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Sample records for galactokinase

  1. Hereditary galactokinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J. G. H.; Don, N. A.; Mann, Trevor P.

    1971-01-01

    A baby with galactokinase deficiency, a recessive inborn error of galactose metabolism, is described. The case is exceptional in that there was no evidence of gypsy blood in the family concerned. The investigation of neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia led to the discovery of galactosuria. As noted by others, the paucity of presenting features makes early diagnosis difficult, and detection by biochemical screening seems desirable. Cataract formation, of early onset, appears to be the only severe persisting complication and may be due to the biosynthesis and accumulation of galactitol in the lens. Ophthalmic surgeons need to be aware of this enzyme defect, because with early diagnosis and dietary treatment these lens changes should be reversible. PMID:5109408

  2. Galactokinase activity in Streptococcus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.; Morris, H.A.; McKay, L.L.

    1985-10-01

    ATP-dependent phosphorylation of (/sup 14/C)galactose by 11 strains of streptococcus thermophilus indicated that these organisms possessed the Leloir enzyme, galactokinase (galK). Activities were 10 times higher in fully induced, galactose-fermenting (Gal/sup +/) strains than in galactose-nonfermenting (Gal/sup -/) strains. Lactose-grown, Gal/sup -/ cells released free galactose into the medium and were unable to utilize residual galactose or to induce galK above basal levels. Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus 19258 also released galactose into the medium, but when lactose was depleted, growth on galactose commenced, and galK increased from 0.025 to 0.22 ..mu..mol of galactose phosphorylated per min per mg of protein. When lactose was added to galactose-grown cells of S. thermophilus 19258, galK activity rapidly decreased. These results suggest that galK in Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus is subject to an induction-repression mechanism, but that galK cannot be induced in Gal/sup -/ strains.

  3. Galactokinase Is a Novel Modifier of Calcineurin-Induced Cardiomyopathy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Teresa E.; Yu, Lin; Wolf, Matthew J.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2014-01-01

    Activated/uninhibited calcineurin is both necessary and sufficient to induce cardiac hypertrophy, a condition that often leads to dilated cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. We expressed constitutively active calcineurin in the adult heart of Drosophila melanogaster and identified enlarged cardiac chamber dimensions and reduced cardiac contractility. In addition, expressing constitutively active calcineurin in the fly heart using the Gal4/UAS system induced an increase in heart wall thickness. We performed a targeted genetic screen for modifiers of calcineurin-induced cardiac enlargement based on previous calcineurin studies in the fly and identified galactokinase as a novel modifier of calcineurin-induced cardiomyopathy. Genomic deficiencies spanning the galactokinase locus, transposable elements that disrupt galactokinase, and cardiac-specific RNAi knockdown of galactokinase suppressed constitutively active calcineurin-induced cardiomyopathy. In addition, in flies expressing constitutively active calcineurin using the Gal4/UAS system, a transposable element in galactokinase suppressed the increase in heart wall thickness. Finally, genetic disruption of galactokinase suppressed calcineurin-induced wing vein abnormalities. Collectively, we generated a model for discovering novel modifiers of calcineurin-induced cardiac enlargement in the fly and identified galactokinase as a previously unknown regulator of calcineurin-induced cardiomyopathy in adult Drosophila. PMID:25081566

  4. Immunological and genetic characterization of 2-deoxygalactose-resistant, galactokinase-deficient mutants of Chinese hamster cells: evidence for structural mutations at the galK locus.

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, B; de Souza, C A; Banville, D; Thirion, J P

    1984-01-01

    Ten independent mutants resistant to 2-deoxygalactose and without any detectable galactokinase activity (null-galactokinase mutations) were isolated from mutagenized Chinese hamster somatic cells. They were analyzed for the presence of serologically cross-reacting material (CRM) with antiserum generated against highly purified Chinese hamster galactokinase. All 10 mutants contain cross-reacting material (i.e., were CRM+), indicating that all the mutations affect the correct expression of a product of the galactokinase structural gene. Complementation analysis among them shows that the 10 mutations fall in one functional genetic unit. PMID:6513922

  5. pH-Rate Profiles Support a General Base Mechanism for Galactokinase (Lactococcus lactis)

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Thoden, James B.; Peters, Greg S.; Holden, Hazel M.; Cleland, W.W.

    2013-01-01

    Galactokinase (GALK), a member the Leloir pathway for normal galactose metabolism, catalyzes the conversion of α-D-galactose to galactose-1-phosphate. For this investigation, we studied the kinetic mechanism and pH profiles of the enzyme from Lactococcus lactis. Our results show that the mechanism for its reaction is sequential in both directions. Mutant proteins D183A and D183N are inactive (<10,000 fold), supporting the role of Asp183 as a catalytic base that deprotonates the C-1 hydroxyl group of galactose. The pH–kcat profile of the forward reaction has a pKa of 6.9 ± 0.2 that likely is due to Asp183. The pH-kcat/KGal profile of the reverse reaction further substantiates this role as it is lacking a key pKa required for a direct proton transfer mechanism. The R36A and R36N mutant proteins show over 100-fold lower activity than that for the wild-type enzyme, thus suggesting that Arg36 lowers the pKa of the C-1 hydroxyl to facilitate deprotonation. PMID:23872454

  6. Molecular and biochemical characterization of human galactokinase and its small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tang, M; Wierenga, K; Elsas, L J; Lai, K

    2010-12-01

    Human galactokinase (GALK) is the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway, converting α-d-galactose into galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1-P). Recently, there is increasing interest in targeting GALK as a novel therapy to ameliorate the disease manifestations in patients with Classic Galactosemia as it would, in combination with (ga-)lactose restriction reduce accumulation of Gal-1-P, a cytotoxic agent. Previously, we identified 34 small molecule compounds that inhibited GALK in vitro using experimental high-throughput screening. In order to isolate useful lead compounds, we characterized these hits with regards to their kinase selectivity profiles, potency and capability to reduce Gal-1-P accumulation in patient cell lines, and their modes of action. We found that the majority of these compounds had IC(50)s ranging from 0.7μM to 33.3μM. When tested against other members of the GHMP kinase family, three compounds (1, 4, and 24) selectively inhibited GALK with high potency. Through alignment of GALK and mevalonate kinase (MVK) crystal structures, we identified that eight amino acid residues and an L1 loop were different within the ATP-binding pockets of these two closely related kinases. By site-directed mutagenesis experiments, we identified one amino acid residue required for the inhibitory function of two of the three selective compounds. Based on these results, we generated binding models of these two compounds using a high-precision docking program. Compounds 4 and 24 inhibited GALK in a mixed model, while compound 1 exhibited parabolic competitive inhibition. Most importantly, using cells from galactosemic patients we found that selected compounds lowered Gal-1-P concentrations.

