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Sample records for galago otolemur garnetti

  1. Subcortical barrelette-like and barreloid-like structures in the prosimian galago (Otolemur garnetti)

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Eva Kille; Liao, Chia-Chi; Qi, Hui-Xin; Balaram, Pooja; Matrov, Denis; Kaas, Jon H.

    2015-01-01

    Galagos are prosimian primates that resemble ancestral primates more than most other extant primates. As in many other mammals, the facial vibrissae of galagos are distributed across the upper and lower jaws and above the eye. In rats and mice, the mystacial macrovibrissae are represented throughout the ascending trigeminal pathways as arrays of cytoarchitecturally distinct modules, with each module having a nearly one-to-one relationship with a specific facial whisker. The macrovibrissal representations are termed barrelettes in the trigeminal somatosensory brainstem, barreloids in the ventroposterior medial subnucleus of the thalamus, and barrels in primary somatosensory cortex. Despite the presence of facial whiskers in all nonhuman primates, barrel-like structures have not been reported in primates. By staining for cytochrome oxidase, Nissl, and vesicular glutamate transporter proteins, we show a distinct array of barrelette-like and barreloid-like modules in the principal sensory nucleus, the spinal trigeminal nucleus, and the ventroposterior medial subnucleus of the galago, Otolemur garnetti. Labeled terminals of primary sensory neurons in the brainstem and cell bodies of thalamocortically projecting neurons demonstrate that barrelette-like and barreloid-like modules are located in areas of these somatosensory nuclei that are topographically consistent with their role in facial touch. Serendipitously, the plane of section that best displays the barreloid-like modules reveals a remarkably distinct homunculus-like patterning which, we believe, is one of the clearest somatotopic maps of an entire body surface yet found. PMID:26038561

  2. Development of Myelination and Cholinergic Innervation in the Central Auditory System of a Prosimian Primate (Otolemur garnetti)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel J.; Lackey, Elizabeth P.; Hackett, Troy A.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2014-01-01

    Change in the timeline of neurobiological growth is an important source of biological variation, and thus phenotypic evolution. However, no study has to date investigated sensory system development in any of the prosimian primates that are thought to most closely resemble our earliest primate ancestors. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter critical to normal brain function by regulating synaptic plasticity associated with attention and learning. Myelination is an important structural component of the brain because it facilitates rapid neuronal communication. In this work we investigated the expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the density of myelinated axons throughout post-natal development in the inferior colliculus (IC), medial geniculate complex (MGC), and auditory cortex (auditory core, belt, and parabelt) in Garnett’s greater galago (Otolemur garnetti). We found that the IC and MGC exhibit relatively high myelinated fiber length density (MFLD) values at birth and attain adult-like values by the species-typical age at weaning. In contrast, neocort-ical auditory fields are relatively unmyelinated at birth and only attain adult-like MFLD values by the species-typical age at puberty. Analysis of AChE expression indicated that, in contrast to evidence from rodent samples, the adult-like distribution of AChE in the core area of auditory cortex, dense bands in layers I, IIIb/IV, and Vb/VI, is present at birth. These data indicate the differential developmental trajectory of central auditory system structures and demonstrate the early onset of adult-like AChE expression in primary auditory cortex in O. garnetti, suggesting the auditory system is more developed at birth in primates compared to rodents. PMID:23749337

  3. Histomorphology of the mandibular condylar cartilage in greater galagos (Otolemur spp.).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Anne M; Smith, Timothy D

    2007-01-01

    The functional morphology of the primate craniomandibular complex and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) components is frequently discussed in terms of gross skeletal structure. At the histomorphologic level, however, the TMJ has only been studied in Old World anthropoids. The present study is designed to describe the microanatomy of the condylar cartilage of the TMJ in two closely related species of greater galago: the exudativorous Otolemur crassicaudatus and the frugivorous O. garnettii. TMJs with intact joint capsules were harvested from adult, cadaveric specimens of these species (four O. crassicaudatus and five O. garnettii). The samples were decalcified, processed for paraffin sectioning, and sectioned at 10-18 microm in the coronal plane. The samples were then stained with hematoxylin/eosin, Gomori trichrome, and Alcian blue, and examined with a photomicroscope. Generally, condylar cartilage in O. crassicaudatus was thickest both laterally and centrally, while O. garnettii had the relatively thickest cartilage laterally. Both species displayed a superficial articular zone, a middle proliferative zone, and a deeply located hypertrophic zone in the condylar cartilage. O. crassicaudatus typically had the greatest cell density in each of these zones. In addition, O. crassicaudatus had focal concentrations of Alcian blue laterally and centrally, while O. garnettii had the greatest reactivity in the central portion only. These results suggest that O. crassicaudatus may be specialized to resist greater compressive force at the TMJ condylar cartilage in specific regions of the mandibular condyle.

  4. Reversible Deactivation of Motor Cortex Reveals Functional Connectivity with Posterior Parietal Cortex in the Prosimian Galago (Otolemur garnettii)

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Dylan F.; Stepniewska, Iwona; Miller, Daniel J.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the functional macrocircuitry of frontoparietal networks in the neocortex of prosimian primates (Otolemur garnettii) using a microfluidic thermal regulator to reversibly deactivate selected regions of motor cortex (M1). During deactivation of either forelimb or mouth/face movement domains within M1, we used long-train intracortical microstimulation techniques to evoke movements from the rostral division of posterior parietal cortex (PPCr). We found that deactivation of M1 movement domains in most instances abolished movements evoked in PPCr. The most common effect of deactivating M1 was to abolish evoked movements in a homotopic domain in PPCr. For example, deactivating M1 forelimb lift domains resulted in loss of evoked movement in forelimb domains in PPCr. However, at some sites, we also observed heterotopic effects; deactivating a specific domain in M1 (e.g., forelimb lift) resulted in loss of evoked movement in a different movement domain in PPCr (e.g., hand-to-mouth or eye-blink). At most sites examined in PPCr, rewarming M1 resulted in a reestablishment of the baseline movement at the same amplitude as that observed before cooling. However, at some sites, reactivation did not result in a return to baseline movement or to the full amplitude of the baseline movement. We discuss our findings in the context of frontoparietal circuits and how they may subserve a repertoire of ecologically relevant behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) of primates integrates sensory information used to guide movements. Different modules within PPC and motor cortex (M1) appear to control various motor behaviors (e.g., reaching, defense, and feeding). How these modules work together may vary across species and may explain differences in dexterity and even the capacity for tool use. We investigated the functional connectivity of these modules in galagos, a prosimian primate with relatively simple frontoparietal circuitry. By deactivating a

  5. Multidirectional chromosome painting reveals a remarkable syntenic homology between the greater galagos and the slow loris.

    PubMed

    Stanyon, R; Dumas, F; Stone, G; Bigoni, F

    2006-04-01

    We report on the first reciprocal chromosome painting of lorisoids and humans. The chromosome painting showed a remarkable syntenic homology between Otolemur and Nycticebus. Eight derived syntenic associations of human segments are common to both Otolemur and Nycticebus, indicative of a considerable period of common evolution between the greater galago and the slow loris. Five additional Robertsonian translocations form the slow loris karyotype, while the remaining chromosomes are syntenically equivalent, although some differ in terms of centromere position and heterochromatin additions. Strikingly, the breakpoints of the human chromosomes found fragmented in these two species are apparently identical. Only fissions of homologs to human chromosomes 1 and 15 provide significant evidence of a cytogenetic link between Lemuriformes and Lorisiformes. The association of human chromosomes 7/16 in both lorisoids strongly suggests that this chromosome was present in the ancestral primate genome.

  6. Vocal activity of lesser galagos (Galago spp.) at zoos.

    PubMed

    Schneiderová, Irena; Zouhar, Jan; Štefanská, Lucie; Bolfíková, Barbora Černá; Lhota, Stanislav; Brandl, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Almost nothing is known about the natural vocal behavior of lesser galagos living in zoos. This is perhaps because they are usually kept in nocturnal exhibits separated from the visitors by a transparent and acoustically insulating glass barrier. The aim of the present study was therefore to fill this gap in knowledge of the vocal behavior of lesser galagos from zoos. This knowledge might be beneficial because the vocalizations of these small primates can be used for species determination. We performed a 10-day-long acoustic monitoring of vocal activity in each of seven various groups of Galago senegalensis and G. moholi living at four zoos. We quantitatively evaluated the occurrence of four loud vocalization types present in both species, including the most species-specific advertisement call. We found that qualitative as well as quantitative differences exist in the vocal behavior of the studied groups. We confirmed that the observed vocalization types can be collected from lesser galagos living at zoos, and the success can be increased by selecting larger and more diverse groups. We found two distinct patterns of diel vocal activity in the most vocally active groups. G. senegalensis groups were most vocally active at the beginning and at the end of their activity period, whereas one G. moholi group showed an opposite pattern. The latter is surprising, as it is generally accepted that lesser galagos emit advertisement calls especially at dawn and dusk, i.e., at the beginning and at the end of their diel activity.

  7. Galagos as avian nest predators in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Derek

    2016-10-01

    Galagos are generally regarded as dietary specialists that feed predominantly on insects and gum. The diet of the thick-tailed greater galago is more varied and also includes fruit and small vertebrates, although the latter is rare and restricted to certain populations. The southern lesser galago is seemingly a more specialist forager, but frugivory was recently reported in two separate populations, suggesting at least some dietary plasticity in this species. The species is not known to consume vertebrates. Here I report on observations of avian nest predation by both thick-tailed greater and southern lesser galagos in Roodewal State Forest Reserve in South Africa. Galagos were responsible for 56 % of nest losses captured on trail cameras. Both species consumed eggs and nestlings of six species of passerines ranging in size from recently hatched to ~30 g nestlings almost ready to fledge. The consumption of vertebrates by the southern lesser galago represents an extension of its diet, as this has not been reported before. The results suggest that eggs and nestlings comprise part of the regular diet of thick-tailed greater galagos in the study area, albeit only seasonal. The consumption of vertebrate prey by southern lesser galagos may represent the expression of latent behavior which is only expressed under certain environmental conditions, e.g., a severe drought, when its regular food base may be diminished. PMID:27503202

  8. The thermoreculatory responses of the galago (Galago crassicaudatus), the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) and the chimpanzee (Pan stayrus) to heat stress.

    PubMed Central

    Hiley, P G

    1976-01-01

    1. The thermoregulatory response of the galago, the baboon and the chimpanzee were studied on exposure to dry bulb temperatures of up to 40 degrees C in a temperature controlled room. 2. Heat exposure caused an elevation in the respiratory frequency of all three species. The increase in the galago was significantly greater than that in the baboon and the chimpanzee. 3. Heat exposure also caused an increase in the cutaneous moisture loss of the baboon and the chimpanzee but not in the galago. 4. Rectal temperatures always rose on heat exposure but the animals never become hypethermic. 5. Sweat gland activity in the baboon and the chimpanzee was stimulated by the administration of acetylcholine and was blocked by the administration of atropine. Sympathetic and parasympathetic drugs had no stimulatory effect on the sueat glands of the galago. 6. Local, infra-red heating of the skin of the galago and the baboon did not stimulate any sweat gland activity. 7. The sweat glands in the galago and the baboon were found to be epitrichial. 8. These findings are discussed in relation to the habitat of each species. They are also compared to thermoregulation in other primate species, especially in relation to the unique nature of thermoregulation in man. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:815544

  9. Structural characterization of neutral and acidic oligosaccharides in the milks of strepsirrhine primates: greater galago, aye-aye, Coquerel's sifaka and mongoose lemur.

