted that the cloud-particle model simulates cloud-cloud collisions, the formation of stellar associations, and supernova explosions as dominant local processes. On the large scale, in response to a spiral galactic gravitational field, global density waves and galactic shocks develop having large-scale characteristics similar to those found in continuum gas dynamical studies. Both the system of gas clouds and the system of young stellar associations forming from the clouds figure in the global spiral structure. However, with the attributes of neither assuming a continuum of gas (as in continuum gas dynamical studies) or requiring a prescribed equation of state (such as the isothermal condition), the cloud-particle picture retains much of the detail lost in earlier work. By detail is meant the small-scale features and structures so important in understanding the local, turbulent state of the interstellar medium as well as the degree of raggedness often seen to be superposed on the global spiral structure.

  17. A comparison of evolutionary tracks for single Galactic massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Palacios, A.

    2013-12-01

    Context. The evolution of massive stars is not fully understood. The relation between different types of evolved massive stars is not clear, and the role of factors such as binarity, rotation or magnetism needs to be quantified. Aims: Several groups make available the results of 1D single stellar evolution calculations in the form of evolutionary tracks and isochrones. They use different stellar evolution codes for which the input physics and its implementation varies. In this paper, we aim at comparing the currently available evolutionary tracks for massive stars. We focus on calculations aiming at reproducing the evolution of Galactic stars. Our main goal is to highlight the uncertainties on the predicted evolutionary paths. Methods: We compute stellar evolution models with the codes MESA and STAREVOL. We compare our results with those of four published grids of massive stellar evolution models (Geneva, STERN, Padova and FRANEC codes). We first investigate the effects of overshooting, mass loss, metallicity, chemical composition. We subsequently focus on rotation. Finally, we compare the predictions of published evolutionary models with the observed properties of a large sample of Galactic stars. Results: We find that all models agree well for the main sequence evolution. Large differences in luminosity and temperatures appear for the post main sequence evolution, especially in the cool part of the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. Depending on the physical ingredients, tracks of different initial masses can overlap, rendering any mass estimate doubtful. For masses between 7 and 20 M⊙, we find that the main sequence width is slightly too narrow in the Geneva models including rotation. It is (much) too wide for the (STERN) FRANEC models. This conclusion is reached from the investigation of the HR diagram and from the evolution of the surface velocity as a function of surface gravity. An overshooting parameter α between 0.1 and 0.2 in models with rotation is

  18. Search for Carbon-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in Milky Way Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indahl, Briana; Pessev, P.

    2014-01-01

    From our current understanding of stellar evolution, it would not be expected to find carbon rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in Milky Way globular clusters. Due to the low metallicity of the population II stars making up the globular clusters and their age, stars large enough to fuse carbon should have already evolved off of the asymptotic giant branch. Recently, however, there have been serendipitous discoveries of these types of stars. Matsunaga et al. (2006) discovered a Mira variable in the globular cluster Lynga 7. It was later confirmed by Feast et al. (2012) that the star is a member of the cluster and must be a product of a stellar merger. In the same year, Sharina et al. (2012) discovered a carbon star in the low metallicity globular cluster NGC6426 and reports it to be a CH star. Five more of these types of stars have been made as serendipitous discoveries and have been reported by Harding (1962), Dickens (1972), Cote et al. (1997), and Van Loon (2007). The abundance of these types of carbon stars in Milky Way globular clusters has been unknown because the discovery of these types of objects has only ever been a serendipitous discovery. These stars could have been easily overlooked in the past as they are outside the typical parameter space of galactic globular clusters. Also advances in near-infrared instruments and observing techniques have made it possible to detect the fainter carbon stars in binary systems. Having an understanding of the abundances of carbon stars in galactic globular clusters will aid in the modeling of globular cluster and galaxy formation leading to a better understanding of these processes. To get an understanding of the abundances of these stars we conducted the first comprehensive search for AGB carbon stars into all Milky Way globular clusters listed in the Harris Catalog (expect for Pyxis). I have found 128 carbon star candidates using methods of comparing color magnitude diagrams of the clusters with the carbon

  19. Star Formation in Space and Time: The Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, E. M.; Stahler, Steven W.

    2006-06-01

    We examine the pattern of star birth in the Orion Nebula cluster (ONC), with the goal of discerning the cluster's formation mechanism. Outside the Trapezium, the distribution of stellar masses is remarkably uniform and is not accurately described by the field-star initial mass function. The deconvolved, three-dimensional density of cluster members peaks at the Trapezium stars, which are truly anomalous in mass. Using theoretical pre-main-sequence tracks, we confirm the earlier finding that star formation has accelerated over the past 107 yr. We further show that the rate of acceleration has been the same for all masses. Thus, there is no correlation between stellar age and mass, contrary to previous claims. Finally, the acceleration has been spatially uniform throughout the cluster. Our reconstruction of the parent molecular cloud spawning the cluster shows that it had a mass of 6700 Msolar prior to its destruction by the Trapezium. If the cloud was supported against self-gravity by mildly dissipative turbulence, then it contracted in a quasi-static but accelerating manner. We demonstrate this contraction theoretically through a simple energy argument. The mean turbulent speed increased to its recent value, which is reflected in the present-day stellar velocity dispersion. The current ONC will be gravitationally unbound once cloud destruction is complete, and is destined to become a dispersing OB association. We hypothesize that similarly crowded groups seen at the centers of distant OB associations are also unbound and do not give rise to the Galactic population of open clusters. Finally, accelerating star formation implies that most clumps within giant molecular complexes should have relatively low formation activity. Sensitive infrared surveys could confirm this hypothesis.

  20. Galactic bulge X-ray burst sources from disrupted globular clusters?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Hertz, P.

    1985-01-01

    The origin of the bright galactic bulge X-ray sources, or GX sources, is unclear despite intensive study for the past 15 years. It is suggested that the fact that many (or most) of the GX sources are X-ray burst sources (GXRBS) and are otherwise apparently identical to the luminous X-ray sources found in globular cluster cores implies that they too may have a globular cluster origin. The possibility that the compact X-ray binaries found in globulars are ejected is constrained by observations of CVs in and out of clusters. The GXRBS are instead hypothesized to have been formed by capture processes in globular clusters which have now largely been disrupted by repeated tidal stripping and shocking in the galactic plane. A statistical analysis of the 12 GXRBS which have precise positions from Einstein and/or optical (or radio) observations indicate that it is probably significant that a bright, of less than about 19, G or K star is found within the error circle (3 arcmin radius) in four cases. These may be surviving giants in a disrupted globular cluster core. Implications for globular cluster evolution and the GXRBS themselves are discussed.

  1. UBVR POLARIMETRY OF EVOLVED CARBON STARS NEAR THE GALACTIC EQUATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, J. M.; Hiriart, D. E-mail: hiriart@astrosen.unam.mx

    2011-07-15

    We present polarimetry and photometry in the UBVR bands of nine low Galactic latitude carbon stars (|b{sup II} | {<=} 15{sup 0}) over a period of one year: V384 Per, ST Cam, S Aur, CL Mon, HV Cas, Y Tau, TT Cyg, U Cyg, and V1426 Cyg. We have corrected the observed values for the effects of extinction and polarization by the interstellar medium to obtain the intrinsic polarization and photometry of the stars. All the observed objects present polarization in at least two bands. There is a statistical correlation between the temporal mean polarization (p) at each filter band and the IR color K - [12] with the redder stars tending to be more polarized. A related trend is found between polarization and mass-loss rate in gas. The degree of polarization increases with the mass-loss rate at around M-dot{sub gas}{approx}3.6x10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We found two stars-TT Cyg and ST Cam-that increase polarization with decreasing mass-loss rate below this value. Multiple observations of TT Cyg, U Cyg, and V1426 Cyg during the campaign show no correlation between polarization and luminosity in any of the UBVR bands. Therefore, the distribution of the scatterers shall vary with time in a very irregular way.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frogel, Jay (Technical Monitor); Smith, Howard A.

    2004-01-01

    In this program we proposed to perform a series of spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and to take advantage of other spectroscopic databases including the first results from SIRTF. Our empha- sis has been on star formation in external, bright IR galaxies, but other areas of research have in- cluded young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star formation regions, and the galactic center. The OH lines in the far infrared were proposed as one key focus of this inquiry because the Principal Investigator (H. Smith) had a full set of OH IR lines from IS0 observations. It was planned that during the proposed 2-1/2 year timeframe of the proposal other data (including perhaps from SIRTF) would become available, and we intended to be responsive to these and other such spec- troscopic data sets. Three papers are included:The Infrared Lines of OH: Diagnostics of Molecular Cloud Conditions in Infrared Bright Galaxies; The Far-Infrared Spectrum of Arp 220; andThe Far-Infrared Emission Line and Continuum Spectrum of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068.

  3. DUST PRODUCTION AND MASS LOSS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Boyer, M. L.; Van Loon, J. Th.

    2011-04-01

    Dust production among post-main-sequence stars is investigated in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) based on infrared photometry and spectroscopy. We identify metallic iron grains as the probable dominant opacity source in these winds. Typical evolutionary timescales of asymptotic giant branch stars suggest the mass-loss rates we report are too high. We suggest that this is because the iron grains are small or elongated and/or that iron condenses more efficiently than at solar metallicity. Comparison to other works suggests metallic iron is observed to be more prevalent toward lower metallicities. The reasons for this are explored, but remain unclear. Meanwhile, the luminosity at which dusty mass loss begins is largely invariant with metallicity, but its presence correlates strongly with long-period variability. This suggests that the winds of low-mass stars have a significant driver that is not radiation pressure, but may be acoustic driving by pulsations.

  4. Variable Circumstellar Disks of Classical Be Stars in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhartz, C.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Wisniewski, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Circumstellar disks are common among many stars, at most spectral types, and at different stages of their lifetimes. Among the near-main-sequence classical Be stars, there is growing evidence that these disks form, dissipate, and reform on timescales that differ from star to star. Using data obtained with the Large Monolithic Imager (LMI) at the Lowell Observatory Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT), along with additional complementary data obtained at the University of Toledo Ritter Observatory (RO), we have begun a long-term monitoring project of a well-studied set of galactic star clusters that are known to contain Be stars. Our goal is to develop a statistically significant sample of variable circumstellar disk systems over multiple timescales. With a robust multi-epoch study we can determine the relative fraction of Be stars that exhibit disk-loss or disk-renewal phases, and investigate the range of timescales over which these events occur. A larger sample will improve our understanding of the prevalence and nature of the disk variability, and may provide insight about underlying physical mechanisms.

  5. Study of open clusters within 1.8 kpc and understanding the Galactic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Y. C.; Dambis, A. K.; Pandey, A. K.; Joshi, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Significant progress has been made in recent years to understand the formation and evolution of our Galaxy, but we still lack a complete understanding of the Galaxy and its structure. Aims: Using an almost complete sample of Galactic open star clusters within 1.8 kpc, we aim to understand the general properties of the open cluster system in the Galaxy and probe the Galactic structure. Methods: We first extracted 1241 open clusters within 1.8 kpc of the Sun from the Milky Way Star Clusters (MWSC) catalog. Considering it an almost complete sample of clusters within this distance, we performed a comprehensive statistical analysis of various cluster parameters such as spatial position, age, size, mass, and extinction. Results: We find an average cluster scale height of zh = 60 ± 2 pc for clusters younger than 700 Myr, which increases to 64 ± 2 pc when we include all the clusters. The zh is found to be strongly dependent on RGC and age, and on an average, zh is more than twice as large as in the outer region than in the inner region of the solar circle, except for the youngest population of clusters. The solar offset is found to be 6.2 ± 1.1 pc above the formal Galactic plane. We derive a local mass density of ρ0 = 0.090 ± 0.005 M⊙/ pc3 and estimate a negligibly small amount of dark matter in the solar neighborhood. The reddening in the direction of clusters suggests a strong correlation with their vertical distance from the Galactic plane with a respective slope of dE(B-V) / dz = 0.40 ± 0.04 and 0.42 ± 0.05 mag/kpc below and above the Galactic plane. We observe a linear mass-radius and mass-age relations in the open clusters and derive the slopes of dR/ d(log M) = 2.08 ± 0.10 and d(log M) / d(log T) = -0.36 ± 0.05, respectively. Conclusions: The dependence of the spatial distribution of clusters on their age points to a complex interplay between cluster formation and survivability within the Galaxy. The geometrical characteristics of a significant

  6. The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS). II. Bright Southern Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sota, A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Morrell, N. I.; Barbá, R. H.; Walborn, N. R.; Gamen, R. C.; Arias, J. I.; Alfaro, E. J.

    2014-03-01

    We present the second installment of GOSSS, a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ~ 2500 digital observations from both hemispheres selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog (GOSC). In this paper we include bright stars and other objects drawn mostly from the first version of GOSC, all of them south of δ = -20°, for a total number of 258 O stars. We also revise the northern sample of Paper I to provide the full list of spectroscopically classified Galactic O stars complete to B = 8, bringing the total number of published GOSSS stars to 448. Extensive sequences of exceptional objects are given, including the early Of/WN, O Iafpe, Ofc, ON/OC, Onfp, Of?p, and Oe types, as well as double/triple-lined spectroscopic binaries. The new spectral subtype O9.2 is also discussed. The magnitude and spatial distributions of the observed sample are analyzed. We also present new results from OWN, a multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopic survey coordinated with GOSSS that is assembling the largest sample of Galactic spectroscopic massive binaries ever attained. The OWN data combined with additional information on spectroscopic and visual binaries from the literature indicate that only a very small fraction (if any) of the stars with masses above 15-20 M ⊙ are born as single systems. In the future we will publish the rest of the GOSSS survey, which is expected to include over 1000 Galactic O stars. The GOSSS spectroscopic data in this article were gathered with one primary facility, the 2.5 m du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO), and three auxiliary ones, the 1.5 m Telescope at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada (OSN), the 3.5 m Telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (CAHA), and the 4.2 m William Hershel Telescope at Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM). The OWN spectroscopic data were gathered at LCO, La Silla Observatory, and CASLEO. Some of the supporting imaging data were obtained by

  7. The SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. II. Validation with Galactic Globular and Open Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.S.; Beers, T.C.; Sivarani, T.; Johnson, J.A.; An, D.; Wilhelm, R.; Prieto, C.Allende; Koesterke, L.; Re Fiorentin, P.; Bailer-Jones, C.A.L.; Norris, J.E.

    2007-10-01

    The authors validate the performance and accuracy of the current SEGUE (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration) Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP), which determines stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity) by comparing derived overall metallicities and radial velocities from selected likely members of three globular clusters (M 13, M 15, and M 2) and two open clusters (NGC 2420 and M 67) to the literature values. Spectroscopic and photometric data obtained during the course of the original Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-1) and its first extension (SDSS-II/SEGUE) are used to determine stellar radial velocities and atmospheric parameter estimates for stars in these clusters. Based on the scatter in the metallicities derived for the members of each cluster, they quantify the typical uncertainty of the SSPP values, {sigma}([Fe/H]) = 0.13 dex for stars in the range of 4500 K {le} T{sub eff} {le} 7500 K and 2.0 {le} log g {le} 5.0, at least over the metallicity interval spanned by the clusters studied (-2.3 {le} [Fe/H] < 0). The surface gravities and effective temperatures derived by the SSPP are also compared with those estimated from the comparison of the color-magnitude diagrams with stellar evolution models; they find satisfactory agreement. At present, the SSPP underestimates [Fe/H] for near-solar-metallicity stars, represented by members of M 67 in this study, by {approx} 0.3 dex.

