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Sample records for galactosemias

  1. Galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Arn, Pamela H.

    2003-07-01

    Despite the dramatic response of sick neonates with galactosemia to the withdrawal of galactose from the diet, over the long-term, complications, including learning disorders, verbal apraxia, and ataxia, often develop. It is clear that, although lifelong galactose restriction remains the basis of treatment for this disease, additional treatment methods are needed. The neurologist familiar with galactosemia can assist in diagnosis of neonates presenting with central nervous system symptoms. Familiarity with the long-term neurologic consequences of galactosemia can help the neurologist assist the family with prognostic information and to avoid unnecessary tests when complications occur.

  2. Galactosemia presenting as recurrent sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Narendra; Rathi, Akanksha

    2011-12-01

    Galactosemia is a treatable metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency of enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) and inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. A case of neonate manifesting with recurrent Escherichia coli sepsis is presented here which turned out to be a classic galactosemia. No other common presenting features were observed in this infant except cataract on slit lamp examination. To the best of our knowledge, there is no case of galactosemia reported in literature which presented with recurrent neonatal sepsis without hepatomegaly, hyperbilirubinemia, bleeding disorder, vomiting, diarrhea, failure to thrive, hypoglycemia, coagulopathy, hemolysis or renal tubular acidosis.

  3. Drosophila melanogaster Models of Galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Daenzer, J M I; Fridovich-Keil, J L

    2017-01-01

    The galactosemias are a family of autosomal recessive genetic disorders resulting from impaired function of the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Type I, or classic galactosemia, results from profound deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Type II galactosemia results from profound deficiency of galactokinase, the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Type III galactosemia results from partial deficiency of UDP galactose 4'-epimerase, the third enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Although at least classic galactosemia has been recognized clinically for more than 100 years, and detectable by newborn screening for more than 50 years, all three galactosemias remain poorly understood. Early detection and dietary restriction of galactose prevent neonatal lethality, but many affected infants grow to experience a broad range of developmental and other disabilities. To date, there is no intervention known that prevents or reverses these long-term complications. Drosophila melanogaster provides a genetically and biochemically facile model for these conditions, enabling studies that address mechanism and open the door for novel approaches to intervention.

  4. Gastrointestinal Health in Classic Galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kelly A; Mulle, Jennifer G; Epstein, Michael P; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2016-07-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism that affects approximately 1/50,000 live births in the USA. Following exposure to milk, which contains large quantities of galactose, affected infants may become seriously ill. Early identification by newborn screening with immediate dietary galactose restriction minimizes or prevents the potentially lethal acute symptoms of CG. However, more than half of individuals with CG still experience long-term complications including cognitive disability, behavioral problems, and speech impairment. Anecdotal reports have also suggested frequent gastrointestinal (GI) problems, but this outcome has not been systematically addressed. In this study we explored the prevalence of GI symptoms among 183 children and adults with CG (cases) and 190 controls. Cases reported 4.5 times more frequent constipation (95% CI 1.8-11.5) and 4.2 times more frequent nausea (95% CI 1.2-15.5) than controls. Cases with genotypes predicting residual GALT activity reported less frequent constipation than cases without predicted GALT activity but this difference was not statistically significant. Because the rigor of dietary galactose restriction varies among individuals with galactosemia, we further tested whether GI symptoms associated with diet in infancy. Though constipation was almost four times as common among cases reporting a more restrictive diet in infancy, this difference was not statistically significant. These data confirm that certain GI symptoms are more common in classic galactosemia compared to controls and suggest that future studies should investigate associations with residual GALT activity and dietary galactose restriction in early life.

  5. Association of fungal sepsis and galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjay; Bharti, Bhavneet; Inusha, P

    2010-06-01

    Galactosemia is one of the rare inborn errors of metabolism, which if detected early can be treated effectively. Galactosemic infants have a significant increased risk of developing sepsis. E. coli sepsis is a known entity, and also an important cause of early mortality in these children. But fungal sepsis in these patients is rarely reported. Here is a case of 45 day-old child who presented with fungal sepsis, which on investigation turned out to be galactosemia.

  6. GALK inhibitors for classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kent; Boxer, Matthew B; Marabotti, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Classic galactosemia is an inherited metabolic disease for which, at present, no therapy is available apart from galactose-restricted diet. However, the efficacy of the diet is questionable, since it is not able to prevent the insurgence of chronic complications later in life. In addition, it is possible that dietary restriction itself could induce negative side effects. Therefore, there is a need for an alternative therapeutic approach that can avert the manifestation of chronic complications in the patients. In this review, the authors describe the development of a novel class of pharmaceutical agents that target the production of a toxic metabolite, galactose-1-phosphate, considered as the main culprit for the cause of the complications, in the patients.

  7. Fertility preservation in female classic galactosemia patients.

    PubMed

    van Erven, Britt; Gubbels, Cynthia S; van Golde, Ron J; Dunselman, Gerard A; Derhaag, Josien G; de Wert, Guido; Geraedts, Joep P; Bosch, Annet M; Treacy, Eileen P; Welt, Corrine K; Berry, Gerard T; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2013-07-16

    Almost every female classic galactosemia patient develops primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) as a diet-independent complication of the disease. This is a major concern for patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The unique pathophysiology of classic galactosemia with a severely reduced follicle pool at an early age requires an adjusted approach. In this article recommendations for physicians based on current knowledge concerning galactosemia and fertility preservation are made. Fertility preservation is only likely to be successful in very young prepubertal patients. In this group, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is currently the only available technique. However, this technique is not ready for clinical application, it is considered experimental and reduces the ovarian reserve. Fertility preservation at an early age also raises ethical questions that should be taken into account. In addition, spontaneous conception despite POI is well described in classic galactosemia. The uncertainty surrounding fertility preservation and the significant chance of spontaneous pregnancy warrant counseling towards conservative application of these techniques. We propose that fertility preservation should only be offered with appropriate institutional research ethics approval to classic galactosemia girls at a young prepubertal age.

  8. FSH isoform pattern in classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Cynthia S; Thomas, Chris M G; Wodzig, Will K W H; Olthaar, André J; Jaeken, Jaak; Sweep, Fred C G J; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2011-04-01

    Female classic galactosemia patients suffer from primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The cause for this long-term complication is not fully understood. One of the proposed mechanisms is that hypoglycosylation of complex molecules, a known secondary phenomenon of galactosemia, leads to FSH dysfunction. An earlier study showed less acidic isoforms of FSH in serum samples of two classic galactosemia patients compared to controls, indicating hypoglycosylation. In this study, FSH isoform patterns of five classic galactosemia patients with POI were compared to the pattern obtained in two patients with a primary glycosylation disorder (phosphomannomutase-2-deficient congenital disorders of glycosylation, PMM2-CDG) and POI, and in five postmenopausal women as controls. We used FPLC chromatofocussing with measurement of FSH concentration per fraction, and discovered that there were no significant differences between galactosemia patients, PMM2-CDG patients and postmenopausal controls. Our results do not support that FSH dysfunction due to a less acidic isoform pattern because of hypoglycosylation is a key mechanism of POI in this disease.

  9. Voice disorders in children with classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Potter, Nancy L

    2011-04-01

    Children with classic galactosemia are at risk for motor speech disorders resulting from disruptions in motor planning and programming (childhood apraxia of speech or CAS) or motor execution (dysarthria). In the present study of 33 children with classic galactosemia, 21% were diagnosed with CAS, 3% with ataxic dysarthria, and 3% with mixed CAS-dysarthria. Voice disorders due to laryngeal insufficiency were common in children with dysarthria and co-occurred with CAS. Most (58%) of the children with classic galactosemia had decreased respiratory-phonatory support for speech, and 33% had disturbed vocal quality that was indicative of cerebellar dysfunction. Three children, two diagnosed with CAS and one not diagnosed with a motor speech disorder, had vocal tremors. Treatment of voice dysfunction in neurogenic speech disorders is discussed.

  10. Galactosemia

    MedlinePlus

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  11. Galactosemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood culture for bacterial infection ( E coli sepsis ) Enzyme activity in the red blood cells Ketones in the urine Prenatal diagnosis by directly measuring the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase "Reducing substances" in ...

  12. Early and severe indirect hyperbilirubinemia as a manifestation of galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Woo, H C; Phornphutkul, C; Laptook, A R

    2010-04-01

    Classic galactosemia results from mutations in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase gene and causes infants to present with jaundice after initiation of lactose containing formulas. Jaundice associated with galactosemia is often thought to have a prominent direct fraction. We report an infant with galactosemia who presented with severe jaundice from indirect hyperbilirubinemia and met criteria for an exchange transfusion within 48 h after milk ingestion.

  13. Low prevalence of classical galactosemia in Korean population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Hee; Cheon, Chong Kun; Kim, Jae-Min; Kang, Minji; Kim, Joo Hyun; Yang, Song Hyun; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2011-01-01

    This study described the clinical and molecular genetic features of classical galactosemia in Korean population to contribute to the insight in the spectrum of galactosemia in the world, as little is known about the spectrum and incidence of galactosemia in Asia. During the 11-year study period, only three Korean children were identified as having classical galactosemia on the basis of the enzymatic and molecular genetic analysis. Asians have been reported to have mutations distinct from those of Caucasians and African Americans, indicating that galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase mutations are ethnically diverse. Our three patients had a total of three mutations (c.252+1G > A, p.Q169H and p.E363K), two of which were novel (p.E363K and c.252+1G > A) mutations. Interestingly, c.252+1G > A, which leads to skipping of exon 2, was observed in all three patients (three of six alleles), indicating that this mutation may be common in Koreans with classical galactosemia. Screening for classical galactosemia in 158,126 Korean newborns identified no patient with classical galactosemia. In conclusion, our findings provide further evidence for the ethnic diversity of classical galactosemia, which may be as rare in Koreans as in other Asian populations.

  14. Sweet and sour: an update on classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana I; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2017-03-09

    Classic galactosemia is a rare inherited disorder of galactose metabolism caused by deficient activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the second enzyme of the Leloir pathway. It presents in the newborn period as a life-threatening disease, whose clinical picture can be resolved by a galactose-restricted diet. The dietary treatment proves, however, insufficient in preventing severe long-term complications, such as cognitive, social and reproductive impairments. Classic galactosemia represents a heavy burden on patients' and their families' lives. After its first description in 1908 and despite intense research in the past century, the exact pathogenic mechanisms underlying galactosemia are still not fully understood. Recently, new important insights on molecular and cellular aspects of galactosemia have been gained, and should open new avenues for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Moreover, an international galactosemia network has been established, which shall act as a platform for expertise and research in galactosemia. Herein are reviewed some of the latest developments in clinical practice and research findings on classic galactosemia, an enigmatic disorder with many unanswered questions warranting dedicated research.

  15. Psychosocial developmental milestones in men with classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Cynthia Sophia; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Berry, Gerard Thomas; Bosch, Annet Maria; Waisbren, Susan; Rubio-Gozalbo, Maria Estela; Grootenhuis, Martha Alexandra

    2011-04-01

    Patients with classic galactosemia suffer from several long term effects of their disease. Research in a group of mainly female patients has shown that these patients may also have a developmental delay with regard to their social aptitude. To study if male galactosemia patients achieve psychosocial developmental milestones more slowly than male peers from the general Dutch population, we assessed their development with the Course of Life Questionnaire (CoLQ). A total of 18 male galactosemia patients participated in this study (response rate 69%): 11 Dutch patients and seven American patients. We found severe delays in the social and psychosexual scales of this questionnaire, but not on the autonomy axis. These results are comparable to an earlier study with a limited number of male patients. The observed delays could be secondary to less developed social skills, cognitive dysfunction, or disrupted language development. We strongly recommend screening of galactosemia patients for developmental delays, to ensure early intervention through social skills training.

  16. Galactosemia: when is it a newborn screening emergency?

    PubMed

    Berry, Gerard T

    2012-05-01

    Classic galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, due to a severe deficiency of the enzyme, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), that catalyzes the conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPglucose) to uridine diphosphate galactose (UDPgalactose) and glucose-1-phosphate. Upon consumption of lactose in the neonatal period, the affected infants develop a potentially lethal disease process with multiorgan involvement. Since the advent of newborn screening (NBS) for galactosemia, we rarely encounter such overwhelmingly ill newborns. After ascertainment that the positive NBS indicates the possibility of galactosemia due to GALT deficiency, the critical question for the physician is whether the infant has the classic or a variant form of GALT deficiency, as classic galactosemia is a medical emergency. However, there are over 230 GALT gene mutations that have been detected around the world. Yet, most positive NBS tests are due to the Duarte biochemical variant condition or a simple false positive. In order to make the correct decision as well as provide informative counseling to parents of infants with a positive NBS, I utilize a relatively simple classification scheme for GALT deficiency. There are three basic forms of GALT deficiency: 1) classic galactosemia; 2) clinical variant galactosemia; and 3) biochemical variant galactosemia. The classic genotype is typified by Q188R/Q188R, the clinical variant by S135L/S135L and the biochemical variant by N314D/Q188R. In classic galactosemia, the erythrocyte GALT enzyme activity is absent or markedly reduced, the blood galactose and erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate levels are markedly elevated, and the patient is at risk to develop potentially lethal E. coli sepsis, as well as the long-term diet-independent complications of galactosemia. Patients with the clinical variant form require treatment but do not die from E. coli sepsis in the neonatal period

  17. Progress toward a genotype/phenotype correlation in galactosemia

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, J.K.V.; Lin, Hsien-Chin; Ng, Won G.

    1994-09-01

    Galactosemia is secondary to deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT). If untreated this condition results in severe neonatal symptoms and can be fatal. Most symptoms disappear upon the institution of a galactose-restricted diet. Therefore, most states in the US and many developed countries have implemented newborn screening programs for galactosemia. We have characterized thus far twelve disease-causing point mutations, four protein polymorphisms, one silent nucleotide substitution and a RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) in over 200 patients. The most common galactosemia mutation, Q188R, is present on about 64% of Caucasian galactosemia alleles in the US. This mutation is present on 67% of {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} Caucasian alleles with severe neonatal symptoms and undetectable crythrocytic GALT activity. Thus, Q188R almost defines the {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} phenotype in Caucasian galactosemia patients. This mutation, however, is present on only 16% of the milder {open_quotes}variant{close_quotes} alleles and never in the homozygous state. Variant patients have up to 10% residual GALT activity in their red cells. Therefore, one or more as of yet uncharacterized mutations other than Q188R must be present in {open_quotes}variant{close_quotes} patients. The Q188R mutations is very rare in other ethnic and racial groups. Thus, Galactosemia is panethnic but the mutational basis of this disease differs among human populations. The frequency of Q188R is intermediate in Hispanic-American patients, probably reflecting the Spanish contribution to the gene pool in this population. We conclude that the Q188R mutation encodes the severe {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes}galactosemia phenotype in Caucasians and that other mutations produce the {open_quotes}variant{close_quotes} galactosemia phenotype.

  18. N-glycan abnormalities in children with galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Coss, Karen P; Hawkes, Colin P; Adamczyk, Barbara; Stöckmann, Henning; Crushell, Ellen; Saldova, Radka; Knerr, Ina; Rubio-Gozalbo, Maria E; Monavari, Ardeshir A; Rudd, Pauline M; Treacy, Eileen P

    2014-02-07

    Galactose intoxication and over-restriction in galactosemia may affect glycosylation pathways and cause multisystem effects. In this study, we describe an applied hydrophilic interaction chromatography ultra-performance liquid chromatography high-throughput method to analyze whole serum and extracted IgG N-glycans with measurement of agalactosylated (G0), monogalactosylated (G1), and digalactosylated (G2) structures as a quantitative measure of galactose incorporation. This was applied to nine children with severe galactosemia (genotype Q188R/Q188R) and one child with a milder variant (genotype S135L/S135L). The profiles were also compared with those obtained from three age-matched children with PMM2-CDG (congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia) and nine pediatric control samples. We have observed that severe N-glycan assembly defects correct in the neonate following dietary restriction of galactose. However, treated adult galactosemia patients continue to exhibit ongoing N-glycan processing defects. We have now applied informative galactose incorporation ratios as a method of studying the presence of N-glycan processing defects in children with galactosemia. We identified N-glycan processing defects present in galactosemia children from an early age. For G0/G1, G0/G2, and (G0/G1)/G2 ratios, the difference noted between galactosemia patients and controls was found to be statistically significant (p = 0.002, 0.01, and 0.006, respectively).

  19. Clinical, molecular, and genetic evaluation of galactosemia in Turkish children

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Sezen Ugan; Gürsoy, Semra; Koçkar, Tuba; Önal, Hasan; Adal, Servet Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Aim Galactosemia is a carbohydrate metabolism disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance. The most frequent enzyme deficiency is galactose-1-phosphate-uridylytransferase, which causes classic galactosemia. When the enzyme is absent, an infant cannot metabolize galactose-1-phosphate and it cumulates in liver, kidney, brain, tongue, lens, and skin. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and molecular characteristics of patients with galactosemia, which is observed more frequently in our country than anywhere else in the world. Material and Methods This is a retrospective study that includes the moleculer and genetic charcteristics of 14 patient who were diagnosed as having galactosemia between January 2009 and January 2011. Results Nine patients were male and 5 female. Consanguineous marriage was detected in the family history of 7 patients. One patient had a history of a deceased sibling with a confirmed diagnosis of galactosemia. The main reasons for admission to the hospital were jaundice in 9, hypoglycemia in 2, sepsis in 2, and elevated liver enzymes in 1 patient. The Beutler test was positive in all patients. The mean enzyme activity was 0.36±0.26 μmol/mL. Only 6 of our cases were diagnosed in the early period (first 15 days). Cataract was present in four patients. Q188R mutation was observed in 13 patients, and homozygote N314D and homozygote E340X mutations were observed in one patient. Three patients had impaired neurologic development according to the Denver Developmental Screening Test II. Conclusion The most common genetic abnormality was Q188R mutation. Only 43% of our patients’s disease could be diagnosed at an early stage. We suggest that galactosemia should be included in the national newborn screening program in order to make earlier diagnoses. PMID:28123333

  20. Purple sweet potato colour--a potential therapy for galactosemia?

    PubMed

    Timson, David J

    2014-06-01

    Galactosemia is an inherited metabolic disease in which galactose is not properly metabolised. There are various theories to explain the molecular pathology, and recent experimental evidence strongly suggests that oxidative stress plays a key role. High galactose diets are damaging to experimental animals and oxidative stress also plays a role in this toxicity which can be alleviated by purple sweet potato colour (PSPC). This plant extract is rich in acetylated anthocyanins which have been shown to quench free radical production. The objective of this Commentary is to advance the hypothesis that PSPC, or compounds therefrom, may be a viable basis for a novel therapy for galactosemia.

  1. A case of galactosemia misdiagnosed as cow's milk intolerance.

    PubMed

    Della Casa, Roberto; Ungaro, Carla; Acampora, Emma; Pignata, Claudio; Vajro, Pietro; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Santamaria, Francesca; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2012-09-19

    We report on a female patient affected by galactosemia in whom the diagnosis was obscured by the concomitant presence of manifestations suggesting a cow's milk intolerance. This case exemplifies the problems in reaching a correct diagnosis in patients with metabolic diseases.

  2. The molecular basis of galactosemia - Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Timson, David J

    2016-09-10

    Galactosemia, an inborn error of galactose metabolism, was first described in the 1900s by von Ruess. The subsequent 100years has seen considerable progress in understanding the underlying genetics and biochemistry of this condition. Initial studies concentrated on increasing the understanding of the clinical manifestations of the disease. However, Leloir's discovery of the pathway of galactose catabolism in the 1940s and 1950s enabled other scientists, notably Kalckar, to link the disease to a specific enzymatic step in the pathway. Kalckar's work established that defects in galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) were responsible for the majority of cases of galactosemia. However, over the next three decades it became clear that there were two other forms of galactosemia: type II resulting from deficiencies in galactokinase (GALK1) and type III where the affected enzyme is UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). From the 1970s, molecular biology approaches were applied to galactosemia. The chromosomal locations and DNA sequences of the three genes were determined. These studies enabled modern biochemical studies. Structures of the proteins have been determined and biochemical studies have shown that enzymatic impairment often results from misfolding and consequent protein instability. Cellular and model organism studies have demonstrated that reduced GALT or GALE activity results in increased oxidative stress. Thus, after a century of progress, it is possible to conceive of improved therapies including drugs to manipulate the pathway to reduce potentially toxic intermediates, antioxidants to reduce the oxidative stress of cells or use of "pharmacological chaperones" to stabilise the affected proteins.

  3. Movement disorders in adult patients with classical galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Carecchio, Miryam; Bhatia, Kailash P; Kojovic, Maja; Parees, Isabel; Chandrashekar, Hoskote S; Footitt, Emma J; Burke, Derek; Edwards, Mark J; Lachmann, Robin H L; Murphy, Elaine

    2013-06-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism leading to toxic accumulation of galactose and derived metabolites. It presents with acute systemic complications in the newborn. Galactose restriction resolves these symptoms, but long-term complications, such as premature ovarian failure and neurological problems including motor dysfunction, may occur despite adequate treatment. The objective of the current study was to determine the frequency and phenotype of motor problems in adult patients with classical galactosemia. In this cross-sectional study, adult patients with a biochemically confirmed diagnosis of galactosemia attending our clinic were assessed with an interview and neurological examination and their notes retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified according to the presence/absence of motor dysfunction on examination. Patients with motor dysfunction were further categorized according to the presence/absence of reported motor symptoms. Forty-seven patients were included. Thirty-one patients showed evidence of motor dysfunction including: tremor (23 patients), dystonia (23 patients), cerebellar signs (6 patients), and pyramidal signs (4 patients). Tremor and dystonia were often combined (16 patients). Thirteen patients reported motor symptoms, with 8 describing progressive worsening. Symptomatic treatment was effective in 4 of 5 patients. Nonmotor neurological features (cognitive, psychiatric, and speech disorders) and premature ovarian failure were more frequent in patients with motor dysfunction. Motor dysfunction is a common complication of classical galactosemia, with tremor and dystonia the most frequent findings. Up to one third of patients report motor symptoms and may benefit from appropriate treatment. Progressive worsening is not uncommon and may suggest ongoing brain damage in a subset of patients.

  4. [Newborn screening for galactosemia: a health economics evaluation].