    PubMed

    Taufik, Epi; Fukuda, Kenji; Senda, Akitsugu; Saito, Tadao; Williams, Cathy; Tilden, Chris; Eisert, Regina; Oftedal, Olav; Urashima, Tadasu

    2012-04-01

    The structures of milk oligosaccharides were characterized for four strepsirrhine primates to examine the extent to which they resemble milk oligosaccharides in other primates. Neutral and acidic oligosaccharides were isolated from milk of the greater galago (Galagidae: Otolemur crassicaudatus), aye-aye (Daubentoniidae: Daubentonia madagascariensis), Coquerel's sifaka (Indriidae: Propithecus coquereli) and mongoose lemur (Lemuridae: Eulemur mongoz), and their chemical structures were characterized by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The oligosaccharide patterns observed among strepsirrhines did not appear to correlate to phylogeny, sociality or pattern of infant care. Both type I and type II neutral oligosaccharides were found in the milk of the aye-aye, but type II predominate over type I. Only type II oligosaccharides were identified in other strepsirrhine milks. α3'-GL (isoglobotriose, Gal(α1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc) was found in the milks of Coquerel's sifaka and mongoose lemur, which is the first report of this oligosaccharide in the milk of any primate species. 2'-FL (Fuc(α1-2)Gal(β1-4)Glc) was found in the milk of an aye-aye with an ill infant. Oligosaccharides containing the Lewis x epitope were found in aye-aye and mongoose lemur milk. Among acidic oligosaccharides, 3'-N-acetylneuraminyllactose (3'-SL-NAc, Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc) was found in all studied species, whereas 6'-N-acetylneuraminyllactose (6'-SL-NAc, Neu5Ac(α2-6)Gal(β1-4)Glc) was found in all species except greater galago. Greater galago milk also contained 3'-N-glycolylneuraminyllactose (3'-SL-NGc, Neu5Gc(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc). The finding of a variety of neutral and acidic oligosaccharides in the milks of strepsirrhines, as previously reported for haplorhines, suggests that such constituents are ancient rather than derived features, and are as characteristic of primate lactation is the classic disaccharide, lactose.

  10. Structural characterization of neutral and acidic oligosaccharides in the milks of strepsirrhine primates: greater galago, aye-aye, Coquerel's sifaka and mongoose lemur.

    PubMed

    Taufik, Epi; Fukuda, Kenji; Senda, Akitsugu; Saito, Tadao; Williams, Cathy; Tilden, Chris; Eisert, Regina; Oftedal, Olav; Urashima, Tadasu

    2012-04-01

    The structures of milk oligosaccharides were characterized for four strepsirrhine primates to examine the extent to which they resemble milk oligosaccharides in other primates. Neutral and acidic oligosaccharides were isolated from milk of the greater galago (Galagidae: Otolemur crassicaudatus), aye-aye (Daubentoniidae: Daubentonia madagascariensis), Coquerel's sifaka (Indriidae: Propithecus coquereli) and mongoose lemur (Lemuridae: Eulemur mongoz), and their chemical structures were characterized by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The oligosaccharide patterns observed among strepsirrhines did not appear to correlate to phylogeny, sociality or pattern of infant care. Both type I and type II neutral oligosaccharides were found in the milk of the aye-aye, but type II predominate over type I. Only type II oligosaccharides were identified in other strepsirrhine milks. α3'-GL (isoglobotriose, Gal(α1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc) was found in the milks of Coquerel's sifaka and mongoose lemur, which is the first report of this oligosaccharide in the milk of any primate species. 2'-FL (Fuc(α1-2)Gal(β1-4)Glc) was found in the milk of an aye-aye with an ill infant. Oligosaccharides containing the Lewis x epitope were found in aye-aye and mongoose lemur milk. Among acidic oligosaccharides, 3'-N-acetylneuraminyllactose (3'-SL-NAc, Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc) was found in all studied species, whereas 6'-N-acetylneuraminyllactose (6'-SL-NAc, Neu5Ac(α2-6)Gal(β1-4)Glc) was found in all species except greater galago. Greater galago milk also contained 3'-N-glycolylneuraminyllactose (3'-SL-NGc, Neu5Gc(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc). The finding of a variety of neutral and acidic oligosaccharides in the milks of strepsirrhines, as previously reported for haplorhines, suggests that such constituents are ancient rather than derived features, and are as characteristic of primate lactation is the classic disaccharide, lactose. PMID:22311613

  11. Three acoustic forms of Allen's galagos (primates; Galagonidae) in the Central African region.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Lesley

    2003-01-01

    This study identifies populations currently classified as Allen's galago (Galago alleni) at ten locations in Gabon, Cameroon and Bioko Island. Morphological diversity was evident both within and between populations. Attention to the loud calls revealed three distinct vocal profiles which are consistent within biogeographical regions. This work is based on the Recognition Concept of Species which refers to a Specific Mate Recognition System. Galagos rely less on visual signals than diurnal primates and recognise each other principally by means of auditory and olfactory signals. Galagos possess repertoires of loud calls relating to contact and alarm which are thought to be species-specific. Other studies of nocturnal prosimians (galagos, tarsiers) have demonstrated that the unique loud call repertoires are reliable indicators of species boundaries; whereas characters such as body size and pelage coloration are highly variable, even within populations. The vocal data in this study provide evidence of at least three acoustic forms of galago within the Allen's group which are predicted to represent three distinct species: the Allen's form on Bioko Island and south-west Cameroon, the Gabon form in southern Cameroon and northern Gabon and the Makandé form in Gabon south of the Ogooué river. Some populations may be vulnerable to extinction due to limited distributions and habitat destruction.

  12. Nonshivering thermogenesis in the African lesser bushbaby, Galago moholi.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Julia; Dausmann, Kathrin H; Mzilikazi, Nomakwezi

    2013-10-15

    The capacity for nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) plays an important role during arousal from torpid states. Recent data on heterotherms inhabiting warmer regions, however, suggest that passive rewarming reduces the need of metabolic heat production during arousal significantly, leading to the question: to what extent do subtropical or tropical heterotherms depend on NST? The African lesser bushbaby, Galago moholi, enters torpid states as an emergency response only, but otherwise stays normothermic throughout the cold and dry winter season. In addition, this species shows unusual rewarming difficulties during arousal from torpor on cold days. We therefore examined the seasonal adjustments of the capacity for NST of naturally acclimatized G. moholi by stimulation with noradrenaline (NA) injection. Dissection of two adult female bushbabies revealed that G. moholi possesses brown adipose tissue, and NA treatment (0.5 mg kg(-1), s.c.) induced a significant elevation in oxygen consumption compared with control (saline) injection. However, the increase in oxygen consumption following injection of NA was not significantly different between winter and summer. Our results show that the ability to produce heat via NST seems to be available throughout the year and that G. moholi is able to change NST capacity within a very short time frame in response to cold spells. Together with results from studies on other (Afro-)tropical heterotherms, which also indicate low or even absent seasonal difference in NST capacity, this raises the question of whether the definition of NST needs to be refined for (Afro-)tropical mammals. PMID:24068349

  13. A morphological and morphometric study of the prosimian lung: the lesser bushbaby Galago senegalensis.

    PubMed Central

    Maina, J N

    1990-01-01

    The lung of the lesser bushbaby (Galago senegalensis) has been investigated morphologically and morphometrically using the transmission and scanning electron microscopes. Grossly and microscopically, the bushbaby lung was found to be essentially similar to that of the other primates and the mammals in general. Subtle morphometric differences were, however, observed, with the bushbaby lung being generally structurally less sophisticated than that of the other primates on which comparable data are available, except for man. The weight-specific surface area of the blood-gas (tissue) barrier in G. senegalensis was 25 cm2 g-1. The thickness of the blood-gas barrier was 0.355 micron and the weight specific total anatomical pulmonary diffusing capacity 0.045 mlO2 sec-1 mbar1 kg-1. The morphological similarity of the galago lung to that of man gives sufficient grounds to justify its possible use in human pulmonary studies but caution has been called for in the general utilisation of primate tissues without first establishing their morphological characteristics, just because the primates are taken to be evolutionally close to man. The dearth of morphological studies on the various organ systems of the prosimians is pointed out. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2272898

  14. Vertical jumping in Galago senegalensis: the quest for an obligate mechanical power amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, P.

    1998-01-01

    Bushbabies (Galago senegalensis) are renowned for their phenomenal jumping capacity. It was postulated that mechanical power amplification must be involved. Dynamic analysis of the vertical jumps performed by two bushbabies confirms the need for a power amplifier. Inverse dynamics coupled to a geometric musculo-skeletal model were used to elucidate the precise nature of the mechanism powering maximal vertical jumps. Most of the power required for jumping is delivered by the vastus muscle-tendon systems (knee extensor). Comparison with the external joint-powers revealed, however, an important power transport from this extensor (about 65%) to the ankle and the midfoot via the bi-articular calf muscles. Peak power output likely implies elastic recoil of the complex aponeurotic system of the vastus muscle. Patterns of changes in length and tension of the muscle-tendon complex during different phases of the jump were found which provide strong evidence for substantial power amplification (times 15). It is argued here that the multiple internal connective tissue sheets and attachment structures of the well-developed bundles of the vastus muscle become increasingly stretched during preparatory crouching and throughout the extension phase, except for the last 13 ms of the push-off (i.e. when power requirements peak). Then, tension in the knee extensors abruptly falls from its maximum, allowing the necessary fast recoil of the tensed tendon structures to occur.

  15. The suprarenal glands of a prosimian primate, the lesser bushbaby (Galago senegalensis).

    PubMed

    Carrmicheal, S W; Haines, D E; Pinkstaff, C A

    1975-02-01

    The gross relationships and light microscopic anatomy of the suprarenal gland of a prosimian primate, Galago senegalensis, is described. The left gland is located medial to the pole of the left kidney in a fascial compartment of its own. The right suprarenal is located medial to the pole of the right kidney in intimate apposition to the liver and inferior vena cava. The capsule of the right gland blends with the capsule of the right lobe of the liver and is also contiguous with the adventitia of the inferior vena cava. The histologic appearance of the gland is similar to that of other primate genera. The zona glomerulosa is poorly developed; the zona fasciculata is composed of cell cords and is relatively well developed and the zona reticularis shows no unusual characteristics. The organization of the lipid content of the various cortical zones show a considerable different pattern than previously reported. The zona glomerulosa contains numerous large lipid droplets. In contrast to the bi-laminar pattern of lipid deposition seen in other primates, the Galgo shows three distinct layers of lipid droplets in the zona fasciculata. The zona reticularis has a moderate population of lipid droplets essentially similar to that reported in most other forms. The medulla, except for a sparse number of centrally displaced zona reticularis cells, is completely devoid of lipid deposits. The junction of the zona reticularis and medulla is distinct, although a connective tissue capsule is not present.

  16. Analyses of feeding lateralization in the small-eared bushbaby (Otolemur garnettii): a comparison with the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Milliken, G W; Stafford, D K; Dodson, D L; Pinger, C D; Ward, J P

    1991-09-01

    Feeding related lateralization was examined in a population of 23 small-eared bushbabies (Otolemur garnettii). The three measures used to determine lateralization were food reaching, holding, and manipulation. Sex and age differences were found, with adult females showing a strong right bias and adult males a left bias. Juvenile males were weakly lateralized and less consistent across measures than adult animals. The use of standard scores to assess lateralization allowed species comparisons to be made. The results of this study were compared with results from a previous study on lateralization in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). Species comparisons found sex differences to be a stronger factor in lateralization than species differences.