  7. Ultra Fast and Sensitive Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Based Assay for Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase and Galactokinase Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([13C6]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [13C6]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4 ± 4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8 ± 0.47 (mean ± SD) µmol·(g Hgb) −1·hr−1. Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analzyed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  8. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test.

  9. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  10. Fusions of the Escherichia coli gyrA and gyrB control regions to the galactokinase gene are inducible by coumermycin treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, R; Gellert, M

    1987-01-01

    We have previously shown that the genes encoding the two subunits of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase are regulated in a manner which is dependent on DNA conformation. When the DNA encoding the gyrA and gyrB genes is relaxed, both genes are expressed at a high level; in negatively supercoiled DNA they are expressed at a low level. In this paper we describe fusions of both the gyrA and gyrB 5' sequences to the E. coli galactokinase gene. In such fusions we found that galactokinase can be induced by treating the cells with coumermycin A1, an inhibitor of DNA gyrase. Our results suggest that the regulation occurs at the transcriptional level and that only a small region of DNA is necessary for coumermycin-induced gene expression. PMID:3029031

  11. Galactokinase encoded by GAL1 is a bifunctional protein required for induction of the GAL genes in Kluyveromyces lactis and is able to suppress the gal3 phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J; Walker-Jonah, A; Hollenberg, C P

    1991-11-01

    We have analyzed a GAL1 mutant (gal1-r strain) of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis which lacks the induction of beta-galactosidase and the enzymes of the Leloir pathway in the presence of galactose. The data show that the K. lactis GAL1 gene product has, in addition to galactokinase activity, a function required for induction of the lactose system. This regulatory function is not dependent on galactokinase activity, as it is still present in a galactokinase-negative mutant (gal1-209). Complementation studies in Saccharomyces cervisiae show that K. lactis GAL1 and gal1-209, but not gal1-r, complement the gal3 mutation. We conclude that the regulatory function of GAL1 in K. lactis soon after induction is similar to the function of GAL3 in S. cerevisiae. PMID:1922058

  12. Regional brain distribution of 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]Fluoro-D-talose: A new PET tracer for measurement of galactokinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haradahira, T.; Inoue, O.; Suzuki, K.

    1994-05-01

    We have recently developed a 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-talose (2-[F-18]FDTal) as a new PET tracer for measurements of galactokinase activities in tissues. The rational of 2-[F-18]FDTal as a PET tracer is based on the metabolic trapping by a formation of 2-[F-18]FDTal-1-phosphate by galactokinase. In this study, we have examined the regional brain distribution of 2-[F-18]FDTal in monkey by PET, and compared it with those of 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (2-[F-18]FDG) and 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-galactose (2-[F-18]FDTal), PET tracers for D-glucose and D-galactose metabolisms, respectively. The F-18 sugars used for the PET studies were prepared through nucleophilic fluorinations of the corresponding triflates with [F-18]fluoride. PET imaging obtained by i.v. injection of 2-[F-18]FDTal in rhesus monkey showed very high accumulation of the radioactivity into an occipital cortex region. This regional distribution was very similar to that of 2-[F-18]FDGal, but was quite different with that of 2-[F-18]FDG. In PET data analyses, washout of the radioactivity from the occipital cortex (30% loss of the initial activity) was observed in an early period ({<=}5 min) after injection of 2-[F-18]FDTal, in contrast with the continuous increase of the radioactivity in the same region after injection of 2-[F-18]FDGal. This data indicates a smaller phosphorylation rate constant (K3) of 2-[F-18]FDTal by brain galactokinase than that of 2-[F-18]FDGal. 2-[F-18]FDGal has been reported to be partly metabolized into an UDP-2-[F-18]FDGal via 2-CF-18]FDGal-l-phosphate in animal brains. Therefore 2-[F-18]FDTal offers an advantage over 2-[F-18]FDGal in undergoing its simple metabolism which enables us to make a simple kinetic model for PET imaging. We conclude that 2-[F-18]FDTal may be a new PET tracer to give a characteristic regional brain distribution which reflect the regional galactokinase activity.

  13. Role of Arg228 in the phosphorylation of galactokinase: the mechanism of GHMP kinases by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meilan; Li, Xiaozhou; Zou, Jian-Wei; Timson, David J

    2013-07-16

    GHMP kinases are a group of structurally related small molecule kinases. They have been found in all kingdoms of life and are mostly responsible for catalyzing the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of intermediary metabolites. Although the GHMP kinases are of clinical, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological importance, the mechanism of GHMP kinases is controversial. A catalytic base mechanism was suggested for mevalonate kinase that has a structural feature of the γ-phosphate of ATP close to an aspartate residue; however, for one GHMP family member, homoserine kinase, where the residue acting as general base is absent, a direct phosphorylation mechanism was suggested. Furthermore, it was proposed by some authors that all the GHMP kinases function by a similar mechanism. This controversy in mechanism has limited our ability to exploit these enzymes as drug targets and in biotechnology. Here the phosphorylation reaction mechanism of the human galactokinase, a member of the GHMP kinase family, was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations (B3LYP-D/AMBER99). The reaction coordinates were localized by potential energy scan using an adiabatic mapping method. Our results indicate that a highly conserved Glu174 captures Arg105 in the proximity of the α-phosphate of ATP, forming a H-bond network; therefore, the mobility of ATP in the large oxyanion hole is restricted. Arg228 functions to stabilize the negative charge developed at the β,γ-bridging oxygen of the ATP during bond cleavage. The reaction occurs via a direct phosphorylation mechanism, and the Asp186 in the proximity of ATP does not directly participate in the reaction pathway. Because Arg228 is not conserved among GHMP kinases, reagents which form interactions with Arg228, and therefore can interrupt its function in phosphorylation, may be developed into potential selective inhibitors for galactokinase.