    PubMed

    Camelo Junior, José Simon; Fernandes, Maria Inez Machado; Jorge, Salim Moysés; Maciel, Lea Maria Zanini; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Camargo, Alceu Salles; Passador, Cláudia Souza; Camelo, Sílvia Helena Henriques

    2011-04-01

    This study assesses the efficiency of the galactosemia add-on test in neonatal screening performed on regular Guthrie card blood spots. Based on estimated average incidence of galactosemia (1:19,984 newborns) in São Paulo State, Brazil, the study develops a cost-benefit analysis model, using a B/C ratio and a 9.25% annual interest rate in order to decapitalize the results. Sensitivity analysis is also performed, varying (as a function of the interest or discount rate) from 0 and 20% and according to the 95% confidence interval (1:7,494-1:59,953 newborns). The results show that the savings obtained by improved health of galactosemic patients detected early by add-on neonatal screening is superior to the costs (B/C=1.33), characterizing galactosemia add-on testing in neonatal screening as an efficient policy. The lower the prevailing interest rate in the economy, the more efficient the neonatal screening policy.

  5. The male reproductive system in classic galactosemia: cryptorchidism and low semen volume.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Cynthia S; Welt, Corrine K; Dumoulin, John C M; Robben, Simon G F; Gordon, Catherine M; Dunselman, Gerard A J; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Berry, Gerard T

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies examining reproductive parameters in men with galactosemia have inconsistently demonstrated abnormalities. We hypothesized that men with galactosemia may demonstrate evidence of reproductive dysfunction. Pubertal history, physical examination, hormone levels and semen analyses were examined in 26 males with galactosemia and compared to those in 46 controls. The prevalence of cryptorchidism was higher in men with galactosemia than in the general population [11.6% vs. 1.0% (95%CI: 0.75-1.26; p <0.001)]. Testosterone (461±125 vs. 532± 33 ng%; p=0.04), inhibin B (144±66 vs. 183±52 pg/mL; p=0.002) and sperm concentration (46±36 vs. 112±75×10(6) spermatozoa/mL; p=0.01) were lower and SHBG was higher (40.7±21.5 vs 26.7±14.6; p=0.002) in men with galactosemia compared to controls. Semen volume was below normal in seven out of 12 men with galactosemia. Men with galactosemia have a higher than expected prevalence of cryptorchidism and low semen volumes. The subtle decrease in testosterone and inhibin B levels and sperm count may indicate mild defects in Sertoli and Leydig cell function, but does not point towards severe infertility causing reproductive impairment. Follow-up studies are needed to further determine the clinical consequences of these abnormalities.

  6. Impaired NADPH oxidase activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes of galactosemia patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Essa, Mazen; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Al-Qabandi, Wafa'a; Khan, Islam

    2013-07-01

    Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder with a wide range of clinical abnormalities. Cellular oxidative stress is considered as one of the pathogenic mechanisms of galactosemia. In this study, we examined the activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX), a major superoxide-generating enzyme system, in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from galactosemia patients. PBL were isolated from galactosemia patients and healthy control subjects and used for cell culture studies and biochemical assays. PBL were cultured in the presence or absence of galactose or galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1-P), and enzyme activities and/or gene expression of NOX, catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were measured in the cell homogenates. PBL isolated from galactosemia patients showed significantly reduced (P < 0.01) activities of catalase and GPx; however SOD activity remained unaltered. Galactosemia patients were found to have significantly (P < 0.01) increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in blood lymphocytes. Enzymatic activity of NOX was significantly (P < 0.001) reduced in galactosemia patients; however, Western blotting revealed that NOX-1 protein was not significantly altered. Interestingly, levels of NOX activity in lymphocytes isolated from galactosemia patients significantly increased but remained subnormal when cultured in galactose-deficient medium for two weeks, indicating a galactose-mediated inhibition of NOX. Lymphocytes isolated from control subjects were found to have significantly (P < 0.01) reduced NOX activity when cultured in the presence of galactose or Gal-1-P for two weeks. These results show that galactose-induced cellular oxidative stress is not NOX mediated. However, impairment of the NOX system might be responsible for some of the clinical complications in galactosemia patients.

  7. Affected functional networks associated with sentence production in classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Inge; van den Hurk, Job; Hofman, Paul Am; Zimmermann, Luc Ji; Uludağ, Kâmil; Jansma, Bernadette M; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2015-08-07

    Patients with the inherited metabolic disorder classic galactosemia have language production impairments in several planning stages. Here, we assessed potential deviations in recruitment and connectivity across brain areas responsible for language production that may explain these deficits. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study neural activity and connectivity while participants carried out a language production task. This study included 13 adolescent patients and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Participants passively watched or actively described an animated visual scene using two conditions, varying in syntactic complexity (single words versus a sentence). Results showed that patients recruited additional and more extensive brain regions during sentence production. Both groups showed modulations with syntactic complexity in left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), a region associated with syntactic planning, and in right insula. In addition, patients showed a modulation with syntax in left superior temporal gyrus (STG), whereas the controls did not. Further, patients showed increased activity in right STG and right supplementary motor area (SMA). The functional connectivity data showed similar patterns, with more extensive connectivity with frontal and motor regions, and restricted and weaker connectivity with superior temporal regions. Patients also showed higher baseline cerebral blood flow (CBF) in right IFG and trends towards higher CBF in bilateral STG, SMA and the insula. Taken together, the data demonstrate that language abnormalities in classic galactosemia are associated with specific changes within the language network. These changes point towards impairments related to both syntactic planning and speech motor planning in these patients.

  8. Coordinated movement, neuromuscular synaptogenesis and trans-synaptic signaling defects in Drosophila galactosemia models.

    PubMed

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Parkinson, William M; Kopke, Danielle L; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-09-01

    The multiple galactosemia disease states manifest long-term neurological symptoms. Galactosemia I results from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which converts galactose-1-phosphate + UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate + UDP-galactose. Galactosemia II results from loss of galactokinase (GALK), phosphorylating galactose to galactose-1-phosphate. Galactosemia III results from the loss of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE), which interconverts UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose, as well as UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) alternatively makes UDP-galactose from uridine triphosphate and galactose-1-phosphate. All four UDP-sugars are essential donors for glycoprotein biosynthesis with critical roles at the developing neuromuscular synapse. Drosophila galactosemia I (dGALT) and II (dGALK) disease models genetically interact; manifesting deficits in coordinated movement, neuromuscular junction (NMJ) development, synaptic glycosylation, and Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. Similarly, dGALE and dUGP mutants display striking locomotor and NMJ formation defects, including expanded synaptic arbours, glycosylation losses, and differential changes in Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. In combination with dGALT loss, both dGALE and dUGP mutants compromise the synaptomatrix glycan environment that regulates Wnt trans-synaptic signalling that drives 1) presynaptic Futsch/MAP1b microtubule dynamics and 2) postsynaptic Frizzled nuclear import (FNI). Taken together, these findings indicate UDP-sugar balance is a key modifier of neurological outcomes in all three interacting galactosemia disease models, suggest that Futsch homolog MAP1B and the Wnt Frizzled receptor may be disease-relevant targets in epimerase and transferase galactosemias, and identify UGP as promising new potential therapeutic target for galactosemia neuropathology.

  9. Molecular basis for Duarte and Los Angeles variant galactosemia

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, S.D.; Lai, K.; Dembure, P.P.

    1997-02-01

    Human erythrocytes that are homozygous for the Duarte enzyme variant of galactosemia (D/D) have a characteristic isoform on isoelectric focusing and 50% reduction in galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) enzyme activity. The Duarte biochemical phenotype has a molecular genotype of N314D/N314D. The characteristic Duarte isoform is also associated with a variant called the {open_quotes}Los Angeles (LA) phenotype,{close_quotes} which has increased GALT enzyme activity. We evaluated GALT enzyme activity and screened the GALT genes of 145 patients with one or more N314D-containing alleles. We found seven with the LA biochemical phenotype, and all had a 1721C{r_arrow}T transition in exon 7 in cis with the N314D missense mutation. The 1721C{r_arrow}T transition is a neutral polymorphism for leucine at amino acid 218 (L218L). In pedigree analyses, this 1721C{r_arrow}T transition segregated with the LA phenotype of increased GALT activity in three different biochemical phenotypes (LA/N, LA/G, and LA/D). To determine the mechanism for increased activity of the LA variant, we compared GALT mRNA, protein abundance, and enzyme thermal stability in lymphoblast cell lines of D and LA phenotypes with comparable genotypes. GALT protein abundance was increased in LA compared to D alleles, but mRNA was similar among all genotypes. We conclude that the codon change N314D in cis with the base-pair transition 1721C{r_arrow}T produces the LA variant of galactosemia and that this nucleotide change increases GALT activity by increasing GALT protein abundance without increasing transcription or decreasing thermal lability. A favorable codon bias for the mutated codon with consequently increased translation rates is postulated as the mechanism. 23 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Prevalence and Phenotype of Childhood Apraxia of Speech In Youth with Galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Potter, Nancy L.; Strand, Edythe A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We address the hypothesis that the severe and persistent speech disorder reported in persons with galactosemia meets contemporary diagnostic criteria for Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). A positive finding for CAS in this rare metabolic disorder has the potential to impact treatment of persons with galactosemia and inform explanatory perspectives on CAS in neurological, neurodevelopmental, and idiopathic contexts. Method Thirty-three youth with galactosemia and significant prior or persistent speech sound disorder were assessed in their homes in 17 states. Participants completed a protocol yielding information on their cognitive, structural, sensorimotor, language, speech, prosody, and voice status and function. Results Eight of the 33 participants (24%) met contemporary diagnostic criteria for CAS. Two participants, one of whom was among the 8 with CAS, met criteria for ataxic or hyperkinetic dysarthria. Group-wise findings for the remaining 24 participants are consistent with a classification category termed Motor Speech Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (MSD-NOS; Shriberg, Fourakis, et al., in press-a). Conclusion We estimate the prevalence of CAS in galactosemia at 18 per hundred, 180 times the estimated risk for idiopathic CAS. Findings support the need to study risk factors for the high occurrence of motor speech disorders in galactosemia, despite early compliant dietary management. PMID:20966389

  11. [Galactosemia associated with Rogers syndrome in a 10-month-old infant].

    PubMed

    Crouzet-Ozenda Luci, L; De Smet, S; Monpoux, F; Ferrero-Vacher, C; Giuliano, F; Sirvent, N

    2011-01-01

    Galactosemia and congenital Rogers syndrome or thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia are 2 rare inherited metabolic diseases. The combination of the 2 diseases has never been reported in the literature. We describe the case of an infant followed for congenital galactosemia since the age of 8 days, with thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia diagnosed at the age of 10 months. Galactosemia's symptoms occur in the first 2 weeks of life with severe liver disease. Total eviction of the galactose allows complete regression and prevention of early symptoms but does not prevent late complications. Rogers syndrome associates megaloblastic anemia, deafness, and diabetes mellitus that begin in childhood. Supplementation with thiamine allows regression of anemia and prevents the onset of diabetes at least until adolescence.

  12. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    De-Souza, Evandro A; Pimentel, Felipe S A; Machado, Caio M; Martins, Larissa S; da-Silva, Wagner S; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Masuda, Claudio A

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast), which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  13. Oxidative stress contributes to outcome severity in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Hopson, Marquise L; Hang, Darwin; Liang, Yongliang; Jones, Dean P; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2013-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a genetic disorder that results from profound loss of galactose-1P-uridylyltransferase (GALT). Affected infants experience a rapid escalation of potentially lethal acute symptoms following exposure to milk. Dietary restriction of galactose prevents or resolves the acute sequelae; however, many patients experience profound long-term complications. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms that underlie pathophysiology in classic galactosemia remain unclear. Recently, we developed a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia and demonstrated that, like patients, GALT-null Drosophila succumb in development if exposed to galactose but live if maintained on a galactose-restricted diet. Prior models of experimental galactosemia have implicated a possible association between galactose exposure and oxidative stress. Here we describe application of our fly genetic model of galactosemia to the question of whether oxidative stress contributes to the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null animals. Our first approach tested the impact of pro- and antioxidant food supplements on the survival of GALT-null and control larvae. We observed a clear pattern: the oxidants paraquat and DMSO each had a negative impact on the survival of mutant but not control animals exposed to galactose, and the antioxidants vitamin C and α-mangostin each had the opposite effect. Biochemical markers also confirmed that galactose and paraquat synergistically increased oxidative stress on all cohorts tested but, interestingly, the mutant animals showed a decreased response relative to controls. Finally, we tested the expression levels of two transcripts responsive to oxidative stress, GSTD6 and GSTE7, in mutant and control larvae exposed to galactose and found that both genes were induced, one by more than 40-fold. Combined, these results implicate oxidative stress and response as contributing factors in the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null Drosophila and

  14. Speech and Language Deficits in Early-Treated Children with Galactosemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waisbren, Susan E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Intelligence and speech-language development of eight children (3.6 to 11.6 years old) with classic galactosemia were assessed by standardized tests. Each of the children had delays of early speech difficulties, and all but one had language disorders in at least one area. Available from: Journal of Pediatrics, C.V. Mosby Co., 11830 Westline…

  15. The galactose-induced decrease in phosphate levels leads to toxicity in yeast models of galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Machado, Caio M; De-Souza, Evandro A; De-Queiroz, Ana Luiza F V; Pimentel, Felipe S A; Silva, Guilherme F S; Gomes, Fabio M; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Masuda, Claudio A

    2017-02-14

    Classic galactosemia is an inborn error of metabolism caused by deleterious mutations in the GALT gene. A number of evidences indicate that the galactose-1-phosphate accumulation observed in patient cells is a cause of toxicity in this disease. Nevertheless, the consequent molecular events caused by the galactose-1-phosphate accumulation remain elusive. Here we show that intracellular inorganic phosphate levels decreased when yeast models of classic galactosemia were exposed to galactose. The decrease in phosphate levels is probably due to the trapping of phosphate in the accumulated galactose-1-phosphate since the deletion of the galactokinase encoding gene GAL1 suppressed this phenotype. Galactose-induced phosphate depletion caused an increase in glycogen content, an expected result since glycogen breakdown by the enzyme glycogen phosphorylase is dependent on inorganic phosphate. Accordingly, an increase in intracellular phosphate levels suppressed the galactose effect on glycogen content and conferred galactose tolerance to yeast models of galactosemia. These results support the hypothesis that the galactose-induced decrease in phosphate levels leads to toxicity in galactosemia and opens new possibilities for the development of better treatments for this disease.

  16. Prevalence and Phenotype of Childhood Apraxia of Speech in Youth with Galactosemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Potter, Nancy L.; Strand, Edythe A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the authors address the hypothesis that the severe and persistent speech disorder reported in persons with galactosemia meets contemporary diagnostic criteria for Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). A positive finding for CAS in this rare metabolic disorder has the potential to impact treatment of persons with galactosemia…

  17. Diversity of approaches to classic galactosemia around the world: a comparison of diagnosis, intervention, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Garber, Kathryn; Kiel, John; Baric, Ivo; Berry, Gerard T; Bosch, Annet; Burlina, Alberto; Chiesa, Ana; Pico, Maria Luz Couce; Estrada, Sylvia C; Henderson, Howard; Leslie, Nancy; Longo, Nicola; Morris, Andrew A M; Ramirez-Farias, Carlett; Schweitzer-Krantz, Susanne; Scheweitzer-Krantz, Susanne; Silao, Catherine Lynn T; Vela-Amieva, Marcela; Waisbren, Susan; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2012-11-01

    Without intervention, classic galactosemia is a potentially fatal disorder in infancy. With the benefit of early diagnosis and dietary restriction of galactose, the acute sequelae of classic galactosemia can be prevented or reversed. However, despite early and lifelong dietary treatment, many galactosemic patients go on to experience serious long-term complications including cognitive disability, speech problems, neurological and/or movement disorders and, in girls and women, ovarian dysfunction. Further, there remains uncertainty surrounding what constitutes a 'best practice' for treating this disorder. To explore the extent and implications of this uncertainty, we conducted a small but global survey of healthcare providers who follow patients with classic galactosemia, seeking to compare established protocols for diagnosis, intervention, and follow-up, as well as the outcomes and outcome frequencies seen in the patient populations cared for by these providers. We received 13 survey responses representing five continents and 11 countries. Respondents underscored disparities in approaches to diagnosis, management and follow-up care. Notably, we saw no clear relationship between differing approaches to care and long-term outcomes in the populations studied. Negative outcomes occurred in the majority of cases regardless of when treatment was initiated, how tightly galactose intake was restricted, or how closely patients were monitored. We document here what is, to our knowledge, the first global comparison of healthcare approaches to classic galactosemia. These data reinforce the idea that there is currently no one best practice for treating patients with classic galactosemia, and underscore the need for more extensive and statistically powerful comparative studies to reveal potential positive or negative impacts of differing approaches.

  18. Functional and structural impact of the most prevalent missense mutations in classic galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana I; Trabuco, Matilde; Ramos, Ruben; Silva, Maria João; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Leandro, Paula; Rivera, Isabel; Vicente, João B

    2014-01-01

    Galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) is a key enzyme in galactose metabolism, particularly important in the neonatal period due to ingestion of galactose-containing milk. GALT deficiency results in the genetic disorder classic galactosemia, whose pathophysiology is still not fully elucidated. Whereas classic galactosemia has been hypothesized to result from GALT misfolding, a thorough functional–structural characterization of GALT most prevalent variants was still lacking, hampering the development of alternative therapeutic approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate the structural–functional effects of nine GALT mutations, four of which account for the vast majority of the mutations identified in galactosemic patients. Several methodologies were employed to evaluate the mutations' impact on GALT function, on the protein secondary and tertiary structures, and on the aggregation propensity. The major structural effect concerns disturbed propensity for aggregation, particularly striking for the p.Q188R variant, resulting from the most frequent (∼60%) allele at a worldwide scale. The absence of major effects at the secondary and tertiary structure levels suggests that the disturbed aggregation results from subtle perturbations causing a higher and/or longer exposure of hydrophobic residues in the variants as compared to WT GALT. The results herein described indicate a possible benefit from introducing proteostasis regulators and/or chemical/pharmacological chaperones to prevent the accumulation of protein aggregates, in new avenues of therapeutic research for classic galactosemia. PMID:25614870

  19. Parenting a child with phenylketonuria or galactosemia: implications for health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    ten Hoedt, Amber E; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Boelen, Carolien C A; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; van Spronsen, Francjan J; Wijburg, Frits A; Bosch, Annet M; Grootenhuis, Martha A

    2011-04-01

    Parents of children with chronic disorders have an impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL) compared to parents of healthy children. Remarkably, parents of children with a metabolic disorder reported an even lower HRQoL than parents of children with other chronic disorders. Possibly, the uncertainty about the course of the disease and the limited life expectancy in many metabolic disorders are important factors in the low parental HRQoL. Therefore, we performed a cross-sectional study in parents of children with phenylketonuria (PKU, OMIM #261600) and galactosemia (OMIM #230400), metabolic disorders not affecting life expectancy, in order to investigate their HRQoL compared to parents of healthy children and to parents of children with other metabolic disorders. A total of 185 parents of children with PKU and galactosemia aged 1-19 years completed two questionnaires. Parents of children with PKU or galactosemia reported a HRQoL comparable to parents of healthy children and a significantly better HRQoL than parents of children with other metabolic disorders. Important predictors for parental mental HRQoL were the psychosocial factors emotional support and loss of friendship. As parental mental functioning influences the health, development and adjustment of their children, it is important that treating physicians also pay attention to the wellbeing of the parents. The insight that emotional support and loss of friendship influence the HRQoL of the parents enables treating physicians to provide better support for these parents.

  20. A re-evaluation of life-long severe galactose restriction for the nutrition management of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Van Calcar, Sandra C; Bernstein, Laurie E; Rohr, Frances J; Scaman, Christine H; Yannicelli, Steven; Berry, Gerard T

    2014-07-01

    The galactose-restricted diet is life-saving for infants with classic galactosemia. However, the benefit and extent of dietary galactose restriction required after infancy remain unclear and variation exists in practice. There is a need for evidence-based recommendations to better standardize treatment for this disorder. This paper reviews the association between diet treatment and outcomes in classic galactosemia and evaluates the contribution of food sources of free galactose in the diet. Recommendations include allowing all fruits, vegetables, legumes, soy products that are not fermented, various aged cheeses and foods containing caseinates. Further research directions are discussed.

  1. A case of classical galactosemia: identification and characterization of 3 distinct mutations in galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene in a single family.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Kaur, Gurjit; Thapa, Babu R; Prasad, Rajendra; Kulkarni, Ketan

    2011-07-01

    Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism. In the very first instance of its kind from India, the authors report the presence of three different galatose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene mutations, associated with galactosemia, in a single Indian family. One of the three mutations, S307X, is a novel mutation (GenBank Accession number GQ355273) and is of nonsense nature causing the truncation of the GALT protein resulting in the decreased enzyme activity. The authors have also emphasized the importance of introduction of new born screening program for galactosemia and its genetic analysis in select settings across the country.

  2. N- and O-linked glycosylation of total plasma glycoproteins in galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Xia, Baoyun; Gleason, Tyler J; Castañeda, Uriel; He, Miao; Berry, Gerard T; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2012-08-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal metabolic disorder that results from profound impairment of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT); despite decades of research, the underlying mechanism of pathophysiology remains unclear. Previous studies of plasma and tissue samples from patients with classic galactosemia have revealed defects of protein and lipid glycosylation, however, the underlying bases for these defects and their clinical significance, if any, has remained unclear. As a step toward addressing these questions we characterized both the N- and O-linked glycomes of plasma proteins from neonates, infants, children, and adults with galactosemia using mass spectrometry and asked (1) whether similar or disparate defects exist for N-linked and O-linked modifications, (2) what factors correlate with the severity of these defects in different patients, and perhaps most important, (3) whether there is any apparent relationship between chronic glycosylation defects and long-term outcome in patients. We found that some but not all of the galactosemic neonates tested exhibited abnormal N- and O-linked glycosylation of plasma proteins. The types of abnormalities seen were similar between N- and O-linked moieties, but the extent of the defects varied between patients. Age, gender, GALT genotype, and predicted residual GALT activity all failed to explain the extent of the glycosylation defect in the samples studied. Dietary galactose restriction markedly normalized both the N- and O-linked glycosylation patterns for all infants tested; however, any remaining glycosylation defects evident in the plasma of older children or adults on galactose-restricted diets showed no correlation with clinical outcome. These data cannot rule out the possibility that subtle or localized glycosylation defects, not detectable by our methods or not reflected in plasma, may contribute to acute or long-term outcome severity.