  17. Analyses of feeding lateralization in the small-eared bushbaby (Otolemur garnettii): a comparison with the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Milliken, G W; Stafford, D K; Dodson, D L; Pinger, C D; Ward, J P

    1991-09-01

    Feeding related lateralization was examined in a population of 23 small-eared bushbabies (Otolemur garnettii). The three measures used to determine lateralization were food reaching, holding, and manipulation. Sex and age differences were found, with adult females showing a strong right bias and adult males a left bias. Juvenile males were weakly lateralized and less consistent across measures than adult animals. The use of standard scores to assess lateralization allowed species comparisons to be made. The results of this study were compared with results from a previous study on lateralization in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). Species comparisons found sex differences to be a stronger factor in lateralization than species differences. PMID:1935006

  18. Torpor on Demand: Heterothermy in the Non-Lemur Primate Galago moholi

    PubMed Central

    Nowack, Julia; Mzilikazi, Nomakwezi; Dausmann, Kathrin H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hibernation and daily torpor are energy- and water-saving adaptations employed to survive unfavourable periods mostly in temperate and arctic environments, but also in tropical and arid climates. Heterothermy has been found in a number of mammalian orders, but within the primates so far it seems to be restricted to one family of Malagasy lemurs. As currently there is no evidence of heterothermy of a primate outside of Madagascar, the aim of our study was to investigate whether small primates from mainland Africa are indeed always homeothermic despite pronounced seasonal changes in weather and food availability. Methodology/Principal Findings One of the nearest relatives of Malagasy lemurs, the African lesser bushbaby, Galago moholi, which inhabits a highly seasonal habitat with a hot wet-season and a cold dry-season with lower food abundance, was investigated to determine whether it is capable of heterothermy. We measured skin temperature of free-ranging individuals throughout the cool dry season using temperature-sensitive collars as well as metabolic rate in captured individuals. Torpor was employed by 15% of 20 animals. Only one of these animals displayed heterothermy in response to natural availability of food and water, whereas the other animals became torpid without access to food and water. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that G. moholi are physiologically capable of employing torpor. However they do not use it as a routine behaviour, but only under adverse conditions. This reluctance is presumably a result of conflicting selective pressures for energy savings versus other ecological and evolutionary forces, such as reproduction or territory defence. Our results support the view that heterothermy in primates evolved before the division of African and Malagasy Strepsirhini, with the possible implication that more primate species than previously thought might still have the potential to call upon this possibility, if the situation

  19. Epaxial muscle fiber architecture favors enhanced excursion and power in the leaper Galago senegalensis.

    PubMed

    Huq, Emranul; Wall, Christine E; Taylor, Andrea B

    2015-10-01

    Galago senegalensis is a habitual arboreal leaper that engages in rapid spinal extension during push-off. Large muscle excursions and high contraction velocities are important components of leaping, and experimental studies indicate that during leaping by G. senegalensis, peak power is facilitated by elastic storage of energy. To date, however, little is known about the functional relationship between epaxial muscle fiber architecture and locomotion in leaping primates. Here, fiber architecture of select epaxial muscles is compared between G. senegalensis (n = 4) and the slow arboreal quadruped, Nycticebus coucang (n = 4). The hypothesis is tested that G. senegalensis exhibits architectural features of the epaxial muscles that facilitate rapid and powerful spinal extension during the take-off phase of leaping. As predicted, G. senegalensis epaxial muscles have relatively longer, less pinnate fibers and higher ratios of tendon length-to-fiber length, indicating the capacity for generating relatively larger muscle excursions, higher whole-muscle contraction velocities, and a greater capacity for elastic energy storage. Thus, the relatively longer fibers and higher tendon length-to-fiber length ratios can be functionally linked to leaping performance in G. senegalensis. It is further predicted that G. senegalensis epaxial muscles have relatively smaller physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) as a consequence of an architectural trade-off between fiber length (excursion) and PCSA (force). Contrary to this prediction, there are no species differences in relative PCSAs, but the smaller-bodied G. senegalensis trends towards relatively larger epaxial muscle mass. These findings suggest that relative increase in muscle mass in G. senegalensis is largely attributable to longer fibers. The relative increase in erector spinae muscle mass may facilitate sagittal flexibility during leaping. The similarity between species in relative PCSAs provides empirical support for

  20. Female reproductive activity and its endocrine correlates in the African lesser bushbaby, Galago moholi.

    PubMed

    Scheun, Juan; Nowack, Julia; Bennett, Nigel C; Ganswindt, Andre

    2016-02-01

    Steroid hormones play an important role in female reproductive physiology and behaviour and are often used to monitor important female reproductive events. However, such studies are often attempted on captive populations alone, delivering limited data. One such example is the African lesser bushbaby, Galago moholi, for which contradicting observational data exist between captive and free-ranging populations, while hormonal analyses have only been obtained from a single captive population. To extend and rectify the limited information, we monitored faecal progestagen and oestrogen metabolite levels across various important life history stages of both captive and free-ranging G. moholi. We additionally recorded changes in vaginal state as well as the occurrence of reproductive and aggressive behaviour throughout the study. Data from our captive population revealed an ovarian cycle length of 33.44 ± 0.59 days (mean ± SD), with follicular and luteal phases of 14.2 ± 1.0 and 19.1 ± 1.5 days, respectively, and an average pregnancy length of 128 ± 3.3 days. The initiation of female reproductive activity was closely linked to an oestrus-related increase in faecal oestrogen metabolite levels. Four of the seven captive females monitored in our study conceived during the May mating period, with one additional female fertilised in September, supporting the idea that the September mating period functions as a back-up for female G. moholi. Identified benchmark faecal progestagen metabolite levels (non-pregnant: >1 µg/g dry weight (DW), pregnant: >9 µg/g DW) should help researchers to determine pregnancy status of randomly wild-caught females in even a cross-sectional study setup. PMID:26649553

  1. Urine marking and territoriality in Galago alleni (Waterhouse, 1837--Lorisoidea, Primates)--a field study by radio-telemetry.

    PubMed

    Charles-Dominique, P

    1977-02-01

    A wild population of Galago alleni was controlled by trapping and followed by radio-tracking in the equatorial rainforest of Gaboon during three study periods of 3 months each in 1972, 73 and 75. The disposition of territories and the social organization are described, as well as their evolution through time. A new technique of radio telemetry permitted identification and localization of urine marking in wild galagos. Urine marking took place throughout the territory, with a fourfold increase in frequency in zones where there is a slight overlap with neighbouring territories (female--female or male--male). The function of urine washing (wetting of the soles of the feet with urine) is discussed in relation to five hypotheses proposed by different authors, and th data obtained in the field in Gaboon. We interpret this behaviour as a means of dispersal of urine marks (social signals) in a three-dimensional milieu where displacement by a combination of leaping and running creates numerous pathways. PMID:404780

  2. The fronto-parietal cortex of the prosimian Galago: patterns of cytochrome oxidase activity and motor maps.

    PubMed

    Fogassi, L; Gallese, V; Gentilucci, M; Luppino, G; Matelli, M; Rizzolatti, G

    1994-01-31

    We mapped the motor areas of the prosimian Galago crassicaudatus using intracortical electrical microstimulation and morphological and histochemical (cytochrome oxidase) techniques. Stimulation data showed that on the brain convexity there is an area (area Frontalis posterior, F post.) from which movements could be evoked at low threshold (< 10 microA). This area is somatotopically organized, with the leg represented medially, the arm centrally and the face and mouth laterally. Proximal and distal movements are not segregated. Most of the evoked movements, even at threshold, consist of movements involving two or more joints. F post. is characterized by a three-band cytochrome oxidase activity pattern. It has an agranular structure, but it lacks pyramidal cells that are larger than those observed in other areas. In front of F post. there is an area histochemically similar to it, Frontalis intermedialis (F int.). This area consists of two cytoarchitectonic divisions: an agranular division (F int. pars caudalis) and a disgranular division (F int. pars rostralis). The excitability threshold of F int. is relatively high (10 to 30 microA). Eye, ear and neck movements are elicited from its lateral part, whereas trunk movements associated with limb movements are elicited from its medial part. Caudal to F post., there is another region from which movements can be evoked with currents between 10 to 30 microA. This region has the same medio-lateral somatotopic arrangement of F post. Typically, single joint movements are elicited from it. Proximal and distal movements are not segregated. In spite of its homogeneity in terms of motor response, the posterior excitable region is formed by two anatomically separate areas: anterior somatic area (S ant.) and posterior somatic area (S post.). S ant. has a typical koniocortex structure, whereas S post, resembles the parakoniocortex as defined by Sanides (J. Hirnforsch., 9 (1967) 225-252). Histochemically both areas are made up of four

  3. Cortical Connections to Single Digit Representations in Area 3b of Somatosensory Cortex in Squirrel Monkeys and Prosimian Galagos

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chia-Chi; Gharbawie, Omar A.; Qi, Huixin; Kaas, Jon H.

    2014-01-01

    The ventral posterior nucleus of thalamus sends highly segregated inputs into each digit representation in area 3b of primary somatosensory cortex. However, the spatial organization of the connections that link digit representations of areas 3b with other somatosensory areas is less understood. Here we examined the cortical inputs to individual digit representations of area 3b in four squirrel monkeys and one prosimian galago. Retrograde tracers were injected into neurophysiologically defined representations of individual digits of area 3b. Cortical tissues were cut parallel to the surface in some cases and showed that feedback projections to individual digits overlapped extensively in the hand representations of areas 3b, 1, and parietal ventral (PV) and second somatosensory (S2) areas. Other regions with overlapping populations of labeled cells included area 3a and primary motor cortex (M1). The results were confirmed in other cases in which the cortical tissues were cut in the coronal plane. The same cases also showed that cells were primarily labeled in the infragranular and supragranular layers. Thus, feedback projections to individual digit representations in area 3b mainly originate from multiple digits and other portions of hand representations of areas 3b, 1, PV, and S2. This organization is in stark contrast to the segregated thalamocortical inputs, which originate in single digit representations and terminate in the matching digit representation in the cortex. The organization of feedback connections could provide a substrate for the integration of information across the representations of adjacent digits in area 3b. PMID:23749740

  4. Density of muscle spindles in prosimian shoulder muscles reflects locomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Yasuo; Taniguchi, Yuki; Kumakura, Hiroo

    2006-01-01

    We examined the correlation between the density of muscle spindles in shoulder muscles and the locomotor mode in three species of prosimian primates: the slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), Garnett's galago (Otolemur garnettii), and the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). The shoulder muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres major, teres minor, and subscapularis) were embedded in celloidin and cut into transverse serial thin sections (40 microm); then, every tenth section was stained using the Azan staining technique. The relative muscle weights and the density of the muscle spindles were determined. The slow loris muscles were heavier and had sparser muscle spindles, as compared to Garnett's galago. These features suggest that the shoulder muscles of the slow loris are more adapted to generating propulsive force and stabilizing the shoulder joint during locomotion and play a less controlling role in forelimb movements. In contrast, Garnett's galago possessed smaller shoulder muscles with denser spindles that are suitable for the control of more rapid locomotor movements. The mean relative weight and the mean spindle density in the shoulder muscles of the ring-tailed lemur were between those of the other primates, suggesting that the spindle density is not simply a consequence of taxonomic status. PMID:17361082

  5. Density of muscle spindles in prosimian shoulder muscles reflects locomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Yasuo; Taniguchi, Yuki; Kumakura, Hiroo

    2006-01-01

    We examined the correlation between the density of muscle spindles in shoulder muscles and the locomotor mode in three species of prosimian primates: the slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), Garnett's galago (Otolemur garnettii), and the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). The shoulder muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres major, teres minor, and subscapularis) were embedded in celloidin and cut into transverse serial thin sections (40 microm); then, every tenth section was stained using the Azan staining technique. The relative muscle weights and the density of the muscle spindles were determined. The slow loris muscles were heavier and had sparser muscle spindles, as compared to Garnett's galago. These features suggest that the shoulder muscles of the slow loris are more adapted to generating propulsive force and stabilizing the shoulder joint during locomotion and play a less controlling role in forelimb movements. In contrast, Garnett's galago possessed smaller shoulder muscles with denser spindles that are suitable for the control of more rapid locomotor movements. The mean relative weight and the mean spindle density in the shoulder muscles of the ring-tailed lemur were between those of the other primates, suggesting that the spindle density is not simply a consequence of taxonomic status.

