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Sample records for galactosemias

  1. Galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Arn, Pamela H.

    2003-07-01

    Despite the dramatic response of sick neonates with galactosemia to the withdrawal of galactose from the diet, over the long-term, complications, including learning disorders, verbal apraxia, and ataxia, often develop. It is clear that, although lifelong galactose restriction remains the basis of treatment for this disease, additional treatment methods are needed. The neurologist familiar with galactosemia can assist in diagnosis of neonates presenting with central nervous system symptoms. Familiarity with the long-term neurologic consequences of galactosemia can help the neurologist assist the family with prognostic information and to avoid unnecessary tests when complications occur.

  2. Galactosemia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... galactosemia is unable to use (metabolize) the simple sugar galactose, which reaches high levels in the body, causing damage to the liver, central nervous system and various other body systems. An infant with ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: galactosemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... mutations in a particular gene and affect different enzymes involved in breaking down galactose. Classic galactosemia , also ... cause galactosemia . These genes provide instructions for making enzymes that are essential for processing galactose obtained from ...

  4. Molecular screening in galactosemia

    SciTech Connect

    Elsas, L.J.; Singh, R.; Fernhoff, P.M.

    1994-09-01

    Classical galactosemia (G/G) is caused by the absence of galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) activity while the Duarte allele produces partial impairment and a specific biochemical phenotype. Cloning and sequencing of the human GALT gene has enabled the identification of prevalent mutations for both Classical and Duarte alleles. The G allele is caused by a Q188R codon mutation in exon 6 in 70% of a Caucasian population while the D allele is caused by an N134D codon mutation in exon 10. Since the Q188R sequence creates a new Hpa II site and the N314D sequence creates a new Sin I site, it is relatively easy to screen for both mutations by multiplex PCR and restriction digest. Here we describe a method for detection of new mutations producing impaired GALT. Patient DNAs are subjected to SSCP (single strand conformational polymorphism) analysis of their 11 GALT exons. Direct sequencing of the exons targeted by SSCP has revealed many codon changes: IVSC 956 (a splice acceptor site loss), S135L, V151A, E203K, A320T, and Y323D. Two of these codon changes, V151A and S135L, have been confirmed as mutations by finding impaired GALT activity in a yeast expression system. We conclude that molecular screening of GALT DNA will clarify the structural biology of GALT and the pathophysiology of galactosemia.

  5. The molecular biology of galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Elsas, L J; Lai, K

    1998-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of galactose 1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT). Although the potentially lethal, neonatal hepatotoxic syndrome is prevented by newborn screening and galactose restriction, long-term outcome for older patients with galactosemia remains problematic. After the cloning and sequencing of the GALT gene, more than 130 mutations in the GALT gene have been associated with GALT deficiency; this review relates them to function and clinical outcome. Two common mutations, Q188R and K285N, account for more than 70% of G alleles in the white population and are associated with classic galactosemia and impaired GALT function. In the black population, S135L accounts for 62% of the alleles causing galactosemia and is associated with good outcomes. A large 5 kb deletion in the GALT gene is found in Ashkenazim Jews. The Duarte galactosemia variant is caused by N314D. Homozygosity for N314D reduces GALT activity to 50%. When either E203K or a 1721C-->T transition (Los Angeles variant) are present in cis with N314D, GALT activity reverts to normal. In this review, we discuss the structural biology of these mutations as they affect both the GALT enzyme and patient outcome.

  6. Fertility preservation in female classic galactosemia patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Almost every female classic galactosemia patient develops primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) as a diet-independent complication of the disease. This is a major concern for patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The unique pathophysiology of classic galactosemia with a severely reduced follicle pool at an early age requires an adjusted approach. In this article recommendations for physicians based on current knowledge concerning galactosemia and fertility preservation are made. Fertility preservation is only likely to be successful in very young prepubertal patients. In this group, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is currently the only available technique. However, this technique is not ready for clinical application, it is considered experimental and reduces the ovarian reserve. Fertility preservation at an early age also raises ethical questions that should be taken into account. In addition, spontaneous conception despite POI is well described in classic galactosemia. The uncertainty surrounding fertility preservation and the significant chance of spontaneous pregnancy warrant counseling towards conservative application of these techniques. We propose that fertility preservation should only be offered with appropriate institutional research ethics approval to classic galactosemia girls at a young prepubertal age. PMID:23866841

  7. Galactosemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Can Use April May Calendar Liver Lowdown Mar 2014 Calendar of Events In The News Academic ... 2016 Calendar Jan Feb 2016 recipe Liver Lowdown Mar/Apr 2016 Liver Lowdown August 2016 Know Your ...

  8. Galactosemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood culture for bacterial infection ( E coli sepsis ) Enzyme activity in the red blood cells Ketones in the urine Prenatal diagnosis by directly measuring the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase "Reducing substances" in ...

  9. A case of galactosemia misdiagnosed as cow's milk intolerance.

    PubMed

    Della Casa, Roberto; Ungaro, Carla; Acampora, Emma; Pignata, Claudio; Vajro, Pietro; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Santamaria, Francesca; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2012-09-19

    We report on a female patient affected by galactosemia in whom the diagnosis was obscured by the concomitant presence of manifestations suggesting a cow's milk intolerance. This case exemplifies the problems in reaching a correct diagnosis in patients with metabolic diseases.

  10. The male reproductive system in classic galactosemia: cryptorchidism and low semen volume.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Cynthia S; Welt, Corrine K; Dumoulin, John C M; Robben, Simon G F; Gordon, Catherine M; Dunselman, Gerard A J; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Berry, Gerard T

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies examining reproductive parameters in men with galactosemia have inconsistently demonstrated abnormalities. We hypothesized that men with galactosemia may demonstrate evidence of reproductive dysfunction. Pubertal history, physical examination, hormone levels and semen analyses were examined in 26 males with galactosemia and compared to those in 46 controls. The prevalence of cryptorchidism was higher in men with galactosemia than in the general population [11.6% vs. 1.0% (95%CI: 0.75-1.26; p <0.001)]. Testosterone (461±125 vs. 532± 33 ng%; p=0.04), inhibin B (144±66 vs. 183±52 pg/mL; p=0.002) and sperm concentration (46±36 vs. 112±75×10(6) spermatozoa/mL; p=0.01) were lower and SHBG was higher (40.7±21.5 vs 26.7±14.6; p=0.002) in men with galactosemia compared to controls. Semen volume was below normal in seven out of 12 men with galactosemia. Men with galactosemia have a higher than expected prevalence of cryptorchidism and low semen volumes. The subtle decrease in testosterone and inhibin B levels and sperm count may indicate mild defects in Sertoli and Leydig cell function, but does not point towards severe infertility causing reproductive impairment. Follow-up studies are needed to further determine the clinical consequences of these abnormalities.

  11. Innovative Therapy for Classic Galactosemia - Tale of Two HTS

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M; Odejinmi, SI; Vankayalapati, H; Wierenga, K; Lai, K

    2011-01-01

    Classic Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), one of the key enzymes in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. While the neonatal morbidity and mortality of the disease are now mostly prevented by newborn screening and galactose restriction, long-term outcome for older children and adults with this disorder remains unsatisfactory. The pathophysiology of Classic Galactosemia is complex, but there is convincing evidence that galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P) accumulation is a major, if not the sole pathogenic factor. Galactokinase (GALK) inhibition will eliminate the accumulation of gal-1P from both dietary sources and endogenous production, and efforts towards identification of therapeutic small molecule GALK inhibitors are reviewed in detail. Experimental and computational high-throughput screenings of compound libraries to identify GALK inhibitors have been conducted, and subsequent studies aimed to characterize, prioritize, as well as to optimize the identified positives have been implemented to improve the potency of promising compounds. Although none of the identified GALK inhibitors inhibit glucokinase and hexokinase, some of them cross-inhibit other related enzymes in the GHMP small molecule kinase superfamily. While this finding may render the on-going hit-to-lead process more challenging, there is growing evidence that such cross-inhibition could also lead to advances in antimicrobial and anti-cancer therapies. PMID:22018723

  12. Galactosemia: the good, the bad, and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2006-12-01

    Alpha-D-galactose is metabolized in species ranging from E. coli to mammals predominantly via a series of sequential reactions collectively known as the Leloir pathway. Deficiency of any one of these enzymes in humans results in a form of the inherited metabolic disorder, galactosemia, although the symptoms and severity depend upon the enzyme impaired, and the degree of functional deficiency (Tyfield and Walter, 2002, The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease. New York: McGraw Hill.). Studies of these enzymes, and the disorders associated with their loss, have led to a much deeper appreciation of the intricate and interwoven levels of regulation that govern their normal function. These insights have further identified likely mediators of outcome severity in patients, and have enabled a rational approach to the development of novel strategies of intervention. PMID:17001680

  13. Prevalence and Phenotype of Childhood Apraxia of Speech in Youth with Galactosemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Potter, Nancy L.; Strand, Edythe A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the authors address the hypothesis that the severe and persistent speech disorder reported in persons with galactosemia meets contemporary diagnostic criteria for Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). A positive finding for CAS in this rare metabolic disorder has the potential to impact treatment of persons with galactosemia…

  14. Functional and structural impact of the most prevalent missense mutations in classic galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana I; Trabuco, Matilde; Ramos, Ruben; Silva, Maria João; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Leandro, Paula; Rivera, Isabel; Vicente, João B

    2014-01-01

    Galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) is a key enzyme in galactose metabolism, particularly important in the neonatal period due to ingestion of galactose-containing milk. GALT deficiency results in the genetic disorder classic galactosemia, whose pathophysiology is still not fully elucidated. Whereas classic galactosemia has been hypothesized to result from GALT misfolding, a thorough functional–structural characterization of GALT most prevalent variants was still lacking, hampering the development of alternative therapeutic approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate the structural–functional effects of nine GALT mutations, four of which account for the vast majority of the mutations identified in galactosemic patients. Several methodologies were employed to evaluate the mutations' impact on GALT function, on the protein secondary and tertiary structures, and on the aggregation propensity. The major structural effect concerns disturbed propensity for aggregation, particularly striking for the p.Q188R variant, resulting from the most frequent (∼60%) allele at a worldwide scale. The absence of major effects at the secondary and tertiary structure levels suggests that the disturbed aggregation results from subtle perturbations causing a higher and/or longer exposure of hydrophobic residues in the variants as compared to WT GALT. The results herein described indicate a possible benefit from introducing proteostasis regulators and/or chemical/pharmacological chaperones to prevent the accumulation of protein aggregates, in new avenues of therapeutic research for classic galactosemia. PMID:25614870

  15. Developmental Defects in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model for Type III Galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    Brokate-Llanos, Ana M.; Monje, José M.; Murdoch, Piedad del Socorro; Muñoz, Manuel J.