  8. THE LESSER ROLE OF SHEAR IN GALACTIC STAR FORMATION: INSIGHT FROM THE GALACTIC RING SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Dib, Sami; Dariush, Ali; Helou, George; Moore, Toby J. T.; Urquhart, James S.

    2012-10-20

    We analyze the role played by shear in regulating star formation in the Galaxy on the scale of individual molecular clouds. The clouds are selected from the {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 line of the Galactic Ring Survey. For each cloud, we estimate the shear parameter which describes the ability of density perturbations to grow within the cloud. We find that for almost all molecular clouds considered, there is no evidence that shear is playing a significant role in opposing the effects of self-gravity. We also find that the shear parameter of the clouds does not depend on their position in the Galaxy. Furthermore, we find no correlations between the shear parameter of the clouds with several indicators of their star formation activity. No significant correlation is found between the shear parameter and the star formation efficiency of the clouds which is measured using the ratio of the massive young stellar objects luminosities, measured in the Red MSX survey, to the cloud mass. There are also no significant correlations between the shear parameter and the fraction of their mass that is found in denser clumps which is a proxy for their clump formation efficiency, nor with their level of fragmentation expressed in the number of clumps per unit mass. Our results strongly suggest that shear is playing only a minor role in affecting the rates and efficiencies at which molecular clouds convert their gas into dense cores and thereafter into stars.

  9. Thermal instabilities in cooling galactic coronae: fuelling star formation in galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Alexander; Read, Justin; Power, Chris; Cole, David

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the means by which cold gas can accrete on to Milky Way mass galaxies from a hot corona of gas, using a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, `SPHS'. We find that the `cold clumps' seen in many classic SPH simulations in the literature are not present in our SPHS simulations. Instead, cold gas condenses from the halo along filaments that form at the intersection of supernovae-driven bubbles from previous phases of star formation. This positive feedback feeds cold gas to the galactic disc directly, fuelling further star formation. The resulting galaxies in the SPH and SPHS simulations differ greatly in their morphology, gas phase diagrams and stellar content. We show that the classic SPH cold clumps owe to a numerical thermal instability caused by an inability for cold gas to mix in the hot halo. The improved treatment of mixing in SPHS suppresses this instability leading to a dramatically different physical outcome. In our highest resolution SPHS simulation, we find that the cold filaments break up into bound, physically motivated clumps that form stars. The filaments are overdense by a factor of 10-100 compared to the surrounding gas, suggesting that the fragmentation results from a physical non-linear instability driven by the overdensity. This `fragmenting filament' mode of disc growth has important implications for galaxy formation, in particular the role of star formation in bringing cold gas into disc galaxies.

  10. F Turnoff Distribution in the Galactic Halo Using Globular Clusters as Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, Matthew; Newberg, H. J.; Simones, J.; Monaco, M.; Cole, N.

    2012-01-01

    F turnoff stars are important tools for studying Galactic halo substructure because they are plentiful, luminous, and can be easily selected by their photometric colors from large surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We describe the absolute magnitude distribution of color-selected F turnoff stars, as measured from SDSS data, for eleven globular clusters in the Milky Way halo. We find that the absolute magnitude distribution of turnoff stars is intrinsically the same for all clusters studied, and is well fit by two half Gaussian functions, centered at μ = 4.18, with a bright-side σ = 0.36, and with a faint-side σ = 0.76. However, the color errors and detection efficiencies cause the observed σ of the faint-side Gaussian to change with magnitude due to contamination from redder main sequence stars (40% at 21st magnitude). We present a function that will correct for this magnitude-dependent change in selected stellar populations, when calculating stellar density from color-selected turnoff stars. We also present a consistent set of distances, ages and metallicities for eleven clusters in the SDSS Data Release 7. We calculate a linear correction function to Padova isochrones so that they are consistent with SDSS globular cluster data from previous papers. We show that our cluster population falls along the theoretical Age-Metallicity Relationship (AMR), and further find that isochrones for stellar populations on the AMR have very similar turnoffs; increasing metallicity and decreasing age conspire to produce similar turnoff magnitudes and colors for all old clusters that lie on the AMR. This research was supported by NSF grant AST 10-09670 and the NASA/NY Space Grant.

  11. Manganese Abundances in Globular Cluster and Halo Field Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobeck, J. S.; Simmerer, J. A.; Fulbright, J. P.; Sneden, C.; Kraft, R. P.; Ivans, I. I.

    2004-05-01

    We have derived Mn abundances for more than 100 stars in nine Galactic globular clusters: M3, M4, M5, M10, M13, M15, M71, Pal5 and NGC 7006. In addition, Mn abundance determinations have been made for a comparable number of halo field stars possessing an overlapping range of metallicities and stellar parameters. The spectra of the cluster giants were obtained as a part of the Lick-Texas investigations into globular cluster chemistry. The spectra of the field stars are a part of a large study by Simmerer et al. (2004, ApJ, submitted). Data were collected at the McDonald, Lick ,and Keck Observatories and were analyzed using the synthetic spectra of the 6000 Å Mn I triplet. Hyperfine structure parameters were included in the synthetic spectra computations. It is well known that metal-poor field stars possess [Mn/Fe] ratios approximately a factor of two lower than solar values (Wallerstein et al. 1963, Gratton et al.1989, McWilliam et al. 1997). Our analysis shows that for the metallicity range -0.5 > [Fe/H] > -2.8 field stars have a mean relative abundance of <[Mn/Fe]> = -0.28±0.01 (sigma = 0.08), a value esssentially identical to that of the nine globular clusters: <[Mn/Fe]> = -0.28±0.01 (sigma = 0.12). It is evident that [Mn/Fe] ratios of metal-poor stars do not depend upon their environment. Our Mn abundance results viewed in conjunction with the globular cluster Cu abundances of Simmerer et al. (2003) suggest the following possibilities: one, the production of these elements is extremely metallicity-dependent or two, these elements were manufactured in the Galactic halo prior to cluster formation. Ongoing support from NSF, currently through grants AST-0307495 to CS and AST-0098453 to RPK, is gratefully acknowledged. Research for III is currently supported by NASA through Hubble Fellowship grant HST-HF-01151.01-A from the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  12. Abundance analysis of blue stragglers in a galactic globular cluster M30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhengshi

    2010-07-01

    We propose to take high resolution spectra of blue straggler stars (BSSs) in a galactic globular cluster M30. Two different origins, mass transfer in a binary system and merger via collisions between single stars, are proposed to explain the properties of BSSs. Numbers of photometric studies and dynamical simulations suggest that even in the same galactic globular cluster the dominant BSSs' formation scenario would differ in regions with different density and radius. Previous spectroscopic studies of BSSs imply that abundance analysis is the most important and effective way to clarify differences between BSSs formed by different mechanisms. Currently, two different BSS sequences on color-magnitude diagram of M30 are reported as the verification of occurrence of two mechanisms in M30. That is the first observational evidence for that the BSSs formed by different mechanisms separated clearly into two sequences. We wish to obtain high resolution spectra for 6 bright (V>17.5 mag) BSSs (3 stars for each sequence) in M30 to confirm the reality of separation in BSS sequences in this GC and distinctions in chemical compositions between BSSs formed via different mechanisms.

  13. Proper Motions and Structural Parameters of the Galactic Globular Cluster M71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadelano, M.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Miocchi, P.; Lanzoni, B.; Pallanca, C.; Massari, D.

    2017-02-01

    By exploiting two ACS/HST data sets separated by a temporal baseline of ∼7 years, we have determined the relative stellar proper motions (PMs; providing membership) and the absolute PM of the Galactic globular cluster M71. The absolute PM has been used to reconstruct the cluster orbit within a Galactic, three-component, axisymmetric potential. M71 turns out to be in a low-latitude disk-like orbit inside the Galactic disk, further supporting the scenario in which it lost a significant fraction of its initial mass. Since large differential reddening is known to affect this system, we took advantage of near-infrared, ground-based observations to re-determine the cluster center and density profile from direct star counts. The new structural parameters turn out to be significantly different from the ones quoted in the literature. In particular, M71 has a core and a half-mass radii almost 50% larger than previously thought. Finally, we estimate that the initial mass of M71 was likely one order of magnitude larger than its current value, thus helping to solve the discrepancy with the observed number of X-ray sources. Based on observations collected with the NASA/ESA HST (GO10775, GO12932), obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  14. The cluster Terzan 5 as a remnant of a primordial building block of the Galactic bulge.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, F R; Dalessandro, E; Mucciarelli, A; Beccari, G; Rich, R M; Origlia, L; Lanzoni, B; Rood, R T; Valenti, E; Bellazzini, M; Ransom, S M; Cocozza, G

    2009-11-26

    Globular star clusters are compact and massive stellar systems old enough to have witnessed the entire history of our Galaxy, the Milky Way. Although recent results suggest that their formation may have been more complex than previously thought, they still are the best approximation to a stellar population formed over a relatively short timescale (less than 1 Gyr) and with virtually no dispersion in the iron content. Indeed, only one cluster-like system (omega Centauri) in the Galactic halo is known to have multiple stellar populations with a significant spread in iron abundance and age. Similar findings in the Galactic bulge have been hampered by the obscuration arising from thick and varying layers of interstellar dust. Here we report that Terzan 5, a globular-cluster-like system in the Galactic bulge, has two stellar populations with different iron contents and ages. Terzan 5 could be the surviving remnant of one of the primordial building blocks that are thought to merge and form galaxy bulges.

  15. Bayesian Analysis and Characterization of Multiple Populations in Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Kaiser, Rachel A.; Stenning, David; Sarajedini, Ata; von Hippel, Ted; van Dyk, David A.; Robinson, Elliot; Stein, Nathan; Jefferys, William H.; BASE-9, HST UVIS Globular Cluster Treasury Program

    2017-01-01

    Globular clusters have long been important tools to unlock the early history of galaxies. Thus, it is crucial we understand the formation and characteristics of the globular clusters (GCs) themselves. Historically, GCs were thought to be simple and largely homogeneous populations, formed via collapse of a single molecular cloud. However, this classical view has been overwhelmingly invalidated by recent work. It is now clear that the vast majority of globular clusters in our Galaxy host two or more chemically distinct populations of stars, with variations in helium and light elements at discrete abundance levels. No coherent story has arisen that is able to fully explain the formation of multiple populations in globular clusters nor the mechanisms that drive stochastic variations from cluster to cluster.We use Cycle 21 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and HST archival ACS Treasury observations of 30 Galactic Globular Clusters to characterize two distinct stellar populations. A sophisticated Bayesian technique is employed to simultaneously sample the joint posterior distribution of age, distance, and extinction for each cluster, as well as unique helium values for two populations within each cluster and the relative proportion of those populations. We find the helium differences among the two populations in the clusters fall in the range of 0.04 to 0.11. Because adequate models varying in CNO are not presently available, we view these spreads as upper limits and present them with statistical rather than observational uncertainties. Evidence supports previous studies suggesting an increase in helium content concurrent with increasing mass of the cluster. We also find that the proportion of the first population of stars increases with mass. Our results are examined in the context of proposed globular cluster formation scenarios.

  16. Cepheids in Galactic Open Clusters: An All-sky Census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Richard I.; Eyer, Laurent; Mowlavi, Nami

    2012-04-01

    We perform an all-sky search for classical (type I) Cepheids that are members of Galactic Open Clusters. Our approach is multi-dimensional, using all available spatial and kinematic parameters. The quantification of errors is crucial for this analysis, so care is taken to find adequate and realistic representations of parameter uncertainties. The data employed in the calculation are taken from published catalogues and the literature, supplemented by specific radial-velocity observations. Our work in progress is outlined here, and issues related to the inhomogeneity of cluster radii in the literature are discussed in some detail.

  17. Variable stars in the VVV globular clusters. I. 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-García, Javier; Dékány, István; Catelan, Márcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Gran, Felipe; Leyton, Paul; Minniti, Dante; Amigo, Pía E-mail: idekany@astro.puc.cl E-mail: rcontrer@astro.puc.cl E-mail: pia.amigo@uv.cl E-mail: dante@astrofisica.cl

    2015-03-01

    The VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) ESO Public Survey is opening a new window to study inner Galactic globular clusters (GCs) using their variable stars. These GCs have been neglected in the past due to the difficulties caused by the presence of elevated extinction and high field stellar densities in their lines of sight. However, the discovery and study of any present variables in these clusters, especially RR Lyrae stars, can help to greatly improve the accuracy of their physical parameters. It can also help to shed some light on the questions raised by the intriguing Oosterhoff dichotomy in the Galactic GC system. In a series of papers we plan to explore variable stars in the GCs falling inside the field of the VVV survey. In this first paper, we search for and study the variables present in two highly reddened, moderately metal-poor, faint, inner Galactic GCs: 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10. We report the discovery of sizable populations of RR Lyrae stars in both GCs. We use near-infrared period–luminosity relations to determine the color excess of each RR Lyrae star, from which we obtain both accurate distances to the GCs and the ratios of the selective-to-total extinction in their directions. We find the extinction toward both clusters to be elevated, non-standard, and highly differential. We also find both clusters to be closer to the Galactic center than previously thought, with Terzan 10 being on the far side of the Galactic bulge. Finally, we discuss their Oosterhoff properties, and conclude that both clusters stand out from the dichotomy followed by most Galactic GCs.

  18. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Circumnuclear Star Clusters in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, Aida; Leitherer, Claus; Chandar, Rupali

    2011-02-01

    We analyze archival HST/STIS/FUV-MAMA imaging and spectroscopy of 13 compact star clusters within the circumnuclear starburst region of M83, the closest such example. We compare the observed spectra with semi-empirical models, which are based on an empirical library of Galactic O and B stars observed with IUE, and with theoretical models, which are based on a new theoretical UV library of hot massive stars computed with WM-Basic. The models were generated with Starburst99 for metallicities of Z = 0.020 and Z = 0.040, and for stellar initial mass functions (IMFs) with upper mass limits of 10, 30, 50, and 100 M sun. We estimate the ages and masses of the clusters from the best-fit model spectra and find that the ages derived from the semi-empirical and theoretical models agree within a factor of 1.2 on average. A comparison of the spectroscopic age estimates with values derived from HST/WFC3/UVIS multi-band photometry shows a similar level of agreement for all but one cluster. The clusters have a range of ages from about 3 to 20 Myr and do not appear to have an age gradient along M83's starburst. Clusters with strong P-Cygni profiles have masses of a few×104 M sun, seem to have formed stars more massive than 30 M sun, and are consistent with a Kroupa IMF from 0.1to100 M sun. Field regions in the starburst lack P-Cygni profiles and are dominated by B stars.