  6. Niche partitioning and environmental factors affecting abundance of strepsirrhines in Angola.

    PubMed

    Bersacola, Elena; Svensson, Magdalena S; Bearder, Simon K

    2015-11-01

    The African nocturnal primates (galagos, pottos, and angwantibos: suborder Strepsirrhini) are the result of the first major primate radiation event in Africa, and are found in different primate communities spread across the entire sub-Saharan Africa. Thus, they represent an interesting group of taxa to investigate community strategies to avoid interspecific competition. Here, we present the result of the first study on nocturnal primate communities in western Angola. We aimed to identify habitat factors influencing strepsirrhine abundance, collect evidence of spatial niche segregation, and discuss possible indications of competitive exclusion in this region. We conducted nocturnal surveys at four study sites: Kumbira, Bimbe, Northern Scarp, and Calandula. At each encounter we recorded species, group size, height of animals above ground, and GPS location. We sampled vegetation using the point-centered quarter method and collected data on canopy cover, disturbance, and undergrowth density. We observed a total of five strepsirrhine species with varying community structures. We did not encounter Galagoides thomasi but we recorded a new species Galagoides sp. nov. 4. Levels of disturbance, canopy cover and undergrowth density were the habitat factors that most influenced variation in abundance of Galagoides demidovii and Perodicticus edwardsi, the latter also preferring the habitat with higher tree density. Vertical separation between sympatric strepsirrhines was strongest in Northern Scarp, where overall relative abundance was also highest. Competitive exclusion between G. thomasi and G. sp. nov. 4 may explain why the former was not present within the Angolan Escarpment sites. We observed coexistence between mainly allopatric Otolemur crassicaudatus and P. edwardsi in Kumbira, and of Galago moholi and G. demidovii in Calandula. Both unusual combinations showed some levels of spatial segregation. Habitat characteristics of the Escarpment region are likely to allow for

  7. Niche partitioning and environmental factors affecting abundance of strepsirrhines in Angola.

    PubMed

    Bersacola, Elena; Svensson, Magdalena S; Bearder, Simon K

    2015-11-01

    The African nocturnal primates (galagos, pottos, and angwantibos: suborder Strepsirrhini) are the result of the first major primate radiation event in Africa, and are found in different primate communities spread across the entire sub-Saharan Africa. Thus, they represent an interesting group of taxa to investigate community strategies to avoid interspecific competition. Here, we present the result of the first study on nocturnal primate communities in western Angola. We aimed to identify habitat factors influencing strepsirrhine abundance, collect evidence of spatial niche segregation, and discuss possible indications of competitive exclusion in this region. We conducted nocturnal surveys at four study sites: Kumbira, Bimbe, Northern Scarp, and Calandula. At each encounter we recorded species, group size, height of animals above ground, and GPS location. We sampled vegetation using the point-centered quarter method and collected data on canopy cover, disturbance, and undergrowth density. We observed a total of five strepsirrhine species with varying community structures. We did not encounter Galagoides thomasi but we recorded a new species Galagoides sp. nov. 4. Levels of disturbance, canopy cover and undergrowth density were the habitat factors that most influenced variation in abundance of Galagoides demidovii and Perodicticus edwardsi, the latter also preferring the habitat with higher tree density. Vertical separation between sympatric strepsirrhines was strongest in Northern Scarp, where overall relative abundance was also highest. Competitive exclusion between G. thomasi and G. sp. nov. 4 may explain why the former was not present within the Angolan Escarpment sites. We observed coexistence between mainly allopatric Otolemur crassicaudatus and P. edwardsi in Kumbira, and of Galago moholi and G. demidovii in Calandula. Both unusual combinations showed some levels of spatial segregation. Habitat characteristics of the Escarpment region are likely to allow for

  8. Brief communication: Effect of size biases in the coefficient of variation on assessing intraspecific variability in the prosimian skeleton.

    PubMed

    Fulwood, Ethan L; Kramer, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the effect of a measurement size bias in coefficients of variation on the evaluation of intraspecific skeletal variability in a sample of eight prosimian species (Eulemur fulvus, Hapalemur griseus, Lemur catta, Varecia variegata, Galago senegalensis, Otolemur crassicaudatus, Nycticebus coucang, and Tarsius syrichta). Measurements with smaller means were expected to have higher coefficients of variation (CVs) due to the impact of instrumental precision on the ability to assess variability. This was evaluated by testing for a negative correlation between CVs and means in the total sample, within each species, and within each measurement, and by testing for the leveraging impact of small measurements on the significance of comparisons of variability between regions of the prosimian skeleton. Three comparisons were made: cranial versus postcranial variability, epiphysis versus diaphysis variability, and forelimb versus hindlimb variability. CVs were significantly negatively correlated with means within the total sample (r(2) = 0.208, P < 0.0001) and within each species. CVs and means were significantly correlated within only three of the measurements, which may reflect the relatively low body size range of the species studied. As predicted by the higher variability of smaller measurements, removing the smallest measurements from comparisons of variable classes containing measurements of different mean magnitudes pushed the comparisons below significance. These results indicate caution should be exercised when using CVs to assess variability across sets of measurements with different means.

  9. Organization of cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic and orexinergic nuclei in three strepsirrhine primates: Galago demidoff, Perodicticus potto and Lemur catta.

    PubMed

    Calvey, Tanya; Patzke, Nina; Kaswera-Kyamakya, Consolate; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Bertelsen, Mads F; Pettigrew, John D; Manger, Paul R

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear organization of the cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic and orexinergic systems in the brains of three species of strepsirrhine primates is presented. We aimed to investigate the nuclear complement of these neural systems in comparison to those of simian primates, megachiropterans and other mammalian species. The brains were coronally sectioned and immunohistochemically stained with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and orexin-A. The nuclei identified were identical among the strepsirrhine species investigated and identical to previous reports in simian primates. Moreover, a general similarity to other mammals was found, but specific differences in the nuclear complement highlighted potential phylogenetic interrelationships. The central feature of interest was the structure of the locus coeruleus complex in the primates, where a central compactly packed core (A6c) of tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive neurons was surrounded by a shell of less densely packed (A6d) tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive neurons. This combination of compact and diffuse divisions of the locus coeruleus complex is only found in primates and megachiropterans of all the mammalian species studied to date. This neural character, along with variances in a range of other neural characters, supports the phylogenetic grouping of primates with megachiropterans as a sister group.

  10. Organization of cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic and orexinergic nuclei in three strepsirrhine primates: Galago demidoff, Perodicticus potto and Lemur catta.

    PubMed

    Calvey, Tanya; Patzke, Nina; Kaswera-Kyamakya, Consolate; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Bertelsen, Mads F; Pettigrew, John D; Manger, Paul R

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear organization of the cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic and orexinergic systems in the brains of three species of strepsirrhine primates is presented. We aimed to investigate the nuclear complement of these neural systems in comparison to those of simian primates, megachiropterans and other mammalian species. The brains were coronally sectioned and immunohistochemically stained with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and orexin-A. The nuclei identified were identical among the strepsirrhine species investigated and identical to previous reports in simian primates. Moreover, a general similarity to other mammals was found, but specific differences in the nuclear complement highlighted potential phylogenetic interrelationships. The central feature of interest was the structure of the locus coeruleus complex in the primates, where a central compactly packed core (A6c) of tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive neurons was surrounded by a shell of less densely packed (A6d) tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive neurons. This combination of compact and diffuse divisions of the locus coeruleus complex is only found in primates and megachiropterans of all the mammalian species studied to date. This neural character, along with variances in a range of other neural characters, supports the phylogenetic grouping of primates with megachiropterans as a sister group. PMID:26562782

  11. Chromosome painting between human and lorisiform prosimians: evidence for the HSA 7/16 synteny in the primate ancestral karyotype.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wenhui; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Fu, Beiyuan; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Robinson, Terence J; Yang, Fengtang

    2006-02-01

    Multidirectional chromosome painting with probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of humans (Homo sapiens, HSA, 2n = 46) and galagos (Galago moholi, GMO, 2n = 38) allowed us to map evolutionarily conserved chromosomal segments among humans, galagos, and slow lorises (Nycticebus coucang, NCO, 2n = 50). In total, the 22 human autosomal painting probes detected 40 homologous chromosomal segments in the slow loris genome. The genome of the slow loris contains 16 sytenic associations of human homologues. The ancient syntenic associations of human chromosomes such as HSA 3/21, 7/16, 12/22 (twice), and 14/15, reported in most mammalian species, were also present in the slow loris genome. Six associations (HSA 1a/19a, 2a/12a, 6a/14b, 7a/12c, 9/15b, and 10a/19b) were shared by the slow loris and galago. Five associations (HSA 1b/6b, 4a/5a, 11b/15a, 12b/19b, and 15b/16b) were unique to the slow loris. In contrast, 30 homologous chromosome segments were identified in the slow loris genome when using galago chromosome painting probes. The data showed that the karyotypic differences between these two species were mainly due to Robertsonian translocations. Reverse painting, using galago painting probes onto human chromosomes, confirmed most of the chromosome homologies between humans and galagos established previously, and documented the HSA 7/16 association in galagos, which was not reported previously. The presence of the HSA 7/16 association in the slow loris and galago suggests that the 7/16 association is an ancestral synteny for primates. Based on our results and the published homology maps between humans and other primate species, we propose an ancestral karyotype (2n = 60) for lorisiform primates.

  12. Pneumocystis carinii infections in zoo animals.

    PubMed

    Poelma, F G

    1975-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii was found to be present in the lungs of twenty-three zoo animals in the Netherlands. The following species were represented: red kangaroo, common tree shrew, Senegal-Galago, Demidoff's-Galago, brown howler monkey, woolly monkey, long-haired spider monkey, white-eared marmoset, chimpanzee, three-toed sloth, palm squirrel, red panda, fennec fox, tree hyrax and large-toothed hyrax.

  13. The Highland Terrain Hopper: a new locomotion system for exploration of Mars and other low-gravity planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgurewicz, Joanna; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Wisniewski, Lukasz; Mege, Daniel; Rickman, Hans

    Field geoscientists need to collect three-dimensional data in order characterise the lithologic succession and structure of terrains, reconstruct their evolution, and eventually reveal the history of a portion of the planet. This is achieved by walking up and down mountains and valleys, conducting and interpreting geological and geophysical traverses, and reading measures made at station located at key sites on mountain peaks or rocky promontories. These activities have been denied to conventional planetary exploration rovers because engineering constraints for landing are strong, especially in terms of allowed terrain roughness and slopes. There are few limitations in the type of scientific payload conventional exploration rovers can carry, from geology and geophysics to geochemistry and exobiology. They lack two skills, however: the ability of working on rugged or unstable terrain, like in canyons and mountains, and on solid bodies having gravity too low for the friction between the wheels and the ground to generate robot displacement. ASTRONIKA Ltd. and the Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences are designing Galago, the Highland Terrain Hopper, a small (Ø~50-100 cm), light (5-10 kg), and robust locomotion system, which addresses the challenge of accessing most areas on low-gravity planetary body for performing scientific observations and measurements, alone or as part of a commando. Galago is symmetric and can jump accurately to a height of 4.5 m on Mars, 9 m on the Moon, and much more on Phobos and other small bodies. For one Galago, a nominal horizontal travel distance of 5 km (1000 jumps) is currently planned with the considered energy source, a battery reloaded by solar panels. Galago may assist other types of robots, or humans, in accessing difficult terrain, or even replace them for specific measurements or campaigning. Its three independent legs make possible several types of motions: accurate jumping (to any place identified in advance

  14. Mandibular corpus strain in primates: further evidence for a functional link between symphyseal fusion and jaw-adductor muscle force.

    PubMed

    Hylander, W L; Ravosa, M J; Ross, C F; Johnson, K R

    1998-11-01

    Previous work indicates that compared to adult thick-tailed galagos, adult long-tailed macaques have much more bone strain on the balancing-side mandibular corpus during unilateral isometric molar biting (Hylander [1979a] J. Morphol. 159:253-296). Recently we have confirmed in these same two species the presence of similar differences in bone-strain patterns during forceful mastication. Moreover, we have also recorded mandibular bone strain patterns in adult owl monkeys, which are slightly smaller than the galago subjects. The owl monkey data indicate the presence of a strain pattern very similar to that recorded for macaques, and quite unlike that recorded for galagos. We interpret these bone-strain pattern differences to be importantly related to differences in balancing-side jaw-adductor muscle force recruitment patterns. That is, compared to galagos, macaques and owl monkeys recruit relatively more balancing-side jaw-adductor muscle force during forceful mastication. Unlike an earlier study (Hylander [1979b] J. Morphol. 160:223-240), we are unable to estimate the actual amount of working-side muscle force relative to balancing-side muscle force (i.e., the W/B muscle force ratio) in these species because we have no reliable estimate of magnitude, direction, and precise location of the bite force during mastication. A comparison of the mastication data with the earlier data recorded during isometric molar biting, however, supports the hypothesis that the two anthropoids have a small W/B jaw-adductor muscle force ratio in comparison to thick-tailed galagos. These data also support the hypothesis that increased recruitment of balancing-side jaw-adductor muscle force in anthropoids is functionally linked to the evolution of symphyseal fusion or strengthening. Moreover, these data refute the hypothesis that the recruitment pattern differences between macaques and thick-tailed galagos are due to allometric factors. Finally, although the evolution of symphyseal fusion

  15. The estimated mechanical advantage of the prosimian ankle joint musculature, and implications for locomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Ryosuke; Kumakura, Hiroo

    2013-05-01

    In this study we compared the power arm lengths and mechanical advantages attributed to 12 lower leg muscles across three prosimian species. The origins and insertions of the lower leg muscles in Garnett's galago, the ring-tailed lemur, and the slow loris were quantified and correlated with positional behaviour. The ankle joint of the galago has a speed-oriented mechanical system, in contrast to that of the slow loris, which exhibits more power-oriented mechanics. The lemur ankle joint exhibited intermediate power arm lengths and an intermediate mechanical advantage relative to the other primates. This result suggests that the mechanical differences in the ankle between the galago and the lemur, taxa that exhibit similar locomotory repertoires, reflect a difference in the kinematics and kinetics of leaping (i.e. generalised vs. specialised leapers). In contrast to leaping primates, lorises have developed a more power-oriented mechanical system as a foot adaptation for positional behaviours such as bridging or cantilevering in their arboreal habitat. PMID:23489408

  16. The estimated mechanical advantage of the prosimian ankle joint musculature, and implications for locomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Ryosuke; Kumakura, Hiroo

    2013-05-01

    In this study we compared the power arm lengths and mechanical advantages attributed to 12 lower leg muscles across three prosimian species. The origins and insertions of the lower leg muscles in Garnett's galago, the ring-tailed lemur, and the slow loris were quantified and correlated with positional behaviour. The ankle joint of the galago has a speed-oriented mechanical system, in contrast to that of the slow loris, which exhibits more power-oriented mechanics. The lemur ankle joint exhibited intermediate power arm lengths and an intermediate mechanical advantage relative to the other primates. This result suggests that the mechanical differences in the ankle between the galago and the lemur, taxa that exhibit similar locomotory repertoires, reflect a difference in the kinematics and kinetics of leaping (i.e. generalised vs. specialised leapers). In contrast to leaping primates, lorises have developed a more power-oriented mechanical system as a foot adaptation for positional behaviours such as bridging or cantilevering in their arboreal habitat.