    2014-01-01

    Type III galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by reduced activity of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase, which participates in galactose metabolism and the generation of various UDP-sugar species. We characterized gale-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that a complete loss-of-function mutation is lethal, as has been hypothesized for humans, whereas a nonlethal partial loss-of-function allele causes a variety of developmental abnormalities, likely resulting from the impairment of the glycosylation process. We also observed that gale-1 mutants are hypersensitive to galactose as well as to infections. Interestingly, we found interactions between gale-1 and the unfolded protein response. PMID:25298520

  16. Galactose content of legumes, caseinates, and some hard cheeses: implications for diet treatment of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Van Calcar, Sandra C; Bernstein, Laurie E; Rohr, Frances J; Yannicelli, Steven; Berry, Gerard T; Scaman, Christine H

    2014-02-12

    There are inconsistent reports on the lactose and/or galactose content of some foods traditionally restricted from the diet for classic galactosemia. Therefore, samples of cheeses, caseinates, and canned black, pinto, kidney, and garbanzo beans were analyzed for free galactose content using HPLC with refractive index or pulsed amperometric detection. Galactose concentrations in several hard and aged cheeses and three mild/medium Cheddars, produced by smaller local dairies, was <10 mg/100 g sample compared to 55.4 mg/100 g sample in four sharp Cheddars produced by a multinational producer. Galactose in sodium and calcium caseinate ranged from undetectable to 95.5 mg/100 g sample. Free galactose level in garbanzo beans was lower than previously reported at 24.6 mg/100 g sample; black beans contained 5.3 mg/100 g, and free galactose was not detected in red kidney or pinto beans. These data provide a basis for recommending inclusion of legumes, caseinate-containing foods, and some aged hard cheeses that had been previously restricted in the diet for individuals with galactosemia.

  17. Galactose content of legumes, caseinates, and some hard cheeses: implications for diet treatment of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Van Calcar, Sandra C; Bernstein, Laurie E; Rohr, Frances J; Yannicelli, Steven; Berry, Gerard T; Scaman, Christine H

    2014-02-12

    There are inconsistent reports on the lactose and/or galactose content of some foods traditionally restricted from the diet for classic galactosemia. Therefore, samples of cheeses, caseinates, and canned black, pinto, kidney, and garbanzo beans were analyzed for free galactose content using HPLC with refractive index or pulsed amperometric detection. Galactose concentrations in several hard and aged cheeses and three mild/medium Cheddars, produced by smaller local dairies, was <10 mg/100 g sample compared to 55.4 mg/100 g sample in four sharp Cheddars produced by a multinational producer. Galactose in sodium and calcium caseinate ranged from undetectable to 95.5 mg/100 g sample. Free galactose level in garbanzo beans was lower than previously reported at 24.6 mg/100 g sample; black beans contained 5.3 mg/100 g, and free galactose was not detected in red kidney or pinto beans. These data provide a basis for recommending inclusion of legumes, caseinate-containing foods, and some aged hard cheeses that had been previously restricted in the diet for individuals with galactosemia. PMID:24456566

  18. Erroneous glucose recordings while using mutant variant of quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase glucometer in a child with galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vivek; Ramakrishnan, Anantharaman; Srinivasan, Ranjini; Sushma, K.; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Ayyar, Vageesh

    2013-01-01

    We report a 2-month-old child with galactosemia and falsely high glucose readings with a glucometer using mutant variant of quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (MutQ-GDH) chemistry. Potentially fatal hypoglycemia could have been induced in the child if insulin infusion had been initiated as per glycemic management protocol. Even though, the product information with the glucometer carries warning regarding interference by high galactose levels, the awareness regarding this interaction is generally poor in many practice settings. Although, false readings have been reported with glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinoline quinone (GDH-PQQ) glucometers, to our knowledge this is the first case report of a falsely high glucose reading due to high galactose in a proven case of galactosemia with a glucometer using the MutQ-GDH chemistry (a modified GDH-PQQ chemistry). Our experience has prompted us to write this case report and we suggest avoiding these glucometers in neonates and infants when a metabolic disease is suspected. PMID:24251189

  19. Cryptic residual GALT activity is a potential modifier of scholastic outcome in school age children with classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Emily L; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Taddeo, Elles; Gleason, Tyler J; Epstein, Michael P; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2013-11-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disorder that results from profound deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Although early diagnosis and rigorous dietary restriction of galactose prevent or resolve the potentially lethal acute symptoms, patients are at markedly increased risk of long-term complications including significant cognitive, speech, and behavioral difficulties, among other problems. The mechanisms that underlie these long-term complications remain unclear, as do the factors that modify their severity. Here we explored the scholastic and behavioral outcomes experienced by a cohort of 54 school age children with classic galactosemia. Data collected included survey responses from parents and teachers, school records including standardized test scores, and GALT genotype data used to estimate predicted residual GALT activity based on a yeast expression system. As expected, many but not all of the children in our study demonstrated speech, scholastic, and behavioral difficulties. Perhaps most striking, we found that predicted cryptic residual GALT activity, often below the threshold of detection of clinical assays, appeared to modify scholastic outcome. These data raise the intriguing possibility that cryptic GALT activity might also influence the severity of other long-term complications in classic galactosemia. PMID:23319291

  20. Differential phonological awareness skills in children with classic galactosemia: a descriptive study of four cases.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Fiona M; Coman, David J; Syrmis, Maryann; Kilcoyne, Sarah; Murdoch, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    Educational achievement, which for individuals with the metabolic disorder classic galactosemia (GAL) is significantly lower than in the wider population, correlates with self-reported quality of life. Phonological awareness skills underpin the development of literacy, and although literacy is a key contributor to successful academic outcomes, no study to date has investigated phonological awareness skills in children with GAL. This study investigated phonological awareness (PA) in four school-aged children with the disorder, two of whom were siblings. Age range for the children was 7 years 7 months to 9 years 2 months. Each child was assessed with the Phonological Awareness criterion-referenced subtest from the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Fourth Edition. Included in the data for analysis was each child's performance measures obtained from their most recent assessment of cognitive and lexical development. A number of descriptive analyses were undertaken on the data. One child, who met her age criterion for PA, had cognitive and lexical development skills in the average range. The remaining three children failed to meet their age criteria. Although these three children presented with clinically similar cognitive and lexical development skills, disparate PA skills were identified. The PA skills of one of the sibling pair were notably more advanced than his older sibling. The limitations of relying on behavioural test results in children with GAL to predict those most at risk of reduced skill development are discussed in terms future research directions.

  1. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L.; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants. PMID:27005423

  2. Galactosemia: A strategy to identify new biochemical phenotypes and molecular genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Elsas, L.J.; Langley, S.; Steele, E.; Evinger, J.; Brown, A.; Singh, R.; Fernhoff, P.; Hjelm, L.N.; Dembure, P.P.; Fridovich-Keil, J.L.

    1995-03-01

    We describe a stratagem for identifying new mutations in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene. GALT enzyme activity and isoforms were defined in erythrocytes from probands and their first-degree relatives. If the biochemical phenotypes segregated in an autosomal recesssive pattern, we screened for common mutations by using multiplex PCR and restriction endonuclease digestions. If common mutant alleles were not present, the 11 exons of the GALT gene were amplified by PCR, and variations from the normal nucleotide sequences were identified by SSCP. The suspected region(s) was then analyzed by direct DNA sequencing. We identified 86 mutant GALT alleles that reduced erythrocyte GALT activity. Seventy-five of these GALT genomes had abnormal SSCP patterns, of which 41 were sequenced, yielding 12 new and 21 previously reported, rare mutations. Among the novel group of 12 new mutations, an unusual biochemical phenotype was found in a family whose newborn proband has classical galactosemia. He had inherited two mutations in cis (N314D-E204K) from his father, whose GALT activity was near normal, and an additional GALT mutation in the splice-acceptor site of intron C (IVSC) from his mother. The substitution of a positively charged E204K mutation created a unique isoform-banding pattern. An asymptomatic sister`s GALT genes carries three mutations (E203K-N314D/N314D) with eight distinct isoform bands. Surprisingly, her erythrocytes have normal GALT activity. We conclude that the synergism of pedigree, biochemical, SSCP, and direct GALT gene analyses is an efficient protocol for identifying new mutations and speculate that E203K and N314D codon changes produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis. 40 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Tissue-specific effects of aldose reductase inhibition on fluorescence and cross-linking of extracellular matrix in chronic galactosemia. Relationship to pentosidine cross-links.

    PubMed

    Richard, S; Tamas, C; Sell, D R; Monnier, V M

    1991-08-01

    Chronic experimental hyperglycemia mediated by galactose has been shown to induce browning and cross-linking of rat tail tendon collagen that could be duplicated in vitro by nonenzymatic galactosylation. To investigate the nature of these changes, Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a 33% galactose diet without and with sorbinil for 6 and 12 mo. Collagen-linked fluorescence and pentosidine cross-links increased with age and galactosemia in tail tendons (P less than 0.001) and skin but were essentially unresponsive to aldose reductase inhibition (ARI). In contrast, tendon breaking time in urea, a likely parameter of cross-linking, was markedly improved (P less than 0.001) by ARI. Fluorescence that was inhibited by sorbinil treatment was increased in pepsin and proteinase K digest of aortic tissue from galactosemic rats (P less than 0.001), but impaired enzymatic digestibility was not observed. Systolic blood pressure as potential consequence of aortic stiffening was not increased in galactosemia. These data suggest that fluorescence in skin and tendon might be in part due to advanced glycosylation and pentosidine formation because these were not decreased by ARI. However, they also suggest that nonfluorescent cross-links may also be forming because, in contrast to fluorescence, tail tendon breaking time was partly corrected by ARI. Thus, it appears that extracellular matrix changes in chronic galactosemia are complex, being partly attributable to advanced glycosylation and partly to polyol-pathway activation.