  14. D-galactose catabolism in Penicillium chrysogenum: Expression analysis of the structural genes of the Leloir pathway.

    PubMed

    Jónás, Ágota; Fekete, Erzsébet; Németh, Zoltán; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we analyzed the expression of the structural genes encoding the five enzymes comprising the Leloir pathway of D-galactose catabolism in the industrial cell factory Penicillium chrysogenum on various carbon sources. The genome of P. chrysogenum contains a putative galactokinase gene at the annotated locus Pc13g10140, the product of which shows strong structural similarity to yeast galactokinase that was expressed on lactose and D-galactose only. The expression profile of the galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase gene at annotated locus Pc15g00140 was essentially similar to that of galactokinase. This is in contrast to the results from other fungi such as Aspergillus nidulans, Trichoderma reesei and A. niger, where the ortholog galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase genes were constitutively expressed. As for the UDP-galactose-4-epimerase encoding gene, five candidates were identified. We could not detect Pc16g12790, Pc21g12170 and Pc20g06140 expression on any of the carbon sources tested, while for the other two loci (Pc21g10370 and Pc18g01080) transcripts were clearly observed under all tested conditions. Like the 4-epimerase specified at locus Pc21g10370, the other two structural Leloir pathway genes - UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (Pc21g12790) and phosphoglucomutase (Pc18g01390) - were expressed constitutively at high levels as can be expected from their indispensable function in fungal cell wall formation. PMID:27630054

  15. The gene of an early onset progressive cataract (cerulean cataract) maps to 17q24

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, M.M.; Ferrell, R.E.; Kivlin, J.D.

    1994-09-01

    Cerulean cataract is an autosomal dominant, fully penetrant, early onset, progressive cataract characterized by blue or white opacifications in the nucleus and cortex of the lens. A five generation family with 44 available affected members in three generations allowed exclusion of linkage of the cerulean cataract phenotype to lens structural protein genes and to all of the chromosomal regions to which autosomal dominant cataract phenotypes have previously been mapped. Exclusion of the plausible candidate instigated a genome-wide search utilizing short tandem repeat polymorphims. The genome search localized the cerulean cataract disease gene to chromosomal region 17q24. The three markers closest to the disease gene are D17S802 [Z({theta})=9.20 at ({theta})=0.086], D17S836 [Z({theta})=4.22 at ({theta})=0.061], and AFMa238yb5 [Z({theta})=7.11 at ({theta})=0.032]. Multipoint analysis yielded a maximum lod score of Z({theta})=11.4 between D17S802 and D17S836 at recombination rates of 0.048 and 0.013 respectively. Three genes that map near the 17q24 chromosomal region and are known to contain highly polymorphic microsatellites were tested for linkage. The genes, DHP-sensitive calcium channel gamma subunit (CACNLG), human somatastatin receptor (SSTR2), and the skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunit (SCN4A), were all excluded [Z({theta})=-{infinity} at ({theta})=0] as the gene causing cerulean cataract. The galactokinase (GK1) gene has not been cloned, but its map location is 17q23-q25. Galactokinase deficiency is characterized by a recessive, progressive, early onset cataract. Because of the map location of galactokinase, the age-at-onset, and progressive nature of cataracts associated with galactokinase deficiency, galactokinase is being investigated as a candidate gene for the cerulean cataract phenotype.

  16. Selection of Galactose-Fermenting Streptococcus thermophilus in Lactose-Limited Chemostat Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Terence D.; Crow, Vaughan L.

    1984-01-01

    Stock cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus are essentially galactose negative (Gal−). Although both galactose 1-phosphate uridyl transferase and uridine-5-diphospho-glucose 4-epimerase are present, suggesting that the genes for the Leloir pathway exist, cells cannot induce high levels of galactokinase. Therefore, galactose is largely excreted when cultures are grown on lactose, and most strains cannot be readily adapted to grow on free galactose. Gal− cultures were grown in a chemostat under lactose limitation in which high concentrations of residual galactose were present. Under this selection pressure, Gal+ organisms eventually took over the culture with all four strains examined. Gal+ cells had induced galactokinase, and three of the four strains grew on free galactose with doubling times of 40 to 50 min. When Gal+ organisms were grown on lactose in batch culture, the galactose moiety was only partially utilized while lactose was still present. As lactose was exhausted, and catabolite repression was lifted, the Leloir pathway enzymes (especially galactokinase) were induced and the residual galactose fermented. Neither phospho-β-galactosidase activity nor the enzymes of the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway were detected in S. thermophilus. In contrast to Streptococcus cremoris and Streptococcus lactis, fermentation was homolactic with galactose in batch cultures and with lactose limitation in the chemostat. When mixed Gal+-Gal− cultures were repeatedly transferred in milk, the Gal− cells became the dominant cell type. The Gal− phenotype of stock cultures probably reflects their prolonged maintenance in milk. PMID:16346586

  17. Transcriptional termination at a fully rho-independent site in Escherichia coli is prevented by uninterrupted translation of the nascent RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J J; Hayward, R S

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the possibility that translation reading through a fully rho-independent transcriptional terminator in Escherichia coli might prevent termination, as already established for rho-dependent terminators. Plasmids were constructed with and without interposition of the rho-independent coliphage T7 'early' terminator between a promoter and galK. Our constructions ensured either that there was no upstream translation, or that translation (initiated at the galE ribosome binding site) stopped upstream of, or at the normal position (the T7 gene 1.3 stop codon) with respect to, the transcriptional terminator; or else downstream of both this stop codon and the terminator. Our galactokinase enzyme and mRNA measurements on strains harbouring these plasmids indicate that 'readthrough translation' eliminates transcriptional termination at the T7 site. This effect is suppressed if the rate of ribosome movement is reduced with fusidic acid. PMID:3036492

  18. Static and dynamic interactions between GALK enzyme and known inhibitors: guidelines to design new drugs for galactosemic patients.