  17. Hip Anatomy and Ontogeny of Lower Limb Musculature in Three Species of Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jeremy J.; Searight, Katherine J.; Stump, Madeliene Atzeva; Kehrer, Matthew B.; Shanafelt, Colleen; Graham, Eric; Smith, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    The hip region is examined to determine what aspects of musculoskeletal anatomy are precociously developed in primate species with highly specialized modes of locomotion. Muscles of the hind limb were removed and weighed in each specimen, and the hip joint of selected specimens was studied in stained serial sections. No perinatal differences among species are evident, but in adults, the hip joint of Galago moholi (a leaping specialist) appears to have proportionally thick articular cartilage (relative to the subchondral plate) compared to two species of cheirogaleids. Muscle mass distribution in the hind limbs confirms previous observations that the quadriceps femoris muscle is especially large in Galago (in percent mass of the entire hind limb), while the hip region is smaller compared to the more quadrupedal cheirogaleids. Across age groups, the species with the least specialized locomotion as adults, Cheirogaleus medius, shows little or no change in proximal to distal percentage distribution of muscle mass. Galago has a larger percentage mass gain in the thigh. We suggest that muscle mass gain to specific limb segments may be a critical milestone for primates with extremely specialized modes of locomotion. PMID:22567295

  18. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean M

    2011-04-29

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich

  19. PhyloMarker—A Tool for Mining Phylogenetic Markers Through Genome Comparison: Application of the Mouse Lemur (Genus Microcebus) Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Runhua; Rowley, Thaine W.; Zhu, Lifeng; Bailey, Carolyn A.; Engberg, Shannon E.; Wood, Mindy L.; Christman, Mary C.; Perry, George H.; Louis, Edward E.; Lu, Guoqing

    2012-01-01

    Molecular phylogeny is a fundamental tool to understanding the evolution of all life forms. One common issue faced by molecular phylogeny is the lack of sufficient molecular markers. Here, we present PhyloMarker, a phylogenomic tool designed to find nuclear gene markers for the inference of phylogeny through multiple genome comparison. Around 800 candidate markers were identified by PhyloMarker through comparison of partial genomes of Microcebus and Otolemur. In experimental tests of 20 randomly selected markers, nine markers were successfully amplified by PCR and directly sequenced in all 17 nominal Microcebus species. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequence data obtained for 17 taxa and nine markers confirmed the distinct lineage inferred from previous mtDNA data. PhyloMarker has also been used by other projects including the herons (Ardeidae, Aves) phylogeny and the Wood mice (Muridae, Mammalia) phylogeny. All source code and sample data are made available at http://bioinfo-srv1.awh.unomaha.edu/phylomarker/.

  20. Antigenic properties of human and animal bloodstains studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using various antisera against specific plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, H; Htay, H H; Sato, K; Katsumata, Y

    1987-01-01

    Antigenic properties of bloodstains of human and non-human primates as well as other animal bloodstains were investigated by the inhibition ELISA using commercially available anti-human albumin (Alb), alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2-M), fibrinogen, transferrin, and immunoglobulin G. In general, chimpanzee bloodstains showed strong cross-reactions with these antisera, and the extent of the cross-reactions of other animal bloodstains decreased largely with the phylogenic order, i.e., agile gibbon (ape), Old World monkeys (Japanese monkey and hamadryas baboon), New World monkeys (night monkey and tufted capuchin monkey), prosimians (grand galago and ring-tailed lemur) and other animals (rat, cattle, swine, goat, dog, cat, and chicken). Among these antisera, anti-human alpha 2-M showed the weakest cross-reaction with chimpanzee bloodstains, and anti-human Alb showed next. PMID:2448970

  1. An assessment of gum-based environmental enrichment for captive gummivorous primates.

    PubMed

    Huber, Hillary F; Lewis, Kerrie P

    2011-01-01

    In the wild, many primates consume gums exuded from trees, and many species are gum specialists. In spite of this, few data exist concerning gum feeding in captivity. Using a web-based survey of 46 zoos in 12 countries, we evaluated the extent to which zoos feed gum to primates. We found that although callitrichids and galagos receive gum-based enrichment, cercopithecines generally do not. Environmental enrichment is important for stimulating naturalistic behavior to promote the psychological wellbeing of animals. Thus, gum-based enrichment is important for captive gummivores. Our study highlights the need to improve environmental enrichment for captive gummivores, in particular that of cercopithecines. This is most striking for the patas monkey (Erythrocebus patas), an obligate gummivore. The exchange of ecological data between field research and captive settings is crucial, and is just one way primate caretakers can contribute to the conservation and welfare of some of our closest living relatives.

  2. Sequence characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 gene in the Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana).

    PubMed

    Dai, Q X; Yao, Y F; Qi, Z C; Huang, Y; Ni, Q Y; Zhang, M W; Xu, H L

    2015-03-13

    In this study, the complete coding region sequence of an innate immune-related TLR4 gene was obtained from the Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) genome via PCR and direct sequencing. The sequence had a total length of 2481 bp, contained 3 complete exons, and encoded 826 amino acids (AAs); its isoelectric point was 5.703, and the molecular weight was 94.72 kDa. The high structure prediction showed that the protein was comprised of one extracellular region, one transmembrane region, and one intracellular region. There were 48 potential functional sites in the protein, including glycosylation, phosphorylation, and acetylation sites. A homology analysis among 9 primate species, including the Tibetan macaque, human, chimpanzee, gibbon, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus monkey, pig-tailed monkey, squirrel monkey, and small-eared galago, showed that the homology of the nucleotide and AA sequences ranged from 60.9-99.5% and 51.4- 99.0%, respectively. Higher variability was identified in the extracellular region of the TLR4 protein, and its variable sites accounted for 88.79% (AA) of the total variable sites. Additionally, the number of AAs at the 3' end of the intracellular region was notably different among the primate lineages. The phylogenetic tree based on TLR4 gene exons of 9 primate species showed that the Tibetan macaque clustered with the rhesus macaque, cynomolgus monkey, and pig-tailed monkey; it was most distant from the small-eared galago. This study will provide an important basis for further study on the expression, regulation, and polymorphism of the TLR4 gene and the relationship between polymorphisms and host disease susceptibility.

  3. Areal, modular, and connectional organization of visual cortex in a prosimian primate, the slow loris (Nycticebus coucang).

    PubMed

    Preuss, T M; Beck, P D; Kaas, J H

    1993-01-01

    Slow lorises (Nycticebus coucang) are nocturnal prosimian (i.e. strepsirhine) primates, closely related to bushbabies (Galago spp.). We examined the organization of visual cortex in four hemispheres from two slow lorises, using connectional and architectonic techniques. All hemispheres were flattened and sections stained for myelin and cytochrome oxidase (CO). Our results indicate, first, that the primary visual area (V1) in slow lorises has a system of small CO-dense blobs, as has been described in most other anthropoid and prosimian primates examined to date. The second visual area (V2) is characterized by broad, stripe-like zones of dense CO staining separated by zones of lighter staining. Loris V2 stripes are less distinct than those of anthropoid primates, and separate classes of thin and thick dark stripes are not apparent. However, V2 stripes are much better developed than in Galago, where they are virtually absent. Injections of wheat-germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) in area V1 revealed reciprocal connections with area V2, and the middle temporal (MT) and dorsolateral (DL) extrastriate areas. Area MT was also identified by its distinctive, dense myelination. As has been reported in anthropoids, DL can be divided into separate caudal and rostral divisions, which differ in myelin and CO staining, and in the strength of their connections with V1. Taken together, our results suggest that many of the features that characterize visual cortex organization in anthropoid primates are present in prosimians and thus probably evolved early in primate history, prior to the diversification of modern primate groups.

  4. Dengue virus infections in Nigeria: a survey for antibodies in monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Fagbami, A H; Monath, T P; Fabiyi, A

    1977-01-01

    A retrospective serological survey for dengue immunity was conducted in Nigeria to determine the prevalence of infection in man and non-human primates. Preliminary haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) tests revealed that 63% of persons tested had HI antibodies against one or more of the following flaviviruses: dengue type 1, yellow fever, West Nile and Wesselsbron. Parallel HI and neutralization (N) tests on 179 human sera showed that six of 20 sera (30%) negative for flavivirus HI antibody contained dengue N antibody. This finding emphasized the advantage of the N test over HI in screening for dengue virus immunity. Neutralization tests performed on 1,816 human sera from different geographical locations in Nigeria showed that 45% of Nigerians were immune to dengue type 2 virus. The percentage of immunity in adults aged 20 years and older (51%) was significantly higher than in children (37%) (P less than 0-01). In all four ecological zones sampled, the highest percentage of dengue N antibody was observed in the derived Savannah zone (63%) followed by the rain forest zone (42%). The Southern Guinea savannah and plateau zones had lower percentages of dengue-immune persons. There was a higher prevalence of antibodies in urban (48%) than in rural communities (37%). Tests on dengue-immune sera showed that 35% of such sera contained N antibodies to dengue only or to dengue and one other virus. Therefore, dengue immunity cannot be explained by heterologous cross reactions within the flavivirus group. In addition, evidence of dengue infection was found in monkeys and galagos. 48% of monkeys and 25% of galagos contained dengue N antibody. The presence of specific dengue N antibodies in a few sera suggests that the occurrence of a forest cycle of dengue is possible in Nigeria.

