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Sample records for galactose

  1. Galactose metabolism by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Abranches, Jacqueline; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Burne, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    The galK gene, encoding galactokinase of the Leloir pathway, was insertionally inactivated in Streptococcus mutans UA159. The galK knockout strain displayed only marginal growth on galactose, but growth on glucose or lactose was not affected. In strain UA159, the sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) for lactose and the PTS for galactose were induced by growth in lactose and galactose, although galactose PTS activity was very low, suggesting that S. mutans does not have a galactose-specific PTS and that the lactose PTS may transport galactose, albeit poorly. To determine if the galactose growth defect of the galK mutant could be overcome by enhancing lactose PTS activity, the gene encoding a putative repressor of the operon for lactose PTS and phospho-beta-galactosidase, lacR, was insertionally inactivated. A galK and lacR mutant still could not grow on galactose, although the strain had constitutively elevated lactose PTS activity. The glucose PTS activity of lacR mutants grown in glucose was lower than in the wild-type strain, revealing an influence of LacR or the lactose PTS on the regulation of the glucose PTS. Mutation of the lacA gene of the tagatose pathway caused impaired growth in lactose and galactose, suggesting that galactose can only be efficiently utilized when both the Leloir and tagatose pathways are functional. A mutation of the permease in the multiple sugar metabolism operon did not affect growth on galactose. Thus, the galactose permease of S. mutans is not present in the gal, lac, or msm operons. PMID:15466549

  2. Galactose tolerance studies of individuals with reduced galactose pathway activity.

    PubMed Central

    Mellman, W J; Rawnsley, B E; Nichols, C W; Needelman, B; Mennuti, M T; Malone, J; Tedesco, T A

    1975-01-01

    The galactose tolerance of individuals with mutant genotypes affecting the activities of galactokinase (GALK) and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) was examined. Genotypes studied were heterozygotes for the GALK and GALT forms of galactosemia, the Duarte-variant GALT, and Philadelphia-variant GALK alleles. The measurements used were urinary concentration of galactose during pregnancy in adults and in infants from the newborn period through the first 5 months of life; the rate of elimination of an intravenous infusion of galactose; and slit-lamp examination of the lens for evidence of cataracts. No unusual urinary excretions of galactose were noted in any of the age groups studied. Intravenous galactose tolerance tests were normal in all but two women, a mother and daughter heterozygous for the GALK-deficient form of galactosemia (GALKG/GALKA). Six other GALKG/GALKA subjects had normal tolerance studies. The intrafamilial consistency and interfamilial differences in the galactose tolerance of GALKG/GALKA individuals suggest heterogeneity of the genes responsible for the GALK-deficient form of galactosemia. Although subclinical cataracts were observed in several individuals, their significance relative to the mutant genotype cannot be resolved with the available data. PMID:173185

  3. Towards Enhanced Galactose Utilization by Lactococcus lactis▿

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Ana R.; Pool, Wietske A.; Solopova, Ana; Kok, Jan; Santos, Helena; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of galactose in dairy products due to partial lactose fermentation by lactic acid bacteria yields poor-quality products and precludes their consumption by individuals suffering from galactosemia. This study aimed at extending our knowledge of galactose metabolism in Lactococcus lactis, with the final goal of tailoring strains for enhanced galactose consumption. We used directed genetically engineered strains to examine galactose utilization in strain NZ9000 via the chromosomal Leloir pathway (gal genes) or the plasmid-encoded tagatose 6-phosphate (Tag6P) pathway (lac genes). Galactokinase (GalK), but not galactose permease (GalP), is essential for growth on galactose. This finding led to the discovery of an alternative route, comprising a galactose phosphotransferase system (PTS) and a phosphatase, for galactose dissimilation in NZ9000. Introduction of the Tag6P pathway in a galPMK mutant restored the ability to metabolize galactose but did not sustain growth on this sugar. The latter strain was used to prove that lacFE, encoding the lactose PTS, is necessary for galactose metabolism, thus implicating this transporter in galactose uptake. Both PTS transporters have a low affinity for galactose, while GalP displays a high affinity for the sugar. Furthermore, the GalP/Leloir route supported the highest galactose consumption rate. To further increase this rate, we overexpressed galPMKT, but this led to a substantial accumulation of α-galactose 1-phosphate and α-glucose 1-phosphate, pointing to a bottleneck at the level of α-phosphoglucomutase. Overexpression of a gene encoding α-phosphoglucomutase alone or in combination with gal genes yielded strains with galactose consumption rates enhanced up to 50% relative to that of NZ9000. Approaches to further improve galactose metabolism are discussed. PMID:20817811

  4. Heavily fluorinated carbohydrates as enzyme substrates: oxidation of tetrafluorinated galactose by galactose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Avgousta; Cini, Elena; Timofte, Roxana S; Flitsch, Sabine L; Turner, Nicholas J; Linclau, Bruno

    2011-10-28

    Galactose oxidase (GOase) was shown to oxidise several C2/C3 fluorinated galactose analogues. Interestingly, the enzyme was able to distinguish between the 2,3-tetrafluorinated galactose and its epimeric glucose analogue, and this represents the first reported biotransformation of a heavily fluorinated sugar.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: glucose-galactose malabsorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... mutations in SGLT1 cause glucose-galactose malabsorption by trafficking defects. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1999 Feb 24;1453( ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  6. Lactose uptake driven by galactose efflux in Streptococcus thermophilus: Evidence for a galactose-lactose antiporter

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.W.; Ponne, C. )

    1991-04-01

    Galactose-nonfermenting (Gal{sup {minus}}) Streptococcus thermophilus TS2 releases galactose into the extracellular medium when grown in medium containing excess lactose. Starved and de-energized Gal{sup {minus}} cells, however, could be loaded with galactose to levels approximately equal to the extracellular concentration (0 to 50 mM). When loaded cells were separated from the medium and resuspended in fresh broth containing 5 mM lactose, galactose efflux occurred. De-energized, galactose-loaded cells, resuspended in buffer or medium, accumulated ({sup 14}C)lactose at a greater rate and to significantly higher intracellular concentrations than unloaded cells. Uptake of lactose by loaded cells was inhibited more than that by unloaded cells in the presence of extracellular galactose, indicating that a galactose gradient was involved in the exchange system. When de-energized, galactose-loaded cells were resuspended in carbohydrate-free medium at pH 6.7, a proton motive force ({Delta}p) of 86 to 90 mV was formed, whereas de-energized, nonloaded cells maintained a {Delta}p of about 56 mV. However, uptake of lactose by loaded cells occurred when the proton motive force was abolished by the addition of an uncoupler or in the presence of a proton-translocating ATPase inhibitor. These results support the hypothesis that galactose efflux in Gal{sup {minus}} S. thermophilus is electrogenic and that the exchange reaction (lactose uptake and galactose efflux) probably occurs via an antiporter system.

  7. Galactose inhibition of ovulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Swartz, W J; Mattison, D R

    1988-03-01

    Clinical evidence suggests an association between galactosemia and premature ovarian failure. In the present study, adult female mice were fed a diet consisting of 50% galactose for either 2, 4, or 6 weeks. At all times there was a decrease in the normal ovulatory response, as evidenced by a reduction in the number of corpora lutea when compared with controls. Additionally, the exposure of galactose-treated mice to a superovulatory regimen of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) failed to induce an increased ovulatory response. Morphologic alterations, such as the increase in interstitial tissue and the appearance of lipofuscin, coupled with the failure to respond to exogenous gonadotropins, suggest that the reduced ovulatory response may be occurring at the level of the ovary. This effect, however, is reversible with cessation of galactose treatment. PMID:3342905

  8. 21 CFR 862.1310 - Galactose test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Galactose test system. 862.1310 Section 862.1310...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1310 Galactose test system. (a) Identification. A galactose test system is a device intended to...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1310 - Galactose test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Galactose test system. 862.1310 Section 862.1310...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1310 Galactose test system. (a) Identification. A galactose test system is a device intended to...

  10. The molecular architecture of galactose mutarotase/UDP-galactose 4-epimerase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2005-06-10

    The metabolic pathway by which beta-D-galactose is converted to glucose 1-phosphate is known as the Leloir pathway and consists of four enzymes. In most organisms, these enzymes appear to exist as soluble entities in the cytoplasm. In yeast such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, however, the first and last enzymes of the pathway, galactose mutarotase and UDP-galactose 4-epimerase, are contained within a single polypeptide chain referred to as Gal10p. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of Gal10p in complex with NAD(+), UDP-glucose, and beta-D-galactose determined to 1.85-A resolution. The enzyme is dimeric with dimensions of approximately 91 A x 135 A x 108 A and assumes an almost V-shaped appearance. The overall architecture of the individual subunits can be described in terms of two separate N- and C-terminal domains connected by a Type II turn formed by Leu-357 to Val-360. The first 356 residues of Gal10p fold into the classical bilobal topology observed for all other UDP-galactose 4-epimerases studied thus far. This N-terminal domain contains the binding sites for NAD(+) and UDP-glucose. The polypeptide chain extending from Glu-361 to Ser-699 adopts a beta-sandwich motif and harbors the binding site for beta-D-galactose. The two active sites of Gal10p are separated by over 50 A. This investigation represents the first structural analysis of a dual function enzyme in the Leloir pathway.

  11. Rapid and efficient galactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Quarterman, Josh; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Feng, Xueyang; Liu, Ian Y; Zhao, Huimin; Arkin, Adam P; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-07-10

    In the important industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, galactose metabolism requires energy production by respiration; therefore, this yeast cannot metabolize galactose under strict anaerobic conditions. While the respiratory dependence of galactose metabolism provides benefits in terms of cell growth and population stability, it is not advantageous for producing fuels and chemicals since a substantial fraction of consumed galactose is converted to carbon dioxide. In order to force S. cerevisiae to use galactose without respiration, a subunit (COX9) of a respiratory enzyme was deleted, but the resulting deletion mutant (Δcox9) was impaired in terms of galactose assimilation. Interestingly, after serial sub-cultures on galactose, the mutant evolved rapidly and was able to use galactose via fermentation only. The evolved strain (JQ-G1) produced ethanol from galactose with a 94% increase in yield and 6.9-fold improvement in specific productivity as compared to the wild-type strain. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis demonstrated a three-fold reduction in carbon flux through the TCA cycle of the evolved mutant with redirection of flux toward the fermentation pathway. Genome sequencing of the JQ-G1 strain revealed a loss of function mutation in a master negative regulator of the Leloir pathway (Gal80p). The mutation (Glu348*) in Gal80p was found to act synergistically with deletion of COX9 for efficient galactose fermentation, and thus the double deletion mutant Δcox9Δgal80 produced ethanol 2.4 times faster and with 35% higher yield than a single knockout mutant with deletion of GAL80 alone. When we introduced a functional COX9 cassette back into the JQ-G1 strain, the JQ-G1-COX9 strain showed a 33% reduction in specific galactose uptake rate and a 49% reduction in specific ethanol production rate as compared to JQ-G1. The wild-type strain was also subjected to serial sub-cultures on galactose but we failed to isolate a mutant capable of utilizing galactose without

  12. Galactose-specific seed lectins from Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Marapakala, Kavitha; Sultan, Nabil Ali M; Kenoth, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Lectins, the carbohydrate binding proteins have been studied extensively in view of their ubiquitous nature and wide-ranging applications. As they were originally found in plant seed extracts, much of the work on them was focused on plant seed lectins, especially those from legume seeds whereas much less attention was paid to the lectins from other plant families. During the last two decades many studies have been reported on lectins from the seeds of Cucurbitaceae species. The main focus of the present review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on these proteins, especially with regard to their physico-chemical characterization, interaction with carbohydrates and hydrophobic ligands, 3-dimensional structure and similarity to type-II ribosome inactivating proteins. The future outlook of research on these galactose-specific proteins is also briefly considered.

  13. PGM2 overexpression improves anaerobic galactose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Saccharomyces cerevisiae galactose is initially metabolized through the Leloir pathway after which glucose 6-phosphate enters glycolysis. Galactose is controlled both by glucose repression and by galactose induction. The gene PGM2 encodes the last enzyme of the Leloir pathway, phosphoglucomutase 2 (Pgm2p), which catalyses the reversible conversion of glucose 1-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate. Overexpression of PGM2 has previously been shown to enhance aerobic growth of S. cerevisiae in galactose medium. Results In the present study we show that overexpression of PGM2 under control of the HXT7'promoter from an integrative plasmid increased the PGM activity 5 to 6 times, which significantly reduced the lag phase of glucose-pregrown cells in an anaerobic galactose culture. PGM2 overexpression also increased the anaerobic specific growth rate whereas ethanol production was less influenced. When PGM2 was overexpressed from a multicopy plasmid instead, the PGM activity increased almost 32 times. However, this increase of PGM activity did not further improve aerobic galactose fermentation as compared to the strain carrying PGM2 on the integrative plasmid. Conclusion PGM2 overexpression in S. cerevisiae from an integrative plasmid is sufficient to reduce the lag phase and to enhance the growth rate in anaerobic galactose fermentation, which results in an overall decrease in fermentation duration. This observation is of particular importance for the future development of stable industrial strains with enhanced PGM activity. PMID:20507616

  14. d-Galactose Uptake by Fenugreek Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Zambou, Katerina; Spyropoulos, Caroline G.

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of d-galactose was studied in detached fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) cotyledons. Uptake kinetics and treatment with p-chloromercury-benzenesulfonic acid indicated that at low concentrations d-galactose was taken up by a carrier. At higher concentrations a diffusion-like component existed. Proton flux and pH studies, treatment with α-naphthaleneacetic acid, and uptake experiments under water stress conditions suggested that d-galactose was not taken up via H+ contransport. However, d-galactose uptake was under metabolic control. Uptake kinetics under water stress conditions suggested that moderate water stress either increased the Km of the carrier or decreased the Vmax. However, prolonged stress transformed the carrier-mediated uptake into a diffusion uptake transport. The uptake of d-galactose by fenugreek cotyledons was very low before and just after germination, was maximum after 35 hours imbibition, and started decreasing thereafter. The different uptake rates of d-galactose with imbibition times were attributed to the operation of the carrier. At low uptake rates the carrier did not operate. Treatment with cycloheximide suggested that the carrier was synthesized de novo just after germination and stopped operating when all galactomannan hydrolysis was over. Results were discussed in the context of control of endosperm galactomannan hydrolysis by the cotyledons of fenugreek embryo. PMID:16667633

  15. Galactose-α-1,3-galactose and Delayed Anaphylaxis, Angioedema, and Urticaria in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Joshua L.; Stallings, Amy P.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Oliveira, Walter M.; Workman, Lisa; James, Haley R.; Tripathi, Anubha; Lane, Charles J.; Matos, Luis; Heymann, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Despite a thorough history and comprehensive testing, many children who present with recurrent symptoms consistent with allergic reactions elude diagnosis. Recent research has identified a novel cause for “idiopathic” allergic reactions; immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody specific for the carbohydrate galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) has been associated with delayed urticaria and anaphylaxis that occurs 3 to 6 hours after eating beef, pork, or lamb. We sought to determine whether IgE antibody to α-Gal was present in sera of pediatric patients who reported idiopathic anaphylaxis or urticaria. METHODS: Patients aged 4 to 17 were enrolled in an institutional review board–approved protocol at the University of Virginia and private practice allergy offices in Lynchburg, VA. Sera was obtained and analyzed by ImmunoCAP for total IgE and specific IgE to α-Gal, beef, pork, cat epithelium and dander, Fel d 1, dog dander, and milk. RESULTS: Forty-five pediatric patients were identified who had both clinical histories supporting delayed anaphylaxis or urticaria to mammalian meat and IgE antibody specific for α-Gal. In addition, most of these cases had a history of tick bites within the past year, which itched and persisted. CONCLUSIONS: A novel form of anaphylaxis and urticaria that occurs 3 to 6 hours after eating mammalian meat is not uncommon among children in our area. Identification of these cases may not be straightforward and diagnosis is best confirmed by specific testing, which should certainly be considered for children living in the area where the Lone Star tick is common. PMID:23569097

  16. Drug allergens and food—the cetuximab and galactose-α-1,3-galactose story

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Emily A.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Commins, Scott P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective A novel form of food allergy has been described that initially became apparent from IgE reactivity with the drug cetuximab. Ongoing work regarding the etiology, distribution, clinical management, and cellular mechanisms of the IgE response to the oligosaccharide galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal) is reviewed. Data Sources Brief review of the relevant literature in peer-reviewed journals. Study Selection Studies on the clinical and immunologic features, pathogenesis, epidemiology, laboratory evaluation, and management of IgE to α-gal are included in this review. Results Recent work has identified a novel IgE antibody response to the mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, α-gal, that has been associated with 2 distinct forms of anaphylaxis: (1) immediate-onset anaphylaxis during first exposure to intravenous cetuximab and (2) delayed-onset anaphylaxis 3 to 6 hours after ingestion of mammalian food products (eg, beef and pork). Study results have suggested that tick bites are a cause of IgE antibody responses to α-gal in the United States. Patients with IgE antibody to α-gal continue to emerge, and, increasingly, these cases involve children. Nevertheless, this IgE antibody response does not appear to pose a risk for asthma but may impair diagnostic testing in some situations. Conclusion The practicing physician should understand the symptoms, evaluation, and management when diagnosing delayed allergic reactions to mammalian meat from IgE to α-gal or when initiating treatment with cetuximab in patients who have developed an IgE antibody response to α-gal. PMID:24468247

  17. Mathematical model of galactose regulation and metabolic consumption in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mitre, Tina M; Mackey, Michael C; Khadra, Anmar

    2016-10-21

    The galactose network has been extensively studied at the unicellular level to broaden our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing galactose metabolism in multicellular organisms. Although the key molecular players involved in the metabolic and regulatory processes of this system have been known for decades, their interactions and chemical kinetics remain incompletely understood. Mathematical models can provide an alternative method to study the dynamics of this network from a quantitative and a qualitative perspective. Here, we employ this approach to unravel the main properties of the galactose network, including equilibrium binary and temporal responses, as a way to decipher its adaptation to actively-changing inputs. We combine its two main components: the genetic branch, which allows for bistable responses, and a metabolic branch, encompassing the relevant metabolic processes that can be repressed by glucose. We use both computational tools to estimate model parameters based on published experimental data, as well as bifurcation analysis to decipher the properties of the system in various parameter regimes. Our model analysis reveals that the interplay between the inducer (galactose) and the repressor (glucose) creates a bistable regime which dictates the temporal responses of the system. Based on the same bifurcation techniques, we explain why the system is robust to genetic mutations and molecular instabilities. These findings may provide experimentalists with a theoretical framework with which they can determine how the galactose network functions under various conditions. PMID:27395401

  18. The use of galactose oxidase in lipid labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Radin, N.S.; Evangelatos, G.P.

    1981-03-01

    Galactose oxidase can be used to oxidize the terminal carbon atom of lipids containing galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine, and the resultant aldehyde group can be reduced back to the original carbinol with radioactive borohydride. The efficiency of the first reaction has been investigated systematically by using (6-/sup 3/H)galactosyl ceramide as substrate and measuring the amount of radioactive water formed. This enabled us to establish that the addition of catalase and peroxidase greatly speeded the oxidation, that phosphate and PIPES buffers were the best among those tested, that the reaction continued for 24 hr without a second addition of galactose oxidase, and that the optimum concentration of organic solvent (tetrahydrofuran) was 50%. The suggestion if made that a similar set of variables be studied for each lipid or nonlipid by the same basic technique: labeling by the oxidase/borohydride method and use of the resultant compound as substrate.

  19. Cytoarchitectural changes in lens epithelium of galactose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Gona, O

    1984-06-01

    Whole mounts of lens epithelia from rats fed on a galactose-rich diet for one, two, three or seven days were examined for morphological alterations. The meridional rows of epithelia from lenses of animals fed on galactose for seven days were found to be grossly disorganized or abnormally elongated. There was some indication that the cells were edematous and that the epithelium had become multilayered. These abnormalities apparently extended into the transitional zone. Evidence of the cytoarchitectural changes was present as early as one day after institution of the 30% galactose diet and progressed steadily over the period of observation. The findings provide support for the hypothesis that loss of meridional row integrity is a phenomenon common to development of most types of cortical cataracts.

  20. Glucose Galactose Malabsorption complicated with Rickets and Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lawati, Tawfiq; Vargees, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Congenital Glucose Galactose malabsorption (CGGM) is a rare disorder with limited data from the Arab world. We report the first case of CGGM in Oman. B.S.A two years old female who presented with chronic osmotic diarrhea since birth with hypernatraemic dehydration. B.S was found to have Glucose Galactose Malabsorption based on clinical trial of ORS and elemental formula. Symptoms resolved on introduction of Carbohydrate free formula. The patient developed many complications while on TPN including rickets and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. These complications have not been reported earlier in CGGM. PMID:22359715

  1. Glucose Galactose Malabsorption complicated with Rickets and Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Al-Lawati, Tawfiq; Vargees, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Congenital Glucose Galactose malabsorption (CGGM) is a rare disorder with limited data from the Arab world. We report the first case of CGGM in Oman.B.S.A two years old female who presented with chronic osmotic diarrhea since birth with hypernatraemic dehydration. B.S was found to have Glucose Galactose Malabsorption based on clinical trial of ORS and elemental formula. Symptoms resolved on introduction of Carbohydrate free formula. The patient developed many complications while on TPN including rickets and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. These complications have not been reported earlier in CGGM.

  2. Elemental and structural studies of the rat galactose cataract

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, C.V.; Unakar, N.J.; Bagchi, M.; Chylack, L.T. Jr.; Jampel, R.S.; Bobrowski, W.F.; Dang, L.; Tsui, J.Y.; Harding, D. )

    1989-01-01

    A series of rat galactose lenses, from 1 to 20 days on the 50% galactose diet, were frozen in the whole eye, and fractured from pole to pole in the frozen state. Lyophilized half-lenses were prepared for analysis by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Following elemental analysis, some specimens were embedded and sectioned for histological studies. Elemental X-ray maps, and/or profiles, were made for K, Na, Cl, Ca, P, and S. As early as two days on the galactose diet, a crescent-shaped region (streak) of Cl, Na, and Ca gain, and K loss develops near the equatorial surface. Between this region and the equatorial surface are the nucleated differentiating fiber cells which maintain low Cl, Na, and Ca, and high K (viable equatorial zone, VEZ). With time the streak expands anteriorly, centrally and posteriorly, eventually (by 20 days) including most of the lens. The VEZ, including the epithelium, however, is non-reactive to the galactose diet, which is deleterious to the fully differentiated fiber cells. Eventually, the VEZ undergoes a characteristic morphological change, apparently due in part to changes in its physical environment.

  3. Galactose promotes fat mobilization in obese lactating and nonlactating women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Galactose consumption as the only carbohydrate source, results in little increase in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations when compared with fasting. Lower insulin might promote endogenous lipolysis during meal absorption, which may facilitate fat loss. The objective was to test the hypothesis ...

  4. Diabeteslike preproliferative retinal changes in galactose-fed dogs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Wyman, M; Ferris, F; Kador, P F

    1992-09-01

    Retinal vessel changes were experimentally investigated by a combination of color fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and histologic studies in beagles that were fed a 30% galactose diet for up to 66 months. Previously, we have described the appearance of pericyte ghosts, microaneurysms, acellular capillaries, and intraretinal hemorrhages in dogs fed a galactose diet for up to 36 months. These disorders were similar to those observed in humans with background diabetic retinopathy. We report herein that dogs fed galactose for 48 to 60 months experience retinal changes associated with the chronic occlusion of capillary beds and subsequent ischemia of the retina. These changes included the appearance of broad areas of nonperfusion, soft exudates (cytoid bodies), intraretinal microvascular abnormalities, occluded arterioles, preretinal and intravitreal hemorrhages, and apparent new vessel growth around the optic disc. The present study clearly demonstrates that the galactose-fed dog is an animal model in which advanced retinal changes develop, and these changes are similar to those associated with preproliferative human diabetic retinopathy.

  5. Age-dependent lens changes in galactose-fed dogs.

    PubMed

    Lackner, P A; Rodriguez, L; Sato, S; Lizak, M J; Wyman, M; Kador, P F

    1997-03-01

    Aldose reductase initiated sugar cataract formation in 9-month old galactose-fed dogs has been documented to progress from an accentuation of lens sutures (1 month after initial feeding) to the appearance of cortical vacuoles (3 months), cortical opacities (4-6 months) and eventually the progressive formation of a clear zone at the cortical equatorial regions of the cataractous lenses (> 12 months). Here, the effect of age on the onset and degree of sugar cataract formation has been investigated in beagles fed a 30% galactose diet starting at 2, 6, and 24 months of age. Cataract formation was monitored by slit lamp and retroillumination microscopy. Compared to 9-month old dogs, cataract formation in the younger dogs was more rapid and the lens changes were more severe. In the 2-month old group of dogs, galactose-feeding resulted in a rapid formation of dense cataracts which began to resorb after 106 days of galactose feeding with only opaque nuclear remnants remaining after eight months. These changes were mirrored by age-dependent reductions of lenticular NADPH-dependent reductase activity.

  6. Elemental and structural studies of the rat galactose cataract.

    PubMed

    Harding, C V; Unakar, N J; Bagchi, M; Chylack, L T; Jampel, R S; Bobrowski, W F; Dang, L; Tsui, J Y; Harding, D

    1989-01-01

    A series of rat galactose lenses, from 1 to 20 days on the 50% galactose diet, were frozen in the whole eye, and fractured from pole to pole in the frozen state. Lyophilized half-lenses were prepared for analysis by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Following elemental analysis, some specimens were embedded and sectioned for histological studies. Elemental X-ray maps, and/or profiles, were made for K, Na, Cl, Ca, P, and S. As early as two days on the galactose diet, a crescent-shaped region ("streak") of Cl, Na, and Ca gain, and K loss develops near the equatorial surface. Between this region and the equatorial surface are the nucleated differentiating fiber cells which maintain low Cl, Na, and Ca, and high K (viable equatorial zone, VEZ). With time the "streak" expands anteriorly, centrally and posteriorly, eventually (by 20 days) including most of the lens. The VEZ, including the epithelium, however, is non-reactive to the galactose diet, which is deleterious to the fully differentiated fiber cells. Eventually, the VEZ undergoes a characteristic morphological change, apparently due in part to changes in its physical environment.

  7. 21 CFR 862.1310 - Galactose test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Galactose test system. 862.1310 Section 862.1310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1310 - Galactose test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Galactose test system. 862.1310 Section 862.1310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1310 - Galactose test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Galactose test system. 862.1310 Section 862.1310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  10. Glycoconjugates as noninvasive probes of intrahepatic metabolism. III. Application to galactose assimilation by the intact rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hellerstein, M.K.; Munro, H.N.

    1988-04-01

    A tracer methodology has been developed for noninvasive assessment of intrahepatic metabolism of administered labeled sugars. In this procedure, we measure the output of the label from the liver in two glycoconjugates derived from hepatic UDP-glucose, namely, glucuronic acid formed through UDP-glucuronic acid and excreted in the urine following acetaminophen administration, and galactose formed through UDP-galactose and then secreted in the carbohydrate portion of glycoproteins in the plasma. Comparison of the distribution of label from various sugar precursors in these end-products can indicate exchanges between hepatic UDP-glucose, UDP-galactose, and UDP-glucuronic acid. In this study we apply the technique to explore whether the enzyme UDP-galactose-4-epimerase catalyzing the step UDP-galactose to UDP-glucose is nonequilibrium and therefore potentially has a regulatory role for utilization of free galactose. The specific activity in the two glycoconjugates was compared when either (1-3H)galactose or (U-14C)glucose was the infused precursor sugar. In rats under a variety of conditions (fasting, oral refeeding, intravenous administration of galactose), label from (1-3H)galactose accumulated in glycoprotein-bound galactose much more than in acetaminophen-bound glucuronic acid, in comparison to label from (U-14C)glucose, demonstrating limitation of the rate of transfer from UDP-galactose to UDP-glucose at the epimerase step. Accordingly, epimerase is suggested to have a regulatory role in the galactose assimilation pathway.

  11. Overlapping and Distinct Roles of Aspergillus fumigatus UDP-glucose 4-Epimerases in Galactose Metabolism and the Synthesis of Galactose-containing Cell Wall Polysaccharides*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mark J.; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Cerone, Robert P.; Baptista, Stefanie D.; Campoli, Paolo V.; Choe, Se-In; Kravtsov, Ilia; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Creuzenet, Carole; Liu, Hong; Berghuis, Albert M.; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Filler, Scott G.; Fontaine, Thierry; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Aspergillus fumigatus contains two galactose-containing polysaccharides, galactomannan and galactosaminogalactan, whose biosynthetic pathways are not well understood. The A. fumigatus genome contains three genes encoding putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerases, uge3, uge4, and uge5. We undertook this study to elucidate the function of these epimerases. We found that uge4 is minimally expressed and is not required for the synthesis of galactose-containing exopolysaccharides or galactose metabolism. Uge5 is the dominant UDP-glucose 4-epimerase in A. fumigatus and is essential for normal growth in galactose-based medium. Uge5 is required for synthesis of the galactofuranose (Galf) component of galactomannan and contributes galactose to the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan. Uge3 can mediate production of both UDP-galactose and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and is required for the production of galactosaminogalactan but not galactomannan. In the absence of Uge5, Uge3 activity is sufficient for growth on galactose and the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan containing lower levels of galactose but not the synthesis of Galf. A double deletion of uge5 and uge3 blocked growth on galactose and synthesis of both Galf and galactosaminogalactan. This study is the first survey of glucose epimerases in A. fumigatus and contributes to our understanding of the role of these enzymes in metabolism and cell wall synthesis. PMID:24257745

  12. Overlapping and distinct roles of Aspergillus fumigatus UDP-glucose 4-epimerases in galactose metabolism and the synthesis of galactose-containing cell wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mark J; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Cerone, Robert P; Baptista, Stefanie D; Campoli, Paolo V; Choe, Se-In; Kravtsov, Ilia; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Creuzenet, Carole; Liu, Hong; Berghuis, Albert M; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Filler, Scott G; Fontaine, Thierry; Sheppard, Donald C

    2014-01-17

    The cell wall of Aspergillus fumigatus contains two galactose-containing polysaccharides, galactomannan and galactosaminogalactan, whose biosynthetic pathways are not well understood. The A. fumigatus genome contains three genes encoding putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerases, uge3, uge4, and uge5. We undertook this study to elucidate the function of these epimerases. We found that uge4 is minimally expressed and is not required for the synthesis of galactose-containing exopolysaccharides or galactose metabolism. Uge5 is the dominant UDP-glucose 4-epimerase in A. fumigatus and is essential for normal growth in galactose-based medium. Uge5 is required for synthesis of the galactofuranose (Galf) component of galactomannan and contributes galactose to the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan. Uge3 can mediate production of both UDP-galactose and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and is required for the production of galactosaminogalactan but not galactomannan. In the absence of Uge5, Uge3 activity is sufficient for growth on galactose and the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan containing lower levels of galactose but not the synthesis of Galf. A double deletion of uge5 and uge3 blocked growth on galactose and synthesis of both Galf and galactosaminogalactan. This study is the first survey of glucose epimerases in A. fumigatus and contributes to our understanding of the role of these enzymes in metabolism and cell wall synthesis.

  13. Fermentation of glucose, lactose, galactose, mannitol, and xylose by bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    de Vries, W; Stouthamer, A H

    1968-08-01

    For six strains of Bifidobacterium bifidum (Lactobacillus bifidus), fermentation balances of glucose, lactose, galactose, mannitol, and xylose were determined. Products formed were acetate, l(+)-lactate, ethyl alcohol, and formate. l(+)-Lactate dehydrogenase of all strains studied was found to have an absolute requirement for fructose-1,6-diphosphate. The phosphoroclastic enzyme could not be demonstrated in cell-free extracts. Cell suspensions fermented pyruvate to equimolar amounts of acetate and formate. Alcohol dehydrogenase was shown in cell-free extracts. Possible explanations have been suggested for the differences in fermentation balances found for different strains and carbon sources. By enzyme determinations, it was shown that bifidobacteria convert mannitol to fructose-6-phosphate by an inducible polyol dehydrogenase and fructokinase. For one strain of B. bifidum, molar growth yields of glucose, lactose, galactose, and mannitol were determined. The mean value of Y (ATP), calculated from molar growth yields and fermentation balances, was 11.3.

  14. Galactose as Broad Ligand for Multiple Tumor Imaging and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuxiang; Chen, Haiyan; Su, Shanyuhan; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Congying; Fida, Guissi; Cui, Sisi; Zhao, Juan; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Galactose residues could be specifically recognized by the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) which is highly exhibited on liver tissues. However, ASGPR has not been widely investigated on different tumor cell lines except for hepatoma carcinoma cells, which motivates us to investigate the possibility of galactose serving as a board tumor ligand. In this study, a galactose (Gal)-based probe conjugated with fluorescence dye MPA (Gal-MPA) was constructed for the evaluation of tumor affinities/targeted ability on different tumor cell lines. In the vitro cell study, it was indicated that the fluorescence probe Gal-MPA displayed higher cell affinity to tumor cells (HepG2, MCF-7 and A549) than that of the normal liver cells l02. In the vivo dynamic study of Gal-MPA in tumor-bearing mice (HepG2, MCF-7, A549, HCT116, U87, MDA-MB-231 and S180), it was shown that its high tumor targeted ability with the maximal tumor/normal tissue ratio reached up to 6.8. Meanwhile, the fast tumor-targeted ability within 2 hours and long retention on tumor site up to 120 hours were observed. Our results demonstrated that galactose should be a promising broad ligand for multiple tumor imaging and targeted therapy. Subsequently, Gal was covalently conjugated to doxorubicin (DOX) to form prodrug Gal-DOX for tumor targeted therapy. The therapeutic results of Gal-DOX than DOX being better suggested that galactosylated prodrugs might have the prospective potential in tumor targeted therapy.

  15. Galactose as Broad Ligand for Multiple Tumor Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuxiang; Chen, Haiyan; Su, Shanyuhan; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Congying; Fida, Guissi; Cui, Sisi; Zhao, Juan; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Galactose residues could be specifically recognized by the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) which is highly exhibited on liver tissues. However, ASGPR has not been widely investigated on different tumor cell lines except for hepatoma carcinoma cells, which motivates us to investigate the possibility of galactose serving as a board tumor ligand. In this study, a galactose (Gal)-based probe conjugated with fluorescence dye MPA (Gal-MPA) was constructed for the evaluation of tumor affinities/targeted ability on different tumor cell lines. In the vitro cell study, it was indicated that the fluorescence probe Gal-MPA displayed higher cell affinity to tumor cells (HepG2, MCF-7 and A549) than that of the normal liver cells l02. In the vivo dynamic study of Gal-MPA in tumor-bearing mice (HepG2, MCF-7, A549, HCT116, U87, MDA-MB-231 and S180), it was shown that its high tumor targeted ability with the maximal tumor/normal tissue ratio reached up to 6.8. Meanwhile, the fast tumor-targeted ability within 2 hours and long retention on tumor site up to 120 hours were observed. Our results demonstrated that galactose should be a promising broad ligand for multiple tumor imaging and targeted therapy. Subsequently, Gal was covalently conjugated to doxorubicin (DOX) to form prodrug Gal-DOX for tumor targeted therapy. The therapeutic results of Gal-DOX than DOX being better suggested that galactosylated prodrugs might have the prospective potential in tumor targeted therapy. PMID:26078797

  16. Galactose recognition by the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Jan; Cowper, Ben; Liu, Yan; Lai, Livia; Pinzan, Camila; Marq, Jean Baptiste; Friedrich, Nikolas; Sawmynaden, Kovilen; Liew, Lloyd; Chai, Wengang; Childs, Robert A; Saouros, Savvas; Simpson, Peter; Roque Barreira, Maria Cristina; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; Matthews, Stephen

    2012-05-11

    Toxosplasma gondii is the model parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, which contains numerous obligate intracellular parasites of medical and veterinary importance, including Eimeria, Sarcocystis, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, and Plasmodium species. Members of this phylum actively enter host cells by a multistep process with the help of microneme protein (MIC) complexes that play important roles in motility, host cell attachment, moving junction formation, and invasion. T. gondii (Tg)MIC1-4-6 complex is the most extensively investigated microneme complex, which contributes to host cell recognition and attachment via the action of TgMIC1, a sialic acid-binding adhesin. Here, we report the structure of TgMIC4 and reveal its carbohydrate-binding specificity to a variety of galactose-containing carbohydrate ligands. The lectin is composed of six apple domains in which the fifth domain displays a potent galactose-binding activity, and which is cleaved from the complex during parasite invasion. We propose that galactose recognition by TgMIC4 may compromise host protection from galectin-mediated activation of the host immune system. PMID:22399295

  17. Safe administration of a gelatin-containing vaccine in an adult with galactose-α-1,3-galactose allergy.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Michelle L; Waibel, Kirk H

    2015-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) E antibodies to galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) are associated with delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian food products and gelatin-based foods (Commins et al., J Allergy Clin Immunol 2009;123:426; Caponetto et al., J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013;1:302). We describe a patient with α-Gal allergy who successfully tolerated the live zoster vaccine and we review anaphylactic reactions reported to this vaccine. Our patient, who tolerated a vaccine containing the highest gelatin content, is reassuring but continued safety assessment of gelatin-containing vaccines for this patient cohort is recommended as there are multiple factors for this patient cohort that influence the reaction risk.

  18. Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by two mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, S. P.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by at least two mechanisms. First, it inhibits auxin-induced H(+)-excretion needed for the initiation of rapid elongation. Galactose cannot be doing so by directly interfering with the ATPase since fusicoccin-induced H(+)-excretion is not affected. Secondly, galactose inhibits long-term auxin-induced growth, even in an acidic (pH 4.5) solution. This may be due to an inhibition of cell wall synthesis. However, galactose does not reduce the capacity of walls to be loosened by H+, given exogenously or excreted in response to fusicoccin.

  19. Glucose inhibibion of galactose-induced synthesis of beta-galactosidase in Streptomyces violaceus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J; Hardisson, C

    1980-03-01

    Various carbon compounds inhibited galactose induced synthesis of a beta-galactosidase activity in Streptomyces violaceus. Glucose and 2-deoxyglucose, but not methyl-alpha-D-glucose, caused inhibition of galactose uptake activity. In addition, glucose, or one of its metabolites, inhibited the synthesis of the glactose uptake system. Therefore it is concluded that the main inhibitory activity of glucose on galactose induced enzyme synthesis is exerted through inducer exclusion. Other carbon sources, such as D-ribose, D-gluconate, cellobiose or DL-alpha-glycerophosphate, did not inhibit uptake of the inducer galactose and may exert their effect through catabolite repression, inactivation or direct enzyme inhibition. PMID:6770791

  20. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  1. Selection of Galactose-Fermenting Streptococcus thermophilus in Lactose-Limited Chemostat Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Terence D.; Crow, Vaughan L.

    1984-01-01

    Stock cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus are essentially galactose negative (Gal−). Although both galactose 1-phosphate uridyl transferase and uridine-5-diphospho-glucose 4-epimerase are present, suggesting that the genes for the Leloir pathway exist, cells cannot induce high levels of galactokinase. Therefore, galactose is largely excreted when cultures are grown on lactose, and most strains cannot be readily adapted to grow on free galactose. Gal− cultures were grown in a chemostat under lactose limitation in which high concentrations of residual galactose were present. Under this selection pressure, Gal+ organisms eventually took over the culture with all four strains examined. Gal+ cells had induced galactokinase, and three of the four strains grew on free galactose with doubling times of 40 to 50 min. When Gal+ organisms were grown on lactose in batch culture, the galactose moiety was only partially utilized while lactose was still present. As lactose was exhausted, and catabolite repression was lifted, the Leloir pathway enzymes (especially galactokinase) were induced and the residual galactose fermented. Neither phospho-β-galactosidase activity nor the enzymes of the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway were detected in S. thermophilus. In contrast to Streptococcus cremoris and Streptococcus lactis, fermentation was homolactic with galactose in batch cultures and with lactose limitation in the chemostat. When mixed Gal+-Gal− cultures were repeatedly transferred in milk, the Gal− cells became the dominant cell type. The Gal− phenotype of stock cultures probably reflects their prolonged maintenance in milk. PMID:16346586

  2. Galactose uncovers face recognition and mental images in congenital prosopagnosia: the first case report.

    PubMed

    Esins, Janina; Schultz, Johannes; Bülthoff, Isabelle; Kennerknecht, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    A woman in her early 40s with congenital prosopagnosia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder observed for the first time sudden and extensive improvement of her face recognition abilities, mental imagery, and sense of navigation after galactose intake. This effect of galactose on prosopagnosia has never been reported before. Even if this effect is restricted to a subform of congenital prosopagnosia, galactose might improve the condition of other prosopagnosics. Congenital prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize other people by their face, has extensive negative impact on everyday life. It has a high prevalence of about 2.5%. Monosaccharides are known to have a positive impact on cognitive performance. Here, we report the case of a prosopagnosic woman for whom the daily intake of 5 g of galactose resulted in a remarkable improvement of her lifelong face blindness, along with improved sense of orientation and more vivid mental imagery. All these improvements vanished after discontinuing galactose intake. The self-reported effects of galactose were wide-ranging and remarkably strong but could not be reproduced for 16 other prosopagnosics tested. Indications about heterogeneity within prosopagnosia have been reported; this could explain the difficulty to find similar effects in other prosopagnosics. Detailed analyses of the effects of galactose in prosopagnosia might give more insight into the effects of galactose on human cognition in general. Galactose is cheap and easy to obtain, therefore, a systematic test of its positive effects on other cases of congenital prosopagnosia may be warranted.

  3. Galactose uncovers face recognition and mental images in congenital prosopagnosia: the first case report.

    PubMed

    Esins, Janina; Schultz, Johannes; Bülthoff, Isabelle; Kennerknecht, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    A woman in her early 40s with congenital prosopagnosia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder observed for the first time sudden and extensive improvement of her face recognition abilities, mental imagery, and sense of navigation after galactose intake. This effect of galactose on prosopagnosia has never been reported before. Even if this effect is restricted to a subform of congenital prosopagnosia, galactose might improve the condition of other prosopagnosics. Congenital prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize other people by their face, has extensive negative impact on everyday life. It has a high prevalence of about 2.5%. Monosaccharides are known to have a positive impact on cognitive performance. Here, we report the case of a prosopagnosic woman for whom the daily intake of 5 g of galactose resulted in a remarkable improvement of her lifelong face blindness, along with improved sense of orientation and more vivid mental imagery. All these improvements vanished after discontinuing galactose intake. The self-reported effects of galactose were wide-ranging and remarkably strong but could not be reproduced for 16 other prosopagnosics tested. Indications about heterogeneity within prosopagnosia have been reported; this could explain the difficulty to find similar effects in other prosopagnosics. Detailed analyses of the effects of galactose in prosopagnosia might give more insight into the effects of galactose on human cognition in general. Galactose is cheap and easy to obtain, therefore, a systematic test of its positive effects on other cases of congenital prosopagnosia may be warranted. PMID:24164936

  4. Galactose Metabolism Plays a Crucial Role in Biofilm Formation by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yunrong; Beauregard, Pascale B.; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Galactose is a common monosaccharide that can be utilized by all living organisms via the activities of three main enzymes that make up the Leloir pathway: GalK, GalT, and GalE. In Bacillus subtilis, the absence of GalE causes sensitivity to exogenous galactose, leading to rapid cell lysis. This effect can be attributed to the accumulation of toxic galactose metabolites, since the galE mutant is blocked in the final step of galactose catabolism. In a screen for suppressor mutants restoring viability to a galE null mutant in the presence of galactose, we identified mutations in sinR, which is the major biofilm repressor gene. These mutations caused an increase in the production of the exopolysaccharide (EPS) component of the biofilm matrix. We propose that UDP-galactose is the toxic galactose metabolite and that it is used in the synthesis of EPS. Thus, EPS production can function as a shunt mechanism for this toxic molecule. Additionally, we demonstrated that galactose metabolism genes play an essential role in B. subtilis biofilm formation and that the expressions of both the gal and eps genes are interrelated. Finally, we propose that B. subtilis and other members of the Bacillus genus may have evolved to utilize naturally occurring polymers of galactose, such as galactan, as carbon sources. PMID:22893383

  5. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  7. Ultrasensitive Capillary Electrophoretic Analysis of Potentially Immunogenic Carbohydrate Residues in Biologics: Galactose-α-1,3-Galactose Containing Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Zoltan; Guttman, Andras; Bones, Jonathan; Shand, Randi L.; Meh, David; Karger, Barry L.

    2012-01-01

    With the recent growth of the global monoclonal antibody market, ultrasensitive techniques are required for rapid analysis of possible immunogenic residues, such as galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-1,3-Gal) on therapeutic proteins expressed in murine or CHO cell lines. We report a capillary electrophoretic approach in conjunction with exoglycosidase digestion for structural elucidation of N-linked IgG glycans containing the above immunogenic epitope. The method uses commercially available reagents and instrumentation, thus making the described methodology readily available for implementation and validation within the biotechnology industry. The method was first evaluated using polyclonal mouse IgG N-glycans which are known to contain α-1,3-Gal containing epitopes. High reproducibility in migration time enabled determination of GU values for five α-1,3-Gal containing structures. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of a NCI reference standard monoclonal antibody and two development phase monoclonal antibodies. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 1 and 2 µg of intact protein IgG starting material, respectively, further indicating the high sensitivity of the described method. PMID:22571495

  8. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  9. Electrochemical biosensing of galactose based on carbon materials: graphene versus multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dalkıran, Berna; Erden, Pınar Esra; Kılıç, Esma

    2016-06-01

    In this study, two enzyme electrodes based on graphene (GR), Co3O4 nanoparticles and chitosan (CS) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), Co3O4 nanoparticles, and CS, were fabricated as novel biosensing platforms for galactose determination, and their performances were compared. Galactose oxidase (GaOx) was immobilized onto the electrode surfaces by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Optimum working conditions of the biosensors were investigated and the analytical performance of the biosensors was compared with respect to detection limit, linearity, repeatability, and stability. The MWCNTs-based galactose biosensor provided about 1.6-fold higher sensitivity than its graphene counterpart. Moreover, the linear working range and detection limit of the MWCNTs-based galactose biosensor was superior to the graphene-modified biosensor. The successful application of the purposed biosensors for galactose biosensing in human serum samples was also investigated. PMID:27074783

  10. Mutations in GAL2 or GAL4 alleviate catabolite repression produced by galactose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez; Flores

    2000-06-01

    Galactose does not allow growth of pyruvate carboxylase mutants in media with ammonium as a nitrogen source, and inhibits growth of strains defective in phosphoglyceromutase in ethanol-glycerol mixtures. Starting with pyc1, pyc2, and gpm1 strains, we isolated mutants that eliminated those galactose effects. The mutations were recessive and were named dgr1-1 and dgr2-1. Strains bearing those mutations in an otherwise wild-type background grew slower than the wild type in rich galactose media, and their growth was dependent on respiration. Galactose repression of several enzymes was relieved in the mutants. Biochemical and genetic evidence showed that dgr1-1 was allelic with GAL2 and dgr2-1 with GAL4. The results indicate that the rate of galactose consumption is critical to cause catabolite repression.

  11. Galactose supplementation in phosphoglucomutase-1 deficiency; review and outlook for a novel treatable CDG

    PubMed Central

    Morava, Eva

    2014-01-01

    We recently redefined phosphoglucomutase-1 deficiency not only as an enzyme defect, involved in normal glycogen metabolism, but also an inborn error of protein glycosylation. Phosphoglucomutase-1 is a key enzyme in glycolysis and glycogenesis by catalyzing in the bidirectional transfer of phosphate from position 1 to 6 on glucose. Glucose-1-P and UDP-glucose are closely linked to galactose metabolism. Normal PGM1 activity is important for effective glycolysis during fasting. Activated glucose and galactose are essential for normal protein glycosylation. The complex defect involving abnormal concentrations of activated sugars leads to hypoglycemia and two major phenotypic presentations, one with primary muscle involvement and the other with severe multisystem disease. The multisystem phenotype includes growth delay and malformations, like cleft palate or uvula, and liver, endocrine and possible cardiomyopathy. The patients have normal intelligence. Decreased transferrin galactosylation is a characteristic finding on mass spectrometry. Previous in vitro studies in patient fibroblasts showed an improvement of glycosylation on galactose supplements. Four patients with PGM1 deficiency have been trialed on D-galactose (compassionate use), and showed improvement of serum transferrin hypoglycosylation. There was a parallel improvement of liver function, endocrine abnormalities and a decrease in the frequency of hypoglycemic episodes. No side effects have been observed. Galactose supplementation didn't seem to resolve all clinical symptoms. Adding complex carbohydrates showed an additional clinical amelioration. Based on the available clinical data we suggest to consider the use of 0.5–1g/kg/day D-galactose and maximum 50g/day oral galactose therapy in PGM1-CDG. The existing data on galactose therapy have to be viewed as preliminary observations. A prospective multicenter trial is ongoing to evaluate the efficacy and optimal D-galactose dose of galactose supplementation

  12. Insights into EPR effect versus lectin-mediated targeted delivery: biodegradable polycarbonate micellar nanoparticles with and without galactose surface decoration.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim Attia, Amalina Binte; Oh, Pamela; Yang, Chuan; Tan, Jeremy Pang Kern; Rao, Nithya; Hedrick, James L; Yang, Yi Yan; Ge, Ruowen

    2014-11-12

    Polymeric micelles with and without galactose are synthesized to study liver targeting ability in an orthotopic HCC rat model. Micelles with galactose accumulate more in the healthy liver tissue instead of HCC, while micelles without galactose amass in HCC by the EPR effect. These micelles show great potential as drug delivery carriers to target either the liver or HCC.

  13. Timing and Variability of Galactose Metabolic Gene Activation Depend on the Rate of Environmental Change

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bo; Ott, William; Josić, Krešimir; Bennett, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of gene network activity allows cells to respond to changes in environmental conditions. For example, the galactose utilization network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by the presence of galactose but repressed by glucose. If both sugars are present, the yeast will first metabolize glucose, depleting it from the extracellular environment. Upon depletion of glucose, the genes encoding galactose metabolic proteins will activate. Here, we show that the rate at which glucose levels are depleted determines the timing and variability of galactose gene activation. Paradoxically, we find that Gal1p, an enzyme needed for galactose metabolism, accumulates more quickly if glucose is depleted slowly rather than taken away quickly. Furthermore, the variability of induction times in individual cells depends non-monotonically on the rate of glucose depletion and exhibits a minimum at intermediate depletion rates. Our mathematical modeling suggests that the dynamics of the metabolic transition from glucose to galactose are responsible for the variability in galactose gene activation. These findings demonstrate that environmental dynamics can determine the phenotypic outcome at both the single-cell and population levels. PMID:26200924

  14. Galactose epimeraseless mutants of Salmonella typhimurium as live vaccines for calves.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R C; Gyles, C L

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a galactose epimeraseless mutant of Salmonella typhimurium administered as an oral vaccine to one week old calves and to investigate properties of galactose epimeraseless mutants which affect their virulence and immunogenicity. The galactose epimeraseless mutant S. typhimurium strain G30D caused diarrhea and fever in three calves to which it was administered orally at a dose of 10(10) organisms; all three calves died following challenge with virulent S. typhimurium ten days postvaccination. Mild illness developed in four calves vaccinated with a dose of 9 X 10(6) organisms and one of these calves survived challenge. Three unvaccinated calves died following challenge. The vaccine organism persisted in tissues and was shed for a prolonged period by calves which received 10(10) organisms. Studies of characteristics of galactose epimeraseless mutants of S. typhimurium showed that, in the presence of galactose, there is selection for secondary mutants which are galactose resistant. The studies indicate that galactose epimeraseless mutants of S. typhimurium are not good candidate live vaccine organisms for use in calves. PMID:3530414

  15. Effects of Exendin-4 on Male Reproductive Parameters of D-Galactose Induced Aging Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of exendin-4 on reproductive alteration in a D-galactose-induced aging mouse model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 72 male Naval Medical Research Institute mice (20~25 g) were randomly divided into six groups: control, exendin-4 (1 nmol/kg), exendin-4 (10 nmol/kg), D-galactose (500 mg/kg), D-galactose+exendin-4 (1 nmol/kg), and D-galactose+exendin-4 (10 nmol/kg). The aging model animals were gavaged with D-galactose for six weeks, and exendin-4 was injected intraperitoneally in the last 10 days. At the end of treatment serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone levels were evaluated and the cauda epididymis and testis were removed to analyze the sperm count and testis morphology. Results The testis weight and volume decreased in the D-galactose group (p<0.01 and p<0.05) respectively. Exendin-4 (1, 10 nmol/kg) increased these parameters in the normal and aging mouse models. Serum LH and FSH levels increased and the sperm count decreased in the D-galactose group (p<0.05). Further, exendin-4 (1 nmol/kg) decreased LH and FSH levels and increased the serum testosterone level and sperm count in both normal and aging animals. Conclusions D-galactose can induce aging alternations in the male reproductive system such as decreased sperm count and increased serum LH and FSH levels through reactive oxygen species over production and reduced antioxidant enzyme activity. Further, co-administration of exendin-4 reduced reproductive complications of D-galactose in an aging mouse model. PMID:25606567

  16. Molecular cloning of a human macrophage lectin specific for galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Cherayil, B.J.; Chairovitz, S.; Wong, C.; Pillai, S. Harvard Medical School, Boston )

    1990-09-01

    The murine Mac-2 protein is a galactose- and IgE-binding lectin secreted by inflammatory macrophages. The authors describe here the cloning an dcharacterization of cDNA representing the human homolog of Mac-2 (hMac-2). The amino acid sequence derived from the hMac-2 cDNA indicates that the protein is evolutionarily highly conserved, with 85% of its amino acid residues being similar to those in the murine homolog. This conservation is especially marked in the carboxyl-terminal lectin domain. The amino-terminal half of the protein is less conserved but still contains the repetitive proline-glycine-rich motif seen in the mouse protein. hMac-2 synthesized in vitro is recognized by the M3/38 monoclonal antibody to Mac-2 and binds to the desialylated glycoprotein asialofetuin and to laminin, a major component of basement membranes. These findings are discussed in the context of the potential functions of hMac-2.

  17. Galactose decorated PLGA nanoparticles for hepatic delivery of acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Swati; Agarwal, Abhinav; Gupta, Nishant Kumar; Saraogi, Gauravkant; Agrawal, Himanshu; Agrawal, G P

    2013-12-01

    The present study explores prospective of surface tailored nanoparticles for targeted delivery of acyclovir along with the interception of minimal side effects. Acyclovir loaded plain and galactosylated poly lectic co glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles were efficiently prepared and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency. The formulations were evaluated for in vitro drug release and hemolysis. Further, biodistribution study and fluorescent microscopic studies were carried out to determine the targeting potential of formulations. SEM revealed smooth morphology and spherical shape of the nanoparticles. In vitro, the galactosylated nanoparticles were found to be least hemolytic and exhibited a sustained release pattern. In vivo studies exhibited an augmented bioavailability, increased residence time and enhanced delivery of acyclovir to the liver upon galactosylation. It may therefore be concluded that galactose conjugated PLGA nanoparticles can be used suitably as vehicles for delivery of bioactives specifically to the hepatic tissues and may be thus exploited in the effective management of various liver disorders.

  18. Impairments of astrocytes are involved in the D-galactose-induced brain aging

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Ming; Hua Xiangdong; Xiao Ming Ding Jiong; Han Qunying Hu Gang

    2008-05-16

    Astrocyte dysfunction is implicated in course of various age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Chronic injection of D-galactose can cause a progressive deterioration in learning and memory capacity and serve as an animal model of aging. To investigate the involvement of astrocytes in this model, oxidative stress biomarkers, biochemical and pathological changes of astrocytes were examined in the hippocampus of the rats with six weeks of D-galactose injection. D-galactose-injected rats displayed impaired antioxidant systems, an increase in nitric oxide levels, and a decrease in reduced glutathione levels. Consistently, western blotting and immunostaining of glial fibrillary acidic protein showed extensive activation of astrocytes. Double-immunofluorescent staining further showed activated astrocytes highly expressed inducible nitric oxide synthase. Electron microscopy demonstrated the degeneration of astrocytes, especially in the aggregated area of synapse and brain microvessels. These findings indicate that impairments of astrocytes are involved in oxidative stress-induced brain aging by chronic injection of D-galactose.

  19. How strict is galactose restriction in adults with galactosaemia? International practice.

    PubMed

    Adam, S; Akroyd, R; Bernabei, S; Bollhalder, S; Boocock, S; Burlina, A; Coote, T; Corthouts, K; Dalmau, J; Dawson, S; Defourny, S; De Meyer, A; Desloovere, A; Devlin, Y; Diels, M; Dokoupil, K; Donald, S; Evans, S; Fasan, I; Ferguson, C; Ford, S; Forga, M; Gallo, G; Grünert, S C; Heddrich-Ellerbrok, M; Heidenborg, C; Jonkers, C; Lefebure, K; Luyten, K; MacDonald, A; Meyer, U; Micciche, A; Müller, E; Portnoi, P; Ripley, S; Robert, M; Robertson, L V; Rosenbaum-Fabian, S; Sahm, K; Schultz, S; Singleton, K; Sjöqvist, E; Stoelen, L; Terry, A; Thompson, S; Timmer, C; Vande Kerckhove, K; van der Ploeg, L; Van Driessche, M; van Rijn, M; van Teeffelen-Heithoff, A; Vitoria, I; Voillot, C; Wenz, J; Westbrook, M; Wildgoose, J; Zweers, H

    2015-05-01

    Dietary management of 418 adult patients with galactosaemia (from 39 centres/12 countries) was compared. All centres advised lactose restriction, 6 restricted galactose from galactosides ± fruits and vegetables and 12 offal. 38% (n=15) relaxed diet by: 1) allowing traces of lactose in manufactured foods (n=13) or 2) giving fruits, vegetables and galactosides (n=2). Only 15% (n=6) calculated dietary galactose. 32% of patients were lost to dietetic follow-up. In adult galactosaemia, there is limited diet relaxation.

  20. Galactose content of legumes, caseinates, and some hard cheeses: implications for diet treatment of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Van Calcar, Sandra C; Bernstein, Laurie E; Rohr, Frances J; Yannicelli, Steven; Berry, Gerard T; Scaman, Christine H

    2014-02-12

    There are inconsistent reports on the lactose and/or galactose content of some foods traditionally restricted from the diet for classic galactosemia. Therefore, samples of cheeses, caseinates, and canned black, pinto, kidney, and garbanzo beans were analyzed for free galactose content using HPLC with refractive index or pulsed amperometric detection. Galactose concentrations in several hard and aged cheeses and three mild/medium Cheddars, produced by smaller local dairies, was <10 mg/100 g sample compared to 55.4 mg/100 g sample in four sharp Cheddars produced by a multinational producer. Galactose in sodium and calcium caseinate ranged from undetectable to 95.5 mg/100 g sample. Free galactose level in garbanzo beans was lower than previously reported at 24.6 mg/100 g sample; black beans contained 5.3 mg/100 g, and free galactose was not detected in red kidney or pinto beans. These data provide a basis for recommending inclusion of legumes, caseinate-containing foods, and some aged hard cheeses that had been previously restricted in the diet for individuals with galactosemia.

  1. UDP-xylose and UDP-galactose synthesis in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Andrea F N; Hangelmann, Lydia; Hofinger, Andreas; Wilson, Iain B H

    2012-01-01

    The presence of xylose and galactose residues in the structure of trichomonad lipoglycans was indicated by previous studies and the modification of any glycoconjugate with either monosaccharide requires the respective presence of the nucleotide sugars, UDP-xylose and UDP-galactose. Biosynthesis of UDP-xylose de novo is mediated by UDP-xylose synthase (UXS; UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase), which converts UDP-glucuronic acid to UDP-xylose, whereas UDP-galactose can be generated from UDP-glucose by UDP-galactose epimerases (GalE). Trichomonas vaginalis cDNAs, encoding proteins with homology to these enzymes from other eukaryotes, were isolated. The recombinant T. vaginalis UDP-xylose synthase and UDP-galactose epimerase were expressed in Escherichia coli and tested via high pressure liquid chromatography to demonstrate their enzymatic activities. Thereby, in this first report on enzymes involved in glycoconjugate biosynthesis in this organism, we demonstrate the existence of xylose and galactose synthesising pathways in T. vaginalis. PMID:22008417

  2. Galactose content of legumes, caseinates, and some hard cheeses: implications for diet treatment of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Van Calcar, Sandra C; Bernstein, Laurie E; Rohr, Frances J; Yannicelli, Steven; Berry, Gerard T; Scaman, Christine H

    2014-02-12

    There are inconsistent reports on the lactose and/or galactose content of some foods traditionally restricted from the diet for classic galactosemia. Therefore, samples of cheeses, caseinates, and canned black, pinto, kidney, and garbanzo beans were analyzed for free galactose content using HPLC with refractive index or pulsed amperometric detection. Galactose concentrations in several hard and aged cheeses and three mild/medium Cheddars, produced by smaller local dairies, was <10 mg/100 g sample compared to 55.4 mg/100 g sample in four sharp Cheddars produced by a multinational producer. Galactose in sodium and calcium caseinate ranged from undetectable to 95.5 mg/100 g sample. Free galactose level in garbanzo beans was lower than previously reported at 24.6 mg/100 g sample; black beans contained 5.3 mg/100 g, and free galactose was not detected in red kidney or pinto beans. These data provide a basis for recommending inclusion of legumes, caseinate-containing foods, and some aged hard cheeses that had been previously restricted in the diet for individuals with galactosemia. PMID:24456566

  3. Gene Transcriptional and Metabolic Profile Changes in Mimetic Aging Mice Induced by D-Galactose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue-Yue; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Li, Rong-Hua; Mu, Chang-Kao; Wang, Chun-Lin; Song, Wei-Wei

    2015-01-01

    D-galactose injection has been shown to induce many changes in mice that represent accelerated aging. This mouse model has been widely used for pharmacological studies of anti-aging agents. The underlying mechanism of D-galactose induced aging remains unclear, however, it appears to relate to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders. Currently, there has yet to be a study that focuses on investigating gene expression changes in D-galactose aging mice. In this study, integrated analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomics and gene expression profiles was used to investigate the changes in transcriptional and metabolic profiles in mimetic aging mice injected with D-galactose. Our findings demonstrated that 48 mRNAs were differentially expressed between control and D-galactose mice, and 51 potential biomarkers were identified at the metabolic level. The effects of D-galactose on aging could be attributed to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders, oxidative damage, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reduction in abnormal substance elimination, cell apoptosis, and insulin resistance. PMID:26176541

  4. Preparation of low galactose yogurt using cultures of Gal(+) Streptococcus thermophilus in combination with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Anbukkarasi, Kaliyaperumal; UmaMaheswari, Thiyagamoorthy; Hemalatha, Thiagarajan; Nanda, Dhiraj Kumar; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Rameshwar

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is an important lactic starter used in the production of yogurt. Most strains of S. thermophilus are galactose negative (Gal(-)) and are able to metabolize only glucose portion of lactose and expel galactose into the medium. This metabolic defect leads to the accumulation of free galactose in yogurt, resulting in galactosemia among consumers. Hence there is an absolute need to develop low galactose yogurt. Therefore, in this study, three galactose positive (Gal(+)) S. thermophilus strains from National Collection of Dairy Cultures (NCDC) viz. NCDC 659 (AJM), NCDC 660 (JM1), NCDC 661 (KM3) and a reference galactose negative (Gal(-)) S. thermophilus NCDC 218 were used for preparation of low galactose yogurt. In milk fermented using S. thermophilus isolates alone, NCDC 659 released less galactose (0.27 %) followed by NCDC 661 (0.3 %) and NCDC 660 (0.45 %) after 10 h at 42 °C. Milk was fermented in combination with Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC 04, in which NCDC 659 released least galactose upto 0.49 % followed by NCDC 661 (0.51 %) and NCDC 660 (0.60 %) than reference Gal(-) NCDC 218(0.79 %). Low galactose yogurt was prepared following standard procedure using Gal(+) S. thermophilus isolates and Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC 04 in 1:1 ratio. Among which low galactose yogurt by NCDC 659 combination contained less galactose 0.37 % followed by NCDC 661 (0.51 %), NCDC 660 (0.65 %) and reference Gal(-) NCDC 218 (0.98 %) after 4 h of fermentation. This study clearly reveals that Gal(+) S. thermophilus isolates can be paired with Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus for developing low galactose yogurt.

  5. Mistletoe lectin I in complex with galactose and lactose reveals distinct sugar-binding properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mikeska, Ruth; Arni, Raghuvir; Mikhailov, Albert; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat; Voelter, Wolfgang; Betzel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The structures of mistletoe lectin I in complex with lactose and galactose reveal differences in binding by the two known sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 and suggest the presence of a third low-affinity site in subdomain β1. The structures of mistletoe lectin I (ML-I) from Viscum album complexed with lactose and galactose have been determined at 2.3 Å resolution and refined to R factors of 20.9% (R{sub free} = 23.6%) and 20.9 (R{sub free} = 24.6%), respectively. ML-I is a heterodimer and belongs to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins of type II, which consist of two chains. The A-chain has rRNA N-glycosidase activity and irreversibly inhibits eukaryotic ribosomes. The B-chain is a lectin and preferentially binds to galactose-terminated glycolipids and glycoproteins on cell membranes. Saccharide binding is performed by two binding sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 of the ML-I B-chain separated by ∼62 Å from each other. The favoured binding of galactose in subdomain α1 is achieved via hydrogen bonds connecting the 4-hydroxyl and 3-hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety with the side chains of Asp23B, Gln36B and Lys41B and the main chain of 26B. The aromatic ring of Trp38B on top of the preferred binding pocket supports van der Waals packing of the apolar face of galactose and stabilizes the sugar–lectin complex. In the galactose-binding site II of subdomain γ2, Tyr249B provides the hydrophobic stacking and the side chains of Asp235B, Gln238B and Asn256B are hydrogen-bonding partners for galactose. In the case of the galactose-binding site I, the 2-hydroxyl group also stabilizes the sugar–protein complex, an interaction thus far rarely detected in galactose-specific lectins. Finally, a potential third low-affinity galactose-binding site in subunit β1 was identified in the present ML-I structures, in which a glycerol molecule from the cryoprotectant buffer has bound, mimicking the sugar compound.

  6. The glucose-galactose paradox in neonatal murine hepatic glycogen synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, C.; Kliegman, R.; Trindade, C. )

    1989-11-01

    In adults glucose incorporation to glycogen is indirect after recycling from lactate. In neonates galactose entry to glycogen exceeds that for glucose, but the pathway is unknown. The pathway of hexose incorporation to glycogen was studied in 5-7-day-old rats and 6-h-old rats injected intraperitoneally (IP) with either double-labeled (6-3H)glucose (nonrecycling), (U-14C)glucose (recycling), or (6-3H)glucose and (U-14C)galactose in saline. In another group of pups, 1 g/kg of glucose or galactose was administered in addition to tracers to determine glycemia and net glycogen synthesis between 15 and 180 min after injection. Blood glucose increased from 3.4 +/- 0.4 to 8.5 +/- 1.5 mM in 5-7-day-old pups in response to IP glucose; there was no glycemic response to galactose, although galactose levels increased from 0.5 to 6.3 mM at 15 min. Hepatic glycogen increased after IP glucose from 14 +/- 2 at 15 min to 30 +/- 3 at 120 min (P less than 0.01), whereas after IP galactose glycogen was 44 +/- 6 mumol/g at 120 min (P less than 0.05). After IP glucose, 3H and 14C disintegration per minute in glycogen increased slowly with 14C exceeding 3H at 120 and 180 min. In contrast IP (14C)galactose resulted in a much greater peak of 14C incorporation into glycogen. The ratio of 3H to 14C in glycogen relative to the injectate after IP glucose decreased from 0.69 +/- 0.12 to 0.36 +/- 0.03 (P less than 0.01) between 15 to 180 min, whereas the ratio after galactose was 0.20 +/- 0.007 to 0.15 +/- 0.02 at these times. The 6-h-old pups also demonstrated augmented incorporation of (14C)galactose in glycogen relative to (3H-14C)glucose. In contrast to 5-7-day-old pups there was no evidence of glucose recycling in 6-h-old pups. In conclusion galactose entry into glycogen exceeds that for glucose and is not dependent on recycling.

  7. Identification of galactose as the immunodominant sugar of leishmanial excreted factor and subsequent labeling with galactose oxidase and sodium boro[3H]hydride.

    PubMed

    Slutzky, G M; Greenblatt, C L

    1982-07-01

    Inhibition by low-molecular-weight sugars of precipitin line formation between a polysaccharide (EF) excreted by Leishmania tropica subsp. major, Leishmania enriettii, and rabbit antileishmanial antibodies on double gel diffusion plates revealed that galactose residues, possibly as components of lactosyl groups, were the critical immunodominant sugars mediating antibody recognition of EF. The galactose residues of the EF of L. tropica subsp. major were specifically labeled with tritium via galactose oxidase and sodium boro[3H]hydride. The radioactive EF had an apparent molecular weight of about 85,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and was precipitated by antileishmanial antibodies as well as Ricinus communis lectins I and II (galactose specific). Lectins specific for glucose-mannose residues, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-acetylgalactosamine did not precipitate the labeled EF. Treatment of [3H]EF with proteolytic (trypsin, papain, protease) or glycosidic (alpha-amylase, beta-galactosidase) enzymes had no effect on either the electrophoretic pattern of the material or on its recognition by antileishmanial antibodies or R. communis lectin. This resistance to enzyme activity suggests that EF may be a useful marker for the presence of the parasite in vivo if it can be detected in minute quantities. PMID:6179874

  8. Two orthorhombic crystal structures of a galactose-specific lectin from Artocarpus hirsuta in complex with methyl-alpha-D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Rao, K N; Suresh, C G; Katre, U V; Gaikwad, S M; Khan, M I

    2004-08-01

    Based on their carbohydrate specificity, the jacalin family of lectins can be divided into two groups: galactose-specific and mannose-specific. The former are cytoplasmic proteins, whereas the latter are localized in the storage vacuoles of cells. It has been proposed that the post-translational modification in some of the lectins that splits their polypeptide chains into two may be crucial for galactose specificity. The mannose-specific members of the family are single-chain proteins that lack the above modification. Although the galactose-specific and the mannose-specific jacalin-type lectins differ in their sequences, they share a common fold: the beta-prism I fold, which is characteristic of Moraceae plant lectins. Here, two crystal structures of a jacalin-related lectin from Artocarpus hirsuta, which is specific for galactose, in complex with methyl-alpha-D-galactose are reported. The lectin crystallized in two orthorhombic forms and one hexagonal form under similar conditions. The crystals had an unusually high solvent content. The structure was solved using the molecular-replacement method using the jacalin structure as a search model. The two orthorhombic forms were refined using data to 2.5 and 3.0 A resolution, respectively. The structures of the A. hirsuta lectin and jacalin are identical. In orthorhombic form I the crystal packing provides three different micro-environments for sugar binding in the same crystal. The observed difference in the specificity for oligosaccharides between the A. hirsuta lectin and jacalin could only be explained based on differences in the molecular associations in the packing and variation of the C-terminal length of the beta-chain. The observed insecticidal activity of A. hirsuta lectin may arise from its similar fold to domain II of the unrelated delta-endotoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis.