    PubMed

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Marabotti, Anna

    2013-05-01

    The search for inhibitors of galactokinase (GALK) enzyme is interesting for their possible therapeutic application capable to alleviate symptoms in people with classic galactosemia. Several high-throughput screenings in the past have found candidate ligands showing a moderate affinity for GALK. Computational analysis of the binding mode of these compounds in comparison to their target protein has been performed only on crystallographic static structures, therefore missing the evolution of the complex during time. In this work, we applied static and dynamics simulations to analyze the interactions between GALK and its potential inhibitors, while taking into account the temporal evolution of the complexes. The collected data allowed us to identify the most important and persistent anchoring points of the known active site and of the newly identified secondary cavity. These data will be of use to increase the specificity and the affinity of a new generation of GALK inhibitors.

  19. Inhibition of raffinose oligosaccharide breakdown delays germination of pea seeds.

    PubMed

    Blöchl, Andreas; Peterbauer, Thomas; Richter, Andreas

    2007-08-01

    Raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) are almost ubiquitous in seeds and have been hypothesized to constitute an important energy source during germination. To test this hypothesis we applied a specific alpha-galactosidase inhibitor (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, DGJ) to germinating pea seeds, resulting in a complete blocking of RFO breakdown. The germination rates of DGJ-treated seeds dropped drastically to about 25% of controls two days after imbibition. Similarly, the activities of the key enzymes in the galactose salvage pathway galactokinase, UDP-galactose pyrophosphorylase and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase, were also significantly lower in seeds treated with the inhibitor. The inhibitory effect on germination could be relieved by galactose but only partially by sucrose, indicating that galactose, in addition to providing easily available energy for growth, may also be an important component of the sugar signaling pathway during germination. Taken together our study, for the first time, provides clear evidence that RFOs play an important role for early germination.

  20. Inherited metabolic diseases affecting the carrier.

    PubMed

    Endres, W

    1997-03-01

    The objective of this review is to draw attention to those inherited metabolic traits which are potentially harmful also for the carrier, and to outline preventive measures, at least for obligate heterozygotes, i.e. parents of homozygous children. Concerning carriers of food-dependent abnormalities, early vascular disease in homocystinuria, hyperammonaemic episodes in ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, presenile cataracts in galactosaemia as well as galactokinase deficiency, spastic paraparesis in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and HELLP syndrome in mothers of babies with long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency have to be mentioned. In the group of food-independent disorders, clinical features in carriers may be paraesthesias and corneal dystrophy in Fabry disease, lens clouding in Lowe syndrome, lung and/or liver diseases in alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, and renal stones in cystinuria type II and III. Finally, two monogenic carrier states are known which in pregnant individuals could possibly afflict the developing fetus, i.e. heterozygosity for galactosaemia and for phenylketonuria. Elevated levels of galactose-1-phosphate have been found in red blood cells of infants heterozygous for galactosaemia born to heterozygous mothers. Aspartame in very high doses is reported to increase blood phenylalanine levels in heterozygotes for phenylketonuria, thus being a risk for the fetus of a heterozygous mother. For some of these carrier states preventive measures can be recommended, e.g. restriction of lactose in parents and heterozygous grandparents of children with galactosaemia and galactokinase deficiency as well as transiently in infants heterozygous for galactosaemia, dietary supplementation with monounsaturated fatty acids in symptomatic carriers for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, avoidance of smoking and alcohol in heterozygotes for alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, avoidance of episodes of dehydration in heterozygotes for cystinuria, and

  1. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Yaung, Stephanie J.; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L.; Church, George M.; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H.; Gerber, Georg K.

    2015-03-11

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Here, our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.

  2. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-03-11

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.

  3. Selection and characterization of a glucokinase-deficient mutant of Tetrahymena thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.T. Jr.; Lavine, J.E.; Morse, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    The authors isolated a mutant of Tetrahymena thermophila that is resistant to inhibition of growth by the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose. The mutant exhibits a deficiency in a cytoplasmic glucokinase. This enzymatic defect and the attendant inability to convert 2-deoxyglucose to toxic phosphorylated derivatives is apparently the sole basis for the mutant phenotype since transport of glucose and 2-deoxyglucose is unimpaired; there is no elevation of glucose-6-phosphatase activity, which could decrease the level of toxic 2-deoxyglucose metabolites. Genetic analyses have shown that the mutant allele is recessive and inherited as a single Mendelian mutation. The glucokinase-deficient strain described here is useful for the selection of other mutants in this organism and for the investigation of various cellular processes initiated or modulated by glucose and its analogs. The authors have exploited the molecular defect in this strain to investigate the initial steps in the cyclic AMP-mediated repression of galactokinase gene expression which is caused by glucose.

  4. Growth and ethanol fermentation ability on hexose and pentose sugars and glucose effect under various conditions in thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Rodrussamee, Nadchanok; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Hirata, Katsushi; Suprayogi; Limtong, Savitree; Kosaka, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Mamoru

    2011-05-01

    Ethanol fermentation ability of the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, which is able to utilize various sugars including glucose, mannose, galactose, xylose, and arabinose, was examined under shaking and static conditions at high temperatures. The yeast was found to produce ethanol from all of these sugars except for arabinose under a shaking condition but only from hexose sugars under a static condition. Growth and sugar utilization rate under a static condition were slower than those under a shaking condition, but maximum ethanol yield was slightly higher. Even at 40°C, a level of ethanol production similar to that at 30°C was observed except for galactose under a static condition. Glucose repression on utilization of other sugars was observed, and it was more evident at elevated temperatures. Consistent results were obtained by the addition of 2-deoxyglucose. The glucose effect was further examined at a transcription level, and it was found that KmGAL1 for galactokinase and KmXYL1 for xylose reductase for galactose and xylose/arabinose utilization, respectively, were repressed by glucose at low and high temperatures, but KmHXK2 for hexokinase was not repressed. We discuss the possible mechanism of glucose repression and the potential for utilization of K. marxianus in high-temperature fermentation with mixed sugars containing glucose.

