Science.gov

Sample records for galactokinase

  1. Hereditary galactokinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J. G. H.; Don, N. A.; Mann, Trevor P.

    1971-01-01

    A baby with galactokinase deficiency, a recessive inborn error of galactose metabolism, is described. The case is exceptional in that there was no evidence of gypsy blood in the family concerned. The investigation of neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia led to the discovery of galactosuria. As noted by others, the paucity of presenting features makes early diagnosis difficult, and detection by biochemical screening seems desirable. Cataract formation, of early onset, appears to be the only severe persisting complication and may be due to the biosynthesis and accumulation of galactitol in the lens. Ophthalmic surgeons need to be aware of this enzyme defect, because with early diagnosis and dietary treatment these lens changes should be reversible. PMID:5109408

  2. Galactokinase promiscuity: a question of flexibility?

    PubMed

    McAuley, Megan; Kristiansson, Helena; Huang, Meilan; Pey, Angel L; Timson, David J

    2016-02-01

    Galactokinase catalyses the first committed step of the Leloir pathway, i.e. the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of α-D-galactose at C1-OH. Reduced galactokinase activity results in the inherited metabolic disease type II galactosaemia. However, inhibition of galactokinase is considered a viable approach to treating more severe forms of galactosaemia (types I and III). Considerable progress has been made in the identification of high affinity, selective inhibitors. Although the structure of galactokinase from a variety of species is known, its catalytic mechanism remains uncertain. Although the bulk of evidence suggests that the reaction proceeds via an active site base mechanism, some experimental and theoretical studies contradict this. The enzyme has potential as a biocatalyst in the production of sugar 1-phosphates. This potential is limited by its high specificity. A variety of approaches have been taken to identify galactokinase variants which are more promiscuous. These have broadened galactokinase's specificity to include a wide range of D- and L-sugars. Initial studies suggest that some of these alterations result in increased flexibility at the active site. It is suggested that modulation of protein flexibility is at least as important as structural modifications in determining the success or failure of enzyme engineering.

  3. Galactokinase activity in Streptococcus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.; Morris, H.A.; McKay, L.L.

    1985-10-01

    ATP-dependent phosphorylation of (/sup 14/C)galactose by 11 strains of streptococcus thermophilus indicated that these organisms possessed the Leloir enzyme, galactokinase (galK). Activities were 10 times higher in fully induced, galactose-fermenting (Gal/sup +/) strains than in galactose-nonfermenting (Gal/sup -/) strains. Lactose-grown, Gal/sup -/ cells released free galactose into the medium and were unable to utilize residual galactose or to induce galK above basal levels. Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus 19258 also released galactose into the medium, but when lactose was depleted, growth on galactose commenced, and galK increased from 0.025 to 0.22 ..mu..mol of galactose phosphorylated per min per mg of protein. When lactose was added to galactose-grown cells of S. thermophilus 19258, galK activity rapidly decreased. These results suggest that galK in Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus is subject to an induction-repression mechanism, but that galK cannot be induced in Gal/sup -/ strains.

  4. Cloning of a human galactokinase gene (GK2) on chromosome 15 by complementation in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R T; Peterson, C L; Calman, A F; Herskowitz, I; O'Donnell, J J

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a galactokinase (EC 2.7.1.6) was isolated by complementation of a galactokinase-deficient (gal1-) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This cDNA encodes a predicted protein of 458 amino acids with 29% identity to galactokinase of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. Previous studies have mapped a human galactokinase gene (GK1) to chromosome 17q23-25, closely linked to thymidine kinase. The galactokinase gene that we have isolated (GK2) is located on chromosome 15. The relationship between the disease locus for galactokinase deficiency galactosemia, which is responsible for cataracts in newborns and possibly presenile cataracts in adults, and the two galactokinase loci is unknown. Images PMID:1438294

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi contains two galactokinases; molecular and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Lobo-Rojas, Ángel E; González-Marcano, Eglys B; Valera-Vera, Edward A; Acosta, Héctor R; Quiñones, Wilfredo A; Burchmore, Richard J S; Concepción, Juan L; Cáceres, Ana J

    2016-10-01

    Two different putative galactokinase genes, found in the genome database of Trypanosoma cruzi were cloned and sequenced. Expression of the genes in Escherichia coli resulted for TcGALK-1 in the synthesis of a soluble and active enzyme, and in the case of TcGALK-2 gene a less soluble protein, with predicted molecular masses of 51.9kDa and 51.3kDa, respectively. The Km values determined for the recombinant proteins were for galactose 0.108mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.091mM (TcGALK-2) and for ATP 0.36mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.1mM (TcGALK-2). Substrate inhibition by ATP (Ki 0.414mM) was only observed for TcGALK-2. Gel-filtration chromatography showed that natural TcGALKs and recombinant TcGALK-1 are monomeric. In agreement with the possession of a type-1 peroxisome-targeting signal by both TcGALKs, they were found to be present inside glycosomes using two different methods of subcellular fractionation in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Both genes are expressed in epimastigote and trypomastigote stages since the respective proteins were immunodetected by western blotting. The T. cruzi galactokinases present their highest (52-47%) sequence identity with their counterpart from Leishmania spp., followed by prokaryotic galactokinases such as those from E. coli and Lactococcus lactis (26-23%). In a phylogenetic analysis, the trypanosomatid galactokinases form a separate cluster, showing an affiliation with bacteria. Epimastigotes of T. cruzi can grow in glucose-depleted LIT-medium supplemented with 20mM of galactose, suggesting that this hexose, upon phosphorylation by a TcGALK, could be used in the synthesis of UDP-galactose and also as a possible carbon and energy source. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of galactokinase from Pyrococcus horikoshii

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Eiji; Sakamoto, Keiko; Obayashi, Naomi; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kuroishi, Chizu; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Shinkai, Akeo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2006-02-01

    Galactokinase from P. horikoshii has been crystallized in both the apo form and as a ternary complex with α-d-galactose and an ATP analogue. The crystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined. Galactokinase (EC 2.7.1.6) catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of α-d-galactose to α-d-galactose-1-phosphate, in an additional metabolic branch of glycolysis. The apo-form crystal structure of the enzyme has not yet been elucidated. Crystals of galactokinase from Pyrococcus horikoshii were prepared in both the apo form and as a ternary complex with α-d-galactose and an ATP analogue. Diffraction data sets were collected to 1.24 Å resolution for the apo form and to 1.7 Å for the ternary complex form using synchrotron radiation. The apo-form crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 108.08, b = 38.91, c = 81.57 Å, β = 109.8°. The ternary complex form was isomorphous with the apo form, except for the length of the a axis. The galactokinase activity of the enzyme was confirmed and the kinetic parameters at 323 K were determined.

  7. Insight into the mechanism of galactokinase: Role of a critical glutamate residue and helix/coil transitions.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Margaret; Huang, Meilan; Timson, David J

    2017-03-01

    Galactokinase, the enzyme which catalyses the first committed step in the Leloir pathway, has attracted interest due to its potential as a biocatalyst and as a possible drug target in the treatment of type I galactosemia. The mechanism of the enzyme is not fully elucidated. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of galactokinase with the active site residues Arg-37 and Asp-186 altered predicted that two regions (residues 174-179 and 231-240) had different dynamics as a consequence. Interestingly, the same two regions were also affected by alterations in Arg-105, Glu-174 and Arg-228. These three residues were identified as important in catalysis in previous computational studies on human galactokinase. Alteration of Arg-105 to methionine resulted in a modest reduction in activity with little change in stability. When Arg-228 was changed to methionine, the enzyme's interaction with both ATP and galactose was affected. This variant was significantly less stable than the wild-type protein. Changing Glu-174 to glutamine (but not to aspartate) resulted in no detectable activity and a less stable enzyme. Overall, these combined in silico and in vitro studies demonstrate the importance of a negative charge at position 174 and highlight the critical role of the dynamics in to key regions of the protein. We postulate that these regions may be critical for mediating the enzyme's structure and function.

  8. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test.

  9. Ultra Fast and Sensitive Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Based Assay for Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase and Galactokinase Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([13C6]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [13C6]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4 ± 4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8 ± 0.47 (mean ± SD) µmol·(g Hgb) −1·hr−1. Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analzyed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  10. Bimodal expression of yeast GAL genes is controlled by a long non-coding RNA and a bifunctional galactokinase.

    PubMed

    Zacharioudakis, Ioannis; Tzamarias, Dimitris

    2017-04-22

    Bimodality in gene expression can generate phenotypic heterogeneity facilitating fitness and growth of isogenic cell populations in suboptimal environments. We investigated the mechanism by which, in conditions of limiting galactose, yeast cell populations activate GAL genes in a bimodal fashion with a cell fraction expressing GAL genes (ON), while the rest subpopulation is kept at the non-expressing (OFF) state. We show that a long non-coding RNA (GAL10-ncRNA) crossing the bidirectional GAL1-10 promoter, decreases the rate by which single cells commit transition to the ON state without affecting the rate of GAL transcription per se in ON cells. This is accomplished by repressing stochastic expression of the bifunctional Gal1p galactokinase, which besides its enzymatic activity acts as an essential inducer of the system under those conditions. We show that once single cells switch to the ON state, the GAL10-ncRNA effect is overridden by accumulating Gal1p levels sufficient to feedback positively on Gal4p, and not by the active transcription of GAL10 that occurs in opposite direction relative to that of GAL10-ncRNA. Conversely, GAL10-ncRNA does not influence transition of ON cells, where Gal4p is active, back to the OFF state. Our model suggests that the functional interplay between GAL10-ncRNA transcription, stochastic Gal1p expression and Gal1p positive feedback on Gal4p constitutes a novel molecular switch mechanism dictating the commitment of individual cells for either metabolic state.

  11. Galactokinase encoded by GAL1 is a bifunctional protein required for induction of the GAL genes in Kluyveromyces lactis and is able to suppress the gal3 phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, J; Walker-Jonah, A; Hollenberg, C P

    1991-01-01

    We have analyzed a GAL1 mutant (gal1-r strain) of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis which lacks the induction of beta-galactosidase and the enzymes of the Leloir pathway in the presence of galactose. The data show that the K. lactis GAL1 gene product has, in addition to galactokinase activity, a function required for induction of the lactose system. This regulatory function is not dependent on galactokinase activity, as it is still present in a galactokinase-negative mutant (gal1-209). Complementation studies in Saccharomyces cervisiae show that K. lactis GAL1 and gal1-209, but not gal1-r, complement the gal3 mutation. We conclude that the regulatory function of GAL1 in K. lactis soon after induction is similar to the function of GAL3 in S. cerevisiae. PMID:1922058

  12. Galactose utilization in Lactobacillus helveticus: isolation and characterization of the galactokinase (galK) and galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (galT) genes.