  19. Open cluster Dolidze 25: Stellar parameters and the metallicity in the Galactic anticentre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, I.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Lorenzo, J.; Castro, N.; Herrero, A.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The young open cluster Dolidze 25, in the direction of the Galactic anticentre, has been attributed a very low metallicity, with typical abundances between -0.5 and -0.7 dex below solar. Aims: We intend to derive accurate cluster parameters and accurate stellar abundances for some of its members. Methods: We have obtained a large sample of intermediate- and high-resolution spectra for stars in and around Dolidze 25. We used the fastwind code to generate stellar atmosphere models to fit the observed spectra. We derive stellar parameters for a large number of OB stars in the area, and abundances of oxygen and silicon for a number of stars with spectral types around B0. Results: We measure low abundances in stars of Dolidze 25. For the three stars with spectral types around B0, we find 0.3 dex (Si) and 0.5 dex (O) below the values typical in the solar neighbourhood. These values, even though not as low as those given previously, confirm Dolidze 25 and the surrounding H ii region Sh2-284 as the most metal-poor star-forming environment known in the Milky Way. We derive a distance 4.5 ± 0.3 kpc to the cluster (rG ≈ 12.3 kpc). The cluster cannot be older than ~3 Myr, and likely is not much younger. One star in its immediate vicinity, sharing the same distance, has Si and O abundances at most 0.15 dex below solar. Conclusions: The low abundances measured in Dolidze 25 are compatible with currently accepted values for the slope of the Galactic metallicity gradient, if we take into account that variations of at least ±0.15 dex are observed at a given radius. The area traditionally identified as Dolidze 25 is only a small part of a much larger star-forming region that comprises the whole dust shell associated with Sh2-284 and very likely several other smaller H ii regions in its vicinity. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, the Mercator Telescope, and the telescopes of the Isaac Newton Group.

  20. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE MILKY WAY'S NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Pfuhl, O.; Fritz, T. K.; Eisenhauer, F.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Ott, T.; Dodds-Eden, K.; Zilka, M.; Sternberg, A.; Maness, H.

    2011-11-10

    We present spatially resolved imaging and integral field spectroscopy data for 450 cool giant stars within 1 pc from Sgr A*. We use the prominent CO bandheads to derive effective temperatures of individual giants. Additionally we present the deepest spectroscopic observation of the Galactic center (GC) so far, probing the number of B9/A0 main-sequence stars (2.2-2.8 M{sub sun}) in two deep fields. From spectrophotometry we construct a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of the red giant population and fit the observed diagram with model populations to derive the star formation history of the nuclear cluster. We find (1) that the average nuclear star formation rate dropped from an initial maximum {approx}10 Gyr ago to a deep minimum 1-2 Gyr ago and increased again during the last few hundred Myrs, (2) that roughly 80% of the stellar mass formed more than 5 Gyr ago, and (3) that mass estimates within R {approx} 1 pc from Sgr A* favor a dominant star formation mode with a 'normal' Chabrier/Kroupa initial mass function for the majority of the past star formation in the GC. The bulk stellar mass seems to have formed under conditions significantly different from the young stellar disks, perhaps because at the time of the formation of the nuclear cluster the massive black hole and its sphere of influence were much smaller than today.

  1. Stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Maxwell Xu; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Portegies Zwart, Simon F.; Spurzem, Rainer

    2017-10-01

    Most stars form in star clusters and stellar associations. However, only about ˜1 per cent of the presently known exoplanets are found in these environments. To understand the roles of star cluster environments in shaping the dynamical evolution of planetary systems, we carry out direct N-body simulations of four planetary system models in three different star cluster environments with respectively N = 2k, 8k and 32k stars. In each cluster, an ensemble of initially identical planetary systems are assigned to solar-type stars with ˜1 M⊙ and evolved for 50 Myr. We found that following the depletion of protoplanetary discs, external perturbations and planet-planet interactions are two driving mechanisms responsible for the destabilization of planetary systems. The planet survival rate varies from ˜95 per cent in the N = 2k cluster to ˜60 per cent in the N = 32k cluster, which suggests that most planetary systems can indeed survive in low-mass clusters, except in the central regions. We also find that planet ejections through stellar encounters are cumulative processes, as only ˜3 per cent of encounters are strong enough to excite the eccentricity by Δe ≥ 0.5. Short-period planets can be perturbed through orbit crossings with long-period planets. When taking into account planet-planet interactions, the planet ejection rate nearly doubles, and therefore multiplicity contributes to the vulnerability of planetary systems. In each ensemble, ˜0.2 per cent of planetary orbits become retrograde due to random directions of stellar encounters. Our results predict that young low-mass star clusters are promising sites for next-generation planet surveys, yet low planet detection rates are expected in dense globular clusters such as 47 Tuc. Nevertheless, planets in denser stellar environments are likely to have shorter orbital periods, which enhance their detectability.

  2. Probing the Birth of Super Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2009-05-01

    Super star clusters are among the most extreme star formation environments known; they have incredible stellar densities, and each can harbor thousands of massive stars within radii of only a few parsecs. The most robust of these clusters may even be precursors to the ancient globular clusters ubiquitous around massive galaxies in the local universe today. Understanding the formation and feedback of super star clusters has the potential to provide us with insight into the evolution of starburst episodes throughout the universe. At present the relationship between the local physical conditions and the voracity of star formation is not well-constrained. Some progress has been made: over the last decade, a number of natal super star clusters have been discovered, providing us with a glimpse into their early evolution. However, the set of existing observations is anemic, and our current physical model for these natal clusters in simplistic. I will overview what we think we know about these objects based on existing observations and outline some of the most significant gaps in our current understanding.

  3. Li abundances in F stars: planets, rotation, and Galactic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Mena, E.; Bertrán de Lis, S.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Sousa, S. G.; Figueira, P.; Mortier, A.; González Hernández, J. I.; Tsantaki, M.; Israelian, G.; Santos, N. C.

    2015-04-01

    explored the Li evolution with [Fe/H] taking advantage of the metal-rich stars included in our sample. We find that Li abundance reaches its maximum around solar metallicity, but decreases in the most metal-rich stars, as predicted by some models of Li Galactic production. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile), with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6 m ESO telescope, with CORALIE spectrograph at the 1.2 m Euler Swiss telescope and with the FEROS spectrograph at the 1.52 m ESO telescope; at the Paranal Observatory, ESO (Chile), using the UVES spectrograph at the VLT/UT2 Kueyen telescope, and with the FIES and SARG spectrographs at the 2.5 m NOT and the 3.6 m TNG, respectively, both at La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain).Tables 3-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Symbiotic stars and other Hα emission-line stars towards the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszalski, Brent; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Udalski, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    Symbiotic stars are interacting binaries with the longest orbital periods, and their multicomponent structure makes them rich astrophysical laboratories. The accretion of a high-mass-loss-rate red giant wind on to a white dwarf (WD) makes them promising Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitors. Systematic surveys for new Galactic symbiotic stars are critical to identify new promising SN Ia progenitors (e.g. RS Oph) and to better estimate the total population size to compare against SN Ia rates. Central to the latter objective is building a complete census of symbiotic stars towards the Galactic bulge. Here we report on the results of a systematic survey of Hα emission-line stars covering 35 deg2. It is distinguished by the combination of deep optical spectroscopy and long-term light curves that improve the certainty of our classifications. A total of 20 bona fide symbiotic stars are found (13 S-types, 6 D-types and 1 D'-type), 35 per cent of which show the symbiotic specific Raman-scattered O VI emission bands, as well as 15 possible symbiotic stars that require further study (six S-types and nine D-types). Light curves show a diverse range of variability including stellar pulsations (semi-regular and Mira), orbital variations and slow changes due to dust. Orbital periods are determined for five S-types and Mira pulsation periods for three D-types. The most significant D-type found is H1-45 and its carbon Mira with a pulsation period of 408.6 d, corresponding to an estimated period-luminosity relation distance of ˜6.2 ± 1.4 kpc and MK = -8.06 ± 0.12 mag. If H1-45 belongs to the Galactic bulge, then it would be the first bona fide luminous carbon star to be identified in the Galactic bulge population. The lack of luminous carbon stars in the bulge is a longstanding unsolved problem. A possible explanation for H1-45 may be that the carbon enhancement was accreted from the progenitor of the WD companion. A wide variety of unusual emission-line stars were also

  5. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}<−20.5. In both single- and multi-component clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2σ, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  6. Galactic kinematics and dynamics from Radial Velocity Experiment stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, J.; Burnett, B.; Kordopatis, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Gilmore, G.; Bienayme, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Famaey, B.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W. A.; Seabroke, G.; Siebert, A.; Watson, F.; Williams, M. E. K.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.

    2014-04-01

    We analyse the kinematics of ˜400 000 stars that lie within ˜2 kpc of the Sun and have spectra measured in the Radial Velocity Experiment. We decompose the sample into hot and cold dwarfs, red-clump and non-clump giants. The kinematics of the clump giants are consistent with being identical with those of the giants as a whole. Without binning the data we fit Gaussian velocity ellipsoids to the meridional-plane components of velocity of each star class and give formulae from which the shape and orientation of the velocity ellipsoid can be determined at any location. The data are consistent with the giants and the cool dwarfs sharing the same velocity ellipsoids, which have vertical velocity dispersion rising from 21 km s-1 in the plane to ˜55 km s-1 at |z| = 2 kpc and radial velocity dispersion rising from 37 km s-1 to 82 km s-1 in the same interval. At (R, z), the longest axis of one of these velocity ellipsoids is inclined to the Galactic plane by an angle ˜0.8 arctan(z/R). We use a novel formula to obtain precise fits to the highly non-Gaussian distributions of vφ components in eight bins in the (R, z) plane. We compare the observed velocity distributions with the predictions of a published dynamical model fitted to the velocities of stars that lie within ˜150 pc of the Sun and star counts towards the Galactic pole. The predictions for the vz distributions are exceptionally successful. The model's predictions for vφ are successful except for the hot dwarfs, and its predictions for vr fail significantly only for giants that lie far from the plane. If distances to the model's stars are overestimated by 20 per cent, the predicted distributions of vr and vz components become skew, and far from the plane broader. The broadening significantly improves the fits to the data. The ability of the dynamical model to give such a good account of a large body of data to which it was not fitted inspires confidence in the fundamental correctness of the assumed, disc

  7. The WAGGS project - I. The WiFeS Atlas of Galactic Globular cluster Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Christopher; Pastorello, Nicola; Bellstedt, Sabine; Alabi, Adebusola; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chevalier, Leonie; Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Penny, Samantha; Foster, Caroline; McDermid, Richard M.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Villaume, Alexa

    2017-07-01

    We present the WiFeS Atlas of Galactic Globular cluster Spectra, a library of integrated spectra of Milky Way and Local Group globular clusters. We used the WiFeS integral field spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope to observe the central regions of 64 Milky Way globular clusters and 22 globular clusters hosted by the Milky Way's low-mass satellite galaxies. The spectra have wider wavelength coverage (3300-9050 Å) and higher spectral resolution (R = 6800) than existing spectral libraries of Milky Way globular clusters. By including Large and Small Magellanic Cloud star clusters, we extend the coverage of parameter space of existing libraries towards young and intermediate ages. While testing stellar population synthesis models and analysis techniques is the main aim of this library, the observations may also further our understanding of the stellar populations of Local Group globular clusters and make possible the direct comparison of extragalactic globular cluster integrated light observations with well-understood globular clusters in the Milky Way. The integrated spectra are publicly available via the project website.

  8. The evolution of active galactic nuclei in clusters of galaxies from the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Bufanda, E.; Hollowood, D.; Jeltema, T. E.; ...

    2016-12-13

    The correlation between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and environment provides important clues to AGN fueling and the relationship of black hole growth to galaxy evolution. Here, we analyze the fraction of galaxies in clusters hosting AGN as a function of redshift and cluster richness for X-ray detected AGN associated with clusters of galaxies in Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The present sample includes 33 AGN with L_X > 1043 ergs s-1 in non-central, host galaxies with luminosity greater than 0.5 L* from a total sample of 432 clusters in the redshift range of 0.10.7. Our result is inmore » good agreement with previous work and parallels the increase in star formation in cluster galaxies over the same redshift range. But, the AGN fraction in clusters is observed to have no significant correlation with cluster mass. Future analyses with DES Year 1 through Year 3 data will be able to clarify whether AGN activity is correlated to cluster mass and will tightly constrain the relationship between cluster AGN populations and redshift.« less

  9. Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution parallaxes and proper motions for 5 Galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Laura L.; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.

    2017-06-01

    The Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) catalogue from Gaia Data Release 1 provided proper motions (PMs) and parallax estimates for over 2 million stars in the Tycho2 catalogue. Although this catalogue provides PMs for only a very small fraction of stars, compared with the expected catalogues from later data releases, already TGAS has been used to study parallaxes and PMs for a variety of objects in the Local Group. I will present results from our recent pilot in which we searched the TGAS catalogue for stars in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We identified a total of 20 member stars across 5 GCs -- NGC 104 (47 Tucanae), NGC 5272 (M3), NGC 6121 (M4), NGC 6397, and NGC 6656 (M22) -- and used them to estimate parallaxes (and hence distances) to the clusters, along with their global proper motions. Combined with literature line-of-sight velocities, we also calculated full space motions for the clusters. I will outline the membership selection process and discuss the subsequent space-motion analysis. I will also compare our PM results to both previous Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based estimates. Our Gaia results compare very well, and highlight the amazing potential of future Gaia data releases.

  10. A Hubble Space Telescope Photometric Study of the Galactic Open Cluster Westerlund 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Alvarez, Carlos; Kobulnicky, H.

    2012-01-01

    The young and massive Galactic open cluster Westerlund 2 has been a source of controversy because of the widely varying and inconsistent estimates for its distance. In this study we use Hubble Space Telescope multi-band photometry to make improved photometric measurements in the crowded cluster core where many of the most luminous members are now resolved into multiple stars. Using new stellar spectroscopy, we provide a more reliable distance measurement based on the mean spectroscopic parallax of 20 O-type member stars. The new spectrophotometric distance, after correction for reddening, is 7.38 ± 0.02 (random) ± 0.08 (systematic) kpc. We also use the HST optical photometry along with mid-infrared photometry to correct for reddening on a star-by-star basis. Differential reddening causes AV to vary from 1.11 mag to as much as 39.25 mag across the cluster. The best solar metallicity isochrone fit to the de-reddened color-magnitude diagram corresponds to an age of 1 - 3 Myr.

  11. METAL PRODUCTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS: THE NON-GALACTIC COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bregman, Joel N.; Anderson, Michael E.; Dai Xinyu E-mail: michevan@umich.ed

    2010-06-10

    The metallicity in galaxy clusters is expected to originate from the stars in galaxies, with a population dominated by high-mass stars likely being the most important stellar component, especially in rich clusters. We examine the relationship between the metallicity and the prominence of galaxies as measured by the star-to-baryon ratio, M{sub *}/M{sub bary}. Counter to expectations, we rule out a metallicity that is proportional to M{sub *}/M{sub bary}, where the best fit has the gas-phase metallicity decreasing with M{sub *}/M{sub bary}, or the metallicity of the gas plus the stars being independent of M{sub *}/M{sub bary}. This implies that the population of stars responsible for the metals is largely proportional to the total baryonic mass of the cluster, not to the galaxy mass within the cluster. If generally applicable, most of the heavy elements in the universe were not produced within galaxies.