  5. The competition plot: a simple test of whether two reactions occur at the same active site.

    PubMed Central

    Chevillard, C; Cárdenas, M L; Cornish-Bowden, A

    1993-01-01

    The competition plot is a method for determining whether or not two enzyme-catalysed reactions occur at the same active site. It is a plot of total rate against p, where p varies from 0 to 1 and specifies the concentrations (1-p)a0 and pb0 of two substrates in terms of reference concentrations a0 and b0 chosen so as to give the same rates at p = 0 and p = 1. If the two substrates react at the same site, the competition plot gives a horizontal straight line, i.e. the total rate is independent of p. Independent reactions at two separate sites give a curve with a maximum; separate reactions with cross-inhibition generate curves with either maxima or minima according to whether the Michaelis constants of the two substrates are smaller or larger than their inhibition constants in the other reactions. Although ambiguous results can sometimes arise, experimental strategies exist for avoiding them, for example working as close as possible to the lower of the two limiting rates. When tested with yeast hexokinase, the plot indicated phosphorylation of glucose and fructose at the same site. Conversely, with a mixture of yeast hexokinase and galactokinase it indicated phosphorylation of glucose and galactose at different sites. In both cases the observed behaviour agreed with the known properties of the enzymes. A slight modification to the definition of this plot allows it to be applied also to enzymes that deviate from Michaelis-Menten kinetics. PMID:8424801

  6. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    DOE PAGES

    Yaung, Stephanie J.; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L.; Church, George M.; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H.; Gerber, Georg K.

    2015-03-11

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Populationmore » dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Here, our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.« less

  7. Innovative Therapy for Classic Galactosemia - Tale of Two HTS

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M; Odejinmi, SI; Vankayalapati, H; Wierenga, K; Lai, K

    2011-01-01

    Classic Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), one of the key enzymes in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. While the neonatal morbidity and mortality of the disease are now mostly prevented by newborn screening and galactose restriction, long-term outcome for older children and adults with this disorder remains unsatisfactory. The pathophysiology of Classic Galactosemia is complex, but there is convincing evidence that galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P) accumulation is a major, if not the sole pathogenic factor. Galactokinase (GALK) inhibition will eliminate the accumulation of gal-1P from both dietary sources and endogenous production, and efforts towards identification of therapeutic small molecule GALK inhibitors are reviewed in detail. Experimental and computational high-throughput screenings of compound libraries to identify GALK inhibitors have been conducted, and subsequent studies aimed to characterize, prioritize, as well as to optimize the identified positives have been implemented to improve the potency of promising compounds. Although none of the identified GALK inhibitors inhibit glucokinase and hexokinase, some of them cross-inhibit other related enzymes in the GHMP small molecule kinase superfamily. While this finding may render the on-going hit-to-lead process more challenging, there is growing evidence that such cross-inhibition could also lead to advances in antimicrobial and anti-cancer therapies. PMID:22018723

  8. Metabolism of D-galactose is dispensable for the induction of the beta-galactosidase (bgaD) and lactose permease (lacpA) genes in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Anita; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we analyze the expression of the Aspergillus nidulans bgaD-lacpA gene couple (encoding an intracellular beta-galactosidase and a lactose permease) in the presence of D-galactose. This monosaccharide can be catabolized via alternative, independent pathways in this model organism. The inductive capabilities of intermediates of the two alternative routes of D-galactose utilization were addressed in loss-of-function mutants defective in a defined step in one of the two pathways. In a galactokinase (galE9) mutant, the cluster is strongly induced by D-galactose, suggesting that formation of Leloir pathway intermediates is not required. The expression profiles of bgaD and lacpA were similar in wild type, L-arabinitol dehydrogenase (araA1), and hexokinase (hxkA1) negative backgrounds, indicating that intermediates of the oxido-reductive pathway downstream of galactitol are not necessary either. Furthermore, bgaD-lacpA transcription was not induced in any of the tested strains when galactitol was provided as the growth substrate. An hxkA1/galE9 double mutant cannot grow on d-galactose at all, but still produced bgaD and lacpA transcripts upon transfer to d-galactose. We therefore concluded that the physiological inducer of the bgaD-lacpA gene cluster upon growth on D-galactose is the nonmetabolized sugar itself.

  9. Early Ankle Mobilization Promotes Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Asilehan, Batiza; Wupuer, Aikeremu; Qianman, Bayixiati; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Maimaitiaili, Abudouheilil; Shawutali, Nuerai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Aizezi, Adili; Aisaiding, Amuding; Bakyt, Yerzat; Aibek, Rakimbaiev; Wuerliebieke, Jianati

    2016-01-01

    The use of early mobilization of the ankle joint without orthosis in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture has been advocated as the optimal management. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes in a postoperative rabbit model of Achilles tendon rupture between early mobilization and immobilized animals using a differential proteomics approach. In total, 135 rabbits were randomized into the control group (n=15), the postoperative cast immobilization (PCI) group (n=60), and the early mobilization (EM) group (n=60). A rupture of the Achilles tendon was created in each animal model and repaired microsurgically, and tendon samples were removed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days postoperatively. Proteins were separated using 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, NCBI database searches, and bioinformatics analyses. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified between groups, some of which may play an important role in Achilles tendon healing. Notable candidate proteins that were upregulated in the EM group were identified, such as CRMP-2, galactokinase 1, tropomyosin-4, and transthyretin. The healing of ruptured Achilles tendons appears to be affected at the level of protein expression with the use of early mobilization. The classic postoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with an orthosis ignored the self-protecting instinct of humans. With a novel operative technique, the repaired tendon can persist the load that comes from traction in knee and ankle joint functional movement. In addition, kinesitherapy provided an excellent experimental outcome via a mechanobiological mechanism.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveals the Metabolic Insight on Consumption of Prebiotics and Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Han; An, Hyun Joo; Garrido, Daniel; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Mills, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis is a common member of the intestinal microbiota in breast-fed infants and capable of metabolizing human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). To investigate the bacterial response to different prebiotics, we analyzed both cell wall associated and whole cell proteins in B. infantis. Proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS followed by comparative proteomics to deduce the protein localization within the cell. Enzymes involved in the metabolism of lactose, glucose, galactooligosaccharides, fructooligosaccharides and HMO were constitutively expressed exhibiting less than two-fold change regardless of the sugar used. In contrast, enzymes in N-Acetylglucosamine and sucrose catabolism were induced by HMO and fructans, respectively. Galactose-metabolizing enzymes phosphoglucomutase, UDP-glucose 4-epimerase and UTP glucose-1-P uridylytransferase were expressed constitutively, while galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, increased their expression three fold when HMO and lactose were used as substrates for cell growth. Cell wall-associated proteomics also revealed ATP-dependent sugar transport systems associated with consumption of different prebiotics. In addition, the expression of 16 glycosyl hydrolases revealed the complete metabolic route for each substrate. Mucin, which possesses O-glycans that are structurally similar to HMO did not induced the expression of transport proteins, hydrolysis or sugar metabolic pathway indicating B. infantis do not utilize these glycoconjugates. PMID:23469017