  3. Developmental defects in a Caenorhabditis elegans model for type III galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Brokate-Llanos, Ana M; Monje, José M; Murdoch, Piedad Del Socorro; Muñoz, Manuel J

    2014-12-01

    Type III galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by reduced activity of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase, which participates in galactose metabolism and the generation of various UDP-sugar species. We characterized gale-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that a complete loss-of-function mutation is lethal, as has been hypothesized for humans, whereas a nonlethal partial loss-of-function allele causes a variety of developmental abnormalities, likely resulting from the impairment of the glycosylation process. We also observed that gale-1 mutants are hypersensitive to galactose as well as to infections. Interestingly, we found interactions between gale-1 and the unfolded protein response.

  4. Capillary bedside blood glucose measurement in neonates: missing a diagnosis of galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Öcal, Murat; Tanrıverdi, Sibel; Baysal, Birsen; Deniz, Ahmet; Öncel, Kahraman; Demirbilek, Hüseyin

    2015-03-01

    A number of factors may lead to inaccuracy in measurement of capillary blood glucose with a glucometer. Measurement of other carbohydrate molecules such as galactose and fructose along with glucose can potentially be a cause of error. We report a newborn patient who was referred to our hospital with conjugated bilirubinemia, hepatomegaly and high capillary blood glucose levels measured with a glucometer. Simultaneous biochemical measurements revealed normal blood glucose levels. Further investigation led to a diagnosis of classical galactosemia. Capillary blood glucose level measured with glucometer also dropped to normal values following cessation of breastfeeding and initiation of feeding with a lactose-free formula.

  5. Galactose content of legumes, caseinates, and some hard cheeses: implications for diet treatment of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Van Calcar, Sandra C; Bernstein, Laurie E; Rohr, Frances J; Yannicelli, Steven; Berry, Gerard T; Scaman, Christine H

    2014-02-12

    There are inconsistent reports on the lactose and/or galactose content of some foods traditionally restricted from the diet for classic galactosemia. Therefore, samples of cheeses, caseinates, and canned black, pinto, kidney, and garbanzo beans were analyzed for free galactose content using HPLC with refractive index or pulsed amperometric detection. Galactose concentrations in several hard and aged cheeses and three mild/medium Cheddars, produced by smaller local dairies, was <10 mg/100 g sample compared to 55.4 mg/100 g sample in four sharp Cheddars produced by a multinational producer. Galactose in sodium and calcium caseinate ranged from undetectable to 95.5 mg/100 g sample. Free galactose level in garbanzo beans was lower than previously reported at 24.6 mg/100 g sample; black beans contained 5.3 mg/100 g, and free galactose was not detected in red kidney or pinto beans. These data provide a basis for recommending inclusion of legumes, caseinate-containing foods, and some aged hard cheeses that had been previously restricted in the diet for individuals with galactosemia.

  6. International clinical guideline for the management of classical galactosemia: diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Welling, Lindsey; Bernstein, Laurie E; Berry, Gerard T; Burlina, Alberto B; Eyskens, François; Gautschi, Matthias; Grünewald, Stephanie; Gubbels, Cynthia S; Knerr, Ina; Labrune, Philippe; van der Lee, Johanna H; MacDonald, Anita; Murphy, Elaine; Portnoi, Pat A; Õunap, Katrin; Potter, Nancy L; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Spencer, Jessica B; Timmers, Inge; Treacy, Eileen P; Van Calcar, Sandra C; Waisbren, Susan E; Bosch, Annet M

    2017-03-01

    Classical galactosemia (CG) is an inborn error of galactose metabolism. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and follow-up of CG are currently lacking, and treatment and follow-up have been demonstrated to vary worldwide. To provide patients around the world the same state-of-the-art in care, members of The Galactosemia Network (GalNet) developed an evidence-based and internationally applicable guideline for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of CG. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. A systematic review of the literature was performed, after key questions were formulated during an initial GalNet meeting. The first author and one of the working group experts conducted data-extraction. All experts were involved in data-extraction. Quality of the body of evidence was evaluated and recommendations were formulated. Whenever possible recommendations were evidence-based, if not they were based on expert opinion. Consensus was reached by multiple conference calls, consensus rounds via e-mail and a final consensus meeting. Recommendations addressing diagnosis, dietary treatment, biochemical monitoring, and follow-up of clinical complications were formulated. For all recommendations but one, full consensus was reached. A 93 % consensus was reached on the recommendation addressing age at start of bone density screening. During the development of this guideline, gaps of knowledge were identified in most fields of interest, foremost in the fields of treatment and follow-up.

  7. White matter microstructure pathology in classic galactosemia revealed by neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Inge; Zhang, Hui; Bastiani, Matteo; Jansma, Bernadette M; Roebroeck, Alard; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2015-03-01

    White matter abnormalities have been observed in patients with classic galactosemia, an inborn error of galactose metabolism. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data collected in the past were generally qualitative in nature. Our objective was to investigate white matter microstructure pathology and examine correlations with outcome and behaviour in this disease, by using multi-shell diffusion weighted imaging. In addition to standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) was used to estimate density and orientation dispersion of neurites in a group of eight patients (aged 16-21 years) and eight healthy controls (aged 15-20 years). Extensive white matter abnormalities were found: neurite density index (NDI) was lower in the patient group in bilateral anterior areas, and orientation dispersion index (ODI) was increased mainly in the left hemisphere. These specific regional profiles are in agreement with the cognitive profile observed in galactosemia, showing higher order cognitive impairments, and language and motor impairments, respectively. Less favourable white matter properties correlated positively with age and age at onset of diet, and negatively with behavioural outcome (e.g. visual working memory). To conclude, this study provides evidence of white matter pathology regarding density and dispersion of neurites in these patients. The results are discussed in light of suggested pathophysiological mechanisms.

  8. From mind to mouth: event related potentials of sentence production in classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Inge; Jansma, Bernadette M; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2012-01-01

    Patients with classic galactosemia, an inborn error of metabolism, have speech and language production impairments. Past research primarily focused on speech (motor) problems, but these cannot solely explain the language impairments. Which specific deficits contribute to the impairments in language production is not yet known. Deficits in semantic and syntactic planning are plausible and require further investigation. In the present study, we examined syntactic encoding while patients and matched controls overtly described scenes of moving objects using either separate words (minimal syntactic planning) or sentences (sentence-level syntactic planning). The design of the paradigm also allowed tapping into local noun phrase- and more global sentence-level syntactic planning. Simultaneously, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs). The patients needed more time to prepare and finish the utterances and made more errors. The patient ERPs had a very similar morphology to that of healthy controls, indicating overall comparable neural processing. Most importantly, the ERPs diverged from those of controls in several functionally informative time windows, ranging from very early (90-150 ms post scene onset) to relatively late (1820-2020 ms post scene onset). These time windows can be associated with different linguistic encoding stages. The ERP results form the first neuroscientific evidence for language production impairments in patients with galactosemia in lexical and syntactic planning stages, i.e., prior to the linguistic output phase. These findings hence shed new light on the language impairments in this disease.

  9. Primary ovarian insufficiency in classic galactosemia: role of FSH dysfunction and timing of the lesion.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Cynthia S; Land, Jolande A; Evers, Johannes L H; Bierau, Jörgen; Menheere, Paul P C A; Robben, Simon G F; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2013-01-01

    FSH inactivity due to secondary hypoglycosylation has been suggested as a potential mechanism for primary ovarian insufficiency in classic galactosemia. To investigate the role of FSH and to gain insight in the timing of the damage, ovarian stimulation tests were performed and data on ovarian imaging collected. Fifteen patients with primary ovarian insufficiency underwent ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins. Only one patient showed a normal increase in estradiol level, all the others had a low or no estradiol response. Anti-Müllerian hormone measurement in all girls and women showed levels below the detection limit of 0.10 μg/l. Ovarian volumes were evaluated by MRI in 14 patients and compared to age matched controls, prepubertal controls and postmenopausal controls. The ovarian volumes of the galactosemic girls were smaller than those of the age matched controls (p = 0.001) and the prepubertal ovaries (p = 0.008), and did not differ significantly from postmenopausal ovarian volumes (p = 0.161). In conclusion we found no evidence that FSH inactivity plays a role in primary ovarian insufficiency in classic galactosemia. Moreover, ovarian imaging results point to an early onset of ovarian failure in this disease.

  10. Mediators of a long-term movement abnormality in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Emily L; DuBoff, Brian; Feany, Mel B; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2012-11-01

    Despite neonatal diagnosis and life-long dietary restriction of galactose, many patients with classic galactosemia grow to experience significant long-term complications. Among the more common are speech, cognitive, behavioral, ovarian and neurological/movement difficulties. Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of these long-term complications remains obscure, hindering prognosis and attempts at improved intervention. As a first step to overcome this roadblock we have begun to explore long-term outcomes in our previously reported GALT-null Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Here we describe the first of these studies. Using a countercurrent device, a simple climbing assay, and a startle response test to characterize and quantify an apparent movement abnormality, we explored the impact of cryptic GALT expression on phenotype, tested the role of sublethal galactose exposure and galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P) accumulation, tested the impact of age, and searched for potential anatomical defects in brain and muscle. We found that about 2.5% residual GALT activity was sufficient to reduce outcome severity. Surprisingly, sublethal galactose exposure and gal-1P accumulation during development showed no effect on the adult phenotype. Finally, despite the apparent neurological or neuromuscular nature of the complication we found no clear morphological differences between mutants and controls in brain or muscle, suggesting that the defect is subtle and/or is physiologic rather than structural. Combined, our results confirm that, like human patients, GALT-null Drosophila experience significant long-term complications that occur independently of galactose exposure, and serve as a proof of principle demonstrating utility of the GALT-null Drosophila model as a tool for exploring genetic and environmental modifiers of long-term outcome in GALT deficiency.

  11. Misfolding of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase can result in type I galactosemia.

    PubMed

    McCorvie, Thomas J; Gleason, Tyler J; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L; Timson, David J

    2013-08-01

    Type I galactosemia is a genetic disorder that is caused by the impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT; EC 2.7.7.12). Although a large number of mutations have been detected through genetic screening of the human GALT (hGALT) locus, for many it is not known how they cause their effects. The majority of these mutations are missense, with predicted substitutions scattered throughout the enzyme structure and thus causing impairment by other means rather than direct alterations to the active site. To clarify the fundamental, molecular basis of hGALT impairment we studied five disease-associated variants p.D28Y, p.L74P, p.F171S, p.F194L and p.R333G using both a yeast model and purified, recombinant proteins. In a yeast expression system there was a correlation between lysate activity and the ability to rescue growth in the presence of galactose, except for p.R333G. Kinetic analysis of the purified proteins quantified each variant's level of enzymatic impairment and demonstrated that this was largely due to altered substrate binding. Increased surface hydrophobicity, altered thermal stability and changes in proteolytic sensitivity were also detected. Our results demonstrate that hGALT requires a level of flexibility to function optimally and that altered folding is the underlying reason of impairment in all the variants tested here. This indicates that misfolding is a common, molecular basis of hGALT deficiency and suggests the potential of pharmacological chaperones and proteostasis regulators as novel therapeutic approaches for type I galactosemia.

  12. Galactosemia caused by a point mutation that activates cryptic donor splice site in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wadelius, C.; Lagerkvist, A. Uppsala Univ. ); Molin, A.K.; Larsson, A. ); Von Doebeln, U. )

    1993-08-01

    Galactosemia affects 1/84,000 in Sweden and is manifested in infancy when the child is exposed to galactose in the diet. If untreated there is a risk of severe early symptoms and, even with a lactose-free diet, late symptoms such as mental retardation and ovarial dysfunction may develop. In classical galactosemia, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) (EC 2.7.7.12) is defective and the normal cDNA sequence of this enzyme has been characterized. Recently eight mutations leading to galactosemia were published. Heparinized venous blood was drawn from a patient with classical galactosemia. In the cDNA from the patient examined, an insertion of 54 bp was found at position 1087. Amplification of the relevant genomic region of the patient's DNA was performed. Exon-intron boundaries and intronic sequences thus determined revealed that the 54-bp insertion was located immediately downstream of exon 10. It was further found that the patient was heterozygous for a point mutation, changing a C to a T (in 5 of 9 clones) at the second base in the intron downstream of the insertion. This alteration creates a sequence which, as well as the ordinary splice site, differs in only two positions from the consensus sequence. It was found that the mutation occurred in only one of the 20 alleles from galactosemic patients and in none of the 200 alleles from normal controls. The mutation is inherited from the mother, who also was found to express the 54-bp-long insertion at the mRNA level. Sequences from the 5[prime] end of the coding region were determined after genomic amplification, revealing a sequence identical to that reported. The mutation on the paternal allele has not been identified. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  13. False-Positive Newborn Screen Using the Beutler Spot Assay for Galactosemia in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stuhrman, Grace; Perez Juanazo, Stefanie J; Crivelly, Kea; Smith, Jennifer; Andersson, Hans; Morava, Eva

    2017-01-12

    Classical galactosemia is detected through newborn screening by measuring galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) in the USA primarily via the Beutler spot assay. We report on an 18-month-old patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency that was originally diagnosed with classical galactosemia. The patient presented with elevated liver function enzymes and bilirubinemia and was immediately treated with soy-based formula. Confirmatory tests revealed deficiency of the GALT enzyme, however, full-sequencing of GALT was normal, suggestive of a different ideology. The Beutler spot assay uses three other enzymatic steps in addition to GALT. A deficiency in either of these enzymes can result in suspected decreased GALT activity when using the Beutler assay. Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation screening for phosphoglucomutase-1 deficiency was negative. Quantitative analysis of G6PD enzyme in red blood cells showed a severe deficiency and a deletion in G6PD. Soy-formula, the standard treatment for galactosemia, has been reported to trigger hemolysis in G6PD deficient patients. G6PD and phosphoglucomutase-1 deficiencies should be considered when confirmatory tests are negative for pathogenic variants in GALT and galactose-1-phosphate level is normal.

  14. Grey matter density decreases as well as increases in patients with classic galactosemia: A voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Inge; van der Korput, Lisanne D; Jansma, Bernadette M; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2016-10-01

    Brain impairments have been observed in patients with classic galactosemia, an inherited metabolic disorder resulting in a particular neuro-cognitive profile. Neuroimaging studies showed abnormalities such as diffuse white mater (WM) abnormalities and grey matter (GM) atrophy. Our current study analysed grey matter density using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and compared the brains of eight adolescent patients with classic galactosemia with eight healthy gender- and aged-matched controls. GM density differences were found in several regions. Decreased GM density was found in the patients in the bilateral putamen and bilateral occipital cortex. Increased GM density in the patients, on the other hand, was found in the bilateral inferior frontal and medial prefrontal cortex. The anatomical profile of the abnormalities is in line with the neuro-cognitive profile of patients with classic galactosemia, including motor dysfunction, speech and language difficulties and higher order cognitive problems. Less favourable GM densities in patients (either increased or decreased compared to controls) correlated with younger age, a worse visual working memory performance, and an older age at initiation of the galactose-restricted diet. To conclude, this explorative study is the first to analyse the GM using VBM in this population, and demonstrates a mixed profile of both increased and decreased GM density in these patients.

  15. Cryptic residual GALT activity is a potential modifier of scholastic outcome in school age children with classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Emily L; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Taddeo, Elles; Gleason, Tyler J; Epstein, Michael P; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2013-11-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disorder that results from profound deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Although early diagnosis and rigorous dietary restriction of galactose prevent or resolve the potentially lethal acute symptoms, patients are at markedly increased risk of long-term complications including significant cognitive, speech, and behavioral difficulties, among other problems. The mechanisms that underlie these long-term complications remain unclear, as do the factors that modify their severity. Here we explored the scholastic and behavioral outcomes experienced by a cohort of 54 school age children with classic galactosemia. Data collected included survey responses from parents and teachers, school records including standardized test scores, and GALT genotype data used to estimate predicted residual GALT activity based on a yeast expression system. As expected, many but not all of the children in our study demonstrated speech, scholastic, and behavioral difficulties. Perhaps most striking, we found that predicted cryptic residual GALT activity, often below the threshold of detection of clinical assays, appeared to modify scholastic outcome. These data raise the intriguing possibility that cryptic GALT activity might also influence the severity of other long-term complications in classic galactosemia.

  16. Frequency distribution of Q188R, N314D, Duarte 1, and Duarte 2 GALT variant alleles in an Indian galactosemia population.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Thapa, Babu R; Kaur, Gurjit; Prasad, Rajendra

    2012-12-01

    Classical galactosemia is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) gene. The Q188R and N314D mutations are the most frequently cited GALT gene mutations. N314D is further associated with two variants, Duarte 1 and Duarte 2. Nevertheless, no reports are available on the clinical and molecular spectrum of galactosemia from the Indian population. The present study was designed to establish the frequency of these two most common mutations and their variants in Indian galactosemia patients so as to determine a single most common mutation/polymorphism for establishing the DNA-based diagnosis of galactosemia. Three alleles were found to be present at a frequency of 0.036 (Q188R), 0.40 (N314D), and 0.39 (D2); no D1 alleles were found. A significantly higher frequency of the Duarte 2 allele in our population suggests the presence of a milder form of galactosemia, which can be well managed by early diagnosis and dietary management.

  17. Biochemical and molecular characterization of GALT gene from Indian galactosemia patients: identification of 10 novel mutations and their structural and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Thapa, Babu R; Kaur, Gurjit; Prasad, Rajendra

    2012-12-24

    Classical Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism caused by severe reduction or absence of the galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) enzyme. Till date, no reports are available on clinical and molecular spectrum of galactosemia from Indian population. The characterization of underlying GALT gene lesions was performed in 55 unrelated galactosemia patients. The GALT mutational spectrum comprised 16 distinct mutations including 10 previously unreported mutations. N314D was the most common mutation with a frequency of 40% followed by Q188R at 2.7%. The novel GALT gene mutations included 6 missense mutations viz. Y89H, Q103R, P166A, S181F, K285R, R333L; one nonsense mutation, S307X and 3 silent mutations--Q103Q, K210K and H319H. The functional significance of the novel GALT missense mutations was investigated using SNPs&GO and SIFT tools. Further, modeling studies using 3D models of mutant and wild type GALT proteins revealed mutations to exert their effects at the molecular level by altering H-bonds, salt bridges, secondary structure or surface features. The study highlighted the heterogeneity of classical galactosemia in the Indian population and also emphasizes the importance of GALT gene analysis in diagnosis of galactosemia. It also revealed that the Indian GALT mutational profile differs significantly from other populations studied.

  18. Copper nanowires immobilized on the boards of microfluidic chips for the rapid and simultaneous diagnosis of galactosemia diseases in newborn urine samples.

    PubMed

    García, Miguel; Alonso-Fernández, José Ramón; Escarpa, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Galactosemia is a rare disease that is diagnosed through the identification of different metabolite profiles. Therefore, the specific detection of galactose 1-phosphate (Gal 1-P), galactose (Gal), and uridyl diphosphate galactose (UDP-Gal) confirms type I, II, and III galactosemia diseases. Because of the low prevalence of galactosemia, sample availability is very scarce and screening methods to diagnose the illness are not commonly employed around the world. This work describes the coupling of microfluidic chips (MCs) to copper nanowires (CuNWs) as electrochemical detectors for the fast diagnosis of galactosemia in precious newborn urine samples. Conceptually speaking, we hypothesize that the inherent selectivity and sensitivity of CuNWs, toward galactosemia metabolites detection in connection with MC selectivity could allow the fast and simultaneous detection of the three galactosemia biomarkers, which implies the fast diagnosis of any galactosemia type in just one single analysis. Electrosynthesized CuNWs show a well-defined shape, with an average length of 6 μm and a width of 300 nm. The modified electrodes exhibited an enhanced electroactive surface area twice as high as the nonmodified ones. Very good intraelectrode repeatability with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of <8% (n = 10) and interelectrode reproducibility with RSDs of <12% (n = 5) were obtained, indicating an excellent stability of the nanoscaled electrochemical detector. Under optimum chemical (3 mM NaOH, pH 11.5), electrokinetic (separation voltage +750 V, injection +1500 V for 5 s) and electrochemical (E = +0.70 V in 3 mM NaOH, pH 11.5) conditions, galactosemia diseases were unequivocally identified, differentiating between type I, II, and III, using selected precious ill diagnosed newborn urine samples. Detection proceeded within less than 350 s, required negligible urine sample consumption, and displayed impressive signal-to-noise characteristics (ranging from 14 to 80) and micromolar

  19. Evidence of oxidative stress in brain and liver of young rats submitted to experimental galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Castro, Márcia B; Ferreira, Bruna K; Cararo, José Henrique; Chipindo, Adália E; Magenis, Marina L; Michels, Monique; Danielski, Lucinéia G; de Oliveira, Marcos R; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L; Petronilho, Fabricia; Schuck, Patrícia F

    2016-12-01

    Galactosemia is a disorder of galactose metabolism, leading to the accumulation of this carbohydrate. Galactosemic patients present brain and liver damage. For evaluated oxidative stress, 30-day-old males Wistar rats were divided into two groups: galactose group, that received a single injection of this carbohydrate (5 μmol/g), and control group, that received saline 0.9 % in the same conditions. One, twelve or twenty-four hours after the administration, animals were euthanized and cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and liver were isolated. After one hour, it was found a significant increase in TBA-RS levels, nitrate and nitrite and protein carbonyl contents in cerebral cortex, as well as protein carbonyl content in the cerebellum and in hepatic level of TBA-RS, and a significant decrease in nitrate and nitrite contents in cerebellum. TBA-RS levels were also found increased in all studied tissues, as well as nitrate and nitrite contents in cerebral cortex and cerebellum, that also present increased protein carbonyl content and impairments in the activity of antioxidant enzymes of rats euthanized at twelve hours. Finally, animals euthanized after twenty-four hours present an increase of TBA-RS levels in studied tissues, as well as the protein carbonyl content in cerebellum and liver. These animals also present an increased nitrate and nitrite content and impairment of antioxidant enzymes activities. Taken together, our data suggest that acute galactose administration impairs redox homeostasis in brain and liver of rats.