  9. D-Galactose as an autoinducer 2 inhibitor to control the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun-Ju; Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Lee, Julian; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is a quorum sensing molecule to which bacteria respond to regulate various phenotypes, including virulence and biofilm formation. AI-2 plays an important role in the formation of a subgingival biofilm composed mostly of Gram-negative anaerobes, by which periodontitis is initiated. The aim of this study was to evaluate D-galactose as an inhibitor of AI-2 activity and thus of the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens. In a search for an AI-2 receptor of Fusobacterium nucleatum, D-galactose binding protein (Gbp, Gene ID FN1165) showed high sequence similarity with the ribose binding protein (RbsB), a known AI-2 receptor of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. D-Galactose was evaluated for its inhibitory effect on the AI-2 activity of Vibrio harveyi BB152 and F. nucleatum, the major coaggregation bridge organism, which connects early colonizing commensals and late pathogenic colonizers in dental biofilms. The inhibitory effect of D-galactose on the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens was assessed by crystal violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy in the absence or presence of AI-2 and secreted molecules of F. nucleatum. D-Galactose significantly inhibited the AI-2 activity of V. harveyi and F. nucleatum. In addition, D-galactose markedly inhibited the biofilm formation of F. nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia induced by the AI-2 of F. nucleatum without affecting bacterial growth. Our results demonstrate that the Gbp may function as an AI-2 receptor and that galactose may be used for prevention of the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens by targeting AI-2 activity. PMID:27572513

  10. Utilization of lactose and galactose by Streptococcus mutans: transport, toxicity, and carbon catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Das, Satarupa; Burne, Robert A

    2010-05-01

    Abundant in milk and other dairy products, lactose is considered to have an important role in oral microbial ecology and can contribute to caries development in both adults and young children. To better understand the metabolism of lactose and galactose by Streptococcus mutans, the major etiological agent of human tooth decay, a genetic analysis of the tagatose-6-phosphate (lac) and Leloir (gal) pathways was performed in strain UA159. Deletion of each gene in the lac operon caused various alterations in expression of a P(lacA)-cat promoter fusion and defects in growth on either lactose (lacA, lacB, lacF, lacE, and lacG), galactose (lacA, lacB, lacD, and lacG) or both sugars (lacA, lacB, and lacG). Failure to grow in the presence of galactose or lactose by certain lac mutants appeared to arise from the accumulation of intermediates of galactose metabolism, particularly galatose-6-phosphate. The glucose- and lactose-PTS permeases, EII(Man) and EII(Lac), respectively, were shown to be the only effective transporters of galactose in S. mutans. Furthermore, disruption of manL, encoding EIIAB(Man), led to increased resistance to glucose-mediated CCR when lactose was used to induce the lac operon, but resulted in reduced lac gene expression in cells growing on galactose. Collectively, the results reveal a remarkably high degree of complexity in the regulation of lactose/galactose catabolism. PMID:20190045

  11. A phylogenetic study on galactose-containing Candida species based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Suh, Sung-Oui; Sugita, Takashi; Nakase, Takashi

    1999-10-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of 33 Candida species containing galactose in the cells were investigated by using 18S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Galactose-containing Candida species and galactose-containing species from nine ascomycetous genera were a heterogeneous assemblage. They were divided into three clusters (II, III, and IV) which were phylogenetically distant from cluster I, comprising 9 galactose-lacking Candida species, C. glabrata, C. holmii, C. krusei, C. tropicalis (the type species of Candida), C. albicans, C. viswanathii, C. maltosa, C. parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, and C. lusitaniae, and 17 related ascomycetous yeasts. These three clusters were also phylogenetically distant from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which contains galactomannan in its cell wall. Cluster II comprised C. magnoliae, C. vaccinii, C. apis, C. gropengiesseri, C. etchellsii, C. floricola, C. lactiscondensi, Wickerhamiella domercqiae, C. versatilis, C. azyma, C. vanderwaltii, C. pararugosa, C. sorbophila, C. spandovensis, C. galacta, C. ingens, C. incommunis, Yarrowia lipolytica, Galactomyces geotrichum, and Dipodascus albidus. Cluster III comprised C. tepae, C. antillancae and its synonym C. bondarzewiae, C. ancudensis, C. petrohuensis, C. santjacobensis, C. ciferrii (anamorph of Stephanoascus ciferrii), Arxula terrestris, C. castrensis, C. valdiviana, C. paludigena, C. blankii, C. salmanticensis, C. auringiensis, C. bertae, and its synonym C. bertae var. chiloensis, C. edax (anamorph of Stephanoascus smithiae), Arxula adeninivorans, and C. steatolytica (synonym of Zygoascus hellenicus). Cluster IV comprised C. cantarellii, C. vinaria, Dipodascopsis uninucleata, and Lipomyces lipofer. Two galactose-lacking and Q-8-forming species, C. stellata and Pichia pastoris, and 5 galactose-lacking and Q-9-forming species, C. apicola, C. bombi, C. bombicola, C. geochares, and C. insectalens, were included in Cluster II. Two galactose-lacking and Q-9-forming species, C. drimydis and C

  12. In utero and lactational β-carotene supplementation attenuates D-galactose-induced hearing loss in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Hao, Shuai; Zhao, Yue; Yang, Hui; Fan, Xiao-Lan; Yang, Jun

    2011-08-01

    D-Galactose could give rise to free radical damage by disturbing the some maternal antioxidants. The oxidative stress induced by D-galactose is a potent inducer of apoptosis, which is accompanied by the activation of protein-splitting enzymes called caspases. Apoptosis is a crucial physiological determinant of embryonic and neonatal development, and play an essential role in the development of the inner ear structures. Recently the increasing of D-galactose exposure is due to high consumption of dairy foods or reduced galactose metabolism. An overwhelming presence of D-galactose is known to become highly ototoxicity to humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether supplementation of pregnant and lactational mothers with β-carotene could attenuate cochlear function damage and hair cells apoptosis induced by d-galactose in newborn rats. Pregnant rats were supplemented with D-galactose, or D-galactose and β-carotene from gestational day (GD) 7 until postnatal day (PND) 21. On PND 22, offspring were examined in the distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) task, cochleae were then harvested for assessment of apoptosis by immunohistochemical stain for cysteine-aspartic acid proteases 3 (caspase-3) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Maternal and offspring blood samples were then collected by direct cardiac puncture in heparin tubes, blood levels of D-galactose and β-carotene were measured, plasma was separated for malondialdehyde (MDA) analysis, erythrocytes were left for superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and glutathione (GSH). D-Galactose could significantly disturb the balance between maternal antioxidants and free radicals, and induce hearing loss in the offspring and cochlear hair cell apoptosis. In contrast, β-carotene supplementation, coincidentally with D-galactose exposure, ameliorated these changes. Our data offer a conceptual framework for designing

  13. In utero and lactational β-carotene supplementation attenuates D-galactose-induced hearing loss in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Hao, Shuai; Zhao, Yue; Yang, Hui; Fan, Xiao-Lan; Yang, Jun

    2011-08-01

    D-Galactose could give rise to free radical damage by disturbing the some maternal antioxidants. The oxidative stress induced by D-galactose is a potent inducer of apoptosis, which is accompanied by the activation of protein-splitting enzymes called caspases. Apoptosis is a crucial physiological determinant of embryonic and neonatal development, and play an essential role in the development of the inner ear structures. Recently the increasing of D-galactose exposure is due to high consumption of dairy foods or reduced galactose metabolism. An overwhelming presence of D-galactose is known to become highly ototoxicity to humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether supplementation of pregnant and lactational mothers with β-carotene could attenuate cochlear function damage and hair cells apoptosis induced by d-galactose in newborn rats. Pregnant rats were supplemented with D-galactose, or D-galactose and β-carotene from gestational day (GD) 7 until postnatal day (PND) 21. On PND 22, offspring were examined in the distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) task, cochleae were then harvested for assessment of apoptosis by immunohistochemical stain for cysteine-aspartic acid proteases 3 (caspase-3) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Maternal and offspring blood samples were then collected by direct cardiac puncture in heparin tubes, blood levels of D-galactose and β-carotene were measured, plasma was separated for malondialdehyde (MDA) analysis, erythrocytes were left for superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and glutathione (GSH). D-Galactose could significantly disturb the balance between maternal antioxidants and free radicals, and induce hearing loss in the offspring and cochlear hair cell apoptosis. In contrast, β-carotene supplementation, coincidentally with D-galactose exposure, ameliorated these changes. Our data offer a conceptual framework for designing

  14. Galactose and Lactose Genes from the Galactose-Positive Bacterium Streptococcus salivarius and the Phylogenetically Related Galactose-Negative Bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus: Organization, Sequence, Transcription, and Activity of the gal Gene Products

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, Katy; Moineau, Sylvain; Frenette, Michel; Lessard, Christian; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a lactose- and galactose-positive bacterium that is phylogenetically closely related to Streptococcus thermophilus, a bacterium that metabolizes lactose but not galactose. In this paper, we report a comparative characterization of the S. salivarius and S. thermophilus gal-lac gene clusters. The clusters have the same organization with the order galR (codes for a transcriptional regulator and is transcribed in the opposite direction), galK (galactokinase), galT (galactose-1-P uridylyltransferase), galE (UDP-glucose 4-epimerase), galM (galactose mutarotase), lacS (lactose transporter), and lacZ (β-galactosidase). An analysis of the nucleotide sequence as well as Northern blotting and primer extension experiments revealed the presence of four promoters located upstream from galR, the gal operon, galM, and the lac operon of S. salivarius. Putative promoters with virtually identical nucleotide sequences were found at the same positions in the S. thermophilus gal-lac gene cluster. An additional putative internal promoter at the 3′ end of galT was found in S. thermophilus but not in S. salivarius. The results clearly indicated that the gal-lac gene cluster was efficiently transcribed in both species. The Shine-Dalgarno sequences of galT and galE were identical in both species, whereas the ribosome binding site of S. thermophilus galK differed from that of S. salivarius by two nucleotides, suggesting that the S. thermophilus galK gene might be poorly translated. This was confirmed by measurements of enzyme activities. PMID:11790749

  15. Serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels in children with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mengjie; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Rong, Liping; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Lizhi; Qiu, Zeting; Mo, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is an immunopathologic diagnosis based on a renal biopsy, it is characterized by deposits of IgA-containing immune complexes in the mesangium. Adults with IgAN have a galactose-deficient IgA1 in the circulation and glomerular deposition. There are few studies on the glycosylation of serum IgA1 in children with IgAN. To measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in pediatric patients with IgAN, 72 biopsy-proven IgAN children were divided into 3 groups based on the clinical features: isolated hematuria group (24 patients), hematuria and proteinuria group (22 patients), and nephritic syndrome group (26 patients). They were also divided into 3 groups according to pathologic grading: grade I + II group (25 patients), grade III group (33 patients) and grade IV + V group (14 patients). 30 healthy children were recruited as a control group. We used vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in all groups and controls. Serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in children with IgAN were higher than controls (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 among the different clinical and pathologic grading groups. The values of the area under the curve for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels were 0.976 (95% CI, 0.953-1.000). The cutoff point for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels was 0.125, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 83.3%, with a positive predictive value of 92.6% and a negative predictive value of 73.5% (P < 0.01). Children with IgAN presented serum galactose-deficient IgA1, which has shown no relationship with the clinical manifestations and pathologic grading of the disease. Detection of serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels by vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has a certain clinical value in diagnosis of children with IgAN.

  16. Transport of d-galactose by the gastrointestinal tract of the locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Pascual, I; Berjón, A; Lostao, M P; Barber, A

    2006-01-01

    Due to exoskeleton, the absorption of nutrients in adult insects takes place across the gastrointestinal tract epithelium. In most physiological studies, sugar intestinal absorption has been described as a diffusional process and to date no sugar transporter has been cloned from the digestive tract of insects. In the present work, the existence of a saturable transport system for galactose in the gastric caeca of Locusta migratoria is clearly demonstrated. This transport shows a relatively high affinity for galactose (apparent K0.5=2-3 mM) and is inhibited by glucose, 2-deoxyglucose and with less potency by fructose and alpha-methyl-d-glucoside. The absence of sodium or the presence of phloridzin hardly affects galactose absorption, indicating that it is not mediated by a SGLT1-like transporter. The absence of K+, Cl-, Mg2+ and Ca2+ or changes in the pH do not modify galactose absorption either. Nevertheless, phloretin, cytochalasin B and theophylline (inhibitors of facilitative transporters) decrease sugar uptake around 50%. Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with poly A+ RNA isolated from gastric caeca show sodium-independent galactose uptake that is three times higher than in non-injected oocytes, further supporting the existence of a mRNA coding for at least one equilibrative sugar transporter in L. migratoria gastric caeca. PMID:16314134

  17. Anti-galactose antibodies do not bind to normal human red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.M.B.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the possibility that senescent cell IgG might have an anti-galactose (anti-gal) specificity as suggested by others. Anti-gal was isolated from normal human serum with ..cap alpha.. melibiose-agarose. The assays used were hemagglutination, rosetting, phagocytosis, and /sup 125/I protein A binding assay, immunoblotting, and glycine/HCL, pH 2.3, versus sugar elutions. Results revealed binding of anti-gal to rabbit but not human RBC. Immunoblotting of anti-gal revealed labeling of approx.29 bands in rabbit red cell membranes and no labeling of autologous human red cell membranes. The authors attempted to inhibit binding of anti-gal with various sugars. Melibiose caused enhancement rather than inhibition of agglutination when used at concentrations reported by previous investigators to cause inhibition. Neither ..cap alpha.. melibiose or galactose caused inhibition of phagocytosis of senescent cells. Senescent cell IgG was not displaced from freshly isolated old red cells by incubation with melibiose or galactose as determined by an /sup 125/I protein A binding assay. The authors were also unable to elute IgG from stored red cells with galactose. The authors conclude that senescent cell IgG does not have an anti-galactose specificity. The authors were unable to demonstrate an anti-gal antibody to normal human red cells.

  18. Accumulation of myoinositol and rubidium ions in galactose-exposed rat lens

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaba, T.; Cheng, H.M.; Kinoshita, J.H.

    1986-10-01

    When rat lens is incubated in 30 mM galactose overnight, the extent of accumulation of rubidium ions (Rb) and myoinositol (MI) are affected, as well as the Na-K ATPase activity. Rb accumulation and Na-K ATPase activity are only slightly affected compared to the dramatic drop in MI accumulation. These changes are completely abolished by sorbinil, which blocks polyol formation, or by rendering the galactose medium hypertonic to offset the osmotic effect of polyol formation. On the other hand, the addition of excess MI to the galactose medium had no effect on correcting these changes. The results obtained are consistent with the polyol-osmotic theory of sugar cataract formation.

  19. Solubility and selective crystallization of lactose from solutions of its hydrolysis products glucose and galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, J.R.; Hegglin, M.; Prenosil, J.E.

    1983-06-01

    A high degree of conversion is desired when lactose is hydrolyzed to glucose and galactose. This produces, however, a high concentration of galactose, which is inhibitory for the enzyme catalyst (beta-galactosidase). The inhibition can be reduced by limiting the conversion per pass over the enzyme (e.g. to ca. 50%), separating unconverted lactose from the reactor effluent, and recycling it to the reactor inlet. (This allows the overall conversion to be raised to ca. 80-90%). The solubilities of lactose, glucose, and galactose have been determined at various temperatures and for sugar mixtures having different concentrations and degrees of hydrolysis. Various cooling crystallizations have defined convenient and simple processes for the selective separation of lactose from its hydrolysis products.

  20. A direct-sensing galactose chemoreceptor recently evolved in invasive strains of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Day, Christopher J.; King, Rebecca M.; Shewell, Lucy K.; Tram, Greg; Najnin, Tahria; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Wilson, Jennifer C.; Fleetwood, Aaron D.; Zhulin, Igor B.; Korolik, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    A rare chemotaxis receptor, Tlp11, has been previously identified in invasive strains of Campylobacter jejuni, the most prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Here we use glycan and small-molecule arrays, as well as surface plasmon resonance, to show that Tlp11 specifically interacts with galactose. Tlp11 is required for the chemotactic response of C. jejuni to galactose, as shown using wild type, allelic inactivation and addition mutants. The inactivated mutant displays reduced virulence in vivo, in a model of chicken colonization. The Tlp11 sensory domain represents the first known sugar-binding dCache_1 domain, which is the most abundant family of extracellular sensors in bacteria. The Tlp11 signalling domain interacts with the chemotaxis scaffolding proteins CheV and CheW, and comparative genomic analysis indicates a likely recent evolutionary origin for Tlp11. We propose to rename Tlp11 as CcrG, Campylobacter ChemoReceptor for Galactose. PMID:27762269

  1. Single-step bioconversion for the preparation of L-gulose and L-galactose.

    PubMed

    Woodyer, Ryan D; Christ, Trevor N; Deweese, Kara A

    2010-02-11

    Both carbohydrate monomers L-gulose and L-galactose are rarely found in nature, but are of great importance in pharmacy R&D and manufacturing. A method for the production of L-gulose and L-galactose is described that utilizes recombinant Escherichia coli harboring a unique mannitol dehydrogenase. The recombinant E. coli system was optimized by genetic manipulation and directed evolution of the recombinant protein to improve conversion. The resulting production process requires a single step, represents the first readily scalable system for the production of these sugars, is environmentally friendly, and utilizes inexpensive reagents, while producing L-galactose at 4.6 g L(-1)d(-1) and L-gulose at 0.90 g L(-1)d(-1).

  2. Substitution of L-fucose by L-galactose in cell walls of arabidopsis mur1

    SciTech Connect

    Zablackis, E.; York, W.S.; Pauly, M.

    1996-06-21

    An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant (mur1) has less than 2 percent of the normal amounts of L-fucose in the primary cell walls of aerial portions of the plant. The survival of mur1 plants challenged the hypothesis that fucose is a required component of biologically active oligosaccharides derived from cell wall xyloglucan. However, the replacement of L-fucose (that is, 6-deoxyl-L-galactose) by L-galactose does not detectably alter the biological activity of the oligosaccharides derived from xyloglucan. Thus, essential structural and conformational features of xyloglucan and xyloglucan-derived oligosaccharides are retained when L-galactose replaces L-fucose. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  4. Short communication: Presence of galactose and glucose promotes browning of sweet whey powder.

    PubMed

    Dattatreya, A; Lee, W; Rankin, S A

    2010-06-01

    This research examined the role of sugar type on the browning of sweet whey powder during accelerated storage. Two model systems, a lactose-lysine system and a sweet whey powder system, were selected. Within each model system experiment were samples containing equimolar concentrations of lactose, galactose, and glucose, and model systems were studied at 3 pH values: 6.5, 6.0, and 5.5. Samples were analyzed for changes in color after accelerated browning at 80 degrees C for 24 h. The results showed that the samples containing galactose and glucose browned to a greater degree than those containing lactose. Browning in the control and lactose-enriched samples was more susceptible to changes in pH. This study indicates that the processing conditions of liquid whey in which the lactose monomers glucose and galactose accumulate may predispose SWP to brown more readily.

  5. Cross-reactions between engineered xylose and galactose pathways in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Overexpression of the PGM2 gene encoding phosphoglucomutase (Pgm2p) has been shown to improve galactose utilization both under aerobic and under anaerobic conditions. Similarly, xylose utilization has been improved by overexpression of genes encoding xylulokinase (XK), enzymes from the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (non-ox PPP) and deletion of the endogenous aldose reductase GRE3 gene in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying either fungal or bacterial xylose pathways. In the present study, we investigated how the combination of these traits affect xylose and galactose utilization in the presence or absence of glucose in S. cerevisiae strains engineered with the xylose reductase (XR)-xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) pathway. Results In the absence of PGM2 overexpression, the combined overexpression of XK, the non-ox PPP and deletion of the GRE3 gene significantly delayed aerobic growth on galactose, whereas no difference was observed between the control strain and the xylose-engineered strain when the PGM2 gene was overexpressed. Under anaerobic conditions, the overexpression of the PGM2 gene increased the ethanol yield and the xylose consumption rate in medium containing xylose as the only carbon source. The possibility of Pgm2p acting as a xylose isomerase (XI) could be excluded by measuring the XI activity in both strains. The additional copy of the PGM2 gene also resulted in a shorter fermentation time during the co-consumption of galactose and xylose. However, the effect was lost upon addition of glucose to the growth medium. Conclusions PGM2 overexpression was shown to benefit xylose and galactose fermentation, alone and in combination. In contrast, galactose fermentation was impaired in the engineered xylose-utilizing strain harbouring extra copies of the non-ox PPP genes and a deletion of the GRE3 gene, unless PGM2 was overexpressed. These cross-reactions are of particular relevance for the fermentation of mixed sugars from

  6. Subfertility and growth restriction in a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) - deficient mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Manshu; Siddiqi, Anwer; Witt, Benjamin; Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Johnson, Britt; Fraser, Nisa; Chen, Wyman; Rascon, Rafael; Yin, Xue; Goli, Harish; Bodamer, Olaf A; Lai, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The first GalT gene knockout (KO) mouse model for Classic Galactosemia (OMIM 230400) accumulated some galactose and its metabolites upon galactose challenge, but was seemingly fertile and symptom free. Here we constructed a new GalT gene-trapped mouse model by injecting GalT gene-trapped mouse embryonic stem cells into blastocysts, which were later implanted into pseudo-pregnant females. High percentage GalT gene-trapped chimera obtained were used to generate heterozygous and subsequently, homozygous GalT gene-trapped mice. Biochemical assays confirmed total absence of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity in the homozygotes. Although the homozygous GalT gene-trapped females could conceive and give birth when fed with normal chow, they had smaller litter size (P=0.02) and longer time-to-pregnancy (P=0.013) than their wild-type littermates. Follicle-stimulating hormone levels of the mutant female mice were not significantly different from the age-matched, wild-type females, but histological examination of the ovaries revealed fewer follicles in the homozygous mutants (P=0.007). Administration of a high-galactose (40% w/w) diet to lactating homozygous GalT gene-trapped females led to lethality in over 70% of the homozygous GalT gene-trapped pups before weaning. Cerebral edema, abnormal changes in the Purkinje and the outer granular cell layers of the cerebellum, as well as lower blood GSH/GSSG ratio were identified in the galactose-intoxicated pups. Finally, reduced growth was observed in GalT gene-trapped pups fed with normal chow and all pups fed with high-galactose (20% w/w) diet. This new mouse model presents several of the complications of Classic Galactosemia and will be useful to investigate pathogenesis and new therapies. PMID:24549051

  7. Combined biosynthetic pathway for de novo production of UDP-galactose: catalysis with multiple enzymes immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziye; Zhang, Jianbo; Chen, Xi; Wang, Peng G

    2002-04-01

    Regeneration of sugar nucleotides is a critical step in the biosynthetic pathway for the formation of oligosaccharides. To alleviate the difficulties in the production of sugar nucleotides, we have developed a method to produce uridine diphosphate galactose (UDP-galactose). The combined biosynthetic pathway, which involves seven enzymes, is composed of three parts: i) the main pathway to form UDP-galactose from galactose, with the enzymes galactokinase, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and inorganic pyrophosphatase, ii) the uridine triphosphate supply pathway catalyzed by uridine monophosphate (UMP) kinase and nucleotide diphosphate kinase, and iii) the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regeneration pathway catalyzed by polyphosphate kinase with polyphosphate added as an energy resource. All of the enzymes were expressed individually and immobilized through their hexahistidine tags onto nickel agarose beads ("super beads"). The reaction requires a stoichiometric amount of UMP and galactose, and catalytic amounts of ATP and glucose 1-phosphate, all inexpensive starting materials. After continuous circulation of the reaction mixture through the super-bead column for 48 h, 50 % of the UMP was converted into UDP-galactose. The results show that de novo production of UDP-galactose on the super-bead column is more efficient than in solution because of the stability of the immobilized enzymes.

  8. Possible role of metal ionophore against zinc induced cognitive dysfunction in D-galactose senescent mice.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Kanchan; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul; Prakash, Atish

    2016-06-01

    Metal ionophores are considered as potential anti-dementia agents, and some are currently undergoing clinical trials. Many metals are known to accumulate and distribute abnormally in the aging brain. Alterations in zinc metal homeostasis in the glutaminergic synapse could contribute to ageing and the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of metal ionophores on long term administration of zinc in D-galactose induced senescent mice. The ageing model was established by combined administration of zinc and D-galactose to mice for 6 weeks. A novel metal ionophore, PBT-2 was given daily to zinc-induced d-galactose senescent mice. The cognitive behaviour of mice was monitored using the Morris Water Maze. The anti-oxidant status and amyloidogenic activity in the ageing mouse was measured by determining mito-oxidative parameters and deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain. Systemic administration of both zinc and D-galactose significantly produced memory deficits, mito-oxidative damage, heightened acetylcholinesterase enzymatic activity and deposition of amyloid-β. Treatment with PBT-2 significantly improved behavioural deficits, biochemical profiles, cellular damage, and curbed the deposition of APP in zinc-induced senescent mice. These findings suggest that PBT-2, acting as a metal protein attenuating compound, may be helpful in the prevention of AD or alleviation of ageing. PMID:26923568

  9. Moderate exercise prevents neurodegeneration in D-galactose-induced aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Xu, Meng; Shen, Bo; Li, Man; Gao, Qian; Wei, Shou-gang

    2016-01-01

    D-galactose has been widely used in aging research because of its efficacy in inducing senescence and accelerating aging in animal models. The present study investigated the benefits of exercise for preventing neurodegeneration, such as synaptic plasticity, spatial learning and memory abilities, in mouse models of aging. D-galactose-induced aging mice were administered daily subcutaneous injections of D-galactose at the base of the neck for 10 consecutive weeks. Then, the mice were subjected to exercise training by running on a treadmill for 6 days a week. Shortened escape latency in a Morris water maze test indicated that exercise improved learning and memory in aging mice. The ameliorative changes were likely induced by an upregulation of Bcl-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, the repression of apoptosis factors such as Fas and Bax, and an increase in the activity of glucose transporters-1 and 4. The data suggest moderate exercise may retard or inhibit neurodegeneration in D-galactose-induced aging mice. PMID:27335566

  10. Unveiling epimerization effects: a rotational study of α-D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2015-06-25

    By studying its C4 epimer α-D-galactose, the effects of epimerization on the conformational behaviour of α-D-glucose have been unveiled. Using laser ablation of crystalline samples, four conformers of α-D-galactopyranose have been observed, for the first time, in a supersonic expansion by analyzing the Fourier transform rotational spectrum.

  11. Moderate exercise prevents neurodegeneration in D-galactose-induced aging mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Xu, Meng; Shen, Bo; Li, Man; Gao, Qian; Wei, Shou-Gang

    2016-05-01

    D-galactose has been widely used in aging research because of its efficacy in inducing senescence and accelerating aging in animal models. The present study investigated the benefits of exercise for preventing neurodegeneration, such as synaptic plasticity, spatial learning and memory abilities, in mouse models of aging. D-galactose-induced aging mice were administered daily subcutaneous injections of D-galactose at the base of the neck for 10 consecutive weeks. Then, the mice were subjected to exercise training by running on a treadmill for 6 days a week. Shortened escape latency in a Morris water maze test indicated that exercise improved learning and memory in aging mice. The ameliorative changes were likely induced by an upregulation of Bcl-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, the repression of apoptosis factors such as Fas and Bax, and an increase in the activity of glucose transporters-1 and 4. The data suggest moderate exercise may retard or inhibit neurodegeneration in D-galactose-induced aging mice. PMID:27335566

  12. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315...

  13. Phylogeny, structure, function, biosynthesis and evolution of sulfated galactose-containing glycans.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-03-01

    Glycans are ubiquitous components of all organisms. The specificity of glycan structures works in molecular recognition in multiple biological processes especially cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling events. These events are mostly driven by functional proteins whose activities are ultimately regulated by interactions with carbohydrate moieties of cell surface glycoconjugates. Galactose is a common composing monosaccharide in glycoconjugates. Sulfation at certain positions of the galactose residues does not only increase affinity for some binding proteins but also makes the structures of the controlling glycans more specific to molecular interactions. Here the phylogenetic distribution of glycans containing the sulfated galactose unit is examined across numerous multicellular organisms. Analysis includes autotrophs and heterotrophs from both terrestrial and marine environments. Information exists more regarding the marine species. Although future investigations in molecular biology must be still performed in order to assure certain hypotheses, empirical evidences based on structural biology of the sulfated galactose-containing glycans among different species particularly their backbone and sulfation patterns clearly indicate great specificity in terms of glycosyltransferase and sulfotransferase activity. This set of information suggests that evolution has shaped the biosynthetic machinery of these glycans somewhat related to their potential functions in the organisms. PMID:26712697

  14. Effect of different beta-adrenergic agonists on the intestinal absorption of galactose and phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Díez-Sampedro, A; Pérez, M; Cobo, M T; Martínez, J A; Barber, A

    1998-08-01

    Nutrient transport across the mammalian small intestine is regulated by several factors, including intrinsic and extrinsic neural pathways, paracrine modulators, circulating hormones and luminal agents. Because beta-adrenoceptors seem to regulate gastrointestinal functions such as bicarbonate and acid secretion, intestinal motility and gastrointestinal mucosal blood flow, we have investigated the effects of different beta-adrenergic agonists on nutrient absorption by the rat jejunum in-vitro. When intestinal everted sacs were used the beta2-agonist salbutamol had no effect either on galactose uptake by the tissue or mucosal-to-serosal flux whereas mixed beta1- and beta2-agonists (isoproterenol and orciprenaline) and beta3-agonists (BRL 35135, Trecadrine, ICI 198157 and ZD 7114) inhibited galactose uptake and transfer of D-galactose from the mucosal-to-serosal media across the intestinal wall (although the inhibiting effects of isoproterenol and Trecadrine were not statistically significant). In intestinal everted rings both Trecadrine and BRL 35135 clearly reduced galactose uptake, the effect being a result of inhibition of the phlorizin-sensitive component. Total uptake of phenylalanine by the intestinal rings was also reduced by those beta3-adrenergic agonists. These results suggest that beta1- and beta3-adrenergic receptors could be involved in the regulation of intestinal active transport of sugars and amino acids. PMID:9751456

  15. Fap2 of Fusobacterium nucleatum is a galactose-inhibitable adhesin involved in coaggregation, cell adhesion, and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Coppenhagen-Glazer, S; Sol, A; Abed, J; Naor, R; Zhang, X; Han, Y W; Bachrach, G

    2015-03-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a common oral anaerobe involved in periodontitis that is known to translocate and cause intrauterine infections. In the oral environment, F. nucleatum adheres to a large diversity of species, facilitating their colonization and creating biological bridges that stabilize the multispecies dental biofilm. Many of these interactions (called coadherences or coaggregations) are galactose sensitive. Galactose-sensitive interactions are also involved in the binding of F. nucleatum to host cells. Hemagglutination of some F. nucleatum strains is also galactose sensitive, suggesting that a single galactose-sensitive adhesin might mediate the interaction of fusobacteria with many partners and targets. In order to identify the fusobacterial galactose-sensitive adhesin, a system for transposon mutagenesis in fusobacteria was created. The mutant library was screened for hemagglutination deficiency, and three clones were isolated. All three clones were found to harbor the transposon in the gene coding for the Fap2 outer membrane autotransporter. The three fap2 mutants failed to show galactose-inhibitable coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis and were defective in cell binding. A fap2 mutant also showed a 2-log reduction in murine placental colonization compared to that of the wild type. Our results suggest that Fap2 is a galactose-sensitive hemagglutinin and adhesin that is likely to play a role in the virulence of fusobacteria.

  16. Fap2 of Fusobacterium nucleatum Is a Galactose-Inhibitable Adhesin Involved in Coaggregation, Cell Adhesion, and Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Coppenhagen-Glazer, S.; Sol, A.; Abed, J.; Naor, R.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a common oral anaerobe involved in periodontitis that is known to translocate and cause intrauterine infections. In the oral environment, F. nucleatum adheres to a large diversity of species, facilitating their colonization and creating biological bridges that stabilize the multispecies dental biofilm. Many of these interactions (called coadherences or coaggregations) are galactose sensitive. Galactose-sensitive interactions are also involved in the binding of F. nucleatum to host cells. Hemagglutination of some F. nucleatum strains is also galactose sensitive, suggesting that a single galactose-sensitive adhesin might mediate the interaction of fusobacteria with many partners and targets. In order to identify the fusobacterial galactose-sensitive adhesin, a system for transposon mutagenesis in fusobacteria was created. The mutant library was screened for hemagglutination deficiency, and three clones were isolated. All three clones were found to harbor the transposon in the gene coding for the Fap2 outer membrane autotransporter. The three fap2 mutants failed to show galactose-inhibitable coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis and were defective in cell binding. A fap2 mutant also showed a 2-log reduction in murine placental colonization compared to that of the wild type. Our results suggest that Fap2 is a galactose-sensitive hemagglutinin and adhesin that is likely to play a role in the virulence of fusobacteria. PMID:25561710

  17. Uridine Diphosphate-4-Keto-Glucose, an Intermediate in the Uridine Diphosphate-Galactose-4-Epimerase Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Utpalendu S.; Ankel, Helmut

    1971-01-01

    When UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (EC 5.1.3.2) from Escherichia coli is incubated with UDP-galactose, then reduced with NaB3H4, label is found in UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose. Enzymatic and chemical degradation demonstrates that the label is bound to carbon 4 of the glycosyl moieties. These results provide direct evidence for the existence of UDP-4-keto-glucose as an enzyme-bound intermediate in the epimerization reaction, and they exclude the formation of a 3-keto intermediate. PMID:4941982

  18. The galactose-binding and mannose-binding jacalin-related lectins are located in different sub-cellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Hause, B; Van Damme, E J

    2000-07-21

    A galactose-specific and a mannose-specific lectin of the family of the jacalin-related lectins have been localized by immunofluorescence microscopy. The present localization studies provide for the first time unambiguous evidence for the cytoplasmic location of the mannose-specific jacalin-related lectin from rhizomes of Calystegia sepium, which definitely differs from the vacuolar location of the galactose-specific jacalin from Artocarpus integrifolia. These observations support the hypothesis that the galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins evolved from their mannose-specific homologues through the acquisition of vacuolar targeting sequences.

  19. Human monoclonal macroglobulins with specificity for Klebsiella K polysaccharides that contain 3,4-pyruvylated-D-galactose and 4,6- pyruvylated-D-galactose

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Two human IgM myeloma proteins, IgMWEA and IgMMAY, were found to react with agar and Klebsiella polysaccharides that contain pyruvylated D- galactose (DGal). Quantitative precipitin data and precipitin inhibition studies with methyl alpha- and beta-glycosides of 4,6- pyruvylated-D-galactose showed their combining sites to be different, although each was directed against the pyruvylated-D-Gal, one reacting most specifically with Klebsiella polysaccharides with terminal nonreducing beta-linked 2,4 pyruvylated-D-Gal, whereas the other reacted equally well with Klebsiella polysaccharides that contain 3,4 beta-linked and 4,6 alpha-linked terminal nonreducing pyruvylated-DGal. Inhibition studies showed that both sites are directed toward one of the two space isomers of 3,4- or 4,6-pyruvylated DGal, the form in which the methyl group of the pyruvate is equatorial, or endo, and its carboxyl group axial, or exo, to the plane of the acetal ring. Coprecipitation studies showed the combining site of IgMWEA to be located on an (Fab')2 fragment and not on the (Fc)5mu fragment. The monoclonal peak in the serum of IgMMAY was specifically precipitated by Klebsiella polysaccharide. Myeloma proteins with specificities of this type may occur with reasonable frequency in humans and may be a consequence of clonal expansion from inapparent infection, carrier states, or disease produced by various Klebsiella organisms. PMID:6158553

  20. Delayed Anaphylaxis to Red Meat in Patients with IgE Specific for Galactose alpha-1,3-Galactose (alpha-gal)

    PubMed Central

    Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can be rapidly progressing and fatal. In instances where the triggering allergen is not known, establishing the etiology of anaphylaxis is pivotal to long-term risk management. Our recent work has identified a novel IgE antibody (Ab) response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), that has been associated with two distinct forms of anaphylaxis: (1) immediate onset anaphylaxis during first exposure to intravenous cetuximab, and (2) delayed onset anaphylaxis 3–6 h after ingestion of mammalian food products (e.g., beef and pork). The results of our studies strongly suggest that tick bites are a cause, if not the only significant cause, of IgE Ab responses to alpha-gal in the southern, eastern and central United States. Patients with IgE Ab to alpha-gal continue to emerge and, increasingly, these cases involve children. This IgE Ab response cross-reacts with cat and dog but does not appear to pose a risk for asthma; however, it may impair diagnostic testing in some situations. PMID:23054628

  1. Lactose biosensor based on lactase and galactose oxidase immobilized in polyvinyl formal.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep K; Kumar, Ashok; Chaudhary, Reeti; Suman; Pundir, Suman; Pundir, C S; Sehgal, Neeta

    2007-01-01

    A lactose biosensor was developed by immobilizing lactase and galactose oxidase in a polyvinyl formal membrane and was attached to the oxygen electrode of a dissolved oxygen analyzer for estimation of lactose in milk and food products. The enzyme immobilized polyvinyl formal membrane was characterized by atomic force microscopy. The biosensor showed the linearity for 1-7 g dl(-1) of lactose and can be reused for up to 20 measurements. The effects of pH, temperature and the stability of the immobilized lactase and galactose oxidase in PVF membrane were also studied. The enzyme membrane was found stable up to 35 degrees C and had a shelf-life of more than three months at 4 degrees C.

  2. Prenatal identification of a heterozygous status in two fetuses at risk for glucose-galactose malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Martín, M G; Turk, E; Kerner, C; Zabel, B; Wirth, S; Wright, E M

    1996-05-01

    Glucose-galactose malabsorption (GGM) is an autosomal recessive disorder which presents with severe osmotic diarrhoea shortly after birth. Two proband siblings with GGM were previously demonstrated to contain a missense mutation (D28N) in the Na(+)-dependent glucose/galactose cotransporter (SGLT1) that accounts for the defect in sugar absorption. Prenatal screening for GGM was performed in two subsequent pregnancies in this large consanguineous family. The first exon of the SGLT1 gene was PCR-amplified from genomic DNA and screened for the presence of the D28N mutation by EcoRV restriction digestion. The proband's sibling was heterozygous and a cousin was not a carrier of the D28N mutation. Both children at 2-years of age remain healthy and have had no diarrhoeal symptoms. Molecular biology techniques will allow a prospective determination of the presence of an abnormal SGLT1 allete and potentially decrease the postnatal morbidity. PMID:8844006

  3. Galactose-functionalized multi-responsive nanogels for hepatoma-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Shaofeng; Gao, Shan; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Ju; Wang, Chun; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    We report here a hepatoma-targeting multi-responsive biodegradable crosslinked nanogel, poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-galactose-ss-N-vinylcaprolactam-ss-methacrylic acid) P(ODGal-VCL-MAA), using a combination of enzymatic transesterification and emulsion copolymerization for intracellular drug delivery. The nanogel exhibited redox, pH and temperature-responsive properties, which can be adjusted by varying the monomer feeding ratio. Furthermore, the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the nanogels was close to body temperature and can result in rapid thermal gelation at 37 °C. Scanning electron microscopy also revealed that the P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel showed uniform spherical monodispersion. With pyrene as a probe, the fluorescence excitation spectra demonstrated nanogel degradation in response to glutathione (GSH). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed an amorphous property of DOX within the nanogel, which was used in this study as a model anti-cancer drug. Drug-releasing characteristics of the nanogel were examined in vitro. The results showed multi-responsiveness of DOX release by the variation of environmental pH values, temperature or the availability of GSH, a biological reductase. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed a higher anti-tumor activity of the galactose-functionalized DOX-loaded nanogels against human hepatoma HepG2 cells, which was, at least in part, due to specific binding between the galactose segments and the asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-Rs) in hepatic cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometric profiles further confirmed elevated cellular uptake of DOX by the galactose-functionalised nanogels. Thus, we report here a multi-responsive P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel with a hepatoma-specific targeting ability for anti-cancer drug delivery.We report here a hepatoma-targeting multi-responsive biodegradable crosslinked nanogel, poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-galactose-ss-N-vinylcaprolactam-ss-methacrylic acid) P(ODGal-VCL-MAA), using

  4. A novel reagentless sensing system for measuring glucose based on the galactose/glucose-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salins, L. L.; Ware, R. A.; Ensor, C. M.; Daunert, S.

    2001-01-01

    The galactose/glucose-binding protein (GBP) is synthesized in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli in a precursor form and exported into the periplasmic space upon cleavage of a 23-amino-acid leader sequence. GBP binds galactose and glucose in a highly specific manner. The ligand induces a hinge motion in GBP and the resultant protein conformational change constitutes the basis of the sensing system. The mglB gene, which codes for GBP, was isolated from the chromosome of E. coli using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Since wild-type GBP lacks cysteines in its structure, introducing this amino acid by site-directed mutagenesis ensures single-label attachment at specific sites with a sulfhydro-specific fluorescent probe. Site-directed mutagenesis by overlap extension PCR was performed to prepare three different mutants to introduce a single cysteine residue at positions 148, 152, and 182. Since these residues are not involved in ligand binding and since they are located at the edge of the binding cleft, they experience a significant change in environment upon binding of galactose or glucose. The sensing system strategy is based on the fluorescence changes of the probe as the protein undergoes a structural change on binding. In this work a reagentless sensing system has been rationally designed that can detect submicromolar concentrations of glucose. The calibration plots have a linear working range of three orders of magnitude. Although the system can sense galactose as well, this epimer is not a potential interfering substance since its concentration in blood is negligible. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. Galacturonic Acid Inhibits the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Galactose, Xylose, and Arabinose

    PubMed Central

    Huisjes, Eline H.; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pKa value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter−1 galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter−1 galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks. PMID:22582063

  6. Crystallization and preliminary structural studies of champedak galactose-binding lectin

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Mohamed, Emida; Ibrahim, Wan Izlina Wan; Hashim, Onn Haji; Isaacs, Neil W.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Galactose-binding lectin from champedak (Artocarpus integer) consists of two chains: α and β (133 and 21 amino acids, respectively). It has been shown to recognize and bind to carbohydrates involved in IgA and C1 inhibitor molecules. The protein was purified and crystallized at 293 K. Crystals were observed in two space groups, P21 and P21212, and diffracted to 1.65 and 2.6 Å, respectively. PMID:19724126

  7. Crystallization and preliminary structural studies of champedak galactose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Mohamed, Emida; Ibrahim, Wan Izlina Wan; Hashim, Onn Haji; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2009-09-01

    Galactose-binding lectin from champedak (Artocarpus integer) consists of two chains: alpha and beta (133 and 21 amino acids, respectively). It has been shown to recognize and bind to carbohydrates involved in IgA and C1 inhibitor molecules. The protein was purified and crystallized at 293 K. Crystals were observed in two space groups, P2(1) and P2(1)2(1)2, and diffracted to 1.65 and 2.6 A, respectively.

  8. Galacturonic acid inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on galactose, xylose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Huisjes, Eline H; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2012-08-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pK(a) value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks. PMID:22582063

  9. Galacturonic acid inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on galactose, xylose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Huisjes, Eline H; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2012-08-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pK(a) value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks.

  10. Glomerulonephritis after hematopoietic cell transplantation: IgA nephropathy with increased excretion of galactose-deficient IgA1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Susie L; Colvin, Gerald A; Rifai, Abdalla; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Novak, Jan; Esparza, Alfredo; Farooqi, Shahida; Julian, Bruce A

    2010-05-01

    We report the development of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) following full myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in two patients with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched sibling donors, unrelated to active or chronic graft-versus-host disease. Both recipients had elevated urinary levels of galactose-deficient IgA1, and one donor-recipient pair had elevated serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1. We propose that IgAN developed after bone marrow transplantation due to a non-graft-versus-host-disease-related multi-hit process associated with glomerular deposition of galactose-deficient IgA1. These two cases provide unique insight into the kinetics of overproduction of galactose-deficient IgA1 and its glomerular deposition and consequential renal injury in IgAN.

  11. Protective effect of Millettia pulchra polysaccharide on cognitive impairment induced by D-galactose in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xing; Huang, Zhongshi; Chen, Xiaoyu; Rong, Yanping; Zhang, Shijun; Jiao, Yang; Huang, Quanfang; Huang, Renbin

    2014-01-30

    A polysaccharide (PMP) was isolated from Millettia pulchra and purified by DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The results showed that PMP was composed of d-glucose and d-arabinose in a molar ratio of 90.79% and 9.21%, with an average molecular weight of about 14,301 Da. Furthermore, the effect of PMP on cognitive impairment induced by d-galactose in mice was evaluated. Treatment with PMP significantly reversed d-galactose-induced learning and memory impairments, as measured by behavioral tests. One of the potential mechanisms of this action was to reduce oxidative stress and suppress inflammatory responses. Furthermore, our results also showed that PMP markedly reduced the content and deposition of β-amyloid peptide, improved the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity, increased the levels of acetylcholine, but decreased cholinesterase activity. These results suggest that PMP exerts an effective protection against d-galactose-induced cognitive impairment, and PMP may be a major bioactive ingredient in M. pulchra.

  12. Effects of galactose adaptation in yeast for ethanol fermentation from red seaweed, Gracilaria verrucosa.

    PubMed

    Ra, Chae Hun; Kim, Yeong Jin; Lee, Sang Yoon; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2015-09-01

    A total monosaccharide concentration of 39.6 g/L, representing 74.0 % conversion of 53.5 g/L total carbohydrate from 80 g dw/L (8 % w/v) Gracilaria verrucosa slurry, was obtained by thermal acid hydrolysis and enzymatic saccharification. G. verrucosa hydrolysate was used as a substrate for ethanol production by 'separate hydrolysis and fermentation' (SHF). The ethanol production and yield (Y EtOH) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae KCCM 1129 with and without adaptation to high galactose concentrations were 18.3 g/L with Y EtOH of 0.46 and 13.4 g/L with Y EtOH of 0.34, respectively. Relationship between galactose adaptation effects and mRNA transcriptional levels were evaluated with GAL gene family, regulator genes of the GAL genetic switch and repressor genes in non-adapted and adapted S. cerevisiae. The development of galactose adaptation for ethanol fermentation of G. verrucosa hydrolysates allowed us to enhance the overall ethanol yields and obtain a comprehensive understanding of the gene expression levels and metabolic pathways involved.

  13. Identification of PblB mediating galactose-specific adhesion in a successful Streptococcus pneumoniae clone.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Lin, Che-Ming; Wang, Jin-Town

    2015-07-21

    The pneumococcal genome is variable and there are minimal data on the influence of the accessory genome on phenotype. Pneumococcal serotype 14 sequence type (ST) 46 had been the most prevalent clone causing pneumonia in children in Taiwan. A microarray was constructed using the genomic DNA of a clinical strain (NTUH-P15) of serotype 14 ST46. Using DNA hybridization, genomic variations in NTUH-P15 were compared to those of 3 control strains. Microarray analysis identified 7 genomic regions that had significant increases in hybridization signals in the NTUH-P15 strain compared to control strains. One of these regions encoded PblB, a phage-encoded virulence factor implicated (in Streptococcus mitis) in infective endocarditis. The isogenic pblB mutant decreased adherence to A549 human lung epithelial cell compared to wild-type NTUH-P15 strain (P = 0.01). Complementation with pblB restored the adherence. PblB is predicted to contain a galactose-binding domain-like region. Preincubation of NTUH-P15 with D-galactose resulted in decreases of adherence to A549 cell in a dose-dependent manner. Challenge of mice with NTUH-P15, isogenic pblB mutant and pblB complementation strains determined that PblB was required for bacterial persistence in the nasopharynx and lung. PblB, as an adhesin mediating the galactose-specific adhesion activity of pneumococci, promote pneumococcal clonal success.

  14. Hsp90 Maintains Proteostasis of the Galactose Utilization Pathway To Prevent Cell Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Rajaneesh Karimpurath

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone that aids in the folding of its metastable client proteins. Past studies have shown that it can exert a strong impact on some cellular pathways by controlling key regulators. However, it is unknown whether several components of a single pathway are collectively regulated by Hsp90. Here, we observe that Hsp90 influences the protein abundance of multiple Gal proteins and the efficiency of galactose utilization even after the galactose utilization pathway (GAL pathway) is fully induced. The effect of Hsp90 on Gal proteins is not at the transcriptional level. Moreover, Gal1 is found to physically interact with Hsp90, and its stability is reduced in low-Hsp90 cells. When Hsp90 is compromised, several Gal proteins form protein aggregates that colocalize with the disaggregase Hsp104. These results suggest that Gal1 and other Gal proteins are probably the clients of Hsp90. An unbalanced GAL pathway has been known to cause fatal growth arrest due to accumulation of toxic galactose metabolic intermediates. It is likely that Hsp90 chaperones multiple Gal proteins to maintain proteostasis and prevent cell lethality especially in a fluctuating environment. PMID:26951197

  15. Galactose utilization sheds new light on sugar metabolism in the sequenced strain Dekkera bruxellensis CBS 2499.

    PubMed

    Moktaduzzaman, Md; Galafassi, Silvia; Capusoni, Claudia; Vigentini, Ileana; Ling, Zhihao; Piškur, Jure; Compagno, Concetta

    2015-03-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are considered two phylogenetically distant relatives, but they share several industrial relevant traits such as the ability to produce ethanol under aerobic conditions (Crabtree effect), high tolerance towards ethanol and acids, and ability to grow without oxygen. Beside a huge adaptability, D. bruxellensis exhibits a broader spectrum in utilization of carbon and nitrogen sources in comparison to S. cerevisiae. With the aim to better characterize its carbon source metabolism and regulation, the usage of galactose and the role that glucose plays on sugar metabolism were investigated in D. bruxellensis CBS 2499. The results indicate that in this yeast galactose is a non-fermentable carbon source, in contrast to S. cerevisiae that can ferment it. In particular, its metabolism is affected by the nitrogen source. Interestingly, D. bruxellensis CBS 2499 exhibits the 'short-term Crabtree effect', and the expression of genes involved in galactose utilization and in respiratory metabolism is repressed by glucose, similarly to what occurs in S. cerevisiae. PMID:25673757

  16. Piperine and curcumin exhibit synergism in attenuating D-galactose induced senescence in rats.

    PubMed

    Banji, David; Banji, Otilia J F; Dasaroju, Swetha; Annamalai, A R

    2013-03-01

    Aging is associated with progressive decline in mental abilities and functional capacities. Postmitotic tissues are most vulnerable to alteration due to oxidative damage leading to behavioral and biochemical changes. We hypothesized that the anatomical and functional facets of the brain could be protected with powerful antioxidants such as piperine and curcumin by examining their effects individually and in combination in delaying senescence induced by d-galactose. Young adult male Wistar rats were treated with piperine (12 mg/kg) alone, and curcumin (40 mg/kg) alone; and in combination for a period of 49 days by the oral route with treatment being initiated a week prior to d-galactose (60 mg/kg, i.p.). A control group, d-galactose alone and naturally aged control were also evaluated. Behavioral tests, hippocampal volume, CA1 neuron number, oxidative parameters, formation of lipofuscin like autofluorescent substances, neurochemical estimation, and histopathological changes in CA1 region of hippocampus were established. Our results suggest that the combination exerted a superior response compared to monotherapy as evidenced by improved spatial memory, reduced oxidative burden, reduced accumulation of lipofuscin; improvement in signaling, increase in hippocampal volume and protection of hippocampal neurons. We speculate that the powerful antioxidant nature of both, augmented response of curcumin in the presence of piperine and enhanced serotoninergic signaling was responsible for improved cognition and prevention in senescence. PMID:23200897

  17. Galactosyl-mimodye ligands for Pseudomonas fluorescens beta-galactose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mazitsos, C F; Rigden, D J; Tsoungas, P G; Clonis, Y D

    2002-11-01

    Protein molecular modelling and ligand docking were employed for the design of anthraquinone galactosyl-biomimetic dye ligands (galactosyl-mimodyes) for the target enzyme galactose dehydrogenase (GaDH). Using appropriate modelling methodology, a GaDH model was build based on a glucose-fructose oxidoreductase (GFO) protein template. Subsequent computational analysis predicted chimaeric mimodye-ligands comprising a NAD-pseudomimetic moiety (anthraquinone diaminobenzosulfonic acid) and a galactosyl-mimetic moiety (2-amino-2-deoxygalactose or shikimic acid) bearing an aliphatic 'linker' molecule. In addition, the designed mimodye ligands had an appropriate in length and chemical nature 'spacer' molecule via which they can be attached onto a chromatographic support without steric clashes upon interaction with GaDH. Following their synthesis, purification and analysis, the ligands were immobilized to agarose. The respective affinity adsorbents, compared to other conventional adsorbents, were shown to be superior affinity chromatography materials for the target enzyme, Pseudomonas fluorescensbeta-galactose dehydrogenase. In addition, these mimodye affinity adsorbents displayed good selectivity, binding low amounts of enzymes other than GaDH. Further immobilized dye-ligands, comprising different linker and/or spacer molecules, or not having a biomimetic moiety, had inferior chromatographic behavior. Therefore, these new mimodyes suggested by computational analysis, are candidates for application in affinity labeling and structural studies as well as for purification of galactose dehydrogenase.

  18. [Neonatal diarrhea due to congenital glucose-galactose malabsorption: report of seven cases].

    PubMed

    Chedane-Girault, C; Dabadie, A; Maurage, C; Piloquet, H; Chailloux, E; Colin, E; Pelatan, C; Giniès, J-L

    2012-12-01

    Congenital glucose-galactose malabsorption (CGGM) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which presents as a protracted diarrhea in early neonatal life. We describe the clinical history, diagnostic evaluation, and management of 7 children with CGGM in western France. There were 4 girls and 3 boys from 5 families, born between 1984 and 2010. The principal complaint was a neonatal onset of watery and acidic severe diarrhea complicated by hypertonic dehydration. The diarrhea stopped with fasting. In 2 cases, the family history supported the diagnosis. In the other cases, elimination of glucose and galactose (lactose) from the diet resulted in the complete resolution of diarrhea symptoms. In 2 cases, the H2 breath tests were positive. In 2 cases, the HGPO or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) demonstrated an abnormal curve with glucose and a normal curve with fructose. DNA sequencing was not used. When glucose and galactose were eliminated from the diet, the infants had normal growth and development. In conclusion, CGGM is a rare etiology of neonatal diarrhea; however, the diagnosis is easy to make and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:23107089

  19. Structure–function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family

    PubMed Central

    Yin, DeLu (Tyler); Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M.; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure–function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  20. Identification of Bacillus anthracis by using monoclonal antibody to cell wall galactose-N-acetylglucosamine polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Ezzell, J W; Abshire, T G; Little, S F; Lidgerding, B C; Brown, C

    1990-01-01

    Guanidine extracts of crude Bacillus anthracis cell wall were used to vaccinate BALB/c mice and to develop monoclonal antibody (MAb) to vegetative cell surface antigens. Two hybridomas selected during this study produced immunoglobulin M immunoglobulins, which appear to be directed to an epitope associated with the galactose-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine polysaccharide. Both demonstrated specificity in their binding to purified B. anthracis cell wall, o-stearoyl-polysaccharide conjugates, and intact, nonencapsulated vegetative cells. The interaction of the MAbs with purified polysaccharide was inhibited by 0.5 M galactose and lactose but not by N-acetylglucosamine, glutamate, glycine, or glycerol. Inhibition by glucose or sucrose was approximately 75% of that seen with galactose. Electron microscopy showed that both MAbs interacted with the cell wall of vegetative cells as well as with the cortex of spores. Neither MAb reacted with encapsulated vegetative cells, such as those from infected guinea pigs, nor did they react with intact spores. After conjugation to fluorescein isothiocyanate, the MAbs stained intensely all B. anthracis strains tested, whereas with two exceptions, none of the strains of 20 other Bacillus spp. was stained. The exceptions, strains of Bacillus cereus, could be differentiated from B. anthracis by being beta-hemolytic on blood agar. Images PMID:2107201

  1. Participation of a galactose-specific C-type lectin in Drosophila immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tanji, Takahiro; Ohashi-Kobayashi, Ayako; Natori, Shunji

    2006-01-01

    A galactose-specific C-type lectin has been purified from a pupal extract of Drosophila melanogaster. This lectin gene, named DL1 (Drosophila lectin 1), is part of a gene cluster with the other two galactose-specific C-type lectin genes, named DL2 (Drosophila lectin 2) and DL3 (Drosophila lectin 3). These three genes are expressed differentially in fruit fly, but show similar haemagglutinating activities. The present study characterized the biochemical and biological properties of the DL1 protein. The recombinant DL1 protein bound to Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi, but not to other Gram-negative or any other kinds of microbial strains that have been investigated. In addition, DL1 agglutinated E. coli and markedly intensified the association of a Drosophila haemocytes-derived cell line with E. coli. For in vivo genetic analysis of the lectin genes, we also established a null-mutant Drosophila. The induction of inducible antibacterial peptide genes was not impaired in the DL1 mutant, suggesting that the galactose-specific C-type lectin does not participate in the induction of antibacterial peptides, but possibly participates in the immune response via the haemocyte-mediated mechanism. PMID:16475980

  2. Hepatoprotective Effects of Swimming Exercise against D-Galactose-Induced Senescence Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wen-Dee; Huang, Wen-Ching; Huang, Chih-Yang; Hsu, Mei-Chich; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether a 12-week swimming exercise training can prevent liver damage or senescence associated biomarkers in an experimental aging model in rats. Twenty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: vehicle treatment with sedentary control (C, n = 6), aging induction with sedentary (A, n = 6), vehicle treatment with swimming exercise (SW, n = 5), and aging induction with swimming exercise (A + SW, n = 6). Rats in groups A and AS received intraperitoneal d-galactose injections (150 mg/kg/day) for 12 weeks to induce aging. Rats in groups SW and A + SW were subjected to swimming exercise training for 12 weeks. Body weight, liver weight, epididymal fat mass, blood biochemistry, and liver pathology were performed at the end of the experiment. Hepatic senescence protein markers such as β-galactosidase, p53, and p21, as well as the inflammatory mediator, IL-6, were examined. The d-galactose-treated rats exhibited increases in AST and γ-GT plasma levels and β-galactosidase protein expression compared to the control group. Swimming exercise significantly reduced BW, epididymal fat mass, γ-GT activity, and p53, p21, and IL-6 protein levels compared to the aging group. These results suggest that a 12-week swimming exercise program suppresses senescence markers and downregulates inflammatory mediator in the liver tissues of d-galactose-induced aging rats. PMID:23843869

  3. Bioactive galactose-branched polyelectrolyte multilayers and microcapsules: self-assembly, characterization, and biospecific lectin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu; Wu, Qi; Chen, Zhi-Chun; Li, Xia; Jiang, Xiu-Ming; Lin, Xian-Fu

    2006-09-26

    We describe the fabrication of multilayers and microcapsules with biologically designed targeting activity using chemoenzymatic synthesized carbohydrate-branched polyelectrolytes. A novel cationic d-galactose-branched copolymer [poly(vinyl galactose ester-co-methacryloxyethyl trimethylammonium chloride), PGEDMC] is alternated with poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) to form thin multifilms by the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique on such different solid surfaces as quartz slides, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films, silicon wafers, and polystyrene (PS) microparticles. The experimental protocols were first optimized on flat, smooth silica substrates using UV-vis, contact angle, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The film properties of PGEDMC/PSS multilayers are modified by varying polyelectrolyte concentration, ionic strength, and counteranion types. Hollow capsules were formed after the removal of colloidal templates; transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy were used to verify the LbL process integrity. PGEDMC/PSS planar films and capsules carrying beta-galactose as recognition signals have specific recognition abilities with peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin rather than concanavalin A (Con A) lectin observed by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  4. Protective effect of Millettia pulchra polysaccharide on cognitive impairment induced by D-galactose in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xing; Huang, Zhongshi; Chen, Xiaoyu; Rong, Yanping; Zhang, Shijun; Jiao, Yang; Huang, Quanfang; Huang, Renbin

    2014-01-30

    A polysaccharide (PMP) was isolated from Millettia pulchra and purified by DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The results showed that PMP was composed of d-glucose and d-arabinose in a molar ratio of 90.79% and 9.21%, with an average molecular weight of about 14,301 Da. Furthermore, the effect of PMP on cognitive impairment induced by d-galactose in mice was evaluated. Treatment with PMP significantly reversed d-galactose-induced learning and memory impairments, as measured by behavioral tests. One of the potential mechanisms of this action was to reduce oxidative stress and suppress inflammatory responses. Furthermore, our results also showed that PMP markedly reduced the content and deposition of β-amyloid peptide, improved the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity, increased the levels of acetylcholine, but decreased cholinesterase activity. These results suggest that PMP exerts an effective protection against d-galactose-induced cognitive impairment, and PMP may be a major bioactive ingredient in M. pulchra. PMID:24299809

  5. Yulangsan polysaccharide improves redox homeostasis and immune impairment in D-galactose-induced mimetic aging.

    PubMed

    Doan, Van Minh; Chen, Chunxia; Lin, Xing; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Nong, Zhihuan; Li, Weisi; Chen, Qingquan; Ming, Jianjun; Xie, Qiuqiao; Huang, Renbin

    2015-05-01

    Yulangsan polysaccharide (YLSP) is a traditional Chinese medicine used in long-term treatment as a modulator of brain dysfunction and immunity. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of YLSP against D-galactose-induced impairment of oxidative stress and the immune system and evaluated its possible mechanism of action. D-galactose was subcutaneously injected into the dorsal neck of mice daily for 8 weeks to establish the aging model. YLSP was simultaneously administered once daily. The results indicate that YLSP significantly improves the general appearance of the aging mice. YLSP significantly increased the levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as super oxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and total anti-oxidation capability, while decreasing the content of malondialdehyde in different tissues, including the liver, brain, and serum. YLSP also increased the interleukin-2 level while decreasing the interleukin-6 level. Moreover, YLSP significantly inhibited advanced glycation end product formation. Furthermore, YLSP decreased p21 and p53 gene expressions in the liver and brain of D-galactose-treated mice. These results suggest that YLSP may have a protective effect suppressing the aging process by enhancing antioxidant activity and immunity, as well as modulating aging-related gene expression. PMID:25920068

  6. Effects of rhein lysinate on D-galactose-induced aging mice

    PubMed Central

    ZHEN, YONG-ZHAN; LIN, YA-JUN; LI, KAI-JI; ZHANG, GUANG-LING; ZHAO, YU-FANG; WANG, MEI-MEI; WEI, JING-BO; WEI, JIE; HU, GANG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-aging effects of rhein lysinate (RHL), and to explore its mechanism of action in a D-galactose-induced aging mouse model. Aging was induced by D-galactose (100 mg/kg/day) that was subcutaneously injected to animals for 8 weeks. RHL was simultaneously administered once a day by intragastric gavage. The appetite, mental condition, body weight and organ index of the mice were monitored. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were determined, and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the liver, kidney and serum were measured by appropriate assay kits. Western blot analysis was used to detect proteins associated with age. The results indicated that RHL may improve the appetite, mental state and organ conditions of the model mice, improve the activities of SOD and GSH-Px, reduce MDA levels and modulate the expression of age-associated proteins (Sirtuin 1, p21 and p16) in D-galactose-induced mice. Therefore, RHL may be effective at suppressing the aging process through a combination of enhancing antioxidant activity, scavenging free radicals and modulating aging-associated gene expression. PMID:26889258

  7. Assessment of liver function in dogs using the 13C-galactose breath test.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Wyse, C A; Goodfellow, M R; Yam, P S; Preston, T; Papasouliotis, K; Hall, E J

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of the 13C-galactose breath test (13C-GBT) in assessing canine liver function by applying it to a group of healthy dogs, and to a group with clinicopathological evidence of liver dysfunction. Breath samples were collected 30 min before ingestion of 13C-galactose, and then at regular intervals thereafter for 6 h. The proportion of 13CO2/12CO2 in the breath samples was measured by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. There was no significant difference in recovery of 13CO2 in the diseased group, compared to the healthy controls, but there was considerable inter-subject variation in both groups, possibly due to differences in the rate of gastric emptying, which could preclude detection of alterations in hepatic metabolism of galactose. The results of this study do not support the application of the 13C-GBT for assessment of canine liver function. PMID:19546016

  8. Caffeine prevents d-galactose-induced cognitive deficits, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Faheem; Ali, Tahir; Ullah, Najeeb; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-11-01

    d-galactose has been considered a senescent model for age-related neurodegenerative disease. It induces oxidative stress which triggers memory impairment, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Caffeine act as anti-oxidant and has been used in various model of neurodegenerative disease. Nevertheless, the effect of caffeine against d-galactose aging murine model of age-related neurodegenerative disease elucidated. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of caffeine against d-galactose. We observed that chronic treatment of caffeine (3 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally (i.p) for 60 days) improved memory impairment and synaptic markers (Synaptophysin and PSD95) in the d-galactose treated rats. Chronic caffeine treatment reduced the oxidative stress via the reduction of 8-oxoguanine through immunofluorescence in the d-galactose-treated rats. Consequently caffeine treatment suppressed stress kinases p-JNK. Additionally, caffeine treatment significantly reduced the d-galactose-induced neuroinflammation through alleviation of COX-2, NOS-2, TNFα and IL-1β. Furthermore we also analyzed that caffeine reduced cytochrome C, Bax/Bcl2 ratio, caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP-1 level. Moreover by evaluating the immunohistochemical results of Nissl and Fluro-Jade B staining showed that caffeine prevented the neurodegeneration in the d-galactose-treated rats. Our results showed that caffeine prevents the d-galactose-induced oxidative stress and consequently alleviated neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration; and synaptic dysfunction and memory impairment. Therefore, we could suggest that caffeine might be a dietary anti-oxidant agent and a good candidate for the age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Proliferative changes of lens epithelial cells in rat and mouse galactose cataracts--examination using whole-mount preparations.

    PubMed

    Terubayashi, H; Tsuji, T; Okamoto, S; Ikebe, H; Akagi, Y

    1993-01-01

    The proliferative activity of the lens epithelium in the early stages of cataract crisis was investigated in rats and mice using the 3H-thymidine autoradiographic method with the whole-mount preparations of total lens epithelial cells. Three-week-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were given a diet which included galactose in three different concentrations (15%, 25%, 50%) to produce sugar cataracts of three different degrees. Seven-week-old ICR mice were given a 50% galactose-diet. In the lenses of control rats and mice, 3H-thymidine labeled cells were observed mainly in the germinative zone at the lens equator; a few labeled cells were detected in the anterior subcapsular central zone. In the lenses of the SD rats on the 4th day of the diet, labeled cells increased remarkably in the central zone. However, labeled cells decreased as the cataract progressed. The peak in the number of labeled cells was observed on the 4th day of the diet regardless of the galactose concentrations, and was not proportional to the degree of the cataracts. In the galactose-fed ICR mice, the blood galactose level was high, but there was no increase in the number of labeled cells or the development of galactose cataract. The marked increase of labeled cells in the central zone in the SD rat lenses had probably occurred because of the accumulation of galactitol.

  10. Growth and gas production of a novel obligatory heterofermentative Cheddar cheese nonstarter lactobacilli species on ribose and galactose.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-06-01

    An obligatory heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus wasatchii sp. nov., isolated from gassy Cheddar cheese was studied for growth, gas formation, salt tolerance, and survival against pasteurization treatments at 63°C and 72°C. Initially, Lb. wasatchii was thought to use only ribose as a sugar source and we were interested in whether it could also utilize galactose. We conducted experiments to determine the rate and extent of growth and gas production in carbohydrate-restricted (CR) de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) medium under anaerobic conditions with various combinations of ribose and galactose at 12, 23, and 37°C, with 23°C being the optimum growth temperature of Lb. wasatchii among the 3 temperatures studied. When Lb. wasatchii was grown on ribose (0.1, 0.5, and 1%), maximum specific growth rates (µmax) within each temperature were similar. When galactose was the only sugar, compared with ribose, µmax was 2 to 4 times lower. At all temperatures, the highest final cell densities (optical density at 640 nm) of Lb. wasatchii were achieved in CR-MRS plus 1% ribose, 0.5% ribose and 0.5% galactose, or 1% ribose and 1% galactose. Similar µmax values and final cell densities were achieved when 50% of the ribose in CR-MRS was substituted with galactose. Such enhanced utilization of galactose in the presence of ribose to support bacterial growth has not previously been reported. It appears that Lb. wasatchii co-metabolizes ribose and galactose, utilizing ribose for energy and galactose for other functions such as cell wall biosynthesis. Co-utilization of both sugars could be an adaptation mechanism of Lb. wasatchii to the cheese environment to efficiently ferment available sugars for maximizing metabolism and growth. As expected, gas formation by the heterofermenter was observed only when galactose was present in the medium. Growth experiments with MRS plus 1.5% ribose at pH 5.2 or 6.5 with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5% NaCl revealed that Lb. wasatchii is

  11. Growth and gas production of a novel obligatory heterofermentative Cheddar cheese nonstarter lactobacilli species on ribose and galactose.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-06-01

    An obligatory heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus wasatchii sp. nov., isolated from gassy Cheddar cheese was studied for growth, gas formation, salt tolerance, and survival against pasteurization treatments at 63°C and 72°C. Initially, Lb. wasatchii was thought to use only ribose as a sugar source and we were interested in whether it could also utilize galactose. We conducted experiments to determine the rate and extent of growth and gas production in carbohydrate-restricted (CR) de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) medium under anaerobic conditions with various combinations of ribose and galactose at 12, 23, and 37°C, with 23°C being the optimum growth temperature of Lb. wasatchii among the 3 temperatures studied. When Lb. wasatchii was grown on ribose (0.1, 0.5, and 1%), maximum specific growth rates (µmax) within each temperature were similar. When galactose was the only sugar, compared with ribose, µmax was 2 to 4 times lower. At all temperatures, the highest final cell densities (optical density at 640 nm) of Lb. wasatchii were achieved in CR-MRS plus 1% ribose, 0.5% ribose and 0.5% galactose, or 1% ribose and 1% galactose. Similar µmax values and final cell densities were achieved when 50% of the ribose in CR-MRS was substituted with galactose. Such enhanced utilization of galactose in the presence of ribose to support bacterial growth has not previously been reported. It appears that Lb. wasatchii co-metabolizes ribose and galactose, utilizing ribose for energy and galactose for other functions such as cell wall biosynthesis. Co-utilization of both sugars could be an adaptation mechanism of Lb. wasatchii to the cheese environment to efficiently ferment available sugars for maximizing metabolism and growth. As expected, gas formation by the heterofermenter was observed only when galactose was present in the medium. Growth experiments with MRS plus 1.5% ribose at pH 5.2 or 6.5 with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5% NaCl revealed that Lb. wasatchii is

  12. The relevance of tick bites to the production of IgE antibodies to the mammalian oligosaccharide galactose-α-1,3-galactose

    PubMed Central

    Commins, Scott P.; James, Hayley R.; Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Pochan, Shawna L.; Workman, Lisa J.; Perzanowski, Matthew S.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Fahy, John V.; Nganga, Lucy W.; Ronmark, Eva; Cooper, Philip J.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2009, we reported a novel form of delayed anaphylaxis to red meat, which is related to serum IgE antibodies to the oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal). Most of these patients had tolerated meat for many years previously. The implication is that some exposure in adult life had stimulated the production of these IgE antibodies. Objectives To investigate possible causes of this IgE antibody response, focusing on evidence related to tick bites, which are common in the region where these reactions occur. Methods Serum assays were carried out using biotinylated proteins and extracts bound to a streptavidin ImmunoCAP. Results Prospective studies on IgE antibodies in three subjects following tick bites showed an increase in IgE to alpha-gal of twenty-fold or greater. Other evidence included i) a strong correlation between histories of tick bites and IgE to alpha-gal (χ2=26.8, p<0.001), ii) evidence that these IgE antibodies are common in areas where the tick Amblyomma americanum is common, and iii) a significant correlation between IgE antibodies to alpha-gal and IgE antibodies to proteins derived from A. americanum (rs=0.75, p<0.001). Conclusion The results presented here provide evidence that tick bites are a cause, or possibly the only cause, of IgE specific for alpha-gal in this area of the United States. Both the number of subjects becoming sensitized and the titer of IgE antibodies to alpha-gal are striking. Here we report the first example of a response to an ectoparasite giving rise to an important form of food allergy. PMID:21453959

  13. Delayed anaphylaxis, angioedema, or urticaria after consumption of red meat in patients with IgE antibodies specific for galactose-α-1,3-galactose

    PubMed Central

    Commins, Scott P.; Satinover, Shama M.; Hosen, Jacob; Mozena, Jonathan; Borish, Larry; Lewis, Barrett D.; Woodfolk, Judith A.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbohydrate moieties are frequently encountered in food and can elicit IgE responses, the clinical significance of which has been unclear. Recent work, however, has shown that IgE antibodies to galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal), a carbohydrate commonly expressed on nonprimate mammalian proteins, are capable of eliciting serious, even fatal, reactions. Objective We sought to determine whether IgE antibodies to α-gal are present in sera from patients who report anaphylaxis or urticaria after eating beef, pork, or lamb. Methods Detailed histories were taken from patients presenting to the University of Virginia Allergy Clinic. Skin prick tests (SPTs), intradermal skin tests, and serum IgE antibody analysis were performed for common indoor, outdoor, and food allergens. Results Twenty-four patients with IgE antibodies to α-gal were identified. These patients described a similar history of anaphylaxis or urticaria 3 to 6 hours after the ingestion of meat and reported fewer or no episodes when following an avoidance diet. SPTs to mammalian meat produced wheals of usually less than 4 mm, whereas intradermal or fresh-food SPTs provided larger and more consistent wheal responses. CAP-RAST testing revealed specific IgE antibodies to beef, pork, lamb, cow’s milk, cat, and dog but not turkey, chicken, or fish. Absorption experiments indicated that this pattern of sensitivity was explained by an IgE antibody specific for α-gal. Conclusion We report a novel and severe food allergy related to IgE antibodies to the carbohydrate epitope α-gal. These patients experience delayed symptoms of anaphylaxis, angioedema, or urticaria associated with eating beef, pork, or lamb. PMID:19070355

  14. Role of Adrenergic Receptors in Glucose, Fructose and Galactose-Induced Increases in Intestinal Glucose Uptake in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Salman, T M; Alada, A R A; Oyebola, D D O

    2014-12-29

    The study investigated the role of adrenergic receptors in glucose, fructose-, and galactose- induced increases in intestinal glucose uptake. Experiments were carried out on fasted male anaesthetized Nigerian local dogs divided into seven groups (with five dogs per group). Group I dogs were administered normal saline and served as control. Dogs in groups II, III and IV were intravenously infused with glucose (1.1 mg/kg/min), fructose (1.1 mg/kg/min) and galactose (1.1 mg/kg/min) respectively. Another three groups, V, VI and VII were pretreated with prazosin (0.2mg/kg), propranolol (0.5mg/kg) or a combination of prazosin (0.2mg/kg) and propranolol (0.5mg/kg) followed by glucose infusion, frutose infusion or galactose infusion respectively. Through a midline laparatomy, the upper jejunum was cannulated for blood flow measurement and blood samples were obtained for measurement of glucose content of the arterial blood and venous blood from the upper jejunal segment. Glucose uptake was calculated as the product of jejunal blood flow and the difference between arterial and venous glucose levels (A-V glucose). The results showed that pretreatment of the animal with prazosin had no effect on glucose and galactose induced increases in glucose uptake. However, pretreatment with propranolol completely abolished glucose, fructose and galactose-induced increases in intestinal glucose uptake. Prazosin also significantly reduced galactose-induced increase in intestinal glucose uptake. The results suggest that the increases in intestinal glucose uptake induced by glucose and fructose are mediated mostly by beta adrenergic receptors while that of galactose is mediated by both alpha and beta adrenergic receptors.