  11. Galactose tolerance studies of individuals with reduced galactose pathway activity.

    PubMed Central

    Mellman, W J; Rawnsley, B E; Nichols, C W; Needelman, B; Mennuti, M T; Malone, J; Tedesco, T A

    1975-01-01

    The galactose tolerance of individuals with mutant genotypes affecting the activities of galactokinase (GALK) and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) was examined. Genotypes studied were heterozygotes for the GALK and GALT forms of galactosemia, the Duarte-variant GALT, and Philadelphia-variant GALK alleles. The measurements used were urinary concentration of galactose during pregnancy in adults and in infants from the newborn period through the first 5 months of life; the rate of elimination of an intravenous infusion of galactose; and slit-lamp examination of the lens for evidence of cataracts. No unusual urinary excretions of galactose were noted in any of the age groups studied. Intravenous galactose tolerance tests were normal in all but two women, a mother and daughter heterozygous for the GALK-deficient form of galactosemia (GALKG/GALKA). Six other GALKG/GALKA subjects had normal tolerance studies. The intrafamilial consistency and interfamilial differences in the galactose tolerance of GALKG/GALKA individuals suggest heterogeneity of the genes responsible for the GALK-deficient form of galactosemia. Although subclinical cataracts were observed in several individuals, their significance relative to the mutant genotype cannot be resolved with the available data. PMID:173185

  12. Gal3 Binds Gal80 Tighter than Gal1 Indicating Adaptive Protein Changes Following Duplication.

    PubMed

    Lavy, Tali; Yanagida, Hayato; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-02-01

    Derived from the yeast whole-genome duplication, Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL1 and GAL3 encode the catabolic enzyme galactokinase (Gal1) and its transcriptional coinducer (Gal3), whereas the ancestral, preduplicated GAL1 gene performed both functions. Previous studies indicated that divergence was primarily driven by changes in upstream promoter elements, and changes in GAL3's coding region are assumed to be the result of drift. We show that replacement of GAL3's open-reading-frame with GAL1's results in an extended lag phase upon switching to growth on galactose with up to 2.5-fold differences in the initial cell masses. Accordingly, the binding affinity of Gal3 to Gal80 was found to be greater than 10-folds higher than that of Gal1, with both a higher association rate (ka) and lower dissociation (kd) rate. Thus, while changes in the noncoding, regulatory regions were the initial driving force for GAL3's subfunctionalization as a coinducer, adaptive changes in the protein sequence seem to have followed.

  13. Combined biosynthetic pathway for de novo production of UDP-galactose: catalysis with multiple enzymes immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziye; Zhang, Jianbo; Chen, Xi; Wang, Peng G

    2002-04-01

    Regeneration of sugar nucleotides is a critical step in the biosynthetic pathway for the formation of oligosaccharides. To alleviate the difficulties in the production of sugar nucleotides, we have developed a method to produce uridine diphosphate galactose (UDP-galactose). The combined biosynthetic pathway, which involves seven enzymes, is composed of three parts: i) the main pathway to form UDP-galactose from galactose, with the enzymes galactokinase, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and inorganic pyrophosphatase, ii) the uridine triphosphate supply pathway catalyzed by uridine monophosphate (UMP) kinase and nucleotide diphosphate kinase, and iii) the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regeneration pathway catalyzed by polyphosphate kinase with polyphosphate added as an energy resource. All of the enzymes were expressed individually and immobilized through their hexahistidine tags onto nickel agarose beads ("super beads"). The reaction requires a stoichiometric amount of UMP and galactose, and catalytic amounts of ATP and glucose 1-phosphate, all inexpensive starting materials. After continuous circulation of the reaction mixture through the super-bead column for 48 h, 50 % of the UMP was converted into UDP-galactose. The results show that de novo production of UDP-galactose on the super-bead column is more efficient than in solution because of the stability of the immobilized enzymes.

  14. Glutamine synthetase-constitutive mutation affecting the glnALG upstream promoter of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    León, P; Romero, D; Garciarrubio, A; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1985-01-01

    The spontaneous gln-76 mutation of Escherichia coli (Osorio et al., Mol. Gen. Genet. 194:114-123, 1984) was previously shown to be responsible for the cis-dominant constitutive expression of the glnA gene in the absence of a glnG-glnF activator system. Nucleotide sequence analysis has now revealed that gln-76 is a single transversion T.A to A.T, an up-promoter mutation affecting the -10 region of glnAp1, the upstream promoter of the glnALG control region. Both, wild-type and gln-76 DNA control regions were cloned into the promoter-probe plasmid pKO1. Galactokinase activity determinations of cells carrying the fused plasmids showed 10-fold more effective expression mediated by gln-76 than by the glnA wild-type control region. Primer extension experiments with RNA from strains carrying the gln-76 control region indicated that the transcription initiation sites were the same in both the gln-76 mutant and the wild type. Images PMID:2866175

  15. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-03-01

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.

  16. Galactose metabolism by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Abranches, Jacqueline; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Burne, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    The galK gene, encoding galactokinase of the Leloir pathway, was insertionally inactivated in Streptococcus mutans UA159. The galK knockout strain displayed only marginal growth on galactose, but growth on glucose or lactose was not affected. In strain UA159, the sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) for lactose and the PTS for galactose were induced by growth in lactose and galactose, although galactose PTS activity was very low, suggesting that S. mutans does not have a galactose-specific PTS and that the lactose PTS may transport galactose, albeit poorly. To determine if the galactose growth defect of the galK mutant could be overcome by enhancing lactose PTS activity, the gene encoding a putative repressor of the operon for lactose PTS and phospho-beta-galactosidase, lacR, was insertionally inactivated. A galK and lacR mutant still could not grow on galactose, although the strain had constitutively elevated lactose PTS activity. The glucose PTS activity of lacR mutants grown in glucose was lower than in the wild-type strain, revealing an influence of LacR or the lactose PTS on the regulation of the glucose PTS. Mutation of the lacA gene of the tagatose pathway caused impaired growth in lactose and galactose, suggesting that galactose can only be efficiently utilized when both the Leloir and tagatose pathways are functional. A mutation of the permease in the multiple sugar metabolism operon did not affect growth on galactose. Thus, the galactose permease of S. mutans is not present in the gal, lac, or msm operons. PMID:15466549