  20. Analysis of galactosemia-linked mutations of GALT enzyme using a computational biology approach.

    PubMed

    Facchiano, A; Marabotti, A

    2010-02-01

    We describe the prediction of the structural and functional effects of mutations on the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase related to the genetic disease galactosemia, using a fully computational approach. One hundred and seven single-point mutants were simulated starting from the structural model of the enzyme obtained by homology modeling methods. Several bioinformatics programs were then applied to each resulting mutant protein to analyze the effect of the mutations. The mutations have a direct effect on the active site, or on the dimer assembly and stability, or on the monomer stability. We describe how mutations may exert their effect at a molecular level by altering H-bonds, salt bridges, secondary structure or surface features. The alteration of protein stability, at level of monomer and/or dimer, is the main effect observed. We found an agreement between our results and the functional experimental data available in literature for some mutants. The data and analyses for all the mutants are fully available in the web-accessible database hosted at http://bioinformatica.isa.cnr.it/GALT.

  1. The structural and molecular biology of type I galactosemia: Enzymology of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase.

    PubMed

    McCorvie, Thomas J; Timson, David J

    2011-09-01

    Reduced galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity is associated with the genetic disease type I galactosemia. This results in an increase in the cellular concentration of galactose 1-phosphate. The accumulation of this toxic metabolite, combined with aberrant glycoprotein and glycolipid biosynthesis, is likely to be the major factor in molecular pathology. The mechanism of GALT was established through classical enzymological methods to be a substituted enzyme in which the reaction with UDP-glucose results in the formation of a covalent, UMP-histidine adduct in the active site. The uridylated enzyme can then react with galactose 1-phosphate to form UDP-galactose. The structure of the enzyme from Escherichia coli reveals a homodimer containing one zinc (II) and one iron (II) ion per subunit. This enzymological and structural knowledge provides the basis for understanding the biochemistry of this critical step in the Leloir pathway. However, a high-resolution crystal structure of human GALT is required to assist greater understanding of the effects of disease-associated mutations.

  2. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase.

    PubMed

    McCorvie, Thomas J; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W

    2016-06-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants.

  3. Classical Galactosemia: Insight into Molecular Pathomechanisms by Differential Membrane Proteomics of Fibroblasts under Galactose Stress.

    PubMed

    Staubach, Simon; Müller, Stefan; Pekmez, Murat; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2017-02-03

    Classical galactosemia, a hereditary metabolic disease caused by the deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT; EC 2.7.712), results in an impaired galactose metabolism and serious long-term developmental affection of the CNS and ovaries, potentially related in part to endogenous galactose-induced protein dysglycosylation. In search for galactose-induced changes in membrane raft proteomes of GALT-deficient cells, we performed differential analyses of lipid rafts from patient-derived (Q) and sex- and age-matched control fibroblasts (H) in the presence or absence of the stressor. Label-based proteomics revealed of the total 454 (female) or 678 (male) proteins a proportion of ∼12% in at least one of four relevant ratios as fold-changed. GALT(-) cell-specific effects in the absence of stressor revealed cell-model-dependent affection of biological processes related to protein targeting to the plasma membrane (female) or to cellular migration (male). However, a series of common galactose-induced effects were observed, among them the strongly increased ER-stress marker GRP78 and calreticulin involved in N-glycoprotein quality control. The membrane-anchored N-glycoprotein receptor CD109 was concertedly decreased under galactose-stress together with cadherin-13, GLIPR1, glypican-1, and semaphorin-7A. A series of proteins showed opposite fold-changes in the two cell models, whereas others fluctuated in only one of the two models.

  4. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L.; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants. PMID:27005423

  5. Neurologic sequela in a patient with galactosemia potentially mediated by interleukin-11 dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Winter, Gidon N; Ben-Pazi, Hilla

    2015-06-01

    A 16-year-old galactosemic patient, homozygous for the 5.5-kb gene deletion, suffered severe neurologic regression following streptococcal infection. Since the gene deletion includes the promoter of interleukin-11a receptor involved in neuronal apoptosis, we questioned whether this patient had no interleukin-11a receptor activity-resulting in neuronal toxicity during septicemia. We hypothesized that interleukin-11 levels would be elevated because of a loss of feedback induced by the absent interleukin-11Ra receptor complex. To assess this, we compared interleukin-11 levels in the proband and 2 of his siblings with the same genetic deletion, to age-matched controls. No differences were found in interleukin-11 levels between groups. Our study was not carried out during acute infective states, when the disrupted immunoregulation triggered by sepsis is relevant, and is thus limited. In conclusion, although interleukin-11 was not chronically elevated in individuals with galactosemia and 5.5-kb gene deletion, data do not rule out potential interleukin-11 dysfunction during acute infection.

  6. Charting a seven-year trajectory of language outcomes for a child with galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Fiona M; Coman, David J; Syrmis, Maryann; Kilcoyne, Sarah; Murdoch, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional methodologies have revealed age-related deterioration in cognitive performance, reflecting progressive neurodegenerative change in a minority of children and adolescents with classic galactosemia (GAL). The application of longitudinal methodologies sensitive to age-related changes at the individual level is needed to determine the extent of any possible decline in function in children with GAL. The authors report on the developmental language outcomes of a 9-year-old female with GAL through an examination of her language development over a 7-year period using a performance tracking system based on the use of raw performance scores required for attainment at the 50th percentile for age. Raw scores typically increase systematically over time and are thus more sensitive to developmental changes. Results suggest that there was no decline in the child's language skills over the course of the investigation. For the case presented, the use of raw scores offered a means of examining the child's patterns of individual change, which revealed stable language skills over the period of monitoring, perhaps indicating a stable disease process for this particular child. The authors propose this descriptive application of raw performance scores that offers a means to determine neurodevelopmental outcomes in the disorder.

  7. Long-term complications in Estonian galactosemia patients with a less strict lactose-free diet and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Krabbi, K; Uudelepp, M-L; Joost, K; Zordania, R; Õunap, K

    2011-07-01

    The main aim of our study was to retrospectively evaluate long-term complications and measure urinary galactose and galactitol excretion in classical galactosemia patients in Estonia who have been treated with a less restricted lactose-free diet and metabolic control. Our study group consisted of five classical galactosemia patients aged 7-14 years and diagnosed since 1996 in Estonia. Their diet eliminates lactose present in dairy foods, but we did not restrict the consumption of mature cheeses, fruits and vegetables. All patients had normal growth, except for one patient who was overweight at the last evaluation. In three patients mental and speech development was normal. One patient, number 1, who was diagnosed latest (at 6 weeks of age), had moderate mental retardation, verbal dyspraxia, extrapyramidal signs and bilateral cataracts. In both patients with developmental problems, a brain MRI showed bilateral subcortical changes in the cerebral white matter. Of four females, only patient 4 (p.Q188R homozygote) has premature ovarian insufficiency. Urinary galactose and galactitol content were retrospectively measured using high-performance liquid chromatography and refractive-index detection from urinary samples that were preserved during the years 1996-2009. Galactose ranged from 60 to 600 mmol/mol creatinine (normal=4-6), and galactitol ranged from 70 to 1200 mmol/mol creatinine (normal=2-4), which was 10-100 and 17-300 times higher than the respective reference ranges for galactose and galactitol. We conclude that a less strict lactose-free diet and metabolic control performed in Estonian classical galactosemia patients does not change long-term outcome compared to previously published studies.

  8. Elevated carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) and its normalization on dietary treatment as a useful biochemical test for hereditary fructose intolerance and galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Pronicka, Ewa; Adamowicz, Maciej; Kowalik, Agnieszka; Płoski, Rafał; Radomyska, Barbara; Rogaszewska, Małgorzata; Rokicki, Dariusz; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta

    2007-07-01

    Abnormalities in protein glycosylation are reported in fructosemia (HFI) and galactosemia, although, particularly in HFI, the published data are limited to single cases. The purpose was to investigate the usefulness of the carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) profile for identification and monitoring of these disorders. First we analyzed CDT values before and shortly after the diagnosis in 10 cases of HFI and 17 cases of galactosemia. In all patients, elevated CDT levels were found that significantly (p < 0.0001) decreased with the therapeutic diet (27.3 +/- 11.5% versus 9.3 +/- 5.1% for HFI and 43.8 +/- 14.1% versus 11.2 +/- 4.0% for galactosemia). To evaluate the use of CDT test in monitoring compliance, the test was performed in 25 HFI patients on fructose-restricted diet. We found an elevated CDT level on 104 from 134 tests (mean 11.3 +/- 5.5%, control 1.5%-6.2%). The fructose intake was found to be 90 +/- 70 mg/kg/d, and the diet was unbalanced. A number of patients presented lower height, elevated urinary uric acid excretion, and hypercalciuria. In conclusion, abnormal percentage of CDT (%CDT) values may allow prompt detection of HFI (or galactosemia). Persistence of some abnormalities in HFI on treatment may be caused by trace amounts of fructose ingestion and/or a deficient diet. Regular %CDT measurements are suggested for HFI treatment monitoring.

  9. A frequent splicing mutation and novel missense mutations color the updated mutational spectrum of classic galactosemia in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana I; Ramos, Ruben; Gaspar, Ana; Costa, Cláudia; Oliveira, Anabela; Diogo, Luísa; Garcia, Paula; Paiva, Sandra; Martins, Esmeralda; Teles, Elisa Leão; Rodrigues, Esmeralda; Cardoso, M Teresa; Ferreira, Elena; Sequeira, Sílvia; Leite, Margarida; Silva, Maria João; de Almeida, Isabel Tavares; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficient galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity. Patients develop symptoms in the neonatal period, which can be ameliorated by dietary restriction of galactose. Many patients develop long-term complications, with a broad range of clinical symptoms whose pathophysiology is poorly understood. The high allelic heterogeneity of GALT gene that characterizes this disorder is thought to play a determinant role in biochemical and clinical phenotypes. We aimed to characterize the mutational spectrum of GALT deficiency in Portugal and to assess potential genotype-phenotype correlations. Direct sequencing of the GALT gene and in silico analyses were employed to evaluate the impact of uncharacterized mutations upon GALT functionality. Molecular characterization of 42 galactosemic Portuguese patients revealed a mutational spectrum comprising 14 nucleotide substitutions: ten missense, two nonsense and two putative splicing mutations. Sixteen different genotypic combinations were detected, half of the patients being p.Q188R homozygotes. Notably, the second most frequent variation is a splicing mutation. In silico predictions complemented by a close-up on the mutations in the protein structure suggest that uncharacterized missense mutations have cumulative point effects on protein stability, oligomeric state, or substrate binding. One splicing mutation is predicted to cause an alternative splicing event. This study reinforces the difficulty in establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation in classic galactosemia, a monogenic disease whose complex pathogenesis and clinical features emphasize the need to expand the knowledge on this "cloudy" disorder.

  10. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model.

    PubMed

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Parkinson, William; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-12-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and extracellular spaces. In addition to acute, potentially lethal neonatal symptoms, maturing individuals with CG develop striking neurodevelopmental, motor and cognitive impairments. Previous studies suggest that neurological symptoms are associated with glycosylation defects, with CG recently being described as a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG), showing defects in both N- and O-linked glycans. Here, we characterize behavioral traits, synaptic development and glycosylated synaptomatrix formation in a GALT-deficient Drosophila disease model. Loss of Drosophila GALT (dGALT) greatly impairs coordinated movement and results in structural overelaboration and architectural abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Dietary galactose and mutation of galactokinase (dGALK) or UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (sugarless) genes are identified, respectively, as critical environmental and genetic modifiers of behavioral and cellular defects. Assaying the NMJ extracellular synaptomatrix with a broad panel of lectin probes reveals profound alterations in dGALT mutants, including depletion of galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucosylated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) moieties, which are differentially corrected by dGALK co-removal and sugarless overexpression. Synaptogenesis relies on trans-synaptic signals modulated by this synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment, and dGALT-null NMJs display striking changes in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) co-receptor and Wnt ligand levels

  11. [Analysis of newborn screening for galactosemia and genotype-phenotype of confirmed galatosemia cases].

    PubMed

    Yang, R L; Tong, F; Hong, F; Qian, G L; Wu, D W; Zhao, Z Y

    2017-02-02

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of galactosemia(GAL), and the characteristics of genotype and phenotype of newborns who were confirmed with GAL in newborn screening in Zhejiang province. Method: The number of all live births, newborn screened infants and all clinical data of confirmed newborns with GAL from October 2013 to March 2015 were retrospectively analyzed by reviewing the data of Zhejiang Province screening center database. And the characteristics of genes and the clinical data of GAL cases who were confirmed by correlative gene test and enzyme activity measurement were analyzed. Result: The prevalence of GAL in Zhejiang province was 1/189 857. Among them, there was 1 case confirmed with GAL typeⅠ (prevalence, 1/759 428), with mutations of c. 904+ 1G>T and c. 687G>A, the enzyme activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) was 56.4% of controls. And there was 1 case of GAL typeⅡ(prevalence, 1/759 428), with mutations of c. 85G>T and c. 502G>A. There were 2 cases confirmed with GAL type Ⅲ(prevalence, 1/379 714), with mutations of c. 505C>T, c. 452G>A, c. 280G>A and c. 925G>A, the enzyme activity of UDP-galactose-4'-epimerase (GALE) were 42% and 38% of controls, respectively. All cases had different abnormal biochemical marks of liver function, and 1 case had combined hyperlactacidemia or hyperammonemia or increase of multiple kinds of amino acids, respectively. The newborn of GAL type Ⅱ had phacoscotasmus before treatment. All the cases were fed with lactose free milk powder, and all the abnormal parameters were improved during following up. Conclusion: The disease of GAL is rare in Zhejiang province, and its genotype distribution is scattered with comparatively mind clinical manifestations, and the cases with early treatment with lactose free milk powder have good prognosis. All cases needed to be treated and followed up for a life-long time. It is recommended that the high risk cases with GAL should be screened as soon as

  12. Rapid screening of classic galactosemia patients: a proof-of-concept study using high-throughput FTIR analysis of plasma.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Caroline; Untereiner, Valérie; Gobinet, Cyril; Zater, Mokhtar; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Garnotel, Roselyne

    2015-04-07

    Classic galactosemia is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease involving the galactose pathway, caused by the deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Galactose accumulation induces in newborns many symptoms, such as liver disease, cataracts, and sepsis leading to death if untreated. Neonatal screening is developed and applied in many countries using several methods to detect galactose or its derived product accumulation in blood or urine. High-throughput FTIR spectroscopy was investigated as a potential tool in the current screening methods. IR spectra were obtained from blood plasma of healthy, diabetic, and galactosemic patients. The major spectral differences were in the carbohydrate region, which was first analysed in an exploratory manner using principal component analysis (PCA). PCA score plots showed a clear discrimination between diabetic and galactosemic patients and this was more marked as a function of the glucose and galactose increased concentration in these patients' plasma respectively. Then, a support vector machine leave-one-out cross-validation (SVM-LOOCV) classifier was built with the PCA scores as the input and the model was tested on median, mean and all spectra from the three population groups. This classifier was able to discriminate healthy/diabetic, healthy/galactosemic, and diabetic/galactosemic patients with sensitivity and specificity rates ranging from 80% to 94%. The total accuracy rate ranged from 87% to 96%. High-throughput FTIR spectroscopy combined with the SVM-LOOCV classification procedure appears to be a promising tool in the screening of galactosemia patients, with good sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, this approach presents the advantages of being cost-effective, fast, and straightforward in the screening of galactosemic patients.

  13. Newborn screening for galactosemia by a second-tier multiplex enzyme assay using UPLC-MS/MS in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dae-Hyun; Jun, Sun-Hee; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jin Q; Song, Junghan

    2011-04-01

    Galactosemia is one of the most important inherited metabolic disorders detected by newborn screening tests. Abnormal results during screening should be confirmed by enzyme activity assays. Recently, we developed a multiplex enzyme assay for galactosemia in erythrocytes using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). In this study, we proposed a second-tier multiplex enzyme assay for galactosemia that can be directly applied to dried blood spots (DBSs). Supernatants from two rehydrated-punched 3.2-mm DBSs were incubated with a reaction mixture containing [¹³C6]galactose, [¹³C2]galactose-1-phosphate, and UDP-glucose as substrates for three galactose-metabolizing enzymes. After a 4-hour incubation, the end products from the combined reaction mixture, [¹³C6]galactose-1-phosphate, UDP-[¹³C2]galactose, and UDP-galactose, were simultaneously measured using UPLC-MS/MS. Substrates, products, and internal standards from the mixture of the three enzyme reactions were clearly separated in the UPLC-MS/MS system, with an injection cycle time of 10 min. Intra- and inter-assay imprecisions of the UPLC-MS/MS were 8.4-14.8% and 13.2-15.7% CV, respectively. Enzyme activities in DBSs from 37 normal individuals and 10 patients with enzyme deficiencies were analyzed. DBSs from galactosemia patients showed consistently lower enzyme activities as compared to those of normal individuals. In conclusion, multiplex enzyme assays using UPLC-MS/MS can be successfully applied to DBS analysis. This method allows a fast and effective second-tier test for newborns showing abnormal screening results.

  14. Functional analysis of mutations in UDP-galactose-4-epimerase (GALE) associated with galactosemia in Korean patients using mammalian GALE-null cells.

    PubMed

    Bang, You-Lim; Nguyen, Trang T T; Trinh, Tram T B; Kim, Yun J; Song, Junghan; Song, Young-Han

    2009-04-01

    Galactosemia is caused by defects in the galactose metabolic pathway, which consists of three enzymes, including UDP-galactose-4-epimerase (GALE). We previously reported nine mutations in Korean patients with epimerase-deficiency galactosemia. In order to determine the functional consequences of these mutations, we expressed wild-type and mutant GALE proteins in 293T cells. GALE(E165K) and GALE(W336X) proteins were unstable, had reduced half-life, formed aggregates and were partly degraded by the proteasome complex. When expressed in GALE-null ldlD cells GALE(E165K), GALE(R239W), GALE(G302D) and GALE(W336X) had no detectable enzyme activity, although substantial amounts of protein were detected in western blots. The relative activities of other mutants were lower than that of wild-type. In addition, unlike wild-type, GALE(R239W) and GALE(G302D) were not able to rescue galactose-sensitive cell proliferation when stably expressed in ldlD cells. The four inactive mutant proteins did not show defects in dimerization or affect the activity of other mutant alleles identified in patients. Our observations show that altered protein stability is due to misfolding and that loss or reduction of enzyme activity is responsible for the molecular defects underlying GALE-deficiency galactosemia.

  15. Fructose-induced hyperuricemia: observations in normal children and in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance and galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Kogut, M D; Roe, T F; Ng, W; Nonnel, G N

    1975-10-01

    After the infusion of fructose, 0.25 g/kg body wt, the mean peak plasma uric acid level was 5.4 +/- 0.7 (SEM) mg/100 ml in six normal children and was not significantly increased compared with that of the mean basal value of 4.1 +/- 0.5 mg/100 ml. The mean blood inorganic phosphate (Pi) levels were significantly less than the mean fasting value after fructose. Blood glucose, lactic acid, and fructose levels were significantly increased after fructose, but serum magnesium levels did not change. In two patients with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) the peak blood uric acid levels were 12.1 and 7.6 mg/100 ml, respectively, after fructose. In both patients the blood glucose concentrations decreased 69 and 26 mg/100 ml below the fasting levels after fructose. The serum Pi level decreased 2.3 and 1.2 mg/100 ml below fasting values, decrements greater than the mean decrement in serum Pi of 0.8 +/- 0.2 mg/100 ml which occurred in six normal children. The mean uric acid excretion, expressed as milligrams per mg urinary creatinine, was 0.6 +/- 0.1 (SEM) before fructose in the normal children and increased significantly to 1.0 +/- mg/mg creatinine after fructose. In two patients with HFI the uric acid excretion increased four- to fivefold after fructose administration; the increased uric acid excretion in HFI exceeded that of normal children. In three patients with galactosemia, increases in blood uric acid levels after galactose ingestion were similar to those in normal children after fructose, but less than those in patients with HFI after fructose. The serum Pi levels decreased less in galactosemic patients after galactose administration than in patients with HFI after fructose infusion. These studies support the hypothesis that fructose-induced hyperuricemia results from degradation of adenosine monophosphate. This effect appears to be specific for fructose. The lack of hyperruricemia in galactosemia patients after galactose ingestion may be explained by the

  16. Vertically-oriented and tailored-shape electro catalytic metallic nanowires for galactosemia free-enzyme rapid diagnosis.

    PubMed

    García Carmona, Laura; González, María Cristina; Escarpa, Alberto

    2017-04-03

    Metallic catalytic nanowires such as nickel and copper nanowires (NWs) for electrochemical detection of carbohydrates involved in metabolic rare diseases are proposed. NWs were electrodeposited using a poly carbonate membrane template, which was cut with the desired shape, stuck in double-sided adhesive tape, pasted into a non-conductive substrate and in situ removed. This simple and versatile approach allowed to obtain NWs vertically oriented (v-NWs) which are contained in the double-sided adhesive tape becoming highly versatile. The high specific surface of working electrode in which the transduction is supported exclusively by the nanomaterial yielded a high analytical performance (extremely low fouling for galactose (RSD<2%; n=25). Likewise, v-NWs exhibited a superior analytical performance with respect to commercial sputtered thick film electrodes showing also a clear advantage related with the price as well as non-need clean room facilities. The analytical potency of the new approach was clearly demonstrated towards the fast and reliable diagnosis of galactosemia using precious newborn urine samples clinically diagnosed. These results revealed new opportunities for future free enzyme diagnosis and development of future point of cares.

  17. Comparison of dynamics of wildtype and V94M human UDP-galactose 4-epimerase-A computational perspective on severe epimerase-deficiency galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Timson, David J; Lindert, Steffen

    2013-09-10

    UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE) catalyzes the interconversion of UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose, an important step in galactose catabolism. Type III galactosemia, an inherited metabolic disease, is associated with mutations in human GALE. The V94M mutation has been associated with a very severe form of type III galactosemia. While a variety of structural and biochemical studies have been reported that elucidate differences between the wildtype and this mutant form of human GALE, little is known about the dynamics of the protein and how mutations influence structure and function. We performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wildtype and V94M enzyme in different states of substrate and cofactor binding. In the mutant, the average distance between the substrate and both a key catalytic residue (Tyr157) and the enzyme-bound NAD+ cofactor and the active site dynamics are altered making substrate binding slightly less stable. However, overall stability or dynamics of the protein is not altered. This is consistent with experimental findings that the impact is largely on the turnover number (kcat), with less substantial effects on Km. Active site fluctuations were found to be correlated in enzyme with substrate bound to just one of the subunits in the homodimer suggesting inter-subunit communication. Greater active site loop mobility in human GALE compared to the equivalent loop in Escherichia coli GALE explains why the former can catalyze the interconversion of UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine while the bacterial enzyme cannot. This work illuminates molecular mechanisms of disease and may inform the design of small molecule therapies for type III galactosemia.