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, B; Pilloud, N

    1991-01-01

    By complementing appropriate gal lesions in Escherichia coli K802, we were able to isolate the galactokinase (galK) and galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (galT) genes of Lactobacillus helveticus. Tn10 transposon mutagenesis, together with in vivo complementation analysis and in vitro enzyme activity measurements, allowed us to map these two genes. The DNA sequences of the genes and the flanking regions were determined. These revealed that the two genes are organized in the order galK-galT in an operonlike structure. In an in vitro transcription-translation assay, the galK and galT gene products were identified as 44- and 53-kDa proteins, respectively, data which corresponded well with the DNA sequencing data. The deduced amino acid sequence of the galK gene product showed significant homologies to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic galactokinase sequences, whereas galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase did not show any sequence similarities to other known proteins. This observation, together with a comparison of known gal operon structures, suggested that the L. helveticus operon developed independently to a translational expression unit having a different gene order than that in E. coli, Streptococcus lividans, or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA sequencing of the flanking regions revealed an open reading frame downstream of the galKT operon. It was tentatively identified as galM (mutarotase) on the basis of the significant amino acid sequence homology with the corresponding Streptococcus thermophilus gene. Images PMID:2066342

  13. Role of Arg228 in the phosphorylation of galactokinase: the mechanism of GHMP kinases by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meilan; Li, Xiaozhou; Zou, Jian-Wei; Timson, David J

    2013-07-16

    GHMP kinases are a group of structurally related small molecule kinases. They have been found in all kingdoms of life and are mostly responsible for catalyzing the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of intermediary metabolites. Although the GHMP kinases are of clinical, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological importance, the mechanism of GHMP kinases is controversial. A catalytic base mechanism was suggested for mevalonate kinase that has a structural feature of the γ-phosphate of ATP close to an aspartate residue; however, for one GHMP family member, homoserine kinase, where the residue acting as general base is absent, a direct phosphorylation mechanism was suggested. Furthermore, it was proposed by some authors that all the GHMP kinases function by a similar mechanism. This controversy in mechanism has limited our ability to exploit these enzymes as drug targets and in biotechnology. Here the phosphorylation reaction mechanism of the human galactokinase, a member of the GHMP kinase family, was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations (B3LYP-D/AMBER99). The reaction coordinates were localized by potential energy scan using an adiabatic mapping method. Our results indicate that a highly conserved Glu174 captures Arg105 in the proximity of the α-phosphate of ATP, forming a H-bond network; therefore, the mobility of ATP in the large oxyanion hole is restricted. Arg228 functions to stabilize the negative charge developed at the β,γ-bridging oxygen of the ATP during bond cleavage. The reaction occurs via a direct phosphorylation mechanism, and the Asp186 in the proximity of ATP does not directly participate in the reaction pathway. Because Arg228 is not conserved among GHMP kinases, reagents which form interactions with Arg228, and therefore can interrupt its function in phosphorylation, may be developed into potential selective inhibitors for galactokinase.

  14. Glucose represses the lactose-galactose regulon in Kluyveromyces lactis through a SNF1 and MIG1- dependent pathway that modulates galactokinase (GAL1) gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, J; Dickson, R C

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the lactose-galactose regulon in Kluyveromyces lactis is induced by lactose or galactose and repressed by glucose. Some components of the induction and glucose repression pathways have been identified but many remain unknown. We examined the role of the SNF1 (KlSNF1) and MIG1 (KlMIG1) genes in the induction and repression pathways. Our data show that full induction of the regulon requires SNF1; partial induction occurs in a Klsnf1 -deleted strain, indicating that a KlSNF1 -independent pathway(s) also regulates induction. MIG1 is required for full glucose repression of the regulon, but there must be a KlMIG1 -independent repression pathway also. The KlMig1 protein appears to act downstream of the KlSnf1 protein in the glucose repression pathway. Most importantly, the KlSnf1-KIMig repression pathway operates by modulating KlGAL1 expression. Regulating KlGAL1 expression in this manner enables the cell to switch the regulon off in the presence of glucose. Overall, our data show that, while the Snf1 and Mig1 proteins play similar roles in regulating the galactose regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and K.lactis , the way in which these proteins are integrated into the regulatory circuits are unique to each regulon, as is the degree to which each regulon is controlled by the two proteins. PMID:9278487

  15. Role of galactose in cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Elzi, David J; Song, Meihua; Shiio, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been proposed to play critical roles in tumor suppression and organismal aging, but the molecular mechanism of senescence remains incompletely understood. Here we report that a putative lysosomal carbohydrate efflux transporter, Spinster, induces cellular senescence in human primary fibroblasts. Administration of d-galactose synergistically enhanced Spinster-induced senescence and this synergism required the transporter activity of Spinster. Intracellular d-galactose is metabolized to galactose-1-phosphate by galactokinase. Galactokinase-deficient fibroblasts, which accumulate intracellular d-galactose, displayed increased baseline senescence. Senescence of galactokinase-deficient fibroblasts was further enhanced by d-galactose administration and was diminished by restoration of wild-type galactokinase expression. Silencing galactokinase in normal fibroblasts also induced senescence. These results suggest a role for intracellular galactose in the induction of cellular senescence.

  16. Rearrangement and mutagenesis of a shuttle vector plasmid after passage in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Razzaque, A; Mizusawa, H; Seidman, M M

    1983-01-01

    A shuttle vector plasmid that contains sequences from simian virus 40, pBR322, and a bacterial marker gene, galactokinase, has been constructed. After replication in cells permissive for virus progeny, plasmid DNA was introduced into a galactokinase-deficient bacterial strain and the relative frequency of colonies with plasmids but without galactokinase activity was determined. This assay showed that 1% of the plasmids were defective after passage in the mammalian cells. Individual mutant plasmids were examined and found to contain deletions, duplications, point mutations, and insertions of cell DNA. Images PMID:6304690

  17. D-galactose catabolism in Penicillium chrysogenum: Expression analysis of the structural genes of the Leloir pathway.

    PubMed

    Jónás, Ágota; Fekete, Erzsébet; Németh, Zoltán; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we analyzed the expression of the structural genes encoding the five enzymes comprising the Leloir pathway of D-galactose catabolism in the industrial cell factory Penicillium chrysogenum on various carbon sources. The genome of P. chrysogenum contains a putative galactokinase gene at the annotated locus Pc13g10140, the product of which shows strong structural similarity to yeast galactokinase that was expressed on lactose and D-galactose only. The expression profile of the galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase gene at annotated locus Pc15g00140 was essentially similar to that of galactokinase. This is in contrast to the results from other fungi such as Aspergillus nidulans, Trichoderma reesei and A. niger, where the ortholog galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase genes were constitutively expressed. As for the UDP-galactose-4-epimerase encoding gene, five candidates were identified. We could not detect Pc16g12790, Pc21g12170 and Pc20g06140 expression on any of the carbon sources tested, while for the other two loci (Pc21g10370 and Pc18g01080) transcripts were clearly observed under all tested conditions. Like the 4-epimerase specified at locus Pc21g10370, the other two structural Leloir pathway genes - UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (Pc21g12790) and phosphoglucomutase (Pc18g01390) - were expressed constitutively at high levels as can be expected from their indispensable function in fungal cell wall formation.

  18. The gene of an early onset progressive cataract (cerulean cataract) maps to 17q24

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, M.M.; Ferrell, R.E.; Kivlin, J.D.

    1994-09-01

    Cerulean cataract is an autosomal dominant, fully penetrant, early onset, progressive cataract characterized by blue or white opacifications in the nucleus and cortex of the lens. A five generation family with 44 available affected members in three generations allowed exclusion of linkage of the cerulean cataract phenotype to lens structural protein genes and to all of the chromosomal regions to which autosomal dominant cataract phenotypes have previously been mapped. Exclusion of the plausible candidate instigated a genome-wide search utilizing short tandem repeat polymorphims. The genome search localized the cerulean cataract disease gene to chromosomal region 17q24. The three markers closest to the disease gene are D17S802 [Z({theta})=9.20 at ({theta})=0.086], D17S836 [Z({theta})=4.22 at ({theta})=0.061], and AFMa238yb5 [Z({theta})=7.11 at ({theta})=0.032]. Multipoint analysis yielded a maximum lod score of Z({theta})=11.4 between D17S802 and D17S836 at recombination rates of 0.048 and 0.013 respectively. Three genes that map near the 17q24 chromosomal region and are known to contain highly polymorphic microsatellites were tested for linkage. The genes, DHP-sensitive calcium channel gamma subunit (CACNLG), human somatastatin receptor (SSTR2), and the skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunit (SCN4A), were all excluded [Z({theta})=-{infinity} at ({theta})=0] as the gene causing cerulean cataract. The galactokinase (GK1) gene has not been cloned, but its map location is 17q23-q25. Galactokinase deficiency is characterized by a recessive, progressive, early onset cataract. Because of the map location of galactokinase, the age-at-onset, and progressive nature of cataracts associated with galactokinase deficiency, galactokinase is being investigated as a candidate gene for the cerulean cataract phenotype.

  19. Selection of Galactose-Fermenting Streptococcus thermophilus in Lactose-Limited Chemostat Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Terence D.; Crow, Vaughan L.

    1984-01-01

    Stock cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus are essentially galactose negative (Gal−). Although both galactose 1-phosphate uridyl transferase and uridine-5-diphospho-glucose 4-epimerase are present, suggesting that the genes for the Leloir pathway exist, cells cannot induce high levels of galactokinase. Therefore, galactose is largely excreted when cultures are grown on lactose, and most strains cannot be readily adapted to grow on free galactose. Gal− cultures were grown in a chemostat under lactose limitation in which high concentrations of residual galactose were present. Under this selection pressure, Gal+ organisms eventually took over the culture with all four strains examined. Gal+ cells had induced galactokinase, and three of the four strains grew on free galactose with doubling times of 40 to 50 min. When Gal+ organisms were grown on lactose in batch culture, the galactose moiety was only partially utilized while lactose was still present. As lactose was exhausted, and catabolite repression was lifted, the Leloir pathway enzymes (especially galactokinase) were induced and the residual galactose fermented. Neither phospho-β-galactosidase activity nor the enzymes of the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway were detected in S. thermophilus. In contrast to Streptococcus cremoris and Streptococcus lactis, fermentation was homolactic with galactose in batch cultures and with lactose limitation in the chemostat. When mixed Gal+-Gal− cultures were repeatedly transferred in milk, the Gal− cells became the dominant cell type. The Gal− phenotype of stock cultures probably reflects their prolonged maintenance in milk. PMID:16346586

  20. Distinct roles of galactose-1P in galactose-mediated growth arrest of yeast deficient in galactose-1P uridylyltransferase (GALT) and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE).

    PubMed

    Mumma, Jane Odhiambo; Chhay, Juliet S; Ross, Kerry L; Eaton, Jana S; Newell-Litwa, Karen A; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2008-02-01

    Galactose is metabolized in humans and other species by the three-enzyme Leloir pathway comprised of galactokinase (GALK), galactose 1-P uridylyltransferase (GALT), and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). Impairment of GALT or GALE in humans results in the potentially lethal disorder galactosemia, and loss of either enzyme in yeast results in galactose-dependent growth arrest of cultures despite the availability of an alternate carbon source. In contrast, loss of GALK in humans is not life-threatening, and in yeast has no impact on the growth of cultures challenged with galactose. Further, the growth of both GALT-null and GALE-null yeast challenged with galactose is rescued by loss of GALK, thereby implicating the GALK reaction product, gal-1P, for a role in the galactose-sensitivity of both strains. However, the nature of that relationship has remained unclear. Here we have developed and applied a doxycycline-repressible allele of galactokinase to define the quantitative relationship between galactokinase activity, gal-1P accumulation, and growth arrest of galactose-challenged GALT or GALE-deficient yeast. Our results demonstrate a clear threshold relationship between gal-1P accumulation and galactose-mediated growth arrest in both GALT-null and GALE-null yeast, however, the threshold for the two strains is distinct. Further, we tested the galactose-sensitivity of yeast double-null for GALT and GALE, and found that although loss of GALT barely changed accumulation of gal-1P, it significantly lowered the accumulation of UDP-gal, and also dramatically rescued growth of the GALE-null cells. Together, these data suggest that while gal-1P alone may account for the galactose-sensitivity of GALT-null cells, other factors, likely to include UDP-gal accumulation, must contribute to the galactose-sensitivity of GALE-null cells.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutants Resistant to Catabolite Repression: Use in Cheese Whey Hydrolysate Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Richard B.; Benitez, Tahia; Woodward, Anne

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of an industrial-type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which rapidly and completely fermented equimolar mixtures of glucose and galactose to ethanol were isolated. These mutants fell into two general phenotypic classes based upon their fermentation kinetics and enzyme induction patterns. One class apparently specifically effects the utilization of galactose and allows sequential utilization of first glucose and then galactose in an anaerobic fermentation. The second class of mutants was resistant to general catabolite repression and produced maltase, invertase, and galactokinase in the presence of repressive levels of glucose. These mutants were completely dominant and appear to represent an as yet undescribed class of mutant. PMID:16346092

  2. Control of the receptor for galactose taxis in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Fahnestock, M; Koshland, D E

    1979-02-01

    The chemotactic response to galactose in wild-type Salmonella typhimurium is not inducible by galactose, but is inducible by fucose, a non-metabolizable analog. In a galactokinase mutant, however, the galactose receptor is inducible by galactose. These data indicate that the concentration of free galactose in the cell controls the levels of the galactose receptor. The intensities of the chemotactic responses were found to vary in proportion to the concentration of galactose receptors. In bacteria with higher levels of galactose receptors, the ribose response is inhibited by galactose. This supports the model in which the ribose and galactose receptors compete for a common component of the signaling system.