  12. Integrated spectral properties of 22 small angular diameter galactic open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Bica, E.

    2007-10-01

    Aims:Flux-calibrated integrated spectra of a sample of 22 Galactic open clusters of small angular diameter are presented. With one exception (ESO 429-SC2), all objects have Galactic longitudes in the range 208° < l < 33°. The spectra cover the range ≈3600-6800 Å, with a resolution of ≈14 Å. The properties of the present cluster sample are compared with those of well-studied clusters located in two 90° sectors, centred at l = 257° and l = 347°. The dissolution rate of Galactic open clusters in these two sectors is examined. Methods: Using the equivalent widths of the Balmer lines and comparing line intensities and continuum distribution of the cluster spectra with those of template cluster spectra with known properties, we derive both foreground reddening values and ages. Thus, we provide information independent of that determined through colour-magnitude diagrams. Results: The derived E(B-V) values for the whole sample vary from 0.0 in ESO 445-SC74 to 1.90 in Pismis 24, while the ages range from ~3 Myr (NGC 6604 and BH 151) to ~3.5 Gyr (Ruprecht 2). For six clusters (Dolidze 34, ESO 429-SC2, ESO 445-SC74, Ruprecht 2, BH 151 and Hogg 9) the foreground E(B-V) colour excesses and ages are determined for the first time. The results obtained for the remaining clusters show, in general terms, good agreement with previous photometric results. Conclusions: The age and reddening distributions of the present sample match those of known clusters in the two selected Galactic sectors. The present results would favour a major dissolution rate of star clusters in these two sectors. Two new solar-metallicity templates are defined corresponding to the age groups of (4-5) Myr and 30 Myr among those of Piatti et al. (2002, MNRAS, 335, 233). The Piatti et al. templates of 20 Myr and (3-4) Gyr are here redefined. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y T

  13. The Stellar Cusp in the Galactic Center: Three-Dimensional Orbits of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Samantha; Ghez, Andrea M.; Boehle, Anna; Yelda, Sylvana; Sitarski, Breann; Witzel, Gunther; Do, Tuan; Lu, Jessica R.; Morris, Mark; Becklin, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    We present new findings from our long term study of the nuclear star cluster around the Galaxy's central supermassive blackhole (SMBH). Measurements where made using speckle and laser guided adaptive optics imaging and integral field spectroscopy on the Keck telescopes. We report 13 new measurable accelerating sources around the SMBH, down to ~17 mag in K band, only 4 of which are known to be young stars, the rest are either known to be old stars or have yet to be spectral typed. Thus we more than double the number of measured accelerations for the known old stars and unknown spectral type population (increasing the number from 6 to 15). Previous observations suggest a flat density profile of late-type stars, contrary to the theorized Bahcall-Wolf cusp (Bahcall & Wolf 1976, 1977; Buchholz et al. 2009; Do et al. 2009; Bartko et al. 2010). With three-dimensional orbits of significantly accelerating sources, we will be able to better characterize the stellar cusp in the Galactic center, including the slope of the stellar density profile.

  14. Open and Globular Cluster Distances for Extragalactic, Galactic, and Stellar Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthey, Guy S.

    2004-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of SIM's few-milliarcsecond astrometric precision is its ability to obtain accurate parallax measurements across more than half of the Galaxy. The "open and globular" project obtains parallax distances to a set of star clusters. One important, goal is to pinpoint the zeropoint of the distance scale for main-sequence fitting. Another goal is to improve stellar evolutionary isochrones and integrated light models. Another goal is to use the clusters themselves to address unsolved problems of late-stage stellar evolution and Galactic and extragalactic chemical evolution. The clusters to be observed are chosen to span the widest possible range of abundance and age, to be as rich as possible, and to be as well-studied as possible.

  15. GSFC Contributions to the NATO X-ray Astronomy Institute, Erice, July 1979. [X-ray spectra of supernova remants, galactic X-ray sources, active galactic nuclei, and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of X-ray astronomical spectroscopy in general is presented and results obtained by HEAO 1 and 2 as well as earlier spacecraft are examined. Particular emphasis is given to the spectra of supernova remnants; galactic binary X-ray sources, cataclysmic variables, bulges, pulsars, and stars; the active nuclei of Seyfert 1 galaxy, BL Lac, and quasars; the diffuse X-ray background; and galactic clusters.

  16. Radial variation in the stellar mass functions of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2016-12-01

    A number of recent observational studies of Galactic globular clusters have measured the variation in the slope of a cluster's stellar mass function α with clustercentric distance r. In order to gather a deeper understanding of the information contained in such observations, we have explored the evolution of α(r) for star clusters with a variety of initial conditions using a large suite of N-body simulations. We have specifically studied how the time evolution of α(r) is affected by initial size, mass, binary fraction, primordial mass segregation, black hole retention, an external tidal field, and the initial mass function itself. Previous studies have shown that the evolution of αG is closely related to the amount of mass-loss suffered by a cluster. Hence, for each simulation, we have also followed the evolution of the slope of the cluster's global stellar mass function, αG, and have shown that clusters follow a well-defined track in the αG-dα(r)/d(ln(r/rm)) plane. The location of a cluster on the αG-dα(r)/d(ln(r/rm)) plane can therefore constrain its dynamical history and, in particular, constrain possible variations in the stellar initial mass function. The αG-dα(r)/d(ln(r/rm)) plane thus serves as a key tool for fully exploiting the information contained in wide-field studies of cluster stellar mass functions.

  17. Towards Realistic Modeling of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, O.; Li, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation are rapidly advancing towards smaller scales. Current models can now resolve giant molecular clouds in galaxies and predict basic properties of star clusters forming within them. I will describe new theoretical simulations of the formation of the Milky Way throughout cosmic time, with the adaptive mesh refinement code ART. However, many challenges - physical and numerical - still remain. I will discuss how observations of massive star clusters and star forming regions can help us overcome some of them. Video of the talk is available at https://goo.gl/ZoZOfX

  18. Evolution of star cluster systems in isolated galaxies: first results from direct N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, L. J.; Bekki, K.; Hurley, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    The evolution of star clusters is largely affected by the tidal field generated by the host galaxy. It is thus in principle expected that under the assumption of a `universal' initial cluster mass function the properties of the evolved present-day mass function of star cluster systems should show a dependence on the properties of the galactic environment in which they evolve. To explore this expectation, a sophisticated model of the tidal field is required in order to study the evolution of star cluster systems in realistic galaxies. Along these lines, in this work we first describe a method developed for coupling N-body simulations of galaxies and star clusters. We then generate a data base of galaxy models along the Hubble sequence and calibrate evolutionary equations to the results of direct N-body simulations of star clusters in order to predict the clusters' mass evolution as function of the galactic environment. We finally apply our methods to explore the properties of evolved `universal' initial cluster mass functions and any dependence on the host galaxy morphology and mass distribution. The preliminary results show that an initial power-law distribution of the masses `universally' evolves into a lognormal distribution, with the properties correlated with the stellar mass and stellar mass density of the host galaxy.

  19. Near-infrared spectroscopy of candidate red supergiant stars in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, Maria; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Menten, Karl M.; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2014-11-01

    Context. Clear identifications of Galactic young stellar clusters farther than a few kpc from the Sun are rare, despite the large number of candidate clusters. Aims: We aim to improve the selection of candidate clusters rich in massive stars with a multiwavelength analysis of photometric Galactic data that range from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths. Methods: We present a photometric and spectroscopic analysis of five candidate stellar clusters, which were selected as overdensities with bright stars (Ks< 7 mag) in GLIMPSE and 2MASS images. Results: A total of 48 infrared spectra were obtained. The combination of photometry and spectroscopy yielded six new red supergiant stars with masses from 10 M⊙ to 15 M⊙. Two red supergiants are located at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (16.°7, -0.°63) and at a distance of about ~3.9 kpc; four other red supergiants are members of a cluster at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (49.°3, + 0.°72) and at a distance of ~7.0 kpc. Conclusions: Spectroscopic analysis of the brightest stars of detected overdensities and studies of interstellar extinction along their line of sights are fundamental to distinguish regions of low extinction from actual stellar clusters. The census of young star clusters containing red supergiants is incomplete; in the existing all-sky near-infrared surveys, they can be identified as overdensities of bright stars with infrared color-magnitude diagrams characterized by gaps. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (ESO Programme 60.A-9700(E), and 089.D-0876), and on observations collected at the UKIRT telescope (programme ID H243NS).MM is currently employed by the MPIfR. Part of this work was performed at RIT (2009), at ESA (2010), and at the MPIfR.Tables 3, 4, and 6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic globular clusters - IX. The Atlas of multiple stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, A. P.; Piotto, G.; Renzini, A.; Marino, A. F.; Bedin, L. R.; Vesperini, E.; D'Antona, F.; Nardiello, D.; Anderson, J.; King, I. R.; Yong, D.; Bellini, A.; Aparicio, A.; Barbuy, B.; Brown, T. M.; Cassisi, S.; Ortolani, S.; Salaris, M.; Sarajedini, A.; van der Marel, R. P.

    2017-01-01

    We use high-precision photometry of red-giant-branch (RGB) stars in 57 Galactic globular clusters (GCs), mostly from the `Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV Legacy Survey of Galactic GCs', to identify and characterize their multiple stellar populations. For each cluster the pseudo-two-colour diagram (or `chromosome map') is presented, built with a suitable combination of stellar magnitudes in the F275W, F336W, F438W, and F814W filters that maximizes the separation between multiple populations. In the chromosome map of most GCs (type-I clusters), stars separate in two distinct groups that we identify with the first (1G) and the second generation (2G). This identification is further supported by noticing that 1G stars have primordial (oxygen-rich, sodium-poor) chemical composition, whereas 2G stars are enhanced in sodium and depleted in oxygen. This 1G-2G separation is not possible for a few GCs where the two sequences have apparently merged into an extended, continuous sequence. In some GCs (type-II clusters) the 1G and/or the 2G sequences appear to be split, hence displaying more complex chromosome maps. These clusters exhibit multiple subgiant branches (SGBs) also in purely optical colour-magnitude diagrams, with the fainter SGB joining into a red RGB which is populated by stars with enhanced heavy-element abundance. We measure the RGB width by using appropriate colours and pseudo-colours. When the metallicity dependence is removed, the RGB width correlates with the cluster mass. The fraction of 1G stars ranges from ˜8 per cent to ˜67 per cent and anticorrelates with the cluster mass, indicating that incidence and complexity of the multiple population phenomenon both increase with cluster mass.

  1. Structural and Dynamical Properties of 29 Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Young-Jong; Chun, Mun-Suk; Yim, Hong-Suh; Byun, Yong-Ik

    1997-12-01

    We use B band CCD images to investigate the surface brightness distributions and dynamical properties of 29 Galactic globular clusters. Model fits suggest that 22 clusters show King type surface brightness profiles, while 7 clusters are characterized by power law cusp profiles. For the King type clusters, concentration parameters (c = log(rt =rc)) range from 1.20 to 2.10, and core radii are 0.4 to 1.9 pc. The mean value of power law slopes of 7 cuspy clusters was estimated as ¥á = 1.011 +/- 0.065. Total masses of King type globular clusters are in the range of 1.7 x 104M to 1.0 x 106M with a mean of 1.7 x 105M . A significant positive correlation between mass and mass-to-light ratio of King type globular clusters has been confirmed with a Pearson's correlation coefficient r = 0.52 and a confidence level of 99%. Our data also confirm a linear relation between total mass and absolute magnitude of King type globular clusters.

  2. The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS): new results from the southern stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sota, A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Barbá, R. H.; Walborn, N. R.; Alfaro, E. J.; Gamen, R. C.; Morrell, N. I.; Arias, J. I.; Penadés Ordaz, M.

    2013-05-01

    The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS) is a project that will observe all known Galactic O stars with B < 14 in the blue-violet part of the spectrum with R ˜ 3000. It is based on v2.0 of the the most complete Galactic O star catalog with accurate spectral types (Maíz Apellániz et al. 2004, ApJS, 151, 103; Sota et al. 2008, RevMexAA Conf. Series, 33, 55) that we have recently compiled. We have completed the first part of the main project and recently published the first articles (Walborn et al. 2010, ApJ, 711, 143; Walborn et al. 2011, AJ, 142, 150; Sota et al. 2011, ApJS, 193, 24). GOSSS is part of a bigger project with the next companion surveys: High resolution spectroscopic surveys: OWN, IACOB, IACOB-sweG, NoMaDS, CAFÉ-BEANS High resolution imaging surveys: Astralux, Astralux Sur.

  3. The Hierarchical Distribution of the Young Stellar Clusters in Six Local Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasha, K.; Calzetti, D.; Adamo, A.; Kim, H.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Dale, D. A.; Fumagalli, M.; Grebel, E. K.; Johnson, K. E.; Kahre, L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Messa, M.; Pellerin, A.; Ryon, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Shabani, F.; Thilker, D.; Ubeda, L.

    2017-05-01

    We present a study of the hierarchical clustering of the young stellar clusters in six local (3-15 Mpc) star-forming galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope broadband WFC3/UVIS UV and optical images from the Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey). We identified 3685 likely clusters and associations, each visually classified by their morphology, and we use the angular two-point correlation function to study the clustering of these stellar systems. We find that the spatial distribution of the young clusters and associations are clustered with respect to each other, forming large, unbound hierarchical star-forming complexes that are in general very young. The strength of the clustering decreases with increasing age of the star clusters and stellar associations, becoming more homogeneously distributed after ˜40-60 Myr and on scales larger than a few hundred parsecs. In all galaxies, the associations exhibit a global behavior that is distinct and more strongly correlated from compact clusters. Thus, populations of clusters are more evolved than associations in terms of their spatial distribution, traveling significantly from their birth site within a few tens of Myr, whereas associations show evidence of disruption occurring very quickly after their formation. The clustering of the stellar systems resembles that of a turbulent interstellar medium that drives the star formation process, correlating the components in unbound star-forming complexes in a hierarchical manner, dispersing shortly after formation, suggestive of a single, continuous mode of star formation across all galaxies.

  4. Scaling Relations of Galactic Winds with Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Ryan; Cecil, Gerald; Heitsch, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    The galactic scale outflows generated by nuclear starbursts consist of a multiphase medium where each phase has a distinct velocity depending on the characteristics of the starburst. Using synthetic absorption lines generated from 3D hydrodynamical simulations we probe the outflow velocity of the hot, warm, and neutral gas entrained in a galactic wind. By varying the star formation rate (SFR) in our simulations, we find no correlation between the outflow velocity of the hot gas with the SFR, but we do find a correlation between the outflow velocity of both warm and neutral gas with the SFR. The scaling relation between outflow velocity and SFR only holds for low SFR until the scaling relation abruptly flattens at a SFR determined by the mass loading of the starburst. The outflow velocity of the hot gas only depends on the mass loading of the starburst and not the SFR. For low SFRs the difference between the velocity of cold gas, as measured by absorption lines of neutral or low ionized gas, may be 5-7 times lower than the velocity of the hot, highly ionized gas. The difference in velocity between the cold and hot gas for higher SFRs depends on the mass loading factor of the starburst. Thus the measured velocities of neutral or low ionized gas cannot be used to estimate the outflow velocity of the hot gas without determining the mass loading of the starburst.