  4. Biochemical and computational analyses of two phenotypically related GALT mutations (S222N and S135L) that lead to atypical galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Cocanougher, Benjamin; Aypar, Umut; McDonald, Amber; Hasadsri, Linda; Bennett, Michael J; Edward Highsmith, W; D׳Aco, Kristin

    2015-06-01

    Galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene [1,2]. We encountered a patient heterozygous for a known pathogenic H132Q mutation and a novel S222N variant of unknown significance [3]. Reminiscent of patients with the S135L mutation, our patient had loss of GALT enzyme activity in erythrocytes but a very mild clinical phenotype [3-8]. We performed splicing experiments and computational structural analyses to investigate the role of the novel S222N variant. Alamut software data predicted loss of splicing enhancers for the S222N and S135L mutations [9,10]. A cDNA library was generated from our patient׳s RNA to investigate for splicing errors, but no change in transcript length was seen [3]. In silico structural analysis was performed to investigate enzyme stability and attempt to understand the mechanism of the atypical galactosemia phenotype. Stability results are publicly available in the GALT Protein Database 2.0 [11-14]. Animations were created to give the reader a dynamic view of the enzyme structure and mutation locations. Protein database files and python scripts are included for further investigation.

  5. Using a Personal Glucose Meter and Alkaline Phosphatase for Point-of-Care Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase in Clinical Galactosemia Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiang, Yu; Novak, Donna E; Hoganson, George E; Zhu, Junjie; Lu, Yi

    2015-10-01

    The personal glucose meter (PGM) was recently shown to be a general meter to detect many targets. Most studies, however, focus on transforming either target binding or enzymatic activity that cleaves an artificial substrate into the production of glucose. More importantly, almost all reports exhibit their methods by using artificial samples, such as buffers or serum samples spiked with the targets. To expand the technology to even broader targets and to validate its potential in authentic, more complex clinical samples, we herein report expansion of the PGM method by using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that links the enzymatic activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase to the production of glucose, which allows point-of-care galactosemia diagnosis in authentic human clinical samples. Given the presence of ALP in numerous enzymatic assays for clinical diagnostics, the methods demonstrated herein advance the field closer to point-of-care detection of a wide range of targets in real clinical samples.

  6. Manganese-Based Superoxide Dismutase Mimics Modify Both Acute and Long-Term Outcome Severity in a Drosophila melanogaster Model of Classic Galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P.; Ryan, Emily L.; Hopson, Marquise L.; Bishop, Heather M.; Weitner, Tin; Tovmasyan, Artak; Spasojevic, Ivan; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Liang, Yongliang; Jones, Dean P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The goal of this study was to use two manganese (Mn)-based superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimics to test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species contribute to both acute and long-term outcomes in a galactose-1P uridylyltransferase (GALT)-null Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Results: We tested the impact of each of two Mn porphyrin SOD mimics, MnTnBuOE-2-PyP5+, and MnTE-2-PyP5+, (i) on survival of GALT-null Drosophila larvae reared in the presence versus absence of dietary galactose and (ii) on the severity of a long-term movement defect in GALT-null adult flies. Both SOD mimics conferred a significant survival benefit to GALT-null larvae exposed to galactose but not to controls or to GALT-null larvae reared in the absence of galactose. One mimic, MnTE-2-PyP5+, also largely rescued a galactose-independent long-term movement defect otherwise seen in adult GALT-null flies. The survival benefit of both SOD mimics occurred despite continued accumulation of elevated galactose-1P in the treated animals, and studies of thiolated proteins demonstrated that in both the presence and absence of dietary galactose MnTE-2-PyP5+ largely prevented the elevated protein oxidative damage otherwise seen in GALT-null animals relative to controls. Innovation and Conclusions: Our results confirm oxidative stress as a mediator of acute galactose sensitivity in GALT-null Drosophila larvae and demonstrate for the first time that oxidative stress may also contribute to galactose-independent adult outcomes in GALT deficiency. Finally, our results demonstrate for the first time that both MnTnBuOE-2-PyP5+ and MnTE-2-PyP5+ are bioavailable and effective when administered through an oral route in a D. melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2361–2371. PMID:23758052

  7. Newborn screening tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders Galactosemia Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) Human immunodeficiency disease (HIV) Organic acid metabolism disorders Phenylketonuria (PKU) Sickle cell disease and other ...

  8. Newborn Screening To Prevent Mental Retardation. The Arc Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc, Arlington, TX.

    This information fact sheet on screening newborns to prevent mental retardation defines newborn screening and outlines how screening is performed. It discusses the six most common disorders resulting in mental retardation for which states most commonly screen. These include phenylketonuria, congenital hypothyroidism, galactosemia, maple syrup…

  9. Nutritional Considerations for Severely Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobsey, Dick

    Children and adults with severe disabilities may have nutritional problems due to the effects of the primary disability (including such syndromes as phenylketonuria, galactosemia, and Hurler's Disease), effects related to medications (including anticonvulsants, tranquilizers, and laxatives), effects of food preferences (restrictive food…

  10. Electrokinetic probes for single-step screening of polyol stereoisomers: the virtues of ternary boronate ester complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Claire; Segui-Lines, Giselle; D'Amaral, Jason C; Ptolemy, Adam S; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2008-01-21

    Electrokinetic probes based on the differential migration of ternary boronate ester complexes permit the selective analysis of micromolar levels of UV-transparent polyol stereoisomers in urine samples via dynamic complexation-capillary electrophoresis that is applicable to single-step screening of in-born errors of sugar metabolism, such as galactosemia.

  11. Infant formulas - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... to cow's milk may also be allergic to soy milk. Soy-based formulas should be used for infants with galactosemia , a rare condition. These formulas can also be used ... have allergies to milk protein and for those with skin rashes or ...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  13. Newborn Screening: National Library of Medicine Literature Search, January 1980 through March 1987. No. 87-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrias, Karen

    This bibliography, prepared by the National Library of Medicine through a literature search of its online databases, covers all aspects of newborn screening. It includes references to screening for: inborn errors of metabolism, such as phenylketonuria and galactosemia; hemoglobinopathies, particularly sickle cell disease; congenital hypothyroidism…

  14. Electrokinetic probes for single-step screening of polyol stereoisomers: the virtues of ternary boronate ester complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Claire; Segui-Lines, Giselle; D'Amaral, Jason C; Ptolemy, Adam S; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2008-01-21

    Electrokinetic probes based on the differential migration of ternary boronate ester complexes permit the selective analysis of micromolar levels of UV-transparent polyol stereoisomers in urine samples via dynamic complexation-capillary electrophoresis that is applicable to single-step screening of in-born errors of sugar metabolism, such as galactosemia. PMID:18399200

  15. Neonatal Screening Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigue, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    Describes several laboratory experiments that are adaptations of clinical tests for certain genetic diseases in babies. Information and procedures are provided for tests for phenylketonuria (PKU), galactosemia, tyrosinemia, cystinuria, and mucopolysaccharidosis. Discusses the effects of each disease on the infants' development. (TW)

  16. Galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Galactosemia screen; GALT; Gal-1-PUT ... which is found in milk and dairy products. 1 out of 65,000 newborns lack a substance ( ... Veins and arteries vary in size from one infant to another and from ... other. Obtaining a blood sample from some infants may be more ...

  17. Newborn Screening for Hereditary Metabolic Disorders in Manitoba, 1965-1970

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J. G.; Hall, D. L.; Haworth, J. C.; Maniar, A.; Sekla, L.

    1971-01-01

    The newborn screening program for hereditary metabolic disorders in Manitoba is reviewed. In 1965, screening was begun on infants born in Metropolitan Winnipeg, and since January 1966 screening has been provincewide. Bloods from 85,868 infants have been screened so far. For the past two-and-a-half years 98.5% of live-born infants surviving the first seven days of life have been screened. The Guthrie bacterial inhibition test was used initially. In 1966 an evaluation was undertaken of one-dimensional amino-acid paper chromatography, and in 1969 this method replaced the Guthrie test. Five cases of phenylketonuria have been identified, and incidence of 1:17, 174. Screening for abnormal sugars in the blood has disclosed two cases of galactosemia. The incidence of galactosemia in the province is 1 in 16,069 live births. PMID:5580751

  18. Galactose tolerance studies of individuals with reduced galactose pathway activity.

    PubMed Central

    Mellman, W J; Rawnsley, B E; Nichols, C W; Needelman, B; Mennuti, M T; Malone, J; Tedesco, T A

    1975-01-01

    The galactose tolerance of individuals with mutant genotypes affecting the activities of galactokinase (GALK) and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) was examined. Genotypes studied were heterozygotes for the GALK and GALT forms of galactosemia, the Duarte-variant GALT, and Philadelphia-variant GALK alleles. The measurements used were urinary concentration of galactose during pregnancy in adults and in infants from the newborn period through the first 5 months of life; the rate of elimination of an intravenous infusion of galactose; and slit-lamp examination of the lens for evidence of cataracts. No unusual urinary excretions of galactose were noted in any of the age groups studied. Intravenous galactose tolerance tests were normal in all but two women, a mother and daughter heterozygous for the GALK-deficient form of galactosemia (GALKG/GALKA). Six other GALKG/GALKA subjects had normal tolerance studies. The intrafamilial consistency and interfamilial differences in the galactose tolerance of GALKG/GALKA individuals suggest heterogeneity of the genes responsible for the GALK-deficient form of galactosemia. Although subclinical cataracts were observed in several individuals, their significance relative to the mutant genotype cannot be resolved with the available data. PMID:173185

  19. Origins, distribution and expression of the Duarte-2 (D2) allele of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Amanda E.; Sanders, Rebecca D.; Garza, Kerry R.; McGaha, Lee Anne; Bean, Lora J. H.; Coffee, Bradford W.; Thomas, James W.; Cutler, David J.; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    Duarte galactosemia is a mild to asymptomatic condition that results from partial impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Patients with Duarte galactosemia demonstrate reduced GALT activity and carry one profoundly impaired GALT allele (G) along with a second, partially impaired GALT allele (Duarte-2, D2). Molecular studies reveal at least five sequence changes on D2 alleles: a p.N314D missense substitution, three intronic base changes and a 4 bp deletion in the 5′ proximal sequence. The four non-coding sequence changes are unique to D2. The p.N314D substitution, however, is not; it is found together with a silent polymorphism, p.L218(TTA), on functionally normal Duarte-1 alleles (D1, also called Los Angeles or LA alleles). The HapMap database reveals that p.N314D is a common human variant, and cross-species comparisons implicate D314 as the ancestral allele. The p.N314D substitution is also functionally neutral in mammalian cell and yeast expression studies. In contrast, the 4 bp 5′ deletion characteristic of D2 alleles appears to be functionally impaired in reporter gene transfection studies. Here we present allele-specific qRT–PCR evidence that D2 alleles express less mRNA in vivo than their wild-type counterparts; the difference is small but statistically significant. Furthermore, we characterize the prevalence of the 4 bp deletion in GG, NN and DG populations; the deletion appears exclusive to D2 alleles. Combined, these data strongly implicate the 4 bp 5′ deletion as a causal mutation in Duarte galactosemia and suggest that direct tests for this deletion, as proposed here, could enhance or supplant current tests, which define D2 alleles on the basis of the presence and absence of linked coding sequence polymorphisms. PMID:19224951

  20. Overview of the current attempts toward the medical treatment of cataract

    SciTech Connect

    Kador, P.F.