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to catabolite repression: use in cheese whey hydrolysate fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.B.; Benitez, T.; Woodward, A.

    1982-09-01

    Mutants of an industrial-type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which rapidly and completely fermented equimolar mixtures of glucose and galactose to ethanol were isolated. These mutants fell into two general phenotypic classes based upon their fermentation kinetics and enzyme induction patterns. One class apparently specifically effects the utilization of galactose and allows sequential utilization of first glucose and then galactose in an anaerobic fermentation. The second class of mutants was resistant to general catabolite repression and produced maltase, invertase, and galactokinase in the presence of repressive levels of glucose. These mutants were completely dominant and appear to represent an as yet undescribed class of mutant. (Refs. 23).

  4. [Biochemical and clinical findings in congenital abnormalities of galactose metabolism (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sitzmann, F C; Kaloud, H; Istvan, L

    1975-01-10

    Current knowledge of the biochemical basis of abnormalities in galactose metabolism are discussed. The clinical picture, analysis of frequency and therapy are described. Although the galactokinase defect hat been described only rarely, abundant literature has been published on the Gal-1-PUT defect. Five variations of this defect are known (Duarte, Los Angeles, Rennes, Indiana and Negro variants), but these simulate only partially the clinical picture of galactosaemia. The UDP-Gal-4-epimerase defect has only once been described. Defects in galactose metabolism which show autosomal recessive inheritance are demonstrated in milk-fed infants by means of the Guthrie test. If the clinical picture arouses the suspicion of a defect in Gal-1-PUT or galactokinase, then a milk-free diet should be given until the diagnosis has been verified by enzyme analysis. Children who have been fed on a lactose-free diet show normal physical and mental development. If possible the entire family of the proband should undergo enzyme analysis in order to detect and to counsel all the heterozygotes in the family. Genetic counselling is considered to be absolutely indicated in this case. Termination of pregnancy is not indicated under any circumstances.

  5. Transposition and gene disruption in the male germline of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, A J; Fritz, S; Largaespada, D A

    2001-06-01

    We have tested a synthetic, functional, transposon called Sleeping Beauty for use in mice as a germline insertional mutagen. We describe experiments in which mutagenic, polyadenylation-site trapping, transposon vectors were introduced into the germline of mice. When doubly transgenic males, expressing the Sleeping Beauty transposase gene (SB10) and harboring poly(A)-trap transposon vectors, were outcrossed to wild-type females, offspring were generated with new transposon insertions. The frequency of new transposon insertion is roughly two per male gamete. These new insertions can be passed through the germline to the next generation and can insert into or near genes. We have generated a preliminary library of 24 mice harboring 56 novel insertion sites, including one insertion into a gene represented in the EST database and one in the promoter of the galactokinase (Gck) gene. This technique has promise as a new strategy for forward genetic screens in the mouse or functional genomics.

  6. Improved one-pot multienzyme (OPME) systems for synthesizing UDP-uronic acids and glucuronides†

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Musleh M.; Qu, Jingyao; Xue, Mengyang; Klyuchnik, Timofey; Siu, Alex; Li, Yanhong; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Hai; Li, Lei; Wang, Peng G.

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana glucuronokinase (AtGlcAK) was cloned and shown to be able to use various uronic acids as substrates to produce the corresponding uronic acid-1-phosphates. AtGlcAK or Bifidobacterium infantis galactokinase (BiGalK) was used with a UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase, an inorganic pyrophosphatase, with or without a glycosyltransferase for highly efficient synthesis of UDP-uronic acids and glucuronides. These improved cost-effective one-pot multienzyme (OPME) systems avoid the use of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-cofactor in dehydrogenase-dependent UDP-glucuronic acid production processes and can be broadly applied for synthesizing various glucuronic acid-containing molecules. PMID:25686901

  7. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    De-Souza, Evandro A.; Pimentel, Felipe S. A.; Machado, Caio M.; Martins, Larissa S.; da-Silva, Wagner S.; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Masuda, Claudio A.

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast), which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia. PMID:24077966

  8. Characterization of a new UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase from Hordeum vulgare (barley).

    PubMed

    Wahl, Claudia; Spiertz, Markus; Elling, Lothar

    2017-09-20

    The broad substrate spectrum of UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylases from plant salvage pathways is of high interest for the synthesis of expensive nucleotide sugars by straightforward enzyme cascade reactions in combination with monosaccharide kinases. We here present a new UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase from Hordeum vulgare with favorable biochemical properties like broad pH and temperature tolerances as well as a broad substrate spectrum and high synthesis stability. Enzyme properties were determined and reaction conditions were optimized by high-through-put multiplexed capillary electrophoresis analysis. In combination with a galactokinase UDP-α-d-galactose (UDP-Gal) was efficiently synthesized with a space-time-yield of 17g/L*h for full conversion of 10mM substrate within 20min by 1.2U of each enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biochemical adaptations of two sugar kinases from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Verhees, Corné H; Koot, Denise G M; Ettema, Thijs J G; Dijkema, Cor; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John

    2002-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus possesses a modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway, including an unusual ADP-dependent glucokinase (ADP-GLK) and an ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase. In the present study, we report the characterization of a P. furiosus galactokinase (GALK) and its comparison with the P. furiosus ADP-GLK. The pyrococcal genes encoding the ADP-GLK and GALK were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the proteins were subsequently purified to homogeneity. Both enzymes are specific kinases with an optimal activity at approx. 90 degrees C. Biochemical characterization of these enzymes confirmed that the ADP-GLK is unable to use ATP as the phosphoryl group donor, but revealed that GALK is ATP-dependent and has an extremely high affinity for ATP. There is a discussion about whether the unusual features of these two classes of kinases might reflect adaptations to a relatively low intracellular ATP concentration in the hyperthermophilic archaeon P. furiosus. PMID:11978175

  10. Biochemical adaptations of two sugar kinases from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Verhees, Corné H; Koot, Denise G M; Ettema, Thijs J G; Dijkema, Cor; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John

    2002-08-15

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus possesses a modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway, including an unusual ADP-dependent glucokinase (ADP-GLK) and an ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase. In the present study, we report the characterization of a P. furiosus galactokinase (GALK) and its comparison with the P. furiosus ADP-GLK. The pyrococcal genes encoding the ADP-GLK and GALK were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the proteins were subsequently purified to homogeneity. Both enzymes are specific kinases with an optimal activity at approx. 90 degrees C. Biochemical characterization of these enzymes confirmed that the ADP-GLK is unable to use ATP as the phosphoryl group donor, but revealed that GALK is ATP-dependent and has an extremely high affinity for ATP. There is a discussion about whether the unusual features of these two classes of kinases might reflect adaptations to a relatively low intracellular ATP concentration in the hyperthermophilic archaeon P. furiosus.

  11. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    De-Souza, Evandro A; Pimentel, Felipe S A; Machado, Caio M; Martins, Larissa S; da-Silva, Wagner S; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Masuda, Claudio A

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast), which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  12. Static and dynamic interactions between GALK enzyme and known inhibitors: guidelines to design new drugs for galactosemic patients.

    PubMed

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Marabotti, Anna

    2013-05-01

    The search for inhibitors of galactokinase (GALK) enzyme is interesting for their possible therapeutic application capable to alleviate symptoms in people with classic galactosemia. Several high-throughput screenings in the past have found candidate ligands showing a moderate affinity for GALK. Computational analysis of the binding mode of these compounds in comparison to their target protein has been performed only on crystallographic static structures, therefore missing the evolution of the complex during time. In this work, we applied static and dynamics simulations to analyze the interactions between GALK and its potential inhibitors, while taking into account the temporal evolution of the complexes. The collected data allowed us to identify the most important and persistent anchoring points of the known active site and of the newly identified secondary cavity. These data will be of use to increase the specificity and the affinity of a new generation of GALK inhibitors.

  13. The clinical and molecular spectrum of galactosemia in patients from the Cape Town region of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Howard; Leisegang, Felicity; Brown, Ruth; Eley, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to document the clinical, laboratory and genetic features of galactosemia in patients from the Cape Town metropolitan region. Methods Diagnoses were based on thin layer chromatography for galactosuria/galactosemia and assays of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase activities. Patients were screened for the common S135L and Q188R transferase gene mutations, using PCR-based assays. Screening for the S135L mutation in black newborns was used to estimate the carrier rate for galactosemia in black South Africans. Results A positive diagnosis of galactosemia was made in 17 patients between the years 1980 to 2001. All had very low or absent galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) activity, and normal galactokinase levels. The mean age at diagnosis was 5.1 months (range 4 days to 6.5 months). A review of 9 patients showed that hepatomegaly (9/9), and splenomegaly, failure to thrive, developmental delay, bilateral cataracts (6/9) were the most frequent features at diagnosis. Six had conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Four experienced invasive E. coli infection before diagnosis. Ten patients were submitted to DNA analysis. All 4 black patients and 2 of mixed extraction were homozygous for the S135L allele, while all 3 white patients were homozygous for the Q188R allele. The remaining patient of mixed extraction was heterozygous for the Q188R allele. The estimated carrier frequency of the S135L mutation in 725 healthy black newborns was 1/60. Conclusions In the absence of newborn screening the delay in diagnosis is most often unacceptably long. Also, carrier frequency data predict a galactosemia incidence of approximately 1/14 400 for black newborns in the Cape Metropole, which is much higher than the current detection rate. It is thus likely that many patients go undetected. PMID:12350230

  14. Newborn screening for galactosemia: a 30-year single center experience.

    PubMed

    Porta, Francesco; Pagliardini, Severo; Pagliardini, Veronica; Ponzone, Alberto; Spada, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Galactosemia due to complete or near-complete galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency was the first disorder added to the pioneering newborn screening panel besides phenylketonuria. In the last 50 years, many criticisms have been focused on the opportunity of its inclusion. Consequently, long-term single center experiences with this issue are generally lacking. We reviewed the outcome of newborn screening for hypergalactosemia performed at our department since 1982 and the correspondent long-term clinical outcome. Among 1 123 909 newborns screened for hypergalactosemia, 33 showed abnormal results confirmed at second tier test. Thirteen patients were affected with classic galactosemia, 8 partial GALT deficiency, 3 severe galactokinase deficiency, 7 transient galactosemia, one congenital porto-systemic shunt, and one glucose transporter 2 deficiency. Acute neonatal liver failure in the late first week of life (5.8±1.1 days) unavoidably complicated the clinical course of classic galactosemia, unless in three second-born siblings treated on the basis of presumptive diagnosis immediately after newborn screening sample collection on day 3. Despite early treatment and long-term steadily normal peripheral blood galactose, 77% of patients with severe GALT deficiency present mild to severe intellectual disabilities. All patients with partial GALT deficiency showed normal intellectual development on a regular diet, as well as patients with galactokinase deficiency under treatment. Availability of screening results within the fifth day after birth would allow the prevention of acute decompensation in classic galactosemia. A systematic diagnostic work-up in all positive newborns is essential to unravel the etiology of hypergalactosemia.