  15. Qing'E formula alleviates the aging process in D-galactose-induced aging mice

    PubMed Central

    ZHONG, LIN; HUANG, FEI; SHI, HAILIAN; WU, HUI; ZHANG, BEIBEI; WU, XIAOJUN; WEI, XIAOHUI; WANG, ZHENGTAO

    2016-01-01

    Qing'E formula (QEF) is a clinically used prescription with four ingredients, Eucommiae Cortex, Psoraleae Fructus, Juglandis Semen and Garlic Rhizoma, from the Song dynasty (10th century CE). The present study aimed to investigate the anti-aging effect and mechanisms of QEF on D-galactose-induced aging mice. A mouse subacute aging model was established by subcutaneous injection of D-galactose at the neck consecutively for 8 weeks. Motor activity and memory impairment of the mice were evaluated by the rotarod test and passive avoidance test, respectively. Serum and liver parameters were analyzed with biochemical kits. Hippocampal mRNA and protein expression levels were examined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. QEF administration significantly ameliorated the impaired motor and memory of aging mice. In the serum, QEF reduced blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and inhibited alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. In the liver, QEF increased the glutathione level, enhanced total antioxidant capacity and catalase activity, deceased NO and MDA production, and reduced NO synthase activity. In the hippocampus, QEF elevated gene expression levels of Klotho, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), forkhead box transcription factor O3, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), insulin-like growth factor-1 and peroxiredoxin-3. QEF increased protein expression levels of Klotho and SIRT1, and decreased that of PGC-1α in the hippocampus. In conclusion, QEF attenuated the aging process in D-galactose-treated mice, which may be mediated through enhancing the antioxidants in the body, protecting renal and hepatic health, and balancing hippocampal expression levels of the longevity-related genes. PMID:27347412

  16. Mechanism of the anticataract effect of liposomal magnesium taurate in galactose-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Iezhitsa, Igor; Saad, Sarah Diyana Bt; Zakaria, Fatin Kamilah Bt; Agarwal, Puneet; Krasilnikova, Anna; Rahman, Thuhairah Hasrah Abdul; Rozali, Khairul Nizam Bin; Spasov, Alexander; Ozerov, Alexander; Alyautdin, Renad; Ismail, Nafeeza Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Increased lenticular oxidative stress and altered calcium/magnesium (Ca/Mg) homeostasis underlie cataractogenesis. We developed a liposomal formulation of magnesium taurate (MgT) and studied its effects on Ca/Mg homeostasis and lenticular oxidative and nitrosative stress in galactose-fed rats. Methods The galactose-fed rats were topically treated with liposomal MgT (LMgT), liposomal taurine (LTau), or corresponding vehicles twice daily for 28 days with weekly anterior segment imaging. At the end of the experimental period, the lenses were removed and subjected to analysis for oxidative and nitrosative stress, Ca and Mg levels, ATP content, Ca2+-ATPase, Na+,K+-ATPase, and calpain II activities. Results The LTau and LMgT groups showed significantly lower opacity index values at all time points compared to the corresponding vehicle groups (p<0.001). However, the opacity index in the LMgT group was lower than that in the LTau group (p<0.05). Significantly reduced oxidative and nitrosative stress was observed in the LTau and LMgT groups. The lens Ca/Mg ratio in LMgT group was decreased by 1.15 times compared to that in the LVh group. Calpain II activity in the LMgT group was decreased by 13% compared to the LVh group. The ATP level and Na+,K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase activities were significantly increased in the LMgT group compared to the LVh group (p<0.05). Conclusions Topical liposomal MgT delays cataractogenesis in galactose-fed rats by maintaining the lens mineral homeostasis and reducing lenticular oxidative and nitrosative stress. PMID:27440992

  17. Solvent and solvent proton dependent steps in the galactose oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, J J; Kosman, D J

    1987-06-16

    Solvent and solvent proton dependent steps involved in the mechanism of the enzyme galactose oxidase have been examined. The deuterium kinetic solvent isotope effect (KSIE) on the velocity of the galactose oxidase catalyzed oxidation of methyl beta-galactopyranoside by O2 was measured. Examination of the thermodynamic activation parameters for the reaction indicated that the isotope effect was attributable to a slightly less favorable delta H value, consistent with a KSIE on proton transfer. A detailed kinetic analysis was performed, examining the effect of D2O on the rate of reaction over the pH range 4.8-8.0. Both pL-rate profiles exhibited bell-shaped curves. Substitution of D2O as solvent shifted the pKes values for the enzymic central complex: pKes1 from 6.30 to 6.80 and pKes2 from 7.16 to 7.35. Analysis of the observed shifts in dissociation constants was performed with regard to potential hydrogenic sites. pKes1 can be attributed to a histidine imidazole, while pKes2 is tentatively assigned to a Cu2+-bound water molecule. A proton inventory was performed (KSIE = +1.55); the plot of kcat vs. mole fraction D2O was linear, indicating the existence of a single solvent-derived proton involved in a galactose oxidase rate-determining step (or steps). The pH dependence of CN- inhibition was also examined. The Ki-pH profile indicated that a group ionization, with pKa = 7.17, modulated CN- inhibition; Ki was at a minimum when this group was in the protonated state. The inhibition profile followed the alkaline limit of the pH-rate profile for the enzymic reaction, suggesting that the group displaced by CN- was also deprotonating above pH 7.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisaharu; Matsumoto, Michiaki

    1996-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose were examined. The pH dependency on the distribution ratio was found to be affected by the valency of the metal ion, and the apparent adsorption equilibrium constants of the metal ions were determined. The order of adsorption of the metal ions is Ga > In > Nd > Eu for the trivalent metal ions and Cu > Ni > Co for the divalent metal ions. It is believed that amino and hydroxyl groups in the chitosan act as a chelating ligand.

  19. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A; Williams, Todd D; Welti, Ruth

    2014-04-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG (galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerol) depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses. PMID:24286212

  20. [Urinary metabolomics study of the effects of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi ethanol extract on D-galactose-induced rats].

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan-fen; Gong, Wen-xia; Zheng, Yan-hong; Li, Jian-wei; Zhou, Yu-zhi; Qin, Xue-mei; Du, Guan-hua

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anti-aging effects and reveal the underlying mechanism of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi ethanol extract (SBG) in D-galactose-induced rats. Fifty rats were randomly divided into five groups: vehicle control group, D-galactose group, and D-galactose combined with 50, 100, 200 mg x kg(-1) SBG. A rat aging model was induced by injecting subcutaneously D-galactose (100 mg x kg(-1)) for ten weeks. At the tenth week, the locomotor activity (in open-field test) and the learning and memory abilities (in Morris water maze test) were examined respectively. The urine was collected using metabolic cages and analyzed by high-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy combined with multivariate statistical analyses. The SBG at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg x kg(-1) treatments groups could significantly ameliorate aging process in rats' cognitive performance. The 50, 100, 200 mg x kg(-1) SBG regulated citrate, pyruvate, lactate, trimethylamine (TMA), pantothenate, β-hydroxybutyrate in urine favorably toward the control group. These biochemical changes are related to the disturbance in energy metabolism, glycometabolism and microbiome metabolism, which is helpful to further understanding the D-galactose induced aging rats and the therapeutic mechanism of SBG. PMID:27405167

  1. Host Glycan Sugar-Specific Pathways in Streptococcus pneumonia: Galactose as a Key Sugar in Colonisation and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Laura; Oliveira, Joana; Veríssimo, André; Vinga, Susana; Lourenço, Eva C.; Ventura, M. Rita; Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem; Fernandes, Vitor E.; Andrew, Peter W.; Yesilkaya, Hasan; Neves, Ana Rute

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a strictly fermentative organism that relies on glycolytic metabolism to obtain energy. In the human nasopharynx S. pneumoniae encounters glycoconjugates composed of a variety of monosaccharides, which can potentially be used as nutrients once depolymerized by glycosidases. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesise that the pneumococcus would rely on these glycan-derived sugars to grow. Here, we identified the sugar-specific catabolic pathways used by S. pneumoniae during growth on mucin. Transcriptome analysis of cells grown on mucin showed specific upregulation of genes likely to be involved in deglycosylation, transport and catabolism of galactose, mannose and N acetylglucosamine. In contrast to growth on mannose and N-acetylglucosamine, S. pneumoniae grown on galactose re-route their metabolic pathway from homolactic fermentation to a truly mixed acid fermentation regime. By measuring intracellular metabolites, enzymatic activities and mutant analysis, we provide an accurate map of the biochemical pathways for galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine catabolism in S. pneumoniae. Intranasal mouse infection models of pneumococcal colonisation and disease showed that only mutants in galactose catabolic genes were attenuated. Our data pinpoint galactose as a key nutrient for growth in the respiratory tract and highlights the importance of central carbon metabolism for pneumococcal pathogenesis. PMID:25826206

  2. Enhanced UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose by homologous overexpression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Yebra, María J

    2011-07-20

    UDP-sugars are widely used as substrates in the synthesis of oligosaccharides catalyzed by glycosyltransferases. In the present work a metabolic engineering strategy aimed to direct the carbon flux towards UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose biosynthesis was successfully applied in Lactobacillus casei. The galU gene coding for UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (GalU) enzyme in L. casei BL23 was cloned under control of the inducible nisA promoter and it was shown to be functional by homologous overexpression. Notably, about an 80-fold increase in GalU activity resulted in approximately a 9-fold increase of UDP-glucose and a 4-fold increase of UDP-galactose. This suggested that the endogenous UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (GalE) activity, which inter-converts both UDP-sugars, is not sufficient to maintain the UDP-glucose/UDP-galactose ratio. The L. casei galE gene coding for GalE was cloned downstream of galU and the resulting plasmid was transformed in L. casei. The new recombinant strain showed about a 4-fold increase of GalE activity, however this increment did not affect that ratio, suggesting that GalE has higher affinity for UDP-galactose than for UDP-glucose. The L. casei strains constructed here that accumulate high intracellular levels of UDP-sugars would be adequate hosts for the production of oligosaccharides.

  3. Enhanced UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose by homologous overexpression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Yebra, María J

    2011-07-20

    UDP-sugars are widely used as substrates in the synthesis of oligosaccharides catalyzed by glycosyltransferases. In the present work a metabolic engineering strategy aimed to direct the carbon flux towards UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose biosynthesis was successfully applied in Lactobacillus casei. The galU gene coding for UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (GalU) enzyme in L. casei BL23 was cloned under control of the inducible nisA promoter and it was shown to be functional by homologous overexpression. Notably, about an 80-fold increase in GalU activity resulted in approximately a 9-fold increase of UDP-glucose and a 4-fold increase of UDP-galactose. This suggested that the endogenous UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (GalE) activity, which inter-converts both UDP-sugars, is not sufficient to maintain the UDP-glucose/UDP-galactose ratio. The L. casei galE gene coding for GalE was cloned downstream of galU and the resulting plasmid was transformed in L. casei. The new recombinant strain showed about a 4-fold increase of GalE activity, however this increment did not affect that ratio, suggesting that GalE has higher affinity for UDP-galactose than for UDP-glucose. The L. casei strains constructed here that accumulate high intracellular levels of UDP-sugars would be adequate hosts for the production of oligosaccharides. PMID:21663774

  4. D-galactose catabolism in Penicillium chrysogenum: Expression analysis of the structural genes of the Leloir pathway.

    PubMed

    Jónás, Ágota; Fekete, Erzsébet; Németh, Zoltán; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we analyzed the expression of the structural genes encoding the five enzymes comprising the Leloir pathway of D-galactose catabolism in the industrial cell factory Penicillium chrysogenum on various carbon sources. The genome of P. chrysogenum contains a putative galactokinase gene at the annotated locus Pc13g10140, the product of which shows strong structural similarity to yeast galactokinase that was expressed on lactose and D-galactose only. The expression profile of the galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase gene at annotated locus Pc15g00140 was essentially similar to that of galactokinase. This is in contrast to the results from other fungi such as Aspergillus nidulans, Trichoderma reesei and A. niger, where the ortholog galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase genes were constitutively expressed. As for the UDP-galactose-4-epimerase encoding gene, five candidates were identified. We could not detect Pc16g12790, Pc21g12170 and Pc20g06140 expression on any of the carbon sources tested, while for the other two loci (Pc21g10370 and Pc18g01080) transcripts were clearly observed under all tested conditions. Like the 4-epimerase specified at locus Pc21g10370, the other two structural Leloir pathway genes - UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (Pc21g12790) and phosphoglucomutase (Pc18g01390) - were expressed constitutively at high levels as can be expected from their indispensable function in fungal cell wall formation. PMID:27630054

  5. A porcine-derived acellular dermal scaffold that supports soft tissue regeneration: removal of terminal galactose-alpha-(1,3)-galactose and retention of matrix structure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Wan, Hua; Zuo, Wenqi; Sun, Wendell; Owens, Rick T; Harper, John R; Ayares, David L; McQuillan, David J

    2009-07-01

    Sub-optimal clinical outcomes after implantation of animal-derived tissue matrices may be attributed to the nature of the processing of the material or to an immune response elicited in response to xenogeneic epitopes. The ability to produce a porcine-derived graft that retains the structural integrity of the extracellular matrix and minimizes potential antigenic response to galactose-alpha-(1,3)-galactose terminal disaccharide (alpha-Gal) may allow the scaffold to support regeneration of native tissue. Dermal tissue from wild-type (WT-porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix [PADM]) or Gal-deficient (Gal(-/-) PADM) pigs was processed to remove cells and DNA while preserving the structural integrity of the extracellular matrix. In addition, the WT tissue was subjected to an enzymatic treatment to minimize the presence of alpha-Gal (Gal-reduced PADM). Extracellular matrix composition and integrity was assessed by histological, immunohistochemical (IHC), and ultrastructural analysis. In vivo performance was evaluated by implantation into the abdominal wall of Old World primates in an exisional repair model. Anti-alpha-Gal activity in the serum of monkeys implanted subcutaneously was assessed by ELISA. Minimal modification to the extracellular matrix was assessed by evaluation of intact structure as demonstrated by staining patterns for type I and type VII collagens, laminin, and fibronectin similar to native porcine skin tissues. Explants from the abdominal wall showed evidence of remodeling, notably fibroblast cell repopulation and revascularization, as early as 1 month. Serum ELISA revealed an initial anti-alpha-Gal induction that decreased to baseline levels over time in the primates implanted with WT-PADM, whereas no or minimal anti-Gal activity was detected in the primates implanted with Gal(-/-) PADM or Gal-reduced PADM. The combination of a nondamaging process, successful removal of cells, and reduction of xenogeneic alpha-Gal antigens from the porcine dermal

  6. Elemental distribution in frozen-hydrated rat lenses with galactose cataract

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama-Ito, H. )

    1990-01-01

    The elemental distributions in frozen-hydrated rat lenses with galactose cataract were compared before and after the onset of the nuclear cataract to investigate the possible role of ion levels in the lens opacification due to the phase separation of the lens cytoplasm. The maps of the weight concentrations of the minor elements, S, Cl, K and Ca, on the basis of wet weight in the central plane of lens were obtained by X-ray analysis with the high energy ion microprobe at a resolution of 50 microns. Before the onset of the nuclear cataract, the distributions of Cl and K, were almost normal, except in the lens posterior periphery with high Cl and low K. In the lens with the nuclear opacity, sudden changes were observed. The Cl increased throughout the lens, and K decreased throughout the lens except at lens anterior thin layer. However, the totalized monovalent ion level changed only slightly. The Ca level increased throughout the lens after the onset of the nuclear cataract, suggesting a possible role of Ca in the nuclear opacification of galactose cataract of rats. The distributions of S were similar to the protein density distributions previously known both in the normal and in the cataractous lenses.

  7. Glucose and galactose absorption after ingestion of milk containing hydrolysed lactose in calves with diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, A

    2000-10-01

    Ten calves which had contracted acute diarrhoea caused by rotavirus, coronavirus and Cryptosporidium were used to test the hypothesis that feeding lactose-hydrolysed cow's milk instead of unprocessed cow's milk improves sugar absorption in diarrhoeic calves. The animals were rehydrated with an orally administered solution containing electrolytes and glucose. Thereafter the calves received one test meal of whole fresh cow's milk whose lactose had been hydrolysed by added lactase and one test meal of unprocessed cow's milk at an interval of 24 h in a cross-over design trial. In comparison with unprocessed milk, the intake of milk containing hydrolysed lactose resulted in a slight decrease of mean breath hydrogen concentration (P = 0.18), but also a slight decrease of mean blood galactose concentration (P = 0.14). There was no treatment effect on mean plasma glucose concentration. Peak plasma glucose and blood galactose concentration tended to be delayed after the intake of lactose-hydrolysed milk, which implies that gastric emptying was probably delayed. The results show that feeding milk which contains hydrolysed lactose does not significantly improve lactose utilization in calves that are suffering from benign infectious diarrhoea.

  8. Structural Determinants of Water Permeation through the Sodium-Galactose Transporter vSGLT

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, Joshua L.; Sheng, Ying; Choe, Seungho; Abramson, Jeff; Wright, Ernest M.; Rosenberg, John M.; Grabe, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Sodium-glucose transporters (SGLTs) facilitate the movement of water across the cell membrane, playing a central role in cellular homeostasis. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the mechanism of water permeation through the inward-facing state of vSGLT based on nearly 10 μs of molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations reveal the transient formation of a continuous water channel through the transporter that permits water to permeate the protein. Trajectories in which spontaneous release of galactose is observed, as well as those in which galactose remains in the binding site, show that the permeation rate, although modulated by substrate occupancy, is not tightly coupled to substrate release. Using a, to our knowledge, novel channel-detection algorithm, we identify the key residues that control water flow through the transporter and show that solvent gating is regulated by side-chain motions in a small number of residues on the extracellular face. A sequence alignment reveals the presence of two insertion sites in mammalian SGLTs that flank these outer-gate residues. We hypothesize that the absence of these sites in vSGLT may account for the high water permeability values for vSGLT determined via simulation compared to the lower experimental estimates for mammalian SGLT1. PMID:24655503

  9. Metallization of double-stranded DNA triggered by bound galactose-modified naphthalene diimide.

    PubMed

    Komizo, Kohei; Ikedo, Hideyuki; Sato, Shinobu; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2014-08-20

    Naphthalene diimide (NDI) derivatives bearing galactose moieties through different spacers, NDI-DS1 and NDI-DS2, were synthesized by the click reaction of the acetylene derivatives of NDI with galactose azide. They bound to double-stranded DNA with threading intercalation, as confirmed by the topoisomerase I assay and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The binding affinities of these ligands were on the order of 10(5) M(-1) with several-fold higher affinity for double-stranded DNA than for single-stranded DNA. The silver mirror reaction on the double-stranded DNA bound to these ligands afforded silver nanowires that were converted to gold nanowires. In the atomic force microscopy measurements, the increased height of DNA areas on a mica plate was observed in the case of double-stranded DNA after NDI-DS2 treatment and subsequently silver mirror reaction, whereas the increased height of DNA areas was not observed in the case of single-stranded DNA after the same treatment. PMID:25011665

  10. Solvent exchangeable protons and the activation of molecular oxygen: the galactose oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Kosman, D J; Driscoll, J J

    1988-01-01

    The reduction of O2 to H2O2 requires two protons as well as two electrons. Thus, activation of dioxygen reasonably may involve either general or specific acid catalysis. Consequently, the reduction of O2 to H2O2 could exhibit a kinetic solvent isotope effect (KSIE). The reaction catalyzed by the mononuclear Cu(II) enzyme, galactose oxidase does exhibit a KSIE (+1.55). The pL-rate profile exhibits an alkaline shift in D2O which can be attributed to the differential partitioning of H+ versus D+ between bulk water and a metal-bound H2O (delta pKa = +0.19). A variety of spectral evidence places an equatorial, Cu(II)-liganded water molecule at the active site of galactose oxidase. The analysis of the KSIE data is detailed and the potential generality of the function of such metal-bound H2O at other type 2 Cu(II) sites is discussed.

  11. Galactose-functionalized cationic polycarbonate diblock copolymer for targeted gene delivery to hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ong, Zhan Yuin; Yang, Chuan; Gao, Shu Jun; Ke, Xi-Yu; Hedrick, James L; Yan Yang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    To mediate selective gene delivery to hepatocytes via the asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-Rs), we designed and synthesized well-defined and narrowly dispersed galactose- and glucose-functionalized cationic polycarbonate diblock copolymers (designated as Gal-APC and Glu-APC, respectively) using organocatalytic ring-opening polymerization of functionalized carbonate monomers, with a subsequent quaternization step using bis-tertiary amines to confer quaternary and tertiary amines for DNA binding and endosomal buffering, respectively. The sugar-functionalized diblock copolymers effectively bound and condensed DNA to form positively charged nanoparticles (<100 nm in diameter and ≈30 mV zeta-potential) that were stable under high physiological salt conditions. In comparison to the control Glu-APC/DNA complexes, Gal-APC/DNA complexes mediated significantly higher gene expression in ASGP-R positive HepG2 cells with no significant difference observed in ASGP-R negative HeLa cells. The co-incubation of Gal-APC/DNA complexes with a natural ASGP-R ligand effectively led to a decrease in gene expression, hence providing evidence for the ASGP-R mediated endocytosis of the polyplexes. Importantly, the Gal-APC/DNA complexes induced minimal cytotoxicities in HepG2 cells at the N/P ratios tested. Taken together, the galactose-functionalized cationic polycarbonate diblock copolymer has potential for use as a non-viral gene vector for the targeted delivery of therapeutic genes to hepatocytes in the treatment of liver diseases.

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Tanaka, Nobukazu; Esaka, Muneharu

    2012-01-01

    L-Galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (GPPase) is an enzyme involved in ascorbate biosynthesis in higher plants. We isolated a cDNA encoding GPPase from tobacco, and named it NtGPPase. The putative amino acid sequence of NtGPPase contained inositol monophosphatase motifs and metal binding sites. Recombinant NtGPPase hydrolyzed not only L-galactose-1-phosphate, but also myo-inositol-1-phosphate. The optimum pH for the GPPase activity of NtGPPase was 7.5. Its enzyme activity required Mg2+, and was inhibited by Li+ and Ca2+. Its fluorescence, fused with green fluorescence protein in onion cells and protoplasts of tobacco BY-2 cells, was observed in both the cytosol and nucleus. The expression of NtGPPase mRNA and protein was clearly correlated with L-ascorbic acid (AsA) contents of BY-2 cells during culture. The AsA contents of NtGPPase over expression lines were higher than those of empty lines at 13 d after subculture. This suggests that NtGPPase contributes slightly to AsA biosynthesis. PMID:22790939

  13. Low Glucose but Not Galactose Enhances Oxidative Mitochondrial Metabolism in C2C12 Myoblasts and Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Anděl, Michal; Trnka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Substituting galactose for glucose in cell culture media has been suggested to enhance mitochondrial metabolism in a variety of cell lines. We studied the effects of carbohydrate availability on growth, differentiation and metabolism of C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured growth rates, ability to differentiate, citrate synthase and respiratory chain activities and several parameters of mitochondrial respiration in C2C12 cells grown in media with varying carbohydrate availability (5 g/l glucose, 1 g/l glucose, 1 g/l galactose, and no added carbohydrates). C2C12 myoblasts grow more slowly without glucose irrespective of the presence of galactose, which is not consumed by the cells, and they fail to differentiate without glucose in the medium. Cells grown in a no-glucose medium (with or without galactose) have lower maximal respiration and spare respiratory capacity than cells grown in the presence of glucose. However, increasing glucose concentration above physiological levels decreases the achievable maximal respiration. C2C12 myotubes differentiated at a high glucose concentration showed higher dependency on oxidative respiration under basal conditions but had lower maximal and spare respiratory capacity when compared to cells differentiated under low glucose condition. Citrate synthase activity or mitochondrial yield were not significantly affected by changes in the available substrate concentration but a trend towards a higher respiratory chain activity was observed at reduced glucose levels. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that using galactose to increase oxidative metabolism may not be applicable to every cell line, and the changes in mitochondrial respiratory parameters associated with treating cells with galactose are mainly due to glucose deprivation. Moderate concentrations of glucose (1 g/l) in a growth medium are optimal for mitochondrial respiration in C2C12 cell line while supraphysiological

  14. Structural elucidation of a 3-O-methyl-D-galactose-containing neutral polysaccharide from the fruiting bodies of Phellinus igniarius.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Zhang, Jingsong; Liu, Yanfang; Tang, Qingjiu; Zhao, Zigao; Xia, Wenshui

    2007-06-11

    PIP60-1, a novel heteropolysaccharide isolated from fruiting bodies of the medicinal fungus, Phellinus igniarius, has a molecular weight of 1.71 x 10(4)Da and is composed of L-fucose, D-glucose, D-mannose, D-galactose and 3-O-Me-D-galactose in a ratio of 1:1:1:2:1. A structural investigation of PIP60-1 carried out using sugar and methylation analyses, combined with (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, HSQC and HMBC experiments, established the repeating unit of the polysaccharide as the following: [structure: see text] PMID:17359952

  15. Multifunctional supramolecular vesicles based on the complex of ferrocenecarboxylic acid capped pillar[5]arene and a galactose derivative for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yincheng; Hou, Chenxi; Ren, Jingli; Xin, Xiaoting; Pei, Yuxin; Lu, Yuchao; Cao, Shoupeng; Pei, Zhichao

    2016-07-21

    Supramolecular vesicles based on the host-guest complexation of ferrocenecarboxylic acid capped pillar[5]arene and a galactose derivative have been constructed, which showed dual-responsiveness and cancer cells targetability resulting from its ferrocenecarboxylic acid units and galactose units, respectively. This work provides a good example for the construction of multifunctional nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery. PMID:27387299

  16. Impact of Oxidative Stress on Ascorbate Biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas via Regulation of the VTC2 Gene Encoding a GDP-l-galactose Phosphorylase*

    PubMed Central

    Urzica, Eugen I.; Adler, Lital N.; Page, M. Dudley; Linster, Carole L.; Arbing, Mark A.; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    The l-galactose (Smirnoff-Wheeler) pathway represents the major route to l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) biosynthesis in higher plants. Arabidopsis thaliana VTC2 and its paralogue VTC5 function as GDP-l-galactose phosphorylases converting GDP-l-galactose to l-galactose-1-P, thus catalyzing the first committed step in the biosynthesis of l-ascorbate. Here we report that the l-galactose pathway of ascorbate biosynthesis described in higher plants is conserved in green algae. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genome encodes all the enzymes required for vitamin C biosynthesis via the l-galactose pathway. We have characterized recombinant C. reinhardtii VTC2 as an active GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase. C. reinhardtii cells exposed to oxidative stress show increased VTC2 mRNA and l-ascorbate levels. Genes encoding enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione system (e.g. ascorbate peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase, and dehydroascorbate reductase) are also up-regulated in response to increased oxidative stress. These results indicate that C. reinhardtii VTC2, like its plant homologs, is a highly regulated enzyme in ascorbate biosynthesis in green algae and that, together with the ascorbate recycling system, the l-galactose pathway represents the major route for providing protective levels of ascorbate in oxidatively stressed algal cells. PMID:22393048

  17. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R.; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A.; Williams, Todd D.; Welti, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection, and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses. PMID:24286212

  18. Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase Enzyme Activity by Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of galactosemia usually involves the measurement of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) activity. Traditional radioactive and fluorescent GALT assays are nonspecific, laborious, and/or lack sufficient analytical sensitivity. We developed a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)–based assay for GALT enzyme activity measurement. Method Our assay used stable isotope-labeled α-galactose-1-phosphate ([13C6]-Gal-1-P) as an enzyme substrate. Sample cleanup and separation were achieved by reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography, and the enzymatic product, isotope-labeled uridine diphosphate galactose ([13C6]-UDPGal), was detected by MS/MS at mass transition (571 > 323) and quantified by use of [13C6]-Glu-1-P (265 > 79) as an internal standard. Results The method yielded a mean (SD) GALT enzyme activity of 23.8 (3.8) µmol · (gHgb)−1 · h−1 in erythrocyte extracts from 71 controls. The limit of quantification was 0.04 µmol · (g Hgb)−1 · h−1 (0.2% of normal control value). Intraassay imprecision was determined at 4 different levels (100%, 25%, 5%, and 0.2% of the normal control values), and the CVs were calculated to be 2.1%, 2.5%, 4.6%, and 9.7%, respectively (n = 3). Interassay imprecision CVs were 4.5%, 6.7%, 8.2%, and 13.2% (n = 5), respectively. The assay recoveries at the 4 levels were higher than 90%. The apparent Km of the 2 substrates, Gal-1-P and UDPGlc, were determined to be 0.38 mmol/L and 0.071 mmol/L, respectively. The assay in erythrocytes of 33 patients with classical galactosemia revealed no detectable activity. Conclusions This LC-MS/MS–based assay for GALT enzyme activity will be useful for the diagnosis and study of biochemically heterogeneous patients with galactosemia, especially those with uncommon genotypes and detectable but low residual activities. PMID:20348403

  19. Role of Snf1p in regulation of intracellular sorting of the lactose and galactose transporter Lac12p in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Wiedemuth, Christian; Breunig, Karin D

    2005-04-01

    The protein kinase Snf1/AMPK plays a central role in carbon and energy homeostasis in yeasts and higher eukaryotes. To work out which aspects of the Snf1-controlled regulatory network are conserved in evolution, the Snf1 requirement in galactose metabolism was analyzed in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. Whereas galactose induction was only delayed, K. lactis snf1 mutants failed to accumulate the lactose/galactose H+ symporter Lac12p in the plasma membran,e as indicated by Lac12-green fluorescent protein fusions. In contrast to wild-type cells, the fusion protein was mostly intracellular in the mutant. Growth on galactose and galactose uptake could be restored by the KHT3 gene, which encodes a new transporter of the HXT subfamily of major facilitators These findings indicate a new role of Snf1p in regulation of sugar transport in K. lactis. PMID:15821131

  20. 6-Azido-6-de­oxy-α-l-galactose (6-azido-l-fucose) monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Booth, K. Victoria; Jenkinson, Sarah F.; Rao, Devendar; Simonisi, Tsuyosi; Fleet, George W. J.; Izumori, Ken; Watkin, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Although 6-azido-6-de­oxy-l-galactose in aqueous solution is in equilibrium between the open-chain, furan­ose and pyran­ose forms, it crystallizes solely as 6-azido-6-de­oxy-α-l-galactopyran­ose monohydrate, C6H11N3O5·H2O, with the six-membered ring adopting a chair conformation. The structure exists as hydrogen-bonded chains, with each mol­ecule acting as a donor and acceptor of five hydrogen bonds. There are no unusual crystal packing features and the absolute configuration was determined from the use of 1-azido-1-de­oxy-d-galactitol as the starting material. PMID:21203271

  1. Purification and characterization of a galactose-specific lectin with mitogenic activity from pinto beans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jack H; Wong, Clarence C T; Ng, T B

    2006-05-01

    A galactose-specific dimeric lectin from pinto beans was purified using a procedure that involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-ion exchange chromatography on Mono S, and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 200. The molecular mass of this homodimeric lectin was 62 kDa and that of each of its subunits was 31 kDa. The hemagglutinating activity of pinto bean lectin was stable within the pH range of 3-12 and the temperature range of 0-70 degrees C. By using the [3H-methyl]-thymidine incorporation assay, it was shown that the lectin had the ability to evoke a mitogenic response from murine splenocytes but it did not inhibit proliferation of L1210 leukemia cells. The pinto bean lectin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 3 microM. PMID:16600511

  2. Protective effect of Artemisia annua L. extract against galactose-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Hye; Seo, Ji Yeon; Liu, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Jong-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Artemisia annua L. (also called qinghao) has been well known as a source of antimalarial drug artemisinins. In addition, the herb was reported to have in vitro antioxidative activity. The present study investigated the protective effect of aqueous ethanol extract of Qinghao (AA extract) against D-galactose-induced oxidative stress in C57BL/6J mice. Feeding AA extract-containing diet lowered serum levels of malondialdehyde and 8-OH-dG that are biomarkers for lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, respectively. Furthermore, AA extract feeding enhanced the activity of NQO1, a typical antioxidant marker enzyme, in tissues such as kidney, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. In conclusion, AA extract was found to have antioxidative activity in mouse model.

  3. Protective Effect of Artemisia annua L. Extract against Galactose-Induced Oxidative Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Hye; Seo, Ji Yeon; Liu, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Jong-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Artemisia annua L. (also called qinghao) has been well known as a source of antimalarial drug artemisinins. In addition, the herb was reported to have in vitro antioxidative activity. The present study investigated the protective effect of aqueous ethanol extract of Qinghao (AA extract) against D-galactose-induced oxidative stress in C57BL/6J mice. Feeding AA extract-containing diet lowered serum levels of malondialdehyde and 8-OH-dG that are biomarkers for lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, respectively. Furthermore, AA extract feeding enhanced the activity of NQO1, a typical antioxidant marker enzyme, in tissues such as kidney, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. In conclusion, AA extract was found to have antioxidative activity in mouse model. PMID:24988450

  4. Control of mannose/galactose ratio during galactomannan formation in developing legume seeds.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M; Scott, C; Gidley, M J; Reid, J S

    1992-04-01

    Galactomannan deposition was investigated in developing endosperms of three leguminous species representative of taxonomic groups which have galactomannans with high, medium and low galactose content. These were fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.; mannose/galactose (Man/Gal) = 1.1), guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.; Man/Gal = 1.6) and Senna occidentalis (L.) Link. (Man/Gal = 3.3), respectively. Endosperms were analysed at different stages of seed development for galactomannan content and the levels, in cell-free extracts, of a mannosyltransferase and a galactosyltransferase which have been shown to catalyse galactomannan biosynthesis in vitro (M. Edwards et al., 1989, Planta 178, 41-51). There was a close correlation in each case between the levels of the biosynthetic mannosyl- and galactosyltransferases and the deposition of galactomannan. The relative in vitro activities of the mannosyl- and galactosyltransferases in fenugreek and guar were similar, and almost constant throughout the period of galactomannan deposition. In Senna the ratio mannosyltransferase/galactosyltransferase was always higher than in the other two species, and it increased substantially throughout the period of galactomannan deposition. In fenugreek and guar the galactomannans present in the endosperms of seeds at different stages of development had the Man/Gal ratios characteristic of the mature seeds. By contrast the galactomannan present in Senna endosperms at the earliest stages of deposition had a Man/Gal ratio of about 2.3. During late deposition this ratio increased rapidly, stabilising at about 3.3, the ratio characteristic of the mature seed. The levels of α-galactosidase in the developing endosperms of fenugreek and guar were low and remained fairly constant throughout the deposition of the galactomannan. In Senna, α-galactosidase activity in the endosperm was low during early galactomannan deposition, but increased subsequently, peaking during late galactomannan

  5. Structural basis for the unusual carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin towards galactose and mannose.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Yves; Astoul, Corinne Houlès; Zamboni, Véronique; Peumans, Willy J; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-05-15

    Evidence is presented that the specificity of jacalin, the seed lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia), is not directed exclusively against the T-antigen disaccharide Galbeta1,3GalNAc, lactose and galactose, but also against mannose and oligomannosides. Biochemical analyses based on surface-plasmon-resonance measurements, combined with the X-ray-crystallographic determination of the structure of a jacalin-alpha-methyl-mannose complex at 2 A resolution, demonstrated clearly that jacalin is fully capable of binding mannose. Besides mannose, jacalin also interacts readily with glucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Structural analyses demonstrated that the relatively large size of the carbohydrate-binding site enables jacalin to accommodate monosaccharides with different hydroxyl conformations and provided unambiguous evidence that the beta-prism structure of jacalin is a sufficiently flexible structural scaffold to confer different carbohydrate-binding specificities to a single lectin.

  6. Structural basis for the unusual carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin towards galactose and mannose.

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Yves; Astoul, Corinne Houlès; Zamboni, Véronique; Peumans, Willy J; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the specificity of jacalin, the seed lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia), is not directed exclusively against the T-antigen disaccharide Galbeta1,3GalNAc, lactose and galactose, but also against mannose and oligomannosides. Biochemical analyses based on surface-plasmon-resonance measurements, combined with the X-ray-crystallographic determination of the structure of a jacalin-alpha-methyl-mannose complex at 2 A resolution, demonstrated clearly that jacalin is fully capable of binding mannose. Besides mannose, jacalin also interacts readily with glucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Structural analyses demonstrated that the relatively large size of the carbohydrate-binding site enables jacalin to accommodate monosaccharides with different hydroxyl conformations and provided unambiguous evidence that the beta-prism structure of jacalin is a sufficiently flexible structural scaffold to confer different carbohydrate-binding specificities to a single lectin. PMID:11988090

  7. Galactose-Depleted Xyloglucan Is Dysfunctional and Leads to Dwarfism in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yingzhen; Peña, Maria J.; Renna, Luciana; Avci, Utku; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Tuomivaara, Sami T.; Li, Xuemei; Reiter, Wolf-Dieter; Brandizzi, Federica; Hahn, Michael G.; Darvill, Alan G.; York, William S.; O’Neill, Malcolm A.

    2015-01-01

    Xyloglucan is a polysaccharide that has important roles in the formation and function of the walls that surround growing land plant cells. Many of these plants synthesize xyloglucan that contains galactose in two different side chains (L and F), which exist in distinct molecular environments. However, little is known about the contribution of these side chains to xyloglucan function. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants devoid of the F side chain galactosyltransferase MURUS3 (MUR3) form xyloglucan that lacks F side chains and contains much less galactosylated xylose than its wild-type counterpart. The galactose-depleted xyloglucan is dysfunctional, as it leads to mutants that are dwarfed with curled rosette leaves, short petioles, and short inflorescence stems. Moreover, cell wall matrix polysaccharides, including xyloglucan and pectin, are not properly secreted and instead accumulate within intracellular aggregates. Near-normal growth is restored by generating mur3 mutants that produce no detectable amounts of xyloglucan. Thus, cellular processes are affected more by the presence of the dysfunctional xyloglucan than by eliminating xyloglucan altogether. To identify structural features responsible for xyloglucan dysfunction, xyloglucan structure was modified in situ by generating mur3 mutants that lack specific xyloglucan xylosyltransferases (XXTs) or that overexpress the XYLOGLUCAN L-SIDE CHAIN GALACTOSYLTRANSFERASE2 (XLT2) gene. Normal growth was restored in the mur3-3 mutant overexpressing XLT2 and in mur3-3 xxt double mutants when the dysfunctional xyloglucan was modified by doubling the amounts of galactosylated side chains. Our study assigns a role for galactosylation in normal xyloglucan function and demonstrates that altering xyloglucan side chain structure disturbs diverse cellular and physiological processes. PMID:25673778

  8. Directed evolution of lectins with sugar-binding specificity for 6-sulfo-galactose.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Tateno, Hiroaki; Kuno, Atsushi; Yabe, Rikio; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2012-06-01

    6-sulfo-galactose (6S-Gal) is a prevalent motif observed in highly sulfated keratan sulfate, which is closely associated with the glioblastoma malignancy while acting as a critical determinant for endogenous lectins. However, facile detection of this unique glycoepitope is greatly hampered because of a lack of appropriate probes. We have previously reported tailoring an α2-6-linked sialic acid-binding lectin from a ricin-B chain-like galactose-binding protein, EW29Ch, by a reinforced ribosome display system following an error-prone PCR. In this study, we challenged the creation of novel lectins to recognize 6S-Gal-terminated glycans by incorporating a high-throughput screening system with a glycoconjugate microarray. After two rounds of selection procedures, 20 mutants were obtained and 12 were then successfully expressed in Escherichia coli, 8 of which showed a significant affinity for 6'-Sulfo-LN (6-O-sulfo-Galβ1-4GlcNAc), which the parental EW29Ch lacked. Analysis of two representative mutants by frontal affinity chromatography revealed a substantial affinity (K(d) ∼3 μm) for a 6S-Gal-terminated glycan. On the basis of the observation that all eight mutants have a common mutation at Glu-20 to Lys, site-directed mutagenesis experiments were performed focusing on this aspect. The results clearly indicated that the E20K mutation is necessary and sufficient to acquire the specificity for 6S-Gal. We also confirmed a difference in binding between E20K and EW29Ch to CHO cells, in which enzymes to catalyze the synthesis of 6S-Gal were overexpressed. The results clearly demonstrate that these mutants have potential to distinguish between cells containing different amounts of 6S-Gal-terminated glycans. This new technology will be used to provide novel tools essential for sulfoglycomics. PMID:22493425

  9. Bitterness of glucose/galactose: novel mutations in the SLC5A1 gene.

    PubMed

    Pode-Shakked, Ben; Reish, Orit; Aktuglu-Zeybek, Cigdem; Kesselman, Dafna; Dekel, Benjamin; Bujanover, Yoram; Anikster, Yair

    2014-01-01

    Glucose galactose malabsorption (GGM) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by life-threatening osmotic diarrhea at infancy. When the intake of the offending sugars (namely, glucose, galactose and lactose) is ceased, the diarrhea promptly stops. Mutations in the SLC5A1 gene, encoding the sodium-glucose co-transporter located in the brush border of enterocytes, have been shown to cause the disease. More than 300 subjects of diverse origin have been reported worldwide, most of whom are a result of a consanguineous union. We examined 6 patients from 4 families presenting with complaints consistent with GGM and responsive to the appropriate fructose-based diet. Genomic DNA of the patients was polymerase chain reaction amplified for each of the 15 exons of the SLC5A1 gene and analyzed by nucleotide sequencing. The analysis lead to the identification of 2 novel mutations: a 1915 del C mutation, a frameshift mutation leading to a premature stop at codon 645; and a substitution missense mutation of T to C on nucleotide 947 (exon 9) causing a L316P substitution. In addition, G426R and C255W mutations previously described were identified; in both cases, the patients were shown to be homozygous and their parents heterozygous for the mutation. Of note, additional patients who underwent a similar evaluation at our center for suspected GGM did not show mutations in the SLC5A1 gene. Because the latter did not previously undergo a diagnostic algorithm in full, for instance, one that may consist of a glucose breath hydrogen test and an empiric attempt of a dietary switch to galactomin, we suggest that molecular genotyping of such patients should only follow such appropriate clinical evaluation. PMID:24048166

  10. Characterization of pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris and its application in the C-2 specific conversion of D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Volc, Jindrich; Halada, Petr; Kubátová, Elena; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K

    2008-02-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH) of the mushroom Agaricus meleagris was purified from mycelial culture media to substantial homogeneity using ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The native enzyme is a monomeric polypeptide with a molecular mass of 66,547Da as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry containing approximately 7% carbohydrate and covalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide. The enzyme exhibited a broad sugar substrate tolerance, oxidizing different aldopyranoses to the corresponding C-2 or C-2,3 (di)dehydro sugars. Preferred electron donors with the highest k(cat)/K(m) values were major sugar constituents of cellulose and hemicellulose, namely d-glucose, D-galactose, l-arabinose, D-xylose and cellobiose. This indicates a possible physiological role of the enzyme in lignocellulose breakdown. PDH showed no detectable activity with oxygen, and its reactivity towards electron acceptors was limited to various substituted benzoquinones and complexed metal ions, with the ferricenium ion and the benzoquinone imine 2,6-dichloroindophenole displaying the highest k(cat)/K(m). The enzyme catalyzed in up to 95% yields the regiospecific conversion of D-galactose to 2-dehydro-D-galactose, an intermediate in a possible biotechnologically interesting process for redox isomerization of D-galactose to the prebiotic sugar D-tagatose.

  11. Hepatocyte-targeting gene delivery using a lipoplex composed of galactose-modified aromatic lipid synthesized with click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Mizuha; Mochizuki, Shinichi; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    Highly efficient drug carriers targeting hepatocyte is needed for treatment for liver diseases such as liver cirrhosis and virus infections. Galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine is known to be recognized and incorporated into the cells through asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) that is exclusively expressed on hepatocyte and hepatoma. In this study, we synthesized a galactose-modified lipid with aromatic ring with click chemistry. To make a complex with DNA, termed 'lipoplex', we prepared a binary micelle composed of cationic lipid; dioleoyltrimethylammoniumpropane (DOTAP) and galactose-modified lipid (D/Gal). We prepared lipoplex from plasmid DNA (pDNA) and D/Gal and examined the cell specificity and transfection efficiency. The lipoplex was able to interact with ASGPR immobilized on gold substrate in the quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor cell. The lipoplex induced high gene expression to HepG2 cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, but not to A549 cells, a human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line. The treatment with asialofetuin, which is a ligand for ASGPR and would work as a competitive inhibitor, before addition of the lipoplexes decreased the expression to HepG2 cells. These results indicate that D/Gal lipoplex was incorporated into HepG2 cells preferentially through ASGPR and the uptake was caused by galactose specific receptor. This delivery system to hepatocytes may overcome the problems for gene therapy and be used for treatment of hepatitis and hepatic cirrhosis.

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of the mouse CGT gene encoding UDP-galactose ceramide-galactosyltransferase (cerebroside synthetase)

    SciTech Connect

    Bosio, A.; Binczek, E.; Stoffel, W.

    1996-07-01

    UDP-galactose ceramide galactosyltransferase, CGT, EC 2.4.1.45, is the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cerebrosides and sulfatides, which are the most abundant glycosphingolipids in the myelin of the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system.

  13. Bioproduction of D-Tagatose from D-Galactose Using Phosphoglucose Isomerase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manisha J; Patel, Arti T; Akhani, Rekha; Dedania, Samir; Patel, Darshan H

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 phosphoglucose isomerase was purified as an active soluble form by a single-step purification using Ni-NTA chromatography that showed homogeneity on SDS-PAGE with molecular mass ∼62 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH for the maximum isomerization activity with D-galactose were 60 °C and 7.0, respectively. Generally, sugar phosphate isomerases show metal-independent activity but PA-PGI exhibited metal-dependent isomerization activity with aldosugars and optimally catalyzed the D-galactose isomerization in the presence of 1.0 mM MnCl2. The apparent Km and Vmax for D-galactose under standardized conditions were calculated to be 1029 mM (±31.30 with S.E.) and 5.95 U/mg (±0.9 with S.E.), respectively. Equilibrium reached after 180 min with production of 567.51 μM D-tagatose from 1000 mM of D-galactose. Though, the bioconversion ratio is low but it can be increased by immobilization and enzyme engineering. Although various L-arabinose isomerases have been characterized for bioproduction of D-tagatose, P. aeruginosa glucose phosphate isomerase is distinguished from the other L-arabinose isomerases by its optimal temperature (60 °C) for D-tagatose production being mesophilic bacteria, making it an alternate choice for bulk production.

  14. Ameliorative effect of lotus seedpod proanthocyanidins on cognitive impairment and brain aging induced by D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu-Shi; Guo, Juan; Hu, Kun; Gao, Yong-Qing; Xie, Bi-Jun; Sun, Zhi-Da; Yang, Er-Ning; Hou, Fang-Li

    2016-02-01

    This study mainly investigated the ameliorative effect of lotus seedpod proanthocyanidins (LSPC) and the mechanism underlying such effect on cognitive impairment and brain aging induced by d-galactose. Aging mice induced by d-galactose (150 mg/kg, sc injection daily for 6 weeks) were chosen for the experiment. LSPCs (30, 60, and 90 mg/kg, ig) were provided after d-galactose injection. Learning and memory functions were detected by Y-maze and step-down avoidance tests. Then, some biochemical indexes related to cognitive ability and aging were measured. Histopathological feature and P53 protein expression in the hippocampus were observed. Results showed that the three different doses of LSPC could significantly ameliorate the learning and memory abilities impaired by d-galactose. LSPC significantly reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide (i.e. 90 mg/kg LSPC group vs. model group, P=0.008), reduced the content of β-amyloid peptide 1-42 (i.e. 90 mg/kg LSPC group vs. model group, P=0.009), decreased the activities of acetylcholinesterase, monoamine oxidase B, total nitric oxide synthase (i.e. 90 mg/kg LSPC group vs. model group, P=0.006), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase and synchronously increased the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the brain. Furthermore, LSPC could prevent neuron damage and could lessen the expression of P53 protein in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrated that LSPC effectively attenuated cognitive damage and improved parameters related to brain aging in senescent mice induced by d-galactose, and may be used to treat Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26657492

  15. Ameliorative effect of lotus seedpod proanthocyanidins on cognitive impairment and brain aging induced by D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu-Shi; Guo, Juan; Hu, Kun; Gao, Yong-Qing; Xie, Bi-Jun; Sun, Zhi-Da; Yang, Er-Ning; Hou, Fang-Li

    2016-02-01

    This study mainly investigated the ameliorative effect of lotus seedpod proanthocyanidins (LSPC) and the mechanism underlying such effect on cognitive impairment and brain aging induced by d-galactose. Aging mice induced by d-galactose (150 mg/kg, sc injection daily for 6 weeks) were chosen for the experiment. LSPCs (30, 60, and 90 mg/kg, ig) were provided after d-galactose injection. Learning and memory functions were detected by Y-maze and step-down avoidance tests. Then, some biochemical indexes related to cognitive ability and aging were measured. Histopathological feature and P53 protein expression in the hippocampus were observed. Results showed that the three different doses of LSPC could significantly ameliorate the learning and memory abilities impaired by d-galactose. LSPC significantly reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide (i.e. 90 mg/kg LSPC group vs. model group, P=0.008), reduced the content of β-amyloid peptide 1-42 (i.e. 90 mg/kg LSPC group vs. model group, P=0.009), decreased the activities of acetylcholinesterase, monoamine oxidase B, total nitric oxide synthase (i.e. 90 mg/kg LSPC group vs. model group, P=0.006), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase and synchronously increased the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the brain. Furthermore, LSPC could prevent neuron damage and could lessen the expression of P53 protein in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrated that LSPC effectively attenuated cognitive damage and improved parameters related to brain aging in senescent mice induced by d-galactose, and may be used to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  16. The level of galactose-deficient IgA1 in the sera of patients with IgA nephropathy is associated with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Hou, Ping; Lv, Jicheng; Moldoveanu, Zina; Li, Yifu; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali G; Novak, Jan; Zhang, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Although high serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 (an important biomarker of IgA nephropathy (IgAN)) are found in most patients with IgAN, their relationship to disease severity and progression remains unclear. To help clarify this we prospectively enrolled 275 patients with IgAN and followed them for a median of 47 months (range 12-96 months). Serum galactose-deficient IgA1 was measured at the time of diagnosis using a lectin-based ELISA, and renal survival was modeled using the Cox proportional hazards method. The serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 were higher in patients with IgAN compared to those in healthy controls. Importantly, in adjusted analysis, higher levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 were independently associated with a greater risk of deterioration in renal function with a hazard ratio of 1.44 per standard deviation of the natural log-transformed galactose-deficient IgA1 concentration. In reference to the first quartile, the risk of kidney failure increased such that the hazard ratio for the second quartile was 2.47, 3.86 for the third, and 4.76 for the fourth quartile of the galactose-deficient IgA1 concentration. Hence, elevated serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 are associated with a poor prognosis in IgAN.

  17. 2-deoxygalactose, a specific substrate of the Salmonella typhiimurium galactose permease: its use for the isolation of galP mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Nagelkerke, F; Postma, P W

    1978-01-01

    2-Deoxygalactose is a specific substrate of the galactose permease. The apparent Km is about 500 micron, compared to 45 micron for galactose, whereas the maximal rate of uptake is one-half to one-third of that of galactose. None of the other galactose transport systems, including methyl beta-D-thiogalactosides I and II, the beta-methyl-galactoside permease, and both arabinose systems, is able to catalyze transport of 2-deoxygalactose to a significant extent. 2-Deoxygalactose can also be used to isolate mutants defective in galactose permease, since it is bacteriostatic. Colonies that grow with lactate, malate, or succinate as a carbon source in the presence of 0.5 to 2 mM 2-doexygalactose were found to be mostly galP mutants, lacking galactose permease. Spontaneous 2-deoxygalactose-resistant strains arose with a frequency of about 2 X 10(-6). galP mutants have also been derived from pts deletion mutants that require galactose permease for growth on glucose. Revertants have been obtained that have acquired the parental phenotype. PMID:342498

  18. Characterization of a F280N variant of L-arabinose isomerase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans identified as a D-galactose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek-Joong; Hong, Seung-Hye; Shin, Kyung-Chul; Jo, Ye-Seul; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2014-11-01

    The double-site variant (C450S-N475K) L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose to D-tagatose, a functional sweetener. Using a substrate-docking homology model, the residues near to D-galactose O6 were identified as Met186, Phe280, and Ile371. Several variants obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of these three residues were analyzed, and a triple-site (F280N) variant enzyme exhibited the highest activity for D-galactose isomerization. The k cat/K m of the triple-site variant enzyme for D-galactose was 2.1-fold higher than for L-arabinose, whereas the k cat/K m of the double-site variant enzyme for L-arabinose was 43.9-fold higher than for D-galactose. These results suggest that the triple-site variant enzyme is a D-galactose isomerase. The conversion rate of D-galactose to D-tagatose by the triple-site variant enzyme was approximately 3-fold higher than that of the double-site variant enzyme for 30 min. However, the conversion yields of L-arabinose to L-ribulose by the triple-site and double-site variant enzymes were 10.6 and 16.0 % after 20 min, respectively. The triple-site variant enzyme exhibited increased specific activity, turnover number, catalytic efficiency, and conversion rate for D-galactose isomerization compared to the double-site variant enzyme. Therefore, the amino acid at position 280 determines the substrate specificity for D-galactose and L-arabinose, and the triple-site variant enzyme has the potential to produce D-tagatose on an industrial scale.

  19. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of D-Galactose-6-Phosphate Isomerase Complexed with Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26), which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD), catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi). Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays. PMID:24015281

  20. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of D-galactose-6-phosphate isomerase complexed with substrates.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Suk; Singh, Raushan Kumar; Lee, Jung-Kul; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26), which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD), catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi). Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a galactose-specific lectin from Dolichos lablab

    PubMed Central

    Lavanya Latha, V.; Kulkarni, Kiran A.; Nagender Rao, R.; Siva Kumar, N.; Suguna, K.

    2006-01-01

    The galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of Dolichos lablab has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.99, b = 84.13, c = 93.15 Å, α = 89.92, β = 76.01, γ = 76.99°. X-ray diffraction data to a resolution of 3.0 Å have been collected under cryoconditions (100 K) using a MAR imaging-plate detector system mounted on a rotating-anode X-ray generator. Molecular-replacement calculations carried out using the available structures of legume lectins as search models revealed that the galactose-specific lectin from D. lablab forms a tetramer similar to soybean agglutinin; two such tetramers are present in the asymmetric unit. PMID:16511291

  2. Protective effect of tetrahydropalmatine against d-galactose induced memory impairment in rat.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhuo; Zhang, Jingze; Yang, Honggai; Huo, Liqin; Gao, Jing; Chen, Hong; Gao, Wenyuan

    2016-02-01

    Aging is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), cardiovascular disease and cancer. Oxidative stress is considered as a major factor that accelerates the aging process. d-galactose (d-gal), a reducing sugar, induces oxidative stress resulting in alteration in mitochondrial dynamics and apoptosis of neurons. To understand the ability of tetrahydropalmatine (THP) to ameliorate memory impairment caused by aging, we investigated the effect of THP on d-gal induced memory impairment in rats. Subcutaneous injection of d-gal (100mg/kg/d) for 8weeks caused memory loss as detected by the Morris water maze and morphologic abnormalities of neurons in the hippocampus regions and cortex of rat brain. THP treatment ameliorated d-gal induced memory impairment associated with the decrease of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) contents, as well as the increase of glutathione (GSH) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. THP treatment was also found to reverse the abnormality of acetylcholine (ACh) levels and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities. In addition, treatment with THP could decrease the expression of nuclear factor κ (NF-κB) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) which prevented the neuroinflammation and memory impairment in the d-gal treated rats. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrated that subcutaneous injection of d-gal produced memory deficits, meanwhile THP could protect neuron from d-gal insults and improve cognition. This study provided an experimental basis for clinical application of THP in AD therapy. PMID:26592138

  3. Systematic capsule gene disruption reveals the central role of galactose metabolism on Cryptococcus neoformans virulence.

    PubMed

    Moyrand, Frédérique; Fontaine, Thierry; Janbon, Guilhem

    2007-05-01

    The polysaccharidic capsule is the main virulence factor of Cryptococcus neoformans. It primarily comprised of two polysaccharides: glucuronoxylomannan (GXM, 88% of the capsule mass) and galactoxylomannan (GalXM, 7% of the capsule mass). We constructed a large collection of mutant strains in which genes potentially involved in capsule biosynthesis were deleted. We used a new post-genomic approach to study the virulence of the strains. Primers specific for unique tags associated with the disruption cassette were used in a real-time PCR virulence assay to measure the fungal burden of each strain in different organs of mice in multi-infection experiments. With this very sensitive assay, we identified a putative UDP-glucose epimerase (Uge1p) and a putative UDP-galactose transporter (Ugt1p) essential for C. neoformans virulence. The uge1Delta and ugt1Delta strains are temperature sensitive and do not produce GalXM but synthesize a larger capsule. These mutant strains (GalXM negative, GXM positive) are not able to colonize the brain even at the first day of infection whereas GXM-negative strains (GalXM positive) can still colonize the brain, although less efficiently than the wild-type strain.

  4. UDP-galactose and acetyl-CoA transporters as Plasmodium multidrug resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Michelle Yi-Xiu; LaMonte, Gregory; Lee, Marcus C S; Reimer, Christin; Tan, Bee Huat; Corey, Victoria; Tjahjadi, Bianca F; Chua, Adeline; Nachon, Marie; Wintjens, René; Gedeck, Peter; Malleret, Benoit; Renia, Laurent; Bonamy, Ghislain M C; Ho, Paul Chi-Lui; Yeung, Bryan K S; Chow, Eric D; Lim, Liting; Fidock, David A; Diagana, Thierry T; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Bifani, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A molecular understanding of drug resistance mechanisms enables surveillance of the effectiveness of new antimicrobial therapies during development and deployment in the field. We used conventional drug resistance selection as well as a regime of limiting dilution at early stages of drug treatment to probe two antimalarial imidazolopiperazines, KAF156 and GNF179. The latter approach permits the isolation of low-fitness mutants that might otherwise be out-competed during selection. Whole-genome sequencing of 24 independently derived resistant Plasmodium falciparum clones revealed four parasites with mutations in the known cyclic amine resistance locus (pfcarl) and a further 20 with mutations in two previously unreported P. falciparum drug resistance genes, an acetyl-CoA transporter (pfact) and a UDP-galactose transporter (pfugt). Mutations were validated both in vitro by CRISPR editing in P. falciparum and in vivo by evolution of resistant Plasmodium berghei mutants. Both PfACT and PfUGT were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by fluorescence microscopy. As mutations in pfact and pfugt conveyed resistance against additional unrelated chemical scaffolds, these genes are probably involved in broad mechanisms of antimalarial drug resistance. PMID:27642791

  5. The yeast galactose network as a quantitative model for cellular memory

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, Sarah R.; Landry, Christian R.; Rifkin, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed surprising behavior in the yeast galactose (GAL) pathway, one of the preeminent systems for studying gene regulation. Under certain circumstances, yeast cells display memory of their prior nutrient environments. We distinguish two kinds of cellular memory discovered by quantitative investigations of the GAL network and present a conceptual framework for interpreting new experiments and current ideas on GAL memory. Reinduction memory occurs when cells respond transcriptionally to one environment, shut down the response during several generations in a second environment, then respond faster and with less cell-to-cell variation when returned to the first environment. Persistent memory describes a long-term, arguably stable response in which cells adopt a bimodal or unimodal distribution of induction levels depending on their preceding environment. Deep knowledge of how the yeast GAL pathway responds to different sugar environments has enabled rapid progress in uncovering the mechanisms behind GAL memory, which include cytoplasmic inheritance of inducer proteins and positive feedback loops among regulatory genes. This network of genes, long used to study gene regulation, is now emerging as a model system for cellular memory. PMID:25328105

  6. UDP-galactose and acetyl-CoA transporters as Plasmodium multidrug resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Michelle Yi-Xiu; LaMonte, Gregory; Lee, Marcus C S; Reimer, Christin; Tan, Bee Huat; Corey, Victoria; Tjahjadi, Bianca F; Chua, Adeline; Nachon, Marie; Wintjens, René; Gedeck, Peter; Malleret, Benoit; Renia, Laurent; Bonamy, Ghislain M C; Ho, Paul Chi-Lui; Yeung, Bryan K S; Chow, Eric D; Lim, Liting; Fidock, David A; Diagana, Thierry T; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Bifani, Pablo

    2016-09-19

    A molecular understanding of drug resistance mechanisms enables surveillance of the effectiveness of new antimicrobial therapies during development and deployment in the field. We used conventional drug resistance selection as well as a regime of limiting dilution at early stages of drug treatment to probe two antimalarial imidazolopiperazines, KAF156 and GNF179. The latter approach permits the isolation of low-fitness mutants that might otherwise be out-competed during selection. Whole-genome sequencing of 24 independently derived resistant Plasmodium falciparum clones revealed four parasites with mutations in the known cyclic amine resistance locus (pfcarl) and a further 20 with mutations in two previously unreported P. falciparum drug resistance genes, an acetyl-CoA transporter (pfact) and a UDP-galactose transporter (pfugt). Mutations were validated both in vitro by CRISPR editing in P. falciparum and in vivo by evolution of resistant Plasmodium berghei mutants. Both PfACT and PfUGT were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by fluorescence microscopy. As mutations in pfact and pfugt conveyed resistance against additional unrelated chemical scaffolds, these genes are probably involved in broad mechanisms of antimalarial drug resistance.

  7. Enzymatic generation of galactose-rich oligosaccharides/oligomers from potato rhamnogalacturonan I pectic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Khodaei, Nastaran; Karboune, Salwa

    2016-04-15

    Potato pulp by-product rich in galactan-rich rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I) was investigated as a new source of oligosaccharides with potential prebiotic properties. The efficiency of selected monocomponent enzymes and multi-enzymatic preparations to generate oligosaccharides/oligomers from potato RG I was evaluated. These overall results of yield were dependent on the activity profile of the multi-enzymatic preparations. Highest oligo-RG I yield of 93.9% was achieved using multi-enzymatic preparation (Depol 670L) with higher hydrolytic activity toward side chains of RG I as compared to its backbone. Main oligo-RG I products were oligosaccharides with DP of 2-12 (79.8-100%), while the oligomers with DP of 13-70 comprised smaller proportion (0.0-20.2%). Galactose (58.9-91.2%, w/w) was the main monosaccharide of oligo-RG I, while arabinose represented 0.0-12.1%. An understanding of the relationship between the activity profile of multi-enzymatic preparations and the yield/DP of oligo-RG I was achieved. This is expected to provide the capability to generate galacto- and galacto(arabino) oligosaccharides and their corresponding oligomers from an abundant by-product. PMID:26616968

  8. Galactose-containing polysaccharides from the human pathogens Sporothrix schenckii and Ceratocystis stenoceras.

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça-Previato, L; Gorin, P A; Travassos, L R

    1980-01-01

    Galactose-containing polysaccharides from three strains of Sporothrix schenckii and one strain of Ceratocystis stenoceras were isolated, and their structures were paritally characterized by chemical analysis and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C-NMR). S. schenckii polysaccharide preparations from all strains were not precipitated by Fehling solution and contained galactomannan (or a mixture of galactan and galactomannan), amylose, and minor amounts of rhamnomannan. C. stenoceras polysaccharide contained galactomannan and a smaller proportion of amylose. Conventional chemical techniques and 13C-NMR spectroscopy showed that the structures of the two preparations were closely related. The core of the galactomannan consisted principally of nonreducing end units and 2-O-, 2,6-di-O-, and perhaps 2,3-di-O-substituted alpha-D-mannopyranosyl units. The core was substituted by beta-D-galactofuranosyl chains; the units are interlinked (1 leads to 6). 13C-NMR evidence shows that the alpha-D-mannopyranosyl units are substituted in the two positions by the beta-D-galactofuranosyl residues. Galactomannans present at the cell surface of S. schenckii represent other potential fungal antigens in addition to the already recognized rhamnomannans and their peptide complexes. PMID:7429638

  9. Steady state recycling chromatography with an integrated solvent removal unit - separation of glucose and galactose.

    PubMed

    Hellstén, Sanna; Siitonen, Jani; Mänttäri, Mika; Sainio, Tuomo

    2012-08-17

    A process concept where a solvent removal unit is integrated to a steady-state recycling chromatography process (SSR-SR) offers a possibility to significantly increase the performance of single column chromatographic separation. The advantages of solvent removal for a difficult separation task at conditions typical for industrial scale chromatography were demonstrated by investigating the performance of SSR-SR in separation of glucose and galactose. Two limits for the extent of solvent removal were imposed: maximum total concentration of the solution fed into the column (viscosity limit) and the maximum total concentration achievable in the solvent removal unit (solubility or osmotic pressure limit). The process was optimized using numerical simulation. Three SSR-SR configurations with different positions of the solvent removal unit were compared with (1) the conventional batch process, (2) SSR without solvent removal, and (3) batch process with solvent removal. SSR-SR was found to always improve the productivity. In addition, solvent removal reduced eluent consumption in most cases. The concentration limits and the concentration of the fresh feed were shown to determine which SSR-SR configuration yields the best performance.

  10. Antiaging Effect of Inula britannica on Aging Mouse Model Induced by D-Galactose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Long, Yuanyuan; Guo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The antiaging effect of Inula britannica flower total flavonoids (IBFTF) on aging mice induced by D-galactose and its mechanism was examined in this study. From the results, the biochemical indexes and histological analysis of skin tissues showed that IBFTF could effectively improve the antioxidant enzyme activity of the aging mice, enhance the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) of skin tissue, and decrease the malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Besides, IBFTF could maintain the skin collagen, hydroxyproline (Hyp), dermal thickness, and moisture content. Meanwhile, IBFTF could significantly reduce the number of cells arrested in G0/G1 phase, and from the point of view of protein and mRNA expression level in skin tissue, IBFTF could significantly increase the expression of Sirt1 and CyclinD1 but decrease the expression of p16 and p21, and its effect was not less than that of the well-known vitamin E (VE). Overall, these results seem to be implying that IBFTF is a potential natural anti-skin aging agent with great antioxidant ability. PMID:27066100

  11. Blueberry treatment decreased D-galactose-induced oxidative stress and brain damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Jale; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Aydın, A Fatih; Betül-Kalaz, Esra; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Uysal, Müjdat

    2015-06-01

    D-galactose (GAL) causes aging-related changes and oxidative stress in the organism. We investigated the effect of whole fresh blueberry (BB) (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) treatment on oxidative stress in age-related brain damage model. Rats received GAL (300 mg/kg; s.c.; 5 days per week) alone or together with 5 % (BB1) and 10 % (BB2) BB containing chow for two months. Malondialdehyde (MDA),protein carbonyl (PC) and glutathione (GSH) levels, and Cu Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities as well as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were determined. Expressions of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were also evaluated in the brain by immunohistochemistry. MDA and PC levels and AChE activity increased, but GSH levels, SOD and GSH-Px activities decreased together with histopathological structural damage in the brain of GAL-treated rats. BB treatments, especially BB2 reduced MDA and PC levels and AChE activity and elevated GSH levels and GSH-Px activity. BB1 and BB2 treatments diminished apoptosis and ameliorated histopathological findings in the brain of GAL-treated rats. These results indicate that BB partially prevented the shift towards an imbalanced prooxidative status and apoptosis together with histopathological amelioration by acting as an antioxidant (radical scavenger) itself in GAL-treated rats.

  12. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Coated with Galactose-Carrying Polymer for Hepatocyte Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Mi Kyong; Kim, In Yong; Kim, Eun Mi; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Akaike, Toshihiro; Cho, Chong Su

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to develop the functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) demonstrating the capacities to be delivered in liver specifically and to be dispersed in physiological environment stably. For this purpose, SPIONs were coated with polyvinylbenzyl-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-D-gluconamide (PVLA) having galactose moieties to be recognized by asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R) on hepatocytes. For use as a control, we also prepared SPIONs coordinated with 2-pyrrolidone. The sizes, size distribution, structure, and coating of the nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electrophoretic light scattering spectrophotometer (ELS), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), respectively. Intracellular uptake of the PVLA-coated SPIONs was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and their hepatocyte-specific delivery was also investigated through magnetic resonance (MR) images of rat liver. MRI experimental results indicated that the PVLA-coated SPIONs possess the more specific accumulation property in liver compared with control, which suggests their potential utility as liver-targeting MRI contrast agent. PMID:18317519

  13. The Prototypical H+/Galactose Symporter GalP Assembles into Functional Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongjin; Taraska, Justin; Merz, Alexey J.; Gonen, Tamir

    2010-01-01

    Glucose is a primary source of energy for human cells. Glucose transporters form specialized membrane channels for the transport of sugars into and out of cells. Galactose permease (GalP) is the closest bacterial homolog of human facilitated glucose transporters. Here, we report the functional reconstitution and 2D crystallization of GalP. Single particle electron microscopy analysis of purified GalP shows that the protein assembles as an oligomer with three distinct densities. Reconstitution assays yield 2D GalP crystals that exhibit a hexagonal array having p3 symmetry. The projection structure of GalP at 18 Å resolution shows that the protein is trimeric. Each monomer in the trimer forms its own channel, but an additional cavity (10~15 Å in diameter) is apparent at the 3-fold axis of the oligomer. We show that the crystalline GalP is able to selectively bind substrate, suggesting that the trimeric form is biologically active. PMID:20006622

  14. Ferulic acid ameliorates memory impairment in d-galactose-induced aging mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Honggai; Qu, Zhuo; Zhang, Jingze; Huo, Liqin; Gao, Jing; Gao, Wenyuan

    2016-11-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) acts as a powerful antioxidant against various age-related diseases. To investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of FA against d-galactose(d-gal)-induced memory deficit, mice were injected with d-gal to induce memory impairment and simultaneously treated with FA and donepezil. The behavioral results revealed that chronic FA treatment reversed d-gal-induced memory impairment. Further, FA treatment inhibited d-gal-induced AChE activity and oxidative stress via increase of superoxide dismutase activity and reduced glutathione content, as well as decrease of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels. We also observed that FA significantly inhibits inflammation in the brain through reduction of NF-κB and IL-1β by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, FA treatment significantly reduces the caspase-3 level in the hippocampus of d-gal-treated mice. Hematoxylin and eosin and Nissl staining showed that FA prevents neurodegeneration induced by d-gal. These findings showed that FA inhibits d-gal-induced AChE activity, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, and consequently ameliorates memory impairment.

  15. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L.; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants. PMID:27005423

  16. Antiaging Effect of Inula britannica on Aging Mouse Model Induced by D-Galactose

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Long, Yuanyuan; Guo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The antiaging effect of Inula britannica flower total flavonoids (IBFTF) on aging mice induced by D-galactose and its mechanism was examined in this study. From the results, the biochemical indexes and histological analysis of skin tissues showed that IBFTF could effectively improve the antioxidant enzyme activity of the aging mice, enhance the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) of skin tissue, and decrease the malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Besides, IBFTF could maintain the skin collagen, hydroxyproline (Hyp), dermal thickness, and moisture content. Meanwhile, IBFTF could significantly reduce the number of cells arrested in G0/G1 phase, and from the point of view of protein and mRNA expression level in skin tissue, IBFTF could significantly increase the expression of Sirt1 and CyclinD1 but decrease the expression of p16 and p21, and its effect was not less than that of the well-known vitamin E (VE). Overall, these results seem to be implying that IBFTF is a potential natural anti-skin aging agent with great antioxidant ability. PMID:27066100

  17. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-like phenotypes in the d-galactose-induced aging mouse model.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hun; Choi, Tae-Saeng

    2012-11-01

    The D-galactose (D-gal)-induced animal model, which is established by consecutive subcutaneous d-gal injections for approximately 6weeks, has been frequently used for aging research. This animal model has been shown to accelerate aging of the brain, kidneys, liver, and blood cells. However, aging of the female reproductive organs in this animal model has not been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the ovary in the d-gal-induced aging mouse model. First, we evaluated anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) as a marker of ovarian aging in blood plasma. We speculated there would be lower AMH levels in d-gal-treated mice because ovarian aging would be induced by d-gal, as reported for other tissues. However, the results showed that AMH levels in d-gal-treated mice were approximately four-fold higher than control mice. Abnormally high AMH levels are detected in ovarian cancer and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients. Therefore, we examined PCOS-related markers in this mouse model. Total testosterone levels were high and abnormal estrous cycles were induced in d-gal-treated mice. These changes, including AMH levels, in d-gal-treated mice were inhibited by aminoguanidine treatment, an advanced glycation end product reducer. In addition, ovarian cysts were observed in some d-gal-treated mice. These results indicate that with respect to female reproduction, d-gal-treated mice are suitable for PCOS studies, rather than aging studies.

  18. Chronic administration of troxerutin protects mouse brain against D-galactose-induced impairment of cholinergic system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Hu, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Zheng, Yuan-Lin; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Ye, Qin; Fan, Shao-Hua; Shan, Qun; Wang, Yong-Jian

    2010-02-01

    Previous evidence showed that administration of d-galactose (d-gal) increased ROS production and resulted in impairment of cholinergic system. Troxerutin, a natural bioflavonoid, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of troxerutin against d-gal-induced impairment of cholinergic system, and explored the potential mechanism of its action. Our results displayed that troxerutin administration significantly improved behavioral performance of d-gal-treated mice in step-through test and morris water maze task. One of the potential mechanisms of this action was decreased AGEs, ROS and protein carbonyl levels in the basal forebrain, hippocampus and front cortex of d-gal-treated mice. Furthermore, our results also showed that troxerutin significantly inhibited cholinesterase (AchE) activity, increased the expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (nAchRalpha7) and enhanced interactions between nAchRalpha7 and either postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors subunit 1 (NMDAR1) in the basal forebrain, hippocampus and front cortex of d-gal-treated mice, which could help restore impairment of brain function.

  19. Effect of galactose on acid induced molten globule state of Soybean Agglutinin: Biophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez; Naseem, Farha; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In the present study the formation of molten globule-like unfolding intermediate Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) in acidic pH range has been established with the help of acrylamide quenching, intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence measurement, far UV CD and dynamic light scattering measurement. A marked increase in ANS fluorescence was observed at pH 2.2. Ksv of acrylamide quenching was found to be higher at pH 2.2 than that of native SBA at pH 7. Far UV CD spectra of pH induced state suggest that SBA shows significant retention of secondary structure closure to native. Hydrodynamic radius of SBA at pH 2.2 was found be more as compared to native state and also in other pH induced states. Further we checked the effect of galactose on the molten globule state of SBA. This study suggests that SBA exist as molten globule at pH 2.2 and this study will help in acid induced molten globule state of other proteins.

  20. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  1. Preliminary crystallographic study of the alpha-D-galactose-specific lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integra) seeds.

    PubMed

    Basu, D; Delucas, L; Parks, E H; Suddath, F L

    1988-06-01

    Crystals of the alpha-D-galactose-specific lectin from Jack fruit (Artocarpus integra) have been obtained from polyethylene glycol 400 solutions. The crystals are orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2 with a = 77.09 A, b = 123.3 A and c = 78.73 A (1 A = 0.1 nm) and have one 39,500 Mr tetramer per asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to at least 2.8 A on precession photographs.