  5. NuSTAR monitoring of the Galactic center diffuse emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavel, Maïca; Krivonos, Roman; Mori, Kaya; Tomsick, John; Zhang, Shuo

    2017-08-01

    Over the past two decades, the intense X-ray monitoring of the Molecular clouds in the inner region of our Galaxy has revealed a large number of reflection features, characterized by both a strong iron line at 6.4keV and associated non-thermal continuum emission. The correlated variations of these structures observed within the whole central molecular zone, along with their surface brightness, are strong evidence that a significant fraction of this diffuse emission is created by past outbursts from the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center, Sagittarius A*. The variability and the intensity of the fluorescent iron line derived from XMM-Newton and Chandra campaigns have demonstrated that the past events were short (few-year duration) but intense (more than 1039 erg/s in luminosity). However, reconstructing the detailed properties of these past events is not straightforward since it also depends on the density and the line of sight distances of the reflecting clouds, which are poorly known. By better constraining the diffuse continuum emission up to several tens of keV, NuSTAR now provides spectral information needed to better understand both the spectral shape of the emission produced during these past events and the geometry of the reflecting clouds. I will present the up-to-date NuSTAR results on the past activity of Sgr A*, including a detailed comparison of the latest 2016 deep observation with the original 2012 survey of the Galactic center and a complete spectral analysis of the Arches cloud and of an other key cloud which has been brightening.

  6. Ruprecht 3: An old star cluster remnant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavani, D. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2003-02-01

    2MASS J and H photometry and integrated spectroscopy are employed to study the nature of the poorly populated compact concentration of stars Ruprecht 3, which was previously catalogued as an open cluster. The integrated spectrum remarkably resembles that of a moderately metal-rich globular cluster. The distribution of the object stars in the colour-magnitude diagram is compatible with that of a 1.5 +/- 0.5 Gyr open cluster or older, depending on whether the bluer stars are interpreted as turnoff stars or blue stragglers, respectively. We derive for the object a distance from the Sun dsun = 0.72 +0.04-0.03 kpc and a colour excess E(B-V) = 0.04. Although a globular cluster remnant cannot be ruled out, the integrated spectrum resemblance to that of a globular cluster probably reflects a stochastic effect owing to the few brighter stars. The structural and photometric properties of Ruprecht 3 are compatible with what would be expected for an intermediate-age open cluster remnant. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  7. Rotation in young massive star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela

    2017-05-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of turbulent molecular clouds show that star clusters form from the hierarchical merger of several sub-clumps. We run smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations of turbulence-supported molecular clouds with mass ranging from 1700 to 43 000 M⊙. We study the kinematic evolution of the main cluster that forms in each cloud. We find that the parent gas acquires significant rotation, because of large-scale torques during the process of hierarchical assembly. The stellar component of the embedded star cluster inherits the rotation signature from the parent gas. Only star clusters with final mass < few × 100 M⊙ do not show any clear indication of rotation. Our simulated star clusters have high ellipticity (˜0.4-0.5 at t = 4 Myr) and are subvirial (Qvir ≲ 0.4). The signature of rotation is stronger than radial motions due to subvirial collapse. Our results suggest that rotation is common in embedded massive (≳1000 M⊙) star clusters. This might provide a key observational test for the hierarchical assembly scenario.

  8. Chemical Compositions of Stars in Globular Cluster NGC 2419

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Shimonee; Smecker-Hane, T.; Bosler, T.

    2007-05-01

    We determine the chemical abundances of 19 red giant branch stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2419. Lying at a distance of 84.2 kpc and a galactocentric distance of 91.5 kpc, NGC 2419 is the fourth brightest globular cluster in the Milky Way with a total magnitude of M_V = -9.6 mag, which is significantly brighter than M_V = -7.5 mag, the typical peak of the globular cluster luminosity functions in external galaxies. Our results will give an insight of whether NGC 2419 is in fact a globular cluster or a core of a disrupted galaxy that merged with the Milky Way. We have used IRAF to reduce spectra we have taken with the DEIMOS spectrograph on the the Keck I 10-meter telescope. Using the strengths of the Ca II triplet absorption lines at approximately 8600 Angstrom, we will determine the chemical abundance of each star. If the chemical abundances differ by significantly more than the observational errors would predict then we can conclude the cluster is a remnant of the core of a galaxy that merged with the Milky Way and not a normal globular cluster, because most globular clusters formed quickly from a well mixed gas cloud, and thus their stars have nearly identical ages and chemical compositions. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from a UROP grant to SK and NSF grant AST-0307863 to TSH. These data were obtained at the Keck Observatory, operated by the California Inst. of Technology, Univ. of California and NASA and made possible by generous financial support from the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  9. Ages of Extragalactic Intermediate-Age Star Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    A dating technique for faint, distant star clusters observable in the local group of galaxies with the space telescope is discussed. Color-magnitude diagrams of Magellanic Cloud clusters are mentioned along with the metallicity of star clusters.

  10. A photoelectric investigation of Ap-stars in open clusters. II - NGC 6475

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitzen, H. M.; Floquet, M.

    1981-07-01

    Results are presented of photoelectric study of Ap stars in the old galactic cluster NGC 6475. Photometry was obtained in the y, g1 and g2 filters at the 50-cm ESO telescope on La Silla. Observations confirm the presence of the three silicon stars found by Abt (1975) (K 88, 55 and 59) and reveal the Ap nature of two additional stars, K 23 and K 14. A b-y reddening value of 0.050 is obtained which is somewhat lower than that found by Snowden (1976), due to evolutionary effects and the calibration used. In addition, virtually no variable reddening in the cluster is observed.

  11. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In this program we proposed to perform a series of spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and to take advantage of other spectroscopic databases including the first results from SIRTF. Our emphasis has been on star formation in external, bright IR galaxies, but other areas of research have included young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star formation regions, and the galactic center. The OH lines in the far infrared were proposed as one key focus of this inquiry, because the Principal Investigator (H. Smith) had a full set of OH IR lines from IS0 observations. It was planned that during the proposed 2-1/2 year timeframe of the proposal other data (including perhaps from SIRTF) would become available, and we intended to be responsive to these and other such spectroscopic data sets. The program has the following goals: 1) Refine the data analysis of IS0 observations to obtain deeper and better SNR results on selected sources. The IS0 data itself underwent pipeline 10 reductions in early 2001, and the more 'hands-on data reduction packages' have been released. The IS0 Fabry-Perot database is particularly sensitive to noise and can have slight calibration errors, and improvements are anticipated. We plan to build on these deep analysis tools and contribute to their development. Model the atomic and molecular line shapes, in particular the OH lines, using revised montecarlo techniques developed by the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) team at the Center for Astrophysics. 2) 3) Use newly acquired space-based SIRTF or SOFIA spectroscopic data as they become available, and contribute to these observing programs as appropriate. 4) Attend scientific meetings and workshops. 5) E&PO activities, especially as related to infrared astrophysics and

  12. Cluster of Stars in Kepler Sight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-16

    This image zooms into a small portion of NASA Kepler full field of view, an expansive, 100-square-degree patch of sky in our Milky Way galaxy. An eight-billion-year-old cluster of stars 13,000 light-years from Earth, called NGC 6791, can be seen in the image. Clusters are families of stars that form together out of the same gas cloud. This particular cluster is called an open cluster, because the stars are loosely bound and have started to spread out from each other. The area pictured is 0.2 percent of Kepler's full field of view, and shows hundreds of stars in the constellation Lyra. The image has been color-coded so that brighter stars appear white, and fainter stars, red. It is a 60-second exposure, taken on April 8, 2009, one day after the spacecraft's dust cover was jettisoned. Kepler was designed to hunt for planets like Earth. The mission will spend the next three-and-a-half years staring at the same stars, looking for periodic dips in brightness. Such dips occur when planets cross in front of their stars from our point of view in the galaxy, partially blocking the starlight. To achieve the level of precision needed to spot planets as small as Earth, Kepler's images are intentionally blurred slightly. This minimizes the number of saturated stars. Saturation, or "blooming," occurs when the brightest stars overload the individual pixels in the detectors, causing the signal to spill out into nearby pixels. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11986

  13. The bound fraction of young star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Nina; Banerjee, Sambaran; Motwani, Bhawna; Kroupa, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    Context. The residual gas within newly formed star clusters is expelled through stellar feedback on timescales ≲ 1 Myr. The subsequent expansion of the cluster results in an unbinding of a fraction of stars, before the remaining cluster members can re-virialize and form a surviving cluster. Aims: We investigate the bound fraction after gas expulsion as a function of initial cluster mass in stars Mecl and gauge the influence of primordial mass segregation, stellar evolution and the tidal field at solar distance. We also assess the impact of the star-formation efficiency ɛSFE and gas expulsion velocity vg. Methods: We perform N-body simulations using Sverre Aarseth's NBODY7 code, starting with compact clusters in their embedded phase and approximate the gas expulsion by means of an exponentially depleting external gravitational field. We follow the process of re-virialization through detailed monitoring of different Lagrange radii over several Myr, examining initial half-mass radii of 0.1 pc, 0.3 pc and 0.5 pc and Mecl usually ranging from 5 × 103M⊙ to 5 × 104M⊙. Results: The strong impact of the relation between the gas expulsion timescale and the crossing time means that clusters with the same initial core density can have very different bound fractions. The adopted ɛSFE = 0.33 in the cluster volume results in a distinct sensitivity to vg over a wide mass range, while a variation of ɛSFE can make the cluster robust to the rapidly decreasing external potential. We confirm that primordial mass segregation leads to a smaller bound fraction, its influence possibly decreasing with mass. Stellar evolution has a higher impact on lower mass clusters, but heating through dynamical friction could expand the cluster to a similar extent. The examined clusters expand well within their tidal radii and would survive gas expulsion even in a strong tidal field.

  14. Featured Image: Star Clusters in M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    This beautiful mosaic of images of the Whirlpool galaxy (M51) and its companion was taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This nearby, grand-design spiral galaxy has a rich population of star clusters, making it both a stunning target for imagery and an excellent resource for learning about stellar formation and evolution. In a recent study, Rupali Chandar (University of Toledo) and collaborators cataloged over 3,800 compact star clusters within this galaxy. They then used this catalog to determine the distributions for the clusters ages, masses, and sizes, which can provide important clues as to how star clusters form, evolve, and are eventually disrupted. You can read more about their study and what they discovered in the paper below.CitationRupali Chandar et al 2016 ApJ 824 71. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/824/2/71

  15. INITIAL SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Kim, Juhan

    2013-01-10

    Despite the importance of their size evolution in understanding the dynamical evolution of globular clusters (GCs) of the Milky Way, studies that focus specifically on this issue are rare. Based on the advanced, realistic Fokker-Planck (FP) approach, we theoretically predict the initial size distribution (SD) of the Galactic GCs along with their initial mass function and radial distribution. Over one thousand FP calculations in a wide parameter space have pinpointed the best-fit initial conditions for the SD, mass function, and radial distribution. Our best-fit model shows that the initial SD of the Galactic GCs is of larger dispersion than today's SD, and that the typical projected half-light radius of the initial GCs is {approx}4.6 pc, which is 1.8 times larger than that of the present-day GCs ({approx}2.5 pc). Their large size signifies greater susceptibility to the Galactic tides: the total mass of destroyed GCs reaches 3-5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun }, several times larger than previous estimates. Our result challenges a recent view that the Milky Way GCs were born compact on the sub-pc scale, and rather implies that (1) the initial GCs were generally larger than the typical size of the present-day GCs, (2) the initially large GCs mostly shrank and/or disrupted as a result of the galactic tides, and (3) the initially small GCs expanded by two-body relaxation, and later shrank by the galactic tides.

  16. Deriving physical parameters of unresolved star clusters. V. M 31 PHAT star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meulenaer, P.; Stonkutė, R.; Vansevičius, V.

    2017-06-01

    Context. This study is the fifth of a series that investigates the degeneracy and stochasticity problems present in the determination of physical parameters such as age, mass, extinction, and metallicity of partially resolved or unresolved star cluster populations in external galaxies when using HST broad-band photometry. Aims: In this work we aim to derive parameters of star clusters using models with fixed and free metallicity based on the HST WFC3+ACS photometric system. The method is applied to derive parameters of a subsample of 1363 star clusters in the Andromeda galaxy observed with the HST. Methods: Following Paper III, we derive the star cluster parameters using a large grid of stochastic models that are compared to the six observed integrated broad-band WFC3+ACS magnitudes of star clusters. Results: We show that the age, mass, and extinction of the M 31 star clusters, derived assuming fixed solar metallicity, are in agreement with previous studies. We also demonstrate the ability of the WFC3+ACS photometric system to derive metallicity of star clusters older than 1 Gyr. We show that the metallicity derived using broad-band photometry of 36 massive M 31 star clusters is in good agreement with the metallicity derived using spectroscopy. Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/602/A112

  17. On the rotation of nuclear star clusters formed by cluster inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsatsi, Athanasia; Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; van de Ven, Glenn; Perets, Hagai B.; Bianchini, Paolo; Neumayer, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are commonly observed in the centres of most galactic nuclei, including our own Milky Way (MW). While their study can reveal important information about the build-up of the innermost regions of galaxies, the physical processes that regulate their formation are still poorly understood. NSCs might have been formed through gas infall and subsequent in situ star formation, and/or through the infall and merging of multiple star clusters into the centre of the galaxy. Here, we investigate the viability of the latter, by studying direct N-body simulations of inspiralling clusters to the centre of an MW-like nuclear bulge that hosts a massive black hole. We find that the NSC formed through this process can show both morphological and kinematical properties that make it comparable with observations of the MW NSC, including significant rotation - a fact that has so far been attributed mainly to gas infall. We explore its kinematic evolution to see if and how the merger history can imprint fossil records on its dynamical structure. Moreover, we study the effect of stellar foreground contamination in the line-of-sight kinematics of the NSC. Our study shows that no fine tuning of the orientation of the infalling globular clusters is necessary to result in a rotating NSC. We suggest that cluster inspiral is a viable mechanism for the formation of rotating NSCs.

  18. Star formation in accretion discs: from the Galactic center to active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, S.; Zahn, J.-P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Keplerian accretion discs around massive black holes (MBHs) are gravitationally unstable beyond a few hundredths of a parsec, and they should collapse to form stars. It has indeed been shown recently that an accretion/star formation episode took place a few million years ago in the Galactic center (GC). This raises the question of how the disc can survive in AGN and quasars and continue to transport matter towards the black hole. Aims: We study the accretion/star formation process in quasars and AGN with one aim in mind: to show that a spectrum similar to the observed one can be produced by the disc. Methods: We compute models of stationary accretion discs that are either continuous or clumpy. Continuous discs must be maintained in a state of marginal stability so that the rate of star formation remains modest and the disc is not immediately destroyed. The disc then requires additional heating and additional transport of angular momentum. In clumpy discs, the momentum transport is provided by cloud interactions. Results: Non-viscous heating can be provided by stellar illumination, but in the case of continuous discs, even momentum transport by supernovae is insufficient for sustaining a marginal state, except at the very periphery of the disc. In clumpy discs it is possible to account for the required accretion rate through interactions between clouds, but this model is unsatisfactory because its parameters are tightly constrained without any physical justification. Conclusions: Finally one must appeal to non-stationary discs with intermittent accretion episodes like those that occurred in the GC, but such a model is probably not applicable either to luminous high redshift quasars or to radio-loud quasars.