  15. DNA methylation at the CfrBI site is involved in expression control in the CfrBI restriction–modification system

    PubMed Central

    Beletskaya, Irina V.; Zakharova, Marina V.; Shlyapnikov, Michael G.; Semenova, Lidiya M.; Solonin, Alexander S.

    2000-01-01

    We have previously found that genes of the CfrBI restriction–modification (R-M) system from Citrobacter freundii are oriented divergently and that their promoter regions overlap. The overlapping promoters suggest regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level. In this study the transcription regulation of CfrBI R-M genes was analyzed in vivo and in vitro in Escherichia coli. It was shown that in the presence of CfrBI methyltransferase (M·CfrBI), cell galactokinase activity decreases 10-fold when the galactokinase gene (galK) is under the control of the cfrBIM promoter and increases 20-fold when galK is under the control of the cfrBIR promoter. The CfrBI site, proven to be unique for the entire CfrBI R-M gene sequence, is located in the –35 cfrBIM promoter region and is in close vicinity of the –10 cfrBIR promoter region. A comparison of the cfrBIM and the cfrBIR promoter activities in the in vitro transcription system using methylated and unmethylated DNA fragments as templates demonstrated that the efficiency of CfrBI R-M gene transcription is regulated by enzymatic modification at the N-4-position of cytosine bases of the CfrBI site by M·CfrBI. From the results of the in vivo and in vitro experiments we suggest a new model of gene expression regulation in type II R-M systems. PMID:11000275

  16. DNA methylation at the CfrBI site is involved in expression control in the CfrBI restriction-modification system.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, I V; Zakharova, M V; Shlyapnikov, M G; Semenova, L M; Solonin, A S

    2000-10-01

    We have previously found that genes of the CFR:BI restriction-modification (R-M) system from Citrobacter freundii are oriented divergently and that their promoter regions overlap. The overlapping promoters suggest regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level. In this study the transcription regulation of CFR:BI R-M genes was analyzed in vivo and in vitro in Escherichia coli. It was shown that in the presence of CFR:BI methyltransferase (M.CFR:BI), cell galactokinase activity decreases 10-fold when the galactokinase gene (galK) is under the control of the cfrBIM promoter and increases 20-fold when galK is under the control of the cfrBIR promoter. The CFR:BI site, proven to be unique for the entire CFR:BI R-M gene sequence, is located in the -35 cfrBIM promoter region and is in close vicinity of the -10 cfrBIR promoter region. A comparison of the cfrBIM and the cfrBIR promoter activities in the in vitro transcription system using methylated and unmethylated DNA fragments as templates demonstrated that the efficiency of CFR:BI R-M gene transcription is regulated by enzymatic modification at the N-4-position of cytosine bases of the CFR:BI site by M.CFR:BI. From the results of the in vivo and in vitro experiments we suggest a new model of gene expression regulation in type II R-M systems.

  17. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-03-01

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.

  18. Perturbation of the interaction between Gal4p and Gal80p of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL switch results in altered responses to galactose and glucose.

    PubMed

    Das Adhikari, Akshay Kumar; Qureshi, Mohd Tanvir; Kar, Rajesh Kumar; Bhat, Paike Jayadeva

    2014-10-01

    In S. cerevisiae, following the Whole Genome Duplication (WGD), GAL1-encoded galactokinase retained its signal transduction function but lost basal expression. On the other hand, its paralogue GAL3, lost kinase activity but retained its signalling function and basal expression, thus making it indispensable for the rapid induction of the S. cerevisiae GAL switch. However, a gal3Δ strain exhibits delayed growth kinetics due to the redundant signalling function of GAL1. The subfunctionalization between the paralogues GAL1 and GAL3 is due to expression divergence and is proposed to be due to the alteration in the Upstream Activating Sequences (UASG ). We demonstrate that the GAL switch becomes independent of GAL3 by altering the interaction between Gal4p and Gal80p without altering the configuration of UASG . In addition to the above, the altered switch of S. cerevisiae loses ultrasensitivity and stringent glucose repression. These changes caused an increase in fitness in the disaccharide melibiose at the expense of a decrease in fitness in galactose. The above altered features of the ScGAL switch are similar to the features of the GAL switch of K. lactis that diverged from S. cerevisiae before the WGD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Selection and characterization of a glucokinase-deficient mutant of Tetrahymena thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.T. Jr.; Lavine, J.E.; Morse, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    The authors isolated a mutant of Tetrahymena thermophila that is resistant to inhibition of growth by the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose. The mutant exhibits a deficiency in a cytoplasmic glucokinase. This enzymatic defect and the attendant inability to convert 2-deoxyglucose to toxic phosphorylated derivatives is apparently the sole basis for the mutant phenotype since transport of glucose and 2-deoxyglucose is unimpaired; there is no elevation of glucose-6-phosphatase activity, which could decrease the level of toxic 2-deoxyglucose metabolites. Genetic analyses have shown that the mutant allele is recessive and inherited as a single Mendelian mutation. The glucokinase-deficient strain described here is useful for the selection of other mutants in this organism and for the investigation of various cellular processes initiated or modulated by glucose and its analogs. The authors have exploited the molecular defect in this strain to investigate the initial steps in the cyclic AMP-mediated repression of galactokinase gene expression which is caused by glucose.

  20. Heterologous repressor-operator recognition among four classes of tetracycline resistance determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Klock, G; Unger, B; Gatz, C; Hillen, W; Altenbuchner, J; Schmid, K; Schmitt, R

    1985-01-01

    Homologous and heterologous repressor-operator interactions among four different classes of tetracycline resistance determinants have been compared. These are represented by RP1/Tn1721 (class A), R222/Tn10 (class B), pSC101/pBR322 (class C), and RA1 (class D). By the use of the purified repressor proteins of class A (TetRA) and class B (TetRB), operator sequences of all four classes are recognized by both with an identical stoichiometry of four repressor subunits per control sequence, but with different affinities. In vitro transcription has been used to demonstrate regulatory activities of TetRA and TetRB upon all four classes of tet genes. Tetracycline acted as an inducer. A functional relationship among the tet regulatory systems was also shown in vivo by complementation of a class A tetR'-galK fusion mutant with the tetR genes of classes A, B, and C. Repression of tetRA-linked galactokinase was ca. 80% in the presence of tetRA or tetRC, and ca. 50% in the presence of tetRB. Taken together, these results demonstrate heterologous repressor-operator interaction, suggesting close relationships among the four classes of Tcr determinants. Images PMID:3881391

  1. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    DOE PAGES

    Yaung, Stephanie J.; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; ...

    2015-03-11

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Populationmore » dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Here, our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.« less

  2. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Yaung, Stephanie J.; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L.; Church, George M.; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H.; Gerber, Georg K.

    2015-03-11

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Here, our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.

  3. Glutamine synthetase-constitutive mutation affecting the glnALG upstream promoter of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    León, P; Romero, D; Garciarrubio, A; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1985-12-01

    The spontaneous gln-76 mutation of Escherichia coli (Osorio et al., Mol. Gen. Genet. 194:114-123, 1984) was previously shown to be responsible for the cis-dominant constitutive expression of the glnA gene in the absence of a glnG-glnF activator system. Nucleotide sequence analysis has now revealed that gln-76 is a single transversion T.A to A.T, an up-promoter mutation affecting the -10 region of glnAp1, the upstream promoter of the glnALG control region. Both, wild-type and gln-76 DNA control regions were cloned into the promoter-probe plasmid pKO1. Galactokinase activity determinations of cells carrying the fused plasmids showed 10-fold more effective expression mediated by gln-76 than by the glnA wild-type control region. Primer extension experiments with RNA from strains carrying the gln-76 control region indicated that the transcription initiation sites were the same in both the gln-76 mutant and the wild type.

  4. Glutamine synthetase-constitutive mutation affecting the glnALG upstream promoter of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    León, P; Romero, D; Garciarrubio, A; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1985-01-01

    The spontaneous gln-76 mutation of Escherichia coli (Osorio et al., Mol. Gen. Genet. 194:114-123, 1984) was previously shown to be responsible for the cis-dominant constitutive expression of the glnA gene in the absence of a glnG-glnF activator system. Nucleotide sequence analysis has now revealed that gln-76 is a single transversion T.A to A.T, an up-promoter mutation affecting the -10 region of glnAp1, the upstream promoter of the glnALG control region. Both, wild-type and gln-76 DNA control regions were cloned into the promoter-probe plasmid pKO1. Galactokinase activity determinations of cells carrying the fused plasmids showed 10-fold more effective expression mediated by gln-76 than by the glnA wild-type control region. Primer extension experiments with RNA from strains carrying the gln-76 control region indicated that the transcription initiation sites were the same in both the gln-76 mutant and the wild type. Images PMID:2866175

  5. Innovative Therapy for Classic Galactosemia - Tale of Two HTS

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M; Odejinmi, SI; Vankayalapati, H; Wierenga, K; Lai, K

    2011-01-01

    Classic Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), one of the key enzymes in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. While the neonatal morbidity and mortality of the disease are now mostly prevented by newborn screening and galactose restriction, long-term outcome for older children and adults with this disorder remains unsatisfactory. The pathophysiology of Classic Galactosemia is complex, but there is convincing evidence that galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P) accumulation is a major, if not the sole pathogenic factor. Galactokinase (GALK) inhibition will eliminate the accumulation of gal-1P from both dietary sources and endogenous production, and efforts towards identification of therapeutic small molecule GALK inhibitors are reviewed in detail. Experimental and computational high-throughput screenings of compound libraries to identify GALK inhibitors have been conducted, and subsequent studies aimed to characterize, prioritize, as well as to optimize the identified positives have been implemented to improve the potency of promising compounds. Although none of the identified GALK inhibitors inhibit glucokinase and hexokinase, some of them cross-inhibit other related enzymes in the GHMP small molecule kinase superfamily. While this finding may render the on-going hit-to-lead process more challenging, there is growing evidence that such cross-inhibition could also lead to advances in antimicrobial and anti-cancer therapies. PMID:22018723

  6. Growth and ethanol fermentation ability on hexose and pentose sugars and glucose effect under various conditions in thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Rodrussamee, Nadchanok; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Hirata, Katsushi; Suprayogi; Limtong, Savitree; Kosaka, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Mamoru

    2011-05-01

    Ethanol fermentation ability of the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, which is able to utilize various sugars including glucose, mannose, galactose, xylose, and arabinose, was examined under shaking and static conditions at high temperatures. The yeast was found to produce ethanol from all of these sugars except for arabinose under a shaking condition but only from hexose sugars under a static condition. Growth and sugar utilization rate under a static condition were slower than those under a shaking condition, but maximum ethanol yield was slightly higher. Even at 40°C, a level of ethanol production similar to that at 30°C was observed except for galactose under a static condition. Glucose repression on utilization of other sugars was observed, and it was more evident at elevated temperatures. Consistent results were obtained by the addition of 2-deoxyglucose. The glucose effect was further examined at a transcription level, and it was found that KmGAL1 for galactokinase and KmXYL1 for xylose reductase for galactose and xylose/arabinose utilization, respectively, were repressed by glucose at low and high temperatures, but KmHXK2 for hexokinase was not repressed. We discuss the possible mechanism of glucose repression and the potential for utilization of K. marxianus in high-temperature fermentation with mixed sugars containing glucose.