  5. Patchy distributions of myelin and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 align with cytochrome oxidase blobs and interblobs in the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rockoff, Emily C; Balaram, Pooja; Kaas, Jon H

    2015-01-01

    Blobs are a modular component of the primary visual cortex (area 17) of all primates, but not of other mammals closely related to primates. They are characterized as an even distribution of patches, puffs, or blobs of dense cytochrome oxidase (CO) expression in layer III of area 17, and are now known to differ from surrounding, nonblob cortex in thalamic, intrinsic, and extrastriate connections. Previous studies have also recognized a blob-like pattern of myelin-dense patches in layer III of area 17 of primates, and more recently the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT)-2 isoform of the VGLUT family has been found to selectively distribute to layer III patches in a similar blob-like pattern. Here, we sought to determine if the blob-like patterns all identify the same modular structures in area 17 of primates by staining alternate brain sections cut parallel to the surface of area 17 of a prosimian primate (Otolemur garnettii) for CO, myelin, and VGLUT2. By aligning the sections from the three preparations, we provide clear evidence that the three preparations all identify the same modular blob structures. The results provide a further understanding of the functional nature of the blobs by demonstrating that their higher level of CO activity is related to thalamic inputs from the lateral geniculate nucleus that use VGLUT2 as their main glutamate transporter, and via myelinated axons. PMID:26097384

  6. The existence of the vomeronasal organ in postnatal chimpanzees and evidence for its homology with that of humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, T D; Siegel, M I; Bonar, C J; Bhatnagar, K P; Mooney, M P; Burrows, A M; Smith, M A; Maico, L M

    2001-01-01

    It is currently thought that New World monkeys, prosimians, and humans are the only primates to possess vomeronasal organs (VNOs) as adults. Recent studies of the human VNO suggest that previous investigations on Old World primates may have missed the VNO. We examined nasal septa from the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) grossly and histologically for comparison with nasal septa from humans, Old World monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, M. nemistrina) and prosimian primates (Microcebus murinus, Otolemur garnettii). Grossly, chimpanzees had depressions on the nasal septum similar to fossae reported anterior to the VNO openings in humans. Histologically, chimpanzees and humans had bilateral epithelial tubes which were above the superior margin of the paraseptal cartilages (vomeronasal cartilage homologue). The epithelial tubes had a homogeneous ciliated epithelium. These structures were thus positionally and structurally identical to the human VNO and unlike the well-developed prosimian VNOs which were surrounded by vomeronasal cartilage. Macaques had no structures which resembled the VNO of either the prosimians or humans. The results demonstrate that the VNO is present postnatally in the chimpanzee and is almost identical to the human VNO in its anatomical position and histological structure. This in turn suggests that the reported absence of the VNO in at least some adult Old World primates is artifactual, and that further study may provide evidence for its existence in other species.

  7. A re-evaluation of the role of vision in the activity and communication of nocturnal primates.

    PubMed

    Bearder, S K; Nekaris, K A I; Curtis, D J

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of vision in the lives of nocturnal primates in comparison to diurnal and cathemeral species. Vision is the major sense in all primates and there is evidence that the eyesight of nocturnal species is more acute and variable than has previously been recognized. Case studies of the behaviour of a galago and a loris in open woodland habitats in relation to ambient light show that Galago moholi males are more likely to travel between clumps of vegetation along the ground when the moon is up, and during periods of twilight, whereas they retreat to more continuous vegetation and travel less when the moon sets. This is interpreted as a strategy for avoiding predators that hunt on the ground when it is dark. The travel distances of Loris lydekkerianus are not affected by moonlight but this species reduces its choice of food items from more mobile prey to mainly ants when the moon sets, indicating the importance of light when searching for high-energy supplements to its staple diet. Evidence is presented for the first time to indicate key aspects of nocturnal vision that would benefit from further research. It is suggested that the light and dark facial markings of many species convey information about species and individual identity when animals approach each other at night. Differences in the colour of the reflective eye-shine, and behavioural responses displayed when exposed to white torchlight, point to different kinds of nocturnal vision that are suited to each niche, including the possibility of some degree of colour discrimination. The ability of even specialist nocturnal species to see well in broad daylight demonstrates an inherent flexibility that would enable movement into diurnal niches. The major differences in the sensitivity and perceptual anatomy of diurnal lemurs compared to diurnal anthropoids, and the emergence of cathemerality in lemurs, is interpreted as a reflection of evolution from different ancestral stocks in very

  8. A Preliminary Analysis of the Relationship between Jaw-Muscle Architecture and Jaw-Muscle Electromyography during Chewing Across Primates

    PubMed Central

    Vinyard, Christopher J.; Taylor, Andrea B.

    2011-01-01

    The architectural arrangement of the fibers within a muscle has a significant impact on how a muscle functions. Recent work on primate jaw-muscle architecture demonstrates significant associations with dietary variation and feeding behaviors. In this study, the relationship between masseter and temporalis muscle architecture and jaw-muscle activity patterns is explored using Belanger's treeshrews and 11 primate species, including three genera of strepsirrhines (Lemur, Otolemur) and five genera of anthropoids (Aotus, Callithrix, Cebus, Macaca, Papio). Jaw-muscle weights, fiber lengths and physiologic cross-sectional areas (PCSA) were quantified for this preliminary analysis or collected from the literature and compared to published electromyographic (EMG) recordings from these muscles. Results indicate that masseter architecture is unrelated to the superficial masseter working-side/balancing-side (W/B) ratio across primate species. Alternatively, relative temporalis architecture is correlated with temporalis W/B ratios across primates. Specifically, relative temporalis PCSA is inversely related to the W/B ratio for the anterior temporalis indicating that as animals recruit a larger relative percentage of their balancing-side temporalis, they possess the ability to generate relatively larger amounts of force from these muscles. These findings support three broader conclusions. First, masseter muscle architecture may have experienced divergent evolution across different primate clades related to novel functional roles in different groups. Second, the temporalis may be functionally constrained (relative to the masseter) across primates in its functional role of creating vertical occlusal forces during chewing. Finally, the contrasting results for the masseter and temporalis suggest that the fiber architecture of these muscles has evolved as distinct functional units in primates. PMID:20235313

  9. A New Exon Derived from a Mammalian Apparent LTR Retrotransposon of the SUPT16H Gene

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Min-In; Kim, Yun-Ji; Lee, Ja-Rang; Jung, Yi-Deun; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2013-01-01

    The SUPT16H gene known as FACTP140 is required for the transcription of other genes. For transcription, genes need to be complexed with accessory factors, including transcription factors and RNA polymerase II. One such factor, FACT, interacts with histones H2A/H2B for nucleosome disassembly and transcription elongation. The SUPT16H gene has a transcript and many expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We were especially interested in an MaLR-derived transcript (EST, BX333035) that included a new exon introduced by a transposable element, a mammalian apparent LTR retrotransposon (MaLR). The MaLR was detected ranging from humans to galagos, indicating the MaLR in the SUPT16H gene is integrated into the primate ancestor genome. A new exon was created by alternative donor site provided by the MaLR. The original transcript and the MaLR-derived transcript were expressed in various human, rhesus monkey, and other primate tissues. Additionally, we identified a new alternative transcript that included the MaLR, but there was no significant difference in the expression of the original transcript and the MaLR-derived transcript. Interestingly, the new alternative transcript and the MaLR-derived transcript had the MaLR sequence in the new exon, but they had different structures by adopting different 3′ splice sites. From this study, we verified transposable elements that contributed to transcriptome diversity. PMID:23671841

  10. Structural analysis of a repetitive protein sequence motif in strepsirrhine primate amelogenin.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Bromley, Keith M; Hacia, Joseph G; Bromage, Timothy G; Snead, Malcolm L; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Paine, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Strepsirrhines are members of a primate suborder that has a distinctive set of features associated with the development of the dentition. Amelogenin (AMEL), the better known of the enamel matrix proteins, forms 90% of the secreted organic matrix during amelogenesis. Although AMEL has been sequenced in numerous mammalian lineages, the only reported strepsirrhine AMEL sequences are those of the ring-tailed lemur and galago, which contain a set of additional proline-rich tandem repeats absent in all other primates species analyzed to date, but present in some non-primate mammals. Here, we first determined that these repeats are present in AMEL from three additional lemur species and thus are likely to be widespread throughout this group. To evaluate the functional relevance of these repeats in strepsirrhines, we engineered a mutated murine amelogenin sequence containing a similar proline-rich sequence to that of Lemur catta. In the monomeric form, the MQP insertions had no influence on the secondary structure or refolding properties, whereas in the assembled form, the insertions increased the hydrodynamic radii. We speculate that increased AMEL nanosphere size may influence enamel formation in strepsirrhine primates. PMID:21437261

  11. Life history profiles for 27 strepsirrhine primate taxa generated using captive data from the Duke Lemur Center

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, Sarah M; Roach, Richard G; Haring, David; Taylor, Julie; Cameron, Freda H; Yoder, Anne D

    2014-01-01

    Since its establishment in 1966, the Duke Lemur Center (DLC) has accumulated detailed records for nearly 4,200 individuals from over 40 strepsirrhine primate taxa—the lemurs, lorises, and galagos. Here we present verified data for 3,627 individuals of 27 taxa in the form of a life history table containing summarized species values for variables relating to ancestry, reproduction, longevity, and body mass, as well as the two raw data files containing direct and calculated variables from which this summary table is built. Large sample sizes, longitudinal data that in many cases span an animal’s entire life, exact dates of events, and large numbers of individuals from closely related yet biologically diverse primate taxa make these datasets unique. This single source for verified raw data and systematically compiled species values, particularly in combination with the availability of associated biological samples and the current live colony for research, will support future studies from an enormous spectrum of disciplines. PMID:25977776

  12. The Development of Small Primate Models for Aging Research

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kathleen E.; Austad, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primate (NHP) aging research has traditionally relied mainly on the rhesus macaque. But the long lifespan, low reproductive rate, and relatively large body size of macaques and related Old World monkeys make them less than ideal models for aging research. Manifold advantages would attend the use of smaller, more rapidly developing, shorter-lived NHP species in aging studies, not the least of which are lower cost and the ability to do shorter research projects. Arbitrarily defining “small” primates as those weighing less than 500 g, we assess small, relatively short-lived species among the prosimians and callitrichids for suitability as models for human aging research. Using the criteria of availability, knowledge about (and ease of) maintenance, the possibility of genetic manipulation (a hallmark of 21st century biology), and similarities to humans in the physiology of age-related changes, we suggest three species—two prosimians (Microcebus murinus and Galago senegalensis) and one New World monkey (Callithrix jacchus)—that deserve scrutiny for development as major NHP models for aging studies. We discuss one other New World monkey group, Cebus spp., that might also be an effective NHP model of aging as these species are longer-lived for their body size than any primate except humans. PMID:21411860

  13. The hustle and bustle of city life: monitoring the effects of urbanisation in the African lesser bushbaby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheun, Juan; Bennett, Nigel C.; Ganswindt, Andre; Nowack, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Urbanisation has become a severe threat to pristine natural areas, causing habitat loss and affecting indigenous animals. Species occurring within an urban fragmented landscape must cope with changes in vegetation type as well as high degrees of anthropogenic disturbance, both of which are possible key mechanisms contributing to behavioural changes and perceived stressors. We attempted to elucidate the effects of urbanisation on the African lesser bushbaby, Galago moholi, by (1) recording activity budgets and body condition (body mass index, BMI) of individuals of urban and rural populations and (2) further determining adrenocortical activity in both populations as a measure of stress via faecal glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM) levels, following successful validation of an appropriate enzyme immunoassay test system (adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge test). We found that both sexes of the urban population had significantly higher BMIs than their rural counterparts, while urban females had significantly higher fGCM concentrations than rural females. While individuals in the urban population fed mainly on provisioned anthropogenic food sources and spent comparatively more time resting and engaging in aggressive interactions, rural individuals fed almost exclusively on tree exudates and spent more time moving between food sources. Although interactions with humans are likely to be lower in nocturnal than in diurnal species, our findings show that the impact of urbanisation on nocturnal species is still considerable, affecting a range of ecological and physiological aspects.