  2. Kinetics of color development, pH decreasing, and anti-oxidative activity reduction of Maillard reaction in galactose/glycine model systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shih-Chuan; Yang, Deng-Jye; Jin, Shu-Yi; Hsu, Chia-Hung; Chen, Su-Lin

    2008-05-15

    Galactose/glycine model systems of sugar concentration 0.035, 0.069, 0.139, and 0.278M were incubated at 60, 75, and 90°C separately for studying the reaction kinetics of color development, pH change, and system anti-oxidative activity change in Maillard reaction. The results indicated that system color development followed first-ordered kinetics on galactose concentration; system pH went linearly down with a logarithm-ordered kinetics on galactose concentration; and anti-oxidative activity reduced linearly with a first-ordered kinetics on galactose concentration. The values of Q10 and activation energy ranged from 1.98 to 2.00 and from 68.8 to 69.5kJ/mol, respectively, for these three properties. PMID:26059131

  3. Enhanced ethanol production from sugarcane juice by galactose adaptation of a newly isolated thermotolerant strain of Pichia kudriavzevii.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Sandeep Singh; Oberoi, Harinder Singh; Sandhu, Simranjeet Kaur; Nanda, Dhiraj; Kumar, Dinesh; Uppal, Satinder Kaur

    2011-05-01

    The thermotolerant yeast strain isolated from sugarcane juice through enrichment technique was identified as a strain of Pichiakudriavzevii (Issatchenkiaorientalis) through molecular characterization. The P. kudriavzevii cells adapted to galactose medium produced about 30% more ethanol from sugarcane juice than the non-adapted cells. The recycled cells could be used for four successive cycles without a significant drop in ethanol production. Fermentation in a laboratory fermenter with galactose adapted P. kudriavzevii cells at 40°C resulted in an ethanol concentration and productivity of 71.9 g L(-1) and 4.0 g L(-1)h(-1), respectively from sugarcane juice composed of about 14% (w/v) sucrose, 2% (w/v) glucose and 1% (w/v) fructose. In addition to ethanol, 3.30 g L(-1) arabitol and 4.19 g L(-1) glycerol were also produced, whereas sorbitol and xylitol were not formed during fermentation. Use of galactose adapted P. kudriavzevii cells for ethanol production from sugarcane juice holds potential for scale-up studies. PMID:21398115

  4. Production and characterisation of potato patatin-galactose, galactooligosaccharides, and galactan conjugates of great potential as functional ingredients.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sooyoun; Karboune, Salwa; Archelas, Alain

    2014-09-01

    Potato proteins are of high interest because of their high nutritional quality and multiple health benefits, but they are currently undervalued due to their limited solubility and stability. Glycated patatin (PTT) with galactose, galactooligosaccharides (GOSs) and galactan were produced through the Maillard reaction and characterised structurally and functionally. Fourier-transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy data revealed important changes in total secondary structures through glycation with GOSs (61.2%) and galactan (36.7%) and also significant tertiary structural changes leading to an exposure of tryptophan residues. These structural changes led to more heat stable forms of PTT with a higher unfolding temperature (70-90 °C) than the unmodified protein (50-70 °C) and with higher antioxidant activity. PTT:galactose conjugates exhibited similar thermal stability and pH-structural behaviour to native PTT. However, the high level of galactose conjugation to PTT and increased exposure of hydrophobic residues led to a significant increase in its emulsifying stability at pH 3. PMID:24731373

  5. Esculetin, a Coumarin Derivative, Inhibits Aldose Reductase Activity in vitro and Cataractogenesis in Galactose-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring coumarin compounds have received substantial attention due to their pharmaceutical effects. Esculetin is a coumarin derivative and a polyphenol compound that is used in a variety of therapeutic and pharmacological strategies. However, its effect on aldose reductase activity remains poorly understood. In this study, the potential beneficial effects of esculetin on lenticular aldose reductase were investigated in galactose-fed (GAL) rats, an animal model of sugar cataracts. Cataracts were induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats via a 50% galactose diet for 2 weeks, and groups of GAL rats were orally treated with esculetin (10 or 50 mg/kg body weight). In vehicle-treated GAL rats, lens opacification was observed, and swelling and membrane rupture of the lens fiber cells were increased. Additionally, aldose reductase was highly expressed in the lens epithelium and superficial cortical fibers during cataract development in the GAL rats. Esculetin reduced rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) activity in vitro, and esculetin treatment significantly inhibited lens opacity, as well as morphological alterations, such as swelling, vacuolation and liquefaction of lens fibers, via the inhibition of aldose reductase in the GAL rats. These results indicate that esculetin is a useful treatment for galactose-induced cataracts. PMID:26902086

  6. Esculetin, a Coumarin Derivative, Inhibits Aldose Reductase Activity in vitro and Cataractogenesis in Galactose-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring coumarin compounds have received substantial attention due to their pharmaceutical effects. Esculetin is a coumarin derivative and a polyphenol compound that is used in a variety of therapeutic and pharmacological strategies. However, its effect on aldose reductase activity remains poorly understood. In this study, the potential beneficialeffects of esculetin on lenticular aldose reductase were investigated in galactose-fed (GAL) rats, an animal model of sugar cataracts. Cataracts were induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats via a 50% galactose diet for 2 weeks, and groups of GAL rats were orally treated with esculetin (10 or 50 mg/kg body weight). In vehicle-treated GAL rats, lens opacificationwas observed, and swelling and membrane rupture of the lens fibercells were increased. Additionally, aldose reductase was highly expressed in the lens epithelium and superficialcortical fibersduring cataract development in the GAL rats. Esculetin reduced rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) activity in vitro, and esculetin treatment significanty inhibited lens opacity, as well as morphological alterations, such as swelling, vacuolation and liquefaction of lens fibers,via the inhibition of aldose reductase in the GAL rats. These results indicate that esculetin is a useful treatment for galactose-induced cataracts. PMID:26902086

  7. Minocycline ameliorates D-galactose-induced memory deficits and loss of Arc/Arg3.1 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Lu, Fen; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun; Sun, Xiao-Jing; Qin, Ling-Zhi; Zhang, Qian-Lin; Yao, Yong; Yu, Qing-Kai; Liang, Xin-Liang

    2016-10-01

    Dysfunction of learning and memory is widely found in many neurological diseases. Understanding how to preserve the normal function of learning and memory will be extremely beneficial for the treatment of these diseases. However, the possible protective effect of minocycline in memory impairment is unknown. We used the well-established D-galactose rat amnesia model and two behavioral tasks, the Morris water maze and the step-down task, for memory evaluation. Western blot and PCR were used to examine the protein and mRNA levels of Arc/Arg3.1. We report that minocycline supplementation ameliorates both the spatial and fear memory deficits caused by D-galactose. We also found that Arc/Arg3.1, c-fos, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels are decreased in the D-galactose animal model, and that minocycline reverses the protein and mRNA levels of Arc in the hippocampus, suggesting the potential role of Arc/Arg3.1 in minocycline's neuroprotective mechanism. Our study strongly suggests that minocycline can be used as a novel treatment for memory impairment in neurological diseases.

  8. Osmanthus fragrans Flower Extract and Acteoside Protect Against d-Galactose-Induced Aging in an ICR Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lina; Mao, Shuqin; Lu, Baiyi; Yang, Jiajia; Zhou, Fei; Hu, Yinzhou; Jiang, Yirong; Shen, Canxi; Zhao, Yajing

    2016-01-01

    Osmanthus fragrans flower extract (OFE) is an organic extract from O. fragrans flower, which exhibits neuroprotective, free radical scavenging, and antioxidant effects. Therefore, the protective effect of OFE and acteoside against aging was studied. An aging ICR mouse model was established by chronically administering d-galactose (250 mg/kg) for 8 weeks. d-galactose induced spatial learning and memory impairments that were successfully inhibited by OFE and acteoside, which could shorten escape latency, improve platform crossing times, and increase zone time. The antioxidant potential of OFE and acteoside in vivo was evaluated by estimating the following: activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase and aging-related enzyme, particularly monoamine oxidase; contents of lipid peroxidation methane dicarboxylic aldehyde, advanced glycation end products, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (a DNA damage product); and levels of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2. OFE and acteoside also inhibited d-galactose-induced neurological aging by suppressing the increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurotrophin-3. Considering the dose-dependent protective effects of OFE and acteoside, we concluded that OFE, rich in acteoside, was a good source of natural antiaging compounds.

  9. A galactose-binding lectin isolated from Aplysia kurodai (sea hare) eggs inhibits streptolysin-induced hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Watanabe, Miharu; Ishizaki, Naoto; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kawakami, Yasushi; Suzuki, Jun; Dogasaki, Chikaku; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Koide, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A; Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujii, Yuki; Iriko, Hideyuki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    A specific galactose-binding lectin was shown to inhibit the hemolytic effect of streptolysin O (SLO), an exotoxin produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Commercially available lectins that recognize N-acetyllactosamine (ECA), T-antigen (PNA), and Tn-antigen (ABA) agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes, but had no effect on SLO-induced hemolysis. In contrast, SLO-induced hemolysis was inhibited by AKL, a lectin purified from sea hare (Aplysia kurodai) eggs that recognizes α-galactoside oligosaccharides. This inhibitory effect was blocked by the co-presence of d-galactose, which binds to AKL. A possible explanation for these findings is that cholesterol-enriched microdomains containing glycosphingolipids in the erythrocyte membrane become occupied by tightly stacked lectin molecules, blocking the interaction between cholesterol and SLO that would otherwise result in penetration of the membrane. Growth of S. pyogenes was inhibited by lectins from a marine invertebrate (AKL) and a mushroom (ABA), but was promoted by a plant lectin (ECA). Both these inhibitory and promoting effects were blocked by co-presence of galactose in the culture medium. Our findings demonstrate the importance of glycans and lectins in regulating mechanisms of toxicity, creation of pores in the target cell membrane, and bacterial growth. PMID:25197935

  10. Substrate specificity of a galactose 6-phosphate isomerase from Lactococcus lactis that produces d-allose from d-psicose.

    PubMed

    Park, Ha-Young; Park, Chang-Su; Kim, Hye-Jung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2007-10-15

    We purified recombinant galactose 6-phosphate isomerase (LacAB) from Lactococcus lactis using HiTrap Q HP and Phenyl-Sepharose columns. The purified LacAB had a final specific activity of 1.79units/mg to produce d-allose. The molecular mass of native galactose 6-phosphate isomerase was estimated at 135.5kDa using Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration, and the enzyme exists as a hetero-octamer of LacA and LacB subunits. The activity of galactose 6-phosphate isomerase was maximal at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C, and enzyme activity was independent of metal ions. When 100g/L of d-psicose was used as the substrate, 25g/L of d-allose and 13g/L of d-altrose were simultaneously produced at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C after 12h of incubation. The enzyme had broad specificity for various aldoses and ketoses. The interconversion of sugars with the same configuration except at the C2 position was driven by using a large amount of enzyme in extended reactions. The interconversion occurred via two isomerization reactions, i.e., the interconversion of d-allose<-->d-psicose<-->d-altrose, and d-allose to d-psicose reaction was faster than d-altrose to d-psicose reaction.

  11. Isolation and characterization of acetic acid-tolerant galactose-fermenting strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from a spent sulfite liquor fermentation plant.

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, T; Peetre, J; Hahn-Hägerdal, B

    1992-01-01

    From a continuous spent sulfite liquor fermentation plant, two species of yeast were isolated, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia membranaefaciens. One of the isolates of S. cerevisiae, no. 3, was heavily flocculating and produced a higher ethanol yield from spent sulfite liquor than did commercial baker's yeast. The greatest difference between isolate 3 and baker's yeast was that of galactose fermentation, even when galactose utilization was induced, i.e., when they were grown in the presence of galactose, prior to fermentation. Without acetic acid present, both baker's yeast and isolate 3 fermented glucose and galactose sequentially. Galactose fermentation with baker's yeast was strongly inhibited by acetic acid at pH values below 6. Isolate 3 fermented galactose, glucose, and mannose without catabolite repression in the presence of acetic acid, even at pH 4.5. The xylose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21) and xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) activities were determined in some of the isolates as well as in two strains of S. cerevisiae (ATCC 24860 and baker's yeast) and Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. The S. cerevisiae strains manifested xylose reductase activity that was 2 orders of magnitude less than the corresponding P. stipitis value of 890 nmol/min/mg of protein. The xylose dehydrogenase activity was 1 order of magnitude less than the corresponding activity of P. stipitis (330 nmol/min/mg of protein). Images PMID:1622236

  12. Metabolism of D-galactose is dispensable for the induction of the beta-galactosidase (bgaD) and lactose permease (lacpA) genes in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Anita; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we analyze the expression of the Aspergillus nidulans bgaD-lacpA gene couple (encoding an intracellular beta-galactosidase and a lactose permease) in the presence of D-galactose. This monosaccharide can be catabolized via alternative, independent pathways in this model organism. The inductive capabilities of intermediates of the two alternative routes of D-galactose utilization were addressed in loss-of-function mutants defective in a defined step in one of the two pathways. In a galactokinase (galE9) mutant, the cluster is strongly induced by D-galactose, suggesting that formation of Leloir pathway intermediates is not required. The expression profiles of bgaD and lacpA were similar in wild type, L-arabinitol dehydrogenase (araA1), and hexokinase (hxkA1) negative backgrounds, indicating that intermediates of the oxido-reductive pathway downstream of galactitol are not necessary either. Furthermore, bgaD-lacpA transcription was not induced in any of the tested strains when galactitol was provided as the growth substrate. An hxkA1/galE9 double mutant cannot grow on d-galactose at all, but still produced bgaD and lacpA transcripts upon transfer to d-galactose. We therefore concluded that the physiological inducer of the bgaD-lacpA gene cluster upon growth on D-galactose is the nonmetabolized sugar itself.

  13. UDP-galactose transporter gene hUGT1 expression in tobacco plants leads to hyper-galactosylated cell wall components.

    PubMed

    Abedi, Tayebeh; Khalil, Mohamed Farouk Mohamed; Asai, Toshihiko; Ishihara, Nami; Kitamura, Kenji; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Nobukazu

    2016-05-01

    We reported previously that tobacco plants transformed with the human UDP-galactose transporter 1 gene (hUGT1-transgenic plants) displayed morphological, architectural, and physiological alterations, such as enhanced growth, increased accumulation of chlorophyll and lignin, and a gibberellin-responsive phenotype. In the present study, we demonstrated that hUGT1 expression altered the monosaccharide composition of cell wall matrix polysaccharides, such as pectic and hemicellulosic polysaccharides, which are biosynthesized in the Golgi lumen. An analysis of the monosaccharide composition of the cell wall matrix polysaccharides revealed that the ratio of galactose to total monosaccharides was significantly elevated in the hemicellulose II and pectin fractions of hUGT1-transgenic plants compared with that of control plants. A hyper-galactosylated xyloglucan structure was detected in hemicellulose II using oligosaccharide mass profiling. These results indicated that, because of the enhanced UDP-galactose transport from the cytosol to the Golgi apparatus by hUGT1, galactose incorporation in the cell wall matrix polysaccharides increased. This increased galactose incorporation may have contributed to increased galactose tolerance in hUGT1-transgenic plants.

  14. Effect of Regular Exercise on the Histochemical Changes of d-Galactose-Induced Oxidative Renal Injury in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sok; Kim, Chan-Sik; Lee, Jin; Suk Kim, Jung; Kim, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Renal lipid accumulation exhibits slowly developing chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased oxidative stress. The impact of exercise on the obese- and oxidative stress-related renal disease is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a high-fat diet (HFD) would accelerate d-galactose-induced aging process in rat kidney and to examine the preventive effect of regular exercise on the obese- and oxidative stress-related renal disease. Oxidative stress was induced by an administration of d-galactose (100 mg/kg intraperitoneally injected) for 9 weeks, and d-galactose-treated rats were also fed with a high-fat diet (60% kcal as fat) for 9 weeks to induce obesity. We investigated the efficacy of regular exercise in reducing renal injury by analyzing Nε-carboxymethyllysine (CML), 8-hydroxygluanine (8-OHdG) and apoptosis. When rats were fed with a HFD for 9 weeks in d-galactose-treated rats, an increased CML accumulation, oxidative DNA damage and renal podocyte loss were observed in renal glomerular cells and tubular epithelial cells. However, the regular exercise restored all these renal changes in HFD plus d-galactose-treated rats. Our data suggested that long-term HFD may accelerate the deposition of lipoxidation adducts and oxidative renal injury in d-galactose-treated rats. The regular exercise protects against obese- and oxidative stress-related renal injury by inhibiting this lipoxidation burden. PMID:24023395

  15. Conformational analysis of champedak galactose-binding lectin under different urea concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kameel, Nurul Iman Ahamed; Wong, Yin How; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Tayyab, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Conformational analysis of champedak galactose-binding (CGB) lectin under different urea concentrations was studied in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.2) using far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (far-UV CD), tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence and ANS fluorescence. In all cases, CGB lectin displayed a two-step, three-state transition. The first transition (from the native state to the intermediate state) started at ∼2.0 M urea and ended at ∼4.5 M urea, while the second transition (from the intermediate state to the completely denatured state) was characterized by the start- and end-points at ∼5.75 M and ∼7.5 M urea, respectively, when analyzed by the emission maximum of Trp fluorescence. A marked increase in the Trp fluorescence, ANS fluorescence and -CD values at 218 nm (-CD218 nm) represented the first transition, whereas a decrease in these parameters defined the second transition. On the other hand, emission maximum of the Trp fluorescence showed a continuous increase throughout the urea concentration range. Transformation of tetramer into monomer represented the first transition, whereas the second transition reflected the unfolding of monomer. Far-UV CD, Trp fluorescence and ANS fluorescence spectra were used to characterize the native, the intermediate and the completely denatured states of CGB lectin, obtained at 0.0 M, 5.0 M and 9.0 M urea, respectively. The intermediate state was characterized by the presence of higher secondary structures, increased ANS binding as well as increased Trp fluorescence intensity. A gradual decrease in the hemagglutination activity of CGB lectin was observed with increasing urea concentrations, showing complete loss at 4.0 M urea.

  16. Carnosine and taurine treatments diminished brain oxidative stress and apoptosis in D-galactose aging model.

    PubMed

    Aydın, A Fatih; Çoban, Jale; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Betül-Kalaz, Esra; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Uysal, Müjdat

    2016-04-01

    D-galactose (GAL) has been used as an animal model for brain aging and antiaging studies. GAL stimulates oxidative stress in several tissues including brain. Carnosine (CAR; β-alanil-L-histidine) and taurine (TAU; 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) exhibit antioxidant properties. CAR and TAU have anti-aging and neuroprotective effects. We investigated the effect of CAR and TAU supplementations on oxidative stress and brain damage in GAL-treated rats. Rats received GAL (300 mg/kg; s.c.; 5 days per week) alone or together with CAR (250 mg/kg/daily; i.p.; 5 days per week) or TAU (2.5% w/w; in rat chow) for 2 months. Brain malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC) and glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione transferase (GST) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were determined. Expressions of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were also evaluated in the brains by immunohistochemistry. GAL treatment increased brain MDA and PC levels and AChE activities. It decreased significantly brain GSH levels, SOD and GSH-Px but not GST activities. GAL treatment caused histopathological changes and increased apoptosis. CAR and TAU significantly reduced brain AChE activities, MDA and PC levels and elevated GSH levels in GAL-treated rats. CAR, but not TAU, significantly increased low activities of SOD and GSH-Px. Both CAR and TAU diminished apoptosis and ameliorated histopathological findings in the brain of GAL-treated rats. Our results indicate that CAR and TAU may be effective to prevent the development of oxidative stress, apoptosis and histopathological deterioration in the brain of GAL-treated rats. PMID:26518192

  17. Conformational analysis of champedak galactose-binding lectin under different urea concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kameel, Nurul Iman Ahamed; Wong, Yin How; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Tayyab, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Conformational analysis of champedak galactose-binding (CGB) lectin under different urea concentrations was studied in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.2) using far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (far-UV CD), tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence and ANS fluorescence. In all cases, CGB lectin displayed a two-step, three-state transition. The first transition (from the native state to the intermediate state) started at ∼2.0 M urea and ended at ∼4.5 M urea, while the second transition (from the intermediate state to the completely denatured state) was characterized by the start- and end-points at ∼5.75 M and ∼7.5 M urea, respectively, when analyzed by the emission maximum of Trp fluorescence. A marked increase in the Trp fluorescence, ANS fluorescence and -CD values at 218 nm (-CD218 nm) represented the first transition, whereas a decrease in these parameters defined the second transition. On the other hand, emission maximum of the Trp fluorescence showed a continuous increase throughout the urea concentration range. Transformation of tetramer into monomer represented the first transition, whereas the second transition reflected the unfolding of monomer. Far-UV CD, Trp fluorescence and ANS fluorescence spectra were used to characterize the native, the intermediate and the completely denatured states of CGB lectin, obtained at 0.0 M, 5.0 M and 9.0 M urea, respectively. The intermediate state was characterized by the presence of higher secondary structures, increased ANS binding as well as increased Trp fluorescence intensity. A gradual decrease in the hemagglutination activity of CGB lectin was observed with increasing urea concentrations, showing complete loss at 4.0 M urea. PMID:26642433

  18. Binding specificity of serum amyloid P component for the pyruvate acetal of galactose

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) is a normal plasma protein that is of interest because of its presence in amyloid deposits, its presence in normal human glomerular basement membrane, and its stable evolutionary conservation. It has calcium-dependent ligand-binding specificity for amyloid fibrils, fibronectin (Fn), C4-binding protein (C4bp), and agarose. Although the binding to agarose, a linear galactan hydrocolloid derived from some marine algae, is unlikely per se to be related to the physiological function of SAP, it does provide a model system in which to explore the precise ligand requirements of SAP. We report here that the amount of SAP from human, mouse, and plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) serum able to bind to agarose from different sources reflect precisely their pyruvate content. Methylation with diazomethane of the carboxyl groups in the pyruvate moiety of agarose completely abolishes SAP binding to agarose. The pyruvate in agarose exists as the 4,6-pyruvate acetal of beta-D-galactopyranose. We have therefore synthesized this galactoside, using a novel procedure, established its structure by analysis of its nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and shown that it completely inhibits all known calcium- dependent binding reactions of SAP. The R isomer of the cyclic acetal, methyl 4,6-O-(1-carboxyethylidene)-beta-D-galactopyranoside (MO beta DG) was effective at millimolar concentration and was more potent than its noncyclic analogue, while pyruvate, D-galactose, and methyl beta-D- galactopyranoside were without effect. The autologous protein ligands of SAP presumably, therefore express a structural determinant(s) that stereochemically resembles MO beta DG. Availability of this specific, well-characterized, low molecular weight ligand for SAP should facilitate further investigation of the function of SAP and its role in physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:6707579

  19. Carnosine and taurine treatments diminished brain oxidative stress and apoptosis in D-galactose aging model.

    PubMed

    Aydın, A Fatih; Çoban, Jale; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Betül-Kalaz, Esra; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Uysal, Müjdat

    2016-04-01

    D-galactose (GAL) has been used as an animal model for brain aging and antiaging studies. GAL stimulates oxidative stress in several tissues including brain. Carnosine (CAR; β-alanil-L-histidine) and taurine (TAU; 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) exhibit antioxidant properties. CAR and TAU have anti-aging and neuroprotective effects. We investigated the effect of CAR and TAU supplementations on oxidative stress and brain damage in GAL-treated rats. Rats received GAL (300 mg/kg; s.c.; 5 days per week) alone or together with CAR (250 mg/kg/daily; i.p.; 5 days per week) or TAU (2.5% w/w; in rat chow) for 2 months. Brain malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC) and glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione transferase (GST) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were determined. Expressions of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were also evaluated in the brains by immunohistochemistry. GAL treatment increased brain MDA and PC levels and AChE activities. It decreased significantly brain GSH levels, SOD and GSH-Px but not GST activities. GAL treatment caused histopathological changes and increased apoptosis. CAR and TAU significantly reduced brain AChE activities, MDA and PC levels and elevated GSH levels in GAL-treated rats. CAR, but not TAU, significantly increased low activities of SOD and GSH-Px. Both CAR and TAU diminished apoptosis and ameliorated histopathological findings in the brain of GAL-treated rats. Our results indicate that CAR and TAU may be effective to prevent the development of oxidative stress, apoptosis and histopathological deterioration in the brain of GAL-treated rats.

  20. Origins, distribution and expression of the Duarte-2 (D2) allele of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Amanda E.; Sanders, Rebecca D.; Garza, Kerry R.; McGaha, Lee Anne; Bean, Lora J. H.; Coffee, Bradford W.; Thomas, James W.; Cutler, David J.; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    Duarte galactosemia is a mild to asymptomatic condition that results from partial impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Patients with Duarte galactosemia demonstrate reduced GALT activity and carry one profoundly impaired GALT allele (G) along with a second, partially impaired GALT allele (Duarte-2, D2). Molecular studies reveal at least five sequence changes on D2 alleles: a p.N314D missense substitution, three intronic base changes and a 4 bp deletion in the 5′ proximal sequence. The four non-coding sequence changes are unique to D2. The p.N314D substitution, however, is not; it is found together with a silent polymorphism, p.L218(TTA), on functionally normal Duarte-1 alleles (D1, also called Los Angeles or LA alleles). The HapMap database reveals that p.N314D is a common human variant, and cross-species comparisons implicate D314 as the ancestral allele. The p.N314D substitution is also functionally neutral in mammalian cell and yeast expression studies. In contrast, the 4 bp 5′ deletion characteristic of D2 alleles appears to be functionally impaired in reporter gene transfection studies. Here we present allele-specific qRT–PCR evidence that D2 alleles express less mRNA in vivo than their wild-type counterparts; the difference is small but statistically significant. Furthermore, we characterize the prevalence of the 4 bp deletion in GG, NN and DG populations; the deletion appears exclusive to D2 alleles. Combined, these data strongly implicate the 4 bp 5′ deletion as a causal mutation in Duarte galactosemia and suggest that direct tests for this deletion, as proposed here, could enhance or supplant current tests, which define D2 alleles on the basis of the presence and absence of linked coding sequence polymorphisms. PMID:19224951

  1. Adipose stem cells' antagonism in glycosylation of D-galactose-induced skin aging of nude mice and its skin recovery function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiying; Wei, Shuyue; Xue, Xinxin; You, Yuntian; Ma, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to discuss adipose stem cells' (ASCs) antagonism in glycosylation of D-galactose-induced skin aging of nude mice and its skin recovery function; the study also aims to explore a new mechanism of anti-aging to provide clinical anti-aging therapy with new thoughts and methods. We selected 40 healthy specific pathogen-free (SPF) nude mice and divided them randomly into four groups which were: blank control group; D-galactose + phosphate buffer saline (PBS) group; D-galactose + ASCs treatment group; and D-galactose + aminoguanidine (AG) group. Results showed that the superoxide dismutase (SOD) level of mice in the D-galactose-induced model group (87.15 ± 4.95 U/g) decreased significantly compared with that of control group (146.21 ± 4.76 U/g), while malonaldehyde (MDA) level of mice in D-galactose induced model group (11.12 ± 2.08 nmol/mg) increased significantly compared with that of control group (5.46 ± 2.05 nmol/mg) (P <0.05); thus D-galactose induced sub-acutely aging mice models were duplicated successfully. Results also indicated that transplantation of ASCs could reverse expression of aging-related biomarkers such as MDA, SOD, and advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs); hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining showed that thickness of the dermis layer as well as the collagen content of mice in the D-galactose-induced model group increased significantly after ASC transplantation compared with that of control group. In addition, immunohistochemical assay showed that expression quantity of CD31 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of mice in the D-galactose-induced model group increased significantly after ASC transplantation compared with that of control group. In conclusion, ASCs can trace cell distribution successfully through bioluminescence, and they survive for a short time in the skin after transplantation, which provides a basis for the application of ASC transplantation in clinical practices. Moreover, ASCs can control

  2. Zoledronate derivatives as potential inhibitors of uridine diphosphate-galactose ceramide galactosyltransferase 8: A combined molecular docking and dynamic study.

    PubMed

    Pannuzzo, Giovanna; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Pannuzzo, Martina; Masman, Marcelo Fabricio; Avola, Rosanna; Cardile, Venera

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by deficiency of galactocerebrosidase activity that affects the myelin sheath of the nervous system, involving dysfunctional metabolism of sphingolipids. It has no cure. Because substrate inhibition therapy has been shown to be effective in some human lysosomal storage diseases, we hypothesize that a substrate inhibition therapeutic approach might be appropriate to allow correction of the imbalance between formation and breakdown of glycosphingolipids and to prevent pathological storage of psychosine. The enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of galactosylceramide and psychosine is uridine diphosphate-galactose ceramide galactosyltransferase (2-hydroxyacylsphingosine 1-β-galactosyltransferase; UGT8; EC 2.4.1.45), which catalyzes the transferring of galactose from uridine diphosphate-galactose to ceramide or sphingosine, an important step of the biosynthesis of galactosphingolipids. Because some bisphosphonates have been identified as selective galactosyltransferase inhibitors, we verify the binding affinity to a generated model of the enzyme UGT8 and investigate the molecular mechanisms of UGT8-ligand interactions of the bisphosphonate zoledronate by a multistep framework combining homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulations. From structural information on UGTs' active site stereochemistry, charge density, and access through the hydrophobic environment, the molecular docking procedure allowed us to identify zoledronate as a potential inhibitor of human ceramide galactosyltransferase. More importantly, zoledronate derivates were designed through computational modeling as putative new inhibitors. Experiments in vivo and in vitro have been planned to verify the possibility of using zoledronate and/or the newly identified inhibitors of UGT8 for a substrate inhibition therapy useful for treatment of Krabbe's disease and/or other lysosomal disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Identification of lysine 153 as a functionally important residue in UDP-galactose 4-epimerase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Swanson, B A; Frey, P A

    1993-12-01

    The role of lysine 153 in the action of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase from Escherichia coli has been investigated by site specific mutagenesis and kinetic and spectrophotometric analysis of the mutant enzymes. The crystal structure of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase shows that the binding of NAD+ to the coenzyme site includes the hydrogen bonded interaction of the epsilon-ammonium group of lysine 153 with the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups of the nicotinamide riboside. Mutation of this residue to methionine or alanine decreases the catalytic activity of the enzyme by a factor of more than 10(3). The NAD+ associated with the wild type enzyme is subject to UMP-dependent reduction by sugars such as glucose and arabinose, but the mutant proteins K153M and K153A are not reduced by sugars in the presence or absence of UMP. NAD+ associated with the wild type enzyme is also subject to UMP-dependent reduction by sodium cyanoborohydride. However, although the mutant proteins bind UMP very well, the rate at which NAD+ associated with them is reduced by sodium cyanoborohydride is almost insensitive to the presence of UMP. The purified wild type enzyme contains significant amounts of NADH bound to the coenzyme site; however, the purified mutants K153M and K153A contain very little NADH. We conclude that lysine 153 plays an important role in increasing the chemical reactivity of enzyme-bound NAD+ in the uridine nucleotide-dependent conformational change associated with reductive inactivation and the catalytic activity of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase.

  4. Ultra Fast and Sensitive Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Based Assay for Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase and Galactokinase Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([13C6]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [13C6]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4 ± 4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8 ± 0.47 (mean ± SD) µmol·(g Hgb) −1·hr−1. Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analzyed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  5. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test.

  6. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  7. Zoledronate derivatives as potential inhibitors of uridine diphosphate-galactose ceramide galactosyltransferase 8: A combined molecular docking and dynamic study.

    PubMed

    Pannuzzo, Giovanna; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Pannuzzo, Martina; Masman, Marcelo Fabricio; Avola, Rosanna; Cardile, Venera

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by deficiency of galactocerebrosidase activity that affects the myelin sheath of the nervous system, involving dysfunctional metabolism of sphingolipids. It has no cure. Because substrate inhibition therapy has been shown to be effective in some human lysosomal storage diseases, we hypothesize that a substrate inhibition therapeutic approach might be appropriate to allow correction of the imbalance between formation and breakdown of glycosphingolipids and to prevent pathological storage of psychosine. The enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of galactosylceramide and psychosine is uridine diphosphate-galactose ceramide galactosyltransferase (2-hydroxyacylsphingosine 1-β-galactosyltransferase; UGT8; EC 2.4.1.45), which catalyzes the transferring of galactose from uridine diphosphate-galactose to ceramide or sphingosine, an important step of the biosynthesis of galactosphingolipids. Because some bisphosphonates have been identified as selective galactosyltransferase inhibitors, we verify the binding affinity to a generated model of the enzyme UGT8 and investigate the molecular mechanisms of UGT8-ligand interactions of the bisphosphonate zoledronate by a multistep framework combining homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulations. From structural information on UGTs' active site stereochemistry, charge density, and access through the hydrophobic environment, the molecular docking procedure allowed us to identify zoledronate as a potential inhibitor of human ceramide galactosyltransferase. More importantly, zoledronate derivates were designed through computational modeling as putative new inhibitors. Experiments in vivo and in vitro have been planned to verify the possibility of using zoledronate and/or the newly identified inhibitors of UGT8 for a substrate inhibition therapy useful for treatment of Krabbe's disease and/or other lysosomal disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  8. Expression of frutalin, an alpha-D-galactose-binding jacalin-related lectin, in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Felix, Wagner; Moreira, Renato A; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2008-08-01

    Frutalin is an alpha-D-galactose-binding lectin expressed in breadfruit seeds. Its isolation from plant is time-consuming and results in a heterogeneous mixture of different lectin isoforms. In order to improve and facilitate the availability of the breadfruit lectin, we cloned an optimised codifying frutalin mature sequence into the pPICZalphaA expression vector. This expression vector, designed for protein expression in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, contains the Saccharomyces alpha-factor preprosequence to direct recombinant proteins into the secretory pathway. Soluble recombinant frutalin was detected in the culture supernatants and recognised by native frutalin antibody. Approximately 18-20 mg of recombinant lectin per litre medium was obtained from a typical small scale methanol-induced culture purified by size-exclusion chromatography. SDS-PAGE and Edman degradation analysis revealed that frutalin was expressed as a single chain protein since the four amino-acid linker peptide "T-S-S-N", which connects alpha and beta chains, was not cleaved. In addition, incomplete processing of the signal sequence resulted in recombinant frutalin with one Glu-Ala N-terminal repeat derived from the alpha-factor prosequence. Endoglycosidase treatment and SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the recombinant frutalin was partly N-glycosylated. Further characterisation of the recombinant lectin revealed that it specifically binds to the monosaccharide Me-alpha-galactose presenting, nevertheless, lesser affinity than the native frutalin. Recombinant frutalin eluted from a size-exclusion chromatography column with a molecular mass of about 62-64 kDa, suggesting a tetrameric structure, however it did not agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes as native frutalin does. This work shows that the galactose-binding jacalin-related lectins four amino-acid linker peptide "T-S-S-N" does not undergo any proteolytic cleavage in the yeast P. pastoris and also that linker cleavage might not be

  9. Snapshots of a metamorphosing Cu(II) ground state in a galactose oxidase-inspired complex.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Russell C; Mirica, Liviu M; Stack, T Daniel P

    2004-12-13

    The novel ligand 2,6-bis[S-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)sulfanylmethyl]pyridine (H(2)L1) and its copper(II) complex Cu(L1), 1, were synthesized with the aim of constructing a model of the active site of the enzyme galactose oxidase (GOase). Cyclic voltammetry studies show that 1 undergoes ligand-based quasi-reversible oxidations (phenolate/phenoxyl) and reversible metal-based reduction [copper(II)/copper(I)] similar to those of GOase, but at potentials much higher and lower, respectively, than those found for the enzyme. At room temperature, spectrophotometric titrations show that 1 binds strongly to 1 equiv of pyridine. In frozen solutions (77 K), 1 quantitatively binds both pyridine and ethers (e.g., 1,4-dioxane) as assessed by X- and Q-band EPR spectroscopy. Profound shifts in the pattern of g values result, from rhombic (g(1) > g(2) > g(3)) in toluene to either inverted axial patterns (g(1) = g(2) > g(3)) in the presence of ethers or a near-axial pattern (g(1) > g(2) > g(3)) in the presence of pyridine. Crystallographic analyses of the parent complex 1.MeCN, the dioxane-bridged dimer [(Cu(L1))(2)((mu-1,4)-1,4-dioxane)].(Me(2)CO)(2) (2), and the pyridine complex [Cu(L1)(pyridine)] (3) show that the pyridine and ether ligands bond to copper at a sixth octahedral position left vacant by the pentadentate NO(2)S(2) coordination mode of L1(2-) and induce perturbations of its geometry. Hybrid DFT calculations based on the crystallographic coordinates combined with perturbation theory expressions for the g values of a d(9) system correlate the results from EPR spectroscopy to the proportions of d(x)(2)(-)(y)(2) and d(z)(2) character in the relevant copper-centered unoccupied molecular orbital. The combination of spectroscopic, structural, and computational results for this set of copper(II) complexes provides a demonstrative example of the physical phenomena underlying rhombic EPR spectra of d(9) systems. PMID:15578842

  10. Production of Normal Mammalian Organ Culture Using a Medium Containing Mem-Alpha, Leibovitz L 15, Glucose Galactose Fructose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under micro- gravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel. The medium used for culturing the cells, especially a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal cells contains a mixture of Mem-alpha and Leibovits L15 supplemented with glucose, galactose and fructose.

  11. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  12. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  13. Saponins from Aralia taibaiensis attenuate D-galactose-induced aging in rats by activating FOXO3a and Nrf2 pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Na; Guo, Yu; Xi, Miao-Miao; Yang, Pei; Zhou, Xue-Ying; Yin, Shuang; Hai, Chun-Xu; Li, Jin-Gang; Qin, Xu-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to the aging process. In our previous studies, we found that the saponins from Aralia taibaiensis have potent antioxidant activity, suggesting the potential protective activity on the aging. However, the protective effect of the saponins and the possible underlying molecular mechanism remain unknown. In the present study, we employed a D-galactose-induced aging rat model to investigate the protective effect of the saponins. We found that D-galactose treatment induced obvious aging-related changes such as the decreased thymus and spleen coefficients, the increased advanced glycation end products (AGEs) level, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SAβ-gal) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Further results showed that Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a), nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and their targeted antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione (GSH), glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) were all inhibited in the aging rats induced by D-galactose treatment. Saponins supplementation showed effective protection on these changes. These results demonstrate that saponins from Aralia taibaiensis attenuate the D-galactose-induced rat aging. By activating FOXO3a and Nrf2 pathways, saponins increase their downstream multiple antioxidants expression and function, at least in part contributing to the protection on the D-galactose-induced aging in rats. PMID:24669284

  14. A high-fat diet increases oxidative renal injury and protein glycation in D-galactose-induced aging rats and its prevention by Korea red ginseng.

    PubMed

    Park, Sok; Kim, Chan-Sik; Min, Jinah; Lee, Soo Hwan; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Declining renal function is commonly observed with age. Obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) may reduce renal function. Korean red ginseng (KRG) has been reported to ameliorate oxidative tissue injury and have an anti-aging effect. This study was designed to investigate whether HFD would accelerate the D-galactose-induced aging process in the rat kidney and to examine the preventive effect of KRG on HFD and D-galactose-induced aging-related renal injury. When rats with D-galactose-induced aging were fed an HFD for 9 wk, enhanced oxidative DNA damage, renal cell apoptosis, protein glycation, and extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a signal of tissue damage, were observed in renal glomerular cells and tubular epithelial cells. However, treatment of rats with HFD- plus D-galactose-induced aging with KRG restored all of these renal changes. Our data suggested that a long-term HFD may enhance D-galactose-induced oxidative renal injury in rats and that this age-related renal injury could be suppressed by KRG through the repression of oxidative injury. PMID:25078371

  15. d-galactose administration induces memory loss and energy metabolism disturbance in mice: protective effects of catalpol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Li; An, Li-Jia; Bao, Yong-Ming; Wang, Jing-Yun; Jiang, Bo

    2008-08-01

    The neuroprotective effects of catalpol, an iridoid glycoside isolated from the fresh rehmannia roots, on the behavior and brain energy metabolism in senescent mice induced by d-galactose were assessed. Except control group, mice were subcutaneously injected with d-galactose (150 mg/kg body weight) for 6 weeks. From the fifth week, drug group mice were treated with catalpol (2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg body weight) and piracetam (300 mg/kg body weight) for the last 2 weeks. Behavioral changes including open field test and passive avoidance were examined after drug administration. To determine the brain damage, pathological alterations were measured by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glutathione S-transferase (GSH-ST), glutamine synthetase (GS), creatine kinase (CK) in brain cortex and hippocampus were determined using different biochemical methods. Consistent with the cognition deficits, the activities of GSH-ST, GS and CK decreased while the activity of LDH increased in aging mice brain. Administration of catalpol for 2-weeks not only ameliorated cognition deficit, but also reversed the biochemical markers mentioned above and reduced the histological lesions in mouse brain. These results suggest that catalpol has protective effects on memory damage and energy metabolism failure in aging model mice and is worth testing for further preclinical study aimed for senescence or neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD).

  16. Physicochemical Behavior of Some Amino Acids/Glycylglycine in Aqueous D-Galactose Solutions at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Anwar; Patel, Rajan; Shahjahan; Ansari, Nizamul Haque

    2010-03-01

    The apparent molar volumes {(overline{V_2})} for glycine (Gly), l-alanine (Ala), phenylalanine (Phe), and glycylglycine (Gly-Gly) in 0.10 m aqueous d-galactose solutions have been determined from density measurements at (298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K. The data for {(overline{V_2})} were utilized to estimate the partial molar volume at infinite dilution {(overline{V_2^0})} , and experimental slope {(S_v^ast)} . The transfer volume, {(overline{V2^0}_(tr))} , and hydration number, ( n H) were also evaluated. The viscosity data were used to evaluate A- and B-coefficients of the Jones-Dole equation, the free energy of activation of viscous flow per mole of the solvent {left(Δ μ1^{0ast} right)} and the solute {left(Δ μ 2^{0ast} right)} . The molar refractivity ( R D) was calculated from refractive index data. The results were discussed in terms of hydrophilic-ionic, hydrophilic-hydrophobic, and hydrophobic-hydrophobic interactions, and structure-making/-breaking ability of the solute (AAs/peptide) in aqueous d-galactose solutions.

  17. Autoantibodies targeting galactose-deficient IgA1 associate with progression of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Berthoux, Francois; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Thibaudin, Lise; Yanagawa, Hiroyuki; Maillard, Nicolas; Mariat, Christophe; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Julian, Bruce A; Novak, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Mesangial and circulating IgA1 with aberrantly glycosylated hinge region O-glycans characterize IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Unlike healthy individuals, some IgA1 is galactose deficient in patients with IgAN, leaving terminal N-acetylgalactosamine residues in the hinge region exposed. Circulating autoantibodies that recognize such galactose-deficient IgA1 as an autoantigen, or the levels of the autoantigen itself, may allow prediction of disease progression. Here, we analyzed serum samples obtained at diagnosis for autoantigen and autoantibodies from 97 patients with IgAN selected from our prospective cohort according to their absolute renal risk for progression to dialysis or death (0, very low; 1, low; 2, high; 3, very high). We also analyzed samples from controls comprising 30 healthy volunteers and 30 patients with non-IgAN disease. The mean follow-up was 13.8 years. We found that mean serum levels of total autoantigen, normalized IgG autoantibody, and total IgA autoantibody were significantly higher in patients than in the combined controls (all P≤0.01). Furthermore, increasing levels correlated with worse clinical outcomes. In Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses, IgG autoantibody levels ≥1.33 predicted dialysis or death (both P≤0.01). In conclusion, these data suggest that serum levels of IgG and IgA autoantibodies strongly associate with the progression of IgAN nephropathy.

  18. Predominance of cluster I Clostridium in hydrogen fermentation of galactose seeded with various heat-treated anaerobic sludges.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Yoon, Jeong-Jun; Kim, Sang-Hyoun; Park, Hee-Deung

    2014-04-01

    To identify the key bacterial populations in hydrogen fermentation of galactose, a fermentor seeded with a heat-treated sludge was operated. After 27h of fermentation, the proportion of butyric acid increased to 69.4wt.% and the gas production yield reached 1.0molH2/molgalactose. In the pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA, an increase of the proportion of the phylum Firmicutes from 4.2% to 92% (mostly cluster I Clostridium) was observed. To verify the predominance and the ubiquity of the cluster, five fermentors seeded with different heat-treated anaerobic sludges having different feedstock compositions and digestion temperatures were investigated using qPCR analyses. The abundance of the cluster increased >100-fold during the fermentation, regardless of the inocula. Moreover, the abundance was negatively correlated with the lag time of hydrogen production and positively correlated with the hydrogen production rate, demonstrating the relevance of the cluster to hydrogen production. Taken together, the results clearly revealed the importance of cluster I Clostridium in the hydrogen fermentation of galactose.

  19. [Effect of kinetin on ovary and uterus in D-galactose-induced female mouse model of aging].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiang-Hong; Liu, Yu-Mei; Cao, Tong; Ouyang, Wu-Qing

    2013-08-25

    The present study was to investigate the effect of kinetin on ovary and uterus of D-galactose-induced female mouse model of aging. Aging female mice model caused by D-galactose were used as model group, the aging model mice intragastrically administered with kinetin solution (daily 25 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg) were used as kinetin groups, and the mice with solvent as normal group (n = 20). To detect the effects of kinetin, estrous cycle, estradiol content, ovarian and uterine wet weight and organ index, SOD and GSH-Px activities, MDA and total protein contents, as well as the reserve function of ovaries were examined. The results showed that, kinetin-induced changes in two kinetin groups were observed, compared with the model group: (1) the estrous cycle was shortened; (2) serum estradiol content was significantly increased; (3) the wet weights of the ovary and uterus were increased significantly; (4) SOD and GSH-Px activities of ovary and uterus were significantly higher; (5) the MDA contents of the ovary and uterus were reduced significantly; (6) total protein contents of the ovary and uterus were increased significantly; (7) the numbers of mature oocytes in fallopian tubes were increased significantly. The results show that kinetin can protect ovary and uterus against oxidative damage, prevent low estrogen secretion caused by ovarian oxidative damage, shorten the estrous cycle in mice, and eventually maintain ovarian and uterine vitalities.

  20. Structural and functional mimic of galactose oxidase by a copper complex of a sterically demanding [N2O2] ligand.

    PubMed

    John, Alex; Shaikh, Mobin M; Ghosh, Prasenjit

    2008-06-01

    A structural and functional mimic of the galactose oxidase (GOase) enzyme active-site by a copper complex supported over a sterically demanding ligand having [N2O2] donor sites is reported. Specifically, the binding of the histidine (496 and 581) and tyrosine (272 and 495) residues to the copper center in a square-pyramidal fashion in the active-site of galactose oxidase (GOase) enzyme has been modeled in a copper complex, ([(3-tert-butyl-5-methyl-2-hydoxybenzyl)(3'-tert-butyl-5'-methyl-2'-oxobenzyl)(2-pyridylmethyl)]amine)Cu(OAc)) (1b), stabilized over a sterically demanding ligand in which the two phenolate-O atoms mimicked the tyrosine binding while an amine-N and pyridyl-N atoms emulated the histidine binding to the metal center, similar to that in the enzyme active-site. Furthermore, the copper complex 1b is found to be an effective functional model of the enzyme as it efficiently catalyzed the chemoselective oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes in high turnover numbers under ambient conditions. An insight into the nature of the active-species was obtained by EPR and CV studies, which in conjunction with the DFT studies, revealed that the active-species is an anti-ferromagnetically coupled diamagnetic radical cation, (1)1b+, obtained by one electron oxidation at the equatorial phenolate-O atom of the ligand in the 1b complex.

  1. Post-transcriptional modification of the poly(A) length of galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase mRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, C A; Bostian, K A; Halvorson, H O

    1980-01-01

    Thermal elution poly(U)-Sepharose chromatography was utilized to fractionate yeast mRNA based on poly(A) size. Analysis of the in vitro translation products of the fractionated RNAs in a wheat-embryo cell-free protein synthesis system shows a heterogeneous but equal distribution of these abundant translatable mRNAs in the different poly(A) size classes. By comparing the translational activity of inducible galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase mRNA, which can be monitored as a function of age, to contitutive mRNAs, we demonstrate that initially galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase mRNA has a uniformly large poly(A) tail which becomes heterogeneous and shorter with age in the cytoplasm. These observations are consistent with the previously observed cytoplasmic poly(A) catabolism in yeast and with cytoplasmic post-transcriptional modification of the poly(A) length of galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase mRNA. Images PMID:6255420

  2. Galactose-Functionalized PolyHIPE Scaffolds for Use in Routine Three Dimensional Culture of Mammalian Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is regarded as a more physiologically relevant method of growing cells in the laboratory compared to traditional monolayer cultures. Recently, the application of polystyrene-based scaffolds produced using polyHIPE technology (porous polymers derived from high internal phase emulsions) for routine 3D cell culture applications has generated very promising results in terms of improved replication of native cellular function in the laboratory. These materials, which are now available as commercial scaffolds, are superior to many other 3D cell substrates due to their high porosity, controllable morphology, and suitable mechanical strength. However, until now there have been no reports describing the surface-modification of these materials for enhanced cell adhesion and function. This study, therefore, describes the surface functionalization of these materials with galactose, a carbohydrate known to specifically bind to hepatocytes via the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), to further improve hepatocyte adhesion and function when growing on the scaffold. We first modify a typical polystyrene-based polyHIPE to produce a cell culture scaffold carrying pendent activated-ester functionality. This was achieved via the incorporation of pentafluorophenyl acrylate (PFPA) into the initial styrene (STY) emulsion, which upon polymerization formed a polyHIPE with a porosity of 92% and an average void diameter of 33 μm. Histological analysis showed that this polyHIPE was a suitable 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cell culture. Galactose-functionalized scaffolds were then prepared by attaching 2′-aminoethyl-β-d-galactopyranoside to this PFPA functionalized polyHIPE via displacement of the labile pentafluorophenyl group, to yield scaffolds with approximately ca. 7–9% surface carbohydrate. Experiments with primary rat hepatocytes showed that cellular albumin synthesis was greatly enhanced during the initial adhesion/settlement period of cells on

  3. DNA polymerase-associated lectin (DPAL) and its binding to the galactose-containing glycoconjugate of the replication complex.

    PubMed

    Kelley, T J; St Amand, T; Groll, J M; Ray, S; Basu, S

    1999-10-01

    The highly purified DNA Pol-alpha from rat prostate tumor (PA-3) and human neuroblastoma (IMR-32) cells appeared to be inhibited by Ricin (RCA-II), and Con-A. Loss of activity (40 to 60%) of a specific form of DNA polymerase from IMR-32 was observed when the cells were treated with tunicamycin [Bhattacharya, P. and Basu, S. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 79:1488-1492]. Binding of ConA and RCA to human recombinant DNA polymerase-alpha showed a specific labile site in the N-terminus [Hsi et al.. (1990) Nucleic Acid Res. 18:6231-6237]. The catalytic polypeptide, DNA polymerase-alpha of eukaryotic origin, was isolated from developing tissues or cultured cells as a family of 180 to 120 kDa polypeptides, perhaps derived from a single primary structure. Immunoblot analysis with a monoclonal antibody (SJK-237-71) indicated that the lower molecular weight polypeptides resulted from either proteolytic cleavage of post-translational modification after specific cleavages. Present results suggest DNA polymerase-alpha from embryonic chicken brain (ECB) contains an alpha-galactose-binding subunit which may be involved in developmental regulation of the enzyme. It was shown before that the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-alpha reduces from 186 kDa in 11-day-old ECB to 120 kDa in 19-day-old ECB [Ray, S. et al. Cell Growth and Differentiation 2:567-573] by the treatment with methyl-alpha-galactose. The low molecular weight DNA polymerase activity (120 kDa) can be reconstituted to high molecular weight (Mr = 186 kDa) with an alpha-galactose binding, 56kDa lectin-like protein. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified lectin were able to precipitate DNA. Pol-alpha as determined by immunostaining with the polymerase-alpha-specific monoclonal antibody SJK 132-20, suggesting this is a DNA polymerase associated-lectin (DPAL). RCA-II and GS-I-Sepharose 4B chromatographies resulted in significant purification of DNA-alpha and a complete separation of polymerase complex and

  4. Synthesis and immunodetection of 6-O-methyl-phosphoramidyl-α-D-galactose: a Campylobacter jejuni antigenic determinant.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuening; Ma, Zuchao; Ewing, Cheryl P; Guerry, Patricia; Monteiro, Mario A

    2015-12-11

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of traveler's diarrhea. Previously, we have shown that a C. jejuni capsule polysaccharide (CPS) conjugate vaccine can fully prevent C.jejuni diarrhea in non-human primates. C.jejuni CPSs are decorated with non-stoichiometric amounts of O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) units that are key serospecific markers. In the case of C.jejuni serotype complex HS23/36, the MeOPN are at positions 2 and 6 of the CPS galactose (Gal). We describe here the synthesis of the p-methoxyphenyl glycoside of MeOPN→6-α-D-Galp, and its immunodetection by antisera raised by C.jejuni CPS conjugates with MeOPN at primary positions. The synthetic approach in this work served as the foundation for a similar MeOPN→6-Gal construct used in a conjugate vaccine, whose synthesis, immunogenicity and efficacy will be described elsewhere.

  5. Allergenicity of potato proteins and of their conjugates with galactose, galactooligosaccharides, and galactan in native, heated, and digested forms.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sooyoun; L'Hocine, Lamia; Karboune, Salwa

    2014-04-23

    The effect of glycation of potato proteins on their immunoreactivity was studied by using a pool of human sera with specific IgE to potato proteins. Patatin conjugates were more immunoreactive than protease inhibitors ones. To better understand this behavior, the changes in patatin structure upon glycation and heat treatment were investigated. Patatin demonstrated an increase in total immunoreactivity when glycated with galactose and galactooligosaccharides. However, galactan conjugation to patatin resulted in a decrease in immunoreactivity by restricting IgE's access to the epitopes. Although the heat treatment resulted in a decrease in patatin's immunoreactivity through aggregation, it was less effective when patatin conjugates were used due to the decrease in aggregation and the secondary structural changes. Upon digestion, native patatin exhibited the largest decrease in immunoreactivity resulting from the disruption of both conformational and sequential epitopes. Patatin conjugates were less digested and had higher IgE-immunoreactivity as compared to the digested patatin.

  6. A systems approach to designing next generation vaccines: combining α-galactose modified antigens with nanoparticle platforms.

    PubMed

    Phanse, Yashdeep; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda R; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Broderick, Scott; Kong, Chang Sun; Rajan, Krishna; Flick, Ramon; Mandell, Robert B; Narasimhan, Balaji; Wannemuehler, Michael J

    2014-01-20

    Innovative vaccine platforms are needed to develop effective countermeasures against emerging and re-emerging diseases. These platforms should direct antigen internalization by antigen presenting cells and promote immunogenic responses. This work describes an innovative systems approach combining two novel platforms, αGalactose (αGal)-modification of antigens and amphiphilic polyanhydride nanoparticles as vaccine delivery vehicles, to rationally design vaccine formulations. Regimens comprising soluble αGal-modified antigen and nanoparticle-encapsulated unmodified antigen induced a high titer, high avidity antibody response with broader epitope recognition of antigenic peptides than other regimen. Proliferation of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells was also enhanced compared to a traditional adjuvant. Combining the technology platforms and augmenting immune response studies with peptide arrays and informatics analysis provides a new paradigm for rational, systems-based design of next generation vaccine platforms against emerging and re-emerging pathogens.

  7. Allergenicity of potato proteins and of their conjugates with galactose, galactooligosaccharides, and galactan in native, heated, and digested forms.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sooyoun; L'Hocine, Lamia; Karboune, Salwa

    2014-04-23

    The effect of glycation of potato proteins on their immunoreactivity was studied by using a pool of human sera with specific IgE to potato proteins. Patatin conjugates were more immunoreactive than protease inhibitors ones. To better understand this behavior, the changes in patatin structure upon glycation and heat treatment were investigated. Patatin demonstrated an increase in total immunoreactivity when glycated with galactose and galactooligosaccharides. However, galactan conjugation to patatin resulted in a decrease in immunoreactivity by restricting IgE's access to the epitopes. Although the heat treatment resulted in a decrease in patatin's immunoreactivity through aggregation, it was less effective when patatin conjugates were used due to the decrease in aggregation and the secondary structural changes. Upon digestion, native patatin exhibited the largest decrease in immunoreactivity resulting from the disruption of both conformational and sequential epitopes. Patatin conjugates were less digested and had higher IgE-immunoreactivity as compared to the digested patatin. PMID:24661320

  8. Lipid requirement and kinetic studies of solubilized UDP-galactose:diacylglycerol galactosyltransferase activity from spinach chloroplast envelope membranes

    PubMed Central

    Covés, Jacques; Joyard, Jacques; Douce, Roland

    1988-01-01

    We have demonstrated a lipid requirement for the UDPgalactose:1,2-diacylglycerol 3-β-D-galactosyl-transferase (or monogalactosyldiacylglycerol synthase; EC 2.4.1.46), an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, solubilized from chloroplast envelope membranes and partially purified by hydroxyapatite chromatography. The enzyme fraction was highly delipidated (<0.1 mg of lipid per mg of protein), and addition of lipids extracted from chloroplast membranes was necessary to reveal the activity. Acidic glycerolipids, and especially phosphatidylglycerol, were the best activators of the enzyme. The preparation of a delipidated enzyme fraction and the development of optimal assay conditions were prerequisites for the determination of the kinetic parameters for the hydrophobic substrate of the enzyme, diacylglycerol. In addition, we have demonstrated the existence of two substrate-binding sites: a hydrophobic one for diacylglycerol and a hydrophilic one for UDP-galactose. PMID:16593955

  9. Jacalin interacts with Asn-linked glycopeptides containing multi-antennary oligosaccharide structure with terminal alpha-linked galactose.

    PubMed

    Do, S I; Lee, K Y

    1998-01-01

    The carbohydrate binding properties of jacalin lectin were examined using RAF9 cell-derived D-[6-3H]glucosamine-radiolabeled total glycopeptides containing N-linked and O-linked oligosaccharides. The binding of N-linked glycopeptides to jacalin was abolished by treatment of alpha-galactosidase whereas O-linked glycopeptides were still bound lectin after this treatment. The removal of O-linked oligosaccharides by mild alkaline/borohydride treatment completely eliminated the lectin binding of alpha-galactosidase treated glycopeptides. These results demonstrate that jacalin interacts with cellular glycopeptides containing N-linked oligosaccharides with terminal alpha-galactose residues as well as glycopeptides containing O-linked oligosaccharides.

  10. A systems approach to designing next generation vaccines: combining α-galactose modified antigens with nanoparticle platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanse, Yashdeep; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda R.; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E.; Broderick, Scott; Kong, Chang Sun; Rajan, Krishna; Flick, Ramon; Mandell, Robert B.; Narasimhan, Balaji; Wannemuehler, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Innovative vaccine platforms are needed to develop effective countermeasures against emerging and re-emerging diseases. These platforms should direct antigen internalization by antigen presenting cells and promote immunogenic responses. This work describes an innovative systems approach combining two novel platforms, αGalactose (αGal)-modification of antigens and amphiphilic polyanhydride nanoparticles as vaccine delivery vehicles, to rationally design vaccine formulations. Regimens comprising soluble αGal-modified antigen and nanoparticle-encapsulated unmodified antigen induced a high titer, high avidity antibody response with broader epitope recognition of antigenic peptides than other regimen. Proliferation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells was also enhanced compared to a traditional adjuvant. Combining the technology platforms and augmenting immune response studies with peptide arrays and informatics analysis provides a new paradigm for rational, systems-based design of next generation vaccine platforms against emerging and re-emerging pathogens.

  11. Lactose and galactose content in cheese results in overestimation of moisture by vacuum oven and microwave methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Rankin, S A; Fonseca, L M; Milani, F X

    2014-05-01

    Moisture determination in cheese is a critical test for regulatory compliance, functionality, and economic reasons. Common methods for moisture determination in cheese rely upon the thermal volatilization of water from cheese and calculation of moisture content based on the resulting loss of mass. Residual sugars, such as lactose and galactose, are commonly present in cheeses at levels ranging from trace amounts to 5%. These sugars are capable of reacting with other compounds in cheese, especially under the thermal conditions required for moisture determination, to yield volatile reaction products. The hypothesis of this work is that residual sugars in cheese will be converted into volatile compounds over the course of moisture determination at a level sufficient to result in overestimated cheese moisture. A full-factorial statistical design was used to evaluate the effects of cheese type, sugar type, sugar level, method type, and all interactions. Cheddar and low-moisture, part-skim (LMPS) Mozzarella cheeses were prepared with 1, 3, and 5% added lactose or galactose, and subjected to either vacuum oven or microwave-based moisture determination methods. Browning index and colorimetry were measured to characterize the color and extent of browning. Volatile analyses were performed to provide chemical evidence of the reactions proposed. The presence of residual sugars altered moisture calculations as a function of cheese type, sugar type, sugar level, method type, and numerous interactions. At higher concentrations of residual sugar, the percentage moisture determinations were increased by values of up to 1.8. Measures of browning reactions, including browning index, colorimetry, and volatile profiles demonstrate that the proposed browning reactions played a causative role. This work establishes the need to consider cheese type, sugar type, sugar levels, and method type as a means of more accurately determining moisture levels. PMID:24630670

  12. Patients with IgA nephropathy have increased serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels.

    PubMed

    Moldoveanu, Z; Wyatt, R J; Lee, J Y; Tomana, M; Julian, B A; Mestecky, J; Huang, W-Q; Anreddy, S R; Hall, S; Hastings, M C; Lau, K K; Cook, W J; Novak, J

    2007-06-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy is the most prevalent form of glomerulonephritis worldwide. A renal biopsy is required for an accurate diagnosis, as no convenient biomarker is currently available. We developed a serological test based upon the observation that this nephropathy is characterized by undergalactosylated IgA1 in the circulation and in mesangial immune deposits. In the absence of galactose, the terminal saccharide of O-linked chains in the hinge region of IgA1 is terminal or sialylated N-acetylgalactosamine. A lectin from Helix aspersa, recognizing N-acetylgalactosamine, was used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that measures galactose-deficient IgA1 in serum. The median serum lectin-binding IgA1 level was significantly higher for 153 Caucasian adult patients with IgA nephropathy without progression to end-stage renal disease as compared with that for 150 healthy Caucasian adult controls. As the lectin-binding IgA1 levels for the controls were not normally distributed, the 90th percentile was used for determination of significant elevation. Using a value of 1076 U/ml as the upper limit of normal, 117 of the 153 patients with IgA nephropathy had an elevated serum lectin-binding IgA1 level. The sensitivity as a diagnostic test was 76.5%, with specificity 94%; the positive predictive value was 88.6% and the negative predictive value was 78.9%. We conclude that this lectin-binding assay may have potential as a noninvasive diagnostic test for IgA nephropathy.

  13. Raffinose Family Oligosaccharides Act As Galactose Stores in Seeds and Are Required for Rapid Germination of Arabidopsis in the Dark.

    PubMed

    Gangl, Roman; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Raffinose synthase 5 (AtRS5, At5g40390) was characterized from Arabidopsis as a recombinant enzyme. It has a far higher affinity for the substrates galactinol and sucrose than any other raffinose synthase previously reported. In addition raffinose synthase 5 is also working as a galactosylhydrolase, degrading galactinol, and raffinose under certain conditions. Together with raffinose synthase 4, which is predominantly a stachyose synthase, both enzymes contribute to the raffinose family oligosaccharide (RFO) accumulation in seeds. A double knockout in raffinose synthase 4 and raffinose synthase 5 (ΔAtRS4,5) was generated, which is devoid of RFOs in seeds. Unstressed leaves of 4 week old ΔAtRS4,5 plants showed drastically 23.8-fold increased concentrations of galactinol. Unexpectedly, raffinose appeared again in drought stressed ΔAtRS4,5 plants, but not under other abiotic stress conditions. Drought stress leads to novel transcripts of raffinose synthase 6 suggesting that this isoform is a further stress inducible raffinose synthase in Arabidopsis. ΔAtRS4,5 seeds showed a 5 days delayed germination phenotype in darkness and an elevated expression of the transcription factor phytochrome interacting factor 1 (AtPIF1) target gene AtPIF6, being a repressor of germination. This prolonged dormancy is not seen during germination in the light. Exogenous galactose partially promotes germination of ΔAtRS4,5 seeds in the dark suggesting that RFOs act as a galactose store and repress AtPIF6 transcripts. PMID:27507985

  14. Lactose and galactose content in cheese results in overestimation of moisture by vacuum oven and microwave methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Rankin, S A; Fonseca, L M; Milani, F X

    2014-05-01

    Moisture determination in cheese is a critical test for regulatory compliance, functionality, and economic reasons. Common methods for moisture determination in cheese rely upon the thermal volatilization of water from cheese and calculation of moisture content based on the resulting loss of mass. Residual sugars, such as lactose and galactose, are commonly present in cheeses at levels ranging from trace amounts to 5%. These sugars are capable of reacting with other compounds in cheese, especially under the thermal conditions required for moisture determination, to yield volatile reaction products. The hypothesis of this work is that residual sugars in cheese will be converted into volatile compounds over the course of moisture determination at a level sufficient to result in overestimated cheese moisture. A full-factorial statistical design was used to evaluate the effects of cheese type, sugar type, sugar level, method type, and all interactions. Cheddar and low-moisture, part-skim (LMPS) Mozzarella cheeses were prepared with 1, 3, and 5% added lactose or galactose, and subjected to either vacuum oven or microwave-based moisture determination methods. Browning index and colorimetry were measured to characterize the color and extent of browning. Volatile analyses were performed to provide chemical evidence of the reactions proposed. The presence of residual sugars altered moisture calculations as a function of cheese type, sugar type, sugar level, method type, and numerous interactions. At higher concentrations of residual sugar, the percentage moisture determinations were increased by values of up to 1.8. Measures of browning reactions, including browning index, colorimetry, and volatile profiles demonstrate that the proposed browning reactions played a causative role. This work establishes the need to consider cheese type, sugar type, sugar levels, and method type as a means of more accurately determining moisture levels.

  15. Galactomutarotase (GALM) and Other Galactose-Related Genes Are Rapidly Induced by Retinoic Acid in Human Myeloid Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Tongkun; Chen, Qiuyan; Zhang, Yao; Zolfaghari, Reza; Ross, A. Catharine

    2008-01-01

    Aldose-1-epimerase (mutarotase) catalyzes the interconversion of α and β hexoses, which is essential for normal carbohydrate metabolism and the production of complex oligosaccharides. Galactose mutarotase (GALM) has been well characterized at the protein level but information is lacking on the regulation of GALM gene expression. We report herein that all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A that is known to induce myeloid lineage cell differentiation into macrophage-like cells, induces a rapid and robust regulation of GALM mRNA expression in human myeloid cells. All-trans-RA at a physiological concentration (20 nM), or Am580, a ligand selective for the nuclear retinoid receptor RARα, increased GALM mRNA in THP-1 cells, with significantly increased expression in 2 h, increasing further to an ~8-fold elevation after 6–40 h (P< 0.005). In contrast, tumor necrosis factor-α did not increase GALM mRNA expression, although it is capable of inducing cell differentiation. RA also increased GALM mRNA in U937 and HL-60 cells. The increase in GALM mRNA by RA was blocked by pretreating THP-1 cells with actinomycin D, but not by cycloheximide. GALM protein and mutarotase activity were also increased time dependently in RA-treated THP-1 cells. In addition to GALM, several other genes in the biosynthetic pathway of galactosyl-containing complex oligosaccharides were more highly expressed in RA-treated THP-1 cells, including B4GALT5, ST3GAL3, ST6GALNAC5, and GALNAC4S-6ST. Thus, the results of this study identify RA as a significant regulator of GALM and other galactose-related genes in myeloid-monocytic cells, which could affect energy utilization, synthesis of cell-surface glycoproteins or glycolipids involved in cell motility, adhesion, and/or functional properties. PMID:18052213

  16. UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase from the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica: biochemical characterization of the enzyme and identification of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zinsser, Veronika L; Lindert, Steffen; Banford, Samantha; Hoey, Elizabeth M; Trudgett, Alan; Timson, David J

    2015-03-01

    Leloir pathway enzyme uridine diphosphate (UDP)-galactose 4'-epimerase from the common liver fluke Fasciola hepatica (FhGALE) was identified and characterized. The enzyme can be expressed in, and purified from, Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme is active: the K(m) (470 μM) is higher than the corresponding human enzyme (HsGALE), whereas the k(cat) (2.3 s(-1)) is substantially lower. FhGALE binds NAD(+) and has shown to be dimeric by analytical gel filtration. Like the human and yeast GALEs, FhGALE is stabilized by the substrate UDP-galactose. Molecular modelling predicted that FhGALE adopts a similar overall fold to HsGALE and that tyrosine 155 is likely to be the catalytically critical residue in the active site. In silico screening of the National Cancer Institute Developmental Therapeutics Program library identified 40 potential inhibitors of FhGALE which were tested in vitro. Of these, 6 showed concentration-dependent inhibition of FhGALE, some with nanomolar IC50 values. Two inhibitors (5-fluoroorotate and N-[(benzyloxy)carbonyl]leucyltryptophan) demonstrated selectivity for FhGALE over HsGALE. These compounds also thermally destabilized FhGALE in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, the selectivity of 5-fluoroorotate was not shown by orotic acid, which differs in structure by 1 fluorine atom. These results demonstrate that, despite the structural and biochemical similarities of FhGALE and HsGALE, it is possible to discover compounds which preferentially inhibit FhGALE.

  17. Near-infrared fluorescence glucose sensing based on glucose/galactose-binding protein coupled to 651-Blue Oxazine

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C.

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •We showed that the NIR fluorophore, 651-Blue Oxazine, is solvatochromic (polarity sensitive). •Blue Oxazine was covalently attached to mutants of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP). •Fluorescence intensity of GBP-Blue Oxazine increased with addition of glucose. •Fluorescence from bead-immobilised GBP-Blue Oxazine was detectable through skin in vitro. •This shows proof-of-concept for non-invasive glucose sensing using GBP-Blue Oxazine. -- Abstract: Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes that are environmentally sensitive or solvatochromic are useful tools for protein labelling in in vivo biosensor applications such as glucose monitoring in diabetes since their spectral properties are mostly independent of tissue autofluorescence and light scattering, and they offer potential for non-invasive analyte sensing. We showed that the fluorophore 651-Blue Oxazine is polarity-sensitive, with a marked reduction in NIR fluorescence on increasing solvent polarity. Mutants of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) used as the glucose receptor were site-specifically and covalently labelled with Blue Oxazine using click chemistry. Mutants H152C/A213R and H152C/A213R/L238S showed fluorescence increases of 15% and 21% on addition of saturating glucose concentrations and binding constants of 6 and 25 mM respectively. Fluorescence responses to glucose were preserved when GBP-Blue Oxazine was immobilised to agarose beads, and the beads were excited by NIR light through a mouse skin preparation studied in vitro. We conclude GBP-Blue Oxazine shows proof-of-concept as a non-invasive continuous glucose sensing system.

  18. Raffinose Family Oligosaccharides Act As Galactose Stores in Seeds and Are Required for Rapid Germination of Arabidopsis in the Dark

    PubMed Central

    Gangl, Roman; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Raffinose synthase 5 (AtRS5, At5g40390) was characterized from Arabidopsis as a recombinant enzyme. It has a far higher affinity for the substrates galactinol and sucrose than any other raffinose synthase previously reported. In addition raffinose synthase 5 is also working as a galactosylhydrolase, degrading galactinol, and raffinose under certain conditions. Together with raffinose synthase 4, which is predominantly a stachyose synthase, both enzymes contribute to the raffinose family oligosaccharide (RFO) accumulation in seeds. A double knockout in raffinose synthase 4 and raffinose synthase 5 (ΔAtRS4,5) was generated, which is devoid of RFOs in seeds. Unstressed leaves of 4 week old ΔAtRS4,5 plants showed drastically 23.8-fold increased concentrations of galactinol. Unexpectedly, raffinose appeared again in drought stressed ΔAtRS4,5 plants, but not under other abiotic stress conditions. Drought stress leads to novel transcripts of raffinose synthase 6 suggesting that this isoform is a further stress inducible raffinose synthase in Arabidopsis. ΔAtRS4,5 seeds showed a 5 days delayed germination phenotype in darkness and an elevated expression of the transcription factor phytochrome interacting factor 1 (AtPIF1) target gene AtPIF6, being a repressor of germination. This prolonged dormancy is not seen during germination in the light. Exogenous galactose partially promotes germination of ΔAtRS4,5 seeds in the dark suggesting that RFOs act as a galactose store and repress AtPIF6 transcripts. PMID:27507985

  19. Galactomutarotase and other galactose-related genes are rapidly induced by retinoic acid in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Pai, Tongkun; Chen, Qiuyan; Zhang, Yao; Zolfaghari, Reza; Ross, A Catharine

    2007-12-25

    Aldose-1-epimerase (mutarotase) catalyzes the interconversion of alpha and beta hexoses, which is essential for normal carbohydrate metabolism and the production of complex oligosaccharides. Galactose mutarotase (GALM) has been well characterized at the protein level, but information is lacking on the regulation of GALM gene expression. We report herein that all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A that is known to induce myeloid lineage cell differentiation into macrophage-like cells, induces a rapid and robust regulation of GALM mRNA expression in human myeloid cells. all-trans-RA at a physiological concentration (20 nM), or Am580, a ligand selective for the nuclear retinoid receptor RARalpha, increased GALM mRNA in THP-1 cells, with significantly increased expression in 2 h, increasing further to an approximately 8-fold elevation after 6-40 h (P < 0.005). In contrast, tumor necrosis factor-alpha did not increase GALM mRNA expression, although it is capable of inducing cell differentiation. RA also increased GALM mRNA in U937 and HL-60 cells. The increase in GALM mRNA by RA was blocked by pretreating THP-1 cells with actinomycin D but not by cycloheximide. GALM protein and mutarotase activity were also increased time dependently in RA-treated THP-1 cells. In addition to GALM, several other genes in the biosynthetic pathway of galactosyl-containing complex oligosaccharides were more highly expressed in RA-treated THP-1 cells, including B4GALT5, ST3GAL3, ST6GALNAC5, and GALNAC4S-6ST. Thus, the results of this study identify RA as a significant regulator of GALM and other galactose-related genes in myeloid-monocytic cells, which could affect energy utilization and synthesis of cell-surface glycoproteins or glycolipids involved in cell motility, adhesion, and/or functional properties.