    1983-04-01

    A variety of agents are currently available that claim to either prevent, delay, or reverse cataracts associated with aging (senile cataracts), radiation, or diabetes and galactosemia (sugar cataracts). Senile cataract therapy includes formulation containing inorganic salts, nutritional supplements, natural product extracts, sulfhydryl, and sulfonic acid containing compounds and miscellaneous redox and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compounds. Agents associated with the treatment of radiation cataracts include antioxidants and free radial scavengers. Aldose reductase inhibitors have been effective in the prevention of sugar cataracts. A summary of these agents and their potential ocular effects are presented.

  1. Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase Enzyme Activity by Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of galactosemia usually involves the measurement of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) activity. Traditional radioactive and fluorescent GALT assays are nonspecific, laborious, and/or lack sufficient analytical sensitivity. We developed a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)–based assay for GALT enzyme activity measurement. Method Our assay used stable isotope-labeled α-galactose-1-phosphate ([13C6]-Gal-1-P) as an enzyme substrate. Sample cleanup and separation were achieved by reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography, and the enzymatic product, isotope-labeled uridine diphosphate galactose ([13C6]-UDPGal), was detected by MS/MS at mass transition (571 > 323) and quantified by use of [13C6]-Glu-1-P (265 > 79) as an internal standard. Results The method yielded a mean (SD) GALT enzyme activity of 23.8 (3.8) µmol · (gHgb)−1 · h−1 in erythrocyte extracts from 71 controls. The limit of quantification was 0.04 µmol · (g Hgb)−1 · h−1 (0.2% of normal control value). Intraassay imprecision was determined at 4 different levels (100%, 25%, 5%, and 0.2% of the normal control values), and the CVs were calculated to be 2.1%, 2.5%, 4.6%, and 9.7%, respectively (n = 3). Interassay imprecision CVs were 4.5%, 6.7%, 8.2%, and 13.2% (n = 5), respectively. The assay recoveries at the 4 levels were higher than 90%. The apparent Km of the 2 substrates, Gal-1-P and UDPGlc, were determined to be 0.38 mmol/L and 0.071 mmol/L, respectively. The assay in erythrocytes of 33 patients with classical galactosemia revealed no detectable activity. Conclusions This LC-MS/MS–based assay for GALT enzyme activity will be useful for the diagnosis and study of biochemically heterogeneous patients with galactosemia, especially those with uncommon genotypes and detectable but low residual activities. PMID:20348403

  2. Static and dynamic interactions between GALK enzyme and known inhibitors: guidelines to design new drugs for galactosemic patients.

    PubMed

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Marabotti, Anna

    2013-05-01

    The search for inhibitors of galactokinase (GALK) enzyme is interesting for their possible therapeutic application capable to alleviate symptoms in people with classic galactosemia. Several high-throughput screenings in the past have found candidate ligands showing a moderate affinity for GALK. Computational analysis of the binding mode of these compounds in comparison to their target protein has been performed only on crystallographic static structures, therefore missing the evolution of the complex during time. In this work, we applied static and dynamics simulations to analyze the interactions between GALK and its potential inhibitors, while taking into account the temporal evolution of the complexes. The collected data allowed us to identify the most important and persistent anchoring points of the known active site and of the newly identified secondary cavity. These data will be of use to increase the specificity and the affinity of a new generation of GALK inhibitors.

  3. Galactose inhibition of ovulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Swartz, W J; Mattison, D R

    1988-03-01

    Clinical evidence suggests an association between galactosemia and premature ovarian failure. In the present study, adult female mice were fed a diet consisting of 50% galactose for either 2, 4, or 6 weeks. At all times there was a decrease in the normal ovulatory response, as evidenced by a reduction in the number of corpora lutea when compared with controls. Additionally, the exposure of galactose-treated mice to a superovulatory regimen of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) failed to induce an increased ovulatory response. Morphologic alterations, such as the increase in interstitial tissue and the appearance of lipofuscin, coupled with the failure to respond to exogenous gonadotropins, suggest that the reduced ovulatory response may be occurring at the level of the ovary. This effect, however, is reversible with cessation of galactose treatment. PMID:3342905

  4. [Liver cirrhosis in metabolic disorders].

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Y

    1994-01-01

    The most early cirrhosis is observed in newborns with neonatal hemachromatosis. Early cirrhosis occurs in hereditary tyrosinemia type I, peroxisomal diseases and glycogen storage disease (type IV). In Wilson's disease, a case complicated with cirrhosis was reported in a 4-year-old patient. Slowly progressive cirrhosis is seen in patients with familial progressive intrahepatic cholestasis. Focal biliary cirrhosis is found in cystic fibrosis of the pancreas. Moreover, many other metabolic disorders, except for urea cycle disorders, are occasionally or rarely complicated with cirrhosis. Early diagnosis and proper management could prevent the development of cirrhosis in patients with galactosemia, hereditary fructose intolerance, etc. The occurrence of hepatoma must be monitored in these patients. Liver transplantation is indicated in a part of the patients with cirrhosis. PMID:8114297

  5. Safety of soy-based infant formulas containing isoflavones: the clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Russell J; Jenks, Belinda H

    2004-05-01

    Soy protein has been used in infant feeding in the West for nearly 100 y. Soy protein infant formulas have evolved in this interval to become safe and effective alternatives for infants whose nutritional needs are not met with human milk or formulas based on cow's milk. Modern soy formulas meet all nutritional requirements and safety standards of the Infant Formula Act of 1980. They are commonly used in infants with immunoglobulin E-mediated cow's milk allergy (at least 86% effective), lactose intolerance, galactosemia, and as a vegetarian human milk substitute. Largely as a result of research in animal models, concerns have been voiced regarding isoflavones in soy infant formulas in relation to nutritional adequacy, sexual development, neurobehavioral development, immune function, and thyroid disease. We discuss the available clinical evidence regarding each of these issues. Available evidence from adult human and infant populations indicates that dietary isoflavones in soy infant formulas do not adversely affect human growth, development, or reproduction. PMID:15113975

  6. Neonates with inborn errors of metabolism: spectrum and short-term outcomes at a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Mehmet; Ünal, Sevim; Okur, İlyas; Ayrancı Sucaklı, İclal; Güzel, Fatma; Koç, Nevra

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the neonates diagnosed as IEM in our neonatal intensive care unit and their outcomes. Among 2994 neonates hospitalized, 51 were diagnosed as IEM (1.7%). Admission complaints were poor feeding, decreased activity, jaundice, seizures, abnormal screening and respiratory problems. Phenylketonuria (11), organic acidemias (8), maple syrup urine disease (5), citrullinemia (5), galactosemia (4), nonketotic hyperglycinemia (4) and tyrosinemia (2) were the most commonly diagnosed IEMs. The follow-up period was 2.5-43 months. Among the 33 neonates followed, 19 had normal development, 9 had developmental delays and 5 had cerebral palsy according to the Guide for Monitoring Child Development. Postnatal age on admission, Apgar score at 5 minutes, being transferred, peritoneal dialysis, cranial ultrasonographic findings, consanguinity and sibling history had significant effects on outcome. Early diagnosis through expanded neonatal screening in countries with high rates of consanguinity, enabling the initiation of early treatment, is essential for achieving low mortality rates and good prognoses. PMID:26613220

  7. Ultra Fast and Sensitive Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Based Assay for Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase and Galactokinase Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([13C6]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [13C6]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4 ± 4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8 ± 0.47 (mean ± SD) µmol·(g Hgb) −1·hr−1. Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analzyed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  8. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test.

  9. Phenotype-Genotype Discrepancy Due to a 5.5-kb Deletion in the GALT Gene.

    PubMed

    González-del Angel, Ariadna; Velázquez-Aragón, José; Alcántara-Ortigoza, Miguel A; Vela-Amieva, Marcela; Hernández-Martínez, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT). More than 200 mutations have been described in the GALT gene. A 5.5-kb GALT deletion, first described in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, may lead either to an erroneous genotype assignment of classical galactosemia or to discrepancies with parental genotypes and the expected biochemical phenotype. The presence of the 5.5-kb deletion was examined in 27 Mexican nonrelated families with at least one child with reduced GALT activity in erythrocytes and it was detected in the 5.5% (n=3) of the 54 alleles tested. The first molecular studies in three of our families showed that the genotypes of the parents were inconsistent with those of their children, which were considered initially as homozygous p.N314D-Duarte 2, but after analyzing for the presence of the 5.5-kb deletion, were reassigned as compound heterozygotes [5.5-kb deletion]+[p.N314D-Duarte 2]. Identification of the 5.5-kb deletion in Mexican patients suggests that this mutation might not be exclusive to a given ethnic group and should be tested in other populations, especially when there is a discrepancy between the genotypes of patients and parents or by incongruence between biochemical phenotype and GALT genotype. Establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation for the 5.5-kb GALT deletion and determining the appropriate management will require additional studies in patients with a G/G genotype bearing the 5.5-kb GALT deletion.