  7. Glucose repression of lactose/galactose metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis is determined by the concentration of the transcriptional activator LAC9 (K1GAL4) [corrected].

    PubMed

    Zachariae, W; Kuger, P; Breunig, K D

    1993-01-11

    In the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis glucose repression of genes involved in lactose and galactose metabolism is primarily mediated by LAC9 (or K1GAL4) the homologue of the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptional activator GAL4. Phenotypic difference in glucose repression existing between natural strains are due to differences in the LAC9 gene (Breunig, 1989, Mol.Gen.Genet. 261, 422-427). Comparison between the LAC9 alleles of repressible and non-repressible strains revealed that the phenotype is a result of differences in LAC9 gene expression. A two-basepair alteration in the LAC9 promoter region produces a promoter-down effect resulting in slightly reduced LAC9 protein levels under all growth conditions tested. In glucose/galactose medium any change in LAC9 expression drastically affects expression of LAC9 controlled genes e.g. those encoding beta-galactosidase or galactokinase revealing a strong dependence of the kinetics of induction on the LAC9 concentration. We propose that in tightly repressible strains the activator concentration drops below a critical threshold that is required for induction to occur. A model is presented to explain how small differences in activator levels are amplified to produce big changes in expression levels of metabolic genes.

  8. Fluorescent 6-amino-6-deoxyglycoconjugates for glucose transporter mediated bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyin; Liu, Shengnan; Liu, Xinyu; Shi, Yunli; Yang, Jinna; Huang, Zhenhua; Zhao, Hongxia; Gao, Qingzhi

    2016-11-18

    Two novel fluorescent bioprobes, namely, 6N-Gly-Cy3 and 6N-Gly-Cy5, were designed and synthesized for real-time glucose transport imaging as well as potentially useful tracer for galactokinase metabolism. The structure of the bioprobes was fully characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR, and HRMS. The fluorescence properties, glucose transporter (GLUT) specificity, and the quenching and safety profiles were studied. The cellular uptake of both bioprobes was competitively diminished by d-glucose, 2-deoxy-d-glucose and GLUT specific inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner in human colon cancer cells (HT29). Comparison study results revealed that the 6N-derived bioprobes are more useful for real-time imaging of cell-based glucose uptake than the structurally similar fluorescent tracer 6-NBDG which was not applicable under physiological conditions. The up to 96 h long-lasting quenching property of 6N-Gly-Cy5 in HT29 suggested the potential applcability of the probe for cell labeling in xenograft transplantation as well as in vivo animal imaging studies.

  9. The Leloir Pathway of Galactose Metabolism - A Novel Therapeutic Target for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Manshu; Etokidem, Enoabasi; Lai, Kent

    2016-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal types of cancer worldwide, with poor prognosis and limited treatments. In order to identify novel therapeutic targets that will lead to development of effective therapies with manageable side effects, we tested the hypothesis that knocking-down galactokinase (GALK1) or galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) gene expression would control the growth of cultured hepatoma cells. Our results showed small interfering RNA (siRNA) against GALK1 or GALT inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in culture. Western blot analysis revealed simultaneous down-regulation of multiple players of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) growth signaling pathway, as well as heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) data, however, showed no significant mRNA reduction of the encoded genes. Our study thus not only supports GALK1 and GALT as being possible novel targets for treating HCC, but also uncovers new post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that link the galactose metabolic pathway to protein expression of the PI3K/AKT pathway in hepatoma.

  10. Metabolism of D-galactose is dispensable for the induction of the beta-galactosidase (bgaD) and lactose permease (lacpA) genes in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Anita; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we analyze the expression of the Aspergillus nidulans bgaD-lacpA gene couple (encoding an intracellular beta-galactosidase and a lactose permease) in the presence of D-galactose. This monosaccharide can be catabolized via alternative, independent pathways in this model organism. The inductive capabilities of intermediates of the two alternative routes of D-galactose utilization were addressed in loss-of-function mutants defective in a defined step in one of the two pathways. In a galactokinase (galE9) mutant, the cluster is strongly induced by D-galactose, suggesting that formation of Leloir pathway intermediates is not required. The expression profiles of bgaD and lacpA were similar in wild type, L-arabinitol dehydrogenase (araA1), and hexokinase (hxkA1) negative backgrounds, indicating that intermediates of the oxido-reductive pathway downstream of galactitol are not necessary either. Furthermore, bgaD-lacpA transcription was not induced in any of the tested strains when galactitol was provided as the growth substrate. An hxkA1/galE9 double mutant cannot grow on d-galactose at all, but still produced bgaD and lacpA transcripts upon transfer to d-galactose. We therefore concluded that the physiological inducer of the bgaD-lacpA gene cluster upon growth on D-galactose is the nonmetabolized sugar itself.

  11. The galactose-induced decrease in phosphate levels leads to toxicity in yeast models of galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Machado, Caio M; De-Souza, Evandro A; De-Queiroz, Ana Luiza F V; Pimentel, Felipe S A; Silva, Guilherme F S; Gomes, Fabio M; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Masuda, Claudio A

    2017-02-14

    Classic galactosemia is an inborn error of metabolism caused by deleterious mutations in the GALT gene. A number of evidences indicate that the galactose-1-phosphate accumulation observed in patient cells is a cause of toxicity in this disease. Nevertheless, the consequent molecular events caused by the galactose-1-phosphate accumulation remain elusive. Here we show that intracellular inorganic phosphate levels decreased when yeast models of classic galactosemia were exposed to galactose. The decrease in phosphate levels is probably due to the trapping of phosphate in the accumulated galactose-1-phosphate since the deletion of the galactokinase encoding gene GAL1 suppressed this phenotype. Galactose-induced phosphate depletion caused an increase in glycogen content, an expected result since glycogen breakdown by the enzyme glycogen phosphorylase is dependent on inorganic phosphate. Accordingly, an increase in intracellular phosphate levels suppressed the galactose effect on glycogen content and conferred galactose tolerance to yeast models of galactosemia. These results support the hypothesis that the galactose-induced decrease in phosphate levels leads to toxicity in galactosemia and opens new possibilities for the development of better treatments for this disease.

  12. Glucose repression of lactose/galactose metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis is determined by the concentration of the transcriptional activator LAC9 (K1GAL4) [corrected

    PubMed Central

    Zachariae, W; Kuger, P; Breunig, K D

    1993-01-01

    In the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis glucose repression of genes involved in lactose and galactose metabolism is primarily mediated by LAC9 (or K1GAL4) the homologue of the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptional activator GAL4. Phenotypic difference in glucose repression existing between natural strains are due to differences in the LAC9 gene (Breunig, 1989, Mol.Gen.Genet. 261, 422-427). Comparison between the LAC9 alleles of repressible and non-repressible strains revealed that the phenotype is a result of differences in LAC9 gene expression. A two-basepair alteration in the LAC9 promoter region produces a promoter-down effect resulting in slightly reduced LAC9 protein levels under all growth conditions tested. In glucose/galactose medium any change in LAC9 expression drastically affects expression of LAC9 controlled genes e.g. those encoding beta-galactosidase or galactokinase revealing a strong dependence of the kinetics of induction on the LAC9 concentration. We propose that in tightly repressible strains the activator concentration drops below a critical threshold that is required for induction to occur. A model is presented to explain how small differences in activator levels are amplified to produce big changes in expression levels of metabolic genes. Images PMID:8441621

  13. Proteome reference map of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and quantitative proteomics towards understanding the prebiotic action of lactitol.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Avishek; Sultan, Abida; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa R; Ejby, Morten; Schmidt, Bjarne Gregers; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Jacobsen, Susanne; Svensson, Birte

    2011-09-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a probiotic bacterium adapted to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and with potential health benefits to the host. Lactitol is a synthetic sugar alcohol used as a sugar replacement in low calorie foods and selectively stimulating growth of L. acidophilus NCFM. In the present study the whole-cell extract proteome of L. acidophilus NCFM grown on glucose until late exponential phase was resolved by 2-DE (pH 3-7). A total of 275 unique proteins assigned to various physiological processes were identified from 650 spots. Differential 2-DE (DIGE) (pH 4-7) of L. acidophilus NCFM grown on glucose and lactitol, revealed 68 spots with modified relative intensity. Thirty-two unique proteins were identified in 41 of these spots changing 1.6-12.7-fold in relative abundance by adaptation of L. acidophilus NCFM to growth on lactitol. These proteins included β-galactosidase small subunit, galactokinase, galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and UDP-glucose-4-epimerase, which all are potentially involved in lactitol metabolism. This first comprehensive proteome analysis of L. acidophilus NCFM provides insights into protein abundance changes elicited by the prebiotic lactitol. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveals the Metabolic Insight on Consumption of Prebiotics and Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Han; An, Hyun Joo; Garrido, Daniel; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Mills, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis is a common member of the intestinal microbiota in breast-fed infants and capable of metabolizing human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). To investigate the bacterial response to different prebiotics, we analyzed both cell wall associated and whole cell proteins in B. infantis. Proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS followed by comparative proteomics to deduce the protein localization within the cell. Enzymes involved in the metabolism of lactose, glucose, galactooligosaccharides, fructooligosaccharides and HMO were constitutively expressed exhibiting less than two-fold change regardless of the sugar used. In contrast, enzymes in N-Acetylglucosamine and sucrose catabolism were induced by HMO and fructans, respectively. Galactose-metabolizing enzymes phosphoglucomutase, UDP-glucose 4-epimerase and UTP glucose-1-P uridylytransferase were expressed constitutively, while galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, increased their expression three fold when HMO and lactose were used as substrates for cell growth. Cell wall-associated proteomics also revealed ATP-dependent sugar transport systems associated with consumption of different prebiotics. In addition, the expression of 16 glycosyl hydrolases revealed the complete metabolic route for each substrate. Mucin, which possesses O-glycans that are structurally similar to HMO did not induced the expression of transport proteins, hydrolysis or sugar metabolic pathway indicating B. infantis do not utilize these glycoconjugates. PMID:23469017

  15. The molecular basis of galactosemia - Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Timson, David J

    2016-09-10

    Galactosemia, an inborn error of galactose metabolism, was first described in the 1900s by von Ruess. The subsequent 100years has seen considerable progress in understanding the underlying genetics and biochemistry of this condition. Initial studies concentrated on increasing the understanding of the clinical manifestations of the disease. However, Leloir's discovery of the pathway of galactose catabolism in the 1940s and 1950s enabled other scientists, notably Kalckar, to link the disease to a specific enzymatic step in the pathway. Kalckar's work established that defects in galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) were responsible for the majority of cases of galactosemia. However, over the next three decades it became clear that there were two other forms of galactosemia: type II resulting from deficiencies in galactokinase (GALK1) and type III where the affected enzyme is UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). From the 1970s, molecular biology approaches were applied to galactosemia. The chromosomal locations and DNA sequences of the three genes were determined. These studies enabled modern biochemical studies. Structures of the proteins have been determined and biochemical studies have shown that enzymatic impairment often results from misfolding and consequent protein instability. Cellular and model organism studies have demonstrated that reduced GALT or GALE activity results in increased oxidative stress. Thus, after a century of progress, it is possible to conceive of improved therapies including drugs to manipulate the pathway to reduce potentially toxic intermediates, antioxidants to reduce the oxidative stress of cells or use of "pharmacological chaperones" to stabilise the affected proteins.