  14. Structural Analysis of a Repetitive Protein Sequence Motif in Strepsirrhine Primate Amelogenin

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Hacia, Joseph G.; Bromage, Timothy G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Paine, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Strepsirrhines are members of a primate suborder that has a distinctive set of features associated with the development of the dentition. Amelogenin (AMEL), the better known of the enamel matrix proteins, forms 90% of the secreted organic matrix during amelogenesis. Although AMEL has been sequenced in numerous mammalian lineages, the only reported strepsirrhine AMEL sequences are those of the ring-tailed lemur and galago, which contain a set of additional proline-rich tandem repeats absent in all other primates species analyzed to date, but present in some non-primate mammals. Here, we first determined that these repeats are present in AMEL from three additional lemur species and thus are likely to be widespread throughout this group. To evaluate the functional relevance of these repeats in strepsirrhines, we engineered a mutated murine amelogenin sequence containing a similar proline-rich sequence to that of Lemur catta. In the monomeric form, the MQP insertions had no influence on the secondary structure or refolding properties, whereas in the assembled form, the insertions increased the hydrodynamic radii. We speculate that increased AMEL nanosphere size may influence enamel formation in strepsirrhine primates. PMID:21437261

  15. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Lisa M; Vallender, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained. PMID:24834046

  16. Afferent connections of the substantia innominata/basal nucleus of Meynert in carnivores and primates.

    PubMed

    Irle, E; Markowitsch, H J

    1986-01-01

    Afferent connections to the substantia innominata/nucleus basalis complex of monkeys and cats were traced by using the method of retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Altogether ten injections of HRP were performed in four monkeys (Saimiri sciureus, Callithrix jacchus, Galago senegalensis) and in four cats, with either vertical or oblique needle approaches. The entire brains excluding the olfactory bulbs and the cerebellum were then screened for labeled neurons. In both monkey and cat brains, many retrogradely labeled neurons could be detected in the amygdala, hypothalamus, midline thalamus, zona incerta, and the fields of Forel. Further but weaker labeling occurred in the medial septal nucleus, diagonal band of Broca, olfactory tubercle, paraventricular, anterior, mediodorsal, and central lateral thalamic nuclei, lateral habenula, ventral tegmental area of Tsai, interpeduncular nucleus, parabrachial, raphe, dorsal tegmental nucleus and the locus caeruleus. Cortically, prefrontal, insular, entorhinal, prepiriform, and periamygdaloid areas of both species showed considerable labeling as well as the whole temporal lobe of the monkeys used. The perirhinal and basal temporal cortex of all cats showed moderate labeling. In both monkeys and cats, extremely scarce labeling occurred within the cingulate, retrosplenial, and subicular cortex. From an anatomical point of view, the manifold connections of the substantia innominata/basal nucleus of Meynert found in this study underscore the participation of these nuclear groups in motivational, emotional, and cognitive (e.g. mnemonic) functions. Considering the widespread cortical efferents of this complex, it is suggested that the substantia innominata/nucleus basalis of Meynert serves the transmission of information arising within the limbic system to the whole neocortex.

  17. Incongruence between genetic and morphological diversity in Microcebus griseorufus of Beza Mahafaly

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, Kellie L; Rasoazanabary, Emilienne; Machlin, Erica; Godfrey, Laurie R; Yoder, Anne D

    2006-01-01

    Background The past decade has seen a remarkable increase in the number of recognized mouse lemur species (genus Microcebus). As recently as 1994, only two species of mouse lemur were recognized according to the rules of zoological nomenclature. That number has now climbed to as many as fifteen proposed species. Indeed, increases in recognized species diversity have also characterized other nocturnal primates – galagos, sportive lemurs, and tarsiers. Presumably, the movement relates more to a previous lack of information than it does to any recent proclivity for taxonomic splitting. Due to their nocturnal habits, one can hypothesize that mouse lemurs will show only minimal variation in pelage coloration as such variation should be inconsequential for the purposes of mate and/or species recognition. Even so, current species descriptions for nocturnal strepsirrhines place a good deal of emphasis on relatively fine distinctions in pelage coloration. Results Here, we report results from a multi-year study of mouse lemur populations from Beza Mahafaly in southern Madagascar. On the basis of morphological and pelage variation, we initially hypothesized the presence of up to three species of mouse lemurs occurring sympatrically at this locality, one of which appeared to be undescribed. Genetic analysis reveals definitively, however, that all three color morphs belong to a single recognized species, Microcebus griseorufus. Indeed, in some cases, the three color morphs can be characterized by identical mitochondrial haplotypes. Conclusion Given these results, we conclude that investigators should always proceed with caution when using a single data source to identify novel species. A synthetic approach that combines morphological, genetic, geographic, and ecological data is most likely to reveal the true nature of species diversity. PMID:17109740

  18. Cranial vault thickness in primates: Homo erectus does not have uniquely thick vault bones.

    PubMed

    Copes, Lynn E; Kimbel, William H

    2016-01-01

    Extremely thick cranial vaults have been noted as a diagnostic characteristic of Homo erectus since the first fossil of the species was identified, but relatively little work has been done on elucidating its etiology or variation across fossils, living humans, or extant non-human primates. Cranial vault thickness (CVT) is not a monolithic trait, and the responsiveness of its layers to environmental stimuli is unknown. We obtained measurements of cranial vault thickness in fossil hominins from the literature and supplemented those data with additional measurements taken on African fossil specimens. Total CVT and the thickness of the cortical and diploë layers individually were compared to measures of CVT in extant species measured from more than 500 CT scans of human and non-human primates. Frontal and parietal CVT in fossil primates was compared to a regression of CVT on cranial capacity calculated for extant species. Even after controlling for cranial capacity, African and Asian H. erectus do not have uniquely high frontal or parietal thickness residuals, either among hominins or extant primates. Extant primates with residual CVT thickness similar to or exceeding H. erectus (depending on the sex and bone analyzed) include Nycticebus coucang, Perodicticus potto, Alouatta caraya, Lophocebus albigena, Galago alleni, Mandrillus sphinx, and Propithecus diadema. However, the especially thick vaults of extant non-human primates that overlap with H. erectus values are composed primarily of cortical bone, while H. erectus and other hominins have diploë-dominated vault bones. Thus, the combination of thick vaults comprised of a thickened diploë layer may be a reliable autapomorphy for members of the genus Homo. PMID:26767964

  19. Bonobo habituation in a forest-savanna mosaic habitat: influence of ape species, habitat type, and sociocultural context.

    PubMed

    Narat, Victor; Pennec, Flora; Simmen, Bruno; Ngawolo, Jean Christophe Bokika; Krief, Sabrina

    2015-10-01

    Habituation is the term used to describe acceptance by wild animals of a human observer as a neutral element in their environment. Among primates, the process takes from a few days for Galago spp. to several years for African apes. There are also intraspecies differences reflecting differences in habitat, home range, and ape-human relationship history. Here, we present the first study of the process of bonobo habituation in a fragmented habitat, a forest-savanna mosaic in the community-based conservation area led by the Congolese nongovernmental organization Mbou-Mon-Tour, Democratic Republic of the Congo. In this area, local people use the forest almost every day for traditional activities but avoid bonobos because of a traditional taboo. Because very few flight reactions were observed during habituation, we focused on quantitative parameters to assess the development of ape tolerance and of the tracking efficiency of observer teams. During the 18-month study period (May 2012-October 2013), 4043 h (319 days) were spent in the forest and bonobos were observed for a total of 405 h (196 contacts on 134 days). The average contact duration was stable over time (124 min), but the minimal distance during a contact decreased with habituation effort. Moreover, bonobo location and tracking efficiency, daily ratio of contact time to habituation effort, and the number of observations at ground level were positively correlated with habituation effort. Our observations suggest that bonobos become habituated relatively rapidly. These results are discussed in relation to the habitat type, ape species, and the local sociocultural context of villagers. The habituation process involves changes in ape behavior toward observers and also more complex interactions concerning the ecosystem, including the building of an efficient local team. Before starting a habituation process, knowledge of the human sociocultural context is essential to assess the balance between risks and benefits.

  20. Cranial vault thickness in primates: Homo erectus does not have uniquely thick vault bones.

    PubMed

    Copes, Lynn E; Kimbel, William H

    2016-01-01

    Extremely thick cranial vaults have been noted as a diagnostic characteristic of Homo erectus since the first fossil of the species was identified, but relatively little work has been done on elucidating its etiology or variation across fossils, living humans, or extant non-human primates. Cranial vault thickness (CVT) is not a monolithic trait, and the responsiveness of its layers to environmental stimuli is unknown. We obtained measurements of cranial vault thickness in fossil hominins from the literature and supplemented those data with additional measurements taken on African fossil specimens. Total CVT and the thickness of the cortical and diploë layers individually were compared to measures of CVT in extant species measured from more than 500 CT scans of human and non-human primates. Frontal and parietal CVT in fossil primates was compared to a regression of CVT on cranial capacity calculated for extant species. Even after controlling for cranial capacity, African and Asian H. erectus do not have uniquely high frontal or parietal thickness residuals, either among hominins or extant primates. Extant primates with residual CVT thickness similar to or exceeding H. erectus (depending on the sex and bone analyzed) include Nycticebus coucang, Perodicticus potto, Alouatta caraya, Lophocebus albigena, Galago alleni, Mandrillus sphinx, and Propithecus diadema. However, the especially thick vaults of extant non-human primates that overlap with H. erectus values are composed primarily of cortical bone, while H. erectus and other hominins have diploë-dominated vault bones. Thus, the combination of thick vaults comprised of a thickened diploë layer may be a reliable autapomorphy for members of the genus Homo.

  1. A multilocus phylogeny reveals deep lineages within African galagids (Primates: Galagidae)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bushbabies (Galagidae) are among the most morphologically cryptic of all primates and their diversity and relationships are some of the most longstanding problems in primatology. Our knowledge of galagid evolutionary history has been limited by a lack of appropriate molecular data and a paucity of fossils. Most phylogenetic studies have produced conflicting results for many clades, and even the relationships among genera remain uncertain. To clarify galagid evolutionary history, we assembled the largest molecular dataset for galagos to date by sequencing 27 independent loci. We inferred phylogenetic relationships using concatenated maximum-likelihood and Bayesian analyses, and also coalescent-based species tree methods to account for gene tree heterogeneity due to incomplete lineage sorting. Results The genus Euoticus was identified as sister taxon to the rest of the galagids and the genus Galagoides was not recovered as monophyletic, suggesting that a new generic name for the Zanzibar complex is required. Despite the amount of genetic data collected in this study, the monophyly of the family Lorisidae remained poorly supported, probably due to the short internode between the Lorisidae/Galagidae split and the origin of the African and Asian lorisid clades. One major result was the relatively old origin for the most recent common ancestor of all living galagids soon after the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Conclusions Using a multilocus approach, our results suggest an early origin for the crown Galagidae, soon after the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, making Euoticus one of the oldest lineages within extant Primates. This result also implies that one – or possibly more – stem radiations diverged in the Late Eocene and persisted for several million years alongside members of the crown group. PMID:24694188

  2. Towards a unified scheme of cortical lamination for primary visual cortex across primates: insights from NeuN and VGLUT2 immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Balaram, Pooja; Kaas, Jon H.

    2014-01-01

    Primary visual cortex (V1) is clearly distinguishable from other cortical areas by its distinctive pattern of neocortical lamination across mammalian species. In some mammals, primates in particular, the layers of V1 are further divided into a number of sublayers based on their anatomical and functional characteristics. While these sublayers are easily recognizable across a range of primates, the exact number of divisions in each layer and their relative position within the depth of V1 has been inconsistently reported, largely due to conflicting schemes of nomenclature for the V1 layers. This conflict centers on the definition of layer 4 in primate V1, and the subdivisions of layer 4 that can be consistently identified across primate species. Brodmann’s (1909) laminar scheme for V1 delineates three subdivisions of layer 4 in primates, based on cellular morphology and geniculate inputs in anthropoid monkeys. In contrast, Hässler’s (1967) laminar scheme delineates a single layer 4 and multiple subdivisions of layer 3, based on comparisons of V1 lamination across the primate lineage. In order to clarify laminar divisions in primate visual cortex, we performed NeuN and VGLUT2 immunohistochemistry in V1 of chimpanzees, Old World macaque monkeys, New World squirrel, owl, and marmoset monkeys, prosimian galagos and mouse lemurs, and non-primate, but highly visual, tree shrews. By comparing the laminar divisions identified by each method across species, we find that Hässler’s (1967) laminar scheme for V1 provides a more consistent representation of neocortical layers across all primates, including humans, and facilitates comparisons of V1 lamination with non-primate species. These findings, along with many others, support the consistent use of Hässler’s laminar scheme in V1 research. PMID:25177277

  3. Djebelemur, a Tiny Pre-Tooth-Combed Primate from the Eocene of Tunisia: A Glimpse into the Origin of Crown Strepsirhines

    PubMed Central

    Marivaux, Laurent; Ramdarshan, Anusha; Essid, El Mabrouk; Marzougui, Wissem; Ammar, Hayet Khayati; Lebrun, Renaud; Marandat, Bernard; Merzeraud, Gilles; Tabuce, Rodolphe; Vianey-Liaud, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular clock estimates of crown strepsirhine origins generally advocate an ancient antiquity for Malagasy lemuriforms and Afro-Asian lorisiforms, near the onset of the Tertiary but most often extending back to the Late Cretaceous. Despite their inferred early origin, the subsequent evolutionary histories of both groups (except for the Malagasy aye-aye lineage) exhibit a vacuum of lineage diversification during most part of the Eocene, followed by a relative acceleration in diversification from the late Middle Eocene. This early evolutionary stasis was tentatively explained by the possibility of unrecorded lineage extinctions during the early Tertiary. However, this prevailing molecular view regarding the ancient origin and early diversification of crown strepsirhines must be viewed with skepticism due to the new but still scarce paleontological evidence gathered in recent years. Methodological/Principal Findings Here, we describe new fossils attributable to Djebelemur martinezi, a≈50 Ma primate from Tunisia (Djebel Chambi). This taxon was originally interpreted as a cercamoniine adapiform based on limited information from its lower dentition. The new fossils provide anatomical evidence demonstrating that Djebelemur was not an adapiform but clearly a distant relative of lemurs, lorises and galagos. Cranial, dental and postcranial remains indicate that this diminutive primate was likely nocturnal, predatory (primarily insectivorous), and engaged in a form of generalized arboreal quadrupedalism with frequent horizontal leaping. Djebelemur did not have an anterior lower dentition as specialized as that characterizing most crown strepsirhines (i.e., tooth-comb), but it clearly exhibited a transformed antemolar pattern representing an early stage of a crown strepsirhine-like adaptation (“pre-tooth-comb”). Conclusions/Significance These new fossil data suggest that the differentiation of the tooth-comb must postdate the djebelemurid divergence, a view

  4. Bonobo habituation in a forest-savanna mosaic habitat: influence of ape species, habitat type, and sociocultural context.