  10. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  11. Subfertility and growth restriction in a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) - deficient mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Manshu; Siddiqi, Anwer; Witt, Benjamin; Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Johnson, Britt; Fraser, Nisa; Chen, Wyman; Rascon, Rafael; Yin, Xue; Goli, Harish; Bodamer, Olaf A; Lai, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The first GalT gene knockout (KO) mouse model for Classic Galactosemia (OMIM 230400) accumulated some galactose and its metabolites upon galactose challenge, but was seemingly fertile and symptom free. Here we constructed a new GalT gene-trapped mouse model by injecting GalT gene-trapped mouse embryonic stem cells into blastocysts, which were later implanted into pseudo-pregnant females. High percentage GalT gene-trapped chimera obtained were used to generate heterozygous and subsequently, homozygous GalT gene-trapped mice. Biochemical assays confirmed total absence of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity in the homozygotes. Although the homozygous GalT gene-trapped females could conceive and give birth when fed with normal chow, they had smaller litter size (P=0.02) and longer time-to-pregnancy (P=0.013) than their wild-type littermates. Follicle-stimulating hormone levels of the mutant female mice were not significantly different from the age-matched, wild-type females, but histological examination of the ovaries revealed fewer follicles in the homozygous mutants (P=0.007). Administration of a high-galactose (40% w/w) diet to lactating homozygous GalT gene-trapped females led to lethality in over 70% of the homozygous GalT gene-trapped pups before weaning. Cerebral edema, abnormal changes in the Purkinje and the outer granular cell layers of the cerebellum, as well as lower blood GSH/GSSG ratio were identified in the galactose-intoxicated pups. Finally, reduced growth was observed in GalT gene-trapped pups fed with normal chow and all pups fed with high-galactose (20% w/w) diet. This new mouse model presents several of the complications of Classic Galactosemia and will be useful to investigate pathogenesis and new therapies. PMID:24549051

  12. [Evaluation of the usefulness for neonatal mass screening in light of 35 years personal experience].

    PubMed

    Bozkowa, K; Cabalska, B; Radomyska, B; Ołtarzewski, M; Lenartowska, I

    1999-01-01

    possibility of foetal damage. The results of our own investigations of maternal PKU are discussed. The significance of mass-screening for galactosemia is still under discussion. In our opinion, mass-screening for galactosemia is not useful and we have discontinued it. Selective screening has been started combined with molecular genetic studies in high risk families. In the future, we plan to prepare guidelines on the principles of diagnosis and treatment of galactosemia in children and women in the reproductive age. Mass-screening for cystic fibrosis is also still under discussion. The results of the early screening programmes were not satisfactory and the tests were discontinued. In 1998, after reorganisation of the whole system, CF screening, using tripsin-radioimmune assays, was started again. The new screening programme is combined with molecular genetic investigation of different mutations. It is still too early to assess the importance and success of this CF mass-screening programme. We decided to discontinue the screening for homocystinuria, histidinemia, tyrosinemia, leucinosis and for neuroblastoma, since these programmes did not comply with criteria of mass-screening. In 1997, major reorganisation of screening programmes for inborn errors of metabolism, at NRIMC, was undertaken. The Guthrie test for PKU was changed to a quantitative colorimetric method. The immuno-luminometric method is used for TSH estimation. The whole system is based on complete computer control of all the steps of screening, from blood sampling on filter paper until the final diagnosis. The advantages of this modern system of organisation of the screening programme are discussed.

  13. Molecular Diagnosis of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance: Founder Mutation in a Community from India.

    PubMed

    Bijarnia-Mahay, Sunita; Movva, Sireesha; Gupta, Neerja; Sharma, Deepak; Puri, Ratna D; Kotecha, Udhaya; Saxena, Renu; Kabra, Madhulika; Mohan, Neelam; Verma, Ishwar C

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a difficult-to-confirm diagnosis, requiring either invasive liver biopsy-enzyme assay or potentially hazardous fructose challenge test or expensive molecular genetic analysis. Therefore, worldwide there has been a trend towards finding "common mutations" in distinct ethnic groups to simplify the process of diagnosis. The nonspecific presentation of the disease often leads to diagnostic confusion with other metabolic liver disorders such as glycogenoses, galactosemia, and tyrosinemia. This leads to much delay in diagnosis with consequent harm to the patient.We report mutations in the ALDOB gene, from eleven Indian patients, seven of whom belong to the Agarwal community. Six patients from the Agarwal community and two non-Agarwal patients harbored one novel mutation, c.324+1G>A (five homozygous and one heterozygous), in the ALDOB gene. Haplotyping performed in families confirmed a founder effect. The community has been known to harbor founder mutations in other genes such as the MLC1, PANK2, and CAPN3 genes, thus providing another evidence for a founder effect in the community in case of HFI. This may pave the path for a simpler and quicker test at least for this community in India. In addition to the founder mutation, we report four other novel mutations, c.112+1delG, c.380-1G>A, c.677G>A, and c.689delA, and a previously reported mutation, c.1013C>T, in the cohort from India.

  14. Cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol: high levels in Niemann-Pick type C, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiency[S

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, Sonia; Arias, Angela; García-Villoria, Judit; Macías-Vidal, Judit; Ros, Emilio; de las Heras, Javier; Girós, Marisa; Coll, Maria J.; Ribes, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by lysosomal/endosomal accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and glycolipids. Recent studies have shown that plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol (CT) and 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC) could be potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC patients. We aimed to know the sensitivity and specificity of these biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC compared with other diseases that can potentially lead to oxysterol alterations. We studied 107 controls and 122 patients including 16 with NPC, 3 with lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency, 8 with other lysosomal diseases, 5 with galactosemia, 11 with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), 3 with Smith-Lemli-Opitz, 14 with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, 19 with unspecific hepatic diseases, 13 with familial hypercholesterolemia, and 30 with neurological involvement and no evidence of an inherited metabolic disease. CT and 7-KC were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS as mono-dimethylglycine derivatives. Levels of 7-KC were high in most of the studied diseases, whereas those of CT were only high in NPC, LAL, and CTX patients. Consequently, although CT is a sensitive biomarker of NPC disease, including those cases with doubtful filipin staining, it is not specific. 7-KC is a very unspecific biomarker. PMID:26239048

  15. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins and ovarian dysfunction in galactosemic rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, K W; Cheng, L Y L; Cheung, A L M; O, W S

    2003-03-01

    Galactosemia is a genetic disease with deficiency of galactose-1-uridyltransferase, resulting in the accumulation of galactose or galactose-1-phosphate in the blood and tissues. Rats were fed with normal rat chow and with a high-galactose diet for 4 weeks to give control and galactosemic groups, and their ovarian function was studied. The two groups of rats were injected with pregnant mare's serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and were killed at different time points after human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) injection. The number of oocytes ovulated in the controls was significantly higher than in the galactosemic group. Morphometric studies of the ovaries also showed a higher number of corpora lutea in the controls. Western blot analysis of granulosa cells showed that the overall expressions of Fas and FasL were lower in the control group and their expressions of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) were higher than in the galactosemic group, especially at 8 h post hCG injection. TDT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) and immunohistochemical staining of ovarian sections with Ki-67 and IAPs showed more apoptotic granulosa cells in the galactosemic group and the expressions of IAPs in granulosa cells also confirmed the result of the Western blot. These findings support our hypothesis that ovarian dysfunction in galactosemic rats is due to increased apoptosis in granulosa cells of maturing follicles. PMID:12658449

  16. Delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency causing neonatal liver failure and hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Shneider, B L; Setchell, K D; Whitington, P F; Neilson, K A; Suchy, F J

    1994-02-01

    Neonatal liver failure was evaluated in two infants. Neither infant had evidence of congenital infection, galactosemia, alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, tyrosinemia, Zellweger syndrome, or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Abnormal levels of iron were detected in the minor salivary glands of the first infant and in the explanted liver of the second. Analyses of urinary bile salts by fast-atom bombardment ionization mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a paucity of primary bile acids and a predominance of 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic and 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic acids. These findings are consistent with delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency, a primary genetic defect in bile acid synthesis. Postmortem evaluation of the first infant revealed significant iron deposition in the liver, pancreas, thyroid, adrenal glands, myocardium, stomach, and submucosal glands of the respiratory tract. In both infants examination of the liver revealed extensive loss of hepatic parenchyma. These cases expand the clinical spectrum of bile acid metabolism defects to include neonatal liver failure with associated hemochromatosis. PMID:8301429

  17. Extensions to the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS).

    PubMed

    Shriberg, Lawrence D; Fourakis, Marios; Hall, Sheryl D; Karlsson, Heather B; Lohmeier, Heather L; McSweeny, Jane L; Potter, Nancy L; Scheer-Cohen, Alison R; Strand, Edythe A; Tilkens, Christie M; Wilson, David L

    2010-10-01

    This report describes three extensions to a classification system for paediatric speech sound disorders termed the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS). Part I describes a classification extension to the SDCS to differentiate motor speech disorders from speech delay and to differentiate among three sub-types of motor speech disorders. Part II describes the Madison Speech Assessment Protocol (MSAP), an ∼ 2-hour battery of 25 measures that includes 15 speech tests and tasks. Part III describes the Competence, Precision, and Stability Analytics (CPSA) framework, a current set of ∼ 90 perceptual- and acoustic-based indices of speech, prosody, and voice used to quantify and classify sub-types of Speech Sound Disorders (SSD). A companion paper provides reliability estimates for the perceptual and acoustic data reduction methods used in the SDCS. The agreement estimates in the companion paper support the reliability of SDCS methods and illustrate the complementary roles of perceptual and acoustic methods in diagnostic analyses of SSD of unknown origin. Examples of research using the extensions to the SDCS described in the present report include diagnostic findings for a sample of youth with motor speech disorders associated with galactosemia, and a test of the hypothesis of apraxia of speech in a group of children with autism spectrum disorders. All SDCS methods and reference databases running in the PEPPER (Programs to Examine Phonetic and Phonologic Evaluation Records) environment will be disseminated without cost when complete.