  18. Galactosemia in the Turkish population with a high frequency of Q188R mutation and distribution of Duarte-1 and Duarte-2 variations.

    PubMed

    Özgül, Rıza Köksal; Güzel-Ozantürk, Ayşegül; Dündar, Halil; Yücel-Yılmaz, Didem; Coşkun, Turgay; Sivri, Serap; Aydoǧdu, Sultan; Tokatlı, Ayşegül; Dursun, Ali

    2013-10-01

    Classical galactosemia is an inherited recessive disorder of galactose metabolism caused by deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT), which is caused by mutations in the GALT gene. In this study, 56 Turkish patients diagnosed with galactosemia were screened for GALT gene mutations using Affymetrix resequencing microarrays. Eleven types of mutations were detected in these patients, including two novel mutations (R258G and G310fsX49) and nine recurrent mutations. We detected six patients who were homozygous for the E340* mutation and for N314D, L218L silent substitutions (Duarte-1 variant) in this study. The haplotype E340*, N314D and L218L has been reported only in Turkish patients, which suggests that the E340* mutation is specific for our population and might be spread by a Turk ancestor. In patients, the Duarte-1 allele was found with a frequency of 10.71%, whereas the Duarte-2 allele was not detected. Duarte-1 and Duarte-2 alleles were found to be present at a frequency of 2.3% and 1.4%, respectively, in the screening of 105 healthy individuals. Considering all detected mutations, it is a very important finding that exons 6 and 10 of the GALT gene account for 79% of all mutant alleles in the Turkish population. The most common mutation is Q188R, with a frequency of 55.35%.

  19. Cell-based galactosemia diagnosis system based on a galactose assay using a bioluminescent Escherichia coli array.

    PubMed

    Woo, Min-Ah; Kim, Moon Il; Cho, Daeyeon; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2013-11-19

    A new cell-based galactose assay system, which is comprised of two bioluminescent Escherichia coli strains immobilized within an agarose gel arrayed on a well plate, has been developed. For this purpose, a galT knockout strain [galT(-) cell] of E. coli was genetically constructed so that cell growth is not promoted by galactose but rather by glucose present in a sample. Another E. coli W strain (normal cell), which grows normally in the presence of either glucose or galactose, was employed. A luminescent reporter gene, which produces luminescence as cells grow, was inserted into both of the E. coli strains, so that cell growth could be monitored in a facile manner. The two strains were separately grown for 4 h on gel arrays to which test samples were individually supplied. The relative luminescence unit (RLU) values caused by cell growth were determined for each array, one of which is resulted by glucose only and the other of which is resulted by both glucose and galactose present in the sample. By employing this protocol, galactose concentrations present in the test sample are reflected in the differences between the RLU values for each array. The practical utility of the new assay system was demonstrated by its use in determining galactose levels in clinical blood spot specimens coming from newborn babies. Because it can be employed to diagnosis of galactosemia in newborn babies in a more rapid, convenient, and cost-effective manner, this cell-based solid-phase galactose assay system should become a powerful alternative to conventional methods, which require labor-intensive and time-consuming procedures and/or complicated and expensive equipment.

  20. Using a Personal Glucose Meter and Alkaline Phosphatase for Point-of-Care Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase in Clinical Galactosemia Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiang, Yu; Novak, Donna E; Hoganson, George E; Zhu, Junjie; Lu, Yi

    2015-10-01

    The personal glucose meter (PGM) was recently shown to be a general meter to detect many targets. Most studies, however, focus on transforming either target binding or enzymatic activity that cleaves an artificial substrate into the production of glucose. More importantly, almost all reports exhibit their methods by using artificial samples, such as buffers or serum samples spiked with the targets. To expand the technology to even broader targets and to validate its potential in authentic, more complex clinical samples, we herein report expansion of the PGM method by using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that links the enzymatic activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase to the production of glucose, which allows point-of-care galactosemia diagnosis in authentic human clinical samples. Given the presence of ALP in numerous enzymatic assays for clinical diagnostics, the methods demonstrated herein advance the field closer to point-of-care detection of a wide range of targets in real clinical samples.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: galactosemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... of these critical enzymes allows galactose and related compounds to build up to toxic levels in the ... galactosaemia revisited. J Inherit Metab Dis. 2006 Aug;29(4):516-25. Epub 2006 Jul 11. Review. ...

  2. GALT protein database, a bioinformatics resource for the management and analysis of structural features of a galactosemia-related protein and its mutants.

    PubMed

    d'Acierno, Antonio; Facchiano, Angelo; Marabotti, Anna

    2009-06-01

    We describe the GALT-Prot database and its related web-based application that have been developed to collect information about the structural and functional effects of mutations on the human enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) involved in the genetic disease named galactosemia type I. Besides a list of missense mutations at gene and protein sequence levels, GALT-Prot reports the analysis results of mutant GALT structures. In addition to the structural information about the wild-type enzyme, the database also includes structures of over 100 single point mutants simulated by means of a computational procedure, and the analysis to each mutant was made with several bioinformatics programs in order to investigate the effect of the mutations. The web-based interface allows querying of the database, and several links are also provided in order to guarantee a high integration with other resources already present on the web. Moreover, the architecture of the database and the web application is flexible and can be easily adapted to store data related to other proteins with point mutations. GALT-Prot is freely available at http://bioinformatica.isa.cnr.it/GALT/.

  3. The metastability of human UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE) is increased by variants associated with type III galactosemia but decreased by substrate and cofactor binding.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L; Padín-Gonzalez, Esperanza; Mesa-Torres, Noel; Timson, David J

    2014-11-15

    Type III galactosemia is an inherited disease caused by mutations which affect the activity of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). We evaluated the impact of four disease-associated variants (p.N34S, p.G90E, p.V94M and p.K161N) on the conformational stability and dynamics of GALE. Thermal denaturation studies showed that wild-type GALE denatures at temperatures close to physiological, and disease-associated mutations often reduce GALE's thermal stability. This denaturation is under kinetic control and results partly from dimer dissociation. The natural ligands, NAD(+) and UDP-glucose, stabilize GALE. Proteolysis studies showed that the natural ligands and disease-associated variations affect local dynamics in the N-terminal region of GALE. Proteolysis kinetics followed a two-step irreversible model in which the intact protein is cleaved at Ala38 forming a long-lived intermediate in the first step. NAD(+) reduces the rate of the first step, increasing the amount of undigested protein whereas UDP-glucose reduces the rate of the second step, increasing accumulation of the intermediate. Disease-associated variants affect these rates and the amounts of protein in each state. Our results also suggest communication between domains in GALE. We hypothesize that, in vivo, concentrations of natural ligands modulate GALE stability and that it should be possible to discover compounds which mimic the stabilising effects of the natural ligands overcoming mutation-induced destabilization.

  4. Acute and long-term outcomes in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia occur independently of galactose-1-phosphate accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Daenzer, Jennifer M. I.; Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P.; Ryan, Emily L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Classic galactosemia (CG) is a potentially lethal inborn error of metabolism that results from the profound loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Neonatal detection and dietary restriction of galactose minimizes or resolves the acute sequelae of CG, but fails to prevent the long-term complications experienced by a majority of patients. One of the substrates of GALT, galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1P), accumulates to high levels in affected infants, especially following milk exposure, and has been proposed as the key mediator of acute and long-term pathophysiology in CG. However, studies of treated patients demonstrate no association between red blood cell Gal-1P level and long-term outcome severity. Here, we used genetic, epigenetic and environmental manipulations of a Drosophila melanogaster model of CG to test the role of Gal-1P as a candidate mediator of outcome in GALT deficiency. Specifically, we both deleted and knocked down the gene encoding galactokinase (GALK) in control and GALT-null Drosophila, and assessed the acute and long-term outcomes of the resulting animals in the presence and absence of dietary galactose. GALK is the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism and is responsible for generating Gal-1P in humans and Drosophila. Our data confirmed that, as expected, loss of GALK lowered or eliminated Gal-1P accumulation in GALT-null animals. However, we saw no concomitant rescue of larval survival or adult climbing or fecundity phenotypes. Instead, we saw that loss of GALK itself was not benign and in some cases phenocopied or exacerbated the outcome seen in GALT-null animals. These findings strongly contradict the long-standing hypothesis that Gal-1P alone underlies pathophysiology of acute and long-term outcomes in GALT-null Drosophila and suggests that other metabolite(s) of galactose, and/or other pathogenic factors, might be involved. PMID

  5. Identification and functional analysis of three distinct mutations in the human galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase gene associated with galactosemia in a single family

    SciTech Connect

    Fridovich-Keil, J.L.; Langley, S.D.; Mazur, L.A.; Lennon, J.C.; Dembure, P.O.; Elsas, L.J. II

    1995-03-01

    We have identified three mutations associated with transferase-deficiency galactosemia in a three-generation family including affected members in two generations and have modeled all three mutations in a yeast-expression system. A sequence of pedigree, biochemical, and molecular analyses of the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) enzyme and genetic locus in both affected and carrier individuals revealed three distinct base substitutions in this family, two (Q188R and S135L) that had been reported previously and one (V151A) that was novel. Biochemical analyses of red-blood-cell lysates from the relevant family members suggested that each of these mutations was associated with dramatic impairment of GALT activity in these cells. While this observation was consistent with our previous findings concerning the Q188R mutation expressed both in humans and in a yeast-model system, it was at odds with a report by Reichardt and colleagues, indicating that in their COS cell-expression system the S135L substitution behaved as a neutral polymorphism. To address this apparent paradox, as well as to investigate the functional significance of the newly identified V151A substitution, all three mutations were recreated by site-directed mutagenesis of the otherwise wild-type human GALT sequence and were expressed both individually and in the appropriate allelic combinations in a GALT-deficient strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results of these yeast-modeling studies were fully consistent with the patient data, leading us to conclude that, at least within the context of the cell types studied, in the homozygous state Q188R is a mutation that eliminates GALT activity, and S135L and V151A are both mutations that impair GALT activity to <6% of wild-type values. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Acute and long-term outcomes in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia occur independently of galactose-1-phosphate accumulation.

    PubMed

    Daenzer, Jennifer M I; Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Hopson, Marquise L; Garza, Kerry R; Ryan, Emily L; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2016-11-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is a potentially lethal inborn error of metabolism that results from the profound loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Neonatal detection and dietary restriction of galactose minimizes or resolves the acute sequelae of CG, but fails to prevent the long-term complications experienced by a majority of patients. One of the substrates of GALT, galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1P), accumulates to high levels in affected infants, especially following milk exposure, and has been proposed as the key mediator of acute and long-term pathophysiology in CG. However, studies of treated patients demonstrate no association between red blood cell Gal-1P level and long-term outcome severity. Here, we used genetic, epigenetic and environmental manipulations of a Drosophila melanogaster model of CG to test the role of Gal-1P as a candidate mediator of outcome in GALT deficiency. Specifically, we both deleted and knocked down the gene encoding galactokinase (GALK) in control and GALT-null Drosophila, and assessed the acute and long-term outcomes of the resulting animals in the presence and absence of dietary galactose. GALK is the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism and is responsible for generating Gal-1P in humans and Drosophila Our data confirmed that, as expected, loss of GALK lowered or eliminated Gal-1P accumulation in GALT-null animals. However, we saw no concomitant rescue of larval survival or adult climbing or fecundity phenotypes. Instead, we saw that loss of GALK itself was not benign and in some cases phenocopied or exacerbated the outcome seen in GALT-null animals. These findings strongly contradict the long-standing hypothesis that Gal-1P alone underlies pathophysiology of acute and long-term outcomes in GALT-null Drosophila and suggests that other metabolite(s) of galactose, and/or other pathogenic factors, might be involved.

  7. In silico prediction of the effects of mutations in the human UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase gene: towards a predictive framework for type III galactosemia.

    PubMed

    McCorvie, Thomas J; Timson, David J

    2013-07-25

    The enzyme UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE) catalyses the reversible epimerisation of both UDP-galactose and UDP-N-acetyl-galactosamine. Deficiency of the human enzyme (hGALE) is associated with type III galactosemia. The majority of known mutations in hGALE are missense and private thus making clinical guidance difficult. In this study a bioinformatics approach was employed to analyse the structural effects due to each mutation using both the UDP-glucose and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine bound structures of the wild-type protein. Changes to the enzyme's overall stability, substrate/cofactor binding and propensity to aggregate were also predicted. These predictions were found to be in good agreement with previous in vitro and in vivo studies when data was available and allowed for the differentiation of those mutants that severely impair the enzyme's activity against UDP-galactose. Next this combination of techniques were applied to another twenty-six reported variants from the NCBI dbSNP database that have yet to be studied to predict their effects. This identified p.I14T, p.R184H and p.G302R as likely severely impairing mutations. Although severely impaired mutants were predicted to decrease the protein's stability, overall predicted stability changes only weakly correlated with residual activity against UDP-galactose. This suggests other protein functions such as changes in cofactor and substrate binding may also contribute to the mechanism of impairment. Finally this investigation shows that this combination of different in silico approaches is useful in predicting the effects of mutations and that it could be the basis of an initial prediction of likely clinical severity when new hGALE mutants are discovered.

  8. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase in erythrocytes (red blood cells... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  9. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase in erythrocytes (red blood cells... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  10. Nutritional Considerations for Severely Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobsey, Dick

    Children and adults with severe disabilities may have nutritional problems due to the effects of the primary disability (including such syndromes as phenylketonuria, galactosemia, and Hurler's Disease), effects related to medications (including anticonvulsants, tranquilizers, and laxatives), effects of food preferences (restrictive food…

  11. Newborn Screening: National Library of Medicine Literature Search, January 1980 through March 1987. No. 87-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrias, Karen

    This bibliography, prepared by the National Library of Medicine through a literature search of its online databases, covers all aspects of newborn screening. It includes references to screening for: inborn errors of metabolism, such as phenylketonuria and galactosemia; hemoglobinopathies, particularly sickle cell disease; congenital hypothyroidism…

  12. Newborn Screening To Prevent Mental Retardation. The Arc Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc, Arlington, TX.

    This information fact sheet on screening newborns to prevent mental retardation defines newborn screening and outlines how screening is performed. It discusses the six most common disorders resulting in mental retardation for which states most commonly screen. These include phenylketonuria, congenital hypothyroidism, galactosemia, maple syrup…

  13. 77 FR 13344 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... of Human Galactokinase for the Treatment of Galactosemia and Cancers Description of Technology... candidates for the treatment of certain cancers, such as PTEN/AKT misregulated cancers. The inventors have already shown that the inhibitors are cytotoxic for several cancer cell lines. Potential...

  14. Fanconi-Bickel syndrome--two cases report.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Norberto; García, Ramiro; Tostado, René; Dhanakotti, Nagasharmila

    2008-01-01

    A one year eight month old male child and his nine month old female sibling were presented with Growth retardation, abdominal distension, doll-like faces, hepatomegaly, phosphaturia, proximal renal tubular dysfunction. The elder sibling also presented with glucosuria, hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia. The younger one later presented with galactosemia. Biopsy of liver on these two patients revealed the accumulation of glycogen in hepatocytes.

  15. Neonatal Screening Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigue, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    Describes several laboratory experiments that are adaptations of clinical tests for certain genetic diseases in babies. Information and procedures are provided for tests for phenylketonuria (PKU), galactosemia, tyrosinemia, cystinuria, and mucopolysaccharidosis. Discusses the effects of each disease on the infants' development. (TW)

  16. Electrokinetic probes for single-step screening of polyol stereoisomers: the virtues of ternary boronate ester complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Claire; Segui-Lines, Giselle; D'Amaral, Jason C; Ptolemy, Adam S; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2008-01-21

    Electrokinetic probes based on the differential migration of ternary boronate ester complexes permit the selective analysis of micromolar levels of UV-transparent polyol stereoisomers in urine samples via dynamic complexation-capillary electrophoresis that is applicable to single-step screening of in-born errors of sugar metabolism, such as galactosemia.

  17. Microchip in situ electrosynthesis of silver metallic oxide clusters for ultra-FAST detection of galactose in galactosemic newborns' urine samples.

    PubMed

    García-Carmona, Laura; Rojas, Daniel; González, María Cristina; Escarpa, Alberto

    2016-10-17

    This work describes for the first time the coupling of microfluidic chips (MC) to electrosynthetized silver metallic oxide clusters (AgMOCs). As an early demonstration of this novel approach, the ultrafast detection of galactose in galactosemic newborns' urine samples is proposed. AgMOCs were in situ electrosynthetized on integrated microchip platinum electrodes using a double pulse technique and characterized in full using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical techniques revealing the presence of silver oxides and electrocatalysis towards galactose as a galactosemia biomarker. Galactose detection in galactosemic newborns' urine samples proceeded in less than 30 s, differentiating between ill and healthy urine samples and requiring negligible urine sample consumption. The significance of the newborns' urine samples confirmed the analytical potency of the MC-AgMOCs approach for future implementation of screening for rare disease diagnosis such as galactosemia.

  18. Inhibition of phosphomannose isomerase by fructose 1-phosphate: an explanation for defective N-glycosylation in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Jaeken, J; Pirard, M; Adamowicz, M; Pronicka, E; van Schaftingen, E

    1996-11-01

    Isoelectrofocusing of serum sialotransferrins from patients with untreated hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) shows a cathodal shift similar to that in carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein (CDG) syndrome type I and in untreated galactosemia. This report is on serum lysosomal enzyme abnormalities in untreated HFI that are identical to those found in CDG syndrome type I but different from those in untreated galactosemia. CDG syndrome type I is due to phosphomannomutase deficiency, a defect in the early glycosylation pathway. It was found that fructose 1-phosphate is a potent competitive inhibitor (Ki congruent to 40 microM) of phosphomannose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.8), the first enzyme of the N-glycosylation pathway thus explaining the N-glycosylation disturbances in HFI.

  19. Galactose oxidation using (13)C in healthy and galactosemic children.

    PubMed

    Resende-Campanholi, D R; Porta, G; Ferrioli, E; Pfrimer, K; Ciampo, L A Del; Junior, J S Camelo

    2015-03-01

    Galactosemia is an inborn error of galactose metabolism that occurs mainly as the outcome of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency. The ability to assess galactose oxidation following administration of a galactose-labeled isotope (1-(13)C-galactose) allows the determination of galactose metabolism in a practical manner. We aimed to assess the level of galactose oxidation in both healthy and galactosemic Brazilian children. Twenty-one healthy children and seven children with galactosemia ranging from 1 to 7 years of age were studied. A breath test was used to quantitate (13)CO2 enrichment in exhaled air before and at 30, 60, and 120 min after the oral administration of 7 mg/kg of an aqueous solution of 1-(13)C-galactose to all children. The molar ratios of (13)CO2 and (12)CO2 were quantified by the mass/charge ratio (m/z) of stable isotopes in each air sample by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. In sick children, the cumulative percentage of (13)C from labeled galactose (CUMPCD) in the exhaled air ranged from 0.03% at 30 min to 1.67% at 120 min. In contrast, healthy subjects showed a much broader range in CUMPCD, with values from 0.4% at 30 min to 5.58% at 120 min. The study found a significant difference in galactose oxidation between children with and without galactosemia, demonstrating that the breath test is useful in discriminating children with GALT deficiencies.

  20. UDP-galactose 4' epimerase (GALE) is essential for development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Rebecca D; Sefton, Jennifer M I; Moberg, Kenneth H; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2010-01-01

    UDP-galactose 4' epimerase (GALE) catalyzes the interconversion of UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose in the final step of the Leloir pathway; human GALE (hGALE) also interconverts UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. GALE therefore plays key roles in the metabolism of dietary galactose, in the production of endogenous galactose, and in maintaining the ratios of key substrates for glycoprotein and glycolipid biosynthesis. Partial impairment of hGALE results in the potentially lethal disorder epimerase-deficiency galactosemia. We report here the generation and initial characterization of a first whole-animal model of GALE deficiency using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Our results confirm that GALE function is essential in developing animals; Drosophila lacking GALE die as embryos but are rescued by the expression of a human GALE transgene. Larvae in which GALE has been conditionally knocked down die within days of GALE loss. Conditional knockdown and transgene expression studies further demonstrate that GALE expression in the gut primordium and Malpighian tubules is both necessary and sufficient for survival. Finally, like patients with generalized epimerase deficiency galactosemia, Drosophila with partial GALE loss survive in the absence of galactose but succumb in development if exposed to dietary galactose. These data establish the utility of the fly model of GALE deficiency and set the stage for future studies to define the mechanism(s) and modifiers of outcome in epimerase deficiency galactosemia.

  1. Clinical and molecular spectra in galactosemic patients from neonatal screening in northeastern Italy: structural and functional characterization of new variations in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) gene.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, E; Marabotti, A; Burlina, A P; Cazzorla, C; D'Apice, M R; Giordano, L; Fasan, I; Novelli, G; Facchiano, A; Burlina, A B

    2015-04-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism due to mutations of the GALT gene leading to toxic accumulation of galactose and derived metabolites. With the benefit of early diagnosis by neonatal screening and early therapy, the acute presentation of classical galactosemia can be prevented. However, despite early diagnosis and treatment, the long term outcome for these patients is still unpredictable because they may go on to develop cognitive disability, speech problems, neurological and/or movement disorders and, in females, ovarian dysfunction. The objectives of the current study were to report our experience with a group of galactosemic patients identified through the neonatal screening programs in northeastern Italy during the last 30years. No neonatal deaths due to galactosemia complications occurred after the introduction of the neonatal screening program. However, despite the early diagnosis and dietary treatment, the patients with classical galactosemia showed one or more long-term complications. A total of 18 different variations in the GALT gene were found in the patient cohort: 12 missense, 2 frameshift, 1 nonsense, 1 deletion, 1 silent variation, and 1 intronic. Six (p.R33P, p.G83V, p.P244S, p.L267R, p.L267V, p.E271D) were new variations. The most common variation was p.Q188R (12 alleles, 31.5%), followed by p.K285N (6 alleles, 15.7%) and p.N314D (6 alleles, 15.7%). The other variations comprised 1 or 2 alleles. In the patients carrying a new mutation, the biochemical analysis of GALT activity in erythrocytes showed an activity of <1%. In silico analysis (SIFT, PolyPhen-2 and the computational analysis on the static protein structure) showed potentially damaging effects of the six new variations on the GALT protein, thus expanding the genetic spectrum of GALT variations in Italy. The study emphasizes the difficulty in establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation in classical galactosemia and underlines the importance of

  2. Overview of the current attempts toward the medical treatment of cataract

    SciTech Connect

    Kador, P.F.