    PubMed

    Narat, Victor; Pennec, Flora; Simmen, Bruno; Ngawolo, Jean Christophe Bokika; Krief, Sabrina

    2015-10-01

    Habituation is the term used to describe acceptance by wild animals of a human observer as a neutral element in their environment. Among primates, the process takes from a few days for Galago spp. to several years for African apes. There are also intraspecies differences reflecting differences in habitat, home range, and ape-human relationship history. Here, we present the first study of the process of bonobo habituation in a fragmented habitat, a forest-savanna mosaic in the community-based conservation area led by the Congolese nongovernmental organization Mbou-Mon-Tour, Democratic Republic of the Congo. In this area, local people use the forest almost every day for traditional activities but avoid bonobos because of a traditional taboo. Because very few flight reactions were observed during habituation, we focused on quantitative parameters to assess the development of ape tolerance and of the tracking efficiency of observer teams. During the 18-month study period (May 2012-October 2013), 4043 h (319 days) were spent in the forest and bonobos were observed for a total of 405 h (196 contacts on 134 days). The average contact duration was stable over time (124 min), but the minimal distance during a contact decreased with habituation effort. Moreover, bonobo location and tracking efficiency, daily ratio of contact time to habituation effort, and the number of observations at ground level were positively correlated with habituation effort. Our observations suggest that bonobos become habituated relatively rapidly. These results are discussed in relation to the habitat type, ape species, and the local sociocultural context of villagers. The habituation process involves changes in ape behavior toward observers and also more complex interactions concerning the ecosystem, including the building of an efficient local team. Before starting a habituation process, knowledge of the human sociocultural context is essential to assess the balance between risks and benefits

  5. Environmental enrichment for a mixed-species nocturnal mammal exhibit.

    PubMed

    Clark, Fay E; Melfi, Vicky A

    2012-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an integral aspect of modern zoo animal management but, empirical evaluation of it is biased toward species housed in single-species groups. Nocturnal houses, where several nocturnal species are housed together, are particularly overlooked. This study investigated whether three species (nine-banded armadillos, Dasypus novemcinctus; Senegal bush babies, Galago senegalensis; two-toed sloths, Choloepus didactylus) in the nocturnal house at Paignton Zoo Environmental Park, UK could be enriched using food-based and sensory EE. Subjects were an adult male and female of each species. EE was deemed effective if it promoted target species-typical behaviors, behavioral diversity, and increased use of enriched exhibit zones. Results from generalized linear mixed models demonstrated that food-based EE elicited the most positive behavioral effects across species. One set of food-based EEs (Kong®, termite mound and hanging food) presented together was associated with a significant increase in species-typical behaviors, increased behavioral diversity, and increased use of enriched exhibit zones in armadillos and bush babies. Although one type of sensory EE (scented pine cones) increased overall exhibit use in all species, the other (rainforest sounds) was linked to a significant decrease in species-typical behavior in bush babies and sloths. There were no intra or interspecies conflicts over EE, and commensalism occurred between armadillos and bush babies. Our data demonstrate that simple food-based and sensory EE can promote positive behavioral changes in a mixed-species nocturnal mammal exhibit. We suggest that both food and sensory EE presented concurrently will maximize opportunities for naturalistic activity in all species.

  6. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Lisa M; Vallender, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained.

  7. Craniodental body mass estimators in the dwarf bushbaby (Galagoides).

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, F P

    2001-06-01

    This study reports data on 17 craniodental body mass estimators in a sample (n = 38) of dwarf galagos (Galagoides). Correlation coefficients (r) range from a high of 0.64 for bizygomatic breadth and body mass to a low of 0.10 for M(3) length and body mass. Of the 17 variables studied, 7 exhibit significant (P < 0.05) correlation coefficients, with 5 of the 7 being multitooth (i.e., tooth row) or cranial variables. In contrast to the correlation coefficients of greater than 0.90 (e.g., Martin [1980] Z Morphol Anthropol 71:115-124; Steudel [1981] Int J Primatol 2:81-90; Gingerich et al. [1982] Am J Phys Anthropol 58:81-100; Conroy [1987] Int J Primatol 8:115-137) published for higher taxonomic level analyses (i.e., all-primate or prosimian) for many of the same variables studied here, the current data indicate weaker relationships when analyzed at the generic level. Possible explanations for the contrast in correlation coefficients between the current and many previous studies include the following: 1) individual variation due to a geographically dispersed sample, 2) individual body mass fluctuations due to seasonal food availability, and 3) individual variation within the sample due to variation in life-history parameters. Because the overall size range of the individuals in a specific or generic level analysis is smaller than that in an ordinal or subordinal sample, the individual variation normally masked when using species means represents a larger proportion of the total variation in a more limited sample. This may then be a cause of these weaker correlations. PMID:11385605

  8. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Lisa M.; Vallender, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained. PMID:24834046

  9. Activation of latent human GDF9 by a single residue change (Gly 391 Arg) in the mature domain.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Courtney M; Stanton, Peter G; Walton, Kelly L; Chan, Karen L; Ritter, Lesley J; Gilchrist, Robert B; Harrison, Craig A

    2012-03-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) controls granulosa cell growth and differentiation during early ovarian folliculogenesis and regulates cumulus cell function and ovulation rate in the later stages of this process. Similar to other TGF-β superfamily ligands, GDF9 is secreted from the oocyte in a noncovalent complex with its prodomain. In this study, we show that prodomain interactions differentially regulate the activity of GDF9 across species, such that murine (m) GDF9 is secreted in an active form, whereas human (h) GDF9 is latent. To understand this distinction, we used site-directed mutagenesis to introduce nonconserved mGDF9 residues into the pro- and mature domains of hGDF9. Activity-based screens of the resultant mutants indicated that a single mature domain residue (Gly(391)) confers latency to hGDF9. Gly(391) forms part of the type I receptor binding site on hGDF9, and this residue is present in all species except mouse, rat, hamster, galago, and possum, in which it is substituted with an arginine. In an adrenocortical cell luciferase assay, hGDF9 (Gly(391)Arg) had similar activity to mGDF9 (EC(50) 55 ng/ml vs. 28 ng/ml, respectively), whereas wild-type hGDF9 was inactive. hGDF9 (Gly(391)Arg) was also a potent stimulator of murine granulosa cell proliferation (EC(50) 52 ng/ml). An arginine at position 391 increases the affinity of GDF9 for its signaling receptors, enabling it to be secreted in an active form. This important species difference in the activation status of GDF9 may contribute to the variation observed in follicular development, ovulation rate, and fecundity between mammals.

  10. Environmental enrichment for a mixed-species nocturnal mammal exhibit.

    PubMed

    Clark, Fay E; Melfi, Vicky A

    2012-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an integral aspect of modern zoo animal management but, empirical evaluation of it is biased toward species housed in single-species groups. Nocturnal houses, where several nocturnal species are housed together, are particularly overlooked. This study investigated whether three species (nine-banded armadillos, Dasypus novemcinctus; Senegal bush babies, Galago senegalensis; two-toed sloths, Choloepus didactylus) in the nocturnal house at Paignton Zoo Environmental Park, UK could be enriched using food-based and sensory EE. Subjects were an adult male and female of each species. EE was deemed effective if it promoted target species-typical behaviors, behavioral diversity, and increased use of enriched exhibit zones. Results from generalized linear mixed models demonstrated that food-based EE elicited the most positive behavioral effects across species. One set of food-based EEs (Kong®, termite mound and hanging food) presented together was associated with a significant increase in species-typical behaviors, increased behavioral diversity, and increased use of enriched exhibit zones in armadillos and bush babies. Although one type of sensory EE (scented pine cones) increased overall exhibit use in all species, the other (rainforest sounds) was linked to a significant decrease in species-typical behavior in bush babies and sloths. There were no intra or interspecies conflicts over EE, and commensalism occurred between armadillos and bush babies. Our data demonstrate that simple food-based and sensory EE can promote positive behavioral changes in a mixed-species nocturnal mammal exhibit. We suggest that both food and sensory EE presented concurrently will maximize opportunities for naturalistic activity in all species. PMID:21387395

  11. Histological definition of the vomeronasal organ in humans and chimpanzees, with a comparison to other primates.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy D; Bhatnagar, Kunwar P; Shimp, Kristin L; Kinzinger, Jonathan H; Bonar, Christopher J; Burrows, Annie M; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2002-06-01

    Otolemur crassicaudatus, and a stratified squamous passageway in all other species. This study also revealed remarkable morphological/histochemical variability in the VNO and nasopalatine regions among the primate species examined. The VNOs of humans and chimpanzees had some structural similarities to nonhomologous ciliated gland ducts seen in other primates. However, certain distinctions from the VNOs of other primates or nonhomologous epithelial structures characterize the human/chimpanzee VNO: 1) bilateral epithelial tubes; 2) a superiorly displaced position in the same plane as the paraseptal cartilages; 3) a homogeneous, pseudostratified columnar morphology with ciliated regions; and 4) mucous-producing structures in the epithelium itself.

  12. Temporalis function in anthropoids and strepsirrhines: an EMG study.

    PubMed

    Hylander, William L; Wall, Christine E; Vinyard, Christopher J; Ross, Callum; Ravosa, Mathew R; Williams, Susan H; Johnson, Kirk R

    2005-09-01

    The major purpose of this study is to analyze anterior and posterior temporalis muscle force recruitment and firing patterns in various anthropoid and strepsirrhine primates. There are two specific goals for this project. First, we test the hypothesis that in addition to transversely directed muscle force, the evolution of symphyseal fusion in primates may also be linked to vertically directed balancing-side muscle force during chewing (Hylander et al. [2000] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 112:469-492). Second, we test the hypothesis of whether strepsirrhines retain the hypothesized primitive mammalian condition for the firing of the anterior temporalis, whereas anthropoids have the derived condition (Weijs [1994] Biomechanics of Feeding in Vertebrates; Berlin: Springer-Verlag, p. 282-320). Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the left and right anterior and posterior temporalis muscles were recorded and analyzed in baboons, macaques, owl monkeys, thick-tailed galagos, and ring-tailed lemurs. In addition, as we used the working-side superficial masseter as a reference muscle, we also recorded and analyzed EMG activity of the left and right superficial masseter in these primates. The data for the anterior temporalis provided no support for the hypothesis that symphyseal fusion in primates is linked to vertically directed jaw muscle forces during mastication. Thus, symphyseal fusion in primates is most likely mainly linked to the timing and recruitment of transversely directed forces from the balancing-side deep masseter (Hylander et al. [2000] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 112:469-492). In addition, our data demonstrate that the firing patterns for the working- and balancing-side anterior temporalis muscles are near identical in both strepsirrhines and anthropoids. Their working- and balancing-side anterior temporalis muscles fire asynchronously and reach peak activity during the power stroke. Similarly, their working- and balancing-side posterior temporalis muscles also fire