  20. Galactose targeted pH-responsive copolymer conjugated with near infrared fluorescence probe for imaging of intelligent drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liyi; Sun, Chunyang; Yan, Lifeng

    2015-01-28

    Theranostic polymeric nanomaterials are of special important in cancer treatment. Here, novel galactose targeted pH-responsive amphiphilic multiblock copolymer conjugated with both drug and near-infrared fluorescence (NIR) probe has been designed and prepared by a four-steps process: (1) ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of N-carboxy anhydride (NCA) monomers using propargylamine as initiator; (2) reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (OEGMA) and gal monomer by an azido modified RAFT agent; (3) combing the obtained two polymeric segments by click reaction; (4) NIR copolymer prodrug was synthesized by chemical linkage of both cyanine dye and anticancer drug doxorubicin to the block copolymer via amide bond and hydrazone, respectively. The obtained NIRF copolymers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and its was measured by means of micelles dynamic light scattering (DLS), field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM), and UV-vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. The prodrug has strong fluorescence in the near-infrared region, and a pH sensitive drug release was confirmed at pH of 5.4 via an in vitro drug release experiment. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry experiments of the prodrug on both HepG2 and NIH3T3 cells reveal that the galactose targeted polymeric prodrug shows a fast and enhanced endocytosis due to the specific interaction for HepG2 cells, indicating the as-prepared polymer is a candidate for theranosis of liver cancer. PMID:25569169

  1. Characterization of hypothetical protein VNG0128C from Halobacterium NRC-1 reveals GALE like activity and its involvement in Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Reshma, S V; Sathyanarayanan, Nitish; Nagendra, H G

    2015-01-01

    VNG0128C, a hypothetical protein from Halobacterium NRC-1, was chosen for detailed insilico and experimental investigations. Computational exercises revealed that VNG0128C functions as NAD(+) binding protein. The phylogenetic analysis with the homolog sequences of VNG0128C suggested that it could act as UDP-galactose 4-epimerase. Hence, the VNG0128C sequence was modeled using a suitable template and docking studies were performed with NAD and UDP-galactose as ligands. The binding interactions strongly indicate that VNG0128C could plausibly act as UDP-galactose 4-epimerase. In order to validate these insilico results, VNG0128C was cloned in pUC57, subcloned in pET22b(+), expressed in BL21 cells and purified using nickel affinity chromatography. An assay using blue dextran was performed to confirm the presence of NAD binding domain. To corroborate the epimerase like enzymatic role of the hypothetical protein, i.e. the ability of the enzyme to convert UDP-galactose to UDP-glucose, the conversion of NAD to NADH was measured. The experimental assay significantly correlated with the insilico predictions, indicating that VNG0128C has a NAD(+) binding domain with epimerase activity. Consequently, its key role in nucleotide-sugar metabolism was thus established. Additionally, the work highlights the need for a methodical characterization of hypothetical proteins (less studied class of biopolymers) to exploit them for relevant applications in the field of biology. PMID:25397923

  2. Selenoprotein R Protects Human Lens Epithelial Cells against D-Galactose-Induced Apoptosis by Regulating Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie; Liu, Hongmei; Zhou, Jun; Huang, Kaixun

    2016-01-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans. Much of selenium's beneficial influence on health is attributed to its presence within 25 selenoproteins. Selenoprotein R (SelR), known as methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 (MsrB1), is a selenium-dependent enzyme that, like other Msrs, is required for lens cell viability. In order to investigate the roles of SelR in protecting human lens epithelial (hLE) cells against damage, the influences of SelR gene knockdown on d-galactose-induced apoptosis in hLE cells were studied. The results showed that both d-galactose and SelR gene knockdown by siRNA independently induced oxidative stress. When SelR-gene-silenced hLE cells were exposed to d-galactose, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) protein level was further increased, mitochondrial membrane potential was significantly decreased and accompanied by a release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. At the same time, the apoptosis cells percentage and the caspase-3 activity were visibly elevated in hLE cells. These results suggested that SelR might protect hLE cell mitochondria and mitigating apoptosis in hLE cells against oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by d-galactose, implying that selenium as a micronutrient may play important roles in hLE cells.

  3. Protective effects of Petroselinum crispum (Mill) Nyman ex A. W. Hill leaf extract on D-galactose-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Vora, Shreya R; Patil, Rahul B; Pillai, Meena M

    2009-05-01

    With an aim to examine the effect of ethanolic extract of P. crispum (Parsley) leaves on the D-galactose-induced oxidative stress in the brain of mouse, the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) involved in oxygen radical (OR)-detoxification and antiperoxidative defense were measured in conjunction with an index of lipid peroxidation in mitochondrial fraction of various regions of the mouse brain. A significant decrease in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity was observed in D-galactose-stressed mice, while catalase activity was increased. Treatment of D-galactose-stressed mice with the ethanolic extract of P. crispum showed protection against the induced oxidative stress in brain regions. Concentration of thiobarbituric acid-reactive product was greatly elevated in D-galactose stress-induced mice and was significantly reduced in the brain regions of these mice upon treatment with P. crispum. It is postulated that parsley shows a protective effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage in the mouse brain.

  4. Pressure-induced inhibition of fast axonal transport of proteins in the rabbit vagus nerve in galactose neuropathy: prevention by an aldose reductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    McLean, W G

    1988-07-01

    Fast and slow anterograde axonal transport and retrograde axonal transport of proteins were studied in the mainly non-myelinated sensory fibres of the vagus nerve of rabbits fed a diet of 50% galactose over a period of 29 days. Galactose feeding had no effect on the rate or protein composition of slow transport nor on the amount of retrogradely transported proteins. There was a slight retardation of fast transported proteins although their composition was unchanged. The galactose feeding led to a significant increase (p less than 0.005) in nerve water content and nerve galactitol but no significant change in myo-inositol. When 20 mm Hg pressure was applied locally to the cervical vagus nerve, fast transported proteins accumulated proximal to the compression zone in the galactose-fed but not in control rabbits. Administration of the aldose reductase inhibitor Statil (ICI 128436) throughout the experiment prevented the increased susceptibility to pressure and the increase in nerve galactitol and water content. The effects of pressure are similar to those found in the streptozotocin-diabetic rat although the underlying mechanisms may differ.

  5. Synthesis of gamma-chaconine and gamma-solanine are catalyzed in potato by two separate glycosyltransferases: UDP-glucose:solanidine glucosyltransferase and UDP-galactose:solanidine galactosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Zimowski, J

    1997-01-01

    UDP-glucose:solanidine glucosyltransferase and UDP-galactose:solanidine galactosyltransferase from cytosol of potato sprouts were partially separated by Sephadex G-100 and Q-Sepharose chromatographies, proving the existence of different glycosylation systems in biosynthesis of alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine.

  6. Chronic systemic D-galactose exposure induces memory loss, neurodegeneration, and oxidative damage in mice: protective effects of R-alpha-lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xu; Zuo, Pingping; Zhang, Qing; Li, Xuekun; Hu, Yazhuo; Long, Jiangang; Packer, Lester; Liu, Jiankang

    2006-06-01

    Chronic systemic exposure of D-galactose to mice, rats, and Drosophila causes the acceleration of senescence and has been used as an aging model. However, the underlying mechanism is as yet unclear. To investigate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in this model, we studied cognitive function, hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and neurogenesis, and peripheral oxidative stress biomarkers and also the protective effects of the antioxidant R-alpha-lipoic acid. Chronic systemic exposure of mice to D-galactose (100 mg/kg, s.c., 7 weeks) induced a spatial memory deficit, an increase in cell karyopyknosis, apoptosis, and caspase-3 protein levels in hippocampal neurons, a decrease in the number of new neurons in the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus, a reduction of migration of neural progenitor cells, and an increase in death of newly formed neurons in the granular cell layer. The D-galactose exposure also induced an increase in peripheral oxidative stress, including an increase in malondialdehyde and decreases in total antioxidative capabilities (T-AOC), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities. A concomitant treatment with lipoic acid ameliorated cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus and also reduced peripheral oxidative damage by decreasing malondialdehyde and increasing T-AOC and T-SOD, without an effect on GSH-Px. These findings suggest that chronic D-galactose exposure induces neurodegeneration by enhancing caspase-mediated apoptosis and inhibiting neurogenesis and neuron migration, as well as increasing oxidative damage. In addition, D-galactose-induced toxicity in mice is a useful model for studying the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and neuroprotective drugs and agents.

  7. Chronic systemic D-galactose exposure induces memory loss, neurodegeneration, and oxidative damage in mice: protective effects of R-alpha-lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xu; Zuo, Pingping; Zhang, Qing; Li, Xuekun; Hu, Yazhuo; Long, Jiangang; Packer, Lester; Liu, Jiankang

    2006-08-15

    Chronic systemic exposure of mice, rats, and Drosophila to D-galactose causes the acceleration of senescence and has been used as an aging model. The underlying mechanism is yet unclear. To investigate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in this model, we studied cognitive function, hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and neurogenesis, and peripheral oxidative stress biomarkers, and also the protective effects of the antioxidant R-alpha-lipoic acid. Chronic systemic exposure of D-galactose (100 mg/kg, s.c., 7 weeks) to mice induced a spatial memory deficit, an increase in cell karyopyknosis, apoptosis and caspase-3 protein levels in hippocampal neurons, a decrease in the number of new neurons in the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus, a reduction of migration of neural progenitor cells, and an increase in death of newly formed neurons in granular cell layer. The D-galactose exposure also induced an increase in peripheral oxidative stress, including an increase in malondialdehyde, a decrease in total anti-oxidative capabilities (T-AOC), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities. A concomitant treatment with lipoic acid ameliorated cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus, and also reduced peripheral oxidative damage by decreasing malondialdehyde and increasing T-AOC and T-SOD, without an effect on GSH-Px. These findings suggest that chronic D-galactose exposure induces neurodegeneration by enhancing caspase-mediated apoptosis and inhibiting neurogenesis and neuron migration, as well as increasing oxidative damage. In addition, D-galactose-induced toxicity in mice is a useful model for studying the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and neuroprotective drugs and agents.

  8. Genetic Interaction of Aspergillus nidulans galR, xlnR and araR in Regulating D-Galactose and L-Arabinose Release and Catabolism Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczyk, Joanna E.; Gruben, Birgit S.; Battaglia, Evy; Wiebenga, Ad; Majoor, Eline; de Vries, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, the xylanolytic regulator XlnR and the arabinanolytic regulator AraR co-regulate pentose catabolism. In nature, the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose are both main building blocks of the polysaccharide arabinoxylan. In pectin and arabinogalactan, these two monosaccharides are found in combination with D-galactose. GalR, the regulator that responds to the presence of D-galactose, regulates the D-galactose catabolic pathway. In this study we investigated the possible interaction between XlnR, AraR and GalR in pentose and/or D-galactose catabolism in A. nidulans. Growth phenotypes and metabolic gene expression profiles were studied in single, double and triple disruptant A. nidulans strains of the genes encoding these paralogous transcription factors. Our results demonstrate that AraR and XlnR not only control pentose catabolic pathway genes, but also genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway. This suggests an interaction between three transcriptional regulators in D-galactose catabolism. Conversely, GalR is not involved in regulation of pentose catabolism, but controls only genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway. PMID:26580075

  9. Genetic Interaction of Aspergillus nidulans galR, xlnR and araR in Regulating D-Galactose and L-Arabinose Release and Catabolism Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Joanna E; Gruben, Birgit S; Battaglia, Evy; Wiebenga, Ad; Majoor, Eline; de Vries, Ronald P

    2015-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, the xylanolytic regulator XlnR and the arabinanolytic regulator AraR co-regulate pentose catabolism. In nature, the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose are both main building blocks of the polysaccharide arabinoxylan. In pectin and arabinogalactan, these two monosaccharides are found in combination with D-galactose. GalR, the regulator that responds to the presence of D-galactose, regulates the D-galactose catabolic pathway. In this study we investigated the possible interaction between XlnR, AraR and GalR in pentose and/or D-galactose catabolism in A. nidulans. Growth phenotypes and metabolic gene expression profiles were studied in single, double and triple disruptant A. nidulans strains of the genes encoding these paralogous transcription factors. Our results demonstrate that AraR and XlnR not only control pentose catabolic pathway genes, but also genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway. This suggests an interaction between three transcriptional regulators in D-galactose catabolism. Conversely, GalR is not involved in regulation of pentose catabolism, but controls only genes of the oxido-reductive D-galactose catabolic pathway.

  10. Effects of magnesium taurate on the onset and progression of galactose-induced experimental cataract: in vivo and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Renu; Iezhitsa, Igor; Awaludin, Nur Adilah; Ahmad Fisol, Nur Farhana; Bakar, Nor Salmah; Agarwal, Puneet; Abdul Rahman, Thuhairah Hasrah; Spasov, Alexander; Ozerov, Alexander; Mohamed Ahmed Salama, Mohamed Salama; Mohd Ismail, Nafeeza

    2013-05-01

    Cataract, a leading cause of blindness, is characterized by lenticular opacities resulting from denaturation of lens proteins due to activation of calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain. Magnesium (Mg(2+)) plays an important role not only in maintaining a low lenticular calcium (Ca(2+)) and sodium concentration but also in preserving the lens redox status. Taurine has also been shown to reduce lenticular oxidative stress. Present study evaluated the anticataract effects of magnesium taurate in vivo and in vitro. Among the five groups of 9 Sprague Dawley rats each, two groups received 30% galactose diet with topical (GDMT) or oral treatment (GDMO) with magnesium taurate. Two groups received 30% galactose diet with topical (GDT) or oral vehicle (GDO). Remaining 1 group received normal diet (ND). Weekly slit lamp examination was done during 21 days experimental period and then all rats were sacrificed; Ca/Mg ratio and antioxidant parameters including reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were measured in the isolated lenses using ELISA. In the in vitro study, 2 groups of 10 normal rat lenses were incubated in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) with galactose while 1 similar group was incubated in DMEM without galactose. In one of the groups, galactose containing medium was supplemented with magnesium taurate. After 48 h of incubation, lenses were photographed and Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio and antioxidant parameters were measured as for in vivo study. The in vivo study, at the end of experimental period, demonstrated delay in the development of cataract with a mean opacity index of 0.53 ± 0.04 and 0.51 ± 0.03 in GDMO (p < 0.05 versus GDO) and GDMT (p < 0.01 versus GDT) respectively. Histopathological grading showed a lower mean value in treated groups, however, the differences from corresponding controls were not significant. Lenticular Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio with a mean value of 1.20 ± 0.26 and 1.05 ± 0.26 in GDMO and GDMT was

  11. Lignans from Schisandra chinensis ameliorate cognition deficits and attenuate brain oxidative damage induced by D-galactose in rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingxu; Shang, Lei; Wang, Mengshi; Zhang, Chenning; Zhao, Xu; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the neuroprotective effects of active compounds from Schisandra chinensis (Trucz.) Baill. (Magnoliaceae) against the D-galactose (D-gal)-induced neurotoxicity in rat. The Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected with D-gal (150 mg/(kg day)) for six weeks and orally administered with water extract or 95 % ethanol extract (partitioned with petroleum ether (PE), chloroform (CF), ethyl acetate (EA) and n-Butanol (NB), respectively) of the fruits of Schisandra chinensis simultaneously. The alteration of cognitive functions was assessed by using Morris water maze and Step-down type passive avoidance test. The results demonstrated that PE fraction was the most effective fraction to ameliorate cognitive deficits. Further biochemical examination indicated that PE could attenuate the activities decreasing of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), the total antioxidant (T-AOC) induced by D-gal, and maintain the normal levels of glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in the serum, prefrontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus of the brain of related rat, selectively. Meanwhile, the compounds of PE fraction were also identified as mainly lignans, thus, these results suggest that lignans from the PE fraction of Schisandra chinensis represented a potential source of medicine for the treatment of the aging-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Human neutrophil migration and activation by BJcuL, a galactose binding lectin purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neutrophil migration to an inflamed site constitutes the first line of the innate immune response against invading microorganisms. Given the crucial role of endogenous lectins in neutrophil mobilization and activation, lectins from exogenous sources have often been considered as putative modulators of leukocyte function. Lectins purified from snake venom have been described as galactoside ligands that induce erythrocyte agglutination and platelet aggregation. This study evaluated human neutrophil migration and activation by C-type lectin BJcuL purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom. Results Utilizing fluorescence microscopy, we observed that biotinylated-BJcuL was evenly distributed on the neutrophil surface, selectively inhibited by D-galactose. Lectin was able to induce modification in the neutrophil morphology in a spherical shape for a polarized observed by optical microscopy and exposure to BJcuL in a Boyden chamber assay resulted in cell migration. After 30 minutes of incubation with BJcuL we found enhanced neutrophil functions, such as respiratory burst, zymozan phagocytosis and an increase in lissosomal volume. In addition, BJcuL delays late apoptosis neutrophils. Conclusion These results demonstrate that BJcuL can be implicated in a wide variety of immunological functions including first-line defense against pathogens, cell trafficking and induction of the innate immune response since lectin was capable of inducing potent neutrophil activation. PMID:21266049

  13. Glutamine synthetase plays a role in D-galactose-induced astrocyte aging in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Gao, Hongchang; Shi, Xiaojie; Wang, Na; Ai, Dongdong; Li, Juan; Ouyang, Li; Yang, Jianbo; Tian, Yueyang; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-10-01

    Astrocytes play multiple roles in physiological and pathological conditions in brain. However, little is known about the alterations of astrocytes in age-related changes, and few aging models of the astrocytes in vitro have been established. Therefore, in the present study, we used d-galactose (D-Gal) to establish astrocyte aging model to explore the alterations of astrocytes in brain aging. We also used (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra to verify the metabolic changes in the cerebral cortex of mice injected with D-gal. The results showed that D-gal (55mM) treatment for 1 week induced senescence characteristics in cultured cortical astrocytes. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis showed that the levels of glutamine synthetase (GS) mRNA and protein were strikingly decreased in the cultured senescent astrocytes, and the senescent astrocytes showed less resistance to the glutamate-induced gliotoxicity. The impairments of glutamate-glutamine cycle and astrocytes were also found in the cerebral cortex of mice treatment with D-gal (100mg/kg) for 6 weeks, and the level of GS mRNA was also found to be reduced markedly, being consistent with the result obtained from the senescent astrocytes in vitro. These results indicate that astrocyte may be the predominant contributor to the pathogenic mechanisms of D-gal-induced brain aging in mice, and GS might be one of the potential therapeutic targets of the aged brain induced by D-gal.

  14. Isolation of a galactose-binding lectin from the venom of the snake Bothrops godmani (Godmann's pit viper).

    PubMed

    Lomonte, B; Rojas, G; Gutiérrez, J M; Ramírez, G

    1990-01-01

    A galactose-binding lectin, isolated from the venom of B. godmani by affinity chromatography, is an acidic protein (pI 4.9) with a subunit mol. wt of about 14,000, occurring mostly as a disulfide-linked dimer of 28,000. A small proportion of lectin appears as a monomer and as a tetramer. The lectin agglutinates erythrocytes from mice, rabbit, cow and human (all ABO types, either Rh positive or negative), but does not agglutinate horse, sheep, goat and snake (Oxybelis aeneus, Colubridae) erythrocytes. The agglutinating activity is inhibited by 1 mM EDTA. The lectin is devoid of lethal, hemorrhagic, myotoxic, proteolytic and phospholipase A2 activities. It is not mitogenic for human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The only effect observed was a moderate induction of edema in the footpad of mice, with a minimal edema-forming dose of 22 micrograms. This effect developed rapidly, and was significantly inhibited by i.p. administration of cyproheptadine, a histamine and serotonin antagonist, before injection of the lectin. Despite the edema-forming activity observed, the low concentration of lectin in crude venom, together with its relatively low potency, suggest that this lectin is not a key component in the development of edema following envenomations by B. godmani.

  15. Antioxidant effects of the orientin and vitexin in Trollius chinensis Bunge in D-galactose-aged mice.

    PubMed

    An, Fang; Yang, Guodong; Tian, Jiaming; Wang, Shuhua

    2012-11-25

    Total flavonoids are the main pharmaceutical components of Trollius chinensis Bunge, and orientin and vitexin are the monomer components of total flavonoids in Trollius chinensis Bunge. In this study, an aged mouse model was established through intraperitoneal injection of D-galactose for 8 weeks, followed by treatment with 40, 20, or 10 mg/kg orientin, vitexin, or a positive control (vitamin E) via intragastric administration for an additional 8 weeks. Orientin, vitexin, and vitamin E improved the general medical status of the aging mice and significantly increased their brain weights. They also produced an obvious rise in total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase levels in the serum, and the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, Na(+)-K(+)-ATP enzyme, and Ca(2+)-Mg(2+)-ATP enzyme in the liver, brain and kidneys. In addition, they significantly reduced malondialdehyde levels in the liver, brain and kidney and lipofuscin levels in the brain. They also significantly improved the neuronal ultrastructure. The 40 mg/kg dose of orientin and vitexin had the same antioxidant capacity as vitamin E. These experimental findings indicate that orientin and vitexin engender anti-aging effects through their antioxidant capacities. PMID:25368632

  16. Unraveling the Conformational Landscape of Ligand Binding to Glucose/Galactose-Binding Protein by Paramagnetic NMR and MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Unione, Luca; Ortega, Gabriel; Mallagaray, Alvaro; Corzana, Francisco; Pérez-Castells, Javier; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Millet, Oscar

    2016-08-19

    Protein dynamics related to function can nowadays be structurally well characterized (i.e., instances obtained by high resolution structures), but they are still ill-defined energetically, and the energy landscapes are only accessible computationally. This is the case for glucose-galactose binding protein (GGBP), where the crystal structures of the apo and holo states provide structural information for the domain rearrangement upon ligand binding, while the time scale and the energetic determinants for such concerted dynamics have been so far elusive. Here, we use GGBP as a paradigm to define a functional conformational landscape, both structurally and energetically, by using an innovative combination of paramagnetic NMR experiments and MD simulations. Anisotropic NMR parameters induced by self-alignment of paramagnetic metal ions was used to characterize the ensemble of conformations adopted by the protein in solution while the rate of interconversion between conformations was elucidated by long molecular dynamics simulation on two states of GGBP, the closed-liganded (holo_cl) and open-unloaded (apo_op) states. Our results demonstrate that, in its apo state, the protein coexists between open-like (68%) and closed-like (32%) conformations, with an exchange rate around 25 ns. Despite such conformational heterogeneity, the presence of the ligand is the ultimate driving force to unbalance the equilibrium toward the holo_cl form, in a mechanism largely governed by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:27219646

  17. Cerebralcare Granule(®), a Chinese Herb Compound Preparation, Attenuates D-Galactose Induced Memory Impairment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhuo; Yang, Honggai; Zhang, Jingze; Huo, Liqin; Chen, Hong; Li, Yuming; Liu, Changxiao; Gao, Wenyuan

    2016-09-01

    Cerebralcare granule(®) (CG) is a preparation of Traditional Chinese Medicine that widely used in China. It was approved by the China State Food and Drug Administration for treatment of headache and dizziness associated with cerebrovascular diseases. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether CG had protective effect against D-galactose (gal)-induced memory impairment and to explore the mechanism of its action. D-gal was administered (100 mg/kg, subcutaneously) once daily for 8 weeks to induced memory deficit and neurotoxicity in the brain of aging mouse and CG (7.5, 15, and 30 g/kg) were simultaneously administered orally. The present study demonstrates that CG can alleviate aging in the mouse brain induced by D-gal through improving behavioral performance and reducing brain cell damage in the hippocampus. CG prevents aging mainly via suppression of oxidative stress response, such as decreasing NO and MDA levels, renewing activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx, as well as decreasing AChE activity in the brain of D-gal-treated mice. In addition, CG prevents aging through inhibiting NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response and caspase-3-medicated neurodegeneration in the brain of D-gal treated mice. Taken together, these data clearly demonstrates that subcutaneous injection of D-gal produced memory deficit, meanwhile CG can protect neuron from D-gal insults and improve memory ability.

  18. New mutations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that partially relieve both glucose and galactose repression activate the protein kinase Snf1.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Cristina; Sanz, Pascual; Gancedo, Carlos

    2003-03-01

    We isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae two mutants, esc1-1 and ESC3-1, in which genes FBP1, ICL1 or GDH2 were partially derepressed during growth in glucose or galactose. The isolation was done starting with a triple mutant pyc1 pyc2 mth1 unable to grow in glucose-ammonium medium and selecting for mutants able to grow in the non-permissive medium. HXT1 and HXT2 which encode glucose transporters were expressed at high glucose concentrations in both esc1-1 and ESC3-1 mutants, while derepression of invertase at low glucose concentrations was impaired. REG1, cloned as a suppressor of ESC3-1, was not allelic to ESC3-1. Two-hybrid analysis showed an increased interaction of the protein kinase Snf1 with Snf4 in the ESC3-1 mutant; this was not due to mutations in SNF1 or SNF4. ESC3-1 did not bypass the requirement of Snf1 for derepression. We hypothesize that ESC3-1 either facilitates activation of Snf1 or interferes with its glucose-dependent inactivation.

  19. Multi-day pre-clinical demonstration of glucose/galactose binding protein-based fiber optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Weidemaier, Kristin; Lastovich, Alexander; Keith, Steven; Pitner, J Bruce; Sistare, Mark; Jacobson, Ross; Kurisko, David

    2011-06-15

    We report here the first pre-clinical demonstration of continuous glucose tracking by fluorophore-labeled and genetically engineered glucose/galactose binding protein (GGBP). Acrylodan-labeled GGBP was immobilized in a hydrogel matrix at the tip of a small diameter optical fiber contained in a stainless steel needle. The fiber optic biosensors were inserted subcutaneously into Yucatan and Yorkshire swine, and the sensor response to changing glucose levels was monitored at intervals over a 7-day period. Sensor mean percent error on day 7 was 16.4±5.0% using a single daily reference blood glucose value to calibrate the sensor. The GGBP sensor's susceptibility to common interferents was tested in a well-plate system using human sera. No significant interference was observed from the tested interferents except for tetracycline at the drug's maximum plasma concentration. The robust performance of the GGBP-based fiber optic sensor in swine models and resistance to interferents indicates the potential of this technology for continuous glucose monitoring in humans.

  20. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pathogenic mutations induce mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic death in transmitochondrial cells incubated with galactose medium.

    PubMed

    Ghelli, Anna; Zanna, Claudia; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Schapira, Anthony H V; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Carelli, Valerio; Rugolo, Michela

    2003-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited form of central vision loss, is associated with mitochondrial DNA pathogenic point mutations affecting different subunits of complex I. We here report that osteosarcoma-derived cytoplasmic hybrids (cybrid) cell lines harboring one of the three most frequent LHON pathogenic mutations, at positions 11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6, undergo cell death when galactose replaces glucose in the medium, contrary to control cybrids that maintain some growth capabilities. This is a well known way to produce a metabolic stress, forcing the cells to rely on the mitochondrial respiratory chain to produce ATP. We demonstrate that LHON cybrid cell death is apoptotic, showing chromatin condensation and nuclear DNA laddering. Moreover, we also document the mitochondrial involvement in the activation of the apoptotic cascade, as shown by the increased release of cytochrome c into the cytosol in LHON cybrid cells as compared with controls. Cybrids bearing the 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 mutations seemed more readily prone to undergo apoptosis as compared with the 11778/ND4 mutation. In conclusion, LHON cybrid cells forced by the reduced rate of glycolytic flux to utilize oxidative metabolism are sensitized to an apoptotic death through a mechanism involving mitochondria.

  1. cDNA cloning and functional expression of the alpha-D-galactose-binding lectin frutalin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Costa, Sofia; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2009-11-01

    cDNA clones encoding frutalin, the alpha-D-galactose-binding lectin expressed in breadfruit seeds (Artocarpus incisa), were isolated and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences indicated that frutalin may be encoded by a family of genes. The NCBI database searches revealed that the frutalin sequence is highly homologous with jacalin and mornigaG sequences. Frutalin cDNA was re-amplified and cloned into the commercial expression vector pET-25b(+) for frutalin production in Escherichia coli. An experimental factorial design was employed to maximise the soluble expression of the recombinant lectin. The results indicated that temperature, time of induction, concentration of IPTG and the interaction between the concentration of IPTG and the time of induction had the most significant effects on the soluble expression level of recombinant frutalin. The optimal culture conditions were as follows: induction with 1 mM IPTG at 22 degrees C for 20 h, yielding 16 mg/l of soluble recombinant frutalin. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis revealed that recombinant frutalin was successfully expressed by bacteria with the expected molecular weight (17 kDa). These analyses also showed that recombinant frutalin was mainly produced as insoluble protein. Recombinant frutalin produced by bacteria revealed agglutination properties and carbohydrate-binding specificity similar to the native breadfruit lectin.

  2. Cytotoxic effects of native and recombinant frutalin, a plant galactose-binding lectin, on HeLa cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Nicolau, Ana; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2011-01-01

    Frutalin is the α-D-galactose-binding lectin isolated from breadfruit seeds. Frutalin was obtained from two different sources: native frutalin was purified from its natural origin, and recombinant frutalin was produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. This work aimed to study and compare the effect of native and recombinant frutalin on HeLa cervical cancer cells proliferation and apoptosis. Furthermore, the interaction between frutalin and the HeLa cells was investigated by confocal microscopy. Despite having different carbohydrate-binding affinities, native and recombinant frutalin showed an identical magnitude of cytotoxicity on HeLa cells growth (IC₅₀~100 μg/mL) and equally induced cell apoptosis. The interaction studies showed that both lectins were rapidly internalised and targeted to HeLa cell's nucleus. Altogether, these results indicate that frutalin action is not dependent on its sugar-binding properties. This study provides important information about the bioactivity of frutalin and contributes to the understanding of the plant lectins cytotoxic activity.

  3. Lignans from Schisandra chinensis ameliorate cognition deficits and attenuate brain oxidative damage induced by D-galactose in rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingxu; Shang, Lei; Wang, Mengshi; Zhang, Chenning; Zhao, Xu; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the neuroprotective effects of active compounds from Schisandra chinensis (Trucz.) Baill. (Magnoliaceae) against the D-galactose (D-gal)-induced neurotoxicity in rat. The Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected with D-gal (150 mg/(kg day)) for six weeks and orally administered with water extract or 95 % ethanol extract (partitioned with petroleum ether (PE), chloroform (CF), ethyl acetate (EA) and n-Butanol (NB), respectively) of the fruits of Schisandra chinensis simultaneously. The alteration of cognitive functions was assessed by using Morris water maze and Step-down type passive avoidance test. The results demonstrated that PE fraction was the most effective fraction to ameliorate cognitive deficits. Further biochemical examination indicated that PE could attenuate the activities decreasing of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), the total antioxidant (T-AOC) induced by D-gal, and maintain the normal levels of glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in the serum, prefrontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus of the brain of related rat, selectively. Meanwhile, the compounds of PE fraction were also identified as mainly lignans, thus, these results suggest that lignans from the PE fraction of Schisandra chinensis represented a potential source of medicine for the treatment of the aging-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26847610

  4. Protective Effects of Selenium, Vitamin E, and Purple Carrot Anthocyanins on D-Galactose-Induced Oxidative Damage in Blood, Liver, Heart and Kidney Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Zhang, Yunlong; Yuan, Yuan; Sun, Yong; Qin, Yan; Deng, Zeyuan; Li, Hongyan

    2016-10-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the protective effects of selenium (Se), vitamin E (Vit E) and anthocyanins from purple carrots and their combination against the oxidative stress induced by D-galactose in rats. A total of 80 male rats were equally divided into 11 groups, one of which acted as control (I) just receiving intraperitoneal injections of physiological saline. The remaining ten groups (II-XI) were intraperitoneally injected with D-galactose at a dose of 400 mg kg(-1) body weight (BW) per day for 42 consecutive days. Rats in groups III-XI were treated with antioxidants via gavage per day as follows: group III: Se-methylselenocysteine (SeMSC), IV: Se as sodium selenite (Na2SeO3), V: Se-enriched yeast (SeY), VI: Vit E as α-tocopherol acetate, VII: anthocyanin from purple carrots (APC), VIII: APC + Vit E, IX: SeMSC + APC+ Vit E, X: Na2SeO3 + APC + Vit E, XI: SeY + Ant + Vit E. The results showed that the rats treated with antioxidants (III-XI) showed significant decreases in the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and carbonyl protein (PCO) compared with the D-galactose-treated group (II) in the heart, liver, kidneys, and blood. Moreover, there were significant increases in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione (GSH) concentration, and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in the heart, liver, kidneys, and blood of antioxidant-treated animals (III-XI) than those in control group (I). In addition, the combined treatments of two or three antioxidants showed greater antioxidant activities than those of individual treatments, suggesting the synergistic antioxidant effects of Se, Vit E, and APC. In conclusion, all the antioxidants exhibited protective effects against D-galactose-induced oxidative damage in rats, and these antioxidants showed a synergistic effect. PMID:27025718

  5. Protective Effects of Selenium, Vitamin E, and Purple Carrot Anthocyanins on D-Galactose-Induced Oxidative Damage in Blood, Liver, Heart and Kidney Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Zhang, Yunlong; Yuan, Yuan; Sun, Yong; Qin, Yan; Deng, Zeyuan; Li, Hongyan

    2016-10-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the protective effects of selenium (Se), vitamin E (Vit E) and anthocyanins from purple carrots and their combination against the oxidative stress induced by D-galactose in rats. A total of 80 male rats were equally divided into 11 groups, one of which acted as control (I) just receiving intraperitoneal injections of physiological saline. The remaining ten groups (II-XI) were intraperitoneally injected with D-galactose at a dose of 400 mg kg(-1) body weight (BW) per day for 42 consecutive days. Rats in groups III-XI were treated with antioxidants via gavage per day as follows: group III: Se-methylselenocysteine (SeMSC), IV: Se as sodium selenite (Na2SeO3), V: Se-enriched yeast (SeY), VI: Vit E as α-tocopherol acetate, VII: anthocyanin from purple carrots (APC), VIII: APC + Vit E, IX: SeMSC + APC+ Vit E, X: Na2SeO3 + APC + Vit E, XI: SeY + Ant + Vit E. The results showed that the rats treated with antioxidants (III-XI) showed significant decreases in the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and carbonyl protein (PCO) compared with the D-galactose-treated group (II) in the heart, liver, kidneys, and blood. Moreover, there were significant increases in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione (GSH) concentration, and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in the heart, liver, kidneys, and blood of antioxidant-treated animals (III-XI) than those in control group (I). In addition, the combined treatments of two or three antioxidants showed greater antioxidant activities than those of individual treatments, suggesting the synergistic antioxidant effects of Se, Vit E, and APC. In conclusion, all the antioxidants exhibited protective effects against D-galactose-induced oxidative damage in rats, and these antioxidants showed a synergistic effect.

  6. Allergy to Red Meat: A Diagnosis Made by the Patient and Confirmed by an Assay for IgE Antibodies Specific for Alpha-1,3-Galactose.

    PubMed

    Kaloga, Mamadou; Kourouma, Sarah; Kouassi, Yao Isidore; Ecra, Elidje Joseph; Gbery, Ildevert Patrice; Allou, Ange S; Diabate, Almamy; Djeha, Djokouehi; Sangaré, Abdoulaye; Yoboue, Yao Pauline

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of allergy to red meat observed in Ivory Coast. A 49-year-old male presented with pruritus. The diagnosis of allergy to red meat was confirmed by an assay for IgE antibodies specific for alpha-1,3 galactose. Interestingly, the disease was considered a spell to the patient who was suspected of being a sorcerer by the community. PMID:26933408

  7. Genome Sequence of Vibrio sp. Strain EJY3, an Agarolytic Marine Bacterium Metabolizing 3,6-Anhydro-l-Galactose as a Sole Carbon Source

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hanseong; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Saeyoung; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Kim, Byung-Yong; Song, Heesang; Lim, Kwang-il

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic fate of 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose (l-AHG) is unknown in the global marine carbon cycle. Vibrio sp. strain EJY3 is an agarolytic marine bacterium that can utilize l-AHG as a sole carbon source. To elucidate the metabolic pathways of l-AHG, we have sequenced the complete genome of Vibrio sp. strain EJY3. PMID:22535948

  8. CD23 molecule acts as a galactose-binding lectin in the cell aggregation of EBV-transformed human B-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kijimoto-Ochiai, S; Uede, T

    1995-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human B-cell lines, L-KT9 and DH3 cells express CD23 antigen, and grow in a mixture of single and aggregated cells. The CD23 molecule has high amino acid sequence homology with C-type lectin and recently we have shown that the solubilized CD23 molecule can really interact with galactose residues on glycoproteins. In this study, therefore, we tested whether CD23 antigen on the cell surface really acts as a galactose-binding lectin in the aggregation of these cells. The EBV-transformed cells (L-KT9) were separated into an aggregated-cell-rich fraction and a single-cell-rich fraction. Aggregated cells disaggregated after removal of galactose by beta-galactosidase treatment, whereas single cells made large aggregation on sialidase treatment, and this aggregation was inhibited in the presence of asialo-fetuin. On the other hand, naturally aggregated cells become single cells with anti-CD23 monoclonal antibody (mAB) as well as the soluble form of CD23, but not with anti-CD21 mAB. In addition, L-KT9 and DH3 cells bound to asialo-fetuin-coupled Sepharose (ASF-Sepharose) and this binding was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment of cells with anti-CD23, but not with anti-CD21 or other anti-adhesion molecules. From these results, we conclude that the naturally aggregated state of EBV-transformed cells occurs mainly through the interaction of CD23 as a lectin molecule and galactose residues as its ligand.

  9. L-arabinose/D-galactose 1-dehydrogenase of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii characterised and applied for bioconversion of L-arabinose to L-arabonate with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Aro-Kärkkäinen, Niina; Toivari, Mervi; Maaheimo, Hannu; Ylilauri, Mikko; Pentikäinen, Olli T; Andberg, Martina; Oja, Merja; Penttilä, Merja; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu

    2014-12-01

    Four potential dehydrogenases identified through literature and bioinformatic searches were tested for L-arabonate production from L-arabinose in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The most efficient enzyme, annotated as a D-galactose 1-dehydrogenase from the pea root nodule bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, was purified from S. cerevisiae as a homodimeric protein and characterised. We named the enzyme as a L-arabinose/D-galactose 1-dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.-), Rl AraDH. It belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family, prefers NADP(+) but uses also NAD(+) as a cofactor, and showed highest catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) towards L-arabinose, D-galactose and D-fucose. Based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and modelling studies, the enzyme prefers the α-pyranose form of L-arabinose, and the stable oxidation product detected is L-arabino-1,4-lactone which can, however, open slowly at neutral pH to a linear L-arabonate form. The pH optimum for the enzyme was pH 9, but use of a yeast-in-vivo-like buffer at pH 6.8 indicated that good catalytic efficiency could still be expected in vivo. Expression of the Rl AraDH dehydrogenase in S. cerevisiae, together with the galactose permease Gal2 for L-arabinose uptake, resulted in production of 18 g of L-arabonate per litre, at a rate of 248 mg of L-arabonate per litre per hour, with 86 % of the provided L-arabinose converted to L-arabonate. Expression of a lactonase-encoding gene from Caulobacter crescentus was not necessary for L-arabonate production in yeast.

  10. Galactose supplementation enhance sialylation of recombinant Fc-fusion protein in CHO cell: an insight into the role of galactosylation in sialylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jintao; Wang, Jie; Fan, Li; Chen, Xinning; Hu, Dongdong; Deng, Xiancun; Poon, H Fai; Wang, Haibin; Liu, Xuping; Tan, Wen-Song

    2015-07-01

    Sialic acid levels of therapeutic glycoprotein play an important role in plasma half-life. An undesirable decrease of sialic acid content was observed when we increased Fc-fusion protein productivity fourfold in a GS-CHO cell line by bioprocess optimization. We investigated the potential mechanism for the sialic acid content reduction. We found that limited nucleotide sugar precursor and the extracellular sialidase were not responsible for the reduction of the sialic acid content after titer improvement. Oligosaccharide analysis revealed that the lack of protein galactosylation was the potential cause for the reduction of sialic acid content. Thus we validated this notion by evaluated galactose supplementation in 2 L bioreactors. Cell culture performance was not impacted by addition of up to 40 mM galactose except for the glucose consumption rate. Addition of 20 mM galactose to the bioreactor resulted in the increase of 44 % for total sialic acid content and 20.3 % for sialylated glycans. These data were further validated when the process was run on 200 L scaled bioreactor. These data together show that the galactosylation plays an apparent role in sialylation in our current system.

  11. L-xylo-3-hexulose reductase is the missing link in the oxidoreductive pathway for D-galactose catabolism in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Mojzita, Dominik; Herold, Silvia; Metz, Benjamin; Seiboth, Bernhard; Richard, Peter

    2012-07-27

    In addition to the well established Leloir pathway for the catabolism of d-galactose in fungi, the oxidoreductive pathway has been recently identified. In this oxidoreductive pathway, D-galactose is converted via a series of NADPH-dependent reductions and NAD(+)-dependent oxidations into D-fructose. The pathway intermediates include galactitol, L-xylo-3-hexulose, and d-sorbitol. This study identified the missing link in the pathway, the L-xylo-3-hexulose reductase that catalyzes the conversion of L-xylo-3-hexulose to D-sorbitol. In Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) and Aspergillus niger, we identified the genes lxr4 and xhrA, respectively, that encode the l-xylo-3-hexulose reductases. The deletion of these genes resulted in no growth on galactitol and in reduced growth on D-galactose. The LXR4 was heterologously expressed, and the purified protein showed high specificity for L-xylo-3-hexulose with a K(m) = 2.0 ± 0.5 mm and a V(max) = 5.5 ± 1.0 units/mg. We also confirmed that the product of the LXR4 reaction is D-sorbitol.

  12. Control of chondroitin sulphate biosynthesis. beta-D-Xylopyranosides as substrates for UDP-galactose: D-xylose transferase from embryonic-chicken cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J A; Robinson, H C

    1981-01-01

    Embryonic-chicken epiphyseal cartilage was incubated in vitro with a variety of beta-xylosides and the amount of [3H]acetate incorporation into chondroitin sulphate was determined under conditions when normal protein core production was inhibited by cycloheximide. The ability of the different beta-xylosides to relieve thea cycloheximide-mediated inhibition of chondroitin sulphate synthesis was influenced by the nature of the aglycan group of te xyloside. beta-Xylosides with apolar and uncharged aglycan groups were most effective and produced a severalfold stimulation of chondroitin sulphate biosynthesis. beta-Xylosides with charged aglycan groups were less effective initiators of chondroitin sulphate synthesis. The rate of galactose transfer from UDP-galactose to each of the beta-xylosides, catalysed by a cell-free microsomal preparation from embryonic cartilage, was measured. This study showed that the nature of the aglycan group of the beta-xyloside was a factor determining the capacity of the xyloside to act as an acceptor for galactosyltransferase I, the enzyme that catalyses the first galactose transfer reaction of chondroitin sulphate synthesis. The aglycan group of the xyloside also appeared to influence other steps leading to chondroitin sulphate chain initiation in vitro. PMID:6796066

  13. Cloning and expression analysis of a UDP-galactose/glucose pyrophosphorylase from melon fruit provides evidence for the major metabolic pathway of galactose metabolism in raffinose oligosaccharide metabolizing plants.

    PubMed

    Dai, Nir; Petreikov, Marina; Portnoy, Vitaly; Katzir, Nurit; Pharr, David M; Schaffer, Arthur A

    2006-09-01

    The Cucurbitaceae translocate a significant portion of their photosynthate as raffinose and stachyose, which are galactosyl derivatives of sucrose. These are initially hydrolyzed by alpha-galactosidase to yield free galactose (Gal) and, accordingly, Gal metabolism is an important pathway in Cucurbitaceae sink tissue. We report here on a novel plant-specific enzyme responsible for the nucleotide activation of phosphorylated Gal and the subsequent entry of Gal into sink metabolism. The enzyme was antibody purified, sequenced, and the gene cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The heterologous protein showed the characteristics of a dual substrate UDP-hexose pyrophosphorylase (PPase) with activity toward both Gal-1-P and glucose (Glc)-1-P in the uridinylation direction and their respective UDP-sugars in the reverse direction. The two other enzymes involved in Glc-P and Gal-P uridinylation are UDP-Glc PPase and uridyltransferase, and these were also cloned, heterologously expressed, and characterized. The gene expression and enzyme activities of all three enzymes in melon (Cucumis melo) fruit were measured. The UDP-Glc PPase was expressed in melon fruit to a similar extent as the novel enzyme, but the expressed protein was specific for Glc-1-P in the UDP-Glc synthesis direction and did not catalyze the nucleotide activation of Gal-1-P. The uridyltransferase gene was only weakly expressed in melon fruit, and activity was not observed in crude extracts. The results indicate that this novel enzyme carries out both the synthesis of UDP-Gal from Gal-1-P as well as the subsequent synthesis of Glc-1-P from the epimerase product, UDP-Glc, and thus plays a key role in melon fruit sink metabolism.

  14. A galactose-functionalized dendritic siRNA-nanovector to potentiate hepatitis C inhibition in liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, Abirami; Reddy, B. Uma; Raghav, Nallani; Ravi, Vijay Kumar; Kumar, Anuj; Maiti, Prabal K.; Sood, A. K.; Jayaraman, N.; Das, Saumitra

    2015-10-01

    A RNAi based antiviral strategy holds the promise to impede hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection overcoming the problem of emergence of drug resistant variants, usually encountered in the interferon free direct-acting antiviral therapy. Targeted delivery of siRNA helps minimize adverse `off-target' effects and maximize the efficacy of therapeutic response. Herein, we report the delivery of siRNA against the conserved 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of HCV RNA using a liver-targeted dendritic nano-vector functionalized with a galactopyranoside ligand (DG). Physico-chemical characterization revealed finer details of complexation of DG with siRNA, whereas molecular dynamic simulations demonstrated sugar moieties projecting ``out'' in the complex. Preferential delivery of siRNA to the liver was achieved through a highly specific ligand-receptor interaction between dendritic galactose and the asialoglycoprotein receptor. The siRNA-DG complex exhibited perinuclear localization in liver cells and co-localization with viral proteins. The histopathological studies showed the systemic tolerance and biocompatibility of DG. Further, whole body imaging and immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the preferential delivery of the nucleic acid to mice liver. Significant decrease in HCV RNA levels (up to 75%) was achieved in HCV subgenomic replicon and full length HCV-JFH1 infectious cell culture systems. The multidisciplinary approach provides the `proof of concept' for restricted delivery of therapeutic siRNAs using a target oriented dendritic nano-vector.A RNAi based antiviral strategy holds the promise to impede hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection overcoming the problem of emergence of drug resistant variants, usually encountered in the interferon free direct-acting antiviral therapy. Targeted delivery of siRNA helps minimize adverse `off-target' effects and maximize the efficacy of therapeutic response. Herein, we report the delivery of siRNA against the conserved 5'-untranslated

  15. Silybum marianum oil attenuates oxidative stress and ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction in mice treated with D-galactose

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu Yun; Dong, Ying; Tu, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Zhou, Xing Hua; Xu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Silybum marianum has been used as herbal medicine for the treatment of liver disease, liver cirrhosis, and to prevent liver cancer in Europe and Asia since ancient times. Silybum marianum oil (SMO), a by-product of silymarin production, is rich in essential fatty acids, phospholipids, sterols, and vitamin E. However, it has not been very good development and use. Objective: In the present study, we used olive oil as a control to investigate the antioxidant and anti-aging effect of SMO in D-galactose (D-gal)-induced aging mice. Materials and Methods: D-gal was injected intraperitoneally (500 mg/kg body weight daily) for 7 weeks while SMO was simultaneously administered orally. The triglycerides (TRIG) and cholesterol (CHOL) levels were estimated in the serum. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), monoamine oxidase (MAO), malondialdehyde (MDA), caspase-3, and Bcl-2 were determined in the liver and brain. The activities of Na+-K+-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase, membrane potential (ΔΨm), and membrane fluidity of the liver mitochondrial were estimated. Results: SMO decreased levels of TRIG and CHOL in aging mice. SMO administration elevated the activities of SOD, GSH-Px, and T-AOC, which are suppressed by aging. The levels of MAO and MDA in the liver and brain were reduced by SMO administration in aging mice. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that SMO significantly decreased the concentration of caspase-3 and improved the activity of Bcl-2 in the liver and brain of aging mice. Furthermore, SMO significantly attenuated the D-gal induced liver mitochondrial dysfunction by improving the activities of Na+-K+-ATPase, Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase, membrane potential (ΔΨm), and membrane fluidity. Conclusion: These results indicate that SMO effectively attenuated oxidative damage and improved apoptosis related factors as well as liver mitochondrial dysfunction in aging mice. PMID:24914315

  16. Uridine diphosphate galactose-4-epimerase. Uridine monophosphate-dependent reduction by alpha- and beta-D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Kang, U G; Nolan, L D; Frey, P A

    1975-09-25

    Rates of UMP-dependent reduction of the DPN+ associated with Escherichia coli UDP-galactose-4-epimerase at 27 degrees and 0.2 M ionic strength in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer, pH 8.5, are reported. The reaction exhibits excellent pseudo-first order behavior when D-glucose is at anomeric equilibrium. The effects of [UMP] and [glucose] on the observed first order rate constants are consistent with the following equation. The symbols phi are empirical parameters. (See article). The data indicate that the pathway involves random equilibrium binding of UMP and glucose followed by rate-limiting decomposition of the ternary complex to epimerase-DNPH. The binding parameters indicate that the principal activating effect of UMP is not simply to increase the affinity of the enzyme for glucose. UMP appears to increase the reactivity or availability of enzyme-bound DPN+. The kinetic isotope effect for the reaction of D-]1-2H]glucose (kH/kD) is 4.2, which confirms that C-1 is oxidized and that hydride transfer is rate limiting. Both of the purified anomers, alpha- and beta-D-glucose, reduce the enzyme-bound DPN+. As indicated by the deviations from pseudo-first order kinetics because of concurrent mutarotation, the beta anomer is the more reactive, reacting about 4 to 5 times faster than the alpha anomer at concentrations well below saturation. Is is suggested that the lack of stereo-specificity in this reaction may be attributed to the two anomers being productively bound with their opposite faces projecting toward C-4 of bound DPN+. Nonstereospecific oxidation of alpha- and beta-D-glucose may be a model for the mechanism of UDP-hexose epimerization, which also involves nonstereospecific hydride transfer.

  17. Cellular signaling and production of galactose-deficient IgA1 in IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Reily, Colin; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Mestecky, Jiri; Julian, Bruce A; Willey, Christopher D; Novak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN), the leading cause of primary glomerulonephritis, is characterized by IgA1-containing immunodeposits in the glomeruli. IgAN is a chronic disease, with up to 40% of patients progressing to end-stage renal disease, with no disease-specific treatment. Multiple studies of the origin of the glomerular immunodeposits have linked elevated circulating levels of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (galactose-deficient in some O-glycans; Gd-IgA1) with formation of nephritogenic Gd-IgA1-containing immune complexes. Gd-IgA1 is recognized as an autoantigen in susceptible individuals by anti-glycan autoantibodies, resulting in immune complexes that may ultimately deposit in the kidney and induce glomerular injury. Genetic studies have revealed that an elevated level of Gd-IgA1 in the circulation of IgAN patients is a hereditable trait. Moreover, recent genome-wide association studies have identified several immunity-related loci that associated with IgAN. Production of Gd-IgA1 by IgA1-secreting cells of IgAN patients has been attributed to abnormal expression and activity of several key glycosyltransferases. Substantial evidence is emerging that abnormal signaling in IgA1-producing cells is related to the production of Gd-IgA1. As Gd-IgA1 is the key autoantigen in IgAN, understanding the genetic, biochemical, and environmental aspects of the abnormal signaling in IgA1-producing cells will provide insight into possible targets for future disease-specific therapy.

  18. Macrophage Galactose-Type Lectin-1 Deficiency Is Associated with Increased Neutrophilia and Hyperinflammation in Gram-Negative Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jondle, Christopher N; Sharma, Atul; Simonson, Tanner J; Larson, Benjamin; Mishra, Bibhuti B; Sharma, Jyotika

    2016-04-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), the carbohydrate-recognizing molecules, orchestrate host immune response in homeostasis and in inflammation. In the present study we examined the function of macrophage galactose-type lectin-1 (MGL1), a mammalian CLR, in pneumonic sepsis, a deadly immune disorder frequently associated with a nonresolving hyperinflammation. In a murine model of pneumonic sepsis using pulmonary infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae, the expression of MGL1 was upregulated in the lungs of K. pneumoniae-infected mice, and the deficiency of this CLR in MGL1(-/-) mice resulted in significantly increased mortality to infection than in the MGL1-sufficient wild-type mice, despite a similar bacterial burden. The phagocytic cells from MGL1(-/-) mice did not exhibit any defects in bacterial uptake and intracellular killing and were fully competent in neutrophil extracellular trap formation, a recently identified extracellular killing modality of neutrophils. Instead, the increased susceptibility of MGL1(-/-) mice seemed to correlate with severe lung pathology, indicating that MGL1 is required for resolution of pulmonary inflammation. Indeed, the MGL1(-/-) mice exhibited a hyperinflammatory response, massive pulmonary neutrophilia, and an increase in neutrophil-associated immune mediators. Concomitantly, MGL1-deficient neutrophils exhibited an increased influx in pneumonic lungs of K. pneumoniae-infected mice. Taken together, these results show a previously undetermined role of MGL1 in controlling neutrophilia during pneumonic infection, thus playing an important role in resolution of inflammation. To our knowledge, this is the first study depicting a protective function of MGL1 in an acute pneumonic bacterial infection. PMID:26912318

  19. Carnosine and taurine treatments decreased oxidative stress and tissue damage induced by D-galactose in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kalaz, Esra Betül; Çoban, Jale; Aydın, A Fatih; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Öztezcan, Serdar; Uysal, Müjdat

    2014-03-01

    D-galactose (GAL) causes aging-related changes and oxidative stress in the organism. We investigated the effect of carnosine (CAR) or taurine (TAU), having antioxidant effects, on hepatic injury and oxidative stress in GAL-treated rats. Rats received GAL (300 mg/kg; s.c.; 5 days/week) alone or together with CAR (250 mg/kg/daily; i.p.; 5 days/week) or TAU (2.5 % w/w; in rat chow) for 2 months. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities and hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC) and glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-0050x), and glutathione transferase (GST) activities were determined. Hepatic expressions of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax and Ki-67 were evaluated. Serum ALT, AST, hepatic MDA, and PC levels were observed to increase in GAL-treated rats. Hepatic Bax expression, but not Bcl-2, increased, Ki-67 expression decreased. GAL treatment caused decreases in GSH levels, SOD and GSH-Px activities in the liver. Hepatic mRNA expressions of SOD, but not GSH-Px, also diminished. CAR or TAU treatments caused significant decreases in serum ALT and AST activities. These treatments decreased apoptosis and increased proliferation and ameliorated histopathological findings in the livers of GAL-treated rats. Both CAR and TAU reduced MDA and PC levels and elevated GSH levels, SOD and GSH-Px (non significant in TAU + GAL group) activities. These treatments did not alter hepatic mRNA expressions of SOD and GSH-Px enzymes. Our results indicate that CAR and TAU restored liver prooxidant status together with histopathological amelioration in GAL-induced liver damage.

  20. Galactose-Deficient IgA1 as a Candidate Urinary Polypeptide Marker of IgA Nephropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Landino; Hall, Stacy; Wyatt, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), circulatory IgA1 and IgA1 in mesangial deposits contain elevated amounts of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1). We hypothesized that a fraction of Gd-IgA1 from the glomerular deposits and/or circulation may be excreted into the urine and thus represent a disease-specific biomarker. Levels of urinary IgA and Gd-IgA1 were determined in 207 patients with IgAN, 205 patients with other renal diseases, and 57 healthy controls, recruited in USA, Japan, and Italy. Urinary IgA was similarly elevated in patients with IgAN and renal-disease controls compared with healthy controls. However, urinary Gd-IgA1 levels were higher in patients with IgAN (IgAN, 28.0 ± 17.9; disease controls, 20.6 ± 17.4 units/mg urinary creatinine; P < 0.0001). Lectin western blotting data confirmed these results. In IgAN patients, levels of urinary Gd-IgA1 correlated with proteinuria (P < 0.001). When we purified IgA from serum and urine of an IgAN patient, the relative proportion of Gd-IgA1 to total IgA1 was higher in the urine compared with serum, suggesting selective excretion of Gd-IgA1 in IgAN. In summary, urinary excretion of Gd-IgA1 was elevated in patients with IgAN and the urinary Gd-IgA1 levels correlated with proteinuria. Urinary Gd-IgA1 may thus represent a disease-specific biomarker of IgAN.

  1. Anti-apoptotic and anti-glycative effects of asiatic acid in the brain of D-galactose treated mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-chun; Yin, Mei-chin; Mong, Mei-chin

    2015-02-01

    Protection of asiatic acid (AA) in mice brain against D-galactose (DG) induced aging was examined. AA at 5, 10 or 20 mg kg(-1) per day was supplied to DG treated mice for 8 weeks. AA intake at 10 or 20 mg kg(-1) per day increased its deposit in brain. DG treatment increased Bax, cleaved caspase-3 protein expression and decreased Bcl-2 expression. AA intake at 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) per day declined Bax, cleaved caspase-3 expression, and retained Bcl-2 expression. DG treatment decreased brain glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase activity; increased brain reactive oxygen species and protein carbonyl levels, and enhanced NAPDH oxidase expression. AA intake at test doses reversed these changes. DG treatment up-regulated the expression of advanced glycation end product (AGE), carboxymethyllysine, receptor of AGE (RAGE), mitogen-activated protein kinases and CD11b as well as increasing the interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release in the brain. AA intake at 5, 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) per day lowered AGE and carboxymethyllysine expression, and at 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) per day reduced RAGE production. AA intake dose-dependently suppressed p-p38 expression and lowered IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels, and at 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) per day down-regulated p-JNK and CD11b expression. DG treatment declined brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) expression and raised glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. AA intake at 20 mg kg(-1) per day retained BDNF expression and at 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) per day reduced GFAP expression. These findings indicated that the supplement of asiatic acid might be beneficial to the prevention or alleviation of brain aging.

  2. Galactose-Deficient IgA1 as a Candidate Urinary Polypeptide Marker of IgA Nephropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Landino; Hall, Stacy; Wyatt, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), circulatory IgA1 and IgA1 in mesangial deposits contain elevated amounts of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1). We hypothesized that a fraction of Gd-IgA1 from the glomerular deposits and/or circulation may be excreted into the urine and thus represent a disease-specific biomarker. Levels of urinary IgA and Gd-IgA1 were determined in 207 patients with IgAN, 205 patients with other renal diseases, and 57 healthy controls, recruited in USA, Japan, and Italy. Urinary IgA was similarly elevated in patients with IgAN and renal-disease controls compared with healthy controls. However, urinary Gd-IgA1 levels were higher in patients with IgAN (IgAN, 28.0 ± 17.9; disease controls, 20.6 ± 17.4 units/mg urinary creatinine; P < 0.0001). Lectin western blotting data confirmed these results. In IgAN patients, levels of urinary Gd-IgA1 correlated with proteinuria (P < 0.001). When we purified IgA from serum and urine of an IgAN patient, the relative proportion of Gd-IgA1 to total IgA1 was higher in the urine compared with serum, suggesting selective excretion of Gd-IgA1 in IgAN. In summary, urinary excretion of Gd-IgA1 was elevated in patients with IgAN and the urinary Gd-IgA1 levels correlated with proteinuria. Urinary Gd-IgA1 may thus represent a disease-specific biomarker of IgAN. PMID:27647947

  3. Bisecting Galactose as a Feature of N-Glycans of Wild-type and Mutant Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shi; Brecker, Lothar; Jin, Chunsheng; Titz, Alexander; Dragosits, Martin; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Jantsch, Verena; Wilson, Iain B. H.; Paschinger, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    The N-glycosylation of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has proven to be highly variable and rather complex; it is an example to contradict the existing impression that “simple” organisms possess also a rather simple glycomic capacity. In previous studies in a number of laboratories, N-glycans with up to four fucose residues have been detected. However, although the linkage of three fucose residues to the N,N′-diacetylchitobiosyl core has been proven by structural and enzymatic analyses, the nature of the fourth fucose has remained uncertain. By constructing a triple mutant with deletions in the three genes responsible for core fucosylation (fut-1, fut-6 and fut-8), we have produced a nematode strain lacking products of these enzymes, but still retaining maximally one fucose residue on its N-glycans. Using mass spectrometry and HPLC in conjunction with chemical and enzymatic treatments as well as NMR, we examined a set of α-mannosidase-resistant N-glycans. Within this glycomic subpool, we can reveal that the core β-mannose can be trisubstituted and so carries not only the ubiquitous α1,3- and α1,6-mannose residues, but also a “bisecting” β-galactose, which is substoichiometrically modified with fucose or methylfucose. In addition, the α1,3-mannose can also be α-galactosylated. Our data, showing the presence of novel N-glycan modifications, will enable more targeted studies to understand the biological functions and interactions of nematode glycans. PMID:26002521

  4. Impact of galactose, lactose, and Grobiotic-B70 on growth performance and energy utilization when fed to broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Douglas, M W; Persia, M; Parsons, C M

    2003-10-01

    Three chick assays were conducted to determine the effect of increasing dietary galactose (GAL), lactose (LAC), and Grobiotic-B70, a LAC fermentation product, on growth performance, toxicity, and energy utilization when fed to commercial broiler chicks. One-day-old male commercial broiler chicks were randomly assigned to treatments in each assay. In all assays, a 22% CP corn-soybean meal-dextrose basal diet containing a growth-promoting antibiotic (Bacitracin methylene disalicylate) was fed. In assay 1, GAL was added at 2, 4, 6, 10, or 15%. In assay 2, Grobiotic-B70 was added at 5%. In assay 3, GAL, LAC, and Grobiotic-B70 were each added at 2, 4, and 6%. All additions were made in place of dextrose, and diets were fed from 0 to 20 or 21 d of age. In assay 1, the 15% GAL treatment resulted in high mortality (27%) by d 3 and was terminated. The 10% GAL treatment also resulted in increased mortality, most of which occurred during the 7-to-14-d period. Inclusion of 2 and 4% GAL resulted in an improvement (P < 0.05) in growth compared to the basal diet. Inclusion of 2, 4, 6, and 10% GAL resulted in a significant linear decrease in MEn (r2 = 0.85). In chick assay 2, 5% Grobiotic-B70 increased growth during the first 2 wk. In chick assay 3, 6% Grobiotic increased weight gain (P < 0.05) from 0 to 14 d, and addition of 2 or 4% GAL, 2 or 4% LAC, and 4 or 6% Grobiotic-B70 increased weight gain (P < 0.08) from 0 to 21 d. Our results indicate that levels of 10 to 15% GAL are toxic. In contrast, low levels of GAL and Grobiotic-B70, and possibly LAC, may increase growth of commercial broiler chicks.

  5. Troxerutin protects the mouse kidney from d-galactose-caused injury through anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Zheng, Yuan-Lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin; Wang, Yan-Yan

    2009-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the protective effect of troxerutin against D-galactose (D-gal)-induced renal injury in mice. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections of kidneys revealed D-gal could cause renal injury and troxerutin could significantly attenuate the injury. We further investigated the mechanisms involved in the protective effects of troxerutin on mouse kidney. The following antioxidant defense enzymes were measured: cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). The content of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) was also analyzed. In D-gal-treated mice, antioxidant enzymes activities were significantly decreased and the level of MDA was significantly higher than those in the vehicle controls. Our results indicated that the protective effect of troxerutin against D-gal induced renal injury might be caused, at least in part, by increasing the activity of antioxidant enzymes with a reduction in lipid peroxidation product. Furthermore, we also examined the inflammatory signal mediators of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostanoid receptor subtype EP2 by Western blot. After treatment with D-gal, the NF-kappaB p65, iNOS, COX-2 and EP2 were markedly upregulated. Upon co-treatment with the troxerutin, however, the expressions of the NF-kappaB p65, iNOS, COX-2 and EP2 markedly reduced, compared to D-gal treatment alone. These results indicated that troxerutin has significantly inhibitory effects on the NF-kappaB-mediated inflammatory response. These findings suggest troxerutin could attenuate renal injury induced by D-gal probably through its antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties.

  6. Serological activity against galactosyl-alpha(1-3)galactose in sera from patients with several kinetoplastida infections.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Rojas, M; Towbin, H

    1988-01-01

    Using rabbit erythrocyte-derived neutral glycosphingolipids enriched for a defined ceramide pentasaccharide as antigens, we have detected elevated anti-galactosyl-alpha(1-3)galactose (anti-G alpha G) antibody values in patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL), chronic Chagas' disease, and Trypanosoma rangeli infections compared with normal subjects or with patients suffering from any of 15 other infectious diseases. The specificity of the G alpha G antibodies was determined by inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, which revealed that several alpha-galactosyl- but not beta-galactosyl-bearing sugars blocked absorption of G alpha G antibodies to the specific antigen used. G alpha G antibodies were mainly distributed between immunoglobulin classes G and M in three Kinetoplastida infections studied, with a lower increase in reactivity detected in immunoglobulin A. Absorption of highly reactive G alpha G antibodies with purified murine laminin and nidogen, two basement membrane proteins, almost abolished G alpha G reactivity, suggesting the identity of anti-G alpha G with laminin and nidogen antibodies previously reported as elevated in Kinetoplastida infections. In ACL, G alpha G antibodies were detected in 71% of patients having skin lesions with a clinical evolution time of 0.5 month. This percentage increased with the time of evolution of skin lesions, reaching 93% in lesions older than 3 months, and tended to decrease inversely to the induration diameter in the skin leishmanin test. It is proposed that similar epitopes may exist on kinetoplast protozoa and that the determination of G alpha G antibodies may be a highly sensitive assay for the detection of humoral responses to Kinetoplastida infections. PMID:2449451

  7. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A.; Waldron, Keith W.; Quesada, Miguel A.; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. PMID:26585222

  8. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A; Waldron, Keith W; Quesada, Miguel A; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A

    2016-02-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. PMID:26585222

  9. Manipulation of the rice L-galactose pathway: evaluation of the effects of transgene overexpression on ascorbate accumulation and abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-Yun; Liu, Ru-Ru; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Tang, Ke-Xuan; Sun, Ming-Fa; Yan, Guo-Hong; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is the most abundant water-soluble antioxidant in plants, and it plays a crucial role in plant growth, development and abiotic stress tolerance. In the present study, six key Arabidopsis or rapeseed genes involved in AsA biosynthesis were constitutively overexpressed in an elite Japonica rice cultivar. These genes encoded the GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP), GDP-mannose-3',5'-epimerase (GME), GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), L-galactose dehydrogenase (GDH), and L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH). The effects of transgene expression on rice leaf AsA accumulation were carefully evaluated. In homozygous transgenic seedlings, AtGGP transgenic lines had the highest AsA contents (2.55-fold greater than the empty vector transgenic control), followed by the AtGME and AtGDH transgenic lines. Moreover, with the exception of the AtGPP lines, the increased AsA content also provoked an increase in the redox state (AsA/DHA ratio). To evaluate salt tolerance, AtGGP and AtGME transgenic seedlings were exposed to salt stress for one week. The relative plant height, root length and fresh weight growth rates were significantly higher for the transgenic lines compared with the control plants. Altogether, our results suggest that GGP may be a key rate-limiting step in rice AsA biosynthesis, and the plants with elevated AsA contents demonstrated enhanced tolerance for salt stress.

  10. Sugar-complex structures of the C-half domain of the galactose-binding lectin EW29 from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi; Hirabayashi, Jun; Kasai, Ken Ichi; Momma, Mitsuru; Fujimoto, Zui

    2009-01-01

    R-type lectins are one of the most prominent types of lectin; they exist ubiquitously in nature and mainly bind to the galactose unit of sugar chains. The galactose-binding lectin EW29 from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris belongs to the R-type lectin family as represented by the plant lectin ricin. It shows haemagglutination activity and is composed of a single peptide chain that includes two homologous domains: N-terminal and C-terminal domains. A truncated mutant of EW29 comprising the C-terminal domain (rC-half) has haemagglutination activity by itself. In order to clarify how rC-half recognizes ligands and shows haemagglutination activity, X-ray crystal structures of rC-half in complex with D-lactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine have been determined. The structure of rC-half is similar to that of the ricin B chain and consists of a beta-trefoil fold; the fold is further divided into three similar subdomains referred to as subdomains alpha, beta and gamma, which are gathered around the pseudo-threefold axis. The structures of sugar complexes demonstrated that subdomains alpha and gamma of rC-half bind terminal galactosyl and N-acetylgalactosaminyl glycans. The sugar-binding properties are common to both ligands in both subdomains and are quite similar to those of ricin B chain-lactose complexes. These results indicate that the C-terminal domain of EW29 uses these two galactose-binding sites for its function as a single-domain-type haemagglutinin. PMID:19153466

  11. Manipulation of the Rice L-Galactose Pathway: Evaluation of the Effects of Transgene Overexpression on Ascorbate Accumulation and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gui-Yun; Liu, Ru-Ru; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Tang, Ke-Xuan; Sun, Ming-Fa; Yan, Guo-Hong; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is the most abundant water-soluble antioxidant in plants, and it plays a crucial role in plant growth, development and abiotic stress tolerance. In the present study, six key Arabidopsis or rapeseed genes involved in AsA biosynthesis were constitutively overexpressed in an elite Japonica rice cultivar. These genes encoded the GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP), GDP-mannose-3',5'-epimerase (GME), GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), L-galactose dehydrogenase (GDH), and L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH). The effects of transgene expression on rice leaf AsA accumulation were carefully evaluated. In homozygous transgenic seedlings, AtGGP transgenic lines had the highest AsA contents (2.55-fold greater than the empty vector transgenic control), followed by the AtGME and AtGDH transgenic lines. Moreover, with the exception of the AtGPP lines, the increased AsA content also provoked an increase in the redox state (AsA/DHA ratio). To evaluate salt tolerance, AtGGP and AtGME transgenic seedlings were exposed to salt stress for one week. The relative plant height, root length and fresh weight growth rates were significantly higher for the transgenic lines compared with the control plants. Altogether, our results suggest that GGP may be a key rate-limiting step in rice AsA biosynthesis, and the plants with elevated AsA contents demonstrated enhanced tolerance for salt stress. PMID:25938231

  12. Galactose 6-O-Sulfotransferases Are Not Required for the Generation of Siglec-F Ligands in Leukocytes or Lung Tissue*

    PubMed Central

    Patnode, Michael L.; Cheng, Chu-Wen; Chou, Chi-Chi; Singer, Mark S.; Elin, Matilda S.; Uchimura, Kenji; Crocker, Paul R.; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Rosen, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophil accumulation is a characteristic feature of the immune response to parasitic worms and allergens. The cell surface carbohydrate-binding receptor Siglec-F is highly expressed on eosinophils and negatively regulates their accumulation during inflammation. Although endogenous ligands for Siglec-F have yet to be biochemically defined, binding studies using glycan arrays have implicated galactose 6-O-sulfate (Gal6S) as a partial recognition determinant for this receptor. Only two sulfotransferases are known to generate Gal6S, namely keratan sulfate galactose 6-O-sulfotransferase (KSGal6ST) and chondroitin 6-O-sulfotransferase 1 (C6ST-1). Here we use mice deficient in both KSGal6ST and C6ST-1 to determine whether these sulfotransferases are required for the generation of endogenous Siglec-F ligands. First, we characterize ligand expression on leukocyte populations and find that ligands are predominantly expressed on cell types also expressing Siglec-F, namely eosinophils, neutrophils, and alveolar macrophages. We also detect Siglec-F ligand activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid fractions containing polymeric secreted mucins, including MUC5B. Consistent with these observations, ligands in the lung increase dramatically during infection with the parasitic nematode, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, which is known to induce eosinophil accumulation and mucus production. Surprisingly, Gal6S is undetectable in sialylated glycans from eosinophils and BAL fluid analyzed by mass spectrometry. Furthermore, none of the ligands we describe are diminished in mice lacking KSGal6ST and C6ST-1, indicating that neither of the known galactose 6-O-sulfotransferases is required for ligand synthesis. These results establish that ligands for Siglec-F are present on several cell types that are relevant during allergic lung inflammation and argue against the widely held view that Gal6S is critical for glycan recognition by this receptor. PMID:23880769

  13. Comparison of /sup 3/H-galactose and /sup 3/H-glucose as precursors of hepatic glycogen in control-fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, J.E.; Garfield, S.A.; Hung, J.T.; Cardell, R.R. Jr.

    1989-05-01

    Labeling of hepatic glycogen derived from 3H-galactose and 3H-glucose was compared shortly after intravenous injection in control-fed rats. The rats were allowed to accumulate 5-8% glycogen prior to receiving label. Fifteen minutes to 2 hours after labeling, liver was excised and processed for routine light (LM) and electron microscopic (EM) radioautography (RAG) or biochemical analysis. After injection of 3H-galactose, LM-RAGs revealed that the percentage of heavily labeled hepatocytes increased from 37% after 15 minutes to 68% after 1 hour but showed no further increase after 2 hours. alpha-Amylase treatment removed most glycogen and incorporated label; thus few silver grains were observed, indicating little incorporation of label except into glycogen. EM-RAGs demonstrated that most label occurred where glycogen was located. Biochemical analysis showed initially a high blood level of label that rapidly plateaued at a reduced level by 5 minutes. Concomitantly, glycogen labeling determined by liquid scintillation counting reflected the increases observed in the RAGs. After injection of 3H-glucose, LM-RAGs revealed that only 12% of the hepatocytes were heavily labeled at 1 hour and 20% at 2 hours. In tissue treated with alpha-amylase, glycogen was depleted and label was close to background level at each interval observed. EM-RAGs showed most grains associated with glycogen deposits. Biochemically, blood levels of label persisted at a high level for 30 minutes and tissue levels increased slowly over the 2-hour period. This study shows that incorporation from 3H-galactose was more rapid than incorporation of 3H-glucose; however, label derived from both carbohydrates appeared to be incorporated mainly into glycogen.

  14. The DC2.3 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans encodes a galectin that recognizes the galactoseβ1→4fucose disaccharide unit.