  16. Drosophila melanogaster Models of Galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Daenzer, J M I; Fridovich-Keil, J L

    2017-01-01

    The galactosemias are a family of autosomal recessive genetic disorders resulting from impaired function of the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Type I, or classic galactosemia, results from profound deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Type II galactosemia results from profound deficiency of galactokinase, the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Type III galactosemia results from partial deficiency of UDP galactose 4'-epimerase, the third enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Although at least classic galactosemia has been recognized clinically for more than 100 years, and detectable by newborn screening for more than 50 years, all three galactosemias remain poorly understood. Early detection and dietary restriction of galactose prevent neonatal lethality, but many affected infants grow to experience a broad range of developmental and other disabilities. To date, there is no intervention known that prevents or reverses these long-term complications. Drosophila melanogaster provides a genetically and biochemically facile model for these conditions, enabling studies that address mechanism and open the door for novel approaches to intervention.

  17. Galactose and Lactose Genes from the Galactose-Positive Bacterium Streptococcus salivarius and the Phylogenetically Related Galactose-Negative Bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus: Organization, Sequence, Transcription, and Activity of the gal Gene Products

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, Katy; Moineau, Sylvain; Frenette, Michel; Lessard, Christian; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a lactose- and galactose-positive bacterium that is phylogenetically closely related to Streptococcus thermophilus, a bacterium that metabolizes lactose but not galactose. In this paper, we report a comparative characterization of the S. salivarius and S. thermophilus gal-lac gene clusters. The clusters have the same organization with the order galR (codes for a transcriptional regulator and is transcribed in the opposite direction), galK (galactokinase), galT (galactose-1-P uridylyltransferase), galE (UDP-glucose 4-epimerase), galM (galactose mutarotase), lacS (lactose transporter), and lacZ (β-galactosidase). An analysis of the nucleotide sequence as well as Northern blotting and primer extension experiments revealed the presence of four promoters located upstream from galR, the gal operon, galM, and the lac operon of S. salivarius. Putative promoters with virtually identical nucleotide sequences were found at the same positions in the S. thermophilus gal-lac gene cluster. An additional putative internal promoter at the 3′ end of galT was found in S. thermophilus but not in S. salivarius. The results clearly indicated that the gal-lac gene cluster was efficiently transcribed in both species. The Shine-Dalgarno sequences of galT and galE were identical in both species, whereas the ribosome binding site of S. thermophilus galK differed from that of S. salivarius by two nucleotides, suggesting that the S. thermophilus galK gene might be poorly translated. This was confirmed by measurements of enzyme activities. PMID:11790749

  18. A food-grade industrial arming yeast expressing β-1,3-1,4-glucanase with enhanced thermal stability*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qin; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Liu-liu; Chen, Qi-he; Chen, Ji-cheng; Zhang, Hong-bo; Ruan, Hui; He, Guo-qing

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a novel food-grade industrial arming yeast displaying β-1,3-1,4-glucanase and to evaluate the thermal stability of the glucanase for practical application. For this purpose, a bi-directional vector containing galactokinase (GAL1) and phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) promoters in different orientations was constructed. The β-1,3-1,4-glucanase gene from Bacillus subtilis was fused to α-agglutinin and expressed under the control of the GAL1 promoter. α-galactosidase induced by the constitutive PGK1 promoter was used as a food-grade selection marker. The feasibility of the α-galactosidase marker was confirmed by the growth of transformants harboring the constructed vector on a medium containing melibiose as a sole carbon source, and by the clear halo around the transformants in Congo-red plates owing to the expression of β-1,3-1,4-glucanase. The analysis of β-1,3-1,4-glucanase activity in cell pellets and in the supernatant of the recombinant yeast strain revealed that β-1,3-1,4-glucanase was successfully displayed on the cell surface of the yeast. The displayed β-1,3-1,4-glucanase activity in the recombinant yeast cells increased immediately after the addition of galactose and reached 45.1 U/ml after 32-h induction. The thermal stability of β-1,3-1,4-glucanase displayed in the recombinant yeast cells was enhanced compared with the free enzyme. These results suggest that the constructed food-grade yeast has the potential to improve the brewing properties of beer. PMID:20043351

  19. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of the Galactose Phenotype of Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus Strains Reveals Four Different Fermentation Profiles

    PubMed Central

    de Vin, Filip; Rådström, Peter; Herman, Lieve; De Vuyst, Luc

    2005-01-01

    Lactose-limited fermentations of 49 dairy Streptococcus thermophilus strains revealed four distinct fermentation profiles with respect to galactose consumption after lactose depletion. All the strains excreted galactose into the medium during growth on lactose, except for strain IMDOST40, which also displayed extremely high galactokinase (GalK) activity. Among this strain collection eight galactose-positive phenotypes sensu stricto were found and their fermentation characteristics and Leloir enzyme activities were measured. As the gal promoter seems to play an important role in the galactose phenotype, the galR-galK intergenic region was sequenced for all strains yielding eight different nucleotide sequences (NS1 to NS8). The gal promoter played an important role in the Gal-positive phenotype but did not determine it exclusively. Although GalT and GalE activities were detected for all Gal-positive strains, GalK activity could only be detected for two out of eight Gal-positive strains. This finding suggests that the other six S. thermophilus strains metabolize galactose via an alternative route. For each type of fermentation profile obtained, a representative strain was chosen and four complete Leloir gene clusters were sequenced. It turned out that Gal-positive strains contained more amino acid differences within their gal genes than Gal-negative strains. Finally, the biodiversity regarding lactose-galactose utilization among the different S. thermophilus strains used in this study was shown by RAPD-PCR. Five Gal-positive strains that contain nucleotide sequence NS2 in their galR-galK intergenic region were closely related. PMID:16000774

  20. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the galactose phenotype of dairy Streptococcus thermophilus strains reveals four different fermentation profiles.

    PubMed

    de Vin, Filip; Rådström, Peter; Herman, Lieve; De Vuyst, Luc

    2005-07-01

    Lactose-limited fermentations of 49 dairy Streptococcus thermophilus strains revealed four distinct fermentation profiles with respect to galactose consumption after lactose depletion. All the strains excreted galactose into the medium during growth on lactose, except for strain IMDOST40, which also displayed extremely high galactokinase (GalK) activity. Among this strain collection eight galactose-positive phenotypes sensu stricto were found and their fermentation characteristics and Leloir enzyme activities were measured. As the gal promoter seems to play an important role in the galactose phenotype, the galR-galK intergenic region was sequenced for all strains yielding eight different nucleotide sequences (NS1 to NS8). The gal promoter played an important role in the Gal-positive phenotype but did not determine it exclusively. Although GalT and GalE activities were detected for all Gal-positive strains, GalK activity could only be detected for two out of eight Gal-positive strains. This finding suggests that the other six S. thermophilus strains metabolize galactose via an alternative route. For each type of fermentation profile obtained, a representative strain was chosen and four complete Leloir gene clusters were sequenced. It turned out that Gal-positive strains contained more amino acid differences within their gal genes than Gal-negative strains. Finally, the biodiversity regarding lactose-galactose utilization among the different S. thermophilus strains used in this study was shown by RAPD-PCR. Five Gal-positive strains that contain nucleotide sequence NS2 in their galR-galK intergenic region were closely related.

  1. Cell death in a co-culture of hepatocellular carcinoma cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells in a medium lacking glucose and arginine.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Human primary hepatocytes are able to survive in a medium without glucose and arginine that is instead supplemented with galactose and ornithine (hepatocyte selection medium; HSM). This is because the cells produce glucose and arginine by the action of galactokinase (GALK) and ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), respectively. It was expected that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells do not survive in HSM. In the current study, HCC cell lines (namely HLE, HLF, PLC/PRL/5, Hep3B and HepG2) and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured in HSM, and the expression levels of GALK1, GALK2 and OTC were analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HLE, HLF and PLC/PRL/5 cells died on day 11, while Hep3B, HepG2 and HUVECs died on day 7. HLF cells were further analyzed as these cells had lower expression levels of GALK1, GALK2 and OTC compared with adult liver cells, and survived until day 11. In these cells, the expression levels of GALK1, GALK2 and OTC did not change on days 3 and 7 as compared to day 0. In addition, a co-culture of HLF cells with HUVECs was established and the medium was changed to HSM. It was observed that HLF cells and HUVECs in co-culture were damaged in HSM. In summary, HCC cells and HUVECs died in a medium without glucose and arginine that was supplemented with galactose and ornithine. HCC cells and HUVECs were damaged in HSM, suggesting a potential application for treatment with the medium.

  2. Subcellular localization of glycolytic enzymes and characterization of intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma rangeli.

    PubMed

    Rondón-Mercado, Rocío; Acosta, Héctor; Cáceres, Ana J; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Concepción, Juan Luis

    2017-09-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate protist that infects wild and domestic mammals as well as humans in Central and South America. Although this parasite is not pathogenic for human, it is being studied because it shares with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, biological characteristics, geographic distribution, vectors and vertebrate hosts. Several metabolic studies have been performed with T. cruzi epimastigotes, however little is known about the metabolism of T. rangeli. In this work we present the subcellular distribution of the T. rangeli enzymes responsible for the conversion of glucose to pyruvate, as determined by epifluorescense immunomicroscopy and subcellular fractionation involving either selective membrane permeabilization with digitonin or differential and isopycnic centrifugation. We found that in T. rangeli epimastigotes the first six enzymes of the glycolytic pathway, involved in the conversion of glucose to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate are located within glycosomes, while the last four steps occur in the cytosol. In contrast with T. cruzi, where three isoenzymes (one cytosolic and two glycosomal) of phosphoglycerate kinase are expressed simultaneously, only one enzyme with this activity is detected in T. rangeli epimastigotes, in the cytosol. Consistent with this latter result, we found enzymes involved in auxiliary pathways to glycolysis needed to maintain adenine nucleotide and redox balances within glycosomes such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, malate dehydrogenase, fumarate reductase, pyruvate phosphate dikinase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Glucokinase, galactokinase and the first enzyme of the pentose-phosphate pathway, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, were also located inside glycosomes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that T. rangeli epimastigotes growing in LIT medium only consume glucose and do not excrete ammonium; moreover, they are unable to survive in partially-depleted glucose medium. The

  3. Coordinated movement, neuromuscular synaptogenesis and trans-synaptic signaling defects in Drosophila galactosemia models

    PubMed Central

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P.; Parkinson, William M.; Kopke, Danielle L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-01-01

    The multiple galactosemia disease states manifest long-term neurological symptoms. Galactosemia I results from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which converts galactose-1-phosphate + UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate + UDP-galactose. Galactosemia II results from loss of galactokinase (GALK), phosphorylating galactose to galactose-1-phosphate. Galactosemia III results from the loss of UDP-galactose 4’-epimerase (GALE), which interconverts UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose, as well as UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) alternatively makes UDP-galactose from uridine triphosphate and galactose-1-phosphate. All four UDP-sugars are essential donors for glycoprotein biosynthesis with critical roles at the developing neuromuscular synapse. Drosophila galactosemia I (dGALT) and II (dGALK) disease models genetically interact; manifesting deficits in coordinated movement, neuromuscular junction (NMJ) development, synaptic glycosylation, and Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. Similarly, dGALE and dUGP mutants display striking locomotor and NMJ formation defects, including expanded synaptic arbours, glycosylation losses, and differential changes in Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. In combination with dGALT loss, both dGALE and dUGP mutants compromise the synaptomatrix glycan environment that regulates Wnt trans-synaptic signalling that drives 1) presynaptic Futsch/MAP1b microtubule dynamics and 2) postsynaptic Frizzled nuclear import (FNI). Taken together, these findings indicate UDP-sugar balance is a key modifier of neurological outcomes in all three interacting galactosemia disease models, suggest that Futsch homolog MAP1B and the Wnt Frizzled receptor may be disease-relevant targets in epimerase and transferase galactosemias, and identify UGP as promising new potential therapeutic target for galactosemia neuropathology. PMID:27466186