    1983-04-01

    A variety of agents are currently available that claim to either prevent, delay, or reverse cataracts associated with aging (senile cataracts), radiation, or diabetes and galactosemia (sugar cataracts). Senile cataract therapy includes formulation containing inorganic salts, nutritional supplements, natural product extracts, sulfhydryl, and sulfonic acid containing compounds and miscellaneous redox and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compounds. Agents associated with the treatment of radiation cataracts include antioxidants and free radial scavengers. Aldose reductase inhibitors have been effective in the prevention of sugar cataracts. A summary of these agents and their potential ocular effects are presented.

  3. An Overview of Cirrhosis in Children.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Jonathan; Jericho, Hilary; Azzam, Ruba K

    2016-12-01

    Cirrhosis is the end result of nearly all forms of progressive liver disease. The diffuse hepatic process can be characterized as a state of inflammation progressing to fibrosis and resulting in nodular regeneration, ultimately leading to disorganized liver architecture and function. The underlying etiology of cirrhosis in children may often differ from adults owing to specific disease processes that manifest in childhood, including biliary atresia, galactosemia, and neonatal hepatitis. Although basic management strategies in children are similar to those in adults, the care given to children with cirrhosis must keep the child's growth and development of paramount importance. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(12):e427-e432.].

  4. Formula allergy and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kerner, J A

    1995-03-01

    There are two major types of adverse reactions in infant formulas: (1) formula allergy/hypersensitivity, which is an immunologic response, and (2) formula intolerance, which is a nonimmunologic response. Formula intolerance can occur in infants with an underlying congenital or acquired enzyme deficiency (disaccharidase deficiency, galactosemia, hereditary fructose intolerance). The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of both reactions are reviewed in this article. The appropriateness of the use of a variety of infant formulas is discussed. Guidelines for the prevention of allergic disease are described as well.

  5. The Rapid and Sensitive Quantitative Determination of Galactose by Combined Enzymatic and Colorimetric Method: Application in Neonatal Screening.

    PubMed

    Kianmehr, Anvarsadat; Mahrooz, Abdolkarim; Ansari, Javad; Oladnabi, Morteza; Shahbazmohammadi, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    The quantitative measurement of galactose in blood is essential for the early diagnosis, treatment, and dietary monitoring of galactosemia patients. In this communication, we aimed to develop a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective combined method for galactose determination in dry blood spots. This procedure was based on the combination of enzymatic reactions of galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD), and alkaline phosphates with a colorimetric system. The incubation time and the concentration of enzymes used in new method were also optimized. The analytical performance was studied by the precision, recovery, linearity, and sensitivity parameters. Statistical analysis was applied to method comparison experiment. The regression equation and correlation coefficient (R (2)) were Y = 0.0085x + 0.032 and R (2) = 0.998, respectively. This assay exhibited a recovery in the range of 91.7-114.3 % and had the limit detection of 0.5 mg/dl for galactose. The between-run coefficient of variation (CV) was between 2.6 and 11.1 %. The within-run CV was between 4.9 and 9.2 %. Our results indicated that the new and reference methods were in agreement because no significant biases exist between them. Briefly, a quick and reliable combined enzymatic and colorimetric assay was presented for application in newborn mass screening and monitoring of galactosemia patients.

  6. Intracerebroventricular D-galactose administration impairs memory and alters activity and expression of acetylcholinesterase in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, André Felipe; Biasibetti, Helena; Zanotto, Bruna Stela; Sanches, Eduardo Farias; Pierozan, Paula; Schmitz, Felipe; Parisi, Mariana Migliorini; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Wyse, Angela T S

    2016-05-01

    Tissue accumulation of galactose is a hallmark in classical galactosemia. Cognitive deficit is a symptom of this disease which is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of galactose on memory (inhibitory avoidance and novel object recognition tasks) of adult rats. We also investigated the effects of galactose on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, immunocontent and gene expression in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Wistar rats received a single injection of galactose (4mM) or saline (control). For behavioral parameters, galactose was injected 1h or 24h previously to the testing. For biochemical assessment, animals were decapitated 1h, 3h or 24h after galactose or saline injection; hippocampus and cerebral cortex were dissected. Results showed that galactose impairs the memory formation process in aversive memory (inhibitory avoidance task) and recognition memory (novel object recognition task) in rats. The activity of AChE was increased, whereas the gene expression of this enzyme was decreased in hippocampus, but not in cerebral cortex. These findings suggest that these changes in AChE may, at least in part, to lead to memory impairment caused by galactose. Taken together, our results can help understand the etiopathology of classical galactosemia.

  7. Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase Enzyme Activity by Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of galactosemia usually involves the measurement of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) activity. Traditional radioactive and fluorescent GALT assays are nonspecific, laborious, and/or lack sufficient analytical sensitivity. We developed a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)–based assay for GALT enzyme activity measurement. Method Our assay used stable isotope-labeled α-galactose-1-phosphate ([13C6]-Gal-1-P) as an enzyme substrate. Sample cleanup and separation were achieved by reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography, and the enzymatic product, isotope-labeled uridine diphosphate galactose ([13C6]-UDPGal), was detected by MS/MS at mass transition (571 > 323) and quantified by use of [13C6]-Glu-1-P (265 > 79) as an internal standard. Results The method yielded a mean (SD) GALT enzyme activity of 23.8 (3.8) µmol · (gHgb)−1 · h−1 in erythrocyte extracts from 71 controls. The limit of quantification was 0.04 µmol · (g Hgb)−1 · h−1 (0.2% of normal control value). Intraassay imprecision was determined at 4 different levels (100%, 25%, 5%, and 0.2% of the normal control values), and the CVs were calculated to be 2.1%, 2.5%, 4.6%, and 9.7%, respectively (n = 3). Interassay imprecision CVs were 4.5%, 6.7%, 8.2%, and 13.2% (n = 5), respectively. The assay recoveries at the 4 levels were higher than 90%. The apparent Km of the 2 substrates, Gal-1-P and UDPGlc, were determined to be 0.38 mmol/L and 0.071 mmol/L, respectively. The assay in erythrocytes of 33 patients with classical galactosemia revealed no detectable activity. Conclusions This LC-MS/MS–based assay for GALT enzyme activity will be useful for the diagnosis and study of biochemically heterogeneous patients with galactosemia, especially those with uncommon genotypes and detectable but low residual activities. PMID:20348403

  8. Cloning of a human galactokinase gene (GK2) on chromosome 15 by complementation in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R T; Peterson, C L; Calman, A F; Herskowitz, I; O'Donnell, J J

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a galactokinase (EC 2.7.1.6) was isolated by complementation of a galactokinase-deficient (gal1-) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This cDNA encodes a predicted protein of 458 amino acids with 29% identity to galactokinase of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. Previous studies have mapped a human galactokinase gene (GK1) to chromosome 17q23-25, closely linked to thymidine kinase. The galactokinase gene that we have isolated (GK2) is located on chromosome 15. The relationship between the disease locus for galactokinase deficiency galactosemia, which is responsible for cataracts in newborns and possibly presenile cataracts in adults, and the two galactokinase loci is unknown. Images PMID:1438294

  9. [Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency with histologic expression of metabolic disease of carbohydrates].

    PubMed

    de la Oliva Senovilla, P; Díaz Fernández, M C; Hierro Llanillo, L; Larrauri Martínez, J; Jara Vega, P

    1989-02-01

    A two months old male affected by alpha-1-AT PiZZ deficiency with severe transient neonatal cholestasis is presented. Two hepatic biopsies were practiced in neonatal period. There was no evidence of PAS positive globules, but an intense univacuolar steatosis and a rossetoid transformation of hepatocytes were observed. Both findings are identical to those found in the histopathologic study of the liver in certain metabolic diseases such as fructosemia and galactosemia. A third biopsy practiced at an age of two years confirmed diagnosis of alpha-1-AT deficit since presence of PAS positive globules was established. It must be pointed out that histopathological findings show great variability among different patients with alpha-1-AT deficit in the neonatal period, as well as the infrequent presence of PAS positive globules in hepatic biopsies of those c during the first months of life.

  10. Ocular Correlates of Inborn Metabolic Defects

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, David G.

    1966-01-01

    The eye provides unique opportunities for the detection, during life, of deposits of storage substances and other characteristic changes resulting from inborn metabolic defects. The cornea shows the macromolecular polysaccharides of Hurler's disease, the cystine crystals in cystinosis, and the copper deposits of Wilson's disease. The sclera shows characteristic pigmentation in alcaptonuria. The iris shows the lack of pigmentation in various types of albinism. The lens is cataractous in galactosemia and dislocated in homocystinuria. The vitreous is opacified in familial amyloidosis. The retina shows different and characteristic deposits with the diseases of Tay-Sachs, Niemann-Pick, metachromatic leukodystrophy, and Farber's lipogranulomatosis. The retinal veins show pronounced tortuosity with Fabry's disease. There is some evidence that optic neuropathy occurs in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Curiously, few abnormalities in the eye have been described in subjects with the glycogen storage diseases. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5332750

  11. [Hepatoblastoma, Etiology, Case Reports].

    PubMed

    Puchmajerová, A; Křepelová, A; Indráková, J; Sítková, R; Balaščak, I; Kruseová, J; Švojgr, K; Kodet, R; Kynčl, M; Vícha, A; Macek, M

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma is an uncommon malignant neoplasm in general, yet, it is the most common liver malignancy in children with the incidence about one per milion children. This type of liver tumor usually occurs before the age of three years. The etiology of hepatoblastoma remains unknown. However, there are some genetic conditions known to be associated with an increased risk of developing hepatoblastoma such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, hemihypertrophy, APC-associated polyposis, α-1-antitrypsin defficiency and some metabolic disorders including tyrosinemia, galactosemia and glycogen storage disease type 1. There is a higher risk of hepatoblastoma in children with very low birthweight, children who acquire hepatitis B at an early age and children with congenital biliary atresia.

  12. An Unusual Case of LCHAD Deficiency Presenting With a Clinical Picture of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: Secondary HLH or Coincidence?

    PubMed

    Erdol, Sahin; Ture, Mehmet; Baytan, Birol; Yakut, Tahsin; Saglam, Halil

    2016-11-01

    There are published reports stating that some of the congenital metabolic diseases, such as lysinuric protein intolerance, multiple sulphatase deficiency, galactosemia, Gaucher disease, Pearson syndrome, and galactosialidosis, might lead to secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). However, to date, to our knowledge, the long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency has never been investigated among patients with HLH. Here, we report on a patient who was referred to our institution for a differential diagnosis of pancytopenia, liver failure, and rhabdomyolysis. The patient was diagnosed with HLH. Further investigation revealed an underlying diagnosis of the LCHAD deficiency. Our case was reported to contribute to the literature, as well as the HLH clinic, emphasizing the consideration of LCHAD deficiency, especially in 1 to 6 months' old infants with laboratory findings of hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis, and elevated creatine kinase.

  13. Static and dynamic interactions between GALK enzyme and known inhibitors: guidelines to design new drugs for galactosemic patients.

    PubMed

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Marabotti, Anna

    2013-05-01

    The search for inhibitors of galactokinase (GALK) enzyme is interesting for their possible therapeutic application capable to alleviate symptoms in people with classic galactosemia. Several high-throughput screenings in the past have found candidate ligands showing a moderate affinity for GALK. Computational analysis of the binding mode of these compounds in comparison to their target protein has been performed only on crystallographic static structures, therefore missing the evolution of the complex during time. In this work, we applied static and dynamics simulations to analyze the interactions between GALK and its potential inhibitors, while taking into account the temporal evolution of the complexes. The collected data allowed us to identify the most important and persistent anchoring points of the known active site and of the newly identified secondary cavity. These data will be of use to increase the specificity and the affinity of a new generation of GALK inhibitors.

  14. Phenotype-Genotype Discrepancy Due to a 5.5-kb Deletion in the GALT Gene.

    PubMed

    González-del Angel, Ariadna; Velázquez-Aragón, José; Alcántara-Ortigoza, Miguel A; Vela-Amieva, Marcela; Hernández-Martínez, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT). More than 200 mutations have been described in the GALT gene. A 5.5-kb GALT deletion, first described in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, may lead either to an erroneous genotype assignment of classical galactosemia or to discrepancies with parental genotypes and the expected biochemical phenotype. The presence of the 5.5-kb deletion was examined in 27 Mexican nonrelated families with at least one child with reduced GALT activity in erythrocytes and it was detected in the 5.5% (n=3) of the 54 alleles tested. The first molecular studies in three of our families showed that the genotypes of the parents were inconsistent with those of their children, which were considered initially as homozygous p.N314D-Duarte 2, but after analyzing for the presence of the 5.5-kb deletion, were reassigned as compound heterozygotes [5.5-kb deletion]+[p.N314D-Duarte 2]. Identification of the 5.5-kb deletion in Mexican patients suggests that this mutation might not be exclusive to a given ethnic group and should be tested in other populations, especially when there is a discrepancy between the genotypes of patients and parents or by incongruence between biochemical phenotype and GALT genotype. Establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation for the 5.5-kb GALT deletion and determining the appropriate management will require additional studies in patients with a G/G genotype bearing the 5.5-kb GALT deletion.

  15. Establishing New Cut-Off Limits for Galactose 1-Phosphate-Uridyltransferase Deficiency for the Dutch Newborn Screening Programme.

    PubMed

    Kemper, E A; Boelen, A; Bosch, A M; van Veen-Sijne, M; van Rijswijk, C N; Bouva, M J; Fingerhut, R; Schielen, P C J I

    2017-01-01

    Newborn screening for classical galactosemia in the Netherlands is performed by five laboratories and is based on the measurement of galactose 1-phosphate-uridyltransferase (GALT) activity and total galactose (TGAL) in heel prick blood spots. Unexpected problems with the GALT assay posed a challenge to switch to a new assay. The aim of this study was to make an analytical and clinical evaluation of GALT assays to replace the current assay and to establish new cut-off values (COVs).First, the manual assay from PerkinElmer (NG-1100) and the GSP assay were compared by analyzing 626 anonymous heel prick samples in parallel. Secondly, a manual GSP method was evaluated and 2,052 samples were compared with the automated GSP assay. Finally, a clinical evaluation was performed by collecting data from 93 referred newborns.No satisfactory correlation was observed between GALT activity measured with the manual NG-1100 assay and the automated GSP assay. An acceptable correlation was found between the manual and automated GSP assay. Intra- and inter-assay variation of the automated GSP were 1.8-10.0% and 3.1-13.9%, respectively. Evaluation of clinical data demonstrated that adjusting the COVs for GALT to 2.0 U/dl and TGAL to 1,100 μmol/l improved specificity of screening for classical galactosemia.An assay designed for automated processing to measure GALT activity in heel prick samples works equally well when processed manually. We therefore adopted both methods in the Dutch screening laboratories. As a result of this evaluation new COVs for GALT and TGAL have been introduced and are valid from July 2015.

  16. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test.

  17. Ultra Fast and Sensitive Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Based Assay for Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase and Galactokinase Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([13C6]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [13C6]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4 ± 4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8 ± 0.47 (mean ± SD) µmol·(g Hgb) −1·hr−1. Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analzyed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  18. [Evaluation of the usefulness for neonatal mass screening in light of 35 years personal experience].

    PubMed

    Bozkowa, K; Cabalska, B; Radomyska, B; Ołtarzewski, M; Lenartowska, I

    1999-01-01

    possibility of foetal damage. The results of our own investigations of maternal PKU are discussed. The significance of mass-screening for galactosemia is still under discussion. In our opinion, mass-screening for galactosemia is not useful and we have discontinued it. Selective screening has been started combined with molecular genetic studies in high risk families. In the future, we plan to prepare guidelines on the principles of diagnosis and treatment of galactosemia in children and women in the reproductive age. Mass-screening for cystic fibrosis is also still under discussion. The results of the early screening programmes were not satisfactory and the tests were discontinued. In 1998, after reorganisation of the whole system, CF screening, using tripsin-radioimmune assays, was started again. The new screening programme is combined with molecular genetic investigation of different mutations. It is still too early to assess the importance and success of this CF mass-screening programme. We decided to discontinue the screening for homocystinuria, histidinemia, tyrosinemia, leucinosis and for neuroblastoma, since these programmes did not comply with criteria of mass-screening. In 1997, major reorganisation of screening programmes for inborn errors of metabolism, at NRIMC, was undertaken. The Guthrie test for PKU was changed to a quantitative colorimetric method. The immuno-luminometric method is used for TSH estimation. The whole system is based on complete computer control of all the steps of screening, from blood sampling on filter paper until the final diagnosis. The advantages of this modern system of organisation of the screening programme are discussed.

  19. The Contribution of Intestinal Gluconeogenesis to Glucose Homeostasis Is Low in 2-Day-Old Pigs.

    PubMed

    Cherbuy, Claire; Vaugelade, Pierre; Labarthe, Simon; Honvo-Houeto, Edith; Darcy-Vrillon, Béatrice; Watford, Malcolm; Duée, Pierre-Henri

    2017-03-01

    Background: Active gluconeogenesis is essential to maintain blood glucose concentrations in neonatal piglets because of the high glucose requirements after birth. In several adult mammals, the liver, kidney, and possibly the gut may exhibit gluconeogenesis during fasting and insulinopenic conditions. During the postnatal period, the intestine expresses all of the gluconeogenic enzymes, suggesting the potential for gluconeogenesis. Galactose in milk is a potential gluconeogenic precursor for newborns.Objective: Our aim was to quantify the rate of intestinal glucose production from galactose in piglets compared with the overall rate of glucose production.Methods: A single bolus of [U-(14)C]-galactose was injected into 2-d-old piglets (females and males; mean ± SEM weight: 1.64 ± 0.07 kg) through a gastric catheter. Galactosemia, glycemia, and glucose turnover rate (assessed by monitoring d-[6-(3)H]-glucose) were monitored. Intestinal glucose production from [U-(14)C]-galactose was calculated from [U-(14)C]-glucose appearance in the blood and isotopic dilution. Galactose metabolism was also investigated in vitro in enterocytes isolated from 2-d-old piglets that were incubated with increasing concentrations of galactose.Results: In piglet enterocytes, galactose metabolism was active (mean ± SEM maximum rate of reaction: 2.26 ± 0.45 nmol · min(-1) · 10(6) cells(-1)) and predominantly oriented toward lactate and pyruvate production (74.0% ± 14.5%) rather than glucose production (26.0% ± 14.5%). In conscious piglets, gastric galactose administration led to an increase in arterial galactosemia (from 0 to 1.0 ± 0.8 mmol/L) and glycemia (35% ± 12%). The initial increase in arterial glycemia after galactose administration was linked to an increase in glucose production rate (33% ± 15%) rather than to a decrease in glucose utilization rate (3% ± 6%). The contribution of intestinal glucose production from galactose was <10% of total glucose production in 2-d

  20. Allelic variation, aneuploidy, and nongenetic mechanisms suppress a monogenic trait in yeast.

    PubMed

    Sirr, Amy; Cromie, Gareth A; Jeffery, Eric W; Gilbert, Teresa L; Ludlow, Catherine L; Scott, Adrian C; Dudley, Aimée M

    2015-01-01

    Clinically relevant features of monogenic diseases, including severity of symptoms and age of onset, can vary widely in response to environmental differences as well as to the presence of genetic modifiers affecting the trait's penetrance and expressivity. While a better understanding of modifier loci could lead to treatments for Mendelian diseases, the rarity of individuals harboring both a disease-causing allele and a modifying genotype hinders their study in human populations. We examined the genetic architecture of monogenic trait modifiers using a well-characterized yeast model of the human Mendelian disease classic galactosemia. Yeast strains with loss-of-function mutations in the yeast ortholog (GAL7) of the human disease gene (GALT) fail to grow in the presence of even small amounts of galactose due to accumulation of the same toxic intermediates that poison human cells. To isolate and individually genotype large numbers of the very rare (∼0.1%) galactose-tolerant recombinant progeny from a cross between two gal7Δ parents, we developed a new method, called "FACS-QTL." FACS-QTL improves upon the currently used approaches of bulk segregant analysis and extreme QTL mapping by requiring less genome engineering and strain manipulation as well as maintaining individual genotype information. Our results identified multiple distinct solutions by which the monogenic trait could be suppressed, including genetic and nongenetic mechanisms as well as frequent aneuploidy. Taken together, our results imply that the modifiers of monogenic traits are likely to be genetically complex and heterogeneous.

  1. Insight into the mechanism of galactokinase: Role of a critical glutamate residue and helix/coil transitions.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Margaret; Huang, Meilan; Timson, David J

    2017-03-01

    Galactokinase, the enzyme which catalyses the first committed step in the Leloir pathway, has attracted interest due to its potential as a biocatalyst and as a possible drug target in the treatment of type I galactosemia. The mechanism of the enzyme is not fully elucidated. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of galactokinase with the active site residues Arg-37 and Asp-186 altered predicted that two regions (residues 174-179 and 231-240) had different dynamics as a consequence. Interestingly, the same two regions were also affected by alterations in Arg-105, Glu-174 and Arg-228. These three residues were identified as important in catalysis in previous computational studies on human galactokinase. Alteration of Arg-105 to methionine resulted in a modest reduction in activity with little change in stability. When Arg-228 was changed to methionine, the enzyme's interaction with both ATP and galactose was affected. This variant was significantly less stable than the wild-type protein. Changing Glu-174 to glutamine (but not to aspartate) resulted in no detectable activity and a less stable enzyme. Overall, these combined in silico and in vitro studies demonstrate the importance of a negative charge at position 174 and highlight the critical role of the dynamics in to key regions of the protein. We postulate that these regions may be critical for mediating the enzyme's structure and function.