  19. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  20. Ancient Black Hole Speeds Through Sun's Galactic Neighborhood, Devouring Companion Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope have found an ancient black hole speeding through the Sun's Galactic neighborhood, devouring a small companion star as the pair travels in an eccentric orbit looping to the outer reaches of our Milky Way Galaxy. The scientists believe the black hole is the remnant of a massive star that lived out its brief life billions of years ago and later was gravitationally kicked from its home star cluster to wander the Galaxy with its companion. "This discovery is the first step toward filling in a missing chapter in the history of our Galaxy," said Felix Mirabel, an astrophysicist at the Institute for Astronomy and Space Physics of Argentina and French Atomic Energy Commission. "We believe that hundreds of thousands of very massive stars formed early in the history of our Galaxy, but this is the first black hole remnant of one of those huge primeval stars that we've found." "This also is the first time that a black hole's motion through space has been measured," Mirabel added. A black hole is a dense concentration of mass with a gravitational pull so strong that not even light can escape it. The research is reported in the Sept. 13 issue of the scientific journal Nature. XTE J1118+480 The object is called XTE J1118+480 and was discovered by the Rossi X-Ray satellite on March 29, 2000. Later observations with optical and radio telescopes showed that it is about 6,000 light-years from Earth and that it is a "microquasar" in which material sucked by the black hole from its companion star forms a hot, spinning disk that spits out "jets" of subatomic particles that emit radio waves. Most of the stars in our Milky Way Galaxy are within a thin disk, called the plane of the Galaxy. However, there also are globular clusters, each containing hundreds of thousands of the oldest stars in the Galaxy which orbit the Galaxy's center in paths that take them far from the Galaxy's plane. XTE J

  1. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE ANTICORRELATIONS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER STARS: THE EFFECT ON CLUSTER INTEGRATED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, P.; Percival, S. M.; Salaris, M. E-mail: smp@astro.livjm.ac.uk

    2011-06-10

    It is widely accepted that individual Galactic globular clusters harbor two coeval generations of stars, the first one born with the 'standard' {alpha}-enhanced metal mixture observed in field halo objects and the second one characterized by an anticorrelated CNONa abundance pattern overimposed on the first generation, {alpha}-enhanced metal mixture. We have investigated with appropriate stellar population synthesis models how this second generation of stars affects the integrated spectrum of a typical metal-rich Galactic globular cluster, like 47 Tuc, focusing our analysis on the widely used Lick-type indices. We find that the only indices appreciably affected by the abundance anticorrelations are Ca4227, G4300, CN{sub 1}, CN{sub 2}, and NaD. The age-sensitive Balmer line, Fe line, and the [MgFe] indices widely used to determine age, Fe, and total metallicity of extragalactic systems are largely insensitive to the second generation population. Enhanced He in second generation stars affects also the Balmer line indices of the integrated spectra, through the change of the turnoff temperature and-with the assumption that the mass-loss history of both stellar generations is the same-the horizontal branch morphology of the underlying isochrones.

  2. A star cluster at the edge of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.

    2007-03-01

    Context: This paper is part of our ongoing study of star formation in the (far-) outer Galaxy. Aims: Our goal in this paper is to study stars and molecular gas in the direction of IRAS 06145+1455 (WB89-789). The kinematic distance of the associated molecular cloud is 11.9 kpc. With a galactocentric distance of ~ 20.2 kpc, this object is at the edge of the (molecular) disk of the Galaxy. Methods: We use near-IR (J, H, K), molecular line-, and dust continuum observations. Results: The near-IR data show the presence of an (embedded) cluster of about 60 stars, with a radius ˜ 1.3 pc and an average stellar surface density ~ 12 pc-2. We find at least 14 stars with NIR-excess, 3 of which are possibly Class I objects. The cluster is embedded in a ˜ 1000 M⊙ molecular/dust core, from which a molecular outflow originates. The temperature of most of the outflowing gas is ⪉ 40 K, and the total mass of the swept-up material is ⪉ 10 M⊙. Near the center of the flow, indications of much higher temperatures are found, probably due to shocks. A spectrum taken of one of the probable cluster members shows a tentative likeness to that of a K3 III-star (with an age of at least 20 Myr). If correct, this would confirm the kinematic distance. Conclusions: .This cluster is the furthest one from the Galactic center yet detected. The combination of old and recent activity implies that star formation has been going on for at least 20 Myr, which is difficult to understand considering the location of this object, where external triggers are either absent or weak, compared to the inner Galaxy. This suggests that once star formation is occurring, later generations of stars may form through the effect of the first generation of stars on the (remnants of) the original molecular cloud. Partly based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile. Table 4 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. The Evolutionary Status of Be Stars: Results from a Photometric Study of Southern Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSwain, M. Virginia; Gies, Douglas R.

    2005-11-01

    Be stars are a class of rapidly rotating B stars with circumstellar disks that cause Balmer and other line emission. There are three possible reasons for the rapid rotation of Be stars: they may have been born as rapid rotators, spun up by binary mass transfer, or spun up during the main-sequence (MS) evolution of B stars. To test the various formation scenarios, we have conducted a photometric survey of 55 open clusters in the southern sky. Of these, five clusters are probably not physically associated groups and our results for two other clusters are not reliable, but we identify 52 definite Be stars and an additional 129 Be candidates in the remaining clusters. We use our results to examine the age and evolutionary dependence of the Be phenomenon. We find an overall increase in the fraction of Be stars with age until 100 Myr, and Be stars are most common among the brightest, most massive B-type stars above the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS). We show that a spin-up phase at the terminal-age main sequence (TAMS) cannot produce the observed distribution of Be stars, but up to 73% of the Be stars detected may have been spun-up by binary mass transfer. Most of the remaining Be stars were likely rapid rotators at birth. Previous studies have suggested that low metallicity and high cluster density may also favor Be star formation. Our results indicate a possible increase in the fraction of Be stars with increasing cluster distance from the Galactic center (in environments of decreasing metallicity). However, the trend is not significant and could be ruled out due to the intrinsic scatter in our data. We also find no relationship between the fraction of Be stars and cluster density.

  4. Binary Black Holes from Dense Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Carl

    2017-01-01

    The recent detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes have the potential to revolutionize our understanding of compact object astrophysics. But to fully utilize this new window into the universe, we must compare these observations to detailed models of binary black hole formation throughout cosmic time. In this talk, I will review our current understanding of cluster dynamics, describing how binary black holes can be formed through gravitational interactions in dense stellar environments, such as globular clusters and galactic nuclei. I will review the properties and merger rates of binary black holes from the dynamical formation channel. Finally, I will describe how the spins of a binary black hole are determined by its formation history, and how we can use this to discriminate between dynamically-formed binaries and those formed from isolated evolution in galactic fields.

  5. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  6. RELATIVISTIC REDSHIFT EFFECTS AND THE GALACTIC-CENTER STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Angelil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit

    2010-03-01

    The high pericenter velocities (up to a few percent of light) of the S stars around the Galactic-center black hole suggest that general relativistic effects may be detectable through the time variation of the redshift during pericenter passage. Previous work has computed post-Newtonian perturbations to the stellar orbits. We study the additional redshift effects due to perturbations of the light path (what one may call 'post-Minkowskian' effects), a calculation that can be elegantly formulated as a boundary-value problem. The post-Newtonian and post-Minkowskian redshift effects are comparable: both are O(beta{sup 3}) and amount to a few km s{sup -1} at pericenter for the star S2. On the other hand, the post-Minkowskian redshift contribution of spin is O(beta{sup 5}) and much smaller than the O(beta{sup 4}) post-Newtonian effect, which would be {approx}0.1 km s{sup -1} for S2.

  7. Modeling mergers of known galactic systems of binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feo, Alessandra; De Pietri, Roberto; Maione, Francesco; Löffler, Frank

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of the merger of six different known galactic systems of binary neutron stars (BNS) of unequal mass with a mass ratio between 0.75 and 0.99. Specifically, these systems are J1756-2251, J0737-3039A, J1906  +  0746, B1534  +  12, J0453  +  1559 and B1913  +  16. We follow the dynamics of the merger from the late stage of the inspiral process up to  ∼20ms after the system has merged, either to form a hyper-massive neutron star (NS) or a rotating black hole (BH), using a semi-realistic equation of state (EOS), namely the seven-segment piece-wise polytropic SLy with a thermal component. For the most extreme of these systems (q  =  0.75, J0453  +  1559), we also investigate the effects of different EOSs: APR4, H4, and MS1. Our numerical simulations are performed using only publicly available open source code such as, the Einstein toolkit code deployed for the dynamical evolution and the LORENE code for the generation of the initial models. We show results on the gravitational wave signals, spectrogram and frequencies of the BNS after the merger and the BH properties in the two cases in which the system collapses within the simulated time.

  8. Quark-Cluster Stars: the Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xiaoyu; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    The nature of pulsar-like compact stars is still in controversy although the first pulsar was found more than 40 years ago. Generally speaking, conventional neutron stars and non-mainstream quark stars are two types of models to describe the inner structure of pulsars, with the former composed mainly of hadrons and the latter of a peculiar kind of matter whose state equation should be understood in the level of quarks rather than hadrons. To construct a more realistic model from both theoretical and observational points of view, we conjecture that pulsars could be "quark-cluster stars" which are composed of quark-clusters with almost equal numbers of up, down and strange quarks. Clustering quark matter could be the result of strong coupling between quarks inside realistic compact stars. The lightest quark clusters could be of H-dibaryons, while quark clusters could also be heavier with more quarks. Being essentially related to the non-perturbative quantum-chromo dynamics (QCD), the state of supra-nuclear condensed matter is really difficult to obtain strictly by only theoretical QCD-calculations, and we expect, nevertheless, that astrophysical observations could help us to have a final solution.

  9. Al-Sufi's Investigation of Stars, Star Clusters and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Ihsan; Stephenson, F. R.; Orchiston, W.

    2011-01-01

    The distinguished Arabic astronomer, Al-Sufi (AD 903-986) is justly famous for his Book of the Fixed Stars, an outstanding Medieval treatise on astronomy that was assembled in 964. Developed from Ptolemy's Algamest, but based upon al-Sufi's own stellar observations, the Book of the Fixed Stars has been copied down through the ages, and currently 35 copies are known to exist in various archival repositories around the world. Among other things, this major work contains 55 astronomical tables, plus star charts for 48 constellations. For the first time a long-overdue English translation of this important early work is in active preparation. In this paper we provide biographical material about Al-Sufi and the contents of his Book of the Fixed Stars, before examining his novel stellar magnitude system, and his listing of star clusters and nebulae (including the first-ever mention of the Great Nebula in Andromeda).

  10. The sub-galactic and nuclear main sequences for local star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragkoudakis, A.; Zezas, A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.

    2017-04-01

    We describe a sub-galactic main sequence (SGMS) relating star formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR) and stellar mass density (Σ⋆) for distinct regions within star-forming galaxies, including their nuclei. We use a sample of 246 nearby star-forming galaxies from the 'Star Formation Reference Survey and demonstrate that the SGMS holds down to ∼1 kpc scales with a slope of α = 0.91 and a dispersion of 0.31 dex, similar to the well-known main sequence (MS) measured for globally integrated SFRs and stellar masses. The SGMS slope depends on galaxy morphology, with late-type galaxies (Sc-Irr) having α = 0.97 and early-type spirals (Sa-Sbc) having α = 0.81. The SGMS constructed from subregions of individual galaxies has on average the same characteristics as the composite SGMS from all galaxies. The SGMS for galaxy nuclei shows a dispersion similar to that seen for other subregions. Sampling a limited range of SFR-M⋆ space may produce either sublinearity or superlinearity of the SGMS slope. For nearly all galaxies, both SFR and stellar mass peak in the nucleus, indicating that circumnuclear clusters are among the most actively star-forming regions in the galaxy and the most massive. The nuclear SFR also correlates with total galaxy mass, forming a distinct sequence from the standard MS of star formation. The nuclear MS will be useful for studying bulge growth and for characterizing feedback processes connecting AGN and star formation.

  11. The Galactic O-Star Spectral Survey (GOSSS) Project status and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sota, Alfredo; Maíz Apellániz, Jesús; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Walborn, Nolan R.; Alfaro, Emilio J.; Gamen, Roberto C.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Arias, Julia I.; Penadés Ordaz, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS) is a project that is observing all known Galactic O stars with B < 13 (˜2000 objects) in the blue-violet part of the spectrum with R˜2500. It also includes two companion surveys (a spectroscopic one at R˜1500 and a high resolution imaging one). It is based on v2.0 of the Galactic O star catalog (v1, Maíz-Apellániz et al. 2004; v2, Sota et al. 2008). We have completed the first part of the main project. Here we present results on the first 400 objects of the sample.

  12. Gamma-ray bursts from fast, galactic neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Leonard, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    What makes a Galactic model of gamma-ray bursts (GBs) feasible is the observation of a new population of objects, fast neutron stars, that are isotropic with respect to the galaxy following a finite period, {approx}30 My, after their formation (1). Our Galactic model for the isotropic component of GBs is based upon high-velocity neutron stars (NSs) that have accretion disks. These fast NSs are formed in tidally locked binaries, producing a unique population of high velocity ({approx_gt}10{sup 3} kms{sup -1}) and slowly rotating (8 s) NSs. Tidal locking occurs due to the meridional circulation caused by the conservation of angular momentum of the tidal lobes. Following the collapse to a NS and the explosion, these lobes initially perturb the NS in the direction of the companion. Subsequent accretion (1 to 2 s) occurs on the rear side of the initial motion, resulting in a runaway acceleration of the NS by neutrino emission from the hot accreted matter. The recoil momentum of the relativistic neutrino emission from the localized, down flowing matter far exceeds the momentum drag of the accreted matter. The recoil of the NS is oriented towards the companion, but the NS misses because of the pre-explosion orbital motion. The near miss captures matter from the companion and forms a disk around the NS. Accretion onto the NS from this initially gaseous disk due to the ``alpha`` viscosity results in a soft gamma-ray repeater phase, which lasts {approx}10{sup 4} yr. Later, after the neutron star has moved {approx}30 kpc from its birthplace, solid bodies form in the disk, and accrete to planetoid size bodies after {approx}3{times}10{sup 7} years. Some of these planetoid bodies, with a mass of {approx}10{sup 21}{endash}10{sup 22} g, are perturbed into an orbit inside the tidal distortion radius of {approx_gt}10{sup 5} km. Of these {approx}1% are captured by the magnetic field of the NS at R{lt}2{times}10{sup 3} km to create GBs.