  17. Towards Enhanced Galactose Utilization by Lactococcus lactis▿

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Ana R.; Pool, Wietske A.; Solopova, Ana; Kok, Jan; Santos, Helena; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of galactose in dairy products due to partial lactose fermentation by lactic acid bacteria yields poor-quality products and precludes their consumption by individuals suffering from galactosemia. This study aimed at extending our knowledge of galactose metabolism in Lactococcus lactis, with the final goal of tailoring strains for enhanced galactose consumption. We used directed genetically engineered strains to examine galactose utilization in strain NZ9000 via the chromosomal Leloir pathway (gal genes) or the plasmid-encoded tagatose 6-phosphate (Tag6P) pathway (lac genes). Galactokinase (GalK), but not galactose permease (GalP), is essential for growth on galactose. This finding led to the discovery of an alternative route, comprising a galactose phosphotransferase system (PTS) and a phosphatase, for galactose dissimilation in NZ9000. Introduction of the Tag6P pathway in a galPMK mutant restored the ability to metabolize galactose but did not sustain growth on this sugar. The latter strain was used to prove that lacFE, encoding the lactose PTS, is necessary for galactose metabolism, thus implicating this transporter in galactose uptake. Both PTS transporters have a low affinity for galactose, while GalP displays a high affinity for the sugar. Furthermore, the GalP/Leloir route supported the highest galactose consumption rate. To further increase this rate, we overexpressed galPMKT, but this led to a substantial accumulation of α-galactose 1-phosphate and α-glucose 1-phosphate, pointing to a bottleneck at the level of α-phosphoglucomutase. Overexpression of a gene encoding α-phosphoglucomutase alone or in combination with gal genes yielded strains with galactose consumption rates enhanced up to 50% relative to that of NZ9000. Approaches to further improve galactose metabolism are discussed. PMID:20817811

  18. Evaluation of analogues of GalNAc as substrates for enzymes of the mammalian GalNAc salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Pouilly, Sabrina; Bourgeaux, Vanessa; Piller, Friedrich; Piller, Véronique

    2012-04-20

    Changes in glycosylation are correlated to disease and associated with differentiation processes. Experimental tools are needed to investigate the physiological implications of these changes either by labeling of the modified glycans or by blocking their biosynthesis. N-Acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) is a monosaccharide widely encountered in glycolipids, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins; once taken up by cells it can be converted through a salvage pathway to UDP-GalNAc, which is further used by glycosyltransferases to build glycans. In order to find new reporter molecules able to integrate into cellular glycans, synthetic analogues of GalNAc were prepared and tested as substrates of both enzymes acting sequentially in the GalNAc salvage pathway, galactokinase 2 (GK2) and uridylpyrophosphorylase AGX1. Detailed in vitro assays identified the GalNAc analogues that can be transformed into sugar nucleotides and revealed several bottlenecks in the pathway: a modification on C6 is not tolerated by GK2; AGX1 can use all products of GK2 although with various efficiencies; and all analogues transformed into UDP-GalNAc analogues except those with alterations on C4 are substrates for the polypeptide GalNAc transferase T1. Besides, all analogues that could be incorporated in vitro into O-glycans were also integrated into cellular O-glycans as attested by their detection on the cell surface of CHO-ldlD cells. Altogether our results show that GalNAc analogues can help to better define structural requirements of the donor substrates for the enzymes involved in GalNAc metabolism, and those that are incorporated into cells will prove valuable for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

  19. A food-grade industrial arming yeast expressing β-1,3-1,4-glucanase with enhanced thermal stability*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qin; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Liu-liu; Chen, Qi-he; Chen, Ji-cheng; Zhang, Hong-bo; Ruan, Hui; He, Guo-qing

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a novel food-grade industrial arming yeast displaying β-1,3-1,4-glucanase and to evaluate the thermal stability of the glucanase for practical application. For this purpose, a bi-directional vector containing galactokinase (GAL1) and phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) promoters in different orientations was constructed. The β-1,3-1,4-glucanase gene from Bacillus subtilis was fused to α-agglutinin and expressed under the control of the GAL1 promoter. α-galactosidase induced by the constitutive PGK1 promoter was used as a food-grade selection marker. The feasibility of the α-galactosidase marker was confirmed by the growth of transformants harboring the constructed vector on a medium containing melibiose as a sole carbon source, and by the clear halo around the transformants in Congo-red plates owing to the expression of β-1,3-1,4-glucanase. The analysis of β-1,3-1,4-glucanase activity in cell pellets and in the supernatant of the recombinant yeast strain revealed that β-1,3-1,4-glucanase was successfully displayed on the cell surface of the yeast. The displayed β-1,3-1,4-glucanase activity in the recombinant yeast cells increased immediately after the addition of galactose and reached 45.1 U/ml after 32-h induction. The thermal stability of β-1,3-1,4-glucanase displayed in the recombinant yeast cells was enhanced compared with the free enzyme. These results suggest that the constructed food-grade yeast has the potential to improve the brewing properties of beer. PMID:20043351

  20. Galactose and Lactose Genes from the Galactose-Positive Bacterium Streptococcus salivarius and the Phylogenetically Related Galactose-Negative Bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus: Organization, Sequence, Transcription, and Activity of the gal Gene Products

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, Katy; Moineau, Sylvain; Frenette, Michel; Lessard, Christian; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a lactose- and galactose-positive bacterium that is phylogenetically closely related to Streptococcus thermophilus, a bacterium that metabolizes lactose but not galactose. In this paper, we report a comparative characterization of the S. salivarius and S. thermophilus gal-lac gene clusters. The clusters have the same organization with the order galR (codes for a transcriptional regulator and is transcribed in the opposite direction), galK (galactokinase), galT (galactose-1-P uridylyltransferase), galE (UDP-glucose 4-epimerase), galM (galactose mutarotase), lacS (lactose transporter), and lacZ (β-galactosidase). An analysis of the nucleotide sequence as well as Northern blotting and primer extension experiments revealed the presence of four promoters located upstream from galR, the gal operon, galM, and the lac operon of S. salivarius. Putative promoters with virtually identical nucleotide sequences were found at the same positions in the S. thermophilus gal-lac gene cluster. An additional putative internal promoter at the 3′ end of galT was found in S. thermophilus but not in S. salivarius. The results clearly indicated that the gal-lac gene cluster was efficiently transcribed in both species. The Shine-Dalgarno sequences of galT and galE were identical in both species, whereas the ribosome binding site of S. thermophilus galK differed from that of S. salivarius by two nucleotides, suggesting that the S. thermophilus galK gene might be poorly translated. This was confirmed by measurements of enzyme activities. PMID:11790749

  1. Development of a real-time PCR method coupled with a selective pre-enrichment step for quantification of Morganella morganii and Morganella psychrotolerans in fish products.