  2. Effects of galactose feeding on aldose reductase gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, R R; Lyons, P A; Wang, A; Sainsbury, A J; Chung, S; Palmer, T N

    1993-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) is implicated in the pathogenesis of the diabetic complications and osmotic cataract. AR has been identified as an osmoregulatory protein, at least in the renal medulla. An outstanding question relates to the response of AR gene expression to diet-induced galactosemia in extrarenal tissues. This paper shows that AR gene expression in different tissues is regulated by a complex multifactorial mechanism. Galactose feeding in the rat is associated with a complex and, on occasions, multiphasic pattern of changes in AR mRNA levels in kidney, testis, skeletal muscle, and brain. These changes are not in synchrony with the temporal sequence of changes in tissue galactitol, galactose, and myoinositol concentrations. Moreover, galactose feeding results in changes in tissue AR activities that are not related, temporally or quantitatively, to the alterations in tissue AR mRNA or galactitol levels. It is concluded that AR gene expression and tissue AR activities are regulated by mechanisms that are not purely dependent on nonspecific alterations in intracellular metabolite concentrations. This conclusion is supported by the finding that chronic xylose feeding, despite being associated with intracellular xylitol accumulation, does not result in alterations in AR mRNA levels, at least in the kidney. PMID:8325980

  3. GALT protein database: querying structural and functional features of GALT enzyme.

    PubMed

    d'Acierno, Antonio; Facchiano, Angelo; Marabotti, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of the impact of variations on protein structure can enhance the comprehension of the mechanisms of genetic diseases related to that protein. Here, we present a new version of GALT Protein Database, a Web-accessible data repository for the storage and interrogation of structural effects of variations of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the impairment of which leads to classic Galactosemia, a rare genetic disease. This new version of this database now contains the models of 201 missense variants of GALT enzyme, including heterozygous variants, and it allows users not only to retrieve information about the missense variations affecting this protein, but also to investigate their impact on substrate binding, intersubunit interactions, stability, and other structural features. In addition, it allows the interactive visualization of the models of variants collected into the database. We have developed additional tools to improve the use of the database by nonspecialized users. This Web-accessible database (http://bioinformatica.isa.cnr.it/GALT/GALT2.0) represents a model of tools potentially suitable for application to other proteins that are involved in human pathologies and that are subjected to genetic variations.

  4. Alternative pathways of galactose assimilation: could inverse metabolic engineering provide an alternative to galactosemic patients?

    PubMed

    Lai, Kent; Klapa, Maria I

    2004-07-01

    The galactose assimilation pathway has been extensively studied as an example of a genetic regulatory switch. Besides the importance of this pathway as a tool in basic biological research, unraveling its structure and regulation is also of major medical importance. Impairment of galactose assimilation is the cause of the genetic metabolic disease known as "galactosemia", while the in vivo activity of the pathway affects the production of glycans. The latter have been connected to tumor metastasis, anti-cancer drug resistance and various cardiovascular diseases. Despite the vast amount of studies, however, galactose assimilation and its interaction with other parts of the metabolic network have not been fully elucidated yet. In yeast and higher eukaryotes, it is still being studied as comprising only the linear Leloir pathway. Recent observations, however, indicate that alternative pathways of galactose assimilation identified in prokaryotes and fungi might also be present in yeast. Such a result is valuable per se, because it could lead to the discovery of these pathways in humans. Even more importantly, these pathways provide alternative phenotypes with known genetic fingerprints that can be used in the context of classical and inverse metabolic engineering to examine and treat the mechanisms of defects of galactose assimilation.

  5. Cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol: high levels in Niemann-Pick type C, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pajares, Sonia; Arias, Angela; García-Villoria, Judit; Macías-Vidal, Judit; Ros, Emilio; de las Heras, Javier; Girós, Marisa; Coll, Maria J; Ribes, Antonia

    2015-10-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by lysosomal/endosomal accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and glycolipids. Recent studies have shown that plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol (CT) and 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC) could be potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC patients. We aimed to know the sensitivity and specificity of these biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC compared with other diseases that can potentially lead to oxysterol alterations. We studied 107 controls and 122 patients including 16 with NPC, 3 with lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency, 8 with other lysosomal diseases, 5 with galactosemia, 11 with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), 3 with Smith-Lemli-Opitz, 14 with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, 19 with unspecific hepatic diseases, 13 with familial hypercholesterolemia, and 30 with neurological involvement and no evidence of an inherited metabolic disease. CT and 7-KC were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS as mono-dimethylglycine derivatives. Levels of 7-KC were high in most of the studied diseases, whereas those of CT were only high in NPC, LAL, and CTX patients. Consequently, although CT is a sensitive biomarker of NPC disease, including those cases with doubtful filipin staining, it is not specific. 7-KC is a very unspecific biomarker.

  6. Differential Proteomics of Urinary Exovesicles from Classical Galactosemic Patients Reveals Subclinical Kidney Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Staubach, Simon; Pekmez, Murat; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2016-06-03

    Classical galactosemia is caused by a nearly complete deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT; EC 2.7.712), resulting in a severely impaired galactose metabolism with galactose-1-phosphate and galactitol accumulation. Even on a galactose-restricted diet, patients develop serious long-term complications of the central nervous system and ovaries that may result from chronic cell-toxic effects exerted by endogenous galactose. To address the question of whether disease-associated cellular perturbations could affect the kidney function of the patients, we performed differential proteomics of detergent-resistant membranes from urinary exovesicles. Galactosemic samples (showing drastic shifts from high-mannose to complex-type N-glycosylation on exosomal N-glycoproteins) and healthy, sex-matched controls were analyzed in quadruplex iTRAQ experiments performed in biological and technical replicates. Particularly in the female patient group, the most striking finding was a drastic increase of abundant serum (glyco)proteins, like albumin, leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein, fetuin, immunoglobulins, prostaglandin H2 d-isomerase, and α-1-microglobulin protein (AMBP), pointing to a subclinical failure of kidney filter function in galactosemic patients and resulting in a heavy overload of exosomal membranes with adsorbed serum (glyco)proteins. Several of these proteins are connected to TBMN and IgAN, proteinuria, and renal damage. The impairment of renal protein filtration was also indicated by increased protein contents derived from extracellular matrices and lysosomes.

  7. Assessment of ataxia phenotype in a new mouse model of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wyman; Caston, Rose; Balakrishnan, Bijina; Siddiqi, Anwer; Parmar, Kamalpreet; Tang, Manshu; Feng, Merry; Lai, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Despite adequate dietary management, patients with classic galactosemia continue to have increased risks of cognitive deficits, speech dyspraxia, primary ovarian insufficiency, and abnormal motor development. A recent evaluation of a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT)-deficient mouse model revealed reduced fertility and growth restriction. These phenotypes resemble those seen in human patients. In this study, we further assess the fidelity of this new mouse model by examining the animals for the manifestation of a common neurological sequela in human patients: cerebellar ataxia. The balance, grip strength, and motor coordination of GALT-deficient and wild-type mice were tested using a modified rotarod. The results were compared to composite phenotype scoring tests, typically used to evaluate neurological and motor impairment. The data demonstrated abnormalities with varying severity in the GALT-deficient mice. Mice of different ages were used to reveal the progressive nature of motor impairment. The varying severity and age-dependent impairments seen in the animal model agree with reports on human patients. Finally, measurements of the cerebellar granular and molecular layers suggested that mutant mice experience cerebellar hypoplasia, which could have resulted from the down-regulation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  8. D-Galactose Causes Motor Coordination Impairment, and Histological and Biochemical Changes in the Cerebellum of Rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, André Felipe; Biasibetti, Helena; Zanotto, Bruna Stela; Sanches, Eduardo Farias; Schmitz, Felipe; Nunes, Vinícius Tejada; Pierozan, Paula; Manfredini, Vanusa; Magro, Débora Delwing Dal; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Wyse, Angela T S

    2016-06-20

    Classical galactosemia is an inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism in which patients accumulate high concentration of galactose in the brain. The most common treatment is a galactose-restricted diet. However, even treated patients develop several complications. One of the most common symptoms is motor coordination impairment, including affected gait, balance, and speech, as well as tremor and ataxia. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular galactose administration on motor coordination, as well as on histological and biochemical parameters in cerebellum of adult rats. Wistar rats received 5 μL of galactose (4 mM) or saline by intracerebroventricular injection. The animals performed the beam walking test at 1 and 24 h after galactose administration. Histological and biochemical parameters were performed 24 h after the injections. The results showed motor coordination impairment at 24 h after galactose injection. Galactose also decreased the number of cells in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum. The immunohistochemistry results suggest that the cell types lost by galactose are neurons and astrocytes in the spinocerebellum and neurons in the cerebrocerebellum. Galactose increased active caspase-3 immunocontent and acetylcholinesterase activity, decreased acetylcholinesterase immunocontent, glutathione, and BDNF levels, as well as caused protein and DNA damage. Our results suggest that galactose induces histological and biochemical changes in cerebellum, which can be associated with motor coordination impairment.

  9. Molecular Diagnosis of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance: Founder Mutation in a Community from India.

    PubMed

    Bijarnia-Mahay, Sunita; Movva, Sireesha; Gupta, Neerja; Sharma, Deepak; Puri, Ratna D; Kotecha, Udhaya; Saxena, Renu; Kabra, Madhulika; Mohan, Neelam; Verma, Ishwar C

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a difficult-to-confirm diagnosis, requiring either invasive liver biopsy-enzyme assay or potentially hazardous fructose challenge test or expensive molecular genetic analysis. Therefore, worldwide there has been a trend towards finding "common mutations" in distinct ethnic groups to simplify the process of diagnosis. The nonspecific presentation of the disease often leads to diagnostic confusion with other metabolic liver disorders such as glycogenoses, galactosemia, and tyrosinemia. This leads to much delay in diagnosis with consequent harm to the patient.We report mutations in the ALDOB gene, from eleven Indian patients, seven of whom belong to the Agarwal community. Six patients from the Agarwal community and two non-Agarwal patients harbored one novel mutation, c.324+1G>A (five homozygous and one heterozygous), in the ALDOB gene. Haplotyping performed in families confirmed a founder effect. The community has been known to harbor founder mutations in other genes such as the MLC1, PANK2, and CAPN3 genes, thus providing another evidence for a founder effect in the community in case of HFI. This may pave the path for a simpler and quicker test at least for this community in India. In addition to the founder mutation, we report four other novel mutations, c.112+1delG, c.380-1G>A, c.677G>A, and c.689delA, and a previously reported mutation, c.1013C>T, in the cohort from India.

  10. Breast is best for babies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander K C; Sauve, Reginald S

    2005-07-01

    Breastfeeding is the optimal method of infant feeding. Breast milk provides almost all the necessary nutrients, growth factors and immunological components a healthy term infant needs, Other advantages of breastfeeding include reduction of incidences and severity of infections; prevention of allergies; possible enhancement of cognitive development; and prevention of obesity, hypertension and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Health gains for breastfeeding mothers include lactation amenorrhea, early involution of the uterus, enhanced bonding between the mother and the infant, and reduction in incidence of ovarian and breast cancer. From the economic perspective, breastfeeding is less expensive than formula feeding. In most cases, maternal ingestion of medications and maternal infections are not contraindications to breastfeeding. Breastfeeding, however, is contraindicated in infants with galactosemia. The management of common breastfeeding issues, such as breast engorgement, sore nipples, mastitis and insufficient milk, is discussed. Breastfeeding should be initiated as soon after delivery as possible. To promote, protect and support breastfeeding, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) developed the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) 10 Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Healthcare professionals have an important role to play in promoting and protecting breastfeeding.

  11. Etiopathogenesis of cataract: An appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun B; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Ravishankar, Basavaiah

    2014-01-01

    Natural eye lens is a crystalline substance to produce a clear passage for light. Cataract is opacity within the clear lens of the eye and is the dominant cause of socio-medical problem i.e., blindness worldwide. The only available treatment of cataract is surgery. However, insufficient surgical facilities in poor and developing countries and post-operative complications inspire researchers to find out other modes of treatment for cataract. In this review, an attempt has been made to appraise various etiological factors of cataract to make their perception clear to build up counterpart treatment. Present study is an assortment of various available literatures and electronic information in view of cataract etiopathogenesis. Various risk factors have been identified in development of cataracts. They can be classified in to genetic factors, ageing (systemic diseases, nutritional and trace metals deficiencies, smoking, oxidative stress etc.), traumatic, complicated (inflammatory and degenerative diseases of eye), metabolic (diabetes, galactosemia etc.), toxic substances including drugs abuses, alcohol etc., radiation (ultraviolet, electromagnetic waves etc.) are implicated as significant risk factors in the development of cataract. PMID:24618482

  12. Breast is best for babies.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alexander K. C.; Sauve, Reginald S.

    2005-01-01

    Breastfeeding is the optimal method of infant feeding. Breast milk provides almost all the necessary nutrients, growth factors and immunological components a healthy term infant needs, Other advantages of breastfeeding include reduction of incidences and severity of infections; prevention of allergies; possible enhancement of cognitive development; and prevention of obesity, hypertension and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Health gains for breastfeeding mothers include lactation amenorrhea, early involution of the uterus, enhanced bonding between the mother and the infant, and reduction in incidence of ovarian and breast cancer. From the economic perspective, breastfeeding is less expensive than formula feeding. In most cases, maternal ingestion of medications and maternal infections are not contraindications to breastfeeding. Breastfeeding, however, is contraindicated in infants with galactosemia. The management of common breastfeeding issues, such as breast engorgement, sore nipples, mastitis and insufficient milk, is discussed. Breastfeeding should be initiated as soon after delivery as possible. To promote, protect and support breastfeeding, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) developed the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) 10 Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Healthcare professionals have an important role to play in promoting and protecting breastfeeding. PMID:16080672

  13. The live-birth prevalence of mucopolysaccharidoses in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Krabbi, Külliki; Joost, Kairit; Zordania, Riina; Talvik, Inga; Rein, Reet; Huijmans, Jan G M; Verheijen, Frans V; Õunap, Katrin

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies on the prevalence of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) in different populations have shown considerable variations. There are, however, few data with regard to the prevalence of MPSs in Fenno-Ugric populations or in north-eastern Europe, except for a report about Scandinavian countries. A retrospective epidemiological study of MPSs in Estonia was undertaken, and live-birth prevalence of MPS patients born between 1985 and 2006 was estimated. The live-birth prevalence for all MPS subtypes was found to be 4.05 per 100,000 live births, which is consistent with most other European studies. MPS II had the highest calculated incidence, with 2.16 per 100,000 live births (4.2 per 100,000 male live births), forming 53% of all diagnosed MPS cases, and was twice as high as in other studied European populations. The second most common subtype was MPS IIIA, with a live-birth prevalence of 1.62 in 100,000 live births. With 0.27 out of 100,000 live births, MPS VI had the third-highest live-birth prevalence. No cases of MPS I were diagnosed in Estonia, making the prevalence of MPS I in Estonia much lower than in other European populations. MPSs are the third most frequent inborn error of metabolism in Estonia after phenylketonuria and galactosemia.

  14. Cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol: high levels in Niemann-Pick type C, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiency[S

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, Sonia; Arias, Angela; García-Villoria, Judit; Macías-Vidal, Judit; Ros, Emilio; de las Heras, Javier; Girós, Marisa; Coll, Maria J.; Ribes, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by lysosomal/endosomal accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and glycolipids. Recent studies have shown that plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol (CT) and 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC) could be potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC patients. We aimed to know the sensitivity and specificity of these biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC compared with other diseases that can potentially lead to oxysterol alterations. We studied 107 controls and 122 patients including 16 with NPC, 3 with lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency, 8 with other lysosomal diseases, 5 with galactosemia, 11 with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), 3 with Smith-Lemli-Opitz, 14 with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, 19 with unspecific hepatic diseases, 13 with familial hypercholesterolemia, and 30 with neurological involvement and no evidence of an inherited metabolic disease. CT and 7-KC were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS as mono-dimethylglycine derivatives. Levels of 7-KC were high in most of the studied diseases, whereas those of CT were only high in NPC, LAL, and CTX patients. Consequently, although CT is a sensitive biomarker of NPC disease, including those cases with doubtful filipin staining, it is not specific. 7-KC is a very unspecific biomarker. PMID:26239048

  15. A Rare Case of Short-Chain Acyl-COA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: The Apparent Rarity of the Disorder Results in Under Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Shilpa; Sujatha, M

    2011-07-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) deficiency is an extremely rare inherited mitochondrial disorder of fat metabolism. This belongs to a group of diseases known as fatty acid oxidation disorders. Screening programmes have provided evidence that all the fatty acid oxidation disorders combined are among the most common inborn errors of metabolism. Mitochondrial beta oxidation of fatty acids is an essential energy producing pathway. It is a particularly important pathway during prolonged periods of starvation and during periods of reduced caloric intake due to gastrointestinal illness or increased energy expenditure during febrile illness. The most common presentation is an acute episode of life threatening coma and hypoglycemia induced by a period of fasting due to defective hepatic ketogenesis. Here, the case of a 4 month old female patient who had seizures since the third day of her birth and persistent hypoglycemia is described. She was born to parents of second degree consanguinity after 10 years of infertility treatment. There was history of delayed cry after birth. Metabolic screening for TSH, galactosemia, 17-OHP, G6PD, cystic fibrosis, biotinidase were normal. Tandem mass spectrometric (TMS) screening for blood amino acids, organic acids, fatty acids showed elevated butyryl carnitine (C4) as 3.40 μmol/L (normal <2.00 μmol/L), hexanoyl carnitine (C6) as 0.92 μmol/L (normal <0.72 μmol/L), C4/C3 as 2.93 μmol/L (normal <1.18 μmol/L). The child was started immediately on carnitor syrup (carnitine) 1/2 ml twice daily. Limitation of fasting stress and dietary fat was advised. Baby responded well by gaining weight and seizures were controlled. Until now, less than 25 patients have been reported worldwide. The limited number of patients diagnosed until now is due to the rarity of the disorder resulting in under diagnosis.

  16. [Breast feeding: health benefits for child and mother].

    PubMed

    Turck, D

    2005-12-01

    Breast milk contains hormones, growth factors, cytokines, cells, etc., and offers many advantages over cow's milk or soy protein infant formulae. The composition of breast milk is influenced by gestational and postnatal age. Prevalence of breastfeeding in France is one of the lowest in Europe: in 2003, only 58% of infants were breastfed when leaving the maternity ward, for a median duration of 10 weeks. Breastfeeding allows normal growth until at least 6 months of age, and can be prolonged until the age of 2 years or more, provided that complementary feeding is started after 6 months. Breastfeeding is associated with slightly enhanced performance on tests of cognitive development. Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 3 months is associated with a lower incidence and severity of diarrhoea, otitis media and respiratory infection. Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 6 months is associated with a lower incidence of allergic disease in at-risk infants (infants with at least one first-degree relative presenting with allergy). Breastfeeding is also associated with a lower incidence of obesity during childhood and adolescence, as well as with a lower incidence of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia in adulthood. Maternal infection with hepatitis B and C virus is not a contraindication to breastfeeding, as opposed to HIV infection and galactosemia. A supplementation with vitamin D and K is necessary in the breastfed infant. Very few medications contraindicate breastfeeding. Premature babies can be breastfed and/or receive mother's milk and/or bank milk, provided they receive energy, protein and mineral supplements. Return to prepregnancy weight is earlier in breastfeeding mothers. Breastfeeding is also associated with a decreased risk of breast and ovarian cancer in the premenopausal period, and of hip fractures and osteoporosis in the postmenopausal period.

  17. Gene therapy for human genetic disease?

    PubMed

    Friedmann, T; Roblin, R

    1972-03-03

    In our view, gene therapy may ameliorate some human genetic diseases in the future. For this reason, we believe that research directed at the development of techniques for gene therapy should continue. For the foreseeable future, however, we oppose any further attempts at gene therapy in human patients because (i) our understanding of such basic processes as gene regulation and genetic recombination in human cells is inadequate; (ii) our understanding of the details of the relation between the molecular defect and the disease state is rudimentary for essentially all genetic diseases; and (iii) we have no information on the short-range and long-term side effects of gene therapy. We therefore propose that a sustained effort be made to formulate a complete set of ethicoscientific criteria to guide the development and clinical application of gene therapy techniques. Such an endeavor could go a long way toward ensuring that gene therapy is used in humans only in those instances where it will prove beneficial, and toward preventing its misuse through premature application. Two recent papers have provided new demonstrations of directed genetic modification of mammalian cells. Munyon et al. (44) restored the ability to synthesize the enzyme thymidine kinase to thymidine kinase-deficient mouse cells by infection with ultraviolet-irradiated herpes simplex virus. In their experiments the DNA from herpes simplex virus, which contains a gene coding for thymidine kinase, may have formed a hereditable association with the mouse cells. Merril et al. (45) reported that treatment of fibroblasts from patients with galactosemia with exogenous DNA caused increased activity of a missing enzyme, alpha-D-galactose-l-phosphate uridyltransferase. They also provided some evidence that the change persisted after subculturing the treated cells. If this latter report can be confirmed, the feasibility of directed genetic modification of human cells would be clearly demonstrated, considerably

  18. [Breastfeeding: health benefits for child and mother].

    PubMed

    Turck, D; Vidailhet, M; Bocquet, A; Bresson, J-L; Briend, A; Chouraqui, J-P; Darmaun, D; Dupont, C; Frelut, M-L; Girardet, J-P; Goulet, O; Hankard, R; Rieu, D; Simeoni, U

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of breastfeeding in France is one of the lowest in Europe: 65% of infants born in France in 2010 were breastfed when leaving the maternity ward. Exclusive breastfeeding allows normal growth until at least 6 months of age, and can be prolonged until the age of 2 years or more, provided that complementary feeding is started after 6 months. Breast milk contains hormones, growth factors, cytokines, immunocompetent cells, etc., and has many biological properties. The composition of breast milk is influenced by gestational and postnatal age, as well as by the moment of the feed. Breastfeeding is associated with slightly enhanced performance on tests of cognitive development. Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 3 months is associated with a lower incidence and severity of diarrhoea, otitis media and respiratory infection. Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 4 months is associated with a lower incidence of allergic disease (asthma, atopic dermatitis) during the first 2 to 3 years of life in at-risk infants (infants with at least one first-degree relative presenting with allergy). Breastfeeding is also associated with a lower incidence of obesity during childhood and adolescence, as well as with a lower blood pressure and cholesterolemia in adulthood. However, no beneficial effect of breastfeeding on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has been shown. Maternal infection with hepatitis B and C virus is not a contraindication to breastfeeding, as opposed to HIV infection and galactosemia. A supplementation with vitamin D and K is necessary in the breastfed infant. Very few medications contraindicate breastfeeding. Premature babies can be breastfed and/or receive mother's milk and/or bank milk, provided they receive energy, protein and mineral supplements. Return to prepregnancy weight is earlier in breastfeeding mothers during the 6 months following delivery. Breastfeeding is also associated with a decreased risk of breast and ovarian cancer in the

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae physiology in the context of galactose assimilation perturbations.