    PubMed

    Nemoto-Sasaki, Yoko; Takai, Shunsuke; Takeuchi, Tomoharu; Arata, Yoichiro; Nishiyama, Kazusa; Yamada, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hideyo; Natsugari, Hideaki; Kasai, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Galectins comprise a large family of β-galactoside-binding proteins in animals and fungi. We previously isolated cDNAs of 10 galectin and galectin-like genes (lec-1 to lec-6 and lec-8 to lec-11) from Caenorhabditis elegans and characterized the carbohydrate-binding properties of their recombinant proteins. In the present study, we isolated cDNA corresponding to an open reading frame of the DC2.3a gene from C. elegans total RNA; this cDNA encodes another potential galectin. A recombinant DC2.3a protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and used for analysis. The protein displayed hemagglutinating activity against rabbit erythrocytes, bound to an asialofetuin-Sepharose column, and was eluted with lactose. Furthermore, frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) analysis confirmed that DC2.3a recognized oligosaccharides with a non-reducing terminal galactose. According to these results, we designated DC2.3 as lec-12. The carbohydrate-binding property of the recombinant DC2.3a/LEC-12a was essentially similar to that of LEC-6. Additionally, DC2.3a/LEC-12a and LEC-6 showed higher affinities for the galactoseβ1→4fucose (Galβ1→4Fuc) disaccharide than for N-acetyllactosamine. This suggests that the principal recognition unit is the Galβ1→4Fuc disaccharide as in the case of the C. elegans galectins. However, the recombinant DC2.3a/LEC-12a showed weak affinity for N-glycan E3, which was previously shown to be a preferential endogenous ligand for LEC-6. The DC2.3a/LEC-12a endogenous ligand structures appear to be somewhat different but contain the same galactose-fucose recognition motif. PMID:21963509

  15. Anti-Apoptotic and Pro-Survival Effect of Alpinate Oxyphyllae Fructus (AOF) in a d-Galactose-Induced Aging Heart

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yung-Ming; Chang, Hen-Hong; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Lin, Hung-Jen; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Padma Viswanadha, Vijaya; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Chen, Ray-Jade; Chang, Hsin-Nung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Aging, a natural biological/physiological phenomenon, is accelerated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and identified by a progressive decrease in physiological function. Several studies have shown a positive relationship between aging and chronic heart failure (HF). Cardiac apoptosis was found in age-related diseases. We used a traditional Chinese medicine, Alpinate Oxyphyllae Fructus (AOF), to evaluate its effect on cardiac anti-apoptosis and pro-survival. Male eight-week-old Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were segregated into five groups: normal control group (NC), d-Galactose-Induced aging group (Aging), and AOF of 50 (AL (AOF low)), 100 (AM (AOF medium)), 150 (AH (AOF high)) mg/kg/day. After eight weeks, hearts were measured by an Hematoxylin–Eosin (H&E) stain, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-assays and Western blotting. The experimental results show that the cardiomyocyte apoptotic pathway protein expression increased in the d-Galactose-Induced aging groups, with dose-dependent inhibition in the AOF treatment group (AL, AM, and AH). Moreover, the expression of the pro-survival p-Akt (protein kinase B (Akt)), Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2), anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-xL) protein decreased significantly in the d-Galactose-induced aging group, with increased performance in the AOF treatment group with levels of p-IGFIR and p-PI3K (Phosphatidylinositol-3′ kinase (PI3K)) to increase by dosage and compensatory performance. On the other hand, the protein of the Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) pathway expression decreased in the aging groups and showed improvement in the AOF treatment group. Our results suggest that AOF strongly works against ROS-induced aging heart problems. PMID:27043531

  16. Sugar composition of the pectic polysaccharides of charophytes, the closest algal relatives of land-plants: presence of 3-O-methyl-d-galactose residues

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Christina; Gregson, Timothy; Murray, Lorna; Sadler, Ian H.; Fry, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims During evolution, plants have acquired and/or lost diverse sugar residues as cell-wall constituents. Of particular interest are primordial cell-wall features that existed, and in some cases abruptly changed, during the momentous step whereby land-plants arose from charophytic algal ancestors. Methods Polysaccharides were extracted from four charophyte orders [Chlorokybales (Chlorokybus atmophyticus), Klebsormidiales (Klebsormidium fluitans, K. subtile), Charales (Chara vulgaris, Nitella flexilis), Coleochaetales (Coleochaete scutata)] and an early-diverging land-plant (Anthoceros agrestis). ‘Pectins’ and ‘hemicelluloses’, operationally defined as extractable in oxalate (100 °C) and 6 m NaOH (37 °C), respectively, were acid- or Driselase-hydrolysed, and the monosaccharides analysed chromatographically. One unusual monosaccharide, ‘U’, was characterized by 1H/13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and also enzymically. Key Results ‘U’ was identified as 3-O-methyl-d-galactose (3-MeGal). All pectins, except in Klebsormidium, contained acid- and Driselase-releasable galacturonate, suggesting homogalacturonan. All pectins, without exception, released rhamnose and galactose on acid hydrolysis; however, only in ‘higher’ charophytes (Charales, Coleochaetales) and Anthoceros were these sugars also efficiently released by Driselase, suggesting rhamnogalacturonan-I. Pectins of ‘higher’ charophytes, especially Chara, contained little arabinose, instead possessing 3-MeGal. Anthoceros hemicelluloses were rich in glucose, xylose, galactose and arabinose (suggesting xyloglucan and arabinoxylan), none of which was consistently present in charophyte hemicelluloses. Conclusions Homogalacturonan is an ancient streptophyte feature, albeit secondarily lost in Klebsormidium. When conquering the land, the first embryophytes already possessed rhamnogalacturonan-I. In contrast, charophyte and land-plant hemicelluloses differ

  17. In Vivo Transcription Dynamics of the Galactose Operon: A Study on the Promoter Transition from P1 to P2 at Onset of Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Sang Chun; Wang, Xun; Yun, Sang Hoon; Jeon, Heung Jin; Lee, Hee Jung; Kim, Hackjin; Lim, Heon M.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative analyses of the 5′ end of gal transcripts indicate that transcription from the galactose operon P1 promoter is higher during cell division. When cells are no longer dividing, however, transcription is initiated more often from the P2 promoter. Escherichia coli cells divide six times before the onset of the stationary phase when grown in LB containing 0.5% galactose at 37°C. Transcription from the two promoters increases, although at different rates, during early exponential phase (until the third cell division, OD600 0.4), and then reaches a plateau. The steady-state transcription from P1 continues in late exponential phase (the next three cell divisions, OD600 3.0), after which transcription from this promoter decreases. However, steady-state transcription from P2 continues 1 h longer into the stationary phase, before decreasing. This longer steady-state P2 transcription constitutes the promoter transition from P1 to P2 at the onset of the stationary phase. The intracellular cAMP concentration dictates P1 transcription dynamics; therefore, promoter transition may result from a lack of cAMP-CRP complex binding to the gal operon. The decay rate of gal-specific transcripts is constant through the six consecutive cell divisions that comprise the exponential growth phase, increases at the onset of the stationary phase, and is too low to be measured during the stationary phase. These data suggest that a regulatory mechanism coordinates the synthesis and decay of gal mRNAs to maintain the observed gal transcription. Our analysis indicates that the increase in P1 transcription is the result of cAMP-CRP binding to increasing numbers of galactose operons in the cell population. PMID:21445255

  18. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A; Waldron, Keith W; Quesada, Miguel A; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A

    2016-02-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness.

  19. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu2+, MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments. PMID:27313597

  20. IgA nephropathy: characterization of IgG antibodies specific for galactose-deficient IgA1.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Moldoveanu, Zina; Hall, Stacy; Brown, Rhubell; Julian, Bruce A; Wyatt, Robert J; Tomana, Milan; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Novak, Jan; Mestecky, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    The circulating immune complexes in IgA nephropathy (IgAN) are composed of galactose (Gal)-deficient IgA1 bound to IgG or IgA1 antibodies specific for hinge-region O-linked glycans of Gal-deficient IgA1. To analyze properties of the anti-glycan antibodies, we determined the binding of serum IgG and IgG secreted by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- immortalized B cells from patients with biopsy-proven IgAN (n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 5) to a panel of antigens coated on ELISA plates. These antigens were: (1) enzymatically desialylated and degalactosylated IgA1 myeloma protein (dd-IgA1), (2) Fab fragment of Gal-deficient IgA1 containing part of the hinge region with O-glycans (Fab-IgA1), (3) synthetic hinge-region peptide linked to bovine albumin (HR-BSA), and (4) synthetic hingeregion glycopeptide with three GalNAc residues linked to BSA (HR-GalNAc-BSA). IgG-secreting EBV-immortalized cell lines were subcloned by limiting dilution. The concentration of total IgG and distribution of IgG subclasses were measured by ELISA. The levels of IgG in sera and supernatants directed against dd-IgA1 and Fab-IgA1 were significantly higher in IgAN patients than in controls (p < 0.01). IgG from IgAN patients exhibited strong reactivity with HR-GalNAc-BSA, but not with HR-BSA. The IgG-secreting cell lines produced antibodies specific to dd-IgA1; the antigen-specific IgG was most frequently of the IgG2 subclass. In summary, sera and supernatants from IgG-secreting cell lines from patients with IgAN were characterized by high levels of IgG antibodies with specificity to the Gal-deficient O-linked glycans of IgA1. The immortalized cell lines will provide a stable and convenient source of IgG for molecular studies of antibodies specific to the aberrant O-glycans in IgA1.

  1. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu(2+), MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments.

  2. A Peptide Mimetic of 5-Acetylneuraminic Acid-Galactose Binds with High Avidity to Siglecs and NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L.; Spyroulias, Georgios A.; Jones, Norman G.; Hanson, Carl V.; Hoober, J. Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified several peptide sequences that mimicked the terminal sugars of complex glycans. Using plant lectins as analogs of lectin-type cell-surface receptors, a tetravalent form of a peptide with the sequence NPSHPLSG, designated svH1C, bound with high avidity to lectins specific for glycans with terminal 5-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac)-galactose (Gal)/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) sequences. In this report, we show by circular dichroism and NMR spectra that svH1C lacks an ordered structure and thus interacts with binding sites from a flexible conformation. The peptide binds with high avidity to several recombinant human siglec receptors that bind preferentially to Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal, Neu5Ac(α2,6)GalNAc or Neu5Ac(α2,8)Neu5Ac ligands. In addition, the peptide bound the receptor NKG2D, which contains a lectin-like domain that binds Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal. The peptide bound to these receptors with a KD in the range of 0.6 to 1 μM. Binding to these receptors was inhibited by the glycoprotein fetuin, which contains multiple glycans that terminate in Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal or Neu5Ac(α2,6)Gal, and by sialyllactose. Binding of svH1C was not detected with CLEC9a, CLEC10a or DC-SIGN, which are lectin-type receptors specific for other sugars. Incubation of neuraminidase-treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with svH1C resulted in binding of the peptide to a subset of the CD14+ monocyte population. Tyrosine phosphorylation of siglecs decreased dramatically when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with 100 nM svH1C. Subcutaneous, alternate-day injections of svH1C into mice induced several-fold increases in populations of several types of immune cells in the peritoneal cavity. These results support the conclusion that svH1C mimics Neu5Ac-containing sequences and interacts with cell-surface receptors with avidities sufficient to induce biological responses at low concentrations. The attenuation of inhibitory receptors suggests that svH1C has

  3. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu(2+), MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments. PMID:27313597

  4. Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cognitive impairment and hippocampus senescence in a rat model of D-galactose-induced aging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiahong; Mu, Xinyi; Zeng, Jin; Xu, Chunyan; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Mengsi; Li, Chengpeng; Chen, Jie; Li, Tinyu; Wang, Yaping

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis continues throughout the lifetime in the hippocampus, while the rate declines with brain aging. It has been hypothesized that reduced neurogenesis may contribute to age-related cognitive impairment. Ginsenoside Rg1 is an active ingredient of Panax ginseng in traditional Chinese medicine, which exerts anti-oxidative and anti-aging effects. This study explores the neuroprotective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on the hippocampus of the D-gal (D-galactose) induced aging rat model. Sub-acute aging was induced in male SD rats by subcutaneous injection of D-gal (120 mg/kg·d) for 42 days, and the rats were treated with ginsenoside Rg1 (20 mg/kg·d, intraperitoneally) or normal saline for 28 days after 14 days of D-gal injection. In another group, normal male SD rats were treated with ginsenoside Rg1 alone (20 mg/kg·d, intraperitoneally) for 28 days. It showed that administration of ginsenoside Rg1 significantly attenuated all the D-gal-induced changes in the hippocampus, including cognitive capacity, senescence-related markers and hippocampal neurogenesis, compared with the D-gal-treated rats. Further investigation showed that ginsenoside Rg1 protected NSCs/NPCs (neural stem cells/progenitor cells) shown by increased level of SOX-2 expression; reduced astrocytes activation shown by decrease level of Aeg-1 expression; increased the hippocampal cell proliferation; enhanced the activity of the antioxidant enzymes GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase) and SOD (Superoxide Dismutase); decreased the levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, which are the proinflammatory cytokines; increased the telomere lengths and telomerase activity; and down-regulated the mRNA expression of cellular senescence associated genes p53, p21Cip1/Waf1 and p19Arf in the hippocampus of aged rats. Our data provides evidence that ginsenoside Rg1 can improve cognitive ability, protect NSCs/NPCs and promote neurogenesis by enhancing the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacity in the hippocampus.

  5. Effects of aluminum on the reduction of neural stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiating neuroblasts in the dentate gyrus of D-galactose-treated mice via increasing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Jung, Hyo Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Seong, Je Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) accumulation increases with aging, and long-term exposure to Al is regarded as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of Al and/or D-galactose on neural stem cells, proliferating cells, differentiating neuroblasts, and mature neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. AlCl3 (40 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administered to C57BL/6J mice for 4 weeks. In addition, vehicle (physiological saline) or D-galactose (100 mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected to these mice immediately after AlCl3 treatment. Neural stem cells, proliferating cells, differentiating neuroblasts, and mature neurons were detected using the relevant marker for each cell type, including nestin, Ki67, doublecortin, and NeuN, respectively, via immunohistochemistry. Subchronic (4 weeks) exposure to Al in mice reduced neural stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiating neuroblasts without causing any changes to mature neurons. This Al-induced reduction effect was exacerbated in D-galactose-treated mice compared to vehicle-treated adult mice. Moreover, exposure to Al enhanced lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus and expression of antioxidants such as Cu, Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase in D-galactose-treated mice. These results suggest that Al accelerates the reduction of neural stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiating neuroblasts in D-galactose-treated mice via oxidative stress, without inducing loss in mature neurons. PMID:26243606

  6. The extent of co-metabolism of glucose and galactose by Lactococcus lactis changes with the expression of the lacSZ operon from Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Solem, Christian; Koebmann, Brian; Jensen, Peter R

    2008-05-01

    The lactose transporter and beta-galactosidase from Streptococcus thermophilus, encoded by the lacSZ operon, were introduced into the lactose-negative strain Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and the expression of the lacSZ operon was modulated by substitution of the native promoter with randomized synthetic promoters. A series of strains with various expression levels of lacSZ were examined for their fermentation of lactose. Strains with a high expression level were found to metabolize lactose in a similar manner to S. thermophilus, i.e. the galactose moiety of lactose was excreted to the growth medium and only glucose was metabolized in glycolysis. Interestingly, strains with low expression of the operon showed a mixed acid metabolism and co-metabolism of galactose and glucose. The lactose flux increased gradually with increasing expression of the lacSZ operon until an optimum was observed at intermediate beta-galactosidase activities of 2000-3000 Miller units. At higher expression levels, the flux decreased. These strains had a glycolytic flux comparable with those of reference strains with the standard lactococcal PTS(lac) (lactose phosphotransferase transport system) lactose transporter, which indicates that lactose transport is not rate-limiting for glycolysis in Lactococcus. Finally, an additional ATP drain was introduced into the fastest growing strain, CS2004, to test whether the ATP demand controlled glycolysis under these conditions, but in fact no increase in glycolytic flux was observed. PMID:17822381

  7. The macrophage galactose-type lectin-1 (MGL1) recognizes Taenia crassiceps antigens, triggers intracellular signaling, and is critical for resistance to this infection.

    PubMed

    Montero-Barrera, Daniel; Valderrama-Carvajal, Héctor; Terrazas, César A; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Vera-Arias, Laura; Carrasco-Yépez, Maricela; Gómez-García, Lorena; Martínez-Saucedo, Diana; Becerra-Díaz, Mireya; Terrazas, Luis I

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectins are multifunctional sugar-binding molecules expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages that internalize antigens for processing and presentation. Macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1) recognizes glycoconjugates expressing Lewis X structures which contain galactose residues, and it is selectively expressed on immature DCs and macrophages. Helminth parasites contain large amounts of glycosylated components, which play a role in the immune regulation induced by such infections. Macrophages from MGL1(-/-) mice showed less binding ability toward parasite antigens than their wild-type (WT) counterparts. Exposure of WT macrophages to T. crassiceps antigens triggered tyrosine phosphorylation signaling activity, which was diminished in MGL1(-/-) macrophages. Following T. crassiceps infection, MGL1(-/-) mice failed to produce significant levels of inflammatory cytokines early in the infection compared to WT mice. In contrast, MGL1(-/-) mice developed a Th2-dominant immune response that was associated with significantly higher parasite loads, whereas WT mice were resistant. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses showed overexpression of the mannose receptors, IL-4Rα, PDL2, arginase-1, Ym1, and RELM-α on MGL1(-/-) macrophages. These studies indicate that MGL1 is involved in T. crassiceps recognition and subsequent innate immune activation and resistance.

  8. The Macrophage Galactose-Type Lectin-1 (MGL1) Recognizes Taenia crassiceps Antigens, Triggers Intracellular Signaling, and Is Critical for Resistance to This Infection

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Barrera, Daniel; Valderrama-Carvajal, Héctor; Terrazas, César A.; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Vera-Arias, Laura; Carrasco-Yépez, Maricela; Gómez-García, Lorena; Martínez-Saucedo, Diana; Becerra-Díaz, Mireya; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectins are multifunctional sugar-binding molecules expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages that internalize antigens for processing and presentation. Macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1) recognizes glycoconjugates expressing Lewis X structures which contain galactose residues, and it is selectively expressed on immature DCs and macrophages. Helminth parasites contain large amounts of glycosylated components, which play a role in the immune regulation induced by such infections. Macrophages from MGL1−/− mice showed less binding ability toward parasite antigens than their wild-type (WT) counterparts. Exposure of WT macrophages to T. crassiceps antigens triggered tyrosine phosphorylation signaling activity, which was diminished in MGL1−/− macrophages. Following T. crassiceps infection, MGL1−/− mice failed to produce significant levels of inflammatory cytokines early in the infection compared to WT mice. In contrast, MGL1−/− mice developed a Th2-dominant immune response that was associated with significantly higher parasite loads, whereas WT mice were resistant. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses showed overexpression of the mannose receptors, IL-4Rα, PDL2, arginase-1, Ym1, and RELM-α on MGL1−/− macrophages. These studies indicate that MGL1 is involved in T. crassiceps recognition and subsequent innate immune activation and resistance. PMID:25664320

  9. Lower cell wall pectin solubilisation and galactose loss during early fruit development in apple (Malus x domestica) cultivar 'Scifresh' are associated with slower softening rate.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jovyn K T; Schröder, Roswitha; Brummell, David A; Sutherland, Paul W; Hallett, Ian C; Smith, Bronwen G; Melton, Laurence D; Johnston, Jason W

    2015-03-15

    Substantial differences in softening behaviour can exist between fruit even within the same species. Apple cultivars 'Royal Gala' and 'Scifresh' soften at different rates despite having a similar genetic background and producing similar amounts of ethylene during ripening. An examination of cell wall metabolism from the fruitlet to the ripe stages showed that in both cultivars pectin solubilisation increased during cell expansion, declined at the mature stage and then increased again during ripening. This process was much less pronounced in the slower softening 'Scifresh' than in 'Royal Gala' at every developmental stage examined, consistent with less cell separation and softening in this cultivar. Both cultivars also exhibited a progressive loss of pectic galactan and arabinan side chains during development. The cell wall content of arabinose residues was similar in both cultivars, but the galactose residue content in 'Scifresh' remained higher than that of 'Royal Gala' at every developmental stage. The higher content of cell wall galactose residue in 'Scifresh' cell walls correlated with a lower β-galactosidase activity and more intense immunolabelling of RG-I galactan side chains in both microscopy sections and glycan microarrays. A high cell wall galactan content has been associated with reduced cell wall porosity, which may restrict access of cell wall-modifying enzymes and thus maintain better structural integrity later in development. The data suggest that the composition and structure of the cell wall at very early development stages may influence subsequent cell wall loosening, and may even predispose the wall's ensuing properties. PMID:25602611

  10. Enzymatic conversion of D-galactose to D-tagatose: cloning, overexpression and characterization of L-arabinose isomerase from Pediococcus pentosaceus PC-5.

    PubMed

    Men, Yan; Zhu, Yueming; Zhang, Lili; Kang, Zhenkui; Izumori, Ken; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Yanhe

    2014-01-01

    The gene encoding L-arabinose isomerase from food-grade strain Pediococcus pentosaceus PC-5 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and characterized. It was optimally active at 50 °C and pH 6.0. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibited a weak requirement for metallic ions for its maximal activity evaluated at 0.6 mM Mn(2+) or 0.8 mM Co(2+). Interestingly, this enzyme was distinguished from other L-AIs, it could not use L-arabinose as its substrate. In addition, a three-dimensional structure of L-AI was built by homology modeling and L-arabinose and D-galactose were docked into the active site pocket of PPAI model to explain the interaction between L-AI and its substrate. The purified P. pentosaceus PC-5 L-AI converted D-galactose into D-tagatose with a high conversion rate of 52% after 24 h at 50 °C, suggesting its excellent potential in D-tagatose production.

  11. Changes in performance and bacterial communities in response to various process disturbances in a high-rate biohydrogen reactor fed with galactose.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Hoon; Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Park, Jong-Hun; Park, Hee-Deung; Kim, Sang-Hyoun

    2015-01-01

    High-rate biohydrogen production was achieved via hybrid immobilized cells fed with galactose in a continuous reactor system. The hybrid immobilized cells were broken down after 20 days and began to form granules by self-aggregation. The peak hydrogen production rate (HPR) and hydrogen yield (HY) of 11.8 ± 0.6 LH2/L-d and 2.1 ± 0.1 mol H2/molgalactose(added), respectively, were achieved at the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8h with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 45 g/L-d. This is the highest yet reported for the employment of galactose in a continuous system. Various process disturbances including shock loading, acidification, alkalization and starvation were examined through bacterial community analysis via pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. The proportion of Clostridia increased during the stable biohydrogen production periods, while that of Bacilli increased when the reactor was disturbed. However, due to the stability of the self-aggregated granules, the process performance was regained within 4-7 days.

  12. Galactose-binding lectin from the seeds of champedak (Artocarpus integer): sequences of its subunits and interactions with human serum O-glycosylated glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Mariati; Anuar Karsani, Saiful; Othman, Iekhsan; Shafinaz Abdul Rahman, Puteri; Haji Hashim, Onn

    2002-07-26

    Our group has previously reported the isolation, partial characterisation, and application of a Galbeta1-3GalNAc- and IgA1-reactive lectin from the seeds of champedak (Artocarpus integer). In the present study, we have subjected the purified lectin to reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and sequenced its subunits. Determination of the N-terminal sequence of the first 47 residues of the large subunit demonstrated at least 95% homology to the N-terminal sequence of the alpha chains of a few other galactose-binding Artocarpus lectins. The two smaller subunits of the lectin, each comprised of 21 amino acid residues, demonstrated minor sequence variability. Their sequences were generally comparable to the beta chains of the other galactose-binding Artocarpus lectins. When used to probe human serum glycopeptides that were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, the lectin demonstrated strong apparent interactions with glycopeptides of IgA1, hemopexin, alpha2-HS glycoprotein, alpha1-antichymotrypsin, and a few unknown glycoproteins. Immobilisation of the lectin to Sepharose generated an affinity column that may be used to isolate the O-glycosylated serum glycoproteins.

  13. Frutalin, a galactose-binding lectin, induces chemotaxis and rearrangement of actin cytoskeleton in human neutrophils: involvement of tyrosine kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Brando-Lima, Aline C; Saldanha-Gama, Roberta F; Henriques, Maria das Graças M O; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C O; Moreira, Renato A; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina

    2005-10-15

    Several lectin-like molecules have been shown as potent activators of leukocytes. Galactose-binding lectins are of special interest since they could interact with several endogenous molecules involved in the innate and specific immune responses. The effects of Frutalin (FTL), an alpha-D-galactose (Gal)-binding plant lectin, on the modulation of neutrophil (PMN) functions were investigated. FTL induced a dose-dependent PMN migration in mice pleural cavity. Moreover, FTL was also a potent direct chemotactic for human PMN, in vitro, and triggered oxidative burst in these cells. These effects were accompanied by a rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton dynamic, activation of tyrosine kinase (TK) pathways, increase in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, and its subsequent association to phosphoinositide3-kinase (PI3K). All those effects were inhibited in the presence of Gal, suggesting specific carbohydrate recognition for FTL effects. The activations of TK and PI3K pathways are essential events for FTL-induced chemotaxis, since inhibitors of these pathways, genistein and LY294002, inhibited neutrophil migration in vitro. The data indicate that sugar-protein interactions between a soluble lectin and galacto-components on neutrophil surface trigger the TK pathway, inducing FAK and PI3K activation, interfering with cell motility and oxidative response.

  14. Recognition of human urine alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase by rat hepatocytes. Involvement of receptors specific for galactose, mannose 6-phosphate and mannose.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, K; Basner, R; Gieselmann, V; Von Figura, K

    1979-05-15

    Adsorptive endocytosis of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase from human urine by isolated rat hepatocytes is inhibited by glycoproteins, polysaccharides and sugars that are known to bind to cell-surface receptors specific for either terminal galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine residues, terminal mannose residues or mannose 6-phosphate residues. Recognition of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase by a cell-surface receptor specific for terminal galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine residues is supported by the observations (a) that neuraminidase pretreatment of the enzyme enhances endocytosis, (b) that beta-galactosidase treatment decreases endocytosis and (c) that neuraminidase pretreatment of hepatocytes decreases alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase endocytosis. Recognition of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase via receptors recognizing mannose 6-phosphate residues is lost after treatment of the enzyme with alkaline phosphatase and endoglucosaminidase H. The effect of endoglucosaminidase H supports the view that the mannose 6-phosphate residues reside in N-glycosidically linked oligosaccharide side chains of the high-mannose type. The weak inhibition of endocytosis produced by compounds known to interact with cell-surface receptors specific for mannose residues suggests that this recognition system plays only a minor role in the endocytosis of lysosomal alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase by hepatocytes. PMID:114170

  15. Recognition of human urine alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase by rat hepatocytes. Involvement of receptors specific for galactose, mannose 6-phosphate and mannose.

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, K; Basner, R; Gieselmann, V; Von Figura, K

    1979-01-01

    Adsorptive endocytosis of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase from human urine by isolated rat hepatocytes is inhibited by glycoproteins, polysaccharides and sugars that are known to bind to cell-surface receptors specific for either terminal galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine residues, terminal mannose residues or mannose 6-phosphate residues. Recognition of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase by a cell-surface receptor specific for terminal galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine residues is supported by the observations (a) that neuraminidase pretreatment of the enzyme enhances endocytosis, (b) that beta-galactosidase treatment decreases endocytosis and (c) that neuraminidase pretreatment of hepatocytes decreases alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase endocytosis. Recognition of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase via receptors recognizing mannose 6-phosphate residues is lost after treatment of the enzyme with alkaline phosphatase and endoglucosaminidase H. The effect of endoglucosaminidase H supports the view that the mannose 6-phosphate residues reside in N-glycosidically linked oligosaccharide side chains of the high-mannose type. The weak inhibition of endocytosis produced by compounds known to interact with cell-surface receptors specific for mannose residues suggests that this recognition system plays only a minor role in the endocytosis of lysosomal alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase by hepatocytes. PMID:114170

  16. Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) extract prevents and improves D-galactose and NaNO2 induced memory impairment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dashti-r, M.H.; Zeinali, F.; Anvari, M.; Hosseini, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of saffron extract on preventing D-galactose and NaNO2 induced memory impairment and improving learning and memory deficits in amnestic mice. In this study, the learning and memory functions in ovariectomized mice were examined by the one way passive and active avoidance tests. In active avoidance test, training in amnestic treated (AT) and amnestic prophylaxis (AP) groups, was improved so that there was a significant difference between them and the amnestic control (AC) group. In passive avoidance test, animal's step through latency, as an index for learning, in all test groups was significantly greater than control group. Total time spent in dark room (DS), which opposes the memory retention ability, in AC was significantly greater than AT group at 1 and 2 hours after full training, while there was not any significant difference between this index in AP and AT as compared with normal control (NC) group. Our findings indicate that saffron hydro-alcoholic extract prevents and improves amnesia induced by D-galactose and NaNO2 in mice. PMID:27418908

  17. Lower cell wall pectin solubilisation and galactose loss during early fruit development in apple (Malus x domestica) cultivar 'Scifresh' are associated with slower softening rate.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jovyn K T; Schröder, Roswitha; Brummell, David A; Sutherland, Paul W; Hallett, Ian C; Smith, Bronwen G; Melton, Laurence D; Johnston, Jason W

    2015-03-15

    Substantial differences in softening behaviour can exist between fruit even within the same species. Apple cultivars 'Royal Gala' and 'Scifresh' soften at different rates despite having a similar genetic background and producing similar amounts of ethylene during ripening. An examination of cell wall metabolism from the fruitlet to the ripe stages showed that in both cultivars pectin solubilisation increased during cell expansion, declined at the mature stage and then increased again during ripening. This process was much less pronounced in the slower softening 'Scifresh' than in 'Royal Gala' at every developmental stage examined, consistent with less cell separation and softening in this cultivar. Both cultivars also exhibited a progressive loss of pectic galactan and arabinan side chains during development. The cell wall content of arabinose residues was similar in both cultivars, but the galactose residue content in 'Scifresh' remained higher than that of 'Royal Gala' at every developmental stage. The higher content of cell wall galactose residue in 'Scifresh' cell walls correlated with a lower β-galactosidase activity and more intense immunolabelling of RG-I galactan side chains in both microscopy sections and glycan microarrays. A high cell wall galactan content has been associated with reduced cell wall porosity, which may restrict access of cell wall-modifying enzymes and thus maintain better structural integrity later in development. The data suggest that the composition and structure of the cell wall at very early development stages may influence subsequent cell wall loosening, and may even predispose the wall's ensuing properties.

  18. Late blowing of Cheddar cheese induced by accelerated ripening and ribose and galactose supplementation in presence of a novel obligatory heterofermentative nonstarter Lactobacillus wasatchensis.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-11-01

    Lactobacillus wasatchensis sp. nov. has been studied for growth and gas formation in a control Cheddar cheese and in cheese supplemented with 0.5% ribose, 0.5% galactose, or 0.25% ribose plus 0.25% galactose using regular and accelerated cheese ripening temperatures of 6 and 12°C, respectively. Milk was inoculated with (1) Lactococcus lactis starter culture, or (2) Lc. lactis starter culture plus Lb. wasatchensis (10(4) cfu/mL). In the control cheese with no added Lb. wasatchensis, starter numbers decreased from 10(7) initially to ~10(4) cfu/g over 23 wk of ripening at 6°C. When the cheese was ripened at 12°C, or if Lb. wasatchensis was added, the final starter counts were 1 log lower. In contrast, nonstarter lactic acid bacteria in the cheese increased from <10(2) cfu/g at press to 10(6) to 10(7) cfu/g after 23 wk, with higher numbers being observed with ripening at 12°C. In cheese with no added Lb. wasatchensis, levels of Lb. wasatchensis were initially below the enumeration threshold but counts of up to 10(3) cfu/g were detected after 23 wk. When the cheese was inoculated with Lb. wasatchensis, it could be enumerated throughout ripening, with final levels at 23 wk being dependent on whether ribose had been added to the cheese curd. With added ribose (with or without added galactose), Lb. wasatchensis grew to 10(7) to 10(8) cfu/g after 23 wk, whereas without added ribose it was 1 log lower. In all cheeses with added Lb. wasatchensis, greater gas formation was observed at 12°C, with most gas production occurring after ~16 wk. Very little gas production was detected in cheese without added Lb. wasatchensis ripened at 12°C or in cheese with added Lb. wasatchensis ripened at 6°C. Adding a combination of ribose and galactose caused more gas formation, putatively because of the ability of Lb. wasatchensis to co-utilize both sugars and grow to high numbers, and then produce gas from galactose as ribose levels were depleted. Even without sugar supplementation, gas

  19. Late blowing of Cheddar cheese induced by accelerated ripening and ribose and galactose supplementation in presence of a novel obligatory heterofermentative nonstarter Lactobacillus wasatchensis.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-11-01

    Lactobacillus wasatchensis sp. nov. has been studied for growth and gas formation in a control Cheddar cheese and in cheese supplemented with 0.5% ribose, 0.5% galactose, or 0.25% ribose plus 0.25% galactose using regular and accelerated cheese ripening temperatures of 6 and 12°C, respectively. Milk was inoculated with (1) Lactococcus lactis starter culture, or (2) Lc. lactis starter culture plus Lb. wasatchensis (10(4) cfu/mL). In the control cheese with no added Lb. wasatchensis, starter numbers decreased from 10(7) initially to ~10(4) cfu/g over 23 wk of ripening at 6°C. When the cheese was ripened at 12°C, or if Lb. wasatchensis was added, the final starter counts were 1 log lower. In contrast, nonstarter lactic acid bacteria in the cheese increased from <10(2) cfu/g at press to 10(6) to 10(7) cfu/g after 23 wk, with higher numbers being observed with ripening at 12°C. In cheese with no added Lb. wasatchensis, levels of Lb. wasatchensis were initially below the enumeration threshold but counts of up to 10(3) cfu/g were detected after 23 wk. When the cheese was inoculated with Lb. wasatchensis, it could be enumerated throughout ripening, with final levels at 23 wk being dependent on whether ribose had been added to the cheese curd. With added ribose (with or without added galactose), Lb. wasatchensis grew to 10(7) to 10(8) cfu/g after 23 wk, whereas without added ribose it was 1 log lower. In all cheeses with added Lb. wasatchensis, greater gas formation was observed at 12°C, with most gas production occurring after ~16 wk. Very little gas production was detected in cheese without added Lb. wasatchensis ripened at 12°C or in cheese with added Lb. wasatchensis ripened at 6°C. Adding a combination of ribose and galactose caused more gas formation, putatively because of the ability of Lb. wasatchensis to co-utilize both sugars and grow to high numbers, and then produce gas from galactose as ribose levels were depleted. Even without sugar supplementation, gas

  20. Chronic administration of Liu Wei Dihuang protects rat's brain against D-galactose-induced impairment of cholinergic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Sun, Qi-Xin; Liu, Yin-Hui; Gao, Wei; Li, Yan-Hai; Lu, Kun; Wang, Zhuo

    2011-06-25

    This study was aimed to investigate the protective effect of Liu Wei Dihuang (LWDH) against D-galactose (D-gal)-induced brain injury in rats and the existence of sex-dependent differences in LWDH protection. Sixty-four rats evenly composed of males and females were randomly assigned into 4 groups (n = 8): normal saline (NS) + NS (N + N), NS + LWDH (N + L), D-gal + NS (D + N) and D-gal + LWDH (D + L) groups. Rats in D + N and D + L groups received daily injection of D-gal (100 mg/kg, s.c.) for six weeks to establish the aging model, while rats in N + N and N + L groups were injected with the same volume of NS. From the third week, rats in N + L and D + L groups were orally administered with a decoction of LWDH for subsequent six weeks. Rats in N + N and D + N groups were orally administered just with the same volume of NS simultaneously. Morris water maze test was employed to evaluate the ability of learning and memory of the rats in all the groups. Acetylcholine (ACh) content, activities of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in visual cortex were assayed. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining were used to observe the morphologic injury in hippocampus and visual cortex, and immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate ChAT and AChE expression levels in the visual cortex. The results showed that the rats in D + N groups exhibited a longer escape latency to platform, lower swimming speed, less percent of target quadrant search time and platform crossings, compared with N + N groups, suggesting the establishment of aging model, while LWDH improved these indexes in D-gal-treated rats. Compared with D + N groups, LWDH increased ACh content and ChAT activity, and decreased AChE activity in visual cortex. Remarkable loss of neurons was found in hippocampus and visual cortex of aging rats, and the injury was significantly attenuated by LWDH. Immunohistochemistry showed D-gal-induced decreases of ChAT and AChE expressions were restored by LWDH

  1. Metagenomic approach for the isolation of a thermostable β-galactosidase with high tolerance of galactose and glucose from soil samples of Turpan Basin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background β-Galactosidases can be used to produce low-lactose milk and dairy products for lactose intolerant people. Although commercial β-galactosidases have outstanding lactose hydrolysis ability, their thermostability is low, and reaction products have strong inhibition to these enzymes. In addition, the β-galactosidases possessing simultaneously high thermostability and tolerance of galactose and glucose are still seldom reported until now. Therefore, identification of novel β-galactosidases with high thermostability and tolerance to reaction products from unculturable microorganisms accounting for over 99% of microorganisms in the environment via metagenomic strategy is still urgently in demand. Results In the present study, a novel β-galactosidase (Gal308) consisting of 658 amino acids was identified from a metagenomic library from soil samples of Turpan Basin in China by functional screening. After being overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity, the enzymatic properties of Gal308 with N-terminal fusion tag were investigated. The recombinant enzyme displayed a pH optimum of 6.8 and a temperature optimum of 78°C, and was considerably stable in the temperature range of 40°C - 70°C with almost unchangeable activity after incubation for 60 min. Furthermore, Gal308 displayed a very high tolerance of galactose and glucose, with the highest inhibition constant Ki,gal (238 mM) and Ki,glu (1725 mM) among β-galactosidases. In addition, Gal308 also exhibited high enzymatic activity for its synthetic substrate o-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG, 185 U/mg) and natural substrate lactose (47.6 U/mg). Conclusion This study will enrich the source of β-galactosidases, and attract some attentions to β-galactosidases from extreme habitats and metagenomic library. Furthermore, the recombinant Gal308 fused with 156 amino acids exhibits many novel properties including high activity and thermostability at high temperatures, the pH optimum

  2. Using a Personal Glucose Meter and Alkaline Phosphatase for Point-of-Care Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase in Clinical Galactosemia Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiang, Yu; Novak, Donna E; Hoganson, George E; Zhu, Junjie; Lu, Yi

    2015-10-01

    The personal glucose meter (PGM) was recently shown to be a general meter to detect many targets. Most studies, however, focus on transforming either target binding or enzymatic activity that cleaves an artificial substrate into the production of glucose. More importantly, almost all reports exhibit their methods by using artificial samples, such as buffers or serum samples spiked with the targets. To expand the technology to even broader targets and to validate its potential in authentic, more complex clinical samples, we herein report expansion of the PGM method by using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that links the enzymatic activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase to the production of glucose, which allows point-of-care galactosemia diagnosis in authentic human clinical samples. Given the presence of ALP in numerous enzymatic assays for clinical diagnostics, the methods demonstrated herein advance the field closer to point-of-care detection of a wide range of targets in real clinical samples.

  3. Influence of asafoetida on prevention and treatment of memory impairment induced by d-galactose and NaNO2 in mice.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Seyyed Majid; Dashti-R, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-09-01

    In Iranian traditional medicine, asafoetida is introduced as a valuable remedy for nervous disorders. Dementia was induced by injection of d-galactose and NaNO2 for 60 consecutive days. Animals were divided into normal control (NC), dementia control (DC), dementia prophylactic (DP), and dementia treated (DT). The learning and memory functions were examined by 1-way active and passive avoidance tests, using a shuttle box device. Avoidance response in training tests and 1 and 3 weeks later was significantly increased in NC, DP, and DT groups compared to the DC group. Step through latency in all groups was significantly greater than the DC group. Total time spent in light room, which shows the memory retention ability, in DP, NC, and DT was significantly greater than the DC group. Our findings indicate that asafoetida could prevent and treat amnesia. These beneficial effects maybe related to some constituent's effectiveness such as ferulic acid and umbelliferone.

  4. One-pot enzymatic production of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose (GalNAc) from 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose (GlcNAc).

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kousuke; Nishimoto, Mamoru; Kitaoka, Motomitsu

    2011-11-01

    2-Acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose (GalNAc) is a common monosaccharide found in biologically functional sugar chains, but its availability is often limited due to the lack of abundant natural sources. In order to produce GalNAc from abundantly available sugars, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose (GlcNAc) was converted to GalNAc by a one-pot reaction using three enzymes involved in the galacto-N-biose/lacto-N-biose I pathway of bifidobacteria. Starting the reaction with 600 mM GlcNAc, 170 mM GalNAc was produced at equilibrium in the presence of catalytic amounts of ATP and UDP-Glc under optimized conditions. GalNAc was separated from GlcNAc using water-eluting cation-exchange chromatography with a commonly available cation-exchange resin.

  5. Characterization of a recombinant L-fucose isomerase from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus that isomerizes L-fucose, D-arabinose, D-altrose, and L-galactose.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yo-Han; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2010-02-01

    A recombinant L-fucose isomerase from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus was purified as a single 68 kDa band with an activity of 76 U mg(-1). The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 204 kDa as a trimer. The maximum activity for L-fucose isomerization was at pH 7 and 75 degrees C in the presence of 1 mM Mn(2+). Its half-life at 70 degrees C was 6.1 h. For aldose substrates, the enzyme displayed activity in decreasing order for L-fucose, with a k (cat) of 11,910 min(-1) and a K (m) of 140 mM, D-arabinose, D-altrose, and L-galactose. These aldoses were converted to the ketoses L-fuculose, D-ribulose, D-psicose, and L-tagatose, respectively, with 24, 24, 85, 55% conversion yields after 3 h.

  6. The tomato HD-Zip I transcription factor SlHZ24 modulates ascorbate accumulation through positive regulation of the D-mannose/L-galactose pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tixu; Ye, Jie; Tao, Peiwen; Li, Hanxia; Zhang, Junhong; Zhang, Yuyang; Ye, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbate (AsA) is an antioxidant that can scavenge the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced when plants encounter stressful conditions. Here, it was revealed by a yeast one-hybrid assay that a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) HD-Zip I family transcription factor, SlHZ24, binds to the promoter of an AsA biosynthetic gene encoding GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase 3 (SlGMP3). Both the transient expression system and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that SlHZ24 binds to a regulatory cis-element in the SlGMP3 promoter, and further overexpression of SlHZ24 in transgenic tomato lines resulted in increased AsA levels. In contrast, suppressing expression of the gene using RNA interference (RNAi) had the opposite effect. These data suggest that SlHZ24 can positively regulate the accumulation of AsA, and in support of this it was shown that SlGMP3 expression increased in the SlHZ24-overexpressing lines and declined in SlHZ24-RNAi lines. SlHZ24 also affected the expression of other genes in the D-mannose/L-galactose pathway, such as genes encoding GDP-mannose-3',5'-epimerase 2 (SlGME2), GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (SlGGP) and SlGMP4. The EMSA indicated that SlHZ24 bound to the promoters of SlGME2 and SlGGP, suggesting multi-targeted regulation of AsA biosynthesis. Finally, SlHZ24-overexpressing plants showed less sensitivity to oxidative stress; we therefore conclude that SlHZ24 promotes AsA biosynthesis, which in turn enhances oxidative stress tolerance. PMID:26610866

  7. Effects of the position of galactose units to Zn(II) phthalocyanine on the uptake and photodynamic activity towards breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantareva, V.; Kril, A.; Angelov, I.; Dimitrov, R.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.

    2012-06-01

    Zn(II)-phthalocyanines with tetra-substitution of D-galactose group on non-peripheral (nGalPc) and peripheral (pGalPc) positions have been studied as photodynamic sensitizers. The both complexes are water-soluble and highly aggregated in water and cell culture medium. The non-peripheral galactose units attached to the phthalocyanine macrocycle (nGalPc) lead to far red shift of absorbance maximum at 703 nm as compared to peripherally substituted pGalPc with maximum at 683 nm. The fluorescence maxima of the studied GalPcs were red shifted (8-14 nm) depending on the used solvent as compared to the absorption maxima. The relatively low fluorescence quantum yields in dimethylsulfoxide (0.06 for nGalPc and 0.21 for pGalPc) were determined. The singlet oxygen generation was determined with lower quantum yield for pGalPc (0.21) as compared to nGalPc (0.38). The lack of dark toxicity towards breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) in wide concentration range (0.125 - 10 μM) was observed. The uptake into the tumor cells and the subcellular localization in MCF-7 cells were determined with higher accumulation for pGalPc, compared to nGalPc. The in vitro photodynamic activity of GalPcs towards breast cancer cells was investigated for different dye concentrations and soft light parameters of 635 nm irradiation. The antitumor activity of nGalPc was superior to the pGalPc-induced cytotoxicity, due to higher generation of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species.

  8. Identification and characterization of an Arabidopsis mutant with altered localization of NIP5;1, a plasma membrane boric acid channel, reveals the requirement for D-galactose in endomembrane organization.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masataka; Wang, Sheliang; Kamiya, Takehiro; Shigenobu, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Fujiwara, Toru; Naito, Satoshi; Takano, Junpei

    2014-04-01

    Endomembrane organization is important for various aspects of cell physiology, including membrane protein trafficking. To explore the molecular mechanisms regulating the trafficking of plasma membrane-localized proteins in plants, we screened for Arabidopsis mutants with defective localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP)5;1. Fluorescence imaging-based screening led to the isolation of a mutant which accumulated abnormal intracellular aggregates labeled by GFP-NIP5;1. The aggregates appeared in epidermal cells in the root elongation zone and included the trans-Golgi network/early endosomes. Rough mapping and whole-genome sequencing identified the mutant as an allele of UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 4 (uge4)/root hair defective 1 (rhd1) /root epidermal bulgar 1 (reb 1), which was originally defined as a cell wall mutant. The responsible gene encodes UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 4 (UGE4), which functions in the biosynthesis of d-galactose, especially for the synthesis of the cell wall polysaccharide xyloglucan and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). The endomembrane aggregates in the mutants were absent in the presence of d-galactose, indicative of a requirement for a d-galactose-containing component in endomembrane organization. Genetic and pharmacological analyses suggested that the aggregates were not caused by the disruption of cell wall polysaccharides or the cytoskeleton. Overall, our results suggest that UGE4 activity in d-galactose synthesis is required for the structure of cell wall polysaccharides and endomembrane organization.

  9. Resistance of Escherichia coli to Penicillins IX. Genetics and Physiology of Class II Ampicillin-Resistant Mutants That Are Galactose Negative or Sensitive to Bacteriophage C21, or Both

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson-Grennberg, Kerstin G.; Nordström, Kurt; Englund, Per

    1971-01-01

    Ampicillin-resistant mutants of class II are determined by a doubling of chromosomally and episomally mediated ampicillin resistance on agar plates. Several mutants were isolated from a female as well as from an Hfr strain. The mutants differed from each other in various properties such as response to colicin E2 and sodium cholate, response to the phages T4 and C21, and fermentation of galactose. By conjugation and transduction experiments, it was shown that mutations in at least four loci gave the class II phenotype. The mutations were found to be in the galU gene, the ctr gene, and two new genes close to mtl denoted lpsA and lpsB. The carbohydrate compositions of the lipopolysaccharides of the mutants were investigated and found to be changed compared to the parent strains. GalU mutants lacked rhamnose and galactose and had 11% glucose compared to the parent strain. The lpsA mutant also lacked rhamnose and had only traces of galactose and 58% glucose, whereas the lpsB mutant contained 14% rhamnose, traces of galactose, and 81% glucose compared to the parent strain. PMID:4945191

  10. The combined role of galactose-deficient IgA1 and streptococcal IgA-binding M Protein in inducing IL-6 and C3 secretion from human mesangial cells: implications for IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Roland; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Olin, Anders I; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Rebetz, Johan; Novak, Jan; Lindahl, Gunnar; Karpman, Diana

    2014-07-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix expansion associated with immune deposits consisting of galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1 and C3. We have previously shown that IgA-binding regions of streptococcal M proteins colocalize with IgA in mesangial immune deposits in patients with IgAN. In the present study, the IgA-binding M4 protein from group A Streptococcus was found to bind to galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1 with higher affinity than to other forms of IgA1, as shown by surface plasmon resonance and solid-phase immunoassay. The M4 protein was demonstrated to bind to mesangial cells not via the IgA-binding region but rather via the C-terminal region, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. IgA1 enhanced binding of M4 to mesangial cells, but not vice versa. Costimulation of human mesangial cells with M4 and galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1 resulted in a significant increase in IL-6 secretion compared with each stimulant alone. Galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1 alone, but not M4, induced C3 secretion from the cells, and costimulation enhanced this effect. Additionally, costimulation enhanced mesangial cell proliferation compared with each stimulant alone. These results indicate that IgA-binding M4 protein binds preferentially to galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1 and that these proteins together induce excessive proinflammatory responses and proliferation of human mesangial cells. Thus, tissue deposition of streptococcal IgA-binding M proteins may contribute to the pathogenesis of IgAN.

  11. [Effect of FGF-21 on learning and memory ability and antioxidant capacity in brain tissue of D-galactose-induced aging mice].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yin-Hang; Ren, Gui-Ping; Liu, Yao-Nan; Qu, Su-Su; Bai, Fu-Liang; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Wen-Fei; Tian, Gui-You; Ye, Xian-Long; Li, De-Shan

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF-21) on learning and memory abilities and antioxidant capacity of D-galactose-induced aging mice. Kunming mice (37.1 +/- 0.62) g were randomly divided into normal control group, model group and FGF-21 high, medium and low dose groups (n = 8). Each group was injected in cervical part subcutaneously with D-galactose 180 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) once a day for 8 weeks. At the same time, FGF-21-treated mice were administered with FGF-21 by giving subcutaneous injection in cervical part at the daily doses of 5, 2 and 1 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1). The normal control group was given with normal saline by subcutaneous injection in cervical part. At seventh week of the experiment, the learning and memory abilities of mice were determined by water maze and jumping stand tests. At the end of the experiment, the mice were sacrificed and the cells damage of hippocampus was observed by HE staining in each group. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in the brain of mice were determined. The results showed that different doses of FGF-21 could reduce the time reaching the end (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) and the number of touching blind side (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) in the water maze comparing with the model group. It could also prolong the latency time (P < 0.05) and decrease the number of errors (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) in the step down test. The result of HE staining showed that FGF-21 could significantly reduce brain cell damage in the hippocampus. The ROS and MDA levels of three different doses FGF-21 treatment group reduced significantly than that of the model group [(5.58 +/- 1.07), (7.78 +/- 1.92), (9.03 +/- 1.77) vs (12.75 +/- 2.02) pmol (DCF) x min(-1) x mg(-1), P < 0.01 or P < 0.05], [(2.92 +/- 0.71), (4.21 +/- 0.81), (4.41 +/- 0.97) vs (5.62 +/- 0.63) nmol x mg(-1) (protein), P < 0

  12. Comparison of the periplasmic receptors for L-arabinose, D-glucose/D-galactose, and D-ribose. Structural and Functional Similarity.

    PubMed

    Vyas, N K; Vyas, M N; Quiocho, F A

    1991-03-15

    The primary sequence of the receptor for L-arabinose or Ara-binding protein (ABP) composed of 306 residues is very different from the D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein (GGBP) which consists of 309 residues. Nevertheless, superimpositioning of the well-refined high resolution structures of ABP in complex with D-galactose and the GGBP in complex with D-glucose shows very similar structures; 220 of the residues (or about 70%) have a root mean square deviation of 2.0 A. From the superpositioning, nine pairs of continuous segments (consisting of 8-51 residues), mainly alpha-helices and beta-strands that form the core of the two lobes of the bilobate proteins were found to exhibit strong sequence homology. The equivalenced structures and aligned sequences show that many of the polar, as well as aromatic residues, in the sugar-binding sites located in the cleft between the two lobes are highly conserved. Surprisingly, however, the exact mode of binding of the D-galactose in ABP is totally different from that of the D-glucose in GGBP. Using the structurally aligned sequences of the ABP and GGBP as a template, we have matched the sequence of the ribose-binding protein (RBP) which consists of 271 residues with the ABP/GGBP pair. Although the nine aligned segments of all three proteins show little sequence identity, they have significant homology. Four additional segments of RBP were matched only with GGBP, leading to the alignment of about 90% of the RBP sequence with the GGBP sequence. Many of the conserved residues in the binding sites of ABP and GGBP matched with similar residues in RBP. Additional observations indicate that the GGBP/RBP pair is more closely related than the ABP/RBP or ABP/GGBP pair. All three binding proteins, which may have diverged from a common ancestor, serve as primary receptors for bacterial high affinity active transport systems. Moreover, GGBP and RBP, but not ABP, also act as receptors for chemotaxis. An exposed site located in one domain

  13. NADPH oxidase 3-associated oxidative stress and caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in the cochleae of D-galactose-induced aged rats

    PubMed Central

    DU, ZHENGDE; LI, SHUO; LIU, LIN; YANG, QIONG; ZHANG, HONGWEI; GAO, CHUNSHENG

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and cell apoptosis are heavily implicated in aging. Our previous study established a mimetic rat model of aging in the cochleae using D-galactose (D-gal), and revealed that chronic injection of D-gal can increase oxidative stress and mtDNA common deletions (CD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the sources of reactive oxygen species and the occurrence of apoptosis in the cochleae of rats following 8 weeks of D-gal exposure. The results of the present study indicated that an elevated accumulation of the mtDNA CD and mitochondrial ultrastructural damage occurred in the cochleae of rats injected with D-gal for 8 weeks. In addition, the levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, NADPH oxidase (NOX) 3, P22phox and cleaved caspase 3, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end-labelling-positive cells were increased in the cochleae of D-gal-treated rats, compared with the controls. These findings suggested that nitric oxide synthase NOX3-associated oxidative stress may contribute to the accumulation of mtDNA mutations and activate a caspase 3-dependent apoptotic signalling pathway in the cochleae during aging. The present study also provided novel insights into the development of age-associated hearing loss, also termed presbycusis. PMID:26498835

  14. Lobular and cellular patterns of early hepatic glycogen deposition in the rat as observed by light and electron microscopic radioautography after injection of /sup 3/H-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, J.E.; Hung, J.T.; Garfield, S.A.; Cardell, R.R. Jr.

    1984-05-01

    Very low hepatic glycogen levels are achieved by overnight fasting of adrenalectomized (ADX) rats. Subsequent injection of dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, stimulates marked increases in glycogen synthesis. Using this system and injecting /sup 3/H-galactose as a glycogen precursor 1 hr prior to sacrifice, the intralobular and intracellular patterns of labeled glycogen deposition were studied by light (LM) and electron (EM) microscopic radioautography. LM radioautography revealed that 1 hr after DEX treatment, labeling patterns for both periportal and centrilobular hepatocytes resembled those in rats with no DEX treatment: 18% of the hepatocytes were unlabeled, and 82% showed light labeling. Two hours after treatment with DEX, 14% of the hepatocytes remained unlabeled, and 78% were lightly labeled; however, 8% of the cells, located randomly throughout the lobule, were intensely labeled. An increased number of heavily labeled cells (26%) appeared 3 hr after DEX treatment; and by 5 hr 91% of the hepatocytes were intensely labeled. Label over the periportal cells at this time was aggregated, whereas centrilobular cells displayed dispersed label. EM radioautographs showed that 2 to 3 hr after DEX injection initial labeling of hepatocytes, regardless of their intralobular location, occurred over foci of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and small electron-dense particles of presumptive glycogen, and in areas of SER and distinct glycogen particles. After 5 hrs of treatment with DEX, the intracellular distribution of label reflected the glycogen patterns characteristic of periportal or centrilobular regions.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of frutalin, an α-D-galactose-specific lectin from Artocarpus incisa seeds.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de Oliveira; D'Muniz Pereira, Humberto; Vieira Neto, Antonio Eufrasio; Mendes Batista Moreno, Frederico Bruno; Duarte Pinto Lobo, Marina; de Sousa, Felipe Domingos; Moreira, Renato de Azevedo

    2015-10-01

    Frutalin is an α-D-galactose-specific carbohydrate-binding glycoprotein with antitumour properties and is a powerful tool for tumour biomarker discovery. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of this lectin, which was isolated from Artocarpus incisa seeds, are reported here. Frutalin was purified and submitted to mass-spectrometric analysis. Diverse masses at approximately 16 kDa were observed in the deconvoluted spectra, which support the presence of isoforms. The best frutalin crystals were grown within a week in 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5 which contained 25% PEG 3350 as a precipitant at 293 K, and diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.81 Å. The monoclinic crystals belonged to space group I2, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.17, b = 74.56, c = 118.98 Å, β = 96.56°. A molecular-replacement solution was obtained which indicated the presence of four monomers per asymmetric unit. Crystallographic refinement of the structure is in progress.

  16. The influence of gender, age and treatment time on brain oxidative stress and memory impairment induced by D-galactose in mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ling; Huang, Huang; Gao, Junying; Marshall, Charles; Chen, Yali; Xiao, Ming

    2014-06-13

    Chronic exposure to d-galactose (d-gal) serves as a model for age-related oxidative damage and cognitive dysfunction. However, methods used, including the dose and treatment time of d-gal as well as the gender, age and strain of animals used, vary greatly among published articles. In this study, we investigate the effect of gender, age and treatment time on brain oxidative stress and spatial memory deficits induced by d-gal in mice, respectively. Eight-week-old female mice injected with 100mg/kg d-gal per day, for 6 weeks, did not show spatial memory impairment or high levels of hydroxyl radical, protein carbonyl and malondialdehyde in brain homogenates, although brain reactive oxygen species were increased when compared with saline control mice. In contrast, both 8-week-old male mice and 24-week-old female mice receiving 100mg/kg d-gal for 6 weeks, or 8-week-old female mice receiving 100mg/kg d-gal for 10 weeks showed spatial memory deficits and significant increases in the above oxidative markers, compared with their corresponding controls. These results demonstrate that d-gal-induced brain oxidative stress and spatial memory impairment are dependent upon exposure time of d-gal, plus gender and age of the animals used. The findings can serve as a useful guide for successfully establishing d-gal induced age-related oxidative damage models.

  17. The human gene CGT encoding the UDP-galactose ceramide galactosyl transferase (cerebroside synthase): Cloning, characterization, and assignment to human chromosome 4, band q26

    SciTech Connect

    Bosio, A.; Binczek, E.; Stoffel, W.

    1996-05-15

    We have previously cloned the human UDP-galactose ceramide galactosyltransferase (CGT, E.C. 2.4.1.45) cDNA. Its open reading frame encodes the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of the glycosphingolipids, cerebrosides and sulfatides, essential constituents of the myelin membrane of the central nervous system (CNS) and PNS. Expression of the CGT gene and of the myelin-specific proteins in the terminal differentiated oligodendrocyte of CNS and in Schwann cells of PNS is cell-specific and highly time-regulated. The CGT gene therefore is important in the differentiation program of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Here we report the structural organization and the chromosomal localization of the human CGT gene. The coding sequence is separated into five exons, which are distributed over >40 kb. The CGT locus was mapped to the distal region of human chromosome 4, band q26. The organization of the CGT gene and of the UGT (uridylglucuronosyl-transferases) gene family suggests a correlation to functional domains of the encoded proteins. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The biosynthesis of gangliosides. The incorporation of galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylneuraminic acid into endogenous acceptors of subcellular particles from rat brain in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Arce, A.; Maccioni, H. J.; Caputto, R.

    1971-01-01

    Gangliosides bound to subcellular particles from rat brain were labelled by incubation of the particles (i) with CMP-N[3H]-acetylneuraminic acid and (ii) simultaneously, with CMP-N[3H]-acetylneuraminic acid and UDP-N-acetyl-[14C1]galactosamine or with CMP-N[3H]-acetylneuraminic acid and UDP-[U-14C]-galactose. Analysis of the labelled gangliosides showed that in (i), (a) the labelling was mostly in the neuraminidase-labile sialyl groups, (b) rigid relationships exist between the enzymes and the sialyl acceptors; the enzymes are not free to interact with all the specific substrates present in the preparation and (c) the precursor of the trisialoganglioside was the major disialoganglioside with a sialyl 2→8 sialyl group. In (ii), (a) precursor–product relationships between the main pools of each ganglioside apparently do not exist, (b) for the labelling of Tay–Sachs ganglioside the amount formed from hematoside was at least 2.5 times that from aminoglycolipid and (c) the major monosialoganglioside was the precursor for the major disialoganglioside with a sialyl 2→8 sialyl group. PMID:5119784

  19. Chongcao-Shencha Attenuates Liver and Kidney Injury through Attenuating Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Response in D-Galactose-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cailan; Mo, Zhizhun; Xie, Jianhui; Xu, Lieqiang; Tan, Lihua; Luo, Dandan; Chen, Hanbin; Yang, Hongmei; Li, Yucui; Su, Ziren; Su, Zuqing

    2016-01-01

    The Chongcao-Shencha (CCSC), a Chinese herbal compound formula, has been widely used as food material and medicine for enhancing physical strength. The present study investigated the possible effect of CCSC in alleviating the liver and kidney injury in D-galactose- (D-gal-) treated mice and the underlying mechanism. Mice were given a subcutaneous injection of D-gal (200 mg/kg) and orally administered CCSC (200, 400, and 800 mg/kg) daily for 8 weeks. Results indicated that CCSC increased the depressed body weight and organ index induced by D-gal, ameliorated the histological deterioration, and decreased the levels of ALT, AST, BUN, and CRE as compared with D-gal group. Furthermore, CCSC not only elevated the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, and GPx but also upregulated the mRNA expression of SOD1, CAT, and GPx1, while decreasing the MDA level in D-gal-treated mice. Results of western blotting analysis showed that CCSC significantly inhibited the upregulation of expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, p-p65, p-IκBα, COX2, and iNOS and inhibited the downregulation of IκBα protein expression caused by D-gal. This study demonstrated that CCSC could attenuate the liver and kidney injury in D-gal-treated mice, and the mechanism might be associated with attenuating oxidative stress and inflammatory response. PMID:27340415

  20. Response surface methodology to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductase enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and d-galactose dehydrogenase in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Shahbaz Mohammadi, Hamid; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Bozorgian, Sajad; Pooraskari, Maryam; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-04-01

    Oxidoreductases are an important family of enzymes that are used in many biotechnological processes. An experimental design was applied to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductases, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis and d-galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH) from Pseudomonas fluorescens AK92 in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was performed to optimize critical factors like polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration, concentration of salt and pH value. The best partitioning conditions was achieved in an ATPS composed of 12% PEG-6000, 15% K2HPO4 with pH 7.5 at 25°C, which ensured partition coefficient (KE) of 66.6 and 45.7 for GDH and GalDH, respectively. Under these experimental conditions, the activity of GDH and GalDH was 569.5U/ml and 673.7U/ml, respectively. It was found that these enzymes preferentially partitioned into the top PEG-rich phase and appeared as single bands on SDS-PAGE gel. Meanwhile the validity of the response model was confirmed by a good agreement between predicted and experimental results. Collectively, according to the obtained data it can be inferred that the ATPS optimization using RSM approach can be applied for recovery and purification of any enzyme from oxidoreductase family. PMID:25591389

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of frutalin, an α-D-galactose-specific lectin from Artocarpus incisa seeds.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de Oliveira; D'Muniz Pereira, Humberto; Vieira Neto, Antonio Eufrasio; Mendes Batista Moreno, Frederico Bruno; Duarte Pinto Lobo, Marina; de Sousa, Felipe Domingos; Moreira, Renato de Azevedo

    2015-10-01

    Frutalin is an α-D-galactose-specific carbohydrate-binding glycoprotein with antitumour properties and is a powerful tool for tumour biomarker discovery. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of this lectin, which was isolated from Artocarpus incisa seeds, are reported here. Frutalin was purified and submitted to mass-spectrometric analysis. Diverse masses at approximately 16 kDa were observed in the deconvoluted spectra, which support the presence of isoforms. The best frutalin crystals were grown within a week in 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5 which contained 25% PEG 3350 as a precipitant at 293 K, and diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.81 Å. The monoclinic crystals belonged to space group I2, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.17, b = 74.56, c = 118.98 Å, β = 96.56°. A molecular-replacement solution was obtained which indicated the presence of four monomers per asymmetric unit. Crystallographic refinement of the structure is in progress. PMID:26457519

  2. [Physical-chemical properties of the mutant (protein) form of D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein GGBP/H152C with an attached fluorescent dye BADAN].

    PubMed

    Fonin, A V; Stepanenko, O V; Povarova, O I; Volova, E A; Filippova, E M; Bublikov, G S; Kuznetsova, I M; Demchenko, A P; Turoverov, K K

    2013-01-01

    The influence of various factors on the physico-chemical characteristics and complexation of glucose with a mutant form of D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein which can be regarded as a sensor of the glucometer, namely the protein GGBP/H152C with solvatochromic dye BADAN attached to the cysteine residue Cys 152, has been investigated. The point mutation His 152Cys and attaching BADAN reduced the affinity of the mutant form GGBP/H152C to glucose more than 8-fold compared to the wild type protein. This allows using this mutant for the determination of sugar content in biological fluids extracted by transdermal technologies. Sufficiently rapid complexation of GGBP/H152C with glucose (the time of protein-glucose complex formation is not more than three seconds even in solutions with a viscosity of 4 cP) provides timely monitoring changes in the concentration of sugar. The changes of ionic strength and pH within the physiological range of values of these variables do not have significant influence on fluorescent characteristics of GGBP/H152C-BADAN. At acidic pH, (see symbol) some of the molecules GGBP/H152C is in the unfolded state. It has been shown that mutant form GGBP/H152C has relatively low resistance to guanidine hydrochloride denaturing effects. This result indicates the need for more stable proteins to create a sensor for glucose biosensor system. PMID:25474908

  3. Involvement of viral envelope GP2 in Ebola virus entry into cells expressing the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Usami, Katsuaki; Matsuno, Keita; Igarashi, Manabu; Denda-Nagai, Kaori; Takada, Ayato; Irimura, Tatsuro

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} Ebola virus infection is mediated by binding to and fusion with the target cells. {yields} Structural feature of the viral glycoprotein determines the infectivity. {yields} Surface C-type lectin, MGL, of macrophages and dendritic cells mediate the infection. {yields} GP2, one of glycoprotein subunits, plays an essential role in MGL-mediated infection. {yields} There is a critical amino acid residue involved in high infectivity. -- Abstract: Ebola virus (EBOV) infection is initiated by the interaction of the viral surface envelope glycoprotein (GP) with the binding sites on target cells. Differences in the mortality among different species of the Ebola viruses, i.e., Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Reston ebolavirus (REBOV), correspond to the in vitro infectivity of the pseudo-typed virus constructed with the GPs in cells expressing macrophage galactose-type calcium-type lectin (MGL/CD301). Through mutagenesis of GP2, the transmembrane-anchored subunit of GP, we found that residues 502-527 of the GP2 sequence determined the different infectivity between VSV-ZEBOV GP and -REBOV GP in MGL/CD301-expressing cells and a histidine residue at position 516 of ZEBOV GP2 appeared essential in the differential infectivity. These findings may provide a clue to clarify a molecular basis of different pathogenicity among EBOV species.

  4. Coenzyme Q10 Inhibits the Aging of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by D-Galactose through Akt/mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dayong; Yan, Bingxi; Yu, Shanshan; Zhang, Chong; Wang, Baoming; Wang, Yayan; Wang, Junbo; Yuan, Zhanggen; Zhang, Lihuang; Pan, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidences indicate that reactive oxygen species are the main factor promoting stem cell aging. Recent studies have demonstrated that coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) plays a positive role in organ and cellular aging. However, the potential for CoQ10 to protect stem cell aging has not been fully evaluated, and the mechanisms of cell senescence inhibited by CoQ10 are still poorly understood. Our previous study had indicated that D-galactose (D-gal) can remarkably induce mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) aging through promoting intracellular ROS generation. In this study, we showed that CoQ10 could significantly inhibit MSC aging induced by D-gal. Moreover, in the CoQ10 group, the expression of p-Akt and p-mTOR was clearly reduced compared with that in the D-gal group. However, after Akt activating by CA-Akt plasmid, the senescence-cell number in the CoQ10 group was significantly higher than that in the control group. These results indicated that CoQ10 could inhibit D-gal-induced MSC aging through the Akt/mTOR signaling. PMID:25789082

  5. Betacyanins from Portulaca oleracea L. ameliorate cognition deficits and attenuate oxidative damage induced by D-galactose in the brains of senescent mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Quan; Yang, Gui-Qin

    2010-06-01

    This experiment was designed to assess the protective effect of betacyanins from Portulaca oleracea L. against the D-galactose (D-gal)-induced neurotoxicity in mice. Betacyanins from Portulaca oleracea markedly reversed the D-gal-induced learning and memory impairments, as measured by behavioral tests. The activities of superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) in D-gal-treated mice were enhanced, while the content of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) was decreased by betacyanin administration. Furthermore, significant negative correlations were found between mouse latency in finding the platform and the activities of SOD, CAT GR and GPx in the mouse brain, but the level of MDA correlated positively with the latency. These results suggest that the neuroprotective effect of betacyanins against D-gal-induced neurotoxicity might be caused, at least in part, by an increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes with a reduction in lipid peroxidation. In comparison with vitamin C (VC), the betacyanins had a more pronounced effect on ameliorating cognition deficits in mice.

  6. Chongcao-Shencha Attenuates Liver and Kidney Injury through Attenuating Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Response in D-Galactose-Treated Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Cailan; Mo, Zhizhun; Xie, Jianhui; Xu, Lieqiang; Tan, Lihua; Luo, Dandan; Chen, Hanbin; Yang, Hongmei; Li, Yucui; Su, Ziren; Su, Zuqing

    2016-01-01

    The Chongcao-Shencha (CCSC), a Chinese herbal compound formula, has been widely used as food material and medicine for enhancing physical strength. The present study investigated the possible effect of CCSC in alleviating the liver and kidney injury in D-galactose- (D-gal-) treated mice and the underlying mechanism. Mice were given a subcutaneous injection of D-gal (200 mg/kg) and orally administered CCSC (200, 400, and 800 mg/kg) daily for 8 weeks. Results indicated that CCSC increased the depressed body weight and organ index induced by D-gal, ameliorated the histological deterioration, and decreased the levels of ALT, AST, BUN, and CRE as compared with D-gal group. Furthermore, CCSC not only elevated the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, and GPx but also upregulated the mRNA expression of SOD1, CAT, and GPx1, while decreasing the MDA level in D-gal-treated mice. Results of western blotting analysis showed that CCSC significantly inhibited the upregulation of expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, p-p65, p-IκBα, COX2, and iNOS and inhibited the downregulation of IκBα protein expression caused by D-gal. This study demonstrated that CCSC could attenuate the liver and kidney injury in D-gal-treated mice, and the mechanism might be associated with attenuating oxidative stress and inflammatory response. PMID:27340415

  7. NGF-Dependent activation of TrkA pathway: A mechanism for the neuroprotective effect of troxerutin in D-galactose-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-mei; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Zhang, Zi-feng; Wang, Yong-jian

    2010-09-01

    D-galactose-(D-gal)-treated mouse, with cognitive impairment, has been used for neurotoxicity investigation and anti-neurotoxicity pharmacology research. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of troxerutin. The results showed that troxerutin improved behavioral performance in D-gal-treated mice by elevating Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutases (Cu, Zn-SOD) activity and decreasing reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, our results showed that troxerutin significantly promoted nerve growth factor (NGF) mRNA expression which resulted in TrkA activation. On one hand, NGF/TrkA induced activation of Akt and ERK1/2, which led to neuronal survival; on the other hand, NGF/TrkA mediated CaMKII and CREB phosphorylation and increased PSD95 expression, which improved cognitive performance. However, the neuroprotective effect of troxerutin was blocked by treatment with K252a, an antagonist for TrkA. No neurotoxicity was observed in mice treated with K252a or troxerutin alone. In conclusion, administration of troxerutin to D-gal-injected mice attenuated cognitive impairment and brain oxidative stress through the activation of NGF/TrkA signaling pathway.

  8. Response surface methodology to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductase enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and d-galactose dehydrogenase in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Shahbaz Mohammadi, Hamid; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Bozorgian, Sajad; Pooraskari, Maryam; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-04-01

    Oxidoreductases are an important family of enzymes that are used in many biotechnological processes. An experimental design was applied to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductases, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis and d-galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH) from Pseudomonas fluorescens AK92 in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was performed to optimize critical factors like polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration, concentration of salt and pH value. The best partitioning conditions was achieved in an ATPS composed of 12% PEG-6000, 15% K2HPO4 with pH 7.5 at 25°C, which ensured partition coefficient (KE) of 66.6 and 45.7 for GDH and GalDH, respectively. Under these experimental conditions, the activity of GDH and GalDH was 569.5U/ml and 673.7U/ml, respectively. It was found that these enzymes preferentially partitioned into the top PEG-rich phase and appeared as single bands on SDS-PAGE gel. Meanwhile the validity of the response model was confirmed by a good agreement between predicted and experimental results. Collectively, according to the obtained data it can be inferred that the ATPS optimization using RSM approach can be applied for recovery and purification of any enzyme from oxidoreductase family.

  9. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone of UDP-galactose: flavonoid 3-O-galactosyltransferase (UF3GaT) expressed in Vigna mungo seedlings.

    PubMed

    Mato, M; Ozeki, Y; Itoh, Y; Higeta, D; Yoshitama, K; Teramoto, S; Aida, R; Ishikura, N; Shibata, M

    1998-11-01

    Four cDNA clones were isolated from Vigna mungo seedlings by the screening with cDNA encoding UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT) of Antirrhinum majus as a probe; the product of the gene corresponding to one cDNA was more highly expressed in the first simple leaves than in stems. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed 1,691 bp (including 326 bp non-reading) containing an open reading frame of 455 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 42% and 23% identity with those of A. majus UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT) and Petunia hybrida UDP-rhamnose:anthocyanidin 3-O-glucoside rhamnosyltransferase (RT), respectively. One region of the cDNA (amino acids 325 to 387) showed similarity to ceramide UDP-galactosyltransferases of mice, rats and humans. A crude extract from Escherichia coli, in which the protein was expressed from the cDNA, showed high UF3GaT activity but low UF3GT activity, and was similar in K(m), optimal pH and substrate specificity to UF3GaT from V. mungo. We conclude that we have obtained UDP-galactose:flavonoid 3-O-galactosyltransferase (UF3GaT) cDNA from V. mungo.

  10. Characterisation of "caramel-type" thermal decomposition products of selected monosaccharides including fructose, mannose, galactose, arabinose and ribose by advanced electrospray ionization mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Golon, Agnieszka; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2013-07-01

    The chemical analysis of caramel, formed upon heating of carbohydrates, remains a significant challenge due to the complexity of the resulting product mixture. Identification of the products formed upon heating of monosaccharides including fructose, mannose, galactose, arabinose and ribose is essential to understand the composition and properties of carbohydrate-rich processed foods. In this work, we report on the use of combined mass spectrometry techniques, including high performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)). The composition of the obtained caramel was examined by high resolution mass spectrometry along with van Krevelen and Kendrick analysis. We found that caramel is composed of oligomers with up to six carbohydrate units formed through unselective glycosidic bond formation, their dehydrated products by losing up to eight water molecules, hydrated products and disproportionation products. An accurate mass measurement and subsequent fragment ion studies of all caramel samples (around 40 compounds) can thus be identified. Glycosidic bond and ring cleavages of sugar moieties were the major observable fragmentation pathways during this experiment. The innovative analytical strategies for the complex mixture analysis used provide a comprehensive account of the chemical composition of caramel, one of the most popular dietary materials over the world.