  4. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model

    PubMed Central

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Parkinson, William; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP–N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP–N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and extracellular spaces. In addition to acute, potentially lethal neonatal symptoms, maturing individuals with CG develop striking neurodevelopmental, motor and cognitive impairments. Previous studies suggest that neurological symptoms are associated with glycosylation defects, with CG recently being described as a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG), showing defects in both N- and O-linked glycans. Here, we characterize behavioral traits, synaptic development and glycosylated synaptomatrix formation in a GALT-deficient Drosophila disease model. Loss of Drosophila GALT (dGALT) greatly impairs coordinated movement and results in structural overelaboration and architectural abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Dietary galactose and mutation of galactokinase (dGALK) or UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (sugarless) genes are identified, respectively, as critical environmental and genetic modifiers of behavioral and cellular defects. Assaying the NMJ extracellular synaptomatrix with a broad panel of lectin probes reveals profound alterations in dGALT mutants, including depletion of galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucosylated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) moieties, which are differentially corrected by dGALK co-removal and sugarless overexpression. Synaptogenesis relies on trans-synaptic signals modulated by this synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment, and dGALT-null NMJs display striking changes in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) co-receptor and Wnt ligand

  5. Modeling the evolution of a classic genetic switch

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The regulatory network underlying the yeast galactose-use pathway has emerged as a model system for the study of regulatory network evolution. Evidence has recently been provided for adaptive evolution in this network following a whole genome duplication event. An ancestral gene encoding a bi-functional galactokinase and co-inducer protein molecule has become subfunctionalized as paralogous genes (GAL1 and GAL3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with most fitness gains being attributable to changes in cis-regulatory elements. However, the quantitative functional implications of the evolutionary changes in this regulatory network remain unexplored. Results We develop a modeling framework to examine the evolution of the GAL regulatory network. This enables us to translate molecular changes in the regulatory network to changes in quantitative network function. We computationally reconstruct an inferred ancestral version of the network and trace the evolutionary paths in the lineage leading to S. cerevisiae. We explore the evolutionary landscape of possible regulatory networks and find that the operation of intermediate networks leading to S. cerevisiae differs substantially depending on the order in which evolutionary changes accumulate; in particular, we systematically explore evolutionary paths and find that some network features cannot be optimized simultaneously. Conclusions We find that a computational modeling approach can be used to analyze the evolution of a well-studied regulatory network. Our results are consistent with several experimental studies of the evolutionary of the GAL regulatory network, including increased fitness in Saccharomyces due to duplication and adaptive regulatory divergence. The conceptual and computational tools that we have developed may be applicable in further studies of regulatory network evolution. PMID:21294912

  6. A food-grade industrial arming yeast expressing beta-1,3-1,4-glucanase with enhanced thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qin; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Liu-liu; Chen, Qi-he; Chen, Ji-cheng; Zhang, Hong-bo; Ruan, Hui; He, Guo-qing

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a novel food-grade industrial arming yeast displaying beta-1,3-1,4-glucanase and to evaluate the thermal stability of the glucanase for practical application. For this purpose, a bi-directional vector containing galactokinase (GAL1) and phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) promoters in different orientations was constructed. The beta-1,3-1,4-glucanase gene from Bacillus subtilis was fused to alpha-agglutinin and expressed under the control of the GAL1 promoter. alpha-galactosidase induced by the constitutive PGK1 promoter was used as a food-grade selection marker. The feasibility of the alpha-galactosidase marker was confirmed by the growth of transformants harboring the constructed vector on a medium containing melibiose as a sole carbon source, and by the clear halo around the transformants in Congo-red plates owing to the expression of beta-1,3-1,4-glucanase. The analysis of beta-1,3-1,4-glucanase activity in cell pellets and in the supernatant of the recombinant yeast strain revealed that beta-1,3-1,4-glucanase was successfully displayed on the cell surface of the yeast. The displayed beta-1,3-1,4-glucanase activity in the recombinant yeast cells increased immediately after the addition of galactose and reached 45.1 U/ml after 32-h induction. The thermal stability of beta-1,3-1,4-glucanase displayed in the recombinant yeast cells was enhanced compared with the free enzyme. These results suggest that the constructed food-grade yeast has the potential to improve the brewing properties of beer.

  7. Towards Enhanced Galactose Utilization by Lactococcus lactis▿

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Ana R.; Pool, Wietske A.; Solopova, Ana; Kok, Jan; Santos, Helena; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of galactose in dairy products due to partial lactose fermentation by lactic acid bacteria yields poor-quality products and precludes their consumption by individuals suffering from galactosemia. This study aimed at extending our knowledge of galactose metabolism in Lactococcus lactis, with the final goal of tailoring strains for enhanced galactose consumption. We used directed genetically engineered strains to examine galactose utilization in strain NZ9000 via the chromosomal Leloir pathway (gal genes) or the plasmid-encoded tagatose 6-phosphate (Tag6P) pathway (lac genes). Galactokinase (GalK), but not galactose permease (GalP), is essential for growth on galactose. This finding led to the discovery of an alternative route, comprising a galactose phosphotransferase system (PTS) and a phosphatase, for galactose dissimilation in NZ9000. Introduction of the Tag6P pathway in a galPMK mutant restored the ability to metabolize galactose but did not sustain growth on this sugar. The latter strain was used to prove that lacFE, encoding the lactose PTS, is necessary for galactose metabolism, thus implicating this transporter in galactose uptake. Both PTS transporters have a low affinity for galactose, while GalP displays a high affinity for the sugar. Furthermore, the GalP/Leloir route supported the highest galactose consumption rate. To further increase this rate, we overexpressed galPMKT, but this led to a substantial accumulation of α-galactose 1-phosphate and α-glucose 1-phosphate, pointing to a bottleneck at the level of α-phosphoglucomutase. Overexpression of a gene encoding α-phosphoglucomutase alone or in combination with gal genes yielded strains with galactose consumption rates enhanced up to 50% relative to that of NZ9000. Approaches to further improve galactose metabolism are discussed. PMID:20817811

  8. Cell death in a co-culture of hepatocellular carcinoma cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells in a medium lacking glucose and arginine

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Human primary hepatocytes are able to survive in a medium without glucose and arginine that is instead supplemented with galactose and ornithine (hepatocyte selection medium; HSM). This is because the cells produce glucose and arginine by the action of galactokinase (GALK) and ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), respectively. It was expected that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells do not survive in HSM. In the current study, HCC cell lines (namely HLE, HLF, PLC/PRL/5, Hep3B and HepG2) and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured in HSM, and the expression levels of GALK1, GALK2 and OTC were analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HLE, HLF and PLC/PRL/5 cells died on day 11, while Hep3B, HepG2 and HUVECs died on day 7. HLF cells were further analyzed as these cells had lower expression levels of GALK1, GALK2 and OTC compared with adult liver cells, and survived until day 11. In these cells, the expression levels of GALK1, GALK2 and OTC did not change on days 3 and 7 as compared to day 0. In addition, a co-culture of HLF cells with HUVECs was established and the medium was changed to HSM. It was observed that HLF cells and HUVECs in co-culture were damaged in HSM. In summary, HCC cells and HUVECs died in a medium without glucose and arginine that was supplemented with galactose and ornithine. HCC cells and HUVECs were damaged in HSM, suggesting a potential application for treatment with the medium. PMID:28123551

  9. The metabolic role and evolution of L-arabinitol 4-dehydrogenase of Hypocrea jecorina.

    PubMed

    Pail, Manuela; Peterbauer, Thomas; Seiboth, Bernhard; Hametner, Christian; Druzhinina, Irina; Kubicek, Christian P

    2004-05-01

    L-Arabinitol 4-dehydrogenase (Lad1) of the cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic fungus Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph: Trichoderma reesei) has been implicated in the catabolism of L-arabinose, and genetic evidence also shows that it is involved in the catabolism of D-xylose in xylitol dehydrogenase (xdh1) mutants and of D-galactose in galactokinase (gal1) mutants of H. jecorina. In order to identify the substrate specificity of Lad1, we have recombinantly produced the enzyme in Escherichia coli and purified it to physical homogeneity. The resulting enzyme preparation catalyzed the oxidation of pentitols (L-arabinitol) and hexitols (D-allitol, D-sorbitol, L-iditol, L-mannitol) to the same corresponding ketoses as mammalian sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), albeit with different catalytic efficacies, showing highest k(cat)/K(m) for L-arabinitol. However, it oxidized galactitol and D-talitol at C4 exclusively, yielding L-xylo-3-hexulose and D-arabino-3-hexulose, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of Lad1 showed that it is a member of a terminal clade of putative fungal arabinitol dehydrogenase orthologues which separated during evolution of SDHs. Juxtapositioning of the Lad1 3D structure over that of SDH revealed major amino acid exchanges at topologies flanking the binding pocket for d-sorbitol. A lad1 gene disruptant was almost unable to grow on L-arabinose, grew extremely weakly on L-arabinitol, D-talitol and galactitol, showed reduced growth on D-sorbitol and D-galactose and a slightly reduced growth on D-glucose. The weak growth on L-arabinitol was completely eliminated in a mutant in which the xdh1 gene had also been disrupted. These data show not only that Lad1 is indeed essential for the catabolism of L-arabinose, but also that it constitutes an essential step in the catabolism of several hexoses; this emphasizes the importance of such reductive pathways of catabolism in fungi.

  10. Acute and long-term outcomes in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia occur independently of galactose-1-phosphate accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Daenzer, Jennifer M. I.; Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P.; Ryan, Emily L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Classic galactosemia (CG) is a potentially lethal inborn error of metabolism that results from the profound loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Neonatal detection and dietary restriction of galactose minimizes or resolves the acute sequelae of CG, but fails to prevent the long-term complications experienced by a majority of patients. One of the substrates of GALT, galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1P), accumulates to high levels in affected infants, especially following milk exposure, and has been proposed as the key mediator of acute and long-term pathophysiology in CG. However, studies of treated patients demonstrate no association between red blood cell Gal-1P level and long-term outcome severity. Here, we used genetic, epigenetic and environmental manipulations of a Drosophila melanogaster model of CG to test the role of Gal-1P as a candidate mediator of outcome in GALT deficiency. Specifically, we both deleted and knocked down the gene encoding galactokinase (GALK) in control and GALT-null Drosophila, and assessed the acute and long-term outcomes of the resulting animals in the presence and absence of dietary galactose. GALK is the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism and is responsible for generating Gal-1P in humans and Drosophila. Our data confirmed that, as expected, loss of GALK lowered or eliminated Gal-1P accumulation in GALT-null animals. However, we saw no concomitant rescue of larval survival or adult climbing or fecundity phenotypes. Instead, we saw that loss of GALK itself was not benign and in some cases phenocopied or exacerbated the outcome seen in GALT-null animals. These findings strongly contradict the long-standing hypothesis that Gal-1P alone underlies pathophysiology of acute and long-term outcomes in GALT-null Drosophila and suggests that other metabolite(s) of galactose, and/or other pathogenic factors, might be involved. PMID

  11. Acute and long-term outcomes in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia occur independently of galactose-1-phosphate accumulation.