  18. Diet in dermatology: revisited.

    PubMed

    Kaimal, Sowmya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Diet has an important role to play in many skin disorders, and dermatologists are frequently faced with the difficulty of separating myth from fact when it comes to dietary advice for their patients. Patients in India are often anxious about what foods to consume, and what to avoid, in the hope that, no matter how impractical or difficult this may be, following this dictum will cure their disease. There are certain disorders where one or more components in food are central to the pathogenesis, e.g. dermatitis herpetiformis, wherein dietary restrictions constitute the cornerstone of treatment. A brief list, although not comprehensive, of other disorders where diet may have a role to play includes atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, psoriasis vulgaris, pemphigus, urticaria, pruritus, allergic contact dermatitis, fish odor syndrome, toxic oil syndrome, fixed drug eruption, genetic and metabolic disorders (phenylketonuria, tyrosinemia, homocystinuria, galactosemia, Refsum's disease, G6PD deficiency, xanthomas, gout and porphyria), nutritional deficiency disorders (kwashiorkar, marasmus, phrynoderma, pellagra, scurvy, acrodermatitis enteropathica, carotenemia and lycopenemia) and miscellaneous disorders such as vitiligo, aphthous ulcers, cutaneous vasculitis and telogen effluvium. From a practical point of view, it will be useful for the dermatologist to keep some dietary information handy to deal with the occasional patient who does not seem to respond in spite of the best, scientific and evidence-based therapy.

  19. Newborn Screening: What Does the Emergency Physician Need to Know?

    PubMed

    Lavin, Lindsay Roofe; Higby, Nicholas; Abramo, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Newborn screening programs were established in the United States in the early 1960s. Newborn screening programs were then developed by states and have continued to be the responsibility of the state. All states require a newborn screening, but what is required of these programs and screening panels has differed greatly by state. Historically, the most commonly screened disorders are the following: congenital hypothyroidism, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, sickle cell disease and associated hemoglobinopathies, biotinidase deficiency, galactosemia, cystic fibrosis and phenylketonuria, maple syrup urine disease, and homocystinuria. However, under new guidelines in 2006 and with new advances in technology, the scope of newborn screening programs has expanded to include at a minimum 9 organic acidurias, 5 fatty acid oxidation disorders, 3 hemoglobinopathies, and 6 other conditions. This CME article reviews the logistics of newborn screening and explores the effect of new technology and recent policy on state screens and what that means for providers. This article also highlights several of the disorders most relevant to emergency room physicians and discusses future considerations of newborn screening. PMID:26335232

  20. Etiopathogenesis of cataract: An appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun B; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Ravishankar, Basavaiah

    2014-01-01

    Natural eye lens is a crystalline substance to produce a clear passage for light. Cataract is opacity within the clear lens of the eye and is the dominant cause of socio-medical problem i.e., blindness worldwide. The only available treatment of cataract is surgery. However, insufficient surgical facilities in poor and developing countries and post-operative complications inspire researchers to find out other modes of treatment for cataract. In this review, an attempt has been made to appraise various etiological factors of cataract to make their perception clear to build up counterpart treatment. Present study is an assortment of various available literatures and electronic information in view of cataract etiopathogenesis. Various risk factors have been identified in development of cataracts. They can be classified in to genetic factors, ageing (systemic diseases, nutritional and trace metals deficiencies, smoking, oxidative stress etc.), traumatic, complicated (inflammatory and degenerative diseases of eye), metabolic (diabetes, galactosemia etc.), toxic substances including drugs abuses, alcohol etc., radiation (ultraviolet, electromagnetic waves etc.) are implicated as significant risk factors in the development of cataract. PMID:24618482

  1. Endocrine manifestations related to inherited metabolic diseases in adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Most inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are recessive, genetically transmitted diseases and are classified into 3 main groups according to their mechanisms: cellular intoxication, energy deficiency, and defects of complex molecules. They can be associated with endocrine manifestations, which may be complications from a previously diagnosed IEM of childhood onset. More rarely, endocrinopathies can signal an IEM in adulthood, which should be suspected when an endocrine disorder is associated with multisystemic involvement (neurological, muscular, hepatic features, etc.). IEM can affect all glands, but diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism are the most frequent disorders. A single IEM can present with multiple endocrine dysfunctions, especially those involving energy deficiency (respiratory chain defects), and metal (hemochromatosis) and storage disorders (cystinosis). Non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter and sometimes hypoparathyroidism should steer the diagnosis towards a respiratory chain defect. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is frequent in haemochromatosis (often associated with diabetes), whereas primary hypogonadism is reported in Alström disease and cystinosis (both associated with diabetes, the latter also with thyroid dysfunction) and galactosemia. Hypogonadism is also frequent in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (with adrenal failure), congenital disorders of glycosylation, and Fabry and glycogen storage diseases (along with thyroid dysfunction in the first 3 and diabetes in the last). This is a new and growing field and is not yet very well recognized in adulthood despite its consequences on growth, bone metabolism and fertility. For this reason, physicians managing adult patients should be aware of these diagnoses. PMID:22284844

  2. Cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol: high levels in Niemann-Pick type C, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pajares, Sonia; Arias, Angela; García-Villoria, Judit; Macías-Vidal, Judit; Ros, Emilio; de las Heras, Javier; Girós, Marisa; Coll, Maria J; Ribes, Antonia

    2015-10-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by lysosomal/endosomal accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and glycolipids. Recent studies have shown that plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol (CT) and 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC) could be potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC patients. We aimed to know the sensitivity and specificity of these biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC compared with other diseases that can potentially lead to oxysterol alterations. We studied 107 controls and 122 patients including 16 with NPC, 3 with lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency, 8 with other lysosomal diseases, 5 with galactosemia, 11 with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), 3 with Smith-Lemli-Opitz, 14 with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, 19 with unspecific hepatic diseases, 13 with familial hypercholesterolemia, and 30 with neurological involvement and no evidence of an inherited metabolic disease. CT and 7-KC were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS as mono-dimethylglycine derivatives. Levels of 7-KC were high in most of the studied diseases, whereas those of CT were only high in NPC, LAL, and CTX patients. Consequently, although CT is a sensitive biomarker of NPC disease, including those cases with doubtful filipin staining, it is not specific. 7-KC is a very unspecific biomarker.

  3. Infant formula.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Nina R

    2009-04-01

    Although the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians recommend breast milk for optimal infant nutrition, many parents still choose formula as an acceptable alternative. The wide variety of available formulas is confusing to parents and physicians, but formulas can be classified according to three basic criteria: caloric density, carbohydrate source, and protein composition. Most infants require a term formula with iron. There is insufficient evidence to recommend supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid or arachidonic acid. Soy formulas are indicated for congenital lactase deficiency and galactosemia, but are not recommended for colic because of insufficient evidence of benefit. Hypoallergenic formulas with extensively hydrolyzed protein are effective for the treatment of milk protein allergy and the prevention of atopic disease in high-risk infants. Antireflux formulas decrease emesis and regurgitation, but have not been shown to affect growth or development. Most infants with reflux require no treatment. Family physicians can use these guidelines to counsel parents about infant formula, countering consumer advertising that is not evidence-based. PMID:19378873

  4. Breast is best for babies.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alexander K. C.; Sauve, Reginald S.

    2005-01-01

    Breastfeeding is the optimal method of infant feeding. Breast milk provides almost all the necessary nutrients, growth factors and immunological components a healthy term infant needs, Other advantages of breastfeeding include reduction of incidences and severity of infections; prevention of allergies; possible enhancement of cognitive development; and prevention of obesity, hypertension and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Health gains for breastfeeding mothers include lactation amenorrhea, early involution of the uterus, enhanced bonding between the mother and the infant, and reduction in incidence of ovarian and breast cancer. From the economic perspective, breastfeeding is less expensive than formula feeding. In most cases, maternal ingestion of medications and maternal infections are not contraindications to breastfeeding. Breastfeeding, however, is contraindicated in infants with galactosemia. The management of common breastfeeding issues, such as breast engorgement, sore nipples, mastitis and insufficient milk, is discussed. Breastfeeding should be initiated as soon after delivery as possible. To promote, protect and support breastfeeding, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) developed the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) 10 Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Healthcare professionals have an important role to play in promoting and protecting breastfeeding. PMID:16080672

  5. Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT)--a biomarker for long-term alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Wiese, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a biomarker for chronic alcohol intake of more than 60 g ethanol/d. It has been reported to be superior to conventional markers like gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and mean corpuscular volume MCV). This review covers theoretical and analytical aspects, with data from controlled drinking experiments and from different population subgroups such as subjects with different liver diseases or different drinking patterns. CDT determinations are particularly indicated in (1) cases of chronic alcohol consumption and relapses after withdrawal, (2) license reapplication after driving under alcohol influence, (3) differentiating patients with enzyme-inducing medication from those with alcohol abuse, 4) congenital disorders of glycosylation such as carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome Ia (CDGS Ia), and (5) patients treated for galactosemia. The main advantage of CDT is its high specificity, as evidenced in combination with increased alcohol consumption. CDT values are not markedly influenced by medication except in immunosuppressed patients, who may show low CDT values. In general, CDT values appear less elevated after alcohol intake in women. The main disadvantage is the relatively low sensitivity. Hence, this parameter is not suitable for screening for subjects with alcohol abuse in the general population. As CDT, GGT, and MCV are connected with chronic alcohol consumption by different pathophysiological mechanisms, a combination of these parameters will further improve the diagnostic value.