  11. Comparative Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging and Phototherapeutic Potential of 124I- Labeled Methyl- 3-(1′-iodobenzyloxyethyl) pyropheophorbide-a vs. the Corresponding Glucose- and Galactose-Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Suresh K.; Sajjad, Munawwar; Chen, Yihui; Zheng, Xiang; Yao, Rutao; Missert, Joseph R.; Batt, Carrie; Nabi, Hani A.; Oseroff, Allan R.; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2009-01-01

    In our present study, 3-(1′-m-iodobenzyloxyethyl) pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester 1, 3-(1′-m-iodobenzyloxyethyl)-172-{(2-deoxy)glucose} pyropheophorbide-a 2, and 3-(1′-m-iodo benzyloxyethyl)-172-{(1-deoxy)galactose} pyropheophorbide-a 3 were synthesized and converted into the corresponding 124I- labeled analogs by reacting the intermediate trimethyltin analogs with Na124I. Photosensitizers 1–3 were evaluated for the PDT efficacy in C3H mice bearing RIF tumors at variable doses and showed a significant long-term tumor cure. Among the compounds investigated, the non-carbohydrate analog 1 was most effective. These results were in contrast to the in vitro data, where compared to the parent analog the corresponding galactose-and glucose derivatives showed enhanced cell kill. Among the corresponding 124I-labeled in analogs, excellent tumor images were obtained from compound 1 both tumor models (RIF and Colon-26) and the best tumor contrast was observed at 72 h post injection. Conjugating a glucose moiety to photosensitizer 1 diminished its tumor uptake, whereas with time the corresponding galactose analog showed improved tumor contrast. PMID:19090663

  12. Gcn4p and the Crabtree effect of yeast: drawing the causal model of the Crabtree effect in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and explaining evolutionary trade-offs of adaptation to galactose through systems biology.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Bordel, Sergio; Hong, KuFk-Ki; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-06-01

    By performing an integrated comparative analysis on the physiology and transcriptome of four different S. cerevisiae strains growing on galactose and glucose, it was inferred that the transcription factors Bas1p, Pho2p, and Gcn4p play a central role in the regulatory events causing the Crabtree effect in S. cerevisiae. The analysis also revealed that a point mutation in the RAS2 observed in a galactose-adapted strain causes a lower Crabtree effect and growth rate on glucose by decreasing the activity of Gcn4p while at the same time is at the origin of higher growth rate on galactose due to a lower activity of the transcriptional repressor Sok2p. The role of Gcn4p on the trade-off effect observed on glucose was confirmed experimentally. This was done by showing that the point mutation in RAS2 does not result in a lower growth rate on glucose if it is introduced in a GCN4-negative background.

  13. Recognition of galactose-deficient O-glycans in the hinge region of IgA1 by N-acetylgalactosamine-specific snail lectins: a comparative binding study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Michelle M; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Brooks, Monica T; Tomana, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Mestecky, Jiri; Julian, Bruce A; Novak, Jan; Herr, Andrew B

    2010-07-13

    Aberrancies in IgA1 glycosylation have been linked to the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), a kidney disease characterized by deposits of IgA1-containing immune complexes in the glomerular mesangium. IgA1 from IgAN patients is characterized by the presence of galactose (Gal)-deficient O-glycans in the hinge region that can act as epitopes for anti-glycan IgG or IgA1 antibodies. The resulting circulating immune complexes are trapped in the glomerular mesangium of the kidney where they trigger localized inflammatory responses by activating mesangial cells. Certain lectins recognize the terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-containing O-glycans on Gal-deficient IgA1 and can be potentially used as diagnostic tools. To improve our understanding of GalNAc recognition by these lectins, we have conducted binding studies to assess the interaction of Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) and Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) with Gal-deficient IgA1. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy revealed that both HAA and HPA bind to a Gal-deficient synthetic hinge region glycopeptide (HR-GalNAc) as well as various aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 myeloma proteins. Despite having six binding sites, both HAA and HPA bind IgA1 in a functionally bivalent manner, with the apparent affinity for IgA1 related to the number of exposed GalNAc groups in the IgA1 hinge. Finally, HAA and HPA were shown to discriminate very effectively between the IgA1 secreted by cell lines derived from peripheral blood cells of patients with IgAN and that from cells of healthy controls. These studies provide insight into lectin recognition of the Gal-deficient IgA1 hinge region and lay the groundwork for the development of reliable diagnostic tools for IgAN.

  14. Crystal Structure of Binary and Ternary Complexes of Archaeal UDP-galactose 4-Epimerase-like l-Threonine Dehydrogenase from Thermoplasma volcanium*

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A gene from the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma volcanium encoding an l-threonine dehydrogenase (l-ThrDH) with a predicted amino acid sequence that was remarkably similar to the sequence of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (GalE) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme was moderately thermostable, retaining more than 90% of its activity after incubation for 10 min at up to 70 °C. The catalytic residue was assessed using site-directed mutagenesis, and Tyr137 was found to be essential for catalysis. To clarify the structural basis of the catalytic mechanism, four different crystal structures were determined using the molecular replacement method: l-ThrDH-NAD+, l-ThrDH in complex with NAD+ and pyruvate, Y137F mutant in complex with NAD+ and l-threonine, and Y137F in complex with NAD+ and l-3-hydroxynorvaline. Each monomer consisted of a Rossmann-fold domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain, and the fold of the catalytic domain showed notable similarity to that of the GalE-like l-ThrDH from the psychrophilic bacterium Flavobacterium frigidimaris KUC-1. The substrate binding model suggests that the reaction proceeds through abstraction of the β-hydroxyl hydrogen of l-threonine via direct proton transfer driven by Tyr137. The factors contributing to the thermostability of T. volcanium l-ThrDH were analyzed by comparing its structure to that of F. frigidimaris l-ThrDH. This comparison showed that the presence of extensive inter- and intrasubunit ion pair networks are likely responsible for the thermostability of T. volcanium l-ThrDH. This is the first description of the molecular basis for the substrate recognition and thermostability of a GalE-like l-ThrDH. PMID:22374996

  15. Galactose conjugated platinum(II) complex targeting the Warburg effect for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Li, Hong; Liu, Ran; Gao, Xiangqian; Zhang, Menghua; Liu, Pengxing; Fu, Zheng; Yang, Jinna; Zhang-Negrerie, Daisy; Gao, Qingzhi

    2016-03-01

    Malignant neoplasms exhibit a higher rate of glycolysis than normal cells; this is known as the Warburg effect. To target it, a galactose-conjugated (trans-R,R-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine)-2-chloromalonato-platinum(II) complex (Gal-Pt) was designed, synthesized, and evaluated in five human cancer cell lines and against two different xenograft tumour models. Gal-Pt exhibits much higher aqueous solubility (over 25 times) and improved cytotoxicity than oxaliplatin, especially in human colon (HT29) and lung (H460) cancer cell lines. The safety profile of Gal-Pt was investigated in vivo by exploring the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and animal mortality rate. The ratios of the animal lethal dosage values to the cytotoxicity in HT29 (LD50/IC50) showed that Gal-Pt was associated with an increased therapeutic index by over 30-fold compared to cisplatin and oxaliplatin. We evaluated in vivo antitumor activity by single agent intravenous treatment comparison studies of Gal-Pt (50 mg/kg as 65% MTD) and cisplatin (3 mg/kg, as 80% MTD) in a H460 lung cancer xenograft model, and with oxaliplatin (7 mg/kg, as 90% MTD) in a HT29 colon cancer xenograft model. The results show that Gal-Pt was more efficacious against H460 than cisplatin, and had superior potency in HT29 cells compared to oxaliplatin under nontoxic dosage conditions. The dependency between cytotoxicity of Gal-Pt and glucose transporters (GLUTs) was investigated by using quercetin as an inhibitor of GLUTs in HT29 cells. The cytotoxic potency of Gal-Pt was highly reduced by the inhibitor, suggesting that the uptake of Gal-Pt was regulated by glucose transporters. The GLUT mediated transportability and cellular uptake of Gal-Pt was also demonstrated using a fluorescent glucose bioprobe in HT29 competition assay. PMID:26807543

  16. Serum Galactose-Deficient IgA1 Level Is Not Associated with Proteinuria in Children with IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, M. Colleen; Afshan, Sabahat; Sanders, John T.; Kane, Oulimata; Eison, T. Matthew; Lau, Keith K.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Julian, Bruce A.; Novak, Jan; Wyatt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Percentage of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) relative to total IgA in serum was recently reported to correlate with proteinuria at time of sampling and during follow-up for pediatric and adult patients with IgA nephropathy. We sought to determine whether this association exists in another cohort of pediatric patients with IgA nephropathy. Methods. Subjects were younger than 18 years at entry. Blood samples were collected on one or more occasions for determination of serum total IgA and Gd-IgA1. Gd-IgA1 was expressed as serum level and percent of total IgA. Urinary protein/creatinine ratio was calculated for random specimens. Spearman's correlation coefficients assessed the relationship between study variables. Results. The cohort had 29 Caucasians and 11 African-Americans with a male : female ratio of 1.9 : 1. Mean age at diagnosis was 11.7 ± 3.7 years. No statistically significant correlation was identified between serum total IgA, Gd-IgA1, or percent Gd-IgA1 versus urinary protein/creatinine ratio determined contemporaneously with biopsy or between average serum Gd-IgA1 or average percent Gd-IgA1 and time-average urinary protein/creatinine ratio. Conclusion. The magnitude of proteinuria in this cohort of pediatric patients with IgA nephropathy was influenced by factors other than Gd-IgA1 level, consistent with the proposed multi-hit pathogenetic pathways for this renal disease. PMID:22754697

  17. Standardized extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08) attenuates contextual associative learning deficits in the aging rat's brain induced by D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Prisila Dulcy, Charles; Singh, Hemant K; Preethi, Jayakumar; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effect of standardized Bacopa monniera extract (BME: BESEB CDRI-08) against the D-galactose (D-gal)-induced brain aging in rats. Experimental groups were subjected to contextual-associative learning task. We found that the administration of BME in the D-gal-treated group attenuated contextual-associative learning deficits; the individuals showed more correct responses and retrieved the reward with less latency. Subsequent analysis showed that the BME administration significantly decreased advance glycation end product (AGE) in serum and increased the activity of antioxidant response element (ARE) and the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and nuclear transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), accompanied by a reduction in the level of serotonin (5-HT) in the hippocampus. The BME treatment also reversed D-gal-induced brain aging by upregulating the levels of the presynaptic proteins synaptotagmin I (SYT1) and synaptophysin (SYP) and the postsynaptic proteins Ca(2+) /calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII) and postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) in the hippocampus during synaptic plasticity. A significant finding is that the D-gal- + BME-treated rats exhibited more correct responses in contextual-associative learning than D-gal alone-treated rats. Our findings suggest that BME treatment attenuates D-gal-induced brain aging and regulates the level of antioxidant enzymes, Nrf2 expression, and the level of 5-HT, which was accompanied by concomitantly increased levels of synaptic proteins SYT1, SYP, αCaMKII, p-αCaMKII, and PSD-95.

  18. Labeling of hepatic glycogen after short- and long-term stimulation of glycogen synthesis in rats injected with 3H-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, J.E.; Garfield, S.A.; Hung, J.T.; Cardell, R.R. Jr. )

    1990-08-01

    The effects of short- and long-term stimulation of glycogen synthesis elicited by dexamethasone were studied by light (LM) and electron (EM) microscopic radioautography (RAG) and biochemical analysis. Adrenalectomized rats were fasted overnight and pretreated for short- (3 hr) or long-term (14 hr) periods with dexamethasone prior to intravenous injection of tracer doses of 3H-galactose. Analysis of LM-RAGs from short-term rats revealed that about equal percentages (44%) of hepatocytes became heavily or lightly labeled 1 hr after labeling. The percentage of heavily labeled cells increased slightly 6 hr after labeling, and unlabeled glycogen became apparent in some hepatocytes. The percentage of heavily labeled cells had decreased somewhat 12 hr after labeling, and more unlabeled glycogen was evident. In the long-term rats 1 hr after labeling, a higher percentage of heavily labeled cells (76%) was observed compared to short-term rats, and most glycogen was labeled. In spite of the high amount of labeling seen initially, the percentage of heavily labeled hepatocytes had decreased considerably to 55% by 12 hr after injection; and sparsely labeled and unlabeled glycogen was prevalent. The EM-RAGs of both short- and long-term rats were similar. Silver grains were associated with glycogen patches 1 hr after labeling; 12 hr after labeling, the glycogen patches had enlarged; and label, where present, was dispersed over the enlarged glycogen clumps. Analysis of DPM/mg tissue corroborated the observed decrease in label 12 hr after administration in the long-term animals. The loss of label observed 12 hr after injection in the long-term pretreated rats suggests that turnover of glycogen occurred during this interval despite the net accumulation of glycogen that was visible morphologically and evident from biochemical measurement.

  19. Ergothioneine and melatonin attenuate oxidative stress and protect against learning and memory deficits in C57BL/6J mice treated with D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Song, T-Y; Lin, H-C; Chen, C-L; Wu, J-H; Liao, J-W; Hu, M-L

    2014-09-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice treated with D-galactose (DG) were used to examine the effects of ergothioneine (EGT), melatonin (MEL), or their combination (EGT+MEL) on learning and memory abilities. The mice were divided into five groups and injected subcutaneously with DG (0.3 mL of 1% DG/mouse) except for group 1 (normal controls). Group 3 was orally supplemented with EGT [0.5 mg/kg body weight (bw)], group 4 with MEL (10 mg/kg bw, p.o.), and group 5 with EGT+MEL. EGT and MEL were provided daily for 88 days, while DG was provided between days 7 to 56. Active avoidance task and Morris water-maze task were used to evaluate learning and memory abilities. DG treatment markedly increased escape latency and decreased the number of avoidance in the active avoidance test, whereas EGT and MEL alone significantly improved the performance. DG also impaired the learning and memory abilities in the water-maze task, and EGT and MEL alone also significantly improved the performance. EGT+MEL produced the strongest effects in both tasks. EGT and MEL alone markedly decreased β-amyloid protein accumulation in the hippocampus and significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation and maintained glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio and superoxide dismutase activity in brain tissues of DG-treated mice. MEL alone completely prevented the rise in brain acetylcholine esterase activity induced by DG, whereas EGT and EGT+MEL were only partially effective. Overall, EGT, MEL, and, in particular, the combination of EGT and MEL effectively protect against learning and memory deficits in C57BL/6J mice treated with DG, possibly through attenuation of oxidative damage.

  20. Pradimicin A, a D-mannose-binding antibiotic, binds pyranosides of L-fucose and L-galactose in a calcium-sensitive manner.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yu; Watanabe, Yasunori; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yukishige; Ojika, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    Pradimicin A (PRM-A) is a unique antibiotic with a lectin-like ability to bind D-mannose (D-Man) in the presence of Ca(2+) ion. Although accumulated evidences suggest that PRM-A recognizes the 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxyl groups of D-Man, BMY-28864, an artificial PRM-A derivative, was shown not to bind L-fucose (L-Fuc) and L-galactose (lLGal), both of which share the characteristic array of the three hydroxyl groups with D-Man. To obtain a plausible explanation for this inconsistency, we performed co-precipitation experiments of PRM-A with L-Fuc, L-Gal, and their methyl pyranosides (L-Fuc-OMe, L-Gal-OMe) by taking advantage of aggregate-forming propensity of the binary [PRM-A/Ca(2+)] complex. While L-Fuc and L-Gal were hardly incorporated into the aggregate, L-Fuc-OMe and L-Gal-OMe were found to exhibit significant binding to PRM-A. However, increased Ca(2+) concentration abolished this binding, raising the possibility that poor binding of L-Fuc and L-Gal to PRM-A is attributed to their chelation with Ca(2+) ion. This possibility was partly supported by (1)H NMR analysis that detected interaction of L-Fuc and L-Gal with Ca(2+) ion in aqueous solution. These results collectively indicate that PRM-A binds pyranosides of L-Fuc and L-Gal when Ca(2+) concentration is not excessive to trap these sugars by chelation but sufficient to form the [PRM-A/Ca(2+)] complex.

  1. Standardized extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08) attenuates contextual associative learning deficits in the aging rat's brain induced by D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Prisila Dulcy, Charles; Singh, Hemant K; Preethi, Jayakumar; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effect of standardized Bacopa monniera extract (BME: BESEB CDRI-08) against the D-galactose (D-gal)-induced brain aging in rats. Experimental groups were subjected to contextual-associative learning task. We found that the administration of BME in the D-gal-treated group attenuated contextual-associative learning deficits; the individuals showed more correct responses and retrieved the reward with less latency. Subsequent analysis showed that the BME administration significantly decreased advance glycation end product (AGE) in serum and increased the activity of antioxidant response element (ARE) and the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and nuclear transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), accompanied by a reduction in the level of serotonin (5-HT) in the hippocampus. The BME treatment also reversed D-gal-induced brain aging by upregulating the levels of the presynaptic proteins synaptotagmin I (SYT1) and synaptophysin (SYP) and the postsynaptic proteins Ca(2+) /calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII) and postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) in the hippocampus during synaptic plasticity. A significant finding is that the D-gal- + BME-treated rats exhibited more correct responses in contextual-associative learning than D-gal alone-treated rats. Our findings suggest that BME treatment attenuates D-gal-induced brain aging and regulates the level of antioxidant enzymes, Nrf2 expression, and the level of 5-HT, which was accompanied by concomitantly increased levels of synaptic proteins SYT1, SYP, αCaMKII, p-αCaMKII, and PSD-95. PMID:22715050

  2. Cloning and DNA Sequence Analysis of an Immunogenic Glucose-Galactose MglB Lipoprotein Homologue from Brachyspira pilosicoli, the Agent of Colonic Spirochetosis†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, P.; Cheng, X.; Duhamel, G. E.

    2000-01-01

    Colonic spirochetosis (CS) is a newly emerging infectious disease of humans and animals caused by the pathogenic spirochete Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina) pilosicoli. The purpose of this study was to characterize an antigen that was recognized by antibodies present in sera of challenge-exposed pigs. The gene encoding the antigen was identified by screening a plasmid library of human B. pilosicoli strain SP16 (ATCC 49776) genomic DNA with hyperimmune and convalescent swine sera. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by the cloned B. pilosicoli gene had a high degree of similarity and identity to glucose-galactose MglB lipoprotein. Located 106 bp downstream of the putative mglB gene was a 3′-truncated open reading frame with 73.8% similarity and 66.3% identity to mglA of Escherichia coli, suggesting a gene arrangement within an operon which is similar to those of other bacteria. A single copy of the gene was present in B. pilosicoli, and homologous sequences were widely conserved among porcine intestinal spirochetes Serpulina intermedia, Brachyspira innocens, Brachyspira murdochii, and the avian Brachyspira alvinipulli, but not in porcine Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, human Brachyspira aalborgi, and porcine Treponema succinifaciens. The deduced molecular weight of the mature MglB lipoprotein was consistent with expression by the cloned gene of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000, as determined by Western blot analysis and [3H]palmitate labeling. Because mucin is the principal constituent of the colonic mucus gel and consists of glycoproteins that can serve as the substrate for growth and chemotaxis of B. pilosicoli in vitro, a role for MglB in mucosal localization of the spirochete appears consistent with the pathogenesis of CS. However, the presence of homologous sequences in closely related but nonpathogenic commensal spirochetes suggests that other virulence determinants may be required for pathogenesis. PMID:10899855

  3. D-Galactose Induces a Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency in Mouse Skeletal Muscle: Potential Benefits of Nutrient Combination in Ameliorating Muscle Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Liao; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jing; Li, Hua; Yang, Yanshen; Liu, Jia; Guo, Zihao; Xiao, Ke; Zhang, Chen; Liu, Jiankang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Accumulating research has shown that chronic D-galactose (D-gal) exposure induces symptoms similar to natural aging in animals. Therefore, rodents chronically exposed to D-gal are increasingly used as a model for aging and delay-of-aging pharmacological research. Mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to play a vital role in aging and age-related diseases; however, whether mitochondrial dysfunction plays a significant role in mice exposed to D-gal remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated cognitive dysfunction, locomotor activity, and mitochondrial dysfunction involved in D-gal exposure in mice. We found that D-gal exposure (125 mg/kg/day, 8 weeks) resulted in a serious impairment in grip strength in mice, whereas spatial memory and locomotor coordination remained intact. Interestingly, muscular mitochondrial complex I deficiency occurred in the skeletal muscle of mice exposed to D-gal. Mitochondrial ultrastructure abnormality was implicated as a contributing factor in D-gal-induced muscular impairment. Moreover, three combinations (A, B, and C) of nutrients applied in this study effectively reversed D-gal-induced muscular impairment. Nutrient formulas B and C were especially effective in reversing complex I dysfunction in both skeletal muscle and heart muscle. These findings suggest the following: (1) chronic exposure to D-gal first results in specific muscular impairment in mice, rather than causing general, premature aging; (2) poor skeletal muscle strength induced by D-gal might be due to the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by complex I deficiency; and (3) the nutrient complexes applied in the study attenuated the skeletal muscle impairment, most likely by improving mitochondrial function. PMID:24476218

  4. Anti-EBOV GP IgGs Lacking α1-3-Galactose and Neu5Gc Prolong Survival and Decrease Blood Viral Load in EBOV-Infected Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Reynard, Olivier; Jacquot, Frédéric; Evanno, Gwénaëlle; Mai, Hoa Le; Salama, Apolline; Martinet, Bernard; Duvaux, Odile; Bach, Jean-Marie; Conchon, Sophie; Judor, Jean-Paul; Perota, Andrea; Lagutina, Irina; Duchi, Roberto; Lazzari, Giovanna; Le Berre, Ludmilla; Perreault, Hélène; Lheriteau, Elsa; Raoul, Hervé; Volchkov, Viktor; Galli, Cesare; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal xenogenic IgGs, although having been used in the prevention and cure of severe infectious diseases, are highly immunogenic, which may restrict their usage in new applications such as Ebola hemorrhagic fever. IgG glycans display powerful xenogeneic antigens in humans, for example α1-3 Galactose and the glycolyl form of neuraminic acid Neu5Gc, and IgGs deprived of these key sugar epitopes may represent an advantage for passive immunotherapy. In this paper, we explored whether low immunogenicity IgGs had a protective effect on a guinea pig model of Ebola virus (EBOV) infection. For this purpose, a double knock-out pig lacking α1-3 Galactose and Neu5Gc was immunized against virus-like particles displaying surface EBOV glycoprotein GP. Following purification from serum, hyper-immune polyclonal IgGs were obtained, exhibiting an anti-EBOV GP titer of 1:100,000 and a virus neutralizing titer of 1:100. Guinea pigs were injected intramuscularly with purified IgGs on day 0 and day 3 post-EBOV infection. Compared to control animals treated with IgGs from non-immunized double KO pigs, the anti-EBOV IgGs-treated animals exhibited a significantly prolonged survival and a decreased virus load in blood on day 3. The data obtained indicated that IgGs lacking α1-3 Galactose and Neu5Gc, two highly immunogenic epitopes in humans, have a protective effect upon EBOV infection. PMID:27280712

  5. Anti-EBOV GP IgGs Lacking α1-3-Galactose and Neu5Gc Prolong Survival and Decrease Blood Viral Load in EBOV-Infected Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Reynard, Olivier; Jacquot, Frédéric; Evanno, Gwénaëlle; Mai, Hoa Le; Martinet, Bernard; Duvaux, Odile; Bach, Jean-Marie; Conchon, Sophie; Judor, Jean-Paul; Perota, Andrea; Lagutina, Irina; Duchi, Roberto; Lazzari, Giovanna; Le Berre, Ludmilla; Perreault, Hélène; Lheriteau, Elsa; Raoul, Hervé; Volchkov, Viktor; Galli, Cesare; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal xenogenic IgGs, although having been used in the prevention and cure of severe infectious diseases, are highly immunogenic, which may restrict their usage in new applications such as Ebola hemorrhagic fever. IgG glycans display powerful xenogeneic antigens in humans, for example α1–3 Galactose and the glycolyl form of neuraminic acid Neu5Gc, and IgGs deprived of these key sugar epitopes may represent an advantage for passive immunotherapy. In this paper, we explored whether low immunogenicity IgGs had a protective effect on a guinea pig model of Ebola virus (EBOV) infection. For this purpose, a double knock-out pig lacking α1–3 Galactose and Neu5Gc was immunized against virus-like particles displaying surface EBOV glycoprotein GP. Following purification from serum, hyper-immune polyclonal IgGs were obtained, exhibiting an anti-EBOV GP titer of 1:100,000 and a virus neutralizing titer of 1:100. Guinea pigs were injected intramuscularly with purified IgGs on day 0 and day 3 post-EBOV infection. Compared to control animals treated with IgGs from non-immunized double KO pigs, the anti-EBOV IgGs-treated animals exhibited a significantly prolonged survival and a decreased virus load in blood on day 3. The data obtained indicated that IgGs lacking α1–3 Galactose and Neu5Gc, two highly immunogenic epitopes in humans, have a protective effect upon EBOV infection. PMID:27280712

  6. Anti-EBOV GP IgGs Lacking α1-3-Galactose and Neu5Gc Prolong Survival and Decrease Blood Viral Load in EBOV-Infected Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Reynard, Olivier; Jacquot, Frédéric; Evanno, Gwénaëlle; Mai, Hoa Le; Salama, Apolline; Martinet, Bernard; Duvaux, Odile; Bach, Jean-Marie; Conchon, Sophie; Judor, Jean-Paul; Perota, Andrea; Lagutina, Irina; Duchi, Roberto; Lazzari, Giovanna; Le Berre, Ludmilla; Perreault, Hélène; Lheriteau, Elsa; Raoul, Hervé; Volchkov, Viktor; Galli, Cesare; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal xenogenic IgGs, although having been used in the prevention and cure of severe infectious diseases, are highly immunogenic, which may restrict their usage in new applications such as Ebola hemorrhagic fever. IgG glycans display powerful xenogeneic antigens in humans, for example α1-3 Galactose and the glycolyl form of neuraminic acid Neu5Gc, and IgGs deprived of these key sugar epitopes may represent an advantage for passive immunotherapy. In this paper, we explored whether low immunogenicity IgGs had a protective effect on a guinea pig model of Ebola virus (EBOV) infection. For this purpose, a double knock-out pig lacking α1-3 Galactose and Neu5Gc was immunized against virus-like particles displaying surface EBOV glycoprotein GP. Following purification from serum, hyper-immune polyclonal IgGs were obtained, exhibiting an anti-EBOV GP titer of 1:100,000 and a virus neutralizing titer of 1:100. Guinea pigs were injected intramuscularly with purified IgGs on day 0 and day 3 post-EBOV infection. Compared to control animals treated with IgGs from non-immunized double KO pigs, the anti-EBOV IgGs-treated animals exhibited a significantly prolonged survival and a decreased virus load in blood on day 3. The data obtained indicated that IgGs lacking α1-3 Galactose and Neu5Gc, two highly immunogenic epitopes in humans, have a protective effect upon EBOV infection.

  7. The reb1-1 Mutation of Arabidopsis. Effect on the Structure and Localization of Galactose-Containing Cell Wall Polysaccharides1[W

    PubMed Central

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Andème-Onzighi, Christine; Aboughe-Angone, Sophie; Bardor, Muriel; Ishii, Tadashi; Lerouge, Patrice; Driouich, Azeddine

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root epidermal bulger1-1 (reb1-1) mutant (allelic to root hair defective1 [rhd1]) is characterized by a reduced root elongation rate and by bulging of trichoblast cells. The REB1/RHD1 gene belongs to a family of UDP-d-Glucose 4-epimerases involved in the synthesis of d-Galactose (Gal). Our previous study showed that certain arabinogalactan protein epitopes were not expressed in bulging trichoblasts of the mutant. In this study, using a combination of microscopical and biochemical methods, we have investigated the occurrence and the structure of three major Gal-containing polysaccharides, namely, xyloglucan (XyG), rhamnogalacturonan (RG)-I, and RG-II in the mutant root cell walls. Our immunocytochemical data show that swollen trichoblasts were not stained with the monoclonal antibody CCRC-M1 specific for α-l-Fucp-(1→2)-β-d-Galp side chains of XyG, whereas they were stained with anti-XyG antibodies specific for XyG backbone. In addition, analysis of a hemicellulosic fraction from roots demonstrates the presence of two structurally different XyGs in reb1-1. One is structurally similar to wild-type XyG and the other is devoid of fuco-galactosylated side chains and has the characteristic of being insoluble. Similar to anti-XyG antibodies, anti-bupleuran 2IIC, a polyclonal antibody specific for galactosyl epitopes associated with pectins, stained all root epidermal cells of both wild type and reb1-1. Similarly, anti-RG-II antibodies also stained swollen trichoblasts in the mutant. In addition, structural analysis of pectic polymers revealed no change in the galactosylation of RG-I and RG-II isolated from reb1-1 root cells. These findings demonstrate that the reb1-1 mutation affects XyG structure, but not that of pectic polysaccharides, thus lending support to the hypothesis that biosynthesis of Gal as well as galactosylation of complex polysaccharides is regulated at the polymer level. PMID:16500990

  8. Bi- to tetravalent glycoclusters presenting GlcNAc/GalNAc as inhibitors: from plant agglutinins to human macrophage galactose-type lectin (CD301) and galectins.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; O'Sullivan, Shane; Koller, Christiane; Murphy, Paul V; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-14

    Emerging insights into the functional spectrum of tissue lectins leads to identification of new targets for the custom-made design of potent inhibitors, providing a challenge for synthetic chemistry. The affinity and selectivity of a carbohydrate ligand for a lectin may immensely be increased by a number of approaches, which includes varying geometrical or topological features. This perspective leads to the design and synthesis of glycoclusters and their testing using assays of physiological relevance. Herein, hydroquinone, resorcinol, benzene-1,3,5-triol and tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethene have been employed as scaffolds and propargyl derivatives obtained. The triazole-containing linker to the α/β-O/S-glycosides of GlcNAc/GalNAc presented on these scaffolds was generated by copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This strategy was used to give a panel of nine glycoclusters with bi-, tri- and tetravalency. Maintained activity for lectin binding after conjugation was ascertained for both sugars in solid-phase assays with the plant agglutinins WGA (GlcNAc) and DBA (GalNAc). Absence of cross-reactivity excluded any carbohydrate-independent reactivity of the bivalent compounds, allowing us to proceed to further testing with a biomedically relevant lectin specific for GalNAc. Macrophage galactose(-binding C)-type lectin, involved in immune defence by dendritic cells and in virus uptake, was produced as a soluble protein without/with its α-helical coiled-coil stalk region. Binding to ligands presented on a matrix and on cell surfaces was highly susceptible to the presence of the tetravalent inhibitor derived from the tetraphenylethene-containing scaffold, and presentation of GalNAc with an α-thioglycosidic linkage proved favorable. Cross-reactivity of this glycocluster to human galectins-3 and -4, which interact with Tn-antigen-presenting mucins, was rather small. Evidently, the valency and spatial display of α-GalNAc residues is a key factor to design potent and

  9. Bi- to tetravalent glycoclusters presenting GlcNAc/GalNAc as inhibitors: from plant agglutinins to human macrophage galactose-type lectin (CD301) and galectins.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; O'Sullivan, Shane; Koller, Christiane; Murphy, Paul V; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-14

    Emerging insights into the functional spectrum of tissue lectins leads to identification of new targets for the custom-made design of potent inhibitors, providing a challenge for synthetic chemistry. The affinity and selectivity of a carbohydrate ligand for a lectin may immensely be increased by a number of approaches, which includes varying geometrical or topological features. This perspective leads to the design and synthesis of glycoclusters and their testing using assays of physiological relevance. Herein, hydroquinone, resorcinol, benzene-1,3,5-triol and tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethene have been employed as scaffolds and propargyl derivatives obtained. The triazole-containing linker to the α/β-O/S-glycosides of GlcNAc/GalNAc presented on these scaffolds was generated by copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This strategy was used to give a panel of nine glycoclusters with bi-, tri- and tetravalency. Maintained activity for lectin binding after conjugation was ascertained for both sugars in solid-phase assays with the plant agglutinins WGA (GlcNAc) and DBA (GalNAc). Absence of cross-reactivity excluded any carbohydrate-independent reactivity of the bivalent compounds, allowing us to proceed to further testing with a biomedically relevant lectin specific for GalNAc. Macrophage galactose(-binding C)-type lectin, involved in immune defence by dendritic cells and in virus uptake, was produced as a soluble protein without/with its α-helical coiled-coil stalk region. Binding to ligands presented on a matrix and on cell surfaces was highly susceptible to the presence of the tetravalent inhibitor derived from the tetraphenylethene-containing scaffold, and presentation of GalNAc with an α-thioglycosidic linkage proved favorable. Cross-reactivity of this glycocluster to human galectins-3 and -4, which interact with Tn-antigen-presenting mucins, was rather small. Evidently, the valency and spatial display of α-GalNAc residues is a key factor to design potent and

  10. Galactose-decorated reduction-sensitive degradable chimaeric polymersomes as a multifunctional nanocarrier to efficiently chaperone apoptotic proteins into hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Huanli; Meng, Fenghua; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-08-12

    Hepatoma-targeting reduction-sensitive chimaeric biodegradable polymersomes were designed and developed based on galactose-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (Gal-PEG-PCL), PEG-PCL-poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PEG-PCL-PDEA, asymmetric), and PEG-SS-PCL for facile loading and triggered intracellular delivery of proteins. The chimaeric polymersomes formed from PEG-PCL-PDEA and PEG-SS-PCL had a monodisperse distribution with average sizes ranging from 95.5 to 199.2 nm depending on PEG-SS-PCL contents. Notably, these polymersomes displayed decent loading of bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin (OVA), and cytochrome C (CC) proteins likely due to presence of electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions between proteins and PDEA block located in the interior of polymersomes. The in vitro release studies showed that protein release was largely accelerated under a reductive condition containing 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT). For example, ca. 77.2 and 22.1% of FITC-BSA were released from CP(SS50) (chimaeric polymersomes containing 50 wt % PEG-SS-PCL) at 37 °C in 12 h in the presence and absence of 10 mM DTT, respectively. Confocal microscopy showed that FITC-CC-loaded Gal-decorated CP(SS40) could efficiently deliver and release FITC-CC into HepG2 cells following 24 h treatment, in contrast to little or negligible fluorescence detected in HepG2 cells treated with FITC-CC-loaded nontargeting polymersomes or free CC. MTT assays revealed that CC-loaded Gal-decorated CP(SS40) exhibited apparent targetability and pronounced antitumor activity to HepG2 cells, in which cell viabilities decreased from 81.9, 60.6, 49.5, 42.2 to 31.5% with increasing Gal-PEG-PCL contents from 0, 10, 20, 30 to 40 wt %. Most remarkably, granzyme B-loaded Gal-decorated chimaeric polymersomes effectively caused apoptosis of HepG2 cells with a markedly low half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 2.7 nM. These reduction-responsive chimaeric biodegradable polymersomes offer a

  11. Amphiphilic Diblock Terpolymer PMAgala-b-P(MAA-co-MAChol)s with Attached Galactose and Cholesterol Grafts and Their Intracellular pH-Responsive Doxorubicin Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Luo, Ting; Sheng, Ruilong; Li, Hui; Sun, Jingjing; Cao, Amin

    2016-01-11

    In this work, a series of diblock terpolymer poly(6-O-methacryloyl-D-galactopyranose)-b-poly(methacrylic acid-co-6-cholesteryloxy hexyl methacrylate) amphiphiles bearing attached galactose and cholesterol grafts denoted as the PMAgala-b-P(MAA-co-MAChol)s were designed and prepared, and these terpolymer amphiphiles were further exploited as a platform for intracellular doxorubicin (DOX) delivery. First, employing a sequential RAFT strategy with preliminarily synthesized poly(6-O-methacryloyl-1,2:3,4-di-O-isopropylidene-d-galactopyranose) (PMAIpGP) macro-RAFT initiator and a successive trifluoroacetic acid (TFA)-mediated deprotection, a series of amphiphilic diblock terpolymer PMAgala-b-P(MAA-co-MAChol)s were prepared, and were further characterized by NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a dynamic contact angle testing instrument (DCAT). In aqueous media, spontaneous micellization of the synthesized diblock terpolymer amphiphiles were continuously examined by critical micellization concentration assay, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the efficacies of DOX loading by these copolymer micelles were investigated along with the complexed nanoparticle stability. Furthermore, in vitro DOX release of the drug-loaded terpolymer micelles were studied at 37 °C in buffer under various pH conditions, and cell toxicities of as-synthesized diblock amphiphiles were examined by MTT assay. Finally, with H1299 cells, intracellular DOX delivery and localization by the block amphiphile vectors were investigated by invert fluorescence microscopy. As a result, it was revealed that the random copolymerization of MAA and MAChol comonomers in the second block limited the formation of cholesterol liquid-crystal phase and enhanced DOX loading efficiency and complex nanoparticle stability, that ionic interactions between the DOX and MAA comonomer

  12. Control of O-glycan synthesis: specificity and inhibition of O-glycan core 1 UDP-galactose:N-acetylgalactosamine-alpha-R beta 3-galactosyltransferase from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Brockhausen, I; Möller, G; Pollex-Krüger, A; Rutz, V; Paulsen, H; Matta, K L

    1992-02-01

    The specificity of glycosyltransferases is a major control factor in the biosynthesis of O-glycans. The enzyme that synthesizes O-glycan core 1, i.e., UDP-galactose:N-acetylgalactosamine-alpha-R beta 3-galactosyltransferase (beta 3-Gal-T; EC 2.4.1.122), was partially purified from rat liver. The enzyme preparation, free of pyrophosphatases, beta 4-galactosyltransferase, beta-galactosidase, and N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I, was used to study the specificity and inhibition of the beta 3-Gal-T. beta 3-Gal-T activity is sensitive to changes in the R-group of the GalNAc alpha-R acceptor substrate and is stimulated when the R-group is a peptide or an aromatic group. Derivatives of GalNAc alpha-benzyl were synthesized and tested as potential substrates and inhibitors. Removal or substitution of the 3-hydroxyl or removal of the 4-hydroxyl of GalNAc abolished beta 3-Gal-T activity. Compounds with modifications of the 3- or 4-hydroxyl of GalNAc alpha-benzyl did not show significant inhibition. Removal or substitution of the 6-hydroxyl of GalNAc reduced activity slightly and these derivatives acted as competitive substrates. derivatives with epoxide groups attached to the 6-position of GalNAc acted as substrates and not as inhibitors, with the exception of the photosensitive 6-O-(4,4-azo)pentyl-GalNAc alpha-benzyl, which inhibited Gal incorporation into GalNAc alpha-benzyl. The results indicate that the enzyme does not require the 6-hydroxyl of GalNAc, but needs the 3- and the axial 4-hydroxyl as essential requirements for binding and activity. In the usual biochemical O-glycan pathway, core 2 (GlcNAc beta 6[Gal beta 3] GalNAc alpha-) is formed from core 1 (Gal beta 3GalNAc-R). We have now demonstrated an alternate pathway that may be of importance in human tissues.

  13. Adjuvant and immunostimulatory effects of a D-galactose-binding lectin from Synadenium carinatum latex (ScLL) in the mouse model of vaccination against neosporosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is an important control measure for neosporosis that is caused by a coccidian parasite, Neospora caninum, leading to abortion and reproductive disorders in cattle and serious economic impacts worldwide. A D-galactose-binding lectin from Synadenium carinatum latex (ScLL) was recently described by our group with potential immunostimulatory and adjuvant effects in the leishmaniasis model. In this study, we evaluated the adjuvant effect of ScLL in immunization of mice against neosporosis. First, we investigated in vitro cytokine production by dendritic cells stimulated with Neospora lysate antigen (NLA), ScLL or both. Each treatment induced TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12 production in a dose-dependent manner, with synergistic effect of NLA plus ScLL. Next, four groups of C57BL/6 mice were immunized with NLA + ScLL, NLA, ScLL or PBS. The kinetics of antibody response showed a predominance of IgG and IgG1 for NLA + ScLL group, whereas IgG2a response was similar between NLA + ScLL and NLA groups. Ex vivo cytokine production by mouse spleen cells showed the highest IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio in the presence of NLA stimulation for mice immunized with NLA + ScLL and the lowest for those immunized with ScLL alone. After parasite challenge, mice immunized with NLA + ScLL or ScLL alone presented higher survival rates (70-80%) and lower brain parasite burden as compared to PBS group, but with no significant changes in morbidity and inflammation scores. In conclusion, ScLL combined with NLA was able to change the cytokine profile induced by the antigen or lectin alone for a Th1-biased immune response, resulting in high protection of mice challenged with the parasite, but with low degree of inflammation. Both features may be important to prevent congenital neosporosis, since protection and low inflammatory response are necessary events to guide towards a successful pregnancy. PMID:23107170

  14. Lactose and D-galactose metabolism in Staphylococcus aureus. IV. Isolation and properties of a class I D-ketohexose-1,6-diphosphate aldolase that catalyzes the cleavage of D-tagatose 1,6-diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Bissett, D L; Anderson, R L

    1980-09-25

    The inducible D-ketohexose-1,6-diphosphate aldolase that functions in the metabolism of lactose and D-galactose in Staphylococcus aurues was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from an extract of D-galactose-grown cells. At saturating substrate concentrations, D-tagatose 1,6-diphosphate was cleaved to dihydroxyacetone phosphate plus D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate at twice the rate of D-fructose 1,6-diphosphate; Km values for D-tagatose 1,6-diphosphate and D-fructose 12,6-diphosphate were 1.5 mM and 2.5 mM, respectively. The enzyme catalyzed the aldol condensation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to yield a mixture of the 1,6-diphosphate derivatives of D-tagatose, D-fructose, D-sorbose, and D-psicose, indicating that it also catalyzes the cleavage of all four D-2-ketohexose 1,6-diphosphates. The enzyme was not inhibited by EDTA and it had no divalent metal ion requirement, but it did exhibit substrate-dependent inactivation by NaBH4, indicating that it is a Class I (Schiff's base) aldolase. Density gradient centrifugation and gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that the enzyme exists as a monomer with amolecular weight of about 37,000 and a sedimentation coefficient of 3.4 S. Data on the stability, pH optimum, and inducibility of the enzyme are also presented.

  15. Optical spectroscopy of nicotinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase from Amycolatopsis methanolica: a comparison with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase and UDP-galactose epimerase.

    PubMed

    Piersma, S R; Visser, A J; de Vries, S; Duine, J A

    1998-03-01

    compared to other NADH-dehydrogenase complexes, but comparable to that observed for NADH bound to horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase. The fluorescence lifetime of NADH bound to the nicotinoprotein is very short compared to enzyme-bound NADH complexes, also compared to NADH bound to horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase. The cofactor-protein interaction in the nicotinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase active site is more rigid and apolar than that in horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase. The optical properties of NADH bound to nicotinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase differ considerably from NADH (tightly) bound to UDP-galactose epimerase from Escherichia coli. This indicates that although both enzymes have NAD(H) as nonexchangeable cofactor, the NADH binding sites are quite different.

  16. UDP-D-galactose synthesis by UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 4 is required for organization of the trans-Golgi network/early endosome in Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheliang; Ito, Toshiaki; Uehara, Masataka; Naito, Satoshi; Takano, Junpei

    2015-09-01

    Endomembrane organization is essential for cell physiology. We previously identified an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant in which a plasma membrane (PM) marker GFP-NIP5;1 and trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE) markers were accumulated in intracellular aggregates in epidermal cells of the root elongation zone. The mutant was identified as an allele of UDP-glucose epimerase 4 (UGE4)/root hair defective 1/root epidermal bulgar 1, which was previously described as a mutant with swollen root epidermal cells and has an altered sugar composition in cell wall polysaccharides. Importantly, these defects including aggregate formation were restored by supplementation of D-galactose in the medium. These results suggested that UDP-D-galactose synthesis by UGE4 is important for endomembrane organization in addition to cell wall structure. Here, we further investigated the nature of the aggregates using various markers of endomembrane compartments and BOR1-GFP, which traffics from PM to vacuole in response to high-B supply. The markers of multi-vesicular bodies/late endosomes (MVB/LEs) and BOR1-GFP were strongly accumulated in the intracellular aggregates, while those of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the vacuolar membrane, and the Golgi were only slightly affected in the uge4 mutant. The abnormal localizations of these markers in the uge4 mutant differed from the effects of inhibitors of actin and microtubule polymerization, although they also affected endomembrane organization. Furthermore, electron microscopy analysis revealed accumulation of abnormal high-electron-density vesicles in elongating epidermal cells. The abnormal vesicles were often associated or interconnected with TGN/EEs and contained ADP-ribosylation factor 1, which is usually localized to the Golgi and the TGN/EEs. On the other hand, structures of the ER, Golgi apparatus, and MVB/LEs were apparently normal in uge4 cells. Together, our data indicate the importance of UDP-D-galactose synthesis by UGE4 for

  17. Biochemical Method for Inserting New Genetic Information into DNA of Simian Virus 40: Circular SV40 DNA Molecules Containing Lambda Phage Genes and the Galactose Operon of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David A.; Symons, Robert H.; Berg, Paul

    1972-01-01

    We have developed methods for covalently joining duplex DNA molecules to one another and have used these techniques to construct circular dimers of SV40 DNA and to insert a DNA segment containing lambda phage genes and the galactose operon of E. coli into SV40 DNA. The method involves: (a) converting circular SV40 DNA to a linear form, (b) adding single-stranded homodeoxypolymeric extensions of defined composition and length to the 3′ ends of one of the DNA strands with the enzyme terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (c) adding complementary homodeoxypolymeric extensions to the other DNA strand, (d) annealing the two DNA molecules to form a circular duplex structure, and (e) filling the gaps and sealing nicks in this structure with E. coli DNA polymerase and DNA ligase to form a covalently closed-circular DNA molecule. PMID:4342968

  18. Dynamical remodeling of the transcriptome during short-term anaerobiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: differential response and role of Msn2 and/or Msn4 and other factors in galactose and glucose media.

    PubMed

    Lai, Liang-Chuan; Kosorukoff, Alexander L; Burke, Patricia V; Kwast, Kurt E

    2005-05-01

    In contrast to previous steady-state analyses of the O(2)-responsive transcriptome, here we examined the dynamics of the response to short-term anaerobiosis (2 generations) in both catabolite-repressed (glucose) and derepressed (galactose) cells, assessed the specific role that Msn2 and Msn4 play in mediating the response, and identified gene networks using a novel clustering approach. Upon shifting cells to anaerobic conditions in galactose medium, there was an acute ( approximately 10 min) yet transient (<45 min) induction of Msn2- and/or Msn4-regulated genes associated with the remodeling of reserve energy and catabolic pathways during the switch from mixed respiro-fermentative to strictly fermentative growth. Concomitantly, MCB- and SCB-regulated networks associated with the G(1)/S transition of the cell cycle were transiently down-regulated along with rRNA processing genes containing PAC and RRPE motifs. Remarkably, none of these gene networks were differentially expressed when cells were shifted in glucose, suggesting that a metabolically derived signal arising from the abrupt cessation of respiration, rather than O(2) deprivation per se, elicits this "stress response." By approximately 0.2 generation of anaerobiosis in both media, more chronic, heme-dependent effects were observed, including the down-regulation of Hap1-regulated networks, derepression of Rox1-regulated networks, and activation of Upc2-regulated ones. Changes in these networks result in the functional remodeling of the cell wall, sterol and sphingolipid metabolism, and dissimilatory pathways required for long-term anaerobiosis. Overall, this study reveals that the acute withdrawal of oxygen can invoke a metabolic state-dependent "stress response" but that acclimatization to oxygen deprivation is a relatively slow process involving complex changes primarily in heme-regulated gene networks.

  19. Protective Effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 on Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells through Attenuating Oxidative Stress and the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in a Mouse Model of d-Galactose-induced Aging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Cai, Dachuan; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Yanyan; Chen, Linbo; Jing, Pengwei; Wang, Lu; Wang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell senescence is an important and current hypothesis accounting for organismal aging, especially the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). Ginsenoside Rg1 is the main active pharmaceutical ingredient of ginseng, which is a traditional Chinese medicine. This study explored the protective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on Sca-1+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/HPCs) in a mouse model of d-galactose-induced aging. The mimetic aging mouse model was induced by continuous injection of d-gal for 42 days, and the C57BL/6 mice were respectively treated with ginsenoside Rg1, Vitamin E or normal saline after 7 days of d-gal injection. Compared with those in the d-gal administration alone group, ginsenoside Rg1 protected Sca-1+ HSC/HPCs by decreasing SA-β-Gal and enhancing the colony forming unit-mixture (CFU-Mix), and adjusting oxidative stress indices like reactive oxygen species (ROS), total anti-oxidant (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, ginsenoside Rg1 decreased β-catenin and c-Myc mRNA expression and enhanced the phosphorylation of GSK-3β. Moreover, ginsenoside Rg1 down-regulated advanced glycation end products (AGEs), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), phospho-histone H2A.X (r-H2A.X), 8-OHdG, p16Ink4a, Rb, p21Cip1/Waf1 and p53 in senescent Sca-1+ HSC/HPCs. Our findings indicated that ginsenoside Rg1 can improve the resistance of Sca-1+ HSC/HPCs in a mouse model of d-galactose-induced aging through the suppression of oxidative stress and excessive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and reduction of DNA damage response, p16Ink4a-Rb and p53-p21Cip1/Waf1 signaling. PMID:27294914

  20. Protective Effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 on Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells through Attenuating Oxidative Stress and the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in a Mouse Model of d-Galactose-induced Aging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Cai, Dachuan; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Yanyan; Chen, Linbo; Jing, Pengwei; Wang, Lu; Wang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell senescence is an important and current hypothesis accounting for organismal aging, especially the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). Ginsenoside Rg1 is the main active pharmaceutical ingredient of ginseng, which is a traditional Chinese medicine. This study explored the protective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on Sca-1⁺ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/HPCs) in a mouse model of d-galactose-induced aging. The mimetic aging mouse model was induced by continuous injection of d-gal for 42 days, and the C57BL/6 mice were respectively treated with ginsenoside Rg1, Vitamin E or normal saline after 7 days of d-gal injection. Compared with those in the d-gal administration alone group, ginsenoside Rg1 protected Sca-1⁺ HSC/HPCs by decreasing SA-β-Gal and enhancing the colony forming unit-mixture (CFU-Mix), and adjusting oxidative stress indices like reactive oxygen species (ROS), total anti-oxidant (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, ginsenoside Rg1 decreased β-catenin and c-Myc mRNA expression and enhanced the phosphorylation of GSK-3β. Moreover, ginsenoside Rg1 down-regulated advanced glycation end products (AGEs), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), phospho-histone H2A.X (r-H2A.X), 8-OHdG, p16(Ink4a), Rb, p21(Cip1/Waf1) and p53 in senescent Sca-1⁺ HSC/HPCs. Our findings indicated that ginsenoside Rg1 can improve the resistance of Sca-1⁺ HSC/HPCs in a mouse model of d-galactose-induced aging through the suppression of oxidative stress and excessive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and reduction of DNA damage response, p16(Ink4a)-Rb and p53-p21(Cip1/Waf1) signaling. PMID:27294914

  1. l-Arabinose Isomerase and d-Xylose Isomerase from Lactobacillus reuteri: Characterization, Coexpression in the Food Grade Host Lactobacillus plantarum, and Application in the Conversion of d-Galactose and d-Glucose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The l-arabinose isomerase (l-AI) and the d-xylose isomerase (d-XI) encoding genes from Lactobacillus reuteri (DSMZ 17509) were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The proteins were purified to homogeneity by one-step affinity chromatography and characterized biochemically. l-AI displayed maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 6.0, whereas d-XI showed maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 5.0. Both enzymes require divalent metal ions. The genes were also ligated into the inducible lactobacillal expression vectors pSIP409 and pSIP609, the latter containing a food grade auxotrophy marker instead of an antibiotic resistance marker, and the l-AI- and d-XI-encoding sequences/genes were coexpressed in the food grade host Lactobacillus plantarum. The recombinant enzymes were tested for applications in carbohydrate conversion reactions of industrial relevance. The purified l-AI converted d-galactose to d-tagatose with a maximum conversion rate of 35%, and the d-XI isomerized d-glucose to d-fructose with a maximum conversion rate of 48% at 60 °C. PMID:24443973

  2. Preparation of Nucleosides Derived from 2-Nitroimidazole and d-Arabinose, d-Ribose, and d-Galactose by the Vorbrüggen Method and Their Conversion to Potential Precursors for Tracers To Image Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    2-Nitroimidazole was silylated using hexaethyldisilazane and then reacted with 1-O-acetyl derivatives of d-arabinose, d-ribose, and d-galactose in acetonitrile at mild temperatures (−20 °C to rt), catalyzed by triethylsilyl triflate (Vorbrüggen conditions). The α-anomer was formed in the former case and the β-anomers in the latter two cases (highly) selectively. When d-arabinose and d-ribose were silylated with tert-butyldiphenylsilyl chloride in pyridine at the hydroxyl groups at C-5 and acetylated at the other ones in a one-pot reaction, mixtures of anomeric 1-O-acetyl derivatives were obtained. These were coupled by the Vorbrüggen method and then deblocked at C-5 and tosylated to give precursors for tracers to image hypoxia in four steps without using Hg(CN)2 necessary for other methods. The Vorbrüggen conditions enable a shorter route to azomycin nucleoside analogues than the previous coupling procedures. PMID:21905640

  3. Delineating binding modes of Gal/GalNAc and structural elements of the molecular recognition of tumor-associated mucin glycopeptides by the human macrophage galactose-type lectin.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Filipa; Garcia-Martin, Fayna; Matsushita, Takahiko; Sardinha, João; Coelho, Helena; Oude-Vrielink, Anneloes; Koller, Christiane; André, Sabine; Cabrita, Eurico J; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Cañada, F Javier

    2014-12-01

    The human macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL) is a key physiological receptor for the carcinoma-associated Tn antigen (GalNAc-α-1-O-Ser/Thr) in mucins. NMR and modeling-based data on the molecular recognition features of synthetic Tn-bearing glycopeptides by MGL are presented. Cognate epitopes on the sugar and matching key amino acids involved in the interaction were identified by saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy. Only the amino acids close to the glycosylation site in the peptides are involved in lectin contact. Moreover, control experiments with non-glycosylated MUC1 peptides unequivocally showed that the sugar residue is essential for MGL binding, as is Ca(2+) . NMR data were complemented with molecular dynamics simulations and Corcema-ST to establish a 3D view on the molecular recognition process between Gal, GalNAc, and the Tn-presenting glycopeptides and MGL. Gal and GalNAc have a dual binding mode with opposite trend of the main interaction pattern and the differences in affinity can be explained by additional hydrogen bonds and CH-π contacts involving exclusively the NHAc moiety.

  4. L-Arabinose isomerase and D-xylose isomerase from Lactobacillus reuteri: characterization, coexpression in the food grade host Lactobacillus plantarum, and application in the conversion of D-galactose and D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Staudigl, Petra; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K

    2014-02-19

    The L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) and the D-xylose isomerase (D-XI) encoding genes from Lactobacillus reuteri (DSMZ 17509) were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The proteins were purified to homogeneity by one-step affinity chromatography and characterized biochemically. L-AI displayed maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 6.0, whereas D-XI showed maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 5.0. Both enzymes require divalent metal ions. The genes were also ligated into the inducible lactobacillal expression vectors pSIP409 and pSIP609, the latter containing a food grade auxotrophy marker instead of an antibiotic resistance marker, and the L-AI- and D-XI-encoding sequences/genes were coexpressed in the food grade host Lactobacillus plantarum . The recombinant enzymes were tested for applications in carbohydrate conversion reactions of industrial relevance. The purified L-AI converted D-galactose to D-tagatose with a maximum conversion rate of 35%, and the D-XI isomerized D-glucose to D-fructose with a maximum conversion rate of 48% at 60 °C.

  5. Light and abiotic stresses regulate the expression of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase and levels of ascorbic acid in two kiwifruit genotypes via light-responsive and stress-inducible cis-elements in their promoters.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liang, Dong; Li, Mingjun; Ma, Fengwang

    2013-09-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) plays an essential role in plants by protecting cells against oxidative damage. GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) is the first committed gene for AsA synthesis. Our research examined AsA levels, regulation of GGP gene expression, and how these are related to abiotic stresses in two species of Actinidia (kiwifruit). When leaves were subjected to continuous darkness or light, ABA or MeJA, heat, or a hypoxic environment, we found some correlation between the relative levels of GGP mRNA and AsA concentrations. In transformed tobacco plants, activity of the GGP promoter was induced by all of these treatments. However, the degree of inducibility in the two kiwifruit species differed among the GGP promoter deletions. We deduced that the G-box motif, a light-responsive element, may have an important function in regulating GGP transcripts under various light conditions in both A. deliciosa and A. eriantha. Other elements such as ABRE, the CGTCA motif, and HSE might also control the promoter activities of GGP in kiwifruit. Altogether, these data suggest that GGP expression in the two kiwifruit species is regulated by light or abiotic stress via the relative cis-elements in their promoters. Furthermore, GGP has a critical role in modulating AsA concentrations in kiwifruit species under abiotic stresses.

  6. Increased p66Shc in the Inner Ear of D-Galactose-Induced Aging Mice with Accumulation of Mitochondrial DNA 3873-bp Deletion: p66Shc and mtDNA Damage in the Inner Ear during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Juan; Yang, Yang; Yao, Ling-Li; Zhou, Xing-Xing; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Xiang; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2012-01-01

    Aging has been associated with mitochondrial DNA damage. P66Shc is an age-related adaptor protein that has a substantial impact on mitochondrial metabolism through regulation of the cellular response to oxidative stress. Our study aimed to establish a D-galactose (D-gal)-induced inner ear aging mouse model and to investigate the potential role of p66Shc and its serine 36-phosphorylated form in the inner ear during aging by using this model. Real-time PCR was performed to detect the mtDNA 3873-bp deletion and the level of p66Shc mRNA in the cochlear lateral wall. Western blot analysis was performed to analyze the total and mitochondrial protein levels of p66Shc and the level of Ser36-P-p66Shc in the cochlear lateral wall. Immunofluoresence was performed to detect the location of the Ser36-P-p66Shc expression in the cochlear lateral wall. The results showed that the accumulation of the mtDNA 3873-bp deletion, total and mitochondrial protein levels of p66Shc and level of Ser36-P-p66Shc were significantly increased in the cochlear lateral wall of the D-gal-treated group when compared to the control group and that Ser36-P-p66Shc was mainly localized in the cytoplasm of the cells in the stria vascularis. During aging, the oxidative stress-related increase of p66Shc and Ser36-P-p66Shc might be associated with the accumulation of the mtDNA 3873-bp deletion in the inner ear. PMID:23209752

  7. Close-up of the Immunogenic α1,3-Galactose Epitope as Defined by a Monoclonal Chimeric Immunoglobulin E and Human Serum Using Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR

    PubMed Central

    Plum, Melanie; Michel, Yvonne; Wallach, Katharina; Raiber, Tim; Blank, Simon; Bantleon, Frank I.; Diethers, Andrea; Greunke, Kerstin; Braren, Ingke; Hackl, Thomas; Meyer, Bernd; Spillner, Edzard

    2011-01-01

    Anaphylaxis mediated by carbohydrate structures is a controversially discussed phenomenon. Nevertheless, IgE with specificity for the xenotransplantation antigen α1,3-Gal (α-Gal) are associated with a delayed type of anaphylaxis, providing evidence for the clinical relevance of carbohydrate epitopes in allergy. The aim of this study was to dissect immunoreactivity, interaction, and fine epitope of α-Gal-specific antibodies to obtain insights into the recognition of carbohydrate epitopes by IgE antibodies and their consequences on a molecular and cellular level. The antigen binding moiety of an α-Gal-specific murine IgM antibody was employed to construct chimeric IgE and IgG antibodies. Reactivity and specificity of the resulting antibodies were assessed by means of ELISA and receptor binding studies. Using defined carbohydrates, interaction of the IgE and human serum was assessed by mediator release assays, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and saturation transfer difference NMR analyses. The α-Gal-specific chimeric IgE and IgG antibodies were proven functional regarding interaction with antigen and Fc receptors. SPR measurements demonstrated affinities in the micromolar range. In contrast to a reference antibody, anti-Gal IgE did not induce mediator release, potentially reflecting the delayed type of anaphylaxis. The α1,3-Gal epitope fine structures of both the recombinant IgE and affinity-purified serum were defined by saturation transfer difference NMR, revealing similar contributions of carbohydrate residues and participation of both galactose residues in interaction. The antibodies generated here constitute the principle underlying α1,3-Gal-mediated anaphylaxis. The complementary data of affinity and fine specificity may help to elucidate the recognition of carbohydrates by the adaptive immune response and the molecular requirements of carbohydrate-based anaphylaxis. PMID:21990360

  8. Galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Galactosemia screen; GALT; Gal-1-PUT ... which is found in milk and dairy products. 1 out of 65,000 newborns lack a substance ( ... Veins and arteries vary in size from one infant to another and from ... other. Obtaining a blood sample from some infants may be more ...

  9. Diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH Mutants That Can Be Isolated in the Presence of 2-Deoxyglucose and Galactose and Characterization of Two Mutants Synthesizing Reduced Levels of HPr, a Phosphocarrier of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne; Brochu, Denis; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2001-01-01

    In streptococci, HPr, a phosphocarrier of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS), undergoes multiple posttranslational chemical modifications resulting in the formation of HPr(His∼P), HPr(Ser-P), and HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P), whose cellular concentrations vary with growth conditions. Distinct physiological functions are associated with specific forms of HPr. We do not know, however, the cellular thresholds below which these forms become unable to fulfill their functions and to what extent modifications in the cellular concentrations of the different forms of HPr modify cellular physiology. In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH mutants that can be isolated by positive selection on a solid medium containing 2-deoxyglucose and galactose and identify 13 amino acids that are essential for HPr to properly accomplish its physiological functions. We also report the characterization of two S. salivarius mutants that produced approximately two- and threefoldless HPr and enzyme I (EI) respectively. The data indicated that (i) a reduction in the synthesis of HPr due to a mutation in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of ptsH reduced ptsI expression; (ii) a threefold reduction in EI and HPr cellular levels did not affect PTS transport capacity; (iii) a twofold reduction in HPr synthesis was sufficient to reduce the rate at which cells metabolized PTS sugars, increase generation times on PTS sugars and to a lesser extent on non-PTS sugars, and impede the exclusion of non-PTS sugars by PTS sugars; (iv) a threefold reduction in HPr synthesis caused a strong derepression of the genes coding for α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase when the cells were grown at the expense of a PTS sugar but did not affect the synthesis of α-galactosidase when cells were grown at the expense of lactose, a noninducing non-PTS sugar; and (v) no correlation was found between the magnitude of enzyme derepression and

  10. Syntheses and insulin-like activity of phosphorylated galactose derivatives.

    PubMed

    Caro, H N; Martín-Lomas, M; Bernabé, M

    1993-02-24

    The syntheses of the poly-phosphorylated galactosides 6, 8, 10, 13, 16, and 20, isolated as sodium salts, have been performed. The non-phosphorylated disaccharide 17 and trisaccharide 21 have been prepared via glycosylation of the 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl galactosides 3 and 2, respectively, and subsequent complete deprotection. Preliminary insulin-like activity of the phosphorylated derivatives is reported. PMID:8458006

  11. A biologically active peptide mimetic of N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Background Glycosylated proteins and lipids are important regulatory factors whose functions can be altered by addition or removal of sugars to the glycan structure. The glycans are recognized by sugar-binding lectins that serve as receptors on the surface of many cells and facilitate initiation of an intracellular signal that changes the properties of the cells. We identified a peptide that mimics the ligand of an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific lectin and asked whether the peptide would express specific biological activity. Findings A 12-mer phage display library was screened with a GalNAc-specific lectin to identify an amino acid sequence that binds to the lectin. Phage particles that were eluted from the lectin with free GalNAc were considered to have been bound to a GalNAc-binding site. Peptides were synthesized with the selected sequence as a quadravalent structure to facilitate receptor crosslinking. Treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for 24 h with the peptide stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) but not of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The secretion of IL-21 was stimulated as strongly with the peptide as with interferon-γ. Conclusion The data indicate that the quadravalent peptide has biological activity with a degree of specificity. These effects occurred at concentrations in the nanomolar range, in contrast to free sugars that generally bind to proteins in the micro- to millimolar range. PMID:19284521

  12. Galactose engineered solid lipid nanoparticles for targeted delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashay; Kesharwani, Prashant; Garg, Neeraj K; Jain, Atul; Jain, Som Akshay; Jain, Amit Kumar; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Ghanghoria, Raksha; Tyagi, Rajeev Kumar; Katare, Om Prakash

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation reports the preparation, optimization, and characterization of surface engineered solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) encapsulated with doxorubicin (DOX). Salient features such as biocompatibility, controlled release, target competency, potential of penetration, improved physical stability, low cost and ease of scaling-up make SLNs viable alternative to liposomes for effective drug delivery. Galactosylation of SLNs instructs some gratifying characteristic, which leads to the evolution of promising delivery vehicles. The impendence of lectin receptors on different cell surfaces makes the galactosylated carriers admirable for targeted delivery of drugs to ameliorate their therapeutic index. Active participation of some lectin receptors in immune responses to antigen overlaid the application of galactosylated carriers in delivery of antigen and immunotherapy for treatment of maladies like cancer. These advantages revealed the promising potential of galactosylated carriers in each perspective of drug delivery. The developed DOX loaded galactosylated SLNs formulation was found to have particle size 239 ± 2.40 nm, PDI 0.307 ± 0.004, entrapment efficiency 72.3 ± 0.9%. Higher cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and nuclear localization of galactosylated SLNs against A549 cells revealed higher efficiency of the formulation. In a nutshell, the galactosylation strategy with SLNs could be a promising approach in improving the delivery of DOX for cancer therapy. PMID:26142628

  13. Reaction of uridine diphosphate galactose 4-epimerase with a suicide inactivator

    SciTech Connect

    Flentke, G.R.; Frey, P.A. )

    1990-03-06

    UDPgalactose 4-epimerase from Escherichia coli is rapidly inactivated by the compounds uridine 5{prime}-diphosphate chloroacetol (UDC) and uridine 5{prime}-diphosphate bromoacetol (UCB). Both UDC and UDB inactivate the enzyme in neutral solution concomitant with the appearance of chromophores absorbing maximally at 325 and 328 nm, respectively. The reaction of UDC with the enzyme follows saturation kinetics characterized by a K{sub D} of 0.110 mM and k{sub inact} of 0.84 min{sup {minus}1} at pH 8.5 and ionic strength 0.2 M. The inactivation by UDC is competitively inhibited by competitive inhibitors of UDPgalactose 4-epimerase, and it is accompanied by the tight but noncovalent binding of UDC to the enzyme in a stoichiometry of 1 mol of UDC/mol of enzyme dimer, corresponding to 1 mol of UDC/mol of enzyme-bound NAD{sup +}. The inactivation of epimerase by uridine 5{prime}-diphosphate ({sup 2}H{sub 2})chloroacetol proceeds with a primary kinetic isotope effect (k{sub H}/k{sub D}) of 1.4. The inactivation mechanism is proposed to involve a minimum of three steps: (a) reversible binding of UDC to the active site of UDPgalactose 4-epimerase; (b) enolization of the chloroacetol moiety of enzyme-bound UDC, catalyzed by an enzymic general base at the active site; (c) alkylation of the nicotinamide ring of NAD{sup +} at the active site by the chloroacetol enolate. The resulting adduct between UDC and NAD{sup +} is proposed to be the chromophore with {lambda}{sub max} at 325 nm. The enzymic general base required to facilitate proton transfer in redox catalysis by this enzyme may be the general base that facilitates enolization of the chloroacetol moiety of UDC in the inactivation reaction.

  14. The Macrophage Galactose-Type C-Type Lectin (MGL) Modulates Regulatory T Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zizzari, Ilaria Grazia; Martufi, Paola; Battisti, Federico; Rahimi, Hassan; Caponnetto, Salvatore; Bellati, Filippo; Nuti, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are physiologically designed to prevent autoimmune disease and maintain self-tolerance. In tumour microenvironments, their presence is related to a poor prognosis, and they influence the therapeutic outcome due to their capacity to suppress the immune response by cell-cell contact and to release immunosuppressive cytokines. In this study, we demonstrate that Treg immunosuppressive activity can be modulated by the cross-linking between the CD45RA expressed by Tregs and the C-type lectin MGL. This specific interaction strongly decreases the im-munosuppressive activity of Tregs, restoring the proliferative capacity of co-cultured T lymphocytes. This effect can be attributed to changes in CD45RA and TCR signalling through the inhibition of Lck and inactivation of Zap-70, an increase in the Foxp3 methylation status and, ultimately, the reduced production of suppressive cytokines. These results indicate a role of MGL as an immunomodulator within the tumour microenvironment interfering with Treg functions, suggesting its possible use in the design of anticancer vaccines. PMID:26147970

  15. Structural characterization of novel L-galactose-containing oligosaccharide subunits of jojoba seed xyloglucans.

    PubMed

    Hantus, S; Pauly, M; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P; York, W S

    1997-10-28

    Jojoba seed xyloglucan was shown to be a convenient source of biologically active xyloglucan oligosaccharides that contain both L- and D-galactosyl residues [E. Zablackis et al., Science, 272 (1996) 1808-1810]. Oligosaccharides were isolated by liquid chromatography of the mixture of oligosaccharides generated by treating jojoba seed xyloglucan with a beta-(1-->4)-endoglucanase. The purified oligosaccharides were reduced with NaBH4, converting them to oligoglycosyl alditol derivatives that were structurally characterized by a combination of mass spectrometry and 2-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. This analysis established that jojoba xyloglucan oligosaccharides contain the novel side-chain [alpha-L-Gal p-(1-->2)-beta-D-Galp-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Xyl p-(1-->6)-], which is structurally homologous to the fucose-containing side-chain [alpha-L-Fucp-(1-->2)-beta-D-Galp-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Xyl p-(1-->6)-] found in other biologically active xyloglucan oligosaccharides.

  16. Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly of Galactose-Functionalized Biocompatible Diblock Copolymers for Intracellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in polymer science are enabling substantial progress in nanobiotechnology, particularly in the design of new tools for enhanced understanding of cell biology and for smart drug delivery formulations. Herein, a range of novel galactosylated diblock copolymer nano-objects is prepared directly in concentrated aqueous solution via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using polymerization-induced self-assembly. The resulting nanospheres, worm-like micelles, or vesicles interact in vitro with galectins as judged by a turbidity assay. In addition, galactosylated vesicles are highly biocompatible and allow intracellular delivery of an encapsulated molecular cargo. PMID:23941545

  17. Troxerutin protects the mouse liver against oxidative stress-mediated injury induced by D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-feng; Fan, Shao-hua; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin

    2009-09-01

    Troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of rutin, has been well-demonstrated to exert hepatoprotective properties. In the present study, we attempted to explore whether the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms were involved in troxerutin-mediated protection from D-gal-induced liver injury. The effects of troxerutin on liver lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymatic activities, and the expression of inflammatory mediator were investigated in D-gal-treated mice. The results showed that troxerutin largely attenuated the D-gal-induced TBARS content increase and also markedly renewed the activities of Cu, Zn-SOD, CAT, and GPx in the livers of D-gal-treated mice. Furthermore, troxerutin inhibited the upregulation of the expression of NF-kappaB p65, iNOS, and COX-2 induced by D-gal. D-Gal-induced tissue architecture changes and serum ALT and AST increases were effectively suppressed by troxerutin. In conclusion, these results suggested that troxerutin could protect the mouse liver from D-gal-induced injury by attenuating lipid peroxidation, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and suppressing inflammatory response. This study provided novel insights into the mechanisms of troxerutin in the protection of the liver.

  18. Chronic administration of troxerutin protects mouse kidney against D-galactose-induced oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan-Min; Ma, Jie-Qiong; Lou, Yao

    2010-10-01

    Troxerutin, a natural bioflavonoid, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of troxerutin against D-gal-induced oxidative DNA damage in mouse kidney, and explored the potential mechanism of its action. Our data showed that troxerutin significantly decreased levels of urea, uric acid and creatinine in serum and the renal histological injury in D-gal-treated mice. Troxerutin markedly restored Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT and GPx activities in the kidney of D-gal-treated mouse. Furthermore, the increase of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (a marker of oxidative DNA damage) induced by d-gal was effectively suppressed by troxerutin. Internucleosomal DNA ladder fragmentation and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in D-gal-treated mice were inhibited by troxerutin, which might be attributed to its antioxidant property by decreasing activities of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase) and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, these results suggested that troxerutin could protect the mouse kidney against D-gal-induced injury by improving renal function, attenuating histopathologic changes, reducing ROS production, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreasing DNA oxidative damage. This study provided novel insights into the protective mechanisms of troxerutin in D-gal-induced kidney injury.

  19. Distinct expression profiles of UDP-galactose: β-D-galactoside α1,4-galactosyltransferase and UDP-galactose: β-D-galactoside β1,4-galactosyltransferase in pigeon, ostrich and chicken.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Noriko; Nawa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2011-03-01

    We previously identified two novel enzymes in pigeon, α1,4- and β1,4-galactosyltransferases (GalTs), which are responsible for the biosynthesis of the Galα1-4Gal and Galβ1-4Gal sequences on glycoproteins, respectively. No such glycan structures and/or enzymes have been found in mammals, suggesting that the expression of these enzymes diverged during the course of vertebrate evolution. To compare their expression profiles among avian species, we first established a method for detecting the activities of these two GalTs based on the two-dimensional high pressure liquid chromatography mapping technique, using 2-aminopyridine-derivatized asialo-biantennary N-glycans as an acceptor substrate. When we analyzed the activities of GalTs in pigeon liver extracts in the presence of UDP-Gal, 13 different products containing Galα1-4Galβ1-4GlcNAc, Galβ1-4Galβ1-4GlcNAc and/or Galα1-4Galβ1-4Galβ1-4GlcNAc branches were identified. The newly formed glycosidic linkages of the enzymatic products were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and methylation analysis, as well as by galactosidase digestions. The activities of both α1,4- and β1,4-GalTs were detected in various tissues in pigeon, although their relative activities were different in each tissue. In contrast, ostrich expressed β1,4-GalT, but not α1,4-GalT, in all tissues analyzed, whereas neither α1,4- nor β1,4-GalT activity was detected in chicken. These results indicate that α1,4- and β1,4-GalTs are expressed in a species-specific manner and are distributed throughout the entire body of pigeon or ostrich when the enzymes are present.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of novel galactose-carbocyanine fluorescent contrast agents with enhanced hydrophilicity and rigid molecular constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongren; Bloch, Sharon; Achilefu, Samuel I.