  13. Formation of runaway stars in a star-cluster potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Taeho; Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Perna, Rosalba

    2017-09-01

    We study the formation of runaway stars due to binary-binary (2+2) interactions in young star-forming clusters and/or associations. This is done using a combination of analytic methods and numerical simulations of 2+2 scattering interactions, both in isolation and in a homogeneous background potential. We focus on interactions that produce two single stars and a binary, and study the outcomes as a function of the depth of the background potential, within a range typical of cluster cores. As reference parameters for the observational properties, we use those observed for the system of runaway stars AE Aur and μ Col and binary ι Ori. We find that the outcome fractions have no appreciable dependence on the depth of the potential, and neither do the velocities of the ejected single stars. However, as the potential gets deeper and a larger fraction of binaries remain trapped, two binary populations emerge, with the escaped component having higher speeds and shorter semimajor axes than the trapped one. Additionally, we find that the relative angles between the ejected products are generally large. In particular, the angle between the ejected fastest star and the escaped binary is typically ≳120°-135°, with a peak at around 160°. However, as the potential gets deeper, the angle distribution becomes broader. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the interpretation of the properties of the runaway stars AE Aur and μ Col.

  14. CN and CH Abundance Analysis in a Sample of Eight Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolinski, Jason P.; Lee, Y.; Beers, T. C.; Martell, S. L.; An, D.; Sivarani, T.

    2011-01-01

    Galactic globular clusters exhibit star-to-star variations in their light element abundances that are not predicted by formation and evolution models involving single stellar generations. Recently it has been suggested that internal pollution from early supernovae and AGB winds may have played important roles in forming a second generation of enriched stars. We present updated results of a CN and CH abundance analysis of stars from the base to the tip of the red giant branch, and in some cases down onto the main sequence, for eight globular clusters with available photometric and spectroscopic data from SDSS-I and SDSS-II/SEGUE. These results include a discussion of the radial distribution of CN enrichment and how this may impact the current paradigm. Funding for SDSS-I and SDSS-II has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Japanese Monbukagakusho, the Max Planck Society, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England. The SDSS Web Site is http://www.sdss.org/. This work was supported in part by grants PHY 02-16783 and PHY 08-22648: Physics Frontiers Center/Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), awarded by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  15. Young star clusters in circumnuclear starburst rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Ma, Chao; Jia, Siyao; Ho, Luis C.; Anders, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We analyse the cluster luminosity functions (CLFs) of the youngest star clusters in two galaxies exhibiting prominent circumnuclear starburst rings. We focus specifically on NGC 1512 and NGC 6951, for which we have access to Hα data that allow us to unambiguously identify the youngest sample clusters. To place our results on a firm statistical footing, we first explore in detail a number of important technical issues affecting the process from converting the observational data into the spectral energy distributions of the objects in our final catalogues. The CLFs of the young clusters in both galaxies exhibit approximate power-law behaviour down to the 90 per cent observational completeness limits, thus showing that star cluster formation in the violent environments of starburst rings appears to proceed similarly as that elsewhere in the local Universe. We discuss this result in the context of the density of the interstellar medium in our starburst-ring galaxies.

  16. Bibliographic compilation of NIR spectroscopy for stars in the Galactic O-Star Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Robledo, S.; Barbá, R.; Arias, J. I.; Morrell, N. I.

    We are carrying out a bibliographic compilation of near-infrared (NIR) (0.7 - 5.0 μm) spectroscopic studies available for stars in the Galactic O Star Catalog (GOSC, Maíz Apellániz et al. 2004). This compilation al- lows us to quantify the precise degree of knowledge about NIR spectral information for GOSC sources, such as band coverage, spectral resolution, equivalent-width measurements, etc. This bibliographic compilation has a clear next step toward the development of a new catalog of O-type stars observed only in the NIR, which will be annexed to the GOSC. In this poster paper we present preliminary results derived from a set of different attributes extracted from the retrieved papers.

  17. SETI in star clusters: a theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Fuente Marcos, R.; de La Fuente Marcos, C.

    2003-05-01

    For several decades, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) has proceeded using advanced astronomical techniques. Different strategies have been proposed for target selection for targeted searches with goals of improving the chances of successful detection of signals from technological civilizations that may inhabit planets around solar-type stars, and to minimize the chances of missing signals from unexpected sites. In this paper we demonstrate that these goals are best achieved by observing star clusters. We show that standard open clusters are not appropriate for SETI scans because their disruption time scale is shorter than the characteristic time scale for the development of a protective atmospheric layer on a habitable planet. However, the old open clusters, those older than some Gy are optimal candidates for SETI surveys as their ages are older than the likely time for intelligent civilizations to emerge and the probability of catastrophic orbital modification as a result of close encounters with other cluster stars is, in general, rather negligible. The final performance of the proposed survey can be significantly increased by using initially a radio telescope beam larger than the cluster apparent size so that the entire cluster can be observed simultaneously. Globular clusters are also good candidates from the statistical point of view but only if hypothetical civilizations located in these clusters have been able to develop astronomical engineering technologies or have been involved in (rather speculative) cosmic colonization.

  18. The dearth of nuclear star clusters in bright galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arca-Sedda, M.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Spera, M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the interaction of a massive globular cluster (GC) with a super massive black hole (SMBH), located at the centre of its host galaxy, by means of direct N-body simulations. The results show that tidal distortions induced by the stellar background and the SMBH act on a time shorter than that of dynamical friction decay for a 106 M⊙ GC whenever the SMBH mass exceeds ˜108 M⊙. This implies an almost complete dissolution of the infalling GC before it reaches the inner region (≲5 pc) of the parent galaxy. The generalization of this result to a larger sample of infalling GCs shows that such destructive process may prevent the formation and growth of a bright galactic nucleus. Another interesting, serendipitous, result we obtained is that the close interaction between the SMBH and the GC produces a `wave' of stars that escape from the cluster and, in a fraction, even from the whole galaxy.

  19. Would a Galactic bar destroy the globular cluster system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Kevin; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Aguilar, Luis

    1992-01-01

    Five different dynamical Galaxy models are presented for the Galactic potential which satisfy the observed rotation curve but contain a central bar so that the 3-kpc nonintersecting streamlines have a radial velocity of 50 km/s when viewed at 45 deg to the bar axis. The effect of the central bars on the destruction rates of globular clusters in the Galaxy is investigated. The method of Aguilar et al. (1988) is applied to these barred Galaxy models. The unknown tangential velocity components of each observed cluster are drawn randomly from an assumed distribution function. The cluster's orbit is integrated, and the bulge shocking rate is calculated. The median destruction rate of the cluster is computed by sampling a large number of such orbits. The addition of the rotating bar does not strongly affect the destruction rates of globular clusters. There is a small increase in the destruction rate for those clusters within about 2.5 kpc. Thus it is not possible to rule out the existence of a rotating bar on these grounds.

  20. Would a Galactic bar destroy the globular cluster system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Kevin; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Aguilar, Luis

    1992-01-01

    Five different dynamical Galaxy models are presented for the Galactic potential which satisfy the observed rotation curve but contain a central bar so that the 3-kpc nonintersecting streamlines have a radial velocity of 50 km/s when viewed at 45 deg to the bar axis. The effect of the central bars on the destruction rates of globular clusters in the Galaxy is investigated. The method of Aguilar et al. (1988) is applied to these barred Galaxy models. The unknown tangential velocity components of each observed cluster are drawn randomly from an assumed distribution function. The cluster's orbit is integrated, and the bulge shocking rate is calculated. The median destruction rate of the cluster is computed by sampling a large number of such orbits. The addition of the rotating bar does not strongly affect the destruction rates of globular clusters. There is a small increase in the destruction rate for those clusters within about 2.5 kpc. Thus it is not possible to rule out the existence of a rotating bar on these grounds.

  1. STAR CLUSTERS IN PSEUDOBULGES OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nino, Daiana; Trenti, Michele; Stiavelli, Massimo; Carollo, C. Marcella; Scarlata, Claudia; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2009-11-15

    We present a study of the properties of the star-cluster systems around pseudobulges of late-type spiral galaxies using a sample of 11 galaxies with distances from 17 Mpc to 37 Mpc. Star clusters are identified from multiband Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFPC2 imaging data by combining detections in three bands (F435W and F814W with ACS and F606W with WFPC2). The photometric data are then compared to population synthesis models to infer the masses and ages of the star clusters. Photometric errors and completeness are estimated by means of artificial source Monte Carlo simulations. Dust extinction is estimated by considering F160W NICMOS observations of the central regions of the galaxies, augmenting our wavelength coverage. In all galaxies we identify star clusters with a wide range of ages, from young (age {approx}< 8 Myr) blue clusters, with typical mass of 10{sup 3} M {sub sun} to older (age >100-250 Myr), more massive, red clusters. Some of the latter might likely evolve into objects similar to the Milky Way's globular clusters. We compute the specific frequencies for the older clusters with respect to the galaxy and bulge luminosities. Specific frequencies relative to the galaxy light appear consistent with the globular cluster specific frequencies of early-type spirals. We compare the specific frequencies relative to the bulge light with the globular cluster specific frequencies of dwarf galaxies, which have a surface brightness profile that is similar to that of the pseudobulges in our sample. The specific frequencies we derive for our sample galaxies are higher than those of the dwarf galaxies, supporting an evolutionary scenario in which some of the dwarf galaxies might be the remnants of harassed late-type spiral galaxies that hosted a pseudobulge.

  2. NGC 346: Looking in the Cradle of a Massive Star Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Hony, Sacha

    2017-03-01

    How does a star cluster of more than few 10,000 solar masses form? We present the case of the cluster NGC 346 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, still embedded in its natal star-forming region N66, and we propose a scenario for its formation, based on observations of the rich stellar populations in the region. Young massive clusters host a high fraction of early-type stars, indicating an extremely high star formation efficiency. The Milky Way galaxy hosts several young massive clusters that fill the gap between young low-mass open clusters and old massive globular clusters. Only a handful, though, are young enough to study their formation. Moreover, the investigation of their gaseous natal environments suffers from contamination by the Galactic disk. Young massive clusters are very abundant in distant starburst and interacting galaxies, but the distance of their hosting galaxies do not also allow a detailed analysis of their formation. The Magellanic Clouds, on the other hand, host young massive clusters in a wide range of ages with the youngest being still embedded in their giant HII regions. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of such star-forming complexes provide a stellar sampling with a high dynamic range in stellar masses, allowing the detailed study of star formation at scales typical for molecular clouds. Our cluster analysis on the distribution of newly-born stars in N66 shows that star formation in the region proceeds in a clumpy hierarchical fashion, leading to the formation of both a dominant young massive cluster, hosting about half of the observed pre-main-sequence population, and a self-similar dispersed distribution of the remaining stars. We investigate the correlation between stellar surface density (and star formation rate derived from star-counts) and molecular gas surface density (derived from dust column density) in order to unravel the physical conditions that gave birth to NGC 346. A power law fit to the data yields a steep correlation between these

  3. Star Formation in the Galactic Center: Massive stars and the ISM in Sgr B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotera, Angela

    Our Galactic Center (GC) is a unique region that enables detailed studies of a mild starburst nucleus at resolutions unapproachable in other galaxies. The GC provides unparalleled opportunities to test theories of the interrelationship of massive stars, molecular and ionized gas, dust, turbulent giant molecular clouds, large-scale magnetic fields, and a black hole; all under extreme conditions. We propose to use FLITECAM to obtain a Paschen-alpha map extending east from the Radio Arc region (previously observed in Paschen-alpha with HST) out to Sgr B. Made up of two distinct regions (Sgr B1 and Sgr B2), Sgr B is one of the most complex star-forming regions in the Galaxy, containing a massive molecular cloud, dozens of HII regions, and numerous young stellar objects (YSOs). Although much of Sgr B2 is unobservable at IR wavelengths due to extinction, Sgr B1 and the periphery of Sgr B2 have lower extinction making the proposed observations possible in these regions. We further propose to complete our Cycle 3 FORCAST observations of the peak mid-infrared emission in Sgr B1 to investigate the temperature and dust structure within these regions which contain known massive stars and massive YSOs. When combined with existing multi-wavelength observations, we will be able to address crucial questions such as: Where are the young massive stars currently located? Is star formation in our Galactic nucleus fundamentally different due to the extreme conditions in the central 400pc? How does the stellar feedback from massive star formation impact turbulence in giant molecular clouds?

  4. MOCCA-SURVEY Database I: Is NGC 6535 a dark star cluster harbouring an IMBH?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Abbas; Bianchini, Paolo; de Vita, Ruggero; Giersz, Mirek; Hypki, Arkadiusz; Kamann, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    We describe the dynamical evolution of a unique type of dark star cluster model in which the majority of the cluster mass at Hubble time is dominated by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). We analysed results from about 2000 star cluster models (Survey Database I) simulated using the Monte Carlo code MOnte Carlo Cluster simulAtor and identified these dark star cluster models. Taking one of these models, we apply the method of simulating realistic `mock observations' by utilizing the Cluster simulatiOn Comparison with ObservAtions (COCOA) and Simulating Stellar Cluster Observation (SISCO) codes to obtain the photometric and kinematic observational properties of the dark star cluster model at 12 Gyr. We find that the perplexing Galactic globular cluster NGC 6535 closely matches the observational photometric and kinematic properties of the dark star cluster model presented in this paper. Based on our analysis and currently observed properties of NGC 6535, we suggest that this globular cluster could potentially harbour an IMBH. If it exists, the presence of this IMBH can be detected robustly with proposed kinematic observations of NGC 6535.

  5. A prescription and fast code for the long-term evolution of star clusters - III. Unequal masses and stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Poul E. R.; Gieles, Mark; Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.; Baumgardt, Holger

    2014-08-01

    We present a new version of the fast star cluster evolution code EVOLVE ME A CLUSTER OF STARS (EMACSS). While previous versions of EMACSS reproduced clusters of single-mass stars, this version models clusters with an evolving stellar content. Stellar evolution dominates early evolution, and leads to: (1) reduction of the mean mass of stars due to the mass loss of high-mass stars; (2) expansion of the half-mass radius; (3) for (nearly) Roche Volume filling clusters, the induced escape of stars. Once sufficient relaxation has occurred (≃10 relaxation times-scales), clusters reach a second, `balanced' state whereby the core releases energy as required by the cluster as a whole. In this state: (1) stars escape due to tidal effects faster than before balanced evolution; (2) the half-mass radius expands or contracts depending on the Roche volume filling factor; and (3) the mean mass of stars increases due to the preferential ejection of low-mass stars. We compare the EMACSS results of several cluster properties against N-body simulations of clusters spanning a range of initial number of stars, mass, half-mass radius, and tidal environments, and show that our prescription accurately predicts cluster evolution for this data base. Finally, we consider applications for EMACSS, such as studies of galactic globular cluster populations in cosmological simulations.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Southern Galactic Be star candidates (Sabogal+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabogal, B. E.; Garcia-Varela, A.

    2014-04-01

    We present the result of a search for southern Galactic Be star candidates within the group of miscellaneous variables of the ASAS-2 catalog of variable stars, using statistical, morphological, photometric, and color criteria. This search lead us to obtain a catalog of 213 new Be star candidates. The I-band light curves of these candidates show outbursts (Type-1 stars) only in 9% of the sample, and stochastic variations (Type-4 stars) in 91% of the sample. We do not find stars showing clear high and low states (Type-2 stars) or showing outbursts and high and low states simultaneously (Type-1/Type-2 stars). Our sample of southern Galactic Be star candidates provide valuable new bright targets for high resolution spectroscopic studies with small/medium size telescopes. (1 data file).