  6. Gene therapy for human genetic disease?

    PubMed

    Friedmann, T; Roblin, R

    1972-03-01

    In our view, gene therapy may ameliorate some human genetic diseases in the future. For this reason, we believe that research directed at the development of techniques for gene therapy should continue. For the foreseeable future, however, we oppose any further attempts at gene therapy in human patients because (i) our understanding of such basic processes as gene regulation and genetic recombination in human cells is inadequate; (ii) our understanding of the details of the relation between the molecular defect and the disease state is rudimentary for essentially all genetic diseases; and (iii) we have no information on the short-range and long-term side effects of gene therapy. We therefore propose that a sustained effort be made to formulate a complete set of ethicoscientific criteria to guide the development and clinical application of gene therapy techniques. Such an endeavor could go a long way toward ensuring that gene therapy is used in humans only in those instances where it will prove beneficial, and toward preventing its misuse through premature application. Two recent papers have provided new demonstrations of directed genetic modification of mammalian cells. Munyon et al. (44) restored the ability to synthesize the enzyme thymidine kinase to thymidine kinase-deficient mouse cells by infection with ultraviolet-irradiated herpes simplex virus. In their experiments the DNA from herpes simplex virus, which contains a gene coding for thymidine kinase, may have formed a hereditable association with the mouse cells. Merril et al. (45) reported that treatment of fibroblasts from patients with galactosemia with exogenous DNA caused increased activity of a missing enzyme, alpha-D-galactose-l-phosphate uridyltransferase. They also provided some evidence that the change persisted after subculturing the treated cells. If this latter report can be confirmed, the feasibility of directed genetic modification of human cells would be clearly demonstrated, considerably

  7. Molecular and biochemical characterization of human galactokinase and its small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tang, M; Wierenga, K; Elsas, L J; Lai, K

    2010-12-01

    Human galactokinase (GALK) is the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway, converting α-d-galactose into galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1-P). Recently, there is increasing interest in targeting GALK as a novel therapy to ameliorate the disease manifestations in patients with Classic Galactosemia as it would, in combination with (ga-)lactose restriction reduce accumulation of Gal-1-P, a cytotoxic agent. Previously, we identified 34 small molecule compounds that inhibited GALK in vitro using experimental high-throughput screening. In order to isolate useful lead compounds, we characterized these hits with regards to their kinase selectivity profiles, potency and capability to reduce Gal-1-P accumulation in patient cell lines, and their modes of action. We found that the majority of these compounds had IC(50)s ranging from 0.7μM to 33.3μM. When tested against other members of the GHMP kinase family, three compounds (1, 4, and 24) selectively inhibited GALK with high potency. Through alignment of GALK and mevalonate kinase (MVK) crystal structures, we identified that eight amino acid residues and an L1 loop were different within the ATP-binding pockets of these two closely related kinases. By site-directed mutagenesis experiments, we identified one amino acid residue required for the inhibitory function of two of the three selective compounds. Based on these results, we generated binding models of these two compounds using a high-precision docking program. Compounds 4 and 24 inhibited GALK in a mixed model, while compound 1 exhibited parabolic competitive inhibition. Most importantly, using cells from galactosemic patients we found that selected compounds lowered Gal-1-P concentrations.

  8. Towards Enhanced Galactose Utilization by Lactococcus lactis▿

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Ana R.; Pool, Wietske A.; Solopova, Ana; Kok, Jan; Santos, Helena; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of galactose in dairy products due to partial lactose fermentation by lactic acid bacteria yields poor-quality products and precludes their consumption by individuals suffering from galactosemia. This study aimed at extending our knowledge of galactose metabolism in Lactococcus lactis, with the final goal of tailoring strains for enhanced galactose consumption. We used directed genetically engineered strains to examine galactose utilization in strain NZ9000 via the chromosomal Leloir pathway (gal genes) or the plasmid-encoded tagatose 6-phosphate (Tag6P) pathway (lac genes). Galactokinase (GalK), but not galactose permease (GalP), is essential for growth on galactose. This finding led to the discovery of an alternative route, comprising a galactose phosphotransferase system (PTS) and a phosphatase, for galactose dissimilation in NZ9000. Introduction of the Tag6P pathway in a galPMK mutant restored the ability to metabolize galactose but did not sustain growth on this sugar. The latter strain was used to prove that lacFE, encoding the lactose PTS, is necessary for galactose metabolism, thus implicating this transporter in galactose uptake. Both PTS transporters have a low affinity for galactose, while GalP displays a high affinity for the sugar. Furthermore, the GalP/Leloir route supported the highest galactose consumption rate. To further increase this rate, we overexpressed galPMKT, but this led to a substantial accumulation of α-galactose 1-phosphate and α-glucose 1-phosphate, pointing to a bottleneck at the level of α-phosphoglucomutase. Overexpression of a gene encoding α-phosphoglucomutase alone or in combination with gal genes yielded strains with galactose consumption rates enhanced up to 50% relative to that of NZ9000. Approaches to further improve galactose metabolism are discussed. PMID:20817811

  9. Newborn screening conditions: What we know, what we do not know, and how we will know it.

    PubMed

    Levy, Harvey L

    2010-12-01

    Expanding newborn screening beyond that for phenylketonuria was always the goal of Guthrie once phenylketonuria screening was on solid ground. He succeeded in this effort to an extent, adding screening for galactosemia, maple syrup urine disease, and homocystinuria. Screening for congenital hypothyroidism, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, biotinidase deficiency, and a few additional disorders was added by others over the years. However, a very large expansion of covered metabolic disorders eluded Guthrie despite his best efforts. This required a new screening technology, tandem mass spectrometry, which was not available until recently. Now, almost all developed newborn screening program use tandem mass spectrometry to cover the 29 metabolic disorders recommended for coverage by the American College of Medical Genetics and additional secondary disorders. The results have in some cases been spectacular in preventing or greatly reducing the burden of disease imposed by many of the screened disorders. However, expanded newborn screening has also brought problems that need to be addressed. These include lack of knowledge about the natural history of some of the disorders, absence of effective preventive therapy for others, identification of seemingly benign disorders or benign variants of severe disorders, and the resulting parental anxiety. To address these and other issues brought by expanded newborn screening, a national effort led by the American College of Medical Genetics has been developed. This effort known as the Newborn Screening Translational Research Network seeks to stimulate research, advocate pilot screening programs for proposed new additions to screening, and develop a protocol-based systematic long-term follow-up of infants identified in expanded screening programs. Upon the outcome, this critical effort will depend on the health and well-being of children throughout the United States. PMID:21150366

  10. Preparation of low galactose yogurt using cultures of Gal(+) Streptococcus thermophilus in combination with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Anbukkarasi, Kaliyaperumal; UmaMaheswari, Thiyagamoorthy; Hemalatha, Thiagarajan; Nanda, Dhiraj Kumar; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Rameshwar

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is an important lactic starter used in the production of yogurt. Most strains of S. thermophilus are galactose negative (Gal(-)) and are able to metabolize only glucose portion of lactose and expel galactose into the medium. This metabolic defect leads to the accumulation of free galactose in yogurt, resulting in galactosemia among consumers. Hence there is an absolute need to develop low galactose yogurt. Therefore, in this study, three galactose positive (Gal(+)) S. thermophilus strains from National Collection of Dairy Cultures (NCDC) viz. NCDC 659 (AJM), NCDC 660 (JM1), NCDC 661 (KM3) and a reference galactose negative (Gal(-)) S. thermophilus NCDC 218 were used for preparation of low galactose yogurt. In milk fermented using S. thermophilus isolates alone, NCDC 659 released less galactose (0.27 %) followed by NCDC 661 (0.3 %) and NCDC 660 (0.45 %) after 10 h at 42 °C. Milk was fermented in combination with Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC 04, in which NCDC 659 released least galactose upto 0.49 % followed by NCDC 661 (0.51 %) and NCDC 660 (0.60 %) than reference Gal(-) NCDC 218(0.79 %). Low galactose yogurt was prepared following standard procedure using Gal(+) S. thermophilus isolates and Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC 04 in 1:1 ratio. Among which low galactose yogurt by NCDC 659 combination contained less galactose 0.37 % followed by NCDC 661 (0.51 %), NCDC 660 (0.65 %) and reference Gal(-) NCDC 218 (0.98 %) after 4 h of fermentation. This study clearly reveals that Gal(+) S. thermophilus isolates can be paired with Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus for developing low galactose yogurt.

  11. Allelic Variation, Aneuploidy, and Nongenetic Mechanisms Suppress a Monogenic Trait in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sirr, Amy; Cromie, Gareth A.; Jeffery, Eric W.; Gilbert, Teresa L.; Ludlow, Catherine L.; Scott, Adrian C.; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2015-01-01

    Clinically relevant features of monogenic diseases, including severity of symptoms and age of onset, can vary widely in response to environmental differences as well as to the presence of genetic modifiers affecting the trait’s penetrance and expressivity. While a better understanding of modifier loci could lead to treatments for Mendelian diseases, the rarity of individuals harboring both a disease-causing allele and a modifying genotype hinders their study in human populations. We examined the genetic architecture of monogenic trait modifiers using a well-characterized yeast model of the human Mendelian disease classic galactosemia. Yeast strains with loss-of-function mutations in the yeast ortholog (GAL7) of the human disease gene (GALT) fail to grow in the presence of even small amounts of galactose due to accumulation of the same toxic intermediates that poison human cells. To isolate and individually genotype large numbers of the very rare (∼0.1%) galactose-tolerant recombinant progeny from a cross between two gal7Δ parents, we developed a new method, called “FACS-QTL.” FACS-QTL improves upon the currently used approaches of bulk segregant analysis and extreme QTL mapping by requiring less genome engineering and strain manipulation as well as maintaining individual genotype information. Our results identified multiple distinct solutions by which the monogenic trait could be suppressed, including genetic and nongenetic mechanisms as well as frequent aneuploidy. Taken together, our results imply that the modifiers of monogenic traits are likely to be genetically complex and heterogeneous. PMID:25398792

  12. Hint, Fhit and GalT: Function, Structure, Evolution and Mechanism of Three Branches of the Histidine Triad Superfamily of Nucleotide Hydrolases and Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    HIT (histidine triad)1 proteins, named for a motif related to the sequence HφHφHφφ, (φ a hydrophobic amino acid) are a superfamily of nucleotide hydrolases and transferases, which act on the α-phosphate of ribonucleotides, and contain a ∼30 kDa domain that is typically either a homodimer of ∼15 kDa polypeptides with two active-sites or an internally, imperfectly repeated polypeptide that retains a single HIT active site. On the basis of sequence, substrate specificity, structure, evolution and mechanism, HIT proteins can be classified into the Hint branch, which consists of adenosine 5′-monophosphoramide hydrolases, the Fhit branch, which consists of diadenosine polyphosphate hydrolases, and the GalT branch, which consists of specific nucleoside monophosphate transferases including galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, diadenosine tetraphosphate phosphorylase, and adenylylsulfate:phosphate adenylytransferase. At least one human representative of each branch is lost in human diseases. Aprataxin, a Hint branch hydrolase, is mutated in ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome. Fhit is lost early in development of many epithelially derived tumors. GalT is deficient in galactosemia. Additionally, ASW is an avian Hint family member that has evolved to have unusual gene expression properties and the complete loss of its nucleotide binding-site. The potential roles of ASW and Hint in avian sexual development are discussed in an accompanying manuscript. Here we review what is known about biological activities of HIT proteins, the structural and biochemical bases for their functions, and propose a new enzyme mechanism for Hint and Fhit that may account for the differences between HIT hydrolases and transferases. PMID:12119013

  13. [Breastfeeding: health benefits for child and mother].