    PubMed

    Syriopoulos, C; Panayotarou, A; Lai, K; Klapa, Maria I

    2008-09-01

    Despite being extensively studied in various organisms due to scientific, industrial and medical interest, the galactose assimilation function and regulation, and especially its interaction with other parts of cellular physiology, have not been fully elucidated yet. The post-genomic era holistic techniques ("omics") could assist towards this goal. In this paper, we holistically analyzed full-genome Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptional profiling data concerning its glucose- and galactose-grown wild-type (WT) physiology and its glucose-grown gal7-deficient (GAL7Delta) physiology, as these were obtained in the experiment described in Lai and Elsas (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 2000, 271, 392-400). The gal7 gene encodes for the second enzyme of the galactose assimilation, Leloir, pathway, and its deficiency in humans causes a potentially lethal disease, named "classic galactosemia". Analysis of the galactose-grown compared to the glucose-grown WT physiology indicated a significant increase in the transcriptional expression of the ribosomal machinery and decrease in the transcriptional activity of the fatty acids' beta-oxidation at the peroxisomes. Comparison of GAL7Delta to WT physiology in glucose indicated a significant transcriptional increase in the mitochondrial activity and the rate of catabolism of disaccharides, including sucrose, mannose and trehalose, towards amplified biosynthesis of the main cell wall components. Comparison with other physiological conditions indicated strong correlation between the glucose-grown GAL7Delta transcriptional physiology and the WT growth under glucose derepression conditions. Finally, the acquired results and the large number of still unknown genes that were related to the galactose assimilation regulation indicated the need for further, specifically designed, perturbations and integrated analyses of multiple levels of cellular function.

  20. One-step metabolomics: carbohydrates, organic and amino acids quantified in a single procedure.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, James D

    2010-06-25

    Every infant born in the US is now screened for up to 42 rare genetic disorders called "inborn errors of metabolism". The screening method is based on tandem mass spectrometry and quantifies acylcarnitines as a screen for organic acidemias and also measures amino acids. All states also perform enzymatic testing for carbohydrate disorders such as galactosemia. Because the results can be non-specific, follow-up testing of positive results is required using a more definitive method. The present report describes the "urease" method of sample preparation for inborn error screening. Crystalline urease enzyme is used to remove urea from body fluids which permits most other water-soluble metabolites to be dehydrated and derivatized for gas chromatography in a single procedure. Dehydration by evaporation in a nitrogen stream is facilitated by adding acetonitrile and methylene chloride. Then, trimethylsilylation takes place in the presence of a unique catalyst, triethylammonium trifluoroacetate. Automated injection and chromatography is followed by macro-driven custom quantification of 192 metabolites and semi-quantification of every major component using specialized libraries of mass spectra of TMS derivatized biological compounds. The analysis may be performed on the widely-used Chemstation platform using the macros and libraries available from the author. In our laboratory, over 16,000 patient samples have been analyzed using the method with a diagnostic yield of about 17%--that is, 17% of the samples results reveal findings that should be acted upon by the ordering physician. Included in these are over 180 confirmed inborn errors, of which about 38% could not have been diagnosed using previous methods.

  1. Novel phenotypes and loci identified through clinical genomics approaches to pediatric cataract.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisha; Anand, Deepti; Monies, Dorota; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Khan, Arif O; Algoufi, Talal; Alowain, Mohammed; Faqeih, Eissa; Alshammari, Muneera; Qudair, Ahmed; Alsharif, Hadeel; Aljubran, Fatimah; Alsaif, Hessa S; Ibrahim, Niema; Abdulwahab, Firdous M; Hashem, Mais; Alsedairy, Haifa; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Lachke, Salil A; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric cataract is highly heterogeneous clinically and etiologically. While mostly isolated, cataract can be part of many multisystem disorders, further complicating the diagnostic process. In this study, we applied genomic tools in the form of a multi-gene panel as well as whole-exome sequencing on unselected cohort of pediatric cataract (166 patients from 74 families). Mutations in previously reported cataract genes were identified in 58% for a total of 43 mutations, including 15 that are novel. GEMIN4 was independently mutated in families with a syndrome of cataract, global developmental delay with or without renal involvement. We also highlight a recognizable syndrome that resembles galactosemia (a fulminant infantile liver disease with cataract) caused by biallelic mutations in CYP51A1. A founder mutation in RIC1 (KIAA1432) was identified in patients with cataract, brain atrophy, microcephaly with or without cleft lip and palate. For non-syndromic pediatric cataract, we map a novel locus in a multiplex consanguineous family on 4p15.32 where exome sequencing revealed a homozygous truncating mutation in TAPT1. We report two further candidates that are biallelically inactivated each in a single cataract family: TAF1A (cataract with global developmental delay) and WDR87 (non-syndromic cataract). In addition to positional mapping data, we use iSyTE developmental lens expression and gene-network analysis to corroborate the proposed link between the novel candidate genes and cataract. Our study expands the phenotypic, allelic and locus heterogeneity of pediatric cataract. The high diagnostic yield of clinical genomics supports the adoption of this approach in this patient group.

  2. Soy protein infant formulae and follow-on formulae: a commentary by the ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Carlo; Axelsson, Irene; Goulet, Olivier; Koletzko, Berthold; Michaelsen, Kim Fleischerm; Puntis, John; Rieu, Daniel; Rigo, Jacques; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania; Turck, Dominique

    2006-04-01

    This comment by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition summarizes available information on the composition and use of soy protein formulae as substitutes for breastfeeding and cows' milk protein formulae as well as on their suitability and safety for supporting adequate growth and development in infants. Soy is a source of protein that is inferior to cows' milk, with a lower digestibility and bioavailability as well as a lower methionine content. For soy protein infant formulae, only protein isolates can be used, and minimum protein content required in the current European Union legislation is higher than that of cows' milk protein infant formulae (2.25 g/100 kcal vs. 1.8 g/100kcal). Soy protein formulae can be used for feeding term infants, but they have no nutritional advantage over cows' milk protein formulae and contain high concentrations of phytate, aluminum, and phytoestrogens (isoflavones), which might have untoward effects. There are no data to support the use of soy protein formulae in preterm infants. Indications for soy protein formulae include severe persistent lactose intolerance, galactosemia, and ethical considerations (e.g., vegan concepts). Soy protein formulae have no role in the prevention of allergic diseases and should not be used in infants with food allergy during the first 6 months of life. If soy protein formulae are considered for therapeutic use in food allergy after the age of 6 months because of their lower cost and better acceptance, tolerance to soy protein should first be established byclinical challenge. There is no evidence supporting the use of soy protein formulae for the prevention or management of infantile colic, regurgitation, or prolonged crying.

  3. Distinct roles of galactose-1P in galactose-mediated growth arrest of yeast deficient in galactose-1P uridylyltransferase (GALT) and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE).

    PubMed

    Mumma, Jane Odhiambo; Chhay, Juliet S; Ross, Kerry L; Eaton, Jana S; Newell-Litwa, Karen A; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2008-02-01

    Galactose is metabolized in humans and other species by the three-enzyme Leloir pathway comprised of galactokinase (GALK), galactose 1-P uridylyltransferase (GALT), and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). Impairment of GALT or GALE in humans results in the potentially lethal disorder galactosemia, and loss of either enzyme in yeast results in galactose-dependent growth arrest of cultures despite the availability of an alternate carbon source. In contrast, loss of GALK in humans is not life-threatening, and in yeast has no impact on the growth of cultures challenged with galactose. Further, the growth of both GALT-null and GALE-null yeast challenged with galactose is rescued by loss of GALK, thereby implicating the GALK reaction product, gal-1P, for a role in the galactose-sensitivity of both strains. However, the nature of that relationship has remained unclear. Here we have developed and applied a doxycycline-repressible allele of galactokinase to define the quantitative relationship between galactokinase activity, gal-1P accumulation, and growth arrest of galactose-challenged GALT or GALE-deficient yeast. Our results demonstrate a clear threshold relationship between gal-1P accumulation and galactose-mediated growth arrest in both GALT-null and GALE-null yeast, however, the threshold for the two strains is distinct. Further, we tested the galactose-sensitivity of yeast double-null for GALT and GALE, and found that although loss of GALT barely changed accumulation of gal-1P, it significantly lowered the accumulation of UDP-gal, and also dramatically rescued growth of the GALE-null cells. Together, these data suggest that while gal-1P alone may account for the galactose-sensitivity of GALT-null cells, other factors, likely to include UDP-gal accumulation, must contribute to the galactose-sensitivity of GALE-null cells.

  4. Allelic Variation, Aneuploidy, and Nongenetic Mechanisms Suppress a Monogenic Trait in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sirr, Amy; Cromie, Gareth A.; Jeffery, Eric W.; Gilbert, Teresa L.; Ludlow, Catherine L.; Scott, Adrian C.; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2015-01-01

    Clinically relevant features of monogenic diseases, including severity of symptoms and age of onset, can vary widely in response to environmental differences as well as to the presence of genetic modifiers affecting the trait’s penetrance and expressivity. While a better understanding of modifier loci could lead to treatments for Mendelian diseases, the rarity of individuals harboring both a disease-causing allele and a modifying genotype hinders their study in human populations. We examined the genetic architecture of monogenic trait modifiers using a well-characterized yeast model of the human Mendelian disease classic galactosemia. Yeast strains with loss-of-function mutations in the yeast ortholog (GAL7) of the human disease gene (GALT) fail to grow in the presence of even small amounts of galactose due to accumulation of the same toxic intermediates that poison human cells. To isolate and individually genotype large numbers of the very rare (∼0.1%) galactose-tolerant recombinant progeny from a cross between two gal7Δ parents, we developed a new method, called “FACS-QTL.” FACS-QTL improves upon the currently used approaches of bulk segregant analysis and extreme QTL mapping by requiring less genome engineering and strain manipulation as well as maintaining individual genotype information. Our results identified multiple distinct solutions by which the monogenic trait could be suppressed, including genetic and nongenetic mechanisms as well as frequent aneuploidy. Taken together, our results imply that the modifiers of monogenic traits are likely to be genetically complex and heterogeneous. PMID:25398792

  5. A retrospective drug use evaluation of cabergoline for lactation inhibition at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    AlSaad, Doua; ElSalem, Samah; Abdulrouf, Palli Valapila; Thomas, Binny; Alsaad, Tayseer; Ahmed, Afif; AlHail, Moza

    2016-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding is considered as gold standard for infant nutrition and should be interrupted only when a compelling indication exists. Certain medical conditions such as abortion, stillbirth, HIV infection, or infant galactosemia and certain medications such as chemotherapy necessitate lactation inhibition to protect the health of mother and infant. Drug use evaluation (DUE) studies are done to explore the current practice in a setting and help to identify areas in which further information and education may be needed by clinicians. Objective The aim of this study was to conduct a DUE of cabergoline to assess indications for lactation inhibition, dosage regimen, and its safety. Method A retrospective cross-sectional DUE study was conducted over a period of 4 months from September 1, 2013, till December 31, 2013, at the Women’s Hospital, Qatar. All cabergoline prescriptions written for lactation inhibition within 10 days of delivery or abortion were included in the study. A descriptive data analysis was undertaken. Results Of the 85 patients included, stillbirth (50.6%) was considered as the main reason for lactation inhibition, followed by abortion (27.1%) and neonatal death (12.9%). The remaining 9.4% of the patients had live baby, and the majority of them were prescribed cabergoline for lactation inhibition because their maternal medical conditions required the use of drugs with insufficient safety data (n=6). Seventy-four percent of patients received cabergoline at accurate time and dose. However, 14% of the patients had preexisting hypertensive disorder and 58.3% of them were diagnosed as uncontrolled hypertension. Conclusion The current DUE study found that cabergoline was mainly used to inhibit lactation for patients with stillbirth, abortion, and neonatal death. In mothers who use medications for other medical conditions, benefits and risks of breastfeeding should be carefully balanced before prescribing cabergoline. Current prescribing pattern

  6. Extensions to the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Fourakis, Marios; Hall, Sheryl D.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; McSweeny, Jane L.; Potter, Nancy L.; Scheer-Cohen, Alison R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Tilkens, Christie M.; Wilson, David L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes three extensions to a classification system for pediatric speech sound disorders termed the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS). Part I describes a classification extension to the SDCS to differentiate motor speech disorders from speech delay and to differentiate among three subtypes of motor speech disorders. Part II describes the Madison Speech Assessment Protocol (MSAP), an approximately two-hour battery of 25 measures that includes 15 speech tests and tasks. Part III describes the Competence, Precision, and Stability Analytics (CPSA) framework, a current set of approximately 90 perceptual- and acoustic-based indices of speech, prosody, and voice used to quantify and classify subtypes of Speech Sound Disorders (SSD). A companion paper, Shriberg, Fourakis, et al. (2010) provides reliability estimates for the perceptual and acoustic data reduction methods used in the SDCS. The agreement estimates in the companion paper support the reliability of SDCS methods and illustrate the complementary roles of perceptual and acoustic methods in diagnostic analyses of SSD of unknown origin. Examples of research using the extensions to the SDCS described in the present report include diagnostic findings for a sample of youth with motor speech disorders associated with galactosemia (Shriberg, Potter, & Strand, 2010) and a test of the hypothesis of apraxia of speech in a group of children with autism spectrum disorders (Shriberg, Paul, Black, & van Santen, 2010). All SDCS methods and reference databases running in the PEPPER (Programs to Examine Phonetic and Phonologic Evaluation Records; [Shriberg, Allen, McSweeny, & Wilson, 2001]) environment will be disseminated without cost when complete. PMID:20831378

  7. Assessing Psychological Functioning in Metabolic Disorders: Validation of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Second Edition (ABAS-II), and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) for Identification of Individuals at Risk.

    PubMed

    Waisbren, Susan E; He, Jianping; McCarter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Long-term follow-up of neuropsychological functioning in metabolic disorders remains difficult due to limited opportunities for comprehensive neuropsychological evaluations. This study examined the validity of using the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Second Edition (ABAS-II), and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) for assessing developmental status in metabolic disorders and for identifying individuals at risk for cognitive deficits. Results from individuals with urea cycle disorders, phenylketonuria, galactosemia, and fatty acid oxidation disorders were obtained on the ABAS-II and BRIEF and were compared to results obtained from neuropsychological testing performed on the same day. Correlations between scores on the ABAS-II and developmental or IQ tests for individuals with urea cycle disorders ranged from 0.48 to 0.72 and concordance rates for scores greater than a standard deviation below the normative mean ranged from 69 to 89%. Correlations ranged from 0.20 to 0.68 with concordance ranging from 73 to 90% in the other metabolic disorders. For the BRIEF, correlations with other tests of executive functioning were significant for urea cycle disorders, with concordance ranging from 52 to 80%. For the other metabolic disorders, correlations ranged from -0.09 to -0.55. Concordance rates for at-risk status on the BRIEF and executive functioning tests ranged from 55% in adults to 80% in children with other metabolic disorders. These results indicate that the ABAS-II and BRIEF together can confidently be used as an adjunct or supplementary method for clinical follow-up and for research on functional status involving infants, children, and adults with metabolic disorders.

  8. Preparation of low galactose yogurt using cultures of Gal(+) Streptococcus thermophilus in combination with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Anbukkarasi, Kaliyaperumal; UmaMaheswari, Thiyagamoorthy; Hemalatha, Thiagarajan; Nanda, Dhiraj Kumar; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Rameshwar

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is an important lactic starter used in the production of yogurt. Most strains of S. thermophilus are galactose negative (Gal(-)) and are able to metabolize only glucose portion of lactose and expel galactose into the medium. This metabolic defect leads to the accumulation of free galactose in yogurt, resulting in galactosemia among consumers. Hence there is an absolute need to develop low galactose yogurt. Therefore, in this study, three galactose positive (Gal(+)) S. thermophilus strains from National Collection of Dairy Cultures (NCDC) viz. NCDC 659 (AJM), NCDC 660 (JM1), NCDC 661 (KM3) and a reference galactose negative (Gal(-)) S. thermophilus NCDC 218 were used for preparation of low galactose yogurt. In milk fermented using S. thermophilus isolates alone, NCDC 659 released less galactose (0.27 %) followed by NCDC 661 (0.3 %) and NCDC 660 (0.45 %) after 10 h at 42 °C. Milk was fermented in combination with Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC 04, in which NCDC 659 released least galactose upto 0.49 % followed by NCDC 661 (0.51 %) and NCDC 660 (0.60 %) than reference Gal(-) NCDC 218(0.79 %). Low galactose yogurt was prepared following standard procedure using Gal(+) S. thermophilus isolates and Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC 04 in 1:1 ratio. Among which low galactose yogurt by NCDC 659 combination contained less galactose 0.37 % followed by NCDC 661 (0.51 %), NCDC 660 (0.65 %) and reference Gal(-) NCDC 218 (0.98 %) after 4 h of fermentation. This study clearly reveals that Gal(+) S. thermophilus isolates can be paired with Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus for developing low galactose yogurt.

  9. A Rapid Screening Test on Dried Blood for the Neonatal Diagnosis of Tyrosinemia Type I

    PubMed Central

    Bodaghkhan, Farahnaz; Geramizadeh, Bita; Rajeh, Abbas Abdollah; Haghighat, Mahmoud; Dehghani, Mohsen; Honar, Naser; Zahmatkeshan, Mojgan; Imanieh, Mohammad-Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tyrosinemia is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by elevated levels of tyrosine and its metabolites in plasma. Without treatment, the disease will progress to hepatic and renal failure, so that without liver transplantation will cause death in less than 10 years of age. So, early diagnosis and treatment can be life saving and crucial. It means that with early treatment starting in the neonatal period, the patient can have normal life with very few restrictions in diets containing tyrosine and phenylalanine. Objectives: In this study we wanted to evaluate an easy to perform, rapid and sensitive qualitative test with low cost, as a part of neonatal screening tests to help early diagnosis and treatment of hereditary tyrosinemia. Patients and Methods: In this cross sectional study, during the study period (2013 - 2014), 100 patients were selected. Fifty three (53) of these patients had proven tyrosinemia and the other 47 cases biliary atresia, paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts, cytomegalovirus (CMV) hepatitis, galactosemia and storage diseases. Results: There were 2 false negative and 14 false positive cases of hereditary tyrosinemia (HT-1) in the test. Six cases of biliary atresia, 7 cases of paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts and one patient with cytomegalovirus (CMV) hepatitis were falsely positive with the test. Sensitivity of the test was 96.23%, specificity 71.43%, positive predictive value (PPV) 78.46%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 94.59%. Conclusions: This rapid qualitative test on dried blood sample is an easy, cheap, and feasible method for the screening of hereditary tyrosinemia in neonatal period. PMID:28203327

  10. Inborn errors of metabolism in infancy: a guide to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Burton, B K

    1998-12-01

    group of inborn errors of metabolism including galactosemia, hereditary tyrosinemia, neonatal hemochromatosis, and a number of other conditions. A subset of lysosomal storage disorders may present very early with coarse facial features, organomegaly, or even hydrops fetalis. Specific patterns of dysmorphic features and congenital anomalies characterize yet another group of inherited metabolic disorders, such as Zellweger syndrome and the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Each of these symptom complexes, and the appropriate evaluation of the affected infants, is discussed in more detail in this review.

  11. [A difficult and complicated case study: neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency].

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan-Zong; Hao, Hu; Ushikai, Miharu; Liu, Guo-Sheng; Xiao, Xin; Saheki, Takeyori; Kobayashi, Keiko; Wang, Zi-Neng

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD) is a kind of inborn errors of metabolism, with the main clinic manifestations of jaundice, hepatomegaly, and abnormal liver function indices. As a mitochondrial solute carrier protein, citrin plays important roles in aerobic glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, urea cycle, and protein and nucleotide syntheses. Therefore citrin deficiency causes various and complicated metabolic disturbances, such as hypoglycemia, hyperlactic acidemia, hyperammonemia, hypoproteinemia, hyperlipidemia, and galactosemia. This paper reported a case of NICCD confirmed by mutation analysis of SLC25A13, the gene encoding citrin. The baby (male, 6 months old) was referred to the First Affiliated Hospital with the complaint of jaundice of the skin and sclera, which it had suffered from for nearly 6 months. Physical examination showed obvious jaundice and a palpable liver 5 cm below the right subcostal margin. Liver function tests revealed elevated enzymatic activities, like GGT, ALP, AST, and ALT, together with increased levels of TBA, bilirubin (especially conjugated bilirubin), and decreased levels of total protein/albumin and fibrinogen. Blood levels of ammonia, lactate, cholesterol, and triglyceride were also increased, and in particular, the serum AFP level reached 319,225.70 microg/L, a extremely elevated value that has rarely been found in practice before. Tandem mass analysis of a dried blood sample revealed increased levels of free fatty acids and tyrosine, methionine, citrulline, and threonine as well. UP-GC-MS analysis of the urine sample showed elevated galactose and galactitol. The baby was thus diagnosed with suspected NICCD based on the findings. It was then treated with oral arginine and multiple vitamins (including fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K), and was fed with lactose-free and medium-chain fatty acids enriched formula instead of breast feeding. After half a month of treatment, the jaundice disappeared

  12. Main Report

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    . Using the validated evidence base and expert opinion, each condition that had previously been assigned to a category based on scores gathered through the data collection instrument was reconsidered. Again, the factors taken into consideration were: 1) available scientific evidence; 2) availability of a screening test; 3) presence of an efficacious treatment; 4) adequate understanding of the natural history of the condition; and 5) whether the condition was either part of the differential diagnosis of another condition or whether the screening test results related to a clinically significant condition. The conditions were then assigned to one of three categories as previously described (core panel, secondary targets, or not appropriate for Newborn Screening). Among the 29 conditions assigned to the core panel are three hemoglobinopathies associated with a Hb/S allele, six amino acidurias, five disorders of fatty oxidation, nine organic acidurias, and six unrelated conditions (congenital hypothyroidism (CH), biotinidase deficiency (BIOT), congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), classical galactosemia (GALT), hearing loss (HEAR) and cystic fibrosis (CF)). Twenty-three of the 29 conditions in the core panel are identified with multiplex technologies such as tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) or high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). On the basis of the evidence, six of the 35 conditions initially placed in the core panel were moved into the secondary target category, which expanded to 25 conditions. Test results not associated with potential disease in the infant (e.g., carriers) were also placed in the secondary target category. When newborn screening laboratory results definitively establish carrier status, the result should be made available to the health care professional community and families. Twenty-seven conditions were determined to be inappropriate for newborn screening at this time. Conditions with limited evidence reported in the scientific literature were more