    PubMed

    Podeur, Gaëtan; Dalgaard, Paw; Leroi, Francoise; Prévost, Hervé; Emborg, Jette; Martinussen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Pilet, Marie-France

    2015-06-16

    Histamine fish poisoning is common and due to toxic concentrations of histamine often produced by Gram-negative bacteria in fin-fish products with a high content of the free amino acid histidine. The genus Morganella includes two species previously reported to cause incidents of histamine fish poisoning. Morganella morganii and Morganella psychrotolerans are both strong producer of histamine. However, little is known about the occurrence and critical stages for fish contamination with these bacteria. To elucidate contamination routes of Morganella, specific real-time quantitative PCR (RTi qPCR) methods for quantification of M. morganii and M. psychrotolerans have been developed. Selective primers amplified a 110 bp region of the vasD gene for M. psychrotolerans and a 171 bp region of the galactokinase gene for M. morganii. These primer-sets showed high specificity as demonstrated by using purified DNA from 23 other histamine producing bacteria and 26 isolates with no or limited histamine production. The efficiency of the qPCR reactions on artificially contaminated fish samples were 100.8% and 96.3% respectively. The limit of quantification (LOQ) without enrichment was 4 log CFU/g. A quantitative enrichment step with a selective medium was included and improved the sensitivity of the methods to a LOQ of below 50 CFU/g in seafood. RTi qPCR methods with or without enrichment were evaluated for enumeration of Morganella species in naturally contaminated fresh fish and lightly preserved seafood from Denmark. These new methods will contribute to a better understanding of the occurrence and histamine production by Morganella species in fish products, information that is essential to reduce the unacceptably high frequency of histamine fish poisoning.

  2. Phenotypic Consequences Resulting from a Methionine-to-Valine Substitution at Position 48 in the HPr Protein of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Plamondon, Pascale; Brochu, Denis; Thomas, Suzanne; Fradette, Julie; Gauthier, Lucie; Vaillancourt, Katy; Buckley, Nicole; Frenette, Michel; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    1999-01-01

    In gram-positive bacteria, the HPr protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) can be phosphorylated on a histidine residue at position 15 (His15) by enzyme I (EI) of the PTS and on a serine residue at position 46 (Ser46) by an ATP-dependent protein kinase (His∼P and Ser-P, respectively). We have isolated from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, by independent selection from separate cultures, two spontaneous mutants (Ga3.78 and Ga3.14) that possess a missense mutation in ptsH (the gene encoding HPr) replacing the methionine at position 48 by a valine. The mutation did not prevent the phosphorylation of HPr at His15 by EI nor the phosphorylation at Ser46 by the ATP-dependent HPr kinase. The levels of HPr(Ser-P) in glucose-grown cells of the parental and mutant Ga3.78 were virtually the same. However, mutant cells growing on glucose produced two- to threefold less HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P) than the wild-type strain, while the levels of free HPr and HPr(His∼P) were increased 18- and 3-fold, respectively. The mutants grew as well as the wild-type strain on PTS sugars (glucose, fructose, and mannose) and on the non-PTS sugars lactose and melibiose. However, the growth rate of both mutants on galactose, also a non-PTS sugar, decreased rapidly with time. The M48V substitution had only a minor effect on the repression of α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase by glucose, but this mutation abolished diauxie by rendering cells unable to prevent the catabolism of a non-PTS sugar (lactose, galactose, and melibiose) when glucose was available. The results suggested that the capacity of the wild-type cells to preferentially metabolize glucose over non-PTS sugars resulted mainly from inhibition of the catabolism of these secondary energy sources via a HPr-dependent mechanism. This mechanism was activated following glucose but not lactose metabolism, and it did not involve HPr(Ser-P) as the only regulatory molecule. PMID:10559156

  3. Diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH Mutants That Can Be Isolated in the Presence of 2-Deoxyglucose and Galactose and Characterization of Two Mutants Synthesizing Reduced Levels of HPr, a Phosphocarrier of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne; Brochu, Denis; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2001-01-01

    In streptococci, HPr, a phosphocarrier of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS), undergoes multiple posttranslational chemical modifications resulting in the formation of HPr(His∼P), HPr(Ser-P), and HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P), whose cellular concentrations vary with growth conditions. Distinct physiological functions are associated with specific forms of HPr. We do not know, however, the cellular thresholds below which these forms become unable to fulfill their functions and to what extent modifications in the cellular concentrations of the different forms of HPr modify cellular physiology. In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH mutants that can be isolated by positive selection on a solid medium containing 2-deoxyglucose and galactose and identify 13 amino acids that are essential for HPr to properly accomplish its physiological functions. We also report the characterization of two S. salivarius mutants that produced approximately two- and threefoldless HPr and enzyme I (EI) respectively. The data indicated that (i) a reduction in the synthesis of HPr due to a mutation in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of ptsH reduced ptsI expression; (ii) a threefold reduction in EI and HPr cellular levels did not affect PTS transport capacity; (iii) a twofold reduction in HPr synthesis was sufficient to reduce the rate at which cells metabolized PTS sugars, increase generation times on PTS sugars and to a lesser extent on non-PTS sugars, and impede the exclusion of non-PTS sugars by PTS sugars; (iv) a threefold reduction in HPr synthesis caused a strong derepression of the genes coding for α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase when the cells were grown at the expense of a PTS sugar but did not affect the synthesis of α-galactosidase when cells were grown at the expense of lactose, a noninducing non-PTS sugar; and (v) no correlation was found between the magnitude of enzyme derepression and