    2004-06-01

    A new carbocyanine optical molecular probe with enhanced water solubility and constrained structural conformations was designed and synthesized. The near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe contains a nonionic D-galactopyranose, which could improve water solubility of the probe and enhance uptake in tumors mediated by glucose transporter. The possibility of multiple attachment points provides the potential to conjugate diverse bioactive molecules to the probe. We developed an efficient synthetic method that is optimized for large-scale synthesis. Preliminary in vivo biodistribution studies show that the probe is rapidly cleared from blood and localize in the liver as early as 5 minutes post-injection of the probe in nude mice. Additional studies to evaluate the tumor uptake of the probe and its bioactive peptide conjugates are in progress.

  1. β-Galactosidase from Ginkgo biloba seeds active against β-galactose-containing N-glycans: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Ziaur; Maeda, Megumi; Kimura, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we purified an acidic β-galactosidase to homogeneity from Ginkgo biloba seeds (β-Gal'ase Gb-1) with approximately 270-fold purification. A molecular mass of the purified β-Gal'ase Gb-1 was estimated about 35 kDa by gel filtration and 32 kDa by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing condition, respectively. On the other hand, β-Gal'ase Gb-1 produced a single band with a molecular mass of 16 kDa by SDS-PAGE under reducing condition. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of 32 kDa and 16 kDa molecules were the same and identified as H-K-A-N-X-V-T-V-A-F-V-M-T-Q-H-, suggesting that β-Gal'ase Gb-1 may function as a homodimeric structure in vivo. When complex-type N-glycans containing β-galactosyl residues were used as substrates, β-Gal'ase Gb-1 showed substantial activity for β1-4 galactosyl residue and modest activity for β1-3 galactosyl residue with an optimum pH near 5.0. Based on these results, the involvement of β-Gal'ase Gb-1 in the degradation of plant complex-type N-glycans is discussed.

  2. Gene regulation of UDP-galactose synthesis and transport: Potential rate limiting processes in initiation of milk production in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactose synthesis is believed to be rate-limiting for milk production. However, understanding the molecular events controlling lactose synthesis in humans is still rudimentary. We have utilized our established model of the RNA isolated from breast milk fat globule from 7 healthy exclusively breastfe...

  3. Fluorescence-based sensing of glucose using engineered glucose/galactose-binding protein: A comparison of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and environmentally sensitive dye labelling strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Faaizah; Gnudi, Luigi; Pickup, John C.

    2008-01-04

    Fluorescence-based glucose sensors using glucose-binding protein (GBP) as the receptor have employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and environmentally sensitive dyes, but with widely varying sensitivity. We therefore compared signal changes in (a) a FRET system constructed by transglutaminase-mediated N-terminal attachment of Alexa Fluor 488/555 as donor and QSY 7 as acceptor at Cys 152 or 182 mutations with (b) GBP labelled with the environmentally sensitive dye badan at C152 or 182. Both FRET systems had a small maximal fluorescence change at saturating glucose (7% and 16%), badan attached at C152 was associated with a 300% maximal fluorescence increase with glucose, though with badan at C182 there was no change. We conclude that glucose sensing based on GBP and FRET does not produce a larger enough signal change for clinical use; both the nature of the environmentally sensitive dye and its site of conjugation seem important for maximum signal change; badan-GBP152C has a large glucose-induced fluorescence change, suitable for development as a glucose sensor.

  4. Crystal structure of MytiLec, a galactose-binding lectin from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis with cytotoxicity against certain cancer cell types.

    PubMed

    Terada, Daiki; Kawai, Fumihiro; Noguchi, Hiroki; Unzai, Satoru; Hasan, Imtiaj; Fujii, Yuki; Park, Sam-Yong; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2016-01-01

    MytiLec is a lectin, isolated from bivalves, with cytotoxic activity against cancer cell lines that express globotriaosyl ceramide, Galα(1,4)Galβ(1,4)Glcα1-Cer, on the cell surface. Functional analysis shows that the protein binds to the disaccharide melibiose, Galα(1,6)Glc, and the trisaccharide globotriose, Galα(1,4)Galβ(1,4)Glc. Recombinant MytiLec expressed in bacteria showed the same haemagglutinating and cytotoxic activity against Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells as the native form. The crystal structure has been determined to atomic resolution, in the presence and absence of ligands, showing the protein to be a member of the β-trefoil family, but with a mode of ligand binding unique to a small group of related trefoil lectins. Each of the three pseudo-equivalent binding sites within the monomer shows ligand binding, and the protein forms a tight dimer in solution. An engineered monomer mutant lost all cytotoxic activity against Raji cells, but retained some haemagglutination activity, showing that the quaternary structure of the protein is important for its cellular effects. PMID:27321048

  5. Crystal structure of MytiLec, a galactose-binding lectin from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis with cytotoxicity against certain cancer cell types

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Daiki; Kawai, Fumihiro; Noguchi, Hiroki; Unzai, Satoru; Hasan, Imtiaj; Fujii, Yuki; Park, Sam-Yong; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Tame, Jeremy R. H.

    2016-01-01

    MytiLec is a lectin, isolated from bivalves, with cytotoxic activity against cancer cell lines that express globotriaosyl ceramide, Galα(1,4)Galβ(1,4)Glcα1-Cer, on the cell surface. Functional analysis shows that the protein binds to the disaccharide melibiose, Galα(1,6)Glc, and the trisaccharide globotriose, Galα(1,4)Galβ(1,4)Glc. Recombinant MytiLec expressed in bacteria showed the same haemagglutinating and cytotoxic activity against Burkitt’s lymphoma (Raji) cells as the native form. The crystal structure has been determined to atomic resolution, in the presence and absence of ligands, showing the protein to be a member of the β-trefoil family, but with a mode of ligand binding unique to a small group of related trefoil lectins. Each of the three pseudo-equivalent binding sites within the monomer shows ligand binding, and the protein forms a tight dimer in solution. An engineered monomer mutant lost all cytotoxic activity against Raji cells, but retained some haemagglutination activity, showing that the quaternary structure of the protein is important for its cellular effects. PMID:27321048

  6. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, but the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Head group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a plant lipid modification occurring during bacterial infection. Little is known about the range of stresses that induce this lipid modification, the molecular species induced, and the function of the modification. Lipidomic analysis using trip...

  7. Homology of the D-galactose-specific lectins from Artocarpus integrifolia and Maclura pomifera and the role of an unusual small polypeptide subunit.

    PubMed

    Young, N M; Johnston, R A; Szabo, A G; Watson, D C

    1989-05-01

    The Maclura pomifera agglutinin (MPA) was purified by affinity chromatography from a seed extract and its properties were compared with those of the Artocarpus integrifolia lectin, jacalin. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography showed both proteins had multiple forms of a small approximately 20-residue polypeptide chain in addition to the major 12,000 Mr subunit. The amino acid sequences of the small chains and the N-terminal sequences of the large subunits showed considerable similarity between the two proteins, approximately 60% identical residues. The homology of the proteins was confirmed by the similarity of their circular dichroism and fluorescence emission spectra. MPA showed much greater spectral changes upon binding methyl alpha-D-galactoside, suggesting it has complete activity rather than the partial activity found for jacalin. The binding of methyl alpha-D-galactoside by MPA was measured by fluorescence titration; the KA was 1.9 X 10(4) M-1 compared to 3.4 X 10(4) M-1 for jacalin. MPA also precipitated human IgA1 in the same manner as jacalin. The spectra indicate the involvement of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in the binding site of these lectins. Since a tryptophan residue is conserved in all the small subunits, they may form part of the binding site.

  8. Molecular cloning of pigeon UDP-galactose:beta-D-galactoside alpha1,4-galactosyltransferase and UDP-galactose:beta-D-galactoside beta1,4-galactosyltransferase, two novel enzymes catalyzing the formation of Gal alpha1-4Gal beta1-4Gal beta1-4GlcNAc sequence.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Noriko; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2010-02-19

    We previously found that pigeon IgG possesses unique N-glycan structures that contain the Gal alpha1-4Gal beta1-4Gal beta1-4GlcNAc sequence at their nonreducing termini. This sequence is most likely produced by putative alpha1,4- and beta1,4-galactosyltransferases (GalTs), which are responsible for the biosynthesis of the Gal alpha1-4Gal and Gal beta1-4Gal sequences on the N-glycans, respectively. Because no such glycan structures have been found in mammalian glycoproteins, the biosynthetic enzymes that produce these glycans are likely to have distinct substrate specificities from the known mammalian GalTs. To study these enzymes, we cloned the pigeon liver cDNAs encoding alpha4GalT and beta4GalT by expression cloning and characterized these enzymes using the recombinant proteins. The deduced amino acid sequence of pigeon alpha4GalT has 58.2% identity to human alpha4GalT and 68.0 and 66.6% identity to putative alpha4GalTs from chicken and zebra finch, respectively. Unlike human and putative chicken alpha4GalTs, which possess globotriosylceramide synthase activity, pigeon alpha4GalT preferred to catalyze formation of the Gal alpha1-4Gal sequence on glycoproteins. In contrast, the sequence of pigeon beta4GalT revealed a type II transmembrane protein consisting of 438 amino acid residues, with no significant homology to the glycosyltransferases so far identified from mammals and chicken. However, hypothetical proteins from zebra finch (78.8% identity), frogs (58.9-60.4%), zebrafish (37.1-43.0%), and spotted green pufferfish (43.3%) were similar to pigeon beta4GalT, suggesting that the pigeon beta4GalT gene was inherited from the common ancestors of these vertebrates. The sequence analysis revealed that pigeon beta4GalT and its homologs form a new family of glycosyltransferases.

  9. Absence of lactobacilli containing glycolipids with the α-galactose epitope and the enhanced fucosylation of a receptor glycolipid GA1 in the digestive tracts of immune-deficient scid mice.

    PubMed

    Iwamori, Masao; Tanaka, Kyoko; Adachi, Shigeki; Aoki, Daisuke; Nomura, Taisei

    2015-07-01

    The Lactobacillus species in the digestive tracts of immune-deficient scid mice was distinct from that in control mice, i.e. Lactobacillus murinus in scid and L. johnsonii in control mice, according to their 16S-rRNA, indicating that a symbiotic relationship between lactobacilli and a host is established under pressure from the immune system. The caecal and colonal contents rich in L. murinus of scid mice were loose with a strong sour smell, resulting in diarrhoea, and those with L. johnsonii in control mice included abundant solid materials. Lactobacillus glycolipids were revealed to be recognized by the immune system, and by TLC-immunostaining, LacTetH-DG (Galα1-6Galα1-6Galα1-2Glcα1-3'DG) of L. johnsonii was detected in the stomach, caecum and colon of control mice, but not in those of scid ones, in which fucosylation of a receptor GA1 for L. johnsonii was enhanced more than 4-fold compared with in the control mice. Thus, structural modification of receptor glycolipids was revealed to occur in the process of establishment of a symbiotic relationship between lactobacilli and a host. LacTetH-DG was also immunogenic to human, because of the presence of natural antibodies against it, and the antibody binding to it was comparable to that of blood group- and species-related glycosphingolipids.

  10. Phenotype-associated lectin-binding profiles of normal and transformed blood cells: a comparative analysis of mannose- and galactose-binding lectins from plants and human serum/placenta.

    PubMed

    Mann, K K; André, S; Gabius, H J; Sharp, J G

    1994-10-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of normal and transformed blood cells are commonly characterized by plant lectins. To infer physiological significance of protein-carbohydrate interactions, mammalian lectins are obviously preferable as research tools. So far, human serum lectins have not been used to assess their binding to immunophenotyped human normal or transformed blood cells. Thus, our study combines two groups of lectins with different specificity from plant and human sources. Besides concanavalin A (ConA) we have isolated the mannose-binding protein and serum amyloid P component from human serum. Especially the mannose-binding protein is believed to play a role in host defence against bacteria and yeast cells with unknown impact on normal and tumor cells. These three lectins establish the first group. In addition to the immunomodulatory mistletoe lectin, whose binding can elicit enhanced cytokine secretion from mononuclear blood cells, we included the beta-galactoside-binding lectin (14 kDa) from human placenta in the second group. The initial series of measurements was undertaken using two-color flow cytometry to determine the phenotype-associated binding (based on cluster designation; CD) of the lectins to blood and bone marrow cells from normal donors and the cell line CEM (T-lymphoblastoid), KG1-A (primitive myeloid leukemia) and Croco II (B-lymphoblastoid). Heterogeneity was apparent for each lectin in the CD-defined cell populations. Significant differences in binding were noted between Viscum album agglutinin (VAA) and other lectins for CD4+ cells from blood and between mannose-binding protein (MBP) and VAA versus 14 kDa, ConA and serum amyloid P component (SAP) for CD19+ cells from bone marrow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Genetics Home Reference: galactosemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... mutations in a particular gene and affect different enzymes involved in breaking down galactose. Classic galactosemia , also ... cause galactosemia . These genes provide instructions for making enzymes that are essential for processing galactose obtained from ...

  12. Substrate specificities of Penicillium simplicissimum alpha-galactosidases.

    PubMed

    Luonteri, E; Tenkanen, M; Viikari, L

    1998-02-15

    The substrate specificities of three Penicillium simplicissimum alpha-galactosidases, AGLI, AGLII, and AGLIII, were determined by using various isolated galactose-containing oligosaccharides and polymeric galacto(gluco)mannans. AGLI released galactose from melibiose and raffinose-family oligosaccharides but the amount of galactose released was decreased from 96% to 35% by the increasing chain length of the substrate from raffinose to verbascose. It was able to release galactose linked to the nonreducing end and less efficiently to the internal residues of the galactomanno-oligomers. AGLI was able to hydrolyze 60-92% of galactose from polymeric galacto(gluco)mannans alone but its action was facilitated by mannanase and beta-mannosidase. In addition, it was able to release about 10% of the galactose from softwood kraft pulp alone and about 22% in combination with mannanase. AGLII was highly specific toward small galactose-containing oligosaccharides in which the galactose is linked to the nonreducing end of the substrate. It released 90-100% of galactose present in melibiose, raffinose, stachyose, and verbascose; however, it was able to degrade polymeric substrates only in combination with mannanase and beta-mannosidase. AGLIII had only low activity toward the oligomeric substrates tested. It was able to release some galactose from the polymeric galacto(gluco)mannans alone, but its action was clearly enhanced by the backbone degrading enzymes.

  13. Galactokinase activity in Streptococcus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.; Morris, H.A.; McKay, L.L.

    1985-10-01

    ATP-dependent phosphorylation of (/sup 14/C)galactose by 11 strains of streptococcus thermophilus indicated that these organisms possessed the Leloir enzyme, galactokinase (galK). Activities were 10 times higher in fully induced, galactose-fermenting (Gal/sup +/) strains than in galactose-nonfermenting (Gal/sup -/) strains. Lactose-grown, Gal/sup -/ cells released free galactose into the medium and were unable to utilize residual galactose or to induce galK above basal levels. Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus 19258 also released galactose into the medium, but when lactose was depleted, growth on galactose commenced, and galK increased from 0.025 to 0.22 ..mu..mol of galactose phosphorylated per min per mg of protein. When lactose was added to galactose-grown cells of S. thermophilus 19258, galK activity rapidly decreased. These results suggest that galK in Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus is subject to an induction-repression mechanism, but that galK cannot be induced in Gal/sup -/ strains.

  14. Differentiation Between Intracellular and Cell Surface Glycosyl Transferases: Galactosyl Transferase Activity in Intact Cells and in Cell Homogenate

    PubMed Central

    Deppert, Wolfgang; Werchau, Hermann; Walter, Gernot

    1974-01-01

    Intact BHK (baby hamster kidney) cells catalyze the hydrolysis of UDP-galactose to free galactose. The generation of galactose from UDP-galactose and its intracellular utilization impede the detection of possible galactosyl transferases on the cell surface of intact cells. Several independent procedures have been used to distinguish between intracellular and cell surface glycosyl transferases. With these procedures, no evidence was obtained for the presence of detectable amounts of galactosyl transferase activity on the surface of BHK cells. The data suggest that galactosyl transferases do not play a general role in the phenomena of cell adhesion and contact inhibition. PMID:4528509

  15. Neuronal marker recovery after Simvastatin treatment in dementia in the rat brain: in vivo magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Tušková, Radka; Lipták, Boris; Szomolányi, Pavol; Vančová, Oľga; Uličná, Oľga; Sumbalová, Zuzana; Kucharská, Jarmila; Dubovický, Michal; Trattnig, Siegfried; Liptaj, Tibor; Kašparová, Svatava

    2015-05-01

    The aim of study was to search for new biomarkers with a magnetic resonance technique to identify the early stages of dementia, induced by D-galactose, and evaluate Simvastatin therapy. Localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements showed a significant decrease in the concentration of N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartylglutamate and myo-inositol in the D-galactose group compared to the control group, and, conversely, an increase of N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartylglutamate in the D-galactose/Simvastatin group. Using a saturation transfer experiment, with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we observed a significant elevation of the forward rate constant of the creatine kinase reaction in the brains of the D-galactose group compared to controls, and subsequently, a significant reduction of this reaction in the D-galactose/Simvastatin group. Spatial learning and memory were evaluated using the modified Morris water maze test. The dynamics of the learning process represented by the learning index revealed a significant reduction in learning in the D-galactose group, but the deficits as a consequence of the D-galactose effects were recovered in the D-galactose/Simvastatin group, in which the learning dynamics resembled those of the control group. By determining the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and total coenzyme Q9 in plasma, we have shown that long-term administration of D-galactose created conditions for oxidative stress, and that the administration of Simvastatin decreased oxidative stress in plasma. Volumetry analyses from the hippocampal area show a reduction in the segmented area in the D-galactose group, compared with the control group, and an enlarged area in the hippocampus in the d-galactose/Simvastatin group.

  16. 75 FR 8920 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Danisco USA, Inc., Sweeteners Division (Xylitol, Xylose...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... (74 FR 6856-6857, 2/11/2009) and the application has been processed pursuant to the FTZ Act and the... (Xylitol, Xylose, Galactose and Mannose); Thomson, IL Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade... Board for authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the xylitol, xylose, galactose and...

  17. The structural characterization of the O-polysaccharide antigen in the lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli serotype O118 and its relationship to the O-antigens of Salmonella enterica O47 and Escherichia coli serotype O151

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide produced by Escherichia coli O118:H16 (standard reference strain; NRCC 6613) contained an O-polysaccharide (O-PS) composed of D-galactose, 2-acetimidoylamino-2,6-dideoxy-L-galactose (L-FucNAm), 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose, ribitol, and phosphate (1:1...

  18. Relationship between galactomannan structure and physicochemical properties of films produced thereof.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, V R F; Souza, B W S; Teixeira, J A; Vicente, A A; Cerqueira, M A

    2015-12-01

    In this work five sources of galactomannans, Adenanthera pavonina, Cyamopsis tetragonolobus, Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Ceratonia siliqua and Sophora japonica, presenting mannose/galactose ratios of 1.3, 1.7, 2.9, 3.4 and 5.6, respectively, were used to produce galactomannan-based films. These films were characterized in terms of: water vapour, oxygen and carbon dioxide permeabilities (WVP, O 2 P and CO 2 P); moisture content, water solubility, contact angle, elongation-at-break (EB), tensile strength (TS) and glass transition temperature (T g ). Results showed that films properties vary according to the galactomannan source (different galactose distribution) and their mannose/galactose ratio. Water affinity of mannan and galactose chains and the intermolecular interactions of mannose backbone should also be considered being factors that affect films' properties. This work has shown that knowing mannose/galactose ratio of galactomannans is possible to foresee galactomannan-based edible films properties. PMID:26604406

  19. Biosynthesis of galactogen: purification of a 1. -->. 6 D-galactosyltransferase from Helix pomatia

    SciTech Connect

    Goudsmit, E.M.

    1986-05-01

    A (1 ..-->.. 6) D-galactosyltransferase from a pellet fraction (8000xg) of Helix pomatia albumen gland has been purified over 2000-fold by affinity chromatography on UDP-p-amino-phenyl-Sepharose. The enzyme catalyzes transfer of D-galactose from UDP-galactose to a 1 ..-->.. 6 linkage on acceptor H. pomatia galactogen. Three other polymers served as acceptors; beef lung galactan, Lymnaea stagnalis galactogen and arabinogalactan from larch wood. To determine the linkage of added galactose termini, acceptor galactogen of H. pomatia that had been tritiated by treatment with galactose oxidase and (/sup 3/H)KBH/sub 4/ was incubated with UDP-D-galactose and purified enzyme extract. /sup 3/H-galactogen reaction product was recovered, methylated, hydrolyzed and acetylated; tritiated derivatives were identified by collection of effluent fractions from gas chromatography.

  20. Inhibition of raffinose oligosaccharide breakdown delays germination of pea seeds.

    PubMed

    Blöchl, Andreas; Peterbauer, Thomas; Richter, Andreas

    2007-08-01

    Raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) are almost ubiquitous in seeds and have been hypothesized to constitute an important energy source during germination. To test this hypothesis we applied a specific alpha-galactosidase inhibitor (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, DGJ) to germinating pea seeds, resulting in a complete blocking of RFO breakdown. The germination rates of DGJ-treated seeds dropped drastically to about 25% of controls two days after imbibition. Similarly, the activities of the key enzymes in the galactose salvage pathway galactokinase, UDP-galactose pyrophosphorylase and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase, were also significantly lower in seeds treated with the inhibitor. The inhibitory effect on germination could be relieved by galactose but only partially by sucrose, indicating that galactose, in addition to providing easily available energy for growth, may also be an important component of the sugar signaling pathway during germination. Taken together our study, for the first time, provides clear evidence that RFOs play an important role for early germination.

  1. Uncoupling of attenuated myo-(3H)inositol uptake and dysfunction in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pumping activity in hypergalactosemic cultured bovine lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cammarata, P.R.; Tse, D.; Yorio, T. )

    1991-06-01

    Attenuation of both the active transport of myo-inositol and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pumping activity has been implicated in the onset of sugar cataract and other diabetic complications in cell culture and animal models of the disease. Cultured bovine lens epithelial cells (BLECs) maintained in galactose-free Eagle's minimal essential medium (MEM) or 40 mM galactose with and without sorbinil for up to 5 days were examined to determine the temporal effects of hypergalactosemia on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and myo-inositol uptake. The Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pumping activity after 5 days of continuous exposure to galactose did not change, as demonstrated by 86Rb uptake. The uptake of myo-(3H)inositol was lowered after 20 h of incubation in galactose and remained below that of the control throughout the 5-day exposure period. The coadministration of sorbinil to the galactose medium normalized the myo-(3H)inositol uptake. No significant difference in the rates of passive efflux of myo-(3H)inositol or 86Rb from preloaded galactose-treated and control cultures was observed. Culture-media reversal studies were also carried out to determine whether the galactose-induced dysfunction in myo-inositol uptake could be corrected. BLECs were incubated in galactose for 5 days, then changed to galactose-free physiological medium with and without sorbinil for a 1-day recovery period. myo-Inositol uptake was reduced to 34% of control after 6 days of continuous exposure to galactose. Within 24 h of media reversal, myo-inositol uptake returned to or exceeded control values in BLECs switched to either MEM or MEM with sorbinil.2+ reversible and occurred independently of changes in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pumping activity in cultured lens epithelium, indicating that the two parameters are not strictly associated and that the deficit in myo-inositol uptake occurs rapidly during hypergalactosemia.

  2. Modulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a skeletal muscle cell line model of mitochondrial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dott, William; Mistry, Pratibha; Wright, Jayne; Cain, Kelvin; Herbert, Karl E

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is increasingly being implicated as a contributing factor to many xenobiotic-induced organ toxicities, including skeletal muscle toxicity. This has necessitated the need for predictive in vitro models that are able to sensitively detect mitochondrial toxicity of chemical entities early in the research and development process. One such cell model involves substituting galactose for glucose in the culture media. Since cells cultured in galactose are unable to generate sufficient ATP from glycolysis they are forced to rely on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for ATP generation and consequently are more sensitive to mitochondrial perturbation than cells grown in glucose. The aim of this study was to characterise cellular growth, bioenergetics and mitochondrial toxicity of the L6 rat skeletal muscle cell line cultured in either high glucose or galactose media. L6 myoblasts proliferated more slowly when cultured in galactose media, although they maintained similar levels of ATP. Galactose cultured L6 cells were significantly more sensitive to classical mitochondrial toxicants than glucose-cultured cells, confirming the cells had adapted to galactose media. Analysis of bioenergetic function with the XF Seahorse extracellular flux analyser demonstrated that oxygen consumption rate (OCR) was significantly increased whereas extracellular acidification rate (ECAR), a measure of glycolysis, was decreased in cells grown in galactose. Mitochondria operated closer to state 3 respiration and had a lower mitochondrial membrane potential and basal mitochondrial O2 (•-) level compared to cells in the glucose model. An antimycin A (AA) dose response revealed that there was no difference in the sensitivity of OCR to AA inhibition between glucose and galactose cells. Importantly, cells in glucose were able to up-regulate glycolysis, while galactose cells were not. These results confirm that L6 cells are able to adapt to growth in a galactose media model

  3. Polygenic evolution of a sugar specialization trade-off in yeast.

    PubMed

    Roop, Jeremy I; Chang, Kyu Chul; Brem, Rachel B

    2016-02-18

    The evolution of novel traits can involve many mutations scattered throughout the genome. Detecting and validating such a suite of alleles, particularly if they arose long ago, remains a key challenge in evolutionary genetics. Here we dissect an evolutionary trade-off of unprecedented genetic complexity between long-diverged species. When cultured in 1% glucose medium supplemented with galactose, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not S. bayanus or other Saccharomyces species, delayed commitment to galactose metabolism until glucose was exhausted. Promoters of seven galactose (GAL) metabolic genes from S. cerevisiae, when introduced together into S. bayanus, largely recapitulated the delay phenotype in 1% glucose-galactose medium, and most had partial effects when tested in isolation. Variation in GAL coding regions also contributed to the delay when tested individually in 1% glucose-galactose medium. When combined, S. cerevisiae GAL coding regions gave rise to profound growth defects in the S. bayanus background. In medium containing 2.5% glucose supplemented with galactose, wild-type S. cerevisiae repressed GAL gene expression and had a robust growth advantage relative to S. bayanus; transgenesis of S. cerevisiae GAL promoter alleles or GAL coding regions was sufficient for partial reconstruction of these phenotypes. S. cerevisiae GAL genes thus encode a regulatory program of slow induction and avid repression, and a fitness detriment during the glucose-galactose transition but a benefit when glucose is in excess. Together, these results make clear that genetic mapping of complex phenotypes is within reach, even in deeply diverged species.

  4. Mediated amperometry reveals different modes of yeast responses to sugars.

    PubMed

    Garjonyte, Rasa; Melvydas, Vytautas; Malinauskas, Albertas

    2016-02-01

    Menadione-mediated amperometry at carbon paste electrodes modified with various yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii and Debaryomyces hansenii) was employed to monitor redox activity inside the yeast cells induced by glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose or galactose. Continuous measurements revealed distinct modes (transient or gradually increasing) of the current development during the first 2 to 3 min after subjection to glucose, fructose and sucrose at electrodes containing S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces strains. Different modes (increasing or decreasing) of the current development after yeast subjection to galactose at electrodes with S. cerevisiae or D. hansenii and at electrodes with C. pulcherrima and P. guilliermondii suggested different mechanisms of galactose assimilation.

  5. Developmental Defects in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model for Type III Galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    Brokate-Llanos, Ana M.; Monje, José M.; Murdoch, Piedad del Socorro; Muñoz, Manuel J.

    2014-01-01

    Type III galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by reduced activity of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase, which participates in galactose metabolism and the generation of various UDP-sugar species. We characterized gale-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that a complete loss-of-function mutation is lethal, as has been hypothesized for humans, whereas a nonlethal partial loss-of-function allele causes a variety of developmental abnormalities, likely resulting from the impairment of the glycosylation process. We also observed that gale-1 mutants are hypersensitive to galactose as well as to infections. Interestingly, we found interactions between gale-1 and the unfolded protein response. PMID:25298520

  6. 1-.sup.11 C-D-Glucose and related compounds

    DOEpatents

    Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1984-03-27

    The novel compounds 1-.sup.11 C-D-glucose, 1-.sup.11 C-D-mannose, 1-.sup.11 C-D-galactose, 2-.sup.11 C-D-glucose, 2-.sup.11 C-D-mannose and 2-.sup.11 C-D-galactose which can be used in nuclear medicine to monitor the metabolism of glucose and galactose can be rapidly prepared by reaction of the appropriate aldose substrate with an alkali metal .sup.11 C-labeled cyanide followed by reduction with a Raney alloy in formic acid.

  7. 1-/sup 11/C-D-glucose and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shiue, C.Y.; Wolf, A.P.

    1982-01-26

    The novel compounds 1-/sup 11/C-D-glucose, 1-/sup 11/C-D-mannose, 1-/sup 11/C-D-galactose, 2-/sup 11/C-D-glucose, 2-/sup 11/C-D-mannose and 2-/sup 11/C-D-galactose which can be used in nuclear medicine to monitor the metabolism of glucose and galactose can be rapidly prepared by reaction of the appropriate aldose substrate with an alkali metal /sup 11/C-labeled cyanide followed by reduction with a Raney alloy in formic acid.

  8. Lipoic Acid Glyco-Conjugates, a New Class of Agents for Controlling Nonspecific Adsorption of Blood Serum at Bio-interfaces for Biosensor and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; El-Boubbou, Kheireddine; Kouyoumdjian, Hovig; Sun, Bin; Huang, Xuefei; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2009-01-01

    The carbohydrate-derived lipoic acid derivatives were studied as protein and cell resistant biomaterials. Six types of carbohydrates were examined for their abilities to reduce nonspecific adsorption of human serum and Hela cell using quartz crystal microbalance. Our data suggested that the structures of carbohydrates play an important role in resisting nonspecific binding. Specifically, the resistance was found to increase in the order of: lipoic fucose < lipoic mannose < lipoic N-acetyl glucosamine < lipoic glucose < lipoic sialic acid < lipoic galactose, where lipoic galactose derivative resisted most nonspecific adsorption. Furthermore, the combination of lipoic galactose and BSA was the most effective in reducing the adsorption of even undiluted human serum and the attachment of Hela cells while allowing specific binding. Several control experiments have demonstrated that the resistant-ability of mixed lipoic galactose and BSA was comparable to the best known system for decreasing nonspecific adsorption. PMID:19968241

  9. Sweeteners - sugars

    MedlinePlus

    ... and jellies. Enhance flavor in processed meats. Provide fermentation for breads and pickles. Add bulk to ice ... and galactose. Maltose (malt sugar) is produced during fermentation. It is found in beer and breads. Maple ...

  10. 75 FR 2551 - NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    .... Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest significant amounts of lactose, a sugar found in milk and.... Lactase breaks milk sugar down into two simpler forms of sugar called glucose and galactose, which...

  11. Galactosemia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... galactosemia is unable to use (metabolize) the simple sugar galactose, which reaches high levels in the body, causing damage to the liver, central nervous system and various other body systems. An infant with ...

  12. A β-mannan utilization locus in Bacteroides ovatus involves a GH36 α-galactosidase active on galactomannans.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sumitha K; Bågenholm, Viktoria; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Bouraoui, Hanene; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Martens, Eric C; Stålbrand, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    The Bacova_02091 gene in the β-mannan utilization locus of Bacteroides ovatus encodes a family GH36 α-galactosidase (BoGal36A), transcriptionally upregulated during growth on galactomannan. Characterization of recombinant BoGal36A reveals unique properties compared to other GH36 α-galactosidases, which preferentially hydrolyse terminal α-galactose in raffinose family oligosaccharides. BoGal36A prefers hydrolysing internal galactose substitutions from intact and depolymerized galactomannan. BoGal36A efficiently releases (> 90%) galactose from guar and locust bean galactomannans, resulting in precipitation of the polysaccharides. As compared to other GH36 structures, the BoGal36A 3D model displays a loop deletion, resulting in a wider active site cleft which likely can accommodate a galactose-substituted polymannose backbone.

  13. Intracellular localization of prenyltransferases of isoflavonoid phytoalexin biosynthesis in bean and soybean.

    PubMed

    Biggs, D R; Welle, R; Grisebach, H

    1990-05-01

    The intracellular localization of prenyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of the phytoalexins glyceollin in soybean (Glycine max L.) and phaseollin in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) has been investigated. By sucrose- and Percoll-gradient centrifugation of microsomes of an elicitor-challenged soybean cell culture, the membranes containing prenyltransferase were separated from the endoplasmic reticulum and shown to be lighter in density. In a continuous Percoll gradient the peak of prenyltransferase activity coincided with the peak of galactolipid synthesis, as determined by incorporation of uridine 5'-diphospho-[(14)C]galactose (UDP-[(14)C]galactose). Intact chloroplasts isolated from cupricchloride-treated bean leaves contained both prenyltransferase and UDP-galactose transferase activity. Both activities increased during chloroplast isolation. Fractionation of swollen chloroplasts on a discontinuous sucrose gradient showed prenyltransferase and UDP-galactose transferase activity in the envelope membrane subfraction. It is concluded that in both plants prenyltransferase is located in the envelope membrane of plastids.

  14. 21 CFR 172.620 - Carrageenan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Gigartina stellata. (b) The food additive conforms to the following conditions: (1) It is a sulfated polysaccharide the dominant hexose units of which are galactose and anhydrogalactose. (2) Range of...

  15. 21 CFR 172.655 - Furcelleran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (red seaweed). (b) The food additive conforms to the following: (1) It is a sulfated polysaccharide the dominant hexose units of which are galactose and anhydrogalactose. (2) Range of sulfate content: 8...

  16. 21 CFR 172.620 - Carrageenan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Gigartina stellata. (b) The food additive conforms to the following conditions: (1) It is a sulfated polysaccharide the dominant hexose units of which are galactose and anhydrogalactose. (2) Range of...

  17. 21 CFR 172.655 - Furcelleran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (red seaweed). (b) The food additive conforms to the following: (1) It is a sulfated polysaccharide the dominant hexose units of which are galactose and anhydrogalactose. (2) Range of sulfate content: 8...

  18. Galactosemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood culture for bacterial infection ( E coli sepsis ) Enzyme activity in the red blood cells Ketones in the urine Prenatal diagnosis by directly measuring the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase "Reducing substances" in ...

  19. Phosphoglycopeptide, a major constituent of the spermatophoric plasma of the octopus (Octopus dofleini martini).

    PubMed

    Brooks, D E; Tate, M E; Mann, T; Martin, A W

    1981-11-01

    A phosphoglycopeptide, accounting for approximately 90% of the characteristically high content of acid-soluble organically-bound phosphorus in the octopus spermatophoric plasma (4 mg P/ml), was identified. Electrophoretic and chromatographic purification, followed by chemical and enzymic hydrolysis, yielded D-galactose phosphate as a degradation product. The galactose and peptide moieties of the compound were linked via a phosphoryl rather than a glycosidic linkage but the peptide was devoid of aromatic amino acids. PMID:7299753

  20. Determination of sugar specificity of jackfruit lectin by a simple sugar-lectin binding assay using microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Wetprasit, N; Chulavatnatol, M

    1997-06-01

    Sugar-lectin binding assay was developed as a simple method which employed direct coating of microtiter plate with galactose-binding lectins. Biotin-galactose conjugate was used to bind to the immobilized lectins. The bound conjugate was then detected using streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase. Using the assay in conjunction with various competing carbohydrates, jackfruit lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus was found to be specific for alpha-anomer of galactoside with an aromatic residue.

  1. Composition of the Capsular and Extracellular Polysaccharides of Rhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Andrew J.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical compositions of the capsular and extracellular polysaccharides of two strains of Rhizobium japonicum (311b 138 and 110) have been determined and correlated as a function of culture age with the ability of the bacteria from which they were obtained to bind soybean seed lectin. Each of the polysaccharides contains approximately constant amounts of mannosyl, glucosyl, and galacturonosyl residues in a molar ratio of 1:2:1. In addition they contain variable amounts of galactosyl and 4-O-methyl galactosyl residues. The total of galactose plus 4-O-methyl galactose, however, is constant and equivalent to the amount of mannose, indicating that the 4-O-methyl galactose residues arise by methylation of galactose residues in the polysaccharides. In both strains the proportion of galactose to methyl galactose is considerably greater in the polysaccharide from bacteria which do bind lectin than in the polysaccharide from bacteria which do not bind lectin. In addition to the changes in polysaccharide composition, there is a reduction of about 50% in the percentage of cells which are encapsulated as the cultures mature from early to late log phase. Since only capsulated cells bind lectin, the combination of the change in capsular composition and loss of encapsulation is probably sufficient to account for the loss of lectin binding capacity during growth of cultures of Rhizobium japonicum 311b 138 and 110. Images PMID:16661379

  2. Galactosylation of serum IgA1 O-glycans in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Katri; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Novak, Jan; Collin, Pekka; Saavalainen, Päivi; Koskinen, Lotta L E; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2011-02-01

    In celiac disease, gluten ingestion provokes small-bowel mucosal injury and production of IgA autoantibodies against transglutaminase 2 (TG2). It has been suggested that in celiac patients IgA could mediate the transepithelial passage of gluten peptides in a mechanism involving the transferrin receptor. As IgA1 with galactose-deficient O-linked glycans has elevated affinity for the transferrin receptor, we assessed whether total serum IgA1 and IgA1 anti-TG2 autoantibodies in celiac patients are aberrantly glycosylated. We report that males with celiac disease have higher total serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 than non-celiac males. Furthermore, O-glycans of the disease-specific TG2 IgA1 autoantibodies in celiac patients exhibited elevated galactose deficiency. A gluten-free diet had no effect on the total serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1, whereas the amount of galactose-deficient anti-TG2 IgA1 decreased. Thus, the undergalactosylated IgA1 molecules are not pathognomonic for celiac disease, but galactose deficiency in IgA1 could be an aggravating factor.

  3. Effects of curcumin (Curcuma longa) on learning and spatial memory as well as cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in adult and aged mice by upregulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor and CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sung Min; Choi, Jung Hoon; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoo, Miyoung; Lee, Sanghee; Kim, Chul Jung; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Hwang, In Koo

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process, and it may lead to the initiation of neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of wild Indian Curcuma longa using a Morris water maze paradigm on learning and spatial memory in adult and D-galactose-induced aged mice. In addition, the effects on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation were assessed by immunohistochemistry for Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX) respectively. The aging model in mice was induced through the subcutaneous administration of D-galactose (100 mg/kg) for 10 weeks. C. longa (300 mg/kg) or its vehicle (physiological saline) was administered orally to adult and D-galactose-treated mice for the last three weeks before sacrifice. The administration of C. longa significantly shortened the escape latency in both adult and D-galactose-induced aged mice and significantly ameliorated D-galactose-induced reduction of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of hippocampal dentate gyrus. In addition, the administration of C. longa significantly increased the levels of phosphorylated CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus. These results indicate that C. longa mitigates D-galactose-induced cognitive impairment, associated with decreased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, by activating CREB signaling in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

  4. Effects of Curcumin (Curcuma longa) on Learning and Spatial Memory as Well as Cell Proliferation and Neuroblast Differentiation in Adult and Aged Mice by Upregulating Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and CREB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sung Min; Choi, Jung Hoon; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoo, Miyoung; Lee, Sanghee; Kim, Chul Jung; Yoon, Yeo Sung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aging is a progressive process, and it may lead to the initiation of neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of wild Indian Curcuma longa using a Morris water maze paradigm on learning and spatial memory in adult and D-galactose-induced aged mice. In addition, the effects on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation were assessed by immunohistochemistry for Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX) respectively. The aging model in mice was induced through the subcutaneous administration of D-galactose (100 mg/kg) for 10 weeks. C. longa (300 mg/kg) or its vehicle (physiological saline) was administered orally to adult and D-galactose-treated mice for the last three weeks before sacrifice. The administration of C. longa significantly shortened the escape latency in both adult and D-galactose-induced aged mice and significantly ameliorated D-galactose-induced reduction of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of hippocampal dentate gyrus. In addition, the administration of C. longa significantly increased the levels of phosphorylated CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus. These results indicate that C. longa mitigates D-galactose-induced cognitive impairment, associated with decreased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, by activating CREB signaling in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. PMID:24712702

  5. Conversion of red-algae Gracilaria verrucosa to sugars, levulinic acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Ra, Chae Hun; Hong, Yong-Ki; Kim, Joong Kyun; Kong, In-Soo; Kim, Sung-Koo; Park, Don-Hee

    2015-02-01

    This study employed a statistical methodology to investigate the optimization of conversion conditions and evaluate the reciprocal interaction of reaction factors related to the process of red-algae Gracilaria verrucosa conversion to sugars (glucose, galactose), levulinic acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) by acidic hydrolysis. Overall, the conditions optimized for glucose formation included a higher catalyst concentration than did those for galactose, and these conditions for galactose were similar to those for 5-HMF. Levulinic acid production, meanwhile, was optimized at a higher reaction temperature, a higher catalyst concentration, and a longer reaction time than was glucose, galactose or 5-HMF production. By this approach, the optimal yields (and reaction conditions) for glucose, galactose, levulinic acid, and 5-HMF were as follows: glucose 5.29 g/L (8.46 wt%) (reaction temperature 160 °C, catalyst concentration 1.92%, reaction time 20 min), galactose 18.38 g/L (29.4 wt%) (160 °C, 1.03%, 20 min), levulinic acid 14.65 g/L (18.64 wt%) (180.9 °C, 2.85%, 50 min), and 5-HMF 3.74 g/L (5.98 wt%) (160.5 °C, 1%, 20 min).

  6. A Pro to Gly mutation in the hinge of the arabinose-binding protein enhances binding and alters specificity. Sugar-binding and crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Vermersch, P S; Tesmer, J J; Lemon, D D; Quiocho, F A

    1990-09-25

    The L-arabinose-binding protein (ABP) of Escherichia coli consists structurally of two distinct globular domains connected by a hinge of three separate peptide segments. Arabinose is bound and completely sequestered within the deep cleft between the two domains. With reduced affinity, ABP also binds D-galactose (approximately 2-fold reduction) and D-fucose (approximately 40-fold reduction). Experiments have been conducted to explore the role in sugar binding of the hinge connecting the two domains of ABP. To increase the flexibility of the hinge region, a glycine was substituted for a proline at position 254 by site-directed mutagenesis. Unexpectedly, this mutation resulted in the dramatic enhancement of galactose binding over that of arabinose. The affinity of the mutant ABP for galactose increased by over 20-fold, while that for arabinose and fucose remained relatively unchanged. We have measured association and dissociation rates of the Gly-254 ABP with L-arabinose, D-galactose, and D-fucose and have determined the crystallographic structure of the protein complexed with each of the three sugars. Both the ligand-binding kinetic measurements and structure analysis indicate that the altered specificity is due to an effective increase in the rigidity of the hinge in the closed conformation which is induced upon galactose binding. Stabilizing contacts are formed between the strands of the hinge in the Gly-254 ABP when galactose is bound which are not found in complexes with the other sugars or the liganded wild-type protein.

  7. The structure of a glycopeptide purified from porcine thyroblobulin.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M; Egami, F

    1971-07-01

    1. The structure of a purified glycopeptide isolated from porcine thyroglobulin was studied by sequential hydrolysis with specific glycosidases, by periodate oxidation and by treatment with galactose oxidase. 2. Sequential hydrolysis with several combinations of neuraminidase, alpha-l-fucosidase, beta-d-galactosidase, beta-N-acetyl-d-glucosaminidase and alpha-d-mannosidase presented the evidence for the following structure. 3. The monosaccharide sequence of the peripheral moiety of the heteropolysaccharide chain was sialic acid-->galactose-->N-acetylglucosamine. Some of the galactose residues were non-reducing end-groups with the sequence galactose-->N-acetylglucosamine. 4. After removal of the peripheral moiety composed of sialic acid, fucose, galactose and N-acetylglucosamine, alpha-mannosidase released 1.4mol of mannose/mol of glycopeptide, indicating that two of the three mannose residues were located between peripheral N-acetylglucosamine and internal N-acetylglucosamine or mannose. 5. Periodate oxidation and sodium borohydride reduction confirmed the results obtained by enzymic degradation and gave information concerning the position of substitution. 6. Based on the results obtained by enzymic hydrolysis and periodate oxidation together with the treatment with galactose oxidase, a structure is proposed for the glycopeptide.

  8. Mechanisms of microbial movement in subsurface materials.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, P J; Sharma, P; Jenneman, G E; McInerney, M J

    1989-01-01

    The biological factors important in the penetration of Escherichia coli through anaerobic, nutrient-saturated, Ottawa sand-packed cores were studied under static conditions. In cores saturated with galactose-peptone medium, motile strains of E. coli penetrated four times faster than mutants defective only in flagellar synthesis. Motile, nonchemotactic mutants penetrated the cores faster than did the chemotactic parental strain. This, plus the fact that a chemotactic galactose mutant penetrated cores saturated with peptone medium at the same rate with or without a galactose gradient, indicates that chemotaxis may not be required for bacterial penetration through unconsolidated porous media. The effect of gas production on bacterial penetration was studied by using motile and nonmotile E. coli strains together with their respective isogenic non-gas-producing mutants. No differences were observed between the penetration rates of the two motile strains through cores saturated with peptone medium with or without galactose. However, penetration of both nonmotile strains was detected only with galactose. The nonmotile, gas-producing strain penetrated cores saturated with galactose-peptone medium five to six times faster than did the nonmotile, non-gas-producing mutant, which indicates that gas production is an important mechanism for the movement of nonmotile bacteria through unconsolidated porous media. For motile strains, the penetration rate decreased with increasing galactose concentrations in the core and with decreasing inoculum sizes. Also, motile strains with the faster growth rates had faster penetration rates. These results imply that, for motile bacteria, the penetration rate is regulated by the in situ bacterial growth rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2552920

  9. Phosphorylation of Streptococcus salivarius Lactose Permease (LacS) by HPr(His∼P) and HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P) and Effects on Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Christian; Cochu, Armelle; Lemay, Jean-Dominique; Roy, Denis; Vaillancourt, Katy; Frenette, Michel; Moineau, Sylvain; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The oral bacterium Streptococcus salivarius takes up lactose via a transporter called LacS that shares 95% identity with the LacS from Streptococcus thermophilus, a phylogenetically closely related organism. S. thermophilus releases galactose into the medium during growth on lactose. Expulsion of galactose is mediated via LacS and stimulated by phosphorylation of the transporter by HPr(His∼P), a phosphocarrier of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS). Unlike S. thermophilus, S. salivarius grew on lactose without expelling galactose and took up galactose and lactose concomitantly when it is grown in a medium containing both sugars. Analysis of the C-terminal end of S. salivarius LacS revealed a IIA-like domain (IIALacS) almost identical to the IIA domain of S. thermophilus LacS. Experiments performed with purified proteins showed that S. salivarius IIALacS was reversibly phosphorylated on a histidine residue at position 552 not only by HPr(His∼P) but also by HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P), a doubly phosphorylated form of HPr present in large amounts in rapidly growing S. salivarius cells. Two other major S. salivarius PTS proteins, IIABLMan and IIABHMan, were unable to phosphorylate IIALacS. The effect of LacS phosphorylation on growth was studied with strain G71, an S. salivarius enzyme I-negative mutant that cannot synthesize HPr(His∼P) or HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P). These results indicated that (i) the wild-type and mutant strains had identical generation times on lactose, (ii) neither strain expelled galactose during growth on lactose, (iii) both strains metabolized lactose and galactose concomitantly when grown in a medium containing both sugars, and (iv) the growth of the mutant was slightly reduced on galactose. PMID:14617640

  10. Polygenic evolution of a sugar specialization tradeoff in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Roop, Jeremy I.; Chang, Kyu Chul; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of novel traits can involve many mutations scattered throughout the genome1,2. Detecting and validating such a suite of alleles, particularly if they arose long ago, remains a key challenge in evolutionary genetics1-3. Here we dissect an evolutionary tradeoff of unprecedented genetic complexity between long-diverged species. When cultured in 1% glucose medium supplemented with galactose, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not S. bayanus or other Saccharomyces species, delayed commitment to galactose metabolism until glucose was exhausted. Promoters of seven galactose (GAL) metabolic genes from S. cerevisiae, when introduced together into S. bayanus, largely recapitulated the delay phenotype in 1% glucose-galactose medium, and most had partial effects when tested in isolation. Variation in GAL coding regions also contributed to the delay when tested individually in 1% glucose-galactose medium. When combined, S. cerevisiae GAL coding regions gave rise to profound growth defects in the S. bayanus background. In medium containing 2.5% glucose supplemented with galactose, wild-type S. cerevisiae repressed GAL gene expression and had a robust growth advantage relative to S. bayanus; transgenesis of S. cerevisiae GAL promoter alleles or GAL coding regions was sufficient for partial reconstruction of these phenotypes. S. cerevisiae GAL genes thus encode a regulatory program of slow induction and avid repression, and a fitness detriment during the glucose-galactose transition but a benefit when glucose is in excess. Together, these results make clear that genetic mapping of complex phenotypes is within reach, even in deeply diverged species. PMID:26863195

  11. Manganese-Based Superoxide Dismutase Mimics Modify Both Acute and Long-Term Outcome Severity in a Drosophila melanogaster Model of Classic Galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P.; Ryan, Emily L.; Hopson, Marquise L.; Bishop, Heather M.; Weitner, Tin; Tovmasyan, Artak; Spasojevic, Ivan; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Liang, Yongliang; Jones, Dean P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The goal of this study was to use two manganese (Mn)-based superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimics to test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species contribute to both acute and long-term outcomes in a galactose-1P uridylyltransferase (GALT)-null Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Results: We tested the impact of each of two Mn porphyrin SOD mimics, MnTnBuOE-2-PyP5+, and MnTE-2-PyP5+, (i) on survival of GALT-null Drosophila larvae reared in the presence versus absence of dietary galactose and (ii) on the severity of a long-term movement defect in GALT-null adult flies. Both SOD mimics conferred a significant survival benefit to GALT-null larvae exposed to galactose but not to controls or to GALT-null larvae reared in the absence of galactose. One mimic, MnTE-2-PyP5+, also largely rescued a galactose-independent long-term movement defect otherwise seen in adult GALT-null flies. The survival benefit of both SOD mimics occurred despite continued accumulation of elevated galactose-1P in the treated animals, and studies of thiolated proteins demonstrated that in both the presence and absence of dietary galactose MnTE-2-PyP5+ largely prevented the elevated protein oxidative damage otherwise seen in GALT-null animals relative to controls. Innovation and Conclusions: Our results confirm oxidative stress as a mediator of acute galactose sensitivity in GALT-null Drosophila larvae and demonstrate for the first time that oxidative stress may also contribute to galactose-independent adult outcomes in GALT deficiency. Finally, our results demonstrate for the first time that both MnTnBuOE-2-PyP5+ and MnTE-2-PyP5+ are bioavailable and effective when administered through an oral route in a D. melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2361–2371. PMID:23758052

  12. Inactivation of Metabolic Genes Causes Short- and Long-Range dys-Regulation in Escherichia coli Metabolic Network

    PubMed Central

    Barupal, Dinesh Kumar; Lee, Sang Jun; Karoly, Edward D.; Adhya, Sankar

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic network in E. coli can be severely affected by the inactivation of metabolic genes that are required to catabolize a nutrient (D-galactose). We hypothesized that the resulting accumulation of small molecules can yield local as well as systemic effects on the metabolic network. Analysis of metabolomics data in wild-type and D-galactose non-utilizing mutants, galT, galU and galE, reveal the large metabolic differences between the wild-type and the mutants when the strains were grown in D-galactose. Network mapping suggested that the enzymatic defects affected the metabolic modules located both at short- and long-ranges from the D-galactose metabolic module. These modules suggested alterations in glutathione, energy, nucleotide and lipid metabolism and disturbed carbon to nitrogen ratio in mutant strains. The altered modules are required for normal cell growth for the wild-type strain, explaining why the cell growth is inhibited in the mutants in the presence of D-galactose. Identification of these distance-based dys-regulations would enhance the systems level understanding of metabolic networks of microorganisms having importance in biomedical and biotechnological research. PMID:24363806

  13. The size, shape and specificity of the sugar-binding site of the jacalin-related lectins is profoundly affected by the proteolytic cleavage of the subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Houlès Astoul, Corinne; Peumans, Willy J; van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Bourne, Yves; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Mannose-specific lectins with high sequence similarity to jacalin and the Maclura pomifera agglutinin have been isolated from species belonging to the families Moraceae, Convolvulaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Poaceae and Musaceae. Although these novel mannose-specific lectins are undoubtedly related to the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins there are several important differences. Apart from the obvious differences in specificity, the mannose- and galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins differ in what concerns their biosynthesis and processing, intracellular location and degree of oligomerization of the protomers. Taking into consideration that the mannose-specific lectins are widely distributed in higher plants, whereas their galactose-specific counterparts are confined to a subgroup of the Moraceae sp. one can reasonably assume that the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins are a small-side group of the main family. The major change that took place in the structure of the binding site of the diverging Moraceae lectins concerns a proteolytic cleavage close to the N-terminus of the protomer. To corroborate the impact of this change, the specificity of jacalin was re-investigated using surface plasmon resonance analysis. This approach revealed that in addition to galactose and N -acetylgalactosamine, the carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin extends to mannose, glucose, N -acetylmuramic acid and N -acetylneuraminic acid. Owing to this broad carbohydrate-binding specificity, jacalin is capable of recognizing complex glycans from plant pathogens or predators. PMID:12169094

  14. The size, shape and specificity of the sugar-binding site of the jacalin-related lectins is profoundly affected by the proteolytic cleavage of the subunits.

    PubMed

    Houlès Astoul, Corinne; Peumans, Willy J; van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Bourne, Yves; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    Mannose-specific lectins with high sequence similarity to jacalin and the Maclura pomifera agglutinin have been isolated from species belonging to the families Moraceae, Convolvulaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Poaceae and Musaceae. Although these novel mannose-specific lectins are undoubtedly related to the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins there are several important differences. Apart from the obvious differences in specificity, the mannose- and galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins differ in what concerns their biosynthesis and processing, intracellular location and degree of oligomerization of the protomers. Taking into consideration that the mannose-specific lectins are widely distributed in higher plants, whereas their galactose-specific counterparts are confined to a subgroup of the Moraceae sp. one can reasonably assume that the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins are a small-side group of the main family. The major change that took place in the structure of the binding site of the diverging Moraceae lectins concerns a proteolytic cleavage close to the N-terminus of the protomer. To corroborate the impact of this change, the specificity of jacalin was re-investigated using surface plasmon resonance analysis. This approach revealed that in addition to galactose and N -acetylgalactosamine, the carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin extends to mannose, glucose, N -acetylmuramic acid and N -acetylneuraminic acid. Owing to this broad carbohydrate-binding specificity, jacalin is capable of recognizing complex glycans from plant pathogens or predators.

  15. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediated hepatocyte targeting - strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anisha A; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-04-10

    Hepatocyte resident afflictions continue to affect the human population unabated. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is primarily expressed on hepatocytes and minimally on extra-hepatic cells. This makes it specifically attractive for receptor-mediated drug delivery with minimum concerns of toxicity. ASGPR facilitates internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and exhibits high affinity for carbohydrates specifically galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and glucose. Isomeric forms of sugar, galactose density and branching, spatial geometry and galactose linkages are key factors influencing ligand-receptor binding. Popular ligands for ASGPR mediated targeting are carbohydrate polymers, arabinogalactan and pullulan. Other ligands include galactose-bearing glycoproteins, glycopeptides and galactose modified polymers and lipids. Drug-ligand conjugates provide a viable strategy; nevertheless ligand-anchored nanocarriers provide an attractive option for ASGPR targeted delivery and are widely explored. The present review details various ligands and nanocarriers exploited for ASGPR mediated delivery of drugs to hepatocytes. Nanocarrier properties affecting ASGPR mediated uptake are discussed at length. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of ASGPR mediated targeting and applications in diagnostics. ASGPR mediated hepatocyte targeting provides great promise for improved therapy of hepatic afflictions.

  16. Structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Michalska, Karolina; Cuff, Marianne E.; Tesar, Christine; Feldmann, Brian; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-08-01

    The crystal structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from the De Ley–Doudoroff pathway of galactose metabolism has been determined at 2.1 Å resolution. In most organisms, efficient d-galactose utilization requires the highly conserved Leloir pathway that converts d-galactose to d-glucose 1-phosphate. However, in some bacterial and fungal species alternative routes of d-galactose assimilation have been identified. In the so-called De Ley–Doudoroff pathway, d-galactose is metabolized into pyruvate and d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in five consecutive reactions carried out by specific enzymes. The penultimate step in this pathway involves the phosphorylation of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate to 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate 6-phosphate catalyzed by 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase, with ATP serving as a phosphoryl-group donor. Here, a crystal structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from Klebsiella pneumoniae determined at 2.1 Å resolution is reported, the first structure of an enzyme from the De Ley–Doudoroff pathway. Structural comparison indicates that the enzyme belongs to the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/hsc70/actin) family of phosphotransferases. The protein is composed of two α/β domains, each of which contains a core common to all family members. Additional elements introduced between conserved structural motifs define the unique features of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase and possibly determine the biological function of the protein.

  17. The effect of uranyl nitrate on intestinal transfer of hexoses

    PubMed Central

    Newey, H.; Sanford, P. A.; Smyth, D. H.

    1966-01-01

    1. Uranyl nitrate in a concentration of 3 × 10-4 M caused reduction in mucosal transfer of glucose but not of galactose nor 3-O-methyl-glucose by sacs of rat everted intestine. At this concentration uranyl nitrate had little effect on glucose metabolism (measured by glucose disappearance). 2. Uranyl nitrate in a concentration of 3 × 10-3 M caused reduction in transfer of glucose, galactose, 3-O-methyl-glucose and fluid, and inhibited glucose metabolism. 3. Uranyl nitrate did not inhibit entry of glucose into the intestine under anaerobic conditions. 4. Glucose was found to inhibit or stimulate galactose transfer depending on the conditions. The inhibitory action is presumably by competition for a common carrier, whereas stimulation indicates that glucose metabolism can supply energy for galactose transfer. 5. It is suggested that there are two different routes for glucose in the cell, one of which is uranyl sensitive and not used by galactose, and the other is uranyl insensitive and shared by both hexoses. The implications of this are discussed in relation to transport and metabolism. PMID:5972151

  18. Galactans of Gracilaria pudumadamensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) of Indian waters.

    PubMed

    Kondaveeti, Stalin; Kumar, Sanjay; Ganesan, Meenakshi S; Siddhanta, Arup K

    2014-09-01

    Galactans from the Indian agarophyte Gracilaria pudumadamensis were extracted and characterized. The isolated native (GP(Native)) and alkali treated (GP(Alkali)) galactans were characterized by IR, 13C NMR, GC-MS and GPC. It was found that GP(Native) and GP(Alkali) were composed mainly of 3,6-anhydro L-galactose, 6-O-methylated D-galactose and galactose in various mole proportions (15.6:69.9:17.5 mole% for GP(Native) and 20.2:69.8:10.0 mole% for GP(Alkali)). The GP(Native) and GP(Alkali) exhibited low gel strengths (< 100 g/cm2) and high melting points (-76 degrees C), which may be due to the presence of high 6-O-Me-galactose contents. The latter, having low sulfate (2.1%), was by far the greatest 6-O-Me-galactose containing polysaccharide in a Gracilaria spp. reported in the literature. This methylated agar contained very low heavy metal ions estimated by inductively coupled plasma spectrophotometry (ICP). The results of this investigation would be useful in bioprospecting of agarophytes, especially those occurring in Indian waters and would be potentially useful in food, personal care and related domains.

  19. The bacteriophage kh receptor of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris KH is the rhamnose of the extracellular wall polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Valyasevi, R; Sandine, W E; Geller, B L

    1990-01-01

    A receptor for bacteriophages of lactic acid bacteria, including Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris KH, was found on the cell wall and not on the cell membrane, as determined by a phage-binding assay of sodium dodecyl sulfate- and mutanolysin-treated cell walls. The cell wall carbohydrates of L. lactis subsp. cremoris KH were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry and found to contain rhamnose, galactose, glucose and N-acetylglucosamine. Similar analysis of mutants that were reduced in the ability to bind phages kh, 643, c2, ml3, and 1 indicated that galactose was essential for binding all phages. In addition, rhamnose was required for binding phages kh and ml3. Inhibition studies of phage binding by using two different lectins with a specificity for galactose indicated that phage kh may not bind directly to galactose. Rather, galactose may be an essential structural component located in the vicinity of the receptor. Incubation of any of the five phages with rhamnose or of phage kh with purified cell walls inactivated the phages. Inactivation required divalent cations and was irreversible. Inactivation of phages was stereospecific for rhamnose, as neither L-(+)- nor D-(-)-fucose (the stereoisomers of rhamnose) inhibited the phage. Furthermore, phage infection of a culture was completely inhibited by the addition of rhamnose to the medium. Therefore, the receptor for phage kh appears to be a rhamnose component of the extracellular wall polysaccharide. PMID:2116761

  20. The biosynthetic pathway of vitamin C in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, G L; Jones, M A; Smirnoff, N

    1998-05-28

    Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) has important antioxidant and metabolic functions in both plants and animals, but humans, and a few other animal species, have lost the capacity to synthesize it. Plant-derived ascorbate is thus the major source of vitamin C in the human diet. Although the biosynthetic pathway of L-ascorbic acid in animals is well understood, the plant pathway has remained unknown-one of the few primary plant metabolic pathways for which this is the case. L-ascorbate is abundant in plants (found at concentrations of 1-5 mM in leaves and 25 mM in chloroplasts) and may have roles in photosynthesis and transmembrane electron transport. We found that D-mannose and L-galactose are efficient precursors for ascorbate synthesis and are interconverted by GDP-D-mannose-3,5-epimerase. We have identified an enzyme in pea and Arabidopsis thaliana, L-galactose dehydrogenase, that catalyses oxidation of L-galactose to L-galactono-1,4-lactone. We propose an ascorbate biosynthesis pathway involving GDP-D-mannose, GDP-L-galactose, L-galactose and L-galactono-1,4-lactone, and have synthesized ascorbate from GDP-D-mannose by way of these intermediates in vitro. The definition of this biosynthetic pathway should allow engineering of plants for increased ascorbate production, thus increasing their nutritional value and stress tolerance.

  1. Mediated amperometry reveals different modes of yeast responses to sugars.

    PubMed

    Garjonyte, Rasa; Melvydas, Vytautas; Malinauskas, Albertas

    2016-02-01

    Menadione-mediated amperometry at carbon paste electrodes modified with various yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii and Debaryomyces hansenii) was employed to monitor redox activity inside the yeast cells induced by glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose or galactose. Continuous measurements revealed distinct modes (transient or gradually increasing) of the current development during the first 2 to 3 min after subjection to glucose, fructose and sucrose at electrodes containing S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces strains. Different modes (increasing or decreasing) of the current development after yeast subjection to galactose at electrodes with S. cerevisiae or D. hansenii and at electrodes with C. pulcherrima and P. guilliermondii suggested different mechanisms of galactose assimilation. PMID:26523505

  2. Influence of Grape Maturity on Complex Carbohydrate Composition of Red Sparkling Wines.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lapuente, Leticia; Apolinar-Valiente, Rafael; Guadalupe, Zenaida; Ayestarán, Belén; Pérez-Magariño, Silvia; Williams, Pascale; Doco, Thierry

    2016-06-22

    This paper studied how grape maturity affected complex carbohydrate composition during red sparkling wine making and wine aging. Grape ripening stage (premature and mature grapes) showed a significant impact on the content, composition, and evolution of polysaccharides and oligosaccharides of sparkling wines. Polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose, mannoproteins, rhamnogalacturonans II, and oligosaccharides in base wines increased with maturity. For both maturity stages, polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose, and the glucuronic acid glycosyl residue of the oligosaccharides were the major carbohydrates detected in all vinification stages. The total glycosyl content of oligosaccharides decreased during the whole period of aging on yeast lees. The reduction of polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose and rhamnogalacturonans type II during the aging was more pronounced in mature samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the polysaccharide and oligosaccharide composition of red sparkling wines.

  3. Influence of Grape Maturity on Complex Carbohydrate Composition of Red Sparkling Wines.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lapuente, Leticia; Apolinar-Valiente, Rafael; Guadalupe, Zenaida; Ayestarán, Belén; Pérez-Magariño, Silvia; Williams, Pascale; Doco, Thierry

    2016-06-22

    This paper studied how grape maturity affected complex carbohydrate composition during red sparkling wine making and wine aging. Grape ripening stage (premature and mature grapes) showed a significant impact on the content, composition, and evolution of polysaccharides and oligosaccharides of sparkling wines. Polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose, mannoproteins, rhamnogalacturonans II, and oligosaccharides in base wines increased with maturity. For both maturity stages, polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose, and the glucuronic acid glycosyl residue of the oligosaccharides were the major carbohydrates detected in all vinification stages. The total glycosyl content of oligosaccharides decreased during the whole period of aging on yeast lees. The reduction of polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose and rhamnogalacturonans type II during the aging was more pronounced in mature samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the polysaccharide and oligosaccharide composition of red sparkling wines. PMID:27226011

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of neoagarobiose hydrolase from Saccharophagus degradans 2-40

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Saeyoung; Lee, Jonas Yun; Ha, Sung Chul; Jung, Jina; Shin, Dong Hae; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2009-01-01

    Many agarolytic bacteria degrade agar polysaccharide into the disaccharide unit neoagarobiose [O-3,6-anhydro-α-l-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)-d-galactose] using various β-agarases. Neoagarobiose hydrolase is an enzyme that acts on the α-­1,3 linkage in neoagarobiose to yield d-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose. This activity is essential in both the metabolism of agar by agarolytic bacteria and the production of fermentable sugars from agar biomass for bioenergy production. Neoagarobiose hydrolase from the marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 129.83, b = 76.81, c = 90.11 Å, β = 101.86°. The crystals diffracted to 1.98 Å resolution and possibly contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:20054134

  5. Gene organization and structure of the Streptomyces lividans gal operon.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, C W; Fornwald, J A; Schmidt, F J; Rosenberg, M; Brawner, M E

    1988-01-01

    We present the gene organization and DNA sequence of the Streptomyces lividans galactose utilization genes. Complementation of Escherichia coli galE, galT, or galK mutants and DNA sequence analysis were used to demonstrate that the galactose utilization genes are organized within an operon with the gene order galT, galE, and galK. Comparison of the inferred protein sequences for the S. lividans gal gene products to the corresponding E. coli and Saccharomyces carlbergensis sequences identified regions of structural homology within each of the galactose utilization enzymes. Finally, we discuss a potential relationship between the gene organization of the operon and the functional roles of the gal enzymes in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:3335481

  6. Structural characterization and effect on anti-angiogenic activity of a fucoidan from Sargassum fusiforme.

    PubMed

    Cong, Qifei; Chen, Huanjun; Liao, Wenfeng; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Peipei; Qin, Yi; Dong, Qun; Ding, Kan

    2016-01-20

    A fucoidan FP08S2 was isolated from the boiling-water extract of Sargassum fusiforme, purified by CaCl2 precipitation and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and Sephacryl S-300. FP08S2 contained fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, glucuronic acid, and 20.8% sulfate. The sulfate groups were attached to diverse positions of fucose, xylose, mannose, and galactose residues. The backbone of FP08S2 consisted of alternate 1,2-linked α-D-Manp and 1,4-linked β-D-GlcpA. Sugar composition analysis and ESI-MS revealed that the oligosaccharides from branches contained fucose, xylose, galactose, glucuronic acid and sulfate. FP08S2 could significantly inhibit tube formation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) dose-dependently. These results suggested that the fucoidan FP08S2 from brown seaweeds S. fusiforme could be a potent anti-angiogenic agent.

  7. Conditions required for citrate utilization during growth of Lactobacillus casei ATCC334 in chemically defined medium and cheddar cheese extract.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñiz, Ilenys; Steele, James L

    2006-10-01

    Conditions required for citrate utilization by Lactobacillus casei ATCC334 were identified. Citrate was utilized by this microorganism in modified Chemically Defined Media (mCDM) as an energy source, solely in the presence of limiting concentrations of galactose. The presence of glucose inhibited citrate utilization by this microorganism even when added in limiting concentrations. Utilization of citrate occurred at pH 6.0 +/- 0.2 and 5.1 +/- 0.2. Together these observations suggest that citrate is an energy source for L. casei in ripening cheese only when the residual levels of carbohydrate post-fermentation are limiting (<2.5 mM), and lactose or glucose are absent. However, citrate utilization by this organism was observed in Cheddar cheese extract (CCE), which naturally contains both lactose and galactose, at the beginning of late-logarithmic phase and regardless of the galactose concentration present in the media.

  8. Enzymic oxidation of monoclonal antibodies by soluble and immobilized bifunctional enzyme complexes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B; Koppel, R; Schwartz, F; Fleminger, G

    1990-06-27

    Site-specific modification of monoclonal antibodies was achieved by oxidation of the carbohydrate moieties of antibodies which are located remote from the antigen binding sites. Sialic acid and galactose are terminal sugars of these carbohydrate chains. Concomitant treatment of the antibodies with neuraminidase and galactose oxidase generated aldehyde groups in the oligosaccharide moieties of immunoglobulins which reacted selectively with amino or hydrazide groups of the matrix. Subsequent immobilization of neuraminidase and galactose oxidase on Eupergit C-adipic dihydrazide proved to be an efficient and selective system for the enzymic oxidation of the monoclonal antibodies without impairing their immunological activity. Oriented immobilization of enzymically oxidized monoclonal antibodies on hydrazide or amino Eupergit C derivatives thus leads to the formation of antibody matrix conjugates which possess high antigen-binding activities. PMID:2119387

  9. Acid-catalyzed conversion of mono- and poly-sugars into platform chemicals: effects of molecular structure of sugar substrate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xun; Wu, Liping; Wang, Yi; Song, Yao; Mourant, Daniel; Gunawan, Richard; Gholizadeh, Mortaza; Li, Chun-Zhu

    2013-04-01

    Hydrolysis/pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass always produces a mixture of sugars with distinct structures as intermediates or products. This study tried to elucidate the effects of molecular structure of sugars on their acid-catalyzed conversions in ethanol/water. Location of carbonyl group in sugars (fructose versus glucose) and steric configuration of hydroxyl groups (glucose versus galactose) significantly affected yields of levulinic acid/ester (fructose>glucose>galactose). The dehydration of fructose to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural produces much less soluble polymer than that from glucose and galactose, which results in high yields of levulinic acid/ester from fructose. Anhydrate sugar such as levoglucosan tends to undergo the undesirable decomposition to form less levulinic acid/ester. Catalytic behaviors of the poly-sugars (sucrose, maltose, raffinose, β-cyclodextrins) were determined much by their basic units. However, their big molecular sizes create the steric hindrance that significantly affects their followed conversion over solid acid catalyst. PMID:23454803

  10. Six fucose-α(1-2) sugars and α-fucose assigned in the human brain using in vivo two-dimensional MRS.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Carolyn; Quadrelli, Scott; Lin, Alexander; Ramadan, Saadallah

    2015-03-01

    A growing body of literature has indicated that fucose-α(1-2)-galactose sugars are implicated in the molecular mechanisms that underlie neuronal development, learning and memory in the human brain. An understanding of the in vivo roles played by these terminal fucose residues has been hampered by the lack of technology to non-invasively monitor their levels in the human brain. We have implemented in vivo two-dimensional MRS technology to examine the human brain in a 3-T clinical MR scanner, and report that six fucose-α(1-2)-galactose residues and free α-fucose are available for inspection. Fucose-α(1-3)-galactose residues cannot yet be assigned using this technology as they resonate under the water resonance. This new application offers an unprecedented insight into the molecular mechanisms by which fucosylated sugars contribute to neuronal processes and how they alter during development, ageing and disease.

  11. Characterization of cellulose and other exopolysaccharides produced from Gluconacetobacter strains.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-22

    This study characterized the cellulosic and non-cellulosic exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by four Gluconacetobacter strains. The yields of bacterial cellulose and water-soluble polysaccharides were dependent on both carbon source and Gluconacetobacter strain. The carbon substrate also affected the composition of the free EPS. When galactose served as an exclusive carbon source, Gluconacetobacter xylinus (G. xylinus) ATCC 53524 and ATCC 700178 produced a distinct alkaline stable crystalline product, which influenced the crystallization of cellulose. Gluconacetobacter hansenii (G. hansenii) ATCC 23769 and ATCC 53582, however, did not exhibit any significant change in cellulose crystal properties when galactose was used as the carbon source. Microscopic observation further confirmed significant incorporation of EPS into the cellulose composites. The cellulosic network produced from galactose medium showed distinctive morphological and structural features compared to that from glucose medium. PMID:25439946

  12. Structure of the oligosaccharides isolated from Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC. seed polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Himani; Gupta, P K; Soni, P L

    2014-01-30

    A water soluble polysaccharide isolated from Prosopis juliflora seed was purified and major homogenous fraction obtained by GPC. Complete hydrolysis of the polysaccharide followed by paper chromatography and GLC analysis indicated the presence of d-galactose and d-mannose in the ratio 1:1.10, respectively. Partial hydrolysis of the polysaccharide furnished one hepta-(I), one octa-(II) and nona-(III) saccharides. Hydrolysis of oligosaccharide I, II and III followed by GLC analysis furnished d-galactose and d-mannose in the ratio 3:4, 3:5 and 5:4, respectively. Methylation analysis, periodate oxidation and (1)H NMR spectral studies of oligosaccharides indicated the presence of (1→4) mannose units linked to (1→6) galactose units.

  13. Production of rare sugars from common sugars in subcritical aqueous ethanol.

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-Ming; Kobayashi, Takashi; Adachi, Shuji

    2015-05-15

    A new isomerization reaction was developed to synthesize rare ketoses. D-tagatose, D-xylulose, and D-ribulose were obtained in the maximum yields of 24%, 38%, and 40%, respectively, from the corresponding aldoses, D-galactose, D-xylose, and D-ribose, by treating the aldoses with 80% (v/v) subcritical aqueous ethanol at 180°C. The maximum productivity of D-tagatose was ca. 80 g/(Lh). Increasing the concentration of ethanol significantly increased the isomerization of D-galactose. Variation in the reaction temperature did not significantly affect the production of D-tagatose from D-galactose. Subcritical aqueous ethanol converted both 2,3-threo and 2,3-erythro aldoses to the corresponding C-2 ketoses in high yields. Thus, the treatment of common aldoses in subcritical aqueous ethanol can be regarded as a new method to synthesize the corresponding rare sugars.

  14. Lectins in fish skin: do they play a role in host-monogenean interactions?