  7. COCOA: Simulating Observations of Star Cluster Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Abbas; Giersz, Mirek; Pych, Wojciech; Dalessandro, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    COCOA (Cluster simulatiOn Comparison with ObservAtions) creates idealized mock photometric observations using results from numerical simulations of star cluster evolution. COCOA is able to present the output of realistic numerical simulations of star clusters carried out using Monte Carlo or N-body codes in a way that is useful for direct comparison with photometric observations. The code can simulate optical observations from simulation snapshots in which positions and magnitudes of objects are known. The parameters for simulating the observations can be adjusted to mimic telescopes of various sizes. COCOA also has a photometry pipeline that can use standalone versions of DAOPHOT (ascl:1104.011) and ALLSTAR to produce photometric catalogs for all observed stars.

  8. UV-bright stars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, Wayne B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper highlights globular cluster studies with Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) in three areas: the discrepancy between observed ultraviolet HB magnitudes and predictions of theoretical HB models; the discovery of two hot subdwarfs in NGC 1851, a globular not previously known to contain such stars; and spectroscopic follow up of newly identified UV-bright stars in M79 and w Cen. I also present results of a recent observation of NGC 6397 with the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer.

  9. Clustering Properties of Far-infrared Sources in the Herschel infrared GALactic Survey (Hi-Gal) Science Demonstration Phase Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billot, Nicolas; Schisano, E.; Molinari, S.; Pestalozzi, M.; Hi-GAL Team

    2011-01-01

    While the study of star forming activity usually relies on fitting spectral energy distributions to probe the physical properties of forming stars, we explore an alternative method to complement this multi-wavelength strategy: we use a Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) algorithm to characterize the spatial distribution of Galactic Far-IR sources and derive their clustering properties. We aim at revealing the spatial imprint of different types of star forming processes, e.g. isolated spontaneous fragmentation of dense molecular clouds, or events of triggered star formation around Hii regions, and evidence global properties of star formation in the Galaxy. We plan on exploiting the entire HiGAL survey of the inner Galactic plane (270 square degrees observed in 5 bands between 70 and 500 microns, P.I. Sergio Molinari) to gather significant statistics on the clustering properties of star forming regions, and to look for possible correlations with source properties such as mass, temperature or evolutionary stage. In this poster we present a pilot study of our project on two 2×2 square degrees fields centered at longitudes l=30 and 59 degrees obtained during the Science Demonstration Phase (SDP) of the Herschel mission.

  10. A NEW LOOK AT THE OLD STAR CLUSTER NGC 6791

    SciTech Connect

    Platais, I.; Cudworth, K. M.; Kozhurina-Platais, V.; McLaughlin, D. E.; Meibom, S.; Veillet, C.

    2011-05-20

    We present comprehensive cluster membership and g'r' photometry of the prototypical old, metal-rich Galactic star cluster NGC 6791. The proper-motion catalog contains 58,901 objects down to g'{approx} 24, limited to a circular area of radius 30'. The highest precision of the proper motions is 0.08 mas yr{sup -1}. Our proper motions confirm cluster membership of all main and also some rare constituents of NGC 6791. The total number of probable cluster members down to g' = 22 (M{sub V} {approx} +8) is {approx}4800, corresponding to M{sub tot} {approx} 5000 M{sub sun}. New findings include an extended horizontal branch in this cluster. The angular radius of NGC 6791 is at least 15' (the effective radius is R{sub h} {approx_equal} 4.'4 while the tidal radius is r{sub t} {approx_equal} 23'). The luminosity function of the cluster peaks at M{sub g}{sup '}{approx}+4.5 and then steadily declines toward fainter magnitudes. Our data provide evidence that differential reddening may not be ignored in NGC 6791.

  11. Evidence for Warped Disks of Young Stars in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartko, H.; Martins, F.; Fritz, T. K.; Genzel, R.; Levin, Y.; Perets, H. B.; Paumard, T.; Nayakshin, S.; Gerhard, O.; Alexander, T.; Dodds-Eden, K.; Eisenhauer, F.; Gillessen, S.; Mascetti, L.; Ott, T.; Perrin, G.; Pfuhl, O.; Reid, M. J.; Rouan, D.; Sternberg, A.; Trippe, S.

    2009-06-01

    The central parsec around the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center (GC) hosts more than 100 young and massive stars. Outside the central cusp (R ~ 1'') the majority of these O and Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars reside in a main clockwise system, plus a second, less prominent disk or streamer system at large angles with respect to the main system. Here we present the results from new observations of the GC with the AO-assisted near-infrared imager NACO and the integral field spectrograph SINFONI on the ESO/VLT. These include the detection of 27 new reliably measured W-R/O stars in the central 12'' and improved measurements of 63 previously detected stars, with proper motion uncertainties reduced by a factor of 4 compared to our earlier work. Based on the sample of 90 well measured W-R/O stars, we develop a detailed statistical analysis of their orbital properties and orientations. We show that half of the W-R/O stars are compatible with being members of a clockwise rotating system. The rotation axis of this system shows a strong transition from the inner to the outer regions as a function of the projected distance from Sgr A*. The main clockwise system either is either a strongly warped single disk with a thickness of about 10°, or consists of a series of streamers with significant radial variation in their orbital planes. Eleven out of 61 clockwise moving stars have an angular separation of more than 30° from the local angular momentum direction of the clockwise system. The mean eccentricity of the clockwise system is 0.36 ± 0.06. The distribution of the counterclockwise W-R/O star is not isotropic at the 98% confidence level. It is compatible with a coherent structure such as stellar filaments, streams, small clusters or possibly a disk in a dissolving state: 10 out of 29 counterclockwise moving W-R/O stars have an angular separation of more than 30° from the local angular momentum direction of the counterclockwise system. The observed disk warp and the

  12. Asymmetric supernova remnants generated by Galactic, massive runaway stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Velázquez, P. F.; Gusdorf, A.

    2015-07-01

    After the death of a runaway massive star, its supernova shock wave interacts with the bow shocks produced by its defunct progenitor, and may lose energy, momentum and its spherical symmetry before expanding into the local interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate whether the initial mass and space velocity of these progenitors can be associated with asymmetric supernova remnants. We run hydrodynamical models of supernovae exploding in the pre-shaped medium of moving Galactic core-collapse progenitors. We find that bow shocks that accumulate more than about 1.5 M⊙ generate asymmetric remnants. The shock wave first collides with these bow shocks 160-750 yr after the supernova, and the collision lasts until 830-4900 yr. The shock wave is then located 1.35-5 pc from the centre of the explosion, and it expands freely into the ISM, whereas in the opposite direction it is channelled into the region of undisturbed wind material. This applies to an initially 20 M⊙ progenitor moving with velocity 20 km s-1 and to our initially 40 M⊙ progenitor. These remnants generate mixing of ISM gas, stellar wind and supernova ejecta that is particularly important upstream from the centre of the explosion. Their light curves are dominated by emission from optically thin cooling and by X-ray emission of the shocked ISM gas. We find that these remnants are likely to be observed in the [O III] λ 5007 spectral line emission or in the soft energy-band of X-rays. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of observed Galactic supernova remnants such as 3C 391 and the Cygnus Loop.

  13. A Multi-Wavelength View of the Environments of Extreme Clustered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Buizer, James M.

    2017-01-01

    It is believed that the vast majority of, if not all, stars form within OB clusters. Most theories of star formation assume a star forms in isolation and ignore the fact that the cluster environment and, especially, the presence of extremely energetic and high mass young stellar objects nearby, may have a profound impact on the formation process of a typical cluster member. Giant HII (GHII) regions are Galactic analogs to starburst regions seen in external galaxies, hosting the most active areas of clustered star formation. As such, GHII regions represent a population of objects that can reveal a wealth of information on the environment of the earliest stages of clustered star formation and how it is affected by feedback from the most massive cluster members. This study employs new mid-infrared imaging data obtained from the airborne observatory, SOFIA, as well as archival imaging data from the near-infrared to cm radio wavelengths to create a rich multi-wavelength dataset of a dozen galactic GHII regions. These data allow quantification of the detailed physical conditions within GHII regions individually and as a population on both global and small scales.

  14. Phase Mixing of Popped Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.; Smith, R.; Fellhauer, M.; Gibson, B. K.; Kroupa, P.; Assmann, P.

    2014-10-01

    As star clusters are expected to form with low star formation efficiencies, the gas in the cluster is expelled quickly and early in their development: the star cluster pops. This leads to an unbound stellar system. Previous N-body simulations have demonstrated the existence of a stepped number density distribution of cluster stars after popping, both in vertical position and vertical velocity, with a passing resemblance to a Christmas tree. Using numerical and analytical methods, we investigate the source of this structure, which arises due to the phase mixing of the out-of-equilibrium stellar system as it evolves in a background analytical potential. Considering only the vertical motions, we construct a theoretical model to describe the time evolution of the phase space distribution of stars in a Miyamoto-Nagai disk potential and a full Milky-Way type potential comprising bulge, halo and disk components, which is then compared with N- body simulations. Using our theoretical model, we investigate the possible observational signatures and the feasibility of detection.

  15. No Evidence of Mass Segregation in the Low-mass Galactic Globular Cluster NGC 6101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Massari, D.; Lanzoni, B.; Miocchi, P.; Beccari, G.

    2015-09-01

    We used a combination of Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based data to probe the dynamical state of the low-mass Galactic globular cluster NGC 6101. We have rederived the structural parameters of the cluster by using star counts and we find that it is about three times more extended than thought before. By using three different indicators, namely the radial distribution of blue straggler stars (BSSs), that of main-sequence binaries, and the luminosity (mass) function, we demonstrated that NGC 6101 shows no evidence of mass segregation, even in the innermost regions. Indeed, both the BSS and the binary radial distributions fully resemble those of any other cluster population. In addition, the slope of the luminosity (mass) function does not change with the distance, as expected for non-relaxed stellar systems. NGC 6101 is one of the few globulars where the absence of mass segregation has been observed so far. This result provides additional support for the use of the “dynamical clock” calibrated on the radial distribution of the blue stragglers as a powerful indicator of the cluster dynamical age. Based on observations collected at the the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile (under proposal 091.D-0562). Also based on observations with the NASA/ESA HST (Prop. 10775), obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  16. Discovery of two low-luminosity star clusters in the Milky Way halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwon

    2015-08-01

    Star clusters in the halo of the Milky Way (MW) hold important clues to the formation and structure of their host galaxy. In the talk, I present the discovery of two new low-luminosity star clusters in the inner and outer halo of the Milky Way. These two star clusters, named as Kim 1 and Kim 2, were first detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and our independent 500 sqr degree survey using the Dark Energy Survey camera (DECam) at the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO repectively. Their true identies were confirmed by deep follow-up imaging using DECam and Gemini-South 8-m telescope. Kim 1 and Kim 2 both exhibit unsual physical properties compared to other classically known star clusters. Kim 1, located at a heliocentric distance of 17 kpc, features extremely low luminosity (Mv~0.3 mag) and low star concentration. Together with the high ellipticity (e ~ 0.4) and irregular isophotes, these properties suggest that we are seeing an intermediate mass star cluster being stripped by the Galactic tidal field. In the case of Kim 2, ~ 104 kpc away from the sun, is the faintest globular cluster ever found in the outer halo of the Milky Way. The globular cluster exhibits evidence of significant mass loss such as extra-tidal stars and mass-segregation. The observed properties of the new star cluster also raise the question about how such a low luminosity star cluster could have survived until today. One possible scenario is that Kim 2 is a star cluster originally located in a satellite dwarf galaxy and was accreted into the Milky Way's halo.

  17. The Galactic open cluster system: evidence of enhanced formation episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.

    The exciting debate about the existence of signs of enhanced formation of Galactic open clusters (OCs) is revisited here on the basis of a revised age distribution. By using the recently updated 2009 version of the Dias et al. catalogue of 1787 OCs, we found that the present OC's age distribution presents two primary excesses at t ~ 10-15 Myr and 1.5 Gyr. We interpret both excesses as signs of enhanced formation episodes similar to those that occurred in other galaxies (e.g., M 51, NGC 1705). When restricting the OC sample to those located in the solar neighbourhood, with the aim of avoiding incompleteness effects, we also find that these clusters are engraved with clear signs of enhanced formation at both ages.

  18. The Distance to the Galactic Globular Cluster, 47 Tuc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Kristin; Goldsbury, R.; Kalirai, J.; Richer, H.; Tremblay, P.; Anderson, J.; Bergeron, P.; Dotter, A.; Esteves, L.; Fahlman, G.; Hansen, B.; Heyl, J.; Hurley, J.; Rich, R.; Shara, M.; Stetson, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new distance determination to the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae by fitting the spectral energy distributions of its white dwarfs to pure hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf models. Our photometric data set is obtained from a 121 orbit Hubble Space Telescope program using the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS/IR channels, capturing F390W, F606W, F110W, and F160W images. These images cover more than 60 arcmin2 and extend over a radial range of 5-13.7 arcmin (6.5-17.9 pc) within the globular cluster. Here, we present our best fitting distance modulus using a likelihood analysis. We also search the white dwarf photometry for infrared excess in the F160W filter, indicative of protoplanetary disks or low mass companions, and find no convincing cases within our sample.

  19. Thermodynamics and galactic clustering with a modified gravitational potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2017-02-01

    Based on thermodynamics, we study the galactic clustering of an expanding Universe by considering the logarithmic and volume (quantum) corrections to Newton's law along with the repulsive effect of a harmonic force induced by the cosmological constant (Λ ) in the formation of the large scale structure of the Universe. We derive the N -body partition function for extended-mass galaxies (galaxies with halos) analytically. For this partition function, we compute the exact equations of states, which exhibit the logarithmic, volume, and cosmological constant corrections. In this setting, a modified correlation (clustering) parameter (due to these corrections) emerges naturally from the exact equations of state. We compute a corrected grand canonical distribution function for this system. Furthermore, we obtain a deviation in differential forms of the two-point correlation functions for both the point-mass and extended-mass cases. The consequences of these deviations on the correlation function's power law are also discussed.

  20. The STAR cluster-finder ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Botlo, M.; LeVine, M.J.; Scheetz, R.A.; Schulz, M.W.; Short, P.; Woods, J.; Crosetto, D.

    1997-12-01

    STAR is a large TPC-based experiment at RHIC, the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The STAR experiment reads out a TPC and an SVT (silicon vertex tracker), both of which require in-line pedestal subtraction, compression of ADC values from 10-bit to 8-bit, and location of time sequences representing responses to charged-particle tracks. The STAR cluster finder ASIC responds to all of these needs. Pedestal subtraction and compression are performed using lookup tables in attached RAM. The authors describe its design and implementation, as well as testing methodology and results of tests performed on foundry prototypes.

  1. Young star cluster evolution and metallicity .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, M.; Bressan, A.

    Young star clusters (SCs) are the cradle of stars and the site of important dynamical processes. We present N-body simulations of young SCs including recipes for metal-dependent stellar evolution and mass loss by stellar winds. We show that metallicity affects significantly the collapse and post-core collapse phase, provided that the core collapse timescale is of the same order of magnitude as the lifetime of massive stars. In particular, the reversal of core collapse is faster for metal-rich SCs, where stellar winds are strong