    PubMed

    Turck, D; Vidailhet, M; Bocquet, A; Bresson, J-L; Briend, A; Chouraqui, J-P; Darmaun, D; Dupont, C; Frelut, M-L; Girardet, J-P; Goulet, O; Hankard, R; Rieu, D; Simeoni, U

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of breastfeeding in France is one of the lowest in Europe: 65% of infants born in France in 2010 were breastfed when leaving the maternity ward. Exclusive breastfeeding allows normal growth until at least 6 months of age, and can be prolonged until the age of 2 years or more, provided that complementary feeding is started after 6 months. Breast milk contains hormones, growth factors, cytokines, immunocompetent cells, etc., and has many biological properties. The composition of breast milk is influenced by gestational and postnatal age, as well as by the moment of the feed. Breastfeeding is associated with slightly enhanced performance on tests of cognitive development. Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 3 months is associated with a lower incidence and severity of diarrhoea, otitis media and respiratory infection. Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 4 months is associated with a lower incidence of allergic disease (asthma, atopic dermatitis) during the first 2 to 3 years of life in at-risk infants (infants with at least one first-degree relative presenting with allergy). Breastfeeding is also associated with a lower incidence of obesity during childhood and adolescence, as well as with a lower blood pressure and cholesterolemia in adulthood. However, no beneficial effect of breastfeeding on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has been shown. Maternal infection with hepatitis B and C virus is not a contraindication to breastfeeding, as opposed to HIV infection and galactosemia. A supplementation with vitamin D and K is necessary in the breastfed infant. Very few medications contraindicate breastfeeding. Premature babies can be breastfed and/or receive mother's milk and/or bank milk, provided they receive energy, protein and mineral supplements. Return to prepregnancy weight is earlier in breastfeeding mothers during the 6 months following delivery. Breastfeeding is also associated with a decreased risk of breast and ovarian cancer in the

  14. Metabolic derangements in deficiency of citrin, a liver-type mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Takeyori; Kobayashi, Keiko; Iijima, Mikio; Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Yazaki, Masahide; Takei, Yo-Ichi; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2005-10-01

    Citrin, encoded by SLC25A13, is a liver-type mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier (AGC), of which deficiency, in autosomal recessive trait, causes neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis (NICCD) and adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). NICCD patients have jaundice, hypoproteinemia, hypoglycemia, galactosemia, growth retardation, fatty liver and multiple aminoacidemia including citrulline, methionine, threonine and tyrosine. Some of the neonates who have experienced NICCD suffer from severe CTLN2 more than 10 years or several decades later. In CTLN2, neuropsychotic symptoms such as disorientation, aberrant behavior, coma and death are observed. Laboratory findings reveal hyperammonemia, citrullinemia, fatty liver and liver-specific decrease in a urea cycle enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). In some cases, hyperlipidemia, pancreatitis and hepatoma are accompanied with CTLN2. Citrin as a liver-type AGC plays a role in supplying aspartate to the cytosol for urea, protein and nucleotide synthesis by exchanging mitochondrial aspartate for cytosolic glutamate and proton, and transporting cytosolic NADH reducing equivalent to mitochondria as a member of malate aspartate shuttle essential for aerobic glycolysis. AGC is also important for gluconeogenesis from lactate. Although it is difficult to explain pathogenesis of the symptoms such as cholestasis in NICCD and liver-specific decrease of ASS protein in CTLN2 from the functions of the AGC, some are understandable by the loss of citrin functions. Many CTLN2 patients have been treated with a low protein and high carbohydrate diet and glycerol at the hyperammonemic coma. We argue that those treatments may result in fatty liver, hyperlipidemia, hyperammonemia and even death due to loss of the citrin functions. Loss of citrin first cause deficiency of aspartate in the cytosol, which results in an increase in cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratio and then activation of fatty acid synthesis pathway to compensate the aberrant

  15. Role of UV Irradiation and Oxidative Stress in Cataract Formation. Medical Prevention by Nutritional Antioxidants and Metabolic Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Shambhu Dayal; Kovtun, Svitlana; Hegde, Kavita Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability with relatively high incidence. It has been proposed that such high incidence is related to oxidative stress induced by continued intraocular penetration of light and consequent photochemical generation of reactive oxygen species such as superoxide and singlet oxygen and their derivatization to other oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical. The latter two can also interact to generate singlet oxygen by Haber-Weis reaction. It has been proposed that in addition to the endogenous enzymatic antioxidant enzymes, the process can be inhibited by many nutritional and metabolic oxyradical scavengers such as ascorbate, vitamin E, pyruvate and xanthine alkaloids such as caffeine. Methods Initial verification of the hypothesis has been done primarily by rat and mouse lens organ culture studies under ambient as well as UV light irradiation and determining the effect of such irradiation on its physiology in terms of its efficiency of active membrane transport activity and the levels of certain metabolites such as GSH and ATP as well as in terms of apoptotic cell death. In vivo studies on the possible prevention of oxidative stress and cataract formation has been done by administering pyruvate and caffeine orally in drinking water as well as by their topical application using diabetic and galactosemic animal models. Results Photosensitized damage to lens has been found to be significantly prevented by ascorbate and pyruvate caused by exposure to visible as well as UVA. Caffeine has been found be effective against UVA as well as UVB. Oral or topical application of pyruvate has been found to inhibit the formation of cataracts induced by diabetes as well as galactosemia. Caffeine has also been found to inhibit cataract induced by sodium selenite as well as high levels of galactose. Studies with diabetes are in progress. Conclusion Various in vitro and in vivo studies summarized in the review strongly

  16. Medical management of chronic liver diseases in children (part I): focus on curable or potentially curable diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada H F; Kamal, Naglaa M

    2011-12-01

    The management of children with chronic liver disease (CLD) mandates a multidisciplinary approach. CLDs can be classified into 'potentially' curable, treatable non-curable, and end-stage diseases. Goals pertaining to the management of CLDs can be divided into prevention or minimization of progressive liver damage in curable CLD by treating the primary cause; prevention or control of complications in treatable CLD; and prediction of the outcome in end-stage CLD in order to deliver definitive therapy by surgical procedures, including liver transplantation. Curative, specific therapies aimed at the primary causes of CLDs are, if possible, best considered by a pediatric hepatologist. Medical management of CLDs in children will be reviewed in two parts, with part I (this article) specifically focusing on 'potentially' curable CLDs. Dietary modification is the cornerstone of management for galactosemia, hereditary fructose intolerance, and certain glycogen storage diseases, as well as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. It is also essential in tyrosinemia, in addition to nitisinone [2-(nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione] therapy, as well as in Wilson disease along with copper-chelating agents such as D-penicillamine, triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride, and ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. Zinc and antioxidants are adjuvant drugs in Wilson disease. New advances in chronic viral hepatitis have been made with the advent of oral antivirals. In children, currently available drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection are standard interferon (IFN)-α-2, pegylated IFN-α-2 (PG-IFN), and lamivudine. In adults, adefovir and entecavir have also been licensed, whereas telbivudine, emtricitabine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, clevudine, and thymosin α-1 are currently undergoing clinical testing. For chronic hepatitis C virus infection, the most accepted treatment is PG-IFN plus ribavirin. Corticosteroids, with or without azathioprine, remain the basic

  17. A new chemical diagnostic method for inborn errors of metabolism by mass spectrometry-rapid, practical, and simultaneous urinary metabolites analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, I; Kuhara, T

    1996-01-01

    -two target metabolic diseases are: methylmalonic acidemia; propionic acidemia; isovaleric acidemia; maple syrup urine disease; β-ketothiolase deficiency; galactosemia; phenylketonuria; hyperphenylalaninemia; homocystinuria; alkaptonuria; multiple carboxylase deficiency; nonketotic hyperglycinemia; lysinuria; cystinuria; tyrosinemia; glutaric aciduria type I; β-hydroxy-β-methylglutaric acidemia; β-methylcrotonylglycinuria; α-aminoadipic-α-ketoadipic aciduria; ornitine transcarbamylase deficiency (four urea cycle disorders can be screened); glutaric aciduria type II; and neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma is not an IEM, and is examined at ca. 6 months of age. The twenty-two target diseases will be reconsidered during the pilot study. An accurate chemical diagnosis and hence early treatment of not only organic acidemias but also amino acidemias, and sugar-, polyol-, and nucleic acid base-accumulating metabolic disorders can be made at a very early stage of life. This procedure is also applicable to metabolic profiling of other body fluids that are potentially informative for the study and characterization of a wide range of inherited and acquired metabolic disorders. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Main Report

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    . Using the validated evidence base and expert opinion, each condition that had previously been assigned to a category based on scores gathered through the data collection instrument was reconsidered. Again, the factors taken into consideration were: 1) available scientific evidence; 2) availability of a screening test; 3) presence of an efficacious treatment; 4) adequate understanding of the natural history of the condition; and 5) whether the condition was either part of the differential diagnosis of another condition or whether the screening test results related to a clinically significant condition. The conditions were then assigned to one of three categories as previously described (core panel, secondary targets, or not appropriate for Newborn Screening). Among the 29 conditions assigned to the core panel are three hemoglobinopathies associated with a Hb/S allele, six amino acidurias, five disorders of fatty oxidation, nine organic acidurias, and six unrelated conditions (congenital hypothyroidism (CH), biotinidase deficiency (BIOT), congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), classical galactosemia (GALT), hearing loss (HEAR) and cystic fibrosis (CF)). Twenty-three of the 29 conditions in the core panel are identified with multiplex technologies such as tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) or high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). On the basis of the evidence, six of the 35 conditions initially placed in the core panel were moved into the secondary target category, which expanded to 25 conditions. Test results not associated with potential disease in the infant (e.g., carriers) were also placed in the secondary target category. When newborn screening laboratory results definitively establish carrier status, the result should be made available to the health care professional community and families. Twenty-seven conditions were determined to be inappropriate for newborn screening at this time. Conditions with limited evidence reported in the scientific literature were more