    PubMed

    Daenzer, Jennifer M I; Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Hopson, Marquise L; Garza, Kerry R; Ryan, Emily L; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2016-11-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is a potentially lethal inborn error of metabolism that results from the profound loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Neonatal detection and dietary restriction of galactose minimizes or resolves the acute sequelae of CG, but fails to prevent the long-term complications experienced by a majority of patients. One of the substrates of GALT, galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1P), accumulates to high levels in affected infants, especially following milk exposure, and has been proposed as the key mediator of acute and long-term pathophysiology in CG. However, studies of treated patients demonstrate no association between red blood cell Gal-1P level and long-term outcome severity. Here, we used genetic, epigenetic and environmental manipulations of a Drosophila melanogaster model of CG to test the role of Gal-1P as a candidate mediator of outcome in GALT deficiency. Specifically, we both deleted and knocked down the gene encoding galactokinase (GALK) in control and GALT-null Drosophila, and assessed the acute and long-term outcomes of the resulting animals in the presence and absence of dietary galactose. GALK is the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism and is responsible for generating Gal-1P in humans and Drosophila Our data confirmed that, as expected, loss of GALK lowered or eliminated Gal-1P accumulation in GALT-null animals. However, we saw no concomitant rescue of larval survival or adult climbing or fecundity phenotypes. Instead, we saw that loss of GALK itself was not benign and in some cases phenocopied or exacerbated the outcome seen in GALT-null animals. These findings strongly contradict the long-standing hypothesis that Gal-1P alone underlies pathophysiology of acute and long-term outcomes in GALT-null Drosophila and suggests that other metabolite(s) of galactose, and/or other pathogenic factors, might be involved.

  12. Activation of silent gal genes in the lac-gal regulon of Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, E E; van den Bogaard, P T; Catzeddu, P; Kuipers, O P; de Vos, W M

    2001-02-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus strain CNRZ 302 is unable to ferment galactose, neither that generated intracellularly by lactose hydrolysis nor the free sugar. Nevertheless, sequence analysis and complementation studies with Escherichia coli demonstrated that strain CNRZ 302 contained structurally intact genes for the Leloir pathway enzymes. These were organized into an operon in the order galKTE, which was preceded by a divergently transcribed regulator gene, galR, and followed by a galM gene and the lactose operon lacSZ. Results of Northern blot analysis showed that the structural gal genes were transcribed weakly, and only in medium containing lactose, by strain CNRZ 302. However, in a spontaneous galactose-fermenting mutant, designated NZ302G, the galKTE genes were well expressed in cells grown on lactose or galactose. In both CNRZ 302 and the Gal(+) mutant NZ302G, the transcription of the galR gene was induced by growth on lactose. Disruption of galR indicated that it functioned as a transcriptional activator of both the gal and lac operons while negatively regulating its own expression. Sequence analysis of the gal promoter regions of NZ302G and nine other independently isolated Gal(+) mutants of CNRZ 302 revealed mutations at three positions in the galK promoter region, which included substitutions at positions -9 and -15 as well as a single-base-pair insertion at position -37 with respect to the main transcription initiation point. Galactokinase activity measurements and analysis of gusA reporter gene fusions in strains containing the mutated promoters suggested that they were gal promoter-up mutations. We propose that poor expression of the gal genes in the galactose-negative S. thermophilus CNRZ 302 is caused by naturally occurring mutations in the galK promoter.

  13. Early Ankle Mobilization Promotes Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Asilehan, Batiza; Wupuer, Aikeremu; Qianman, Bayixiati; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Maimaitiaili, Abudouheilil; Shawutali, Nuerai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Aizezi, Adili; Aisaiding, Amuding; Bakyt, Yerzat; Aibek, Rakimbaiev; Wuerliebieke, Jianati

    2016-01-01

    The use of early mobilization of the ankle joint without orthosis in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture has been advocated as the optimal management. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes in a postoperative rabbit model of Achilles tendon rupture between early mobilization and immobilized animals using a differential proteomics approach. In total, 135 rabbits were randomized into the control group (n=15), the postoperative cast immobilization (PCI) group (n=60), and the early mobilization (EM) group (n=60). A rupture of the Achilles tendon was created in each animal model and repaired microsurgically, and tendon samples were removed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days postoperatively. Proteins were separated using 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, NCBI database searches, and bioinformatics analyses. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified between groups, some of which may play an important role in Achilles tendon healing. Notable candidate proteins that were upregulated in the EM group were identified, such as CRMP-2, galactokinase 1, tropomyosin-4, and transthyretin. The healing of ruptured Achilles tendons appears to be affected at the level of protein expression with the use of early mobilization. The classic postoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with an orthosis ignored the self-protecting instinct of humans. With a novel operative technique, the repaired tendon can persist the load that comes from traction in knee and ankle joint functional movement. In addition, kinesitherapy provided an excellent experimental outcome via a mechanobiological mechanism. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Coordinated movement, neuromuscular synaptogenesis and trans-synaptic signaling defects in Drosophila galactosemia models.

    PubMed

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Parkinson, William M; Kopke, Danielle L; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-09-01

    The multiple galactosemia disease states manifest long-term neurological symptoms. Galactosemia I results from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which converts galactose-1-phosphate + UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate + UDP-galactose. Galactosemia II results from loss of galactokinase (GALK), phosphorylating galactose to galactose-1-phosphate. Galactosemia III results from the loss of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE), which interconverts UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose, as well as UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) alternatively makes UDP-galactose from uridine triphosphate and galactose-1-phosphate. All four UDP-sugars are essential donors for glycoprotein biosynthesis with critical roles at the developing neuromuscular synapse. Drosophila galactosemia I (dGALT) and II (dGALK) disease models genetically interact; manifesting deficits in coordinated movement, neuromuscular junction (NMJ) development, synaptic glycosylation, and Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. Similarly, dGALE and dUGP mutants display striking locomotor and NMJ formation defects, including expanded synaptic arbours, glycosylation losses, and differential changes in Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. In combination with dGALT loss, both dGALE and dUGP mutants compromise the synaptomatrix glycan environment that regulates Wnt trans-synaptic signalling that drives 1) presynaptic Futsch/MAP1b microtubule dynamics and 2) postsynaptic Frizzled nuclear import (FNI). Taken together, these findings indicate UDP-sugar balance is a key modifier of neurological outcomes in all three interacting galactosemia disease models, suggest that Futsch homolog MAP1B and the Wnt Frizzled receptor may be disease-relevant targets in epimerase and transferase galactosemias, and identify UGP as promising new potential therapeutic target for galactosemia neuropathology.

  15. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model.

    PubMed

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Parkinson, William; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-12-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and extracellular spaces. In addition to acute, potentially lethal neonatal symptoms, maturing individuals with CG develop striking neurodevelopmental, motor and cognitive impairments. Previous studies suggest that neurological symptoms are associated with glycosylation defects, with CG recently being described as a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG), showing defects in both N- and O-linked glycans. Here, we characterize behavioral traits, synaptic development and glycosylated synaptomatrix formation in a GALT-deficient Drosophila disease model. Loss of Drosophila GALT (dGALT) greatly impairs coordinated movement and results in structural overelaboration and architectural abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Dietary galactose and mutation of galactokinase (dGALK) or UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (sugarless) genes are identified, respectively, as critical environmental and genetic modifiers of behavioral and cellular defects. Assaying the NMJ extracellular synaptomatrix with a broad panel of lectin probes reveals profound alterations in dGALT mutants, including depletion of galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucosylated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) moieties, which are differentially corrected by dGALK co-removal and sugarless overexpression. Synaptogenesis relies on trans-synaptic signals modulated by this synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment, and dGALT-null NMJs display striking changes in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) co-receptor and Wnt ligand levels

  16. Diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH Mutants That Can Be Isolated in the Presence of 2-Deoxyglucose and Galactose and Characterization of Two Mutants Synthesizing Reduced Levels of HPr, a Phosphocarrier of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne; Brochu, Denis; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2001-01-01

    In streptococci, HPr, a phosphocarrier of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS), undergoes multiple posttranslational chemical modifications resulting in the formation of HPr(His∼P), HPr(Ser-P), and HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P), whose cellular concentrations vary with growth conditions. Distinct physiological functions are associated with specific forms of HPr. We do not know, however, the cellular thresholds below which these forms become unable to fulfill their functions and to what extent modifications in the cellular concentrations of the different forms of HPr modify cellular physiology. In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH mutants that can be isolated by positive selection on a solid medium containing 2-deoxyglucose and galactose and identify 13 amino acids that are essential for HPr to properly accomplish its physiological functions. We also report the characterization of two S. salivarius mutants that produced approximately two- and threefoldless HPr and enzyme I (EI) respectively. The data indicated that (i) a reduction in the synthesis of HPr due to a mutation in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of ptsH reduced ptsI expression; (ii) a threefold reduction in EI and HPr cellular levels did not affect PTS transport capacity; (iii) a twofold reduction in HPr synthesis was sufficient to reduce the rate at which cells metabolized PTS sugars, increase generation times on PTS sugars and to a lesser extent on non-PTS sugars, and impede the exclusion of non-PTS sugars by PTS sugars; (iv) a threefold reduction in HPr synthesis caused a strong derepression of the genes coding for α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase when the cells were grown at the expense of a PTS sugar but did not affect the synthesis of α-galactosidase when cells were grown at the expense of lactose, a noninducing non-PTS sugar; and (v) no correlation was found between the magnitude of enzyme derepression and

  17. Phenotypic Consequences Resulting from a Methionine-to-Valine Substitution at Position 48 in the HPr Protein of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Plamondon, Pascale; Brochu, Denis; Thomas, Suzanne; Fradette, Julie; Gauthier, Lucie; Vaillancourt, Katy; Buckley, Nicole; Frenette, Michel; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    1999-01-01

    In gram-positive bacteria, the HPr protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) can be phosphorylated on a histidine residue at position 15 (His15) by enzyme I (EI) of the PTS and on a serine residue at position 46 (Ser46) by an ATP-dependent protein kinase (His∼P and Ser-P, respectively). We have isolated from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, by independent selection from separate cultures, two spontaneous mutants (Ga3.78 and Ga3.14) that possess a missense mutation in ptsH (the gene encoding HPr) replacing the methionine at position 48 by a valine. The mutation did not prevent the phosphorylation of HPr at His15 by EI nor the phosphorylation at Ser46 by the ATP-dependent HPr kinase. The levels of HPr(Ser-P) in glucose-grown cells of the parental and mutant Ga3.78 were virtually the same. However, mutant cells growing on glucose produced two- to threefold less HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P) than the wild-type strain, while the levels of free HPr and HPr(His∼P) were increased 18- and 3-fold, respectively. The mutants grew as well as the wild-type strain on PTS sugars (glucose, fructose, and mannose) and on the non-PTS sugars lactose and melibiose. However, the growth rate of both mutants on galactose, also a non-PTS sugar, decreased rapidly with time. The M48V substitution had only a minor effect on the repression of α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase by glucose, but this mutation abolished diauxie by rendering cells unable to prevent the catabolism of a non-PTS sugar (lactose, galactose, and melibiose) when glucose was available. The results suggested that the capacity of the wild-type cells to preferentially metabolize glucose over non-PTS sugars resulted mainly from inhibition of the catabolism of these secondary energy sources via a HPr-dependent mechanism. This mechanism was activated following glucose but not lactose metabolism, and it did not involve HPr(Ser-P) as the only regulatory molecule. PMID:10559156